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Sample records for aerosol number density

  1. Ice nucleation in the upper troposphere: Sensitivity to aerosol number density, temperature, and cooling rate

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.J.; Toon, O.B.

    1994-09-01

    We have investigated the processes that control ice crystal nucleation in the upper troposphere using a numerical model. Nucleation of ice resulting from cooling was simulated for a range of aerosol number densities, initial temperatures, and cooling rates. In contrast to observations of stratus clouds, we find that the number of ice crystals that nucleate in cirrus is relatively insensitive to the number of aerosols present. The ice crystal size distribution at the end of the nucleation process is unaffected by the assumed initial aerosol number density. Essentially, nucleation continues until enough ice crystals are present such that their deposition growth rapidly depletes the vapor and shuts off any further nucleation. However, the number of ice crystals nucleated increases rapidly with decreasing initial temperature and increasing cooling rate. This temperature dependence alone could explain the large ice crystal number density observed in very cold tropical cirrus.

  2. Investigation of Aerosol Surface Area Estimation from Number and Mass Concentration Measurements: Particle Density Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Evans, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    For nanoparticles with nonspherical morphologies, e.g., open agglomerates or fibrous particles, it is expected that the actual density of agglomerates may be significantly different from the bulk material density. It is further expected that using the material density may upset the relationship between surface area and mass when a method for estimating aerosol surface area from number and mass concentrations (referred to as “Maynard’s estimation method”) is used. Therefore, it is necessary to quantitatively investigate how much the Maynard’s estimation method depends on particle morphology and density. In this study, aerosol surface area estimated from number and mass concentration measurements was evaluated and compared with values from two reference methods: a method proposed by Lall and Friedlander for agglomerates and a mobility based method for compact nonspherical particles using well-defined polydisperse aerosols with known particle densities. Polydisperse silver aerosol particles were generated by an aerosol generation facility. Generated aerosols had a range of morphologies, count median diameters (CMD) between 25 and 50 nm, and geometric standard deviations (GSD) between 1.5 and 1.8. The surface area estimates from number and mass concentration measurements correlated well with the two reference values when gravimetric mass was used. The aerosol surface area estimates from the Maynard’s estimation method were comparable to the reference method for all particle morphologies within the surface area ratios of 3.31 and 0.19 for assumed GSDs 1.5 and 1.8, respectively, when the bulk material density of silver was used. The difference between the Maynard’s estimation method and surface area measured by the reference method for fractal-like agglomerates decreased from 79% to 23% when the measured effective particle density was used, while the difference for nearly spherical particles decreased from 30% to 24%. The results indicate that the use of

  3. Analysis of tropospheric aerosol number density for aerosols of 0.2- to 3-micrometers diameter: Central and northeastern Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Barrick, John D.; Hudgins, Charles H.; Bagwell, Donald R.; Blake, Donald R.

    1994-01-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment conducted during the summer of 1990 focused on the distribution of trace species in central and northeastern Canada (altitudes less than 6 km) and the importance of surface sources/sinks, local emissions, distant transport, tropospheric/stratospheric exchange. Aircraft flights were based from North Bay, Ontario, and Goose Bay, Labrador, Canada. As part of the aircraft measurements, aerosol number density (0.2- to 3-micrometers diameter) was measured using an optical laser technique. Results show that summertime aerosol budgets of central and northeastern Canada can be significantly impacted by the transport of pollutants from distant source regions. Biomass burning in Alaska and western and central Canada exerts major influences on regional aerosol budgets. Urban emissions transported from the U.S./Canadian border regions are also important. Aerosol enhancements (mixed layer and free troposphere) were most prevalent in air with carbon monoxide mixing ratios greater than 110 parts per billion by volume (ppbv). When data were grouped as to the source of the air (5-day back trajectories) either north or south of the polar jet, aerosol number density in the mixed layer showed a tendency to be enhanced for air south of the jet relative to north of the jet. However, this difference was not observed for measurements at the higher altitudes (4 to 6 km). For some flights, mixed layer aerosol number densities were greater than 100 higher than free-tropospheric values (3- to 6-km altitude). The majority of the observed mixed layer enhancement was associated with transport of effluent-rich air into the Canadian regions. Aerosol emissions from natural Canadian ecosystems were relatively small when compared to transport.

  4. Temporal and spatial effects of ablation plume on number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol measured by laser-induced breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, H.; Kakehata, M.

    2013-05-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel method of evaluating the number density of droplets in an aerosol by laser-induced breakdown. The number density of droplets is evaluated from the volume in which the laser intensity exceeds the breakdown threshold intensity for droplets, and the number of droplets in this volume, which is evaluated by the experimentally observed breakdown probability. This measurement method requires a large number of laser shots for not only precise measurement but also highly temporally and spatially resolved density distribution in aerosol. Laser ablation plumes ejected from liquid droplets generated by breakdown disturb the density around the measurement points. Therefore, the recovery time of the density determines the maximum repetition rate of the probe laser irradiating a fixed point. The expansion range of the ablation plume determines the minimum distance at which the measurement points are unaffected by a neighboring breakdown when multiple laser beams are simultaneously irradiated. These laser irradiation procedures enable the measurement of the number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol at a large number of points within a short measurement time.

  5. Temporal and spatial effects of ablation plume on number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol measured by laser-induced breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Yashiro, H.; Kakehata, M.

    2013-05-07

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel method of evaluating the number density of droplets in an aerosol by laser-induced breakdown. The number density of droplets is evaluated from the volume in which the laser intensity exceeds the breakdown threshold intensity for droplets, and the number of droplets in this volume, which is evaluated by the experimentally observed breakdown probability. This measurement method requires a large number of laser shots for not only precise measurement but also highly temporally and spatially resolved density distribution in aerosol. Laser ablation plumes ejected from liquid droplets generated by breakdown disturb the density around the measurement points. Therefore, the recovery time of the density determines the maximum repetition rate of the probe laser irradiating a fixed point. The expansion range of the ablation plume determines the minimum distance at which the measurement points are unaffected by a neighboring breakdown when multiple laser beams are simultaneously irradiated. These laser irradiation procedures enable the measurement of the number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol at a large number of points within a short measurement time.

  6. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1 m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  7. Aerosol and cloud droplet number concentrations observed in marine stratocumulus

    SciTech Connect

    Vong, R.J.; Covert, D.S.

    1995-12-01

    The relationship between measurements of cloud droplet number concentration and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration, as inferred from aerosol size spectra, was investigated at a {open_quote}clean air{close_quote}, marine site (Cheeka Peak) located near the coast of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Preliminary results demonstrated that cloud droplet number increased and droplet diameter decreased as aerosol number concentration (CCN) increased. These results support predictions of a climate cooling due to any future increases in marine aerosol concentrations.

  8. Variations in Aerosol Size and Number during Discover-Aq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstead, E.; Thornhill, K. L.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Hudgins, C.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission is a multi-year campaign designed to improve the use of satellites to monitor surface-level air quality. DISCOVER-AQ is addressing its goals by conducting a series of coordinated ground-based and flight experiments over urban areas with well-established air quality issues to obtain vertically resolved measurements of trace gas and aerosol components for comparing with satellite observations of column-integrated quantities. The first flight mission was conducted over the Washington D.C. - Baltimore metropolitan area during July, 2011. It consisted of 14 science flights by the NASA Wallops Flight Facility P-3B aircraft over 6 highly-instrumented ground sites located around Baltimore. This region frequently violates ambient air quality standards for particulate matter as well as ozone and has a complex mixture of biogenic and anthropogenic sources. A large suite of aerosol instruments were flown onboard the P-3B aircraft to measure the microphysical, optical and chemical properties of aerosols during spirals over the ground sites and during low level flights over Interstates 95 and 695 connecting Washington and Baltimore. The package included condensation nuclei (CN) counters to provide measurements of total aerosols greater than 3 nm (UCN) and 10 nm (CN); a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) to measure size in the 10 to 300 nm diameter range; an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS) for sizing 90 to 1000 nm diameter particles, and a Laser Aerosol Spectrometer for sizing 100 to 7500 nm particles. This presentation examines the variability of aerosol size and number in both time and space over the Baltimore metropolitan region. Within the atmospheric boundary layer between 0.3 and 1 km, particle number densities and size distributions varied considerable over short time periods and across horizontal distances

  9. ESTIMATING MICROORGANISM DENSITIES IN AEROSOLS FROM SPRAY IRRIGATION OF WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document summarizes current knowledge about estimating the density of microorganisms in the air near wastewater management facilities, with emphasis on spray irrigation sites. One technique for modeling microorganism density in air is provided and an aerosol density estimati...

  10. Intercomparison of aerosol instruments: number concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, E O; Sinclair, D; Tu, K W; Hinchliffe, L; Franklin, H

    1982-05-01

    An intercomparison of aerosol instruments conducted February 23-27, 1981, at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) focused on five instruments: the Pollak and TSI condensation nucleus counters; the Active Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer (ASAS-X); and two aerosol electrometers. Test aerosols of sodium chloride and ammonium fluorescein generated by nebulization/electrostatic classification were used to obtain 195 lines of comparison data. Concentrations measured by the ASAS-X and the TSI aerosol electrometer averaged respectively 1.388 and 1.581 times that measured by the Pollak. These ratios were very stable during the week and there was little effect of particle size or material. Most other comparisons were equally stable. However, a review of past work at EML and elsewhere led to the disturbing conclusion that these ratios may change from year to year, or from season to season. A filter sample was taken from microscopy, concurrent with readings from the ASAS-X and the TSI condensation nucleus counters. In this sample, the two instruments differed by 20%. Within its 20% uncertainty, the filter result matched both the TSI and ASAS-X readings.

  11. Estimating Marine Aerosol Particle Volume and Number from Maritime Aerosol Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Munchak, L. A.; Holben, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass) are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The average solution MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the best solution dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data.

  12. Calculating Atomic Number Densities for Uranium

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-01-01

    Provides method to calculate atomic number densities of selected uranium compounds and hydrogenous moderators for use in nuclear criticality safety analyses at gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facilities.

  13. Density and elemental ratios of secondary organic aerosol: Application of a density prediction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Shunsuke; Tang, Ping; Tang, Xiaochen; Clark, Christopher H.; Qi, Li; Seo, Eric; Asa-Awuku, Akua; Cocker, David

    2013-04-01

    Organic material density is a fundamental parameter in aerosol science, yet direct measurement is not readily available. This study investigates density and elemental ratios of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by the oxidation of 22 different volatile organic compounds with a wide range of molecular size (C5˜C15) in an environmental chamber. Reactants with a larger number of carbons yielded SOA with lower density (e.g., β-caryophyllene SOA: 1.22 g cm-3) compared with smaller ones (e.g., phenol SOA: 1.43 g cm-3) consistent with different extents of oxidation of the parent molecule. A recent study proposed a semi-empirical relationship between elemental ratios (O/C and H/C) and organic material density (Kuwata et al., 2012). The prediction method therein is evaluated against the large experimental data set of this study acquired in the UC Riverside/CE-CERT environmental chamber. The predicted particle densities agree with experimental measurements within 12% as stated by Kuwata et al. (2012) except for C6 compounds (benzene, phenol, and catechol). Therefore, the range of application has been further extended to include anthropogenic (aromatic) systems. The effects of nitrogen and sulfur on the density prediction remain unclear.

  14. Lightning flash density in relation to aerosol over Nanjing (China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y. B.; Peng, L.; Shi, Z.; Chen, H. R.

    2016-06-01

    Time series data of lightning flash density, aerosol optical depth (AOD), surface temperature, convective available potential energy (CAPE) and thunderstorm days for 10 years (2002-2011), cloud-to-ground lightning (CG), and AOD of 5 years for summer season, i.e., June, July, and August over Nanjing, China, have been analyzed, to investigate the impact of aerosols on lightning. The results indicate that the radiative effect of aerosol may be one of the main reason for the decrease of the lightning flash density in a long period, while the aerosol microphysical effect may be a major role in the increase of the percent of + CG flashes (P+ CG). The dependence of surface temperature, CAPE, and thunderstorm days on AOD (R = - 0.748, - 0.741, - 0.744), and the negative correlation (R = - 0.634) between lightning flash density and AOD may lend support for the radiative effect of aerosol on lightning. In addition, elevated aerosols may change the charge distribution in thundercloud, hence enhancing the positive cloud-to-ground lightning (+ CG) activity, as P+ CG is positively correlated with AOD.

  15. Inkjet aerosol generator as monodisperse particle number standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Kenjiro; Sakurai, Hiromu; Ehara, Kensei

    2013-05-01

    Inkjet technology can be applied to generate highly monodisperse aerosol particles in micrometer range at a precisely controlled rate. AIST has been developing an inkjet aerosol generator (AIST-IAG), and the device will soon become the secondary measurement standard for aerosol particle number concentration in 0.35 μm to 10 μm range. The AIST-IAG can generate both solid and liquid particles consisting of water-soluble ionic compounds. We first report the characteristics of the particle sizes of the generated particles. The full width half maximum of the particle size distribution is about 2 percent, and the particle diameter of the IAG particles was calibrated as a function of the particle mass within 0.6-10 μm range using polystyrene latex sphere as reference material. Then we report the capability of the AIST-IAG as the particle number standard. The particle generation efficiency ηIAG was defined as the number of aerosol particles exiting from the AIST-IAG divided by the rate of the droplet generation, and the values of ηIAG within 0.35-10 μm is essentially 100%, and the 95% confidence interval of the values is less than 1%. The result strongly supports that the AISTIAG can be used to calibrate the counting efficiency of the optical particle counters in submicrometer to micrometer range.

  16. The post-pinatubo evolution of stratospheric aerosol surface area density as inferred from SAGE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Thomason, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June of 1991, the aerosol mass loading of the stratosphere increased from -1 Mt to approximately 30 Mt. This change in aerosol loading was responsible for numerous radiative and chemical changes observed within the stratosphere. As a result, the ability to quantify aerosol properties on a global basis during this period is important. Aerosol surface area density is a critical parameter in governing the rates of heterogeneous reactions, such as ClONO2 plus H2O yields HNO3 plus HOCl, which influence the stratospheric abundance of ozone. Following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, measurements by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE 2) indicated that the stratospheric aerosol surface area density increased by as much as a factor of 100. Using SAGE 2 multi-wavelength aerosol extinction data, aerosol surface area density as well as mass are derived for the period following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo through the present.

  17. Improving aerosol distributions below clouds by assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud droplet number

    PubMed Central

    Saide, Pablo E.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Spak, Scott N.; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in current capabilities to constrain aerosols adversely impact atmospheric simulations. Typically, aerosol burdens within models are constrained employing satellite aerosol optical properties, which are not available under cloudy conditions. Here we set the first steps to overcome the long-standing limitation that aerosols cannot be constrained using satellite remote sensing under cloudy conditions. We introduce a unique data assimilation method that uses cloud droplet number (Nd) retrievals to improve predicted below-cloud aerosol mass and number concentrations. The assimilation, which uses an adjoint aerosol activation parameterization, improves agreement with independent Nd observations and with in situ aerosol measurements below shallow cumulus clouds. The impacts of a single assimilation on aerosol and cloud forecasts extend beyond 24 h. Unlike previous methods, this technique can directly improve predictions of near-surface fine mode aerosols responsible for human health impacts and low-cloud radiative forcing. Better constrained aerosol distributions will help improve health effects studies, atmospheric emissions estimates, and air-quality, weather, and climate predictions. PMID:22778436

  18. Effect of an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant on ambient air densities of aerosols containing bacteria and viruses.

    PubMed

    Fannin, K F; Vana, S C; Jakubowski, W

    1985-05-01

    Bacteria- and virus-containing aerosols were studied during the late summer and fall seasons in a midwestern suburb of the United States before and during the start-up and operation of an unenclosed activated sludge wastewater treatment plant. The study showed that the air in this suburban area contained low-level densities of indicator microorganisms. After the plant began operating, the densities of total aerobic bacteria-containing particles, standard plate count bacteria, total coliforms, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci, and coliphages increased significantly in the air within the perimeter of the plant. Before plant operations, bacteria were detected from five genera, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Serratia, Salmonella, and Aeromonas. During plant operations, the number of genera identified increased to 11. In addition to those genera found before plant operations, Escherichia, Providencia, Citrobacter, Acinetobacter, Pasteurella, and Proteus, were also identified. Enteric viruses were detected in low densities from the air emissions of this plant. Only standard plate count bacteria remained at significantly higher than base-line densities beyond 250 m downwind from the center of the aeration tanks. Fecal streptococci and coliphages appeared to be more stable in aerosols than the other indicator microorganisms studied. In general, the densities of microorganism-containing aerosols were higher at night than during the day. The techniques used in this study may be employed to establish microorganism-containing aerosol exposure during epidemiological investigations. PMID:2988442

  19. Non-spherical aerosol transport under oscillatory shear flows at low-Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shachar Berman, Lihi; Delorme, Yann; Hofemeier, Philipp; Frankel, Steven; Sznitman, Josue

    2014-11-01

    Most airborne particles are intrinsically non-spherical. In particular, non-spherical particles with high aspect ratios, such as fibers, are acknowledged to be more hazardous than their spherical counterparts due to their ability to penetrate into deeper lung regions, causing serious pulmonary diseases. Not only do particle properties such as size, shape, and density have a major impact on particle transport, for non-spherical aerosols, their orientations also greatly influence particle trajectories due to modified lift and drag characteristics. Until present, however, most of our understanding of the dynamics of inhaled particles in the deep airways of the lungs has been limited to spherical particles only. In the present work, we seek to quantify through numerical simulations the transport of non-spherical airborne particles and their deposition under oscillatory shear flows at low Reynolds numbers, characteristic of acinar airways. Here, the Euler-Lagrangian model is used to solve the translational movement of a fiber, whereas the Eulerian rotational equations are introduced and solved to predict detailed unsteady fiber orientations. Overall, our efforts provide new insight into realistic dynamics of inhaled non-spherical aerosols under characteristic breathing motions.

  20. Modal density function and number of propagating modes in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Often raised questions in duct sound propagation studies involve the total number of propagating modes, the number of propagating radial modes for a particular spinning lobe number, and the number of modes possible between two given values of cutoff ratio or eigenvalue. These questions can be answered approximately by using the modal distribution function which is the integral of the modal density function for ducts in a manner similar to that previously published for architectural acoustics. The modal density functions are derived for rectangular and circular ducts with a uniform steady flow. Results from this continuous theory are compared to the actual (discrete) modal distributions.

  1. TRACING GALAXIES THROUGH COSMIC TIME WITH NUMBER DENSITY SELECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Leja, Joel; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Franx, Marijn

    2013-03-20

    A central challenge in observational studies of galaxy formation is how to associate progenitor galaxies with their descendants at lower redshifts. One promising approach is to link galaxies at fixed number density rather than fixed luminosity or mass. This method is effective if stellar mass rank order is broadly conserved through cosmic time. In this paper, we use the Guo et al. semi-analytical model to analyze under what circumstances this assumption is valid in the context of a cosmological simulation. Specifically, we select progenitor galaxies at a constant number density and compare the stellar mass evolution of their descendants to the evolution at a constant number density. The median stellar mass of the descendants increases by a factor of four (0.6 dex) from z = 3 to z = 0. Constant number density selection reproduces this to within 40% (0.15 dex) over a wide range of number densities. We show that the discrepancy primarily results from scatter in the stellar mass growth rates and merging. After applying simple, observationally based corrections for these processes, the discrepancy is reduced to 12% (0.05 dex). We conclude that number density selection can be used to predict the median descendant mass of high-redshift progenitor galaxies. The main uncertainty in this study is that semi-analytical models do not reproduce the observed mass evolution of galaxies, which makes the quantitative aggregate effects of star formation, merging, and quenching on the rank order of galaxies somewhat uncertain.

  2. IN SITU MEASUREMENTS OF THE SIZE AND DENSITY OF TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerst, S. M.; Tolbert, M. A

    2013-06-10

    The organic haze produced from complex CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} chemistry in the atmosphere of Titan plays an important role in processes that occur in the atmosphere and on its surface. The haze particles act as condensation nuclei and are therefore involved in Titan's methane hydrological cycle. They also may behave like sediment on Titan's surface and participate in both fluvial and aeolian processes. Models that seek to understand these processes require information about the physical properties of the particles including their size and density. Although measurements obtained by Cassini-Huygens have placed constraints on the size of the haze particles, their densities remain unknown. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments and measured the size, number density, and particle density of Titan aerosol analogs, or tholins, for CH{sub 4} concentrations from 0.01% to 10% using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that the densities currently in use by many Titan models are higher than the measured densities of our tholins.

  3. Stratospheric aerosol acidity, density, and refractive index deduced from SAGE 2 and NMC temperature data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Poole, L. R.; Wang, P.-H.; Chiou, E. W.

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor concentrations obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) and collocated temperatures provided by the National Meteorological Center (NMC) from 1986 to 1990 are used to deduce seasonally and zonally averaged acidity, density, and refractive index of stratospheric aerosols. It is found that the weight percentage of sulfuric acid in the aerosols increases from about 60 just above the tropopause to about 86 at 35 km. The density increases from about 1.55 to 1.85 g/cu cm between the same altitude limits. Some seasonal variations of composition and density are evident at high latitudes. The refractive indices at 1.02, 0.694, and 0.532 micrometers increase, respectively, from about 1.425, 1.430, and 1.435 just above the tropopause to about 1.445, 1.455, and 1.458 at altitudes above 27 km, depending on the season and latitude. The aerosol properties presented can be used in models to study the effectiveness of heterogeneous chemistry, the mass loading of stratospheric aerosols, and the extinction and backscatter of aerosols at different wavelengths. Computed aerosol surface areas, rate coefficients for the heterogeneous reaction ClONO2 + H2O yields HOCl + HNO3 and aerosol mass concentrations before and after the Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 are shown as sample applications.

  4. A Method for Measuring the Density of Irregularly Shaped Aerosol Particles Such as Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hout, R.; Katz, J.

    2003-12-01

    Prediction of the long distance dispersal of (biological) aerosol particles, such as pollen, in the atmosphere is of great importance in pollution control and allergy studies. The particle parameters affecting dispersal include size, shape and density. In this work a simple method has been tested and implemented for measuring the density of aerosols without prior knowledge of their size and shape. The method is based on measurement of the settling velocity of particles in two fluids with different density and viscosity at low Reynolds numbers (Stokes flow). Consequently, the settling velocity is proportional to the particle size and density. For two statistically similar samples of particles, based on pdf of equivalent projected area diameter, the pdf of the particle settling velocity was measured in two fluids with different density and viscosity (Dow Corning 200 fluid). For known fluid properties, the resulting particle density is then proportional to the ratio of the settling velocities in the two fluids. The method was used to determine the density of corn (Zea Mays) pollen. The pollen settling velocity was measured in a square settling chamber (5x5x45cm) using in-line digital holography that allows in-focus tracking of the pollen in a 3-D sample volume. Additional advantages of in-line digital holography are its simple setup and the possibility of recording holographic movies. The measured mean corn pollen density was 1119.3 kg/m3 with an absolute error of 45.2 kg/m3. Pdf's of size distributions (based on projected areas) of corn pollen were determined using optical microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). These observations were performed with pollen immersed in both Dow Corning 200 fluids as well as in a dry state. No change in size and shape were observed. However when immersed in water, the corn pollen grew and became nearly spherical. Thus, for a known pollen density and size distribution, Stokes' Law for a sphere could be used to predict the

  5. Theoretical analysis of particle number density in steady aeolian saltation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Liqiang; Zou, Xueyong

    2014-01-01

    Particle number density or particle concentration in aeolian saltation is one important input parameter to calculate the sand flux, kinetic energy and mid-air collision probability in the aeolian saltation and particle concentration is also related to the wind erosion capacity, hence, in the present paper, the vertical distribution of particle number density in steady aeolian saltation is analyzed based on two different types of probability density functions of vertical lift-off velocity of saltating particles: one is the PDF (probability density function) of vertical velocity of lift-off particles in the three-dimensional space defined as a type-A PDF which considers the number of particles in various velocity bins per unit volume; and the other is the PDF of vertical velocity of lift-off particles ejected from the sand bed surface in a period of time as a type-B PDF which considers the number flux of particles in various velocity bins per unit surface area. These two types of PDFs are from two different perspectives (i.e., volume- and surface-based perspectives, respectively), and can be deduced from each other. The half-normal and exponential distributions are recommended for the type-A PDF, and the corresponding type-B PDF is expressed by Rayleigh and Gamma(2) distributions. The PDF distribution pattern of vertical velocity of lift-off particles has an important influence on the vertical profile of particle number density. If the type-A PDF of vertical velocity of ejected particles is a half-normal distribution, the particle number density decays exponentially with height. If the type-A PDF is an exponential distribution, the particle number density also decreases with height. If the type-A PDF is Gamma(3) and Rayleigh distributions, the particle number density first increases, then decreases with height. The type-A and type-B height parameters, which are calculated according to the mean vertical lift-off velocity from the type-A and type-B PDFs, respectively

  6. Processes controlling the annual cycle of Arctic aerosol number and size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Betty; Martin, Randall V.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Tunved, Peter; Breider, Thomas J.; D'Andrea, Stephen D.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements at high-Arctic sites (Alert, Nunavut, and Mt. Zeppelin, Svalbard) during the years 2011 to 2013 show a strong and similar annual cycle in aerosol number and size distributions. Each year at both sites, the number of aerosols with diameters larger than 20 nm exhibits a minimum in October and two maxima, one in spring associated with a dominant accumulation mode (particles 100 to 500 nm in diameter) and a second in summer associated with a dominant Aitken mode (particles 20 to 100 nm in diameter). Seasonal-mean aerosol effective diameter from measurements ranges from about 180 in summer to 260 nm in winter. This study interprets these annual cycles with the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global aerosol microphysics model. Important roles are documented for several processes (new-particle formation, coagulation scavenging in clouds, scavenging by precipitation, and transport) in controlling the annual cycle in Arctic aerosol number and size. Our simulations suggest that coagulation scavenging of interstitial aerosols in clouds by aerosols that have activated to form cloud droplets strongly limits the total number of particles with diameters less than 200 nm throughout the year. We find that the minimum in total particle number in October can be explained by diminishing new-particle formation within the Arctic, limited transport of pollution from lower latitudes, and efficient wet removal. Our simulations indicate that the summertime-dominant Aitken mode is associated with efficient wet removal of accumulation-mode aerosols, which limits the condensation sink for condensable vapours. This in turn promotes new-particle formation and growth. The dominant accumulation mode during spring is associated with build up of transported pollution from outside the Arctic coupled with less-efficient wet-removal processes at colder temperatures. We recommend further attention to the key processes of new-particle formation, interstitial coagulation, and wet removal and their delicate

  7. Diamond like carbon coatings: Categorization by atomic number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, John C.

    1986-01-01

    Dense diamond-like hydrocarbon films grown at the NASA Lewis Research Center by radio frequency self bias discharge and by direct ion beam deposition were studied. A new method for categorizing hydrocarbons based on their atomic number density and elemental composition was developed and applied to the diamond-like hydrocarbon films. It was shown that the diamond-like hydrocarbon films are an entirely new class of hydrocarbons with atomic number densities lying between those of single crystal diamond and adamantanes. In addition, a major review article on these new materials was completed in cooperation with NASA Lewis Research Center personnel.

  8. First measurements of aerosol optical depth and Angstrom exponent number from AERONET's Kuching site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Santo V.; Chew, Boon N.; Mohamad, M.; Mahmud, M.; Liew, Soo C.

    2013-10-01

    We report our first measurements, over the 2011 dry season period, of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent number and its fine mode counterpart obtained from photometric measurements at AERONET's newest site located at the city of Kuching, Sarawak, East Malaysia. This site was set up as part of the collaborative efforts of the Seven South East Asian Studies (7SEAS) regional aerosol measurements initiative. Located at the converging zone between peninsular Malaysia and the land masses of Sumatra, Borneo, Java and Sulawesi, this site is expected to provide first hand evidence about the physical and optical characteristics of the regional aerosol environment, specially during the biomass burning months. Moreover, given its relative proximity to our Singapore radiation measurement super-site, Kuching is expected to provide further insight on aerosol transport pathways caused by seasonal winds transporting smoke to other parts of the maritime continent and the South Asia region.

  9. [Characteristics of Number Concentration Size Distributions of Aerosols Under Processes in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Su, Jie; Zhao, Pu-sheng; Chen, Yi-na

    2016-04-15

    The aerosol number concentration size distributions were measured by a Wide-Range Particle Spectrometer (WPS-1000XP) at an urban site of Beijing from 2012 to 2014; and the characteristics of the size distributions in different seasons and weather conditions were discussed. The results showed that the daily average number concentration of Aitken mode aerosols was highest in the spring and lowest in the autumn; the daily average number concentration of accumulation mode aerosols was bigher in the spring and winter, while lowest in summer; and the average concentration of coarse mode was highest during the winter. The Aitken mode particles had the most significant diurnal variations resulted from the traffic sources and the summer photochemical reactions. In the spring, autumn and winter, the number concentrations of accumulation mode of the nighttime was higher than that of the daytime. The coarse mode particles did not have obvious diurnal variation. During the heavy pollution process, the accumulation mode aerosols played a decisive role in PM₂.₅ concentrations and was usually removed by the north wind. The precipitation could effectively eliminate the coarse mode particles, but it bad no obvious effect on the accumulation mode particles under small speed wind and zero speed wind. During the dust process, the concentrations of coarse mode particles increased significantly, while the accumulation mode aerosol concentration was obviously decreased. PMID:27548939

  10. Observation of number-density-dependent growth of plasmonic nanobubbles

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Takashi; Wang, Xiaolong; Chatterjee, Souvik; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Interaction dynamics of laser pulses and nanoparticles are of great interest in recent years. In many cases, laser-nanoparticle interactions result in the formation of plasmonic nanobubbles, and the dynamics of nanoparticles and nanobubbles are inseparable. So far, very little attention has been paid to the number density. Here we report the first observation of number-density-dependent growth of plasmonic nanobubbles. Our results show that the nanobubbles growth depends (does not depend) on the number density at high (low) laser fluence, although the inter-particle distance in the solution is as long as 14–30 μm. This cannot be explained by the existing physical picture, and we propose a new model which takes into account the pressure waves arising from nanoparticles. The numerical results based on this model agree well with the experimental results. Our findings imply that the number density can be a new doorknob to control laser-nanobubble as well as laser-nanoparticle interactions. PMID:27354184

  11. Observation of number-density-dependent growth of plasmonic nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takashi; Wang, Xiaolong; Chatterjee, Souvik; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Interaction dynamics of laser pulses and nanoparticles are of great interest in recent years. In many cases, laser-nanoparticle interactions result in the formation of plasmonic nanobubbles, and the dynamics of nanoparticles and nanobubbles are inseparable. So far, very little attention has been paid to the number density. Here we report the first observation of number-density-dependent growth of plasmonic nanobubbles. Our results show that the nanobubbles growth depends (does not depend) on the number density at high (low) laser fluence, although the inter-particle distance in the solution is as long as 14-30 μm. This cannot be explained by the existing physical picture, and we propose a new model which takes into account the pressure waves arising from nanoparticles. The numerical results based on this model agree well with the experimental results. Our findings imply that the number density can be a new doorknob to control laser-nanobubble as well as laser-nanoparticle interactions. PMID:27354184

  12. Aerosol effective density measurement using scanning mobility particle sizer and quartz crystal microbalance with the estimation of involved uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Bighnaraj; Aggarwal, Shankar G.; Sinha, Deepak; Gupta, Prabhat K.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we have used a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to estimate the effective density of aerosol particles. This approach is tested for aerosolized particles generated from the solution of standard materials of known density, i.e. ammonium sulfate (AS), ammonium nitrate (AN) and sodium chloride (SC), and also applied for ambient measurement in New Delhi. We also discuss uncertainty involved in the measurement. In this method, dried particles are introduced in to a differential mobility analyser (DMA), where size segregation is done based on particle electrical mobility. Downstream of the DMA, the aerosol stream is subdivided into two parts. One is sent to a condensation particle counter (CPC) to measure particle number concentration, whereas the other one is sent to the QCM to measure the particle mass concentration simultaneously. Based on particle volume derived from size distribution data of the SMPS and mass concentration data obtained from the QCM, the mean effective density (ρeff) with uncertainty of inorganic salt particles (for particle count mean diameter (CMD) over a size range 10-478 nm), i.e. AS, SC and AN, is estimated to be 1.76 ± 0.24, 2.08 ± 0.19 and 1.69 ± 0.28 g cm-3, values which are comparable with the material density (ρ) values, 1.77, 2.17 and 1.72 g cm-3, respectively. Using this technique, the percentage contribution of error in the measurement of effective density is calculated to be in the range of 9-17 %. Among the individual uncertainty components, repeatability of particle mass obtained by the QCM, the QCM crystal frequency, CPC counting efficiency, and the equivalence of CPC- and QCM-derived volume are the major contributors to the expanded uncertainty (at k = 2) in comparison to other components, e.g. diffusion correction, charge correction, etc. Effective density for ambient particles at the beginning of the winter period in New Delhi was measured to be 1.28 ± 0.12 g cm-3

  13. THE EVOLUTION OF THE NUMBER DENSITY OF COMPACT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Poggianti, B. M.; Calvi, R.; Renzini, A.; Moretti, A.; D'Onofrio, M.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Fritz, J.

    2013-11-10

    We compare the number density of compact (small size) massive galaxies at low and high redshift using our Padova Millennium Galaxy and Group Catalogue (PM2GC) at z = 0.03-0.11 and the CANDELS results from Barro et al. at z = 1-2. The number density of local compact galaxies with luminosity weighted (LW) ages compatible with being already passive at high redshift is compared with the density of compact passive galaxies observed at high-z. Our results place an upper limit of a factor ∼2 on the evolution of the number density and are inconsistent with a significant size evolution for most of the compact galaxies observed at high-z. Instead, the evolution may be significant (up to a factor five) for the most extreme, ultracompact galaxies. Considering all compact galaxies, regardless of LW age and star formation activity, a minority of local compact galaxies (≤1/3) might have formed at z < 1. Finally, we show that the secular decrease of the galaxy stellar mass due to simple stellar evolution may in some cases be a non-negligible factor in the context of the evolution of the mass-size relation, and we caution that passive evolution in mass should be taken into account when comparing samples at different redshifts.

  14. Modal density function and number of propagating modes in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    The question of the number of propagating modes within a small range of mode cut off ratio was raised. The population density of modes were shown to be greatest near cut off and least for the well propagating modes. It was shown that modes of nearly the same cut off ratio behave nearly the same in a sound absorbing duct as well as in the way they propagate to the far. Handling all of the propagating modes individually, they can be grouped into several cut off ratio ranges. It is important to know the modal density function to estimate acoustic power distribution.

  15. The number density of quiescent compact galaxies at intermediate redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Damjanov, Ivana; Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Chilingarian, Igor

    2014-09-20

    Massive compact systems at 0.2 < z < 0.6 are the missing link between the predominantly compact population of massive quiescent galaxies at high redshift and their analogs and relics in the local volume. The evolution in number density of these extreme objects over cosmic time is the crucial constraining factor for the models of massive galaxy assembly. We select a large sample of ∼200 intermediate-redshift massive compacts from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectroscopy by identifying point-like Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric sources with spectroscopic signatures of evolved redshifted galaxies. A subset of our targets have publicly available high-resolution ground-based images that we use to augment the dynamical and stellar population properties of these systems by their structural parameters. We confirm that all BOSS compact candidates are as compact as their high-redshift massive counterparts and less than half the size of similarly massive systems at z ∼ 0. We use the completeness-corrected numbers of BOSS compacts to compute lower limits on their number densities in narrow redshift bins spanning the range of our sample. The abundance of extremely dense quiescent galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.6 is in excellent agreement with the number densities of these systems at high redshift. Our lower limits support the models of massive galaxy assembly through a series of minor mergers over the redshift range 0 < z < 2.

  16. Aerosol effective density measurement using scanning mobility particle sizer and quartz crystal microbalance with the estimation of involved uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, B.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Sinha, D.; Gupta, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have used scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to estimate the effective density of aerosol particles. This approach is tested for aerosolized particles generated from the solution of standard materials of known density, i.e. ammonium sulfate (AS), ammonium nitrate (AN) and sodium chloride (SC), and also applied for ambient measurement in New Delhi. We also discuss uncertainty involved in the measurement. In this method, dried particles are introduced in to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), where size segregation was done based on particle electrical mobility. At the downstream of DMA, the aerosol stream is subdivided into two parts. One is sent to a condensation particle counter (CPC) to measure particle number concentration, whereas other one is sent to QCM to measure the particle mass concentration simultaneously. Based on particle volume derived from size distribution data of SMPS and mass concentration data obtained from QCM, the mean effective density (ρeff) with uncertainty of inorganic salt particles (for particle count mean diameter (CMD) over a size range 10 to 478 nm), i.e. AS, SC and AN is estimated to be 1.76 ± 0.24, 2.08 ± 0.19 and 1.69 ± 0.28 g cm-3, which are comparable with the material density (ρ) values, 1.77, 2.17 and 1.72 g cm-3, respectively. Among individual uncertainty components, repeatability of particle mass obtained by QCM, QCM crystal frequency, CPC counting efficiency, and equivalence of CPC and QCM derived volume are the major contributors to the expanded uncertainty (at k = 2) in comparison to other components, e.g. diffusion correction, charge correction, etc. Effective density for ambient particles at the beginning of winter period in New Delhi is measured to be 1.28 ± 0.12 g cm-3. It was found that in general, mid-day effective density of ambient aerosols increases with increase in CMD of particle size measurement but particle photochemistry is an important

  17. Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    2013-10-21

    The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

  18. Aerosol number size distributions over a coastal semi urban location: Seasonal changes and ultrafine particle bursts.

    PubMed

    Babu, S Suresh; Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Moorthy, K Krishna

    2016-09-01

    Number-size distribution is one of the important microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols that influence aerosol life cycle, aerosol-radiation interaction as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. Making use of one-yearlong measurements of aerosol particle number-size distributions (PNSD) over a broad size spectrum (~15-15,000nm) from a tropical coastal semi-urban location-Trivandrum (Thiruvananthapuram), the size characteristics, their seasonality and response to mesoscale and synoptic scale meteorology are examined. While the accumulation mode contributed mostly to the annual mean concentration, ultrafine particles (having diameter <100nm) contributed as much as 45% to the total concentration, and thus constitute a strong reservoir, that would add to the larger particles through size transformation. The size distributions were, in general, bimodal with well-defined modes in the accumulation and coarse regimes, with mode diameters lying in the range 141 to 167nm and 1150 to 1760nm respectively, in different seasons. Despite the contribution of the coarse sized particles to the total number concentration being meager, they contributed significantly to the surface area and volume, especially during transport of marine air mass highlighting the role of synoptic air mass changes. Significant diurnal variation occurred in the number concentrations, geometric mean diameters, which is mostly attributed to the dynamics of the local coastal atmospheric boundary layer and the effect of mesoscale land/sea breeze circulation. Bursts of ultrafine particles (UFP) occurred quite frequently, apparently during periods of land-sea breeze transitions, caused by the strong mixing of precursor-rich urban air mass with the cleaner marine air mass; the resulting turbulence along with boundary layer dynamics aiding the nucleation. These ex-situ particles were observed at the surface due to the transport associated with boundary layer dynamics. The particle growth rates from

  19. Improved simulation of aerosol, cloud, and density measurements by shuttle lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Morley, B. M.; Livingston, J. M.; Grams, G. W.; Patterson, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    Data retrievals are simulated for a Nd:YAG lidar suitable for early flight on the space shuttle. Maximum assumed vertical and horizontal resolutions are 0.1 and 100 km, respectively, in the boundary layer, increasing to 2 and 2000 km in the mesosphere. Aerosol and cloud retrievals are simulated using 1.06 and 0.53 microns wavelengths independently. Error sources include signal measurement, conventional density information, atmospheric transmission, and lidar calibration. By day, tenuous clouds and Saharan and boundary layer aerosols are retrieved at both wavelengths. By night, these constituents are retrieved, plus upper tropospheric, stratospheric, and mesospheric aerosols and noctilucent clouds. Density, temperature, and improved aerosol and cloud retrievals are simulated by combining signals at 0.35, 1.06, and 0.53 microns. Particlate contamination limits the technique to the cloud free upper troposphere and above. Error bars automatically show effect of this contamination, as well as errors in absolute density nonmalization, reference temperature or pressure, and the sources listed above. For nonvolcanic conditions, relative density profiles have rms errors of 0.54 to 2% in the upper troposphere and stratosphere. Temperature profiles have rms errors of 1.2 to 2.5 K and can define the tropopause to 0.5 km and higher wave structures to 1 or 2 km.

  20. Effects of unequal particle number densities on Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.

    1989-01-01

    Analytic plasma theory and numerical solutions of the dispersion equation are used to show that the assumption that the linear properties of the waves are determined by a charge-neutral plasma in the absence of the nonthermal particles, while the nonthermal particles cause growth or additional damping superposed onto the background, is seriously flawed even for stable plasmas. Even when the nonthermal particles do not contribute significantly to the dispersion equation, unequal thermal electron and ion number densities (due to the presence of the nonthermal particles) may cause fundamental low wave number modifications to the Alfven modes, including the creation of a new resonance and severely modified dispersion. These results are found for both cold and warm plasmas. Previous work on Alfven waves should be reevaluated in view of these results.

  1. Vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration in the troposphere over Siberia derived from airborne in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Machida, Toshinobu; Kozlov, Alexandr; Malyskin, Sergei; Simonenkov, Denis; Davydov, Denis; Fofonov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosols particles is very important when estimating aerosol radiative effects. To date there are a lot of research programs aimed to study aerosol vertical distribution, but only a few ones exist in such insufficiently explored region as Siberia. Monthly research flights and several extensive airborne campaigns carried out in recent years in Siberian troposphere allowed the vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration to be summarized. In-situ aerosol measurements were performed in a wide range of particle sizes by means of improved version of the Novosibirsk-type diffusional particle sizer and GRIMM aerosol spectrometer Model 1.109. The data on aerosol vertical distribution enabled input parameters for the empirical equation of Jaenicke (1993) to be derived for Siberian troposphere up to 7 km. Vertical distributions of aerosol number concentration in different size ranges averaged for the main seasons of the year will be presented. This work was supported by Interdisciplinary integration projects of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science No. 35, No. 70 and No. 131; the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 14-05-00526). Jaenicke R. Tropospheric aerosols, in Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions, edited by P.V. Hobs. -Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1993.- P. 1-31.

  2. Probability density distribution of velocity differences at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent understanding of fine-scale turbulence structure in high Reynolds number flows is mostly based on Kolmogorov's original and revised models. The main finding of these models is that intrinsic characteristics of fine-scale fluctuations are universal ones at high Reynolds numbers, i.e., the functional behavior of any small-scale parameter is the same in all flows if the Reynolds number is high enough. The only large-scale quantity that directly affects small-scale fluctuations is the energy flux through a cascade. In dynamical equilibrium between large- and small-scale motions, this flux is equal to the mean rate of energy dissipation epsilon. The pdd of velocity difference is a very important characteristic for both the basic understanding of fully developed turbulence and engineering problems. Hence, it is important to test the findings: (1) the functional behavior of the tails of the probability density distribution (pdd) represented by P(delta(u)) is proportional to exp(-b(r) absolute value of delta(u)/sigma(sub delta(u))) and (2) the logarithmic decrement b(r) scales as b(r) is proportional to r(sup 0.15) when separation r lies in the inertial subrange in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows.

  3. Relativistic cosmology number densities and the luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarrem, A. S.; Lopes, A. R.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: This paper studies the connection between the relativistic number density of galaxies down the past light cone in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime with non-vanishing cosmological constant and the galaxy luminosity function (LF) data. It extends the redshift range of previous results presented in Albani et al. (2007, ApJ, 657, 760), where the galaxy distribution was studied out to z = 1. Observational inhomogeneities were detected at this range. This research also searches for LF evolution in the context of the framework advanced by Ribeiro and Stoeger (2003, ApJ, 592, 1), further developing the theory linking relativistic cosmology theory and LF data. Methods: Selection functions are obtained using the Schechter parameters and redshift parametrization of the galaxy LF obtained from an I-band selected dataset of the FORS deep field galaxy survey in the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 5.0 for its blue bands and 0.75 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 for its red ones. Differential number counts, densities and other related observables are obtained, and then used with the calculated selection functions to study the empirical radial distribution of the galaxies in a fully relativistic framework. Results: The redshift range of the dataset used in this work, which is up to five times larger than the one used in previous studies, shows an increased relevance of the relativistic effects of expansion when compared to the evolution of the LF at the higher redshifts. The results also agree with the preliminary ones presented in Albani et al., suggesting a power-law behavior of relativistic densities at high redshifts when they are defined in terms of the luminosity distance.

  4. Relationship Between Aerosol Number Size Distribution and Atmospheric Electric Potential Gradient in an Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Matthew; Matthews, James; Bacak, Asan; Silva, Hugo; Priestley, Michael; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley

    2016-04-01

    Small ions are created in the atmosphere by ground based radioactive decay and solar and cosmic radiation ionising the air. The ionosphere is maintained at a high potential relative to the Earth due to global thunderstorm activity, a current from the ionosphere transfers charge back to the ground through the weakly ionised atmosphere. A potential gradient (PG) exists between the ionosphere and the ground that can be measured in fair weather using devices such as an electric field mill. PG is inversely-proportional to the conductivity of the air and therefore to the number of ions of a given electrical mobility; a reduction of air ions will cause an increase of PG. Aerosols in the atmosphere act as a sink of air ions with an attachment rate dependent on aerosol size distribution and ion mobility. These relationships have been used to infer high particulate, and hence pollution, levels in historic datasets of atmospheric PG. A measurement campaign was undertaken in Manchester, UK for three weeks in July and August where atmospheric PG was measured with an electric field mill (JCI131, JCI Chilworth) on a second floor balcony, aerosol size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI3936), aerosol concentration measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC, Grimm 5.403) and local meteorological measurements taken on a rooftop measurement site ~200 m away. Field mill and CPC data were taken at 1 s intervals and SMPS data in 2.5 minute cycles. Data were excluded for one hour either side of rainfall as rainclouds and droplets can carry significant charge which would affect PG. A quantity relating to the attachment of ions to aerosol (Ion Sink) was derived from the effective attachment coefficient of the aerosols. Further measurements with the field mill and CPC were taken at the same location in November 2015 when bonfire events would be expected to increase aerosol concentrations. During the summer measurements, particle number count (PNC

  5. Spaceborne lidar measurement accuracy - Simulation of aerosol, cloud, molecular density, and temperature retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Morley, B. M.; Browell, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with studies concerning the use of an orbiting optical radar (lidar) to conduct aerosol and cloud measurements, attention has been given to the accuracy with which lidar return signals could be measured. However, signal-measurement error is not the only source of error which can affect the accuracy of the derived information. Other error sources are the assumed molecular-density and atmospheric-transmission profiles, and the lidar calibration factor (which relates signal to backscatter coefficient). The present investigation has the objective to account for the effects of all these errors sources for several realistic combinations of lidar parameters, model atmospheres, and background lighting conditions. In addition, a procedure is tested and developed for measuring density and temperature profiles with the lidar, and for using the lidar-derived density profiles to improve aerosol retrievals.

  6. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  7. Equatorial electron energy and number densities in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthey, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A synchrotron model with a Maxwellian energy distribution of the form e to the (-E/E sub 0) power is used in a comparison with spatially resolved radio interferometric measurements of the Jovian emission. The observations of the decimeter radiation as a function of equatorial distance at 10.4 and 21 cm wavelength were reduced to source emission/cc of source electrons in each of 16 concentric rings. The peak energies for isotropically distributed electrons exceeded the maximum energy for flat orbiting electrons, and the peaks were generally located from 2.25 to 3 Jupiter radii. Beyond 3 radii, the order of magnitude on number density became a sensitive function of pitch angle distribution. The total equatorial intensities at 75 cm wavelength were computed for (E sub 0)(r) and n(r) at different values of B sub 0. The radiative half life for electrons of initial energy E sub 0 in a dipole field was calculated and found to be nearly constant at one year or less for altitudes at and below the position in peak energy.

  8. Investigation of the seasonal variations of aerosol physicochemical properties and their impact on cloud condensation nuclei number concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Timothy S.

    Aerosols are among the most complex yet widely studied components of the atmosphere not only due to the seasonal variability of their physical and chemical properties but also their effects on climate change. The three main aerosol types that are known to affect the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere are: mineral dust, anthropogenic pollution, and biomass burning aerosols. In order to understand how these aerosols affect the atmosphere, this dissertation addresses the following three scientific questions through a combination of surface and satellite observations: SQ1: What are the seasonal and regional variations of aerosol physico-chemical properties at four selected Asian sites? SQ2: How do these aerosol properties change during transpacific and intra-continental long range transport? SQ3: What are the impacts of aerosol properties on marine boundary layer cloud condensation nuclei number concentration? This dissertation uses an innovative approach to classify aerosol properties by region and season to address SQ1. This is useful because this method provides an additional dimension when investigating the physico-chemical properties of aerosols by linking a regional and seasonal dependence to both the aerosol direct and indirect effects. This method involves isolating the aerosol physico-chemical properties into four separate regions using AERONET retrieved Angstrom exponent (AEAOD) and single scattering co-albedo (o oabs) to denote aerosol size and absorptive properties. The aerosols events are then clustered by season. The method is first applied to four AERONET sites representing single mode aerosol dominant regions: weakly absorbing pollution (NASA Goddard), strongly absorbing pollution (Mexico City), mineral dust (Solar Village), and biomass burning smoke (Alta Floresta). The method is then applied to four Asian sites that represent complicated aerosol components. There are strong regional and seasonal influences of the four aerosol types over the

  9. Scatterer Number Density Considerations in Reference Phantom Based Attenuation Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Rubert, Nicholas; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-01-01

    Attenuation estimation and imaging has the potential to be a valuable tool for tissue characterization, particularly for indicating the extent of thermal ablation therapy in the liver. Often the performance of attenuation estimation algorithms is characterized with numerical simulations or tissue mimicking phantoms containing a high scatterer number density (SND). This ensures an ultrasound signal with a Rayleigh distributed envelope and an SNR approaching 1.91. However, biological tissue often fails to exhibit Rayleigh scattering statistics. For example, across 1,647 ROI's in 5 ex vivo bovine livers we find an envelope SNR of 1.10 ± 0.12 when imaged with the VFX 9L4 linear array transducer at a center frequency of 6.0 MHz on a Siemens S2000 scanner. In this article we examine attenuation estimation in numerical phantoms, TM phantoms with variable SND's, and ex vivo bovine liver prior to and following thermal coagulation. We find that reference phantom based attenuation estimation is robust to small deviations from Rayleigh statistics. However, in tissue with low SND, large deviations in envelope SNR from 1.91 lead to subsequently large increases in attenuation estimation variance. At the same time, low SND is not found to be a significant source of bias in the attenuation estimate. For example, we find the standard deviation of attenuation slope estimates increases from 0.07 dB/cm MHz to 0.25 dB/cm MHz as the envelope SNR decreases from 1.78 to 1.01 when estimating attenuation slope in TM phantoms with a large estimation kernel size (16 mm axially by 15 mm laterally). Meanwhile, the bias in the attenuation slope estimates is found to be negligible (< 0.01 dB/cm MHz). We also compare results obtained with reference phantom based attenuation estimates in ex vivo bovine liver and thermally coagulated bovine liver. PMID:24726800

  10. On the number density of "direct collapse" black hole seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habouzit, Mélanie; Volonteri, Marta; Latif, Muhammad; Dubois, Yohan; Peirani, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) reside in the center of most local galaxies, but they also power active galactic nuclei and quasars, detected up to z = 7. These quasars put constraints on early BH growth and the mass of BH seeds. The scenario of "direct collapse" is appealing as it leads to the formation of large mass BH seeds, 10^4-10^6 {M_{⊙}}, which eases explaining how quasars at z = 6 - 7 are powered by BHs with masses >109 M⊙. Direct collapse, however, appears to be rare, as the conditions required by the scenario are that gas is metal-free, the presence of a strong photo-dissociating Lyman-Werner flux, and large inflows of gas at the center of the halo, sustained for 10 - 100 Myr. We performed several cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that cover a large range of box sizes and resolutions, thus allowing us to understand the impact of several physical processes on the distribution of direct collapse BHs. We identify halos where direct collapse can happen, and derive the number density of BHs. We also investigate the discrepancies between hydrodynamical simulations, direct or post-processed, and semi-analytical studies. Under optimistic assumptions, we find that for direct collapse to account for BHs in normal galaxies, the critical Lyman-Werner flux required for direct collapse must be about two orders of magnitude lower than predicted by 3D simulations that include detailed chemical models. However, when supernova feedback is relatively weak, enough direct collapse BHs to explain z = 6 - 7 quasars can be obtained for Lyman-Werner fluxes about one order of magnitude lower than found in 3D simulations.

  11. Number size distribution measurements of biological aerosols under contrasting environments and seasons from southern tropical India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Cv, Biju; Krishna, Ravi; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. Though omnipresent, their concentration and composition exhibit large spatial and temporal variations depending up on their sources, land-use, and local meteorology. The Indian tropical region, which constitutes approximately 18% of the world's total population exhibits vast geographical extend and experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the sources, properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to have significant variations over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the location and seasons. Here we present the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) from two contrasting locations in Southern tropical India measured during contrasting seasons using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS). Measurements were carried out at a pristine high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) during two contrasting seasons, South-West Monsoon (June-August, 2014) and winter (Jan - Feb, 2015) and in Chennai, a coastal urban area, during July - November 2015. FBAP concentrations at both the locations showed large variability with higher concentrations occurring at Chennai. Apart from regional variations, the FBAP concentrations also exhibited variations over two different seasons under the same environmental condition. In Munnar the FBAP concentration increased by a factor of four from South-West Monsoon to winter season. The average size distribution of FBAP at both

  12. Variability of aerosol particle number concentrations observed over the western Pacific in the spring of 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegawa, N.; Moteki, N.; Oshima, N.; Koike, M.; Kita, K.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Kondo, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne measurements of aerosols were conducted over the western Pacific in the spring of 2009 during the Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia (A-FORCE) aircraft campaign. The A-FORCE flights intensively covered an important vertical-latitudinal range in the outflow region of East Asia (0-9 km altitude; 27°N-38°N). This paper presents the variability of aerosol particle number concentrations obtained by condensation particle counters and a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), with the focus on those in the free troposphere. The number concentration data include total condensation nuclei with particle diameters (dp) larger than 10 nm (total CN10), PM0.17-CN10 (dp ~10-130 nm), and SP2 black carbon (NBC; dp ~75-850 nm). Large increases in total CN10 that were not associated with NBC were observed in the free troposphere, suggesting influences from new particle formation (NPF). Statistical characteristics of total CN10, PM0.17-CN10, and NBC in the lower troposphere (LT; 0-3 km), middle troposphere (MT; 3-6 km), and upper troposphere (UT; 6-9 km) are investigated. The correlation between total CN10 and NBC, along with the ratio of PM0.17 to total CN10 and carbon monoxide mixing ratio (CO), is used to interpret the observed variability. The median concentrations of total CN10 and PM0.17-CN10 in the UT were higher than those in the MT by a factor of ~1.4 and ~1.6, respectively. We attribute the enhancements of CN10 in the UT to NPF. Possible mechanisms affecting NPF in the free troposphere are discussed.

  13. Five-years of atmospheric aerosol number size distribution measurements in Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, Nikolaos; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    The first long term measurements of atmospheric particle size distributions from the Eastern Mediterranean region are reported. Atmospheric aerosol number size distributions have been measured at the environmental research station of University of Crete at Finokalia, Crete, Greece (35° 20' N, 25° 40' E, 250m a.s.l) on a continuous base since 2008. A custom built (TROPOS type) scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) is used covering size ranges from 8 to 900 nm. The system is humidity controlled so that relative humidity is kept below 40% most of the time. Throughout the measuring period the average number concentration of the particles in the studied size range was found to be 2354 ± 1332 cm-3 (median of 2098 cm-3). Maximum concentrations are observed during summer while minimum during winter, reflecting the effectiveness of the removal processes in the region. Clear annual circles are found for the number concentrations of nucleation, Aitken and accumulation mode particles. Nucleation mode is presenting different pattern from the other two modes, with the highest concentrations during winter (and March) and the lowest during summer. New particle formation events are more frequently observed during March and October. The number size distributions present different seasonal patterns. During summer, unimodal distributions centering on the lower end of the accumulation mode size range are dominant in our observations. The prevailing meteorology characterized by the Etesian winds (Meltemi) and the lack of precipitation along the trajectory results to the arrival of well mixed air masses at Finokalia, carrying aged aerosol mainly from central and Eastern Europe. Regarding the other seasons, the shape of the distributions is more variable and strongly dependent on the air mass history: When the air masses are of marine origin or precipitation has affected them, the size distributions are mainly bimodal (peaking both in Aitken and in Accumulation mode). These

  14. Using high time resolution aerosol and number size distribution measurements to estimate atmospheric extinction.

    PubMed

    Malm, William C; McMeeking, Gavin R; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Levin, Ezra; Carrico, Christian M; Day, Derek E; Collett, Jeffrey L; Lee, Taehyoung; Sullivan, Amy P; Raja, Suresh

    2009-09-01

    Rocky Mountain National Park is experiencing reduced visibility and changes in ecosystem function due to increasing levels of oxidized and reduced nitrogen. The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur (RoMANS) study was initiated to better understand the origins of sulfur and nitrogen species as well as the complex chemistry occurring during transport from source to receptor. As part of the study, a monitoring program was initiated for two 1-month time periods--one during the spring and the other during late summer/fall. The monitoring program included intensive high time resolution concentration measurements of aerosol number size distribution, inorganic anions, and cations, and 24-hr time resolution of PM2.5 and PM10 mass, sulfate, nitrate, carbon, and soil-related elements concentrations. These data are combined to estimate high time resolution concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol mass and fine mass species estimates of ammoniated sulfate, nitrate, and organic and elemental carbon. Hour-by-hour extinction budgets are calculated by using these species concentration estimates and measurements of size distribution and assuming internal and external particle mixtures. Summer extinction was on average about 3 times higher than spring extinction. During spring months, sulfates, nitrates, carbon mass, and PM10 - PM2.5 mass contributed approximately equal amounts of extinction, whereas during the summer months, carbonaceous material extinction was 2-3 times higher than other species. PMID:19785272

  15. Evaluation of the tropospheric aerosol number concentrations simulated by two versions of the global model ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Kazil, J.; Feichter, J.

    2009-04-01

    Since its first version developed by Stier et al. (2005), the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM has gone through further development and updates. The changes in the model include (1) a new time integration scheme for the condensation of the sulfuric acid gas on existing particles, (2) a new aerosol nucleation scheme that takes into account the charged nucleation caused by cosmic rays, and (3) a parameterization scheme explicitly describing the conversion of aerosol particles to cloud nuclei. In this work, simulations performed with the old and new model versions are evaluated against some measurements reported in recent years. The focus is on the aerosol size distribution in the troposphere. Results show that modifications in the parameterizations have led to significant changes in the simulated aerosol concentrations. Vertical profiles of the total particle number concentration (diameter > 3nm) compiled by Clarke et al. (2002) suggest that, over the Pacific in the upper free troposphere, the tropics are associated with much higher concentrations than the mid-latitude regions. This feature is more reasonably reproduced by the new model version, mainly due to the improved results of the nucleation mode aerosols. In the lower levels (2-5 km above the Earth's surface), the number concentrations of the Aitken mode particles are overestimated compared to both the Pacific data given in Clarke et al. (2002) and the vertical profiles over Europe reported by Petzold et al. (2007). The physical and chemical processes that have led to these changes are identified by sensitivity tests. References: Clarke and Kapustin: A Pacific aerosol survey - part 1: a decade of data on production, transport, evolution and mixing in the troposphere, J. Atmos. Sci., 59, 363-382, 2002. Petzold et al.: Perturbation of the European free troposphere aerosol by North American forest fire plumes during the ICARTT-ITOP experiment in summer 2004, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 5105-5127, 2007

  16. Physiochemical properties of carbonaceous aerosol from agricultural residue burning: Density, volatility, and hygroscopicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunlin; Hu, Yunjie; Chen, Jianmin; Ma, Zhen; Ye, Xingnan; Yang, Xin; Wang, Lin; Wang, Xinming; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2016-09-01

    Size-resolved effective density, mixing state, and hygroscopicity of smoke particles from five kinds of agricultural residues burning were characterized using an aerosol chamber system, including a volatility/hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (V/H-TDMA) combined with an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM). To profile relationship between the thermodynamic properties and chemical compositions, smoke PM1.0 and PM2.5 were also measured for the water soluble inorganics, mineral elements, and carbonaceous materials like organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). Smoke particle has a density of 1.1-1.4 g cm-3, and hygroscopicity parameter (κ) derived from hygroscopic growth factor (GF) of the particles ranges from 0.20 to 0.35. Size- and fuel type-dependence of density and κ are obvious. The integrated effective densities (ρ) and hygroscopicity parameters (κ) both scale with alkali species, which could be parameterized as a function of organic and inorganic mass fraction (forg &finorg) in smoke PM1.0 and PM2.5: ρ-1 =finorg · ρinorg-1 +forg · ρorg-1 and κ =finorg ·κinorg +forg ·κorg . The extrapolated values of ρinorg and ρorg are 2.13 and 1.14 g cm-3 in smoke PM1.0, while the characteristic κ values of organic and inorganic components are about 0.087 and 0.734, which are similar to the bulk density and κ calculated from predefined chemical species and also consistent with those values observed in ambient air. Volatility of smoke particle was quantified as volume fraction remaining (VFR) and mass fraction remaining (MFR). The gradient temperature of V-TDMA was set to be consistent with the splitting temperature in the OC-EC measurement (OC1 and OC2 separated at 150 and 250 °C). Combing the thermogram data and chemical composition of smoke PM1.0, the densities of organic matter (OM1 and OM2 correspond to OC1 and OC2) are estimated as 0.61-0.90 and 0.86-1.13 g cm-3, and the ratios of OM1/OC1 and OM2/OC2 are 1.07 and 1.29 on average

  17. Measurement simulation of spatial coherence and density degree by turbulence of aerosol and CO II in atmospheric environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayama, Hiroshi; Li, Wei

    2006-09-01

    Atmopheric turbulence is one of the important correction factors to evaluate the earth's surface using a sinsor on a satellite. CO II and aerosol are selected as factors of turbulence. The effects of turbulence caused by CO II and aerosol on the light reflected from the earth's surface are estimated by measuring the degradation of spatial coherence of light in a chamber in which atmospheric turbulence is generated. Dry ice is used to generate carbon dioxide gas. degradation of spatial coherence is measured in relation to the increase of CO II. Turbulence caused by aerosol is measured by density of smoke cigarettes. The spatial coherence of light in the chamber degrades in relation to the increase of aerosol and as a result the turbulence increases. The relation between the turbulence and the degree of spatial coherence is explained in a formula.

  18. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  19. Comparison of Methods for Predicting the Compositional Dependence of the Density and Refractive Index of Organic-Aqueous Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chen; Miles, Rachael E H; Cotterell, Michael I; Marsh, Aleksandra; Rovelli, Grazia; Rickards, Andrew M J; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Reid, Jonathan P

    2016-08-25

    Representing the physicochemical properties of aerosol particles of complex composition is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting aerosol thermodynamic, kinetic, and optical properties and processes and for interpreting and comparing analysis methods. Here, we consider the representations of the density and refractive index of aqueous-organic aerosol with a particular focus on the dependence of these properties on relative humidity and water content, including an examination of the properties of solution aerosol droplets existing at supersaturated solute concentrations. Using bulk phase measurements of density and refractive index for typical organic aerosol components, we provide robust approaches for the estimation of these properties for aerosol at any intermediate composition between pure water and pure solute. Approximately 70 compounds are considered, including mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids, alcohols, diols, nitriles, sulfoxides, amides, ethers, sugars, amino acids, aminium sulfates, and polyols. We conclude that the molar refraction mixing rule should be used to predict the refractive index of the solution using a density treatment that assumes ideal mixing or, preferably, a polynomial dependence on the square root of the mass fraction of solute, depending on the solubility limit of the organic component. Although the uncertainties in the density and refractive index predictions depend on the range of subsaturated compositional data available for each compound, typical errors for estimating the solution density and refractive index are less than ±0.1% and ±0.05%, respectively. Owing to the direct connection between molar refraction and the molecular polarizability, along with the availability of group contribution models for predicting molecular polarizability for organic species, our rigorous testing of the molar refraction mixing rule provides a route to predicting refractive indices for aqueous solutions containing organic molecules

  20. An analysis of the evolving comoving number density of galaxies in hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrey, Paul; Wellons, Sarah; Machado, Francisco; Griffen, Brendan; Nelson, Dylan; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; McKinnon, Ryan; Pillepich, Annalisa; Ma, Chung-Pei; Vogelsberger, Mark; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the evolving comoving cumulative number density of galaxy populations found in the Illustris simulation. Cumulative number density is commonly used to link galaxy populations across different epochs by assuming that galaxies preserve their number density in time. Our analysis allows us to examine the extent to which this assumption holds in the presence of galaxy mergers or when rank ordering is broken owing to variable stellar growth rates. Our primary results are as follows: (1) the inferred average stellar mass evolution obtained via a constant comoving number density assumption is systematically biased compared to the merger tree results at the factor of ˜2(4) level when tracking galaxies from redshift z = 0 to 2(3); (2) the median number density evolution for galaxy populations tracked forward in time is shallower than for galaxy populations tracked backward; (3) a similar evolution in the median number density of tracked galaxy populations is found regardless of whether number density is assigned via stellar mass, stellar velocity dispersion, or halo mass; (4) explicit tracking reveals a large diversity in the stellar and dark matter assembly histories that cannot be captured by constant number density analyses; (5) the significant scatter in galaxy linking methods is only marginally reduced (˜20 per cent) by considering additional physical galaxy properties. We provide fits for the median evolution in number density for use with observational data and discuss the implications of our analysis for interpreting multi-epoch galaxy property observations.

  1. Simultaneous retrieval of effective refractive index and density from size distribution and light scattering data: weakly absorbing aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Pekour, M.; Berg, L. K.; Shilling, J.; Flynn, C.; Mei, F.; Jefferson, A.

    2014-05-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define "weakly absorbing" as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 μm. The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE ~ 3%) and reasonable (RMSE ~ 28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49 ± 0.02) and effective density (1.68 ± 0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10

  2. Simultaneous Retrieval of Effective Refractive Index and Density from Size Distribution and Light Scattering Data: Weakly-Absorbing Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Shilling, John E.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mei, Fan; Jefferson, Anne

    2014-10-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define “weakly absorbing” as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 um.The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE~3%) and reasonable (RMSE~28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49±0.02) and effective density (1.68±0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10micron particles. The evaluation results also reveal that the

  3. EFFECT OF AN ACTIVATED SLUDGE WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT ON AMBIENT AIR DENSITIES OF AEROSOLS CONTAINING BACTERIA AND VIRUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria and virus-containing aerosols were studied during late summer and fall in a U.S. midwestern suburb before and during the start up and operation of an unenclosed activated sludge wastewater treatment plant. The air in this suburban area contained low-level densities of in...

  4. Mapping neutral, ion, and electron number densities within laser-ablated plasma plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, I.; Doyle, Liam A.; Martin, G. W.; Riley, Dave; Lamb, M. J.; Graham, William G.; Morrow, Tom; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.

    1998-05-01

    Spatially and temporally varying neutral, ion and electron number densities have been mapped out within laser ablated plasma plumes expanding into vacuum. Ablation of a magnesium target was performed using a KrF laser, 30 ns pulse duration and 248 nm wavelength. During the initial stage of plasma expansion (t number densities, for laser power densities on target in the range 1.3 - 3.0 X 108 W/cm2. Later in the plasma expansion (t equals 1 microsecond(s) ) simultaneous absorption and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to determine 3D neutral and ion number densities, for a power density equal to 6.7 X 107 W/cm2. Two distinct regions within the plume were identified. One is a fast component (approximately 106 cm-1) consisting of ions and neutrals with maximum number densities observed to be approximately 30 and 4 X 1012 cm-3 respectively, and the second consists of slow moving neutral material at a number density of up to 1015 cm-3. Additionally a Langmuir probe has been used to obtain ion and electron number densities at very late times in the plasma expansion (1 microsecond(s) density on target equal to 6 X 108 W/cm2. Two regions within the plume with different velocities were observed. Within a fast component (approximately 3 X 106 cms-1) electron and ion number densities of the order 5 X 1012 cm-3 were observed and within the second slower component (approximately 106 cms-1) electron and ion number densities of the order 1 - 2 X 1013 cm-3 were determined.

  5. [Relationships among Cyrtotrachelus buqueti larval density and wormhole number and bamboo shoot damage degree].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yao-Jun; Wang, Shu-Fang; Gong, Jia-Wen; Liu, Chao; Mu, Chi; Qin, Hong

    2009-08-01

    In August of 2007 and 2008, a field investigation was made to study the relationships among Cyrtotrachelus buqueti larval density and wormhole number and bamboo shoot damage degree in Sichuan Province. The three pairs of variables, i. e., C. buqueti larval density and wormhole number, C. buqueti larval density and bamboo shoot damage degree, and C. buqueti wormhole number and bamboo shoot damage degree, fitted cubic equations well, with the correlation coefficients at P = 0.001. Based on these mathematical models, the forecast tables for C. buqueti larval density and bamboo shoot damage degree were established, and the thresholds of C. buqueti larval density and wormhole number were 0.13 and 0.40 individual per bamboo, respectively. PMID:19947221

  6. Aerosol and NOx emission factors and submicron particle number size distributions in two road tunnels with different traffic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, D.; Weingartner, E.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Ordóñez, C.; Kurtenbach, R.; Wiesen, P.; Rodler, J.; Sturm, P.; McCrae, I.; Ekström, M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2006-06-01

    Measurements of aerosol particle number size distributions (18-700 nm), mass concentrations (PM2.5 and PM10) and NOx were performed in the Plabutsch tunnel, Austria, and in the Kingsway tunnel, United Kingdom. These two tunnels show different characteristics regarding the roadway gradient, the composition of the vehicle fleet and the traffic frequency. The submicron particle size distributions contained a soot mode in the diameter range D=80-100 nm and a nucleation mode in the range of D=20-40 nm. In the Kingsway tunnel with a significantly lower particle number and volume concentration level than in the Plabutsch tunnel, a clear diurnal variation of nucleation and soot mode particles correlated to the traffic density was observed. In the Plabutsch tunnel, soot mode particles also revealed a diurnal variation, whereas no substantial variation was found for the nucleation mode particles. During the night a higher number concentration of nucleation mode particles were measured than soot mode particles and vice versa during the day. In this tunnel with very high soot emissions during daytime due to the heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) share of 18% and another 40% of diesel driven light-duty vehicles (LDV) semivolatile species condense on the pre-existing soot surface area rather than forming new particles by homogeneous nucleation. With the low concentration of soot mode particles in the Kingsway tunnel, also the nucleation mode particles exhibit a diurnal variation. From the measured parameters real-world traffic emission factors were estimated for the whole vehicle fleet as well as differentiated into the two categories LDV and HDV. In the particle size range D=18-700 nm, each vehicle of the mixed fleet emits (1.50±0.08)×1014 particles km-1 (Plabutsch) and (1.26±0.10)×1014 particles km-1 (Kingsway), while particle volume emission factors of 0.209±0.008 cm3 km-1 and 0.036±0.004 cm3 km-1, respectively, were obtained. PM1 emission factors of 104±4 mg km-1 (Plabutsch

  7. Aerosol and NOx emission factors and submicron particle number size distributions in two road tunnels with different traffic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, D.; Weingartner, E.; Prévát, A. S. H.; Ordóñez, C.; Kurtenbach, R.; Wiesen, P.; Rodler, J.; Sturm, P.; McCrae, I.; Sjödin, Å.; Baltensperger, U.

    2005-07-01

    Measurements of aerosol particle number size distributions (18-700 nm), mass concentrations (PM2.5 and PM10) and NOx were performed in the Plabutsch tunnel, Austria, and in the Kingsway tunnel, United Kingdom. These two tunnels show different characteristics regarding the roadway gradient, the composition of the vehicle fleet and the traffic frequency. The submicron particle size distributions contained a soot mode in the diameter range D=80-100 nm and a nucleation mode in the range of D=20-40 nm. In the Kingsway tunnel with a significantly lower particle number and volume concentration level than in the Plabutsch tunnel, a clear diurnal variation of nucleation and soot mode particles correlated to the traffic density was observed. In the Plabutsch tunnel, soot mode particles also revealed a diurnal variation, whereas no substantial variation was found for the nucleation mode particles. During the night a higher number concentration of nucleation mode particles were measured than soot mode particles and vice versa during the day. In this tunnel with very high soot emissions during daytime due to the heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) share of 18% and another 40% of diesel driven light-duty vehicles (LDV) semivolatile species condense on the pre-existing soot surface area rather than forming new particles by homogeneous nucleation. With the low concentration of soot mode particles in the Kingsway tunnel, also the nucleation mode particles exhibit a diurnal variation. From the measured parameters real-world traffic emission factors were estimated for the whole vehicle fleet as well as differentiated into the two categories LDV and HDV. In the particle size range D=18-700 nm, each vehicle of the mixed fleet emits (1.50±0.08)·1014 particles km-1 (Plabutsch) and (1.26±0.10)·1014 particles km-1 (Kingsway), while particle volume emission factors of 0.209±0.008 cm3 km-1 and 0.036±0.004 cm3 km-1, respectively, were obtained. PM1 emission factors of 104±4 mg km-1 (Plabutsch

  8. Influence of Population Density on Offspring Number and Size in Burying Beetles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauter, Claudia M.

    2010-01-01

    This laboratory exercise investigates the influence of population density on offspring number and size in burying beetles. Students test the theoretical predictions that brood size declines and offspring size increases when competition over resources becomes stronger with increasing population density. Students design the experiment, collect and…

  9. The real part of the refractive indices and effective densities for chemically segregated ambient aerosols in Guangzhou measured by a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guohua; Bi, Xinhui; Qiu, Ning; Han, Bingxue; Lin, Qinhao; Peng, Long; Chen, Duohong; Wang, Xinming; Peng, Ping'an; Sheng, Guoying; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge on the microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols is essential to better evaluate their radiative forcing. This paper presents an estimate of the real part of the refractive indices (n) and effective densities (ρeff) of chemically segregated atmospheric aerosols in Guangzhou, China. Vacuum aerodynamic diameter, chemical compositions, and light-scattering intensities of individual particles were simultaneously measured by a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) during the fall of 2012. On the basis of Mie theory, n at a wavelength of 532 nm and ρeff were estimated for 17 particle types in four categories: organics (OC), elemental carbon (EC), internally mixed EC and OC (ECOC), and Metal-rich. The results indicate the presence of spherical or nearly spherical shapes for the majority of particle types, whose partial scattering cross-section versus sizes were well fitted to Mie theoretical modeling results. While sharing n in a narrow range (1.47-1.53), majority of particle types exhibited a wide range of ρeff (0.87-1.51 g cm-3). The OC group is associated with the lowest ρeff (0.87-1.07 g cm-3), and the Metal-rich group with the highest ones (1.29-1.51 g cm-3). It is noteworthy that a specific EC type exhibits a complex scattering curve versus size due to the presence of both compact and irregularly shaped particles. Overall, the results on the detailed relationship between physical and chemical properties benefits future research on the impact of aerosols on visibility and climate.

  10. Relativistic cosmology number densities in void-Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarrem, A.; Andreani, P.; February, S.; Gruppioni, C.; Lopes, A. R.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2014-03-01

    Aims: The goal of this work is to compute the number density of far-IR selected galaxies in the comoving frame and along the past lightcone of observationally constrained Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi "giant void" models and to compare those results with their standard model counterparts. Methods: We derived integral number densities and differential number densities using different cosmological distance definitions in the Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi dust models. Then, we computed selection functions and consistency functions for the luminosity functions in the combined fields of the Herschel/PACS evolutionary probe (PEP) survey in both standard and void cosmologies, from which we derived the observed values of the above-mentioned densities. We used the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics to study both the evolution of the consistency functions and its connection to the evolution of the comoving density of sources. Finally, we fitted the power-law behaviour of the densities along the observer's past lightcone. Results: The analysis of the comoving number density shows that the increased flexibility of the Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi models is not enough to fit the observed redshift evolution of the number counts, if it is specialised to a recent best-fit giant void parametrisation. The results for the power-law fits of the densities along the observer's past lightcone show general agreement across both cosmological models studied here around a slope of -2.5 ± 0.1 for the integral number density on the luminosity-distance volumes. The differential number densities show much bigger slope discrepancies. Conclusions: We conclude that the differential number densities on the observer's past lightcone were still rendered dependent on the cosmological model by the flux limits of the PEP survey. In addition, we show that an intrinsic evolution of the sources must be assumed to fit the comoving number-density redshift evolution in the giant void parametrisation for the Lema

  11. Accumulation-rate history at Siple Dome, West Antarctica, using bubble number-density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, M.; Dennison, A.; Alley, R. B.; Fitzpatrick, J. J.; Fegyveresi, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Past allowable accumulation rate/temperature combinations at Siple Dome, West Antarctica, are estimated from the measured number-density of bubbles in ice core samples. Mass density increase and grain growth in polar firn both are controlled by temperature and accumulation rate, and their integrated effects are recorded in the number-density of bubbles as the firn changes to ice [1]. Accumulation-rate estimates from measured bubble number-density and additional constraints from numerical modeling of firn densification at Siple Dome are consistent with 1-D ice-flow model results that have little change in the thickness of the ice sheet in the central Ross Embayment of West Antarctica since the last glacial maximum [2]. Using methods developed to analyze late-Holocene bubble number-density samples from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Ice Core Project [3], Siple Dome bubble number-densities show an early-Holocene high in accumulation rate followed by an approximately 10% reduction in accumulation rate between 11.33 ka and 1.863 ka. [1] Spencer, M.K., R.B. Alley and J.J. Fitzpatrick. Developing a bubble number-density paleoclimatic indicator for glacier ice, J. Glaciol. 52(178), 358-364 (2006). [2] E.D. Waddington et al., Decoding the dipstick: thickness of Siple Dome, West Antarctica, at the last glacial maximum, Geology 33(4), 281-284 (2005). [3] J.M. Fegyveresi, et al., Late-Holocene climate evolution at the WAIS Divide site, West Antarctica: bubble number-density estimates, J. Glaciol., 57(204) , 629 - 638 (2011).

  12. Aerosol number size distributions in the lower troposphere over a background region and megalopolis (Novosibirsk) on result of airborne sounding in 2011-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belan, Boris D.; Kozlov, Artem V.; Simonenkov, Denis V.; Tolmachev, Gennadii N.; Tsaruk, Victoria V.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we present a comparison of the data on aerosol number size distribution measured with GRIMM 1.109 aerosol spectrometer in the lower troposphere over Novosibirsk and background area 150 km south-west of it during research flights of Optik TU-134 aircraft laboratory carried out along the route Novosibirsk - Ordynskoye - Novosibirsk in 2011-2013. Aerosol number size distributions averaged over 3 years as together so for warm and cold seasons separately are considered here. It is shown that the accumulation of anthropogenic aerosol within the BL over the city is typical for the cold period, which is most likely caused by inversions those are rapidly destroyed by vertical mixing during warm season and anthropogenic aerosols from the city are transported into the free troposphere.

  13. Production Mechanisms, Number Concentration, Size Distribution. Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Petters, Markus; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bates. Tim; O'Dowd, Colin; Reid, Jeff; Lewis, Ernie R.; Gantt, Brett; Anguelova, Magdalena D.; Bhave, Prakash V.; Bird, James; Callaghan, Adrian H.; Ceburnis, Darius; Chang, Rachel; Clark, Antony; deLeeuw, Gerrit; Deane, Grant; DeMott, Paul J.; Elliot, Scott; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Fairall, Chris W.; Hawkins, Lelia; Hu, Yongxiang; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Over forty scientists from six countries convened in Raleigh, NC on June 4-6 2012 to review the status and prospects of sea spray aerosol research. Participants were researchers from the oceanography and atmospheric science communities, including academia, private industry, and government agencies. The recommendations from the working groups are summarized in a science prioritization matrix that is meant to prioritize the research agenda and identify areas of investigation by the magnitude of their impact on proposed science questions. Str

  14. Simultaneous retrieval of effective refractive index and density from size distribution and light-scattering data: weakly absorbing aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Pekour, M.; Berg, L. K.; Shilling, J.; Flynn, C.; Mei, F.; Jefferson, A.

    2014-10-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define "weakly absorbing" as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 μm. The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from mobility and aerodynamic particle size spectrometers commonly referred to as a scanning mobility particle sizer and an aerodynamic particle sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE ~ 3%) and reasonable (RMSE ~ 28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49 ± 0.02) and effective density (1.68 ± 0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the

  15. Developing a bubble number-density paleoclimatic indicator for glacier ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, M.K.; Alley, R.B.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Past accumulation rate can be estimated from the measured number-density of bubbles in an ice core and the reconstructed paleotemperature, using a new technique. Density increase and grain growth in polar firn are both controlled by temperature and accumulation rate, and the integrated effects are recorded in the number-density of bubbles as the firn changes to ice. An empirical model of these processes, optimized to fit published data on recently formed bubbles, reconstructs accumulation rates using recent temperatures with an uncertainty of 41% (P < 0.05). For modern sites considered here, no statistically significant trend exists between mean annual temperature and the ratio of bubble number-density to grain number-density at the time of pore close-off; optimum modeled accumulation-rate estimates require an eventual ???2.02 ?? 0.08 (P < 0.05) bubbles per close-off grain. Bubble number-density in the GRIP (Greenland) ice core is qualitatively consistent with independent estimates for a combined temperature decrease and accumulation-rate increase there during the last 5 kyr.

  16. Holocene climate at Siple Dome, West Antarctica, using bubble number-density.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, M. K.; Dennison, A.; Alley, R. B.; Fitzpatrick, J. J.; Fegyveresi, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Past allowable accumulation rate/temperature combinations from Holocene ice core samples at Siple Dome, West Antarctica, are estimated from the measured number-density of bubbles. Mass density increase and grain growth in polar firn both are controlled by temperature and accumulation rate, and their integrated effects are recorded in the number-density of bubbles as the firn changes to ice1, 2. Siple Dome bubble number-densities show an early-Holocene high in accumulation rate followed by an approximately 10% reduction in accumulation rate between 11.33 ka and 1.863 ka. 1. Spencer, M.K., R.B. Alley and J.J. Fitzpatrick. Developing a bubble number-density paleoclimatic indicator for glacier ice, J. Glaciol. 52(178), 358-364 (2006). 2. J.M. Fegyveresi, et al., Late-Holocene climate evolution at the WAIS Divide site, West Antarctica: bubble number-density estimates, J. Glaciol., 57(204) , 629 - 638 (2011).

  17. Utilization of O4 Slant Column Density to Derive Aerosol Layer Height from a Space-Borne UV-Visible Hyperspectral Sensor: Sensitivity and Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Torres, Omar; Lee, Kwang-Mog; Lee, Sang Deok

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivities of oxygen-dimer (O4) slant column densities (SCDs) to changes in aerosol layer height are investigated using the simulated radiances by a radiative transfer model, the linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer (VLIDORT), and the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. The sensitivities of the O4 index (O4I), which is defined as dividing O4 SCD by 10(sup 40) molecules (sup 2) per centimeters(sup -5), to aerosol types and optical properties are also evaluated and compared. Among the O4 absorption bands at 340, 360, 380, and 477 nanometers, the O4 absorption band at 477 nanometers is found to be the most suitable to retrieve the aerosol effective height. However, the O4I at 477 nanometers is significantly influenced not only by the aerosol layer effective height but also by aerosol vertical profiles, optical properties including single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol optical depth (AOD), particle size, and surface albedo. Overall, the error of the retrieved aerosol effective height is estimated to be 1276, 846, and 739 meters for dust, non-absorbing, and absorbing aerosol, respectively, assuming knowledge on the aerosol vertical distribution shape. Using radiance data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a new algorithm is developed to derive the aerosol effective height over East Asia after the determination of the aerosol type and AOD from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). About 80 percent of retrieved aerosol effective heights are within the error range of 1 kilometer compared to those obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) measurements on thick aerosol layer cases.

  18. Utilization of O4 slant column density to derive aerosol layer height from a space-borne UV-visible hyperspectral sensor: sensitivity and case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Torres, Omar; Lee, Kwang-Mog; Lee, Sang Deok

    2016-02-01

    The sensitivities of oxygen-dimer (O4) slant column densities (SCDs) to changes in aerosol layer height are investigated using the simulated radiances by a radiative transfer model, the linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer (VLIDORT), and the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. The sensitivities of the O4 index (O4I), which is defined as dividing O4 SCD by 1040 molecules2 cm-5, to aerosol types and optical properties are also evaluated and compared. Among the O4 absorption bands at 340, 360, 380, and 477 nm, the O4 absorption band at 477 nm is found to be the most suitable to retrieve the aerosol effective height. However, the O4I at 477 nm is significantly influenced not only by the aerosol layer effective height but also by aerosol vertical profiles, optical properties including single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol optical depth (AOD), particle size, and surface albedo. Overall, the error of the retrieved aerosol effective height is estimated to be 1276, 846, and 739 m for dust, non-absorbing, and absorbing aerosol, respectively, assuming knowledge on the aerosol vertical distribution shape. Using radiance data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a new algorithm is developed to derive the aerosol effective height over East Asia after the determination of the aerosol type and AOD from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). About 80 % of retrieved aerosol effective heights are within the error range of 1 km compared to those obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) measurements on thick aerosol layer cases.

  19. Impact of new particle formation on the concentrations of aerosol number and cloud condensation nuclei around Beijing

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, H.; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Wiedensohler, A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-10-13

    New particle formation (NPF) is one of the most important processes in controlling the concentrations of aerosol number (condensation nuclei, CN) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere. In this study, we introduced a new aerosol model representation with 20 size bins between 1 nm and 10 {mu}m and activation-type and kinetic nucleation parameterizations into the WRF-chem model (called NPF-explicit WRF-chem). Model calculations were conducted in the Beijing region in China for the periods during the CARE-Beijing 2006 campaign conducted in August and September 2006. Model calculations successfully reproduced the timing of NPF and no-NPF days in the measurements (21 of 26 days). Model calculations also reproduced the subsequent rapid growth of new particles with a time scale of half a day. These results suggest that once a reasonable nucleation rate at a diameter of 1 nm is given, explicit calculations of condensation and coagulation processes can reproduce the clear contrast between NPF and no-NPF days as well as further growth up to several tens nanometers. With this reasonable representation of the NPF process, we show that NPF contributed 20-30% of CN concentrations (> 10 nm in diameter) in and around Beijing on average. We also show that NPF increases CCN concentrations at higher supersaturations (S > 0.2%), while it decreases them at lower supersaturations (S < 0.1%). This is likely because NPF suppresses the increases in both the size and hygroscopicity of pre-existing particles through the competition of condensable gases between new particles and pre-existing particles. Sensitivity calculations show that a reduction of primary aerosol emissions, such as black carbon (BC), would not necessarily decrease CCN concentrations because of an increase in NPF. Sensitivity calculations also suggest that the reduction ratio of primary aerosol and SO2 emissions will be key in enhancing or damping the BC mitigation effect.

  20. Mach number study of supersonic turbulence: the properties of the density field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstandin, L.; Schmidt, W.; Girichidis, P.; Peters, T.; Shetty, R.; Klessen, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the scaling properties of turbulent flows using a suite of three-dimensional numerical simulations. We model driven, compressible, isothermal, turbulence with Mach numbers ranging from the subsonic ({M} ≈ 0.5) to the highly supersonic regime ({M}≈ 16). The forcing scheme consists of both solenoidal (transverse) and compressive (longitudinal) modes in equal parts. We confirm the relation σ s^2 = ln {(1+b^2{M}^2)} between the Mach number and the standard deviation of the logarithmic density with b = 0.33. We find increasing deviations with higher Mach number from the predicted lognormal shape in the high-density wing of the density probability density function. The density spectra follow {D}(k, {M}) ∝ k^{ζ ({M})} with scaling exponents depending on the Mach number. We find ζ ({M}) = α {M}^{β } with coefficients α = -2.1 and β = -0.33. The dependence of the scaling exponent on the Mach number implies a fractal dimension D=2+1.05 {M}^{-0.33}.

  1. Mach number study of supersonic turbulence: The properties of the density field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstandin, L.; Schmidt, W.; Girichidis, P.; Peters, T.; Shetty, R.; Klessen, R. S.

    2016-06-01

    We analyse the scaling properties of turbulent flows using a suite of three-dimensional numerical simulations. We model driven, compressible, isothermal, turbulence with Mach numbers ranging from the subsonic (mathcal {M} ≈ 0.5) to the highly supersonic regime (mathcal {M}≈ 16). The forcing scheme consists of both solenoidal (transverse) and compressive (longitudinal) modes in equal parts. We confirm the relation σ s^2 = ln {(1+b^2mathcal {M}^2)} between the Mach number and the standard deviation of the logarithmic density with b = 0.33. We find increasing deviations with higher Mach number from the predicted log-normal shape in the high density wing of the density probability density function. The density spectra follow mathcal {D}(k, mathcal {M}) ∝ k^{ζ (mathcal {M})} with scaling exponents depending on the Mach number. We find ζ (mathcal {M}) = α mathcal {M}^{β } with a coefficient α = -2.1 and β = -0.33. The dependence of the scaling exponent on the Mach number implies a fractal dimension D=2+1.05 mathcal {M}^{-0.33}.

  2. Decay of the electron number density in the nitrogen afterglow using a hairpin resonator probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefert, Nicholas S.; Ganguly, Biswa N.; Sands, Brian L.; Hebner, Greg A.

    2006-08-01

    A hairpin resonator was used to measure the electron number density in the afterglow of a nitrogen glow discharge (p=0.25-0.75Torr). Electron number densities were measured using a time-dependent approach similar to the approach used by Spencer et al. [J. Phys. D 20, 923 (1987)]. The decay time of the electron number density was used to determine the electron temperature in the afterglow, assuming a loss of electrons via ambipolar diffusion to the walls. The electron temperature in the near afterglow remained between 0.4 and 0.6eV, depending on pressure. This confirms the work by Guerra et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma. Sci. 31, 542 (2003)], who demonstrated experimentally and numerically that the electron temperature stays significantly above room temperature via superelastic collisions with highly vibrationally excited ground state molecules and metastables, such as AΣu+3.

  3. Evaluation and modelling of the size fractionated aerosol particle number concentration measurements nearby a major road in Helsinki - Part I: Modelling results within the LIPIKA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjola, M. A.; Pirjola, L.; Karppinen, A.; Härkönen, J.; Korhonen, H.; Hussein, T.; Ketzel, M.; Kukkonen, J.

    2007-08-01

    A field measurement campaign was conducted near a major road "Itäväylä" in an urban area in Helsinki in 17-20 February 2003. Aerosol measurements were conducted using a mobile laboratory "Sniffer" at various distances from the road, and at an urban background location. Measurements included particle size distribution in the size range of 7 nm-10 μm (aerodynamic diameter) by the Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) and in the size range of 3-50 nm (mobility diameter) by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), total number concentration of particles larger than 3 nm detected by an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC), temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, driving route of the mobile laboratory, and traffic density on the studied road. In this study, we have compared measured concentration data with the predictions of the road network dispersion model CAR-FMI used in combination with an aerosol process model MONO32. For model comparison purposes, one of the cases was additionally computed using the aerosol process model UHMA, combined with the CAR-FMI model. The vehicular exhaust emissions, and atmospheric dispersion and transformation of fine and ultrafine particles was evaluated within the distance scale of 200 m (corresponding to a time scale of a couple of minutes). We computed the temporal evolution of the number concentrations, size distributions and chemical compositions of various particle size classes. The atmospheric dilution rate of particles is obtained from the roadside dispersion model CAR-FMI. Considering the evolution of total number concentration, dilution was shown to be the most important process. The influence of coagulation and condensation on the number concentrations of particle size modes was found to be negligible on this distance scale. Condensation was found to affect the evolution of particle diameter in the two smallest particle modes. The assumed value of the concentration of condensable organic

  4. A Statistical Analysis for Estimating Fish Number Density with the Use of a Multibeam Echosounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth-Miller, Madeline L.

    Fish number density can be estimated from the normalized second moment of acoustic backscatter intensity [Denbigh et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 457-469 (1991)]. This method assumes that the distribution of fish scattering amplitudes is known and that the fish are randomly distributed following a Poisson volume distribution within regions of constant density. It is most useful at low fish densities, relative to the resolution of the acoustic device being used, since the estimators quickly become noisy as the number of fish per resolution cell increases. New models that include noise contributions are considered. The methods were applied to an acoustic assessment of juvenile Atlantic Bluefin Tuna, Thunnus thynnus. The data were collected using a 400 kHz multibeam echo sounder during the summer months of 2009 in Cape Cod, MA. Due to the high resolution of the multibeam system used, the large size (approx. 1.5 m) of the tuna, and the spacing of the fish in the school, we expect there to be low fish densities relative to the resolution of the multibeam system. Results of the fish number density based on the normalized second moment of acoustic intensity are compared to fish packing density estimated using aerial imagery that was collected simultaneously.

  5. THE STELLAR NUMBER DENSITY DISTRIBUTION IN THE LOCAL SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD IS NORTH-SOUTH ASYMMETRIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yanny, Brian; Gardner, Susan

    2013-11-10

    We study the number density distribution of a sample of K and M dwarf stars, matched north and south of the Galactic plane within a distance of 2 kpc from the Sun, using observations from the Ninth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We determine distances using the photometric parallax method, and in this context systematic effects exist which could potentially impact the determination of the number density profile with height from the Galactic plane—and ultimately affect a number density north-south asymmetry. They include: (1) the calibration of the various photometric parallax relations, (2) the ability to separate dwarfs from giants in our sample, (3) the role of stellar population differences such as age and metallicity, (4) the ability to determine the offset of the Sun from the Galactic plane, and (5) the correction for reddening from dust in the Galactic plane, though our stars are at high Galactic latitudes. We find the various analyzed systematic effects to have a negligible impact on our observed asymmetry, and using a new and larger sample of stars we confirm and refine the earlier discovery of Widrow et al. of a significant Galactic north-south asymmetry in the stellar number density distribution.

  6. The Stellar Number Density Distribution in the Local Solar Neighborhood is North-South Asymmetric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanny, Brian; Gardner, Susan

    2013-11-01

    We study the number density distribution of a sample of K and M dwarf stars, matched north and south of the Galactic plane within a distance of 2 kpc from the Sun, using observations from the Ninth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We determine distances using the photometric parallax method, and in this context systematic effects exist which could potentially impact the determination of the number density profile with height from the Galactic plane—and ultimately affect a number density north-south asymmetry. They include: (1) the calibration of the various photometric parallax relations, (2) the ability to separate dwarfs from giants in our sample, (3) the role of stellar population differences such as age and metallicity, (4) the ability to determine the offset of the Sun from the Galactic plane, and (5) the correction for reddening from dust in the Galactic plane, though our stars are at high Galactic latitudes. We find the various analyzed systematic effects to have a negligible impact on our observed asymmetry, and using a new and larger sample of stars we confirm and refine the earlier discovery of Widrow et al. of a significant Galactic north-south asymmetry in the stellar number density distribution.

  7. A NEW DENSITY VARIANCE-MACH NUMBER RELATION FOR SUBSONIC AND SUPERSONIC ISOTHERMAL TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Konstandin, L.; Girichidis, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R. S.

    2012-12-20

    The probability density function of the gas density in subsonic and supersonic, isothermal, driven turbulence is analyzed using a systematic set of hydrodynamical grid simulations with resolutions of up to 1024{sup 3} cells. We perform a series of numerical experiments with root-mean-square (rms) Mach number M ranging from the nearly incompressible, subsonic (M=0.1) to the highly compressible, supersonic (M=15) regime. We study the influence of two extreme cases for the driving mechanism by applying a purely solenoidal (divergence-free) and a purely compressive (curl-free) forcing field to drive the turbulence. We find that our measurements fit the linear relation between the rms Mach number and the standard deviation (std. dev.) of the density distribution in a wide range of Mach numbers, where the proportionality constant depends on the type of forcing. In addition, we propose a new linear relation between the std. dev. of the density distribution {sigma}{sub {rho}} and that of the velocity in compressible modes, i.e., the compressible component of the rms Mach number, M{sub comp}. In this relation the influence of the forcing is significantly reduced, suggesting a linear relation between {sigma}{sub {rho}} and M{sub comp}, independent of the forcing, and ranging from the subsonic to the supersonic regime.

  8. Fine mapping of copy number variations on two cattle genome assemblies using high density SNP array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Btau_4.0 and UMD3.1 are two distinct cattle reference genome assemblies. In our previous study using the low density BovineSNP50 array, we reported a copy number variation (CNV) analysis on Btau_4.0 with 521 animals of 21 cattle breeds, yielding 682 CNV regions with a total length of 139.8 megabases...

  9. Estimation of size and number density of microbubbles based on analysis of frequency-dependent attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Tamura, Kazuki; Yamaguchi, Tadashi

    2016-07-01

    A method of estimating the size and number density of microbubbles in suspension is proposed, which matches the theoretically calculated frequency dependent attenuation coefficient with the experimental data. Assuming that the size distribution of bubbles is given by a log-normal function, three parameters (expected value and standard deviation of radius and the number density of bubbles) of Sonazoid® in the steady flow were estimated. Bubbles are exposed to ultrasound with a center frequency of 5 MHz and mechanical indices of 0.4, 0.5, 0.7, and 1.1. The expected value and standard deviation for the size distribution were estimated to be 70–85 and 45–60% of the reference values in the case of a lower mechanical index, respectively. The number density was estimated to be 20–30 times smaller than the reference values. This fundamental examination indicates that the number density of bubbles can be qualitatively evaluated by the proposed method.

  10. Microwave resonance lamp absorption technique for measuring temperature and OH number density in combustion environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempert, Walter R.

    1988-01-01

    A simple technique for simultaneous determination of temperature and OH number density is described, along with characteristic results obtained from measurements using a premixed, hydrogen air flat flame burner. The instrumentation is based upon absorption of resonant radiation from a flowing microwave discharge lamp, and is rugged, relatively inexpensive, and very simple to operate.

  11. On the Number Density of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Clusters of Galaxies.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Monteagudo; Atrio-Barandela; Mücket

    2000-01-10

    If the mean properties of clusters of galaxies are well described by the entropy-driven model, the distortion induced by the cluster population on the blackbody spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation is proportional to the total amount of intracluster gas, while temperature anisotropies are dominated by the contribution of 1014 M middle dot in circle clusters. This result depends marginally on cluster parameters, and it can be used to estimate the number density of clusters with enough hot gas to produce a detectable Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Comparing different cosmological models, the relation depends mainly on the density parameter Omegam. If the number density of clusters could be estimated by a different method, then this dependence could be used to constrain Omegam. PMID:10600620

  12. Mach number study of supersonic turbulence: the properties of the density field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstandin, L.; Schmidt, W.; Girichidis, P.; Peters, T.; Shetty, R.; Klessen, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    We model driven, compressible, isothermal, turbulence with Mach numbers ranging from the subsonic ($\\mathcal{M} \\approx 0.65$) to the highly supersonic regime ($\\mathcal{M}\\approx 16 $). The forcing scheme consists both solenoidal (transverse) and compressive (longitudinal) modes in equal parts. We find a relation $\\sigma_{s}^2 = \\mathrm{b}\\log{(1+\\mathrm{b}^2\\mathcal{M}^2)}$ between the Mach number and the standard deviation of the logarithmic density with $\\mathrm{b} = 0.457 \\pm 0.007$. The density spectra follow $\\mathcal{D}(k,\\,\\mathcal{M}) \\propto k^{\\zeta(\\mathcal{M})}$ with scaling exponents depending on the Mach number. We find $\\zeta(\\mathcal{M}) = \\alpha \\mathcal{M}^{\\beta}$ with a coefficient $\\alpha$ that varies slightly with resolution, whereas $\\beta$ changes systematically. We extrapolate to the limit of infinite resolution and find $\\alpha = -1.91 \\pm 0.01,\\, \\beta =-0.30\\pm 0.03$. The dependence of the scaling exponent on the Mach number implies a fractal dimension $D=2+0.96 \\mathcal{M}^{-0.30}$. We determine how the scaling parameters depend on the wavenumber and find that the density spectra are slightly curved. This curvature gets more pronounced with increasing Mach number. We propose a physically motivated fitting formula $\\mathcal{D}(k) = \\mathcal{D}_0 k^{\\zeta k^{\\eta}}$ by using simple scaling arguments. The fit reproduces the spectral behaviour down to scales $k\\approx 80$. The density spectrum follows a single power-law $\\eta = -0.005 \\pm 0.01$ in the low Mach number regime and the strongest curvature $\\eta = -0.04 \\pm 0.02$ for the highest Mach number. These values of $\\eta$ represent a lower limit, as the curvature increases with resolution.

  13. Analysis of number size distributions of tropical free tropospheric aerosol particles observed at Pico Espejo (4765 m a.s.l.), Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeissner, T.; Krejci, R.; Ström, J.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.; Hochschild, G.; Gross, J.; Hoffmann, P.; Calderon, S.

    2011-04-01

    The first long-term measurements of aerosol number and size distributions in South-American tropical free troposphere (FT) were performed from March 2007 until March 2009. The measurements took place at the high altitude Atmospheric Research Station Alexander von Humboldt. The station is located on top of the Sierra Nevada mountain ridge at 4765 m a.s.l. nearby the city of Mérida, Venezuela. Aerosol size distribution and number concentration data was obtained with a custom-built Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS) system and a Condensational Particle Counter (CPC). The analysis of the annual and diurnal variability of the tropical FT aerosol focused mainly on possible links to the atmospheric general circulation in the tropics. Considerable annual and diurnal cycles of the particle number concentration were observed. Highest total particle number concentrations were measured during the dry season (January-March, 519 ± 613 cm-3), lowest during the wet season (July-September, 318 ± 194 cm-3). The more humid FT (relative humidity (RH) range 50-95 %) contained generally higher aerosol particle number concentrations (573 ± 768 cm-3 during dry season, 320 ± 195 cm-3 during wet season) than the dry FT (RH < 50 %, 454 ± 332 cm-3 during dry season, 275 ± 172 cm-3 during wet season), indicating the importance of convection for aerosol distributions in the tropical FT. The diurnal cycle in the variability of the particle number concentration was mainly driven by local orography.

  14. Area vs. density: influence of visual variables and cardinality knowledge in early number comparison.

    PubMed

    Abreu-Mendoza, Roberto A; Soto-Alba, Elia E; Arias-Trejo, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Current research in the number development field has focused in individual differences regarding the acuity of children's approximate number system (ANS). The most common task to evaluate children's acuity is through non-symbolic numerical comparison. Efforts have been made to prevent children from using perceptual cues by controlling the visual properties of the stimuli (e.g., density, contour length, and area); nevertheless, researchers have used these visual controls interchangeably. Studies have also tried to understand the relation between children's cardinality knowledge and their performance in a number comparison task; divergent results may in fact be rooted in the use of different visual controls. The main goal of the present study is to explore how the usage of different visual controls (density, total filled area, and correlated and anti-correlated area) affects children's performance in a number comparison task, and its relationship to children's cardinality knowledge. For that purpose, 77 preschoolers participated in three tasks: (1) counting list elicitation to test whether children could recite the counting list up to ten, (2) give a number to evaluate children's cardinality knowledge, and (3) number comparison to evaluate their ability to compare two quantities. During this last task, children were asked to point at the set with more geometric figures when two sets were displayed on a screen. Children were exposed only to one of the three visual controls. Results showed that overall, children performed above chance in the number comparison task; nonetheless, density was the easiest control, while correlated and anti-correlated area was the most difficult in most cases. Only total filled area was sensitive to discriminate cardinal principal knowers from non-cardinal principal knowers. How this finding helps to explain conflicting evidence from previous research, and how the present outcome relates to children's number word knowledge is discussed

  15. Area vs. density: influence of visual variables and cardinality knowledge in early number comparison

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Mendoza, Roberto A.; Soto-Alba, Elia E.; Arias-Trejo, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Current research in the number development field has focused in individual differences regarding the acuity of children's approximate number system (ANS). The most common task to evaluate children's acuity is through non-symbolic numerical comparison. Efforts have been made to prevent children from using perceptual cues by controlling the visual properties of the stimuli (e.g., density, contour length, and area); nevertheless, researchers have used these visual controls interchangeably. Studies have also tried to understand the relation between children's cardinality knowledge and their performance in a number comparison task; divergent results may in fact be rooted in the use of different visual controls. The main goal of the present study is to explore how the usage of different visual controls (density, total filled area, and correlated and anti-correlated area) affects children's performance in a number comparison task, and its relationship to children's cardinality knowledge. For that purpose, 77 preschoolers participated in three tasks: (1) counting list elicitation to test whether children could recite the counting list up to ten, (2) give a number to evaluate children's cardinality knowledge, and (3) number comparison to evaluate their ability to compare two quantities. During this last task, children were asked to point at the set with more geometric figures when two sets were displayed on a screen. Children were exposed only to one of the three visual controls. Results showed that overall, children performed above chance in the number comparison task; nonetheless, density was the easiest control, while correlated and anti-correlated area was the most difficult in most cases. Only total filled area was sensitive to discriminate cardinal principal knowers from non-cardinal principal knowers. How this finding helps to explain conflicting evidence from previous research, and how the present outcome relates to children's number word knowledge is discussed

  16. Number and density of equine preantral follicles in different ovarian histological section thicknesses.

    PubMed

    Alves, K A; Alves, B G; Rocha, C D; Visonná, M; Mohallem, R F F; Gastal, M O; Jacomini, J O; Beletti, M E; Figueiredo, J R; Gambarini, M L; Gastal, E L

    2015-04-01

    Regardless of species, advances in preantral follicle culture and cryopreservation and transplant of ovarian tissue techniques are dependent on the number and density of preantral follicles in the ovary. This study tested the effect of different histological section thicknesses on number, classification, and density of equine preantral follicles. An ovarian fragment was obtained from 5- to 10-year-old mares (n = 14) after slaughter, and each fragment was submitted to three histological section thickness treatments: 3, 5, and 7 μm. The area (cm(2)) of each ovarian fragment was measured, and the sections were evaluated by light microscopy. The percentage of morphologically normal follicles (89%) was similar (P > 0.05) among primordial, transitional, and primary follicles and also among histological section thicknesses. A greater (P < 0.05) number of preantral follicles per histological section were seen in the 7-μm (8.0 ± 2.2) than that in the 3-μm (3.4 ± 0.7) treatment. Furthermore, a linear regression analysis reported that the number of preantral follicles increased (P < 0.05) when a thicker section treatment was used. However, no association (P > 0.05) between follicular density and treatment was observed. The mean number of preantral follicles per fragment (45.3 ± 18.8) and the follicular density (3.0 ± 0.5 follicles per cm(2)) were different (P < 0.05) among mares. In conclusion, this study on equine preantral follicles reported that (1) a 7-μm histological section thickness might be recommended because it allowed identification of a greater number of preantral follicles per sample, (2) a large individual variation in follicle population and density was detected regardless of histological section thickness, and (3) mares have a low number and density of preantral follicles when compared with those reported for other species. PMID:25628263

  17. Retrieval of metal atom and ion number densities in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langowski, Martin; Von Savigny, Christian; Burrows, John

    2016-07-01

    When meteoroids enter the Earth's atmosphere with velocities of several 10 km/s, they heat up due to frictional heating and meteoric material is ablated in the upper atmosphere at around 100 km. A certain part of this ablated material are metal atoms and ions, which form layers of about 10 km width at altitudes between 80 to 110 km. The metal atoms and ions are strong emitters of dayglow coming from resonance fluorescence. From satellite observations of these emission signature, densities of the metal atom and ion layers can be retrieved. From the densities of the metal layers in combination with model simulations the input rate of meteoric material can be estimated, which still shows a large uncertainty range between 1 to 300 tons per day. We will present results of the number density retrievals from the SCIAMACHY limb mesosphere and lower thermosphere measurements from 2008 to 2012 for Mg, Mg^{+} and Na.

  18. Mobile measurements of aerosol number and volume size distributions in an Alpine valley: Influence of traffic versus wood burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, S.; Mohr, C.; Richter, R.; Keller, J.; Mohr, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    The spatial variability of highly time resolved size distributions was investigated in a narrow valley which provides the opportunity to study the impact of different sources on ambient particle concentrations during summer and winter time. The measurements were performed with a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) from TSI, Inc. on a mobile laboratory in Southern Switzerland. The results indicate enhanced number concentrations (between 150 000 and 500 000 cm -3) along the busy highway A2 which is the main transit route through the Swiss Alps connecting the northern and southern part of Switzerland. Especially the nanoparticles with diameters lower than 30 nm showed strongly increased number concentrations on the highway both in summer and winter. In winter time, high aerosol volume concentrations (PM 0.3) were found in villages where wood burning is often used for heating purposes. Both traffic and wood burning were found to be important sources for particulate mass which accumulates during temperature inversions in winter time. Traffic was the dominant and wood burning a minor source for the nanoparticle number concentration. This is important regarding health impacts and its attribution to different sources because wood burning might contribute most to particulate mass whereas at the same time and place traffic contributes most to particulate number. In addition, during summer time volatility measurements were performed with the FMPS showing that the nucleation mode prevalently seen on the highway was removed by more than 95% by thermal treatment.

  19. Cloud Liquid Water, Mean Droplet Radius and Number Density Measurements Using a Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid micro-spheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested.

  20. Effects of turbulence and number density on the drag coefficient of droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudoff, R. C.; Kamemoto, D. Y.; Bachalo, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    Droplet drag coefficients for polydispersed drops are determined via the behavior of drops decelerating on the stagnation streamline of a cylinder with an afterbody mounted in a wind tunnel test section. A variety of velocity, turbulence levels, and droplet number densities were studied. A force balance equation technique was used to determine drag coefficient. For the levels of number density, up to 700/cc, and turbulence, up to about 7 percent, no definite effects were seen. However, the smallest drops in the high turbulence case showed some evidence of drop-turbulence and/or drop-drop interactions. The drag results that were developed for this set of measurements agreed well with other empirical relations previously determined.

  1. Cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius, and number density measurements using a Raman lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-12-27

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius, and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid microspheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  2. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bioactive glasses for photon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    This work was carried out to study the nature of mass attenuation coefficient of bioactive glasses for gamma rays. Bioactive glasses are a group of synthetic silica-based bioactive materials with unique bone bonding properties. In the present study, we have calculated the effective atomic number, electron density for photon interaction of some selected bioactive glasses viz., SiO2-Na2O, SiO2-Na2O-CaO and SiO2-Na2O-P2O5 in the energy range 1 keV to 100 MeV. We have also computed the single valued effective atomic number by using XMuDat program. It is observed that variation in effective atomic number (ZPI, eff) depends also upon the weight fractions of selected bioactive glasses and range of atomic numbers of the elements. The results shown here on effective atomic number, electron density will be more useful in the medical dosimetry for the calculation of absorbed dose and dose rate.

  3. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bioactive glasses for photon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2015-08-28

    This work was carried out to study the nature of mass attenuation coefficient of bioactive glasses for gamma rays. Bioactive glasses are a group of synthetic silica-based bioactive materials with unique bone bonding properties. In the present study, we have calculated the effective atomic number, electron density for photon interaction of some selected bioactive glasses viz., SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O, SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-CaO and SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in the energy range 1 keV to 100 MeV. We have also computed the single valued effective atomic number by using XMuDat program. It is observed that variation in effective atomic number (Z{sub PI,} {sub eff}) depends also upon the weight fractions of selected bioactive glasses and range of atomic numbers of the elements. The results shown here on effective atomic number, electron density will be more useful in the medical dosimetry for the calculation of absorbed dose and dose rate.

  4. Temperature and number density measurements using Raman scattering in turbulent-supersonic-combusting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyashekar, Nigil Satish

    Scramjet engines propelled at hypersonic velocities have the potential to replace existing rocket launchers. Commercializing the vehicle is an arduous task, owing to issues relating to low combustion efficiency. The performance, thrust, and speed of the engine can be improved by optimizing: turbulence-chemistry interaction to provide mixing conditions favorable for the chemistry, pressure buildup, and re-circulation of hydrogen throughout the engine. The performance of the engine can be measured, flow and chemical dynamics can be evaluated when all three variables in the transport equations are known. The variables are instantaneous flow velocity, static temperature (refers to the macroscopic temperature and not the molecular species temperature), and total number density at a point in the flow. The motive is to build a non-intrusive tool to measure thermodynamic quantities (static temperature and total number density). This can be integrated with a velocity measurement tool, in the future, to obtain all three variables simultaneously and instantaneously. The dissertation describes in detail the motivation for the proposed work, with introduction to the formalism involved, with a concise literature review, followed by mathematical perspective to obtain the working equations for temperature and number density. The design of the adiabatic burner and the experimental setup used for calibration is discussed with the uncertainty involved in measurements. The measurements are made for a certain set of flow conditions in the laminar burner by Raman scattering and is validated by comparing it to the theoretical/adiabatic flame temperature and mole fraction plots, in lean and rich regime. This technique is applied to turbulent, supersonic, hydrogen-air flame of an afterburning rocket nozzle. The statistics of temperature and total number density versus the corresponding values at adiabatic conditions gives the departure from thermal and chemical equilibrium. The extent of

  5. Effective atomic number and density determination of rocks by X-ray microtomography.

    PubMed

    Jussiani, Eduardo Inocente; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Microtomography, as a non-destructive technique, has become an important tool in studies of internal properties of materials. Recently, interest using this methodology in characterizing the samples with respect to their compositions, especially rocks, has grown. Two physical properties, density and effective atomic number, are important in determining the composition of rocks. In this work, six samples of materials with densities that varied from 2.42 to 6.84g/cm(3) and effective atomic numbers from 15.0 to 77.3 were studied. The measurements were made using a SkyScan-Bruker 1172 microtomography apparatus operating in voltages at 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100kV with a resolution of 13.1μm. Through micro-CT images, an average gray scale was calculated for the samples and correlation studies of this value with the density and the effective atomic number of samples were made. Linear fits were obtained for each energy value. The obtained functions were tested with samples of Amazonite, Gabbro, Sandstone and Sodalite. PMID:25485800

  6. Quantitative imaging of electron density and effective atomic number using phase contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2010-05-01

    Compared to single energy CT, which only provides information for x-ray linear attenuation coefficients, dual-energy CT is able to obtain both the electron density and effective atomic number for different materials in a quantitative way. In this study, as an alternative to dual-energy CT, a novel quantitative imaging method based on phase contrast CT is presented. Rather than requiring two projection data sets with different x-ray energy spectra, diffraction-grating-based phase contrast CT is capable of reconstructing images of both linear attenuation and refractive index decrement from the same projection data using a single x-ray energy spectra. From the two images, quantitative information of both the electron density and effective atomic number can be extracted. Two physical phantoms were constructed and used to validate the presented method. Experimental results demonstrate that (1) electron density can be accurately determined from refractive index decrement through a linear relationship, and (2) the effective atomic number can be explicitly derived from the ratio of the linear attenuation to refractive index decrement using a power function plus a constant. The presented method will provide insight into the technique of material separation and find its use in medical and industrial applications.

  7. Number size distribution of aerosols at Mt. Huang and Nanjing in the Yangtze River Delta, China: Effects of air masses and characteristics of new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglei; Zhu, Bin; Shen, Lijuan; An, Junlin; Yin, Yan; Kang, Hanqing

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol number spectra in the range of 10 nm-10 μm were observed at Mt. Huang (Aug. 15-Sep. 15) and Nanjing (Oct. 13-Nov. 15) by a wide-range particle spectrometer (WPS) in 2011. Based on the backward trajectories obtained using the HYSPLIT model, the transport pathways of observed air masses during the study periods were classified into the following four groups: maritime air mass, continental air mass, marine-continental mixed air mass and local air mass. The variations in the aerosol number spectrum and the new particle formation (NPF) events for various types of air masses were discussed, along with meteorological data. The results showed that the average number concentration was 12,540 cm- 3 at Nanjing and only 2791 cm- 3 at Mt. Huang. The aerosol number concentration in Nanjing was 3-7 times higher than that in Mt. Huang; the large discrepancy was in the range of 10-100 nm. Different types of air masses had different effects on number concentration distribution. The number concentration of aerosols was higher in marine air masses, continental air masses and continental-marine mixed air masses at 10-50 nm, 100-500 nm and 50-200 nm, respectively. Under the four types of air masses, the aerosol size spectra had bimodal distributions in Nanjing and unimodal distributions in Mt. Huang (except under continental air masses: HT1). The effects of the diverse air masses on aerosol size segments of the concentration peak in Mt. Huang were stronger than those in Nanjing. The local air masses were dominant at these two sites and accounted for 44% of the total air masses. However, the aerosol number concentration was the lowest in Mt. Huang and the highest in Nanjing when local air masses were present. The number concentrations for foreign air masses increased at Mt. Huang and decreased at Nanjing. Different types of air masses had greater effects on the aerosol spectrum distribution at Mt. Huang than at Nanjing. During the NPF events, the particle growth rates at Mt

  8. On the competition among aerosol number, size and composition in predicting CCN variability: a multi-annual field study in an urbanized desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbie, E.; Youn, J.-S.; Balch, B.; Wonaschütz, A.; Shingler, T.; Wang, Z.; Conant, W. C.; Betterton, E. A.; Sorooshian, A.

    2015-02-01

    A two-year dataset of measured CCN concentrations at 0.2% supersaturation is combined with aerosol size distribution and aerosol chemistry data to probe the effects of aerosol number concentrations, size distribution and composition on CCN patterns. Data have been collected over a period of two years (2012-2014) in central Tucson, Arizona: a significant urban area surrounded by a sparsely populated desert. Average CCN concentrations are typically lowest in spring (233 cm-3), highest in winter (430 cm-3) and have a secondary peak during the North American Monsoon season (July to September; 372 cm-3). There is significant variability outside of seasonal patterns with extreme concentrations (1 and 99% levels) ranging from 56 to 1945 cm-3 as measured during the winter, the season with highest variability. Modeled CCN concentrations based on fixed chemical composition achieve better closure in winter, with size and number alone able to predict 82% of the variance in CCN concentration. Changes in aerosol chemistry are typically aligned with changes in size and aerosol number, such that composition can be parameterized even though it is still variable. In summer, models based on fixed chemical composition explain at best only 41% (pre-monsoon) and 36% (monsoon) of the variance. This is attributed to the effects of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production, the competition between new particle formation and condensational growth, and the complex interaction of meteorology, regional and local emissions, and multi-phase chemistry during the North American Monsoon. Chemical composition is found to be an important factor for improving predictability in spring and on longer timescales in winter. Regimes where parameterized models exhibit improved predictive skill are typically explained by strong relationships between CCN concentrations and the prevailing meteorology and dominant aerosol chemistry mechanisms suggesting that similar findings could be possible in other locations

  9. On the competition among aerosol number, size and composition in predicting CCN variability: a multi-annual field study in an urbanized desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbie, E.; Youn, J.-S.; Balch, B.; Wonaschütz, A.; Shingler, T.; Wang, Z.; Conant, W. C.; Betterton, E. A.; Sorooshian, A.

    2015-06-01

    A 2-year data set of measured CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentrations at 0.2 % supersaturation is combined with aerosol size distribution and aerosol composition data to probe the effects of aerosol number concentrations, size distribution and composition on CCN patterns. Data were collected over a period of 2 years (2012-2014) in central Tucson, Arizona: a significant urban area surrounded by a sparsely populated desert. Average CCN concentrations are typically lowest in spring (233 cm-3), highest in winter (430 cm-3) and have a secondary peak during the North American monsoon season (July to September; 372 cm-3). There is significant variability outside of seasonal patterns, with extreme concentrations (1 and 99 % levels) ranging from 56 to 1945 cm-3 as measured during the winter, the season with highest variability. Modeled CCN concentrations based on fixed chemical composition achieve better closure in winter, with size and number alone able to predict 82 % of the variance in CCN concentration. Changes in aerosol chemical composition are typically aligned with changes in size and aerosol number, such that hygroscopicity can be parameterized even though it is still variable. In summer, models based on fixed chemical composition explain at best only 41 % (pre-monsoon) and 36 % (monsoon) of the variance. This is attributed to the effects of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production, the competition between new particle formation and condensational growth, the complex interaction of meteorology, regional and local emissions and multi-phase chemistry during the North American monsoon. Chemical composition is found to be an important factor for improving predictability in spring and on longer timescales in winter. Parameterized models typically exhibit improved predictive skill when there are strong relationships between CCN concentrations and the prevailing meteorology and dominant aerosol physicochemical processes, suggesting that similar findings could be

  10. On the competition among aerosol number, size and composition in predicting CCN variability: a multi-annual field study in an urbanized desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbie, Ewan; Youn, Jong-Sang; Balch, Brian; Wonaschuetz, Anna; Shingler, Taylor; Wang, Zhen; Conant, William; Betterton, Eric; Sorooshian, Armin

    2015-04-01

    A two-year dataset of measured CCN concentrations at 0.2% supersaturation is combined with aerosol size distribution and aerosol chemistry data to probe the effects of aerosol number concentrations, size distribution and composition on CCN patterns. Data have been collected over a period of two years (2012-2014) in central Tucson, Arizona: a significant urban area surrounded by a sparsely populated desert. Average CCN concentrations are typically lowest in spring (233 cm-3), highest in winter (430 cm-3) and have a secondary peak during the North American Monsoon season (July to September; 372 cm-3). There is significant variability outside of seasonal patterns with extreme concentrations (1% and 99% levels) ranging from 56 cm-3 to 1945 cm-3 as measured during the winter, the season with highest variability. Modeled CCN concentrations based on fixed chemical composition achieve better closure in winter, with size and number alone able to predict 82% of the variance in CCN concentration. Changes in aerosol chemistry are typically aligned with changes in size and aerosol number, such that composition can be parameterized even though it is still variable. In summer, models based on fixed chemical composition explain at best only 41% (pre-monsoon) and 36% (monsoon) of the variance. This is attributed to the effects of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production, the competition between new particle formation and condensational growth, and the complex interaction of meteorology, regional and local emissions, and multi-phase chemistry during the North American Monsoon. Chemical composition is found to be an important factor for improving predictability in spring and on longer timescales in winter. Regimes where parameterized models exhibit improved predictive skill are typically explained by strong relationships between CCN concentrations and the prevailing meteorology and dominant aerosol chemistry mechanisms suggesting that similar findings could be possible in other

  11. On the competition among aerosol number, size and composition in predicting CCN variability: a multi-annual field study in an urbanized desert

    PubMed Central

    Crosbie, E.; Youn, J.-S.; Balch, B.; Wonaschütz, A.; Shingler, T.; Wang, Z.; Conant, W. C.; Betterton, E. A.; Sorooshian, A.

    2015-01-01

    A 2-year data set of measured CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentrations at 0.2 % supersaturation is combined with aerosol size distribution and aerosol composition data to probe the effects of aerosol number concentrations, size distribution and composition on CCN patterns. Data were collected over a period of 2 years (2012–2014) in central Tucson, Arizona: a significant urban area surrounded by a sparsely populated desert. Average CCN concentrations are typically lowest in spring (233 cm−3), highest in winter (430 cm−3) and have a secondary peak during the North American monsoon season (July to September; 372 cm−3). There is significant variability outside of seasonal patterns, with extreme concentrations (1 and 99 % levels) ranging from 56 to 1945 cm−3 as measured during the winter, the season with highest variability. Modeled CCN concentrations based on fixed chemical composition achieve better closure in winter, with size and number alone able to predict 82% of the variance in CCN concentration. Changes in aerosol chemical composition are typically aligned with changes in size and aerosol number, such that hygroscopicity can be parameterized even though it is still variable. In summer, models based on fixed chemical composition explain at best only 41% (pre-monsoon) and 36% (monsoon) of the variance. This is attributed to the effects of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production, the competition between new particle formation and condensational growth, the complex interaction of meteorology, regional and local emissions and multi-phase chemistry during the North American monsoon. Chemical composition is found to be an important factor for improving predictability in spring and on longer timescales in winter. Parameterized models typically exhibit improved predictive skill when there are strong relationships between CCN concentrations and the prevailing meteorology and dominant aerosol physicochemical processes, suggesting that similar findings

  12. Entrainment Across a Sheared Density Interface in High Richardson Number Cavity Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Nicholas; Kirkpartick, Michael; Armfield, Steve

    2015-11-01

    The turbulent entrainment of fluid across a sharp density interface has been examined experimentally in a purging cavity flow. In the experiments, a long straight cavity with sloped entry and exit boundaries is located in the base of a straight open channel. Saline fluid is entrained from the cavity into the overflow. The cavity geometry has been designed to ensure there is no separation of the overflow in the cavity region with the goal of obtaining a single mode of entrainment, related only to the interface properties rather than to cavity specific mechanisms. The bulk entrainment rate has been measured and correlated with bulk Richardson number over Ri = 1 . 0 - 20 at Reynolds number Re = 7100 - 15100 . The entrainment rate is shown to scale with the local bulk Richardson number E ~= CRi - 1 . 38 , very close to the established result for entrainment across a sharp two layer density interface in a recirculating water channel (Strang and Fernando, J Fluid Mech., 428, 2001) but with an order of magnitude lower coefficient C. Experiments instrumented with PIV/LIF were used to relate the bulk Ri to the local gradient Richardson number of the interface. In the cavity setting the interface appears to remain sharper, resulting in larger Rig and reduced entrainment.

  13. Setting an observational upper limit to the number density of interstellar objects with Pan-STARRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, T.; Vereš, P.; Jedicke, R.; Denneau, L.; Beshore, E.

    2014-07-01

    Since the theory of a spherical reservoir of comets far beyond the planetary orbits (Oort, 1950) and subsequent work on origin and evolution of planets and small bodies (Charnoz and Morbidelli, 2003) it has been suggested that countless comets have left the Solar System shortly after its formation. Hence, it is likely that the other planetary systems ejected comets into interstellar space as well. However, the interstellar object (ISO) on a hyperbolic orbit with respect to the Sun has not been observed yet. In our work we derive the number density of ISO based on observational data from the Catalina Sky Survey (2005-2012) and Pan-STARRS1 survey (2010-2013). In the simulation we created 10,000,000 synthetic ISO based on velocity distribution by Grav et al. (2011) and used synthetics in the simulated survey study by using MOPS (Denneau et al., 2013). The number density of ISO was elaborated through the Poisson statistics of a non-detection with the 90 % confidence limit (C.L.) and detection efficiency of observed fields with known limiting magnitudes and survey characteristics. The number density was derived as a function of the absolute magnitude H and size-frequency distribution slope α by taking the cometary activity of long-period comets into account. We found that at 90 % C.L. the density of inert ISO population is 5.4×10^{-2} au^{-3} and 1.6×10^{-3} au^{-3} for the active population for objects larger than H>19 and with α=0.5.

  14. Distribution of E/N and N/e/ in a cross-flow electric discharge laser. [electric field to neutral gas density and electron number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, J. W., Jr.; Lancashire, R. B.; Manista, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements have been conducted of the effect of the convection of ions and electrons on the discharge characteristics in a large scale laser. The results are presented for one particular distribution of ballast resistance. Values of electric field, current density, input power density, ratio of electric field to neutral gas density (E/N), and electron number density were calculated on the basis of measurements of the discharge properties. In a number of graphs, the E/N ratio, current density, power density, and electron density are plotted as a function of row number (downstream position) with total discharge current and gas velocity as parameters. From the dependence of the current distribution on the total current, it appears that the electron production in the first two rows significantly affects the current flowing in the succeeding rows.

  15. Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities and aerosol optical properties form MAXDOAS measurements in Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Nan; Van. Roozendael, Michel; Ding, Aijun; Zhou, Bin; Hendrick, François; Shen, Yicheng; Wang, Tin; Valks, Pieter

    2014-05-01

    Air pollution is one of the most important environmental problems in developing Asian countries like China. Due to huge consumption of fossil fuels and rapid increase of traffic emissions in the past decades, many regions in China have been experiencing heavy air pollution. The Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region includes the mega-city Shanghai and the well-industrialized and urbanized areas of Zhejiang Province and Jiangsu Province, with over ten large cities, such as Hangzhou, Suzhou and Nanjing. Covering only 2% land area, this region produces over 20% of China's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) which makes it the most densely populated region and one of the most polluted regions in China. For instance, there more than 60% of a year was haze days with poor visibility in Shanghai over the last few years. In the YRD region, knowledge gaps still exist in the understanding of the source and transport of air pollutants because only few measurement studies have been conducted. MAX-DOAS measurements were performed in Shanghai city center and Wujiang (border of Shanghai and Jiangsu Province) from 2010 to 2012 and in Nanjing (capital of Jiangsu Province) from April 2013. A retrieval algorithm, based on an on-line implementation of the radiative transfer code LIDORT and the optimal estimation technique, has been used to provide information on aerosol extinction vertical profiles. The total aerosol optical depths (AODs) calculated from the retrieved profiles were compared to MODIS, AERONET and local PM measurements. The aerosol information was input to LIDORT to calculate NO2 air mass factors. The retrieved tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) were compared to in-situ and satellite NO2 measurements.

  16. Density and atomic number measurements with spectral x-ray attenuation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heismann, B. J.; Leppert, J.; Stierstorfer, K.

    2003-08-01

    X-ray attenuation measurements are widely used in medical and industrial applications. The usual results are one- to three-dimensional representations of the attenuation coefficient μ(r). In this paper, we present the ρZ projection algorithm for obtaining the density ρ(r) and atomic number Z(r) with an energy-resolving x-ray method. As input data the algorithm uses at least two measurements μ1,μ2,… with different spectral weightings of the source spectrum S(E) and/or detector sensitivity D(E). Analytically, ρ is a function of μ1-cμ2, c=const, and Z is a function of μ1/μ2. The full numerical treatment yields ρ(μ1,μ2) and Z(μ1,μ2) with S(E) and D(E) as commutative parametric functions. We tested the method with dual-energy computed tomography measurements of an organic sample and a set of chemical solutions with predefined ρ and Z. The resulting images show ρ and Z as complementary information: The density ρ reflects the morphology of the objects, whereas the atomic number Z=number of electrons/atom describes the material distribution. For our experimental setup we obtain an absolute precision of 0.1 for Z and 20 mg/cm3 for ρ. The ρZ projection can potentially lead to these classes of quantitative information for various scientific, industrial, and medical applications.

  17. Final Report, The Influence of Organic-Aerosol Emissions and Aging on Regional and Global Aerosol Size Distributions and the CCN Number Budget

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, Neil M.

    2015-12-23

    We conducted laboratory experiments and analyzed data on aging of organic aerosol and analysis of field data on volatility and CCN activity. With supplemental ASR funding we participated in the FLAME-IV campaign in Missoula MT in the Fall of 2012, deploying a two-chamber photochemical aging system to enable experimental exploration of photochemical aging of biomass burning emissions. Results from that campaign will lead to numerous publications, including demonstration of photochemical production of Brown Carbon (BrC) from secondary organic aerosol associated with biomass burning emissions as well as extensive characterization of the effect of photochemical aging on the overall concentrations of biomass burning organic aerosol. Excluding publications arising from the FLAME-IV campaign, project research resulted in 8 papers: [11, 5, 3, 10, 12, 4, 8, 7], including on in Nature Geoscience addressing the role of organic compounds in nanoparticle growth [11

  18. Aerosol- and updraft-limited regimes of cloud droplet formation: influence of particle number, size and hygroscopicity on the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutter, P.; Su, H.; Trentmann, J.; Simmel, M.; Rose, D.; Gunthe, S. S.; Wernli, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-09-01

    We have investigated the formation of cloud droplets under pyro-convective conditions using a cloud parcel model with detailed spectral microphysics and with the κ-Köhler model approach for efficient and realistic description of the cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity of aerosol particles. Assuming a typical biomass burning aerosol size distribution (accumulation mode centred at 120 nm), we have calculated initial cloud droplet number concentrations (NCD) for a wide range of updraft velocities (w=0.25-20 m s-1) and aerosol particle number concentrations (NCN=200-105 cm-3) at the cloud base. Depending on the ratio between updraft velocity and particle number concentration (w/NCN), we found three distinctly different regimes of CCN activation and cloud droplet formation: (1) An aerosol-limited regime that is characterized by high w/NCN ratios (>≈10-3 m s-1 cm3), high maximum values of water vapour supersaturation (Smax>≈0.5%), and high activated fractions of aerosol particles (NCN/NCN>≈90%). In this regime NCD is directly proportional to NCN and practically independent of w. (2) An updraft-limited regime that is characterized by low w/NCN ratios (<≈10-4 m s-1 cm3), low maximum values of water vapour supersaturation (Smax<≈0.2%), and low activated fractions of aerosol particles (NCD/NCN<≈20%). In this regime NCD is directly proportional to w and practically independent of NCN. (3) An aerosol- and updraft-sensitive regime (transitional regime), which is characterized by parameter values in between the two other regimes and covers most of the conditions relevant for pyro-convection. In this regime NCD depends non-linearly on both NCN and w. In sensitivity studies we have tested the influence of aerosol particle size distribution and hygroscopicity on NCD. Within the range of effective hygroscopicity parameters that is characteristic for continental atmospheric aerosols (κ≈0.05-0.6), we found that NCD depends rather weakly on the actual value of κ

  19. Global Distribution of Cloud Droplet Number Concentration, Autoconversion Rate, and Aerosol Indirect Effect Under Diabatic Droplet Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, Donifan; Sotiropoulou, Rafaella; Nenes, Athanasios

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a global assessment of the sensitivity of droplet number to diabatic activation (i.e., including effects from entrainment of dry air) and its first-order tendency on indirect forcing and autoconversion. Simulations were carried out with the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) atmospheric and transport model using climatological metereorological fields derived from the former NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO), the NASA Finite volume GCM (FVGCM) and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies version II (GISS) GCM. Cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) is calculated using a physically based prognostic parameterization that explicitly includes entrainment effects on droplet formation. Diabatic activation results in lower CDNC, compared to adiabatic treatment of the process. The largest decrease in CDNC (by up to 75 percent) was found in the tropics and in zones of moderate CCN concentration. This leads to a global mean effective radius increase between 0.2-0.5 micrometers (up to 3.5 micrometers over the tropics), a global mean autoconversion rate increase by a factor of 1.1 to 1.7 (up to a factor of 4 in the tropics), and a 0.2-0.4 W m(exp -2) decrease in indirect forcing. The spatial patterns of entrainment effects on droplet activation tend to reduce biases in effective radius (particularly in the tropics) when compared to satellite retrievals. Considering the diabatic nature of ambient clouds, entrainment effects on CDNC need to be considered in GCM studies of the aerosol indirect effect.

  20. Diffusion with chemical reaction: An attempt to explain number density anomalies in experiments involving alkali vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The mutual diffusion of two reacting gases is examined which takes place in a bath of inert gas atoms. Solutions are obtained between concentric spheres, each sphere acting as a source for one of the reactants. The calculational model is used to illustrate severe number density gradients observed in absorption experiments with alkali vapor. Severe gradients result when sq root k/D R is approximately 5 where k, D, and R are respectively the second order rate constant, the multicomponent diffusion constant, and the geometrical dimension of the experiment.

  1. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS.
    Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu*, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ...

  2. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-17

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two inter-penetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential, using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. In addition, as the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of themore » FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a non-zero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a “devil's staircase” behavior at a finite temperature.« less

  3. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-01

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two interpenetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. As the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of the FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a nonzero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a "devil's staircase" behavior at a finite temperature.

  4. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-17

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two inter-penetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential, using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. In addition, as the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of the FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a non-zero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a “devil's staircase” behavior at a finite temperature.

  5. Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2014-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids.

  6. Calculation of radiation attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some building materials.

    PubMed

    Damla, N; Baltas, H; Celik, A; Kiris, E; Cevik, U

    2012-07-01

    Some building materials, regularly used in Turkey, such as sand, cement, gas concrete (lightweight, aerated concrete), tile and brick, have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic, numbers (Z(eff)), effective electron densities (N(e)) and photon interaction cross section (σ(a)) at 14 different energies from 81- to 1332-keV gamma-ray energies. The gamma rays were detected by using gamma-ray spectroscopy, a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The elemental compositions of samples were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Mass attenuation coefficients of these samples have been compared with tabulations based upon the results of WinXcom. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using the mixture rule and the experimental values of investigated parameters were compared with the calculated values. The agreement of measured values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities and photon interaction cross section with the theory has been found to be quite satisfactory. PMID:22128356

  7. Electron density and effective atomic number (Zeff) determination through x-ray Moiré deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia Leiva, Maria Pia; Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Talbot-Lau based Moiré deflectometry is a powerful density diagnostic capable of delivering refraction information and attenuation from a single image, through the accurate detection of X-ray phase-shift and intensity. The technique is able to accurately measure both the real part of the index of refraction δ (directly related to electron density) and the attenuation coefficient μ of an object placed in the x-ray beam. Since the atomic number Z (or Zeff for a composite sample) is proportional to these quantities, an elemental map of the effective atomic number can be obtained with the ratio of the phase and the absorption image. The determination of Zeff from refraction and attenuation measurements with Moiré deflectometry could be of high interest in various fields of HED research such as shocked materials and ICF experiments as Zeff is linked, by definition, to the x-ray absorption properties of a specific material. This work is supported by U.S. DoE/NNSA Grant No. 435 DENA0001835.

  8. Toward Creating A Global Retrospective Climatology of Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Robert J.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are thought to cause a significant direct and indirect climate forcing, but the magnitude of this forcing remains highly uncertain because of poor knowledge of global aerosol characteristics and their temporal changes. The standard long-term global product, the one-channel Advanced Very-High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aerosol optical thickness over the ocean, relies on a single predefined aerosol model and can be inaccurate in many cases. Furthermore, it provides no information on aerosol column number density, thus making it impossible to estimate the indirect aerosol effect on climate. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data can be used to detect absorbing aerosols over land, but are insensitive to aerosols located below one kilometer. It is thus clear that innovative approaches must be employed in order to extract a more quantitative and accurate aerosol climatology from available satellite and other measurements, thus enabling more reliable estimates of the direct and indirect aerosol forcings. The Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP) was established in 1998 as part of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX). Its main objective is to analyze satellite radiance measurements and field observations to infer the global distribution of aerosols, their properties, and their seasonal and interannual variations. The overall goal is to develop advanced global aerosol climatologies for the period of satellite data and to make the aerosol climatologies broadly available through the GACP web site.

  9. Measurements of high number densities of ice crystals in the tops of tropical cumulonimbus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knollenberg, R. G.; Kelly, K.; Wilson, J. C.

    1993-05-01

    Imaging and light scattering instruments were used during the January/February 1987 STEP Tropical Experiment at Darwin, Australia, to measure ice crystal size distributions in the tops of tropical cumulonimbus anvils associated with tropical cyclones and related cloud systems. Two light scattering instruments covered particles from 0.1-μm to 78-μm diameter. Particles larger than 50-μm diameter were imaged with a two-dimensional Grey optical array imaging probe. The measurements were made at altitudes ranging from 13 to 18 km at temperatures ranging from -60° to -90°C. Additional measurements made in continental cumulonimbus anvils in the western United States offer a comparative data set. The tropical anvil penetrations revealed surprisingly high concentrations of ice crystals. Number densities were typically greater than 10 cm-3 with up to 100 cm-3 if one includes all particles larger than 0.1 μm and can approach condensation nuclei in total concentration. In order to explain the high number densities, ice crystal nucleation at altitude is proposed with the freezing of fairly concentrated solution droplets in equilibrium at low relative humidities. Any dilute liquid phase is hypothesized to be transitory with a vanishingly short lifetime and limited to cloud levels nearer -40°C. Homogeneous nucleation of ice involving H2SO4 nuclei is attractive in explaining the high number densities of small ice crystals observed near cloud top at temperatures below -60°C. The tropical size distributions were converted to mass using a spherical equivalent size, while the continental anvil data were treated as crystalline plates. Comparisons of the ice water contents integrated from the mass distributions with total water contents measured with NOAA Lyman-alpha instruments require bulk densities equivalent to solid ice for best agreement. Correlation between the two data sets for a number of flight passes was quite good and was further improved by subtraction of water

  10. PROPERTIES OF SATELLITE GALAXIES IN THE SDSS PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY: LUMINOSITIES, COLORS, AND PROJECTED NUMBER DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Lares, M.; Lambas, D. G.; Dominguez, M. J.

    2011-07-15

    We analyze photometric data in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) to infer statistical properties of faint satellites associated with isolated bright galaxies (M{sub r} < -20.5) in the redshift range 0.03 < z < 0.1. The mean projected radial number density profile shows an excess of companions in the photometric sample around the primaries, with approximately a power-law shape that extends up to {approx_equal} 700 kpc. Given this overdensity signal, a suitable background subtraction method is used to study the statistical properties of the population of bound satellites, down to magnitude M{sub r} = -14.5, in the projected radial distance range 100 < r{sub p} /kpc < 3(R{sub vir}). The maximum projected distance corresponds to the range 470-660 kpc for the different samples. We have also considered a color cut consistent with the observed colors of spectroscopic satellites in nearby galaxies so that distant redshifted galaxies do not dominate the statistics. We have tested the implementation of this background subtraction procedure using a mock catalog derived from the Millennium simulation semianalytic galaxy catalog based on a {Lambda} cold dark matter model. We find that the method is effective in reproducing the true projected radial satellite number density profile and luminosity distributions, providing confidence in the results derived from SDSS data. We find that the spatial extent of satellite systems is larger for bright, red primaries. Also, we find a larger spatial distribution of blue satellites. For the different samples analyzed, we derive the average number of satellites and their luminosity distributions down to M{sub r} = -14.5. The mean number of satellites depends very strongly on host luminosity. Bright primaries (M{sub r} < -21.5) host on average {approx}6 satellites with M{sub r} < -14.5. This number is reduced for primaries with lower luminosities (-21.5 < M{sub r} < -20.5) which have less than one satellite per host. We

  11. A high-energy-density, high-Mach number single jet experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J. F.; Dittrich, T. R.; Elliott, J. B.; Glendinning, S. G.; Cotrell, D. L.

    2011-08-15

    A high-energy-density, x-ray-driven, high-Mach number (M{>=} 17) single jet experiment shows constant propagation speeds of the jet and its bowshock into the late time regime. The jet assumes a characteristic mushroom shape with a stalk and a head. The width of the head and the bowshock also grow linearly in time. The width of the stalk decreases exponentially toward an asymptotic value. In late time images, the stalk kinks and develops a filamentary nature, which is similar to experiments with applied magnetic fields. Numerical simulations match the experiment reasonably well, but ''exterior'' details of the laser target must be included to obtain a match at late times.

  12. Phototactic number-density flux in the localized bioconvection of Euglena gracilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Erika; Suematsu, Nobuhiko; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori; Izumi, Shunsuke; Iima, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    Euglena gracilis is a unicellular phototactic flagellate; it escapes from light sources if the light intensity is higher than 200 W/m2 (negative phototaxis). When the suspension of E. gracilis is illuminated from the bottom by strong light, bioconvection patterns are generated. In the case of E. gracilis, the patterns can be spatially localized. The localization mechanism has not been clarified. We report experimental results related to the localization mechanism. In particular, we experimentally measured the strength of the phototaxis in the lateral direction as well as vertical direction. We prepared a thin container in which the suspension is included, and gave the linearly-changing light intensity. We found the number density gets a peak at a particular light intensity, which never happens if the suspension has the vertical phototaxis only. Further, we succeeded in getting the function representing lateral phototaxis. The relationship between the measured functions and the localized convection cells will be also reported.

  13. A limit on the number density of bright z ~ 7 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Bremer, Malcolm N.; Squitieri, Valentina; Douglas, Laura S.; Lehnert, Matthew D.

    2008-05-01

    We present a survey of bright optical dropout sources in two deep, multiwavelength surveys comprising 11 widely separated fields, aimed at constraining the galaxy luminosity function at z ~ 7 for sources at 5-10L*(z = 6). Our combined survey area is 225arcmin2 to a depth of JAB = 24.2 (3σ) and 135arcmin2 to J = 25.3 (4σ). We find that infrared data longwards of 2μm are essential for classifying optical dropout sources, and in particular for identifying cool Galactic star contaminants. Our limits on the number density of high-redshift sources are consistent with current estimates of the Lyman break galaxy luminosity function at z = 6.

  14. Mobile lidar system for measurement of water vapor mixing ratio and ozone number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Water Vapor Lidar was modified and extended to make differential absorption measurements of ozone. Water vapor measurements make use of a weak molecular scattering process known as Raman scattering. It is characterized by a shift in wavelength of the scattered beam of light relative to the incident one. Some of the energy of the incident photon is converted to vibrational or rotational energy within the molecule leaving the scattered photon shifted to a slightly longer wavelength. When performing water vapor measurements, profiles are acquired of water vapor mixing ratio from near the ground to beyond 7 km every 2 minutes. By forming a color composite image of the individual profiles, the spatial and temporal evolution of water vapor is visible with vertical resolution of 75 to 150m and temporal resolution of 2 minutes. The ozone lidar is intended for use as a cross calibration facility for other stationary ozone lidar systems. The ozone measurement employs the technique known as differential absorption. The backscattered laser radiation from two different wavelengths is measured. Successful measurements of 308 nm returns were made from 80 km with an averaging period of 6 hours. Using these data and a standard atmosphere density curve, an ozone number density profile was made which agrees very well with the standard ozone curve between 20 and 40 km.

  15. Mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities for some polymers.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Cakir, Merve; Isitman, Nihat Ali

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the total mass attenuation coefficients (μ(m)) for some homo- and hetero-chain polymers, namely polyamide-6 (PA-6), poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene (PS) were measured at 59.5, 511, 661.6, 1173.2, 1274.5 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The samples were separately irradiated with (241)Am, (22)Na, (137)Cs and (60)Co (638 kBq) radioactive gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″×2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector having an energy resolution of 7 % at 662 keV gamma ray from the decay of (137)Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Z(eff)) and the effective electron densities (N(eff)) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μ(m) values for the investigated samples. Furthermore, Z(eff) and N(eff) of each polymer were computed for total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region from 1 keV to 10 MeV. The experimental values of the selected polymers were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. PMID:22645382

  16. Effect of number density on optimal design of gold nanoshells for plasmonic photothermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Debabrata; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Cheng, Wenlong; Premaratne, Malin

    2012-01-01

    Despite much research efforts being devoted to the design optimization of metallic nanoshells, no account is taken of the fact that the number of the nanoshells that can be delivered to a given cancerous site vary with their size. In this paper, we study the effect of the nanoshell number density on the absorption and scattering properties of a gold-nanoshell ensemble exposed to a broadband near-infrared radiation, and optimize the nanoshells’ dimensions for efficient cancer treatment by analyzing a wide range of human tissues. We first consider the general situation in which the number of the delivered nanoshells decreases with their mean radius R as ∝ R−β, and demonstrate that the optimal design of nanoshells required to treat cancer most efficiently depends critically on β. In the case of β = 2, the maximal energy absorbed (scattered) by the ensemble is achieved for the same dimensions that maximize the absorption (scattering) efficiency of a single nanoshell. We thoroughly study this special case by the example of gold nanoshells with silica core. To ensure that minimal thermal injury is caused to the healthy tissue surrounding a cancerous site, we estimate the optimal dimensions that minimize scattering by the nanoshells for a desired value of the absorption efficiency. The comparison of gold nanoshells with different cores shows that hollow nanoshells exhibiting relatively low absorption efficiency are less harmful to the healthy tissue and, hence, are preferred over the strongly absorbing nanoshells. For each of the cases analyzed, we provide approximate analytical expressions for the optimal nanoshell dimensions, which may be used as design guidelines by experimentalists, in order to optimize the synthesis of gold nanoshells for treating different types of human cancer at their various growth stages. PMID:23304644

  17. Large-scale fluctuations in the number density of galaxies in independent surveys of deep fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, S. I.; Lovyagin, N. Yu.; Baryshev, Yu. V.; Gorokhov, V. L.

    2016-06-01

    New arguments supporting the reality of large-scale fluctuations in the density of the visible matter in deep galaxy surveys are presented. A statistical analysis of the radial distributions of galaxies in the COSMOS and HDF-N deep fields is presented. Independent spectral and photometric surveys exist for each field, carried out in different wavelength ranges and using different observing methods. Catalogs of photometric redshifts in the optical (COSMOS-Zphot) and infrared (UltraVISTA) were used for the COSMOS field in the redshift interval 0.1 < z < 3.5, as well as the zCOSMOS (10kZ) spectroscopic survey and the XMM-COSMOS and ALHAMBRA-F4 photometric redshift surveys. The HDFN-Zphot and ALHAMBRA-F5 catalogs of photometric redshifts were used for the HDF-N field. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the fluctuations in the numbers of galaxies obtained for independent surveys of the same deep field reaches R = 0.70 ± 0.16. The presence of this positive correlation supports the reality of fluctuations in the density of visible matter with sizes of up to 1000 Mpc and amplitudes of up to 20% at redshifts z ~ 2. The absence of correlations between the fluctuations in different fields (the correlation coefficient between COSMOS and HDF-N is R = -0.20 ± 0.31) testifies to the independence of structures visible in different directions on the celestial sphere. This also indicates an absence of any influence from universal systematic errors (such as "spectral voids"), which could imitate the detection of correlated structures.

  18. Constraints on Lyα Blob Number Densities at 2.1 and 3.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, John; Ciardullo, R.; Feldmeier, J. J.; Gronwall, C.; Hagen, A.; MUSYC Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Ly-alpha blobs are thought to be associated with regions over dense in compact Lyα emitters (LAEs) at the intersection of dark matter filaments, and may be the progenitors of today's galaxy clusters. Thus, a blob census can help explain the structure and formation history of these rare objects. We report the results of a deep narrow-band survey for Lyα blobs in three ~0.3 deg^2 fields: the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (at z = 2.06 and z = 3.1), the Extended Hubble Deep Field South (at z = 2.06 and z = 3.12) and the MUSYC field SDSS 1030+05 (at z = 2.06). Our surveys cover a total volume of 0.923 x 10^6 Mpc^3 at z = 2.06, and 0.871 x 10^6 Mpc^3 at z = 3.1; they are sensitive to blobs which have rest-frame equivalent widths greater than 30 Angstrom, and resolved blobs whose isophotal areas, defined using a surface brightnesses limit equivalent to a value of 5.5 x 10^{-18 ergs/cm^2/s/arcsec^2 at z = 2.3, exceed a specified limit. We search for blobs expected in SDSS 1030+05 based on an observed over density of compact LAEs in the field (Gronwall et al, in prep.), and we use our results to place limits on the number density of low surface brightness blobs outside of clusters.

  19. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  20. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-01

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ2 value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ2 value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  1. Hydroxyl layer: trend of number density and intra-annual variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnemann, G. R.; Hartogh, P.; Berger, U.; Grygalashvyly, M.

    2015-06-01

    The layer of vibrationally excited hydroxyl (OH*) near the mesopause in Earth's atmosphere is widely used to derive the temperature at this height and to observe dynamical processes such as gravity waves. The concentration of OH* is controlled by the product of atomic hydrogen, with ozone creating a layer of enhanced concentration in the mesopause region. However, the basic influences on the OH* layer are atomic oxygen and temperature. The long-term monitoring of this layer provides information on a changing atmosphere. It is important to know which proportion of a trend results from anthropogenic impacts on the atmosphere and which proportion reflects natural variations. In a previous paper (Grygalashvyly et al., 2014), the trend of the height of the layer and the trend in temperature were investigated particularly in midlatitudes on the basis of our coupled dynamic and chemical transport model LIMA (Leibniz Institute Middle Atmosphere). In this paper we consider the trend for the number density between the years 1961 and 2009 and analyze the reason of the trends on a global scale. Further, we consider intra-annual variations. Temperature and wind have the strongest impacts on the trend. Surprisingly, the increase in greenhouse gases (GHGs) has no clear influence on the chemistry of OH*. The main reason for this lies in the fact that, in the production term of OH*, if atomic hydrogen increases due to increasing humidity of the middle atmosphere by methane oxidation, ozone decreases. The maximum of the OH* layer is found in the mesopause region and is very variable. The mesopause region is a very intricate domain marked by changeable dynamics and strong gradients of all chemically active minor constituents determining the OH* chemistry. The OH* concentration responds, in part, very sensitively to small changes in these parameters. The cause for this behavior is given by nonlinear reactions of the photochemical system being a nonlinear enforced chemical oscillator

  2. Estimation of effective scatterer size and number density in near-infrared tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin

    2007-05-01

    Light scattering from tissue originates from the fluctuations in intra-cellular and extra-cellular components, so it is possible that macroscopic scattering spectroscopy could be used to quantify sub-microscopic structures. Both electron microscopy (EM) and optical phase contrast microscopy were used to study the origin of scattering from tissue. EM studies indicate that lipid-bound particle sizes appear to be distributed as a monotonic exponential function, with sub-micron structures dominating the distribution. Given assumptions about the index of refraction change, the shape of the scattering spectrum in the near infrared as measured through bulk tissue is consistent with what would be predicted by Mie theory with these particle size histograms. The relative scattering intensity of breast tissue sections (including 10 normal & 23 abnormal) were studied by phase contrast microscopy. Results show that stroma has higher scattering than epithelium tissue, and fat has the lowest values; tumor epithelium has lower scattering than the normal epithelium; stroma associated with tumor has lower scattering than the normal stroma. Mie theory estimation scattering spectra, was used to estimate effective particle size values, and this was applied retrospectively to normal whole breast spectra accumulated in ongoing clinical exams. The effective sizes ranged between 20 and 1400 nm, which are consistent with subcellular organelles and collagen matrix fibrils discussed previously. This estimation method was also applied to images from cancer regions, with results indicating that the effective scatterer sizes of region of interest (ROI) are pretty close to that of the background for both the cancer patients and benign patients; for the effective number density, there is a big difference between the ROI and background for the cancer patients, while for the benign patients, the value of ROI are relatively close to that of the background. Ongoing MRI-guided NIR studies indicated

  3. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power-law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of the potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied include the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings (and hence the direction of the radial electric field), the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  4. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  5. Number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate: a transform theory for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Amano, Ken-Ichi; Liang, Yunfeng; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Kota; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Onishi, Hiroshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-06-21

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquids can measure a force curve between a probe and a buried substrate. The shape of the measured force curve is related to hydration structure on the substrate. However, until now, there has been no practical theory that can transform the force curve into the hydration structure, because treatment of the liquid confined between the probe and the substrate is a difficult problem. Here, we propose a robust and practical transform theory, which can generate the number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate from the force curve. As an example, we analyzed a force curve measured by using our high-resolution AFM with a newly fabricated ultrashort cantilever. It is demonstrated that the hydration structure on muscovite mica (001) surface can be reproduced from the force curve by using the transform theory. The transform theory will enhance AFM's ability and support structural analyses of solid/liquid interfaces. By using the transform theory, the effective diameter of a real probe apex is also obtained. This result will be important for designing a model probe of molecular scale simulations. PMID:27080590

  6. Comparison of surface vacuum ultraviolet emissions with resonance level number densities. I. Argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boffard, John B. Lin, Chun C.; Culver, Cody; Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold

    2014-03-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons emitted from excited atomic states are ubiquitous in material processing plasmas. The highly energetic photons can induce surface damage by driving surface reactions, disordering surface regions, and affecting bonds in the bulk material. In argon plasmas, the VUV emissions are due to the decay of the 1s{sub 4} and 1s{sub 2} principal resonance levels with emission wavelengths of 104.8 and 106.7 nm, respectively. The authors have measured the number densities of atoms in the two resonance levels using both white light optical absorption spectroscopy and radiation-trapping induced changes in the 3p{sup 5}4p→3p{sup 5}4s branching fractions measured via visible/near-infrared optical emission spectroscopy in an argon inductively coupled plasma as a function of both pressure and power. An emission model that takes into account radiation trapping was used to calculate the VUV emission rate. The model results were compared to experimental measurements made with a National Institute of Standards and Technology-calibrated VUV photodiode. The photodiode and model results are in generally good accord and reveal a strong dependence on the neutral gas temperature.

  7. Single particle counting diagnostic system for measuring fine particulates at high number densities in research and industrial applications. Final report summarizing instrument development, validation and operating instructions

    SciTech Connect

    Holve, D.J.

    1983-10-01

    Optical methods for particle size distribution measurements in practical high temperature environments have achieved feasibility and offer significant advantages over conventional sampling methods. The present report describes a mobile electro-optical system which has been designed for general use in a wide range of research and industrial environments. Specific features of this system include a method of providing in situ alignment and incorporation of an extinction measurement for application to optically thick aerosol flows. The instrument has demonstrated capability for measuring individual particles in the size range 0.25 to 100 microns at number densities up to 10/sup 12//m/sup 3/. In addition to demonstration of the system's wide dynamic range, we show the utility of the in situ alignment method in hot (1100 K) turbulent flows where beam steering can be a problem. As an example of the instrument's application, number and mass frequency distribution measurements of flyash and pulverized coal obtained in an atmospheric combustion exhaust simulator show that the raw pulverized coal contains large numbers of submicron particles similar to the flyash formed after combustion.

  8. New constraints on the primordial black hole number density from Galactic γ-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehoucq, R.; Cassé, M.; Casandjian, J.-M.; Grenier, I.

    2009-07-01

    Context: Primordial black holes are unique probes of cosmology, general relativity, quantum gravity and non standard particle physics. They open a new window on the very small scales in the early Universe and also can be considered as the ultimate particle accelerator in their last (explosive) moments since they are supposed to reach, very briefly, the Planck temperature. Aims: Upper limits on the primordial black hole number density of mass Mstar = 5×1014 g, the Hawking mass (born in the big-bang terminating their life presently), is determined comparing their predicted cumulative γ-ray emission, galaxy-wise, to the one observed by the EGRET satellite, once corrected for non thermal γ-ray background emission induced by cosmic ray protons and electrons interacting with light and matter in the Milky Way. Methods: A model with free gas emissivities is used to map the Galaxy in the 100 MeV photon range, where the peak of the primordial black hole emission is expected. The best gas emissivities and additional model parameters are obtained by fitting the EGRET data and are used to derive the maximum emission of the primordial black hole of the Hawking mass, assuming that they are distributed like the dark matter in the Galactic halo. Results: The bounds we obtain, depending on the dark matter distribution, extrapolated to the whole Universe (Ω_PBH(Mstar) = 2.4×10-10 to 2.6×10-9) are more stringent than the previous ones derived from extragalactic γ-ray background and antiprotons fluxes, though less model dependent and based on more robust data. Conclusions: These new limits have interesting consequences on the theory of the formation of small structures in the Universe, since they are the only constraint on very small scale density fluctuations left by inflation. Significant improvements by data gathered by the FERMI γ-ray satellite are expected in the near future. The interest of a generalisation of this work beyond the standard particle model and in

  9. Response of Potato Tuber Number and Spatial Distribution to Plant Density in Different Growing Seasons in Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shun-Lin; Wang, Liang-Jun; Wan, Nian-Xin; Zhong, Lei; Zhou, Shao-Meng; He, Wei; Yuan, Ji-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of different density treatments on potato spatial distribution and yield in spring and fall. Plant density influenced yield and composition, horizontal, and vertical distribution distances between potato tubers, and spatial distribution position of tuber weights. The results indicated that: (1) Spring potato yield had a convex quadratic curve relationship with density, and the highest value was observed at 15.75 × 10(4) tubers per hectare. However, the yield of fall potatoes showed a linear relationship with plant density, and the highest value was observed at 18 × 10(4) tubers per hectare; (2) Density had a greater influence on the tuber weight of spring potatoes and fruit number of single fall potatoes; (3) The number of potato tubers in the longitudinal concentration exhibited a negative linear relationship with density, whereas the average vertical distribution distance of tubers exhibited a positive incremental hyperbolic relationship. For spring and fall potato tubers, the maximum distances were 8.4152 and 6.3316 cm, and the minimum distances 8.7666 and 6.9366 cm, respectively; and (4) Based on the artificial neural network model of the spatial distribution of tuber weight, density mainly affected the number and spatial distribution of tubers over 80 g. Tubers over 80 g were mainly distributed longitudinally (6-10 cm) and transversely (12-20 cm) within the high density treatment, and the transverse distribution scope and number of tubers over 80 g were reduced significantly. Spring potato tubers over 80 g grown at the lowest density were mainly distributed between 12 and 20 cm, whereas those at the highest density were primarily distributed between 10 and 15 cm. PMID:27092146

  10. Response of Potato Tuber Number and Spatial Distribution to Plant Density in Different Growing Seasons in Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shun-Lin; Wang, Liang-Jun; Wan, Nian-Xin; Zhong, Lei; Zhou, Shao-Meng; He, Wei; Yuan, Ji-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of different density treatments on potato spatial distribution and yield in spring and fall. Plant density influenced yield and composition, horizontal, and vertical distribution distances between potato tubers, and spatial distribution position of tuber weights. The results indicated that: (1) Spring potato yield had a convex quadratic curve relationship with density, and the highest value was observed at 15.75 × 104 tubers per hectare. However, the yield of fall potatoes showed a linear relationship with plant density, and the highest value was observed at 18 × 104 tubers per hectare; (2) Density had a greater influence on the tuber weight of spring potatoes and fruit number of single fall potatoes; (3) The number of potato tubers in the longitudinal concentration exhibited a negative linear relationship with density, whereas the average vertical distribution distance of tubers exhibited a positive incremental hyperbolic relationship. For spring and fall potato tubers, the maximum distances were 8.4152 and 6.3316 cm, and the minimum distances 8.7666 and 6.9366 cm, respectively; and (4) Based on the artificial neural network model of the spatial distribution of tuber weight, density mainly affected the number and spatial distribution of tubers over 80 g. Tubers over 80 g were mainly distributed longitudinally (6–10 cm) and transversely (12–20 cm) within the high density treatment, and the transverse distribution scope and number of tubers over 80 g were reduced significantly. Spring potato tubers over 80 g grown at the lowest density were mainly distributed between 12 and 20 cm, whereas those at the highest density were primarily distributed between 10 and 15 cm. PMID:27092146

  11. Scatterer number density considerations in reference phantom-based attenuation estimation.

    PubMed

    Rubert, Nicholas; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-07-01

    Attenuation estimation and imaging have the potential to be a valuable tool for tissue characterization, particularly for indicating the extent of thermal ablation therapy in the liver. Often the performance of attenuation estimation algorithms is characterized with numerical simulations or tissue-mimicking phantoms containing a high scatterer number density (SND). This ensures an ultrasound signal with a Rayleigh distributed envelope and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) approaching 1.91. However, biological tissue often fails to exhibit Rayleigh scattering statistics. For example, across 1647 regions of interest in five ex vivo bovine livers, we obtained an envelope SNR of 1.10 ± 0.12 when the tissue was imaged with the VFX 9L4 linear array transducer at a center frequency of 6.0 MHz on a Siemens S2000 scanner. In this article, we examine attenuation estimation in numerical phantoms, tissue-mimicking phantoms with variable SNDs and ex vivo bovine liver before and after thermal coagulation. We find that reference phantom-based attenuation estimation is robust to small deviations from Rayleigh statistics. However, in tissue with low SNDs, large deviations in envelope SNR from 1.91 lead to subsequently large increases in attenuation estimation variance. At the same time, low SND is not found to be a significant source of bias in the attenuation estimate. For example, we find that the standard deviation of attenuation slope estimates increases from 0.07 to 0.25 dB/cm-MHz as the envelope SNR decreases from 1.78 to 1.01 when estimating attenuation slope in tissue-mimicking phantoms with a large estimation kernel size (16 mm axially × 15 mm laterally). Meanwhile, the bias in the attenuation slope estimates is found to be negligible (<0.01 dB/cm-MHz). We also compare results obtained with reference phantom-based attenuation estimates in ex vivo bovine liver and thermally coagulated bovine liver. PMID:24726800

  12. Detection of enhancement in number densities of background galaxies due to magnification by massive galaxy clusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chiu, I.; Dietrich, J. P.; Mohr, J.; Applegate, D. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bayliss, M. B.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Capasso, R.; et al

    2016-02-18

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z≃0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian≃0.9 (low-z background) and zmedian≃1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3σ and 1.3σ for the low- and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit NFW models simultaneously to all observedmore » magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor η that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in η resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting η for the combined background populations with 1σ uncertainties is 0.83 ± 0.24(stat) ± 0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We also use our best-fit η to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. Our work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.« less

  13. Detection of Enhancement in Number Densities of Background Galaxies due to Magnification by Massive Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, I.

    2015-10-06

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z≃0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian≃0.9 (low-z background) and zmedian≃1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3σ and 1.3σ for the low- and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit NFW models simultaneously to all observed magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor η that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in η resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting η for the combined background populations with 1σ uncertainties is 0.83±0.24(stat)±0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We also use our best-fit η to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. Our work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.

  14. Detection of enhancement in number densities of background galaxies due to magnification by massive galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, I.; Dietrich, J. P.; Mohr, J.; Applegate, D. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bayliss, M. B.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Capasso, R.; Desai, S.; Gangkofner, C.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Gupta, N.; Hennig, C.; Hoekstra, H.; von der Linden, A.; Liu, J.; McDonald, M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Strazzullo, V.; Stubbs, C. W.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE-) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z ≃ 0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. These clusters are observed by the Megacam on the Magellan Clay Telescope though gri filters. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian ≃ 0.9 (low-z background) and zmedian ≃ 1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3σ and 1.3σ for the low- and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit Navarro, Frenk and White models simultaneously to all observed magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor η that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in η resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting η for the combined background populations with 1σ uncertainties is 0.83 ± 0.24(stat) ± 0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We use our best-fitting η to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. This work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.

  15. Characterization of hydrocarbons in aerosols at a Mediterranean city with a high density of palm groves.

    PubMed

    Chofre, Carolina; Gil-Moltó, Juan; Galindo, Nuria; Varea, Montse; Caballero, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    Samples of PM1 and PM10 were collected for 1 year at an urban background station in the city of Elche (southeastern Spain) and analyzed to determine the content of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A few samples were also gathered at a second sampling point established at one of the several palm tree gardens of the city in order to evaluate the influence of biogenic emissions on the urban levels of n-alkanes. Diagnostic parameters obtained for aliphatic hydrocarbons (carbon maximum number (C max), carbon preference index (CPI), and wax n-alkane content (%WNA)) revealed a higher contribution of biogenic n-alkanes in PM10 than in PM1. Moreover, the values of %WNA indicated that the levels of n-alkanes in Elche were more affected by emissions from terrestrial vegetation than in other urban areas, particularly in the palm tree grove location (%WNA = 29 for PM10). PAH diagnostic ratios pointed to traffic as the main anthropogenic source of hydrocarbons in Elche, with predominance of diesel versus gasoline vehicle emissions. The average levels of total PAHs (~1 ng m(-3)) were noticeably lower than the values registered at other urban areas in Europe, most likely because emissions from other sources are scarce. Both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons showed higher levels in the cold season due to the lower atmospheric dispersion conditions, the increase in traffic exhaust emissions, and the lower ambient temperatures that reduce the evaporation of semivolatile species. PMID:27502520

  16. Degree and plane of polarization of multiple scattered light. 2: Earth's atmosphere with aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    The degree of polarization, as well as the direction of the plane of polarization, were calculated by a Monte Carlo method for the reflected and transmitted photons from the earth's atmosphere. The solar photons were observed during multiple collisions with aerosols and the Rayleigh scattering centers in the atmosphere. The aerosol number density, as well as the ratio of aerosol to Rayleigh scattering, varies with height. The proportion of aerosol to Rayleigh scattering was appropriately chosen at each wavelength 0.4 microns and 0.7 microns; ozone absorption was included where appropriate. Three different aerosol number densities were used to study the effects of aerosol variations. Results are given for a solar zenith angle of 81.37 deg and a surface albedo of zero. The polarization of the reflected and transmitted photons was found to be sensitive to the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere at certain angles of observation.

  17. The evolution of galaxies at constant number density: a less biased view of star formation, quenching, and structural formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ownsworth, Jamie R.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Mundy, Carl J.; Mortlock, Alice; Hartley, William G.; Duncan, Kenneth; Almaini, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Due to significant galaxy contamination and impurity in stellar mass selected samples (up to 95 per cent from z = 0-3), we examine the star formation history, quenching time-scales, and structural evolution of galaxies using a constant number density selection with data from the United Kingdom Infra-Red Deep Sky Survey Ultra-Deep Survey field. Using this methodology, we investigate the evolution of galaxies at a variety of number densities from z = 0-3. We find that samples chosen at number densities ranging from 3 × 10-4 to 10-5 galaxies Mpc-3 (corresponding to z ˜ 0.5 stellar masses of M* = 1010.95-11.6 M0) have a star-forming blue fraction of ˜50 per cent at z ˜ 2.5, which evolves to a nearly 100 per cent quenched red and dead population by z ˜ 1. We also see evidence for number density downsizing, such that the galaxies selected at the lowest densities (highest masses) become a homogeneous red population before those at higher number densities. Examining the evolution of the colours for these systems furthermore shows that the formation redshift of galaxies selected at these number densities is zform > 3. The structural evolution through size and Sérsic index fits reveal that while there remains evolution in terms of galaxies becoming larger and more concentrated in stellar mass at lower redshifts, the magnitude of the change is significantly smaller than for a mass-selected sample. We also find that changes in size and structure continues at z < 1, and is coupled strongly to passivity evolution. We conclude that galaxy structure is driving the quenching of galaxies, such that galaxies become concentrated before they become passive.

  18. Model–Observation Comparisons of Electron Number Densities in the Coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during January 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigren, E.; Altwegg, K.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Eriksson, A. I.; Galand, M.; Henri, P.; Johansson, F.; Odelstad, E.; Tzou, C.-Y.; Valliéres, X.

    2016-09-01

    During 2015 January 9–11, at a heliocentric distance of ˜2.58–2.57 au, the ESA Rosetta spacecraft resided at a cometocentric distance of ˜28 km from the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, sweeping the terminator at northern latitudes of 43°N–58°N. Measurements by the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis/Comet Pressure Sensor (ROSINA/COPS) provided neutral number densities. We have computed modeled electron number densities using the neutral number densities as input into a Field Free Chemistry Free model, assuming H2O dominance and ion-electron pair formation by photoionization only. A good agreement (typically within 25%) is found between the modeled electron number densities and those observed from measurements by the Mutual Impedance Probe (RPC/MIP) and the Langmuir Probe (RPC/LAP), both being subsystems of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium. This indicates that ions along the nucleus-spacecraft line were strongly coupled to the neutrals, moving radially outward with about the same speed. Such a statement, we propose, can be further tested by observations of H3O+/H2O+ number density ratios and associated comparisons with model results.

  19. Model–Observation Comparisons of Electron Number Densities in the Coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during January 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigren, E.; Altwegg, K.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Eriksson, A. I.; Galand, M.; Henri, P.; Johansson, F.; Odelstad, E.; Tzou, C.-Y.; Valliéres, X.

    2016-09-01

    During 2015 January 9–11, at a heliocentric distance of ∼2.58–2.57 au, the ESA Rosetta spacecraft resided at a cometocentric distance of ∼28 km from the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, sweeping the terminator at northern latitudes of 43°N–58°N. Measurements by the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis/Comet Pressure Sensor (ROSINA/COPS) provided neutral number densities. We have computed modeled electron number densities using the neutral number densities as input into a Field Free Chemistry Free model, assuming H2O dominance and ion-electron pair formation by photoionization only. A good agreement (typically within 25%) is found between the modeled electron number densities and those observed from measurements by the Mutual Impedance Probe (RPC/MIP) and the Langmuir Probe (RPC/LAP), both being subsystems of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium. This indicates that ions along the nucleus-spacecraft line were strongly coupled to the neutrals, moving radially outward with about the same speed. Such a statement, we propose, can be further tested by observations of H3O+/H2O+ number density ratios and associated comparisons with model results.

  20. THE NUMBER DENSITY AND MASS DENSITY OF STAR-FORMING AND QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT 0.4 {<=} z {<=} 2.2

    SciTech Connect

    Brammer, Gabriel B.; Whitaker, K. E.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Lee, K.-S.; Muzzin, A.; Marchesini, D.; Franx, M.; Kriek, M.; Labbe, I.; Quadri, R. F.; Williams, R.; Rudnick, G.

    2011-09-20

    We study the buildup of the bimodal galaxy population using the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey, which provides excellent redshifts and well-sampled spectral energy distributions of {approx}27, 000 galaxies with K < 22.8 at 0.4 < z < 2.2. We first show that star-forming galaxies and quiescent galaxies can be robustly separated with a two-color criterion over this entire redshift range. We then study the evolution of the number density and mass density of quiescent and star-forming galaxies, extending the results of the COMBO-17, DEEP2, and other surveys to z = 2.2. The mass density of quiescent galaxies with M {approx}> 3 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} increases by a factor of {approx}10 from z {approx} 2 to the present day, whereas the mass density in star-forming galaxies is flat or decreases over the same time period. Modest mass growth by a factor of {approx}2 of individual quiescent galaxies can explain roughly half of the strong density evolution at masses >10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, due to the steepness of the exponential tail of the mass function. The rest of the density evolution of massive, quiescent galaxies is likely due to transformation (e.g., quenching) of the massive star-forming population, a conclusion which is consistent with the density evolution we observe for the star-forming galaxies themselves, which is flat or decreasing with cosmic time. Modest mass growth does not explain the evolution of less massive quiescent galaxies ({approx}10{sup 10.5} M{sub sun}), which show a similarly steep increase in their number densities. The less massive quiescent galaxies are therefore continuously formed by transforming galaxies from the star-forming population.

  1. Aerosol physical properties from satellite horizon inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Malchow, H. L.; Merritt, D. C.; Var, R. E.; Whitney, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility is investigated of determining the physical properties of aerosols globally in the altitude region of 10 to 100 km from a satellite horizon scanning experiment. The investigation utilizes a horizon inversion technique previously developed and extended. Aerosol physical properties such as number density, size distribution, and the real and imaginary components of the index of refraction are demonstrated to be invertible in the aerosol size ranges (0.01-0.1 microns), (0.1-1.0 microns), (1.0-10 microns). Extensions of previously developed radiative transfer models and recursive inversion algorithms are displayed.

  2. Aerosol optical thickness measurements during FIFE '89

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Markham, Brian L.

    1990-01-01

    The measurements used for correction and calibration are presented which permit the estimation of atmospheric effects on reflected and transmitted solar radiation. Four sun-photometers are calibrated and used to derive aerosol optical thicknesses that agree with expected uncertainties, and lower values and higher values are associated with cool dry northerly flows and warm humid southerly flows, respectively. The rapid increase in the vertical aerosol optical thickness after sunrise is related to the growth of the mixing layer which can be inferred from the 2D maps of the instantaneous aerosol number densities.

  3. Monitoring diesel particulate matter and calculating diesel particulate densities using Grimm model 1.109 real-time aerosol monitors in underground mines.

    PubMed

    Kimbal, Kyle C; Pahler, Leon; Larson, Rodney; VanDerslice, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is no Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA)-approved sampling method that provides real-time results for ambient concentrations of diesel particulates. This study investigated whether a commercially available aerosol spectrometer, the Grimm Portable Aerosol Spectrometer Model 1.109, could be used during underground mine operations to provide accurate real-time diesel particulate data relative to MSHA-approved cassette-based sampling methods. A subset was to estimate size-specific diesel particle densities to potentially improve the diesel particulate concentration estimates using the aerosol monitor. Concurrent sampling was conducted during underground metal mine operations using six duplicate diesel particulate cassettes, according to the MSHA-approved method, and two identical Grimm Model 1.109 instruments. Linear regression was used to develop adjustment factors relating the Grimm results to the average of the cassette results. Statistical models using the Grimm data produced predicted diesel particulate concentrations that highly correlated with the time-weighted average cassette results (R(2) = 0.86, 0.88). Size-specific diesel particulate densities were not constant over the range of particle diameters observed. The variance of the calculated diesel particulate densities by particle diameter size supports the current understanding that diesel emissions are a mixture of particulate aerosols and a complex host of gases and vapors not limited to elemental and organic carbon. Finally, diesel particulate concentrations measured by the Grimm Model 1.109 can be adjusted to provide sufficiently accurate real-time air monitoring data for an underground mining environment. PMID:22554097

  4. Measurements of the number density of water molecules in plasma by using a combined spectral-probe method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskiy, A. V.; Ochkin, V. N.; Afonin, O. N.; Antipenkov, A. B.

    2015-09-01

    A novel method for measuring the number density of water molecules in low-temperature plasma is developed. The absolute intensities of rotational lines of the (0,0) band of the OH( A 2Σ- X 2П) transition are used. Lines with sufficiently large rotational quantum numbers referring to the so-called "hot" group of molecules produced by electron-impact dissociative excitation of water molecules are chosen for measurements. The excitation rate of a process with a known cross section is determined by measuring the parameters of plasma electrons by means of the probe method. The measured number densities of molecules are compared with those in the initial plasma-forming mixture. The time evolution of the particle densities in plasma is investigated. The problems of the sensitivity and applicability of the absolute spectral method are considered.

  5. Examination of methods to determine free-ion diffusivity and number density from analysis of electrode polarization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangyang; Sun, Che-Nan; Fan, Fei; Sangoro, Joshua R; Berman, Marc B; Greenbaum, Steve G; Zawodzinski, Thomas A; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2013-04-01

    Electrode polarization analysis is frequently used to determine free-ion diffusivity and number density in ionic conductors. In the present study, this approach is critically examined in a wide variety of electrolytes, including aqueous and nonaqueous solutions, polymer electrolytes, and ionic liquids. It is shown that the electrode polarization analysis based on the Macdonald-Trukhan model [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 144903 (2006); J. Non-Cryst. Solids 357, 3064 (2011)] progressively fails to give reasonable values of free-ion diffusivity and number density with increasing salt concentration. This should be expected because the original model of electrode polarization is designed for dilute electrolytes. An empirical correction method which yields ion diffusivities in reasonable agreement with pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements is proposed. However, the analysis of free-ion diffusivity and number density from electrode polarization should still be exercised with great caution because there is no solid theoretical justification for the proposed corrections. PMID:23679415

  6. Examination of methods to determine free-ion diffusivity and number density from analysis of electrode polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yangyang; Sun, Che-Nan; Fan, Fei; Sangoro, Joshua R; Berman, Marc; Greenbaum, Steve; Zawodzinski, Thomas; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2013-01-01

    Electrode polarization analysis is frequently used to determine free-ion diffusivity and number density in ionic conductors. In the present study, this approach is critically examined in a wide variety of electrolytes, including aqueous and nonaqueous solutions, polymer electrolytes, and ionic liquids. It is shown that the electrode polarization analysis based on theMacdonald-Trukhan model [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 144903 (2006); J. Non-Cryst. Solids 357, 3064 (2011)] progressively fails to give reasonable values of free-ion diffusivity and number density with increasing salt concentration. This should be expected because the original model of electrode polarization is designed for dilute electrolytes. An empirical correction method which yields ion diffusivities in reasonable agreement with pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements is proposed. However, the analysis of free-ion diffusivity and number density from electrode polarization should still be exercised with great caution because there is no solid theoretical justification for the proposed corrections.

  7. Measurements of the number density of water molecules in plasma by using a combined spectral−probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Bernatskiy, A. V. Ochkin, V. N.; Afonin, O. N.; Antipenkov, A. B.

    2015-09-15

    A novel method for measuring the number density of water molecules in low-temperature plasma is developed. The absolute intensities of rotational lines of the (0,0) band of the OH(A{sup 2}Σ–X{sup 2}Π) transition are used. Lines with sufficiently large rotational quantum numbers referring to the so-called “hot” group of molecules produced by electron-impact dissociative excitation of water molecules are chosen for measurements. The excitation rate of a process with a known cross section is determined by measuring the parameters of plasma electrons by means of the probe method. The measured number densities of molecules are compared with those in the initial plasma-forming mixture. The time evolution of the particle densities in plasma is investigated. The problems of the sensitivity and applicability of the absolute spectral method are considered.

  8. Time-dependent occupation numbers in reduced-density-matrix-functional theory: Application to an interacting Landau-Zener model

    SciTech Connect

    Requist, Ryan; Pankratov, Oleg

    2011-05-15

    We prove that if the two-body terms in the equation of motion for the one-body reduced density matrix are approximated by ground-state functionals, the eigenvalues of the one-body reduced density matrix (occupation numbers) remain constant in time. This deficiency is related to the inability of such an approximation to account for relative phases in the two-body reduced density matrix. We derive an exact differential equation giving the functional dependence of these phases in an interacting Landau-Zener model and study their behavior in short- and long-time regimes. The phases undergo resonances whenever the occupation numbers approach the boundaries of the interval [0,1]. In the long-time regime, the occupation numbers display correlation-induced oscillations and the memory dependence of the functionals assumes a simple form.

  9. Joint constraints on galaxy bias and σ8 through the N-pdf of the galaxy number density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; Vielva, Patricio; Martínez, Vicent J.; Sanz, José L.; Saar, Enn; Paredes, Silvestre

    2016-03-01

    We present a full description of the N-probability density function of the galaxy number density fluctuations. This N-pdf is given in terms, on the one hand, of the cold dark matter correlations and, on the other hand, of the galaxy bias parameter. The method relies on the assumption commonly adopted that the dark matter density fluctuations follow a local non-linear transformation of the initial energy density perturbations. The N-pdf of the galaxy number density fluctuations allows for an optimal estimation of the bias parameter (e.g., via maximum-likelihood estimation, or Bayesian inference if there exists any a priori information on the bias parameter), and of those parameters defining the dark matter correlations, in particular its amplitude (σ8). It also provides the proper framework to perform model selection between two competitive hypotheses. The parameters estimation capabilities of the N-pdf are proved by SDSS-like simulations (both, ideal log-normal simulations and mocks obtained from Las Damas simulations), showing that our estimator is unbiased. We apply our formalism to the 7th release of the SDSS main sample (for a volume-limited subset with absolute magnitudes Mr <= -20). We obtain hat b = 1.193 ± 0.074 and σ̂8 = 0.862 ± 0.080, for galaxy number density fluctuations in cells of the size of 30h-1Mpc. Different model selection criteria show that galaxy biasing is clearly favoured.

  10. Internal one-particle density matrix for Bose-Einstein condensates with finite number of particles in a harmonic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Taiichi; Funaki, Yasuro; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Roepke, Gerd; Schuck, Peter; Tohsaki, Akihiro

    2009-05-15

    Investigations on the internal one-particle density matrix in the case of Bose-Einstein condensates with a finite number (N) of particles in a harmonic potential are performed. We solve the eigenvalue problem of the Pethick-Pitaevskii-type internal density matrix and find a fragmented condensate. On the contrary the condensate Jacobi-type internal density matrix gives complete condensation into a single state. The internal one-particle density matrix is, therefore, shown to be different in general for different choices of the internal coordinate system. We propose two physically motivated criteria for the choice of the adequate coordinate systems that give us a unique answer for the internal one-particle density matrix. One criterion is that in the infinite particle number limit (N={infinity}) the internal one-particle density matrix should have the same eigenvalues and eigenfunctions as those of the corresponding ideal Bose-Einstein condensate in the laboratory frame. The other criterion is that the coordinate of the internal one-particle density matrix should be orthogonal to the remaining (N-2) internal coordinates, though the (N-2) coordinates, in general, do not need to be mutually orthogonal. This second criterion is shown to imply the first criterion. It is shown that the internal Jacobi coordinate system satisfies these two criteria while the internal coordinate system adopted by Pethick and Pitaevskii for the construction of the internal one-particle density matrix does not. It is demonstrated that these two criteria uniquely determine the internal one-particle density matrix that is identical to that calculated with the Jacobi coordinates. The relevance of this work concerning {alpha}-particle condensates in nuclei, as well as bosonic atoms in traps, is pointed out.

  11. Late-Holocene climate evolution at the WAIS Divide site, West Antarctica: Bubble number-density estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fegyveresi, John M.; Alley, R.B.; Spencer, M.K.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.; Steig, E.J.; White, J.W.C.; McConnell, J.R.; Taylor, K.C.

    2011-01-01

    A surface cooling of ???1.7??C occurred over the ???two millennia prior to ???1700 CE at the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) Divide site, based on trends in observed bubble number-density of samples from the WDC06A ice core, and on an independently constructed accumulation-rate history using annual-layer dating corrected for density variations and thinning from ice flow. Density increase and grain growth in polar firn are both controlled by temperature and accumulation rate, and the integrated effects are recorded in the number-density of bubbles as the firn changes to ice. Numberdensity is conserved in bubbly ice following pore close-off, allowing reconstruction of either paleotemperature or paleo-accumulation rate if the other is known. A quantitative late-Holocene paleoclimate reconstruction is presented for West Antarctica using data obtained from the WAIS Divide WDC06A ice core and a steady-state bubble number-density model. The resultant temperature history agrees closely with independent reconstructions based on stable-isotopic ratios of ice. The ???1.7??C cooling trend observed is consistent with a decrease in Antarctic summer duration from changing orbital obliquity, although it remains possible that elevation change at the site contributed part of the signal. Accumulation rate and temperature dropped together, broadly consistent with control by saturation vapor pressure.

  12. High-temperature flow field's electron number density measurement by two-wavelength moiré tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Yun; Song, Yang; Gu, Fang; Shao, Shao-Feng; Zhang, Ying-Ying

    2016-04-01

    In this Letter, a direct method is proposed to measure the electron number density distribution for high-temperature complex flow fields. The experimental system of two-wavelength moiré tomography is established, while four key issues are solved and well clarified. The argon arc plasma is adopted as an example for experiment, while 532 and 808 nm are chosen as the two probe wavelengths. The results indicate that the electron number density's distribution of the measured argon arc plasma can be directly obtained by two-wavelength moiré tomography, which can avoid the imprecision of the indirect methods. This Letter can provide some reference for various high-temperature and high-density gradient flow field optical measurement and diagnosis. PMID:27192307

  13. A diagnostic stratospheric aerosol size distribution inferred from SAGE II measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.

    1991-01-01

    An aerosol size distribution model for the stratosphere is inferred based on 5 years of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II measurements of multispectral aerosol and water vapor extinction. The SAGE II aerosol and water vapor extinction data strongly suggest that there is a critical particle radius below which there is a relatively weak dependence of particle number density with size and above which there are few, if any, particles. A segmented power law model, as a simple representation of this dependence, is used in theoretical calculations and intercomparisons with a variety of aerosol measurements including dustsondes, longwave lidar, and wire impactors and shows a consistently good agreement.

  14. Outdoor and indoor aerosol size, number, mass and compositional dynamics at an urban background site during warm season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, N.; Kubelova, L.; Makes, O.; Cusack, M.; Ondracek, J.; Vodička, P.; Schwarz, J.; Zdimal, V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the use of a unique valve switching system that allowed for high temporal resolution indoor and outdoor data to be collected concurrently from online C-ToF-AMS, SMPS and OC/EC, and offline BLPI measurements. The results reveal near real-time dynamic aerosol behaviour along a migration path from an outdoor to indoor environment. An outdoor reduction in NR-PM1 mass concentration occurred daily from AM (06:00-12:00) to PM (12:00-18:00). SO4 (26%-37%) [AM/PM] increased proportionally during afternoons at the expense of NO3 (18%-7%). The influences of mixing height, temperature and solar radiation were considered against the mean mass concentration loss for each species. Losses were then calculated according to species via a basic input/output model. NO3 lost the most mass during afternoon periods, which we attribute to the accelerated dissociation of NH4NO3 through increasing temperature and decreasing relative humidity. Indoor/outdoor (I/O) ratios varied from 0.46 for <40 nm to 0.65 for >100 nm. These ratios were calculated using average SMPS PNC measurements over the full campaign and corroborated using a novel technique of calculating I/O penetration ratios through the indoor migration of particles during a new particle formation event. This ratio was then used to observe changes in indoor composition relative to those outdoors. Indoor sampling was carried out in an undisturbed room with no known sources. Indoor concentrations were found to be proportional to those outdoors, with organic matter [2.7 μg/m3] and SO4 [1.7 μg/m3] being the most prominent species. These results are indicative of fairly rapid aerosol penetration, a source-free indoor environment and small afternoon I/O temperature gradients. Fine fraction NO3 was observed indoors in both real-time AMS PM1 and off-line BLPI measurements. Greater mass concentration losses were observed from filter measurements, highlighting an important time dependency factor when investigating semi

  15. Stratospheric aerosol forcing for climate modeling: 1850-1978

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfeuille, Florian; Luo, Beiping; Thomason, Larry; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We present here a stratospheric aerosol dataset produced using the available aerosol optical depth observations from the pre-satellite period. The scarce atmospheric observations are supplemented by additional information from an aerosol microphysical model, initialized by ice-core derived sulfur emissions. The model is used to derive extinctions at all altitudes, latitudes and times when sulfur injections are known for specific volcanic eruptions. The simulated extinction coefficients are then scaled to match the observed optical depths. In order to produce the complete optical properties at all wavelengths (and the aerosol surface area and volume densities) needed by climate models, we assume a lognormal size distribution of the aerosols. Correlations between the extinctions in the visible and the effective radius and distribution width parameters are taken from the better constrained SAGE II period. The aerosol number densities are then fitted to match the derived extinctions in the 1850-1978 period. From these aerosol size distributions, we then calculate extinction coefficients, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors at all wavelengths using the Mie theory. The aerosol surface area densities and volume densities are also provided.

  16. Patch occupancy, number of individuals and population density of the Marbled White in a changing agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenda, Magdalena; Skórka, Piotr

    2010-09-01

    Metapopulation theory predicts the occurrence of animals in habitat patches. In this paper, we tested predictions based on this theory, including effects of spatial autocorrelation, to describe factors affecting the presence, local number of individuals and density of the Marbled White butterfly Melanargia galathea in habitat patches spread across the agricultural landscape of southern Poland. This agricultural landscape has undergone significant changes in recent decades due to the country's political transformation and is currently characterized by a large proportion of fallow (abandoned) land. We compared 48 occupied habitat patches with 60 unoccupied ones. Positive spatial autocorrelation was found in the number and density of individuals in habitat patches. The probability of patch occupancy was higher for patches that were larger, had a higher proportion of edges, were located closer to the nearest neighbouring local population and to the nearest piece of fallow, contained a smaller area of cut grass, and also had more nectar resources. The number of Marbled Whites in habitat patches was positively related to the patch area, the distance to the nearest fallow and the abundance of nectar resources, but was negatively related to the density of shrubs. The density of individuals was positively related to abundance of flowers, proportion of edge in a patch and distance to the nearest fallow, but it was negatively related to patch area, vegetation height and grass cover. These results indicate that recent land-use changes in agricultural landscapes have had both positive and negative effects on the presence and local number of individuals and density of the Marbled White. These changes affect the metapopulation of the species through changes in habitat quality and landscape connectivity in the area surrounding habitat patches.

  17. Retrieval of sodium number density profiles in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere from SCIAMACHY limb emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langowski, M. P.; von Savigny, C.; Burrows, J. P.; Rozanov, V. V.; Dunker, T.; Hoppe, U.-P.; Sinnhuber, M.; Aikin, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the retrieval of sodium atom (Na) number density on a latitude and altitude grid from SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) limb measurements of the Na resonance fluorescence. The results are obtained between 50 and 150 km altitude and the resulting global seasonal variations of Na are analyzed. The retrieval approach is adapted from that used for the retrieval of magnesium atom (Mg) and magnesium ion (Mg+) number density profiles recently reported by Langowski et al. (2014). Monthly mean values of Na are presented as a function of altitude and latitude. This data set was retrieved from the 4 years of spectroscopic limb data of the SCIAMACHY mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) measurement mode (mid-2008 to early 2012). The Na layer has a nearly constant peak altitude of 90-93 km for all latitudes and seasons, and has a full width at half maximum of 5-15 km. Small but significant seasonal variations in Na are identified for latitudes less than 40°, where the maximum Na number densities are 3000-4000 atoms cm-3. At middle to high latitudes a clear seasonal variation with a winter maximum of up to 6000 atoms cm-3 is observed. The high latitudes, which are only measured in the summer hemisphere, have lower number densities, with peak densities being approximately 1000 Na atoms cm-3. The full width at half maximum of the peak varies strongly at high latitudes and is 5 km near the polar summer mesopause, while it exceeds 10 km at lower latitudes. In summer the Na atom concentration at high latitudes and at altitudes below 88 km is significantly smaller than that at middle latitudes. The results are compared with other observations and models and there is overall a good agreement with these.

  18. Implementation of the Missing Aerosol Physics into LLNL IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C

    2005-02-09

    characteristics and composition of aerosols. These processes, together with other physical properties (i.e., size, density, and refractive index), determine the atmospheric lifetime of aerosols and their radiative forcing. To better represent physical properties of aerosols, we adapted an aerosol microphysics model that simulates aerosol size distribution. Work toward this goal was done in collaboration with Professor Anthony Wexler of University of California at Davis. Professor Wexler's group has developed sectional models of atmospheric aerosol dynamics that include an arbitrary number of size sections and chemical compounds or compound classes. The model, AIM (Aerosol Inorganic Model), is designed to predict the mass distribution and composition of urban and regional particulate matter (''Sun and Wexler'', 1998a, b). This model is currently incorporated into EPA's Models-3 air quality modeling platform/CMAQ (Community Multiscale Air Quality) to test its performance with previous simulations of CMAQ over the continental US.

  19. Kinetic and electron-electron energies for convex sums of ground state densities with degeneracies and fractional electron number

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Mel E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu; Anderson, James S. M.; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Ayers, Paul W. E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu

    2014-05-14

    Properties of exact density functionals provide useful constraints for the development of new approximate functionals. This paper focuses on convex sums of ground-level densities. It is observed that the electronic kinetic energy of a convex sum of degenerate ground-level densities is equal to the convex sum of the kinetic energies of the individual degenerate densities. (The same type of relationship holds also for the electron-electron repulsion energy.) This extends a known property of the Levy-Valone Ensemble Constrained-Search and the Lieb Legendre-Transform refomulations of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional to the individual components of the functional. Moreover, we observe that the kinetic and electron-repulsion results also apply to densities with fractional electron number (even if there are no degeneracies), and we close with an analogous point-wise property involving the external potential. Examples where different degenerate states have different kinetic energy and electron-nuclear attraction energy are given; consequently, individual components of the ground state electronic energy can change abruptly when the molecular geometry changes. These discontinuities are predicted to be ubiquitous at conical intersections, complicating the development of universally applicable density-functional approximations.

  20. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities and mass attenuation coefficients in Au alloys.

    PubMed

    Han, I; Demir, L

    2010-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho) for pure Au and Au99Be1, Au88Ge12, Au95Zn5 alloys were measured at 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The samples were irradiated with 241Am and 109Cd radioactive point source using transmission arrangement. The gamma- rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Total atomic and electronic cross-sections (sigmat and sigmae), effective atomic and electron densities (Zeff and Nel) were determined using the obtained mass attenuation coefficients for investigated Au alloys. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients of each alloy were estimated using mixture rule. PMID:20421703

  1. Structures with high number density of carbon nanotubes and 3-dimensional distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zheng (Inventor); Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A composite is described having a three dimensional distribution of carbon nanotubes. The critical aspect of such composites is a nonwoven network of randomly oriented fibers connected at their junctions to afford macropores in the spaces between the fibers. A variety of fibers may be employed, including metallic fibers, and especially nickel fibers. The composite has quite desirable properties for cold field electron emission applications, such as a relatively low turn-on electric field, high electric field enhancement factors, and high current densities. The composites of this invention also show favorable properties for other an electrode applications. Several methods, which also have general application in carbon nanotube production, of preparing these composites are described and employ a liquid feedstock of oxyhydrocarbons as carbon nanotube precursors.

  2. Structures in Ionospheric Number Density and Velocity Associated with Polar Cap Ionization Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivanc, O.; Heelis, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral characteristics of polar cap F region irregularities on large density gradients associated with polar ionization patches are studied using in situ measurements made by the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) spacecraft. The 18 patches studied in this paper were identified by the algorithm introduced by Coley and Heelis, and they were encountered during midnight-noon passes of the spacecraft. Density and velocity spectra associated with these antisunward convecting patches are analyzed in detail. Observations indicate the presence of structure on most patches regardless of the distance between the patch and the cusp where they are believed to develop. Existence of structure on both leading and trailing edges is established when such edges exist. Results, which show no large dependence of Delta N/N power on the sign of the edge gradient del N, do not allow the identification of leading and trailing edges of the patch. The Delta N/N is an increasing function of gradient del N regardless of the sign of the gradient. The correlation between Delta N/N and Delta V is generally poor, but for a given intensity in Delta V, Delta N/N maximizes in regions of large gradients in N. There is evidence for the presence of unstructured patches that seem to co-exist with unstructured horizontal velocities. Slightly smaller spectral indices for trailing edges support the presence of the E X B drift instability. Although this instability is found to be operating in some cases, results suggest that stirring may be a significant contributor to kilometer-size structures in the polar cap.

  3. Oribatid mite species numbers increase, densities decline and parthenogenetic species suffer during bog degradation.

    PubMed

    Seniczak, Anna; Seniczak, Stanisław; Maraun, Mark; Graczyk, Radomir; Mistrzak, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    This study compared the oribatid mites in two natural and four industrially exploited bogs. One natural bog (Zakręt, Z) was located in northeastern Poland and the other one (Toporowy Staw Niżni, TSN), in southern Poland. The four exploited bogs were also located in southern Poland and can be ranked from least to most degraded as follows: Łysa Puścizna (LP), Baligówka (B), Puścizna Mała (PM) and Kaczmarka (K). In the natural bogs, the water pH was higher than in the degraded ones, but other parameters were lower (conductivity, colour value, oxygen demand, and concentration of chlorides). In the natural bogs, the Oribatida were highly abundant (average density was 169,100 ind./m(2)), but with low species diversity and one dominating species. In bog Z the most abundant was Limnozetes foveolatus that had dominance of 75 % and in bog TSN, located at higher altitude, Trimalaconothrus maior dominated (73 %). In two degraded bogs that had still good water conditions (LP and B) the oribatid communities resembled those from the natural bogs; in LP the most abundant species was Hydrozetes lacustris and in bog B, L. foveolatus. In contrast, in two more degraded bogs (PM and K) the abundance of mites was lower (average density was 17,850 ind./m(2)), species diversity of the Oribatida was higher, and no species achieved a high dominance like in the natural bogs. Additionally, in more degraded bogs the abundance of parthenogenetic species was lower than in the natural bogs. PMID:26846473

  4. Modelling the number density of Hα emitters for future spectroscopic near-IR space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzetti, L.; Hirata, C. M.; Geach, J. E.; Cimatti, A.; Baugh, C.; Cucciati, O.; Merson, A.; Norberg, P.; Shi, D.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The future space missions Euclid and WFIRST-AFTA will use the Hα emission line to measure the redshifts of tens of millions of galaxies. The Hα luminosity function at z> 0.7 is one of the major sources of uncertainty in forecasting cosmological constraints from these missions. Aims: We construct unified empirical models of the Hα luminosity function spanning the range of redshifts and line luminosities relevant to the redshift surveys proposed with Euclid and WFIRST-AFTA. Methods: By fitting to observed luminosity functions from Hα surveys, we build three models for its evolution. Different fitting methodologies, functional forms for the luminosity function, subsets of the empirical input data, and treatment of systematic errors are considered to explore the robustness of the results. Results: Functional forms and model parameters are provided for all three models, along with the counts and redshift distributions up to z ~ 2.5 for a range of limiting fluxes (FHα> 0.5 - 3 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1) that are relevant for future space missions. For instance, in the redshift range 0.90 density in the range 7700-130 300 and 2000-4800 deg-2 respectively at fluxes above FHα> 1 and 2 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1, and 32 000-48 0000 for FHα> 0.5 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1 in the extended redshift range 0.40 density of the Universe, and the closely related cosmic star formation history.

  5. Hepatitis C virus G1b infection decreases the number of small low-density lipoprotein particles

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Chika; Nagano, Tomohisa; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Tomita, Yoichi; Sugita, Tomonori; Aida, Yuta; Itagaki, Munenori; Satoh, Kenichi; Sutoh, Satoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Tsubota, Akihito; Aizawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate how hepatitis C virus (HCV) G1b infection influences the particle number of lipoproteins. METHODS: The numbers of lipoprotein particles in fasting sera from 173 Japanese subjects, 82 with active HCV G1b infection (active HCV group) and 91 with cleared HCV infection (SVR group), were examined. Serum lipoprotein was fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography into twenty fractions. The cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in each fraction were measured using LipoSEARCH. The number of lipoprotein particles in each fraction was calculated using a newly developed algorithm, and the relationship between chronic HCV G1b infection and the lipoprotein particle number was determined by multiple linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The median number of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles was significantly lower in the active HCV group [1182 nmol/L, interquartile range (IQR): 444 nmol/L] than in the SVR group (1363 nmol/L, IQR: 472 nmol/L, P < 0.001), as was that of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles (14168 nmol/L vs 15054 nmol/L, IQR: 4114 nmol/L vs 3385 nmol/L, P = 0.042). The number of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles was similar between the two groups. Among the four LDL sub-fractions, the number of large LDL particles was similar between the two groups. However, the numbers of medium (median: 533.0 nmol/L, IQR: 214.7 nmol/L vs median: 633.5 nmol/L, IQR: 229.6 nmol/L, P < 0.001), small (median: 190.9 nmol/L, IQR: 152.4 nmol/L vs median: 263.2 nmol/L, IQR: 159.9 nmol/L; P < 0.001), and very small LDL particles (median: 103.5 nmol/L, IQR: 66.8 nmol/L vs median: 139.3 nmol/L, IQR: 67.3 nmol/L, P < 0.001) were significantly lower in the active HCV group than in the SVR group, respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated an association between HCV G1b infection and the decreased numbers of medium, small, and very small LDL particles. However, active HCV infection did not affect the number of large LDL

  6. In situ measurement of particulate number density and size distribution from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.

    1974-01-01

    Commercial particulate measuring instruments were flown aboard the NASA Convair 990. A condensation nuclei monitor was utilized to measure particles larger than approximately 0.003 micrometers in diameter. A specially designed pressurization system was used with this counter so that the sample could be fed into the monitor at cabin altitude pressure. A near-forward light scattering counter was used to measure the number and size distribution particles in the size range from 0.5 to 5 micrometers and greater in diameter.

  7. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities from mass attenuation coefficients near the K edge in some samarium compounds.

    PubMed

    Akman, F; Durak, R; Turhan, M F; Kaçal, M R

    2015-07-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some samarium compounds were determined using the experimental total mass attenuation coefficient values near the K edge in the X-ray energy range from 36.847 up to 57.142 keV. The measurements, in the region from 36.847 to 57.142 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the Kα2, Kα1, Kβ1 and Kβ2 X-rays from different secondary source targets excited by the 59.54 keV gamma-photons from an Am-241 annular source. This paper presents the first measurement of the effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some samarium compounds near the K edge. The results of the study showed that the measured values were in good agreement with the theoretically calculated ones. PMID:25880612

  8. Studies on mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for CoCuAg alloy thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın, G.; Cengiz, E.; Tıraşoğlu, E.; Aylıkcı, V.; Bakkaloğlu, Ö. F.

    2009-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients for the elements Co, Cu and Ag and a thin film of CoCuAg alloy were measured in the energy range 4.029-38.729 keV. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities were calculated by using these coefficients. The energies were obtained by using secondary targets that were irradiated with gamma-ray photons of 241Am. The x-rays were counted by using a Canberra Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The results were compared with theoretical calculated values and fairly good agreement was found between them within an average experimental error. The mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities were plotted versus photon energy.

  9. Increasing positive ion number densities below the peak of ion-electron pair production in Titan's ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Vigren, E.; Galand, M.; Shebanits, O.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Geppert, W. D.; Lavvas, P.; Vuitton, V.

    2014-05-01

    We combine derived ion-electron pair formation rates with Cassini Radio Plasma Wave Science Langmuir Probe measurements of electron and positive ion number densities in Titan's sunlit ionosphere. We show that positive ion number densities in Titan's sunlit ionosphere can increase toward significantly lower altitudes than the peak of ion-electron pair formation despite that the effective ion-electron recombination coefficient increases. This is explained by the increased mixing ratios of negative ions, which are formed by electron attachment to neutrals. While such a process acts as a sink for free electrons, the positive ions become longer-lived as the rate coefficients for ion-anion neutralization reactions are smaller than those for ion-electron dissociative recombination reactions.

  10. Size Segregation and Number Density Enhancement of Particles in Accretion Disk Eddies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klahr, H. H.; Henning, Th.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the conditions for trapping solid dust particles in eddies and discuss the behavior of particles in a non-laminar protoplanetary accretion disk. We considered particle sizes from small dust grains to larger objects, 10(exp -4) cm less than a(sub p) less than 10(exp 2) cm. Independent of the source of turbulence, one can expect eddies to exist in the gas flow of a accretion disk, in the form of randomly occurring turbulent features or as convective cells. Due to the centrifugal force, solid particles are driven out of an eddy. It will be shown that this process is inhibited by the gravitational force induced by the protostar. Because of the mass dependence of the friction time, a given eddy becomes a trap for particles of a characteristic size and causes a local change in the dust density. Thus, the size distribution of the grains is no longer spatially homogeneous on small scales. Our general estimates do not depend on special turbulence or convection models. We calculate the maximal inhomogeneity due to this process. The strongest effect was observed for mm-sized particles, which can be concentrated by a factor of 100 within only 100 years.

  11. A pathway analysis of global aerosol processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Although budgets for aerosol emission and deposition (macrophysical fluxes) have been studied before, much less is known about the budgets of processes e.g. nucleation, coagulation and condensation. A better understanding of their relative importance would improve our understanding of the aerosol system and help model development and evaluation. Aerosols are not only emitted from and deposited to the Earth's surface but are modified during their transport. The processes for these modifications include nucleation of H2SO4 gas into new aerosol, coagulation with other aerosol and condensation of H2SO4 unto existing aerosol. As a result of these processes, aerosol grow in size and change their chemical composition, often becoming hydrophilic where they were hydrophobic before. This affects their characteristics for various deposition processes (sedimentation, dry or wet deposition) as well as their radiative properties and hence climate forcing by aerosol. We present a complete budget of all aerosol processes in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAM including the M7 microphysics. This model treats aerosol as 7 distinct but interacting two-moment modes of mixed species (soot, organic carbons, sulfate, sea salt and dust). We will show both global budgets as well as regional variations in dominant processes. Some of our conclusions are: condensation of H2SO4 gas onto pre-existing particles is an important process, dominating the growth of small particles in the nucleation mode to the Aitken mode and the ageing of hydrophobic matter. Together with in-cloud production of H2SO4, it significantly contributes to (and often dominates) the mass burden (and hence composition) of the hydrophilic Aitken and accumulation mode particles. Particle growth itself is the leading source of number densities in the hydrophilic Aitken and accumulation modes, with their hydrophobic counterparts contributing (even locally) relatively little. However, the coarse mode is mostly decoupled from the

  12. Factors affecting ion kinetic temperature, number density, and containment time in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The degree of toroidal symmetry of the plasma, the number of midplane electrode rings, the configuration of electrode rings, and the location of the diagnostic instruments with respect to the electrode rings used to generate the plasma are discussed. Impurities were deliberately introduced into the plasma, and the effects of the impurity fraction on ion kinetic temperature and electron number density were observed. It is concluded that, if necessary precautions are taken, the plasma communicates extremely well along the magnetic field lines and displays a high degree of symmetry from sector to sector for a wide range of electrode ring configurations and operating conditions. Finally, some characteristic data taken under nonoptimized conditions are presented, which include the highest electron number density and the longest particle containment time (1.9 msec) observed. Also, evidence from a paired comparison test is presented which shows that the electric field acting along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma improves the plasma density and the calculated containment time more than an order of magnitude if the electric field points inward, relative to the values observed when it points (and pushes ions) radially outward.

  13. Organic aerosol processing in tropical deep convective clouds: Development of a new model (CRM-ORG) and implications for sources of particle number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Julin, J.; Riipinen, I.; Ekman, A. M. L.

    2015-10-01

    The difficulty in assessing interactions between atmospheric particles and clouds is due in part to the chemical complexity of the particles and to the wide range of length and timescales of processes occurring simultaneously during a cloud event. The new Cloud-Resolving Model with Organics (CRM-ORG) addresses these interactions by explicitly predicting the formation, transport, uptake, and re-release of surrogate organic compounds consistent with the volatility basis set framework within a nonhydrostatic, three-dimensional cloud-resolving model. CRM-ORG incorporates photochemical production, explicit condensation/evaporation of organic and inorganic vapors, and a comprehensive set of four different mechanisms describing particle formation from organic vapors and sulfuric acid. We simulate two deep convective cloud events over the Amazon rain forest in March 1998 and compare modeled particle size distributions with airborne observations made during the time period. The model predictions agree well with the observations for Aitken mode particles in the convective outflow (10-14 km) but underpredict nucleation mode particles by a factor of 20. A strong in-cloud particle formation process from organic vapors alone is necessary to reproduce even relatively low ultrafine particle number concentrations (~1500 cm-3). Sensitivity tests with variable initial aerosol loading and initial vertical aerosol profile demonstrate the complexity of particle redistribution and net gain or loss in the cloud. In-cloud particle number concentrations could be enhanced by as much as a factor of 3 over the base case simulation in the cloud outflow but were never reduced by more than a factor of 2 lower than the base. Additional sensitivity cases emphasize the need for constrained estimates of surface tension and affinity of organic vapors to ice surfaces. When temperature-dependent organic surface tension is introduced to the new particle formation mechanisms, the number concentration of

  14. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol versus particle number in middle school children

    PubMed Central

    Mietus-Snyder, Michele; Drews, Kimberly L.; Otvos, James D.; Willi, Steven M.; Foster, Gary D.; Jago, Russell; Buse, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To characterize lipids and lipoproteins in a diverse school-based cohort and identify features associated with discordance between low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and LDL particle (LDL-P). Study design Sixth grade children enrolled in the HEALTHY trial (n=2,384; mean age 11.3 ± 0.6 yr; 54.2% female) were evaluated for standard lipids, lipoprotein particles measured by nuclear magnetic resonance, and homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Characteristics of subgroups with values of LDL-C and LDL-P discordant by >20 percentile units, an amount reasoned to be clinically significant, were compared. Results Four hundred twenty-eight (18%) of children were in the LDL-P < LDL-C subgroup and 375 (16%) in the LDL-P > LDL-C subgroup. Those with LDL-P > LDL-C had significantly higher BMI, waist circumference, HOMA-IR, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and reflected a greater Hispanic ethnic composition but fewer of black race than both the concordant (LDL-P ≅ LDL-C) and opposite discordant (LDL-P < LDL-C) subgroups. Conclusions There is as much lipoprotein cholesterol compositional heterogeneity in 6th graders as has been described in adults and a discordant atherogenic phenotype of LDL-P > LDL-C, common in obesity, is often missed when only LDL-C is considered. Conversely, many children with moderate-risk cholesterol measures (75th to 99th percentile) have a lower LDL particle burden. PMID:23415622

  15. Aerosols and environmental pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth’s atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth’s radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  16. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  17. Column Number Density Expressions Through M = 0 and M = 1 Point Source Plumes Along Any Straight Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions for column number density (CND) are developed for optical line of sight paths through a variety of steady free molecule point source models including directionally-constrained effusion (Mach number M = 0) and flow from a sonic orifice (M = 1). Sonic orifice solutions are approximate, developed using a fair simulacrum fitted to the free molecule solution. Expressions are also developed for a spherically-symmetric thermal expansion (M = 0). CND solutions are found for the most general paths relative to these sources and briefly explored. It is determined that the maximum CND from a distant location through directed effusion and sonic orifice cases occurs along the path parallel to the source plane that intersects the plume axis. For the effusive case this value is exactly twice the CND found along the ray originating from that point of intersection and extending to infinity along the plume's axis. For sonic plumes this ratio is reduced to about 4/3. For high Mach number cases the maximum CND will be found along the axial centerline path. Keywords: column number density, plume flows, outgassing, free molecule flow.

  18. Ultramassive dense early-type galaxies: Velocity dispersions and number density evolution since z = 1.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, A.; Saracco, P.; Tamburri, S.; Lonoce, I.; Ciocca, F.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We investigate the stellar mass assembly history of ultramassive (M⋆ ≳ 1011M⊙) dense (Σ = M⋆/2πRe2> 2500M⊙ pc-2) early-type galaxies (ETGs, elliptical and spheroidal galaxies) selected on basis of visual classification over the last 9 Gyr. Methods: We traced the evolution of the comoving number density ρ of ultramassive dense ETGs and compared their structural (effective radius Re and stellar mass M⋆) and dynamical (velocity dispersion σe) parameters over the redshift range 0 < z < 1.6. We derived the number density ρ at 1.6 number density of ultramassive dense local ETGs from the SDSS sample taking all of the selection bias affecting the spectroscopic sample into account. To compare the dynamical and structural parameters, we collected a sample of 11 ultramassive dense ETGs at 1.2 < z < 1.6 for which velocity dispersion measurements are available. For four of these ETGs (plus one at z = 1.91), we present previously unpublished estimates of velocity dispersion, based on optical VLT-FORS2 spectra. We probe the intermediate redshift range (0.2 ≲ z ≲ 0.9) and the local Universe with different ETGs samples. Results: We find that the comoving number density of ultramassive dense ETGs evolves with z as ρ(z) ∝ (1 + z)0.3 ± 0.8 implying a decrease of ~25% of the population of ultramassive dense ETGs since z = 1.6. By comparing the structural and dynamical properties of high-z ultramassive dense ETGs over the range 0 ≲ z < 1.6 in the [Re, M⋆, σe] plane, we find that all of the ETGs of the high-z sample have counterparts with similar properties in the local Universe. This implies either that the majority (~70%) of ultramassive dense ETGs already completed the assembly and shaping at ⟨ z ⟩ = 1.4, or that, if a significant portion of dense ETGs evolves in size, new

  19. Plant Density Effect on Grain Number and Weight of Two Winter Wheat Cultivars at Different Spikelet and Grain Positions

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yingli; Zheng, Mengjing; Yang, Dongqing; Jin, Min; Chen, Jin; Wang, Zhenlin; Yin, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    In winter wheat, grain development is asynchronous. The grain number and grain weight vary significantly at different spikelet and grain positions among wheat cultivars grown at different plant densities. In this study, two winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars, ‘Wennong6’ and ‘Jimai20’, were grown under four different plant densities for two seasons, in order to study the effect of plant density on the grain number and grain weight at different spikelet and grain positions. The results showed that the effects of spikelet and grain positions on grain weight varied with the grain number of spikelets. In both cultivars, the single-grain weight of the basal and middle two-grain spikelets was higher at the 2nd grain position than that at the 1st grain position, while the opposite occurred in the top two-grain spikelets. In the three-grain spikelets, the distribution of the single-grain weight was different between cultivars. In the four-grain spikelets of Wennong6, the single-grain weight was the highest at the 2nd grain position, followed by the 1st, 3rd, and 4th grain positions. Regardless of the spikelet and grain positions, the single-grain weight was the highest at the 1st and 2nd grain positions and the lowest at the 3rd and 4th grain positions. Overall, plant density affected the yield by controlling the seed-setting characteristics of the tiller spike. Therefore, wheat yield can be increased by decreasing the sterile basal and top spikelets and enhancing the grain weight at the 3rd and 4th grain positions, while maintaining it at the 1st and 2nd grain positions on the spikelet. PMID:27171343

  20. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products. PMID:27400522

  1. In situ measurements of particulate number density and size distribution from an aircraft. [using light scattering particle counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.

    1974-01-01

    Two different commercial particulate measuring instruments were flown aboard the NASA Convair 990. A condensation nuclei monitor was utilized to measure particles larger than approximately 0.003 micron in diameter. A specially designed pressurization system was used with this monitor at cabin altitude pressure. A near-forward light scattering counter was used to measure the number and size distribution particles in the size range from 0.5 to 5 microns and greater in diameter. Considerable variation in number density was encountered for both classes of particles at the test altitudes ranging from 5 to 12 km. Presence of clouds could be detected by the light scattering instrument because large numbers of particles would then be registered by the instrument, especially in the size range above 5.0 microns in diameter.

  2. Low Mach number two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence - Energy budgets and density fluctuations in a polytropic fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Theory suggests that three distinct types of turbulence can occur in the low Mach number limit of polytropic flow: nearly incompressible flows dominated by vorticity, nearly pure acoustic turbulence dominated by compression, and flows characterized by near statistical equipartition of vorticity and compressions. Distinctions between these kinds of turbulence are investigated here by direct numerical simulation of two-dimensional compressible hydrodynamic turbulence. Dynamical scalings of density fluctuations, examination of the ratio of transverse to longitudinal velocity fluctuations, and spectral decomposition of the fluctuations are employed to distinguish the nature of these low Mach number solutions. A strong dependence on the initial data is observed, as well as a tendency for enhanced effects of compressibility at later times and at higher wave numbers, as suggested by theories of nearly incompressible flows.

  3. The dependence of computed tomography number to relative electron density conversion on phantom geometry and its impact on planned dose.

    PubMed

    Inness, Emma K; Moutrie, Vaughan; Charles, Paul H

    2014-06-01

    A computed tomography number to relative electron density (CT-RED) calibration is performed when commissioning a radiotherapy CT scanner by imaging a calibration phantom with inserts of specified RED and recording the CT number displayed. In this work, CT-RED calibrations were generated using several commercially available phantoms to observe the effect of phantom geometry on conversion to electron density and, ultimately, the dose calculation in a treatment planning system. Using an anthropomorphic phantom as a gold standard, the CT number of a material was found to depend strongly on the amount and type of scattering material surrounding the volume of interest, with the largest variation observed for the highest density material tested, cortical bone. Cortical bone gave a maximum CT number difference of 1,110 when a cylindrical insert of diameter 28 mm scanned free in air was compared to that in the form of a 30 × 30 cm(2) slab. The effect of using each CT-RED calibration on planned dose to a patient was quantified using a commercially available treatment planning system. When all calibrations were compared to the anthropomorphic calibration, the largest percentage dose difference was 4.2 % which occurred when the CT-RED calibration curve was acquired with heterogeneity inserts removed from the phantom and scanned free in air. The maximum dose difference observed between two dedicated CT-RED phantoms was ±2.1 %. A phantom that is to be used for CT-RED calibrations must have sufficient water equivalent scattering material surrounding the heterogeneous objects that are to be used for calibration. PMID:24760737

  4. Emissions of organic aerosol mass, black carbon, particle number, and regulated and unregulated gases from scooters and light and heavy duty vehicles with different fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, R.; Clairotte, M.; Adam, T. W.; Giechaskiel, B.; Heringa, M. F.; Elsasser, M.; Martini, G.; Manfredi, U.; Streibel, T.; Sklorz, M.; Zimmermann, R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Astorga, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Prevot, A. S. H.

    2014-06-01

    A sampling campaign with seven different types of vehicles was conducted in 2009 at the vehicle test facilities of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra (Italy). The vehicles chosen were representative of some categories circulating in Europe and were fueled either with standard gasoline or diesel and some with blends of rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel. The aim of this work was to improve the knowledge about the emission factors of gas phase and particle-associated regulated and unregulated species from vehicle exhaust. Unregulated species such as black carbon (BC), primary organic aerosol (OA) content, particle number (PN), monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and a~selection of unregulated gaseous compounds, including nitrous acid (N2O), ammonia (NH3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and methane (CH4), were measured in real time with a suite of instruments including a high-resolution aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer, a resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Diesel vehicles, without particle filters, featured the highest values for particle number, followed by gasoline vehicles and scooters. The particles from diesel and gasoline vehicles were mostly made of BC with a low fraction of OA, while the particles from the scooters were mainly composed of OA. Scooters were characterized by super high emissions factors for OA, which were orders of magnitude higher than for the other vehicles. The heavy duty diesel vehicle (HDDV) featured the highest nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, while the scooters had the highest emissions for total hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds due to the unburned and partially burned gasoline and lubricant oil mixture. Generally, vehicles fuelled with biodiesel blends showed lower emission factors of OA and total aromatics than those from the standard fuels

  5. The effect of an on-orbit near encounter on the number flux density of micron sized particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, Carl R.; Tanner, William G.; Stevenson, Tim J.; Borg, Janet; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Alexander, W. Merle; Maag, Andrew J.

    1993-01-01

    Many materials and techniques have been developed by the authors to sample the flux of particles in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), and through regular insitu sampling of the flux in LEO, the materials and techniques have produced data which complement the data now being amassed by the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) research activities. Recent flight experiments on STS-32, STS-44, STS-46, and STS-52 have been conducted to develop an understanding of the spatial density as a function of size (mass) for particle sizes 1x10(exp -6) cm and larger. In addition to the enumeration of particle impacts, it was also the intent of these experiments that hypervelocity particles be captured and returned intact. Measurements were performed post-flight to determine the flux density, diameters, and subsequent effects on various optical, thermal control, and structural materials. During the course of the STS-44 mission, the Space Shuttle corrected its altitude by 26 km to evade a spent upper stage. The results of this near encounter suggests that a cloud of micron sized particles exist in the vicinity of the object. Data also suggest that the flux density is nearly two (2) orders of magnitude higher than background flux. A comparison of the number flux density along with microphotographs of the captured particles will be presented for the referenced shuttle flights.

  6. Development of vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for wide measurement range of number density using a dual-tube inductively coupled plasma light source

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, Akira; Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki

    2012-12-15

    A vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for a wide measurement range of atomic number densities is developed. Dual-tube inductively coupled plasma was used as a light source. The probe beam profile was optimized for the target number density range by changing the mass flow rate of the inner and outer tubes. This system was verified using cold xenon gas. As a result, the measurement number density range was extended from the conventional two orders to five orders of magnitude.

  7. Development of vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for wide measurement range of number density using a dual-tube inductively coupled plasma light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Akira; Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki

    2012-12-01

    A vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for a wide measurement range of atomic number densities is developed. Dual-tube inductively coupled plasma was used as a light source. The probe beam profile was optimized for the target number density range by changing the mass flow rate of the inner and outer tubes. This system was verified using cold xenon gas. As a result, the measurement number density range was extended from the conventional two orders to five orders of magnitude.

  8. Inhibitory control and visuo-spatial reversibility in Piaget's seminal number conservation task: a high-density ERP study.

    PubMed

    Borst, Grégoire; Simon, Grégory; Vidal, Julie; Houdé, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The present high-density event-related potential (ERP) study on 13 adults aimed to determine whether number conservation relies on the ability to inhibit the overlearned length-equals-number strategy and then imagine the shortening of the row that was lengthened. Participants performed the number-conservation task and, after the EEG session, the mental imagery task. In the number-conservation task, first two rows with the same number of tokens and the same length were presented on a computer screen (COV condition) and then, the tokens in one of the two rows were spread apart (INT condition). Participants were instructed to determine whether the two rows had an identical number of tokens. In the mental imagery task, two rows with different lengths but the same number of tokens were presented and participants were instructed to imagine the tokens in the longer row aligning with the tokens in the shorter row. In the number-conservation task, we found that the amplitudes of the centro-parietal N2 and fronto-central P3 were higher in the INT than in the COV conditions. In addition, the differences in response times between the two conditions were correlated with the differences in the amplitudes of the fronto-central P3. In light of previous results reported on the number-conservation task in adults, the present results suggest that inhibition might be necessary to succeed the number-conservation task in adults even when the transformation of the length of one of the row is displayed. Finally, we also reported correlations between the speed at which participants could imagine the shortening of one of the row in the mental imagery task, the speed at which participants could determine that the two rows had the same number of tokens after the tokens in one of the row were spread apart and the latency of the late positive parietal component in the number-conservation task. Therefore, performing the number-conservation task might involve mental transformation processes in

  9. Technical Note: Exploring the limit for the conversion of energy-subtracted CT number to electron density for high-atomic-number materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masatoshi; Tsukihara, Masayoshi

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: For accurate tissue inhomogeneity correction in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide ρ{sub e} range. The purpose of this study is to address the limitations of the conversion method with respect to atomic number (Z) by elucidating the role of partial photon interactions in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion process. Methods: The authors performed numerical analyses of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion for 105 human body tissues, as listed in ICRU Report 46, and elementary substances with Z = 1–40. Total and partial attenuation coefficients for these materials were calculated using the XCOM photon cross section database. The effective x-ray energies used to calculate the attenuation were chosen to imitate a dual-source CT scanner operated at 80–140 kV/Sn under well-calibrated and poorly calibrated conditions. Results: The accuracy of the resultant calibrated electron density,ρ{sub e}{sup cal}, for the ICRU-46 body tissues fully satisfied the IPEM-81 tolerance levels in radiotherapy treatment planning. If a criterion of ρ{sub e}{sup cal}/ρ{sub e} − 1 is assumed to be within ±2%, the predicted upper limit of Z applicable for the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion under the well-calibrated condition is Z = 27. In the case of the poorly calibrated condition, the upper limit of Z is approximately 16. The deviation from the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} linearity for higher Z substances is mainly caused by the anomalous variation in the photoelectric-absorption component. Conclusions: Compensation among the three partial components of the photon interactions provides for sufficient linearity of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion to be applicable for most human tissues even for poorly conditioned scans in which there exists a large variation of effective x

  10. A dynamo theory prediction for solar cycle 22: Sunspot number, radio flux, exospheric temperature, and total density at 400 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Hedin, A. E.

    1986-01-01

    Using the dynamo theory method to predict solar activity, a value for the smoothed sunspot number of 109 + or - 20 is obtained for solar cycle 22. The predicted cycle is expected to peak near December, 1990 + or - 1 year. Concommitantly, F(10.7) radio flux is expected to reach a smoothed value of 158 + or - 18 flux units. Global mean exospheric temperature is expected to reach 1060 + or - 50 K and global total average total thermospheric density at 400 km is expected to reach 4.3 x 10 to the -15th gm/cu cm + or - 25 percent.

  11. A dynamo theory prediction for solar cycle 22 - Sunspot number, radio flux, exospheric temperature, and total density at 400 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Hedin, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    Using the 'dynamo theory' method to predict solar activity, a value for the smoothed sunspot number of 109 + or - 20 is obtained for solar cycle 22. The predicted cycle is expected to peak near December, 1990 + or - 1 year. Concommitantly, F(10.7) radio flux is expected to reach a smoothed value of 158 + or - 18 flux units. Global mean exospheric temperature is expected to reach 1060 + or - 50 K and global total average total thermospheric density at 400 km is expected to reach 4.3 x 10 to the -15th gm/cu cm + or - 25 percent.

  12. Orbiting lidar simulations. I - Aerosol and cloud measurements by an independent-wavelength technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Morley, B. M.; Livingston, J. M.; Grams, G. W.; Patterson, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    Aerosol and cloud measurements have been simulated for a Space Shuttle lidar. Expected errors - in signal, transmission, density, and calibration - are calculated algebraically and checked by simulating measurements and retrievals using random-number generators. By day, vertical structure is retrieved for tenuous clouds, Saharan aerosols, and boundary layer aerosols (at 0.53 and 1.06 micron) as well as strong volcanic stratospheric aerosols (at 0.53 micron). By night, all these constituents are retrieved plus upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols (at 1.06 micron), mesospheric aerosols (at 0.53 micron), and noctilucent clouds (at 1.06 and 0.53 micron). The vertical resolution was 0.1-0.5 km in the troposphere, 0.5-2.0 km above, except 0.25-1.0 km in the mesospheric cloud and aerosol layers; horizontal resolution was 100-2000 km.

  13. Aerosol Mass Loading, Mixing State, Size and Number in Present Day (2000) and Future (2100): Study with the Advanced Particle Microphysics (APM) module in the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, G.; Yu, F.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols affect the global energy budget by scattering and absorbing sunlight (direct effects) and by changing the microphysical properties, lifetime, and coverage of clouds (indirect effects). One of the key challenges in quantifying the aerosol direct and indirect effects is to deep our understanding about the size distribution, size-resolved composition, and mixing state of aerosols. However, detailed information on size distribution and mixing state is often not available or incomplete in current climate models. Here, we incorporated APM into CESM. APM is a multi-type, multi-component (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, SOA, BC, OC, dust, and sea salt), size-resolved particle microphysics model. Online chemistry, up-to-date nucleation, oxidation aging of medium-volatile and semi-volatile organic gases, aerosol-cloud interaction with stratiform cloud, shallow convection cloud, and deep convection cloud are considered. The amounts of secondary species coated on primary particles, through condensation, coagulation, equilibrium uptake, and aqueous chemistry, are also tracked. Model results are compared with aerosol mass observed by IMPROVE/EMEP, vertical structure of global particle number from aircraft-based field campaigns, particle and cloud condensation nuclei number at ground-based stations, aerosol optical properties retrieved by several satellites. Model results can capture the major characteristics shown in these observations. With this model system, we find that global burdens of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, BC, OC from 2000 to 2100, under scenario RCP 4.5 where total radiative forcing is stabilized before 2100, are decreased by 44%, 50%, 43%, 40%, 40%, respectively. Dust and sea salt increase slightly. Global burdens of secondary species coated on BCOC, dust, and sea salt are deceased by 34%, 30% and 60%, respectively. Global averaged aerosol number in the lower troposphere (from surface to 3 km) is significantly decreased, especially for particles smaller than

  14. Effects of Lewis number, density ratio and gravity on burning velocity and conditional statistics in stagnating turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jaesung; Huh, Kang Y.

    2014-09-01

    DNS is performed to analyse the effects of Lewis number (Le), density ratio and gravity in stagnating turbulent premixed flames. The results show good agreement with those of Lee and Huh (Combustion and Flame, Vol. 159, 2012, pp. 1576-1591) with respect to the turbulent burning velocity, ST, in terms of turbulent diffusivity, flamelet thickness, mean curvature and displacement speed at the leading edge. In all four stagnating flames studied, a mean tangential strain rate resulting in a mean flamelet thickness smaller than the unstretched laminar flame thickness leads to an increase in ST. A flame cusp of positive curvature involves a superadiabatic burned gas temperature due to diffusive-thermal instability for an Le less than unity. Wrinkling tends to be suppressed at a larger density ratio, not enhanced by hydrodynamic instability, in the stagnating flow configuration. Turbulence is produced, resulting in highly anisotropic turbulence with heavier unburned gas accelerating through a flame brush by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Results are also provided on brush thickness, flame surface density and conditional velocities in burned and unburned gas and on flame surfaces to represent the internal brush structures for all four test flames.

  15. An investigation of Raman lidar aerosol measurements and their application to the study of the aerosol indirect effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Felicita

    radius and droplet number density using this new capability have been studied. Some discrepancies are found between the CARL and AERI measurements of liquid water path and droplet effective radius and they need to be studied in more detail when a larger dataset is available. To study the correlation between aerosol presence and cloud microphysics the calculations of IE, introduced by Feingold as a parameterization of the aerosol indirect effect, has been performed here for the first time using exclusively Raman lidar data. The work shown here is an indication that the combined measurements of aerosol extinction, cloud liquid water content, droplet radius and droplet number density with a Raman lidar represents an interesting new technique for the study of the aerosol indirect effect.

  16. Determination of the number density of excited and ground Zn atoms during rf magnetron sputtering of ZnO target

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloul, L.; Gangwar, R. K.; Stafford, L.

    2015-07-15

    A combination of optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS) and optical emission spectroscopy measurements was used to monitor the number density of Zn atoms in excited 4s4p ({sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable states as well as in ground 4s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) state in a 5 mTorr Ar radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering plasma used for the deposition of ZnO-based thin films. OAS measurements revealed an increase by about one order of magnitude of Zn {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable atoms by varying the self-bias voltage on the ZnO target from −115 to −300 V. Over the whole range of experimental conditions investigated, the triplet-to-singlet metastable density ratio was 5 ± 1, which matches the statistical weight ratio of these states in Boltzmann equilibrium. Construction of a Boltzmann plot using all Zn I emission lines in the 200–500 nm revealed a constant excitation temperature of 0.33 ± 0.04 eV. In combination with measured populations of Zn {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable atoms, this temperature was used to extrapolate the absolute number density of ground state Zn atoms. The results were found to be in excellent agreement with those obtained previously by actinometry on Zn atoms using Ar as the actinometer gas [L. Maaloul and L. Stafford, J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 31, 061306 (2013)]. This set of data was then correlated to spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements of the deposition rate of Zn atoms on a Si substrate positioned at 12 cm away from the ZnO target. The deposition rate scaled linearly with the number density of Zn atoms. In sharp contrast with previous studies on RF magnetron sputtering of Cu targets, these findings indicate that metastable atoms play a negligible role on the plasma deposition dynamics of Zn-based coatings.

  17. A fiber-optic interferometer for in situ measurements of plasma number density in pulsed-power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. M.; Keefer, D. R.; Wright, N. W.

    2003-07-01

    A fiber-optic-based interferometer has been designed, constructed, and applied to plasma measurements in pulsed-power systems. The beam from a 1310 nm solid-state diode laser is coupled into a single-mode fiber and split into two beams, one of which was passed through an acousto-optic modulator to frequency shift the light. Both beams travel through approximately 30 m of fiber, with the probe volume consisting of a short air or vacuum gap in the probe beam fiber where the light is collimated and collected by lenses. The beams are then recombined on a photodiode, producing a time-varying sinusoidal intensity signal that is phase modulated with the presence of a plasma in the probe volume. This configuration allows for remote measurements of plasma electron number density, and is robust with respect to vibration in the plasma source and electromagnetic interference. Tests indicate that phase measurement accuracies of ±0.045 rad corresponding to number density accuracies of ±1.2×1019 m-2 at 1310 nm are achievable with this device. A description of this interferometer, including refinements needed to achieve these accuracies, is presented along with the results of tests performed on a coaxial plasma gun.

  18. A new method to measure electron density and effective atomic number using dual-energy CT images.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Luis Isaac Ramos; Azorin, José Fernando Pérez; Almansa, Julio F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method to extract the electron density ([Formula: see text]) and the effective atomic number (Z eff) from dual-energy CT images, based on a Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the atomic cross section per electron. This method was used to calibrate a Siemens Definition CT using the CIRS phantom. The predicted electron density and effective atomic number using 80 kVp and 140 kVp were compared with a calibration phantom and an independent set of samples. The mean absolute deviations between the theoretical and calculated values for all the samples were 1.7 %  ±  0.1 % for [Formula: see text] and 4.1 %  ±  0.3 % for Z eff. Finally, these results were compared with other stoichiometric method. The application of the KLE to represent the atomic cross section per electron is a promising method for calculating [Formula: see text] and Z eff using dual-energy CT images. PMID:26649484

  19. A new method to measure electron density and effective atomic number using dual-energy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Garcia, Luis Isaac; Pérez Azorin, José Fernando; Almansa, Julio F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method to extract the electron density ({ρ\\text{e}} ) and the effective atomic number (Z eff) from dual-energy CT images, based on a Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) of the atomic cross section per electron. This method was used to calibrate a Siemens Definition CT using the CIRS phantom. The predicted electron density and effective atomic number using 80 kVp and 140 kVp were compared with a calibration phantom and an independent set of samples. The mean absolute deviations between the theoretical and calculated values for all the samples were 1.7 %  ±  0.1 % for {ρ\\text{e}} and 4.1 %  ±  0.3 % for Z eff. Finally, these results were compared with other stoichiometric method. The application of the KLE to represent the atomic cross section per electron is a promising method for calculating {ρ\\text{e}} and Z eff using dual-energy CT images.

  20. An improved multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver for three-dimensional flows with large density ratio and high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shu, C.; Yang, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    An improved multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver (MLBFS) is proposed in this work for effective simulation of three-dimensional (3D) multiphase flows with large density ratio and high Reynolds number. As a finite volume scheme, the MLBFS originally proposed in [27] applies the finite volume method to solve for macroscopic flow variables directly. The fluxes are reconstructed locally at each cell interface by using the standard LBM solutions. Due to the modeling error of the standard LBM, the reconstructed fluxes deviate from those in the Navier-Stokes equations; and to compensate this error, a complex tensor is introduced in the original MLBFS. However, the computation of the tensor introduces additional complexity and usually needs a relatively thicker interface thickness to maintain numerical stability, which makes the solver be complex and inefficient in the 3D case. To remove this drawback, in this work, a theoretical analysis to the formulations obtained from the Chapman-Enskog expansion is conducted. It is shown that the modeling error can be effectively removed by modifying the computation of the equilibrium density distribution function. With this improvement, the proposed 3D MLBFS not only avoids the calculation of the compensation tensor but also is able to maintain numerical stability with very thin interface thickness. Several benchmark cases, including the challenging droplet impacting on a dry surface, head-on collisions of binary droplets and droplet splashing on a thin film with density ratio 1000 and Reynolds number up to 3000, are studied to validate the proposed solver. The obtained results agree well with the published data.

  1. Potential of dual-energy subtraction for converting CT numbers to electron density based on a single linear relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The conversion of the computed tomography (CT) number to electron density is one of the main processes that determine the accuracy of patient dose calculations in radiotherapy treatment planning. However, the CT number and electron density of tissues cannot be generally interrelated via a simple one-to-one correspondence because the CT number depends on the effective atomic number as well as the electron density. The purpose of this study is to present a simple conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number ({Delta}HU) by means of dual-energy CT (DECT) to the relative electron density ({rho}{sub e}) via a single linear relationship. Methods: The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method was demonstrated by performing analytical DECT image simulations that were intended to imitate a second-generation dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner with an additional tin filtration for the high-kV tube. The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} calibration line was obtained from the image simulation with a 33 cm-diameter electron density calibration phantom equipped with 16 inserts including polytetrafluoroethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and aluminum; the elemental compositions of these three inserts were quite different to those of body tissues. The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method was also applied to previously published experimental CT data, which were measured using two different CT scanners, to validate the clinical feasibility of the present approach. In addition, the effect of object size on {rho}{sub e}-calibrated images was investigated by image simulations using a 25 cm-diameter virtual phantom for two different filtrations: with and without the tin filter for the high-kV tube. Results: The simulated {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} plot exhibited a predictable linear relationship over a wide range of {rho}{sub e} from 0.00 (air) to 2.35 (aluminum). Resultant values of the coefficient of determination, slope, and intercept of the linear function fitted to the data were close to those

  2. Tomography of atomic number and density of materials using dual-energy imaging and the Alvarez and Macovski attenuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paziresh, M.; Kingston, A. M.; Latham, S. J.; Fullagar, W. K.; Myers, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography and the Alvarez and Macovski [Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)] transmitted intensity (AMTI) model were used in this study to estimate the maps of density (ρ) and atomic number (Z) of mineralogical samples. In this method, the attenuation coefficients are represented [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)] in the form of the two most important interactions of X-rays with atoms that is, photoelectric absorption (PE) and Compton scattering (CS). This enables material discrimination as PE and CS are, respectively, dependent on the atomic number (Z) and density (ρ) of materials [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)]. Dual-energy imaging is able to identify sample materials even if the materials have similar attenuation coefficients at single-energy spectrum. We use the full model rather than applying one of several applied simplified forms [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976); Siddiqui et al., SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition (Society of Petroleum Engineers, 2004); Derzhi, U.S. patent application 13/527,660 (2012); Heismann et al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 2073-2079 (2003); Park and Kim, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 59, 2709 (2011); Abudurexiti et al., Radiol. Phys. Technol. 3, 127-135 (2010); and Kaewkhao et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 109, 1260-1265 (2008)]. This paper describes the tomographic reconstruction of ρ and Z maps of mineralogical samples using the AMTI model. The full model requires precise knowledge of the X-ray energy spectra and calibration of PE and CS constants and exponents of atomic number and energy that were estimated based on fits to simulations and calibration measurements. The estimated ρ and Z images of the samples used in this paper yield average relative errors of 2.62% and 1.19% and maximum relative errors of 2.64% and 7.85%, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the method accounts for the beam hardening effect in density (ρ) and

  3. A comparison of Solar Mesosphere Explorer and Stratosphere Aerosol and Gas Experiment II ozone densities near the stratopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusch, D. W.; Clancy, R. T.; Mccormick, M. P.; Zawodny, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Ozone measurements made by the SME UV Spectrometer and the Stratosphere Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) spectometer are compared at 1.0 mbar for the time period from October 1984 to December 1986, using a model of the diurnal variation of ozone to correct for the difference in local times of the two measurements. The absolute values of the ozone mixing ratio measured by the two spectrometers were found to agree to better than 5 percent, with no significant divergence between the instruments. It is concluded that, since the SAGE II data are not dependent on the absolute calibration of the instrument, these data can be used as time-dependent 'ground truth' measurements for comparisons with other instruments.

  4. On-the-fly cross flow laser guided separation of aerosol particles based on size, refractive index and density-theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lall, A A; Terray, A; Hart, S J

    2010-12-20

    Laser separation of particles is achieved using forces resulting from the momentum exchange between particles and photons constituting the laser radiation. Particles can experience different optical forces depending on their size and/or optical properties, such as refractive index. Thus, particles can move at different speeds in the presence of an optical force, leading to spatial separations. In this paper, we present a theoretical analysis on laser separation of non-absorbing aerosol particles moving at speeds (1-10 cm/sec) which are several orders of magnitude greater than typical particle speeds used in previous studies in liquid medium. The calculations are presented for particle deflection by a loosely focused Gaussian 1064 nm laser, which simultaneously holds and deflects particles entrained in flow perpendicular to their direction of travel. The gradient force holds the particles against the viscous drag for a short period of time. The scattering force simultaneously pushes the particles, perpendicular to the flow, during this period. Our calculations show particle deflections of over 2500 µm for 15 µm aerosol particles, and a separation of over 1500 µm between 5 µm and 10 µm particles when the laser is operated at 10 W. We show that a separation of about 421 µm can be achieved between two particles of the same size (10 µm) but having a refractive index difference of 0.1. Density based separations are also possible. Two 10 µm particles with a density difference of 600 kg/m3 can be separated by 193 µm. Examples are shown for separation distances between polystyrene, poly(methylmethacrylate), silica and water particles. These large laser guided deflections represent a novel achievement for optical separation in the gas phase. PMID:21196954

  5. DNS of aerosol evolution in a turbulent jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kun; Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2011-11-01

    The effects of turbulence on the evolution of aerosols are not well understood. In this work, the interaction of aerosol dynamics and turbulence are studied in a canonical flow configuration by numerical means. The configuration consists of a hot nitrogen stream saturated with dibutyl phthalate (DBP) vapor mixing with cool air in a shear layer. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) for the momentum and scalar fields is coupled with the direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) for the condensing liquid phase. The effects of turbulent mixing on aerosol processes (nucleation, condensation, and coagulation) are quantified by analyzing the statistics of number density and droplet sizes.

  6. A New Real-Time Method for Determining Particles Sphericity and Density: Application to Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed by Ozonolysis of alpha-Pinene

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Yang, Juan; Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Imre, Dan G.

    2008-11-01

    Particle volumes are most often obtained by measuring particle mobility size distributions and assuming that the particles are spherical. These volumes are then converted to mass loads by using particle densities that are commonly either assumed or estimated from the measured mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters assuming again that the particles are spherical. Depending on the system, these assumptions can introduce significant errors. We present a new method that can be applied to any particle system to determine in real-time whether the particles are spherical or not. We use our 2nd generation single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) to measure with extremely high precision the vacuum aerodynamic size distributions of particles classified by differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and demonstrate that the line shape of these distributions provide a way to unambiguously distinguish between spherical and aspherical particles. Moreover, the very same experimental system is used to obtain in addition to individual particle size, its density, composition and dynamic shape factor. We illustrate the application of this method to secondary organic aerosols formed as a result of ozonolysis of α-pinene in the presence and absence of an OH scavenger and find these particles to be spherical with densities of 1.198±0.004 gcm-3 and 1.213±0.003 gcm-3 respectively.

  7. A new real-time method for determining particles' sphericity and density: application to secondary organic aerosol formed by ozonolysis of alpha-pinene.

    PubMed

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Yang, Juan; Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A; Imre, Dan

    2008-11-01

    Particle volumes are most often obtained by measuring particle mobility size distributions and assuming that the particles are spherical. Particle volumes are then converted to mass loads by using particle densities that are commonly estimated from measured mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters, assuming that the particles are spherical. For aspherical particles, these assumptions can introduce significant errors. We present in this work a new method that can be applied to any particle system to determine in real time whether the particles are spherical or not. We use our second-generation single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) to measure with extremely high precision the vacuum aerodynamic size distributions of particles that are classified by differential mobility analyzer and demonstrate that the line shape of these vacuum aerodynamic size distributions provide a way to unambiguously distinguish between spherical and aspherical particles. Moreover, the very same experimental system is used to obtain the size, density, composition, and dynamic shape factors of individual particles. We present an application of this method to secondary organic aerosols that are formed as a result of ozonolysis of alpha-pinene in the presence and absence of an OH scavenger and find these particles to be spherical with densities of 1.198 +/- 0.004 and 1.213 +/- 0.003 g cm(-3), respectively. PMID:19031898

  8. Oligodendrocyte and Interneuron Density in Hippocampal Subfields in Schizophrenia and Association of Oligodendrocyte Number with Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Falkai, Peter; Steiner, Johann; Malchow, Berend; Shariati, Jawid; Knaus, Andreas; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Schneider-Axmann, Thomas; Kraus, Theo; Hasan, Alkomiet; Bogerts, Bernhard; Schmitt, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In schizophrenia, previous stereological post-mortem investigations of anterior, posterior, and total hippocampal subfields showed no alterations in total neuron number but did show decreased oligodendrocyte numbers in CA4, an area that corresponds to the polymorph layer of the dentate gyrus (DG). However, these investigations identified oligodendrocytes only on the basis of morphological criteria in Nissl staining and did not assess alterations of interneurons with immunohistochemical markers. Moreover, the association of findings in the posterior hippocampus with cognitive deficits remains unknown. On the basis of the available clinical records, we compared patients with definite and possible cognitive dysfunction; nine patients had evidence in their records of either definite (n = 4) or possible (n = 5) cognitive dysfunction. Additionally, we assessed the density of two oligodendrocyte subpopulations immunostained by the oligodendrocyte transcription factors Olig1 and Olig2 and of interneurons immunolabeled by parvalbumin. We investigated posterior hippocampal subregions in the post-mortem brains of the same schizophrenia patients (SZ; n = 10) and healthy controls (n = 10) we examined in our previously published stereological studies. Our stereological studies found that patients with definite cognitive deficits had decreased total/Nissl-stained oligodendrocyte numbers in the left (p = 0.014) and right (p = 0.050) CA4, left CA2/3 (p = 0.050), left CA1 (p = 0.027), and left (p = 0.050) and right (p = 0.014) subiculum of the anterior part of the hippocampus compared to patients with possible cognitive deficits. In the present study, we found no significant influence of definite cognitive deficits in the posterior part of the hippocampus, whereas in the entire hippocampus SZ with definite cognitive deficits showed decreased oligodendrocyte numbers in the left (p = 0.050) and right (p = 0.050) DG and left CA2/3 (p = 0.050). We did not find significant differences in

  9. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  10. Column Number Density Expressions Through M = 0 and M = 1 Point Source Plumes Along Any Straight Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions for column number density (CND) are developed for optical line of sight paths through a variety of steady free molecule point source models including directionally-constrained effusion (Mach number M = 0) and flow from a sonic orifice (M 1). Sonic orifice solutions are approximate, developed using a fair simulacrum fitted to the free molecule solution. Expressions are also developed for a spherically-symmetric thermal expansion (M = 0). CND solutions are found for the most general paths relative to these sources and briefly explored. It is determined that the maximum CND from a distant location through directed effusion and sonic orifice cases occurs along the path parallel to the source plane that intersects the plume axis. For the effusive case this value is exactly twice the CND found along the ray originating from that point of intersection and extending to infinity along the plumes axis. For sonic plumes this ratio is reduced to about 43. For high Mach number cases the maximum CND will be found along the axial centerline path.

  11. Numerical investigation on boiling flow of liquid nitrogen in a vertical tube using bubble number density approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xuefeng; Li, Xiangdong; Wang, Rongshun

    2016-04-01

    An average bubble number density (ABND) model was formulated and numerically resolved for the subcooled flow boiling of liquid nitrogen. The effects of bubble coalescence and breakup were taken into account. Some new closure correlations describing bubble nucleation and departure on the heating surface were selected as well. For the purpose of comparison, flow boiling of liquid nitrogen was also numerically simulated using a modified two-fluid model. The results show that the simulations performed by using the ABND model achieve encouraging improvement in accuracy in predicting heat flux and wall temperature of a vertical tube. Moreover, the influence of the bubble coalescence and breakup is shown to be great on predicting overall pressure beyond the transition point.

  12. MODELING THE ANOMALY OF SURFACE NUMBER DENSITIES OF GALAXIES ON THE GALACTIC EXTINCTION MAP DUE TO THEIR FIR EMISSION CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Yahata, Kazuhiro; Kayo, Issha; Nishimichi, Takahiro

    2015-02-01

    The most widely used Galactic extinction map is constructed assuming that the observed far-infrared (FIR) fluxes come entirely from Galactic dust. According to the earlier suggestion by Yahata et al., we consider how FIR emission of galaxies affects the SFD map. We first compute the surface number density of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 galaxies as a function of the r-band extinction, A {sub r,} {sub SFD}. We confirm that the surface densities of those galaxies positively correlate with A {sub r,} {sub SFD} for A {sub r,} {sub SFD} < 0.1, as first discovered by Yahata et al. for SDSS DR4 galaxies. Next we construct an analytical model to compute the surface density of galaxies, taking into account the contamination of their FIR emission. We adopt a log-normal probability distribution for the ratio of 100 μm and r-band luminosities of each galaxy, y ≡ (νL){sub 100} {sub μm}/(νL) {sub r}. Then we search for the mean and rms values of y that fit the observed anomaly, using the analytical model. The required values to reproduce the anomaly are roughly consistent with those measured from the stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies. Due to the limitation of our statistical modeling, we are not yet able to remove the FIR contamination of galaxies from the extinction map. Nevertheless, the agreement with the model prediction suggests that the FIR emission of galaxies is mainly responsible for the observed anomaly. Whereas the corresponding systematic error in the Galactic extinction map is 0.1-1 mmag, it is directly correlated with galaxy clustering and thus needs to be carefully examined in precision cosmology.

  13. Ozone synthesis improves by increasing number density of plasma channels and lower voltage in a nonthermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif Malik, Muhammad; Hughes, David

    2016-04-01

    Improvements in ozone synthesis from air and oxygen by increasing the number density of plasma channels and lower voltage for the same specific input energy (SIE) were explored in a nonthermal plasma based on a sliding discharge. The number of plasma channels and energy per pulse increased in direct proportion to the increase in the effective length of the anode (the high voltage electrode). Decreasing the discharge gap increased the energy per pulse for the same length and allowed the installation of more electrode pairs in the same space. It allowed the increase of the number of plasma channels in the same space to achieve the same SIE at a lower peak voltage with less energy per plasma channel. The ozone concentration gradually increased to ~1500 ppmv (140 to 50 g kWh-1) from air and to ~6000 ppmv (400 to 200 g kWh-1) from oxygen with a gradual increase in the SIE to ~200 J L-1, irrespective of the variations in electrode geometry, applied voltage or flow rate of the feed gas. A gradual increase in SIE beyond 200 J L-1 gradually increased the ozone concentration to a certain maximum value followed by a decline, but the rate of increase and the maximum value was higher for the greater number of plasma channels and lower peak voltage combination. The maximum ozone concentration was ~5000 ppmv (~30 g kWh-1) from air and ~22 000 ppmv (~80 g kWh-1) from oxygen. The results are explained on the basis of characteristics of the plasma and ozone synthesis mechanism.

  14. Seasonal variation of atmospheric aerosols and its impact on aerosol radiation forcing over Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Srivastava, M. K.; Bano, T.; Nath, S.; Tanwar, R. S.; Singh, R.

    Seasonal variability in suspended particulate matter concentration optical properties of aerosol and radiation flux have been studied for Delhi station India using long-term data that comprised of ground based and satellite-borne observations Ground based measurements were taken by a hand-held portable spectrometer MICROTOPS II Solar Light Co Inc USA operating at central wavelengths 340 500 675 870 and 1020 nms FWHM pm 2-10 nm The global radiation flux was measured using the CM-21 pyranometer Kipp and Zonen Germany for wavelength range 305-2800 nm The flux for 290-320 nm wavelength range was measured using UV-Biometer Solar Light Co Inc USA The seasonal change in radiative forcing due to seasonal variability in number density and character of the aerosols is done using Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transfer model SBDART Since the chemical character of the dominating aerosols for different season was not readily available an estimation of the aerosol composition was done using Optical Properties of Aerosols and Cloud OPAC model The output of the OPAC model gives the required parameters for the estimation of radiation forcing by SBDART These include single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter Initial results reveal three specific seasonal characteristics of aerosols pre-monsoon post monsoon and the winter excluding monsoon period when data is highly irregular due to predominantly cloudy conditions and heavy downpour During pre-monsoon high aerosol optical depth AOD and near zero often

  15. Tracking a large number of closely spaced objects based on the particle probability hypothesis density filter via optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangkui; Xu, Hui; An, Wei; Sheng, Weidong; Xu, Dan

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to tracking a large number of closely spaced objects (CSO) in image sequences that is based on the particle probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter and multiassignment data association. First, the particle PHD filter is adopted to eliminate most of the clutters and to estimate multitarget states. In the particle PHD filter, a noniterative multitarget estimation technique is introduced to reliably estimate multitarget states, and an improved birth particle sampling scheme is present to effectively acquire targets among clutters. Then, an integrated track management method is proposed to realize multitarget track continuity. The core of the track management is the track-to-estimation multiassignment association, which relaxes the traditional one-to-one data association restriction due to the unresolved focal plane CSO measurements. Meanwhile, a unified technique of multiple consecutive misses for track deletion is used jointly to cope with the sensitivity of the PHD filter to the missed detections and to eliminate false alarms further, as well as to initiate tracks of large numbers of CSO. Finally, results of two simulations and one experiment show that the proposed approach is feasible and efficient.

  16. Order of magnitude physics : a textbook with applications to the retinal rod and the density of prime numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Sanjoy

    I develop tools to amplify our mental senses: our intuition and reasoning abilities. The first five chapters—based on the Order of Magnitude Physics class taught at Caltech by Peter Goldreich and Sterl Phinney—form part of a textbook on dimensional analysis, approximation, and physical reasoning. The text is a resource of intuitions, problem-solving methods, and physical interpretations. By avoiding mathematical complexity, order-of-magnitude techniques increase our physical understanding, and allow us to study otherwise difficult or intractable problems. The textbook covers: (1) simple estimations, (2) dimensional analysis, (3) mechanical properties of materials, (4) thermal properties of materials, and (5) water waves. As an extended example of order-of-magnitude methods, I construct an analytic model for the flash sensitivity of a retinal rod. This model extends the flash-response model of Lamb and Pugh with an approximate model for steady-state response as a function of background light I_b. The combined model predicts that the flash sensitivity is proportional to I_b^(-1.3). This result roughly agrees with experimental data, which show that the flash sensitivity follows the Weber-Fechner behavior of I_b^(-1) over an intensity range of 100. Because the model is simple, it shows clearly how each biochemical pathway determines the rod's response. The second example is an approximate model of primality, the square-root model. Its goal is to explain features of the density of primes. In this model, which is related to the Hawkins' random sieve, divisibility and primality are probabilistic. The model implies a recurrence for the probability that a number n is prime. The asymptotic solution to the recurrence is (log n)^(-1), in agreement with the prime-number theorem. The next term in the solution oscillates around (log n)^(-1) with a period that grows superexponentially. These oscillations are a model for oscillations in the density of actual primes first

  17. Order of magnitude physics: A textbook with applications to the retinal rod and to the density of prime numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Sanjoy

    1998-12-01

    I develop tools to amplify our mental senses: our intuition and reasoning abilities. The first five chapters-based on the Order of Magnitude Physics class taught at Caltech by Peter Goldreich and Sterl Phinney-form part of a textbook on dimensional analysis, approximation, and physical reasoning. The text is a resource of intuitions, problem-solving methods, and physical interpretations. By avoiding mathematical complexity, order-of-magnitude techniques increase our physical understanding, and allow us to study otherwise difficult or intractable problems. The textbook covers: (1) simple estimations, (2) dimensional analysis, (3) mechanical properties of materials, (4) thermal properties of materials, and (5) water waves. As an extended example of order-of-magnitude methods, I construct an analytic model for the flash sensitivity of a retinal rod. This model extends the flash-response model of Lamb and Pugh with an approximate model for steady-state response as a function of background light Ib. The combined model predicts that the flash sensitivity is proportional to I-1.3b . This result roughly agrees with experimental data, which show that the flash sensitivity follows the Weber-Fechner behavior of I-1b over an intensity range of 100. Because the model is simple, it shows clearly how each biochemical pathway determines the rod's response. The second example is an approximate model of primality, the square-root model. Its goal is to explain features of the density of primes. In this model, which is related to the Hawkins' random sieve, divisibility and primality are probabilistic. The model implies a recurrence for the probability that a number n is prime. The asymptotic solution to the recurrence is (log n)-1, in agreement with the prime-number theorem. The next term in the solution oscillates around (log n) -1 with a period that grows superexponentially. These oscillations are a model for oscillations in the density of actual

  18. On the accuracy of stratospheric aerosol extinction derived from in situ size distribution measurements and surface area density derived from remote SAGE II and HALOE extinction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Deshler, Terry

    2015-08-01

    In situ stratospheric aerosol measurements, from University of Wyoming optical particle counters (OPCs), are compared with Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE) II (versions 6.2 and 7.0) and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) satellite measurements to investigate differences between SAGE II/HALOE-measured extinction and derived surface area and OPC-derived extinction and surface area. Coincident OPC and SAGE II measurements are compared for a volcanic (1991-1996) and nonvolcanic (1997-2005) period. OPC calculated extinctions agree with SAGE II measurements, within instrumental uncertainty, during the volcanic period, but have been a factor of 2 low during the nonvolcanic period. Three systematic errors associated with the OPC measurements, anisokineticity, inlet particle evaporation, and counting efficiency, were investigated. An overestimation of the OPC counting efficiency is found to be the major source of systematic error. With this correction OPC calculated extinction increases by 15-30% (30-50%) for the volcanic (nonvolcanic) measurements. These changes significantly improve the comparison with SAGE II and HALOE extinctions in the nonvolcanic cases but slightly degrade the agreement in the volcanic period. These corrections have impacts on OPC-derived surface area density, exacerbating the poor agreement between OPC and SAGE II (version 6.2) surface areas. This disparity is reconciled with SAGE II version 7.0 surface areas. For both the volcanic and nonvolcanic cases these changes in OPC counting efficiency and in the operational SAGE II surface area algorithm leave the derived surface areas from both platforms in significantly better agreement and within the ± 40% precision of the OPC moment calculations.

  19. On the accuracy of stratospheric aerosol extinction derived from in situ size distribution measurements and surface area density derived from remote SAGE II and HALOE extinction measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Deshler, Terry

    2015-08-26

    In situ stratospheric aerosol measurements, from University of Wyoming optical particle counters (OPCs), are compared with Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE) II (versions 6.2 and 7.0) and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) satellite measurements to investigate differences between SAGE II/HALOE-measured extinction and derived surface area and OPC-derived extinction and surface area. Coincident OPC and SAGE II measurements are compared for a volcanic (1991-1996) and nonvolcanic (1997 2005) period. OPC calculated extinctions agree with SAGE II measurements, within instrumental uncertainty, during the volcanic period, but have been a factor of 2 low during the nonvolcanic period. Three systematic errors associated with themore » OPC measurements, anisokineticity, inlet particle evaporation, and counting efficiency, were investigated. An overestimation of the OPC counting efficiency is found to be the major source of systematic error. With this correction OPC calculated extinction increases by 15 30% (30 50%) for the volcanic (nonvolcanic) measurements. These changes significantly improve the comparison with SAGE II and HALOE extinctions in the nonvolcanic cases but slightly degrade the agreement in the volcanic period. These corrections have impacts on OPC-derived surface area density, exacerbating the poor agreement between OPC and SAGE II (version 6.2) surface areas. This disparity is reconciled with SAGE II version 7.0 surface areas. For both the volcanic and nonvolcanic cases these changes in OPC counting efficiency and in the operational SAGE II surface area algorithm leave the derived surface areas from both platforms in significantly better agreement and within the 40% precision of the OPC moment calculations.« less

  20. On the accuracy of stratospheric aerosol extinction derived from in situ size distribution measurements and surface area density derived from remote SAGE II and HALOE extinction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Deshler, Terry

    2015-08-26

    In situ stratospheric aerosol measurements, from University of Wyoming optical particle counters (OPCs), are compared with Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE) II (versions 6.2 and 7.0) and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) satellite measurements to investigate differences between SAGE II/HALOE-measured extinction and derived surface area and OPC-derived extinction and surface area. Coincident OPC and SAGE II measurements are compared for a volcanic (1991-1996) and nonvolcanic (1997 2005) period. OPC calculated extinctions agree with SAGE II measurements, within instrumental uncertainty, during the volcanic period, but have been a factor of 2 low during the nonvolcanic period. Three systematic errors associated with the OPC measurements, anisokineticity, inlet particle evaporation, and counting efficiency, were investigated. An overestimation of the OPC counting efficiency is found to be the major source of systematic error. With this correction OPC calculated extinction increases by 15 30% (30 50%) for the volcanic (nonvolcanic) measurements. These changes significantly improve the comparison with SAGE II and HALOE extinctions in the nonvolcanic cases but slightly degrade the agreement in the volcanic period. These corrections have impacts on OPC-derived surface area density, exacerbating the poor agreement between OPC and SAGE II (version 6.2) surface areas. This disparity is reconciled with SAGE II version 7.0 surface areas. For both the volcanic and nonvolcanic cases these changes in OPC counting efficiency and in the operational SAGE II surface area algorithm leave the derived surface areas from both platforms in significantly better agreement and within the 40% precision of the OPC moment calculations.

  1. Spatial correlation of high density EMG signals provides features robust to electrode number and shift in pattern recognition for myocontrol.

    PubMed

    Stango, Antonietta; Negro, Francesco; Farina, Dario

    2015-03-01

    Research on pattern recognition for myoelectric control has usually focused on a small number of electromyography (EMG) channels because of better clinical acceptability and low computational load with respect to multi-channel EMG. However, recently, high density (HD) EMG technology has substantially improved, also in practical usability, and can thus be applied in myocontrol. HD EMG provides several closely spaced recordings in multiple locations over the skin surface. This study considered the use of HD EMG for controlling upper limb prostheses, based on pattern recognition. In general, robustness and reliability of classical pattern recognition systems are influenced by electrode shift in dons and doff, and by the presence of malfunctioning channels. The aim of this study is to propose a new approach to attenuate these issues. The HD EMG grid of electrodes is an ensemble of sensors that records data spatially correlated. The experimental variogram, which is a measure of the degree of spatial correlation, was used as feature for classification, contrary to previous approaches that are based on temporal or frequency features. The classification based on the variogram was tested on seven able-bodied subjects and one subject with amputation, for the classification of nine and seven classes, respectively. The performance of the proposed approach was comparable with the classic methods based on time-domain and autoregressive features (average classification accuracy over all methods ∼ 95% for nine classes). However, the new spatial features demonstrated lower sensitivity to electrode shift ( ± 1 cm) with respect to the classic features . When even just one channel was noisy, the classification accuracy dropped by ∼ 10% for all methods. However, the new method could be applied without any retraining to a subset of high-quality channels whereas the classic methods require retraining when some channels are omitted. In conclusion, the new spatial feature space

  2. Three years of aerosol mass, black carbon and particle number concentrations at Montsec (southern Pyrenees, 1570 m a.s.l.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, A.; Pey, J.; Minguillón, M. C.; Pérez, N.; Pandolfi, M.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.

    2014-04-01

    Time variation of mass particulate matter (PM1 and PM1&minus10), black carbon (BC) and number of particles (N3: number of particles with an aerodynamic diameter higher than 3 nm, and N10: higher than 10 nm) concentrations at the high-altitude site of Montsec (MSC) in the southern Pyrenees was interpreted for the period 2010-2012. At MSC, PM10 (12 μg m-3) and N7 (2140 # cm-3) three-year arithmetic average concentrations were higher than those measured at other high-altitude sites in central Europe during the same period (PM10: 3-9 μg m-3 and N: 634-2070 # cm-3). By contrast, BC concentrations at MSC (0.2 μg m-3) were equal to or even lower than those measured at these European sites (0.2-0.4 μg m-3). These differences were attributed to the higher relevance of Saharan dust transport and to the higher importance of the biogenic precursor emissions and new particle formation (NPF) processes, and to the lower influence of anthropogenic emissions at MSC. The different time variation of PM and BC concentrations compared with that of N suggests that these aerosol parameters were governed by diverse factors at MSC. Both PM and BC concentrations showed marked differences for different meteorological scenarios, with enhanced concentrations under North African air outbreaks (PM1&minus10: 13 μg m-3, PM1: 8 μg m-3 and BC: 0.3 μg m-3) and low concentrations when Atlantic advections occurred (PM1-10: 5 μg m-3, PM1: 4 μg m-3 and BC: 0.1 μg m-3). PM and BC concentrations increased in summer, with a secondary maximum in early spring, and were at their lowest in winter, due to the contrasting origin of the air masses in the warmer seasons (spring and summer) and in the colder seasons (autumn and winter). The maximum in the warmer seasons was attributed to long-range transport processes that mask the breezes and regional transport breaking the daily cycles of these pollutants. By contrast, PM and BC concentrations showed clear diurnal cycles, with maxima at midday in the

  3. Temperature and number density measurement in non-uniform supersonic flowfields undergoing mixing using toluene PLIF thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamba, Mirko; Miller, Victor A.; Mungal, M. Godfrey; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2015-08-01

    Single-excitation, dual-band-collection toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is used to measure temperature and number density (or partial pressure) fields in non-uniform supersonic complex flows in the presence of mixing and compressibility. The study provides a quantitative evaluation of the technique in transverse jets in supersonic crossflow (JISCF). It is found that toluene PLIF is highly effective in visualizing the structure of supersonic flows and that temperature can be accurately inferred with acceptable signal-to-noise ratios (of order 30) even when mixing occurs. The technique was applied to several JISCFs that differ by jet fluid properties with resulting different structures. In the presence of compressibility and mixing, it is found that the PLIF signal is non-unique, a feature that is used to identify the mixing region of the transverse jet. Measurement errors due to camera registration errors have also been quantified. Because of the complexity of the flowfield, it is found that minute misalignment (<0.1 pixels) between the two PLIF images can introduce measurable errors on the order of tens of Kelvins and significant errors in temperature gradients.

  4. Global 2-D intercomparison of sectional and modal aerosol modules

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenstein, D K; Penner, J E; Herzog, M; Liu, Xiaohong

    2007-05-08

    We present an intercomparison of two aerosol modules, one sectional, one modal, in a global 2-D model in order to differentiate their behavior for tropospheric and stratospheric applications. We model only binary sulfuric acid-water aerosols in this study. Two versions of the sec-tional model and three versions of the modal model are used to test the sensitivity of background aerosol mass and size distribution to the number of bins or modes and to the pre-scribed width of the largest mode. We find modest sensitivity to the number of bins (40 vs 150) used in the sectional model. Aerosol mass is found to be reduced in a modal model if care is not taken in selecting the width of the largest lognormal mode, reflecting differences in sedimentation in the middle stratosphere. The size distributions calculated by the sec-tional model can be better matched by a modal model with four modes rather than three modes in most but not all sit-uations. A simulation of aerosol decay following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo shows that the representation of the size distribution can have a signflcant impact on model-calculated aerosol decay rates in the stratosphere. Between 1991 and 1995, aerosol mass and surface area density calcu-lated by two versions of the modal model adequately match results from the sectional model. Calculated effective radius for the same time period shows more intermodel variability.

  5. Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols, defined as particles and droplets suspended in air, are always present in the atmosphere. They are part of the earth-atmosphere climate system, because they interact with both incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. They do this directly through scattering and absorption, and indirectly through effects on clouds. Submicrometer aerosols usually predominate in terms of number of particles per unit volume of air. They have dimensions close to the wavelengths of visible light, and thus scatter radiation from the sun very effectively. They are produced in the atmosphere by chemical reactions of sulfur-, nitrogen- and carbon-containing gases of both natural and anthropogenic origins. Light absorption is dominated by particles containing elemental carbon (soot), produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and by biomass burning. Light-scattering dominates globally, although absorption can be significant at high latitudes, particularly over highly reflective snow- or ice-covered surfaces. Other aerosol substances that may be locally important are those from volcanic eruptions, wildfires and windblown dust.

  6. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  7. Three years of aerosol mass, black carbon and particle number concentrations at Montsec (southern~Pyrenees, 1570 m a.s.l.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, A.; Pey, J.; Minguillón, M. C.; Pérez, N.; Pandolfi, M.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.

    2013-10-01

    Time variation of mass particulate matter (PM1 and PM1-10), black carbon (BC) and particle number (N) concentrations at the high altitude site of Montsec (MSC) in the southern Pyrenees was interpreted for the period 2010-2012. The MSC site registered higher PM10 (12 μg m-3) and N > 7 nm (2209 # cm-3) concentrations than those measured at other high altitude sites in central Europe (PM10: 3-9 μg m-3 and N: 634-2070 # cm-3). By contrast, BC concentrations at MSC (0.2 μg m-3) were equal or even lower than those measured at these European sites (0.2-0.4 μg m-3). These differences were attributed to the lower influence of anthropogenic emissions and to the higher relevance of Saharan dust transport and new particle formation (NPF) processes at MSC. The different time variation of PM and BC concentrations compared with that of N suggests that these aerosol parameters were governed by diverse factors at MSC. Both PM and BC concentrations showed marked differences for different meteorological scenarios, with enhanced concentrations under North African outbreaks (PM1-10: 13 μg m-3, PM1: 8 μg m-3 and BC: 0.3 μg m-3) and low concentrations when Atlantic advections occurred (PM1-10: 5 μg m-3, PM1: 4 μg m-3 and BC: 0.1 μg m-3). Because of the contrasting origin of the air masses in the warmer seasons (spring and summer) and in the colder seasons (autumn and winter), PM and BC concentrations showed a marked increase in summer, with a secondary maximum in early spring, and were at their lowest during winter. The maximum in the warmer seasons was attributed to long-range transport processes which mask the breezes and regional transport breaking the daily cycles of these pollutants. By contrast, PM and BC concentrations showed clear diurnal cycles with maxima at midday in the colder seasons. A statistically significant weekly variation was also obtained for the BC concentrations, displaying a progressive increase from Tuesday to Saturday, followed by a significant

  8. The measurement of electron number density in helium micro hollow gas discharge using asymmetric He I lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovović, J.; Šišović, N. M.

    2015-09-01

    The electron number density N e in helium micro hollow gas discharge (MHGD) is measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. The structure of MHGD is a gold-alumina-gold sandwich with 250 μm alumina thickness and 100 μm diameter hole. The electron temperature T e and gas temperature T g in the discharge is determined using the relative intensity of He I lines and {{\\text{N}}2}+≤ft({{\\text{B}}2}Σ\\text{u}+- {{X}2}Σ\\text{g}+\\right) R branch lines in the frame of BP technique, respectively. The simple procedure based on spectral line broadening theory was developed in MATLAB to generate synthetic neutral line asymmetric profiles. The synthetic profiles were compared with an experimental He I 447.1 nm and He I 492.2 nm line to obtain N e from the centre of a micro hollow gas discharge (MHGD) source in helium. The N e results were compared with N e values obtained from the forbidden-to-allowed (F/A) intensity ratio technique. The comparison confirmed higher N e determined using a F/A ratio due to large uncertainty of the method. Applying the fitting formula for a He I 492.2 nm line derived from computer simulation (CS) gives the same N e values as the one determined using the MATLAB procedure in this study. The dependence of N e on gas pressure and electric current is investigated as well.

  9. Effects of aerosol on evaporation, freezing and precipitation in a multiple cloud system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Soo; Kim, Byung-Gon; Yum, Seong Soo; Seo, Kyong-Hwan; Jung, Chang-Hoon; Um, Jun Shik; Li, Zhanqing; Hong, JinKyu; Chang, Ki-Ho; Jeong, Jin-Yim

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation account for a large portion of uncertainties in the prediction of the future course of global hydrologic circulations and climate. As a process of a better understanding of interactions between aerosol, clouds and precipitation, simulations are performed for a mixed-phase convective multiple-cloud system over the tropics. Studies on single-cloud systems have shown that aerosol-induced increases in freezing, associated increases in parcel buoyancy and thus the intensity of clouds (or updrafts) are a main mechanism which controls aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in convective clouds. However, in the multiple-cloud system that plays much more important roles in global hydrologic circulations and thus climate than single-cloud systems, aerosol effects on condensation play the most important role in aerosol-induced changes in the intensity of clouds and the effects on freezing play a negligible role in those changes. Aerosol-induced enhancement in evaporation intensifies gust fronts and increases the number of subsequently developing clouds, which leads to the substantial increases in condensation and associated intensity of convection. Although aerosol-induced enhancement in freezing takes part in the increases in condensation by inducing stronger convergence around cloud bottom, the increases in condensation are ~one order of magnitude larger than those in freezing. It is found that while aerosol-induced increases in freezing create intermittent extremely heavy precipitation, aerosol-induced increases in evaporation enhance light and medium precipitation in the multiple-cloud system here. This increase in light and medium precipitation makes it possible that cumulative precipitation increases with increasing aerosol concentration, although the increase is small. It is interesting that the altitude of the maximum of the time- and domain-averaged hydrometeor mass densities is quite robust to increases in aerosol

  10. Colloids exposed to random potential energy landscapes: From particle number density to particle-potential and particle-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewerunge, Jörg; Sengupta, Ankush; Capellmann, Ronja F.; Platten, Florian; Sengupta, Surajit; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2016-07-01

    Colloidal particles were exposed to a random potential energy landscape that has been created optically via a speckle pattern. The mean particle density as well as the potential roughness, i.e., the disorder strength, were varied. The local probability density of the particles as well as its main characteristics were determined. For the first time, the disorder-averaged pair density correlation function g(1)(r) and an analogue of the Edwards-Anderson order parameter g(2)(r), which quantifies the correlation of the mean local density among disorder realisations, were measured experimentally and shown to be consistent with replica liquid state theory results.

  11. Colloids exposed to random potential energy landscapes: From particle number density to particle-potential and particle-particle interactions.

    PubMed

    Bewerunge, Jörg; Sengupta, Ankush; Capellmann, Ronja F; Platten, Florian; Sengupta, Surajit; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2016-07-28

    Colloidal particles were exposed to a random potential energy landscape that has been created optically via a speckle pattern. The mean particle density as well as the potential roughness, i.e., the disorder strength, were varied. The local probability density of the particles as well as its main characteristics were determined. For the first time, the disorder-averaged pair density correlation function g((1))(r) and an analogue of the Edwards-Anderson order parameter g((2))(r), which quantifies the correlation of the mean local density among disorder realisations, were measured experimentally and shown to be consistent with replica liquid state theory results. PMID:27475395

  12. Other medications for aerosol delivery.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bruce K

    2006-01-01

    Although aerosol therapy is most commonly used to treat asthma and COPD, there are a large number of aerosol medications now used or in development for other diseases. Mucoactive agents have long been available by aerosol, but now we have truly effective drugs to improve effective airway clearance including dornase alfa, hyperosmolar saline, and aerosol surfactant. Inhaled antibiotics are available for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis and other chronic airway infections. With the development of devices that can target aerosol to the deep lung, the opportunity to deliver medications systemically by the aerosol route has become a reality. Insulin, recently approved in the US as aerosol therapy, and other peptides are systemically absorbed from the distal airway and alveolus. Aerosol gene transfer therapy to correct abnormalities associated with cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia and other airway diseases also holds great potential. PMID:16798603

  13. Investigation of the on-axis atom number density in the supersonic gas jet under high gas backing pressure by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guanglong; Xu, Yi; Cao, Yunjiu; Mi, Yiming; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Lili; Boldarev, A. S.; Geng, Xiaotao; Kim, Dong Eon

    2015-10-15

    The supersonic gas jets from conical nozzles are simulated using 2D model. The on-axis atom number density in gas jet is investigated in detail by comparing the simulated densities with the idealized densities of straight streamline model in scaling laws. It is found that the density is generally lower than the idealized one and the deviation between them is mainly dependent on the opening angle of conical nozzle, the nozzle length and the gas backing pressure. The density deviation is then used to discuss the deviation of the equivalent diameter of a conical nozzle from the idealized d{sub eq} in scaling laws. The investigation on the lateral expansion of gas jet indicates the lateral expansion could be responsible for the behavior of the density deviation. These results could be useful for the estimation of cluster size and the understanding of experimental results in laser-cluster interaction experiments.

  14. Comparison of Lidar and In-Situ Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, S. H.; Northam, G. B.; Rosen, J. M.; Pepin, T. J.; Hofmann, D. H.; McCormick, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    This paper will present the results of a comparative study conducted in Laramie, Wyoming, during the summer and fall of 1972, as part of the Department of Transportation's Climatic Impact Assessment Program (ClAP). The study included independent, and nearly simultaneous, measurements of stratospheric aerosols using a LIDAR system and a balloon-borne in-situ particle counter. The LIDAR provides a remote measurement of volume backscatter (aerosols and molecules) in a narrow wavelength region centered at the ruby wavelength (6943R); whereas the balloon-borne in-situ counter measures aerosol concentration by counting aerosols greater than approx. 0.30 microns in diameter as they are pumped through a chamber and scatter white light forward into photo-detectors. The comparison of measurements that will be discussed using the two techniques involves formulating the LIDAR data so that it is compatible with the counter data. The formulation includes separation of the scattering due to aerosols from the total and displaying this in terms of aerosol scattering function. Aerosol scattering function is proportional to aerosol concentration if the aerosol parameters, such as size distribution and composition, are constant with altitude. In separating the aerosol scattering from the total, the need for real atmospheric number density over the Standard Atmosphere is also discussed.

  15. Effects of Plant Density on the Number of Glandular Trichomes and on Yield and Quality of Essential Oils from Oregano.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Teresa; La Bella, Salvatore; Leto, Claudio; Bonsangue, Giuseppe; Leone, Raffaele; Gennaro, Maria Cristina; Virga, Giuseppe; Inguanta, Rosalinda; Licata, Mario

    2016-06-01

    Plants yields are influenced by agronomic techniques. Plant density is a complex issue and extremely important when maximizing both crop quality, and biomass and essential oil yields. Plants belonging to the Origanum vulgare subspecies hirtum (Link) Ietswaart were grown adopting four types of plant density and were characterized in biometric and chemical terms. The samples were analyzed using the ANOVA (Principal Component Analysis) statistical method regarding biometric aspects, EO yield and peltate hair density. Essential oil (EO) was extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed using GC-FID and GC-MS. GC-FID and GC-MS analysis led to the identification of 45 compounds from the EO. Plant density affected production both in terms of biomass and EO. However, it was not found to have affected peltate glandular trichome density or EO quality. PMID:27534133

  16. MODELING AND EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF AN AEROSOL GENERATOR FOR VERY HIGH NUMBER CURRENTS BASED ON A FREE TURBULENT JET. (R827354C008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we report on theoretical and experimental work on aerosol formation in a free turbulent jet. A hot DEHS vapor issues through a circular nozzle into slowly moving cold air. Vapor concentration and temperatures are such that particles are formed via homogeneous nuc...

  17. Temporal survey of electron number density and electron temperature in the exhaust of a megawatt MPD-Arc thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, C. J.; Rose, J. R.; Sigman, D. R.

    1971-01-01

    Temporal and radial profiles are obtained 30 cm downstream from the anode for two peak arc currents (11.2 kA and 20 kA) and for various auxiliary magnetic fields (0, 1.0 T, and 2.0T) using the Thomson scattering technique. Average density and temperature are relatively constant for over 100 microseconds with significant fluctuations. Radial profiles obtained are relatively flat for 4 cm from the axis. Compared to earlier 20 cm data, the exhaust density has decreased significantly, the average temperature (4.6 eV) has not changed, and the density hole with an auxiliary magnetic field has enlarged.

  18. Temporal survey of electron number density and electron temperature in the exhaust of a megawatt MPD-arc thruster.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, C. J.; Rose, J. R.; Sigman, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Temporal and radial profiles are obtained 30 cm downstream from the anode for two peak arc currents (11.2 kA and 20 kA) and for various auxiliary magnetic fields (0, 1.0 T, and 2.0 T) using the Thomson scattering technique. Average density and temperature are relatively constant for over 100 microseconds with significant fluctuations. Radial profiles obtained are relatively flat for 4 cm from the axis. Compared to earlier 20 cm data, the exhaust density has decreased significantly, the average temperature has not changed, and the density ?hole' with an auxiliary magnetic field has enlarged.

  19. Monitoring biological aerosols using UV fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eversole, Jay D.; Roselle, Dominick; Seaver, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus has been designed and constructed to continuously monitor the number density, size, and fluorescent emission of ambient aerosol particles. The application of fluorescence to biological particles suspended in the atmosphere requires laser excitation in the UV spectral region. In this study, a Nd:YAG laser is quadrupled to provide a 266 nm wavelength to excite emission from single micrometer-sized particles in air. Fluorescent emission is used to continuously identify aerosol particles of biological origin. For calibration, biological samples of Bacillus subtilis spores and vegetative cells, Esherichia coli, Bacillus thuringiensis and Erwinia herbicola vegetative cells were prepared as suspensions in water and nebulized to produce aerosols. Detection of single aerosol particles, provides elastic scattering response as well as fluorescent emission in two spectral bands simultaneously. Our efforts have focuses on empirical characterization of the emission and scattering characteristics of various bacterial samples to determine the feasibility of optical discrimination between different cell types. Preliminary spectroscopic evidence suggest that different samples can be distinguished as separate bio-aerosol groups. In addition to controlled sample results, we will also discuss the most recent result on the effectiveness of detection outdoor releases and variations in environmental backgrounds.

  20. Analysis by oxygen atom number density measurement of high-speed hydrophilic treatment of polyimide using atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, S.

    2015-03-30

    This paper describes the fundamental experimental data of the plasma surface modification of the polyimide using atmospheric pressure microwave plasma source. The experimental results were discussed from the point of view of the radical’s behavior, which significantly affects the modification mechanism. The purpose of the study is to examine how the value of the oxygen atom density will affect the hydrophilic treatment in the upstream region of the plasma where gas temperature is very high. The surface modification experiments were performed by setting the polyimide film sample in the downstream region of the plasma. The degree of the modification was measured by a water contact angle measurement. The water contact angle decreased less than 30 degrees within 1 second treatment time in the upstream region. Very high speed modification was observed. The reason of this high speed modification seems that the high density radical which contributes the surface modification exist in the upstream region of the plasma. This tendency is supposed to the measured relatively high electron density (~10{sup 15}cm{sup −3}) at the center of the plasma. We used the electric heating catalytic probe method for oxygen radical measurement. An absolute value of oxygen radical density was determined by catalytic probe measurement and the results show that ~10{sup 15}cm{sup −3} of the oxygen radical density in the upstream region and decreases toward downstream region. The experimental results of the relation of the oxygen radical density and hydrophilic modification of polyimide was discussed.

  1. Prediction of Particle Number Density and Particle Properties in the Flow Field Observed by the Nephelometer Experiment on the Galileo Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naughton, Jonathan W.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to assist in the analysis of data returned from the Galileo Probe's Nephelometer instrument. A computation of the flow field around the Galileo Probe during its descent through the Jovian atmosphere was simulated. The behavior of cloud particles that passed around the Galileo probe was then computed and the number density in the vicinity of the Nephelometer instrument was predicted. The results of our analysis support the finding that the number density of cloud particles was not the same in each of the four sampling volumes of the Nephelometer instrument. The number densities calculated in this study are currently being used to assist in the reanalysis of the data returned from the Galileo Probe.

  2. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  3. The physical state of UTLS aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Th.; Colberg, C. A.; Corti, T.; Fueglistaler, S.; Hoyle, C. R.; Koop, T.; Krieger, U. K.; Luo, B. P.; Marcolli, C.

    2003-04-01

    This paper gives an overview of the present knowledge on the physical state of aerosols in the upper troposphere (UT) and lower stratosphere (LS). Are UTLS aerosols liquid, solid or mixed-phase? And how does ice nucleate in/on such aerosols? Good progress has been made towards a quantitative theory of homogeneous nucleation of ice in purely liquid solutions of arbitrary composition and concentration based on a volume-proportional description. Very recently it has been proposed that ice nucleation might be facilitated by the surface of aerosol droplets, rather than starting in the bulk, suggests a reversal of the traditional view. Nucleation rates would then be surface-proportional rather than volume-proportional, with potentially strong effects on cloud formation, ice number densities and dehydration of UT. However, laboratory and theoretical evidence is presented corroborating the traditional picture. Above the frost point UTLS aerosols remain either liquid or mixed-phase, e.g. solid letovicite plus the remaining liquid containing aqueous inorganic acids and organic compounds. Massive deliquescence and efflorescence point reductions are expected to occur upon mixing of miscible organic and inorganic components. Hence, for a reliable prediction of the phase composition of individual aerosol particles, the knowledge of the aerosol's mixing state is indispensable. By now little is known about the morphology of mixed-phase aerosols. Experiments suggest that the solid may be coated by liquid, or conversely that the liquid might be enclosed by the solid, possibly leading to different radiative and heterogeneous chemical properties. Knowledge on the impact of efflorescence or salting out on subsequent ice formation is at its infancy. The relative importance of all these processes, in particular of homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation in the UTLS, depends crucially on gravity-wave-induced small-scale temperature fluctuations with typical amplitudes of 1-2 K and

  4. Dependence Of The Computerized Tomography (CT) Number - Electron Density Relationship On Patient Size And X-Ray Beam Filtration For Fan Beam CT Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, M. E.; Thomason, C. L.; McGary, R.; Hunt, M. A.; Simpson, L. D.; Miller, D. W.; Laughlin, J. S.

    1981-07-01

    The applicability of quantitative information contained in CT scans to diagnostic radiology and to radiation therapy treatment planning and the heterogeneity problem has been recognized by members of the radiological community and by manufacturers. Determination of the relationship between electron density and CT number is important for these applications. As CT technology has evolved, CT number generation has changed. CT number variation was limited in the early water bag systems. However, later generation "air" scanners may exhibit variation in CT numbers across a reconstructed image which are re-lated to positioning within the scan circle and scan field size. Results of experimental investigations using tissue-equivalent phantoms of different cross-sectional shapes and areas on the Technicare Delta 2020 are presented. Investigations also cover the effect of "shaped" and "flat" x-ray beam filters. A variation in CT number is demonstrated on this fan beam geometry scanner for phantoms of different sizes and for different scan circle diameters. An explanation of these effects is given. Differences of as much as 20% in determination of tissue electron density relative to water under different experimental conditions are obtained and reported. A family of curves (electron density vs. CT number) is presented for different patient cross-sectional areas and different scanner settings.

  5. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  6. Direct measurements of mass-specific optical cross sections of single-component aerosol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Radney, James G; Ma, Xiaofei; Gillis, Keith A; Zachariah, Michael R; Hodges, Joseph T; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2013-09-01

    The optical properties of atmospheric aerosols vary widely, being dependent upon particle composition, morphology, and mixing state. This diversity and complexity of aerosols motivates measurement techniques that can discriminate and quantify a variety of single- and multicomponent aerosols that are both internally and externally mixed. Here, we present a new combination of techniques to directly measure the mass-specific extinction and absorption cross sections of laboratory-generated aerosols that are relevant to atmospheric studies. Our approach employs a tandem differential mobility analyzer, an aerosol particle mass analyzer, cavity ring-down and photoacoustic spectrometers, and a condensation particle counter. This suite of instruments enables measurement of aerosol particle size, mass, extinction and absorption coefficients, and aerosol number density, respectively. Taken together, these observables yield the mass-specific extinction and absorption cross sections without the need to model particle morphology or account for sample collection artifacts. Here we demonstrate the technique in a set of case studies which involve complete separation of aerosol by charge, separation of an external mixture by mass, and discrimination between particle types by effective density and single-scattering albedo. PMID:23875772

  7. Characteristics of the Pinatubo Aerosol Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Weiguo

    Optical depths at visible and infrared wavelengths obtained in Tucson, Arizona before and after the Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 have been used to investigate the characteristics of the stratospheric aerosols due to the Pinatubo eruption. The intrusion of the Pinatubo aerosols over Tucson first occurred on July 26, 1991 when the spectral optical depth values rose to two to four times their normal values. In general, there was a pattern of increase between June 1991 and April 1992, and a gradual decrease after April 1992. The stratospheric Pinatubo aerosol in April 1992 was characterized by a typical columnar total number density on the order of 8.78 times 10 ^6 particles cm^{-2} in the size range of 0.2-0.7mu m. The total number density decreased to the order of 9.28 times 10^5 particles cm^{-2} by April 1994. Simulations of the size distribution using a simple polydisperse coagulation and fallout model showed that both of the processes played a very important role in the evolution and transport of the particles in the interval from April 1992 to March 1993. A strong seasonal variation was observed in the aerosol optical depth data. The values are higher in the winter and spring and lower in the summer and fall. This variation is explained by more effective transport of particles from the tropics poleward in the winter and spring than in the summer and fall. We also observed that there was a reduction in stratospheric ozone associated with the Pinatubo aerosols, possibly because of the extra sites available for heterogeneous chemical reactions. The reduction was more noticeable in the spring and summer than in other seasons. The magnitude of the ozone reduction was in a good agreement with other studies.

  8. On-site monitoring of atomic density number for an all-optical atomic magnetometer based on atomic spin exchange relaxation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng; Chen, Xiyuan; Ding, Ming; Shan, Guangcun; Hu, Zhaohui; Quan, Wei

    2016-07-25

    We present a method for monitoring the atomic density number on site based on atomic spin exchange relaxation. When the spin polarization P ≪ 1, the atomic density numbers could be estimated by measuring magnetic resonance linewidth in an applied DC magnetic field by using an all-optical atomic magnetometer. The density measurement results showed that the experimental results the theoretical predictions had a good consistency in the investigated temperature range from 413 K to 463 K, while, the experimental results were approximately 1.5 ∼ 2 times less than the theoretical predictions estimated from the saturated vapor pressure curve. These deviations were mainly induced by the radiative heat transfer efficiency, which inevitably leaded to a lower temperature in cell than the setting temperature. PMID:27464172

  9. Aerosol and nucleation research in support of NASA cloud physics experiments in space. [ice nuclei generator for the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vali, G.; Rogers, D.; Gordon, G.; Saunders, C. P. R.; Reischel, M.; Black, R.

    1978-01-01

    Tasks performed in the development of an ice nucleus generator which, within the facility concept of the ACPL, would provide a test aerosol suitable for a large number and variety of potential experiments are described. The impact of Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory scientific functional requirements on ice nuclei generation and characterization subsystems was established. Potential aerosol generating systems were evaluated with special emphasis on reliability, repeatability and general suitability for application in Spacelab. Possible contamination problems associated with aerosol generation techniques were examined. The ice nucleating abilities of candidate test aerosols were examined and the possible impact of impurities on the nucleating abilities of those aerosols were assessed as well as the relative merits of various methods of aerosol size and number density measurements.

  10. Surface charge dynamics and OH and H number density distributions in near-surface nanosecond pulse discharges at a liquid / vapor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Caroline; Petrishchev, Vitaly; Yin, Zhiyao; Lempert, Walter R.; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2015-10-01

    The present work provides insight into surface charge dynamics and kinetics of radical species reactions in nanosecond pulse discharges sustained at a liquid-vapor interface, above a distilled water surface. The near-surface plasma is sustained using two different discharge configurations, a surface ionization wave discharge between two exposed metal electrodes and a double dielectric barrier discharge. At low discharge pulse repetition rates (~100 Hz), residual surface charge deposition after the discharge pulse is a minor effect. At high pulse repetition rates (~10 kHz), significant negative surface charge accumulation over multiple discharge pulses is detected, both during alternating polarity and negative polarity pulse trains. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and two-photon absorption LIF (TALIF) line imaging are used for in situ measurements of spatial distributions of absolute OH and H atom number densities in near-surface, repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas. Both in a surface ionization wave discharge and in a double dielectric barrier discharge, peak measured H atom number density, [H] is much higher compared to peak OH number density, due to more rapid OH decay in the afterglow between the discharge pulses. Higher OH number density was measured near the regions with higher plasma emission intensity. Both OH and especially H atoms diffuse out of the surface ionization wave plasma volume, up to several mm from the liquid surface. Kinetic modeling calculations using a quasi-zero-dimensional H2O vapor / Ar plasma model are in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The results demonstrate the experimental capability of in situ radical species number density distribution measurements in liquid-vapor interface plasmas, in a simple canonical geometry that lends itself to the validation of kinetic models.

  11. Energy dependence and systematics of level-density parameters in nuclei of mass number in the range of A = 20-60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudzevich, O. T.

    2015-12-01

    Existing direct and indirect experimental data on level densities in excited nuclei of mass and charge number in the ranges of A = 20-60 and Z = 11-27, respectively, were compiled and analyzed. Contradictions between values extracted from the results of measurements performed by different methods were revealed. Consistent input data were selected, and a systematics of level-density parameters was created on this basis within the generalized model of superfluid nuclei. The effect of the first discrete vibrational levels on extracted parameters was studied.

  12. Energy dependence and systematics of level-density parameters in nuclei of mass number in the range of A = 20–60

    SciTech Connect

    Grudzevich, O. T.

    2015-12-15

    Existing direct and indirect experimental data on level densities in excited nuclei of mass and charge number in the ranges of A = 20–60 and Z = 11–27, respectively, were compiled and analyzed. Contradictions between values extracted from the results of measurements performed by different methods were revealed. Consistent input data were selected, and a systematics of level-density parameters was created on this basis within the generalized model of superfluid nuclei. The effect of the first discrete vibrational levels on extracted parameters was studied.

  13. Hydromagnetic dynamos in rotating spherical fluid shells in dependence on the Prandtl number, density stratification and electromagnetic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šoltis, Tomáš; Šimkanin, Ján

    2014-12-01

    We present an investigation of dynamo in a simultaneous dependence on the non-uniform stratification, electrical conductivity of the inner core and the Prandtl number. Computations are performed using the MAG dynamo code. In all the investigated cases, the generated magnetic fields are dipolar. Our results show that the dynamos, especially magnetic field structures, are independent in our investigated cases on the electrical conductivity of the inner core. This is in agreement with results obtained in previous analyses. The influence of non-uniform stratification is for our parameters weak, which is understandable because most of the shell is unstably stratified, and the stably stratified region is only a thin layer near the CMB. The teleconvection is not observed in our study. However, the influence of the Prandtl number is strong. The generated magnetic fields do not become weak in the polar regions because the magnetic field inside the tangent cylinder is always regenerated due to the weak magnetic diffusion.

  14. Do we really need a large number of particles to simulate bimolecular reactive transport with random walk methods? A kernel density estimation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Random walk particle tracking methods are a computationally efficient family of methods to solve reactive transport problems. While the number of particles in most realistic applications is in the order of 106-109, the number of reactive molecules even in diluted systems might be in the order of fractions of the Avogadro number. Thus, each particle actually represents a group of potentially reactive molecules. The use of a low number of particles may result not only in loss of accuracy, but also may lead to an improper reproduction of the mixing process, limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect as a proxy to model incomplete mixing in porous media. In this work, we propose using a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations that allows getting the expected results for a well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. The idea consists of treating each particle as a sample drawn from the pool of molecules that it represents; this way, the actual location of a tracked particle is seen as a sample drawn from the density function of the location of molecules represented by that given particle, rigorously represented by a kernel density function. The probability of reaction can be obtained by combining the kernels associated to two potentially reactive particles. We demonstrate that the observed deviation in the reaction vs time curves in numerical experiments reported in the literature could be attributed to the statistical method used to reconstruct concentrations (fixed particle support) from discrete particle distributions, and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing. We further explore the evolution of the kernel size with time, linking it to the diffusion process. Our results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve computational efficiency and robustness in reactive transport simulations, and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative mechanistic models and not on a

  15. Indoor aerosol size distributions in a gymnasium.

    PubMed

    Castro, Amaya; Calvo, Ana I; Alves, Célia; Alonso-Blanco, Elisabeth; Coz, Esther; Marques, Liliana; Nunes, Teresa; Fernández-Guisuraga, Jose Manuel; Fraile, Roberto

    2015-08-15

    In this study, an indoor/outdoor monitoring program was carried out in a gymnasium at the University of Leon, Spain. The main goal was a characterization of aerosol size distributions in a university gymnasium under different conditions and sports activities (with and without magnesia alba) and the study of the mass fraction deposited in each of the parts of the respiratory tract. The aerosol particles were measured in 31 discrete channels (size ranges) using a laser spectrometer probe. Aerosol size distributions were studied under different conditions: i) before sports activities, ii) activities without using magnesia alba, iii) activities using magnesia alba, iv) cleaning procedures, and v) outdoors. The aerosol refractive index and density indoors were estimated from the aerosol composition: 1.577-0.003i and 2.055 g cm(-3), respectively. Using the estimated density, the mass concentration was calculated, and the evolution of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 for different activities was assessed. The quality of the air in the gymnasium was strongly influenced by the use of magnesia alba (MgCO3) and the number of gymnasts who were training. Due to the climbing chalk and the constant process of resuspension, average PM10 concentrations of over 440 μg m(-3) were reached. The maximum daily concentrations ranged from 500 to 900 μg m(-3). Particle size determines the place in the respiratory tract where the deposition occurs. For this reason, the inhalable, thoracic, tracheobronchial and respirable fractions were assessed for healthy adults and high risk people, according to international standards. The estimations show that, for healthy adults, up to 300 μg m(-3) can be retained by the trachea and bronchi, and 130 μg m(-3) may reach the alveolar region. The different physical activities and the attendance rates in the sports facility have a significant influence on the concentration and size distributions observed. PMID:25897726

  16. "allometry" Deterministic Approaches in Cell Size, Cell Number and Crude Fiber Content Related to the Physical Quality of Kangkong (Ipomoea reptans) Grown Under Different Plant Density Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selamat, A.; Atiman, S. A.; Puteh, A.; Abdullah, N. A. P.; Mohamed, M. T. M.; Zulkeefli, A. A.; Othman, S.

    Kangkong, especially the upland type (Ipomoea reptans) is popularly consumed as a vegetable dish in the South East Asian countries for its quality related to Vitamins (A and C) and crude fiber contents. Higher fiber contents would prevent from the occurrence of colon cancer and diverticular disease. With young stem edible portion, its cell number and size contribute to the stem crude fiber content. The mathematical approach of allometry of cell size, number, and fiber content of stem could be used in determining the 'best' plant density pressure in producing the quality young stem to be consumed. Basically, allometry is the ratio of relative increment (growth or change) rates of two parameters, or the change rate associated to the log of measured variables relationship. Kangkog grown equal or lower than 55 plants m-2 produced bigger individual plant and good quality (physical) kangkong leafy vegetable, but with lower total yield per unit area as compared to those grown at higher densities.

  17. Aerosol Production in a Mixed Deciduous/Coniferous Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, N.; Mielke, L.; Alaghmand, M.; Galloway, M.; Kammrath, A.; Keutsch, F.; Hansen, R.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P.; Carroll, M.; Bertman, S.; Shepson, P.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosols are of fundamental concern because of their impacts on air quality, human health and radiative forcing. Recent studies have focused on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production due to oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and more importantly biogenic-VOCs (BVOCs), in particular, isoprene. However, the SOA precursors are not well understood because the mechanisms have shown that isoprene oxidation can contribute to aerosol production through multiple generation oxidation products. For terpenes, it is more likely that primary or secondary oxidation products lead to particle formation. In the present study, we measured the aerosol size distribution, along with O3, HOx, NOx, NOy and BVOCs, in a mixed deciduous forest that is undergoing successional transition to a conifer-dominated species mix. This study was conducted in a rural forest environment in northern Michigan as a part of the summer 2008 PROPHET campaign at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). We examine here the potential BVOC contribution to aerosol formation. A TSI, inc. Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) was used to measure aerosol number density in the size range, 15 nm < x < 711 nm and a Proton Transfer Reaction - Linear Ion Trap (PTR-LIT) mass spectrometer for quantifying isoprene and other BVOCs, including methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, and total monoterpenes. Preliminary results show periods of new particle production. Here we use a unique set of BVOC, HOx, NOx, NOy, O3 and meteorological data to examine conditions leading to new particle production.

  18. Spatially and temporally resolved electron number density measurements in a decaying laser-induced plasma using hydrogen-alpha line profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parigger, Christian; Plemmons, D. H.; Lewis, J. W. L.

    1995-06-01

    A Nd:YAG laser was operated at 1064 nm and with 6-ns pulse duration to achieve optical breakdown in gaseous hydrogen at pressures of 150 and 810 Torr. Spatially and temporally resolved laser-induced emission spectra were measured early in the plasma decay. With hydrogen-alpha line profiles, electron number density values were determined along the laser beam plasma in the range 1019 to 1016 cc -1.

  19. Implications for the Number Density of Quasars at z > 4.8 Using VIZJ Imaging from the BTC40 Multicolor Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursick, Shelly; Kennefick, J. D.; Smith, M.; Monier, E.; Hall, P.; Osmer, P.; Dalton, G.; Green, R.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of optical spectroscopy of four faint high redshift quasar candidates taken with the GMOS -S instrument on Gemini South during the spring 08’ and fall 06’ semesters. These candidates were selected as part of the VIZ and J multicolor BTC40 survey for z > 4.8 quasars. We will discuss implications for the number density of quasars at these redshifts.

  20. Studies on mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Pravina P.; Bichile, Govind K.

    2013-11-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as Glycine (C2H5NO2), DL-Alanine (C3H7NO2), Proline (C5H9NO2), L-Leucine (C6H13NO2 ), L-Arginine (C6H14N4O2) and L-Arginine Monohydrochloride (C6H15ClN4O2), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 10.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities are in good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error.

  1. GENOME-WIDE MAPPING OF COPY NUMBER VARIATIONS IN COMMERCIAL HYBRID PIGS USING A HIGH-DENSITY SNP GENOTYPING ARRAY.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L S; Li, J; Yang, J; Liu, C L; Xie, X H; He, Y N; Liu, X X; Xin, W S; Zhang, W C; Ren, J; Ma, J W; Huang, L S

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are important forms of structural variation in human and animals and can be considered as a major genetic component of phenotypic diversity. Here we used the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip V2 and a DLY [Duroc x (Large White x Landrace)] commercial hybrid population to identify 272 CNVs belonging to 165 CNV regions (CNVRs), of which 66 are new. As CNVRs are specific to origin of population, our DLY-specific data is an important complementary to the existing CNV map in the pig genome. Eight CNVRs were selected. for validation by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and the accurate rate was high (87.25%). Gene function analysis suggested that a common CNVR may play an important role in multiple traits, including growth rate and carcass quality. PMID:27183798

  2. Simulated lidar return from a one-dimensional stratospheric aerosol model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P.; Swissler, T. J.; Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for theoretical calculations of lidar backscatter at wavelengths of 0.6943 and 1.06 microns from the stratospheric aerosol. The computations are based on the size distribution, particle number density, and particle composition predicted by a one-dimensional model of the stratospheric aerosol layer that assumes that the primary source of sulfur to the stratosphere is biogenic OCS released at ground level. The aerosol particles are taken to be spherical liquid H2SO4-H2O solution droplets with solid cores, which undergo condensation, evaporation, coagulation, sedimentation, and vertical eddy mixing. The theoretical backscatter profiles are compared with experimental results obtained from actual lidar observations of the stratospheric aerosol layer before and after the eruption of Volcan de Fuego in October 1974. The model predictions are shown to be in good agreement with the average of a number of observations.

  3. A Single-Array-Based Method for Detecting Copy Number Variants Using Affymetrix High Density SNP Arrays and its Application to Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Fu, Wenjiang

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative evidence has shown that structural variations, due to insertions, deletions, and inversions of DNA, may contribute considerably to the development of complex human diseases, such as breast cancer. High-throughput genotyping technologies, such as Affymetrix high density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, have produced large amounts of genetic data for genome-wide SNP genotype calling and copy number estimation. Meanwhile, there is a great need for accurate and efficient statistical methods to detect copy number variants. In this article, we introduce a hidden-Markov-model (HMM)-based method, referred to as the PICR-CNV, for copy number inference. The proposed method first estimates copy number abundance for each single SNP on a single array based on the raw fluorescence values, and then standardizes the estimated copy number abundance to achieve equal footing among multiple arrays. This method requires no between-array normalization, and thus, maintains data integrity and independence of samples among individual subjects. In addition to our efforts to apply new statistical technology to raw fluorescence values, the HMM has been applied to the standardized copy number abundance in order to reduce experimental noise. Through simulations, we show our refined method is able to infer copy number variants accurately. Application of the proposed method to a breast cancer dataset helps to identify genomic regions significantly associated with the disease. PMID:26279618

  4. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  5. Electron density and transport in top-gated graphene nanoribbon devices: First-principles Green function algorithms for systems containing a large number of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areshkin, Denis A.; Nikolić, Branislav K.

    2010-04-01

    The recent fabrication of graphene nanoribbon (GNR) field-effect transistors poses a challenge for first-principles modeling of carbon nanoelectronics due to many thousand atoms present in the device. The state of the art quantum transport algorithms, based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism combined with the density-functional theory (NEGF-DFT), were originally developed to calculate self-consistent electron density in equilibrium and at finite bias voltage (as a prerequisite to obtain conductance or current-voltage characteristics, respectively) for small molecules attached to metallic electrodes where only a few hundred atoms are typically simulated. Here we introduce combination of two numerically efficient algorithms which make it possible to extend the NEGF-DFT framework to device simulations involving large number of atoms. Our first algorithm offers an alternative to the usual evaluation of the equilibrium part of electron density via numerical contour integration of the retarded Green function in the upper complex half-plane. It is based on the replacement of the Fermi function f(E) with an analytic function f˜(E) coinciding with f(E) inside the integration range along the real axis, but decaying exponentially in the upper complex half-plane. Although f˜(E) has infinite number of poles, whose positions and residues are determined analytically, only a finite number of those poles have non-negligible residues. We also discuss how this algorithm can be extended to compute the nonequilibrium contribution to electron density, thereby evading cumbersome real-axis integration (within the bias voltage window) of NEGFs which is very difficult to converge for systems with large number of atoms while maintaining current conservation. Our second algorithm combines the recursive formulas with the geometrical partitioning of an arbitrary multiterminal device into nonuniform segments in order to reduce the computational complexity of the retarded Green

  6. Enhancing Genome-Wide Copy Number Variation Identification by High Density Array CGH Using Diverse Resources of Pig Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiying; Jiang, Jicai; Wang, Haifei; Kang, Huimin; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jian-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are important forms of genomic variation, and have attracted extensive attentions in humans as well as domestic animals. In the study, using a custom-designed 2.1 M array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), genome-wide CNVs were identified among 12 individuals from diverse pig breeds, including one Asian wild population, six Chinese indigenous breeds and two modern commercial breeds (Yorkshire and Landrace), with one individual of the other modern commercial breed, Duroc, as the reference. A total of 1,344 CNV regions (CNVRs) were identified, covering 47.79 Mb (∼1.70%) of the pig genome. The length of these CNVRs ranged from 3.37 Kb to 1,319.0 Kb with a mean of 35.56 Kb and a median of 11.11 Kb. Compared with similar studies reported, most of the CNVRs (74.18%) were firstly identified in present study. In order to confirm these CNVRs, 21 CNVRs were randomly chosen to be validated by quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) and a high rate (85.71%) of confirmation was obtained. Functional annotation of CNVRs suggested that the identified CNVRs have important function, and may play an important role in phenotypic and production traits difference among various breeds. Our results are essential complementary to the CNV map in the pig genome, which will provide abundant genetic markers to investigate association studies between various phenotypes and CNVs in pigs. PMID:24475311

  7. The Role of Aerosols on Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.

    2006-01-01

    Cloud physics is inevitably affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distribution below the clouds. Therefore, the size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effects of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, a detailed spectral--bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e., pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e., 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions.

  8. PREDICTIONS OF ION PRODUCTION RATES AND ION NUMBER DENSITIES WITHIN THE DIAMAGNETIC CAVITY OF COMET 67P/CHURYUMOV-GERASIMENKO AT PERIHELION

    SciTech Connect

    Vigren, E.; Galand, M.

    2013-07-20

    We present a one-dimensional ion chemistry model of the diamagnetic cavity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target comet for the ESA Rosetta mission. We solve the continuity equations for ionospheric species and predict number densities of electrons and selected ions considering only gas-phase reactions. We apply the model to the subsolar direction and consider conditions expected to be encountered by Rosetta at perihelion (1.29 AU) in 2015 August. Our default simulation predicts a maximum electron number density of {approx}8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3} near the surface of the comet, while the electron number densities for cometocentric distances r > 10 km are approximately proportional to 1/r {sup 1.23} assuming that the electron temperature is equal to the neutral temperature. We show that even a small mixing ratio ({approx}0.3%-1%) of molecules having higher proton affinity than water is sufficient for the proton transfer from H{sub 3}O{sup +} to occur so readily that other ions than H{sub 3}O{sup +}, such as NH{sub 4} {sup +} or CH{sub 3}OH{sub 2} {sup +}, become dominant in terms of volume mixing ratio in part of, if not throughout, the diamagnetic cavity. Finally, we test how the predicted electron and ion densities are influenced by changes of model input parameters, including the neutral background, the impinging EUV solar spectrum, the solar zenith angle, the cross sections for photo- and electron-impact processes, the electron temperature profile, and the temperature dependence of ion-neutral reactions.

  9. Conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density based on a single linear relationship: an experimental verification using a clinical dual-source CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi; Noto, Yoshiyuki; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi

    2013-05-01

    In radiotherapy treatment planning, the conversion of the computed tomography (CT) number to electron density is one of the main processes that determine the accuracy of patient dose calculations. However, in general, the CT number and electron density of tissues cannot be interrelated using a simple one-to-one correspondence. This study aims to experimentally verify the clinical feasibility of an existing novel conversion method proposed by the author of this note, which converts the energy-subtracted CT number (ΔHU) to the relative electron density (ρe) via a single linear relationship by using a dual-energy CT (DECT). The ΔHU-ρe conversion was performed using a clinical second-generation dual-source CT scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with tube potentials of 80 kV and 140 kV with and without an additional tin filter. The ΔHU-ρe calibration line was obtained from the DECT image acquisition for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom. In addition, the effect of object size on ΔHU-ρe conversion was also experimentally investigated. The plot of the measured ΔHU versus nominal ρe values exhibited a single linear relationship over a wide ρe range from 0.00 (air) to 2.35 (aluminum). The ΔHU-ρe conversion performed with the tin filter yielded a lower dose and more reliable ρe values that were less affected by the object-size variation when compared to the corresponding values obtained for the case without the tin filter. PMID:23571116

  10. Conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density based on a single linear relationship: an experimental verification using a clinical dual-source CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi; Noto, Yoshiyuki; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi

    2013-05-01

    In radiotherapy treatment planning, the conversion of the computed tomography (CT) number to electron density is one of the main processes that determine the accuracy of patient dose calculations. However, in general, the CT number and electron density of tissues cannot be interrelated using a simple one-to-one correspondence. This study aims to experimentally verify the clinical feasibility of an existing novel conversion method proposed by the author of this note, which converts the energy-subtracted CT number (ΔHU) to the relative electron density (ρe) via a single linear relationship by using a dual-energy CT (DECT). The ΔHU-ρe conversion was performed using a clinical second-generation dual-source CT scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with tube potentials of 80 kV and 140 kV with and without an additional tin filter. The ΔHU-ρe calibration line was obtained from the DECT image acquisition for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom. In addition, the effect of object size on ΔHU-ρe conversion was also experimentally investigated. The plot of the measured ΔHU versus nominal ρe values exhibited a single linear relationship over a wide ρe range from 0.00 (air) to 2.35 (aluminum). The ΔHU-ρe conversion performed with the tin filter yielded a lower dose and more reliable ρe values that were less affected by the object-size variation when compared to the corresponding values obtained for the case without the tin filter.

  11. Integrated analysis of copy number and loss of heterozygosity in primary breast carcinomas using high-density SNP array.

    PubMed

    Ching, Ho Ching; Naidu, Rakesh; Seong, Mun Kein; Har, Yip Cheng; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd

    2011-09-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, marked by extensive chromosomal aberrations. In this study, we aimed to explicate the underlying chromosomal copy number (CN) alterations and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) implicated in a cohort of Malaysian hospital-based primary breast carcinoma samples using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array platform. The analysis was conducted by hybridizing the extracted DNA of 70 primary breast carcinomas and 37 normal peripheral blood samples to the Affymetrix 250K Sty SNP arrays. Locus-specific CN aberrations and LOH were statistically summarized using the binary segmentation algorithm and hidden Markov model. Selected genes from the SNP array analysis were also validated using quantitative real-time PCR. The merging of CN and LOH data fabricated distinctive integrated alteration profiles, which were comprised of finely demarcated minimal sites of aberrations. The most prevalent gains (≥ 30%) were detected at the 8q arm: 8q23.1, 8q23.3, 8q24.11, 8q24.13, 8q24.21, 8q24.22, 8q24.23 and 8q24.3, whilst the most ubiquitous losses (≥ 20%) were noted at the 8p12, 8p21.1, 8p21.2, 8p21.1-p21.2, 8p21.3, 8p22, 8p23.1, 8p23.1‑p23.2, 8p23.3, 17p11.2, 17p12, 17p11.2-p12, 17p13.1 and 17p13.2 regions. Copy-neutral LOH was characterized as the most prevailing LOH event, in which the most frequent distributions (≥ 30%) were revealed at 3p21.31, 5q33.2, 12q24.12, 12q24.12‑q24.13 and 14q23.1. These findings offer compre-hensive genome-wide views on breast cancer genomic changes, where the most recurrent gain, loss and copy-neutral LOH events were harboured within the 8q24.21, 8p21.1 and 14q23.1 loci, respectively. This will facilitate the uncovering of true driver genes pertinent to breast cancer biology and the develop-ment of prospective therapeutics. PMID:21687935

  12. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice particles on glassy aerosols modifies TTL cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T. W.; Murray, B. J.; Dobbie, S.; Al-Jumur, S. M.; Cui, Z.; Wagner, R.; Moehler, O.; Schnaiter, M.; Benz, S.; Niemand, M.; Saathoff, H.; Skrotzki, J.; Ebert, V.; Wagner, S.; Karcher, B.

    2010-12-01

    Experiments at the AIDA chamber, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, have shown that glassy aqueous citric acid aerosol can nucleate ice at temperatures relevant to the tropical tropopause layer (TTL)(1). Modelling suggests this new route to the formation of TTL cirrus can provide an explanation for the very low ice particle number density observed in cirrus clouds in this region and may lead to high in-cloud supersaturations(1). Nucleation of ice on glassy aerosol is consistent with the absence of traditional ice nuclei in sampled TTL cirrus residue(2). In addition, we will present new data from experiments performed in July 2010 at the AIDA chamber using glassy aerosols composed of other atmospherically relevant compounds (levoglucosan, raffinose) and an internal mixture of five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate (raffinose/M5AS)(3). All four systems tested nucleate ice when in a glassy state. This indicates that heterogeneous ice nucleation is a general property of glassy aerosols and that natural aerosols which are composed of similar molecules will also nucleate ice if glassy. Glassy aqueous levoglucosan and raffinose/M5AS aerosol nucleated ice at temperatures similar to those found for glassy aqueous citric acid aerosol (<202 K). Whereas raffinose, which forms a glass at much higher temperatures, nucleated ice heterogeneously at up to ~220 K. This activity at higher temperatures suggests that ice nucleation by glassy aerosol may also play a role in the formation of warmer ice clouds. (1)B. J. Murray et al., Heterogeneous nucleation of ice particles on glassy aerosols under cirrus conditions, Nature Geosci, 2010, 3, 233-237. (2)K. D. Froyd et al., Aerosols that form subvisible cirrus at the tropical tropopause, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2010, 10, 209-218. (3)B. Zobrist et al., Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses?, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2008, 8, 5221-5244.

  13. Global Distribution and Sources of Volatile and Nonvolatile Aerosol In the Remote Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Avery, M.; Viezee, W.; Che, Y.; Tabazadeh, A.; Hamill, P.; Pueschel, R.; Hannan, J. R.; Anderson, B.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Airborne measurements of aerosol (Condensation Nuclei, CN) and selected trace gases made in the areas of the North Atlantic Ocean during SONEX (October/November 1997), and the south tropical Pacific Ocean during PEM-Tropics A (September/October 1996) and PEM-Tropics B (March/April 1999) have been analyzed. Emphasis is on the interpretations of variations in the number densities of the fine (>17 nm) and ultrafine (>8 nm) CN in the upper troposphere (8-12 km). These data suggest that large number densities of highly volatile CN (10(exp 4)-10(exp 5)/cu cm) are present in the clean upper troposphere with highest values over the tropical1subtropical region. Through marine convection and long-distance horizontal transport, volatile CN originating from the tropical/subtropical regions can frequently impact the abundance of aerosol in the middle and upper troposphere at mid to high latitudes. Nonvolatile aerosol particles behave in a manner similar to tracers of combustion (CO) and photochemical pollution (PAN), implying a source from continental pollution of industrial or biomass burning origin. In the upper troposphere, we find that volatile and nonvolatile partials number densities are inversely correlated. An aerosol microphysical model is used to suggest that coagulation of fine volatile particles with fewer larger nonvolatile particles provides one possible mechanism for this relationship. It appears that nonvolatile particles, of principally anthropogenic origin,provide a highly efficient removal process for the fine volatile aerosol.

  14. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

  15. Measurements of cross sections for electron-impact excitation into the metastable levels of argon and number densities of metastable argon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Schappe, R.S.; Schulman, M.B.; Anderson, L.W.; Lin, C.C. )

    1994-07-01

    The technique of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been applied to measure the cross sections for electron-impact excitation into the metastable levels of argon atoms as well as the number densities of the argon metastable atoms produced by electron excitation. A monoenergetic electron beam excites the ground-state atoms into the 3[ital p][sup 5]4[ital s] [sup 3][ital P][sub 0],[sup 3][ital P][sub 2] metastable levels (1[ital s][sub 3] and 1[ital s][sub 5] in Paschen's notation) and a pulsed laser pumps the atoms of a metastable level to a level in the 3[ital p][sup 5]4[ital p] configuration (2[ital p] in Paschen's notation). The transient LIF from the 2[ital p] level is shown to be proportional to the apparent cross section of the metastable level and to the metastable number densities so that measurements of LIF enable us to determine both metastable cross sections and number densities. Methods for absolute calibration are described. We obtain both the apparent and direct excitation cross sections for each of the two metastable levels for electron energies from threshold to 200 eV and the results are compared with previous experimental and theoretical works. The pulsed LIF technique is also used to determine the disappearance rates of the metastable atoms after the electron beam is turned off. Two distinct decay modes are found and the observed behaviors are consistent with calculations based on diffusion theory.

  16. “Rings of saturn-like” nanoarrays with high number density of hot spots for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Zhigao; Liao, Lei; Wu, Wei; Guo, Shishang; Zhao, Xinyue; Li, Wei; Ren, Feng; Jiang, Changzhong E-mail: czjiang@whu.edu.cn; Mei, Fei; Xiao, Xiangheng E-mail: czjiang@whu.edu.cn; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jiao

    2014-07-21

    The Ag nanoparticles (NPs) surrounding triangular nanoarrays (TNAs) with high number density of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) hot spots (SERS hot spots ring) are prepared by a combination of NPs deposition and subsequent colloid lithography processing. Owing to the SERS hot spots ring, the Ag NPs surrounding TNAs have been proved an excellent candidate for ultrasensitive molecular sensing for their high SERS signal enhancing capacity in experiments and theories. The Ag NPs surrounding TNAs can be readily used for the quick detection of low concentrations of molecules related to food safety; herein, detection of melamine is discussed.

  17. Preliminary numerical study on the cumulus-stratus transition induced by the increase of formation rate of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Shin-ichiro; Hasegawa, Koichi; Kusano, Kanya

    2015-04-01

    The influence of aerosol-cloud interactions on the steady state of marine stratocumulus is investigated through a series of numerical simulations of an idealized meteorological system in which aerosols are formed constantly. We constructed the system by modifying the set-up based on the RICO composite case defined in van Zanten et al. (2011). The super-droplet method (SDM) (Shima, 2008; Shima et al., 2009) is used for the simulation of cloud microphysical processes. The SDM is a particle-based and probabilistic method, with which the time evolution of aerosol/cloud/precipitation particles are calculated in a unified and accurate manner. For the simulation of atmospheric fluid dynamical processes, the cloud resolving model CReSS (Tsuboki, 2008) is used, in which the quasi-compressible approximation and the sound mode splitting method are applied. The steady states of the system are compared changing the aerosol nucleation rate and the initial number density of aerosols. It is observed that the system gradually evolves to reach its final steady state in a few days, which is irrelevant to the initial number density of aerosols. A transition of the final steady state from cumuli to strati occurs when the aerosol formation rate is increased. Chemical reactions in the gas phase and the liquid phase are not yet incorporated in the model, and the numerical simulations are performed in two dimensions. For these limitations, the results obtained are still preliminary.

  18. Evaluation of LIDAR/Polarimeter Aerosol Measurements by In Situ Instrumentation during DEVOTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Dolgos, G.; Ottaviani, M.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Yang, M. M.; Hair, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    -based). In situ measurements include aerosol number density, size, scattering, absorption and hygroscopicity (aerosol scattering as a function of relative humidity). The PI-Neph will provide the first airborne in situ measurements of aerosol polarized phase function for comparison to the RSP retrievals. As this is the first airborne use of the PI-Neph, aerosol scattering measurements from the PI-Neph will be compared to an integrating nephelometer to provide a primary indication of instrument functionality. Specific flights will be performed to study a range of aerosol classifications including fresh anthropogenic pollution (flights over populated regions), aged pollution (tracking pollution as it moves off shore), sea salt (low altitude ocean flights by the in situ aircraft) and biogenic (flights over forest canopies). In addition, the DLH and a wing-mounted cloud aerosol precipitation spectrometer will provide insight into aerosol retrievals above and near clouds.

  19. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C. Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-28

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O, SiH{sub 4}, PH{sub 3}, SH{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  20. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C.; Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-01

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH4, NH3, H2O, SiH4, PH3, SH2, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  1. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some human tissues and dosimetric materials for mean energies of various radiation sources relevant to radiotherapy and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2014-09-01

    Effective atomic numbers, Zeff, and electron densities, neff, are convenient parameters used to characterise the radiation response of a multi-element material in many technical and medical applications. Accurate values of these physical parameters provide essential data in medical physics. In the present study, the effective atomic numbers and electron densities have been calculated for some human tissues and dosimetric materials such as Adipose Tissue (ICRU-44), Bone Cortical (ICRU-44), Brain Grey/White Matter (ICRU-44), Breast Tissue (ICRU-44), Lung Tissue (ICRU-44), Soft Tissue (ICRU-44), LiF TLD-100H, TLD-100, Water, Borosilicate Glass, PAG (Gel Dosimeter), Fricke (Gel Dosimeter) and OSL (Aluminium Oxide) using mean photon energies, Em, of various radiation sources. The used radiation sources are Pd-103, Tc-99, Ra-226, I-131, Ir-192, Co-60, 30 kVp, 40 kVp, 50 kVp (Intrabeam, Carl Zeiss Meditec) and 6 MV (Mohan-6 MV) sources. The Em values were then used to calculate Zeff and neff of the tissues and dosimetric materials for various radiation sources. Different calculation methods for Zeff such as the direct method, the interpolation method and Auto-Zeff computer program were used and agreements and disagreements between the used methods have been presented and discussed. It has been observed that at higher Em values agreement is quite satisfactory (Dif.<5%) between the adopted methods.

  2. Spectroscopic measurements of the electron number density, electron temperature and OH(A) rotational distribution in a liquid electrode dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krähling, Tobias; Geisler, Sebastian; Okruss, Michael; Florek, Stefan; Franzke, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The electron temperature and number density as well as the OH(A) rotational distribution of a discharge with flowing liquid electrode and dielectric barrier coupling (a liquid electrode dielectric barrier discharge, LE-DBD) were investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy. By using the Stark broadening of three Strontium lines, the electron number density Ne and the lower bound of the electron temperature Te can be simultaneously measured. The values obtained were Ne = (0.8 - 1.6) × 1016 cm- 3 and Te > 1.1 eV, respectively. The OH(A) rotational distribution deviates from equilibrium and can be described by a superposition of two Boltzmann distributions with T1 = (3230 ± 90) K for K ' ≤ 15 and T2 = (7300 ± 300) K for K ' ≥ 16. Consideration of the formation mechanisms of OH(A) and reaction rates suggests that the dissociative recombination of H2O+ and H3O+ is responsible for the higher rotational state distribution, where these ions can only be produced in the LE-DBD through an electrospray-like process.

  3. Aerosol Behavior Log-Normal Distribution Model.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-10-22

    HAARM3, an acronym for Heterogeneous Aerosol Agglomeration Revised Model 3, is the third program in the HAARM series developed to predict the time-dependent behavior of radioactive aerosols under postulated LMFBR accident conditions. HAARM3 was developed to include mechanisms of aerosol growth and removal which had not been accounted for in the earlier models. In addition, experimental measurements obtained on sodium oxide aerosols have been incorporated in the code. As in HAARM2, containment gas temperature, pressure,more » and temperature gradients normal to interior surfaces are permitted to vary with time. The effects of reduced density on sodium oxide agglomerate behavior and of nonspherical shape of particles on aerosol behavior mechanisms are taken into account, and aerosol agglomeration due to turbulent air motion is considered. Also included is a capability to calculate aerosol concentration attenuation factors and to restart problems requiring long computing times.« less

  4. Global Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... sizes and from multiple sources, including biomass burning, mineral dust, sea salt and regional industrial pollution. A color scale is ... desert source region. Deserts are the main sources of mineral dust, and MISR obtains aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths ...

  5. NOTE: Cone beam computerized tomography: the effect of calibration of the Hounsfield unit number to electron density on dose calculation accuracy for adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Joan; McCurdy, Boyd; Greer, Peter B.

    2009-08-01

    The availability of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) images at the time of treatment has opened possibilities for dose calculations representing the delivered dose for adaptive radiation therapy. A significant component in the accuracy of dose calculation is the calibration of the Hounsfield unit (HU) number to electron density (ED). The aim of this work is to assess the impact of HU to ED calibration phantom insert composition and phantom volume on dose calculation accuracy for CBCT. CBCT HU to ED calibration curves for different commercial phantoms were measured and compared. The effect of the scattering volume of the phantom on the HU to ED calibration was examined as a function of phantom length and radial diameter. The resulting calibration curves were used at the treatment planning system to calculate doses for geometrically simple phantoms and a pelvic anatomical phantom to compare against measured doses. Three-dimensional dose distributions for the pelvis phantom were calculated using the HU to ED curves and compared using Chi comparisons. The HU to ED calibration curves for the commercial phantoms diverge at densities greater than that of water, depending on the elemental composition of the phantom insert. The effect of adding scatter material longitudinally, increasing the phantom length from 5 cm to 26 cm, was found to be up to 260 HU numbers for the high-density insert. The change in the HU value, by increasing the diameter of the phantom from 18 to 40 cm, was found to be up to 1200 HU for the high-density insert. The effect of phantom diameter on the HU to ED curve can lead to dose differences for 6 MV and 18 MV x-rays under bone inhomogeneities of up to 20% in extreme cases. These results show significant dosimetric differences when using a calibration phantom with materials which are not tissue equivalent. More importantly, the amount of scattering material used with the HU to ED calibration phantom has a significant effect on the dosimetric

  6. Implication of nonintegral occupation number and Fermi-Dirac statistics in the local-spin-density approximation applied to finite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dhar, S.

    1989-02-01

    In electronic-structure calculations for finite systems using the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation, it is assumed that the eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equation should obey Fermi-Dirac (FD) statistics. In order to comply with this assumption for some of the transition-metal atoms, a nonintegral occupation number is used which also minimizes the total energy. It is shown here that for finite systems it is not necessary that the eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equation obey FD statistics. It is also shown that the Kohn-Sham exchange potential used in all LSD models is correct only for integer occupation number. With a noninteger occupation number the LSD exchange potential will be smaller than that given by the Kohn-Sham potential. Ab initio self-consistent spin-polarized calculations have been performed numerically for the total energy of an iron atom. It is found that the ground state belongs to the 3d/sup 6/4s/sup 2/ configuration. The ionization potentials of all the Fe/sup n//sup +/ ions are reported and are in agreement with experiment.

  7. Reactive nitrogen, ozone, and nitrate aerosols observed in the Arctic stratosphere in January 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Y.; Koike, M.; Iwasaka, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Aimedieu, P.; Newman, P.A.; Matthews, W.A.; Sheldon, W.R.

    1992-08-20

    This paper reports balloon borne measurements on two days in January 1990, from Sweden, of stratospheric densities of reactive nitrogen, nitrate aerosols, and ozone. On one days the measurements were inside the polar vortex, and on the second outside. Reactive nitrogen levels were depressed inside the vortex, which is interpreted in terms of the cold temperatures during December and early January which other measurements support. Denitrification is observed inside the vortex, relative to typical number densities observed when outside the vortex.

  8. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids in the energy range 1 keV-100 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Morteza; Lunscher, Nolan; Yeow, John T. W.

    2013-04-01

    Recently, there has been an interest in fabrication of X-ray sensors based on bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump protein in cell membrane of Halobacterium salinarium. Therefore, a better understanding of interaction of X-ray photons with bacteriorhodopsin is required. We use WinXCom program to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids for photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV. These amino acids include alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, valine, Asx1, Asx2, Glx1 and Glx2. We then use that data to calculate effective atomic number and electron densities for the same range of energy. We also emphasize on two ranges of energies (10-200 keV and 1-20 MeV) in which X-ray imaging and radiotherapy machines work.

  9. Determination of the effective atomic numbers and electron densities for YBaCuO superconductor in the range 59.5 136 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltaş, H.; Çevik, U.

    2008-04-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ superconductor at 59.5, 65.2, 77.1, 94.6, 122 and 136 keV were calculated by using the measured mass attenuation coefficients. Measurements were made by performing transmission experiments in a well-collimated narrow beam geometry set-up by employing Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 0.16 keV at 5.9 keV. These values are found to be in good agreement with theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data. The observed crystal structure of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ superconductor is close to the theoretical structure. Zeff and Nel experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values for calcined and sintered YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ.

  10. Studies on effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and electron density of some narcotic drugs in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounhalli, Shivraj G.; Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption ZPEA,eff, photon interaction ZPI,eff and for electron density Nel, have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for narcotic drugs, such as Heroin (H), Cocaine (CO), Caffeine (CA), Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Cannabinol (CBD), Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). The ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel values have been found to change with energy and composition of the narcotic drugs. The energy dependence ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel is shown graphically. The maximum difference between the values of ZPEA,eff, and ZPI,eff occurs at 30 keV and the significant difference of 2 to 33% for the energy region 5-100 keV for all drugs. The reason for these differences is discussed.

  11. Kinetics of heterogeneous bubble nucleation in rhyolitic melts: implications for the number density of bubbles in volcanic conduits and for pumice textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzel, N.; Laporte, D.; Provost, A.; Kannewischer, I.

    2008-12-01

    We performed decompression experiments to simulate the ascent of a phenocryst-bearing rhyolitic magma in a volcanic conduit. The starting materials were bubble-free rhyolites water-saturated at 200 MPa 800°C under oxidizing conditions: they contained 6.0 wt% dissolved H2O and a dense population of hematite crystals (8.7 ± 2 × 105 mm-3). Pressure was decreased from the saturation value to a final value ranging from 99 to 20 MPa, at constant temperature (800°C); the rate of decompression was either 1,000 or 27.8 kPa/s. In all experiments, we observed a single event of heterogeneous bubble nucleation beginning at a pressure P N equal to 63 ± 3 MPa in the 1,000 kPa/s series, and to 69 ± 1 MPa in the 27.8 kPa/s series. Below P N, the degree of water supersaturation in the liquid rapidly decreased to a few 0.1 wt%, the nucleation rate dropped, and the bubble number density (BND) stabilized to a value strongly sensitive to decompression rate: 80 mm-3 at 27.8 kPa/s vs. 5,900 mm-3 at 1,000 kPa/s. This behaviour is like the behavior formerly described in the case of homogeneous bubble nucleation in the rhyolite-H2O system and in numerical simulations of vesiculation in ascending magmas. Similar degrees of water supersaturation were measured at 27.8 and 1,000 kPa/s, implying that a faster decompression rate does not result in a larger departure from equilibrium. Our experimental results imply that BNDs in acid to intermediate magmas ascending in volcanic conduits will depend on both the decompression rate left| {left. {{text{d}}P/{text{d}}t} right|} right. and the number density of phenocrysts, especially the number density of magnetite microphenocrysts (1 100 mm-3), which is the only mineral species able to reduce significantly the degree of water supersaturation required for bubble nucleation. Very low BNDs (≈1 mm-3) are predicted in the case of effusive eruptions ( left| {left. {{text{d}}P/{text{d}}t} right|} right. ≈ 0.1 kPa/s). High BNDs (up to 107 mm-3) and

  12. Complex refractive indices of aerosols retrieved by continuous wave-cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lang-Yona, N; Rudich, Y; Segre, E; Dinar, E; Abo-Riziq, A

    2009-03-01

    The major uncertainties associated with the direct impact of aerosols on climate call for fast and accurate characterization of their optical properties. Cavity ring down (CRD) spectroscopy provides highly sensitive measurement of aerosols' extinction coefficients from which the complex refractive index (RI) of the aerosol may be retrieved accurately for spherical particles of known size and number density, thus it is possible to calculate the single scattering albedo and other atmospherically relevant optical parameters. We present a CRD system employing continuous wave (CW) single mode laser. The single mode laser and the high repetition rate obtained significantly improve the sensitivity and reliability of the system, compared to a pulsed laser CRD setup. The detection limit of the CW-CRD system is between 6.67 x 10(-10) cm(-1) for an empty cavity and 3.63 x 10(-9) cm(-1) for 1000 particles per cm(3) inside the cavity, at a 400 Hz sampling and averaging of 2000 shots for one sample measurement taken in 5 s. For typical pulsed-CRD, the detection limit for an empty cavity is less than 3.8 x 10(-9) cm(-1) for 1000 shots averaged over 100 s at 10 Hz. The system was tested for stability, accuracy, and RI retrievals for scattering and absorbing laboratory-generated aerosols. Specifically, the retrieved extinction remains very stable for long measurement times (1 h) with an order of magnitude change in aerosol number concentration. In addition, the optical cross section (sigma(ext)) of a 400 nm polystyrene latex sphere (PSL) was determined within 2% error compared to the calculated value based on Mie theory. The complex RI of PSL, nigrosin, and ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols were determined by measuring the extinction efficiency (Q(ext)) as a function of the size parameter ((piD)/lambda) and found to be in very good agreement with literature values. A mismatch in the retrieved RI of Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) compared to a previous study was observed and is

  13. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen; Khain, Alexander; Matsui, Toshihisa; Lang, Stephen; Simpson, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    ]. Please see Tao et al. (2007) for more detailed description on aerosol impact on precipitation. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated.

  14. Modeling Electrical Structure of the Artificial Charged Aerosol Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydenko, S.; Iudin, D.; Klimashov, V.; Kostinskiy, A. J.; Syssoev, V.

    2014-12-01

    The electric structure of the unipolar charged aerosol cloud is considered. The cloud of the volume about 30 cubic meters is generated in the open atmosphere by the original aeroelectrical facility consisting of the source of the aquated ions and the high-voltage discharger. Representing the charge density distribution as a superposition of regular and irregular parts, a model of the electrical structure of the cloud is developed. The regular part is calculated under the stationary current approximation taking into account the source current structure, the shape of the cloud, and results of the multi-point measurements of the electric field and conductivity in the vicinity of the cloud. The irregular part describes random spatiotemporal fluctuations of the charge density which are assumed to be proportional to the aerosol number density. It is shown that a quasi-electrostatic field of the charged aerosol is characterized by significant spatial fluctuations showing the scale invariance. The mean-square fluctuations of the voltage between different parts of the cloud are proportional to the square root of its linear dimensions and may reach significant values even in the absence of the regular field. The basic parameters of the fluctuating spatial structure of the electric field inside the charged aerosol cloud are estimated. It is shown that the charge density fluctuations could lead to a significant (up to 2,5 times) local enhancement of the electric field as compared to the field of the regular part of the charge density. The above effect could serve as one of the important mechanisms of the spark initiation.

  15. Impact of clouds and precipitation on atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronache, Constantin

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols have a significant impact on the dynamics and microphysics of continental mixed-phase convective clouds. High aerosol concentrations provide enhanced cloud condensation nuclei that can lead to the invigoration of convection and increase of surface rainfall. Such effects are dependent on environmental conditions and aerosol properties. Clouds are not only affected by aerosol, they also alter aerosol properties by various processes. Cloud processing of aerosol includes: convective redistribution, modification in the number and size of aerosol particles, chemical processing, new particle formation around clouds, and aerosol removal by rainfall to the surface. Among these processes, the wet removal during intense rain events, in polluted continental regions, can lead to spikes in acidic deposition into environment. In this study, we address the effects of clouds and precipitation on the aerosol distribution in cases of convective precipitation events in eastern US. We examine the effects of clouds and precipitation on various aerosol species, as well as their temporal and spatial variability.

  16. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  17. Measurement of electron density and effective atomic number by dual-energy scan using a 320-detector computed tomography scanner with raw data-based analysis: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Kiguchi, Masao; Tsushima, So; Taniguchi, Akira; Kaichi, Yoko; Yamagami, Takuji; Awai, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of the electron densities and effective atomic numbers determined by raw data-based dual-energy analysis on a 320-detector computed tomography scanner. The mean (SD) errors between the measured and true electron densities and between the measured and true effective atomic numbers were 1.3% (1.5%) and 3.1% (3.2%), respectively. Electron densities and effective atomic numbers can be determined with high accuracy, which may help to improve accuracy in radiotherapy treatment planning. PMID:24983439

  18. A detailed study of the 2010 fires in Russia by multiple satellite instruments: what can we learn from the UV Aerosol Indices?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M. J.; Wagner, T.; Fromm, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    For almost a month in July and August 2010, an exceptionally high number of fires occurred across western Russia. Varying fire characteristics and intensity due to differences in fuel composition and meteorological conditions caused smoke plumes to vary in color, altitude and optical density. Peat bog fires around Moscow tended to produce low-lying, whitish smoke layers, whereas some severe forest fires were found to have caused so-called pyro-Cbs: thick, mostly dark smoke plumes on top of large convective clouds that reached as high as the stratosphere. In situations where an aerosol layer overlays a cloud, many remote sensing aerosol retrievals break down due to the brightness of the “surface”. The UV Aerosol Indices (UVAI) do not suffer from this drawback, and in fact are more sensitive to absorbing aerosols if the underlying surface is bright, therefore making them very suitable for our type of investigation. However, aerosol plumes are very complex and the UVAI are only semi-quantitative measures that are determined by aerosol extinction and absorption, but also by the altitude of the aerosol plume. We therefore chose to combine our UVAI measurements from the instruments SCIAMACHY, OMI, and GOME-2 with observations by other satellite instruments, such as MODIS, MISR, MERIS, and CALIOP. We also compared the measurements to radiative transfer model calculations of many different aerosol scenarios to draw conclusions about what specific aerosol characteristics cause the variation in pyro-Cb appearances.

  19. A rocket-borne mass analyzer for charged aerosol particles in the mesosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Knappmiller, Scott; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Friedrich, Martin

    2008-10-15

    An electrostatic mass spectrometer for nanometer-sized charged aerosol particles in the mesosphere has been developed and tested. The analyzer is mounted on the forward end of a rocket and has a slit opening for admitting a continuous sample of air that is exhausted through ports at the sides. Within the instrument housing are two sets of four collection plates that are biased with positive and negative voltages for the collection of negative and positive aerosol particles, respectively. Each collection plate spans about an order of magnitude in mass which corresponds to a factor of 2 in radius. The number density of the charge is calculated from the current collected by the plates. The mean free path for molecular collisions in the mesosphere is comparable to the size of the instrument opening; thus, the analyzer performance is modeled by a Monte Carlo computer code that finds the aerosol particles trajectories within the instrument including both the electrostatic force and the forces from collisions of the aerosol particles with air molecules. Mass sensitivity curves obtained using the computer models are near to those obtained in the laboratory using an ion source. The first two flights of the instrument returned data showing the charge number densities of both positive and negative aerosol particles in four mass ranges.

  20. The electron-to-neutral number density ratio in the inner coma of 67P at different stages of the Rosetta mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigren, Erik; Altwegg, Kathrin; Edberg, Niklas J. T.; Eriksson, Anders I.; Galand, Marina; Goetz, Charlotte; Henri, Pierre; Héritier, Kevin; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Odelstad, Elias; Tzou, Chia-Yu

    2016-04-01

    The ESA Rosetta spacecraft has followed comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko closely (typically at tens to hundreds of km) since early August 2014 covering heliocentric distances from ~3.6 AU to ~1.25 AU at perihelion in August 2015. Since arrival at the comet the neutral number density, nN, at the spacecraft location, has been probed by the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis/Comet Pressure Sensor (ROSINA/COPS [1]). Likewise, the dual Langmuir Probe (LAP [2]) and the Mutual Impedance Probe (MIP [3]), both being subsystems of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC [4]), have operated allowing for the retrieval of the electron number density, ne. Arguably, the electron-to-neutral number density ratio, ne/nN, accessible from these observations, is key to gain insights into the processes dictating the ionization balance within the inner coma of 67P [5]. In January 2015, at a heliocentric distance of ~2.4-2.6 AU (and when not being disturbed by by-passing co-rotating interaction regions [6]) we find that a Field Free Chemistry Free (FFCF) solar EUV deposition model reasonably well captures the observed ne/nN ratio in the H2O dominated summer hemisphere of 67P. For the same period we find ratios often elevated by more than a factor of 2 (with respect to modeled values) in the winter hemisphere and argue that this partly could be caused by high mixing ratios of CO2 [see 7]. We are currently conducting a study of ne/nN ratios in the coma of 67P when close to perihelion, which includes time-intervals when within the diamagnetic cavity as attested from observations [8] by the RPC/Fluxgate Magnetometer (MAG, [9]). Results of these investigations will be presented at the meeting. The closer distance to the sun and the enhanced activity bring about several effects that are anticipated to at least somewhat reduce ne/nN ratios from values predicted by the FFCF-model. As an example one may expect an increased influence of dissociative recombination on the ionization

  1. Initial implementation of the conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density in tissue inhomogeneity corrections: An anthropomorphic phantom study of radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi; Noto, Yoshiyuki; Sasamoto, Ryuta; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To achieve accurate tissue inhomogeneity corrections in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide range of ρ{sub e}. The purpose of this study is to present an initial implementation of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method for a treatment planning system (TPS). In this paper, two example radiotherapy plans are used to evaluate the reliability of dose calculations in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method. Methods: CT images were acquired using a clinical dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with two tube potential pairs and an additional tin (Sn) filter for the high-kV tube (80–140 kV/Sn and 100–140 kV/Sn). Single-energy CT using the same DSCT scanner was also performed at 120 kV to compare the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method with a conventional conversion from a CT number to ρ{sub e} (Hounsfield units, HU–ρ{sub e} conversion). Lookup tables for ρ{sub e} calibration were obtained from the CT image acquisitions for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom (EDP). To investigate the beam-hardening effect on dosimetric uncertainties, two EDPs with different sizes (a body EDP and a head EDP) were used for the ρ{sub e} calibration. Each acquired lookup table was applied to two radiotherapy plans designed using the XiO TPS with the superposition algorithm for an anthropomorphic phantom. The first radiotherapy plan was for an oral cavity tumor and the second was for a lung tumor. Results: In both treatment plans, the performance of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion was superior to that of the conventional HU–ρ{sub e} conversion in terms of the reliability of dose calculations. Especially, for the oral tumor plan, which dealt with dentition and bony structures, treatment

  2. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities from mass attenuation coefficients in Ti xCo 1-x and Co xCu 1-x alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, I.; Demir, L.

    2009-11-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients ( μ/ρ), for pure Ti, Co, Cu and Co and Cu ( x = 0.8, 0.7, 0.6, 0.5, 0.4, 0.3 and 0.2) alloys were measured at 22.1, 25.0, 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The samples were irradiated with 109Cd and 241Am radioactive point source using transmission arrangement. The X- and γ-rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Total atomic and electronic cross-sections ( σt and σe), effective atomic numbers ( Z eff) and electron densities ( N el) were determined using the obtained μ/ρ values for investigated 3d alloys. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using mixture rule and the experimental values of investigated parameters were compared with the calculated values.

  3. Chemical composition, effective atomic number and electron density study of trommel sieve waste (TSW), Portland cement, lime, pointing and their admixtures with TSW in different proportions.

    PubMed

    Kurudirek, Murat; Aygun, Murat; Erzeneoğlu, Salih Zeki

    2010-06-01

    The trommel sieve waste (TSW) which forms during the boron ore production is considered to be a promising building material with its use as an admixture with Portland cement and is considered to be an alternative radiation shielding material, also. Thus, having knowledge on the chemical composition and radiation interaction properties of TSW as compared to other building materials is of importance. In the present study, chemical compositions of the materials used have been determined using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRFS). Also, TSW, some commonly used building materials (Portland cement, lime and pointing) and their admixtures with TSW have been investigated in terms of total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho), photon interaction cross sections (sigma(t)), effective atomic numbers (Z(eff)) and effective electron densities (N(e)) by using X-rays at 22.1, 25keV and gamma-rays at 88keV photon energies. Possible conclusions were drawn with respect to the variations in photon energy and chemical composition. PMID:20080413

  4. Collisional, radiative and total electron interaction in compound semiconductor detectors and solid state nuclear track detectors: effective atomic number and electron density.

    PubMed

    Kurudirek, Murat; Kurudirek, Sinem V

    2015-05-01

    Effective atomic numbers, Zeff and electron densities, Ne are widely used for characterization of interaction processes in radiation related studies. A variety of detectors are employed to detect different types of radiations i.e. photons and charged particles. In the present work, some compound semiconductor detectors (CSCD) and solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) were investigated with respect to the partial as well as total electron interactions. Zeff and Ne of the given detectors were calculated for collisional, radiative and total electron interactions in the kinetic energy region 10keV-1GeV. Maximum values of Zeff and Ne were observed at higher kinetic energies of electrons. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne up to ≈20-25% were noticed for the detectors, GaN, ZnO, Amber and CR-39 for total electron interaction. Moreover, the obtained Zeff and Ne for electrons were compared to those obtained for photons in the entire energy region. Significant variations in Zeff were also noted not only for photons (up to ≈40% for GaN) but also between photons and electrons (up to ≈60% for CR-39) especially at lower energies. Except for the lower energies, Zeff and Ne keep more or less constant values for the given materials. The energy regions where Zeff and Ne keep constant clearly show the availability of using these parameters for characterization of the materials with respect to the radiation interaction processes. PMID:25702888

  5. Effective atomic number and electron density of amino acids within the energy range of 0.122-1.330 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Chaitali V.; Lokhande, Rajkumar M.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2016-08-01

    Photon attenuation coefficient calculation methods have been widely used to accurately study the properties of amino acids such as n-acetyl-L-tryptophan, n-acetyl-L-tyrosine, D-tryptophan, n-acetyl-L-glutamic acid, D-phenylalanine, and D-threonine. In this study, mass attenuation coefficients (μm) of these amino acids for 0.122-, 0.356-, 0.511-, 0.662-, 0.884-, 1.170, 1.275-, 1.330-MeV photons are determined using the radio-nuclides Co57, Ba133, Cs137, Na22, Mn54, and Co60. NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system was used to detect gamma rays with a resolution of 8.2% at 0.662 MeV. The calculated attenuation coefficient values were then used to determine total atomic cross sections (σt), molar extinction coefficients (ε), electronic cross sections (σe), effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of the amino acids. Theoretical values were calculated based on the XCOM data. Theoretical and experimental values are found to be in a good agreement (error<5%). The variations of μm, σt, ε, σe, Zeff, and Neff with energy are shown graphically. The values of μm, σt, ε, σe are higher at lower energies, and they decrease sharply as energy increases; by contrast, Zeff and Neff were found to be almost constant.

  6. Absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283. 3-nm resonant line from a lead hollow cathode lamp. An absolute number density calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, J.W. ); Oldenborg, R.C.; Baughcum, S.L. )

    1989-10-19

    An accurate absolute number density calibration curve for absorption by gaseous lead atoms of the 283.3-nm resonant line from a typical lead hollow cathode lamp is reported. This calibration shows the usual curvature in the Beer-Lambert plot for atomic absorption at moderate to high absorbances that is commonly attributed to self-absorption leading to line reversal in the source and/or preferential absorption at the line center when the absorber temperature is not much greater than the source Doppler temperature. A theoretical calculation utilizing a Doppler-limited Fourier transform spectrum of the 283.3-nm emission from the lamp and a tabulated value of the absorption cross section and accounting for the isotopic and nuclear hyperfine components in both the emission and absorption due to naturally occurring lead quantitatively reproduces the experimental calibration curve without any parameter adjustments. It is found that the curvature in the Beer-Lambert plot has more to do with the fact that the absorbing and emitting atoms are a mixture of isotopes giving several isotopic and nuclear hyperfine transitions at slightly different frequencies than it does with preferential absorption at line centers.

  7. Determining the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density of raw wood and binderless particleboards of Rhizophora spp. by using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marashdeh, Mohammad W.; Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim F.; Abdel Munem, Eid M.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Ariffin, Alawiah; Al-Omari, Saleh

    Rhizophora spp. wood has the potential to serve as a solid water or tissue equivalent phantom for photon and electron beam dosimetry. In this study, the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron density (Neff) of raw wood and binderless Rhizophora spp. particleboards in four different particle sizes were determined in the 10-60 keV energy region. The mass attenuation coefficients used in the calculations were obtained using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation code. The MCNP5 calculations of the attenuation parameters for the Rhizophora spp. samples were plotted graphically against photon energy and discussed in terms of their relative differences compared with those of water and breast tissue. Moreover, the validity of the MCNP5 code was examined by comparing the calculated attenuation parameters with the theoretical values obtained by the XCOM program based on the mixture rule. The results indicated that the MCNP5 process can be followed to determine the attenuation of gamma rays with several photon energies in other materials.

  8. [Investigation of Aerosol Mixed State and CCN Activity in Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Ma, Yan; Zheng, Jun; Li, Shi-zheng; Wang, Li-peng

    2016-04-15

    During 11-18 September 2014, the size-resolved aerosol Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) activity and mixing state were measured using Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNC), Aerosol Particle Mass (APM) and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The results showed that aerosols mainly existed as an internal mixture. For 76, 111, 138 and 181 nm particles, black carbon (BC) accounted for 5.4%, 10%, l0.7% and 6.7% of the particle mass, but as high as 51%, 57%, 70% and 59% of the particle number concentrations, respectively, suggesting that BC was a type of important condensation nuclei in the atmosphere and made significant contributions to particle numbers. The occasionally observed external mixtures were mainly present in 111 and 138 nm particles. The critical supersaturation was 0.25%, 0.13%, 0.06% and 0.015% for 76, 111, 138 and 181 nm particles, respectively. Precipitation and haze had significant effects on the particle CCN activity. The hygroscopicity parameter K was 0.37, 0.29 and 0.39 in rainy, clear and hazy days, respectively. Particle density and CCN activity were impacted by chemical compositions. Compared with clear days, higher contents of inorganic salts and lower contents of organics were found on hazy days, accompanied by lower particle density and higher CCN activity. PMID:27548938

  9. Stratospheric aerosols and climatic change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, B.; Pollack, J. B.; Summers, A.; Toon, O. B.; Sagan, C.; Van Camp, W.

    1976-01-01

    Generated primarily by volcanic explosions, a layer of submicron silicate particles and particles made of concentrated sulfuric acids solution is present in the stratosphere. Flights through the stratosphere may be a future source of stratospheric aerosols, since the effluent from supersonic transports contains sulfurous gases (which will be converted to H2SO4) while the exhaust from Space Shuttles contains tiny aluminum oxide particles. Global heat balance calculations have shown that the stratospheric aerosols have made important contributions to some climatic changes. In the present paper, accurate radiative transfer calculations of the globally-averaged surface temperature (T) are carried out to estimate the sensitivity of the climate to changes in the number of stratospheric aerosols. The results obtained for a specified model atmosphere, including a vertical profile of the aerosols, indicate that the climate is unlikely to be affected by supersonic transports and Space Shuttles, during the next decades.

  10. The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm, Products and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Mattoo, S.; Chu, D. A.; Martins, J. V.; Li, R.-R.; Ichoku, C.; Levy, R. C.; Kleidman, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard both NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites is making near global daily observations of the earth in a wide spectral range. These measurements are used to derive spectral aerosol optical thickness and aerosol size parameters over both land and ocean. The aerosol products available over land include aerosol optical thickness at three visible wavelengths, a measure of the fraction of aerosol optical thickness attributed to the fine mode and several derived parameters including reflected spectral solar flux at top of atmosphere. Over ocean, the aerosol optical thickness is provided in seven wavelengths from 0.47 microns to 2.13 microns. In addition, quantitative aerosol size information includes effective radius of the aerosol and quantitative fraction of optical thickness attributed to the fine mode. Spectral aerosol flux, mass concentration and number of cloud condensation nuclei round out the list of available aerosol products over the ocean. The spectral optical thickness and effective radius of the aerosol over the ocean are validated by comparison with two years of AERONET data gleaned from 133 AERONET stations. 8000 MODIS aerosol retrievals colocated with AERONET measurements confirm that one-standard deviation of MODIS optical thickness retrievals fall within the predicted uncertainty of delta tauapproximately equal to plus or minus 0.03 plus or minus 0.05 tau over ocean and delta tay equal to plus or minus 0.05 plus or minus 0.15 tau over land. 271 MODIS aerosol retrievals co-located with AERONET inversions at island and coastal sites suggest that one-standard deviation of MODIS effective radius retrievals falls within delta r_eff approximately equal to 0.11 microns. The accuracy of the MODIS retrievals suggests that the product can be used to help narrow the uncertainties associated with aerosol radiative forcing of global climate.

  11. A global aerosol classification algorithm incorporating multiple satellite data sets of aerosol and trace gas abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Beirle, S.; Hörmann, C.; Kaiser, J. W.; Stammes, P.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Wagner, T.

    2015-09-01

    Detecting the optical properties of aerosols using passive satellite-borne measurements alone is a difficult task due to the broadband effect of aerosols on the measured spectra and the influences of surface and cloud reflection. We present another approach to determine aerosol type, namely by studying the relationship of aerosol optical depth (AOD) with trace gas abundance, aerosol absorption, and mean aerosol size. Our new Global Aerosol Classification Algorithm, GACA, examines relationships between aerosol properties (AOD and extinction Ångström exponent from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), UV Aerosol Index from the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment, GOME-2) and trace gas column densities (NO2, HCHO, SO2 from GOME-2, and CO from MOPITT, the Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere instrument) on a monthly mean basis. First, aerosol types are separated based on size (Ångström exponent) and absorption (UV Aerosol Index), then the dominating sources are identified based on mean trace gas columns and their correlation with AOD. In this way, global maps of dominant aerosol type and main source type are constructed for each season and compared with maps of aerosol composition from the global MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) model. Although GACA cannot correctly characterize transported or mixed aerosols, GACA and MACC show good agreement regarding the global seasonal cycle, particularly for urban/industrial aerosols. The seasonal cycles of both aerosol type and source are also studied in more detail for selected 5° × 5° regions. Again, good agreement between GACA and MACC is found for all regions, but some systematic differences become apparent: the variability of aerosol composition (yearly and/or seasonal) is often not well captured by MACC, the amount of mineral dust outside of the dust belt appears to be overestimated, and the abundance of secondary organic aerosols is underestimated in comparison

  12. Introducing the aerosol-climate model MAECHAM5-SAM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, R.; Timmreck, C.; Graf, H. F.

    2009-04-01

    We are presenting a new global aerosol model MAECHAM5-SAM2 to study the aerosol dynamics in the UTLS under background and volcanic conditions. The microphysical core modul SAM2 treats the formation, the evolution and the transport of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The aerosol size distribution and the weight percentage of the sulphuric acid solution is calculated dependent on the concentrations of H2SO4 and H2O, their vapor pressures, the atmospheric temperature and pressure. The fixed sectional method is used to resolve an aerosol distribution between 1 nm and 2.6 micron in particle radius. Homogeneous nucleation, condensation and evaporation, coagulation, water-vapor growth, sedimentation and sulphur chemistry are included. The module is applied in the middle-atmosphere MAECHAM5 model, resolving the atmosphere up to 0.01 hPa (~80 km) in 39 layers. It is shown here that MAECHAM5-SAM2 well represents in-situ measured size distributions of stratospheric background aerosol in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. Distinct differences can be seen when derived integrated aerosol parameters (surface area, effective radius) are compared with aerosol climatologies based on the SAGE II satellite instrument (derived by the University of Oxford and the NASA AMES laboratory). The bias between the model and the SAGE II data increases as the moment of the aerosol size distribution decreases. Thus the modeled effective radius show the strongest bias, followed by the aerosol surface area density. Correspondingly less biased are the higher moments volume area density and the mass density of the global stratospheric aerosol coverage. This finding supports the key finding No. 2 of the SPARC Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (2006), where it was shown that during periods of very low aerosol load in the stratosphere, the consistency between in-situ and satellite measurements, which exist in a volcanically perturbed stratosphere, breaks down and significant

  13. Balloon measurements of aerosol in the Antarctic stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morita, Y.; Takagi, M.; Iwasaka, Y.; Ono, A.

    1985-01-01

    Three balloon soundings of aerosol were conducted from Syowa Station, Antarctica in April, June and October 1983. Number concentration and the size distribution of aerosol particles with diameter greater than 0.3 microns were measured by using a light scattering aerosol particle counter. The influence of the eruption of Mt. El Chichon on the aerosol concentration in the stratosphere was observed on October 16. Very high aerosol concentration at stratospheric heights was obtained from the first successful aerosol sounding in winter Antarctic stratosphere. The result gives direct evidence of winter enhancement in the Antarctic stratosphere.

  14. Calculation of effective atomic number and electron density of essential biomolecules for electron, proton, alpha particle and multi-energetic photon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Onaran, Tayfur

    2015-07-01

    Effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) of some essential biomolecules have been calculated for total electron interaction, total proton interaction and total alpha particle interaction using an interpolation method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. Also, the spectrum weighted Zeff for multi-energetic photons has been calculated using Auto-Zeff program. Biomolecules consist of fatty acids, amino acids, carbohydrates and basic nucleotides of DNA and RNA. Variations of Zeff and Ne with kinetic energy of ionizing charged particles and effective photon energies of heterogeneous sources have been studied for the given materials. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne have been observed through the entire energy region for electron, proton and alpha particle interactions. Non-uniform variation has been observed for protons and alpha particles in low and intermediate energy regions, respectively. The maximum values of Zeff have found to be in higher energies for total electron interaction whereas maximum values have found to be in relatively low energies for total proton and total alpha particle interactions. When it comes to the multi-energetic photon sources, it has to be noted that the highest Zeff values were found at low energy region where photoelectric absorption is the pre-dominant interaction process. The lowest values of Zeff have been shown in biomolecules such as stearic acid, leucine, mannitol and thymine, which have highest H content in their groups. Variation in Ne seems to be more or less the same with the variation in Zeff for the given materials as expected.

  15. Increasing the number of unloading/reambulation cycles does not adversely impact body composition and lumbar bone mineral density but reduces tissue sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shikha; Manske, Sarah L.; Judex, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    A single exposure to hindlimb unloading leads to changes in body mass, body composition and bone, but the consequences of multiple exposures are not yet understood. Within a 18 week period, adult C57BL/6 male mice were exposed to 1 (1x-HLU), 2 (2x-HLU) or 3 (3x-HLU) cycles of 2 weeks of hindlimb unloading (HLU) followed by 4 weeks of reambulation (RA), or served as ambulatory age-matched controls. In vivo μCT longitudinally tracked changes in abdominal adipose and lean tissues, lumbar vertebral apparent volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and upper hindlimb muscle cross-sectional area before and after the final HLU and RA cycle. During the final HLU cycle, significant decreases in total adipose tissue and vertebral vBMD in the three experimental groups occurred such that there were no significant between-group differences at the beginning of the final RA cycle. However, the magnitude of the HLU induced losses diminished in mice undergoing their 2nd or 3rd HLU cycle. Irrespective of the number of HLU/RA cycles, total adipose tissue and vertebral vBMD recovered and were no different from age-matched controls after the final RA period. In contrast, upper hindlimb muscle cross-sectional area was significantly lower than controls in all unloaded groups after the final RA period. These results suggest that tissues in the abdominal region are more resilient to multiple bouts of unloading and more amenable to recovery during reambulation than the peripheral musculoskeletal system.

  16. Compositional Analysis of Aerosols Using Calibration-Free Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Boudhib, Mohamed; Hermann, Jörg; Dutouquet, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that the elemental composition of aerosols can be measured using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) without any preliminary calibration with standard samples. Therefore, a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser beam was focused into a flux of helium charged with alumina aerosols of a few micrometers diameter. The emission spectrum of the laser-generated breakdown plasma was recorded with an echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector. The spectral features including emission from both the helium carrier gas and the Al2O3 aerosols were analyzed on the base of a partial local thermodynamic equilibrium. Thus, Boltzmann equilibrium distributions of population number densities were assumed for all plasma species except of helium atoms and ions. By analyzing spectra recorded for different delays between the laser pulse and the detector gate, it is shown that accurate composition measurements are only possible for delays ≤1 μs, when the electron density is large enough to ensure collisional equilibrium for the aerosol vapor species. The results are consistent with previous studies of calibration-free LIBS measurements of solid alumina and glass and promote compositional analysis of aerosols via laser-induced breakdown in helium. PMID:26974717

  17. Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-499

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.

    2013-10-01

    Under this CRADA NREL will support Creare's project for the Department of Energy entitled 'Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density' which involves the development of an air-flow based cooling product that increases energy density, safety, and reliability of hybrid electric vehicle battery packs.

  18. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2014-05-19

    , 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops

  19. Generation of a monodispersed aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenck, H.; Mikasa, M.; Devicariis, R.

    1974-01-01

    The identity and laboratory test methods for the generation of a monodispersed aerosol are reported on, and are subjected to the following constraints and parameters; (1) size distribution; (2) specific gravity; (3) scattering properties; (4) costs; (5) production. The procedure called for the collection of information from the literature, commercial available products, and experts working in the field. The following topics were investigated: (1) aerosols; (2) air pollution -- analysis; (3) atomizers; (4) dispersion; (5) particles -- optics, size analysis; (6) smoke -- generators, density measurements; (7) sprays; (8) wind tunnels -- visualization.

  20. Aerosol particles and the formation of advection fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A study of numerical simulation of the effects of concentration, particle size, mass of nuclei, and chemical composition on the dynamics of warm fog formation, particularly the formation of advection fog, is presented. This formation is associated with the aerosol particle characteristics, and both macrophysical and microphysical processes are considered. In the macrophysical model, the evolution of wind components, water vapor content, liquid water content, and potential temperature under the influences of vertical turbulent diffusion, turbulent momentum, and turbulent energy transfers are taken into account. In the microphysical model, the supersaturation effect is incorporated with the surface tension and hygroscopic material solution. It is shown that the aerosol particles with the higher number density, larger size nuclei, the heavier nuclei mass, and the higher ratio of the Van't Hoff factor to the molecular weight favor the formation of the lower visibility advection fogs with stronger vertical energy transfer during the nucleation and condensation time period.

  1. Atmospheric oxidation of isoprene and 1,3-Butadiene: influence of aerosol acidity and Relative humidity on secondary organic aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of acidic seed aerosols on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA)have been examined in a number of previous studies, several of which have observed strong linear correlations between the aerosol acidity (measured as nmol H+ per m3 air s...

  2. Aerosol-Cloud Interaction at the Land Site of VOCALS-REx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fochesatto, Javier; Shaw, Glenn; Krejci, Radovan; Chand, Duli; Gallarado, Laura; Cordova, Ana

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol-Cloud-Ocean interactions in the South-East Pacific represent one of the best natural laboratories to study aerosol-cloud-climate processes thanks to stable large scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation and large anthropogenic sources associated mainly with copper industry. This article discuss the microphysical and optical characteristics of aerosols in the marine boundary layer (MBL) and the free troposphere(FT) related to the coastal MBL dynamics, stratocumulus cloud formation and dissipation in an environment influenced by air pollution sources in the FT and MBL. The analysis is based on observations from the Land Sites of VOCALS-REx at Paposo (25 S, 70 W, 700 masl) on the Pacific ocean coast, about 150 km south of Antofagasta in Chile and from free tropospheric site at ESO Paranal Observatory located inland at 2435 masl some 40 km NE from Paposo site. Combination of the in situ measurements from both, free troposphere and MBL together with lidar observations provides comprehensive insight into MBL-free troposphere interactions. The aerosol properties in FT are to a large degree controlled by sulfate-dominated aerosol from copper industry in northern Chile. The free tropospheric aerosol close to the coast has very stable accumulation mode dominated size distribution with mode diameter ~0.1 µm, but the aerosol number density for particles > 0.01 µm as well as for particles > 0.26 µm show large variability between 300 and 1600 cm-3 and 5 and 50 cm-3, respectively. The large variability can be attributed to changing influence from individual emission sources due to changing intensity of the coastal jet flow and diurnal ventilation of the shallow boundary layer in hilly region of the Atacama Desert mountain plateau. Polluted aerosols from FT are transported to the MBL along the Andes western slope through katabatic flows and downward mixed into the MBL most intensively in a narrow band along the coast.

  3. Analysis of secondary organic aerosols from ozonolysis of isoprene by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Sato, Kei; Hirokawa, Jun; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Okumura, Motonori; Tohno, Susumu; Imamura, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    To understand the mechanism of formation of the secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) produced by the ozonolysis of isoprene, proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to identify the semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) produced in both the gaseous and the aerosol phases and to estimate the gas-aerosol partitioning of each SVOC in chamber experiments. To aid in the identification of the SVOCs, the products were also studied with negative ion-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS), which can selectively detect carboxylic acids and hydroperoxides. The gaseous products were observed by on-line PTR-MS and NI-CIMS, whereas the SVOCs in SOAs collected on a filter were vaporized by heating the filter and were then analysed by off-line PTR-MS and NI-CIMS. The formation of oligomeric hydroperoxides involving a Criegee intermediate as a chain unit was observed in both the gaseous and the aerosol phases by NI-CIMS. PTR-MS also detected oligomeric hydroperoxides as protonated molecules from which a H2O molecule was eliminated, [M-OH]+. In the aerosol phase, oligomers involving formaldehyde and methacrolein as chain units were observed by PTR-MS in addition to oligomeric hydroperoxides. The gas-aerosol partitioning of each component was calculated from the ion signals in the gaseous and aerosol phases measured by PTR-MS. From the gas-aerosol partitioning, the saturated vapour pressures of the oligomeric hydroperoxides were estimated. Measurements by a fast-mobility-particle-sizer spectrometer revealed that the increase of the number density of the particles was complete within a few hundred seconds from the start of the reaction.

  4. Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements in the Southern Ocean Within the Framework of Maritime Aerosol Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Sayer, A. M.; Sakerin, S. M.; Radionov, V. F.; Courcoux, Y.; Broccardo, S. P.; Evangelista, H.; Croot, P. L.; Disterhoft, P.; Piketh, S.; Milinevsky, G. P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Slutsker, I.; Giles, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol production sources over the World Ocean and various factors determining aerosol spatial and temporal distribution are important for understanding the Earth's radiation budget and aerosol-cloud interactions. The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) as a component of AERONET has been collecting aerosol optical depth data over the oceans since 2006. A significant progress has been made in data acquisition over areas that previously had very little or no coverage. Data collection included intensive study areas in the Southern Ocean and off the coast of Antarctica including a number of circumnavigation cruises in high southern latitudes. It made an important contribution to MAN and provided a valuable reference point in atmospheric aerosol optical studies. The paper presents results of this international and multi-agency effort in studying aerosol optical properties over Southern Ocean and adjacent areas. The ship-borne aerosol optical depth measurements offer an excellent opportunity for comparison with global aerosol transport models, satellite retrievals and provide useful information on aerosol distribution over the World Ocean. A public domain web-based database dedicated to the MAN activity can be found at http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/maritime_aerosol_network.html.

  5. Chemical and Physical Properties of Bulk Aerosols within Four Sectors Observed during TRACE-P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Talbot, R. W.; Dibb, J. E.; Fuelberg, E.; Hudgins, C. H.; Kiley, C. M.; Russo, R.; Scheuer, E.; Seid, G.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical and physical aerosol data collected on the DC-8 during TRACE-P were grouped into four sectors based on back trajectories. The four sectors represent long-range transport from the west (WSW), regional circulation over the western Pacific and Southeast Asia (SE Asia), polluted transport from Northern Asia with substantial sea salt at low altitudes (NNW) and a substantial amount of dust (Channel). WSW has generally low mixing ratios at both middle and high altitudes, with the bulk of the aerosol mass due to non-sea-salt water-soluble inorganic species. Low altitude SE Asia also has low mean mixing ratios in general, with the majority of the aerosol mass comprised of non-sea-salts, however, soot is also relatively important m this region. "w had the highest mean sea salt mixing ratios, with the aerosol mass at low altitudes (a km) evenly divided between sea salts, mm-sea-salts, and dust. The highest mean mixing ratios of water-soluble ions and soot were observed at the lowest altitudes (a km) in the Channel sector. The bulk of the aerosol mass exported from Asia emanates h m Channel at both low and midaltitudes, due to the prevalence of dust compared to other sectors. Number densities show enhanced fine particles for Channel and NNW, while their volume distributions are enhanced due to sea salt and dust Low-altitude Channel exhibits the highest condensation nuclei ((34) number densities along with enhanced scattering coefficients, compared to the other sectors. At midaltitudes (2-7 km), low mean CN number densities coupled with a high proportion of nonvolatile particles (265%) observed in polluted sectors (Channel and NNW) are attributed to wet scavenging which removes hygroscopic CN particles. Low single scatter albedo m SE Asia reflects enhanced soot

  6. Chemical and physical properties of bulk aerosols within four sectors observed during TRACE-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Talbot, R. W.; Dibb, J. E.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Hudgins, C. H.; Kiley, C. M.; Russo, R.; Scheuer, E.; Seid, G.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.

    2003-11-01

    Chemical and physical aerosol data collected on the DC-8 during TRACE-P were grouped into four sectors based on back trajectories. The four sectors represent long-range transport from the west (WSW), regional circulation over the western Pacific and Southeast Asia (SE Asia), polluted transport from northern Asia with substantial sea salt at low altitudes (NNW) and a substantial amount of dust (Channel). WSW has generally low mixing ratios at both middle and high altitudes, with the bulk of the aerosol mass due to non-sea-salt water-soluble inorganic species. Low altitude SE Asia also has low mean mixing ratios in general, with the majority of the aerosol mass comprised of non-sea-salts, however, soot is also relatively important in this region. NNW had the highest mean sea salt mixing ratios, with the aerosol mass at low altitudes (<2 km) evenly divided between sea salts, non-sea-salts, and dust. The highest mean mixing ratios of water-soluble ions and soot were observed at the lowest altitudes (<2 km) in the Channel sector. The bulk of the aerosol mass exported from Asia emanates from Channel at both low and midaltitudes, due to the prevalence of dust compared to other sectors. Number densities show enhanced fine particles for Channel and NNW, while their volume distributions are enhanced due to sea salt and dust. Low-altitude Channel exhibits the highest condensation nuclei (CN) number densities along with enhanced scattering coefficients, compared to the other sectors. At midaltitudes (2-7 km), low mean CN number densities coupled with a high proportion of nonvolatile particles (≥65%) observed in polluted sectors (Channel and NNW) are attributed to wet scavenging which removes hygroscopic CN particles. Low single scatter albedo in SE Asia reflects enhanced soot.

  7. Properties of aerosol processed by ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Y.; Adler, G.; Moise, T.; Erlick-Haspel, C.

    2012-12-01

    We suggest that highly porous aerosol (HPA) can form in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere when ice particles encounter sub-saturation leading to ice sublimation similar to freeze drying. This process can occur at the lower layers of cirrus clouds (few km), at anvils of high convective clouds and thunderstorms, in clouds forming in atmospheric gravitational waves, in contrails and in high convective clouds injecting to the stratosphere. A new experimental system that simulates freeze drying of proxies for atmospheric aerosol at atmospheric pressure was constructed and various proxies for atmospheric soluble aerosol were studied. The properties of resulting HPA were characterized by various methods. It was found that the resulting aerosol have larger sizes (extent depends on substance and mixing), lower density (largevoid fraction), lower optical extinction and higher CCN activity and IN activity. Implication of HPA's unique properties and their atmospheric consequences to aerosol processing in ice clouds and to cloud cycles will be discussed.

  8. How We Can Constrain Aerosol Type Globally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    In addition to aerosol number concentration, aerosol size and composition are essential attributes needed to adequately represent aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) in models. As the nature of ACI varies enormously with environmental conditions, global-scale constraints on particle properties are indicated. And although advanced satellite remote-sensing instruments can provide categorical aerosol-type classification globally, detailed particle microphysical properties are unobtainable from space with currently available or planned technologies. For the foreseeable future, only in situ measurements can constrain particle properties at the level-of-detail required for ACI, as well as to reduce uncertainties in regional-to-global-scale direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF). The limitation of in situ measurements for this application is sampling. However, there is a simplifying factor: for a given aerosol source, in a given season, particle microphysical properties tend to be repeatable, even if the amount varies from day-to-day and year-to-year, because the physical nature of the particles is determined primarily by the regional environment. So, if the PDFs of particle properties from major aerosol sources can be adequately characterized, they can be used to add the missing microphysical detail the better sampled satellite aerosol-type maps. This calls for Systematic Aircraft Measurements to Characterize Aerosol Air Masses (SAM-CAAM). We are defining a relatively modest and readily deployable, operational aircraft payload capable of measuring key aerosol absorption, scattering, and chemical properties in situ, and a program for characterizing statistically these properties for the major aerosol air mass types, at a level-of-detail unobtainable from space. It is aimed at: (1) enhancing satellite aerosol-type retrieval products with better aerosol climatology assumptions, and (2) improving the translation between satellite-retrieved aerosol optical properties and

  9. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach. The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).

  10. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach.more » The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).« less

  11. Holistic aerosol evaluation using synthesized aerosol aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson-Parris, Duncan; Reddington, Carly; Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip; Carslaw, Ken; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    Despite ongoing efforts there are still large uncertainties in aerosol concentrations and loadings across many commonly used GCMs. This in turn leads to large uncertainties in the contributions of the direct and indirect aerosol forcing on climate. However, constraining these fields using earth observation data, although providing global coverage, is problematic for many reasons, including the large uncertainties in retrieving aerosol loadings. Additionally, the inability to retrieve aerosols in or around cloudy scenes leads to further sampling biases (Gryspeerdt 2015). Many in-situ studies have used regional datasets to attempt to evaluate the model uncertainties, but these are unable to provide an assessment of the models ability to represent aerosols properties on a global scale. Within the Global Aerosol Synthesis and Science Project (GASSP) we have assembled the largest collection of quality controlled, in-situ aircraft observations ever synthesized to a consistent format. This provides a global set of in-situ measurements of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) and Black Carbon (BC), amongst others. In particular, the large number of vertical profiles provided by this aircraft data allows us to investigate the vertical structure of aerosols across a wide range of regions and environments. These vertical distributions are particularly valuable when investigating the dominant processes above or below clouds where remote sensing data is not available. Here we present initial process-based assessments of the BC lifetimes and vertical distributions of CCN in the HadGEM-UKCA and ECHAM-HAM models using this data. We use point-by-point based comparisons to avoid the sampling issues associated with comparing spatio-temporal aggregations.

  12. Validation of DSMC results for chemically nonequilibrium air flows against measurements of the electron number density in RAM-C II flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevyrin, Alexander A.; Vashchenkov, Pavel V.; Bondar, Yevgeniy A.; Ivanov, Mikhail S.

    2014-12-01

    An ionized flow around the RAM C-II vehicle in the range of altitudes from 73 to 81 km is studied by the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method with three models of chemical reactions. It is demonstrated that vibration favoring in reactions of dissociation of neutral molecules affects significantly the predicted values of plasma density in the shock layer, and good agreement between the results of experiments and DSMC computations can be achieved in terms of the plasma density as a function of the flight altitude.

  13. Validation of DSMC results for chemically nonequilibrium air flows against measurements of the electron number density in RAM-C II flight experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shevyrin, Alexander A.; Vashchenkov, Pavel V.; Bondar, Yevgeniy A.; Ivanov, Mikhail S.

    2014-12-09

    An ionized flow around the RAM C-II vehicle in the range of altitudes from 73 to 81 km is studied by the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method with three models of chemical reactions. It is demonstrated that vibration favoring in reactions of dissociation of neutral molecules affects significantly the predicted values of plasma density in the shock layer, and good agreement between the results of experiments and DSMC computations can be achieved in terms of the plasma density as a function of the flight altitude.

  14. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  15. The Organic Aerosols of Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Lawrence, Kenneth; Beauchamp, Patricia M.; Zimmerman, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    One of Titan's many characteristics is the presence of a haze that veils its surface. This haze is composed of heavy organic particles and determining the chemical composition of these particles is a primary objective for future probes that would conduct in situ analysis. Meanwhile, solar occultations provide constraints on the optical characteristics of the haze layer. This paper describes solar occultation observations obtained by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. These observations strongly constrain the optical characteristics of the haze layer. We detail the different steps involved in the processing of these data and apply them to two occultations that were observed at the South Pole and at the equator in order to investigate the latitudinal dependence of optical properties. The light curves obtained in seven atmospheric windows between 0.933-microns to 5-microns allow us to characterize atmospheric layers from 300 km to the surface. Very good fits of the light curves are obtained using a simple profile of number density of aerosols that is characterized by a scale height. The main difference between the South Pole and the equator is that the value of the scale height increases with altitude at the South Pole whereas it decreases at the equator. The vertically integrated amount of aerosols is similar at the two locations. The curve describing the cross-section versus wavelength is identical at the two locations suggesting that the aerosols have similar characteristics. Finally, we find that the two-way vertical transmission at 5-microns is as large as 80% at both locations.

  16. Identification of Catalysts and Materials for a High-Energy Density Biochemical Fuel Cell: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-345

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, M.; Svedruzic, D.

    2013-07-01

    The proposed research attempted to identify novel biochemical catalysts, catalyst support materials, high-efficiency electron transfer agents between catalyst active sites and electrodes, and solid-phase electrolytes in order to maximize the current density of biochemical fuel cells that utilize various alcohols as substrates.

  17. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  18. Meteorological Influences on SE U.S. Background Aerosol Variability: Multi-Year Measurements from the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research Facility (AppalAIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Krintz, I. A.; Zhou, Y. C.; Madison, B. F.; Link, M. F.; Morrow, H. A.; Perry, B.

    2013-12-01

    Climate models, satellite-based aerosol retrieval algorithms, and radiative transfer code require prescribed aerosol extensive and intensive properties and (often) vertical distributions on regional and sub-regional scales. Aerosol loading, composition, and intensive properties in the SE U.S depend strongly on local and synoptic meteorology, which contribute to large seasonal aerosol variability and also significant inter-annual variability. As such, long-term continuous measurements of aerosol loading, properties, vertical distributions and their meteorological dependence made from regionally-representative sites are necessary to provide context for field campaigns such as SAS and SEAC4RS and to better understand the factors influencing aerosol trends and variability. Established in June 2009, the high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1090m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL / NASA AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S., in addition to a micro-pulsed lidar(MPL), a surface MET station, meteorological radiosonde launching system, size-resolved aerosol chemistry, and trace gas chemistry (VOCs, O3, CO2). Aerosol loading, vertical distributions, and properties measured at AppalAIR vary predominantly on seasonal scales and to a lesser extent on inter-annual scales. Monthly-averaged summer aerosol optical depth (AOD) exceeds that in winter by a factor of 6-7. Summer aerosols measured at AppalAIR are mostly sub-micron and are larger and less absorbing than winter aerosols, giving rise to seasonal variability in direct radiative forcing (DRF) governed primarily by variations in aerosol loading (AOD). Summer aerosols are also less hygroscopic, consistent with the high (~70%) organic fraction of the summer dry, non-refractory aerosol mass, which in turn varies with T and RH. Aerosol number densities are highest during fall and spring and under clear, dry meteorological regimes and are

  19. The Truth about Stratospheric Aerosols: Key Results from SPARC`s Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Peter, T.

    2005-12-01

    Given the critical role it plays in ozone chemistry, the Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (ASAP) has been carried out by the WCRP project on Stratospheric Process and their Role in Climate (SPARC). The objective of this report was to present a systematic analysis of the state of knowledge of stratospheric aerosols including their precursors. It includes an examination of precursor concentrations and trends, measurements of stratospheric aerosol properties, trends in those properties, and modeling their formation, transport, and distribution in both background and volcanic conditions. The assessment found that the dominant nonvolcanic stratospheric aerosol precursor gases are OCS, SO2, and tropospheric aerosol. Therefore, though SO2, human-related activities play a significant role in the observed background stratospheric aerosol. There is general agreement between measured OCS and modeling of its transformation to sulfate aerosol, and observed aerosols. However, there is a significant dearth of SO2 measurements, and the role of tropospheric SO2 in the stratospheric aerosol budget - while significant - remains a matter of some guesswork. The assessment also found that there is basic agreement between the various data sets and models particularly during periods of elevated loading. However, at background levels significant differences were found that indicate that substantial questions remain regarding the nature of stratospheric aerosol during these periods particularly in the lower stratosphere. For instance, during periods of very low aerosol loading significant differences exist between systems for key parameters including aerosol surface area density and extinction. At the same time, comparisons of models and satellite observations of aerosol extinction found good agreement at visible wavelengths above 20-25 km altitude region but are less satisfactory for infrared wavelengths. While there are some model short-comings relative to observations in

  20. Optimized sparse-particle aerosol representations for modeling cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; McGraw, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sparse representations of atmospheric aerosols are needed for efficient regional- and global-scale chemical transport models. Here we introduce a new framework for representing aerosol distributions, based on the method of moments. Given a set of moment constraints, we show how linear programming can be used to identify collections of sparse particles that approximately maximize distributional entropy. The collections of sparse particles derived from this approach reproduce CCN activity of the exact model aerosol distributions with high accuracy. Additionally, the linear programming techniques described in this study can be used to bound key aerosol properties, such as the number concentration of CCN. Unlike the commonly used sparse representations, such as modal and sectional schemes, the maximum-entropy moment-based approach is not constrained to pre-determined size bins or assumed distribution shapes. This study is a first step toward a new aerosol simulation scheme that will track multivariate aerosol distributions with sufficient computational efficiency for large-scale simulations.

  1. Rocket-borne probes for charged mesospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.; Sternovsky, Z.

    We describe a series of rocket-borne probes for detecting charged solid particles in the ionosphere. The first type of probe is a flat charge-collecting surface on the skin of the rocket. Behind this surface is a permanent magnet that shields the probe from electrons. The current that is recorded is thus from heavier charged aerosol particles. This heavy charge carrier current is converted to a charge number density. A probe launched from White Sands in November 1998 detected a narrow layer at 86 km consistent with sporadic E layer of metallic ions. Two launches were made from the Andoya Rocket Range (Norway) during the MIDAS SOLSTICE campaign in the summer of 2001. Layers of positively and negatively charged aerosol particles were detected on both flights, but inadvertent positive ion collection complicated the analysis. Subsequent payloads included a second probe that supplemented the magnetic field with a positive bias voltage to improve positive ion rejection. Three launches were made from Andoya during the MIDAS MacWAVE campaign in July 2003 with this dual-probe package. Within PMSE, the probes measured an aerosol particle distribution, clearly resolving small positive, small negative, and large negative particles. A new mass-analyzing probe is being developed in which electric fields within the nosecone deflect charged aerosol particles admitted at the nosecone tip. This probe takes advantage of the reduced density behind the shock front to increase the mean free path within the instrument so that cryopumping is not required. The new probe has three pairs of collection surfaces with opposite polarities for collecting (1) electrons and light ions, (2) particles with mass 150-103 amu, and (3) particles with mass 103 -- 2 x 104 amu.

  2. Radiative Effects of Aerosol in the Marine Environment: Tales from the Two-Column Aerosol Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, L. K.; Fast, J. D.; Barnard, J.; Chand, D.; Chapman, E. G.; Comstock, J. M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Flynn, C. J.; Hair, J. W.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hubbe, J.; Johnson, R.; Kassianov, E.; Kluzek, C.; Laskin, A.; Lee, Y.; Mei, F.; Michalsky, J. J.; Redemann, J.; Rogers, R. R.; Russell, P. B.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Schmid, B.; Shilling, J. E.; Shinozuka, Y.; Springston, S. R.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Berkowitz, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    There is still uncertainty associated with the direct radiative forcing by atmospheric aerosol and its representation in atmospheric models. This is particularly true in marine environments near the coast where the aerosol loading is a function of both naturally occurring and anthropogenic aerosol. These regions are also subject to variable synoptic and thermally driven flows (land-sea breezes) that transport aerosol between the continental and marine environments. The situation is made more complicated due to seasonal changes in aerosol emissions. Given these differences in emissions, we expect significant differences in the aerosol intensive and extensive properties between summer and winter and data is needed to evaluate models over the wide range of conditions. To address this issue, the recently completed Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) was designed to measure the key aerosol parameters in two atmospheric columns, one located over Cape Cod, Massachusetts and another approximately 200 km from the coast over the Atlantic Ocean. Measurements included aerosol size distribution, chemical composition, optical properties and vertical distribution. Several aspects make TCAP unique, including the year-long deployment of a suite of surface-based instruments by the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and two aircraft intensive operations periods supported by the ARM Airborne Facility, one conducted in July 2012 and a second in February 2013. The presentation will include a discussion of the impact of the aerosol optical properties and their uncertainty on simulations of the radiation budget within the TCAP domain in the context of both single column and regional scale models. Data from TCAP will be used to highlight a number of important factors, including diurnal variation in aerosol optical depth measured at the surface site, systematic changes in aerosol optical properties (including scattering, absorption, and

  3. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-08-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO). The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases

  4. Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K.; Turner, R.S.

    1994-07-01

    In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

  5. Global aerosol effects on convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Till; Stier, Philip

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect cloud properties, and thereby the radiation balance of the planet and the water cycle. The influence of aerosols on clouds is dominated by increase of cloud droplet and ice crystal numbers (CDNC/ICNC) due to enhanced aerosols acting as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. In deep convective clouds this increase in CDNC/ICNC is hypothesised to increase precipitation because of cloud invigoration through enhanced freezing and associated increased latent heat release caused by delayed warm rain formation. Satellite studies robustly show an increase of cloud top height (CTH) and precipitation with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD, as proxy for aerosol amount). To represent aerosol effects and study their influence on convective clouds in the global climate aerosol model ECHAM-HAM, we substitute the standard convection parameterisation, which uses one mean convective cloud for each grid column, with the convective cloud field model (CCFM), which simulates a spectrum of convective clouds, each with distinct values of radius, mixing ratios, vertical velocity, height and en/detrainment. Aerosol activation and droplet nucleation in convective updrafts at cloud base is the primary driver for microphysical aerosol effects. To produce realistic estimates for vertical velocity at cloud base we use an entraining dry parcel sub cloud model which is triggered by perturbations of sensible and latent heat at the surface. Aerosol activation at cloud base is modelled with a mechanistic, Köhler theory based, scheme, which couples the aerosols to the convective microphysics. Comparison of relationships between CTH and AOD, and precipitation and AOD produced by this novel model and satellite based estimates show general agreement. Through model experiments and analysis of the model cloud processes we are able to investigate the main drivers for the relationship between CTH / precipitation and AOD.

  6. Modeling immersion freezing with aerosol-dependent prognostic ice nuclei in Arctic mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukert, M.; Hoose, C.

    2014-07-01

    While recent laboratory experiments have thoroughly quantified the ice nucleation efficiency of different aerosol species, the resulting ice nucleation parameterizations have not yet been extensively evaluated in models on different scales. Here the implementation of an immersion freezing parameterization based on laboratory measurements of the ice nucleation active surface site density of mineral dust and ice nucleation active bacteria, accounting for nucleation scavenging of ice nuclei, into a cloud-resolving model with two-moment cloud microphysics is presented. We simulated an Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during Flight 31 of the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign near Barrow, Alaska. Through different feedback cycles, the persistence of the cloud strongly depends on the ice number concentration. It is attempted to bring the observed cloud properties, assumptions on aerosol concentration, and composition and ice formation parameterized as a function of these aerosol properties into agreement. Depending on the aerosol concentration and on the ice crystal properties, the simulated clouds are classified as growing, dissipating, and quasi-stable. In comparison to the default ice nucleation scheme, the new scheme requires higher aerosol concentrations to maintain a quasi-stable cloud. The simulations suggest that in the temperature range of this specific case, mineral dust can only contribute to a minor part of the ice formation. The importance of ice nucleation active bacteria and possibly other ice formation modes than immersion freezing remains poorly constrained in the considered case, since knowledge on local variations in the emissions of ice nucleation active organic aerosols in the Arctic is scarce.

  7. Mass analysis of charged aerosol particles in NLC and PMSE during the ECOMA/MASS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, S.; Horányi, M.; Knappmiller, S.; Sternovsky, Z.; Holzworth, R.; Shimogawa, M.; Friedrich, M.; Torkar, K.; Gumbel, J.; Megner, L.; Baumgarten, G.; Latteck, R.; Rapp, M.; Hoppe, U.-P.; Hervig, M. E.

    2009-03-01

    MASS (Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer) is a multichannel mass spectrometer for charged aerosol particles, which was flown from the Andøya Rocket Range, Norway, through NLC and PMSE on 3 August 2007 and through PMSE on 6 August 2007. The eight-channel analyzers provided for the first time simultaneous measurements of the charge density residing on aerosol particles in four mass ranges, corresponding to ice particles with radii <0.5 nm (including ions), 0.5-1 nm, 1-2 nm, and >3 nm (approximately). Positive and negative particles were recorded on separate channels. Faraday rotation measurements provided electron density and a means of checking charge density measurements made by the spectrometer. Additional complementary measurements were made by rocket-borne dust impact detectors, electric field booms, a photometer and ground-based radar and lidar. The MASS data from the first flight showed negative charge number densities of 1500-3000 cm-3 for particles with radii >3 nm from 83-88 km approximately coincident with PMSE observed by the ALWIN radar and NLC observed by the ALOMAR lidar. For particles in the 1-2 nm range, number densities of positive and negative charge were similar in magnitude (~2000 cm-3) and for smaller particles, 0.5-1 nm in radius, positive charge was dominant. The occurrence of positive charge on the aerosol particles of the smallest size and predominately negative charge on the particles of largest size suggests that nucleation occurs on positive condensation nuclei and is followed by collection of negative charge during subsequent growth to larger size. Faraday rotation measurements show a bite-out in electron density that increases the time for positive aerosol particles to be neutralized and charged negatively. The larger particles (>3 nm) are observed throughout the NLC region, 83-88 km, and the smaller particles are observed primarily at the high end of the range, 86-88 km. The second flight into PMSE alone at 84-88 km, found only

  8. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W m(exp -2) in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  9. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W/sq m in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  10. Evaluation of the discmini personal aerosol monitor for submicrometer sodium chloride and metal aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Jessica Breyan

    This work evaluated the robust, lightweight DiSCmini (DM) aerosol monitor for its ability to measure the concentration and mean diameter of submicrometer aerosols. Tests were conducted with monodispersed and polydispersed aerosols composed of two particle types (sodium chloride, NaCl, and spark generated metal particles, which simulate particles found in welding fume) at three different steady-state concentration ranges (Low, <103; Medium, 103-104; and High, >104 particles/cm3). Particle number concentration, lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentration, and mean size measured with the DM were compared to those measured with reference instruments, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a handheld condensation particle counter (CPC). Particle number concentrations measured with the DM were within 16% of those measured by the CPC for polydispersed aerosols. Poorer agreement was observed for monodispersed aerosols (+/-35% for most tests and +101% for 300-nm NaCl). LDSA concentrations measured by the DM were 96% to 155% of those estimated with the SMPS. The geometric mean diameters measured with the DM were within 30% of those measured with the SMPS for monodispersed aerosols and within 25% for polydispersed aerosols (except for the case when the aerosol contained a substantial number of particles larger than 300 nm). The accuracy of the DM is reasonable for particles smaller than 300 nm but caution should be exercised when particles larger than 300 nm are present.

  11. Quantifying compositional impacts of ambient aerosol on cloud droplet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Sara

    It has been historically assumed that most of the uncertainty associated with the aerosol indirect effect on climate can be attributed to the unpredictability of updrafts. In Chapter 1, we analyze the sensitivity of cloud droplet number density, to realistic variations in aerosol chemical properties and to variable updraft velocities using a 1-dimensional cloud parcel model in three important environmental cases (continental, polluted and remote marine). The results suggest that aerosol chemical variability may be as important to the aerosol indirect effect as the effect of unresolved cloud dynamics, especially in polluted environments. We next used a continuous flow streamwise thermal gradient Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (CCNc) to study the water-uptake properties of the ambient aerosol, by exposing an aerosol sample to a controlled water vapor supersaturation and counting the resulting number of droplets. In Chapter 2, we modeled and experimentally characterized the heat transfer properties and droplet growth within the CCNc. Chapter 3 describes results from the MIRAGE field campaign, in which the CCNc and a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) were deployed at a ground-based site during March, 2006. Size-resolved CCN activation spectra and growth factor distributions of the ambient aerosol in Mexico City were obtained, and an analytical technique was developed to quantify a probability distribution of solute volume fractions for the CCN in addition to the aerosol mixing-state. The CCN were shown to be much less CCN active than ammonium sulfate, with water uptake properties more consistent with low molecular weight organic compounds. The pollution outflow from Mexico City was shown to have CCN with an even lower fraction of soluble material. "Chemical Closure" was attained for the CCN, by comparing the inferred solute volume fraction with that from direct chemical measurements. A clear diurnal pattern was observed for the CCN solute

  12. Externally mixed aerosol : simulation of ice nucleation in a parcel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anquetil-Deck, Candy; Hoose, Corinna; Conolly, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The effect of different aerosol (mineral dust, bacteria and soot) acting as immersion ice nuclei is investigated using ACPIM (AerosolCloud Precipitation Interaction Model) [1]. ACPIM is a powerful tool which can be used in two different ways. This box model can be, either, driven by experimental data (experiments carried out at the AIDA cloud chamber facility) or used as an air parcel in order to examine different ice nucleation parameterizations under specific conditions. This adiabatic air parcel model was employed for the simulation of a convective cloud. The study consists here in the investigation of how two externally mixed aerosols interact with one another. The initial study concentrates on mineral dust aerosol and biological aerosol without any background in order to fully understand the interaction between the different types of aerosol. Immersion freezing is described for the mineral dust aerosol by Niemand et al. 's parameterization [2], which was derived from laboratory studies in AIDA and is an extension of surface site density approach suggested by Connolly et al. [1]. Regarding bioaerosol, we introduce Hummel et al. 's parameterization [3] : f(in) = f(max)(1 - exp(- Ap *n(s)(T))) With an empirically fitted ice nucleation active site density n s based on AIDA measurements of Pseudomonas syringae bacteria [4]. This initial study is conducted for different proportion of each aerosol (the total number of aerosol being constant throughout all the simulation runs) at different vertical velocities. We then extented this study with different backgrounds (urban, marine, rural) in order to get a full picture. We found that there is not only a CCN competition but an IN competition as well. References : [1] Connolly, P. J., Möhler O., Field P. R., Saathoff H., Burgess, R., Choularton, T. and Gallagher, M., Atmos. Chem. Phys 9, 2805-2824 (2009). [2] Niemand, M., Möhler, O., Vogel B., Vogel, H., Hoose, C., Connolly, P., Klein, H., Bingemer, H., De

  13. Application of a coupled aerosol formation: Radiative transfer model to climatic studies of aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    A sophisticated one dimensional physical-chemical model of the formation and evolution of stratospheric aerosols was used to predict the size and number concentration of the stratospheric aerosols as functions of time and altitude following: a large volcanic eruption; increased addition of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) or sulfur dioxide (SO2) to the troposphere; increased supersonic aircraft (SST) flights in the stratosphere; and, large numbers of space shuttle (SS) flights through the stratosphere. A radiative-convective one dimensional climate sensitivity study, using the results of the aerosol formation model, was performed to assess the ground level climatic significance of these perturbations to the stratospheric aerosol layer. Volcanic eruptions and large OCS or SO2 increases could cause significant climatic changes. Currently projected SS launches and moderate fleets of SST's are unlikely to upset the stratospheric aerosol layer enough to significantly impact climate.

  14. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne E.; Adams, P. J.

    2013-06-28

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth’s energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically-based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect using analytic representations of droplet nucleation, cloud and aerosol vertical structure, and horizontal variability in cloud water and aerosol concentration. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of aerosol indirect effects that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates are found to be sensitive to several uncertain parameters, including the preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the size of the primary particles, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Aerosol indirect effects are surprisingly linear in emissions. This simple model provides a much stronger physical basis for representing aerosol indirect effects than previous representations in integrated assessment models designed to quickly explore the parameter space of emissions-climate interactions. The model also produces estimates that depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models.

  15. A System to Create Stable Nanoparticle Aerosols from Nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yaobo; Riediker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle aerosols released from nanopowders in workplaces are associated with human exposure and health risks. We developed a novel system, requiring minimal amounts of test materials (min. 200 mg), for studying powder aerosolization behavior and aerosol properties. The aerosolization procedure follows the concept of the fluidized-bed process, but occurs in the modified volume of a V-shaped aerosol generator. The airborne particle number concentration is adjustable by controlling the air flow rate. The system supplied stable aerosol generation rates and particle size distributions over long periods (0.5-2 hr and possibly longer), which are important, for example, to study aerosol behavior, but also for toxicological studies. Strict adherence to the operating procedures during the aerosolization experiments ensures the generation of reproducible test results. The critical steps in the standard protocol are the preparation of the material and setup, and the aerosolization operations themselves. The system can be used for experiments requiring stable aerosol concentrations and may also be an alternative method for testing dustiness. The controlled aerosolization made possible with this setup occurs using energy inputs (may be characterized by aerosolization air velocity) that are within the ranges commonly found in occupational environments where nanomaterial powders are handled. This setup and its operating protocol are thus helpful for human exposure and risk assessment. PMID:27501179

  16. Simulations of Aerosol Microphysics in the NASA GEOS-5 Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter; Smith; Randles; daSilva

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol-cloud-chemistry interactions have potentially large but uncertain impacts on Earth's climate. One path to addressing these uncertainties is to construct models that incorporate various components of the Earth system and to test these models against data. To that end, we have previously incorporated the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) module online in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System model (GEOS-5). GEOS-5 provides a platform for Earth system modeling, incorporating atmospheric and ocean general circulation models, a land surface model, a data assimilation system, and treatments of atmospheric chemistry and hydrologic cycle. Including GOCART online in this framework has provided a path for interactive aerosol-climate studies; however, GOCART only tracks the mass of aerosols as external mixtures and does not include the detailed treatments of aerosol size distribution and composition (internal mixtures) needed for aerosol-cloud-chemistry-climate studies. To address that need we have incorporated the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) online in GEOS-5. CARMA is a sectional aerosol-cloud microphysical model, capable of treating both aerosol size and composition explicitly be resolving the aerosol distribution into a variable number of size and composition groupings. Here we present first simulations of dust, sea salt, and smoke aerosols in GEOS-5 as treated by CARMA. These simulations are compared to available aerosol satellite, ground, and aircraft data and as well compared to the simulated distributions in our current GOCART based system.

  17. Understanding the impact of saharan dust aerosols on tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeger, Aaron

    Genesis of Tropical Cyclones (TCs) in the main development region for Atlantic hurricanes is tied to convection initiated by African easterly waves (AEWs) during Northern hemisphere summer and fall seasons. The main development region is also impacted by dust aerosols transported from the Sahara. It has been hypothesized that dust aerosols can modulate the development of TCs through aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interaction processes. In this study, we investigate the impact of dust aerosols on TC development using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem). We first develop a technique to constrain the WRF-Chem model with a realistic three-dimensional spatial distribution of dust aerosols. The horizontal distribution of dust is specified using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived aerosol products and output from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. The vertical distribution of dust is constrained using the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO). We validate our technique through in situ aircraft measurements where both showed aerosol number concentrations from 20-30 cm-3 in the atmosphere for Saharan dust moving over the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Then, we use the satellite data constraint technique to nudge the WRF-Chem aerosol fields throughout the simulation of TC Florence developing over the eastern Atlantic Ocean during September 2006. Three different experiments are conducted where the aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interaction processes are either activated or deactivated in the model while all other model options are identical between the experiments. By comparing the model experiment results, the impact of the aerosol interaction processes on TC development can be understood. The results indicate that dust aerosols can delay or prevent the development of a TC as the minimum sea level pressure of TC Florence was 13 h

  18. Experimental Technique for Studying Aerosols of Lyophilized Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Christopher S.; Derr, John S.; Flurie, Eugene G.; Roderick, Roger C.

    1970-01-01

    An experimental technique is presented for studying aerosols generated from lyophilized bacteria by using Escherichia coli B, Bacillus subtilis var. niger, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Pasteurella tularensis. An aerosol generator capable of creating fine particle aerosols of small quantities (10 mg) of lyophilized powder under controlled conditions of exposure to the atmosphere is described. The physical properties of the aerosols are investigated as to the distribution of number of aerosol particles with particle size as well as to the distribution of number of bacteria with particle size. Biologically unstable vegetative cells were quantitated physically by using 14C and Europium chelate stain as tracers, whereas the stable heat-shocked B. subtilis spores were assayed biologically. The physical persistence of the lyophilized B. subtilis aerosol is investigated as a function of size of spore-containing particles. The experimental result that physical persistence of the aerosol in a closed aerosol chamber increases as particle size is decreased is satisfactorily explained on the bases of electrostatic, gravitational, inertial, and diffusion forces operating to remove particles from the particular aerosol system. The net effect of these various forces is to provide, after a short time interval in the system (about 2 min), an aerosol of fine particles with enhanced physical stability. The dependence of physical stability of the aerosol on the species of organism and the nature of the suspending medium for lyophilization is indicated. Also, limitations and general applicability of both the technique and results are discussed. PMID:4992657

  19. The relationship between aerosol model uncertainty and radiative forcing uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carslaw, Ken; Lee, Lindsay; Reddington, Carly

    2016-04-01

    There has been no systematic assessment of how reduction in the uncertainty of global aerosol models will feed through to the uncertainty in the predicted forcing. We use a global model perturbed parameter ensemble to show that tight observational constraint of aerosol concentrations in the model has a relatively small effect on the aerosol-related uncertainty in the calculated aerosol-cloud forcing between pre-industrial and present day periods. One factor is the low sensitivity of present-day aerosol to natural emissions that determine the pre-industrial aerosol state. But the major cause of the weak constraint is that the full uncertainty space of the model generates a large number of model variants that are "equally acceptable" compared to present-day aerosol observations. The narrow range of aerosol concentrations in the observationally constrained model gives the impression of low aerosol model uncertainty, but this hides a range of very different aerosol models. These multiple so-called "equifinal" model variants predict a wide range of forcings. Equifinality in the aerosol model means that tuning of a small number of model processes to achieve model-observation agreement could give a misleading impression of model robustness.

  20. Comparison of MADE3-simulated and observed aerosol distributions with a focus on aerosol vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christopher; Hendricks, Johannes; Righi, Mattia; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of aerosol radiative forcing estimates from climate models depends on the accuracy of simulated global aerosol distribution and composition, as well as on the models' representation of the aerosol-cloud and aerosol-radiation interactions. To help improve on previous modeling studies, we recently developed the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE3 that explicitly tracks particle mixing state in the Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges. We implemented MADE3 into the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC and evaluated it by comparison of simulated aerosol properties to observations. Compared properties include continental near-surface aerosol component concentrations and size distributions, continental and marine aerosol vertical profiles, and nearly global aerosol optical depth. Recent studies have shown the specific importance of aerosol vertical profiles for determination of the aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, our focus here is on the evaluation of simulated vertical profiles. The observational data is taken from campaigns between 1990 and 2011 over the Pacific Ocean, over North and South America, and over Europe. The datasets include black carbon and total aerosol mass mixing ratios, as well as aerosol particle number concentrations. Compared to other models, EMAC with MADE3 yields good agreement with the observations - despite a general high bias of the simulated mass mixing ratio profiles. However, BC concentrations are generally overestimated by many models in the upper troposphere. With MADE3 in EMAC, we find better agreement of the simulated BC profiles with HIPPO data than the multi-model average of the models that took part in the AeroCom project. There is an interesting difference between the profiles from individual campaigns and more "climatological" datasets. For instance, compared to spatially and temporally localized campaigns, the model simulates a more continuous decline in both total

  1. Is the radiative forcing due to black carbon aerosols as large as some recent studies suggest?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, O.; Wang, R.; Balkanski, Y.; Tao, S.; Myhre, G.; Valari, M.; Huneeus, N.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic black carbon aerosols is responsible for a radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions (RFari), aerosol-cloud interactions (RFaci) and aerosol-snow interactions (RFasi). All estimates are very uncertain but some recent studies (e.g. Chung et al., 2012; Bond et al., 2013) have suggested that global models significantly underestimate aerosol absorption and have applied scaling factors to correct for this underestimation. As a result Bond et al. estimate RFari to be +0.5 (+0.1 to +0.9) Wm-2 for fossil fuel and biofuel only. The fifth assessment report adopted an estimate of +0.4 (+0.05 to +0.8) Wm-2. In this presentation we will show that a number of factors are likely to lead to overestimate the discrepancy in aerosol absorption between observations and models, which questions the need for very large scaling factors to reconcile models with observations. Issues with past methodological include a too small correction for NO2 absorption in AERONET retrievals of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) at 440 nm, representativity errors when comparing outputs from global models with AERONET retrievals, and model biases in aerosol vertical profiles. We will show in particular how a new emission inventory and high-resolution aerosol modelling over Asia can resolve a significant fraction of the discrepancy with observations. Bond, T. C., et al., 2013: Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: A scientific assessment. Journal of Geophysical Research, 118, 5380-5552, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50171. Chung, C. E., V. Ramanathan, and D. Decremer, 2012: Observationally constrained estimates of carbonaceous aerosol radiative forcing. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109, 11624-11629 Geographic distributions of BC emission density (A, MACCity; B, PKU-BC), modeled surface BC concentrations (C, by MACCity/INCA; D, by PKU-BC/INCA-zA), and modeled BC AAOD (E, by MACCity/INCA; F, by PKU-BC/INCA-zA). The

  2. Variability of aerosol properties and Planetary Boundary Layer heights from airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, ground-based measurements, and the WRF model during CalNex and CARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, M. D.; Swanson, A. J.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Hair, J. W.; Hostetler, C. A.; Rogers, R.; Fast, J. D.; Berg, L. K.; Pekour, M. S.; Shaw, W. J.; Zaveri, R. A.; Haman, C. L.; Cook, A.; Harper, D.

    2011-12-01

    The NASA airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed on board the NASA Langley Research Center's B200 aircraft to California in May and June of 2010 to aid in characterizing aerosol properties during the CalNex and CARES field missions. Measurements of aerosol extinction (at 532 nm), backscatter (at 532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (at 532 and 1064 nm) during 31 flights and nearly 100 hours, many in coordination with other participating research aircraft, satellites, and ground sites, constitute a diverse data set for use in characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, as well as properties and variability of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). This work examines the variability of the extensive (dependent on aerosol type and number density) and intensive (dependent on aerosol type only) aerosol properties to aid in describing the broader context of aerosol behavior within and nearby the Sacramento and Los Angeles Basin regions. PBL heights derived from HSRL measurements will be compared with those produced by local ceilometers, radiosondes, and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Spatial and temporal averages of aerosol properties will be presented.

  3. Influences of in-cloud aerosol scavenging parameterizations on aerosol concentrations and wet deposition in ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Lohmann, U.; Martin, R. V.; Stier, P.; Wurzler, S.; Feichter, J.; Hoose, C.; Heikkilä, U.; van Donkelaar, A.; Ferrachat, S.

    2009-10-01

    A diagnostic nucleation scavenging scheme, which determines stratiform cloud scavenging ratios for both aerosol mass and number distributions, based on cloud droplet, and ice crystal number concentrations, is introduced into the ECHAM5-HAM global climate model. This is coupled with a size-dependent in-cloud impaction scavenging parameterization for both cloud droplet-aerosol, and ice crystal-aerosol collisions. Sensitivity studies are presented, which compare aerosol concentrations, and deposition between a variety of in-cloud scavenging approaches, including prescribed fractions, several diagnostic schemes, and a prognostic aerosol cloud processing treatment that passes aerosol in-droplet and in-ice crystal concentrations between model time steps. For one sensitivity study, assuming 100% of the in-cloud aerosol is scavenged into the cloud droplets and ice crystals, the annual global mean accumulation mode number burden is decreased by 65%, relative to a simulation with prognostic aerosol cloud processing. Diagnosing separate nucleation scavenging ratios for aerosol number and mass distributions, as opposed to equating the aerosol mass scavenging to the number scavenging ratios, reduces the annual global mean sulfate burden by near to 10%. The annual global mean sea salt burden is 30% lower for the diagnostic approach, which does not carry aerosol in-droplet and in-crystal concentrations between model time-steps as compared to the prognostic scheme. Implementation of in-cloud impaction scavenging reduced the annual, global mean black carbon burden by 30% for the prognostic aerosol cloud processing scheme. Better agreement with observations of black carbon profiles from aircraft (changes near to one order of magnitude for mixed phase clouds), 210Pb surface layer concentrations and wet deposition, and the geographic distribution of aerosol optical depth are found for the new diagnostic scavenging as compared to prescribed ratio scavenging scheme of the standard ECHAM

  4. The Impact of Aerosol Particle Mixing State on the Hygroscopicity of Sea Spray Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Schill, Steven R; Collins, Douglas B; Lee, Christopher; Morris, Holly S; Novak, Gordon A; Prather, Kimberly A; Quinn, Patricia K; Sultana, Camille M; Tivanski, Alexei V; Zimmermann, Kathryn; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2015-06-24

    Aerosol particles influence global climate by determining cloud droplet number concentrations, brightness, and lifetime. Primary aerosol particles, such as those produced from breaking waves in the ocean, display large particle-particle variability in chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state, all of which affect the ability of individual particles to accommodate water and grow into cloud droplets. Despite such diversity in molecular composition, there is a paucity of methods available to assess how particle-particle variability in chemistry translates to corresponding differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. Here, an approach has been developed that allows for characterization of the distribution of aerosol hygroscopicity within a chemically complex population of atmospheric particles. This methodology, when applied to the interpretation of nascent sea spray aerosol, provides a quantitative framework for connecting results obtained using molecular mimics generated in the laboratory with chemically complex ambient aerosol. We show that nascent sea spray aerosol, generated in situ in the Atlantic Ocean, displays a broad distribution of particle hygroscopicities, indicative of a correspondingly broad distribution of particle chemical compositions. Molecular mimics of sea spray aerosol organic material were used in the laboratory to assess the volume fractions and molecular functionality required to suppress sea spray aerosol hygroscopicity to the extent indicated by field observations. We show that proper accounting for the distribution and diversity in particle hygroscopicity and composition are important to the assessment of particle impacts on clouds and global climate. PMID:27162963

  5. The Impact of Aerosol Particle Mixing State on the Hygroscopicity of Sea Spray Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol particles influence global climate by determining cloud droplet number concentrations, brightness, and lifetime. Primary aerosol particles, such as those produced from breaking waves in the ocean, display large particle–particle variability in chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state, all of which affect the ability of individual particles to accommodate water and grow into cloud droplets. Despite such diversity in molecular composition, there is a paucity of methods available to assess how particle–particle variability in chemistry translates to corresponding differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. Here, an approach has been developed that allows for characterization of the distribution of aerosol hygroscopicity within a chemically complex population of atmospheric particles. This methodology, when applied to the interpretation of nascent sea spray aerosol, provides a quantitative framework for connecting results obtained using molecular mimics generated in the laboratory with chemically complex ambient aerosol. We show that nascent sea spray aerosol, generated in situ in the Atlantic Ocean, displays a broad distribution of particle hygroscopicities, indicative of a correspondingly broad distribution of particle chemical compositions. Molecular mimics of sea spray aerosol organic material were used in the laboratory to assess the volume fractions and molecular functionality required to suppress sea spray aerosol hygroscopicity to the extent indicated by field observations. We show that proper accounting for the distribution and diversity in particle hygroscopicity and composition are important to the assessment of particle impacts on clouds and global climate. PMID:27162963

  6. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  7. A Computationally Efficient Algorithm for Aerosol Phase Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Peters, Len K.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2004-10-04

    Three-dimensional models of atmospheric inorganic aerosols need an accurate yet computationally efficient thermodynamic module that is repeatedly used to compute internal aerosol phase state equilibrium. In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of a computationally efficient numerical solver called MESA (Multicomponent Equilibrium Solver for Aerosols). The unique formulation of MESA allows iteration of all the equilibrium equations simultaneously while maintaining overall mass conservation and electroneutrality in both the solid and liquid phases. MESA is unconditionally stable, shows robust convergence, and typically requires only 10 to 20 single-level iterations (where all activity coefficients and aerosol water content are updated) per internal aerosol phase equilibrium calculation. Accuracy of MESA is comparable to that of the highly accurate Aerosol Inorganics Model (AIM), which uses a rigorous Gibbs free energy minimization approach. Performance evaluation will be presented for a number of complex multicomponent mixtures commonly found in urban and marine tropospheric aerosols.

  8. CALIPSO Observations of Volcanic Aerosol in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Pitts, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    In the stratosphere, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) has observed the presence of aerosol plumes associated with the eruptions several volcanoes including Montserrat (May 2006), Chaiten (May 2008), and Kasatochi (August 2008). While the dense ash plumes from these eruptions dissipate relatively quickly, CALIPSO continued to detect an enhanced aerosol layer from the Montserrat eruption from the initial observations in June 2006 well into 2008. Solar occultation missions were uniquely capable of monitoring stratospheric aerosol. However, since the end of long-lived instruments like the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II), there has been no clear space-based successor instrument. A number of active instruments, some employing new techniques, are being evaluated as candidate sources of stratospheric aerosol data. Herein, we examine suitability of the CALIPSO 532-nm aerosol backscatter coefficient measurements.

  9. Infrared spectroscopic methods for the study of aerosol particles using White cell optics: Development and characterization of a new aerosol flow tube.

    PubMed

    Nájera, Juan J; Fochesatto, Javier G; Last, Deborah J; Percival, Carl J; Horn, Andrew B

    2008-12-01

    A description of a new aerosol flow tube apparatus for measurements in situ under atmospherically relevant conditions is presented here. The system consists of a laboratory-made nebulizer generation system and a flow tube with a White cell-based Fourier transform IR for the detection system. An assessment of the White cell coupled to the flow tube was carried out by an extensive set of experiments to ensure the alignment of the infrared beam and optimize the performance of this system. The detection limit for CO was established as (1.0+/-0.3) ppm and 16 passes was chosen as the optimum number of passes to be used in flow tube experiments. Infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize dry aerosol particles in the flow tube. Pure particles composed of ammonium sulfate or sodium chloride ranging between 0.8 and 2.1 mum for size diameter and (0.8-4.9)x10(6) particles/cm(3) for density number were generated by nebulization of aqueous solutions. Direct measurements of the aerosol particle size agree with size spectra retrieved from inversion of the extinction measurements using Mie calculations, where the difference residual value is in the order of 0.2%. The infrared detection limit for ammonium sulfate aerosol particles was determined as d(p)=0.9 mum and N=5x10(3) particles/cm(3) with sigma=1.1 by Mie calculation. Alternatively, Mie calculations were performed to determine the flexibility in varying the optical length when aerosol particles are sent by the injector. The very good agreement between the values retrieved for aerosol particles injected through the flow tube or through the injector clearly validates the estimation of the effective optical path length for the injector. To determine the flexibility in varying the reaction zone length, analysis of the extinction spectra as function of the position of the injector was carried out by monitoring the integrated area of different absorption modes of the ammonium sulfate. We conclude that the aerosol loss in the

  10. Comparison of surface vacuum ultraviolet emissions with resonance level number densities. II. Rare-gas plasmas and Ar-molecular gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Boffard, John B. Lin, Chun C.; Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Culver, Cody; Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold

    2015-03-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emissions from excited plasma species can play a variety of roles in processing plasmas, including damaging the surface properties of materials used in semiconductor processing. Depending on their wavelength, VUV photons can easily transmit thin upper dielectric layers and affect the electrical characteristics of the devices. Despite their importance, measuring VUV fluxes is complicated by the fact that few materials transmit at VUV wavelengths, and both detectors and windows are easily damaged by plasma exposure. The authors have previously reported on measuring VUV fluxes in pure argon plasmas by monitoring the concentrations of Ar(3p{sup 5}4s) resonance atoms that produce the VUV emissions using noninvasive optical emission spectroscopy in the visible/near-infrared wavelength range [Boffard et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 32, 021304 (2014)]. Here, the authors extend this technique to other rare-gases (Ne, Kr, and Xe) and argon-molecular gas plasmas (Ar/H{sub 2}, Ar/O{sub 2}, and Ar/N{sub 2}). Results of a model for VUV emissions that couples radiation trapping and the measured rare-gas resonance level densities are compared to measurements made with both a calibrated VUV photodiode and a sodium salicylate fluorescence detection scheme. In these more complicated gas mixtures, VUV emissions from a variety of sources beyond the principal resonance levels of the rare gases are found to contribute to the total VUV flux.

  11. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  12. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  13. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  14. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  15. Uncertainties of simulated aerosol optical properties induced by assumptions on aerosol physical and chemical properties: an AQMEII-2 perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. In the framework of the AQMEII-2 model in...

  16. Tropopsheric Aerosol Chemistry via Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsnop, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    A broad overview of size resolved aerosol chemistry in urban, rural and remote regions is evolving from deployment of aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) throughout the northern hemisphere. Using thermal vaporization and electron impact ionization as universal detector of non-refractory inorganic and organic composition, the accumulation of AMS results represent a library of mass spectral signatures of aerosol chemistry. For organics in particular, mass spectral factor analysis provides a procedure for classifying (and simplifying) complex mixtures composed of the hundreds or thousands of individual compounds. Correlations with parallel gas and aerosol measurements (e.g. GC/MS, HNMR, FTIR) supply additional chemical information needed to interpret mass spectra. The challenge is to separate primary and secondary; anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning sources - and subsequent - transformations of aerosol chemistry and microphysics.

  17. Aerosol activation properties and CCN closure during TCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Shilling, J. E.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Chand, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Berg, L. K.; Schmid, B.

    2013-12-01

    The indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols currently remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2007). This large uncertainty is partially due to our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturation. In addition, there is a large uncertainty in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulated by climate models near the North American coast and a wide variety in the types of clouds are observed over this region. The goal of the US Department of Energy Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to understand the processes responsible for producing and maintaining aerosol distributions and associated radiative and cloud forcing off the coast of North America. During the TCAP study, aerosol total number concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were in-situ measured from the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G-1) research aircraft during two Intensive Operations Periods (IOPs), one conducted in July 2012 and the other in February 2013. An overall aerosol size distribution was achieved by merging the observations from several instruments, including Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-200, DMT), and Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS, DMT). Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.) and single particle mass spectrometer, mini-SPLAT. Based on the aerosol size distribution, CCN number concentration (characterized by a DMT dual column CCN counter with a range from 0.1% to 0.4%), and chemical composition, a CCN closure was obtained. The sensitivity of CCN closure to organic hygroscopicity was investigated. The differences in aerosol/CCN properties between two columns, and between two phases, will be discussed.

  18. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols are generated in the atmosphere through anthropogenic and natural mechanisms. These sources have signatures in the aerosol optical and microphysical properties that can be used to identify the aerosol type/mixture. Spectral aerosol absorption information (absorption Angstrom exponent; AAE) used in conjunction with the particle size parameterization (extinction Angstrom exponent; EAE) can only identify the dominant absorbing aerosol type in the sample volume (e.g., black carbon vs. iron oxides in dust). This AAE/EAE relationship can be expanded to also identify non-absorbing aerosol types/mixtures by applying an absorption weighting. This new relationship provides improved aerosol type distinction when the magnitude of absorption is not equal (e.g, black carbon vs. sulfates). The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data provide spectral aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo - key parameters used to determine EAE and AAE. The proposed aerosol type/mixture relationship is demonstrated using the long-term data archive acquired at AERONET sites within various source regions. The preliminary analysis has found that dust, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol types/mixtures can be determined from this AAE/EAE relationship when applying the absorption weighting for each available wavelength (Le., 440, 675, 870nm). Large, non-spherical dust particles absorb in the shorter wavelengths and the application of 440nm wavelength absorption weighting produced the best particle type definition. Sulfate particles scatter light efficiently and organic carbon particles are small near the source and aggregate over time to form larger less absorbing particles. Both sulfates and organic carbon showed generally better definition using the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting. Black carbon generation results from varying combustion rates from a number of sources including industrial processes and biomass burning. Cases with primarily black carbon showed

  19. Retrieving Aerosol in a Cloudy Environment: Aerosol Availability as a Function of Spatial and Temporal Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert C.; Heidinger, Andrew; Pierce, R. Bradley; Chin, Mian

    2011-01-01

    The challenge of using satellite observations to retrieve aerosol properties in a cloudy environment is to prevent contamination of the aerosol signal from clouds, while maintaining sufficient aerosol product yield to satisfy specific applications. We investigate aerosol retrieval availability at different instrument pixel resolutions, using the standard MODIS aerosol cloud mask applied to MODIS data and a new GOES-R cloud mask applied to GOES data for a domain covering North America and surrounding oceans. Aerosol availability is not the same as the cloud free fraction and takes into account the technqiues used in the MODIS algorithm to avoid clouds, reduce noise and maintain sufficient numbers of aerosol retrievals. The inherent spatial resolution of each instrument, 0.5x0.5 km for MODIS and 1x1 km for GOES, is systematically degraded to 1x1 km, 2x2 km, 4x4 km and 8x8 km resolutions and then analyzed as to how that degradation would affect the availability of an aerosol retrieval, assuming an aerosol product resolution at 8x8 km. The results show that as pixel size increases, availability decreases until at 8x8 km 70% to 85% of the retrievals available at 0.5 km have been lost. The diurnal pattern of aerosol retrieval availability examined for one day in the summer suggests that coarse resolution sensors (i.e., 4x4 km or 8x8 km) may be able to retrieve aerosol early in the morning that would otherwise be missed at the time of current polar orbiting satellites, but not the diurnal aerosol properties due to cloud cover developed during the day. In contrast finer resolution sensors (i.e., 1x1 km or 2x2 km) have much better opportunity to retrieve aerosols in the partly cloudy scenes and better chance of returning the diurnal aerosol properties. Large differences in the results of the two cloud masks designed for MODIS aerosol and GOES cloud products strongly reinforce that cloud masks must be developed with specific purposes in mind and that a generic cloud mask

  20. Rocket-borne probes for charged ionospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, B.; Sternovsky, Z.; Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2003-10-01

    A series of rocket-borne probes is described for detecting charged solid particles in the ionosphere. The probes are flat charge-collecting surfaces on the skin of the rocket that have behind them a permanent magnet that magnetically insulates the probe from electrons. Several probes have also had a small positive bias of several volts to reduce collection of light molecular ions. The current that is recorded is thus from heavier charged particles and this is converted to a charge number density. Several summer launches into the polar mesosphere have found charged aerosol layers at the altitudes of noctilucent clouds and polar summer mesospheric radar echoes. A new probe is being developed in which electric deflection is used to determine the mass of the particles. This probe takes advantage of the reduced density behind the shock front to increase the mean free path within the instrument, so that cryopumping is not required.

  1. Three dimensional modeling of Titan's aerosols and winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Erik Joseph Lester

    Titan's atmosphere is enshrouded by an organic aerosol haze that obscures the surface at visible wavelengths. Elucidating the nature of this haze is key to understanding Titan's complex climate system and seasonal cycles. To approach this problem, I used a global circulation model coupled to an aerosol microphysical model to explore the physical properties of the haze, its spatial and temporal distribution, and any effects on the atmosphere. I established a best-guess set of microphysical properties that describes the aerosol in Titan's atmosphere based on sensitivity tests of the parameters. From this approach I confirmed that the aerosol haze is comprised of aggregate particles with a fractal dimension of about 2. A charge on the particles equal to 7.5 electrons/micron radius best fist observations of phase function and number density, and a production rate of 10--14 g/cm2 /s best matches vertical extinction profiles in Titan's atmosphere. I also present a formation mechanism for Titan's detached haze layer based on a balance between the vertical winds and particle fall velocities, and use a simple analytical model to reproduce the mechanism and match it to vertical extinction profiles from Cassini observations. Our simulations suggest that the detached haze layer will reappear at high altitude, around 550 km, between mid 2014 and early 2015. Finally, we show how the addition of topography and an ad hoc acceleration in our model affects the surface winds, making them more aligned with the dune crestline orientations on Titan. Through analysis of model output and comparison with spacecraft observations, I have been able to provide a coherent picture for the origin and evolution of Titan' s mysterious haze.

  2. Aerosol size distribution seasonal characteristics measured in Tiksi, Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, E.; Kondratyev, V.; Brus, D.; Laurila, T.; Lihavainen, H.; Backman, J.; Vakkari, V.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.; Uttal, T.; Ivakhov, V.; Makshtas, A.

    2015-07-01

    Four years of continuous aerosol number size distribution measurements from an Arctic Climate Observatory in Tiksi Russia are analyzed. Source region effects on particle modal features, and number and mass concentrations are presented for different seasons. The monthly median total aerosol number concentration in Tiksi ranges from 184 cm-3 in November to 724 cm-3 in July with a local maximum in March of 481 cm-3. The total mass concentration has a distinct maximum in February-March of 1.72-2.38 μg m-3 and two minimums in June of 0.42 μg m-3 and in September-October of 0.36-0.57 μg m-3. These seasonal cycles in number and mass concentrations are related to isolated aerosol sources such as Arctic haze in early spring which increases accumulation and coarse mode numbers, and biogenic emissions in summer which affects the smaller, nucleation and Aitken mode particles. The impact of temperature dependent natural emissions on aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei numbers was significant. Therefore, in addition to the precursor emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds, the frequent Siberian forest fires, although far are suggested to play a role in Arctic aerosol composition during the warmest months. During calm and cold months aerosol concentrations were occasionally increased by nearby aerosol sources in trapping inversions. These results provide valuable information on inter-annual cycles and sources of Arctic aerosols.

  3. Aerosol Transmission of Filoviruses.

    PubMed

    Mekibib, Berhanu; Ariën, Kevin K

    2016-01-01

    Filoviruses have become a worldwide public health concern because of their potential for introductions into non-endemic countries through international travel and the international transport of infected animals or animal products. Since it was first identified in 1976, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire) and Sudan, the 2013-2015 western African Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak is the largest, both by number of cases and geographical extension, and deadliest, recorded so far in medical history. The source of ebolaviruses for human index case(s) in most outbreaks is presumptively associated with handling of bush meat or contact with fruit bats. Transmission among humans occurs easily when a person comes in contact with contaminated body fluids of patients, but our understanding of other transmission routes is still fragmentary. This review deals with the controversial issue of aerosol transmission of filoviruses. PMID:27223296

  4. Aerosol Transmission of Filoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Mekibib, Berhanu; Ariën, Kevin K.

    2016-01-01

    Filoviruses have become a worldwide public health concern because of their potential for introductions into non-endemic countries through international travel and the international transport of infected animals or animal products. Since it was first identified in 1976, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire) and Sudan, the 2013–2015 western African Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak is the largest, both by number of cases and geographical extension, and deadliest, recorded so far in medical history. The source of ebolaviruses for human index case(s) in most outbreaks is presumptively associated with handling of bush meat or contact with fruit bats. Transmission among humans occurs easily when a person comes in contact with contaminated body fluids of patients, but our understanding of other transmission routes is still fragmentary. This review deals with the controversial issue of aerosol transmission of filoviruses. PMID:27223296

  5. Aerosol chamber and modelling studies on the reaction of soot aerosols with ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Moehler, O.; Naumann, K.H.; Saathoff, H.

    1995-12-31

    Heterogeneous processes in atmospheric aerosols are known to play important roles in the chemical transformation of air pollutants. Especially irregularly shaped aerosol particles like soot have large surface areas to interact with trace gases. The overall efficiency of those processes depends on various parameters like the particle shape, the chemical surface conditions, the surface reaction mechanisms and the gas transport processes to and from the surface. The shape and surface of soot particles are transformed due to their heterogeneous chemical activity. Therefore, the surface reaction efficiency of atmospheric soot particles also depends on their age and history. The scope of this work is to investigate the ozone depletion potential of soot particles at typical atmospheric conditions. The experiments are carried out in a cylindrical aerosol vessel with a volume of 3.7 m{sup 3}. The soot aerosol is produced with a sparc generator and introduced into the aerosol vessel together with the ozone. The variation of the number concentration, the mass concentration and the size distribution of the soot aerosol within the aerosol vessel is measured and electron micrographs are taken to obtain information on the particle morphology. The ozone concentration is continuously monitored by UV-absorption. The experimental data are compared with model results to analyze the physical and chemical processes in the aerosol system in more detail. The aerosol model developed at our institute is based on the concept of fractal geometry and calculates the dynamic behaviour of irregularly shaped aerosols. More recently, the model was extended to describe the interaction of the aerosol particles with gases. This paper summarizes first results of the experimental and modelling work. The possible impact on tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  6. Fine ash morphology and aerosol formation: A comparison of coal and biomass fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenevert, Blake Charles

    1998-12-01

    Modeling and experimental methods were used to investigate ash formation mechanisms of four industrially significant high-alkali biomass (sawdust/sanderdust) fuels. Alkali minerals tend to vaporize and recondense to form sub-micron aerosol, which poses health risks and causes special operational problems for industrial combustors. Sawdust/sanderdust was burned in a 15 kW natural gas-fired tunnel furnace. The resulting ash was collected by a water-cooled probe, and size sorted by cascade impaction and Electrical Aerosol Size Analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy techniques were used to determine morphology and composition by size cut. Three ash modes were present: (1) A residual mode composed primarily of porous calcium structures with a scale length of 8 microns and larger. This mode was likely the result of direct oxide and carbonate formation. (2) A secondary residual mode near 2 microns composed of fluxed and fragmented calcium, but also containing significant amounts of Si, Fe, Mn and Al. This mode appeared to be composed of eutectic melts separated from the parent ash particle. (3) An aerosol mode composed of Na and K with Cl anion, or sulfate anion when Cl was not present. The aerosol mode diameter was found to be a function of initial nucleate number density and coagulation time. Long coagulation time or high initial number density resulted in an aerosol mode diameter near 0.1 micron. Modeling was composed of three elements: (1) Equilibrium modeling---These calculations validated experimental evidence for alkali vaporization and condensation, predicting all alkali to enter the vapor phase as NaCl or KCl when Cl is available, or NaOH and KOH otherwise. (2) Condensation modeling---This model was used to determine the partitioning of alkali metal between homogeneous particulate matter formation (self-nucleation) and deposition on existing residual particles. It was shown that vaporized alkali can be collected on the

  7. New understanding and quantification of the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interaction for studying aerosol indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyi; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Minghua; Peng, Yiran

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol indirect effects suffer from large uncertainty in climate models and among observations. This study focuses on two plausible factors: regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions and the effect of cloud droplet spectral shape. We show, using a new parcel model, that combined consideration of droplet number concentration (Nc) and relative dispersion (ɛ, ratio of standard deviation to mean radius of the cloud droplet size distribution) better characterizes the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions than considering Nc alone. Given updraft velocity (w), ɛ increases with increasing aerosol number concentration (Na) in the aerosol-limited regime, peaks in the transitional regime, and decreases with further increasing Na in the updraft-limited regime. This new finding further reconciles contrasting observations in literature and reinforces the compensating role of dispersion effect. The nonmonotonic behavior of ɛ further quantifies the relationship between the transitional Na and w that separates the aerosol- and updraft-limited regimes.

  8. Biogenic Contributions to Summertime Arctic Aerosol: Observations of Aerosol Composition from the Netcare 2014 Aircraft Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Burkart, J.; Koellner, F.; Schneider, J.; Bozem, H.; Hoor, P. M.; Brauner, R.; Herber, A. B.; Leaitch, W. R.; Abbatt, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic is a complex and poorly studied aerosol environment, impacted by strong anthropogenic contributions during winter months and by regional sources in cleaner summer months. In order to gain a predictive understanding of the changing climate in this region, it is necessary to understand the balance between these two aerosol sources to clarify how aerosol might be altered by or contribute to climate change. We present results of vertically resolved, submicron aerosol composition from an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) during the NETCARE 2014 Polar6 aircraft campaign. The campaign was based in the high Arctic, at Resolute, NU (74°N), allowing measurements from 60 to 2900 meters over ice, open water and near the ice-edge. Concurrent measurements aboard the Polar6 included ultrafine and accumulation mode particle number and size, cloud condensation nuclei concentrations, trace gas concentrations and single particle composition. Aerosol vertical profiles measured by the AMS can be broadly characterized into two regimes corresponding to different meteorological conditions: the first with very low aerosol loading (<0.1 μg/m3) at low altitudes compared to that aloft and high numbers of nucleation mode particles, and the second with higher concentrations at lower levels. This second regime was associated with low concentrations of nucleation mode particles, and higher observable levels of methane sulphonic acid (MSA) from AMS measurements at low altitudes. MSA, produced during the oxidation of dimethyl sulphide, is a marker for the contribution of ocean-derived biogenic sulphur to particulate sulphur and could be identified and quantified using the high-resolution AMS. MSA to sulphate ratios were observed to increase towards lower altitudes, suggesting a contribution to aerosol loading from the ocean. In addition, we present measurements of aerosol neutralization and the characteristics of organic aerosol that relate to the growth of

  9. Below-cloud rain scavenging of atmospheric aerosols for aerosol deposition models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chate, D. M.; Murugavel, P.; Ali, K.; Tiwari, S.; Beig, G.

    2011-03-01

    Below-cloud aerosol scavenging is generally estimated from field measurements using advanced instruments that measure changes in aerosol distributions with respect to rainfall. In this study, we discuss various scavenging mechanisms and scavenging coefficients from past laboratory and field measurements. Scavenging coefficients derived from field measurements (representing natural aerosols scavenging) are two orders higher than that of theoretical ones for smaller particles (Dp < 2 μm). Measured size-resolved scavenging coefficients can be served as a better option to the default scavenging coefficient (e.g. a constant of 10-4 s-1 for all size of aerosols, as used in the CALPUFF model) for representing below-cloud aerosol scavenging. We propose scavenging correction parameter (CR) as an exponential function of size-resolved scavenging coefficients, winds and width in the downwind of the source-receptor system. For a wind speed of 3 m s-1, CR decrease with the width in the downwind for particles of diameters Dp < 0.1 μm but CR does not vary much for particles in the accumulation mode (0.1 < Dp < 2 μm). For a typical urban aerosol distribution, assuming 3 m s-1 air-flow in the source-receptor system, 10 km downwind width, 2.84 mm h-1 of rainfall and using aerosol size dependent scavenging coefficients in the CR, scavenging of aerosols is found to be 16% in number and 24% in volume of total aerosols. Using the default scavenging coefficient (10-4 s-1) in the CALPUFF model, it is found to be 64% in both number and volume of total aerosols.

  10. Calculation of amorphous silica solubilities at 25° to 300°C and apparent cation hydration numbers in aqueous salt solutions using the concept of effective density of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, Robert O.; Williams, Marshall L.

    1983-01-01

    The solubility of amorphous silica in aqueous salt solutions at 25° to 300°C can be calculated using information on its solubility in pure water and a model in which the activity of water in the salt solution is defined to equal the effective density. pe, of “free” water in that solution. At temperatures of 100°C and above, pe closely equals the product of the density of the solution times the weight fraction of water in the solution. At 25°C, a correction parameter must be applied to pe that incorporates a term called the apparent cation hydration number, h. Because of the many assumptions and other uncertainties involved in determining values of h, by the model used here, the reported numbers are not necessarily real hydration numbers even though they do agree with some published values determined by activity and diffusion methods. Whether or not h is a real hydration number, it would appear to be useful in its inclusion within a more extensive activity coefficient term that describes the departure of silica solubilities in concentrated salt solutions from expected behavior according to the model presented here. Values of h can be calculated from measured amorphous silica solubilities in salt solutions at 25°C provided there is no complexing of dissolved silica with the dissolved salt, or if the degree of complexing is known. The previously postulated aqueous silica-sulfate complexing in aqueous Na2SO4 solutions is supported by results of the present effective density of water model

  11. Aerosol cloud processing with the global model ECHAM5-HAM-SALSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, T.; Korhonen, H.; Zubair, M.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Lehtinen, K.; Kokkola, H.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their interactions with clouds constitute the largest uncertainty in the radiative forcing of the Earth's atmosphere. Increasing aerosol number concentrations increases the cloud droplet concentration and droplet surface and hence the cloud albedo. This mechanism is called the aerosol indirect effect on climate. Understanding the changes in cloud droplet number concentrations and size by anthropogenic aerosols are the key factors in the study of future climate change. Therefore the aerosols' formation and growth from nanoparticles to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) must be described accurately. The formation and growth of aerosols are shown to be described more accurately with sectional representations than with bulk (total aerosol mass only), modal (lognormal modes describing mass and number size distribution) or moment (processes tied to different moments of particle number size distribution) approaches. Recently the sectional aerosol models have been implemented to global climate models. However, the resolution of sectional models must be optimised to reduce the computational cost. We have implemented the sectional aerosol model SALSA in ECHAM5-HAM. SALSA describes the aerosol population with 20 size sections. The dynamics are optimised for large scale applications and the model includes an improved moving center sectional method. The particulate mass consists of five compounds: sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon, sea salt and dust. The aerosol processing has been studied extensively and there are many numerical models used to predict CCN number concentrations. However, due to computational limitations many of them are not suitable for utilisation in global climate models. Therefore in most global climate studies on aerosol activation to CCN is examined using cloud activation parameterisations. We study the aerosol cloud processing and its affect on transport of aerosols using Abdul-Razzak-Ghan aerosol cloud activation

  12. Aerosol Composition and Morphology during the 2005 Marine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle Study

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Laskin, Alexander; Laulainen, Nels S.

    2005-12-01

    The composition and morphology of aerosols activated within cloud droplets relative to the properties of aerosols not activated is of central importance to studies directed at improved parameterization of the treatment of aerosols in large-scale models. These models have many applications, including evaluations of the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on climate. To further our understanding of these aerosol characteristics, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Science Program (ASP), joined forces with other participants of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) "Marine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle Study" between July 4 and July 29, 2005, at Pt. Reyes, California. Observations from in situ aerosol instruments and from the ARM Mobile Facility will be combined in a first look at observations from this period. The in situ aerosol measurements included high time resolution data of size-resolved bulk composition (sulfate, nitrate, NH4, organics, etc.) and single particle analysis to determine elemental composition and morphology. A CCN counter was also deployed to measure the fraction of cloud droplet kernels that are CCN active over a range of super-saturations. Our presentation will partition measurements into periods of cloudy and cloud-free periods, and will also be partitioned between periods associated with northerly back trajectories that arrived at Pt. Reyes after passing along the Washington-Oregon coast, westerly oceanic trajectories and a very limited number of periods when the air flow appeared to be associated with urban areas to the south and southeast.

  13. Measurement of charged aerosol particles in the mesosphere by a rocket-borne probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, Byron; Horanyi, Mihaly; Robertson, Scott

    2002-11-01

    A magnetically shielded, charge collecting rocket probe was used on two flights of the MIDAS (MIddle Atmosphere Dynamics and Structure) SOLSTICE (Studies of Layered STructures and ICE) 2001 rocket campaign from Andoya, Norway. The probe was a graphite collection surface with a permanent magnet underneath to deflect electrons. The first launched June 17, 2001 was into a strong, multiply layered PMSE detected by the ALWIN radar. The probe measured negative particles with a peak charge number density of -1500 charges per cc. The second (June 24), into another strong, multiply layered PMSE, saw a band of positive particles centered in the lowest radar echo maximum, and a negative particle layer accompanied by a positive ion excess. The charge number densities for the PMSE particles were several thousand charges per cc. Unexpectedly, 2 km beneath the PMSE, the probe also found a very pronounced negative layer which was probably a noctilucent cloud. Computer simulations of incoming, singly negatively charged ice aerosols were performed using a rarefied flow field representative of the MIDAS payload at zero angle of attack. Ice aerosols < 1 nm in radius were diverted by the leading shock front, indicating the smallest detectable ice aerosol by this probe

  14. Evaluating Aerosol Process Modules within the Framework of the Aerosol Modeling Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J. D.; Velu, V.; Gustafson, W. I.; Chapman, E.; Easter, R. C.; Shrivastava, M.; Singh, B.

    2012-12-01

    Factors that influence predictions of aerosol direct and indirect forcing, such as aerosol mass, composition, size distribution, hygroscopicity, and optical properties, still contain large uncertainties in both regional and global models. New aerosol treatments are usually implemented into a 3-D atmospheric model and evaluated using a limited number of measurements from a specific case study. Under this modeling paradigm, the performance and computational efficiency of several treatments for a specific aerosol process cannot be adequately quantified because many other processes among various modeling studies (e.g. grid configuration, meteorology, emission rates) are different as well. The scientific community needs to know the advantages and disadvantages of specific aerosol treatments when the meteorology, chemistry, and other aerosol processes are identical in order to reduce the uncertainties associated with aerosols predictions. To address these issues, an Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) has been developed that systematically and objectively evaluates new aerosol treatments for use in regional and global models. The AMT consists of the modular Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a series testbed cases for which extensive in situ and remote sensing measurements of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties are available, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of meteorological, chemical, aerosol process modules. WRF contains various parameterizations of meteorological, chemical, and aerosol processes and includes interactive aerosol-cloud-radiation treatments similar to those employed by climate models. In addition, the physics suite from the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) have also been ported to WRF so that they can be tested at various spatial scales and compared directly with field campaign data and other parameterizations commonly used by the mesoscale modeling community. Data from several campaigns, including the 2006

  15. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  16. Characterization of a Vortex Shaking Method for Aerosolizing Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Deye, Gregory; Turkevich, Leonid A.

    2015-01-01

    Generation of well-dispersed, well-characterized fibers is important in toxicology studies. A vortex-tube shaking method is investigated using glass fibers to characterize the generated aerosol. Controlling parameters that were studied included initial batch amounts of glass fibers, preparation of the powder (e.g., preshaking), humidity, and airflow rate. Total fiber number concentrations and aerodynamic size distributions were typically measured. The aerosol concentration is only stable for short times (t < 10 min) and then falls precipitously, with concomitant changes in the aerosol aerodynamic size distribution; the plateau concentration and its duration both increase with batch size. Preshaking enhances the initial aerosol concentration and enables the aerosolization of longer fibers. Higher humidity strongly affects the particle size distribution and the number concentration, resulting in a smaller modal diameter and a higher number concentration. Running the vortex shaker at higher flow rates (Q > 0.3 lpm), yields an aerosol with a particle size distribution representative of the batch powder; running the vortex shaker at a lower aerosol flow rate (Q ~ 0.1 lpm) only aerosolizes the shorter fibers. These results have implications for the use of the vortex shaker as a standard aerosol generator. PMID:26635428

  17. Atmospheric aerosols as prebiotic chemical reactors

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Christopher M.; Ellison, G. Barney; Tuck, Adrian F.; Vaida, Veronica

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere have recently been found to contain a large number of chemical elements and a high content of organic material. The latter property is explicable by an inverted micelle model. The aerosol sizes with significant atmospheric lifetimes are the same as those of single-celled organisms, and they are predicted by the interplay of aerodynamic drag, surface tension, and gravity. We propose that large populations of such aerosols could have afforded an environment, by means of their ability to concentrate molecules in a wide variety of physical conditions, for key chemical transformations in the prebiotic world. We also suggest that aerosols could have been precursors to life, since it is generally agreed that the common ancestor of terrestrial life was a single-celled organism. The early steps in some of these initial transformations should be accessible to experimental investigation. PMID:11035775

  18. An analysis of global aerosol type as retrieved by MISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Gaitley, Barbara J.

    2015-05-01

    In addition to aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol type is required globally for climate forcing calculations, constraining aerosol transport models and other applications. However, validating satellite aerosol-type retrievals is more challenging than testing AOD results, because aerosol type is a more complex quantity, and ground truth data are far less numerous and generally not as robust. We evaluate the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) Version 22 aerosol-type retrievals by assessing product self-consistency on a regional basis and by making comparisons with general expectation and with the Aerosol Robotic Network aerosol-type climatology, as available. The results confirm and add detail to the observation that aerosol-type discrimination improves dramatically where midvisible AOD exceeds about 0.15 or 0.2. When the aerosol-type information content of the observations is relatively low, increased scattering-angle range improves particle-type sensitivity. The MISR standard, operational product discriminates among small, medium, and large particles and exhibits qualitative sensitivity to single-scattering albedo (SSA) under good aerosol-type retrieval conditions, providing a categorical aerosol-type classification. MISR Ångström exponent deviates systematically from ground truth where particle types missing from the algorithm climatology are present, or where cloud contamination is likely to occur, and SSA tends to be overestimated where absorbing particles are found. We determined that the number of mixtures passing the algorithm acceptance criteria (#SuccMix) represents aerosol-type retrieval quality effectively, providing a useful aerosol-type quality flag.

  19. Aerosol Correction for Improving OMPS/LP Ozone Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zhong; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Loughman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite Limb Profiler (OMPS-LP) on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite was launched on Oct. 28, 2011. Limb profilers measures the radiance scattered from the Earth's atmospheric in limb viewing mode from 290 to 1000 nm and infer ozone profiles from tropopause to 60 km. The recently released OMPS-LP Version 2 data product contains the first publicly released ozone profiles retrievals, and these are now available for the entire OMPS mission, which extends from April, 2012. The Version 2 data product retrievals incorporate several important improvements to the algorithm. One of the primary changes is to turn off the aerosol retrieval module. The aerosol profiles retrieved inside the ozone code was not helping the ozone retrieval and was adding noise and other artifacts. Aerosols including polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) and polar mesospheric clouds (PMC) have a detectable effect on OMPS-LP data. Our results show that ignoring the aerosol contribution would produce an ozone density bias of up to 10 percent in the region of maximum aerosol extinction. Therefore, aerosol correction is needed to improve the quality of the retrieved ozone concentration profile. We provide Aerosol Scattering Index (ASI) for detecting aerosols-PMC-PSC, defined as ln(Im-Ic) normalized at 45km, where Im is the measured radiance and Ic is the calculated radiance assuming no aerosols. Since ASI varies with wavelengths, latitude and altitude, we can start by assuming no aerosol profiles in calculating the ASIs and then use the aerosol profile to see if it significantly reduces the residuals. We also discuss the effect of aerosol size distribution on the ozone profile retrieval process. Finally, we present an aerosol-PMC-PSC correction scheme.

  20. Determination of particle nucleation and growth rates from measured aerosol size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verheggen, B.; Mozurkewich, M.

    2003-04-01

    The effects of aerosols on atmospheric chemistry, health and climate are dependent on particle size and composition, and therefore on particle nucleation and growth. An analytical model has been developed to determine nucleation and growth rates from measurements of consecutive aerosol size distributions. The evolution of an aerosol population in time is described by the General Dynamic Equation (GDE). Wall loss, coagulation loss and coagulation production are determined, based on the measured aerosol size distributions. Taking their contributions into account, a non-linear regression analysis of the GDE is performed for each time interval to find the value of the growth rate, that gives best agreement between the measured and calculated change in the size distribution. Other parameters can also be verified and/or optimized by regression analysis. Knowing the growth rate as a function of time (and size) from the regression analysis, each measured cohort of particles is tracked backwards in time to their time of formation, where the radius of the critical cluster is assumed to be 0.5 nm. The number density of each cohort has decreased since their formation, due to wall losses and coagulation processes. Perturbation theory is used to approximate the contribution of within mode coagulation in decreasing the number density. Wall losses and coagulation scavenging are well characterized for each time interval. The integrated losses, from time of formation to time of measurement, are used to obtain the number of nucleated particles, and ultimately the -empirically determined- nucleation rate. The analysis is applied to measurements made in Calspan's 590 m3 smog chamber, following SO2 nucleation.

  1. In situ infrared aerosol spectroscopy for a variety of nerve agent simulants using flow-through photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Gurton, Kristan P; Felton, Melvin; Dahmani, Rachid; Ligon, David

    2007-09-01

    We present newly measured results of an ongoing experimental program established to measure optical cross sections in the mid- and long-wave infrared for a variety of chemically and biologically based aerosols. For this study we consider only chemically derived aerosols, and in particular, a group of chemical compounds often used as simulants for the detection of extremely toxic organophosphorus nerve agents. These materials include: diethyl methylphosphonate (DEMP), dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), and diethyl phthalate (DEP). As reported in a prior study [Appl. Opt. 44, 4001 (2005)], we combine two optical techniques well suited for aerosol spectroscopy [i.e., flow-through photoacoustics and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) emission spectroscopy], to measure in situ the absolute extinction and absorption cross sections over a variety of wavelengths spanning the IR spectral region from 3 to 13 mum. Aerosol size distribution(s), particle number density, and dosimetric measurements are recorded simultaneously in order to present optical cross sections that are aerosol mass normalized, i.e., m(2)/gram. Photoacoustic results, conducted at a series of CO(2) laser lines, compare well with measured broadband FTIR spectral extinction. Both FTIR and photoacoustic data also compare well with Mie theory calculations based on measured size distributions and previously published complex indices of refraction. PMID:17805369

  2. In situ infrared aerosol spectroscopy for a variety of nerve agent simulants using flow-through photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurton, Kristan P.; Felton, Melvin; Dahmani, Rachid; Ligon, David

    2007-09-01

    We present newly measured results of an ongoing experimental program established to measure optical cross sections in the mid- and long-wave infrared for a variety of chemically and biologically based aerosols. For this study we consider only chemically derived aerosols, and in particular, a group of chemical compounds often used as simulants for the detection of extremely toxic organophosphorus nerve agents. These materials include: diethyl methylphosphonate (DEMP), dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), and diethyl phthalate (DEP). As reported in a prior study [Appl. Opt. 44, 4001 (2005)], we combine two optical techniques well suited for aerosol spectroscopy [i.e., flow-through photoacoustics and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) emission spectroscopy], to measure in situ the absolute extinction and absorption cross sections over a variety of wavelengths spanning the IR spectral region from 3 to 13 μm. Aerosol size distribution(s), particle number density, and dosimetric measurements are recorded simultaneously in order to present optical cross sections that are aerosol mass normalized, i.e., m2/gram. Photoacoustic results, conducted at a series of CO2 laser lines, compare well with measured broadband FTIR spectral extinction. Both FTIR and photoacoustic data also compare well with Mie theory calculations based on measured size distributions and previously published complex indices of refraction.

  3. Characterization of Ambient Black Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Levy, M. E.; Zheng, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the strong absorption over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon (BC) is a key short-lived climate forcer, which contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. The impact of BC on the radiative forcing of the Earth-Atmosphere system is highly dependent of the particle properties. In this presentation, emphasis will be placed on characterizing BC containing aerosols in at the California-Mexico border to obtain a greater understanding of the atmospheric aging and properties of ambient BC aerosols. A comprehensive set of directly measured aerosol properties, including the particle size distribution, effective density, hygroscopicity, volatility, and several optical properties, will be discussed to quantify the mixing state and composition of ambient particles. In Tijuana, Mexico, submicron aerosols are strongly influenced by vehicle emissions; subsequently, the BC concentration in Tijuana is considerably higher than most US cities with an average BC concentration of 2.71 × 2.65 g cm-3. BC accounts for 24.75 % × 9.44 of the total submicron concentration on average, but periodically accounts for over 50%. This high concentration of BC strongly influences many observed aerosol properties such as single scattering albedo, hygroscopicity, effective density, and volatility.

  4. Calculations of relative optical air masses for various aerosol types and minor gases in Arctic and Antarctic atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Petkov, Boyan H.

    2014-02-01

    The dependence functions of relative optical air mass on apparent solar zenith angle θ have been calculated over the θ < 87° range for the vertical profiles of wet-air molecular number density in the Arctic and Antarctic atmospheres, extinction coefficients of different aerosol types, and molecular number density of water vapor, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and oxygen dimer. The calculations were made using as weight functions the seasonal average vertical profiles of (i) pressure and temperature derived from multiyear sets of radiosounding measurements performed at Ny-Ålesund, Alert, Mario Zucchelli, and Neumayer stations; (ii) volume extinction coefficients of background summer aerosol, Arctic haze, and Kasatochi and Pinatubo volcanic aerosol measured with lidars or balloon-borne samplings; and (iii) molecular number concentrations of the above minor gases, derived from radiosonde, ozonesonde, and satellite-based observations. The air mass values were determined using a formula based on a realistic atmospheric air-refraction model. They were systematically checked by comparing their mutual differences with the uncertainties arising from the seasonal and daily variations in pressure and temperature conditions within the various ranges, where aerosol and gases attenuate the solar radiation most efficiently. The results provide evidence that secant-approximated and midlatitude air mass values are inappropriate for analyzing the Sun photometer measurements performed at polar sites. They indicate that the present evaluations can be reliably used to estimate the aerosol optical depth from the Arctic and Antarctic measurements of total optical depth, after appropriate corrections for the Rayleigh scattering and gaseous absorption optical depths.

  5. Impact of Aerosol Processing on Orographic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, Sara; Zubler, Elias M.; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol particles undergo significant modifications during their residence time in the atmosphere. Physical processes like coagulation, coating and water uptake, and aqueous surface chemistry alter the aerosol size distribution and composition. At this, clouds play a primary role as physical and chemical processing inside cloud droplets contributes considerably to the changes in aerosol particles. A previous study estimates that on global average atmospheric particles are cycled three times through a cloud before being removed from the atmosphere [1]. An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles has been implemented in the regional weather forecast and climate model COSMO-CLM. The employed model version includes a two-moment cloud microphysical scheme [2] that has been coupled to the aerosol microphysical scheme M7 [3] as described by Muhlbauer and Lohmann, 2008 [4]. So far, the formation, transfer and removal of cloud-borne aerosol number and mass were not considered in the model. Following the parameterization for cloud-borne particles developed by Hoose et al., 2008 [5], distinction between in-droplet and in-crystal particles is made to more physically account for processes in mixed-phase clouds, such as the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process and contact and immersion freezing. In our model, this approach has been extended to allow for aerosol particles in five different hydrometeors: cloud droplets, rain drops, ice crystals, snow flakes and graupel. We account for nucleation scavenging, freezing and melting processes, autoconversion, accretion, aggregation, riming and selfcollection, collisions between interstitial aerosol particles and hydrometeors, ice multiplication, sedimentation, evaporation and sublimation. The new scheme allows an evaluation of the cloud cycling of aerosol particles by tracking the particles even when scavenged into hydrometeors. Global simulations of aerosol processing in clouds have recently been conducted by Hoose et al

  6. Absolute number density calibration of the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283. 3-nm resonance line from a high-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp and the calculated effect of argon pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, J.W.; McClean, R.E. ); Oldenborg, R.C. )

    1991-03-21

    The absolute number density calibration for the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283.3-nm resonance line from a high-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp (Photron superlamp) is determined and found to be the same as that of a standard hollow cathode lamp. Comparisons of the calibrations to theoretical calculations are found to be quite satisfactory. The effects of argon pressures in the absorption cell on the calibration are examined theoretically by using a simple Lorentzian broadening and shifting model. These calculations show the expected reduction in sensitivity and increasing linearity of Beer-Lambert plots with increasing argon pressure.

  7. Simultaneous Measurements of direct, semi-direct and indirect aerosol forcing with Stacked Autonomous UAVs: A New Observing Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, V.; Roberts, G.; Ramana, M. V.; Corrigan, C.; Nguyen, H.

    2006-12-01

    We report here first time demonstration with three autonomously flying Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) of cloudy sky albedo, transmission atmospheric solar absorption, aerosol and cloud droplet concentrations and number densities. From these direct measurements we derive the direct, semi-direct and the first indirect aerosol forcing. The observing system consisted of 3 light weight UAVs, instrumented with miniaturized instruments (Roberts et al, 2006; Ramana et al, 2006; Corrigan et al 2006) for measuring aerosol concentrations and size distribution, cloud microphysical properties, black carbon concentration and broad band and narrow band solar fluxes. The airborne measurements were validated and augmented by the Atmospheric Brown Clouds Maldives Climate Observatory (ABC_MCO) in the island of Hanimaadhoo in the N. Indian Ocean (Corrigan et al, 2006; Ramana and Ramanathan 2006). The campaign was conducted during March and early April of 2006 when this region is subject to long range transport of pollution from S. Asia. In the stacked 3_UAV configuration, one flew in the boundary layer below clouds to characterize the aerosols feeding the clouds and the transmission of solar radiation by the absorbing aerosol layer and clouds above; the second inside the trade cumulus clouds to directly observe the fully nucleated cloud drop size and concentrations and total liquid water content; and the third above the cloud to determine the incoming solar and the reflected solar radiation. The 3-UAVs were programmed to sample the same region(or clouds) within seconds of each other, thus providing unique insights into how aerosols and boundary layer dynamics modulate the cloud microphysics and thus the albedo and solar absorption of cloudy skies in the planet. The period of observations also included a major dust-soot event which revealed a large increase in atmospheric solar absorption. We will present results on how 3- dimensional clouds with absorbing aerosols modulate

  8. Sea spray aerosol as a unique source of ice nucleating particles

    PubMed Central

    DeMott, Paul J.; Hill, Thomas C. J.; McCluskey, Christina S.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Ruppel, Matthew J.; Mason, Ryan H.; Irish, Victoria E.; Lee, Taehyoung; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Snider, Jefferson R.; McMeeking, Gavin R.; Dhaniyala, Suresh; Lewis, Ernie R.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Abbatt, Jonathan; Lee, Christopher; Sultana, Camille M.; Ault, Andrew P.; Axson, Jessica L.; Diaz Martinez, Myrelis; Venero, Ingrid; Santos-Figueroa, Gilmarie; Stokes, M. Dale; Deane, Grant B.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Bertram, Timothy H.; Bertram, Allan K.; Moffett, Bruce F.; Franc, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) are vital for ice initiation in, and precipitation from, mixed-phase clouds. A source of INPs from oceans within sea spray aerosol (SSA) emissions has been suggested in previous studies but remained unconfirmed. Here, we show that INPs are emitted using real wave breaking in a laboratory flume to produce SSA. The number concentrations of INPs from laboratory-generated SSA, when normalized to typical total aerosol number concentrations in the marine boundary layer, agree well with measurements from diverse regions over the oceans. Data in the present study are also in accord with previously published INP measurements made over remote ocean regions. INP number concentrations active within liquid water droplets increase exponentially in number with a decrease in temperature below 0 °C, averaging an order of magnitude increase per 5 °C interval. The plausibility of a strong increase in SSA INP emissions in association with phytoplankton blooms is also shown in laboratory simulations. Nevertheless, INP number concentrations, or active site densities approximated using “dry” geometric SSA surface areas, are a few orders of magnitude lower than corresponding concentrations or site densities in the surface boundary layer over continental regions. These findings have important implications for cloud radiative forcing and precipitation within low-level and midlevel marine clouds unaffected by continental INP sources, such as may occur over the Southern Ocean. PMID:26699469

  9. Sea spray aerosol as a unique source of ice nucleating particles.

    PubMed

    DeMott, Paul J; Hill, Thomas C J; McCluskey, Christina S; Prather, Kimberly A; Collins, Douglas B; Sullivan, Ryan C; Ruppel, Matthew J; Mason, Ryan H; Irish, Victoria E; Lee, Taehyoung; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Rhee, Tae Siek; Snider, Jefferson R; McMeeking, Gavin R; Dhaniyala, Suresh; Lewis, Ernie R; Wentzell, Jeremy J B; Abbatt, Jonathan; Lee, Christopher; Sultana, Camille M; Ault, Andrew P; Axson, Jessica L; Diaz Martinez, Myrelis; Venero, Ingrid; Santos-Figueroa, Gilmarie; Stokes, M Dale; Deane, Grant B; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L; Grassian, Vicki H; Bertram, Timothy H; Bertram, Allan K; Moffett, Bruce F; Franc, Gary D

    2016-05-24

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) are vital for ice initiation in, and precipitation from, mixed-phase clouds. A source of INPs from oceans within sea spray aerosol (SSA) emissions has been suggested in previous studies but remained unconfirmed. Here, we show that INPs are emitted using real wave breaking in a laboratory flume to produce SSA. The number concentrations of INPs from laboratory-generated SSA, when normalized to typical total aerosol number concentrations in the marine boundary layer, agree well with measurements from diverse regions over the oceans. Data in the present study are also in accord with previously published INP measurements made over remote ocean regions. INP number concentrations active within liquid water droplets increase exponentially in number with a decrease in temperature below 0 °C, averaging an order of magnitude increase per 5 °C interval. The plausibility of a strong increase in SSA INP emissions in association with phytoplankton blooms is also shown in laboratory simulations. Nevertheless, INP number concentrations, or active site densities approximated using "dry" geometric SSA surface areas, are a few orders of magnitude lower than corresponding concentrations or site densities in the surface boundary layer over continental regions. These findings have important implications for cloud radiative forcing and precipitation within low-level and midlevel marine clouds unaffected by continental INP sources, such as may occur over the Southern Ocean. PMID:26699469

  10. Sea spray aerosol as a unique source of ice nucleating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, Paul J.; Hill, Thomas C. J.; McCluskey, Christina S.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Collins, Douglas B.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Ruppel, Matthew J.; Mason, Ryan H.; Irish, Victoria E.; Lee, Taehyoung; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Siek Rhee, Tae; Snider, Jefferson R.; McMeeking, Gavin R.; Dhaniyala, Suresh; Lewis, Ernie R.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Abbatt, Jonathan; Lee, Christopher; Sultana, Camille M.; Ault, Andrew P.; Axson, Jessica L.; Diaz Martinez, Myrelis; Venero, Ingrid; Santos-Figueroa, Gilmarie; Stokes, M. Dale; Deane, Grant B.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Bertram, Timothy H.; Bertram, Allan K.; Moffett, Bruce F.; Franc, Gary D.

    2016-05-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) are vital for ice initiation in, and precipitation from, mixed-phase clouds. A source of INPs from oceans within sea spray aerosol (SSA) emissions has been suggested in previous studies but remained unconfirmed. Here, we show that INPs are emitted using real wave breaking in a laboratory flume to produce SSA. The number concentrations of INPs from laboratory-generated SSA, when normalized to typical total aerosol number concentrations in the marine boundary layer, agree well with measurements from diverse regions over the oceans. Data in the present study are also in accord with previously published INP measurements made over remote ocean regions. INP number concentrations active within liquid water droplets increase exponentially in number with a decrease in temperature below 0 °C, averaging an order of magnitude increase per 5 °C interval. The plausibility of a strong increase in SSA INP emissions in association with phytoplankton blooms is also shown in laboratory simulations. Nevertheless, INP number concentrations, or active site densities approximated using “dry” geometric SSA surface areas, are a few orders of magnitude lower than corresponding concentrations or site densities in the surface boundary layer over continental regions. These findings have important implications for cloud radiative forcing and precipitation within low-level and midlevel marine clouds unaffected by continental INP sources, such as may occur over the Southern Ocean.

  11. Airborne Aerosol Closure Studies During PRIDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, Beat; Reid, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    The Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE) was conducted during June/July of 2000 to study the properties of Saharan dust aerosols transported across the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean Islands. During PRIDE, the NASA Ames Research Center six-channel (380 - 1020 nm) airborne autotracking sunphotometer (AATS-6) was operated aboard a Piper Navajo airplane alongside a suite of in situ aerosol instruments. The in situ aerosol instrumentation relevant to this paper included a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP-100) and a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP), covering the radius range of approx. 0.05 to 10 microns. The simultaneous and collocated measurement of multi-spectral aerosol optical depth and in situ particle size distribution data permits a variety of closure studies. For example, vertical profiles of aerosol optical depth obtained during local aircraft ascents and descents can be differentiated with respect to altitude and compared to extinction profiles calculated using the in situ particle size distribution data (and reasonable estimates of the aerosol index of refraction). Additionally, aerosol extinction (optical depth) spectra can be inverted to retrieve estimates of the particle size distributions, which can be compared directly to the in situ size distributions. In this paper we will report on such closure studies using data from a select number of vertical profiles at Cabras Island, Puerto Rico, including measurements in distinct Saharan Dust Layers. Preliminary results show good agreement to within 30% between mid-visible aerosol extinction derived from the AATS-6 optical depth profiles and extinction profiles forward calculated using 60s-average in situ particle size distributions and standard Saharan dust aerosol refractive indices published in the literature. In agreement with tendencies observed in previous studies, our initial results show an underestimate of aerosol extinction calculated based on the in situ size distributions

  12. Characterization of aerosol particles at the forested site in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimselyte, I.; Garbaras, A.; Kvietkus, K.; Remeikis, V.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM), especially fine particles (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 1 m, PM1), has been found to play an important role in global climate change, air quality, and human health. The continuous study of aerosol parameters is therefore imperative for better understanding the environmental effects of the atmospheric particles, as well as their sources, formation and transformation processes. The particle size distribution is particularly important, since this physical parameter determines the mass and number density, lifetime and atmospheric transport, or optical scattering behavior of the particles in the atmosphere (Jaenicke, 1998). Over the years several efforts have been made to improve the knowledge about the chemical composition of atmospheric particles as a function of size (Samara and Voutsa, 2005) and to characterize the relative contribution of different components to the fine particulate matter. It is well established that organic materials constitute a highly variable fraction of the atmospheric aerosol. This fraction is predominantly found in the fine size mode in concentrations ranging from 10 to 70% of the total dry fine particle mass (Middlebrook et al., 1998). Although organic compounds are major components of the fine particles, the composition, formation mechanism of organic aerosols are not well understood. This is because particulate organic matter is part of a complex atmospheric system with hundreds of different compounds, both natural and anthropogenic, covering a wide range of chemical properties. The aim of this study was to characterize the forest PM1, and investigate effects of air mass transport on the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition, estimate and provide insights into the sources and characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols through analysis ^13C/12C isotopic ratio as a function of the aerosol particles size. The measurements were performed at the Rugšteliškis integrated

  13. Investigation of aerosol and cloud properties using multiwavelength Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verghese, Sachin John

    Lidar measurements obtained during several field campaigns have provided an extensive dataset for investigating aerosol characteristics and cloud properties. In this thesis we use measurements of multi-wavelength optical extinction measured with a Raman lidar to infer aerosol and cloud particle size variations. Aerosol extinction depends on both size and number density of the scatterers. The optical extinction at different wavelengths depends on the sixth power of the size parameter for aerosols much smaller than the scattering wavelength, and on the second power of the size parameter for aerosols much larger than the wavelength. Changes in the density of a particular size aerosol lead to a proportional response. The extinction profiles at several wavelengths are simultaneously examined to study changes in the aerosol size distribution over an interesting range of sizes corresponding to accumulation-mode particles. Model calculations based on Mie scattering theory are compared with extinction profiles at different wavelengths, water vapor profiles, and other simultaneous measurements, to investigate the formation and dissipation of cloud structures. The optical scattering measurements from aerosols and cloud particles demonstrate that various characteristics of aerosols and visibility can be determined. We demonstrate the capability of the new technique using the multi-wavelength extinction ratios to profile information about changes in CCN particle size in the range of 50 nm to 0.5 mum. Examples taken from three different field campaigns demonstrate that changes in the size of the cloud particles during the different stages of growth and dissipation are observed in the multi-wavelength aerosol extinction using this technique. We also show the relationship that exists between particle size increase or decrease in cloud regions, based on the extinction coefficients and changes in relative humidity. The deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) is found to exert a strong

  14. Thermoluminescent aerosol analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Long, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for detecting and measuring trace amounts of aerosols when reacted with ozone in a gaseous environment was examined. A sample aerosol was exposed to a fixed ozone concentration for a fixed period of time, and a fluorescer was added to the exposed sample. The sample was heated in a 30 C/minute linear temperature profile to 200 C. The trace peak was measured and recorded as a function of the test aerosol and the recorded thermoluminescence trace peak of the fluorescer is specific to the aerosol being tested.

  15. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  16. A Physically-Based Estimate of Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Sulfate Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.); Easter, Richard C.); Chapman, Elaine G.); Abdul-Razzak, Hayder; Zhang, Yang ); Leung, Ruby ); Laulainen, Nels S.); Saylor, Rick D.); Zaveri, Rahul A.)

    2001-04-01

    Estimates of direct and indirect radiative forcing by anthropogenic sulfate aerosols from an integrated global aerosol and climate modeling system are presented. A detailed global tropospheric chemistry and aerosol model that predicts concentrations of oxidants as well as aerosols and aerosol precursors, is coupled to a general circulation model that predicts both cloud water mass and cloud droplet number. Both number and mass of several externally-mixed aerosol size modes are predicted, with internal mixing assumed for the different aerosol components within each mode. Predicted aerosol species include sulfate, organic and black carbon, soil dust, and sea salt. The models use physically-based treatments of aerosol radiative properties (including dependence on relative humidity) and aerosol activation as cloud condensation nuclei. Parallel simulations with and without anthropogenic sulfate aerosol are performed for a global domain. The global and annual mean direct and indirect radiative forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate are estimated to be -0.3 to -0.5 and -1.5 to -3.0 W m-2, respectively. The radiative forcing is sensitive to the model's horizontal resolution, the use of predicted vs. analyzed relative humidity, the prediction vs. diagnosis of aerosol number and droplet number, and the parameterization of droplet collision/coalescence. About half of the indirect radiative forcing is due to changes in droplet radius and half to increased cloud liquid water.

  17. The Two-Column Aerosol Project: Phase I—Overview and impact of elevated aerosol layers on aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Burton, Sharon P.; Cairns, Brian; Chand, Duli; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dunagan, Stephen; Ferrare, Richard A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John; Jefferson, Anne; Johnson, Roy; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Kollias, Pavlos; Lamer, Katia; Lantz, Kathleen; Mei, Fan; Miller, Mark A.; Michalsky, Joseph; Ortega, Ivan; Pekour, Mikhail; Rogers, Ray R.; Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, Jens; Sedlacek, Arthur J.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John E.; Shinozuka, Yohei; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Tyrrell, Megan; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Volkamer, Rainer; Zelenyuk, Alla; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2016-01-01

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique study designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including those related to aerosol mixing state and aerosol radiative forcing. The study was designed to sample the atmosphere between and within two atmospheric columns; one fixed near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second moveable column over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed at the base of the Cape Cod column, and the ARM Aerial Facility was utilized for the summer and winter intensive observation periods. One important finding from TCAP is that four of six nearly cloud-free flight days had aerosol layers aloft in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL-2). These layers contributed up to 60% of the total observed aerosol optical depth (AOD). Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning material and nitrate compared to aerosol found near the surface. In addition, while there was a great deal of spatial and day-to-day variability in the aerosol chemical composition and optical properties, no systematic differences between the two columns were observed.

  18. Stochastic methods for aerosol chemistry: a compact molecular description of functionalization and fragmentation in the heterogeneous oxidation of squalane aerosol by OH radicals.

    PubMed

    Wiegel, A A; Wilson, K R; Hinsberg, W D; Houle, F A

    2015-02-14

    The heterogeneous oxidation of organic aerosol by hydroxyl radicals (OH) can proceed through two general pathways: functionalization, in which oxygen functional groups are added to the carbon skeleton, and fragmentation, in which carbon-carbon bonds are broken, producing higher volatility, lower molecular weight products. An ongoing challenge is to develop a quantitative molecular description of these pathways that connects the oxidative evolution of the average aerosol properties (e.g. size and hygroscopicity) to the transformation of free radical intermediates. In order to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of aerosol oxidation, a relatively compact kinetics model is developed for the heterogeneous oxidation of squalane particles by OH using free radical intermediates that convert reactive hydrogen sites into oxygen functional groups. Stochastic simulation techniques are used to compare calculated system properties over ten oxidation lifetimes with the same properties measured in experiment. The time-dependent average squalane aerosol mass, volume, density, carbon number distribution of scission products, and the average elemental composition are predicted using known rate coefficients. For functionalization, the calculations reveal that the distribution of alcohol and carbonyl groups is controlled primarily by the initial OH abstraction rate and to lesser extent by the branching ratio between secondary peroxy radical product channels. For fragmentation, the calculations reveal that the formation of activated alkoxy radicals with neighboring functional groups controls the molecular decomposition, particularly at high O/C ratios. This kinetic scheme provides a framework for understanding the oxidation chemistry of a model organic aerosol and informs parameterizations of more complex systems. PMID:25578323

  19. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen; Khain, Alexander; Matsui, Toshihisa; Lang, Stephen; Simpson, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low clean concentration and a high dirty concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated.

  20. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.

    2005-01-01

    Cloud microphysics are inevitable affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds, Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effect of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bim microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e., pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e., 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions.

  1. A Stokes' velocity photographic method for measuring the size distribution of aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.

    1974-01-01

    Aerosol particles are allowed to settle in a vertical glass walled vessel, and their settling velocity is determined by photographing them while the light entering the camera is being chopped at a known rate. The settling velocity of each particle can be determined from the photographs, and by applying the Stokes' law, one can calculate the radius of each particle. The Stokes' law for a sphere settling freely in a quiet medium is given. If the volume of the photographed region of the illumination is known, the aerosol number density and size distribution can be obtained. Experiments with alumina particles of given size distributions indicate that the method works accurately. One set of a typical experiment with 3.0-micrometer Al2O3 particles is presented, which shows that the measured size distribution peaks at approximately 3.0 micrometer.

  2. Comprehensive Measurement of Atmospheric Aerosols with a Wide Range Aerosol Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keck, L.; Pesch, M.; Grimm, H.

    2011-07-01

    A wide range aerosol spectrometer (WRAS) was used for comprehensive long term measurements of aerosol size distributions. The system combines the results of an optical aerosol spectrometer with the results of a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to record essentially the full size range (5 nm - 32 μm) of atmospheric particles in 72 channels. Measurements were carried out over one year (2009) at the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW)-Station Hohenpeißenberg, Bavaria. Total particle number concentrations obtained from the aerosol size distributions were compared to the total number concentrations measured by a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC). The comparison showed an excellent agreement of the data. The high time resolution of 5 minutes allows the combination of the measured size distributions with meteorological data and correlations to gaseous pollutants (CO, NOx and SO2). A good correlation of particle number and CO concentrations was found for long distance transported small particles, which were probably mainly soot particles. Correlations to NOx were observed for aerosols from local sources such as traffic emissions. The formation of secondary aerosols from gaseous precursors was also observed. Episodes of relatively high concentration of particles in the range of 2-3 μm were probably caused by pollen.

  3. Interspecific Interactions and the Scope for Parent-Offspring Conflict: High Mite Density Temporarily Changes the Trade-Off between Offspring Size and Number in the Burying Beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides

    PubMed Central

    De Gasperin, Ornela; Kilner, Rebecca M.

    2016-01-01

    Parents have a limited amount of resources to invest in reproduction and commonly trade-off how much they invest in offspring size (or quality) versus brood size. A negative relationship between offspring size and number has been shown in numerous taxa and it underpins evolutionary conflicts of interest between parents and their young. For example, previous work on vertebrates shows that selection favours mothers that produce more offspring, at the expense of individual offspring size, yet favours offspring that have relatively few siblings and therefore attain a greater size at independence. Here we analyse how this trade-off is temporarily affected by stochastic variation in the intensity of interspecific interactions. We examined the effect of the mite Poecilochirus carabi on the relationship between offspring size and number in the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides. We manipulated the initial number of mites in the reproductive event (by introducing either no mites, 4 mites, 10 mites, or 16 mites), and assessed the effect on the brood. We found a similar trade-off between offspring size and number in all treatments, except in the '16 mite' treatment where the correlation between offspring number and size flattened considerably. This effect arose because larvae in small broods failed to attain a high mass by dispersal. Our results show that variation in the intensity of interspecific interactions can temporarily change the strength of the trade-off between offspring size and number. In this study, high densities of mites prevented individual offspring from attaining their optimal weight, thus potentially temporarily biasing the outcome of parent-offspring conflict in favour of parents. PMID:26985819

  4. Contribution of sulfate and organic aerosols to cloud condensation nuclei at Point Reyes, California

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Carpio, C.A.; Corrigan, C.E.; Novakov, T.; Penner, J.E.

    1995-12-01

    We have determined mass size distributions of major aerosol species by the Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) and simultaneously measured aerosol number size distributions and CCN number concentrations (at 0.5% supersaturation) at a Pacific coastal site (Point Reyes, California). Number size distributions were calculated from the impactor data from which the mass contributions of sulfate, organic, and seasalt aerosols to CCN number concentrations were estimated. The derived and measured size distributions and the derived and measured CCN number concentrations were found to be in good agreement. Our results demonstrate that organic aerosols, depending on the meteorological conditions, may contribute a variable and often dominant fraction to the CCN concentrations.

  5. Constraining the aerosol influence on cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryspeerdt, E.; Quaas, J.; Bellouin, N.

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions have the potential to modify many different cloud properties. There is significant uncertainty in the strength of these aerosol-cloud interactions in analyses of observational data, partly due to the difficulty in separating aerosol effects on clouds from correlations generated by local meteorology. The relationship between aerosol and cloud fraction (CF) is particularly important to determine, due to the strong correlation of CF to other cloud properties and its large impact on radiation. It has also been one of the hardest to quantify from satellites due to the strong meteorological covariations involved. This work presents a new method to analyze the relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and CF. By including information about the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), the impact of the meteorological covariations is significantly reduced. This method shows that much of the AOD-CF correlation is explained by relationships other than that mediated by CDNC. By accounting for these, the strength of the global mean AOD-CF relationship is reduced by around 80%. This suggests that the majority of the AOD-CF relationship is due to meteorological covariations, especially in the shallow cumulus regime. Requiring CDNC to mediate the AOD-CF relationship implies an effective anthropogenic radiative forcing from an aerosol influence on liquid CF of -0.48 W m-2 (-0.1 to -0.64 W m-2), although some uncertainty remains due to possible biases in the CDNC retrievals in broken cloud scenes.

  6. Microphysical processes affecting stratospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P.; Toon, O. B.; Kiang, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    Physical processes which affect stratospheric aerosol particles include nucleation, condensation, evaporation, coagulation and sedimentation. Quantitative studies of these mechanisms to determine if they can account for some of the observed properties of the aerosol are carried out. It is shown that the altitude range in which nucleation of sulfuric acid-water solution droplets can take place corresponds to that region of the stratosphere where the aerosol is generally found. Since heterogeneous nucleation is the dominant nucleation mechanism, the stratospheric solution droplets are mainly formed on particles which have been mixed up from the troposphere or injected into the stratosphere by volcanoes or meteorites. Particle growth by heteromolecular condensation can account for the observed increase in mixing ratio of large particles in the stratosphere. Coagulation is important in reducing the number of particles smaller than 0.05 micron radius. Growth by condensation, applied to the mixed nature of the particles, shows that available information is consistent with ammonium sulfate being formed by liquid phase chemical reactions in the aerosol particles. The upper altitude limit of the aerosol layer is probably due to the evaporation of sulfuric acid aerosol particles, while the lower limit is due to mixing across the tropopause.

  7. Fine Aerosol Bulk Composition Measured on WP-3D Research Aircraft in Vicinity of the Northeastern United States - Results from NEAQS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, R. E.; Sullivan, A. P.; Weber, R. J.; Brock, C. A.; Wollny, A. G.; Holloway, J. S.; deGouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.

    2007-01-01

    During the New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS) in the summer of 2004, airborne measurements were made of the major inorganic ions and the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) of the submicron (PM(sub 1.0)) aerosol. These and ancillary data are used to describe the overall aerosol chemical characteristics encountered during the study. Fine particle mass was estimated from particle volume and a calculated density based on measured particle composition. Fine particle organic matter (OM) was estimated from WSOC and a mass balance analysis. The aerosol over the northeastern United States (U.S.) and Canada was predominantly sulfate and associated ammonium, and organic components, although in unique plumes additional ionic components were also periodically above detection limits. In power generation regions, and especially in the Ohio River Valley region, the aerosol tended to be predominantly sulfate (approximately 60% micro gram /micro gram) and apparently acidic, based on an excess of measured anions compared to cations. In all other regions where sulfate concentrations were lower and a smaller fraction of overall mass, the cations and anions were balanced suggesting a more neutral aerosol. In contrast, the WSOC and estimated OM were more spatially uniform and the fraction of OM relative to PM mass was largely influenced by sources of sulfate. The study median OM mass fraction was 40%. Throughout the study region, sulfate and organic aerosol mass were highest near the surface and decreased rapidly with increasing altitude. The relative fraction of organic mass to sulfate was similar throughout all altitudes within the boundary layer (altitude less than 2.5 km), but was significantly higher at altitude layers in the free troposphere (above 2.5 km). A number of distinct biomass burning plumes from fires in Alaska and the Yukon were periodically intercepted, mostly at altitudes between 3 and 4 km. These plumes were associated with highest aerosol concentrations of the

  8. Measurement of the ambient organic aerosol volatility distribution: application during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment (FAME-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Kostenidou, E.; Hildebrandt, L.; Riipinen, I.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-07-01

    A variable residence time thermodenuder (TD) was combined with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to measure the volatility distribution of aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May of 2008 (FAME-2008). A new method for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility distribution was developed combining measurements of all three instruments together with an aerosol dynamics model. Challenges in the interpretation of ambient thermodenuder-AMS measurements include the potential resistances to mass transfer during particle evaporation, the effects of particle size on the evaporated mass fraction, the changes in the AMS collection efficiency and particle density as the particles evaporate partially in the TD, and finally potential losses inside the TD. Our proposed measurement and data analysis method accounts for all of these problems combining the AMS and SMPS measurements. The AMS collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the TD was found to be approximately 10% lower than the collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the bypass. The organic aerosol measured at Finokalia is approximately 2 orders of magnitude less volatile than fresh laboratory-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol. This low volatility is consistent with its highly oxygenated AMS mass spectrum. The results are found to be highly sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient of the evaporating species.

  9. Evaluation of aerosol properties simulated by the high resolution global coupled chemistry-aerosol-microphysics model C-IFS-GLOMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Flemming, Johannes; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Engelen, Richard; Remy, Samuel; Boucher, Olivier; Benduhn, Francois; Hewson, Will; Woodhouse, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The EU Framework Programme GEMS and MACC consortium projects co-ordinated by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) have developed an operational global forecasting and reanalysis system (Composition-IFS) for atmospheric composition including greenhouse gases, reactive gases and aerosol. The current operational C-IFS system uses a mass-based aerosol model coupled to data assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth measured by satellite (MODIS) to predict global aerosol properties. During MACC, the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics scheme was added to the system, providing information on aerosol size and number for improved representation of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions, accounting also for simulated global variations in size distribution and internally-mixed particle composition. The IFS-GLOMAP system has recently been upgraded to couple with the sulphur cycle simulated in the online TM5 tropospheric chemistry module for global reactive gases. This C-IFS-GLOMAP system is also being upgraded to use a new "nitrate-extended" version of GLOMAP which realistically treats the size-resolved gas-particle partitioning of semi volatile gases ammonia and nitric acid. In this poster we described C-IFS-GLOMAP and present an evaluation of the global sulphate aerosol distribution simulated in this coupled aerosol-chemistry C-IFS-GLOMAP, comparing to surface observations in Europe, North America and the North Atlantic and contrasting to the fixed timescale sulphate production scheme developed in GEMS. We show that the coupling to the TM5 sulphur chemistry improves the seasonal cycle of sulphate aerosol, for example addressing a persistent wintertime sulphate high bias in northern Europe. The improved skill in simulated sulphate aerosol seasonal cycle is a pre-requisite to realistically characterise nitrate aerosol since biases in sulphate affect the amount of free ammonia available to form ammonium nitrate.

  10. Aging affects the ice-nucleating properties of volcanic ash aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingemer, H.; Klein, H.; Ebert, M.; Haunold, W.; Bundke, U.; Herrmann, T.; Kandler, K.; Müller-Ebert, D.; Weinbruch, S.; Judt, A.; Wéber, A.; Nillius, B.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Levin, Z.; Curtius, J.

    2012-04-01

    The effectiveness of volcanic ash as ice nuclei (IN) has been debated in the past. While some reported enhanced IN concentrations in volcanic plumes, others found no evidence for that. Here we show that "aged" volcanic particles sampled from the atmosphere in central Germany when the ash cloud of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption was present are very effective IN, as compared to particles of aerosolized "fresh" volcanic sediment that had been collected close to the eruption site in Iceland. The number concentration of atmospheric IN was measured with the same method both at the Taunus Observatory in central Germany and at Tel Aviv University, Israel, as well as in laboratory-generated aerosol of volcanic ash. Aerosol was sampled by electrostatic precipitation of particles onto silicon substrates and was subsequently analyzed at - 8° to -18°C (deposition and condensation nucleation modes) in the isothermal static vapor diffusion chamber FRIDGE. The composition of individual atmospheric IN was analyzed by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) with EDX. Our daily measurements show a significant enhancement of atmospheric IN when the dispersed ash cloud reached central Europe in April 2010 and the eastern Mediterranean in May 2010. Pure volcanic ash accounts for at least 53-68% of the 239 individual ice nucleating particles that were analyzed by ESEM-EDX in aerosol samples collected at Taunus Observatory during the volcanic peak of April 2010. Volcanic ash samples that had been collected close to the eruption site were aerosolized in the laboratory and measured by FRIDGE. Our analysis confirms the relatively poor ice nucleating efficiency (at -18°C and 119% ice-saturation) of such "fresh" volcanic ash, as it had recently been found by other workers. We find that both the fraction of the aerosol that is active as ice nuclei as well as the density of ice-active sites on the aerosol surface are three orders of magnitude larger in the samples collected

  11. Reallocation in modal aerosol models: impacts on predicting aerosol radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhola, T.; Kokkola, H.; Korhonen, H.; Partanen, A.-I.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric models often represent the aerosol particle size distribution with a modal approach, in which particles are described with log-normal modes within predetermined size ranges. This approach reallocates particles numerically from one mode to another for example during particle growth, potentially leading to artificial changes in the aerosol size distribution. In this study we analysed how the modal reallocation affects climate-relevant variables: cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), aerosol-cloud interaction parameter (ACI) and light extinction coefficient (qext). The ACI parameter gives the response of CDNC to a change in total aerosol number concentration. We compared these variables between a modal model (with and without reallocation routines) and a high resolution sectional model, which was considered a reference model. We analysed the relative differences in the chosen variables in four experiments designed to assess the influence of atmospheric aerosol processes. We find that limiting the allowed size ranges of the modes, and subsequent remapping of the distribution, leads almost always to an underestimation of cloud droplet number concentrations (by up to 100%) and an overestimation of light extinction (by up to 20%). On the other hand, the aerosol-cloud interaction parameter can be either over- or underestimated by the reallocating model, depending on the conditions. For example, in the case of atmospheric new particle formation events followed by rapid particle growth, the reallocation can cause on average a 10% overestimation of the ACI parameter. Thus it is shown that the reallocation affects the ability of a model to estimate aerosol climate effects accurately, and this should be taken into account when using and developing aerosol models.

  12. HOUSTON AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intensive field study of ambient aerosols was conducted in Houston between September 14 and October 14, 1978. Measurements at 12 sites were made using (1) two relocatable monitoring systems instrumented for aerosol and gaseous pollutants, (2) a network of high volume samplers ...

  13. Global Aerosol Observations

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... atmosphere, directly influencing global climate and human health. Ground-based networks that accurately