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Sample records for aerosol optical tweezers

  1. Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Philip H.; Maragò, Onofrio M.; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    1. Introduction; Part I. Theory: 2. Ray optics; 3. Dipole approximation; 4. Optical beams and focusing; 5. Electromagnetic theory; 6. Computational methods; 7. Brownian motion; Part II. Practice: 8. Building an optical tweezers; 9. Data acquisition and optical tweezers calibration; 10. Photonic force microscope; 11. Wavefront engineering and holographic optical tweezers; 12. Advanced techniques; Part III. Applications: 13. Single molecule biophysics; 14. Cell biology; 15. Spectroscopy; 16. Optofluidics and lab on a chip; 17. Colloid science; 18. Microchemistry; 19. Aerosol science; 20. Statistical physics; 21. Nanothermodynamics; 22. Plasmonics; 23. Nanostructures; 24. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms; 25. Towards the quantum regime at the mesoscale; Index.

  2. Characterisation of coated aerosols using optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. H.; Ward, A.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Thin organic films are believed to form naturally on the surface of aerosols [1,2] and influence aerosol properties. Cloud condensation nuclei formation and chemical reactions such as aerosol oxidation are effected by the presence of thin films [3]. There is a requirement to characterise the physical properties of both the core aerosol and its organic film in order to fully understand the contribution of coated aerosols to the indirect effect. Two complementary techniques have been used to study the oxidation of thin organic films on the surface of aerosols; laser optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry. Micron sized polystyrene beads coated in oleic acid have been trapped in air using two counter propagating laser beams. Polystyrene beads are used as a proxy for solid aerosol. The trapped aerosol is illuminated with a white LED over a broadband wavelength range and the scattered light collected to produce a Mie spectrum [4]. Analysis of the Mie spectrum results in determination of the core polystyrene bead radius, the oleic acid film thickness and refractive index dispersion of the core and shell [5]. A flow of ozone gas can then be introduced into the aerosol environment to oxidise the thin film of oleic acid and the reaction followed by monitoring the changes in the Mie spectrum. The results demonstrate complete removal of the oleic acid film. We conclude that the use of a counter propagating optical trap combined with white light Mie spectroscopy can be used to study a range of organic films on different types of aerosols and their oxidation reactions. Neutron reflectometry has been used as a complementary technique to study the oxidation of monolayer films at the air-water interface in order to gain information on reaction kinetics. The oxidation of an oleic acid film at the air-water interface by the common tropospheric oxidant ozone has been studied using a Langmuir trough. Results indicate complete removal of the oleic acid film with ozone in agreement with the optical tweezers study, which confounds a previous study [6]. Findings also show complicated reaction kinetics that depend on the surface coverage of the film. Combining single particle studies using optical tweezing with macromolecular studies of thin films using neutron reflectometry provides a detailed atmospheric understanding of thin films on aerosols and their oxidation reactions. 1. Tervahattu H., Hartonen K., Kerminen V-H., Kupianen K., Aarnio P., Koskentalo T., Tuck A. and Vaida V., 2002, J. Geophys. Res. 107, 4053-4060. 2. Ellison G., Tuck A. and Vaida V., 1999, J. Geophys. Res. 104, 11633-11641. 3. King M.D., Thompson K.C., Ward A.D., 2004, JACS, 51, 16710-16711. 4. Ward A.D., Zhang M. and Hunt O., 2008, Opt. Express, 16, 16390-16403. 5. C.F. Bohren and D.R. Huffman, Absorption and Scattering of Light by Small Particles, (Wiley Scientific 1998). 6. King M.D., Rennie A.R., Thompson K.C., Fisher F.N., Dong C.C., Thomas R.K., Pfrang C., Hughes A.V., 2009, PCCP, 11, 7699-7707.

  3. Micro-rheology and interparticle interactions in aerosols probed with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Jonathan P.; Power, Rory M.; Cai, Chen; Simpson, Stephen H.

    2014-09-01

    Using optical tweezers for micro-rheological investigations of a surrounding fluid has been routinely demonstrated. In this work, we will demonstrate that rheological measurements of the bulk and surface properties of aerosol particles can be made directly using optical tweezers, providing important insights into the phase behavior of materials in confined environments and the rate of molecular diffusion in viscous phases. The use of holographic optical tweezers to manipulate aerosol particles has become standard practice in recent years, providing an invaluable tool to investigate particle dynamics, including evaporation/ condensation kinetics, chemical aging and phase transformation. When combined with non-linear Raman spectroscopy, the size and refractive index of a particle can be determined with unprecedented accuracy <+/- 0.05%). Active control of the relative positions of pairs of particles can allow studies of the coalescence of particles, providing a unique opportunity to investigate the bulk and surface properties that govern the hydrodynamic relaxation in particle shape. In particular, we will show how the viscosity and surface tension of particles can be measured directly in the under-damped regime at low viscosity. In the over-damped regime, we will show that viscosity measurements can extend close to the glass transition, allowing measurements over an impressive dynamic range of 12 orders of magnitude in relaxation timescale and viscosity. Indeed, prior to the coalescence event, we will show how the Brownian trajectories of trapped particles can yield important and unique insights into the interactions of aerosol particles.

  4. Probing the micro-rheological properties of aerosol particles using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Power, Rory M; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-07-01

    The use of optical trapping techniques to manipulate probe particles for performing micro-rheological measurements on a surrounding fluid is well-established. Here, we review recent advances made in the use of optical trapping to probe the rheological properties of trapped particles themselves. In particular, we review observations of the continuous transition from liquid to solid-like viscosity of sub-picolitre supersaturated solution aerosol droplets using optical trapping techniques. Direct measurements of the viscosity of the particle bulk are derived from the damped oscillations in shape following coalescence of two particles, a consequence of the interplay between viscous and surface forces and the capillary driven relaxation of the approximately spheroidal composite particle. Holographic optical tweezers provide a facile method for the manipulation of arrays of particles allowing coalescence to be controllably induced between two micron-sized aerosol particles. The optical forces, while sufficiently strong to confine the composite particle, are several orders of magnitude weaker than the capillary forces driving relaxation. Light, elastically back-scattered by the particle, is recorded with sub-100 ns resolution allowing measurements of fast relaxation (low viscosity) dynamics, while the brightfield image can be used to monitor the shape relaxation extending to times in excess of 1000 s. For the slowest relaxation dynamics studied (particles with the highest viscosity) the presence and line shape of whispering gallery modes in the cavity enhanced Raman spectrum can be used to infer the relaxation time while serving the dual purpose of allowing the droplet size and refractive index to be measured with accuracies of ±0.025% and ±0.1%, respectively. The time constant for the damped relaxation can be used to infer the bulk viscosity, spanning from the dilute solution limit to a value approaching that of a glass, typically considered to be >10(12) Pa s, whilst the frequencies of the normal modes of the oscillations of the particle can be used to infer surface properties. We will review the use of optical tweezers for studying the viscosity of aerosol particles and discuss the potential use of this micro-rheological tool for probing the fundamental concepts of phase, thermodynamic equilibrium and metastability. PMID:24994710

  5. Probing the micro-rheological properties of aerosol particles using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Rory M.; Reid, Jonathan P.

    2014-07-01

    The use of optical trapping techniques to manipulate probe particles for performing micro-rheological measurements on a surrounding fluid is well-established. Here, we review recent advances made in the use of optical trapping to probe the rheological properties of trapped particles themselves. In particular, we review observations of the continuous transition from liquid to solid-like viscosity of sub-picolitre supersaturated solution aerosol droplets using optical trapping techniques. Direct measurements of the viscosity of the particle bulk are derived from the damped oscillations in shape following coalescence of two particles, a consequence of the interplay between viscous and surface forces and the capillary driven relaxation of the approximately spheroidal composite particle. Holographic optical tweezers provide a facile method for the manipulation of arrays of particles allowing coalescence to be controllably induced between two micron-sized aerosol particles. The optical forces, while sufficiently strong to confine the composite particle, are several orders of magnitude weaker than the capillary forces driving relaxation. Light, elastically back-scattered by the particle, is recorded with sub-100 ns resolution allowing measurements of fast relaxation (low viscosity) dynamics, while the brightfield image can be used to monitor the shape relaxation extending to times in excess of 1000 s. For the slowest relaxation dynamics studied (particles with the highest viscosity) the presence and line shape of whispering gallery modes in the cavity enhanced Raman spectrum can be used to infer the relaxation time while serving the dual purpose of allowing the droplet size and refractive index to be measured with accuracies of ±0.025% and ±0.1%, respectively. The time constant for the damped relaxation can be used to infer the bulk viscosity, spanning from the dilute solution limit to a value approaching that of a glass, typically considered to be >1012 Pa s, whilst the frequencies of the normal modes of the oscillations of the particle can be used to infer surface properties. We will review the use of optical tweezers for studying the viscosity of aerosol particles and discuss the potential use of this micro-rheological tool for probing the fundamental concepts of phase, thermodynamic equilibrium and metastability.

  6. Devil's lens optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Jones, P H

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate an optical tweezers using a laser beam on which is imprinted a focusing phase profile generated by a Devil's staircase fractal structure (Cantor set). We show that a beam shaped in this way is capable of stably trapping a variety of micron- and submicron-sized particles and calibrate the optical trap as a function of the control parameters of the fractal structure, and explain the observed variation as arising from radiation pressure exerted by unfocused parts of the beam in the region of the optical trap. Experimental results are complemented by calculation of the structure of the focus in the regime of high numerical aperture. PMID:25968658

  7. On chip shapeable optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Renaut, C.; Cluzel, B.; Dellinger, J.; Lalouat, L.; Picard, E.; Peyrade, D.; Hadji, E.; de Fornel, F.

    2013-01-01

    Particles manipulation with optical forces is known as optical tweezing. While tweezing in free space with laser beams was established in the 1980s, integrating the optical tweezers on a chip is a challenging task. Recent experiments with plasmonic nanoantennas, microring resonators, and photonic crystal nanocavities have demonstrated optical trapping. However, the optical field of a tweezer made of a single microscopic resonator cannot be shaped. So far, this prevents from optically driven micromanipulations. Here we propose an alternative approach where the shape of the optical trap can be tuned by the wavelength in coupled nanobeam cavities. Using these shapeable tweezers, we present micromanipulation of polystyrene microspheres trapped on a silicon chip. These results show that coupled nanobeam cavities are versatile building blocks for optical near-field engineering. They open the way to much complex integrated tweezers using networks of coupled nanobeam cavities for particles or bio-objects manipulation at a larger scale. PMID:23887310

  8. Interferometer Control of Optical Tweezers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses progress in using spatial light modulators and interferometry to control the beam profile of an optical tweezers. The approach being developed is to use a spatial light modulator (SLM) to control the phase profile of the tweezers beam and to use a combination of the SLM and interferometry to control the intensity profile. The objective is to perform fine and calculable control of the moments and forces on a tip or tool to be used to manipulate and interrogate nanostructures. The performance of the SLM in generating multiple and independently controllable tweezers beams is also reported. Concurrent supporting research projects are mentioned and include tweezers beam scattering and neural-net processing of the interference patterns for control of the tweezers beams.

  9. Raman Spectroscopy of Isotopic Water Diffusion in Ultraviscous, Glassy, and Gel States in Aerosol by Use of Optical Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Davies, James F; Wilson, Kevin R

    2016-02-16

    The formation of ultraviscous, glassy, and amorphous gel states in aqueous aerosol following the loss of water results in nonequilibrium dynamics due to the extended time scales for diffusive mixing. Existing techniques for measuring water diffusion by isotopic exchange are limited by contact of samples with the substrate, and methods applied to infer diffusion coefficients from mass transport in levitated droplets requires analysis by complex coupled differential equations to derive diffusion coefficients. We present a new technique that combines contactless levitation with aerosol optical tweezers with isotopic exchange (D2O/H2O) to measure the water diffusion coefficient over a broad range (Dw ≈ 10(-12)-10(-17) m(2)·s(-1)) in viscous organic liquids (citric acid, sucrose, and shikimic acid) and inorganic gels (magnesium sulfate, MgSO4). For the organic liquids in binary and ternary mixtures, Dw depends on relative humidity and follows a simple compositional Vignes relationship. In MgSO4 droplets, water diffusivity decreases sharply with water activity and is consistent with predictions from percolation theory. These measurements show that, by combining micrometer-sized particle levitation (a contactless measurement with rapid mixing times) with an established probe of water diffusion, Dw can be simply and directly quantified for amorphous and glassy states that are inaccessible to existing methods. PMID:26751163

  10. Optical Tweezer Assembly and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    An Optical Tweezer, as the name implies, is a useful tool for precision manipulation of micro and nano scale objects. Using the principle of electromagnetic radiation pressure, an optical tweezer employs a tightly focused laser beam to trap and position objects of various shapes and sizes. These devices can trap micrometer and nanometer sized objects. An exciting possibility for optical tweezers is its future potential to manipulate and assemble micro and nano sized sensors. A typical optical tweezer makes use of the following components: laser, mirrors, lenses, a high quality microscope, stage, Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera, TV monitor and Position Sensitive Detectors (PSDs). The laser wavelength employed is typically in the visible or infrared spectrum. The laser beam is directed via mirrors and lenses into the microscope. It is then tightly focused by a high magnification, high numerical aperture microscope objective into the sample slide, which is mounted on a translating stage. The sample slide contains a sealed, small volume of fluid that the objects are suspended in. The most common objects trapped by optical tweezers are dielectric spheres. When trapped, a sphere will literally snap into and center itself in the laser beam. The PSD s are mounted in such a way to receive the backscatter after the beam has passed through the trap. PSD s used with the Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) technique provide highly precise data. Most optical tweezers employ lasers with power levels ranging from 10 to 100 miliwatts. Typical forces exerted on trapped objects are in the pico-newton range. When PSDs are employed, object movement can be resolved on a nanometer scale in a time range of milliseconds. Such accuracy, however, can only by utilized by calibrating the optical tweezer. Fortunately, an optical tweezer can be modeled accurately as a simple spring. This allows Hook s Law to be used. My goal this summer at NASA Glenn Research Center is the assembly and calibration of an optical tweezer setup in the Instrumentation and Controls Division (5520). I am utilizing a custom LabVIEW Virtual Instrument program for data collection and microscope stage control. Helping me in my assignment are the following people: Mentor Susan Wrbanek (5520), Dr. Baha Jassemnejad (UCO) and Technicians Ken Weiland (7650) and James Williams (7650). Without their help, my task would not be possible.

  11. Quantum noise in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Michael A.; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2013-12-01

    Quantum enhanced sensitivity in optical tweezers based particle tracking was recently demonstrated. This has provided the necessary tool for quantum metrology to play an important role in biological measurements. Here we introduce the basic theory relevant to such optical tweezers experiments, and overview the significance of sub-shot noise limited sensitivity to practical experiments. In particular, biophysical experiments are subject to optical power constraints, which therefore limits the absolute sensitivity which is classically achievable. Quantum enhanced particle tracking can overcome this limit, and is therefore likely to play an important role in such biophysical experiments in the near future.

  12. Undergraduate Construction of Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbell, Lawrence

    2012-10-01

    I will present a poster on the construction of optical tweezers. This will demonstrate the full process one must go through when working on a research project. First I sifted through the internet for papers and information pertaining to the tweezers. Afterwards I discussed the budget with the lab manager. Next I made purchases, however some items, such as the sample mount, needed to be custom made. These I built in the machine shop. Once the tweezers were operational I spent some time ensuring that the mirrors and lenses were adjusted just right, so that the trap performed at full strength. Finally, I used video data of the Brownian motion of trapped silica microspheres to get a reasonable estimate of the trapping stiffness with such particles. As a general note, all of this was done with the intent of leaving the tweezers for future use by other undergraduates. Because of this extra effort was taken to ensure the tweezers were as safe to use as possible. For this reason a visible LASER was chosen over an infrared LASER, in addition, the LASER was oriented parallel to the surface of the table in order to avoid stray upwards beams.

  13. Optical tweezers technique and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, HongLian; Li, ZhiYuan

    2013-12-01

    Since their advent in the 1980s, optical tweezers have attracted more and more attention due to their unique non-contact and non-invasion characteristics and their wide applications in physics, biology, chemistry, medical science and nanoscience. In this paper, we introduce the basic principle, the history and typical applications of optical tweezers and review our recent experimental works on the development and application of optical tweezers technique. We will discuss in detail several technological issues, including high precision displacement and force measurement in single-trap and dual-trap optical tweezers, multi-trap optical tweezers with each trap independently and freely controlled by means of space light modulator, and incorporation of cylindrical vector optical beams to build diversified optical tweezers beyond the conventional Gaussian-beam optical tweezers. We will address the application of these optical tweezers techniques to study biophysical problems such as mechanical deformation of cell membrane and binding energy between plant microtubule and microtubule associated proteins. Finally we present application of the optical tweezers technique for trapping, transporting, and patterning of metallic nanoparticles, which can be harnessed to manipulate surface plasmon resonance properties of these nanoparticles.

  14. Fluorescence support in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Animas, J. G.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.; Ponce, L.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the development of an installation for proves for characterization by fluorescence of micrometer and nanometer particles supported on the trapping and manipulation by optical trapping technique (optical tweezers). The system features an laser operating at 480 nm, CCD camera for image acquisition, Thor Labs micrometric table X, Y, Z for the movement of the sample and the trap in the visual field. The design includes the use of intensity modulated optical trap, with the option of being used in pulsed, opening up possibilities for the use of resonant phenomena optomechanical type for particle capture.

  15. Photonic nanojets in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Antonio Alvaro Ranha

    2015-09-01

    Photonic nanojets have been brought into attention ten years ago for potential application in ultramicroscopy, because of its sub-wavelength resolution that can enhance detection and interaction with matter. For these novel applications under development, the optical trapping of a sphere acts as an ideal framework to employ photonic nanojets. In the present study, we generated nanojets by using a highly focused incident beam, in contrast to traditional plane waves. The method inherits the advantage of optical trapping, especially for intracellular applications, with the microsphere in equilibrium on the beam propagation axis and positioned arbitrarily in space. Moreover, owing to optical scattering forces, when the sphere is in equilibrium, its center shifts with respect to the focal point of the incident beam. However, when the system is in stable equilibrium with a configuration involving optical tweezers, photonic nanojets cannot be formed. To overcome this issue, we employed double optical tweezers in an unorthodox configuration involving two collinear and co-propagating beams, the precise positioning of which would turn on/off the photonic nanojets, thereby improving the applicability of photonic nanojets.

  16. Characterizing conical refraction optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C; McDougall, C; Rafailov, E; McGloin, D

    2014-12-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focusing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots, and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focusing on the trap stiffness, and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot, but benefit from rotational control. PMID:25490654

  17. Optical tweezers to study viruses.

    PubMed

    Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    A virus is a complex molecular machine that propagates by channeling its genetic information from cell to cell. Unlike macroscopic engines, it operates in a nanoscopic world under continuous thermal agitation. Viruses have developed efficient passive and active strategies to pack and release nucleic acids. Some aspects of the dynamic behavior of viruses and their substrates can be studied using structural and biochemical techniques. Recently, physical techniques have been applied to dynamic studies of viruses in which their intrinsic mechanical activity can be measured directly. Optical tweezers are a technology that can be used to measure the force, torque and strain produced by molecular motors, as a function of time and at the single-molecule level. Thanks to this technique, some bacteriophages are now known to be powerful nanomachines; they exert force in the piconewton range and their motors work in a highly coordinated fashion for packaging the viral nucleic acid genome. Nucleic acids, whose elasticity and condensation behavior are inherently coupled to the viral packaging mechanisms, are also amenable to examination with optical tweezers. In this chapter, we provide a comprehensive analysis of this laser-based tool, its combination with imaging methods and its application to the study of viruses and viral molecules. PMID:23737055

  18. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Moelmer, Klaus; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2011-09-15

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits require the transport of atoms to neighboring sites. We numerically optimize the nonadiabatic transport of the atoms through the lattice and the intensity ramps of the optical tweezer in order to maximize the gate fidelities. We find overall gate times of a few 100 {mu}s, while keeping the error probability due to vibrational excitations and spontaneous scattering below 10{sup -3}. The requirements on the positioning error and intensity noise of the optical tweezer and the magnetic field stability are analyzed and we show that atoms in optical lattices could meet the requirements for fault-tolerant scalable quantum computing.

  19. Tomographic phase microscopy using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habaza, Mor; Gilboa, Barak; Roichman, Yael; Shaked, Natan T.

    2015-07-01

    We review our technique for tomographic phase microscopy with optical tweezers [1]. This tomographic phase microscopy approach enables full 3-D refractive-index reconstruction. Tomographic phase microscopy measures quantitatively the 3- D distribution of refractive-index in biological cells. We integrated our external interferometric module with holographic optical tweezers for obtaining quantitative phase maps of biological samples from a wide range of angles. The close-tocommon- path, off-axis interferometric system enables a full-rotation tomographic acquisition of a single cell using holographic optical tweezers for trapping and manipulating with a desired array of traps, while acquiring phase information of a single cell from all different angles and maintaining the native surrounding medium. We experimentally demonstrated two reconstruction algorithms: the filtered back-projection method and the Fourier diffraction method for 3-D refractive index imaging of yeast cells.

  20. An optical tweezer for complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schablinski, Jan; Wieben, Frank; Block, Dietmar

    2015-04-15

    This paper describes the experimental realization of an optical trap for microparticles levitating in the plasma sheath. Single particles can be trapped in a laser beam comparable to optical tweezers known from colloidal suspensions. The trapping mechanism is discussed and two applications of the system are shown.

  1. Optical tweezer micromanipulation of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Wright, Graham D; Arlt, Jochen; Poon, Wilson C K; Read, Nick D

    2007-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been little used in experimental studies on filamentous fungi. We have built a simple, compact, easy-to-use, safe and robust optical tweezer system that can be used with brightfield, phase contrast, differential interference contrast and fluorescence optics on a standard research grade light microscope. We have used this optical tweezer system in a range of cell biology applications to trap and micromanipulate whole fungal cells, organelles within cells, and beads. We have demonstrated how optical tweezers can be used to: unambiguously determine whether hyphae are actively homing towards each other; move the Spitzenkrper and change the pattern of hyphal morphogenesis; make piconewton force measurements; mechanically stimulate hyphal tips; and deliver chemicals to localized regions of hyphae. Significant novel experimental findings from our study were that germ tubes generated significantly smaller growth forces than leading hyphae, and that both hyphal types exhibited growth responses to mechanical stimulation with optically trapped polystyrene beads. Germinated spores that had been optically trapped for 25min exhibited no deleterious effects with regard to conidial anastomosis tube growth, homing or fusion. PMID:16908207

  2. Optical tweezers study life under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazal, Furqan M.; Block, Steven M.

    2011-06-01

    Optical tweezers have become one of the primary weapons in the arsenal of biophysicists, and have revolutionized the new field of single-molecule biophysics. Today's techniques allow high-resolution experiments on biological macromolecules that were mere pipe dreams only a decade ago.

  3. Probing the Casimir force with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ether, D. S., Jr.; Pires, L. B.; Umrath, S.; Martinez, D.; Ayala, Y.; Pontes, B.; Araújo, G. R. de S.; Frases, S.; Ingold, G.-L.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Viana, N. B.; Nussenzveig, H. M.; Neto, P. A. Maia

    2015-11-01

    We propose to use optical tweezers to probe the Casimir interaction between microspheres inside a liquid medium for geometric aspect ratios far beyond the validity of the widely employed proximity force approximation. This setup has the potential for revealing unprecedented features associated to the non-trivial role of the spherical curvatures. For a proof of concept, we measure femtonewton double-layer forces between polystyrene microspheres at distances above 400 nm by employing very soft optical tweezers, with stiffness of the order of fractions of a fN/nm. As a future application, we propose to tune the Casimir interaction between a metallic and a polystyrene microsphere in saline solution from attraction to repulsion by varying the salt concentration. With those materials, the screened Casimir interaction may have a larger magnitude than the unscreened one. This line of investigation has the potential for bringing together different fields including classical and quantum optics, statistical physics and colloid science, while paving the way for novel quantitative applications of optical tweezers in cell and molecular biology.

  4. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  5. Investigating hydrodynamic synchronisation using holographic optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, Stuart; Debono, Luke; Bruot, Nicolas; Kotar, Jurij; Cicuta, Pietro; Miles, Mervyn; Hanna, Simon; Phillips, David; Simpson, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    Coordinated motion at low Reynolds number is widely observed in biological micro-systems, but the underlying mechanisms are often unclear. A holographic optical tweezers system is used to experimentally study this phenomenon, by employing optical forces to drive a pair of coplanar microspheres in circular orbits with a constant tangential force. In this system synchronisation is caused by hydrodynamic forces arising from the motion of the two spheres. The timescales of their synchronisation from large initial phase differences are explored and found to be dependent on how stiffly the microspheres are confined to their circular orbits. These measured timescales show good agreement with numerical simulations.

  6. Periodic cavitation in an optical tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona-Sosa, Viridiana; Alba-Arroyo, José E.; Quinto-Su, Pedro A.

    2015-08-01

    We show that microscopic explosions (cavitation bubbles) can be generated periodically in an optical tweezer. An absorbing microparticle is attracted to the trapping beam waist where it eventually superheats a small volume of liquid resulting in a cavitation bubble that impulsively pushes the particle close to the starting position where the cycle restarts. The bubbles expand and collapse in a timescale on the order of one microsecond and are detected with a high speed video recorder and a fast photodiode. We also present preliminary results on the interaction between two microparticles generating cavitation bubbles in the same optical trap.

  7. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  8. Topology optimization of the optical tweezers setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sun-Uk; Lee, Yong-Gu

    2005-02-01

    Optical tweezers (OT) uses a focused laser beam to trap and move microscopic objects. The design of OT consists of laying out stationary and moving (or rotating) lenses and mirrors so that two design constraints are met at the objective back aperture (OBA): 1) the laser beam has to be pivoted around the center, and 2) the beam has to keep the same degree of overfilling. While these constraints are met, the objectives are to maximize the divergence/convergence angle and the beam rotation angle at the OBA. They are each accomplished by moving a lens or rotating a mirror, respectively. There are few known designs that give (claimed) good performances while satisfying above constraints. However, these designs are improvised inventions with no attempts in optimization. In this paper, we propose a new method for designing an optimized OT that achieves the best performance with given pool of optical elements. Our method, (Topology Optimization of the Optical Tweezers Setup) first divides the layout space into finite lattices and then distributes lenses and mirrors to appropriate lattices. Subsequently, whether the attempted configuration conforms to the constraints is tested. If the test is successful, the layout and its performance are recorded. At the end, the best performing layout is found. In this paper, we primarily concentrate on optimizing the positions of lens components. In the future, this approach will be generalized for more complicated configurations that include mirror components.

  9. Aberrated optical tweezers for manipulation of microscopic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Gupta, Pradeep K.

    2007-02-01

    Microscopic objects can be manipulated in a more complex and effective way by use of static aberrated tweezers. We theoretically studied dynamics of interaction of Rayleigh particles with such asymmetric tweezers. Microscopic objects are pulled at the high intensity gradient end of the asymmetric tweezers, get accelerated and are ejected from the other end. Thus objects from two locations could be transported by two asymmetric line tweezers and mixed at another place where the low intensity gradient regions of the two beams meet. It is pertinent to note here that the speed of transport is determined by the laser beam power and the degree of asymmetry in the intensity profile. And since for a fixed asymmetry and laser power, the speed is dependent on the refractive index and size of the objects, sorting of these objects could be made possible. Sorting could be achieved either by scanning the asymmetric line tweezers across the sample or without scanning the stage by use of two asymmetric line tweezers. In the all-optical approach (use of two asymmetric line tweezers), we exploited the fact that when the speed of objects transported by one tweezers crossed a threshold value, these did not interact with the second tweezers and therefore moved undeviated; whereas slower moving objects were collected by the second tweezers and transported to a well-separated location.

  10. Multiplexed spectroscopy with holographic optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibula, Matthew A.; McIntyre, David H.

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a multiplexed holographic optical tweezers system with an imaging spectrometer to manipulate multiple optically trapped nanosensors and detect multiple fluorescence spectra. The system uses a spatial light modulator (SLM) to control the positions of infrared optical traps in the sample so that multiple nanosensors can be positioned into regions of interest. Spectra of multiple nanosensors are detected simultaneously with the application of an imaging spectrometer. Nanosensors are capable of detecting changes in their environment such as pH, ion concentration, temperature, and voltage by monitoring changes in the nanosensors' emitted fluorescence spectra. We use streptavidin labeled quantum dots bound to the surface of biotin labeled polystyrene microspheres to measure temperature changes by observing a corresponding shift in the wavelength of the spectral peak. The fluorescence is excited at 532 nm with a wide field source.

  11. Optical tweezers calibration with Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkcan, Silvan; Richly, Maximilian U.; Le Gall, Antoine; Fiszman, Nicolas; Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Westbrook, Nathalie; Perronet, Karen; Alexandrou, Antigoni

    2014-09-01

    We present a new method for calibrating an optical-tweezer setup that is based on Bayesian inference1. This method employs an algorithm previously used to analyze the confined trajectories of receptors within lipid rafts2,3. The main advantages of this method are that it does not require input parameters and is insensitive to systematic errors like the drift of the setup. Additionally, it exploits a much larger amount of the information stored in the recorded bead trajectory than standard calibration approaches. The additional information can be used to detect deviations from the perfect harmonic potential or detect environmental influences on the bead. The algorithm infers the diffusion coefficient and the potential felt by a trapped bead, and only requires the bead trajectory as input. We demonstrate that this method outperforms the equipartition method and the power-spectrum method in input information required (bead radius and trajectory length) and in output accuracy. Furthermore, by inferring a higher order potential our method can reveal deviations from the assumed second-order potential. More generally, this method can also be used for magnetic-tweezer calibration.

  12. Touching the microworld with force-feedback optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Pacoret, Cécile; Bowman, Richard; Gibson, Graham; Haliyo, Sinan; Carberry, David; Bergander, Arvid; Régnier, Stéphane; Padgett, Miles

    2009-06-01

    Optical tweezers are a powerful tool for micromanipulation and measurement of picoNewton sized forces. However, conventional interfaces present difficulties as the user cannot feel the forces involved. We present an interface to optical tweezers, based around a low-cost commercial force feedback device. The different dynamics of the micro-world make intuitive force feedback a challenge. We propose a coupling method using an existing optical tweezers system and discuss stability and transparency. Our system allows the user to perceive real Brownian motion and viscosity, as well as forces exerted during manipulation of objects by a trapped bead. PMID:19506679

  13. Optical tweezers for studying taxis in parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Fontes, A.; Stahl, C. V.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Ayres, D. C.; Almeida, D. B.; Farias, P. M. A.; Santos, B. S.; Santos-Mallet, J.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Giorgio, S.; Feder, D.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-04-01

    In this work we present a methodology to measure force strengths and directions of living parasites with an optical tweezers setup. These measurements were used to study the parasites chemotaxis in real time. We observed behavior and measured the force of: (i) Leishmania amazonensis in the presence of two glucose gradients; (ii) Trypanosoma cruzi in the vicinity of the digestive system walls, and (iii) Trypanosoma rangeli in the vicinity of salivary glands as a function of distance. Our results clearly show a chemotactic behavior in every case. This methodology can be used to study any type of taxis, such as chemotaxis, osmotaxis, thermotaxis, phototaxis, of any kind of living microorganisms. These studies can help us to understand the microorganism sensory systems and their response function to these gradients.

  14. Stretching short DNA tethers using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reihani, Nader; Bosanac, Lana; Hansen, Thomas M.; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2006-08-01

    With the evolution of single molecule techniques as force-scope optical tweezers, it has become possible to perform very accurate measurements of the elastic properties of biopolymers as e.g. DNA. Nucleic acid elasticity is important in the interaction of these molecules with proteins and protein complexes in the living cell. Most experimental and theoretical effort has been aimed at uncovering and understanding of the behavior of polymers with contour lengths significantly longer than their persistence length. The well-established Worm-Like-Chain model has been modified such that a satisfactory description of such long biopolymers is available. However, in many single molecule experiments, such as the unfolding of RNA stem-loops1 and RNA pseudoknots,2 one is dealing with biopolymers whose contour lengths are comparable to persistence lengths. A full understanding of such curves requires an understanding of the physics of short biopolymers. For such cases, theories are just beginning to emerge and there is hardly any experimental data available. We target this problem by optical tweezers quantitative force-extension measurements on short biopolymers. The biopolymers used are primarily double stranded DNA whose total length ( 300 nm) is comparable to their persistence length ( 50 nm). As a control of our equipment and methods, we also stretch longer dsDNA (1100 nm), the force-extension curves of which resemble those in literature. 3 For the short DNA the force-extension curves qualitatively resemble those predicted by WLC theories, but a reasonable fit can only be made if the persistence length is allowed to be a fitting parameter. If made a fitting parameter, the 'apparent persistence length' is found as 8.7+/-4 nm, a number which is significantly lower than the real physical value.

  15. Low frequency dynamical stabilisation in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Christopher J.; Smart, Thomas J.; Jones, Philip H.; Cubero, David

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that a rigid pendulum with minimal friction will occupy a stable equilibrium position vertically upwards when its suspension point is oscillated at high frequency. The phenomenon of the inverted pendulum was explained by Kapitza by invoking a separation of timescales between the high frequency modulation and the much lower frequency pendulum motion, resulting in an effective potential with a minimum in the inverted position. We present here a study of a microscopic optical analogue of Kapitza's pendulum that operates in different regimes of both friction and driving frequency. The pendulum is realized using a microscopic particle held in a scanning optical tweezers and subject to a viscous drag force. The motion of the optical pendulum is recorded and analyzed by digital video microscopy and particle tracking to extract the trajectory and stable orientation of the particle. In these experiments we enter the regime of low driving frequency, where the period of driving is comparable to the characteristic relaxation time of the radial motion of the pendulum with finite stiffness. In this regime we find stabilization of the pendulum at angles other than the vertical (downwards) is possible for modulation amplitudes exceeding a threshold value where, unlike the truly high frequency case studied previously, both the threshold amplitude and equilibrium position are found to be functions of friction. Experimental results are complemented by an analytical theory for induced stability in the low frequency driving regime with friction.

  16. Sorting Out Bacterial Viability with Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, M.; Hanstorp, D.; Hagberg, P.; Enger, J.; Nyström, T.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a method, using laser, optical tweezers and direct microscopic analysis of reproductive potential and membrane integrity, to assess single-cell viability in a stationary-phase Escherichia coli population. It is demonstrated here that a reduction in cell integrity, determined by using the fluorescent nucleic acid stain propidium iodide, correlated well with a reduction in cell proliferating potential during the stationary-phase period studied. Moreover, the same cells that exhibited reduced integrity were found to be the ones that failed to divide upon nutrient addition. A small but significant number of the intact cells (496 of 7,466 [6.6%]) failed to replicate. In other words, we did not find evidence for the existence of a large population of intact but nonculturable cells during the stationary-phase period studied but it is clear that reproductive ability can be lost prior to the loss of membrane integrity. In addition, about 1% of the stationary-phase cells were able to divide only once upon nutrient addition, and in a few cases, only one of the two cells produced by division was able to divide a second time, indicating that localized cell deterioration, inherited by only one of the daughters, may occur. The usefulness of the optical trapping methodology in elucidating the mechanisms involved in stationary-phase-induced bacterial death and population heterogeneity is discussed. PMID:10986260

  17. Constructing Dual Beam Optical Tweezers for Undergraduate Biophysics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudelin, Brian; West-Coates, Devon; Del'Etoile, Jon; Grotzke, Eric; Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Optical tweezing, or trapping, is a modern physics technique which allows us to use the radiation pressure from laser beams to trap micron sized particles. Optical tweezers are commonly used in graduate level biophysics research but seldom used at the undergraduate level. Our goal is to construct a dual beam optical tweezers for future undergraduate biophysical research. Dual beam optical tweezers use two counter propagating laser beams to provide a stronger trap. In this study we discuss how the assembly of the dual beam optical tweezers is done through three main phases. The first phase was to construct a custom compressed air system to isolate the optical table from the vibrations from its surroundings so that we can measure pico-newton scale forces that are observed in biological systems. In addition, the biomaterial flow system was designed with a flow cell to trap biomolecules by combining several undergraduate semester projects. During the second phase we set up the optics to image and display the inside of the flow cell. Currently we are in the process of aligning the laser to create an effective trap and developing the software to control the data collection. This optical tweezers set up will enable us to study potential cancer drug interactions with DNA at the single molecule level and will be a powerful tool in promoting interdisciplinary research at the undergraduate level.

  18. A mode-division-multiplexing single fiber optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Enming; Liu, Zhihai; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yaxun; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2015-07-01

    We propose and demonstrate a mode division multiplexing single fiber optical tweezers. By using this tweezers, one can trap a yeast cell and then launch it away from the fiber tip with a certain speed to a certain position without moving the optical fiber in a single fiber optical trapping apparatus. We excite both LP01 and LP11 mode beams in a same normal communication fiber core to generate the optical launching force and trapping force by molding the fiber tip into a special tapered-tip shape. A yeast cell of 6μm diameter is trapped and then being launched away. We construct the optical trapping and launching potential wells by controlling the power of two mode beams. This micro particle directional launching function expands new features of fiber optical tweezers based on the normal communication fiber, providing for the possibility of more practical applications in the biomedical research fields.

  19. Tying a molecular knot with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Yasuharu; Yasuda, Ryohei; Akashi, Ken-Ichirou; Harada, Yoshie; Miyata, Hidetake; Kinosita, Kazuhiko; Itoh, Hiroyasu

    1999-06-01

    Filamentous structures are abundant in cells. Relatively rigid filaments, such as microtubules and actin, serve as intracellular scaffolds that support movement and force, and their mechanical properties are crucial to their function in the cell. Some aspects of the behaviour of DNA, meanwhile, depend critically on its flexibility-for example, DNA-binding proteins can induce sharp bends in the helix. The mechanical characterization of such filaments has generally been conducted without controlling the filament shape, by the observation of thermal motions or of the response to external forces or flows. Controlled buckling of a microtubule has been reported, but the analysis of the buckled shape was complicated. Here we report the continuous control of the radius of curvature of a molecular strand by tying a knot in it, using optical tweezers to manipulate the strand's ends. We find that actin filaments break at the knot when the knot diameter falls below 0.4µm. The pulling force at breakage is around 1pN, two orders of magnitude smaller than the tensile stress of a straight filament. The flexural rigidity of the filament remained unchanged down to this diameter. We have also knotted a single DNA molecule, opening up the possibility of studying curvature-dependent interactions with associated proteins. We find that the knotted DNA is stronger than actin.

  20. Characterization of periodic cavitation in optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Sosa, Viridiana; Alba-Arroyo, José Ernesto; Quinto-Su, Pedro A

    2016-03-10

    Microscopic vapor explosions or cavitation bubbles can be generated repeatedly in optical tweezers with a microparticle that partially absorbs at the trapping laser wavelength. In this work we measure the size distribution and the production rate of cavitation bubbles for microparticles with a diameter of 3 μm using high-speed video recording and a fast photodiode. We find that there is a lower bound for the maximum bubble radius Rmax∼2  μm which can be explained in terms of the microparticle size. More than 94% of the measured Rmax are in the range between 2 and 6 μm, while the same percentage of the measured individual frequencies fi or production rates are between 10 and 200 Hz. The photodiode signal yields an upper bound for the lifetime of the bubbles, which is at most twice the value predicted by the Rayleigh equation. We also report empirical relations between Rmax, fi, and the bubble lifetimes. PMID:26974779

  1. Probing the Casimir force with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia Neto, Paulo; Ether, Diney; Pires, Luis; Ayala, Yareni; Rosa, Felipe; Umrath, Stefan; Ingold, Gert; Viana, Nathan; Nussenzveig, Moyses

    2015-03-01

    Optical tweezers (OT) are single-beam laser traps for neutral particles, usually applied to dielectric microspheres immersed in a fluid. The stiffness is proportional to the trapping beam power, and hence can be tuned to very small values, allowing one to measure femtonewton forces, once the device is carefully calibrated. We employ OT to measure the Casimir (or retarded van der Waals) force between polystyrene beads in ethanol, for distances between 50 nanometers and 1 micrometer. The spherical beads have diameters ranging from 3 to 7 micrometers. We find a rather large correction to the widely employed Proximity Force approximation (PFA), since the ratio between distances and sphere radii is much larger than the typical values probed in recent experiments. For the comparison with experimental data, we compute the Casimir force using the scattering approach applied to the spherical geometry, including the contribution of double-layer forces. We also present experimental results for the total force between a mercury microdroplet and a polystyrene bead immersed in ethanol, with similar distances and diameters. In short, we probe the Casimir force with different materials in a regime far from the validity of PFA, such that the spherical geometry plays a non-trivial role.

  2. Optical Tweezers Array and Nimble Tweezers Probe Generated by Spatial- Light Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Jassemnejad, Baha; Seibel, Robin E.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    An optical tweezers is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center as a visiblelight interface between ubiquitous laser technologies and the interrogation, visualization, manufacture, control, and energization of nanostructures such as silicon carbide (SiC) nanotubes. The tweezers uses one or more focused laser beams to hold micrometer-sized particles called tools (sometimes called tips in atomic-force-microscope terminology). A strongly focused laser beam has an associated light-pressure gradient that is strong enough to pull small particles to the focus, in spite of the oppositely directed scattering force; "optical tweezers" is the common term for this effect. The objective is to use the tools to create carefully shaped secondary traps to hold and assemble nanostructures that may contain from tens to hundreds of atoms. The interaction between a tool and the nanostructures is to be monitored optically as is done with scanning probe microscopes. One of the initial efforts has been to create, shape, and control multiple tweezers beams. To this end, a programmable spatial-light modulator (SLM) has been used to modify the phase of a laser beam at up to 480 by 480 points. One program creates multiple, independently controllable tweezer beams whose shapes can be tailored by making the SLM an adaptive mirror in an interferometer (ref. 1). The beams leave the SLM at different angles, and an optical Fourier transform maps these beams to different positions in the focal plane of a microscope objective. The following figure shows two arrays of multiple beams created in this manner. The patterns displayed above the beam array control the intensity-to-phase transformation required in programming the SLM. Three of the seven beams displayed can be used as independently controllable beams.

  3. Optical tweezers-assisted measurements of elastic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnunen, M.; Tuorila, J.; Haapalainen, T.; Karmenyan, A.; Tuchin, V.; Myllylä, R.

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been used in biophysical studies for over twenty years. Typical application areas are force measurements of subcellular structures and cell biomechanics. Optical tweezers can also be used to manipulate the orientation of objects. Moreover, using various beam shapes, optical tweezers allow measuring light scattering from single and multiple objects by keeping particles and cells in place during the measurement. At single cell level, light scattering yields important information about the object being studied, including its size, shape and refractive index. Also dependent scattering can be studied. In this paper, we review experimental work conducted in this area by our group and show new results relating to optical clearing phenomena at single microparticle level.

  4. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic acids. We use single molecule DNA stretching to show that the nucleocapsid protein (NC) of the yeast retrotransposon Ty3, which is likely to be an ancestor of HIV NC, has optimal nucleic acid chaperone activity with only a single zinc finger. We also show that the chaperone activity of the ORF1 protein is responsible for successful replication of the mouse LINE-1 retrotransposon. LINE-1 is also 17% of the human genome, where it generates insertion mutations and alters gene expression. Retrotransposons such as LINE-1 and Ty3 are likely to be ancestors of retroviruses such as HIV. Human APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits HIV-1 replication via cytidine deamination of the viral ssDNA genome, as well as via a distinct deamination-independent mechanism. Efficient deamination requires rapid on-off binding kinetics, but a slow dissociation rate is required for the proposed deaminase-independent mechanism. We resolve this apparent contradiction with a new quantitative single molecule method, which shows that A3G initially binds ssDNA with fast on-off rates and subsequently converts to a slow binding mode. This suggests that oligomerization transforms A3G from a fast enzyme to a slow binding protein, which is the biophysical mechanism that allows A3G to inhibit HIV replication. A complete understanding of the mechanism of A3G-mediated antiviral activity is required to design drugs that disrupt the viral response to A3G, enhance A3G packaging inside the viral core, and other potential strategies for long-term treatment of HIV infection. We use single molecule biophysics to explore the function of proteins involved in bacterial DNA replication, endogenous retrotransposition of retroelements in eukaryotic hosts such yeast and mice, and HIV replication in human cells. Our quantitative results provide insight into protein function in a range of complex biological systems and have wide-ranging implications for human health.

  5. Mechanisms of HCV NS3 Helicase Monitored by Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    As one of the essential enzymes for viral genome replication, the hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase is one of the best characterized RNA helicases to date in understanding the mechanistic cycles in a helicase-catalyzed strand separation reaction. Recently, single-molecule studies on NS3, in particular the use of optical tweezers with sub-base pair spatial resolution, have allowed people to examine the potential elementary steps of NS3 in unwinding the double-stranded RNA fueled by ATP binding and hydrolysis. In this chapter, I detail the essential technical elements involved in conducting a high-resolution optical tweezers study of NS3 helicase, starting from the purification of the recombinant helicase protein from E. coli to setting up a high-resolution single-molecule experiment using optical tweezers. PMID:25579590

  6. Graded-index optical fiber tweezers with long manipulation length.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuan; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qun-Feng; Wu, Yu; Rao, Yunjiang; Peng, Gang-Ding; Lang, Jinyi; Zhang, Ke

    2014-10-20

    Long manipulation length is critical for optical fiber tweezers to enhance the flexibility of non-contact trapping. In this paper a long manipulation distance of more than 40 μm is demonstrated experimentally by the graded-index fiber (GIF) tweezers, which is fabricated by chemically etching a GIF taper with a large cone angle of 58°. The long manipulation distance is obtained by introducing an air cavity between the lead-in single mode fiber and the GIF as well as by adjusting the laser power in the existence of a constant background flow. The influence of the cavity length and the GIF length on the light distribution and the focusing length of the GIF taper is investigated numerically, which is helpful for optimizing the parameters to perform stable optical trapping. This kind of optical fiber tweezers has advantages including low-cost, easy-to-fabricate and easy-to-use. PMID:25401560

  7. Optical tweezers force measurements to study parasites chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Fontes, A.; Almeida, D. B.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Ayres, D. C.; Giorgio, S.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we propose a methodology to study microorganisms chemotaxis in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. Forces involved in the movement of unicellular parasites are very small, in the femto-pico-Newton range, about the same order of magnitude of the forces generated in an Optical Tweezers. We applied this methodology to investigate the Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) and Trypanossoma cruzi (T. cruzi) under distinct situations.

  8. Atomic force microscopy combined with optical tweezers (AFM/OT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, F.; Zembrzycki, K.; Nakielski, P.; Pawłowska, S.; Kowalewski, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    The role of mechanical properties is essential to understand molecular, biological materials, and nanostructures dynamics and interaction processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the most commonly used method of direct force evaluation, but due to its technical limitations this single probe technique is unable to detect forces with femtonewton resolution. In this paper we present the development of a combined atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers (AFM/OT) instrument. The focused laser beam, on which optical tweezers are based, provides us with the ability to manipulate small dielectric objects and to use it as a high spatial and temporal resolution displacement and force sensor in the same AFM scanning zone. We demonstrate the possibility to develop a combined instrument with high potential in nanomechanics, molecules manipulation and biological studies. AFM/OT equipment is described and characterized by studying the ability to trap dielectric objects and quantifying the detectable and applicable forces. Finally, optical tweezers calibration methods and instrument applications are given.

  9. Marker-free cell discrimination by holographic optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, F.; Warber, M.; Zwick, S.; van der Kuip, H.; Haist, T.; Osten, W.

    2009-06-01

    We introduce a method for marker-free cell discrimination based on optical tweezers. Cancerous, non-cancerous, and drug-treated cells could be distinguished by measuring the trapping forces using holographic optical tweezers. We present trapping force measurements on different cell lines: normal pre-B lymphocyte cells (BaF3; "normal cells"), their Bcr-Abl transformed counterparts (BaF3-p185; "cancer cells") as a model for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and Imatinib treated BaF3-p185 cells. The results are compared with reference measurements obtained by a commercial flow cytometry system.

  10. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon.

    PubMed

    Kotsifaki, D G; Kandyla, M; Lagoudakis, P G

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects. PMID:27195446

  11. Force of single kinesin molecules measured with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Kuo, S C; Sheetz, M P

    1993-04-01

    Isometric forces generated by single molecules of the mechanochemical enzyme kinesin were measured with a laser-induced, single-beam optical gradient trap, also known as optical tweezers. For the microspheres used in this study, the optical tweezers was spring-like for a radius of 100 nanometers and had a maximum force region at a radius of approximately 150 nanometers. With the use of biotinylated microtubules and special streptavidin-coated latex microspheres as handles, microtubule translocation by single squid kinesin molecules was reversibly stalled. The stalled microtubules escaped optical trapping forces of 1.9 +/- 0.4 piconewtons. The ability to measure force parameters of single macromolecules now allows direct testing of molecular models for contractility. PMID:8469975

  12. A microscopic steam engine implemented in an optical tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A.

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of improved steam engines at the end of the 18th century marked the start of the industrial revolution and the birth of classical thermodynamics. Currently, there is great interest in miniaturizing heat engines, but so far traditional heat engines operating with the expansion and compression of gas have not reached length scales shorter than one millimeter. Here, a micrometer-sized piston steam engine is implemented in an optical tweezer. The piston is a single colloidal microparticle that is driven by explosive vapourization of the surrounding liquid (cavitation bubbles) and by optical forces at a rate between a few tens of Hertz and one kilo-Hertz. The operation of the engine allows to exert impulsive forces with optical tweezers and induce streaming in the liquid, similar to the effect of transducers when driven at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies.

  13. A microscopic steam engine implemented in an optical tweezer.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of improved steam engines at the end of the 18th century marked the start of the industrial revolution and the birth of classical thermodynamics. Currently, there is great interest in miniaturizing heat engines, but so far traditional heat engines operating with the expansion and compression of gas have not reached length scales shorter than one millimeter. Here, a micrometer-sized piston steam engine is implemented in an optical tweezer. The piston is a single colloidal microparticle that is driven by explosive vapourization of the surrounding liquid (cavitation bubbles) and by optical forces at a rate between a few tens of Hertz and one kilo-Hertz. The operation of the engine allows to exert impulsive forces with optical tweezers and induce streaming in the liquid, similar to the effect of transducers when driven at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. PMID:25523395

  14. Optical tweezers theory near a flat surface: a perturbative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Dutra, Rafael S.; Maia Neto, Paolo A.; Nussenzveig, H. Moyses

    We propose a perturbative calculation of the optical force exercised by a focused laser beam on a microsphere of arbitrary radius that is localized near a flat glass surface in a standard optical tweezers setup. Starting from the Mie-Debye representation for the electric field of a Gaussian laser beam, focused by an objective of high numerical aperture, we derive a recursive series that represents the multiple reflections that describe the reverberation of laser light between the microsphere and the glass slide. We present numerical results for the axial component of the optical force and the axial trap stiffness. Numerical results for a configuration typical in biological applications--a microsphere of 0.5 µm radius at a distance around 0.25 µm from the surface--show a 37 [1] Viana N B, Rocha M S. Mesquita O N, et al. (2007) Towards absolute calibration of optical tweezers. Phys Rev E 75:021914-1-14. [2] Dutra R S, Viana N B, Maia Neto P A, et al. (2014) Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers. Phys Rev A 90:013825-1-13. Rafael S. Dutra thanks the Brazilian ``Science without Borders'' program for a postdoctoral scholarship.

  15. Evidence for localized cell heating induced by infrared optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y; Cheng, D K; Sonek, G J; Berns, M W; Chapman, C F; Tromberg, B J

    1995-01-01

    The confinement of liposomes and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by infrared (IR) optical tweezers is shown to result in sample heating and temperature increases by several degrees centigrade, as measured by a noninvasive, spatially resolved fluorescence detection technique. For micron-sized spherical liposome vesicles having bilayer membranes composed of the phospholipid 1,2-diacyl-pentadecanoyl-glycero-phosphocholine (15-OPC), a temperature rise of approximately 1.45 +/- 0.15 degrees C/100 mW is observed when the vesicles are held stationary with a 1.064 microns optical tweezers having a power density of approximately 10(7) W/cm2 and a focused spot size of approximately 0.8 micron. The increase in sample temperature is found to scale linearly with applied optical power in the 40 to 250 mW range. Under the same trapping conditions, CHO cells exhibit an average temperature rise of nearly 1.15 +/- 0.25 degrees C/100 mW. The extent of cell heating induced by infrared tweezers confinement can be described by a heat conduction model that accounts for the absorption of infrared (IR) laser radiation in the aqueous cell core and membrane regions, respectively. The observed results are relevant to the assessment of the noninvasive nature of infrared trapping beams in micromanipulation applications and cell physiological studies. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:7612858

  16. All-Optical Constant-Force Laser Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Rajalakshmi; Gajraj, Arivalagan; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2004-01-01

    Optical tweezers are a powerful tool for the study of single biomolecules. Many applications require that a molecule be held under constant tension while its extension is measured. We present two schemes based on scanning-line optical tweezers to accomplish this, providing all-optical alternatives to force-clamp traps that rely on electronic feedback to maintain constant-force conditions for the molecule. In these schemes, a laser beam is rapidly scanned along a line in the focal plane of the microscope objective, effectively creating an extended one-dimensional optical potential over distances of up to 8 μm. A position-independent lateral force acting on a trapped particle is created by either modulating the laser beam intensity during the scan or by using an asymmetric beam profile in the back focal plane of the microscope objective. With these techniques, forces of up to 2.69 pN have been applied over distances of up to 3.4 μm with residual spring constants of <26.6 fN/μm. We used these techniques in conjunction with a fast position measurement scheme to study the relaxation of λ-DNA molecules against a constant external force with submillisecond time resolution. We compare the results to predictions from the wormlike chain model. PMID:15345573

  17. Evidence for localized cell heating induced by infrared optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Cheng, D.K.; Sonek, G.J.; Berns, M.W.; Chapman, C.F.; Tromberg, B.J.

    1995-05-01

    The confinement of liposomes and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by infrared (IR) optical tweezers is shown to result in sample heating and temperature increases by several degrees centigrade, as measured by a noninvasive, spatially resolved fluorescence detection technique. For micron-sized spherical liposome vesicles having bilayer membranes composed of the phospholipid 1,2-diacyl-pentadecanoyl-glycero-phosphocholine (15-OPC), a temperature rise of {similar_to}1.45{plus_minus}0.15 {degree}C/100 mW is observed when the vesicles are held stationary with a 1.064 {mu}m optical tweezers having a power density of {similar_to}10{sup 7} W/cm{sup 2} and a focused spot size of {similar_to}0.8 {mu}m. The increase in sample temperature is found to scale linearly with applied optical power in the 40 to 250 mW range. Under the same trapping conditions, CHO cells exhibit an average temperature rise of nearly 1.15{plus_minus}0.25 {degree}C/100 mW. The extent of cell heating induced by infrared tweezers confinement can be described by a heat conduction model that accounts for the absorption of infrared (IR) laser radiation in the aqueous cell core and membrane regions, respectively. The observed results are relevant to the assessment of the noninvasive nature of infrared trapping beams in micromanipulation applications and cell physiological studies. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Interferometer-Controlled Optical Tweezers Constructed for Nanotechnology and Biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to control microparticles was developed in-house at the NASA Glenn Research Center in support of the nanotechnology project under NASA's Aerospace Propulsion and Power Base Research Program. A prototype interferometer-controlled optical tweezers was constructed to manipulate scanning probe microscope (SPM) tips. A laser beam passed through a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and a microscope objective then produced an optical trap from the coaxial beams. The trap levitated and generated the coarse motion of a 10-mm polystyrene sphere used to simulate a SPM tip. The interference between the beams provided fine control of the forces and moments on the sphere. The interferometer included a piezoelectric-scanned mirror to modulate the interference pattern. The 10-mm sphere was observed to oscillate about 1 mm as the mirror and fringe pattern oscillated. The prototype tweezers proved the feasibility of constructing a more sophisticated interferometer tweezers to hold and manipulate SPM tips. The SPM tips are intended to interrogate and manipulate nanostructures. A more powerful laser will be used to generate multiple traps to hold nanostructures and SPM tips. The vibrating mirror in the interferometer will be replaced with a spatial light modulator. The modulator will allow the optical phase distribution in one leg of the interferometer to be programmed independently at 640 by 480 points for detailed control of the forces and moments. The interference patterns will be monitored to measure the motion of the SPM tips. Neuralnetwork technology will provide fast analysis of the interference patterns for diagnostic purposes and for local or remote feedback control of the tips. This effort also requires theoretical and modeling support in the form of scattering calculations for twin coherent beams from nonspherical particles.

  19. Single optical tweezers based on elliptical core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Li; Chen, Yunhao; Liu, Zhihai; Zhang, Yaxun; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2016-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new single optical tweezers based on an elliptical core fiber, which can realize the trapped yeast cell rotation with a precise and simple control. Due to the elliptical shape of the fiber core, the LP11 mode beam can propagate stably. When we rotate the fiber tip, the LP11 mode beam will also rotate along with the fiber tip, which helps to realize the trapped micro-particle rotation. By using this method, we can easily realize the rotation of the trapped yeast cells, the rotating angle of the yeast cell is same as the elliptical core fiber tip.

  20. Optical Tweezers for Sample Fixing in Micro-Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Amenitsch, H.; Rappolt, M.; Sartori, B.; Laggner, P.; Cojoc, D.; Ferrari, E.; Garbin, V.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, Ch.

    2007-01-19

    In order to manipulate, characterize and measure the micro-diffraction of individual structural elements down to single phospholipid liposomes we have been using optical tweezers (OT) combined with an imaging microscope. We were able to install the OT system at the microfocus beamline ID13 at the ESRF and trap clusters of about 50 multi-lamellar liposomes (< 10 {mu}m large cluster). Further we have performed a scanning diffraction experiment with a 1 micrometer beam to demonstrate the fixing capabilities and to confirm the size of the liposome cluster by X-ray diffraction.

  1. Kinect 4 … holographic optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhiddin, C.; Phillips, D. B.; Miles, M. J.; Picco, L.; Carberry, D. M.

    2013-07-01

    The 3D position and orientation of a microtool confined in multiple optical traps needs to be controlled in order for one to perform modern, challenging experiments; for example, in order to utilize it as a scanning probe and investigate the surface of optically sensitive cells. The control interface has traditionally used the keyboard/mouse combination—limiting manipulations to a series of 1D/2D transforms. In this paper we demonstrate how the Kinect can be utilized to control the position and orientation of a microtool utilizing macroscopic models.

  2. Perturbation between two traps in dual-trap optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Lin; Zhou, Fei; Huang, Lu; Guo, Honglian; Li, Zhaolin; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2011-04-01

    Dual-trap optical tweezers are widely used in biological sciences and many other areas. The two traps are generally considered to be independent of each other in most situations. But when they are close and even touch side by side, the influence may not be negligible. We calculate the optical force of dielectric spherical particles trapped in dual-trap optical tweezers by means of the discrete dipole approximation method and analyze the perturbation effect between the two traps. We find that the electric field does not change much when it is scattered by the trapped particles. As a result, the scattering light from one sphere has a little perturbation effect on the trapping force upon the other sphere. The perturbation mainly comes from the other trap and is thus affected by the distance between the two traps. In the experiment, the displacement of the sphere trapped in an immovable trap is observed when another trap is moving close. The experiment data of relative displacement match qualitatively with the calculation data.

  3. 'Lissajous-like' trajectories in optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Hay, R F; Gibson, G M; Simpson, S H; Padgett, M J; Phillips, D B

    2015-12-14

    When a microscopic particle moves through a low Reynolds number fluid, it creates a flow-field which exerts hydrodynamic forces on surrounding particles. In this work we study the 'Lissajous-like' trajectories of an optically trapped 'probe' microsphere as it is subjected to time-varying oscillatory hydrodynamic flow-fields created by a nearby moving particle (the 'actuator'). We show a breaking of time-reversal symmetry in the motion of the probe when the driving motion of the actuator is itself time-reversal symmetric. This symmetry breaking results in a fluid-pumping effect, which arises due to the action of both a time-dependent hydrodynamic flow and a position-dependent optical restoring force, which together determine the trajectory of the probe particle. We study this situation experimentally, and show that the form of the trajectories observed is in good agreement with Stokesian dynamics simulations. Our results are related to the techniques of active micro-rheology and flow measurement, and also highlight how the mere presence of an optical trap can perturb the environment it is in place to measure. PMID:26698964

  4. Study of bacterial motility using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil

    Bacteria are arguably the simplest of known microorganisms, forming a fundamental part of the world we live in. Many functions they perform are found in scaled-up versions in higher organisms. Among many advanced functions, bacteria possess the ability to move in search for nutrients and favorable growth conditions. Measurement of the dynamical variables associated with bacterial swimming has proven to be difficult due to the lack of an accurate and convenient tool. In the past optical traps have been used for the manipulation of microscopic objects and measurement of minute forces. Herein, I have devised techniques for use of optical traps for direct measurement of the dynamics of bacterial swimming and chemotaxis, shedding light on the propulsion apparatus and sensory systems. A detailed analysis is performed to explore the effects of non-local hydrodynamic interactions on the swimming of single cells. Due to the lack of reliable measurement techniques, experimentalists often use theoretical models to estimate bacterial dynamics, the validity of which are tested. I emphasize the shortcomings of the very popular Resistive Force Theory (RFT) and indicate how the more rigorous Slender Body Theory (SBT) is able to overcome the limitations. In addition the chemotaxis of the marine bacterial strain Vibrio alginolyticus is studied with the revelation of a previously unknown chemotactic mechanism. Direct observations showed that these cells are able to bend their flagella to impart direction changes, which is paramount for an effective search strategy. This interesting find opens several intriguing questions pertaining to chemotaxis.

  5. Particle tracking stereomicroscopy in optical tweezers: control of trap shape.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Richard; Gibson, Graham; Padgett, Miles

    2010-05-24

    We present an optical system capable of generating stereoscopic images to track trapped particles in three dimensions. Two-dimensional particle tracking on each image yields three dimensional position information. Our approach allows the use of a high numerical aperture (NA=1.3) objective and large separation angle, such that particles can be tracked axially with resolution of 3 nm at 340 Hz. Spatial Light Modulators (SLMs), the diffractive elements used to steer and split laser beams in Holographic Optical Tweezers, are also capable of more general operations. We use one here to vary the ratio of lateral to axial trap stiffness by changing the shape of the beam at the back aperture of the microscope objective. Beams which concentrate their optical power at the extremes of the back aperture give rise to much more efficient axial trapping. The flexibility of using an SLM allows us to create multiple traps with different shapes. PMID:20589039

  6. Peculiarities of RBC aggregation studied by double trap optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Evgeny V.; Zhdanov, Alexander G.; Rykova, Sofia Yu.; Krasnova, Tatyana N.; Sokolova, Irina A.; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2010-04-01

    Aggregation peculiarities of red blood cells (RBCs) in autologous plasma are studied using double trap optical tweezers technique. The positions of RBCs are controlled with submicrometer accuracy by two optical traps formed by strongly focused laser beams (λ=1064 nm). Quantitative measurements of interaction forces between RBCs in pair aggregates are performed. Depending on the RBCs aggregation force, four different end-points of disaggregation induced by optical trap movement are revealed. Analysis of experimental force dependence on the distance between two RBCs during disaggregation is in a good agreement with the model of ring-shaped interaction surfaces of RBCs in pair aggregate. Aggregation velocities measured are shown to be strongly different for healthy and pathologic (System Lupus Erythematosis - SLE) blood samples.

  7. Precision Assembly of Complex Cellular Microenvironments using Holographic Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, Glen R.; Britchford, Emily; Upton, Thomas; Ware, James; Gibson, Graham M.; Devaud, Yannick; Ehrbar, Martin; Padgett, Miles; Allen, Stephanie; Buttery, Lee D.; Shakesheff, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The accurate study of cellular microenvironments is limited by the lack of technologies that can manipulate cells in 3D at a sufficiently small length scale. The ability to build and manipulate multicellular microscopic structures will facilitate a more detailed understanding of cellular function in fields such as developmental and stem cell biology. We present a holographic optical tweezers based technology to accurately generate bespoke cellular micro-architectures. Using embryonic stem cells, 3D structures of varying geometries were created and stabilized using hydrogels and cell-cell adhesion methods. Control of chemical microenvironments was achieved by the temporal release of specific factors from polymer microparticles positioned within these constructs. Complex co-culture micro-environmental analogues were also generated to reproduce structures found within adult stem cell niches. The application of holographic optical tweezers-based micromanipulation will enable novel insights into biological microenvironments by allowing researchers to form complex architectures with sub-micron precision of cells, matrices and molecules. PMID:25716032

  8. Invited article: a review of haptic optical tweezers for an interactive microworld exploration.

    PubMed

    Pacoret, Cécile; Régnier, Stéphane

    2013-08-01

    This paper is the first review of haptic optical tweezers, a new technique which associates force feedback teleoperation with optical tweezers. This technique allows users to explore the microworld by sensing and exerting picoNewton-scale forces with trapped microspheres. Haptic optical tweezers also allow improved dexterity of micromanipulation and micro-assembly. One of the challenges of this technique is to sense and magnify picoNewton-scale forces by a factor of 10(12) to enable human operators to perceive interactions that they have never experienced before, such as adhesion phenomena, extremely low inertia, and high frequency dynamics of extremely small objects. The design of optical tweezers for high quality haptic feedback is challenging, given the requirements for very high sensitivity and dynamic stability. The concept, design process, and specification of optical tweezers reviewed here are focused on those intended for haptic teleoperation. In this paper, two new specific designs as well as the current state-of-the-art are presented. Moreover, the remaining important issues are identified for further developments. The initial results obtained are promising and demonstrate that optical tweezers have a significant potential for haptic exploration of the microworld. Haptic optical tweezers will become an invaluable tool for force feedback micromanipulation of biological samples and nano- and micro-assembly parts. PMID:24007046

  9. Dynamic excitations in membranes induced by optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ziv, R; Moses, E; Nelson, P

    1998-01-01

    We present the phenomenology of transformations in lipid bilayers that are excited by laser tweezers. A variety of dynamic instabilities and shape transformations are observed, including the pearling instability, expulsion of vesicles, and more exotic ones, such as the formation of passages. Our physical picture of the laser-membrane interaction is based on the generation of tension in the bilayer and loss of surface area. Although tension is the origin of the pearling instability, it does not suffice to explain expulsion of vesicles, where we observe opening of giant pores and creeping motion of bilayers. We present a quantitative theoretical framework to understand most of the observed phenomenology. The main hypothesis is that lipid is pulled into the optical trap by the familiar dielectric effect, is disrupted, and finally is repackaged into an optically unresolvable suspension of colloidal particles. This suspension, in turn, can produce osmotic pressure and depletion forces, driving the observed transformations. PMID:9649388

  10. Use of optical tweezers to probe epithelial mechanosensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cellular mechanosensation mechanisms have been implicated in a variety of disease states. Specifically in renal tubules, the primary cilium and associated mechanosensitive ion channels are hypothesized to play a role in water and salt homeostasis, with relevant disease states including polycystic kidney disease and hypertension. Previous experiments investigating ciliary-mediated cellular mechanosensation have used either fluid flow chambers or micropipetting to elicit a biological response. The interpretation of these experiments in terms of the ``ciliary hypothesis'' has been difficult due the spatially distributed nature of the mechanical disturbance-several competing hypotheses regarding possible roles of primary cilium, glycocalyx, microvilli, cell junctions, and actin cytoskeleton exist. I report initial data using optical tweezers to manipulate individual primary cilia in an attempt to elicit a mechanotransduction response-specifically, the release of intracellular calcium. The advantage of using laser tweezers over previous work is that the applied disturbance is highly localized. I find that stimulation of a primary cilium elicits a response, while stimulation of the apical surface membrane does not. These results lend support to the hypothesis that the primary cilium mediates transduction of mechanical strain into a biochemical response in renal epithelia.

  11. An automated and user-friendly optical tweezers for biomolecular investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathi, Pranav

    Optical tweezers are not new to biological applications but building a tweezers which is versatile, automated, precise, stable and user-friendly is quite challenging. Such a tweezers usually require not only a hefty budget but vast understanding of engineering of optomechanical systems. I describe in this dissertation a versatile, automated, precise, stable and user-friendly optical tweezers that we developed for biomolecular investigations under limited budget. I describe automation and control improvements along with newly-developed surface detection software. I also describe cost-effective optomechanical devices used in tweezers with potential for broader application. Finally, I present new results of single-molecule force spectroscopy of DNA overstretching as a function of water isotope type. Single DNA unzipping is also presented as a proof of concept.

  12. Mechanical properties of a giant liposome studied using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitamichi, Yoko; Ichikawa, Masatoshi; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2009-09-01

    The mechanical properties of a micrometer-sized giant liposome are studied by deforming it from the inside using dual-beam optical tweezers. As the liposome is extended, its shape changes from a sphere to a lemon shape, and finally, a tubular part is generated. The surface tension σ and the bending rigidity κ of the lipid membrane are obtained from the measured force-extension curve. In a one-phase liposome, it was found that σ increases as the charged component increases but κ remains approximately constant. In a two-phase liposome, the characteristic deformation and the force-extension curve differ from those observed for the one-phase liposome.

  13. Multi-beam bilateral teleoperation of holographic optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Onda, Kazuhisa; Arai, Fumihito

    2012-02-13

    A multi-beam bilateral teleoperation system of holographic optical tweezers accelerated by a graphics processing unit is proposed and evaluated. This double-arm teleoperation system is composed of two haptic devices and two laser-trapped micro-beads. Each micro-bead is trapped and moved following the trajectory of each haptic device, and the forces to which the micro-beads are subjected, which are generated by Stokes drag, are measured and fed back to an operator via the haptic devices. This real-time telexistence was quantitatively evaluated based on the time response of the trapped beads and the fed-back forces. And the demonstration of touching red blood cells shows the effectiveness of this system for biomedical application. PMID:22418122

  14. Investigating collagen self-assembly with optical tweezers microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Nancy; Shayegan, Marjan; Altindal, Tuba

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Assembled from individual triple-helical proteins to make strong fibres, collagen is a beautiful example of a hierarchical self-assembling system. Using optical tweezers to perform microrheology measurements, we explore the dynamics of interactions between collagens responsible for their self-assembly and examine the development of heterogeneous mechanics during assembly into fibrillar gels. Telopeptides, short non-helical regions that flank the triple helix, have long been known to facilitate fibril self-assembly. We find that their removal not only slows down fibril nucleation but also results in a significant frequency-dependent reduction in the elastic modulus of collagens in solution. We interpret these results in terms of a model in which telopeptides facilitate transient intermolecular interactions, which enhance network connectivity in solution and lead to more rapid assembly in fibril-forming conditions. Current address: Department of Physics, McGill University.

  15. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: Construction, optimization, and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanes, Richard D. L.; Jenkins, Matthew C.; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2009-08-01

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45, smaller angles give a full 2? phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method.

  16. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: Construction, optimization, and calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Hanes, Richard D. L.; Jenkins, Matthew C.; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2009-08-15

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45 deg., smaller angles give a full 2{pi} phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method.

  17. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: construction, optimization, and calibration.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Richard D L; Jenkins, Matthew C; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2009-08-01

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45 degrees, smaller angles give a full 2pi phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method. PMID:19725658

  18. Optical tweezers as manufacturing and characterization tool in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Ghadiri, R.; Ksouri, S. I.; Gurevich, E. L.; Ostendorf, A.

    2014-09-01

    Pumping and mixing of small volumes of liquid samples are basic processes in microfluidic applications. Among the number of different principles for active transportation of the fluids microrotors have been investigated from the beginning. The main challenge in microrotors, however, has been the driving principle. In this work a new approach for a very simple magnetic driving principle has been realized. More precisely, we take advantage of optical grippers to fabricate various microrotors and introduce an optical force method to characterize the fluid flow generated by rotating the structures through magnetic actuation. The microrotors are built of silica and magnetic microspheres which are initially coated with Streptavidin or Biotin molecules. Holographic optical tweezers (HOT) are used to trap, to position, and to assemble the microspheres with the chemical interaction of the biomolecules leading to a stable binding. Using this technique, complex designs of microrotors can be realized. The magnetic response of the magnetic microspheres enables the rotation and control of the structures through an external magnetic field. The generated fluid flow around the microrotor is measured optically by inserting a probe particle next to the rotor. While the probe particle is trapped by optical forces the flow force leads to a displacement of the particle from the trapping position. This displacement is directly related to the flow velocity and can be measured and calibrated. Variations of the microrotor design and rotating speed lead to characteristic flow fields.

  19. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  20. Efficient loading of a single neutral atom into an optical microscopic tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Liu, Bei; Diao, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jie-Ying; Jin, Gang; Wang, Jun-Min

    2015-04-01

    A single atom in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) with trap size (hundreds of micrometers) can be transferred into an optical microscopic tweezer with a probability of ~ 100%. The ability to transfer a single atom into two traps back and forth allows us to study the loading process. The loading probability is found to be insensitive to the geometric overlap of the MOT and the tweezer. It is therefore possible to perform simultaneously loading of a single atom into all sites of the tweezer array for many qubits. In particular, we present a simulation of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays of an optical microscopic tweezer. We find the same qualitative behavior for all of the trap parameters. Project supported by the National Major Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921601) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61205215, 11274213, and 61475091).

  1. Calibration of femtosecond optical tweezers as a sensitive thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2015-08-01

    We present cumulative perturbation effects of femtosecond laser pulses on an optical tweezer. Our experiments involve a dual wavelength high repetition rate femtosecond laser, one at the non-heating wavelength of 780 nm while the other at 1560 nm to cause heating in the trapped volume under low power (100-800 μW) conditions. The 1560 nm high repetition rate laser acts as a resonant excitation source for the vibrational combination band of the hydroxyl group (OH) of water, which helps create the local heating effortlessly within the trapping volume. With such an experimental system, we are the first to observe direct effect of temperature on the corner frequency deduced from power spectrum. We can, thus, control and measure temperature precisely at the optical trap. This observation has lead us to calculate viscosity as well as temperature in the vicinity of the trapping zone. These experimental results also support the well-known fact that the nature of Brownian motion is the response of the optically trapped bead from the temperature change of surroundings. Temperature rise near the trapping zone can significantly change the viscosity of the medium. However, we notice that though the temperature and viscosity are changing as per our corner frequency calculations, the trap stiffness remains the same throughout our experiments within the temperature range of about 20 K.

  2. Design of a high-quality optical conjugate structure in optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunguang; An, Ran; Zhang, Chengwei; Lei, Hai; Hu, Xiaodong; Li, Hongbin; Hu, Xiaotang

    2015-02-20

    We propose an approach to realize a high-quality optical conjugate of a piezo-driven mirror (PM) in optical tweezers. Misalignments between the optical beam and the steering center of the PM are analyzed mathematically. The decentrations in different directions cause different changes, either a position change of the conjugate plane or a spot variation of the beam during PM steering. On the other hand, these misalignment-introduced problems provide the information to check the assembling errors. Thus a wanted conjugate plane of the PM can be effectively and precisely achieved according to the detection signals. This approach is also available to deal with multifactor coupling error. At the end, the procedure for error analysis is given by testing homebuilt optical tweezers. PMID:25968206

  3. Optical nanofiber integrated into an optical tweezers for particle manipulation and in-situ fiber probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusachenko, Ivan; Frawley, Mary C.; Truong, Viet. G.; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2014-09-01

    Precise control of particle positioning is desirable in many optical propulsion and sorting applications. Here, we develop an integrated platform for particle manipulation consisting of a combined optical nanofiber and optical tweezers system. Individual silica microspheres were introduced to the nanofiber at arbitrary points using the optical tweezers, thereby producing pronounced dips in the fiber transmission. We show that such consistent and reversible transmission modulations depend on both particle and fiber diameter, and may be used as a reference point for in-situ nanofiber or particle size measurement. Therefore we combine SEM size measurements with nanofiber transmission data to provide calibration for particle-based fiber assessment. We also demonstrate how the optical tweezers can be used to create a `particle jet' to feed a supply of microspheres to the nanofiber surface, forming a particle conveyor belt. This integrated optical platform provides a method for selective evanescent field manipulation of micron-sized particles and facilitates studies of optical binding and light-particle interaction dynamics.

  4. Particle interaction measurements using laser tweezers optical trapping.

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Timothy P.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Grillet, Anne M.; Molecke, Ryan A.

    2008-08-01

    Laser tweezers optical trapping provides a unique noninvasive capability to trap and manipulate particles in solution at the focal point of a laser beam passed through a microscope objective. Additionally, combined with image analysis, interaction forces between colloidal particles can be quantitatively measured. By looking at the displacement of particles within the laser trap due to the presence of a neighboring particle or looking at the relative diffusion of two particles held near each other by optical traps, interparticle interaction forces ranging from pico- to femto-Newtons can be measured. Understanding interaction forces is critical for predicting the behavior of particle dispersions including dispersion stability and flow rheology. Using a new analysis method proposed by Sainis, Germain, and Dufresne, we can simultaneously calculate the interparticle velocity and particle diffusivity which allows direct calculation of the interparticle potential for the particles. By applying this versatile tool, we measure difference in interactions between various phospholipid bilayers that have been coated onto silica spheres as a new type of solid supported liposome. We measure bilayer interactions of several cell membrane lipids under various environmental conditions such as pH and ionic strength and compare the results with those obtained for empty liposomes. These results provide insight into the role of bilayer fluctuations in liposome fusion, which is of fundamental interest to liposome based drug delivery schemes.

  5. Dispersive light-matter interaction in programmable optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Bianca J.; Horvath, Milena S. J.; Deb, Amita B.; Kjørgaard, Niels

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a robust interrogation system using frequency modulation spectroscopy to measure the quantum state-dependent phase shift incurred on an off-resonant optical probe when transmitted by an atomic medium. Recently, our focus has been on extending this technique for the detection of Feshbach resonances in 87Rb atoms. Feshbach resonance is a mechanism which allows the atomic interaction strength to be precisely tuned via an external magnetic field. To access a Feshbach resonance atoms must be independently prepared in certain internal states, during which we utilize programmable optical tweezers to perform precise spatial micro-manipulation of the ensemble in laser "test-tubes." We use our dispersive probing system to identify the resonant magnetic field value in a sample with a dense "ball" geometry. An important design consideration for such a probing scheme is the three-dimensional mode-matching at the interface between light and the atomic sample when coupled by the dispersive interaction. We discuss challenges which dealing with this new geometry compared to the previously used prolate geometry, and consider the possibility of dipole-dipole interactions in our sample leading to cooperative light scattering processes.

  6. Computer-automated program for calibration of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. D.; Foley, T. W.; Chang, A. N.; Mowa, S.; Burris, J. L.; Hester, B. C.

    2012-10-01

    An optical tweezers (OT) system uses focused laser light to contain and manipulate nano-scale to micro-scale particles. Trap stiffness is the quantitative measurement of the ability to trap a particle. For some techniques, this measurement depends on an accurate knowledge of the particle's position in time. A position sensing detector (PSD) is used to track particle motion by detecting laser light from the trapping region. The PSD outputs voltages corresponding to the x- and y-coordinates of particle motion, providing a means of knowing the location of the particle in time. An OT system requires a calibration to convert the measured voltages into accurate distances. This process is time-consuming and frequently needs to be repeated, however, with the growing availability of computer-aided data acquisition and control, the complete process can now be automated, reducing time spent by researchers and increasing level of accuracy of future measurements. We have developed a program written in LabVIEW that will, after initialization, 1) via image processing, calibrate the pixel size of the camera, 2) calibrate the optical tweezer position detector by controlling a motorized mirror to move a trapped bead through a detection laser with simultaneous position detector signal measurements, 3) re-align the trap beam and the detection beam by motorized mirror control, 4) measure position data for the same trapped particle being illuminated by the detection beam, and 5) analyze the position signal via the power spectrum method and equipartition method to give two trap stiffness values for comparison. Previous automated calibration methods require additional and sometimes costly equipment as well as some precalibration of stage motion or pixel size. Here, the user only needs to input the known size of the bead (provided by the manufacturer) into the program, insert their prepared slide into their microscope, input some parameters and make selections, and click "start" in order to achieve experimental values of the camera and position detector calibrations, as well as trap stiffness. We intend to implement many other calibration techniques that require additional equipment, but have designed this initial system for use in a standard position-detection-capable OT setup as long as it has a digital camera and motorized mirror that can be controlled with LabVIEW.

  7. Optical trapping of a spherically symmetric sphere in the ray-optics regime: a model for optical tweezers upon cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yiren; Hsu Long; Chi Sien

    2006-06-01

    Since their invention in 1986, optical tweezers have become a popular manipulation and force measurement tool in cellular and molecular biology. However, until recently there has not been a sophisticated model for optical tweezers on trapping cells in the ray-optics regime. We present a model for optical tweezers to calculate the optical force upon a spherically symmetric multilayer sphere representing a common biological cell. A numerical simulation of this model shows that not only is the magnitude of the optical force upon a Chinese hamster ovary cell significantly three times smaller than that upon a polystyrene bead of the same size, but the distribution of the optical force upon a cell is also much different from that upon a uniform particle, and there is a 30% difference in the optical trapping stiffness of these two cases. Furthermore, under a small variant condition for the refractive indices of any adjacent layers of the sphere, this model provides a simple approximation to calculate the optical force and the stiffness of an optical tweezers system.

  8. Detecting Bacterial Surface Organelles on Single Cells Using Optical Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Zakrisson, Johan; Singh, Bhupender; Svenmarker, Pontus; Wiklund, Krister; Zhang, Hanqing; Hakobyan, Shoghik; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Andersson, Magnus

    2016-05-10

    Bacterial cells display a diverse array of surface organelles that are important for a range of processes such as intercellular communication, motility and adhesion leading to biofilm formation, infections, and bacterial spread. More specifically, attachment to host cells by Gram-negative bacteria are mediated by adhesion pili, which are nanometers wide and micrometers long fibrous organelles. Since these pili are significantly thinner than the wavelength of visible light, they cannot be detected using standard light microscopy techniques. At present, there is no fast and simple method available to investigate if a single cell expresses pili while keeping the cell alive for further studies. In this study, we present a method to determine the presence of pili on a single bacterium. The protocol involves imaging the bacterium to measure its size, followed by predicting the fluid drag based on its size using an analytical model, and thereafter oscillating the sample while a single bacterium is trapped by an optical tweezer to measure its effective fluid drag. Comparison between the predicted and the measured fluid drag thereby indicate the presence of pili. Herein, we verify the method using polymer coated silica microspheres and Escherichia coli bacteria expressing adhesion pili. Our protocol can in real time and within seconds assist single cell studies by distinguishing between piliated and nonpiliated bacteria. PMID:27088225

  9. Fiber optical tweezers for microscale and nanoscale particle manipulation and force sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuxiang

    2011-12-01

    Optical tweezers have been an important tool in biology and physics for studying single molecules and colloidal systems. Most of current optical tweezers are built with microscope objectives, which are: i) expensive, ii) bulky and hard to integrate, iii) sensitive to environmental fluctuations, iv) limited in terms of working distances from the substrate, and v) rigid with the requirements on the substrate (transparent substrate made with glass and with a fixed thickness). These limitations of objective-based optical tweezers prevent them from being miniaturized. Fiber optical tweezers can provide a solution for cost reduction and miniaturization, and these optical tweezers can be potentially used in microfluidic systems. However, the existing fiber optical tweezers have the following limitations: i) low trapping efficiency due to weakly focused beams, ii) lack of the ability to control the positions of multiple particles simultaneously, and iii) limited functionalities. The overall objective of this dissertation work is to further the fundamental understanding of fiber optical tweezers through experimental study and modeling, and to develop novel fiber optical tweezers systems to enhance the capability and functionalities of fiber optical tweezers as microscale and nanoscale manipulators/sensors. The contributions of this dissertation work are summarized as follows. i) An enhanced understanding of the inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers (DFOTs) system has been achieved. Stable three dimensional (3D) optical trapping of a single micron-sized particle has been experimentally demonstrated. This is the first time that the trapping efficiency has been calibrated and the stiffness of the trap has been obtained in the experiments, which has been carried out by using two methods: the drag force method and power spectrum analysis. Such calibration enables the system to be used as a picoNewton-level force sensor in addition to a particle manipulator. The influence of system parameters on the trapping performance has been carefully investigated through both experimental and numerical studies. ii) Multiple traps have been created and carefully studied with the inclined DFOTs for the first time. Three traps, one 3D trap and two 2D traps, have been experimentally created at different vertical levels with adjustable separations and positions. iii) Multiple functionalities have been achieved and studied for the first time with the inclined DFOTs. Particle separation, grouping, stacking, rod alignment, rod rotation, and optical binding have been experimentally demonstrated. The multiple functionalities allow the inclined DFOTs to find applications in the study of interaction forces in colloidal systems as well as parallel particle manipulation in drug delivery systems. iv) Far-field superfocusing effect has been investigated and successfully demonstrated with a fiber-based surface plasmonic (SP) lens for the first time. A planar SP lens with a set of concentric nanoscale rings on a fiber endface has been developed. For the first time, a focus size that is comparable to the smallest achievable focus size of high NA objective lenses has been achieved with the fiber-based SP lens. The fiber-based SP lens can bridge the nanoscale particles/systems and the macroscale power sources/detectors, which has been a long standing challenge for nanophotonics. In addition to optical trapping, the fiber-based SP lens will impact many applications including high-resolution lithography, high-resolution fluorescence detection, and sub-wavelength imaging. v) Trapping ability enhanced with the fiber-based SP lens has been successfully demonstrated. With the help of the fiber-based SP lens, the trapping efficiency of fiber optical tweezers has been significantly enhanced, which is comparable with that of objective-based optical tweezers. A submicron-sized bacterium has been successfully trapped in three dimensions for the first time with optical tweezers based on single fibers.

  10. Hydroxyl radical oxidation of glucose in aqueous aerosol studied in single levitated droplets by laser Raman tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, M. D.; Hunt, O. R.; Ward, A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent work has highlighted that cloud processing of atmospheric contaminants changes the optical properties of these clouds. Airborne particulate matter plays a crucial role in determining the climate and weather of the Earth. The chemical composition of particulate matter affects climate directly, by scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and indirectly, owing to its ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei, thus leading to an increase in cloud formation. Both the direct and indirect effects are influenced by the chemical composition of the aerosol. We present a study of oxidation of important biomass burning marker (glucose) by hydroxyl radical in single optically levitated droplets (1-20μm) using Laser Raman Tweesers. We levitate and hold the aqueous particle in the focus of an Ar-ion laser and photogenerate hydroxyl radical in the particle by a second UV laser. The Particle is subjected to a known RH. Scattered light from the trapping laser is used to provide chemical data in real time via Raman spectroscopy and brightfeild spectroscopy is used to follow the hygrodynamic size changes of the particle also in real time. The decay of glucose and hydrogen peroxide (by Raman spectroscopy) can be a fitted to a kinetic model to determine the rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radical with glucose as shown in the figure. Unlike our previous work (oxidation of organic particles with ozone) we see no size change and thus no change in critical supersaturation following reaction. This surprising result suggests this reaction does not alter cloud optical properties. To our knowledge this is the first time hydroxyl radical chemistry in single droplets has been studied by laser Raman tweezers. The work demonstrates that laser Raman tweezers is an excellent technique for studying the effect of oxidation reaction on the hygroscopic properties of aerosol. Loss of glucose and hydrogen peroxide from single optically levitated particle during photolysis of hydrogen peroxide by 350nm laser. Points determined by Raman spectroscopy. The decay of hydrogen peroxide and glucose can be fitted to simple kinetic model to determine rate constant of OH reacting with glucose (solid lines)

  11. Dye lasing in optically manipulated liquid aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadag, Yasin; Aas, Mehdi; Jonáš, Alexandr; Anand, Suman; McGloin, David; Kiraz, Alper

    2013-09-01

    We present dye lasing from optically manipulated glycerol-water aerosols with diameters ranging between 7.7 and 11.0 μm confined in optical tweezers. While being optically trapped near the focal point of an infrared laser, the droplets stained with Rhodamine B were pumped with a Q-switched green laser and their fluorescence emission spectra featuring whispering gallery modes (WGMs) were recorded with a spectrograph. Nonlinear dependence of the intensity of the droplet WGMs on the pump laser fluence indicates dye lasing. The average wavelength of the lasing WGMs could be tuned between 600 and 630 nm by adjusting the droplet size. These results may lead to new ways of probing airborne particles, exploiting the high sensitivity of stimulated emission to small perturbations in the droplet laser cavity and the gain medium.

  12. Automatic real time evaluation of red blood cell elasticity by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Diógenes S.; Silva, Diego C. N.; Williams, Ajoke J.; Bezerra, Marcos A. C.; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E.

    2015-05-01

    Optical tweezers have been used to trap, manipulate, and measure individual cell properties. In this work, we show that the association of a computer controlled optical tweezers system with image processing techniques allows rapid and reproducible evaluation of cell deformability. In particular, the deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) plays a key role in the transport of oxygen through the blood microcirculation. The automatic measurement processes consisted of three steps: acquisition, segmentation of images, and measurement of the elasticity of the cells. An optical tweezers system was setup on an upright microscope equipped with a CCD camera and a motorized XYZ stage, computer controlled by a Labview platform. On the optical tweezers setup, the deformation of the captured RBC was obtained by moving the motorized stage. The automatic real-time homemade system was evaluated by measuring RBCs elasticity from normal donors and patients with sickle cell anemia. Approximately 150 erythrocytes were examined, and the elasticity values obtained by using the developed system were compared to the values measured by two experts. With the automatic system, there was a significant time reduction (60 × ) of the erythrocytes elasticity evaluation. Automated system can help to expand the applications of optical tweezers in hematology and hemotherapy.

  13. Mapping force of interaction between PLGA nanoparticle with cell membrane using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhajed, Suyash; Gu, Ling; Homayoni, Homa; Nguyen, Kytai; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-03-01

    Drug delivery using magnetic (Fe 3 O4) Poly Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid (PLGA) nanoparticles is finding increasing usage in therapeutic applications due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility and targeted localization. Since optical tweezers allow non-contact, highly sensitive force measurement, we utilized optical tweezers for studying interaction forces between the Fe 3 O4 -PLGA nanoparticles with prostate cancer PC3 cells. Presence of Fe 3 O4 within the PLGA shell allowed efficient trapping of these nanoparticles in near-IR optical tweezers. The conglomerated PLGA nanoparticles could be dispersed by use of the optical tweezers. Calibration of trapping stiffness as a function of laser beam power was carried out using equipartition theorem method, where the mean square displacement was measured with high precision using time-lapse fluorescence imaging of the nanoparticles. After the trapped PLGA nanoparticle was brought in close vicinity of the PC3 cell membrane, displacement of the nanoparticle from trap center was measured as a function of time. In short time scale (30 sec) , whiletheforceofinteractionwaswithin 0.2 pN , theforceincreasedbeyond 1 pNatlongertimescales (~ 10 min). We will present the results of the time-varying force of interactions between PLGA nanoparticles with PC3 cells using optical tweezers.

  14. Automatic real time evaluation of red blood cell elasticity by optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Moura, Diógenes S; Silva, Diego C N; Williams, Ajoke J; Bezerra, Marcos A C; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E

    2015-05-01

    Optical tweezers have been used to trap, manipulate, and measure individual cell properties. In this work, we show that the association of a computer controlled optical tweezers system with image processing techniques allows rapid and reproducible evaluation of cell deformability. In particular, the deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) plays a key role in the transport of oxygen through the blood microcirculation. The automatic measurement processes consisted of three steps: acquisition, segmentation of images, and measurement of the elasticity of the cells. An optical tweezers system was setup on an upright microscope equipped with a CCD camera and a motorized XYZ stage, computer controlled by a Labview platform. On the optical tweezers setup, the deformation of the captured RBC was obtained by moving the motorized stage. The automatic real-time homemade system was evaluated by measuring RBCs elasticity from normal donors and patients with sickle cell anemia. Approximately 150 erythrocytes were examined, and the elasticity values obtained by using the developed system were compared to the values measured by two experts. With the automatic system, there was a significant time reduction (60×) of the erythrocytes elasticity evaluation. Automated system can help to expand the applications of optical tweezers in hematology and hemotherapy. PMID:26026527

  15. Silicon photonics for functional on-chip optical tweezers devices and circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hong; Wang, Jiawei; Poon, Andrew W.

    2013-02-01

    Silicon photonics using waveguide- and microresonator-based devices are finding technologically important applications in the field of optofluidics. By integrating microfluidic channels on top of silicon-based planar devices, silicon photonic devices can function as on-chip optical tweezers to manipulate micro/nanoparticles. In this paper, we will highlight our recent progress in the field of optofluidics using silicon nitride devices for on-chip optical manipulation including the experimental demonstrations of: (i) planar optical tweezers using waveguide junctions with and without tapers, (ii) microparticle buffering and dropping on microring resonator devices upon linearly polarized light and (iii) microparticle trapping and assembling on circular microdisk resonators. Such devices can function as basic building blocks for "optical tweezers circuits" in lab-on-chip applications.

  16. Near-field enhanced optical tweezers utilizing femtosecond-laser nanostructured substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kotsifaki, D. G. Kandyla, M.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2015-11-23

    We present experimental evidence of plasmonic-enhanced optical tweezers, of polystyrene beads in deionized water in the vicinity of metal-coated nanostructures. The optical tweezers operate with a continuous wave near-infrared laser. We employ a Cu/Au bilayer that significantly improves dissipation of heat generated by the trapping laser beam and avoid de-trapping from heat convection currents. We investigate the improvement of the optical trapping force and the effective trapping quality factor, and observe an exponential distance dependence of the trapping force from the nanostructures, indicative of evanescent plasmonic enhancement.

  17. Near-field enhanced optical tweezers utilizing femtosecond-laser nanostructured substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsifaki, D. G.; Kandyla, M.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental evidence of plasmonic-enhanced optical tweezers, of polystyrene beads in deionized water in the vicinity of metal-coated nanostructures. The optical tweezers operate with a continuous wave near-infrared laser. We employ a Cu/Au bilayer that significantly improves dissipation of heat generated by the trapping laser beam and avoid de-trapping from heat convection currents. We investigate the improvement of the optical trapping force and the effective trapping quality factor, and observe an exponential distance dependence of the trapping force from the nanostructures, indicative of evanescent plasmonic enhancement.

  18. Fiber based optical tweezers for simultaneous in situ force exertion and measurements in a 3D polyacrylamide gel compartment.

    PubMed

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M; Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-07-01

    Optical tweezers play an important role in biological applications. However, it is difficult for traditional optical tweezers based on objective lenses to work in a three-dimensional (3D) solid far away from the substrate. In this work, we develop a fiber based optical trapping system, namely inclined dual fiber optical tweezers, that can simultaneously apply and measure forces both in water and in a 3D polyacrylamide gel matrix. In addition, we demonstrate in situ, non-invasive characterization of local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide gel by measurements on an embedded bead. The fiber optical tweezers measurements agree well with those of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The inclined dual fiber optical tweezers provide a promising and versatile tool for cell mechanics study in 3D environments. PMID:26203364

  19. Fiber based optical tweezers for simultaneous in situ force exertion and measurements in a 3D polyacrylamide gel compartment

    PubMed Central

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M; Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-01-01

    Optical tweezers play an important role in biological applications. However, it is difficult for traditional optical tweezers based on objective lenses to work in a three-dimensional (3D) solid far away from the substrate. In this work, we develop a fiber based optical trapping system, namely inclined dual fiber optical tweezers, that can simultaneously apply and measure forces both in water and in a 3D polyacrylamide gel matrix. In addition, we demonstrate in situ, non-invasive characterization of local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide gel by measurements on an embedded bead. The fiber optical tweezers measurements agree well with those of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The inclined dual fiber optical tweezers provide a promising and versatile tool for cell mechanics study in 3D environments. PMID:26203364

  20. Calibration of a dual-trap optical tweezers for single molecule force spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoqing; Hu, Chunguang; Gao, Xiaoqing; Su, Chenguang; Wang, Sirong; Lei, Hai; Hu, Xiaodong; Li, Hongbin; Hu, Xiaotang

    2015-10-01

    Optical tweezers has shown its significant advantages in applying pico-Newton force on micro beads and handling them with nanometer-level precision, and becomes a powerful tool for single-molecule biology. Many excellent researching results in use of the optical tweezers have been reported. Most of them focus on the single-trap optical tweezers experiments. However, when a single-trap optical tweezers is applied to biological molecule, there is often an obvious noise from the sample chamber holder to which one end of the sample molecule is tethered. In contrast, a dual-trap optical tweezers can intrinsically avoid this problem because both ends of the sample tethered to microspheres are manipulated with two separate optical traps. In order to force the molecule precisely, it is of importance to do calibrations for both traps. Many approaches have been studied to obtain the stiffness and sensitivity of the trap, but those are not quite suitable for making calibration during experiment. Here, we use a modified method of power spectrum density (PSD) for the calibrations of the stiffness and sensitivity of the traps, which combines a sinusoidal motion of the sample stage. The main strength of the method is that the beads used for the calibration also can be used in experiment later. In addition, the calibration can be performed during experiment. Finally, an experiment using a dsDNA molecule to test the system is presented. The results show that the calibration approach for the dual-trap optical tweezers is efficient and accurate.

  1. Substrate-dependent cell elasticity measured by optical tweezers indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad S.; Ndoye, Fatou; Coceano, Giovanna; Niemela, Joseph; Bonin, Serena; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, cell elasticity has been widely investigated as a potential label free indicator for cellular alteration in different diseases, cancer included. Cell elasticity can be locally measured by pulling membrane tethers, stretching or indenting the cell using optical tweezers. In this paper, we propose a simple approach to perform cell indentation at pN forces by axially moving the cell against a trapped microbead. The elastic modulus is calculated using the Hertz-model. Besides the axial component, the setup also allows us to examine the lateral cell-bead interaction. This technique has been applied to measure the local elasticity of HBL-100 cells, an immortalized human cell line, originally derived from the milk of a woman with no evidence of breast cancer lesions. In addition, we have studied the influence of substrate stiffness on cell elasticity by performing experiments on cells cultured on two substrates, bare and collagen-coated, having different stiffness. The mean value of the cell elastic modulus measured during indentation was 26±9 Pa for the bare substrate, while for the collagen-coated substrate it diminished to 19±7 Pa. The same trend was obtained for the elastic modulus measured during the retraction of the cell: 23±10 Pa and 13±7 Pa, respectively. These results show the cells adapt their stiffness to that of the substrate and demonstrate the potential of this setup for low-force probing of modifications to cell mechanics induced by the surrounding environment (e.g. extracellular matrix or other cells).

  2. Mechanical properties of stored red blood cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Alexandre de Thomaz, Andre; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; de Lourdes Barjas-Castro, Maria; Brandao, Marcelo M.; Saad, Sara T. O.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the red blood cell (RBC) membrane overall elasticity μ by measuring the deformation of the cells when dragged at a constant velocity through a plasma fluid by an optical tweezers. The deformability of erythrocytes is a critical determinant of blood flow in the microcirculation. We tested our method and hydrodynamic models, which included the presence of two walls, by measuring the RBC deformation as a function of drag velocity and of the distance to the walls. The capability and sensitivity of this method can be evaluated by its application to a variety of studies, such as, the measurement of RBC elasticity of sickle cell anemia patients comparing homozygous (HbSS), including patients taking hydroxyrea (HU) and heterozygous (HbAS) with normal donors and the RBC elasticity measurement of gamma irradiated stored blood for transfusion to immunosupressed patients as a function of time and dose. These studies show that the technique has the sensitivity to discriminate heterozygous and homozygous sickle cell anemia patients from normal donors and even follow the course of HU treatment of Homozygous patients. The gamma irradiation studies show that there is no significant change in RBC elasticity over time for up to 14 days of storage, regardless of whether the unit was irradiated or not, but there was a huge change in the measured elasticity for the RBC units stored for more than 21 days after irradiation. These finds are important for the assessment of stored irradiated RBC viability for transfusion purposes because the present protocol consider 28 storage days after irradiation as the limit for the RBC usage.

  3. Dynamic properties of bacterial pili measured by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallman, Erik G.; Andersson, Magnus J.; Schedin, Staffan S.; Jass, Jana; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2004-10-01

    The ability of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to cause urinary tract infections is dependent on their ability to colonize the uroepithelium. Infecting bacteria ascend the urethra to the bladder and then kidneys by attaching to the uroepithelial cells via the differential expression of adhesins. P pili are associated with pyelonephritis, the more severe infection of the kidneys. In order to find means to treat pyelonephritis, it is therefore of interest to investigate the properties P pili. The mechanical behavior of individual P pili of uropathogenic Escherichia coli has recently been investigated using optical tweezers. P pili, whose main part constitutes the PapA rod, composed of ~1000 PapA subunits in a helical arrangement, are distributed over the bacterial surface and mediate adhesion to host cells. We have earlier studied P pili regarding its stretching/elongation properties where we have found and characterized three different elongation regions, of which one constitute an unfolding of the quaternary (helical) structure of the PapA rod. It was shown that this unfolding takes place at an elongation independent force of 27 +/- 2 pN. We have also recently performed studies on its folding properties and shown that the unfolding/folding of the PapA rod is completely reversible. Here we present a study of the dynamical properties of the PapA rod. We show, among other things, that the unfolding force increases and that the folding force decreases with the speed of unfolding and folding respectively. Moreover, the PapA rod can be folded-unfolded a significant number of times without loosing its characteristics, a phenomenon that is believed to be important for the bacterium to keep close contact to the host tissue and consequently helps the bacterium to colonize the host tissue.

  4. Mechanical property analysis of stored red blood cell using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjie; Wen, Cheng; Xie, Huimin; Ye, Anpei; Yin, Yajun

    2009-05-01

    The deformation of human red blood cells subjected to direct stretching by optical tweezers was analyzed. The maximum force exerted by optical tweezers on the cell via a polystyrene microbead 5microm in diameter was 315pN. Digital image correlation (DIC) method was introduced to calculate the force and the deformation of the cell for the first time. Force-extension relation curves of the biconcave cell were quantitatively assessed when erythrocytes were stored in Alsever's Solution for 2 days, 5 days, 7 days and 14 days respectively. Experiment results demonstrated that the deformability of red blood cells was impaired with the stored time. PMID:19168336

  5. On-site manipulation of single whole-genome DNA molecules using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oana, Hidehiro; Kubo, Koji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2004-11-01

    In this letter, we describe a noninvasive methodology for manipulating single Mb-size whole-genome DNA molecules. Cells were subjected to osmotic shock and the genome DNA released from the burst cells was transferred to a region of higher salt concentration using optical tweezers. The transferred genome DNA exhibits a conformational transition from a compact state into an elongated state, accompanied by the change in its environment. The applicability of optical tweezers to the on-site manipulation of giant genome DNA is suggested, i.e., lab-on-a-plate.

  6. Noncontact microsurgery and micromanipulation of living cells with combined system femtosecond laser scalpel-optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ina, Inna V.; Sitnikov, Dmitry S.; Ovchinnikov, Andrey V.; Agranat, Mikhail B.; Khramova, Yulia V.; Semenova, Maria L.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the results of using self-developed combined laser system consisting of a femtosecond laser scalpel (Cr:Forsterite seed oscillator and a regenerative amplifier, 620 nm, 100 fs, 10 Hz) and optical tweezers (cw laser, 1064 nm) for performing noncontact laser-mediated polar body (PB) and trophectoderm (TE) biopsy of early mammalian embryos. To perform PB biopsy the femtosecond laser scalpel was initially used to drill an opening in the zona pellucida, and then the PB was extracted out of the zygote with the optical tweezers. Unlike PB biopsy, TE biopsy allows diagnosing maternally-derived as well as paternally-derived defects. Moreover, as multiple TE cells can be taken from the embryo, more reliable diagnosis can be done. TE biopsy was performed by applying laser pulses to dissect the desired amount of TE cells that had just left the zona pellucida during the hatching. Optical tweezers were then used to trap and move the dissected TE cells in a prescribed way. Laser power in optical tweezers and energy of femtosecond laser pulses were thoroughly optimized to prevent cell damage and obtain high viability rates. In conclusion, the proposed techniques of laser-based embryo biopsy enable accurate, contamination-free, simple and quick microprocessing of living cells.

  7. Listening to proteins and viruses with nanoaperture optical tweezers (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Reuven

    2015-08-01

    This talk will present a nanoaperture tweezer approach to measure the acoustic spectra of viruses and single proteins. The approach, termed extraordinary optical Raman (EAR), shows promise for uncovering the structure and mechanical properties of nanoparticles as well as the effects of their interactions.

  8. Analysis of optical trap mediated aerosol coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, N. S.; Power, R.; Anand, S.; McGloin, D.; Almohamedi, A.; Downie, M.; Reid, J. P.; Hudson, A. J.

    2012-10-01

    The use of optical tweezers for the analysis of aerosols is valuable for understanding the dynamics of atmospherically relevant particles. However to be able to make accurate measurements that can be directly tied to real-world phenomena it is important that we understand the influence of the optical trap on those processes. One process that is seemingly straightforward to study with these techniques is binary droplet coalescence, either using dual beam traps, or by particle collision with a single trapped droplet. This binary coalescence is also of interest in many other processes that make use of dense aerosol sprays such as spray drying and the use of inhalers for drug delivery in conditions such as asthma or hay fever. In this presentation we discuss the use of high speed (~5000 frames per second) video microscopy to track the dynamics of particles as they approach and interact with a trapped aqueous droplet and develop this analysis further by considering elastic light scattering from droplets as they undergo coalescence. We find that we are able to characterize the re-equilibration time of droplets of the same phase after they interact and that the trajectories taken by airborne particles influenced by an optical trap are often quite complex. We also examine the role of parameters such as the salt concentration of the aqueous solutions used and the influence of laser wavelength.

  9. Time-shared optical tweezers with a microlens array for dynamic microbead arrays.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Wakida, Shin-Ichi

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic arrays of microbeads and cells offer great flexibility and potential as platforms for sensing and manipulation applications in various scientific fields, especially biology and medicine. Here, we present a simple method for assembling and manipulating dense dynamic arrays based on time-shared scanning optical tweezers with a microlens array. Three typical examples, including the dynamic and simultaneous bonding of microbeads in real-time, are demonstrated. The optical design and the hardware setup for our approach are also described. PMID:26504619

  10. Time-shared optical tweezers with a microlens array for dynamic microbead arrays

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Wakida, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic arrays of microbeads and cells offer great flexibility and potential as platforms for sensing and manipulation applications in various scientific fields, especially biology and medicine. Here, we present a simple method for assembling and manipulating dense dynamic arrays based on time-shared scanning optical tweezers with a microlens array. Three typical examples, including the dynamic and simultaneous bonding of microbeads in real-time, are demonstrated. The optical design and the hardware setup for our approach are also described. PMID:26504619

  11. Dynamic Simulation of Trapping and Controlled Rotation of a Microscale Rod Driven by Line Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghshenas-Jaryani, Mahdi; Bowling, Alan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2013-03-01

    Since the invention of optical tweezers, several biological and engineering applications, especially in micro-nanofluid, have been developed. For example, development of optically driven micromotors, which has an important role in microfluidic applications, has vastly been considered. Despite extensive experimental studies in this field, there is a lack of theoretical work that can verify and analyze these observations. This work develops a dynamic model to simulate trapping and controlled rotation of a microscale rod under influence of the optical trapping forces. The laser beam, used in line optical tweezers with a varying trap's length, was modeled based on a ray-optics approach. Herein, the effects of viscosity of the surrounding fluid (water), gravity, and buoyancy were included in the proposed model. The predicted results are in overall agreement with the experimental observation, which make the theoretical model be a viable tool for investigating the dynamic behavior of small size objects manipulated by optical tweezers in fluid environments. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. MCB-1148541.

  12. 2D multiforce optical tweezers to investigate cell adhesion strengthening in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emiliani, Valentina; Sanvitto, Daniele; Durieux, Christiane

    2006-04-01

    We present the multi trap optical tweezers system that enables to generate two-dimensional dynamical configurations of focal spot where the trapping force of each element can be individually changed. We apply the system to investigate how substrate rigidity affects the strength of the integrin-extracellular matrix adhesion in living cells. Adhesion sites of different rigidity are mimicked by simultaneously attaching on cell cortex beads held by optical traps of different stiffness. We monitor the effect induced by the local rigidity on cell adhesion by looking at vinculin recruitment in GFP-Vin transfected HeLa cell. To this end the optical tweezers system is inserted in an epifluorescence inverted microscope.

  13. An Improved Optical Tweezers Assay for Measuring the Force Generation of Single Kinesin Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Rao, Lu; Gennerich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Numerous microtubule-associated molecular motors, including several kinesins and cytoplasmic dynein, produce opposing forces that regulate spindle and chromosome positioning during mitosis. The motility and force generation of these motors are therefore critical to normal cell division, and dysfunction of these processes may contribute to human disease. Optical tweezers provide a powerful method for studying the nanometer motility and piconewton force generation of single motor proteins in vitro. Using kinesin-1 as a prototype, we present a set of step-by-step, optimized protocols for expressing a kinesin construct (K560-GFP) in Escherichia coli, purifying it, and studying its force generation in an optical tweezers microscope. We also provide detailed instructions on proper alignment and calibration of an optical trapping microscope. These methods provide a foundation for a variety of similar experiments. PMID:24633799

  14. A new iterative Fourier transform algorithm for optimal design in holographic optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmolo, P.; Miccio, L.; Merola, F.; Ferraro, P.; Netti, P. A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose a new Iterative Fourier Transform Algorithm (IFTA) capable to suppress ghost traps and noise in Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOT), maintaining a high diffraction efficiency in a computational time comparable with the others iterative algorithms. The process consists in the planning of the suitable ideal target of optical tweezers as input of classical IFTA and we show we are able to design up to 4 real traps, in the field of view imaged by the microscope objective, using an IFTA built on fictitious phasors, located in strategic positions in the Fourier plane. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is evaluated both for numerical and optical reconstructions and compared with the other techniques known in literature.

  15. Characterization of Individual Magnetic Nanoparticles in Solution by Double Nanohole Optical Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haitian; Jones, Steven; Choi, Byoung-Chul; Gordon, Reuven

    2016-04-13

    We study individual superparamagnetic Fe3O4 (magnetite) nanoparticles in solution using a double nanohole optical tweezer with magnetic force setup. By analysis of the trapping optical transmission signal (step size, autocorrelation, the root-mean-square signal, and the distribution with applied magnetic field), we are able to measure the refractive index, magnetic susceptibility, remanence and size of each trapped nanoparticle. The size distribution is found to agree well with scanning electron microscopy measurements, and the permeability, magnetic susceptibility and remanence values are all in agreement with published results. Our approach demonstrates the versatility of the optical tweezer with magnetic field setup to characterize nanoparticles in fluidic mixtures with potential for isolation of desired particles and pick-and-place functionality. PMID:26977716

  16. Optical levitation and manipulation of stuck particles with pulsed optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok Ambardekar, Amol; Li, Yong-Qing

    2005-07-01

    We report on optical levitation and manipulation of microscopic particles that are stuck on a glass surface with pulsed optical tweezers. An infrared pulse laser at 1.06 μm was used to generate a large gradient force (up to 10^-9 N) within a short duration (~45 μs) that overcomes the adhesive interaction between the particles and the glass surface. Then a low-power continuous-wave diode laser at 785 nm was used to capture and manipulate the levitated particle. We have demonstrated that both stuck dielectric and biological micrometer-sized particles, including polystyrene beads, yeast cells, and Bacillus cereus bacteria, can be levitated and manipulated with this technique. We measured the single-pulse levitation efficiency for 2.0 μm polystyrene beads as a function of the pulse energy and of the axial displacement from the stuck particle to the pulsed laser focus, which was as high as 88%.

  17. New biodiagnostics based on optical tweezers: typing red blood cells, and identification of drug resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jia-Wen; Lin, Chuen-Fu; Wang, Shyang-Guang; Lee, Yi-Chieh; Chiang, Chung-Han; Huang, Min-Hui; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Vitrant, Guy; Pan, Ming-Jeng; Lee, Horng-Mo; Liu, Yi-Jui; Baldeck, Patrice L.; Lin, Chih-Lang

    2013-09-01

    Measurements of optical tweezers forces on biological micro-objects can be used to develop innovative biodiagnostics methods. In the first part of this report, we present a new sensitive method to determine A, B, D types of red blood cells. Target antibodies are coated on glass surfaces. Optical forces needed to pull away RBC from the glass surface increase when RBC antigens interact with their corresponding antibodies. In this work, measurements of stripping optical forces are used to distinguish the major RBC types: group O Rh(+), group A Rh(+) and group B Rh(+). The sensitivity of the method is found to be at least 16-folds higher than the conventional agglutination method. In the second part of this report, we present an original way to measure in real time the wall thickness of bacteria that is one of the most important diagnostic parameters of bacteria drug resistance in hospital diagnostics. The optical tweezers force on a shell bacterium is proportional to its wall thickness. Experimentally, we determine the optical tweezers force applied on each bacteria family by measuring their escape velocity. Then, the wall thickness of shell bacteria can be obtained after calibrating with known bacteria parameters. The method has been successfully applied to indentify, from blind tests, Methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including VSSA (NCTC 10442), VISA (Mu 50), and heto-VISA (Mu 3)

  18. Differential detection of dual traps improves the spatial resolution of optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Chemla, Yann R.; Izhaky, David; Bustamante, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The drive toward more sensitive single-molecule manipulation techniques has led to the recent development of optical tweezers capable of resolving the motions of biological systems at the subnanometer level, approaching the fundamental limit set by Brownian fluctuations. One successful approach has been the dual-trap optical tweezers, in which the system of study is held at both ends by microspheres in two separate optical traps. We present here a theoretical description of the Brownian limit on the spatial resolution of such systems and verify these predictions by direct measurement in a Brownian noise-limited dual-trap optical tweezers. We find that by detecting the positions of both trapped microspheres, correlations in their motions can be exploited to maximize the resolving power of the instrument. Remarkably, we show that the spatial resolution of dual optical traps with dual-trap detection is always superior to that of more traditional, single-trap designs, despite the added Brownian noise of the second trapped microsphere. PMID:16751267

  19. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  20. Single-molecule force spectroscopy using the NanoTracker optical tweezers platform: from design to application.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, A; van Mameren, J; Ragona, S

    2009-08-01

    Since the development of detection and analysis techniques for optical tweezers setups, there has been an ever-increasing interest in optical tweezers as a quantitative method, shifting its applications from a pure manipulation tool towards the investigation of motions and forces. With the capability of manipulation and detection of forces of a few hundred picoNewtons down to a fraction of a picoNewton, optical tweezers are perfectly suitable for the investigation of single molecules. Accordingly, the technique has been extensively used for the biophysical characterization of biomolecules, ranging from the mechanical and elastic properties of biological polymers to the dynamics associated with enzymatic activity and protein motility. Here, the use of state-of-the-art optical tweezers on the elasticity of single DNA molecules is presented, highlighting the possibilities this technique offers for the investigation of protein-DNA interaction, but also for other single molecule applications. Technical in nature, design aspects of the NanoTracker optical tweezers setup are addressed, presenting the recent advances in the development of optical tweezers, ranging from noise reduction to detection and calibration methodology. PMID:19689314

  1. Optical tweezers and surface plasmon resonance combination system based on the high numerical aperture lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Xuchen; Zhang, Bei; Lan, Guoqiang; Wang, Yiqiao; Liu, Shugang

    2015-11-01

    Biology and medicine sample measurement takes an important role in the microscopic optical technology. Optical tweezer has the advantage of accurate capture and non-pollution of the sample. The SPR(surface plasmon resonance) sensor has so many advantages include high sensitivity, fast measurement, less consumption of sample and label-free detection of biological sample that the SPR sensing technique has been used for surface topography, analysis of biochemical and immune, drug screening and environmental monitoring. If they combine, they will play an important role in the biological, chemical and other subjects. The system we propose use the multi-axis cage system, by using the methods of reflection and transmiss ion to improve the space utilization. The SPR system and optical tweezer were builtup and combined in one system. The cage of multi-axis system gives full play to its accuracy, simplicity and flexibility. The size of the system is 20 * 15 * 40 cm3 and thus the sample can be replaced to switch between the optical tweezers system and the SPR system in the small space. It means that we get the refractive index of the sample and control the particle in the same system. In order to control the revolving stage, get the picture and achieve the data stored automatically, we write a LabVIEW procedure. Then according to the data from the back focal plane calculate the refractive index of the sample. By changing the slide we can trap the particle as optical tweezer, which makes us measurement and trap the sample at the same time.

  2. Combining optical tweezers and patch clamp for studies of cell membrane electromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng; Ermilov, Sergey; Murdock, David; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-09-01

    We have designed and implemented a novel experimental setup which combines optical tweezers with patch-clamp apparatus to investigate the electromechanical properties of cellular plasma membranes. In this system, optical tweezers provide measurement of forces at piconewton scale, and the patch-clamp technique allows control of the cell transmembrane potential. A micron-size bead trapped by the optical tweezers is brought in contact with the membrane of a voltage-clamped cell, and subsequently moved away to form a plasma membrane tether. Bead displacement from the trapping center is monitored by a quadrant photodetector for dynamic measurements of tether force. Fluorescent beads and the corresponding fluorescence imaging optics are used to eliminate the shadow of the cell projected on the quadrant photodetector. Salient information associated with the mechanical properties of the membrane tether can thus be obtained. A unique feature of this setup is that the patch-clamp headstage and the manipulator for the recording pipette are mounted on a piezoelectric stage, preventing relative movements between the cell and the patch pipette during the process of tether pulling. Tethers can be pulled from the cell membrane at different holding potentials, and the tether force response can be measured while changing transmembrane potential. Experimental results from mammalian cochlear outer hair cells and human embryonic kidney cells are presented.

  3. Mechanics of the human red blood cell deformed by optical tweezers*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, M.; Lim, C. T.; Suresh, S.

    2003-11-01

    The mechanical deformation characteristics of living cells are known to influence strongly their chemical and biological functions and the onset, progression and consequences of a number of human diseases. The mechanics of the human red blood cell (erythrocyte) subjected to large deformation by optical tweezers forms the subject of this paper. Video photography of the cell deformed in a phosphate buffered saline solution at room temperature during the imposition of controlled stretching forces, in the tens to several hundreds picoNewton range, is used to assess experimentally the deformation characteristics. The mechanical responses of the cell during loading and upon release of the optical force are then analysed to extract the elastic properties of the cell membrane by recourse to several different constitutive formulations of the elastic and viscoelastic behavior within the framework of a fully three-dimensional finite element analysis. A parametric study of various geometric, loading and structural factors is also undertaken in order to develop quantitative models for the mechanics of deformation by means of optical tweezers. The outcome of the experimental and computational analyses is then compared with the information available on the mechanical response of the red blood cell from other independent experimental techniques. Potential applications of the optical tweezers method described in this paper to the study of mechanical deformation of living cells under different stress states and in response to the progression of some diseases are also highlighted.

  4. Polymeric optical fiber tweezers as a tool for single cell micro manipulation and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Soppera, O.; Guerreiro, A.; Jorge, P. A...

    2015-09-01

    In this paper a new type of polymeric fiber optic tweezers for single cell manipulation is reported. The optical trapping of a yeast cell using a polymeric micro lens fabricated by guided photo polymerization at the fiber tip is demonstrated. The 2D trapping of the yeast cells is analyzed and maximum optical forces on the pN range are calculated. The experimental results are supported by computational simulations using a FDTD method. Moreover, new insights on the potential for simultaneous sensing and optical trapping, are presented.

  5. In Vivo Quantification of Peroxisome Tethering to Chloroplasts in Tobacco Epidermal Cells Using Optical Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongbo; Metz, Jeremy; Teanby, Nick A; Ward, Andy D; Botchway, Stanley W; Coles, Benjamin; Pollard, Mark R; Sparkes, Imogen

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes are highly motile organelles that display a range of motions within a short time frame. In static snapshots, they can be juxtaposed to chloroplasts, which has led to the hypothesis that they are physically interacting. Here, using optical tweezers, we tested the dynamic physical interaction in vivo. Using near-infrared optical tweezers combined with TIRF microscopy, we were able to trap peroxisomes and approximate the forces involved in chloroplast association in vivo in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and observed weaker tethering to additional unknown structures within the cell. We show that chloroplasts and peroxisomes are physically tethered through peroxules, a poorly described structure in plant cells. We suggest that peroxules have a novel role in maintaining peroxisome-organelle interactions in the dynamic environment. This could be important for fatty acid mobilization and photorespiration through the interaction with oil bodies and chloroplasts, highlighting a fundamentally important role for organelle interactions for essential biochemistry and physiological processes. PMID:26518344

  6. Dual-trap optical tweezers with real-time force clamp control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, Anders E.; Ojala, Heikki; Ziedaite, Gabija; Hæggström, Edward

    2011-08-01

    Single molecule force clamp experiments are widely used to investigate how enzymes, molecular motors, and other molecular mechanisms work. We developed a dual-trap optical tweezers instrument with real-time (200 kHz update rate) force clamp control that can exert 0-100 pN forces on trapped beads. A model for force clamp experiments in the dumbbell-geometry is presented. We observe good agreement between predicted and observed power spectra of bead position and force fluctuations. The model can be used to predict and optimize the dynamics of real-time force clamp optical tweezers instruments. The results from a proof-of-principle experiment in which lambda exonuclease converts a double-stranded DNA tether, held at constant tension, into its single-stranded form, show that the developed instrument is suitable for experiments in single molecule biology.

  7. Membrane tether formation from voltage-clamped outer hair cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Murdock, David R.; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-06-01

    Outer hair cells contribute an active mechanical feedback to the vibrations of the cochlear structures resulting in the high sensitivity and frequency selectivity of normal hearing. We have designed and implemented a novel experimental setup that combines optical tweezers with patch-clamp apparatus to investigate the electromechanical properties of cellular plasma membranes. A micron-size bead trapped by the optical tweezers is brought in contact with the membrane of a voltage-clamped cell, and subsequently moved away to form a plasma membrane tether. Bead displacement during tether elongation is monitored by a quadrant photodetector to obtain time-resolved measurements of the tethering force. Salient information associated with the mechanical properties of the membrane tether can thus be obtained. Tethers can be pulled from the cell membrane at different holding potentials, and the tether force response can be measured while changing transmembrane potential. Experimental results from outer hair cells and human embryonic kidney cells are presented.

  8. DNA as a Metrology Standard for Length and Force Measurements with Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Rickgauer, John Peter; Fuller, Derek N.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2006-01-01

    Optical tweezers have broad applications in studies of structures and processes in molecular and cellular biophysics. Use of optical tweezers for quantitative molecular-scale measurement requires careful calibration in physical units. Here we show that DNA molecules may be used as metrology standards for force and length measurements. Analysis of DNA molecules of two specific lengths allows simultaneous determination of all essential measurement parameters. We validate this biological-calibration method experimentally and with simulated data, and show that precisions in determining length scale factor (∼0.2%), length offset (∼0.03%), force scale factor (∼2%), and compliance of the traps (∼3%) are limited only by current measurement variation, much of which arises from polydispersity of the microspheres (∼2%). We find this procedure to be simpler and more convenient than previous methods, and suggest that it provides an easily replicated standard that can insure uniformity of measurements made in different laboratories. PMID:16963512

  9. Low cost optical tweezers systems using double coil driving stepping motor to controlling sample stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laowattanatham, N.; Cheamanunkul, N.; Plaipichit, S.; Buranasiri, P.; Nuansri, R.

    2013-06-01

    In this research, the low cost optical tweezers systems using X-Y stage has been developed by using 5-phase stepping motor. By using sequential double coil driving, we can obtain the driving torque larger than using the single coil driving. The moving scale is fine resolution at 0.2 micrometer. The overall systems based on microcontroller PIC18F458 and joystick controller with LabView® graphical user interface (GUI). The mechanical damping has been included in the system for decreasing the vibrational noise. By using this method, our optical tweezers system is cheaper than the other commercial system that has been used the piezoelectric driving, and still has the same efficiency.

  10. Probing the structural dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Dustin B; Woodside, Michael T

    2015-10-01

    Conformational changes are an essential feature of most molecular processes in biology. Optical tweezers have emerged as a powerful tool for probing conformational dynamics at the single-molecule level because of their high resolution and sensitivity, opening new windows on phenomena ranging from folding and ligand binding to enzyme function, molecular machines, and protein aggregation. By measuring conformational changes induced in a molecule by forces applied by optical tweezers, new insight has been gained into the relationship between dynamics and function. We discuss recent advances from studies of how structure forms in proteins and RNA, including non-native structures, fluctuations in disordered proteins, and interactions with chaperones assisting native folding. We also review the development of assays probing the dynamics of complex protein-nucleic acid and protein-protein assemblies that reveal the dynamic interactions between biomolecular machines and their substrates. PMID:26189090

  11. Single-cell optoporation and transfection using femtosecond laser and optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Waleed, Muhammad; Hwang, Sun-Uk; Kim, Jung-Dae; Shabbir, Irfan; Shin, Sang-Mo; Lee, Yong-Gu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new single-cell optoporation and transfection technique using a femtosecond Gaussian laser beam and optical tweezers. Tightly focused near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser pulse was employed to transiently perforate the cellular membrane at a single point in MCF-7 cancer cells. A distinct technique was developed by trapping the microparticle using optical tweezers to focus the femtosecond laser precisely on the cell membrane to puncture it. Subsequently, an external gene was introduced in the cell by trapping and inserting the same plasmid-coated microparticle into the optoporated cell using optical tweezers. Various experimental parameters such as femtosecond laser exposure power, exposure time, puncture hole size, exact focusing of the femtosecond laser on the cell membrane, and cell healing time were closely analyzed to create the optimal conditions for cell viability. Following the insertion of plasmid-coated microparticles in the cell, the targeted cells exhibited green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the fluorescent microscope, hence confirming successful transfection into the cell. This new optoporation and transfection technique maximizes the level of selectivity and control over the targeted cell, and this may be a breakthrough method through which to induce controllable genetic changes in the cell. PMID:24049675

  12. Quantitation of Malaria Parasite-Erythrocyte Cell-Cell Interactions Using Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Crick, Alex J.; Theron, Michel; Tiffert, Teresa; Lew, Virgilio L.; Cicuta, Pietro; Rayner, Julian C.

    2014-01-01

    Erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites is an essential step for parasite survival and hence the pathogenesis of malaria. Invasion has been studied intensively, but our cellular understanding has been limited by the fact that it occurs very rapidly: invasion is generally complete within 1 min, and shortly thereafter the merozoites, at least in in vitro culture, lose their invasive capacity. The rapid nature of the process, and hence the narrow time window in which measurements can be taken, have limited the tools available to quantitate invasion. Here we employ optical tweezers to study individual invasion events for what we believe is the first time, showing that newly released P. falciparum merozoites, delivered via optical tweezers to a target erythrocyte, retain their ability to invade. Even spent merozoites, which had lost the ability to invade, retain the ability to adhere to erythrocytes, and furthermore can still induce transient local membrane deformations in the erythrocyte membrane. We use this technology to measure the strength of the adhesive force between merozoites and erythrocytes, and to probe the cellular mode of action of known invasion inhibitory treatments. These data add to our understanding of the erythrocyte-merozoite interactions that occur during invasion, and demonstrate the power of optical tweezers technologies in unraveling the blood-stage biology of malaria. PMID:25140419

  13. Template stripped double nanohole in a gold film for nano-optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Zinck, Aurora A.; Gelfand, Ryan M.; Gordon, Reuven

    2014-12-01

    Double nanohole (DNH) laser tweezers can optically trap and manipulate objects such as proteins, nanospheres, and other nanoparticles; however, precise fabrication of those DNHs has been expensive with low throughput. In this work, template stripping was used to pattern DNHs with gaps as small as 7 nm, in optically thick Au films. These DNHs were used to trap streptavidin as proof of operation. The structures were processed multiple times from the same template to demonstrate reusability. Template stripping is a promising method for high-throughput, reproducible, and cost efficient fabrication of DNH apertures for optical trapping.

  14. Optical macro-tweezers: trapping of highly motile micro-organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalhammer, G.; Steiger, R.; Bernet, S.; Ritsch-Marte, M.

    2011-04-01

    Optical micromanipulation stands for contact-free handling of microscopic particles by light. Optical forces can manipulate non-absorbing objects in a large range of sizes, e.g., from biological cells down to cold atoms. Recently much progress has been made going from the micro- down to the nanoscale. Less attention has been paid to going the other way, trapping increasingly large particles. Optical tweezers typically employ a single laser beam tightly focused by a microscope objective of high numerical aperture to stably trap a particle in three dimensions (3D). As the particle size increases, stable 3D trapping in a single-beam trap requires scaling up the optical power, which eventually induces adverse biological effects. Moreover, the restricted field of view of standard optical tweezers, dictated by the use of high NA objectives, is particularly unfavorable for catching actively moving specimens. Both problems can be overcome by traps with counter-propagating beams. Our 'macro-tweezers' are especially designed to trap highly motile organisms, as they enable three-dimensional all-optical trapping and guiding in a volume of 2 × 1 × 2 mm3. Here we report for the first time the optical trapping of large actively swimming organisms, such as for instance Euglena protists and dinoflagellates of up to 70 µm length. Adverse bio-effects are kept low since trapping occurs outside high intensity regions, e.g., focal spots. We expect our approach to open various possibilities in the contact-free handling of 50-100 µm sized objects that could hitherto not be envisaged, for instance all-optical holding of individual micro-organisms for taxonomic identification, selective collecting or tagging.

  15. Luminescent nanoparticle trapping with far-field optical fiber-tip tweezers.

    PubMed

    Decombe, Jean-Baptiste; Valdivia-Valero, Francisco J; Dantelle, Graldine; Lemnager, Godefroy; Gacoin, Thierry; Colas des Francs, Grard; Huant, Serge; Fick, Jochen

    2016-02-25

    We report stable and reproducible trapping of luminescent dielectric YAG:Ce(3+) nanoparticles with sizes down to 60 nm using far-field dual fiber tip optical tweezers. The particles are synthesized by a specific glycothermal route followed by an original protected annealing step, resulting in significantly enhanced photostability. The tweezers properties are analyzed by studying the trapped particles residual Brownian motion using video or reflected signal records. The trapping potential is harmonic in the transverse direction to the fiber axis, but reveals interference fringes in the axial direction. Large trapping stiffness of 35 and 2 pN ?m(-1) W(-1) is measured for a fiber tip-to-tip distance of 3 ?m and 300 nm and 60 nm particles, respectively. The forces acting on the nanoparticles are discussed within the dipolar approximation (gradient and scattering force contributions) or exact calculations using the Maxwell Stress Tensor formalism. Prospects for trapping even smaller particles are discussed. PMID:26883602

  16. Luminescent nanoparticle trapping with far-field optical fiber-tip tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decombe, Jean-Baptiste; Valdivia-Valero, Francisco J.; Dantelle, Géraldine; Leménager, Godefroy; Gacoin, Thierry; Colas Des Francs, Gérard; Huant, Serge; Fick, Jochen

    2016-02-01

    We report stable and reproducible trapping of luminescent dielectric YAG:Ce3+ nanoparticles with sizes down to 60 nm using far-field dual fiber tip optical tweezers. The particles are synthesized by a specific glycothermal route followed by an original protected annealing step, resulting in significantly enhanced photostability. The tweezers properties are analyzed by studying the trapped particles residual Brownian motion using video or reflected signal records. The trapping potential is harmonic in the transverse direction to the fiber axis, but reveals interference fringes in the axial direction. Large trapping stiffness of 35 and 2 pN μm-1 W-1 is measured for a fiber tip-to-tip distance of 3 μm and 300 nm and 60 nm particles, respectively. The forces acting on the nanoparticles are discussed within the dipolar approximation (gradient and scattering force contributions) or exact calculations using the Maxwell Stress Tensor formalism. Prospects for trapping even smaller particles are discussed.

  17. Neural Network for Image-to-Image Control of Optical Tweezers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Weiland, Kenneth E.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2004-01-01

    A method is discussed for using neural networks to control optical tweezers. Neural-net outputs are combined with scaling and tiling to generate 480 by 480-pixel control patterns for a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM can be combined in various ways with a microscope to create movable tweezers traps with controllable profiles. The neural nets are intended to respond to scattered light from carbon and silicon carbide nanotube sensors. The nanotube sensors are to be held by the traps for manipulation and calibration. Scaling and tiling allow the 100 by 100-pixel maximum resolution of the neural-net software to be applied in stages to exploit the full 480 by 480-pixel resolution of the SLM. One of these stages is intended to create sensitive null detectors for detecting variations in the scattered light from the nanotube sensors.

  18. Analysis of the influence of manufacturing and alignment related errors on an optical tweezer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampmann, R.; Sinzinger, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we present the design process as well as experimental results of an optical system for trapping particles in air. For positioning applications of micro-sized objects onto a glass wafer we developed a highly efficient optical tweezer. The focus of this paper is the iterative design process where we combine classical optics design software with a ray optics based force simulation tool. Thus we can find the best compromise which matches the optical systems restrictions with stable trapping conditions. Furthermore we analyze the influence of manufacturing related tolerances and errors in the alignment process of the optical elements on the optical forces. We present the design procedure for the necessary optical elements as well as experimental results for the aligned system.

  19. Crosstalk elimination in the detection of dual-beam optical tweezers by spatial filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Dino; Oddershede, Lene B.; Reihani, S. Nader S.

    2014-05-15

    In dual-beam optical tweezers, the accuracy of position and force measurements is often compromised by crosstalk between the two detected signals, this crosstalk leading to systematic and significant errors on the measured forces and distances. This is true both for dual-beam optical traps where the splitting of the two traps is done by polarization optics and for dual optical traps constructed by other methods, e.g., holographic tweezers. If the two traps are orthogonally polarized, most often crosstalk is minimized by inserting polarization optics in front of the detector; however, this method is not perfect because of the de-polarization of the trapping beam introduced by the required high numerical aperture optics. Here we present a simple and easy-to-implement method to efficiently eliminate crosstalk. The method is based on spatial filtering by simply inserting a pinhole at the correct position and is highly compatible with standard back focal plane photodiode based detection of position and force. Our spatial filtering method reduces crosstalk up to five times better than polarization filtering alone. The effectiveness is dependent on pinhole size and distance between the traps and is here quantified experimentally and reproduced by theoretical modeling. The method here proposed will improve the accuracy of force-distance measurements, e.g., of single molecules, performed by dual-beam optical traps and hence give much more scientific value for the experimental efforts.

  20. Measurement of particle motion in optical tweezers embedded in a Sagnac interferometer.

    PubMed

    Galinskiy, Ivan; Isaksson, Oscar; Salgado, Israel Rebolledo; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Mehlig, Bernhard; Hanstorp, Dag

    2015-10-19

    We have constructed a counterpropagating optical tweezers setup embedded in a Sagnac interferometer in order to increase the sensitivity of position tracking for particles in the geometrical optics regime. Enhanced position determination using a Sagnac interferometer has previously been described theoretically by Taylor et al. [Journal of Optics 13, 044014 (2011)] for Rayleigh-regime particles trapped in an antinode of a standing wave. We have extended their theory to a case of arbitrarily-sized particles trapped with orthogonally-polarized counter-propagating beams. The working distance of the setup was sufficiently long to optically induce particle oscillations orthogonally to the axis of the tweezers with an auxiliary laser beam. Using these oscillations as a reference, we have experimentally shown that Sagnac-enhanced back focal plane interferometry is capable of providing an improvement of more than 5 times in the signal-to-background ratio, corresponding to a more than 30-fold improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio. The experimental results obtained are consistent with our theoretical predictions. In the experimental setup, we used a method of optical levitator-assisted liquid droplet delivery in air based on commercial inkjet technology, with a novel method to precisely control the size of droplets. PMID:26480368

  1. 3D multiple optical tweezers based on time-shared scanning with a fast focus tunable lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoshio

    2013-02-01

    Three-dimensional controlled manipulation of individual micro-objects requires multiple optical tweezers that can be independently controlled in a 3D working space with high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, the author presents 3D multiple optical tweezers based on a time-shared scanning technique with an electrically focus tunable lens for axial steering and a two-axis steering mirror for lateral steering. Four typical examples of 3D controlled manipulation, including the rotation of a single bead on its axis, are demonstrated in real time. The optical system design and the control method are also described.

  2. Controlling local temperature in water using femtosecond optical tweezer

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    A novel method of directly observing the effect of temperature rise in water at the vicinity of optical trap center is presented. Our approach relies on changed values of corner frequency of the optical trap that, in turn, is realized from its power spectra. Our two color experiment is a unique combination of a non-heating femtosecond trapping laser at 780 nm, coupled to a femtosecond infrared heating laser at 1560 nm, which precisely controls temperature at focal volume of the trap center using low powers (100-800 µW) at high repetition rate. The geometric ray optics model quantitatively supports our experimental data. PMID:26417491

  3. Tuning the stiffness asymmetry of optical tweezers via polarization control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Jinmyoung; Choi, Jai-Min

    2016-03-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of tailoring the landscape of the optical potential by using the polarization state of a trap laser beam as a tuning knob. Two groups of polystyrene spheres, i.e., 300 nm and 1 μm, are optically trapped individually to investigate the effect of the intrinsic and a strongly-modified optical field distribution on the resulting trap stiffness, respectively. The angular variations of the orthogonal pair of stiffnesses, k x and k y , with the polarization state of the trap laser beam were systematically analyzed, and the results show that polarization control could provide a wide tuning range of trap-stiffness asymmetry ( s T = 1- k x / k y ). The implication of asymmetry control of the optical potential is briefly discussed.

  4. Single beam optical vortex tweezers with tunable orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Drevinskas, Rokas Beresna, Martynas; Kazansky, Peter G.

    2014-06-09

    We propose a single beam method for generating optical vortices with tunable optical angular momentum without altering the intensity distribution. With the initial polarization state varying from linear to circular, we gradually control the torque transferred to the trapped non-absorbing and non-birefringent silica beads. The continuous transition from the maximum rotation speed to zero without changing the trapping potential gives a way to study the complex tribological interactions.

  5. High-resolution dual-trap optical tweezers with differential detection: alignment of instrument components.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Carlos; Chemla, Yann R; Moffitt, Jeffrey R

    2009-10-01

    Optical traps or "optical tweezers" have become an indispensable tool in understanding fundamental biological processes. Using our design, a dual-trap optical tweezers with differential detection, we can detect length changes to a DNA molecule tethering the trapped beads of 1 bp. By forming two traps from the same laser and maximizing the common optical paths of the two trapping beams, we decouple the instrument from many sources of environmental and instrumental noise that typically limit spatial resolution. The performance of a high-resolution instrument--the formation of strong traps, the minimization of background signals from trap movements, or the mitigation of the axial coupling, for example--can be greatly improved through careful alignment. This procedure, which is described in this article, starts from the laser and advances through the instrument, component by component. Alignment is complicated by the fact that the trapping light is in the near infrared (NIR) spectrum. Standard infrared viewing cards are commonly used to locate the beam, but unfortunately, bleach quickly. As an alternative, we use an IR-viewing charge-coupled device (CCD) camera equipped with a C-mount telephoto lens and display its image on a monitor. By visualizing the scattered light on a pair of irises of identical height separated by >12 in., the beam direction can be set very accurately along a fixed axis. PMID:20147041

  6. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Huguet, J. M.; Ritort, F.

    2013-04-15

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  7. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation.

    PubMed

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Huguet, J M; Ritort, F

    2013-04-01

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces. PMID:23635178

  8. In situ microparticle analysis of marine phytoplankton cells with infrared laser-based optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonek, G. J.; Liu, Y.; Iturriaga, R. H.

    1995-11-01

    We describe the application of infrared optical tweezers to the in situ microparticle analysis of marine phytoplankton cells. A Nd:YAG laser (lambda=3D 1064 nm) trap is used to confine and manipulate single Nannochloris and Synechococcus cells in an enriched seawater medium while spectral fluorescence and Lorenz-Mie backscatter signals are simultaneously acquired under a variety of excitation and trapping conditions. Variations in the measured fluorescence intensities of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and phycoerythrin pigments in phytoplankton cells are observed. These variations are related, in part, to basic intrasample variability, but they also indicate that increasing ultraviolet-exposure time and infrared trapping power may have short-term effects on cellular physiology that are related to Chl a photobleaching and laser-induced heating, respectively. The use of optical tweezers to study the factors that affect marine cell physiology and the processes of absorption, scattering, and attenuation by individual cells, organisms, and particulate matter that contribute to optical closure on a microscopic scale are also described. (c)1995 Optical Society of America

  9. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuxun; Cheng, Jinping; Kong, Chi-Wing; Wang, Xiaolin; Han Cheng, Shuk; Li, Ronald A.; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  10. Optical tweezers study of red blood cell aggregation and disaggregation in plasma and protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisung; Kinnunen, Matti; Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Evgeny V.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Meglinski, Igor; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of optical tweezers (OT)-induced spontaneous aggregation and disaggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied at the level of cell doublets to assess RBC interaction mechanics. Measurements were performed under in vitro conditions in plasma and fibrinogen and fibrinogen + albumin solutions. The RBC spontaneous aggregation kinetics was found to exhibit different behavior depending on the cell environment. In contrast, the RBC disaggregation kinetics was similar in all solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating a significant contribution of the studied proteins to the process. The impact of the study on assessing RBC interaction mechanics and the protein contribution to the reversible RBC aggregation process is discussed.

  11. Measuring stall forces in vivo with optical tweezers through light momentum changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas, J.; Farré, A.; López-Quesada, C.; Fernández, X.; Martín-Badosa, E.; Montes-Usategui, M.

    2011-10-01

    The stall forces of processive molecular motors have been widely studied previously in vitro. Even so, in vivo experiments are required for determining the actual performance of each molecular motor in its natural environment. We report the direct measurement of light momentum changes in single beam optical tweezers as a suitable technique for measuring forces inside living cells, where few alternatives exist. The simplicity of this method, which does not require force calibration for each trapped object, makes it convenient for measuring the forces involved in fast dynamic biological processes such us intracellular traffic. Here we present some measurements of the stall force of processive molecular motors inside living Allium cepa cells.

  12. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Shuxun; Wang Xiaolin; Sun Dong; Cheng Jinping; Han Cheng, Shuk; Kong, Chi-Wing; Li, Ronald A.

    2013-07-15

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  13. The Cryptococcus neoformans capsule: lessons from the use of optical tweezers and other biophysical tools.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Bruno; Frases, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, representing one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients. The main virulence factor of C. neoformans is the polysaccharide capsule; however, many fundamental aspects of capsule structure and function remain poorly understood. Recently, important capsule properties were uncovered using optical tweezers and other biophysical techniques, including dynamic and static light scattering, zeta potential and viscosity analysis. This review provides an overview of the latest findings in this emerging field, explaining the impact of these findings on our understanding of C. neoformans biology and resistance to host immune defenses. PMID:26157436

  14. High-resolution, long-term characterization of bacterial motility using optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Min, Taejin L.; Mears, Patrick J.; Chubiz, Lon M.; Rao, Christopher V.; Golding, Ido; Chemla, Yann R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a single-cell motility assay, which allows the quantification of bacterial swimming in a well-controlled environment, for durations of up to an hour and with a temporal resolution higher than the flagellar rotation rates of ~100 Hz. The assay is based on an instrument combining optical tweezers, light and fluorescence microscopy, and a microfluidic chamber. Using this device we characterized the long-term statistics of the run-tumble time series in individual Escherichia coli cells. We also quantified higher-order features of bacterial swimming, such as changes in velocity and reversals of swimming direction. PMID:19801991

  15. The Cryptococcus neoformans capsule: lessons from the use of optical tweezers and other biophysical tools

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Bruno; Frases, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, representing one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients. The main virulence factor of C. neoformans is the polysaccharide capsule; however, many fundamental aspects of capsule structure and function remain poorly understood. Recently, important capsule properties were uncovered using optical tweezers and other biophysical techniques, including dynamic and static light scattering, zeta potential and viscosity analysis. This review provides an overview of the latest findings in this emerging field, explaining the impact of these findings on our understanding of C. neoformans biology and resistance to host immune defenses. PMID:26157436

  16. A modular assembling platform for manufacturing of microsystems by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksouri, Sarah Isabelle; Aumann, Andreas; Ghadiri, Reza; Prüfer, Michael; Baer, Sebastian; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Due to the increased complexity in terms of materials and geometries for microsystems new assembling techniques are required. Assembling techniques from the semiconductor industry are often very specific and cannot fulfill all specifications in more complex microsystems. Therefore, holographic optical tweezers are applied to manipulate structures in micrometer range with highest flexibility and precision. As is well known non-spherical assemblies can be trapped and controlled by laser light and assembled with an additional light modulator application, where the incident laser beam is rearranged into flexible light patterns in order to generate multiple spots. The complementary building blocks are generated by a two-photon-polymerization process. The possibilities of manufacturing arbitrary microstructures and the potential of optical tweezers lead to the idea of combining manufacturing techniques with manipulation processes to "microrobotic" processes. This work presents the manipulation of generated complex microstructures with optical tools as well as a storage solution for 2PP assemblies. A sample holder has been developed for the manual feeding of 2PP building blocks. Furthermore, a modular assembling platform has been constructed for an `all-in-one' 2PP manufacturing process as a dedicated storage system. The long-term objective is the automation process of feeding and storage of several different 2PP micro-assemblies to realize an automated assembly process.

  17. In situ microparticle analysis of marine phytoplankton cells with infrared laser-based optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Sonek, G J; Liu, Y; Iturriaga, R H

    1995-11-20

    We describe the application of infrared optical tweezers to the in situ microparticle analysis of marine phytoplankton cells. A Nd:YAG laser (λ= 1064 nm) trap is used to confine and manipulate single Nannochloris and Synechococcus cells in an enriched seawater medium while spectral fluorescence and Lorenz-Mie backscatter signals are simultaneously acquired under a variety of excitation and trapping conditions. Variations in the measured fluorescence intensities of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and phycoerythrin pigments in phytoplankton cells are observed. These variations are related, in part, to basic intrasample variability, but they also indicate that increasing ultraviolet-exposure time and infrared trapping power may have short-term effects on cellular physiology that are related to Chl a photobleaching and laser-induced heating, respectively. The use of optical tweezers to study the factors that affect marine cell physiology and the processes of absorption, scattering, and attenuation by individual cells, organisms, and particulate matter that contribute to optical closure on a microscopic scale are also described. PMID:21060655

  18. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measured properties of atmospheric aerosol particles are presented. These include aerosol size frequency distribution and complex retractive index. The optical properties of aerosols are computed based on the presuppositions of thermodynamic equilibrium and of Mie-theory.

  19. Nearly deterministic loading of a single cesium atom in a magneto-optical trap and in a microscopic optical tweezer by feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bei; Wang, Jun-Min; Diao, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jie-Ying; Jin, Gang; He, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Based on feedback control techniques and our realization of nearly complete transferring cold cesium (Cs) atoms from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) to a far-off-resonance microscopic optical tweezer, we investigated the possibility for nearly deterministic loading of a single Cs atom in a MOT and in a microscopic optical tweezer. We combined feedback controls on the gradient of the MOT quadrupole magnetic field (QMF) and on blue-detuned light-assisted collisions (LAC) of confined cold atoms in the tweezer. Using active feedback on QMF of the MOT, we have achieved ~ 98% of probability of single atom loading in a MOT. In a microscopic optical tweezer, by combining the feedback controls on the QMF and the LAC, we finally achieved ~ 95.2% of probability of single atom loading in the tweezer. This two-path feedback control scheme may be extended to load a small-size 2D tweezer array with exact single atom trapped in each site simultaneously. This is very important and promising to implement an addressable multiple-qubit system for demonstrating quantum register and quantum processor.

  20. Evaluating cell matrix mechanics using an integrated nonlinear optical tweezer-confocal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Berney; Alonzo, Carlo A. C.; Xia, Lawrence; Speroni, Lucia; Georgakoudi, Irene; Soto, Ana M.; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Cronin-Golomb, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Biomechanics plays a central role in breast epithelial morphogenesis. In this study we have used 3D cultures in which normal breast epithelial cells are able to organize into rounded acini and tubular ducts, the main structures found in the breast tissue. We have identified fiber organization as a main determinant of ductal organization. While bulk rheological properties of the matrix seem to play a negligible role in determining the proportion of acini versus ducts, local changes may be pivotal in shape determination. As such, the ability to make microscale rheology measurements coupled with simultaneous optical imaging in 3D cultures can be critical to assess the biomechanical factors underlying epithelial morphogenesis. This paper describes the inclusion of optical tweezers based microrheology in a microscope that had been designed for nonlinear optical imaging of collagen networks in ECM. We propose two microrheology methods and show preliminary results using a gelatin hydrogel and collagen/Matrigel 3D cultures containing mammary gland epithelial cells.

  1. Chemotaxis study using optical tweezers to observe the strength and directionality of forces of Leishmania amazonensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Fontes, Adriana; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Ayres, Diana C.; Giorgio, Selma; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-08-01

    The displacements of a dielectric microspheres trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) can be used as a force transducer for mechanical measurements in life sciences. This system can measure forces on the 50 femto Newtons to 200 pico Newtons range, of the same order of magnitude of a typical forces induced by flagellar motion. The process in which living microorganisms search for food and run away from poison chemicals is known is chemotaxy. Optical tweezers can be used to obtain a better understanding of chemotaxy by observing the force response of the microorganism when placed in a gradient of attractors and or repelling chemicals. This report shows such observations for the protozoa Leishmania amazomenzis, responsible for the leishmaniasis, a serious tropical disease. We used a quadrant detector to monitor the movement of the protozoa for different chemicals gradient. This way we have been able to observe both the force strength and its directionality. The characterization of the chemotaxis of these parasites can help to understand the infection mechanics and improve the diagnosis and the treatments employed for this disease.

  2. A study of red blood cell deformability in diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Thomas J.; Richards, Christopher J.; Bhatnagar, Rhythm; Pavesio, Carlos; Agrawal, Rupesh; Jones, Philip H.

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) in which high blood sugar levels cause swelling, leaking and occlusions in the blood vessels of the retina, often resulting in a loss of sight. The microvascular system requires red blood cells (RBCs) to undergo significant cellular deformation in order to pass through vessels whose diameters are significantly smaller than their own. There is evidence to suggest that DM impairs the deformability of RBCs, and this loss of deformability has been associated with diabetic kidney disease (or nephropathy) - another microvascular complication of DM. However, it remains unclear whether reduced deformability of RBCs correlates with the presence of DR. Here we present an investigation into the deformability of RBCs in patients with diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers. To extract a value for the deformability of RBCs we use a dual-trap optical tweezers set-up to stretch individual RBCs. RBCs are trapped directly (i.e. without micro-bead handles), so rotate to assume a `side-on' orientation. Video microscopy is used to record the deformation events, and shape analysis software is used to determine parameters such as initial and maximum RBC length, allowing us to calculate the deformability for each RBC. A small decrease in deformability of diabetes cells subject to this stretching protocol is observed when compared to control cells. We also report on initial results on three dimensional imaging of individual RBCs using defocussing microscopy.

  3. A novel single fiber optical tweezers based on light-induced thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Zhihai; Liang, Peibo; Zhang, Yaxun; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2015-07-01

    We present and demonstrate a novel single fiber optical tweezers which can trap and launch (clean) a target polystyrene (PS) microsphere (diameter~10μm) with independent control by using two wavelengths beams: 980nm and 1480nm. We employ 980nm laser beam to trap the target PS microsphere by molding the fiber tip into a special tapered-shape; and we employ 1480nm laser beam to launch the trapped PS microsphere with a certain velocity by using the thermophoresis force generated from the thermal effect due to the high absorption of the 1480nm laser beams in water. When the launching force is smaller than the trapping force, the PS microsphere will be trapped near the fiber tip, and the launching force will blow away other PS microspheres in the workspace realizing the cleaning function; When the launching force is larger than the trapping force, the trapped PS microsphere will be launched away from the fiber tip with a certain velocity and towards a certain direction, realizing the launching function. This PS microsphere launching and cleaning functions expanded new features of single fiber optical tweezers, providing for the possibility of more practical applications in the micro manipulation research fields.

  4. Application of optical tweezers and excimer laser to study protoplast fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantawang, Titirat; Samipak, Sompid; Limtrakul, Jumras; Chattham, Nattaporn

    2015-07-01

    Protoplast fusion is a physical phenomenon that two protoplasts come in contact and fuse together. Doing so, it is possible to combine specific genes from one protoplast to another during fusion such as drought resistance and disease resistance. There are a few possible methods to induce protoplast fusion, for example, electrofusion and chemical fusion. In this study, chemical fusion was performed with laser applied as an external force to enhance rate of fusion and observed under a microscope. Optical tweezers (1064 nm with 100X objective N.A. 1.3) and excimer laser (308 nm LMU-40X-UVB objective) were set with a Nikon Ti-U inverted microscope. Samples were prepared by soaking in hypertonic solution in order to induce cell plasmolysis. Elodea Canadensis and Allium cepa plasmolysed leaves were cut and observed under microscope. Concentration of solution was varied to induce difference turgor pressures on protoplasts pushing at cell wall. Free protoplasts in solution were trapped by optical tweezers to study the effect of Polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution. PEG was diluted by Ca+ solution during the process to induced protoplast cell contact and fusion. Possibility of protoplast fusion by excimer laser was investigated and found possible. Here we report a novel tool for plant cell fusion using excimer laser. Plant growth after cell fusion is currently conducted.

  5. Design of hybrid optical tweezers system for controlled three-dimensional micromanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Tsutsui, Shogo; Kitajima, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) micro/nano-manipulation using optical tweezers is a significant technique for various scientific fields ranging from biology to nanotechnology. For the dynamic handling of multiple/individual micro-objects in a true 3D working space, we present an improved hybrid optical tweezers system consisting of two multibeam techniques. These two techniques include the generalized phase contrast method with a spatial light modulator and the time-shared scanning method with a two-axis steering mirror and an electrically focus-tunable lens. Unlike our previously reported system that could only handle micro-objects in a two and half dimensional working space, the present system has high versatility for controlled manipulation of multiple micro-objects in a true 3D working space. The controlled rotation of five beads forming a pentagon, that of four beads forming a tetrahedron about arbitrary axes, and the fully automated assembly and subsequent 3D translation of micro-bead arrays are successfully demonstrated as part of the 3D manipulation experiment.

  6. Measuring integrated cellular mechanical stress response at focal adhesions by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeleau, François; Bessard, Judicael; Marceau, Normand; Sheng, Yunlong

    2011-09-01

    The ability of cells to sustain mechanical stress is largely modulated by the cytoskeleton. We present a new application of optical tweezers to study cell's mechanical properties. We trap a fibronectin-coated bead attached to an adherent H4II-EC3 rat hepatoma cell in order to apply the force to the cell surface membrane. The bead position corresponding to the cell's local mechanical response at focal adhesions is measured with a quadrant detector. We assessed the cell response by tracking the evolution of the equilibrium force for 40 cells selected at random and selected a temporal window to assess the cell initial force expression at focal adhesions. The mean value of the force within this time window over 40 randomly selected bead/cell bounds was 52.3 pN. Then, we assessed the responses of the cells with modulation of the cytoskeletons, namely the ubiquitous actin-microfilaments and microtubules, plus the differentiation-dependent keratin intermediate filaments. Notably, a destabilization of the first two networks led to around 50 and 30% reductions in the mean equilibrium forces, respectively, relative to untreated cells, whereas a loss of the third one yielded a 25% increase. The differences in the forces from untreated and treated cells are resolved by the optical tweezers experiment.

  7. Formation of an artificial blood vessel: adhesion force measurements with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoener, Gregor; Campbell, Julie H.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2004-10-01

    We are investigating the formation of a tissue capsule around a foreign body. This tissue capsule can be used as an autologous graft for the replacement of diseased blood vessels or for bypass surgery. The graft is grown in the peritoneal cavity of the recipient and the formation starts with the adhesion of cells to the foreign body. We identify the cell type and measure the adhesion of these cells to foreign materials using optical tweezers. Cell adhesion to macroscopic samples and microspheres is investigated. No difference in the adhesion force was measurable for polyethylene, silicon and Tygon on a scale accessible to optical tweezers. The density of adherent cells was found to vary strongly, being highest on polyethylene. The mean rupture forces for cell-microsphere adhesion ranged from 24 to 39 pN and changed upon preadsorption of bovine serum albumin. For plain microspheres, the highest mean rupture force was found for PMMA, which also showed the highest adhesion probability for the cell-microsphere interaction.

  8. Probing mechanical properties of Jurkat cells under the effect of ART using oscillating optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Khakshour, Samaneh; Beischlag, Timothy V; Sparrey, Carolyn; Park, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoid leukemia is a common type of blood cancer and chemotherapy is the initial treatment of choice. Quantifying the effect of a chemotherapeutic drug at the cellular level plays an important role in the process of the treatment. In this study, an oscillating optical tweezer was employed to characterize the frequency-dependent mechanical properties of Jurkat cells exposed to the chemotherapeutic agent, artesunate (ART). A motion equation for a bead bound to a cell was applied to describe the mechanical characteristics of the cell cytoskeleton. By comparing between the modeling results and experimental results from the optical tweezer, the stiffness and viscosity of the Jurkat cells before and after the ART treatment were obtained. The results demonstrate a weak power-law dependency of cell stiffness with frequency. Furthermore, the stiffness and viscosity were increased after the treatment. Therefore, the cytoskeleton cell stiffness as the well as power-law coefficient can provide a useful insight into the chemo-mechanical relationship of drug treated cancer cells and may serve as another tool for evaluating therapeutic performance quantitatively. PMID:25928073

  9. Dynamic holographic optical tweezers using a twisted-nematic liquid crystal display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangfu; Wen, Cheng; Ye, Anpei

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we realize dynamic holographic optical tweezers (HOT) using a commercial twisted-nematic liquid crystal display (TN-LCD) removed from a video projector, and manipulate multiple particles simultaneously. After measuring the parameters of the TN-LCD, we find that it is not suited to work as a phase-only modulator for infrared optical tweezers because of the small range of its phase modulation. To overcome this shortcoming, we employ binary computer-generated holograms obtained with the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm instead of kinoforms, and optimize the diffraction efficiency of the TN-LCD by the choice of the polarization angel of the input laser and the two grey level video signals driving the TN-LCD. Since TN-LCDs are more prevalent than other types of LC devices, such as parallel-aligned nematic and ferroelectric LC devices, our approach provides an easier and lower-cost access to the set-up of a HOT system.

  10. Probing Mechanical Properties of Jurkat Cells under the Effect of ART Using Oscillating Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoid leukemia is a common type of blood cancer and chemotherapy is the initial treatment of choice. Quantifying the effect of a chemotherapeutic drug at the cellular level plays an important role in the process of the treatment. In this study, an oscillating optical tweezer was employed to characterize the frequency-dependent mechanical properties of Jurkat cells exposed to the chemotherapeutic agent, artesunate (ART). A motion equation for a bead bound to a cell was applied to describe the mechanical characteristics of the cell cytoskeleton. By comparing between the modeling results and experimental results from the optical tweezer, the stiffness and viscosity of the Jurkat cells before and after the ART treatment were obtained. The results demonstrate a weak power-law dependency of cell stiffness with frequency. Furthermore, the stiffness and viscosity were increased after the treatment. Therefore, the cytoskeleton cell stiffness as the well as power-law coefficient can provide a useful insight into the chemo-mechanical relationship of drug treated cancer cells and may serve as another tool for evaluating therapeutic performance quantitatively. PMID:25928073

  11. Absolute position total internal reflection microscopy with an optical tweezer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lulu; Woolf, Alexander; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Capasso, Federico

    2014-01-01

    A noninvasive, in situ calibration method for total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) based on optical tweezing is presented, which greatly expands the capabilities of this technique. We show that by making only simple modifications to the basic TIRM sensing setup and procedure, a probe particle’s absolute position relative to a dielectric interface may be known with better than 10 nm precision out to a distance greater than 1 μm from the surface. This represents an approximate 10× improvement in error and 3× improvement in measurement range over conventional TIRM methods. The technique’s advantage is in the direct measurement of the probe particle’s scattering intensity vs. height profile in situ, rather than relying on assumptions, inexact system analogs, or detailed knowledge of system parameters for calibration. To demonstrate the improved versatility of the TIRM method in terms of tunability, precision, and range, we show our results for the hindered near-wall diffusion coefficient for a spherical dielectric particle. PMID:25512542

  12. Micro- and nano-particle trapping using fibered optical nano-tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decombe, Jean-Baptiste; Dantelle, Géraldine; Gacoin, Thierry; Valdivia-Valero, Francisco J.; Colas des Francs, Gérard; Huant, Serge; Fick, Jochen

    2014-09-01

    We present the stable trapping of luminescent 300-nm cerium-doped YAG particles in aqueous suspension using a dual fiber tip optical tweezers. The particles were elaborated using a specific glycothermal synthesis route together with an original protected annealing step. We obtained harmonic trap potentials in the direction transverse to the optical fiber axes. In the longitudinal direction, the potential shows some sub-structure revealed by two peaks in the distribution statistics with a distance of about half the wavelength of the trapping laser. We calculated intensity normalized trapping stiffness of 36 pN•μm-1W-1. These results are compared to previous work of microparticle trapping and discussed thanks to numerical simulations based on finite element method.

  13. Tuning the size and configuration of nanocarbon microcapsules: aqueous method using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frusawa, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Youei

    2014-02-01

    To date, optical manipulation techniques for aqueous dispersions have been developed that deposit and/or transport nanoparticles not only for fundamental studies of colloidal dynamics, but also for either creating photonic devices or allowing accurate control of liquids on micron scales. Here, we report that optical tweezers (OT) system is able to direct three-dimensional assembly of graphene, graphite, and carbon nanotubes (CNT) into microcapsules of hollow spheres. The OT technique facilitates both to visualize the elasticity of a CNT microcapsule and to arrange a triplet of identical graphene microcapsules in aqueous media. Furthermore, the similarity of swelling courses has been found over a range of experimental parameters such as nanocarbon species, the power of the incident light, and the suspension density. Thanks to the universality in evolutions of rescaled capsule size, we can precisely control the size of various nanocarbon microcapsules by adjusting the duration time of laser emission.

  14. A general method for manipulating DNA sequences from any organism with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Derek N.; Gemmen, Gregory J.; Rickgauer, John Peter; DuPont, Aurelie; Millin, Rachel; Recouvreux, Pierre; Schweitzer, Allen L.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2005-08-01

    Here we describe and characterize a method for manipulating desired DNA sequences from any organism with optical tweezers. Molecules are produced from either genomic or cloned DNA by PCR using labeled primers and are tethered between two optically trapped microspheres. We demonstrate that human, insect, plant, bacterial, and viral sequences ranging from ~10 to 40 kbp can be manipulated. Force-extension measurements show that these constructs exhibit uniform elastic properties in accord with the expected contour lengths for the targeted sequences. Detailed protocols for preparing and manipulating these molecules are presented, and tethering efficiency is characterized as a function of DNA concentration, ionic strength, and pH. Attachment strength is characterized by measuring the unbinding time distribution as a function of applied force.

  15. Calibrating oscillation response of a piezo-stage using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin-Hua; Li, Di; Hu, Xin-Yao; Zhong, Min-Cheng; Wang, Zi-Qiang; Gong, Lei; Liu, Wei-Wei; Li, Yin-Mei

    2015-09-21

    In optical tweezers, a piezo-stage (PZT) is widely used to precisely position samples for force clamp, calibrating optical trap and stretching DNA. For a trapped bead in solution, the oscillation response of PZT is vital for all kinds of applications. A coupling ratio, actual amplitude to nominal amplitude, can be calibrated by power spectral density during sinusoidal oscillations. With oscillation frequency increasing, coupling ratio decreases in both x- and y-directions, which is also confirmed by the calibration with light scattering of scanning two aligned beads on slide. Those oscillation responses are related with deformability of chamber and the intrinsic characteristics of PZT. If we take nominal amplitude as actual amplitude for sinusoidal oscillations at 50 Hz, the amplitude is overestimated ~2 times in x-direction and ~3 times in y-direction. That will lead to huge errors for subsequent calibrations. PMID:26406617

  16. Optical tweezers directed one-bead one-sequence synthesis of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Oehrlein, Stefan; Somoza, Mark M; Perez, Jose R Sanchez; Kershner, Ryan; Cerrina, Franco

    2011-05-01

    An optical tweezers directed parallel DNA oligonucleotide synthesis methodology is described in which controlled pore glass (CPG) beads act as solid substrates in a two-stream microfluidic reactor. The reactor contains two parallel sets of physical confinement features that retain beads in the reagent stream for synthetic reaction but allow the beads to be optically trapped and transferred between the reagent and the inert streams for sequence programming. As a demonstration, we synthesized oligonucleotides of target sequence 25-nt, one deletion and one substitution using dimethoxytrityl (DMT) nucleoside phosphoramidite chemistry. In detecting single-nucleotide mismatches, fluorescence in situ hybridization of the bead-conjugated probes showed high specificity and signal-to-noise ratios. These preliminary results suggest further possibilities of creating a novel type of versatile, sensitive and multifunctional reconfigurable one-bead one-compound (OBOC) bead array. PMID:21445444

  17. Composite SERS-based satellites navigated by optical tweezers for single cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Stetciura, Inna Y; Yashchenok, Alexey; Masic, Admir; Lyubin, Evgeny V; Inozemtseva, Olga A; Drozdova, Maria G; Markvichova, Elena A; Khlebtsov, Boris N; Fedyanin, Andrey A; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Gorin, Dmitry A; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we have designed composite SERS-active micro-satellites, which exhibit a dual role: (i) effective probes for determining cellular composition and (ii) optically movable and easily detectable markers. The satellites were synthesized by the layer-by-layer assisted decoration of silica microparticles with metal (gold or silver) nanoparticles and astralen in order to ensure satellite SERS-based microenvironment probing and satellite recognition, respectively. A combination of optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy can be used to navigate the satellites to a certain cellular compartment and probe the intracellular composition following cellular uptake. In the future, this developed approach may serve as a tool for single cell analysis with nanometer precision due to the multilayer surface design, focusing on both extracellular and intracellular studies. PMID:26040199

  18. Tuning the size and configuration of nanocarbon microcapsules: aqueous method using optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Frusawa, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Youei

    2014-01-01

    To date, optical manipulation techniques for aqueous dispersions have been developed that deposit and/or transport nanoparticles not only for fundamental studies of colloidal dynamics, but also for either creating photonic devices or allowing accurate control of liquids on micron scales. Here, we report that optical tweezers (OT) system is able to direct three-dimensional assembly of graphene, graphite, and carbon nanotubes (CNT) into microcapsules of hollow spheres. The OT technique facilitates both to visualize the elasticity of a CNT microcapsule and to arrange a triplet of identical graphene microcapsules in aqueous media. Furthermore, the similarity of swelling courses has been found over a range of experimental parameters such as nanocarbon species, the power of the incident light, and the suspension density. Thanks to the universality in evolutions of rescaled capsule size, we can precisely control the size of various nanocarbon microcapsules by adjusting the duration time of laser emission. PMID:24509866

  19. Optical tweezers assisted imaging of the Z-ring in Escherichia coli: measuring its radial width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmon, G.; Kumar, P.; Feingold, M.

    2014-01-01

    Using single-beam, oscillating optical tweezers we can trap and rotate rod-shaped bacterial cells with respect to the optical axis. This technique allows imaging fluorescently labeled three-dimensional sub-cellular structures from different, optimized viewpoints. To illustrate our method we measure D, the radial width of the Z-ring in unconstricted Escherichia coli. We use cells that express FtsZ-GFP and have their cytoplasmic membrane stained with FM4-64. In a vertically oriented cell, both the Z-ring and the cytoplasmic membrane images appear as symmetric circular structures that lend themselves to quantitative analysis. We found that D ≅ 100 nm, much larger than expected.

  20. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  1. Energy Landscape of Alginate-Epimerase Interactions Assessed by Optical Tweezers and Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Håti, Armend Gazmeno; Aachmann, Finn Lillelund; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Sletmoen, Marit

    2015-01-01

    Mannuronan C-5 epimerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze epimerization of alginates at the polymer level. This group of enzymes thus enables the tailor-making of various alginate residue sequences to attain various functional properties, e.g. viscosity, gelation and ion binding. Here, the interactions between epimerases AlgE4 and AlgE6 and alginate substrates as well as epimerization products were determined. The interactions of the various epimerase–polysaccharide pairs were determined over an extended range of force loading rates by the combined use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. When studying systems that in nature are not subjected to external forces the access to observations obtained at low loading rates, as provided by optical tweezers, is a great advantage since the low loading rate region for these systems reflect the properties of the rate limiting energy barrier. The AlgE epimerases have a modular structure comprising both A and R modules, and the role of each of these modules in the epimerization process were examined through studies of the A- module of AlgE6, AlgE6A. Dynamic strength spectra obtained through combination of atomic force microscopy and the optical tweezers revealed the existence of two energy barriers in the alginate-epimerase complexes, of which one was not revealed in previous AFM based studies of these complexes. Furthermore, based on these spectra estimates of the locations of energy transition states (xβ), lifetimes in the absence of external perturbation (τ0) and free energies (ΔG#) were determined for the different epimerase–alginate complexes. This is the first determination of ΔG# for these complexes. The values determined were up to 8 kBT for the outer barrier, and smaller values for the inner barriers. The size of the free energies determined are consistent with the interpretation that the enzyme and substrate are thus not tightly locked at all times but are able to relocate. Together with the observed different affinities determined for AlgE4-polymannuronic acid (poly-M) and AlgE4-polyalternating alginate (poly-MG) macromolecular pairs these data give important contribution to the growing understanding of the mechanisms underlying the processive mode of these enzymes. PMID:26496653

  2. Energy Landscape of Alginate-Epimerase Interactions Assessed by Optical Tweezers and Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Håti, Armend Gazmeno; Aachmann, Finn Lillelund; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Sletmoen, Marit

    2015-01-01

    Mannuronan C-5 epimerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze epimerization of alginates at the polymer level. This group of enzymes thus enables the tailor-making of various alginate residue sequences to attain various functional properties, e.g. viscosity, gelation and ion binding. Here, the interactions between epimerases AlgE4 and AlgE6 and alginate substrates as well as epimerization products were determined. The interactions of the various epimerase-polysaccharide pairs were determined over an extended range of force loading rates by the combined use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. When studying systems that in nature are not subjected to external forces the access to observations obtained at low loading rates, as provided by optical tweezers, is a great advantage since the low loading rate region for these systems reflect the properties of the rate limiting energy barrier. The AlgE epimerases have a modular structure comprising both A and R modules, and the role of each of these modules in the epimerization process were examined through studies of the A- module of AlgE6, AlgE6A. Dynamic strength spectra obtained through combination of atomic force microscopy and the optical tweezers revealed the existence of two energy barriers in the alginate-epimerase complexes, of which one was not revealed in previous AFM based studies of these complexes. Furthermore, based on these spectra estimates of the locations of energy transition states (xβ), lifetimes in the absence of external perturbation (τ0) and free energies (ΔG#) were determined for the different epimerase-alginate complexes. This is the first determination of ΔG# for these complexes. The values determined were up to 8 kBT for the outer barrier, and smaller values for the inner barriers. The size of the free energies determined are consistent with the interpretation that the enzyme and substrate are thus not tightly locked at all times but are able to relocate. Together with the observed different affinities determined for AlgE4-polymannuronic acid (poly-M) and AlgE4-polyalternating alginate (poly-MG) macromolecular pairs these data give important contribution to the growing understanding of the mechanisms underlying the processive mode of these enzymes. PMID:26496653

  3. Rotational analysis of birefringent crystal particles based on modified theory in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yong; Zhu, Yanying; Yao, Wenying; Pei, Huan

    2015-04-01

    In order to achieve high-precision, controllable rotation of uniaxial birefringent crystal particles, we study the principle of optical rotation due to the transfer of spin angular momentum from light to birefringent crystal particles. The interaction process between the beam and particles is affected by various factors existed actually, for instance: the reflection of beam on the crystal surface, laser power, the set of angle between the crystal optical axis and surface, radius, phase difference between the ordinary ray and extraordinary ray. According to the analysis of these factors, the theoretical model of optical rotation is reconstructed. The theoretical curves of calcium carbonate and silicon particles chosen as experimental material between the rotational frequency and the radius are simulated and calculated. The result shows that the rotation frequency is inversely proportional to the cube of radius, and compared the performance of modified model with traditional model. The birefringent particles are rotated by optical tweezers in the experiment, and rotation frequency is measured with the same laser power. According to the experimental results of optical rotation, the modified Friese theoretical model is proved to be the reasonably and excellence, in addition, the result shows the maximum frequency of calcium carbonate is 19.1Hz, and the maximum frequency of silicon particles is 11.5Hz. The rationality of our experiment is testified by compared with theoretical analysis. Our study has great directive significance to the design of optical driven micro-mechanical motor and the material selection of rotor.

  4. Rapid feedback control and stabilization of an optical tweezers with a budget microcontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Daniel; Wang, Haowei; Milstein, Joshua N.

    2014-09-01

    Laboratories ranging the scientific disciplines employ feedback control to regulate variables within their experiments, from the flow of liquids within a microfluidic device to the temperature within a cell incubator. We have built an inexpensive, yet fast and rapidly deployed, feedback control system that is straightforward and flexible to implement from a commercially available Arduino Due microcontroller. This is in comparison with the complex, time-consuming and often expensive electronics that are commonly implemented. As an example of its utility, we apply our feedback controller to the task of stabilizing the main trapping laser of an optical tweezers. The feedback controller, which is inexpensive yet fast and rapidly deployed, was implemented from hacking an open source Arduino Due microcontroller. Our microcontroller based feedback system can stabilize the laser intensity to a few tenths of a per cent at 200 kHz, which is an order of magnitude better than the laser's base specifications, illustrating the utility of these devices.

  5. 3D Manipulation of Protein Microcrystals with Optical Tweezers for X-ray Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikima, T.; Hashimoto, K.; Murakami, H.; Ueno, G.; Kawano, Y.; Hirata, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Kumasaka, T.; Yamamoto, M.

    2013-03-01

    In some synchrotron facilities such as SPring-8, X-ray microbeams have been utilized for protein crystallography, allowing users to collect diffraction data from a protein microcrystal. Usually, a protein crystal is picked up manually from a crystallization droplet. However it is very difficult to manipulate the protein microcrystals which are very small and fragile against a shock and changes of temperature and solvent condition. We have been developing an automatic system applying the optical tweezers with two lensed fiber probes to manipulate the fragile protein microcrystal. The system succeeded in trapping a crystal and levitating it onto the cryoloop in the solvent. X-ray diffraction measurement for the manipulated protein microcrystals indicated that laser irradiation and trap with 1064nm wavelength hardly affected the result of X-ray structural analysis.

  6. Studies of cochlear outer hair cell membrane mechanics using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, David R.; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2003-06-01

    An optical tweezers system was used to study the mechanical characteristics of outer hair cell (OHC) and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell plasma membranes. The effect of the cationic amphipath chlorpromazine (CPZ) on the equilibrium tethering force, (Feq) force relaxation time constant,(τ) and effective membrane viscosity (ηeff) was measured. The Feq for the OHC lateral wall plasma membrane was ~60 pN and was unchanged by addition of CPZ. A significantly greater τ value was observed in CPZ-treated OHCs (30.5 +/- 12.6 s) than in control OHCs (19.0 +/- 13.2 s). The Feq and τ values for control HEK cells were >60% lower than the respective OHC values but increased by ~3 times following CPZ addition. Effective viscosity ranged between 1.49-1.81 pN•s/μm for CPZ-treated OHCs. This represents a decrease from reported control OHC membrane viscosities.

  7. Measurement of PLGA-NP interaction with single smooth muscle cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Mondal, Argha; Homayoni, Homa; Nguyen, Kytai; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2012-10-01

    For intervention of cardiovascular diseases, biodegradable and biocompatible, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) are emerging as agents of choice for controlled and targeted drug delivery. Therefore development of PLGA-NP with optimal physico-chemical properties will allow efficient binding and thus delivery of drug to targeted cells under various patho-physiological conditions. The force kinetics and its dependence on size of the NPs will be crucial for designing the NPs. Since optical tweezers allow non-contact, highly sensitive force measurement with high spatial and temporal resolution, we utilized it for studying interaction forces between magnetic PLGA nanoparticles with smooth muscle cells (SMC). In order to investigate effect of size, interaction force for 200 to 1100nm PLGA NP was measured. For similar interaction duration, the force was found to be higher with increase in size. The rupture force was found to depend on time of interaction of SMC with NPs.

  8. Mechanism of termination of bacteriophage DNA packaging investigated with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    delToro, Damian J.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2012-10-01

    The genomes of many dsDNA viruses are replicated by a mechanism that produces a long concatemer of multiple genomes. These viruses utilize multifunctional molecular motor complexes referred to as "terminases" that can excise a unit genome length of DNA and package it into preformed viral shells. Remarkably, the terminase motor can initiate packaging at the appropriate start point, translocate DNA, sense when a sufficient length has been packaged, and then switch into a mode where it arrests and cleaves the DNA to release a filled virus particle. We have recently developed an improved method to measure single phage lambda DNA packaging using dual-trap optical tweezers and pre-stalled motor-DNA-procapsid complexes. We are applying this method to test proposed mechanisms for the sensor that triggers termination; specifically a velocity-monitor model vs. energy-monitor model vs. capsid-filling monitor model.

  9. Evaluating the toxic effect of an antimicrobial agent on single bacterial cells with optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Akbar; Zhang, Chensong; Chen, Joseph; Reihani, S. N. S.; Chen, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    We implement an optical tweezers technique to assess the effects of chemical agents on single bacterial cells. As a proof of principle, the viability of a trapped Escherichia coli bacterium is determined by monitoring its flagellar motility in the presence of varying concentrations of ethyl alcohol. We show that the killing time of the bacterium can be effectively identified from the correlation statistics of the positional time series recorded from the trap, while direct quantification from the time series or associated power spectra is intractable. Our results, which minimize the lethal effects of bacterial photodamage, are consistent with previous reports of ethanol toxicity that used conventional culture-based methods. This approach can be adapted to study other pairwise combinations of drugs and motile bacteria, especially to measure the response times of single cells with better precision. PMID:25657879

  10. Evaluating the toxic effect of an antimicrobial agent on single bacterial cells with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Akbar; Zhang, Chensong; Chen, Joseph; Reihani, S N S; Chen, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    We implement an optical tweezers technique to assess the effects of chemical agents on single bacterial cells. As a proof of principle, the viability of a trapped Escherichia coli bacterium is determined by monitoring its flagellar motility in the presence of varying concentrations of ethyl alcohol. We show that the "killing time" of the bacterium can be effectively identified from the correlation statistics of the positional time series recorded from the trap, while direct quantification from the time series or associated power spectra is intractable. Our results, which minimize the lethal effects of bacterial photodamage, are consistent with previous reports of ethanol toxicity that used conventional culture-based methods. This approach can be adapted to study other pairwise combinations of drugs and motile bacteria, especially to measure the response times of single cells with better precision. PMID:25657879

  11. Optical tweezers as a force sensor for separating dielectrophoresis and AC electroosmosis forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyu; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2010-08-01

    Forces experienced by colloidal particles in an AC electric field such as dielectrophoresis (DEP) and AC electro-osmosis (ACEO) have been widely investigated for their application in microfluidic devices. In order to provide a more complete theoretical basis for such AC electrokinetic mechanisms, we propose a method to quantify the two forces upon one individual particle using optical tweezers as a force transducer and lock-in phase sensitive detection technique to allow high selectivity. Using this method, we isolated the ACEO force from the DEP force for charged polystyrene sphere in deionized (DI) water. ACEO free DEP crossover frequencies and a comprehensive 2D-mapping of the frequency dependent ACEO forces are presented in this paper.

  12. Measurement of the microscopic viscosities of microfluids with a dynamic optical tweezers system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuquan; Wu, Xiaojing; Wang, Yijia; Zhu, Siwei; Gao, Bruce Z; Yuan, X-C

    2016-01-01

    Viscosity coefficients of microfluids—Newtonian and non-Newtonian—were explored through the rotational motion of a particle trapped by optical tweezers in a microflute. Unlike conventional methods based on viscometers, our microfluidic system employs samples of less than 30 µl to complete a measurement. Viscosity coefficients of ethanol and fetal bovine serum, as typical examples of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, were obtained experimentally, and found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Additionally, a practical application to a DNA solution with incremental ethidium bromide content was employed and the results are consistent with clinical data, indicating that our system provides a potentially important complementary tool for use in such biological and medical applications.

  13. Determination of femto Newton forces and fluid viscosity using optical tweezers: application to Leishmania amazonensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma; de Castro, Archimedes B., Jr.; Neto, Vivaldo M.; Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Marques, Gustavo P.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this research is to use the displacements of a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) as a force transducer in mechanical measurements in life sciences. To do this we compared the theoretical optical and hydrodynamic models with experimental data under a broad variation of parameters such as fluid viscosity, refractive index, drag velocity and wall proximities. The laser power was measured after the objective with an integration sphere because normal power meters do not provide an accurate measurement for beam with high numerical apertures. With this careful laser power determination the plot of the optical force (calculated by the particle displacement) versus hydrodynamic force (calculated by the drag velocity) under very different conditions shows an almost 45 degrees straight line. This means that hydrodynamic models can be used to calibrate optical forces and vice-versa. With this calibration we observed the forces of polystyrene bead attached to the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for a serious tropical disease. The force range is from 200 femto Newtons to 4 pico Newtons and these experiments shows that OT can be used for infection mechanism and chemotaxis studies in parasites. The other application was to use the optical force to measure viscosities of few microliters sample. Our result shows 5% accuracy measurements.

  14. Cone and rod cells have different target preferences in vitro as revealed by optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Robert J.; Hgnason, Kormkur; Brimacombe, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose When neural circuits are damaged in adulthood, regenerating and sprouting processes must distinguish appropriate targets to recreate the normal circuitry. We tested the ability of adult nerve cells to target specific cells in culture using the retina as a model system. Methods Under sterile culture conditions, retinal cells, isolated from tiger salamander retina, were micromanipulated with optical tweezers to create pairs of first-order photoreceptor cells with second- or third-order retinal neurons. The development of cell contact and presynaptic varicosities, the direction and amount of neuritic growth, and nerve cell polarity were assessed after seven days in vitro. Cultures were labeled for rod opsin to distinguish rod from cone cells and for the alpha subunit of the trimeric G protein Go (Go?) to identify cone-dominated and mixed rod-cone ON bipolar cells. Results Quantitative analysis of growth demonstrated that target preferences were cell-specific: Cone cells preferred second-order bipolar cells, whereas rod cells grew toward third-order neurons, which include amacrine and ganglion cells. In addition, when rod cells grew toward bipolar cells, they chose an abnormally high number of Go?-positive bipolar cells. These growth patterns were not affected by tweezers manipulation or the amount of growth. Cell orientation of the photoreceptor also did not affect preferences: Cells oriented away from dendritic processes could reorient their axonal pole toward the target cell. Conclusions Cone cells preferred normal partners, and rod cells preferred novel partners. These intrinsic preferences indicate that adult nerve cells can have differing capacities for targeting even if they come from the same cell class. Further, these differences may help explain the patterns of photoreceptor sprouting seen in retinal degeneration in which rod, but not cone, cells invade the inner retinal layers where third-order neurons are located. PMID:18432315

  15. Cell manipulation tool with combined microwell array and optical tweezers for cell isolation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Gou, Xue; Chen, Shuxun; Yan, Xiao; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    Isolation from rare cells and deposition of sorted cells with high accuracy for further study are critical to a wide range of biomedical applications. In the current paper, we report an automated cell manipulation tool with combined optical tweezers and a uniquely designed microwell array, which functions for recognition, isolation, assembly, transportation and deposition of the interesting cells. The microwell array allows the passive hydrodynamic docking of cells, while offering the opportunity to inspect the interesting cell phenotypes with high spatio-temporal resolution based on the flexible image processing technique. In addition, dynamic and parallel cell manipulation in three dimensions can realize the target cell levitation from microwell and pattern assembly with multiple optical traps. Integrated with the programmed motorized stage, the optically levitated and assembled cells can be transported and deposited to the predefined microenvironment, so the tool can facilitate the integration of other on-chip functionalities for further study without removing these isolated cells from the chip. Experiments on human embryonic stem cells and yeast cells are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed cell manipulation tool. Besides the application to cell isolation and deposition, three other biological applications with this tool are also presented.

  16. Spatially-sculpted aberrated optical tweezers for delivery of nanoparticles onto cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivalingaiah, Shivaranjani; Chhajed, Suyash; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-03-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) are emerging as photochemical and photothermal agents for delivery of drugs and heat onto the targeted cells. Here, we report spatially-sculpting of transverse potential landscape by introducing aberration in the optical tweezers beam for delivery of therapeutic NP on to the prostate cancer PC3 cells. A tunable Ti-Sapphire laser beam was focused to a diffraction limited spot by use of a high numerical aperture microscope objective for optical trapping. A cylindrical lens was used to create the beam profile astigmatic, which led to spatially extended potential landscape. In order to facilitate transport of NP, Comatic potential was created by tilting of the astigmatic beam with respect to the optic axis. NPs were attracted towards the potential minima, transported along the major axis of the elliptic spot and ejected out along the direction having lower stiffness. The Carbon NPs as well as Poly Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid NPs were efficiently transported and concentrated near the PC3 cells in-vitro. The direction and the speed of transport of nano-particles could be reversed by change in tilt direction and angle. Further, by utilizing the scattering force with the asymmetric gradient force, three-dimensional transport of nanoparticles was achieved. The effect of laser beam power and size / refractive index of the nano-particles on the speed of transport will be presented.

  17. The μPIVOT: an integrated particle image velocimeter and optical tweezers instrument for microenvironment investigations

    PubMed Central

    Nève, N; Lingwood, J K; Zimmerman, J; Kohles, S S; Tretheway, D C

    2008-01-01

    A novel instrument to manipulate and characterize the mechanical environment in and around microscale objects in a fluidic environment has been developed by integrating two laser-based techniques: micron-resolution particle image velocimetry (μPIV) and optical tweezers (OT). This instrument, the μPIVOT, enables a new realm of microscale studies, yet still maintains the individual capabilities of each optical technique. This was demonstrated with individual measurements of optical trap stiffness (∼70 pN μm−1 for a 20 μm polystyrene sphere and a linear relationship between trap stiffness and laser power) and fluid velocities within 436 nm of a microchannel wall. The integrated device was validated by comparing computational flow predictions to the measured velocity profile around a trapped particle in either a uniform flow or an imposed, gravity-driven microchannel flow (R2 = 0.988, RMS error = 13.04 μm s−1). Interaction between both techniques is shown to be negligible for 15 μm to 35 μm diameter trapped particles subjected to fluid velocities from 50 μm s−1 to 500 μm s−1 even at the highest laser power (1.45 W). The integrated techniques will provide a unique perspective toward understanding microscale phenomena including single-cell biomechanics, non-Newtonian fluid mechanics and single particle or particle–particle hydrodynamics. PMID:18953424

  18. In Vivo Quantification of Peroxisome Tethering to Chloroplasts in Tobacco Epidermal Cells Using Optical Tweezers1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hongbo; Teanby, Nick A.; Ward, Andy D.; Coles, Benjamin; Pollard, Mark R.; Sparkes, Imogen

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes are highly motile organelles that display a range of motions within a short time frame. In static snapshots, they can be juxtaposed to chloroplasts, which has led to the hypothesis that they are physically interacting. Here, using optical tweezers, we tested the dynamic physical interaction in vivo. Using near-infrared optical tweezers combined with TIRF microscopy, we were able to trap peroxisomes and approximate the forces involved in chloroplast association in vivo in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and observed weaker tethering to additional unknown structures within the cell. We show that chloroplasts and peroxisomes are physically tethered through peroxules, a poorly described structure in plant cells. We suggest that peroxules have a novel role in maintaining peroxisome-organelle interactions in the dynamic environment. This could be important for fatty acid mobilization and photorespiration through the interaction with oil bodies and chloroplasts, highlighting a fundamentally important role for organelle interactions for essential biochemistry and physiological processes. PMID:26518344

  19. Parallel optical tweezers with combining a diffractive optical element and a spatial light modulator for photonic DNA memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, MingJie; Tate, Naoya; Ogura, Yusuke; Tanida, Jun

    2007-09-01

    To overcome the restriction of the density of optical memory systems due to diffraction limit, we have been studying photonic DNA memory, which utilizes photonic technologies and the DNA computing methodology. Our scheme is on the basis of local DNA reaction using laser irradiation and transportation of DNA using parallel optical tweezers with fabricating DNA clusters by attaching DNA onto beads. This paper reports on a new dynamic optical tweezers system, which combines a spatial light modulator (SLM) and a diffractive optical element (DOE) for manipulating DNA clusters. With this combination, real-time programmable manipulation of DNA clusters is achievable in a large spatial range. We also can choose simple patterns for the SLM, and decrease computation cost. In this experiment, a laser beam (633nm wavelength) illuminates a SLM (Hamamatsu Photonics K. K.; PPM8267), which is imaged on an 80-lp/mm transmission-type grating, then the beam is focused with a water immersible objective lens (x 100, NA 1). Simple blazed-phase patterns have different grating constants that are perpendicular to that of the grating are displayed on the SLM. We succeeded in lifting up three 6-micron-diameter polystyrene beads on a glass slide with light spots duplicated by the grating, then transporting the beads in three dimensions simultaneously with changing the grating constants on the SLM. We demonstrated that a same manipulation was implemented at different positions by duplicating a pattern that was generated when only using the SLM. This is usable in implementing a same operation for different data at multiple positions with a single instruction. The promising applications of the method include a nano-scale image memory with encryption.

  20. Determination of fluid viscosity and femto Newton forces of Leishmania amazonensis using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma; de Castro, Archimedes, Jr.; Neto, Vivaldo M.; de Y. Pozzo, Liliana; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2005-08-01

    The displacements of a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) can be used as a force transducer for mechanical measurements in life sciences such as the measurement of forces of living microorganisms or the viscosity of local fluids. The technique we used allowed us to measure forces on the 200 femto Newtons to 4 pico Newtons range of the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for a serious tropical disease. These observations can be used to understand the infection mechanism and chemotaxis of these parasites. The same technique was used to measure viscosities of few microliters sample with agreement with known samples better than 5%. To calibrate the force as a function of the microsphere displacement we first dragged the microsphere in a fluid at known velocity for a broad range of different optical and hydrodynamical parameters. The hydrodynamical model took into account the presence of two walls and the force depends on drag velocity, fluid viscosity and walls proximities, while the optical model in the geometric optics regime depends on the particle and fluid refractive indexes and laser power. To measure the high numerical (NA) aperture laser beam power after the objective we used an integration sphere to avoid the systematic errors of usual power meters for high NA beams. After this careful laser power measurement we obtained an almost 45 degrees straight line for the plot of the optical force (calculated by the particle horizontal displacement) versus hydrodynamic force (calculated by the drag velocity) under variation of all the parameters described below. This means that hydrodynamic models can be used to calibrate optical forces, as we have done for the parasite force measurement, or vice-versa, as we did for the viscosity measurements.

  1. Assessment of red blood cell deformability in type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy by dual optical tweezers stretching technique

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Smart, Thomas; Nobre-Cardoso, João; Richards, Christopher; Bhatnagar, Rhythm; Tufail, Adnan; Shima, David; H. Jones, Phil; Pavesio, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    A pilot cross sectional study was conducted to investigate the role of red blood cells (RBC) deformability in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) without and with diabetic retinopathy (DR) using a dual optical tweezers stretching technique. A dual optical tweezers was made by splitting and recombining a single Nd:YAG laser beam. RBCs were trapped directly (i.e., without microbead handles) in the dual optical tweezers where they were observed to adopt a “side-on” orientation. RBC initial and final lengths after stretching were measured by digital video microscopy, and a Deformability index (DI) calculated. Blood from 8 healthy controls, 5 T2DM and 7 DR patients with respective mean age of 52.4yrs, 51.6 yrs and 52 yrs was analysed. Initial average length of RBCs for control group was 8.45 ± 0.25 μm, 8.68 ± 0.49 μm for DM RBCs and 8.82 ± 0.32 μm for DR RBCs (p < 0.001). The DI for control group was 0.0698 ± 0.0224, and that for DM RBCs was 0.0645 ± 0.03 and 0.0635 ± 0.028 (p < 0.001) for DR group. DI was inversely related to basal length of RBCs (p = 0.02). DI of RBC from DM and DR patients was significantly lower in comparison with normal healthy controls. A dual optical tweezers method can hence be reliably used to assess RBC deformability. PMID:26976672

  2. Normal and system lupus erythematosus red blood cell interactions studied by double trap optical tweezers: direct measurements of aggregation forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Eugeny V.; Zhdanov, Alexander G.; Rykova, Sophia Yu.; Sokolova, Irina A.; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2012-02-01

    Direct measurements of aggregation forces in piconewton range between two red blood cells in pair rouleau are performed under physiological conditions using double trap optical tweezers. Aggregation and disaggregation properties of healthy and pathologic (system lupus erythematosis) blood samples are analyzed. Strong difference in aggregation speed and behavior is revealed using the offered method which is proposed to be a promising tool for SLE monitoring at single cell level.

  3. Assessment of red blood cell deformability in type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy by dual optical tweezers stretching technique.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Smart, Thomas; Nobre-Cardoso, João; Richards, Christopher; Bhatnagar, Rhythm; Tufail, Adnan; Shima, David; H Jones, Phil; Pavesio, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    A pilot cross sectional study was conducted to investigate the role of red blood cells (RBC) deformability in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) without and with diabetic retinopathy (DR) using a dual optical tweezers stretching technique. A dual optical tweezers was made by splitting and recombining a single Nd:YAG laser beam. RBCs were trapped directly (i.e., without microbead handles) in the dual optical tweezers where they were observed to adopt a "side-on" orientation. RBC initial and final lengths after stretching were measured by digital video microscopy, and a Deformability index (DI) calculated. Blood from 8 healthy controls, 5 T2DM and 7 DR patients with respective mean age of 52.4yrs, 51.6 yrs and 52 yrs was analysed. Initial average length of RBCs for control group was 8.45 ± 0.25 μm, 8.68 ± 0.49 μm for DM RBCs and 8.82 ± 0.32 μm for DR RBCs (p < 0.001). The DI for control group was 0.0698 ± 0.0224, and that for DM RBCs was 0.0645 ± 0.03 and 0.0635 ± 0.028 (p < 0.001) for DR group. DI was inversely related to basal length of RBCs (p = 0.02). DI of RBC from DM and DR patients was significantly lower in comparison with normal healthy controls. A dual optical tweezers method can hence be reliably used to assess RBC deformability. PMID:26976672

  4. Stratospheric aerosol optical depths, 1850-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Makiko; Hansen, James E.; Mccormick, M. Patrick; Pollack, James B.

    1993-01-01

    A global stratospheric aerosol database employed for climate simulations is described. For the period 1883-1990, aerosol optical depths are estimated from optical extinction data, whose quality increases with time over that period. For the period 1850-1882, aerosol optical depths are more crudely estimated from volcanological evidence for the volume of ejecta from major known volcanoes. The data set is available over Internet.

  5. Manipulating CD4+ T cells by optical tweezers for the initiation of cell-cell transfer of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    McNerney, Gregory P.; Hübner, Wolfgang; Chen, Benjamin K.; Huser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Cell-cell interactions through direct contact are very important for cellular communication and coordination – especially for immune cells. The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) induces immune cell interactions between CD4+ cells to shuttle between T cells via a virological synapse. A goal to understand the process of cell-cell transmission through virological synapses is to determine the cellular states that allow a chance encounter between cells to become a stable cell-cell adhesion. Here we demonstrate the use of optical tweezers to manipulate uninfected primary CD4+ T cells near HIV Gag-iGFP transfected Jurkat T cells to probe the determinants that induce stable adhesion. When combined with fast 4D confocal fluorescence microscopy, optical tweezers can be utilized to not only facilitate cell-cell contact, but to also allow one to simultaneously track the formation of a virological synapse, and ultimately to enable us to precisely determine all events preceding virus transfer. HIV-1 infected T cell (green) decorated with uninfected primary T cells (red) by manipulating the primary cells with an optical tweezers system PMID:20301121

  6. Isolation of genomic DNA molecule from a single cell and control its higher order structure using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oana, Hidehiro; Hagiya, Isao; Washizu, Masao; Kubo, Koji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2005-08-01

    In this report, we describe a noninvasive methodology for manipulating single Mb-size whole-genome DNA molecules. Cells were subjected to osmotic shock and the genome DNA released from the burst cells was transferred to a region of higher salt concentration between cover slips using optical tweezers. The transferred genome DNA exhibits a conformational transition from a compact state into an elongated state, accompanied by the change in its environment. Here, the applicability of optical tweezers to the on-site manipulation of giant genomic DNA is suggested. Next, to control the field environment more precisely, a flow chamber was made and similar investigations were carried out. In the flow chamber, the higher-order structure of individual chromosomal DNA molecules from a fission yeast that were folded by polyamine was changed to a partially unfolded form by transporting into a higher salt condition using optical tweezers. These promising methodologies demonstrated here may make it possible to recover an intact single whole-genome DNA from a cell and carry out further sequential investigations under a microscope.

  7. A new approach to follow a single extracellular vesicle-cell interaction using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Prada, Ilaria; Amin, Ladan; Furlan, Roberto; Legname, Giuseppe; Verderio, Claudia; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical membrane structures released by most cells. These highly conserved mediators of intercellular communication carry proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, and transfer these cellular components between cells by different mechanisms, such as endocytosis, macropinocytosis, or fusion. However, the temporal and spatial dynamics of vesicle-cell interactions still remain largely unexplored. Here we used optical tweezers to drive single EVs produced by microglial cells onto the surface of astrocytes or microglia in primary culture. By visualizing single EV-cell contacts, we observed that microglial vesicles displayed different motilities on the surface of astrocytes compared with microglia. After contact, EVs positioned on astrocytes displayed some minor oscillatory motion around the point of adhesion, while vesicles dragged to microglia displayed quite regular directional movement on the plasma membrane. Both the adhesion and motion of vesicles on glial cells were strongly reduced by cloaking phosphatidylserine (PS) residues, which are externalized on the vesicle membrane and act as determinants for vesicle recognition by target cells. These data identify optical manipulation as a powerful tool to monitor in vitro vesicle-cell dynamics with high temporal and spatial resolution and to determine in a quantitative manner the contribution of surface receptors/extracellular protein ligands to the contact. PMID:26757810

  8. Combined optical tweezers and laser dissector for controlled ablation of functional connections in neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difato, Francesco; Dal Maschio, Marco; Marconi, Emanuele; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Maccione, Alessandro; Fellin, Tommasso; Berdondini, Luca; Chieregatti, Evelina; Benfenati, Fabio; Blau, Axel

    2011-05-01

    Regeneration of functional connectivity within a neural network after different degrees of lesion is of utmost clinical importance. To test pharmacological approaches aimed at recovering from a total or partial damage of neuronal connections within a circuit, it is necessary to develop a precise method for controlled ablation of neuronal processes. We combined a UV laser microdissector to ablate neural processes in vitro at single neuron and neural network level with infrared holographic optical tweezers to carry out force spectroscopy measurements. Simultaneous force spectroscopy, down to the sub-pico-Newton range, was performed during laser dissection to quantify the tension release in a partially ablated neurite. Therefore, we could control and measure the damage inflicted to an individual neuronal process. To characterize the effect of the inflicted injury on network level, changes in activity of neural subpopulations were monitored with subcellular resolution and overall network activity with high temporal resolution by concurrent calcium imaging and microelectrode array recording. Neuronal connections have been sequentially ablated and the correlated changes in network activity traced and mapped. With this unique combination of electrophysiological and optical tools, neural activity can be studied and quantified in response to controlled injury at the subcellular, cellular, and network level.

  9. Optical tweezers and multiphoton microscopies integrated photonic tool for mechanical and biochemical cell processes studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Faustino, W. M.; Fontes, A.; Fernandes, H. P.; Barjas-Castro, M. d. L.; Metze, K.; Giorgio, S.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.

    2007-09-01

    The research in biomedical photonics is clearly evolving in the direction of the understanding of biological processes at the cell level. The spatial resolution to accomplish this task practically requires photonics tools. However, an integration of different photonic tools and a multimodal and functional approach will be necessary to access the mechanical and biochemical cell processes. This way we can observe mechanicaly triggered biochemical events or biochemicaly triggered mechanical events, or even observe simultaneously mechanical and biochemical events triggered by other means, e.g. electricaly. One great advantage of the photonic tools is its easiness for integration. Therefore, we developed such integrated tool by incorporating single and double Optical Tweezers with Confocal Single and Multiphoton Microscopies. This system can perform 2-photon excited fluorescence and Second Harmonic Generation microscopies together with optical manipulations. It also can acquire Fluorescence and SHG spectra of specific spots. Force, elasticity and viscosity measurements of stretched membranes can be followed by real time confocal microscopies. Also opticaly trapped living protozoas, such as leishmania amazonensis. Integration with CARS microscopy is under way. We will show several examples of the use of such integrated instrument and its potential to observe mechanical and biochemical processes at cell level.

  10. Measuring electrical and mechanical properties of red blood cells with a double optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Fernandes, Heloise P.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; de Thomaz, André A.; Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-08-01

    The fluid lipid bilayer viscoelastic membrane of red blood cells (RBC) contains antigen glycolproteins and proteins which can interact with antibodies to cause cell agglutination. This is the basis of most of the immunohematologic tests in blood banks and the identification of the antibodies against the erythrocyte antigens is of fundamental importance for transfusional routines. The negative charges of the RBCs creates a repulsive electric (zeta) potential between the cells and prevents their aggregation in the blood stream. The first counterions cloud strongly binded moving together with the RBC is called the compact layer. This report proposes the use of a double optical tweezers for a new procedure for measuring: (1) the apparent membrane viscosity, (2) the cell adhesion, (3) the zeta potential and (4) the compact layer's size of the charges formed around the cell in the electrolytic solution. To measure the membrane viscosity we trapped silica beads strongly attached to agglutinated RBCs and measured the force to slide one RBC over the other as a function of the relative velocity. The RBC adhesion was measured by slowly displacing two RBCs apart until the disagglutination happens. The compact layer's size was measured using the force on the silica bead attached to a single RBC in response to an applied voltage and the zeta potential was obtained by measuring the terminal velocity after releasing the RBC from the optical trap at the last applied voltage. We believe that the methodology here proposed can improve the methods of diagnosis in blood banks.

  11. Calibration of optical tweezers with positional detection in the back focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Tolic-Noerrelykke, Simon F.; Schaeffer, Erik; Howard, Jonathon; Pavone, Francesco S.; Juelicher, Frank; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2006-10-15

    We explain and demonstrate a new method of force and position calibrations for optical tweezers with back-focal-plane photodetection. The method combines power spectral measurements of thermal motion and the response to a sinusoidal motion of a translation stage. It consequently does not use the drag coefficient of the trapped object as an input. Thus, neither the viscosity, nor the size of the trapped object, nor its distance to nearby surfaces needs to be known. The method requires only a low level of instrumentation and can be applied in situ in all spatial dimensions. It is both accurate and precise: true values are returned, with small error bars. We tested this experimentally, near and far from surfaces in the lateral directions. Both position and force calibrations were accurate to within 3%. To calibrate, we moved the sample with a piezoelectric translation stage, but the laser beam could be moved instead, e.g., by acousto-optic deflectors. Near surfaces, this precision requires an improved formula for the hydrodynamical interaction between an infinite plane and a microsphere in nonconstant motion parallel to it. We give such a formula.

  12. Dynamic translocation of ligand-complexed DNA through solid-state nanopores with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sischka, Andy; Spiering, Andre; Khaksar, Maryam; Laxa, Miriam; König, Janine; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Anselmetti, Dario

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the threading and controlled translocation of individual lambda-DNA (λ-DNA) molecules through solid-state nanopores with piconewton force sensitivity, millisecond time resolution and picoampere ionic current sensitivity with a set-up combining quantitative 3D optical tweezers (OT) with electrophysiology. With our virtually interference-free OT set-up the binding of RecA and single peroxiredoxin protein molecules to λ-DNA was quantitatively investigated during dynamic translocation experiments where effective forces and respective ionic currents of the threaded DNA molecule through the nanopore were measured during inward and outward sliding. Membrane voltage-dependent experiments of reversible single protein/DNA translocation scans yield hysteresis-free, asymmetric single-molecule fingerprints in the measured force and conductance signals that can be attributed to the interplay of optical trap and electrostatic nanopore potentials. These experiments allow an exact localization of the bound protein along the DNA strand and open fascinating applications for label-free detection of DNA-binding ligands, where structural and positional binding phenomena can be investigated at a single-molecule level.

  13. Escape forces and trajectories in optical tweezers and their effect on calibration.

    PubMed

    Bui, Ann A M; Stilgoe, Alexander B; Khatibzadeh, Nima; Nieminen, Timo A; Berns, Michael W; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2015-09-21

    Whether or not an external force can make a trapped particle escape from optical tweezers can be used to measure optical forces. Combined with the linear dependence of optical forces on trapping power, a quantitative measurement of the force can be obtained. For this measurement, the particle is at the edge of the trap, away from the region near the equilbrium position where the trap can be described as a linear spring. This method provides the ability to measure higher forces for the same beam power, compared with using the linear region of the trap, with lower risk of optical damage to trapped specimens. Calibration is typically performed by using an increasing fluid flow to exert an increasing force on a trapped particle until it escapes. In this calibration technique, the particle is usually assumed to escape along a straight line in the direction of fluid-flow. Here, we show that the particle instead follows a curved trajectory, which depends on the rate of application of the force (i.e., the acceleration of the fluid flow). In the limit of very low acceleration, the particle follows the surface of zero axial optical force during the escape. The force required to produce escape depends on the trajectory, and hence the acceleration. This can result in variations in the escape force of a factor of two. This can have a major impact on calibration to determine the escape force efficiency. Even when calibration measurements are all performed in the low acceleration regime, variations in the escape force efficiency of 20% or more can still occur. We present computational simulations using generalized Lorenz-Mie theory and experimental measurements to show how the escape force efficiency depends on rate of increase of force and trapping power, and discuss the impact on calibration. PMID:26406637

  14. Drug-DNA interactions at single molecule level: A view with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Studies of small molecule--DNA interactions are essential for developing new drugs for challenging diseases like cancer and HIV. The main idea behind developing these molecules is to target and inhibit the reproduction of the tumor cells and infected cells. We mechanically manipulate single DNA molecule using optical tweezers to investigate two molecules that have complex and multiple binding modes. Mononuclear ruthenium complexes have been extensively studied as a test for rational drug design. Potential drug candidates should have high affinity to DNA and slow dissociation kinetics. To achieve this, motifs of the ruthenium complexes are altered. Our collaborators designed a dumb-bell shaped binuclear ruthenium complex that can only intercalate DNA by threading through its bases. Studying the binding properties of this complex in bulk studies took hours. By mechanically manipulating a single DNA molecule held with optical tweezers, we lower the barrier to thread and make it fast compared to the bulk experiments. Stretching single DNA molecules with different concentration of drug molecules and holding it at a constant force allows the binding to reach equilibrium. By this we can obtain the equilibrium fractional ligand binding and length of DNA at saturated binding. Fitting these results yields quantitative measurements of the binding thermodynamics and kinetics of this complex process. The second complex discussed in this study is Actinomycin D (ActD), a well studied anti-cancer agent that is used as a prototype for developing new generations of drugs. However, the biophysical basis of its activity is still unclear. Because ActD is known to intercalate double stranded DNA (dsDNA), it was assumed to block replication by stabilizing dsDNA in front of the replication fork. However, recent studies have shown that ActD binds with even higher affinity to imperfect duplexes and some sequences of single stranded DNA (ssDNA). We directly measure the on and off rates by stretching the DNA molecule to a certain force and holding it at constant force while adding the drug and then while washing off the drug. Our finding resolves the long lasting controversy of ActD binding modes, clearly showing that both the dsDNA binding and ssDNA binding converge to the same single mode. The result supports the hypothesis that the primary characteristic of ActD that contributes to its biological activity is its ability to inhibit cellular replication by binding to transcription bubbles and causing cell death.

  15. Spectrin-Level Modeling of the Cytoskeleton and Optical Tweezers Stretching of the Erythrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Li, J.; Dao, M.; Lim, C. T.; Suresh, S.

    2005-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional computational study of whole-cell equilibrium shape and deformation of human red blood cell (RBC) using spectrin-level energetics. Random network models consisting of degree-2, 3, …, 9 junction complexes and spectrin links are used to populate spherical and biconcave surfaces and intermediate shapes, and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are then performed with spectrin connectivities fixed. A sphere is first filled with cytosol and gradually deflated while preserving its total surface area, until cytosol volume consistent with the real RBC is reached. The equilibrium shape is determined through energy minimization by assuming that the spectrin tetramer links satisfy the worm-like chain free-energy model. Subsequently, direct stretching by optical tweezers of the initial equilibrium shape is simulated to extract the variation of axial and transverse diameters with the stretch force. At persistence length p = 7.5 nm for the spectrin tetramer molecule and corresponding in-plane shear modulus μ0 ≈ 8.3 μN/m, our models show reasonable agreement with recent experimental measurements on the large deformation of RBC with optical tweezers. We find that the choice of the reference state used for the in-plane elastic energy is critical for determining the equilibrium shape. If a position-independent material reference state such as a full sphere is used in defining the in-plane energy, then the bending modulus κ needs to be at least a decade larger than the widely accepted value of 2 × 10−19 J to stabilize the biconcave shape against the cup shape. We demonstrate through detailed computations that this paradox can be avoided by invoking the physical hypothesis that the spectrin network undergoes constant remodeling to always relax the in-plane shear elastic energy to zero at any macroscopic shape, at some slow characteristic timescale. We have devised and implemented a liquefied network structure evolution algorithm that relaxes shear stress everywhere in the network and generates cytoskeleton structures that mimic experimental observations. PMID:15749778

  16. Absence of a barrier to backwards rotation of the bacterial flagellar motor demonstrated with optical?tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Richard M.; Berg, Howard C.

    1997-01-01

    A cell of the bacterium Escherichia coli was tethered covalently to a glass coverslip by a single flagellum, and its rotation was stopped by using optical tweezers. The tweezers acted directly on the cell body or indirectly, via a trapped polystyrene bead. The torque generated by the flagellar motor was determined by measuring the displacement of the laser beam on a quadrant photodiode. The coverslip was mounted on a computer-controlled piezo-electric stage that moved the tether point in a circle around the center of the trap so that the speed of rotation of the motor could be varied. The motor generated ?4500 pN nm of torque at all angles, regardless of whether it was stalled, allowed to rotate very slowly forwards, or driven very slowly backwards. This argues against models of motor function in which rotation is tightly coupled to proton transit and back-transport of protons is severely limited. PMID:9405630

  17. Optical rotor capable of controlling clockwise and counterclockwise rotation in optical tweezers by displacing the trapping position.

    PubMed

    Ukita, Hiroo; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2010-04-01

    A clockwise rotor and a counterclockwise rotor (a clockwise rotor placed upside down) are linked on the optical axis to control the rotation direction in optical tweezers by displacing the trapping (focus) position. The dependence of optical torque on the trapping position of this linked rotor is analyzed using an upward-directed focused beam as illumination, via an objective lens with a numerical aperture of 1.4, using a ray optics model under the condition that laser light is incident to not only the lower surfaces, but also to the side surfaces of both rotors. The rotation rate in water is also simulated for an SU-8 linked rotor with 20 microm diameter at a laser power of 200 mW, with rotor thickness as a parameter, by balancing the optical torque with the drag force evaluated using computational fluid dynamics. It is confirmed that the rotation direction changes from clockwise to counterclockwise with the displacement of the trapping position, that almost the same rotation speed is possible in both directions, and that both speeds increase, reach a maximum at a rotor thickness of 9 microm, and then decrease as the thickness increases. PMID:20357886

  18. Uncoiling mechanism of Klebsiella pneumoniae type 3 pili measured by using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng-Jung; Chan, Chia-Han; Liu, Kuo-Liang; Huang, Ying-Jung; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chang, Hwan-You; Yew, Tri-Rung; Hsu, Ken Y.; Hsu, Long

    2007-09-01

    Pili are bacterial appendages that play many important roles in bacterial behaviors, physiology and interaction with hosts. Via pili, bacteria are able to adhere to, migrate onto, and colonize on host cells, mechanically. Different from the most studied type 1 and P type pili, which are rigid and thick with an average of 6~7 nm in diameter, type 3 pili are relatively tiny (3-5 nm in diameter) and flexible, and their biophysical properties remains unclear. By using optical tweezers, we found that the elongation processes of type 3 pili are divided into three phases: (1) elastic elongation, (2) uncoiling elongation, and (3) intrinsic elongation, separately. Besides, the uncoiling force of the recombinant pili displayed on the surface of E. coli [pmrkABCD V1F] is measured 20 pN in average stronger than that of E. coli [pmrkABCD V1]. This suggests that pilin MrkF is involved in determining the mechanical properties of the type 3 pili.

  19. Cell viability in optical tweezers: high power red laser diode versus Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Hendinger, Anita; Sailer, Reinhard; Gschwend, Michael H.; Strauss, Wolfgang S.; Bauer, Manfred; Schuetze, Karin

    2000-01-01

    Viability of cultivated Chinese hamster ovary cells in optical tweezers was measured after exposure to various light doses of red high power laser diodes ((lambda) equals 670 - 680 nm) and a Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser ((lambda) equals 1064 nm). When using a radiant exposure of 2.4 GJ/cm2, a reduction of colony formation up to a factor 2 (670 - 680 nm) or 1.6 (1064 nm) as well as a delay of cell growth were detected in comparison with nonirradiated controls. In contrast, no cell damage was found at an exposure of 340 MJ/cm2 applied at 1064 nm. Cell viabilities were correlated with fluorescence excitation spectra and with literature data of wavelength dependent cloning efficiencies. Fluorescence excitation maxima of the coenzymes NAD(P)H and flavins were detected at 365 and 450 nm, respectively. This is half of the wavelengths of the maxima of cell inactivation, suggesting that two-photon absorption by these coenzymes may contribute to cellular damage. Two-photon excitation of NAD(P)H and flavins may also affect cell viability after exposure to 670 - 680 nm, whereas one-photon excitation of water molecules seems to limit cell viability at 1064 nm.

  20. STED nanoscopy combined with optical tweezers reveals protein dynamics on densely covered DNA (presentation video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Iddo; Sitters, Gerrit; Broekmans, Onno D.; Farge, Graldine; Menges, Carolin; Wende, Wolfgang; Hell, Stefan W.; Peterman, Erwin J.; Wuite, Gijs J.

    2014-09-01

    Dense coverage of DNA by proteins is a ubiquitous feature of cellular processes such as DNA organization, replication and repair. We present a single-molecule approach capable of visualizing individual DNA-binding proteins on densely covered DNA and in the presence of high protein concentrations. Our approach combines optical tweezers with multicolor confocal and stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence microscopy. Proteins on DNA are visualized at a resolution of 50 nm, a sixfold resolution improvement over that of confocal microscopy. High temporal resolution (<50 ms) is ensured by fast one-dimensional beam scanning. Individual trajectories of proteins translocating on DNA can thus be distinguished and tracked with high precision. We demonstrate our multimodal approach by visualizing the assembly of dense nucleoprotein filaments with unprecedented spatial resolution in real time. Experimental access to the force-dependent kinetics and motility of DNA-associating proteins at biologically relevant protein densities is essential for linking idealized in vitro experiments with the in vivo situation.

  1. Single-molecule kinetics under force: probing protein folding and enzymatic activity with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley

    2010-03-01

    Weak non-covalent bonds between and within single molecules govern many aspects of biological structure and function (e.g. DNA base-paring, receptor-ligand binding, protein folding, etc.) In living systems, these interactions are often subject to mechanical forces, which can greatly alter their kinetics and activity. My group develops and applies novel single-molecule manipulation techniques to explore and quantify these force-dependent kinetics. Using optical tweezers, we have quantified the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of different proteins, including the cytoskeletal protein spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans's group [1], and the A2 domain of the von Willebrand factor blood clotting protein in collaboration with T. Springer's group [2]. Furthermore, we have studied the kinetics of the ADAMTS13 enzyme acting on a single A2 domain, and have shown that physiolgical forces in the circulation can act as a cofactor for enzymatic cleavage, regulating hemostatic activity [2]. References: 1. E. Evans, K. Halvorsen, K. Kinoshita, and W.P. Wong, Handbook of Single Molecule Biophysics, P. Hinterdorfer, ed., Springer (2009). 2. X. Zhang, K. Halvorsen, C.-Z. Zhang, W.P. Wong, and T.A. Springer, Science 324 (5932), 1330-1334 (2009).

  2. Optical tweezers reveal a dynamic mechanical response of cationic peptide-DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amy; Zheng, Tai; Sucayan, Sarah; Chou, Szu-Ting; Tricoli, Lucas; Hustedt, Jason; Kahn, Jason; Mixson, A. James; Seog, Joonil

    2013-03-01

    Nonviral carriers have been developed to deliver nucleic acids by forming nanoscale complexes; however, there has been limited success in achieving high transfection efficiency. Our hypothesis is that a factor affecting gene delivery efficiency is the mechanical response of the condensed complex. To begin to test this hypothesis, we directly measured the mechanical properties of DNA-carrier complexes using optical tweezers. Histidine-lysine (HK) polymer, Asparagine-lysine (NK) polymer and poly-L-lysine were used to form complexes with a single DNA molecule. As carriers were introduced, a sudden decrease in DNA extension occurrs at a force level which is defined as critical force (Fc). Fc is carrier and concentration dependent. Pulling revealed reduction in DNA extension length for HK-DNA complexes. The characteristics of force profiles vary by agent and can be dynamically manipulated by changes in environmental conditions such as ionic strength of the buffer as well as pH. Heparin can remove cationic reagents which are otherwise irreversibly bound to DNA. The implications for optimizing molecular interactions to enhance transfection efficiency will be discussed.

  3. Optical tweezers based measurement of PLGA-NP interaction with prostate cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesener, Thea; Mondal, Argha; Menon, Jyothi U.; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2013-02-01

    In order to quantify the binding capacities of polymeric, biodegradable and biocompatible poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs), conjugated with either R11 peptides or Folic Acid, the strength by detach from prostate cancer cells (PCCs) was measured via optical tweezers based measurements. Specific nanoparticle drug delivery eliminates the previously used diffuse, full-body application of potent cancer drugs by localizing drug delivery to malignant cells. Precise monitoring of NP position in the trap near the PCC membrane using a fluorescence imaging based method enabled calibration of the trap stiffness and subsequent force measurements. By defining the force with which the many diverse conjugates and coatings of different types of NPs bind the vast array of cancer cell types, chemotherapeutic drugs can be delivered in a specific manner with the optimal particle and corresponding conjugates. Further, and most significantly, the rupture force measurements will reveal whether or not targeted nanoparticles can overcome the force of blood attempting to pull the particle from designated cells. Our preliminary study revealed that the binding between PLGA-NPs and prostate cancer cells is enhanced by coating with folic acid or R11 peptides. These conjugates increase the force required to detach the particle thus allowing particles to overcome drag force of the blood in prostate capillary systems.

  4. The Elasticity of Single Titin Molecules Using a Two-Bead Optical Tweezers Assay

    PubMed Central

    Leake, Mark C.; Wilson, David; Gautel, Mathias; Simmons, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    Titin is responsible for the passive elasticity of the muscle sarcomere. The mechanical properties of skeletal and cardiac muscle titin were characterized in single molecules using a novel dual optical tweezers assay. Antibody pairs were attached to beads and used to select the whole molecule, I-band, A-band, a tandem-immunoglobulin (Ig) segment, and the PEVK region. A construct from the PEVK region expressing >25% of the full-length skeletal muscle isoform was chemically conjugated to beads and similarly characterized. By elucidating the elasticity of the different regions, we showed directly for the first time, to our knowledge, that two entropic components act in series in the skeletal muscle titin I-band (confirming previous speculations), one associated with tandem-immunoglobulin domains and the other with the PEVK region, with persistence lengths of 2.9 nm and 0.76 nm, respectively (150 mM ionic strength, 22°C). Novel findings were: the persistence length of the PEVK component rose (0.4–2.7 nm) with an increase in ionic strength (15–300 mM) and fell (3.0–0.3 nm) with a temperature increase (10–60°C); stress-relaxation in 10–12-nm steps was observed in the PEVK construct and hysteresis in the native PEVK region. The region may not be a pure random coil, as previously thought, but contains structured elements, possibly with hydrophobic interactions. PMID:15298915

  5. Label-free measurements of membrane tether thickness using optical tweezers combined with SLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarshar, Mohammad; Wong, Winson T.; Anvari, Bahman

    2015-03-01

    Various cellular activities such as motility, division, and endocytosis involve a change in the cell shape. The mechanical interactions between the cell membrane and cytoskeleton play an important role in regulating changes in the cell shape. Tether formation from cell membranes provides a technique to characterize the mechanical properties of cell membranes and membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. Accurate measurement of the nano-scale tether diameter is relevant to quantification of membrane tension, bending modulus, and adhesion energy of the membrane-cytoskeleton structure. We have integrated optical tweezers with quantitative phase imaging, based on spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM), to simultaneously form tethers from HEK-293 cells and measure their diameters. Tether thickness along the illumination axis was measured using the quantitative phase map of the sample, and the refractive index (RI) mismatch between the sample and the surrounding media. The RI of the tethers ranged from 1.354 to 1.368 (cell culture medium RI=1.337). Our SLIM imaging system provided a 38 nm resolution in tether thickness measurements. Tether diameter fluctuations of <100 nm were resolved on tethers that ranged between 600-900 nm in diameter. Our integrated platform also provides the ability to simultaneously manipulate and image cell organelles in a non-contact and marker-free manner at nanometer spatial resolution.

  6. The elasticity of single titin molecules using a two-bead optical tweezers assay.

    PubMed

    Leake, Mark C; Wilson, David; Gautel, Mathias; Simmons, Robert M

    2004-08-01

    Titin is responsible for the passive elasticity of the muscle sarcomere. The mechanical properties of skeletal and cardiac muscle titin were characterized in single molecules using a novel dual optical tweezers assay. Antibody pairs were attached to beads and used to select the whole molecule, I-band, A-band, a tandem-immunoglobulin (Ig) segment, and the PEVK region. A construct from the PEVK region expressing >25% of the full-length skeletal muscle isoform was chemically conjugated to beads and similarly characterized. By elucidating the elasticity of the different regions, we showed directly for the first time, to our knowledge, that two entropic components act in series in the skeletal muscle titin I-band (confirming previous speculations), one associated with tandem-immunoglobulin domains and the other with the PEVK region, with persistence lengths of 2.9 nm and 0.76 nm, respectively (150 mM ionic strength, 22 degrees C). Novel findings were: the persistence length of the PEVK component rose (0.4-2.7 nm) with an increase in ionic strength (15-300 mM) and fell (3.0-0.3 nm) with a temperature increase (10-60 degrees C); stress-relaxation in 10-12-nm steps was observed in the PEVK construct and hysteresis in the native PEVK region. The region may not be a pure random coil, as previously thought, but contains structured elements, possibly with hydrophobic interactions. PMID:15298915

  7. Mechanics of protein-DNA interaction studied with ultra-fast optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monico, Carina; Tempestini, Alessia; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.; Capitanio, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The lac operon is a well known example of gene expression regulation, based on the specific interaction of Lac repressor protein (LacI) with its target DNA sequence (operator). LacI and other DNA-binding proteins bind their specific target sequences with rates higher than allowed by 3D diffusion alone. Generally accepted models predict a combination of free 3D diffusion and 1D sliding along non-specific DNA. We recently developed an ultrafast force-clamp laser trap technique capable of probing molecular interactions with sub-ms temporal resolution, under controlled pN-range forces. With this technique, we tested the interaction of LacI with two different DNA constructs: a construct with two copies of the O1 operator separated by 300 bp and a construct containing the native E.coli operator sequences. Our measurements show at least two classes of LacI-DNA interactions: long (in the tens of s range) and short (tens of ms). Based on position along the DNA sequence, the observed interactions can be interpreted as specific binding to operator sequences (long events) and transient interactions with nonspecific sequences (short events). Moreover, we observe continuous sliding of the protein along DNA, passively driven by the force applied with the optical tweezers.

  8. Force measuring optical tweezers system for long time measurements of P pili stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Magnus; Fllman, Erik; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2006-02-01

    A force-measuring optical tweezers instrumentation and long time measurements of the elongation and retraction of bacterial fimbriae from Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) under strain are presented. The instrumentation is presented in some detail. Special emphasis is given to measures taken to reduce the influence of noise and drifts in the system and from the surrounding, which makes long term force measurements possible. Individual P pili from UPEC bacteria were used as a biological model system for repetitive unfolding and refolding cycles of bacterial fimbriae under equilibrium conditions. P pili have evolved into a three-dimensional helix-like structure, the PapA rod, that can be successively and significantly elongated and/or unfolded when exposed to external forces. The instrumentation is used for characterization of the force-vs.-elongation response of the PapA rod of individual P pili, with emphasis on the long time stability of the forced unfolding and refolding of the helical structure of the PapA rod. The results show that the PapA rod is capable of withstanding extensive strain, leading to a complete unfolding of the helical structure, repetitive times during the life cycle of a bacterium without any noticeable alteration of the mechanical properties of the P pili. This function is believed to be importance for UPEC bacteria in vivo since it provides a close contact to a host cell (which is an initial step of invasion) despite urine cleaning attempts.

  9. Quantifying the DNA binding characteristics of ruthenium based threading intercalator Λ Λ -P with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryden, Nicholas; McCauley, Micah; Westerlund, Fredrik; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark; Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Utilizing optical tweezers, biophysics researchers have been able to study drug-DNA interactions on the single molecule level. Binuclear ruthenium complexes are a particular type of drug molecule that have been found to have potential cancer-fighting qualities, due to their high binding affinity and low dissociation rates. These complexes are threading intercalators, meaning that they must thread their bulky side chains through DNA base pairs to allow the central planar moiety to intercalate between the bases. In this study, we explored the binding properties of the binuclear ruthenium complex, ΛΛ -P (ΛΛ -[µ-bidppz(phen)4Ru2]4+) . A single DNA molecule is held at a constant force and the ΛΛ -P solution introduced to the system in varying concentrations until equilibrium is reached. DNA extension data at various concentrations of ΛΛ -P recorded as a function of time provide the DNA binding kinetics and equilibrium binding affinity. Preliminary data analysis suggests that ΛΛ -P exhibits fast binding kinetics compared to the very similar ΔΔ -P. These complexes have the same chemical structure and only differ in their chirality, which suggests that the left handed (ΛΛ) threading moieties require less DNA structural distortion for threading compared with the right handed (ΔΔ) threading moieties.

  10. Graphical aerosol classification method using aerosol relative optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi-Xiang; Yuan, Yuan; Shuai, Yong; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-06-01

    A simple graphical method is presented to classify aerosol types based on a combination of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and aerosol relative optical thickness (AROT). Six aerosol types, including maritime (MA), desert dust (DD), continental (CO), sub-continental (SC), urban industry (UI) and biomass burning (BB), are discriminated in a two dimensional space of AOT440 and AROT1020/440. Numerical calculations are performed using MIE theory based on a multi log-normal particle size distribution, and the AROT ranges for each aerosol type are determined. More than 5 years of daily observations from 8 representative aerosol sites are applied to the method to confirm spatial applicability. Finally, 3 individual cases are analyzed according to their specific aerosol status. The outcomes indicate that the new graphical method coordinates well with regional characteristics and is also able to distinguish aerosol variations in individual situations. This technique demonstrates a novel way to estimate different aerosol types and provide information on radiative forcing calculations and satellite data corrections.

  11. Effect of salicylate on outer hair cell plasma membrane viscoelasticity: studies using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermilov, Sergey A.; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-06-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) of mammalian outer hair cells (OHCs) generates mechanical forces in response to changes in the transmembrane electrical potential. The resulting change in the cell length is known as electromotility. Salicylate (Sal), the anionic, amphipathic derivative of aspirin induces reversible hearing loss and decreases electromotile response of the OHCs. Sal may change the local curvature and mechanical properties of the PM, eventually resulting in reduced electromotility or it may compete with intracellular monovalent anions, particularly Cl-, which are essential for electromotility. In this work we have used optical tweezers to study the effects of Sal on viscoelastic properties of the OHC PM when separated from the underlying composite structures of the cell wall. In this procedure, an optically trapped microsphere is brought in contact with PM and subsequently pulled away to form a tether. We measured the force exerted on the tether as a function of time during the process of tether growth at different pulling rates. Effective tether viscosity, steady-state tethering force extrapolated to zero pulling rate, and the time constant for tether growth were estimated from the measurements of the instantaneous tethering force. The time constant for the tether growth measured for the OHC basal end decreased 1.65 times after addition of 10 mM Sal, which may result from an interaction between Sal and cholesterol, which is more prevalent in the PM of OHC basal end. The time constants for the tether growth calculated for the OHC lateral wall and control human embryonic kidney cells as well as the other calculated viscoelastic parameters remained the same after Sal perfusion, favoring the hypothesis of competitive inhibition of electromotility by salicylate.

  12. Studying red blood cell agglutination by measuring electrical and mechanical properties with a double optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Fernandes, Heloise P.; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2007-07-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) viscoelastic membrane contains proteins and glycolproteins embedded in, or attached, to a fluid lipid bilayer and are negatively charged, which creates a repulsive electric (zeta) potential between the cells and prevents their aggregation in the blood stream. The basis of the immunohematologic tests is the interaction between antigens and antibodies that causes hemagglutination. The identification of antibodies and antigens is of fundamental importance for the transfusional routine. This agglutination is induced by decreasing the zeta-potential through the introduction of artificial potential substances. This report proposes the use of the optical tweezers to measure the membrane viscosity, the cell adhesion, the zeta-potential and the size of the double layer of charges (CLC) formed around the cell in an electrolytic solution. The adhesion was quantified by slowly displacing two RBCs apart until the disagglutination. The CLC was measured using the force on the bead attached to a single RBC in response to an applied voltage. The zeta-potential was obtained by measuring the terminal velocity after releasing the RBC from the optical trap at the last applied voltage. For the membrane viscosity experiment, we trapped a bead attached to RBCs and measured the force to slide one RBC over the other as a function of the relative velocity. After we tested the methodology, we performed measurements using antibody and potential substances. We observed that this experiment can provide information about cell agglutination that helps to improve the tests usually performed in blood banks. We also believe that this methodology can be applied for measurements of zeta-potentials in other kind of samples.

  13. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coceano, G.; Yousafzai, M. S.; Ma, W.; Ndoye, F.; Venturelli, L.; Hussain, I.; Bonin, S.; Niemela, J.; Scoles, G.; Cojoc, D.; Ferrari, E.

    2016-02-01

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young’s modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines’ elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM.

  14. Force Mapping during the Formation and Maturation of Cell Adhesion Sites with Multiple Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Schwingel, Melanie; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Focal contacts act as mechanosensors allowing cells to respond to their biomechanical environment. Force transmission through newly formed contact sites is a highly dynamic process requiring a stable link between the intracellular cytoskeleton and the extracellular environment. To simultaneously investigate cellular traction forces in several individual maturing adhesion sites within the same cell, we established a custom-built multiple trap optical tweezers setup. Beads functionalized with fibronectin or RGD-peptides were placed onto the apical surface of a cell and trapped with a maximum force of 160 pN. Cells form adhesion contacts around the beads as demonstrated by vinculin accumulation and start to apply traction forces after 30 seconds. Force transmission was found to strongly depend on bead size, surface density of integrin ligands and bead location on the cell surface. Highest traction forces were measured for beads positioned on the leading edge. For mouse embryonic fibroblasts, traction forces acting on single beads are in the range of 80 pN after 5 minutes. If two beads were positioned parallel to the leading edge and with a center-to-center distance less than 10 µm, traction forces acting on single beads were reduced by 40%. This indicates a spatial and temporal coordination of force development in closely related adhesion sites. We also used our setup to compare traction forces, retrograde transport velocities, and migration velocities between two cell lines (mouse melanoma and fibroblasts) and primary chick fibroblasts. We find that maximal force development differs considerably between the three cell types with the primary cells being the strongest. In addition, we observe a linear relation between force and retrograde transport velocity: a high retrograde transport velocity is associated with strong cellular traction forces. In contrast, migration velocity is inversely related to traction forces and retrograde transport velocity. PMID:23372781

  15. Active microrheology with optical tweezers: a versatile tool to investigate anisotropies in intermediate filament networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neckernuss, T.; Mertens, L. K.; Martin, I.; Paust, T.; Beil, M.; Marti, O.

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical properties of cells are determined by the cytoskeleton and especially by intermediate filaments (IFs). To measure the contribution of IFs to the mechanics of the cytoskeleton, we determine the shear moduli of in vitro assembled IF networks consisting of keratin 8/18 and MgCl2, serving as a crosslinker. In this study we want to present a new method, a combination of active and passive microrheology, to characterize these networks. We also show the applicability of the new method and discuss new findings on the organization and force transmission in keratin networks gained by the new method. We trap and move embedded polystyrene particles with an optical tweezers setup in an oscillatory manner. The amplitude response of the trapped particle is measured and evaluated with a lock-in approach in order to suppress random motions. With this technique we determine the degree of isotropy of the assembled network and sense preferred directions due to inhomogeneities of the network. Furthermore, we show that we can deliberately create anisotropic networks by adjusting the assembly process and chamber geometry. To determine whether there are local network anisotropies in a globally isotropic network, we altered the evaluation method and included the motion of embedded particles in the vicinity of the trapped one. The correlations of the observed motions enable us to map local network anisotropies. Finally, we compare mechanical properties determined from passive with ones from active microrheology. We find the networks measured with the active technique to be approximately 20% more compliant than the ones from passive measurements.

  16. Optical tweezers for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Magnus; Axner, Ove; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Fällman, Erik

    2006-08-01

    Instrumentation and methodologies for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles by the use of force measuring optical tweezers have been developed. A thorough study of the biomechanical properties of fimbrial adhesion organelles expressed by uropathogenic E. coli, so-called pili, is presented. Steady-state as well as dynamic force measurements on P pili, expressed by E. coli causing pyelonephritis, have revealed, among other things, various unfolding and refolding properties of the helical structure of P pili, the PapA rod. Based on these properties an energy landscape model has been constructed by which specific biophysical properties of the PapA rod have been extracted, e.g. the number of subunits, the length of a single pilus, bond lengths and activation energies for bond opening and closure. Moreover, long time repetitive measurements have shown that the rod can be unfolded and refolded repetitive times without losing its intrinsic properties. These properties are believed to be of importance for the bacteria's ability to maintain close contact with host cells during initial infections. The results presented are considered to be of importance for the field of biopolymers in general and the development of new pharmaceuticals towards urinary tract infections in particular. The results show furthermore that the methodology can be used to gain knowledge of the intrinsic biomechanical function of adhesion organelles. The instrumentation is currently used for characterization of type 1 pili, expressed by E. coli causing cystitis, i.e. infections in the bladder. The first force spectrometry investigations of these pili will be presented.

  17. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  18. A New Optical Aerosol Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonda, Mark; Malcolmson, Andrew; Bonin, Mike; Stratton, David; Rogers, C. Fred; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An optical particle spectrometer capable of measuring aerosol particle size distributions from 0.02 to 100 micrometers has been developed. This instrument combines several optical methods in one, in-situ configuration; it can provide continuous data collection to encompass the wide dynamic size ranges and concentrations found in studies of modeled planetary atmospheres as well as terrestrial air quality research. Currently, the system is incorporated into an eight liter capacity spherical pressure vessel that is appropriate both for flowthrough and for in-situ particle generation. The optical sizing methods include polarization ratio, The scattering, and forward scattering detectors, with illumination from a fiber-coupled, Argon-ion laser. As particle sizes increase above 0.1 micrometer, a customized electronics and software system automatically shifts from polarization to diffraction-based measurements as the angular scattering detectors attain acceptable signal-to-noise ratios. The number concentration detection limits are estimated to be in the part-per-trillion (ppT by volume) range, or roughly 1000 submicron particles per cubic centimeter. Results from static experiments using HFC134A (approved light scattering gas standard), flow-through experiments using sodium chloride (NaCl) and carbon particles, and dynamic 'Tholin' (photochemical produced particles from ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated acetylene and nitrogen) experiments have been obtained. The optical spectrometer data obtained with particles have compared well with particle sizes determined by electron microscopy. The 'Tholin' tests provided real-time size and concentration data as the particles grew from about 30 nanometers to about 0.8 micrometers, with concentrations ranging from ppT to ppB, by volume. Tests are still underway, to better define sizing accuracy and concentration limits, these results will be reported.

  19. Single-cell adhesion probed in-situ using optical tweezers: A case study with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelain, Mickaël; Rouxhet, Paul G.; Pignon, Frédéric; Magnin, Albert; Piau, Jean-Michel

    2012-06-01

    A facile method of using optical trapping to measure cell adhesion forces is presented and applied to the adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glass, in contact with solutions of different compositions. Trapping yeast cells with optical tweezers (OT) is not perturbed by cell wall deformation or cell deviation from a spherical shape. The trapping force calibration requires correction not only for the hydrodynamic effect of the neighboring wall but also for spherical aberrations affecting the focal volume and the trap stiffness. Yeast cells trapped for up to 5 h were still able to undergo budding but showed an increase of doubling time. The proportion of adhering cells showed the expected variation according to the solution composition. The detachment force varied in the same way. This observation and the fact that the detachment stress was exerted parallel to the substrate surface point to the role of interactions involving solvated macromolecules. Both the proportion of adhering cells and the removal force showed a distribution which, in our experimental conditions, must be attributed to a heterogeneity of surface properties at the cell level or at the subcellular scale. As compared with magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and more conventional ways of studying cell adhesion (shear-flow cells), OT present several advantages that are emphasized in this paper.

  20. Microfluidic growth chambers with optical tweezers for full spatial single-cell control and analysis of evolving microbes.

    PubMed

    Probst, Christopher; Grünberger, Alexander; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2013-12-01

    Single-cell analysis in microfluidic systems has opened up new possibilities in biotechnological research enabling us to deal with large eukaryotic cells and even small bacteria. In particular, transient investigations in laminar flow or diffusive environments can be performed to unravel single cell behaviour. Up to now, most systems have been limited with respect to precise cell inoculation and sampling methods. Individual cell selection and manipulations have now been made possible by combining laser tweezers with microfluidic cell cultivation environments specifically tailored for micrometre-sized bacteria. Single cells were optically seeded into various micrometre-sized growth sites arranged in parallel. During cultivation, single-cell elongation, morphology and growth rates were derived from single cells and microcolonies of up to 500 cells. Growth of irradiated bacteria was not impaired by minimizing the exposed laser dosage as confirmed by exceptional growth rates. In fact, Escherichia coli exhibited doubling times of less than 20min. For the first time, a filamentous Escherichia coli WT (MG1655) was safely relocated from its growing microcolony by laser manipulations. The cell was transferred to an empty cultivation spot allowing single-cell growth and morphology investigations. Contrary to previous discussions, the filamentous E. coli exhibited normal cell morphology and division after a few generations. This combination of optical tweezers and single-cell analysis in microfluidics adds a new degree of freedom to microbial single-cell analysis. PMID:24041615

  1. Three-Dimensional Optical Trapping of a Plasmonic Nanoparticle using Low Numerical Aperture Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Karásek, Vítězslav; Paták, Aleš; Pokorná, Zuzana; Mika, Filip; Zemánek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    It was previously believed that larger metal nanoparticles behave as tiny mirrors that are pushed by the light beam radiative force along the direction of beam propagation, without a chance to be confined. However, several groups have recently reported successful optical trapping of gold and silver particles as large as 250 nm. We offer a possible explanation based on the fact that metal nanoparticles naturally occur in various non-spherical shapes and their optical properties differ significantly due to changes in localized plasmon excitation. We demonstrate experimentally and support theoretically three-dimensional confinement of large gold nanoparticles in an optical trap based on very low numerical aperture optics. We showed theoretically that the unique properties of gold nanoprisms allow an increase of trapping force by an order of magnitude at certain aspect ratios. These results pave the way to spatial manipulation of plasmonic nanoparticles using an optical fibre, with interesting applications in biology and medicine.

  2. Three-Dimensional Optical Trapping of a Plasmonic Nanoparticle using Low Numerical Aperture Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Karásek, Vítězslav; Paták, Aleš; Pokorná, Zuzana; Mika, Filip; Zemánek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    It was previously believed that larger metal nanoparticles behave as tiny mirrors that are pushed by the light beam radiative force along the direction of beam propagation, without a chance to be confined. However, several groups have recently reported successful optical trapping of gold and silver particles as large as 250 nm. We offer a possible explanation based on the fact that metal nanoparticles naturally occur in various non-spherical shapes and their optical properties differ significantly due to changes in localized plasmon excitation. We demonstrate experimentally and support theoretically three-dimensional confinement of large gold nanoparticles in an optical trap based on very low numerical aperture optics. We showed theoretically that the unique properties of gold nanoprisms allow an increase of trapping force by an order of magnitude at certain aspect ratios. These results pave the way to spatial manipulation of plasmonic nanoparticles using an optical fibre, with interesting applications in biology and medicine. PMID:25630432

  3. Optical Tweezers and Optical Trapping Improved for Future Automated Micromanipulation and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Decker, Arthur J.

    2005-01-01

    Optical trap arrays are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for holding, manipulating, and optically interrogating arrays of nanotube sensors. The trap arrays, for example, might be used to arrange arrays of chemical sensors for insertion onto a chip in liquid, air, and vacuum environments. Neural-network-controlled spatial light modulators (SLMs) are to generate and control the trap positions and trap profiles in three dimensions.

  4. tweezercalib 2.0: Faster version of MatLab package for precise calibration of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Poul Martin; Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2006-03-01

    We present a vectorized version of the MatLab (MathWorks Inc.) package tweezercalib for calibration of optical tweezers with precision. The calibration is based on the power spectrum of the Brownian motion of a dielectric bead trapped in the tweezers. Precision is achieved by accounting for a number of factors that affect this power spectrum, as described in vs. 1 of the package [I.M. Tolić-Nørrelykke, K. Berg-Sørensen, H. Flyvbjerg, Matlab program for precision calibration of optical tweezers, Comput. Phys. Comm. 159 (2004) 225-240]. The graphical user interface allows the user to include or leave out each of these factors. Several "health tests" are applied to the experimental data during calibration, and test results are displayed graphically. Thus, the user can easily see whether the data comply with the theory used for their interpretation. Final calibration results are given with statistical errors and covariance matrix. New version program summaryTitle of program: tweezercalib Catalogue identifier: ADTV_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTV_v2_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Reference in CPC to previous version: I.M. Tolić-Nørrelykke, K. Berg-Sørensen, H. Flyvbjerg, Comput. Phys. Comm. 159 (2004) 225 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADTV Does the new version supersede the original program: Yes Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: General computer running MatLab (Mathworks Inc.) Operating systems under with the program has been tested: Windows2000, Windows-XP, Linux Programming language used: MatLab (Mathworks Inc.), standard license Memory required to execute with typical data: Of order four times the size of the data file High speed storage required: none No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 135 989 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 527 611 Distribution format: tar. gz Nature of physical problem: Calibrate optical tweezers with precision by fitting theory to experimental power spectrum of position of bead doing Brownian motion in incompressible fluid, possibly near microscope cover slip, while trapped in optical tweezers. Thereby determine spring constant of optical trap and conversion factor for arbitrary-units-to-nanometers for detection system. Method of solution: Elimination of cross-talk between quadrant photo-diode's output channels for positions (optional). Check that distribution of recorded positions agrees with Boltzmann distribution of bead in harmonic trap. Data compression and noise reduction by blocking method applied to power spectrum. Full accounting for hydrodynamic effects: Frequency-dependent drag force and interaction with nearby cover slip (optional). Full accounting for electronic filters (optional), for "virtual filtering" caused by detection system (optional). Full accounting for aliasing caused by finite sampling rate (optional). Standard non-linear least-squares fitting. Statistical support for fit is given, with several plots facilitating inspection of consistency and quality of data and fit. Summary of revisions: A faster fitting routine, adapted from [J. Nocedal, Y.x. Yuan, Combining trust region and line search techniques, Technical Report OTC 98/04, Optimization Technology Center, 1998; W.H. Press, B.P. Flannery, S.A. Teukolsky, W.T. Vetterling, Numerical Recipes. The Art of Scientific Computing, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1986], is applied. It uses fewer function evaluations, and the remaining function evaluations have been vectorized. Calls to routines in Toolboxes not included with a standard MatLab license have been replaced by calls to routines that are included in the present package. Fitting parameters are rescaled to ensure that they are all of roughly the same size (of order 1) while being fitted. Generally, the program package has been updated to comply with MatLab, vs. 7.0, and optimized for speed. Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Data should be positions of bead doing Brownian motion while held by optical tweezers. For high precision in final results, data should be time series measured over a long time, with sufficiently high experimental sampling rate: The sampling rate should be well above the characteristic frequency of the trap, the so-called corner frequency. Thus, the sampling frequency should typically be larger than 10 kHz. The Fast Fourier Transform used works optimally when the time series contain 2 data points, and long measurement time is obtained with n>12-15. Finally, the optics should be set to ensure a harmonic trapping potential in the range of positions visited by the bead. The fitting procedure checks for harmonic potential. Typical running time: Seconds Unusual features of the program: None References: The theoretical underpinnings for the procedure are found in [K. Berg-Sørensen, H. Flyvbjerg, Power spectrum analysis for optical tweezers, Rev. Sci. Ins. 75 (2004) 594-612].

  5. Calibrating bead displacements in optical tweezers using acousto-optic deflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, Karen C.; Mameren, Joost van; Stienen, Ger J.M.; Peterman, Erwin J.G.; Wuite, Gijs J.L.; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2006-01-15

    Displacements of optically trapped particles are often recorded using back-focal-plane interferometry. In order to calibrate the detector signals to displacements of the trapped object, several approaches are available. One often relies either on scanning a fixed bead across the waist of the laser beam or on analyzing the power spectrum of movements of the trapped bead. Here, we introduce an alternative method to perform this calibration. The method consists of very rapidly scanning the laser beam across the solvent-immersed, trapped bead using acousto-optic deflectors while recording the detector signals. It does not require any knowledge of solvent viscosity and bead diameter, and works in all types of samples, viscous or viscoelastic. Moreover, it is performed with the same bead as that used in the actual experiment. This represents marked advantages over established methods.

  6. Using optical tweezers for measuring the interaction forces between human bone cells and implant surfaces: System design and force calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Martin; Madgavkar, Ashwin; Stjerndahl, Maria; Wu, Yanrong; Tan, Weihong; Duran, Randy; Niehren, Stefan; Mustafa, Kamal; Arvidson, Kristina; Wennerberg, Ann

    2007-07-15

    Optical tweezers were used to study the interaction and attachment of human bone cells to various types of medical implant materials. Ideally, the implant should facilitate cell attachment and promote migration of the progenitor cells in order to decrease the healing time. It is therefore of interest, in a controlled manner, to be able to monitor the cell adhesion process. Results from such studies would help foresee the clinical outcome of integrating medical implants. The interactions between two primary cell culture models, human gingival fibroblasts and bone forming human osteoblast cells, and three different implant materials, glass, titanium, and hydroxyapatite, were studied. A novel type of optical tweezers, which has a newly designed quadrant detector and a powerful 3 W laser was constructed and force calibrated using two different methods: one method in which the stiffness of the optical trap was obtained by monitoring the phase lag between the trap and the moved object when imposing a forced oscillation on the trapped object and another method in which the maximum trapping force was derived from the critical velocity at which the object escapes the trap. Polystyrene beads as well as cells were utilized for the calibrations. This is the first time that cells have been used directly for these types of force calibrations and, hence, direct measurements of forces exerted on cells can be performed, thus avoiding the difficulties often encountered when translating the results obtained from cell measurements to the calibrations obtained with reference materials. This more straightforward approach represents an advantage in comparison to established methods.

  7. Optical Characterization of Metallic Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Wenbo; Lin, Bing

    2005-01-01

    Airborne metallic particulates from industry and urban sources are highly conducting aerosols. The characterization of these pollutant particles is important for environment monitoring and protection. Because these metallic particulates are highly reflective, their effect on local weather or regional radiation budget may also need to be studied. In this work, light scattering characteristics of these metallic aerosols are studied using exact solutions on perfectly conducting spherical and cylindrical particles. It is found that for perfectly conducting spheres and cylinders, when scattering angle is larger than approx. 90 deg. the linear polarization degree of the scattered light is very close to zero. This light scattering characteristics of perfectly conducting particles is significantly different from that of other aerosols. When these perfectly conducting particles are immersed in an absorbing medium, this light scattering characteristics does not show significant change. Therefore, measuring the linear polarization of scattered lights at backward scattering angles can detect and distinguish metallic particulates from other aerosols. This result provides a great potential of metallic aerosol detection and monitoring for environmental protection.

  8. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Jauffred, Liselotte; Taheri, S. M.; Linke, Heiner; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2015-08-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trapped in air using a 1064 nm laser. The positions visited by the trapped gold nano-particle were quantified using a quadrant photo diode placed in the back focal plane. The time traces were analyzed and the trapping stiffness characterizing gold aerosol trapping determined and compared to aerosol trapping of nanometer sized silica and polystyrene particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that gold nano-particles trap more strongly in air than similarly sized polystyrene and silica particles. We found that, in a certain power range, the trapping strength of polystyrene particles is linearly decreasing with increasing laser power.

  9. Comparative study of methods to calibrate the stiffness of a single-beam gradient-force optical tweezers over various laser trapping powers

    PubMed Central

    Sarshar, Mohammad; Wong, Winson T.; Anvari, Bahman

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical tweezers have become an important instrument in force measurements associated with various physical, biological, and biophysical phenomena. Quantitative use of optical tweezers relies on accurate calibration of the stiffness of the optical trap. Using the same optical tweezers platform operating at 1064 nm and beads with two different diameters, we present a comparative study of viscous drag force, equipartition theorem, Boltzmann statistics, and power spectral density (PSD) as methods in calibrating the stiffness of a single beam gradient force optical trap at trapping laser powers in the range of 0.05 to 1.38 W at the focal plane. The equipartition theorem and Boltzmann statistic methods demonstrate a linear stiffness with trapping laser powers up to 355 mW, when used in conjunction with video position sensing means. The PSD of a trapped particle’s Brownian motion or measurements of the particle displacement against known viscous drag forces can be reliably used for stiffness calibration of an optical trap over a greater range of trapping laser powers. Viscous drag stiffness calibration method produces results relevant to applications where trapped particle undergoes large displacements, and at a given position sensing resolution, can be used for stiffness calibration at higher trapping laser powers than the PSD method. PMID:25375348

  10. Rotation rate of a three-wing rotor illuminated by upward-directed focused beam in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukita, Hiroo; Ohnishi, Takakazu; Nonohara, Yasunari

    2008-03-01

    The optical torque and the trapping position (focal point) in optical tweezers are analyzed for upward-directed focused laser illumination using a ray optics model, considering that laser light is incident at not only the lower surface but also the side surface of a 3-wing rotor. The viscous drag force due to the pressure and the shearing stress on all surfaces of the rotor is evaluated using computational fluid dynamics. The rotation rate is simulated in water by balancing the optical torque with the drag force, resulting in 500 rpm for an SU-8 rotor with 20 μm diameter at a laser power of 200 mW. The trapping position is estimated to be 7.6 μm in the rotor with an upward-directed laser at 200 mW via an objective lens having a numerical aperture of 1.4. Both the rotation rate and the trapping position agree well with the values obtained in the experiment.

  11. tweezercalib 2.1: Faster version of MatLab package for precise calibration of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Poul Martin; Tolic-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2006-10-01

    New version program summaryTitle of program: tweezercalib Catalogue identifier:ADTV_v2_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTV_v2_1 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:no No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 134 188 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 050 368 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MatLab (Mathworks Inc.), standard license Computer:General computer running MatLab (Mathworks Inc.) Operating system:Windows2000, Windows-XP, Linux RAM:Of order four times the size of the data file Classification:3, 4.14, 18, 23 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADTV_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 174 (2006) 518 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: yes Nature of problem:Calibrate optical tweezers with precision by fitting theory to experimental power spectrum of position of bead doing Brownian motion in incompressible fluid, possibly near microscope cover slip, while trapped in optical tweezers. Thereby determine spring constant of optical trap and conversion factor for arbitrary-units-to-nanometers for detection system. The theoretical underpinnings of the procedure may be found in Ref. [3]. Solution method:Elimination of cross-talk between quadrant photo-diodes, output channels for positions (optional). Check that distribution of recorded positions agrees with Boltzmann distribution of bead in harmonic trap. Data compression and noise reduction by blocking method applied to power spectrum. Full accounting for hydrodynamic effects; Frequency-dependent drag force and interaction with nearby cover slip (optional). Full accounting for electronic filters (optional), for "virtual filtering" caused by detection system (optional). Full accounting for aliasing caused by finite sampling rate (optional). Standard non-linear least-squares fitting with custom written routines based on Refs. [1,2]. Statistical support for fit is given, with several plots facilitating inspection of consistency and quality of data and fit. Reasons for the new version:Recent progress in the field has demonstrated a better approximation of the formula for the theoretical power spectrum with corrections due to frequency dependence of motion and distance to a surface nearby. Summary of revisions:The expression for the theoretical power spectrum when accounting for corrections to Stokes law, P(f), has been updated to agree with a better approximation of the theoretical spectrum, as discussed in Ref. [4] The units of the kinematic viscosity applied in the program is now stated in the input window. Greek letters and exponents are inserted in the input window. The graphical output has improved: The figures now bear a meaningful title and four figures that test the quality of the fit are now combined in one figure with four parts. Restrictions: Data should be positions of bead doing Brownian motion while held by optical tweezers. For high precision in final results, data should be time series measured over a long time, with sufficiently high experimental sampling rate; The sampling rate should be well above the characteristic frequency of the trap, the so-called corner frequency. Thus, the sampling frequency should typically be larger than 10 kHz. The Fast Fourier Transform used works optimally when the time series contain 2 data points, and long measurement time is obtained with n>12-15. Finally, the optics should be set to ensure a harmonic trapping potential in the range of positions visited by the bead. The fitting procedure checks for harmonic potential. Running time:seconds ReferencesJ. Nocedal, Y.x. Yuan, Combining trust region and line search techniques, Technical Report OTC 98/04, Optimization Technology Center, 1998. W.H. Press, B.P. Flannery, S.A. Teukolsky, W.T. Vetterling, Numerical Recipes. The Art of Scientific Computing, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1986. (The theoretical underpinnings for the procedure) K. Berg-Sørensen and Henrik Flyvbjerg, Power spectrum analysis for optical tweezers, Rev. Sci. Ins. 75 (2004) 594-612. S.F. Tolic-Nørrelykke, et al., Calibration of optical tweezers with positions detection in the back-focal-plane, arXiv:physics/0603037 v2, 2006.

  12. Diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth observed at AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Slutsker, I.; Chatenet, B.; Pinker, R. T.

    2002-12-01

    Diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth is important for various applications, including satellite aerosol data validation, radiative forcing computations, studies of aerosol interaction with humidity and clouds, and also public health. Aerosol optical depth measurements acquired through the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network are analyzed. Analysis of the diurnal cycle over major urban/industrial areas within the network showed a prevailing pattern of the optical depth increase by 10-40% during the day at most sites. Diurnal variability range is <10% over various sites where dust aerosol is a major contributor to optical depth. Sites in southern Africa influenced by distant sources of biomass burning aerosol show no diurnal cycle, while the presence of local sources causes a diurnal trend with a maximum aerosol loading observed in the afternoon hours. Over oceans, because of the very low optical depth, even 20% departure from the daily average is practically within the measurement uncertainty.

  13. FACS-sorted particles reduce the data variance in optical tweezers-assisted dynamic force spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangner, T.; Singer, D.; Wagner, C.; Gutsche, C.; Ueberschär, O.; Hoffmann, R.; Kremer, F.

    2013-08-01

    By combining optical tweezers-assisted dynamic force spectroscopy experiments with fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), we demonstrate a new approach to reducing the data variance in measuring receptor-ligand interactions on a single molecule level by ensuring similar coating densities. Therefore, the carboxyfluorescein-labelled monophosphorylated peptide tau226-240[pThr231] is anchored on melamine resin beads and these beads are sorted by FACS to achieve a homogeneous surface coverage. To quantify the impact of the fluorescence dye on the bond parameters between the phosphorylated peptide and the corresponding phosphorylation specific anti-human tau monoclonal antibody HPT-104, we perform dynamic force spectroscopy and compare the results to data using unsorted beads covered with the non-fluorescence peptide analogue. Finally, we demonstrate that the data variance of the relative binding frequency is significantly decreased by a factor of 3.4 using pre-sorted colloids with a homogeneous ligand coating compared to using unsorted colloids.

  14. In vivo X-ray elemental imaging of single cell model organisms manipulated by laser-based optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Vergucht, Eva; Brans, Toon; Beunis, Filip; Garrevoet, Jan; De Rijcke, Maarten; Bauters, Stephen; Deruytter, David; Vandegehuchte, Michiel; Van Nieuwenhove, Ine; Janssen, Colin; Burghammer, Manfred; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    We report on a radically new elemental imaging approach for the analysis of biological model organisms and single cells in their natural, in vivo state. The methodology combines optical tweezers (OT) technology for non-contact, laser-based sample manipulation with synchrotron radiation confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microimaging for the first time. The main objective of this work is to establish a new method for in vivo elemental imaging in a two-dimensional (2D) projection mode in free-standing biological microorganisms or single cells, present in their aqueous environment. Using the model organism Scrippsiella trochoidea, a first proof of principle experiment at beamline ID13 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) demonstrates the feasibility of the OT XRF methodology, which is applied to study mixture toxicity of Cu-Ni and Cu-Zn as a result of elevated exposure. We expect that the new OT XRF methodology will significantly contribute to the new trend of investigating microorganisms at the cellular level with added in vivo capability. PMID:25762511

  15. Laser microbeams for DNA damage induction, optical tweezers for the search on blood pressure relaxing drugs: contributions to ageing research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigaravicius, P.; Monajembashi, S.; Hoffmann, M.; Altenberg, B.; Greulich, K. O.

    2009-08-01

    One essential cause of human ageing is the accumulation of DNA damages during lifetime. Experimental studies require quantitative induction of damages and techniques to visualize the subsequent DNA repair. A new technique, the "immuno fluorescent comet assay", is used to directly visualize DNA damages in the microscope. Using DNA repair proteins fluorescently labeled with green fluorescent protein, it could be shown that the repair of the most dangerous DNA double strand breaks starts with the inaccurate "non homologous end joining" pathway and only after 1 - 1 ½ minutes may switch to the more accurate "homologous recombination repair". One might suggest investigating whether centenarians use "homologous recombination repair" differently from those ageing at earlier years and speculate whether it is possible, for example by nutrition, to shift DNA repair to a better use of the error free pathway and thus promote healthy ageing. As a complementary technique optical tweezers, and particularly its variant "erythrocyte mediated force application", is used to simulate the effects of blood pressure on HUVEC cells representing the inner lining of human blood vessels. Stimulating one cell induces in the whole neighbourhood waves of calcium and nitric oxide, known to relax blood vessels. NIFEDIPINE and AMLODIPINE, both used as drugs in the therapy of high blood pressure, primarily a disease of the elderly, prolong the availability of nitric oxide. This partially explains their mode of action. In contrast, VERAPAMILE, also a blood pressure reducing drug, does not show this effect, indicating that obviously an alternative mechanism must be responsible for vessel relaxation.

  16. Mechanism of a viral DNA packaging motor studied by characterization of biochemical mutants via optical tweezers measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsay, James M.; Sippy, Jean; Feiss, Michael; Smith, Douglas E.

    2008-08-01

    Optical tweezers measurements were employed to directly observe viral DNA packaging in wild type and packaging mutants of bacteriophage lambda. Several key findings are reported here: DNA packaging by purified wild type lambda motors was measured for the first time, showing nearly identical behavior in packaging DNA to crude extracts of terminase components. A slow packaging lambda mutant, T194M, was found to package DNA at ~10× slower velocity than wild type. Meanwhile another packaging mutant Y46F was found to package DNA slower than the wild type (60-70% the velocity of the wild type velocity) as well as slipping >10x more frequently (per length of DNA) than wild type. Another mutant (K84A) showed slower packaging (60-70% the velocity of wildtype), but displayed slipping and pausing behavior similar to wild type. Finally the pausing and slipping dependence on length of DNA packaged of the various terminases studied was discovered, suggesting further structural defects of the mutants that are detrimental to translocation. These studies confirm the location of an ATPase center in the N-terminal portion of gpA which is responsible for translocation of dsDNA.

  17. Dependence of bacteriophage φ29 DNA packaging on ionic conditions studied by optical tweezers manipulation of single DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Derek N.; Rickgauer, John P.; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2006-08-01

    The bacteriophage φ29 portal motor is capable of packaging the φ29, 19.3 Kbp, genome to high density into its preformed capsid. The packaging process must overcome the forces due to confining the highly negative charge of the DNA to a small volume, as well as the forces due to bending the DNA on length scales smaller than one persistence length. Both of these energetic considerations can be modulated by the ionic nature of the buffer DNA packaging occurs in. To measure the effects of DNA charge shielding on the packaging process, we studied the dynamics of DNA packaging by optical tweezers in a variety of different ionic conditions. We looked at the effects monovalent, divalent, and trivalent cations have on the motor function and its dependence on external force and, we observed the rate of DNA packaging at nominal force as a function of capsid filling. Specifically, we varied the concentrations of Na +, Mg +2, and cobalt hexamine in the solution bathing the bacteriophage during packaging to see what effects, if any, these cations have. From these measurements, we present an inferred internal force as a function of percent filling of the bacteriophage capsid in a variety of ionic environments. Preliminary analysis suggests the ionic environment can modulate internal pressure, with the presence of higher valence cations better shielding the packaged DNA resulting in lower internal pressures.

  18. Physiological Monitoring of Optically Trapped Cells: Studying the Effects of Confinement by 1064 NM Lazer Tweezers Using Microfluorometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yagang

    A novel technique that combines microfluorometric detection and optical laser trapping has been developed for in-situ assessing the physiological state of an optically trapped biological sample. This optical diagnostic technique achieves high sensitivity (>30 dB signal -to-noise ratio) and high spatial resolution (~ 1 μm) over a broad spectral range (>400 nm). The fluorescence spectra derived from exogenous fluorescent probes, including laurdan, acridine orange, propidium iodide and Snarf, are used to assess the effects of optical confinement with respect to temperature, DNA structure, cell viability, and intracellular pH, respectively. In the latter three cases, fluorescence is excited via a two-photon absorption process, using the cw laser trap itself as the fluorescence excitation source. This enables the cw near infrared laser trapping beam to be used simultaneously as an optical diagnostic probe as well as an optical micromanipulator. Using microfluorometry, a temperature increase of less than several degrees centigrade was measured for test samples, including liposomes, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and human sperm cells that were held stationary by 1064 nm optical tweezers having a power density of ~10^7 W/cm^2. Additional physiological monitoring experiments indicated that there is no observable denaturation of DNA, or change of intracellular pH under typical continuous wave laser trapping conditions (P <= 400 mW). Under some circumstances, however, it was possible to achieve a decrease in cell viability with cw trapping, as monitored by a live/dead vital stain. In comparison, significant DNA denaturation and cellular physiological changes (e.g. cell death) were observed when a Q-switched pulsed laser at a threshold of ~30mu J/pulse was used as trapping source. These results generally support the conclusion that cw laser trapping at 1064 nm wavelength is a safe, non-invasive process and should prove to be of great value for understanding the mechanisms of laser microirradiation effects on living cells held stationary in a near-infrared trapping beam.

  19. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinozuka, Y.; Johnson, R. R.; Flynn, C. J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Dunagan, S.E.; Kluzek, C. D.; Hubbe, J. M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T. F.; Wagener, R.; Gregory, L.; Chand, D.; Berg, L. K.; Rogers, R. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, J. W.; Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), a hyperspectral airborne Sun photometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two-Column Aerosol Project. Root-mean-square differences from Aerosol Robotic Network ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm, and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3 km deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on Department of Energy Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, and 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, and 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350 and 1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were approx. 0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR's spatially resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  20. Magnetic Tweezers for the Measurement of Twist and Torque

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Lee, Mina; Ordu, Orkide; Kerssemakers, Jacob W. J.; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques make it possible to investigate the behavior of individual biological molecules in solution in real time. These techniques include so-called force spectroscopy approaches such as atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers, flow stretching, and magnetic tweezers. Amongst these approaches, magnetic tweezers have distinguished themselves by their ability to apply torque while maintaining a constant stretching force. Here, it is illustrated how such a “conventional” magnetic tweezers experimental configuration can, through a straightforward modification of its field configuration to minimize the magnitude of the transverse field, be adapted to measure the degree of twist in a biological molecule. The resulting configuration is termed the freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers. Additionally, it is shown how further modification of the field configuration can yield a transverse field with a magnitude intermediate between that of the “conventional” magnetic tweezers and the freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers, which makes it possible to directly measure the torque stored in a biological molecule. This configuration is termed the magnetic torque tweezers. The accompanying video explains in detail how the conversion of conventional magnetic tweezers into freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers and magnetic torque tweezers can be accomplished, and demonstrates the use of these techniques. These adaptations maintain all the strengths of conventional magnetic tweezers while greatly expanding the versatility of this powerful instrument. PMID:24894412

  1. Aerosol Optical Depth Determinations for BOREAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.; Guzman, R. P.; Ried, D.; Lobitz, B.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Automated tracking sun photometers were deployed by NASA/Ames Research Center aboard the NASA C-130 aircraft and at a ground site for all three Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) in central Saskatchewan, Canada during the summer of 1994. The sun photometer data were used to derive aerosol optical depths for the total atmospheric column above each instrument. The airborne tracking sun photometer obtained data in both the southern and northern study areas at the surface prior to takeoff, along low altitude runs near the ground tracking sun photometer, during ascents to 6-8 km msl, along remote sensing flightlines at altitude, during descents to the surface, and at the surface after landing. The ground sun photometer obtained data from the shore of Candle Lake in the southern area for all cloud-free times. During the first IFC in May-June ascents and descents of the airborne tracking sun photometer indicated the aerosol optical depths decreased steadily from the surface to 3.5 kni where they leveled out at approximately 0.05 (at 525 nm), well below levels caused by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. On a very clear day, May 31st, surface optical depths measured by either the airborne or ground sun photometers approached those levels (0.06-0.08 at 525 nm), but surface optical depths were often several times higher. On June 4th they increased from 0.12 in the morning to 0.20 in the afternoon with some evidence of brief episodes of pollen bursts. During the second IFC surface aerosol optical depths were variable in the extreme due to smoke from western forest fires. On July 20th the aerosol optical depth at 525 nm decreased from 0.5 in the morning to 0.2 in the afternoon; they decreased still further the next day to 0.05 and remained consistently low throughout the day to provide excellent conditions for several remote sensing missions flown that day. Smoke was heavy for the early morning of July 24th but cleared partially by 10:30 local time and cleared fully by 11:30. Heavy smoke characterized the rest of the IFC in both study areas.

  2. Optical Properties of Titan's Aerosol Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Sandra I.; Contreras, G.; Agarwal, V.

    2006-09-01

    In the upper Titan's atmosphere its main constituents, CH4 and N2, are photolyzed and radiolyzed by solar photons and magnetospheric electrons. The primary products of these chemical interactions evolve to heavier organic compounds which are likely to associate to form the haze layers observed on Titan's upper atmosphere. Different theories and models have been used to explain the physical, chemical and optical properties of the haze material, but only with limited success. Among the parameters involved in these models, the complex refractive index is one of the most critical due to the influence that chemical composition and structural organization of the solid have on the n and k values. As part of a continued systematical study for the synthesis and characterization of Titan's aerosol analogues initiated in our group, we have subjected mixtures of CH4 in N2 to laser irradiation to produce layer of aerosol analogues. A set of optical properties values directly calculated from the transmission and reflectance curves, as well as a chemical characterization, by tandem mass spectroscopy, of the laboratory analogues will be presented. Our experimental protocol avoids some of the difficulties usually faced on laboratory simulations (over-irradiation, contamination with atmospheric oxygen, accurate ratio of initial gas mixture), porosity influences will also be discussed. The optical values can be used to determine how the chemical and optical properties of these aerosols influence the matching with the observed geometric albedo spectrum and how they participate in the radiative equilibrium processes in Titan's atmosphere. They will certainly help in the interpretation of the observations made by the Huygens descend through Titan's atmosphere last January and in all the new information about Titan generated since then. Financial support from CONACyT (40449) and PROMEP (103.5/03/1134) is acknowledged. SIRJ acknowledges a travel grant from PIFI 3.2.

  3. The Effect of Aerosol Hygroscopicity and Volatility on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic sources can influence optical properties of ambient aerosol by altering its hygroscopicity and contributing to light absorption directly via formation of brown carbon and indirectly by enhancing light absorption by black carbon ("lensing effect"). The magnitude of these effects remains highly uncertain. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of relative humidity and temperature on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). The sample-conditioning system provided measurements at ambient RH, 10%RH ("dry"), 85%RH ("wet"), and 200 C ("TD"). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) and a variable residence time constant temperature TD in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. We will present results of the on-going analysis of the collected data set. We will show that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. SOA appears to increase aerosol light absorption by about 10%. TD measurements suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology.

  4. Fabrication of a Material Assembly of Silver Nanoparticles Using the Phase Gradients of Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zijie; Sajjan, Manas; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2015-04-01

    Optical matter can be created using the intensity gradient and electrodynamic (e.g., optical binding) forces that nano- and microparticles experience in focused optical beams. Here we show that the force associated with phase gradient is also important. In fact, in optical line traps the phase gradient force is crucial in determining the structure and stability of optical matter arrays consisting of Ag nanoparticles (NPs). NP lattices can be repeatedly assembled and disassembled simply by changing the sign of the phase gradient. The phase gradient creates a compressive force (and thus a stress) in the optically bound Ag NP lattices, causing structural transitions (a stress response) from 1D "chains" to 2D lattices, and even to amorphous structures. The structural transitions and dynamics of driven transport are well described by electrodynamics simulations and modeling using a drift-diffusion Langevin equation.

  5. Fabrication of a material assembly of silver nanoparticles using the phase gradients of optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zijie; Sajjan, Manas; Scherer, Norbert F

    2015-04-10

    Optical matter can be created using the intensity gradient and electrodynamic (e.g., optical binding) forces that nano- and microparticles experience in focused optical beams. Here we show that the force associated with phase gradient is also important. In fact, in optical line traps the phase gradient force is crucial in determining the structure and stability of optical matter arrays consisting of Ag nanoparticles (NPs). NP lattices can be repeatedly assembled and disassembled simply by changing the sign of the phase gradient. The phase gradient creates a compressive force (and thus a stress) in the optically bound Ag NP lattices, causing structural transitions (a stress response) from 1D "chains" to 2D lattices, and even to amorphous structures. The structural transitions and dynamics of driven transport are well described by electrodynamics simulations and modeling using a drift-diffusion Langevin equation. PMID:25910124

  6. Are electron tweezers possible?

    PubMed

    Oleshko, Vladimir P; Howe, James M

    2011-11-01

    Positively answering the question in the title, we demonstrate in this work single electron beam trapping and steering of 20-300nm solid Al nanoparticles generated inside opaque submicron-sized molten Al-Si eutectic alloy spheres. Imaging of solid nanoparticles and liquid alloy in real time was performed using energy filtering in an analytical transmission electron microscope (TEM). Energy-filtering TEM combined with valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy enabled us to investigate in situ nanoscale transformations of the internal structure, temperature dependence of plasmon losses, and local electronic and optical properties under melting and crystallization of individual binary alloy particles. For particles below 20nm in size, enhanced vibrations of the dynamic solid-liquid interface due to instabilities near the critical threshold were observed just before melting. The obtained results indicate that focused electron beams can act as a tool for manipulation of metal nanoparticles by transferring linear and angular mechanical momenta. Such thermally assisted electron tweezers can be utilized for touchless manipulation and processing of individual nano-objects and potentially for fabrication of assembled nanodevices with atomic level sensitivity and lateral resolution provided by modern electron optical systems. This is by three orders of magnitude better than for light microscopy utilized in conventional optical tweezers. New research directions and potential applications of trapping and tracking of nano-objects by focused electron beams are outlined. PMID:21946000

  7. Black carbon aerosol mixing state, organic aerosols and aerosol optical properties over the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Morgan, W. T.; Flynn, M.; Highwood, E. J.; Turnbull, K.; Haywood, J.; Coe, H.

    2011-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb sunlight thereby leading to a positive radiative forcing and a warming of climate and can also impact human health through their impact on the respiratory system. The state of mixing of BC with other aerosol species, particularly the degree of internal/external mixing, has been highlighted as a major uncertainty in assessing its radiative forcing and hence its climate impact, but few in situ observations of mixing state exist. We present airborne single particle soot photometer (SP2) measurements of refractory BC (rBC) mass concentrations and mixing state coupled with aerosol composition and optical properties measured in urban plumes and regional pollution over the UK. All data were obtained using instrumentation flown on the UK's BAe-146-301 large Atmospheric Research Aircraft (ARA) operated by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM). We measured sub-micron aerosol composition using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and used positive matrix factorization to separate hydrocarbon-like (HOA) and oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA). We found a higher number fraction of thickly coated rBC particles in air masses with large OOA relative to HOA, higher ozone-to-nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratios and large concentrations of total sub-micron aerosol mass relative to rBC mass concentrations. The more ozone- and OOA-rich air masses were associated with transport from continental Europe, while plumes from UK cities had higher HOA and NOx and fewer thickly coated rBC particles. We did not observe any significant change in the rBC mass absorption efficiency calculated from rBC mass and light absorption coefficients measured by a particle soot absorption photometer despite observing significant changes in aerosol composition and rBC mixing state. The contributions of light scattering and absorption to total extinction (quantified by the single scattering albedo; SSA) did change for different air masses, with lower SSA observed in urban plumes compared to regional aerosol (0.85 versus 0.9-0.95). We attribute these differences to the presence of relatively rapidly formed secondary aerosol, primarily OOA and ammonium nitrate, which must be taken into account in radiative forcing calculations.

  8. Black carbon aerosol mixing state, organic aerosols and aerosol optical properties over the United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Morgan, W. T.; Flynn, M.; Highwood, E. J.; Turnbull, K.; Haywood, J.; Coe, H.

    2011-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb sunlight thereby leading to a positive radiative forcing and a warming of climate and can also impact human health through their impact on the respiratory system. The state of mixing of BC with other aerosol species, particularly the degree of internal/external mixing, has been highlighted as a major uncertainty in assessing its radiative forcing and hence its climate impact, but few in situ observations of mixing state exist. We present airborne single particle soot photometer (SP2) measurements of refractory BC (rBC) mass concentrations and mixing state coupled with aerosol composition and optical properties measured in urban plumes and regional pollution over the United Kingdom. All data were obtained using instrumentation flown on the UK's BAe-146-301 large Atmospheric Research Aircraft (ARA) operated by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM). We measured sub-micron aerosol composition using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and used positive matrix factorization to separate hydrocarbon-like (HOA) and oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA). We found a higher number fraction of thickly coated rBC particles in air masses with large OOA relative to HOA, higher ozone-to-nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratios and large concentrations of total sub-micron aerosol mass relative to rBC mass concentrations. The more ozone- and OOA-rich air masses were associated with transport from continental Europe, while plumes from UK cities had higher HOA and NOx and fewer thickly coated rBC particles. We did not observe any significant change in the rBC mass absorption efficiency calculated from rBC mass and light absorption coefficients measured by a particle soot absorption photometer despite observing significant changes in aerosol composition and rBC mixing state. The contributions of light scattering and absorption to total extinction (quantified by the single scattering albedo; SSA) did change for different air masses, with lower SSA observed in urban plumes compared to regional aerosol (0.85 versus 0.9-0.95). We attribute these differences to the presence of relatively rapidly formed secondary aerosol, primarily OOA and ammonium nitrate, which must be taken into account in radiative forcing calculations.

  9. Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements in the Southern Ocean Within the Framework of Maritime Aerosol Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Sayer, A. M.; Sakerin, S. M.; Radionov, V. F.; Courcoux, Y.; Broccardo, S. P.; Evangelista, H.; Croot, P. L.; Disterhoft, P.; Piketh, S.; Milinevsky, G. P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Slutsker, I.; Giles, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol production sources over the World Ocean and various factors determining aerosol spatial and temporal distribution are important for understanding the Earth's radiation budget and aerosol-cloud interactions. The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) as a component of AERONET has been collecting aerosol optical depth data over the oceans since 2006. A significant progress has been made in data acquisition over areas that previously had very little or no coverage. Data collection included intensive study areas in the Southern Ocean and off the coast of Antarctica including a number of circumnavigation cruises in high southern latitudes. It made an important contribution to MAN and provided a valuable reference point in atmospheric aerosol optical studies. The paper presents results of this international and multi-agency effort in studying aerosol optical properties over Southern Ocean and adjacent areas. The ship-borne aerosol optical depth measurements offer an excellent opportunity for comparison with global aerosol transport models, satellite retrievals and provide useful information on aerosol distribution over the World Ocean. A public domain web-based database dedicated to the MAN activity can be found at http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/maritime_aerosol_network.html.

  10. Near infrared optical tweezers and nanosecond ablation on yeast and algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsifaki, D. G.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A.

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, lasers for optical trapping and micromanipulation of microscopic particles or cells and sub cellular structures, both in vivo and in vitro, have gained remarkable interest in biomedical research and applications. Although the principles and the mechanisms of pulsed laser ablation have been well described for macroscopic interventions, the microbeam operation under microscopic guidance necessitates further investigation. In this work, we present the research and development efforts towards a pulsed ultraviolet microbeam laser system, the design and realization efforts towards a near infrared laser trapping device and the results obtained on yeast cells and algae by the combined system. We investigated the optical dissection of the cells versus the presence of optical trapping forces and the presence of rhodamine dye. We characterized the optical ablation of the cell walls and resulting cavitation as plasma formation effects which create shock waves due to their occurrence only in nanosecond pulse irradiation mode. We estimated the minimum energy of the microbeam for optical dissection of yeast cell, under the influence of optical trapping forces, as lower as 3 μJ, while in the presence of rhodamine as lower as 2 μJ. Lastly, using the techniques of optical microsurgery we demonstrated the minimum energy value for sub cellular dissection on an algae cell equal to 27 μJ.

  11. Photonic Crystal Optical Tweezers with High Efficiency for Live Biological Samples and Viability Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Peifeng; Wu, Jingda; Liu, Gary W.; Keeler, Ethan G.; Pun, Suzie H.; Lin, Lih Y.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new optical trapping method for single cells that utilizes modulated light fields to trap a wide array of cell types, including mammalian, yeast, and Escherichia coli cells, on the surface of a two-dimensional photonic crystal. This method is capable of reducing the required light intensity, and thus minimizing the photothermal damage to living cells, thereby extending cell viability in optical trapping and cell manipulation applications. To this end, a thorough characterization of cell viability in optical trapping environments was performed. This study also demonstrates the technique using spatial light modulation in patterned manipulation of live cell arrays over a broad area. PMID:26814808

  12. Photonic Crystal Optical Tweezers with High Efficiency for Live Biological Samples and Viability Characterization.

    PubMed

    Jing, Peifeng; Wu, Jingda; Liu, Gary W; Keeler, Ethan G; Pun, Suzie H; Lin, Lih Y

    2016-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new optical trapping method for single cells that utilizes modulated light fields to trap a wide array of cell types, including mammalian, yeast, and Escherichia coli cells, on the surface of a two-dimensional photonic crystal. This method is capable of reducing the required light intensity, and thus minimizing the photothermal damage to living cells, thereby extending cell viability in optical trapping and cell manipulation applications. To this end, a thorough characterization of cell viability in optical trapping environments was performed. This study also demonstrates the technique using spatial light modulation in patterned manipulation of live cell arrays over a broad area. PMID:26814808

  13. Photonic Crystal Optical Tweezers with High Efficiency for Live Biological Samples and Viability Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Peifeng; Wu, Jingda; Liu, Gary W.; Keeler, Ethan G.; Pun, Suzie H.; Lin, Lih Y.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new optical trapping method for single cells that utilizes modulated light fields to trap a wide array of cell types, including mammalian, yeast, and Escherichia coli cells, on the surface of a two-dimensional photonic crystal. This method is capable of reducing the required light intensity, and thus minimizing the photothermal damage to living cells, thereby extending cell viability in optical trapping and cell manipulation applications. To this end, a thorough characterization of cell viability in optical trapping environments was performed. This study also demonstrates the technique using spatial light modulation in patterned manipulation of live cell arrays over a broad area.

  14. Quantitative comparison of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol indirect effects in three polluted Asian cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B.; Ahn, C.; Torres, O.; Durbin, P.

    2008-12-01

    Advances in satellite technology and ground based measurement techniques have resulted in vast amount of data on aerosol and cloud parameters. Aerosol indirect effects are characterized by the effects of aerosol on cloud radiative properties. This being a subject of significant interest for climate change and human health effects, many computational and satellite data analysis studies have been made to understand this mechanism. However, most of the studies are made on understanding the global effects. In this work we attempt to understand the local effects by making quantitative analysis of aerosol and its indirect effects in three polluted Asian cities. We analyze aerosol optical depth (AOD) data from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and MISR (Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer), aerosol extinction optical depth, absorption optical depth, and aerosol index (AI) data from OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and compare with AOD data of AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) at Beijing, China; Dalanzadgad, Mongolia; and Kanpur, India. Cloud parameters from MODIS data are correlated with aerosol optical depth. Seasonal variation of aerosol optical depth and its effect on cloud radiative properties are discussed. Large differences in AOD are observed in the measurements by different instruments. The differences in the results of indirect effects indicate considerable influence of local environment.

  15. Design of a high-performance optical tweezer for nanoparticle trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conteduca, D.; Dell'Olio, F.; Ciminelli, C.; Krauss, T. F.; Armenise, M. N.

    2016-04-01

    Integrated optical nanotweezers offer a novel paradigm for optical trapping, as their ability to confine light at the nanoscale leads to extremely high gradient forces. To date, nanotweezers have been realized either as photonic crystal or as plasmonic nanocavities. Here, we propose a nanotweezer device based on a hybrid photonic/plasmonic cavity with the goal of achieving a very high quality factor-to-mode volume ( Q/ V) ratio. The structure includes a 1D photonic crystal dielectric cavity vertically coupled to a bowtie nanoantenna. A very high Q/ V ~ 107 (λ/n)-3 with a resonance transmission T = 29 % at λ R = 1381.1 nm has been calculated by 3D finite element method, affording strong light-matter interaction and making the hybrid cavity suitable for optical trapping. A maximum optical force F = -4.4 pN, high values of stability S = 30 and optical stiffness k = 90 pN/nm W have been obtained with an input power P in = 1 mW, for a polystyrene nanoparticle with a diameter of 40 nm. This performance confirms the high efficiency of the optical nanotweezer and its potential for trapping living matter at the nanoscale, such as viruses, proteins and small bacteria.

  16. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-Ming; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan; Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan ; Lee, Yuarn-Jang; Wang, Wei-Ting; Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; Hsu, Chien-Ting; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; Tsai, Jing-Shin; Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; Wu, Chien-Ming; Ou, Keng-Liang; Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan ; and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  17. Deinococcus radiodurans RecA nucleoprotein filaments characterized at the single-molecule level with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Pobegalov, Georgii; Cherevatenko, Galina; Alekseev, Aleksandr; Sabantsev, Anton; Kovaleva, Oksana; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Morozova, Natalia; Baitin, Dmitrii; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail

    2015-10-23

    Deinococcus radiodurans can survive extreme doses of ionizing radiation due to the very efficient DNA repair mechanisms that are able to cope even with hundreds of double-strand breaks. RecA, the critical protein of homologous recombination in bacteria, is one of the key components of the DNA-repair system. Repair of double-strand breaks requires RecA binding to DNA and assembly of the RecA nucleoprotein helical filaments. The Escherichia coli RecA protein (EcRecA) and its interactions with DNA have been extensively studied using various approaches including single-molecule techniques, while the D. radiodurans RecA (DrRecA) remains much less characterized. However, DrRecA shows some remarkable differences from E. coli homolog. Here we combine microfluidics and single-molecule DNA manipulation with optical tweezers to follow the binding of DrRecA to long double-stranded DNA molecules and probe the mechanical properties of DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments at physiological pH. Our data provide a direct comparison of DrRecA and EcRecA binding to double-stranded DNA under identical conditions. We report a significantly faster filaments assembly as well as lower values of persistence length and contour length for DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments compared to EcRecA. Our results support the existing model of DrRecA forming more frequent and less continuous filaments relative to those of EcRecA. PMID:26365346

  18. A balanced, phase sensitive back-focal plane interferometry technique to determine dynamics of a trapped bead in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Basudev; Pal, Sambit Bikas; Haldar, Arijit; Gupta, Ratnesh Kumar; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Banerjee, Ayan

    2012-04-01

    Back-focal plane interferometry is typically used to determine displacements of a trapped bead which lead to trapping force measurements in optical tweezers. In most cases, intensity shifts of the back-scattered interference pattern due to displacements of the bead are measured by a position sensitive detector placed in the microscope back-focal plane. However, in intensity-based measurements, the axial displacement resolution is typically worse than the lateral resolution since for axial displacements, the inherent resolution of the position detector cannot be used. In this paper, we demonstrate that measurement of the phase of the back-scattered light yields high axial displacement resolution, and can also be used for lateral displacement measurement. In our experiments, we separate out the back-scattered light from the trapped bead and reflected light from the top surface of the sample chamber by a confocal arrangement consisting of a spatial filter used in combination with two apertures. We proceed to beat the two separated components in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer where we employ balanced detection to improve our fringe contrast, and thus the sensitivity of the phase measurement. For lateral displacement sensing, we match experimental results to within 10% with a theoretical simulation determining the shift of the overall phase contour of the back-scattered light due to a given lateral displacement by using plane wave decomposition in conjunction with Mie scattering theory. Our technique is also able to track the Brownian motion of trapped beads from the phase jitter so that, similar to intensity-based measurements, we can use it to determine the spring constant of the trap, and thus the trapping force. The sensitivity of our technique is limited by path drifts of the external interferometer which we have currently stabilized by locking it to a frequency stabilized diode laser to obtain displacement measurement resolution ~200 pm.

  19. Leishmania amazonensis chemotaxis under glucose gradient studied by the strength and directionality of forces measured with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; Fontes, Adriana; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Ayres, Diana Copi; Giorgio, Selma; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2007-02-01

    Chemotaxis is the mechanism microorganisms use to sense the environment surrounding them and to direct their movement towards attractive, or away from the repellent, chemicals. The biochemical sensing is almost the only way for communication between unicellular organisms. Prokaryote and Eukaryote chemotaxis has been mechanically studied mainly by observing the directionality and timing of the microorganisms movements subjected to a chemical gradient, but not through the directionality and strength of the forces it generates. To observe the vector force of microorganisms under a chemical gradient we developed a system composed of two large chambers connected by a tiny duct capable to keep the chemical gradient constant for more than ten hours. We also used the displacements of a microsphere trapped in an Optical Tweezers as the force transducer to measure the direction and the strength of the propulsion forces of flagellum of the microorganism under several gradient conditions. A 9μm diameter microsphere particle was trapped with a Nd:YAG laser and its movement was measured through the light scattered focused on a quadrant detector. We observed the behavior of the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis (eukaryote) under several glucose gradients. This protozoa senses the gradient around it by swimming in circles for three to five times following by tumbling, and not by the typical straight swimming/tumbling of bacteria. Our results also suggest that force direction and strength are also used to control its movement, not only the timing of swimming/tumbling, because we observed a higher force strength clearly directed towards the glucose gradient.

  20. The study of adhesive forces between the type-3 fimbriae of Klebsiella pneumoniae and collagen-coated surfaces by using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chiahan; Fan, Chia-chieh; Huang, Ying-Jung; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Long, Hsu

    2004-10-01

    Adherence to host cells by a bacterial pathogen is a critical step for establishment of infection. It will contribute greatly to the understanding of bacterial pathogenesis by studying the biological force between a single pair of pathogen and host cell. In our experiment, we use a calibrated optical tweezers system to detach a single Klebsiella pneumoniae, the pathogen, from collagen, the host. By gradually increasing the laser power of the optical tweezers until the Klebsiella pneumoniae is detached from the collagen, we obtain the magnitude of the adhesive force between them. This happens when the adhesive force is barely equal to the trapping force provided by the optical tweezers at that specific laser power. This study is important because Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen which causes suppurative lesions, urinary and respiratory tract infections. It has been proved that type 3 fimbrial adhesin (mrkD) is strongly associated with the adherence of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Besides, four polymorphic mrkD alleles: namely, mrkDv1, v2, v3, and v4, are typed by using RFLP. In order to investigate the relationship between the structure and the function for each of these variants, DNA fragments encoding the major fimbrial proteins mrkA, mrkB, mrkC are expressed together with any of the four mrkD adhesins in E. coli JM109. Our study shows that the E. coli strain carrying the mrkDv3 fimbriae has the strongest binding activity. This suggests that mrkDv3 is a key factor that enhances the adherence of Klebsiella Pneumoniae to human body.

  1. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-11-13

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  2. Multiwavelength multistatic optical scattering for aerosol characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.

    The main focus of this research is the development of a technique to remotely characterize aerosol properties, such as particle size distribution, concentration, and refractive index as a function of wavelength, through the analysis of optical scattering measurements. The proposed technique is an extension of the multistatic polarization ratio technique that has been developed by prior students at the Penn State Lidar Lab to include multiple wavelengths. This approach uses the ratio of polarized components of the scattering phase functions at multiple wavelengths across the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum to extract the microphysical and optical properties of aerosols. The scattering intensities at each wavelength are vertically separated across the face of the imager using a transmission diffraction grating, so that scattering intensities for multiple wavelengths at many angles are available for analysis in a single image. The ratio of the scattering phase function intensities collected using parallel and perpendicular polarized light are formed for each wavelength and analysis of the ratio is used to determine the microphysical properties of the aerosols. One contribution of the present work is the development of an inversion technique based on a genetic algorithm that retrieves lognormal size distributions from scattering measurements by minimizing the squared error between measured polarization ratios and polarization ratios calculated using the Mie solution to Maxwell's equations. The opportunities and limitations of using the polarization ratio are explored, and a genetic algorithm is developed to retrieve single mode and trimodal lognormal size distributions from multiwavelength, angular scattering data. The algorithm is designed to evaluate particles in the diameter size range of 2 nm to 60 im, and uses 1,000 linear spaced diameters within this range to compute the modeled polarization ratio. The algorithm returns geometric mean radii and geometric standard deviations within 2% of the correct value when inverting a single lognormal probability size distribution from simulated polarization ratios that include random Gaussian noise added to limit the signal-to-noise ratio to 25. The genetic algorithm performed reasonably well when retrieving results using a single complex refractive index for all three wavelengths while finding the lognormal particle size parameters. Three inversion runs of the algorithm on simulated noisy data showed that the algorithm could retrieved a trimodal size distribution and a single complex refractive index that produced a very good fit between the simulated noisy polarization ratios and the forward-calculated polarization ratios. A significant contribution of the present work is a set of tests conducted at the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Aerosol Test Facility (ATF), which is a controlled environment, where direct measurements of the size distribution and concentration of the scattering volume are available. The aerosol size distribution results obtained from inversion of the measured scattering phase functions, a lognormal size distribution with a geometric mean diameter of ˜450 nm and a geometric standard deviation of ˜1.3, compare favorably with measurements from an aerodynamic particle sizer and a condensation particle counter. This is one of the first large scale experiments where a comparison between multistatic inversion results and known properties of the interrogated volume of aerosols are made under controlled conditions. The eventual goal is to develop a prototype sensor and an analysis approach to provide an important and useful tool to better define the atmospheric aerosol properties.

  3. Using Optical Tweezers for the Characterization of Polyelectrolyte Solutions with Very Low Viscoelasticity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recently, optical tweezing has been used to provide a method for microrheology addressed to measure the rheological properties of small volumes of samples. In this work, we corroborate this emerging field of microrheology by using these optical methods for the characterization of polyelectrolyte solutions with very low viscoelasticity. The influence of polyelectrolyte (i.e., polyacrylamide, PAM) concentration, specifically its aging, of the salt concentration is shown. The close agreement of the technique with classical bulk rheological measurements is demonstrated, illustrating the advantages of the technique. PMID:23786307

  4. Measurement of the atom number distribution in an optical tweezer using single-photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmanek, A.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Grangier, P.; Browaeys, A.

    2010-08-15

    We demonstrate in this paper a method to reconstruct the atom number distribution of a cloud containing a few tens of cold atoms. The atoms are first loaded from a magneto-optical trap into a microscopic optical dipole trap and then released in a resonant light probe where they undergo a Brownian motion and scatter photons. We count the number of photon events detected on an image intensifier. Using the response of our detection system to a single atom as a calibration, we extract the atom number distribution when the trap is loaded with more than one atom. The atom number distribution is found to be compatible with a Poisson distribution.

  5. Fluorescence Detection of H5N1 Virus Gene Sequences Based on Optical Tweezers with Two-Photon Excitation Using a Single Near Infrared Nanosecond Pulse Laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Cao, Di; Kang, Ya-Feng; Lin, Yi; Cui, Ran; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2016-04-19

    We present an analytical platform by combining near-infrared optical tweezers with two-photon excitation for fluorescence detection of H5N1 virus gene sequences. A heterogeneous enrichment strategy, which involved polystyrene (PS) microsphere and quantum dots (QDs), was adopted. The final hybrid-conjugate microspheres were prepared by a facile one-step hybridization procedure by using PS microspheres capturing target DNA and QDs tagging, respectively. Quantitative detection was achieved by the optical tweezers setup with a low-cost 1064 nm nanosecond pulse laser for both optical trapping and two-photon excitation for the same hybrid-conjugate microsphere. The detection limits for both neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences and hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences are 16-19 pM with good selectivity for one-base mismatch, which is approximately 1 order of magnitude lower than the most existing fluorescence-based analysis method. Besides, because of the fact that only signal from the trapped particle is detected upon two-photon excitation, this approach showed extremely low background in fluorescence detection and was successfully applied to directly detect target DNA in human whole serum without any separation steps and the corresponding results are very close to that in buffer solution, indicating the strong anti-interference ability of this method. Therefore, it can be expected to be an emerging alternative for straightforward detecting target species in complex samples with a simple procedure and high-throughput. PMID:27023254

  6. Climatology of Aerosol Optical Properties in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queface, Antonio J.; Piketh, Stuart J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough regionally dependent understanding of optical properties of aerosols and their spatial and temporal distribution is required before we can accurately evaluate aerosol effects in the climate system. Long term measurements of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent and retrieved single scattering albedo and size distribution, were analyzed and compiled into an aerosol optical properties climatology for southern Africa. Monitoring of aerosol parameters have been made by the AERONET program since the middle of the last decade in southern Africa. This valuable information provided an opportunity for understanding how aerosols of different types influence the regional radiation budget. Two long term sites, Mongu in Zambia and Skukuza in South Africa formed the core sources of data in this study. Results show that seasonal variation of aerosol optical thicknesses at 500 nm in southern Africa are characterized by low seasonal multi-month mean values (0.11 to 0.17) from December to May, medium values (0.20 to 0.27) between June and August, and high to very high values (0.30 to 0.46) during September to November. The spatial distribution of aerosol loadings shows that the north has high magnitudes than the south in the biomass burning season and the opposite in none biomass burning season. From the present aerosol data, no long term discernable trends are observable in aerosol concentrations in this region. This study also reveals that biomass burning aerosols contribute the bulk of the aerosol loading in August-October. Therefore if biomass burning could be controlled, southern Africa will experience a significant reduction in total atmospheric aerosol loading. In addition to that, aerosol volume size distribution is characterized by low concentrations in the non biomass burning period and well balanced particle size contributions of both coarse and fine modes. In contrast high concentrations are characteristic of biomass burning period, combined with significant dominance of fine mode particles.

  7. Calibration of Optical Tweezers for In Vivo Force Measurements: How do Different Approaches Compare?

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Yonggun; Tripathy, Suvranta K.; Narayanareddy, Babu R.J.; Mattson-Hoss, Michelle K.; Gross, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    There is significant interest in quantifying force production inside cells, but since conditions in vivo are less well controlled than those in vitro, in vivo measurements are challenging. In particular, the in vivo environment may vary locally as far as its optical properties, and the organelles manipulated by the optical trap frequently vary in size and shape. Several methods have been proposed to overcome these difficulties. We evaluate the relative merits of these methods and directly compare two of them, a refractive index matching method, and a light-momentum-change method. Since in vivo forces are frequently relatively high (e.g., can exceed 15 pN for lipid droplets), a high-power laser is employed. We discover that this high-powered trap induces local temperature changes, and we develop an approach to compensate for uncertainties in the magnitude of applied force due to such temperature variations. PMID:25229154

  8. Global Aerosol Optical Models and Lookup Tables for the New MODIS Aerosol Retrieval over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Loraine A.; Dubovik, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Since 2000, MODIS has been deriving aerosol properties over land from MODIS observed spectral reflectance, by matching the observed reflectance with that simulated for selected aerosol optical models, aerosol loadings, wavelengths and geometrical conditions (that are contained in a lookup table or 'LUT'). Validation exercises have showed that MODIS tends to under-predict aerosol optical depth (tau) in cases of large tau (tau greater than 1.0), signaling errors in the assumed aerosol optical properties. Using the climatology of almucantur retrievals from the hundreds of global AERONET sunphotometer sites, we found that three spherical-derived models (describing fine-sized dominated aerosol), and one spheroid-derived model (describing coarse-sized dominated aerosol, presumably dust) generally described the range of observed global aerosol properties. The fine dominated models were separated mainly by their single scattering albedo (omega(sub 0)), ranging from non-absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.95) in developed urban/industrial regions, to neutrally absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx.90) in forest fire burning and developing industrial regions, to absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.85) in regions of savanna/grassland burning. We determined the dominant model type in each region and season, to create a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid of assumed aerosol type. We used vector radiative transfer code to create a new LUT, simulating the four aerosol models, in four MODIS channels. Independent AERONET observations of spectral tau agree with the new models, indicating that the new models are suitable for use by the MODIS aerosol retrieval.

  9. Aerosol optical properties measurement by recently developed cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weixiong; Xu, Xuezhe; Zhang, Qilei; Fang, Bo; Qian, Xiaodong; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun

    2015-04-01

    Development of appropriate and well-adapted measurement technologies for real-time in-situ measurement of aerosol optical properties is an important step towards a more accurate and quantitative understanding of aerosol impacts on climate and the environment. Aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA, ω), the ratio between the scattering (αscat) and extinction (αext) coefficients, is an important optical parameter that governs the relative strength of the aerosol scattering and absorption capacity. Since the aerosol extinction coefficient is the sum of the absorption and scattering coefficients, a commonly used method for the determination of SSA is to separately measure two of the three optical parameters - absorption, scattering and extinction coefficients - with different instruments. However, as this method involves still different instruments for separate measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients under different sampling conditions, it might cause potential errors in the determination of SSA value, because aerosol optical properties are very sensitive to the sampling conditions such as temperature and relative humidity (RH). In this paper, we report on the development of a cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) and an integrating sphere (IS) for direct in-situ measurement of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients on the exact same sample volume. The cavity-enhanced albedometer holds great promise for high-sensitivity and high-precision measurement of ambient aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients (hence absorption coefficient and SSA determination) and for absorbing trace gas concentration. In addition, simultaneous measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients enable a potential application for the retrieval of particle number size distribution and for faster retrieval of aerosols' complex RI. The albedometer was deployed to characterize the aerosol optical properties in the Haze Observation Project Especially for Jing-Jin-Ji Area (HOPE-J3A) during Nov. 2014 - Jan. 2015 and the primary measurement results will be presented.

  10. A force measurement instrument for optical tweezers based on the detection of light momentum changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farré, Arnau; Marsà, Ferran; Montes-Usategui, Mario

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we present and discuss several developments implemented in an instrument that uses the detection of the light momentum change for measuring forces in an optical trap. A system based on this principle provides a direct determination of this magnitude regardless of the positional response of the sample under the effect of an external force, and it is therefore to be preferred when in situ calibrations of the trap stiffness are not attainable or are difficult to achieve. The possibility to obtain this information without relying upon a harmonic model of the force is more general and can be used in a wider range of situations. Forces can be measured on non-spherical samples or non-Gaussian beams, on complex and changing environments, such as the interior of cells, or on samples with unknown properties (size, viscosity, etc.). However, the practical implementation of the method entails some difficulties due to the strict conditions in the design and operation of an instrument based on this method. We have focused on some particularly conflicting points. We developed a process and a mechanism to determine and systematically set the correct axial position of the device. We further analyzed and corrected the non-uniform transmittance of the optical system and we finally compensated for the variations in the sensor responsivity with temperature. With all these improvements, we obtained an accuracy of ~5% in force measurements for samples of different kinds.

  11. Using the OMI Aerosol Index and Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth to Evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Govindaraju, R.

    2014-12-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV Aerosol Index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). In this presentation we show comparisons of model produced AI with the corresponding OMI measurements during several months of 2007 characterized by a good sampling of dust and biomass burning events. In parallel, model produced Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) were compared to OMI AAOD for the same period, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols were deficient. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors, aerosol retrievals from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain misplacement of plume height by the model.

  12. Using the OMI Aerosol Index and Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2014-12-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV Aerosol Index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the South African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally-dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons. Finally, during a period where the Asian region was mainly dominated by anthropogenic aerosols, we have performed a qualitative analysis in which the specification of anthropogenic emissions in GEOS-5 is adjusted to provide insight into discrepancies observed in AI comparisons.

  13. Diurnal Variability of Aerosol Optical Depth Observed at AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Ginoux, P.; Eck, T. F.; Slutsker, I.

    2002-05-01

    For various applications diurnal variability of atmospheric optical parameters is of great importance. The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) of automatic Sun/sky radiometers collected data on various sites worldwide. In the current paper we present diurnal variations of aerosol optical depth and its spectral dependence for various sites and aerosol types. Our analysis includes consideration of the source regions and vertical profiles of meteorological parameters. We compute diurnal variations of optical parameters according to the following procedure. All individual observations for a day are expressed as a percentage departure from the daily mean. Computed percentages are averaged by every hour for each measurement period (burning season, dusty season, yearly, etc.). Multi-year statistics allows establishing robust repeatable diurnal pattern for urban/industrial aerosol at GSFC and Mexico City, biomass-burning aerosol at Mongu (Zambia), dust/ biomass-burning aerosol mixture at Ilorin (Nigeria) and continental/ maritime mixture at Arica (Chile). At a number of monitoring sites aerosol optical depth did not show any diurnal variation. Aerosol optical depth and its spectral dependence variability depend on advection, local turbulent exchange, local pollution and other factors.

  14. Maritime Aerosol Optical Model Based on the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Frouin, R.; Fargion, G.; Dubovik, O.; Dubovik, O.; Eck, T. F.; Eck, T. F.; Slutsker, I.; Slutsker, I.

    2001-12-01

    The quality of bio-optical products of satellite ocean color sensors is strongly dependent on the accuracy of atmospheric correction algorithms. Atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery requires better aerosol modeling. Aerosol optical properties over the oceans vary considerably. In order to simulate aerosol optical conditions over the oceans three major sources should be considered, which we can define in terms of generalized source trajectories: continental air, pure oceanic air, and desert dust. In the current study we consider primarily pure oceanic air. To retrieve a ``pure maritime'' component we?ve considered the data set with the aerosol optical depth smaller than 0.15 and Angstrom parameter less than 1. Aerosol optical model include information about optical (aerosol optical depth and its spectral and diurnal dependence, phase function and single scattering albedo) and microphysical (size distribution and its parameters, refractive index) characteristics and eigen vectors of covariance matrix. Day-to-day variations, diurnal variations, frequency of occurrences are presented for Bermuda (Atlantic Ocean), Lanai, Hawaii (Pacific Ocean) and Kaashidhoo, Maldives (Indian Ocean). Daily averages and instantaneous measurements are considered in the analysis. Comparison of the columnar volume size distributions for each site is presented. Derived ``maritime'' component in the size distribution appeared to be very similar for the sites considered. Estimates are made for the fractional contribution of the fine and coarse modes to aerosol optical depth and total concentration. The intercorrelation of aerosol optical depth values at different wavelengths reveals that correlation factors are generally high for both instantaneous and daily averaged measurements. Spectral dependence of the first two eigen vectors of covariance matrix is similar. For all three sites the first vector explains about 92-93% of the total spectral variance of optical depth and the second vector explains 6-7%. The first two eigen vectors are clearly sufficient to simulate the principal features of the optical depth spectral behavior.

  15. Interesting physics and applications using microbubbles in thermo-optic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Basudev; Ghosh, Subhrokoli; Roy, Soumyajit; Banerjee, Ayan

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a technique of generating a micro-bubble inside an optical trap by using a material (Mo-based Soft Oxometalate (SOM) compound) that absorbs at the trapping laser wavelength. A high concentration aqueous dispersion of the SOMs is taken in a sample chamber, and the trapping laser is focused on SOMs adsorbed on one of the surfaces of the chamber, so as to create a hot spot due to which a microbubble is nucleated. Due to the temperature gradient on the bubble, a surface tension gradient results, which leads to Marangoni type flows around the bubble. The resultant Marangoni ow around the bubble causes self-assembly of material at its base, which undergoes a phase transition into a crystalline state when the laser spot is translated causing the bubble to follow due to convective effects.1 We have used this technique to pattern materials ranging from dyes to carbon nano-tubes to conducting polymers which co-assemble in a mixture with the SOMs. The method is rather universal and has been used to develop catalytic chips2 and solution processed printable electronics. The flow generated by the bubbles can be studied by mapping the trajectories of probe particles in the vicinity of the bubble. We show interesting self-assembly of the particles on the bubble surface, as well as manipulation of trajectories of the particles by multiple bubbles. The bubble can also be used to capture, transport, and release particles in a perfectly controlled manner.

  16. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties During SAFARI-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) operated onboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft during the SAFARI-2000 field campaign. The CPL provided high spatial resolution measurements of aerosol optical properties at both 1064 nm and 532 nm. We present here results of planetary boundary layer (PBL) aerosol optical depth analysis and profiles of aerosol extinction. Variation of optical depth and extinction are examined as a function of regional location. The wide-scale aerosol mapping obtained by the CPL is a unique data set that will aid in future studies of aerosol transport. Comparisons between the airborne CPL and ground-based MicroPulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net) sites are shown to have good agreement.

  17. Ultraviolet broadband light scattering for optically-trapped submicron-sized aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    David, Grgory; Esat, K?van; Ritsch, Irina; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-02-10

    We describe a broadband light scattering setup for the characterization of size and refractive index of single submicron-to-micron sized aerosol particles. Individual particles are isolated in air by a quadruple Bessel beam optical trap or a counter-propagating optical tweezer. The use of very broadband radiation in the wavelength range from 320 to 700 nm covering the ultraviolet region allows to size submicron particles. We show that a broad wavelength range is required to determine the particle radius and the refractive index with an uncertainty of several nanometers and ?0.01, respectively. The smallest particle radius that can be accurately determined lies around 300 nm. Wavelength-dependent refractive index data over a broad range are obtained, including the ultraviolet region where corresponding data are rare. Four different applications are discussed: (1) the sizing of submicron polystyrene latex spheres, (2) the evaporation of binary glycerol water droplets, (3) hydration/dehydration cycling of aqueous potassium carbonate droplets, and (4) photochemical reactions of oleic acid droplets. PMID:26863396

  18. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Charles R. P.; Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Cochran, Sandy; Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-04-14

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35 MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chamber. The manipulation capabilities were demonstrated experimentally with 45 and 90-μm-diameter polystyrene spheres. These capabilities bring the dexterity of acoustic tweezers substantially closer to that of optical tweezers.

  19. Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, J; Flynn, C; Michalsky, J

    2013-03-17

    This document describes the process applied to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) and normal incidence multifilter radiometers (NIMFR) operated at the ARM Climate Research Facility’s ground-based facilities.

  20. Vertical Profiles of Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Condensation Nuclei, Optical Aerosol, Aerosol Optical Properties, and Aerosol Volatility Measured from Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, T.; Snider, J. R.; Vali, G.

    1998-01-01

    Under the support of this grant a balloon-borne gondola containing a variety of aerosol instruments was developed and flown from Laramie, Wyoming, (41 deg N, 105 deg W) and from Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S, 170 deg E). The gondola includes instruments to measure the concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), optically detectable aerosol (OA.) (r greater than or equal to 0.15 - 2.0 microns), and optical scattering properties using a nephelometer (lambda = 530 microns). All instruments sampled from a common inlet which was heated to 40 C on ascent and to 160 C on descent. Flights with the CN counter, OA counter, and nephelometer began in July 1994. The CCN counter was added in November 1994, and the engineering problems were solved by June 1995. Since then the flights have included all four instruments, and were completed in January 1998. Altogether there were 20 flights from Laramie, approximately 5 per year, and 2 from Lauder. Of these there were one or more engineering problems on 6 of the flights from Laramie, hence the data are somewhat limited on those 6 flights, while a complete data set was obtained from the other 14 flights. Good CCN data are available from 12 of the Laramie flights. The two flights from Lauder in January 1998 were successful for all measurements. The results from these flights, and the development of the balloon-bome CCN counter have formed the basis for five conference presentations. The heated and unheated CN and OA measurements have been used to estimate the mass fraction of the aerosol volatile, while comparisons of the nephelometer measurements were used to estimate the light scattering, associated with the volatile aerosol. These estimates were calculated for 0.5 km averages of the ascent and descent data between 2.5 km and the tropopause, near 11.5 km.

  1. Aerosol optical properties of the free troposphere: Tropospheric backscatter climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, James M.

    1994-12-01

    A unique ensemble of aerosol sensors (backscattersondes, nephelometers and particle counters) has been assembled during the course of this research to obtain new measurements relating to the optical properties of aerosols in the atmosphere, especially in the free troposphere. A knowledge of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio has been greatly enhanced as a result of this project and the inference of representative values along with the range of variation is now possible. Agreement between the optical model results and actual measurements appears to be quite satisfactory. An initial climatology of aerosol backscatter in the free troposphere has been developed and is in general agreement with results and inferences from global remote sensing instruments. However, the data from remote sensors may indicate a larger influence of volcanic aerosols on the upper troposphere than actually exists. Further work with high resolution soundings is needed to fully resolve this issue.

  2. Validation of MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval Over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Ichoku, C.; Remer, L. A.; Tanre, D.; Holben, B. N.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerosol optical depths are derived operationally for the first time over land in the visible wavelengths by MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) onboard the EOSTerra spacecraft. More than 300 Sun photometer data points from more than 30 AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites globally were used in validating the aerosol optical depths obtained during July - September 2000. Excellent agreement is found with retrieval errors within (Delta)tau=+/- 0.05 +/- 0.20 tau, as predicted, over (partially) vegetated surfaces, consistent with pre-launch theoretical analysis and aircraft field experiments. In coastal and semi-arid regions larger errors are caused predominantly by the uncertainty in evaluating the surface reflectance. The excellent fit was achieved despite the ongoing improvements in instrument characterization and calibration. This results show that MODIS-derived aerosol optical depths can be used quantitatively in many applications with cautions for residual clouds, snow/ice, and water contamination.

  3. The complex folding behavior of HIV-1-protease monomer revealed by optical-tweezer single-molecule experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Caldarini, M; Sonar, P; Valpapuram, I; Tavella, D; Volonté, C; Pandini, V; Vanoni, M A; Aliverti, A; Broglia, R A; Tiana, G; Cecconi, C

    2014-12-01

    We have used optical tweezers and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the unfolding and refolding process of a stable monomeric form of HIV-1-protease (PR). We have characterized the behavior under tension of the native state (N), and that of the ensemble of partially folded (PF) conformations the protein visits en route to N, which collectively act as a long-lived state controlling the slow kinetic phase of the folding process. Our results reveal a rich network of unfolding events, where the native state unfolds either in a two-state manner or by populating an intermediate state I, while the PF state unravels through a multitude of pathways, underscoring its structural heterogeneity. Refolding of mechanically denatured HIV-1-PR monomers is also a multiple-pathway process. Molecular dynamics simulations allowed us to gain insight into possible conformations the protein adopts along the unfolding pathways, and provide information regarding possible structural features of the PF state. PMID:25194276

  4. Identification of stepped changes of binding affinity during interactions between the disintegrin rhodostomin and integrin αIIbβ3 in living cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chia-Fen; Chang, Bo-Jui; Pai, Chyi-Huey; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Chi, Sien; Hsu, Long; Tsai, Jin-Wu; Lin, Chi-Hung

    2004-10-01

    Integrin receptors serve as both mechanical links and signal transduction mediators between the cell and its environment. Experimental evidence demonstrates that conformational changes and lateral clustering of the integrin proteins may affect their binding to ligands and regulate downstream cellular responses; however, experimental links between the structural and functional correlations of the ligand-receptor interactions are not yet elucidated. In the present report, we utilized optical tweezers to measure the dynamic binding between the snake venom rhodostomin, coated on a microparticle and functioned as a ligand, and the membrane receptor integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3) expressed on a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell. A progressive increase of total binding affinity was found between the bead and CHO cell in the first 300 sec following optical tweezers-guided contact. Further analysis of the cumulative data revealed the presence of "unit binding force" presumably exerted by a single rhodostomin-integrin pair. Interestingly, two such units were found. Among the measurements of less total binding forces, presumably taken at the early stage of ligand-receptor interactions, a unit of 4.15 pN per molecule pair was derived. This unit force dropped to 2.54 pN per molecule pair toward the later stage of interactions when the total binding forces were relatively large. This stepped change of single molecule pair binding affinity was not found when mutant rhodostomin proteins were used as ligands (a single unit of 1.81 pN per pair was found). These results were interpreted along with the current knowledge about the conformational changes of integrins during the "molecule activation" process.

  5. Gradient forces on double-negative particles in optical tweezers using Bessel beams in the ray optics regime.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2010-11-01

    Gradient forces on double negative (DNG) spherical dielectric particles are theoretically evaluated for v-th Bessel beams supposing geometrical optics approximations based on momentum transfer. For the first time in the literature, comparisons between these forces for double positive (DPS) and DNG particles are reported. We conclude that, contrary to the conventional case of positive refractive index, the gradient forces acting on a DNG particle may not reverse sign when the relative refractive index n goes from |n|>1 to |n|<1, thus revealing new and interesting trapping properties. PMID:21164774

  6. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  7. Assessment of Error in Aerosol Optical Depth Measured by AERONET Due to Aerosol Forward Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinyuk, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Smirnov, Alexander; Eck, Thomas F.; Slustsker, Ilya; Schafer, Joel S.; Giles, David M.; Sorokin, Michail

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the effect of aerosol forward scattering on the accuracy of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by CIMEL Sun photometers. The effect is quantified in terms of AOD and solar zenith angle using radiative transfer modeling. The analysis is based on aerosol size distributions derived from multi-year climatologies of AERONET aerosol retrievals. The study shows that the modeled error is lower than AOD calibration uncertainty (0.01) for the vast majority of AERONET level 2 observations, 99.53%. Only 0.47% of the AERONET database corresponding mostly to dust aerosol with high AOD and low solar elevations has larger biases. We also show that observations with extreme reductions in direct solar irradiance do not contribute to level 2 AOD due to low Sun photometer digital counts below a quality control cutoff threshold.

  8. Parameterization of Optical Properties for Hydrated Internally Mixed Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2007-05-16

    Aerosol optical properties can be approximated in terms of analytic functions of the wet surface mode radius with coefficients that can be related to the wet refractive index. The wet radius is diagnosed from the dry radius and relative humidity using the Kohler theory. The wet refractive index is diagnosed from the volume fractions and refractive indices of all components of the aerosol, including water, using volume mixing for soluble components and an effective medium approximation for the insoluble components. The parameterization is evaluated by comparing with Mie solutions for highly scattering and highly absorbing aerosol for a wide range in size distributions and relative humidity. Errors are often less than 10% and are less then 30% for all conditions except when absorption is negligible. The parameterization is suitable for any aerosol model that uses log-normal size distributions composed of internal mixtures of multiple aerosol components.

  9. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions calculated from the OPC data are closely correlated with the results of the particle size-selective sampling using the CIP 10. Furthermore, the OPC data allow calculation of the thoracic fraction of workplace aerosol (not measured by sampling), which is interesting in the presence of allergenic particles like fungi spores. The results also show that the modified COP inlet adequately samples inhalable aerosol in the range of workplace particle-size distribution. PMID:22009365

  10. Strategies for Improved CALIPSO Aerosol Optical Depth Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Mark A.; Kuehn, Ralph E.; Tackett, Jason L.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Omar, A.; Getzewich, Brian J.; Powell, Kathleen A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Young, Stuart A.; Avery, Melody A.; Winker, David M.; Trepte, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) project will be releasing version 3 of its level 2 data products. In this paper we describe several changes to the algorithms and code that yield substantial improvements in CALIPSO's retrieval of aerosol optical depths (AOD). Among these are a retooled cloud-clearing procedure and a new approach to determining the base altitudes of aerosol layers in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The results derived from these modifications are illustrated using case studies prepared using a late beta version of the level 2 version 3 processing code.

  11. Aerosol optical depth retrieval using the MERIS observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Linlu; Rozanov, Vladimir; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Surface reflectance determination and aerosol type selection are the two main challenges for space-borne aerosol remote sensing, especially for those instruments lacking of near-infrared channels, high-temporal observations, multi-angles abilities and/or polarization information. However, space based instruments like the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and the successor, Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) with high calibration accuracy and high spatial resolution provide unique abilities for obtaining valuable aerosol information for a better understanding of the impact of aerosols on climate, which is still one of the largest uncertainties of global climate change evaluation. In this study, a new Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrieval algorithm is presented. Global aerosol type and surface spectral dataset were used for the aerosol type selection and surface reflectance determination. A modified Ross-Li mode is used to describe the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) effect. The comparison with operational MODIS C6 product and the validation using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) show promising results.

  12. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived from Sea WiFS-Inferred Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties inferred from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) radiance measurements are used to compute the aerosol shortwave radiative forcing using a radiative transfer model. The aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength of 865-nm is taken from the SeaWIFS archive. It is found that the nominal optical thickness over oceans ranges from 0.1 to 0.2. Using a maritime aerosol model and the radiances measured at the various SeaWiFS channels, the Angstrom exponent is determined to be 0.2174, the single-scattering albedo to be 0.995, and the asymmetry factor to be 0.786. The radiative transfer model has eight bands in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions and three bands in the near infrared. It includes the absorption due to aerosols, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and oxygen, and the scattering due to aerosols and gases (Rayleigh scattering). The radiative forcing is computed over global oceans for four months (January, April, July, and October, 1998) to represent four seasons. It is found that the aerosol radiative forcing is large and changes significantly with seasons near the continents with large-scale forest fires and desert dust. Averaged over oceans and the four months, the aerosol radiative forcing is approximately 7 W/sq m at the top of the atmosphere. This large radiative forcing is expected to have a significant cooling effect on the Earth's climate as implied from simulations of a number of general circulation models.

  13. The Two-Column Aerosol Project: Phase I—Overview and impact of elevated aerosol layers on aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Burton, Sharon P.; Cairns, Brian; Chand, Duli; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dunagan, Stephen; Ferrare, Richard A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John; Jefferson, Anne; Johnson, Roy; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Kollias, Pavlos; Lamer, Katia; Lantz, Kathleen; Mei, Fan; Miller, Mark A.; Michalsky, Joseph; Ortega, Ivan; Pekour, Mikhail; Rogers, Ray R.; Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, Jens; Sedlacek, Arthur J.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John E.; Shinozuka, Yohei; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Tyrrell, Megan; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Volkamer, Rainer; Zelenyuk, Alla; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2016-01-01

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique study designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including those related to aerosol mixing state and aerosol radiative forcing. The study was designed to sample the atmosphere between and within two atmospheric columns; one fixed near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second moveable column over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed at the base of the Cape Cod column, and the ARM Aerial Facility was utilized for the summer and winter intensive observation periods. One important finding from TCAP is that four of six nearly cloud-free flight days had aerosol layers aloft in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL-2). These layers contributed up to 60% of the total observed aerosol optical depth (AOD). Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning material and nitrate compared to aerosol found near the surface. In addition, while there was a great deal of spatial and day-to-day variability in the aerosol chemical composition and optical properties, no systematic differences between the two columns were observed.

  14. Optical extinction of highly porous aerosol following atmospheric freeze drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Gabriela; Haspel, Carynelisa; Moise, Tamar; Rudich, Yinon

    2014-06-01

    Porous glassy particles are a potentially significant but unexplored component of atmospheric aerosol that can form by aerosol processing through the ice phase of high convective clouds. The optical properties of porous glassy aerosols formed from a freeze-dry cycle simulating freezing and sublimation of ice particles were measured using a cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer (CRD-AS) at 532 nm and 355 nm wavelength. The measured extinction efficiency was significantly reduced for porous organic and mixed organic-ammonium sulfate particles as compared to the extinction efficiency of the homogeneous aerosol of the same composition prior to the freeze-drying process. A number of theoretical approaches for modeling the optical extinction of porous aerosols were explored. These include effective medium approximations, extended effective medium approximations, multilayer concentric sphere models, Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory, and the discrete dipole approximation. Though such approaches are commonly used to describe porous particles in astrophysical and atmospheric contexts, in the current study, these approaches predicted an even lower extinction than the measured one. Rather, the best representation of the measured extinction was obtained with an effective refractive index retrieved from a fit to Mie scattering theory assuming spherical particles with a fixed void content. The single-scattering albedo of the porous glassy aerosols was derived using this effective refractive index and was found to be lower than that of the corresponding homogeneous aerosol, indicating stronger relative absorption at the wavelengths measured. The reduced extinction and increased absorption may be of significance in assessing direct, indirect, and semidirect forcing in regions where porous aerosols are expected to be prevalent.

  15. Tube length-assisted optimized aerosol trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, S. Mohammad-Reza; Sadeghi, Mohammad; Madadi, Ebrahim; S. Reihani, S. Nader

    2014-10-01

    Trapping a single aerosol using optical tweezers could be of great importance for environmental sciences. Though a single nanoparticle as small as 10 nm is successfully trapped in aqueous media using optical tweezers, due to spherical aberration only large clusters of nanoparticles were stably trapped in air. In this paper we provide our theoretical and experimental results on optimized trapping of aerosols as small as 400 nm in radius by the introduction of an extra spherical aberration source in order to minimize the total spherical aberration of the system. Our method allows for trapping of high refractive index particles such as polystyrene beads in air. It also provides considerably large trappable depth range which endows in-depth trapping. Our theoretical and experimental results are in very good agreement.

  16. Aerosol optical properties in the ABL over arctic sea ice from airborne aerosol lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Neuber, Roland; Ritter, Christoph; Maturilli, Marion; Dethloff, Klaus; Herber, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Between 2009 and 2013 aerosols, sea ice properties and meteorological variables were measured during several airborne campaigns covering a wide range of the western Arctic Ocean. The campaigns were carried out with the aircraft Polar 5 of the German Alfred-Wegener-Institute (AWI) during spring and summer periods. Optical properties of accumulation mode aerosol and clouds were measured with the nadir looking AMALi aerosol lidar covering the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere up to 3000m, while dropsondes provided coincident vertical profiles of meteorological quantities. Based on these data we discuss the vertical distribution of aerosol backscatter in and above the atmospheric boundary layer and its dependence on relative humidity, dynamics and underlying sea ice properties. We analyze vertical profiles of lidar and coincident dropsonde measurements from various locations in the European and Canadian Arctic from spring and summer campaigns. Sea ice cover is derived from modis satellite and aircraft onboard camera images. The aerosol load in the arctic atmospheric boundary layer shows a high variability. Various meteorological parameters and in particular boundary layer properties are discussed with their respective influence on aerosol features. To investigate the effect of the frequency and size of open water patches on aerosol properties, we relate the profiles to the sea ice properties influencing the atmosphere in the upwind region.

  17. Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived From SeaWIFS - Retrieved Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Mong-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To understand climatic implications of aerosols over global oceans, the aerosol optical properties retrieved from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) are analyzed, and the effects of the aerosols on the Earth's radiation budgets (aerosol radiative forcing, ARF) are computed using a radiative transfer model. It is found that the distribution of the SeaWiFS-retrieved aerosol optical thickness is distinctively zonal. The maximum in the equatorial region coincides with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, and the maximum in the Southern Hemispheric high latitudes coincides with the region of prevailing westerlies. The minimum aerosol optical thickness is found in the subtropical high pressure regions, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. These zonal patterns clearly demonstrate the influence of atmospheric circulation on the oceanic aerosol distribution. Over global oceans, aerosols reduce the annual mean net downward solar flux by 5.4 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and by 6.1 W m-2 at the surface. The largest ARF is found in the tropical Atlantic, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal, the coastal regions of Southeast and East Asia, and the Southern Hemispheric high latitudes. During the period of the Indonesian big fires (September-December 1997), the cooling due to aerosols is greater than 15 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and greater than 30 W m(exp -1) at the surface in the vicinity of the maritime continents. The atmosphere receives extra solar radiation by greater than 15 W m(exp -1) over a large area. These large changes in radiative fluxes are expected to have enhanced the atmospheric stability, weakened the atmospheric circulation, and augmented the drought condition during that period. It would be very instructive to simulate the regional climatic. The model-calculated clear sky solar flux at the top of the atmosphere is compared with that derived from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). The net downward solar flux of CERES is systematically larger than the model calculations by -3 W M-2. In the equatorial region, the CERES-derived net downward solar flux is even larger than the model calculations without including aerosols. It is possible that the CERES incorrectly identified regions of high humidity and high aerosol concentration as being cloud contaminated and, hence, overestimated the clear sky net downward solar flux.

  18. Spatial and temporal variations of aerosols around Beijing in summer 2006: 2. Local and column aerosol optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Hitoshi; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Fast, Jerome D.; Poschl, U.; Garland, R. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Wiedensohler, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Zhu, T.

    2010-11-23

    Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-chem model calculations were conducted to study aerosol optical properties around Beijing, China, during the Campaign of Air Quality Research in Beijing and Surrounding Region 2006 (CAREBeijing-2006) period. In this paper, we interpret aerosol optical properties in terms of aerosol mass concentrations and their chemical compositions by linking model calculations with measurements. In general, model calculations reproduced observed features of spatial and temporal variations of various surface and column aerosol optical parameters in and around Beijing. Spatial and temporal variations of aerosol absorption, scattering, and extinction coefficient corresponded well to those of elemental carbon (primary aerosol), sulfate (secondary aerosol), and the total aerosol mass concentration, respectively. These results show that spatial and temporal variations of the absorption coefficient are controlled by local emissions (within 100 km around Beijing during the preceding 24 h), while those of the scattering coefficient are controlled by regional-scale emissions (within 500 km around Beijing during the preceding 3 days) under synoptic-scale meteorological conditions, as discussed in our previous study of aerosol mass concentration. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction revealed that the contribution of secondary aerosols and their water uptake increased with altitude within the planetary boundary layer, leading to a considerable increase in column aerosol optical depth (AOD) around Beijing. These effects are the main factors causing differences in regional and temporal variations between particulate matter (PM) mass concentration at the surface and column AOD over a wide region in the northern part of the Great North China Plain.

  19. Toward Investigating Optically Trapped Organic Aerosols with CARS Microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, L. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change notes the huge uncertainty in the effect that atmospheric aerosols play in determining overall global temperature, specifically in their ability to nucleate clouds. To better understand aerosol chemistry, the novel coupling of gradient force optical trapping with broad bandwidth coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy is being developed to study single particles suspended in air. Building on successful designs employed separately for the techniques, this hybrid technology will be used to explain how the oxidation of organic compounds changes the chemical and physical properties of aerosols. By trapping the particles, an individual aerosol can be studied for up to several days. Using a broad bandwidth pulse for one of the incident beams will result in a Raman vibrational spectrum from every laser pulse. Combined with signal enhancement due to resonance and coherence of nonlinear CARS spectroscopy, this technique will allow for acquisition of data on the millisecond time scale, facilitating the study of dynamic processes. This will provide insights on how aerosols react with and absorb species from the gas phase. These experiments will increase understanding of aerosol oxidation and growth mechanisms and the effects that aerosols have on our atmosphere and climate. Progress in efforts developing this novel technique to study model systems is presented.

  20. Background Maritime Aerosol: Their Optical Thickness and Scattering Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Dubovik, Oleg; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of human induced change in the aerosol concentration and properties, or the aerosol response to climate change (e.g. droughts producing fires or dust) should be measured relative to a "background aerosol". How to define this background aerosol, so that it is both measurable and useful? Here we use 10 stations located in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans to answer this question. Using a data set of the spectral optical thickness measured by the Aerosol Robotic network (AERONET), extending 1-3 years, we find the background conditions for these stations. The oceanic background aerosol is the result of ocean emission and spray, and some residual long lived continental aerosol. Its source is very broadly spread and is expected to vary little in time. Pollution or dust sources are from specific locations, emitted and transported to the measuring site in specific combination of meteorological conditions. Therefore they are expected to vary with time. It follows that the background aerosol can be identified as the median for conditions with small variations. To define the background we compute the median of N consequent measurements. We use N=50 that in average cloudy conditions corresponds to 2-3 days of measurements and N=100 (4-5 days). Most high polluted or dusty conditions correspond to data sequences with high standard deviation (greater than 0.02 in optical thickness) and are excluded. From the remaining N point running medians with low standard deviations we derive again the median. This excludes those rare cases of pollution or dust that is stable during the N measurements. The results show that the background aerosol over the Pacific Ocean is characterize by optical thickness of 0.055 at 500 nm and Angstrom exponent of 0.74. Over the Atlantic Ocean the values are 0.070 and 1.1 respectively, with little influence of the assumed value of N (50 or 100). The derivation of the background uses 20,000 and 5000 medians respectively that passed the criteria. The contribution of coarse and fine aerosol to the background aerosol is also calculated.

  1. Asian Aerosols: A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model sensitivity study of model response to aerosol optical depth and aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric absorption by black carbon (BC) aerosol heats the atmosphere while simultaneously cooling the surface and reducing latent and sensible heat fluxes from the land. Recent studies have shown that absorbing BC aerosol can have a large impact on regional climates, including modification of the hydrological cycle. However, significant uncertainties remain with regards to (a) the total amount of all aerosol species and (b) the amount of aerosol absorption. Here we present a GCM sensitivity study focusing on the influences due to total aerosol amount and aerosol absorption in the south and east Asian regions. Six experiments are conducted to test the equilibrium response of the GFDL AM2 GCM (under conditions of prescribed, observed sea surface temperatures) to (i) changes in aerosol absorption caused by changes in BC aerosol amount, and (ii) aerosol extinction optical depth increases corresponding to the year 1990 relative to a control case of 1950. In order to systematically explore the uncertainties in aerosol loading and absorption, the sensitivity experiments are classified into four regimes: low extinction optical depth, low absorption; low extinction optical depth, high absorption; high extinction optical depth, low absorption; and high extinction optical depth, high absorption. Changes in surface temperature and changes in the hydrological cycle are generally insignificant when lower aerosol extinction optical depths are considered. For higher extinction optical depths, the change in the modeled regional circulation relative to the control circulation over south and east Asia is affected by the amount of aerosol absorption and contrasts sharply to the regional circulation change associated with increasing only scattering aerosols. When increasing absorbing aerosols over the region, low-level convergence and increases in vertical velocity overcome the stabilizing effects of the absorbing aerosol and enhance the monsoonal circulation and precipitation rate in northwestern India relative to the control run. In contrast, the presence of a purely scattering aerosol weakens the monsoonal circulation relative to the control run and inhibits precipitation in this same region. This study has potential implications for aerosol reduction strategies that seek to mitigate air pollution concerns. At higher optical depths, if absorbing aerosol is present, reduction of scattering aerosol alone may have a lesser effect on precipitation changes, implying that reductions in black carbon aerosol should be undertaken at the same time as reductions in sulfate aerosol.

  2. Absorbing aerosols over Asia: A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model sensitivity study of model response to aerosol optical depth and aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2008-11-01

    Forcing by absorbing atmospheric black carbon (BC) tends to heat the atmosphere, cool the surface, and reduce the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes. BC aerosol can have a large impact on regional climates and the hydrologic cycle. However, significant uncertainties remain concerning the increases in (1) the total amount of all aerosol species and (2) the amount of aerosol absorption that may have occurred over the 1950-1990 period. Focusing on south and east Asia, the sensitivity of a general circulation model's climate response (with prescribed sea surface temperatures and aerosol distributions) to such changes is investigated by considering a range of both aerosol absorption and aerosol extinction optical depth increases. We include direct and semidirect aerosol effects only. Precipitation changes are less sensitive to changes in aerosol absorption optical depth at lower aerosol loadings. At higher-extinction optical depths, low-level convergence and increases in vertical velocity overcome the stabilizing effects of absorbing aerosols and enhance the monsoonal circulation and precipitation in northwestern India. In contrast, the presence of increases in only scattering aerosols weakens the monsoonal circulation and inhibits precipitation here. Cloud amount changes can enhance or counteract surface solar flux reduction depending on the aerosol loading and absorption, with the changes also influencing the surface temperature and the surface energy balance. The results have implications for aerosol reduction strategies in the future that seek to mitigate air pollution concerns. At higher optical depths, if absorbing aerosol is present, reduction of scattering aerosol alone has a reduced effect on precipitation changes, implying that reductions in BC aerosols should be undertaken at the same time as reductions in sulfate aerosols.

  3. Optical Properties of Polymers Relevant to Secondary Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero-Ortiz, W.; Gomez-Hernandez, M. E.; Xu, W.; Guo, S.; Zhang, R.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a critical role in climate directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and indirectly by modifying the cloud formation. Currently, the direct and indirect effects of aerosols represent the largest uncertainty in climate predictions models. Some aerosols are directly emitted, but the majority are formed in the atmosphere by the oxidation of gaseous precursors. However, the formation of aerosols at the molecular level is not fully characterized. Certain category of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which represent a significant fraction of the total aerosol burden, can be light-absorbing, also known as brown carbon. However, the overall contribution of SOA to the brown carbon and the related climate forcing is poorly understood. Such incomplete understanding is due in part to the chemical complexity of SOA and the lack of knowledge regarding SOA formation, transformation, and optical properties. Based on previous laboratory experiments, field measurements, and modeling studies, it has been suggested that the polymers and oligomers play an important role in the SOA formation. Atmospheric polymers could be produced by the hydration or heterogeneous reactions of epoxides and small α-dicarbonyls. Their aqueous chemistry products have been shown to give light-absorbing and high molecular weight oligomeric species, which increase the SOA mass production and alter the direct and indirect effect of aerosols. In this paper, the aerosol chemistry of small α-dicarbonyl compounds with amines is investigated and the associated optical properties are measured using spectroscopic techniques. The differences between primary, secondary and tertiary amines with glyoxal and methylglyoxal are evaluated in terms of SOA browning efficiency. Atmospheric implications of our present work for understanding the formation of light-absorbing SOA will be presented, particularly in terms of the product distribution of light-absorbing SOA formed by aqueous phase reactions.

  4. Optical Modeling and Interpretation of TRACE-P Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, W. B.; Anderson, B. E.; Browell, E. V.; Butler, C. F.; Brackett, V. G.; Jordan, C. E.

    2002-12-01

    The NASA Langley airborne UV Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system participated in the NASA-sponsored Transport and Atmospheric Chemistry near the Equator-Pacific (TRACE-P) mission, designed to study transport and transformation of emissions from Asia, from February 26 to April 9, 2001. The UV DIAL system measures backscatter in both nadir and zenith at 1064, 600, and 300 nm and depolarization ratio in the nadir at 600 nm. From the lidar backscatter measurement, the aerosol scattering ratio (ASR) is determined. The ASR is the ratio of aerosol backscatter to molecular backscatter and is derived by dividing the total backscatter by a standard atmosphere molecular density profile then normalizing in some low-aerosol region of the atmosphere. The wavelength dependence of aerosol backscatter, which is related to aerosol size, is determined from the ASRs at 1064 and 600 nm. The depolarization ratio, which is sensitive to irregularly shaped particles, is used to determine the presence of dust. Dust encountered during this mission originated primarily in China, but also in India and Africa. In situ instruments onboard the DC-8 provide additional information such as meteorological parameters, aerosol size distributions and chemical composition, and gas concentrations. These in situ data are being used along with the ASRs to help determine the aerosol optical properties. These optical properties will then enable the use of the extensive lidar profiles to achieve the goal of estimating the effects of aerosols on radiative forcing of the atmosphere over the western Pacific as well as over Asia near the coast.

  5. The 2002 Reno Aerosol Optics Study: Overview and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, P. J.; Ogren, J. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Covert, D. S.; Ahlquist, N.; Virkkula, A.; Strawa, A. W.; Schmid, B.; Atkinson, D. B.; Petzold, A.

    2002-12-01

    During 3-28 June 2002, the Reno Aerosol Optics Study was conducted at the Desert Research Institute in Reno, NV. The objective of this study was to characterize, under controlled conditions, both existing and new in situ instruments designed to measure aerosol light extinction, absorption, and scattering. Participating in this experiment were three cavity ringdown extinction instruments, one classic extinction cell, three integrating nephelometers, two photoacoustic absorption instruments, and five filter-based absorption instruments. Good coverage of the visible spectrum was achieved from the operating wavelengths of the various instruments, with limited measurements being made in the near UV and near IR. A new mixing chamber (~76 L volume) was used to deliver varying amounts of white, black, and ambient aerosols and filtered air to all instruments. The white aerosols were submicrometer ammonium sulfate, while several submicrometer black aerosols including kerosene soot and diesel emission particles were studied. Individual tests were run with aerosol extinction varying between low (~50 Mm-1) and high (~500 Mm-1) values and aerosol single-scattering albedos ranging from ~0.3 (pure black aerosol) to ~1.0 (pure ammonium sulfate). The primary emphasis of the study was to evaluate the accuracy and precision of current methods for measuring the light absorption coefficient of atmospheric aerosols (\\sigmaap). Two independent standards for \\sigmaap were found to agree within about 10% at a wavelength of 532 nm: photoacoustic absorption vs. the difference of extinction and scattering. These standards provide the basis for deriving calibration curves for the filter-based instruments.

  6. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Properties under Thin Cirrus from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, Nai-Yung Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew Mark.

    2014-01-01

    Retrieval of aerosol optical properties using shortwave bands from passive satellite sensors, such as MODIS, is typically limited to cloud-free areas. However, if the clouds are thin enough (i.e. thin cirrus) such that the satellite-observed reflectance contains signals under the cirrus layer, and if the optical properties of this cirrus layer are known, the TOA reflectance can be corrected for the cirrus layer to be used for retrieving aerosol optical properties. To this end, we first correct the TOA reflectances in the aerosol bands (0.47, 0.55, 0.65, 0.86, 1.24, 1.63, and 2.12 micron for ocean algorithm and 0.412, 0.47, and 0.65 micron for deep blue algorithm) for the effects of thin cirrus using 1.38 micron reflectance and conversion factors that convert cirrus reflectance in 1.38 micron band to those in aerosol bands. It was found that the conversion factors can be calculated by using relationships between reflectances in 1.38 micron band and minimum reflectances in the aerosol bands (Gao et al., 2002). Refer to the example in the figure. Then, the cirrus-corrected reflectance can be calculated by subtracting the cirrus reflectance from the TOA reflectance in the optically thin case. A sensitivity study suggested that cloudy-sky TOA reflectances can be calculated with small errors in the form of simple linear addition of cirrus-only reflectances and clear-sky reflectances. In this study, we correct the cirrus signals up to TOA reflectance at 1.38 micron of 0.05 where the simple linear addition is valid without extensive radiative transfer simulations. When each scene passes the set of tests shown in the flowchart, the scene is corrected for cirrus contamination and passed into aerosol retrieval algorithms.

  7. Variability of aerosol optical properties in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, M.; Cusack, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2011-05-01

    Aerosol light scattering, black carbon (BC) and particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured at Montseny, a regional background site in the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB) which is part of the European Supersite for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (EUSAAR). Off line analyses of 24 h PM filters collected with Hi-Vol instruments were performed for the determination of the main chemical components of PM. Measurements of BC were used to calculate the light absorption properties of atmospheric particles. Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) at 635 nm was estimated starting from aerosol scattering and absorption measurements, while ngstrm exponents were calculated by means of the three wavelengths (450 nm, 525 nm, 635 nm) aerosol light scattering measurements from Nephelometer. Mean scattering and hemispheric backscattering coefficients (@ 635 nm) were 26.8 23.3 Mm-1 and 4.3 2.7 Mm-1, respectively and the mean aerosol absorption coefficient was 2.8 2.2 Mm-1. Mean values of Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and ngstrm exponent (calculated from 450 nm to 635 nm) at MSY were 0.90 0.05 and 1.2 0.6, respectively. A clear relationship was observed between the PM1/PM10 and PM2.5/PM10 ratios as a function of the calculated ngstrm exponents. Mass scattering cross sections for fine mass and sulfate at 635 nm were calculated in 2.8 0.5 m2 g-1 and 11.8 2.2 m2 g-1 respectively, while the mean aerosol absorption cross section was estimated around 10.4 2.0 m2 g-1. The variability in aerosol optical properties in the WMB were largely explained by the origin and ageing of air masses over the measurement site. The sea breeze played an important role in transporting pollutants from the developed WMB coastlines towards inland rural areas, changing the optical properties of aerosols. Aerosol scattering and backscattering coefficients increased by around 40 % in the afternoon when the sea breeze was fully developed while the absorption coefficient increased by more than 100 % as a consequence of the increase in BC concentration at MSY observed under sea breeze circulation. The analysis of the ngstrm () exponent as a function of the origin the air masses revealed that polluted winter anticyclonic conditions and summer recirculation scenarios typical of the WMB led to an increase of fine particles in the atmosphere ( = 1.4 0.1) while the aerosol optical properties under Atlantic Advection episodes and Saharan dust outbreaks were clearly dominated by coarser particles ( = 0.7 0.3).

  8. Titan's aerosols : chemistry and optical behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, F.; Coll, P.; Ramirez, S.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Da Silva, A.; Lafait, J.; Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques Team; Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares Team; Laboratoire d'Optique des Solides Team

    2000-10-01

    This presentation deals with the most recent results about aerosol analogues of Titan's atmosphere being produced at LISA, and that are considered as the most representative laboratory analogues (Coll et al., PSS, 1999; McKay et al., PSS, in press). We will present here the latest data concerning the refractive complex index of this material (Ramirez et al., Icarus, accepted). These results are of crucial importance for various research fields such as radiative transfer and surface behaviour modeling. We will also discuss the results of a comparative chemical analysis of several products (Poly-C2H4, different Poly-HCN samples...), as well as Titan's aerosols analogues (obtained from different different energy sources). We will highlight the different families of such analogues (Coll et al., in preparation). Finally we will conclude on the advances made in Titan's aerosols characterization after 20 years of research, taking into account that we have no direct information on them (Coll et al., Adv. Space Res., subm.).

  9. Aerosol Optical Depth over Africa retrieved from AATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Rodriques, Edith

    2010-05-01

    Aerosols produced over the African continent have important consequences for climate. In particular, large amounts of desert dust are produced over the Sahara and transported across the North Atlantic where desert dust deposition influences the eco system by iron fertilization, and further North over Europe with outbreaks as far as Scandinavia. Biomass burning occurs in most of the African continent south of the Sahara and causes a net positive radiating forcing resulting in local warming of the atmosphere layers. These effects have been studied during large field campaigns. Satellites can systematically provide information on aerosols over a large area such as Africa and beyond. To this end, we retrieved the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at three wavelengths (555nm, 670nm, and 1600nm) over Africa from the reflectance measured at the top of the atmosphere by the AATSR (Advances Along Track Scanning Radiometer) flying on ENVISAT, for one year (1 May 2008 to 30 April 2009) to obtain information on the seasonal and spatial behaviour of the AOD, episodes of high AOD events and connect the retrieved AOD with the ground-based aerosol measurements. The AOD retrieval algorithm, which is applied to cloud-free pixels over land, is based on the comparison of the measured and modeled reflectance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The algorithm uses look-up-tables (LUTs) to compute the modeled TOA reflectance. For AOD retrieval, an aerosol in the atmosphere is assumed to be an external mixture of fine and coarse mode particles. The two aerosol types are mixed such that the spectral behavior of the reflectance due to aerosol best fits the measurements. Comparison with AERONET (Aerosol Roboric NETwork), which is a network of ground-based sun photometers which measure atmospheric aerosol properties, shows good agreement but with some overestimation of the AATSR retrieved AOD. Different aerosol models have been used to improve the comparison. The lack of AERONET stations in Africa, its location in similar-type environments, while Africa is a continent with desert-to-rainforest lands with steppe, savanna, woodlands in between, makes it difficult to select the most appropriate aerosol types in the retrieval. We aim to find the connection of the aerosol types used in retrieval with the seasonality (rainy season, dry season, biomass burning season) and air mass transport (e.g., transport of Sahara dust).

  10. Retrieval of aerosol optical properties over land using PMAp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorski, Michael; Munro, Rosemary; Lang, Ruediger; Poli, Gabriele; Holdak, Andriy

    2015-04-01

    The retrieval of aerosol optical properties is an important task for industry and climate forecasting. An ideal instrument should include observations with moderate spectral and high spatial resolutions for a wide range of wavelengths (from the UV to the TIR), measurements of the polarization state at different wavelengths and measurements of the same scene for different observation geometries. As such an ideal instrument is currently unavailable the usage of different instruments on one satellite platform is an alternative choice. Since February 2014, the Polar Multi sensor Aerosol product (PMAp) is delivered as operational GOME product to our customers. The algorithms retrieve aerosol optical properties over ocean (AOD, volcanic ash, aerosol type) using a multi-sensor approach (GOME, AVHRR, IASI). The next releases of PMAp will provide an extended set of aerosol and cloud properties which include AOD over land and an improved volcanic ash retrieval combining AVHRR and IASI. This presentation gives an overview on the existing product and the prototypes in development. The major focus is the discussion of the AOD retrieval over land implemented in the upcoming PMAp2 release. In addition, the results of our current validation studies (e.g. comparisons to AERONET, other satellite platforms and model data) are shown.

  11. Microcrystal manipulation with laser tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Armin Duman, Ramona; Stevens, Bob; Ward, Andy

    2013-07-01

    Optical trapping has successfully been applied to select and mount microcrystals for subsequent X-ray diffraction experiments. X-ray crystallography is the method of choice to deduce atomic resolution structural information from macromolecules. In recent years, significant investments in structural genomics initiatives have been undertaken to automate all steps in X-ray crystallography from protein expression to structure solution. Robotic systems are widely used to prepare crystallization screens and change samples on synchrotron beamlines for macromolecular crystallography. The only remaining manual handling step is the transfer of the crystal from the mother liquor onto the crystal holder. Manual mounting is relatively straightforward for crystals with dimensions of >25 m; however, this step is nontrivial for smaller crystals. The mounting of microcrystals is becoming increasingly important as advances in microfocus synchrotron beamlines now allow data collection from crystals with dimensions of only a few micrometres. To make optimal usage of these beamlines, new approaches have to be taken to facilitate and automate this last manual handling step. Optical tweezers, which are routinely used for the manipulation of micrometre-sized objects, have successfully been applied to sort and mount macromolecular crystals on newly designed crystal holders. Diffraction data from CPV type 1 polyhedrin microcrystals mounted with laser tweezers are presented.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of S-NPP VIIRS aerosol optical thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongqing; Remer, Lorraine A.; Huang, Jingfeng; Huang, Ho-Chun; Kondragunta, Shobha; Laszlo, Istvan; Oo, Min; Jackson, John M.

    2014-04-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is the next-generation polar-orbiting operational environmental sensor with a capability for global aerosol observations. The VIIRS aerosol Environmental Data Record (EDR) is expected to continue the decade-long successful multispectral aerosol retrieval from the NASA's Earth Observing System Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for scientific research and applications. Since the launch of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP), the VIIRS aerosol calibration/validation team has been continuously monitoring, evaluating, and improving the performance of VIIRS aerosol retrievals. In this study, the VIIRS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 550 nm EDR at current Provisional maturity level is evaluated by comparing it with MODIS retrievals and measurements from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN). The VIIRS global mean AOT at 550 nm differs from that of MODIS by approximately -0.01 over ocean and 0.03 over land (0.00 and -0.01 for the collocated retrievals) but shows larger regional biases. Global validation with AERONET and with MAN measurements shows biases of 0.01 over ocean and -0.01 over land, with about 64% and 71% of retrievals falling within the expected uncertainty range established by MODIS over ocean (±(0.03 + 0.05AOT)) and over land (±(0.05 + 0.15AOT)), respectively. The VIIRS retrievals over land exhibit slight overestimation over vegetated surfaces and underestimation over soil-dominated surfaces. These results show that the VIIRS AOT at 550 nm product provides a solid global data set for quantitative scientific investigations and environmental monitoring.

  13. Variability of aerosol optical properties in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, M.; Cusack, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2011-08-01

    Aerosol light scattering, absorption and particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured at Montseny, a regional background site in the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB) which is part of the European Supersite for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (EUSAAR). Off line analyses of 24 h PM filters collected with Hi-Vol instruments were performed for the determination of the main chemical components of PM. Mean scattering and hemispheric backscattering coefficients (@ 635 nm) were 26.623.2 Mm-1 and 4.32.7 Mm-1, respectively and the mean aerosol absorption coefficient (@ 637 nm) was 2.82.2 Mm-1. Mean values of Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and ngstrm exponent () (calculated from 450 nm to 635 nm) at MSY were 0.900.05 and 1.30.5 respectively. A clear relationship was observed between the PM1/PM10 and PM2.5/PM10 ratios as a function of the calculated ngstrm exponents. Mass scattering cross sections (MSC) for fine mass and sulfate at 635 nm were 2.80.5 m2 g-1 and 11.82.2 m2 g-1, respectively, while the mean aerosol absorption cross section (MAC) was 10.42.0 m2 g-1. The variability in aerosol optical properties in the WMB were largely explained by the origin and ageing of air masses over the measurement site. The MAC values appear dependent of particles aging: similar to the expected absorption cross-section for fresh emissions under Atlantic Advection episodes and higher under aerosol pollution episodes. The analysis of the ngstrm exponent as a function of the origin the air masses revealed that polluted winter anticyclonic conditions and summer recirculation scenarios typical of the WMB led to an increase of fine particles in the atmosphere ( = 1.50.1) while the aerosol optical properties under Atlantic Advection episodes and Saharan dust outbreaks were clearly dominated by coarser particles ( = 1.00.4). The sea breeze played an important role in transporting pollutants from the developed WMB coastlines towards inland rural areas, changing the optical properties of aerosols. Aerosol scattering and backscattering coefficients increased by around 40 % in the afternoon when the sea breeze was fully developed while the absorption coefficient increased by more than 100 % as a consequence of the increase in the equivalent black carbon concentration (EBC) observed at MSY under sea breeze circulation.

  14. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Detection for Aerosol Optical Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, M.; Black, N.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-12-01

    Particulate matter emitted by anthropogenic and natural sources strongly affect the radiative budget of the Earth. Non-absorbing aerosols have a negative radiative forcing effect, acting to cool the planet and thereby masking the warming caused by greenhouse gases. Absorbing aerosols including black carbon, dust and brown carbon can provide positive radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere depending on their optical properties. Due to its short atmospheric lifetime, black carbon can have a strong regional effect (e.g. in Himalaya and in the Arctic, where surface albedo is high). How much aerosols affect the Earth’s climate however remains highly uncertain. Providing accurate, widespread and unbiased measurements of aerosol optical properties is important for understanding how aerosols will affect the future climate system. However, in depth studies on aerosol optical properties, and in particular absorption, are still lacking. Photoacoustic spectrometry has been recently employed to measure aerosol absorption. The technique is more fundamental and unbiased then traditional filter-based techniques. This type of spectrometry exploits the photoacoustic effect, which is the production of an acoustic wave from the excitation of a particle absorbing a photon. Currently available commercial spectrometers are very useful for laboratory and field experiments, but due to their typical size, they are unpractical for studies employing small payload aircrafts (e.g. unmanned aircrafts) or balloons. A recent development in photoacoustic spectrometry reported by Kosterev et al. in 2002 is the use of a quartz tuning fork for the detection, termed Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectrometry (QEPAS). Due to the high resonance frequency (~32 KHz) of the tuning fork, QEPAS has good potential for the miniaturization of a photoacoustic spectrometry system. The quartz tuning fork is piezoelectric, and a signal is generated only when the tines of the tuning fork move in opposite directions. This property of the tuning fork makes QEPAS less sensitive to background noise. The method has been successfully demonstrated on gaseous species, and is less sensitive to background noise than typical acoustic spectrometers. We present preliminary results for the application of QEPAS to the characterization of aerosol optical properties. Here we analyze first laboratory results from our research and propose possible improvements on our current design.

  15. Three optical methods for remotely measuring aerosol size distributions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, J. A.; Herman, B. M.

    1971-01-01

    Three optical probing methods for remotely measuring atmospheric aerosol size distributions are discussed and contrasted. The particular detection methods which are considered make use of monostatic lidar (laser radar), bistatic lidar, and solar radiometer sensing techniques. The theory of each of these measurement techniques is discussed briefly, and the necessary constraints which must be applied to obtain aerosol size distribution information from such measurements are pointed out. Theoretical and/or experimental results are also presented which demonstrate the utility of the three proposed probing methods.

  16. Studies of viral DNA packaging motors with optical tweezers: a comparison of motor function in bacteriophages φ29, λ, and T4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Douglas E.; Fuller, Derek N.; Raymer, Dorian M.; Rickgauer, Peter; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Catalano, Carlos E.; Kottadiel, Vishal; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2007-09-01

    A key step in the assembly of many viruses is the packaging of double-stranded DNA into a viral procapsid (an empty protein shell) by the action of an ATP-powered portal motor complex. We have developed methods to measure the packaging of single DNA molecules into single viral proheads in real time using optical tweezers. We can measure DNA binding and initiation of translocation, the DNA translocation dynamics, and the filling of the capsid against resisting forces. In addition to studying bacteriophage φ29, we have recently extended these methods to study the E. coli bacteriophages λ and T4, two important model systems in molecular biology. The three systems have different capsid sizes/shapes, genome lengths, and biochemical and structural differences in their packaging motors. Here, we compare and contrast these three systems. We find that all three motors translocate DNA processively and generate very large forces, each exceeding 50 piconewtons, ~20x higher force than generated by the skeletal muscle myosin 2 motor. This high force generation is required to overcome the forces resisting the confinement of the stiff, highly charged DNA at high density within the viral capsids. However, there are also striking differences between the three motors: they exhibit different DNA translocation rates, degrees of static and dynamic disorder, responses to load, and pausing and slipping dynamics.

  17. Effect of Dust and Anthropogenic Aerosols on Columnar Aerosol Optical Properties over Darjeeling (2200 m asl), Eastern Himalayas, India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Adak, Anandamay; Singh, Ajay K.; Devara, Panuganti C. S.; Raha, Sibaji

    2012-01-01

    Background The loading of atmospheric particulate matter (aerosol) in the eastern Himalaya is mainly regulated by the locally generated anthropogenic aerosols from the biomass burning and by the aerosols transported from the distance sources. These different types of aerosol loading not only affect the aerosol chemistry but also produce consequent signature on the radiative properties of aerosol. Methodology/Principal Findings An extensive study has been made to study the seasonal variations in aerosol components of fine and coarse mode aerosols and black carbon along with the simultaneous measurements of aerosol optical depth on clear sky days over Darjeeling, a high altitude station (2200 masl) at eastern Himalayas during the year 2008. We observed a heavy loading of fine mode dust component (Ca2+) during pre-monsoon (Apr – May) which was higher by 162% than its annual mean whereas during winter (Dec – Feb), the loading of anthropogenic aerosol components mainly from biomass burning (fine mode SO42− and black carbon) were higher (76% for black carbon and 96% for fine mode SO42−) from their annual means. These high increases in dust aerosols during pre-monsoon and anthropogenic aerosols during winter enhanced the aerosol optical depth by 25 and 40%, respectively. We observed that for every 1% increase in anthropogenic aerosols, AOD increased by 0.55% during winter whereas for every 1% increase in dust aerosols, AOD increased by 0.46% during pre-monsoon. Conclusion/Significance The natural dust transport process (during pre-monsoon) plays as important a role in the radiation effects as the anthropogenic biomass burning (during winter) and their differential effects (rate of increase of the AOD with that of the aerosol concentration) are also very similar. This should be taken into account in proper modeling of the atmospheric environment over eastern Himalayas. PMID:22792264

  18. Aerosol optical depth over complex topography: comparison of AVHRR, MERIS and MODIS aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffler, Michael; Popp, Christoph; Hauser, Adrian; Wunderle, Stefan

    Aerosols are a key component in the Earth's atmosphere, influencing the radiation budget due to scattering and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation and changing cloud physics by serving as cloud condensation nuclei. Furthermore, dispersed particles alter visibility and affect human health. Remote sensing techniques are a common means to monitor aerosol variability on large spatial scales. The accuracy of these retrievals is highest over surfaces with well known spectral properties and low reflectance (e.g. oceans). The retrieval over brighter and heterogeneous land surfaces is more demanding, since temporally unstable surface reflectance and a reduced aerosol signal may result in larger errors. Regions with highly complex topography, like the Alps, can exhibit even larger errors, basically due to directional effects caused by the topography, temporal snow coverage, and usually higher cloud amount. Ground validation of remote sensing aerosol products is generally performed using sun photometer measurements from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). However, the lack of such sites in the central parts of the Alps renders validation difficult. To study the potential of aerosol remote sensing in regions with complex topography, namely in the Alps, we make use of an unusual situation on one of the major trans-alpine traffic routes in June 2006: A fatal rock fall caused the nearly one month closure of the Gotthard route in the Central Swiss Reuss Valley. Large parts of the traffic were redirected to the San Bernardino route (eastern Switzerland), which had a large impact on the local traffic amount, and thereby on air quality. Herein we compare the performance of three different sensors (AVHRR, MERIS, MODIS) in detecting this obvious change in the aerosol optical depth of the two alpine valleys in summer 2006. First results from AVHRR show a clear reduction (47%) of the aerosol optical depth along the Gotthard route compared to the five year monthly mean (2003 to 2007). On the other hand, we found an increase (25%) of the optical depth at the San Bernardino route for the investigated period. Preliminary analyses with the two other sensors show slightly different results.

  19. Correlation of aerosol mass near the ground with aerosol optical depth during two seasons in Munich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Klaus; Harbusch, Andreas; Emeis, Stefan; Koepke, Peter; Wiegner, Matthias

    2008-06-01

    Relations of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) with aerosol mass concentration near the ground, particulate matter (PM), have been studied on the basis of measurements. The objective is with respect to possible remote sensing methods to get information on the spatial and temporal variation of aerosols which is important for human health effects. Worldwide the AOD of the atmospheric column is routinely monitored by sun-photometers and accessible from satellite measurements also. It is implied here that the AOD is caused mainly by attenuation processes within the mixing layer because this layer includes nearly all atmospheric aerosols. Thus the mixing layer height (MLH) is required together with the AOD, measured by ground-based sun-photometers (around 560 nm), to get information about aerosols near the ground. MLH is determined here from surface-based remote sensing. Investigations were performed during two measurement campaigns in and near Munich in May and November/December 2003 on the basis of daily mean values. Using AOD and MLH measurements the aerosol extinction coefficient of the mixing layer has been calculated. This quantity was correlated with the measured PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 mass concentrations near the ground by performing a linear regression and thus providing a mass extinction efficiency giving squares of the correlation coefficients (R2) between 0.48 (PM1 during summer campaign) and 0.90 (PM2.5 during winter campaign). These correlations suggest that the derived mass extinction efficiencies represent a statistically significant relation between the aerosol extinction coefficients and the surface-based PM mass concentrations mainly during winter conditions.

  20. Derivation of Aerosol Columnar Mass from MODIS Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean A.

    2003-01-01

    In order to verify performance, aerosol transport models (ATM) compare aerosol columnar mass (ACM) with those derived from satellite measurements. The comparison is inherently indirect since satellites derive optical depths and they use a proportionality constant to derive the ACM. Analogously, ATMs output a four dimensional ACM distribution and the optical depth is linearly derived. In both cases, the proportionality constant requires a direct intervention of the user by prescribing the aerosol composition and size distribution. This study introduces a method that minimizes the direct user intervention by making use of the new aerosol products of MODIS. A parameterization is introduced for the derivation of columnar aerosol mass (AMC) and CCN concentration (CCNC) and comparisons between sunphotometer, MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) and in-measurements are shown. The method still relies on the scaling between AMC and optical depth but the proportionality constant is dependent on the MODIS derived r$_{eff}$,\\eta (contribution of the accumulation mode radiance to the total radiance), ambient RH and an assumed constant aerosol composition. The CCNC is derived fkom a recent parameterization of CCNC as a function of the retrieved aerosol volume. By comparing with in-situ data (ACE-2 and TARFOX campaigns), it is shown that retrievals in dry ambient conditions (dust) are improved when using a proportionality constant dependent on r$ {eff}$ and \\eta derived in the same pixel. In high humidity environments, the improvement inthe new method is inconclusive because of the difficulty in accounting for the uneven vertical distribution of relative humidity. Additionally, two detailed comparisons of AMC and CCNC retrieved by the MAS algorithm and the new method are shown. The new method and MAS retrievals of AMC are within the same order of magnitude with respect to the in-situ measurements of aerosol mass. However, the proposed method is closer to the in-situ measurements than the MODIS retrievals. The retrievals of CCNC are also within the same order of magnitude for both methods. The new method is applied to an actual MODIS retrieval and although no in-situ data is available to compare, it is shown that the proposed method yields more credible values than the MODIS retrievals. In addition, recent data available from the PRIDE (Puerto Rico Dust Experiment, July 2000) will be shown by comparing sunphotometer, MODIS and in-situ data.

  1. Ceilometer calibration for retrieval of aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoshitaka; Kai, Kenji; Kawai, Kei; Nagai, Tomohiro; Sakai, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Uchiyama, Akihiro; Batdorj, Dashdondog; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki

    2015-03-01

    Ceilometers are durable compact backscatter lidars widely used to detect cloud base height. They are also useful for measuring aerosols. We introduced a ceilometer (CL51) for observing dust in a source region in Mongolia. For retrieving aerosol profiles with a backscatter lidar, the molecular backscatter signal in the aerosol free heights or system constant of the lidar is required. Although the system constant of the ceilometer is calibrated by the manufacturer, it is not necessarily accurate enough for the aerosol retrieval. We determined a correction factor, which is defined as the ratio of true attenuated backscattering coefficient to the measured attenuated backscattering coefficient, for the CL51 ceilometer using a dual-wavelength Mie-scattering lidar in Tsukuba, Japan before moving the ceilometer to Dalanzadgad, Mongolia. The correction factor determined by minimizing the difference between the ceilometer and lidar backscattering coefficients was approximately 1.2±0.1. Applying the correction to the CL51 signals, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) agreed well with the sky-radiometer AOD during the observation period (13-17 February 2013) in Tsukuba (9 ×10-3 of mean square error). After moving the ceilometer to Dalanzadgad, however, the AOD observed with the CL51 (calibrated by the correction factor determined in Tsukuba) was approximately 60% of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sun photometer AOD. The possible causes of the lower AOD results are as follows: (1) the limited height range of extinction integration (< 3 km); (2) change in the correction factor during the ceilometer transportation or with the window contamination in Mongolia. In both cases, on-site calibrations by dual-wavelength lidar are needed. As an alternative method, we showed that the backward inversion method was useful for retrieving extinction coefficients if the AOD was larger than 1.5. This retrieval method does not require the system constant and molecular backscatter signals, and can be applied to severe dust and air pollution aerosol cases in East Asia.

  2. Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties over the ARM SGP Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Jonsson, H.; Strawa, A.; Provencal, B.; Covert, D.; Arnott, P.; Bucholtz, A.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rissman, T.

    2003-01-01

    In order to meet one of its goals - to relate observations of radiative fluxes and radiances to the atmospheric composition - the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has pursued measurements and modeling activities that attempt to determine how aerosols impact atmospheric radiative transfer, both directly and indirectly. However, significant discrepancies between aerosol properties measured in situ or remotely remain. To this end, the ARM program will conduct an Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in May 2003 at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north central Oklahoma. The IOP involves airborne measurements from two airplanes over the heavily instrumented SGP site. We will give an overview of early airborne results obtained aboard Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. The aircraft will carry instrumentation to perform in-situ measurements of aerosol absorption, scattering, extinction and particle size including such novel techniques as the photoacoustic and cavity ring-down methods. Aerosol optical depth and extinction will be measured with the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel sunphotometer. Furthermore up- and downwelling solar (broadband and spectral) and infrared radiation will be measured using three different instruments. The up-looking radiation instruments will be mounted on a newly developed stabilized platform, which will keep the instruments level up to aircraft pitch and roll angles of 10 degrees. Additional effort will be directed toward measurement of cloud condensation nucleus concentration as a function of supersaturation and relating CCN concentration to aerosol composition and size distribution. This relation is central to description of the aerosol indirect effect.

  3. Relating Aerosol Mass and Optical Depth in the Summertime Continental Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Wagner, N.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Attwood, A. R.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Brown, S. S.; McComiskey, A. C.; Gordon, T. D.; Welti, A.; Carlton, A. G.; Murphy, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD), the column-integrated ambient aerosol light extinction, is determined from satellite and ground-based remote sensing measurements. AOD is the parameter most often used to validate earth system model simulations of aerosol mass. Relating aerosol mass to AOD, however, is problematic due to issues including aerosol water uptake as a function of relative humidity (RH) and the complicated relationship between aerosol physicochemical properties and light extinction. Measurements of aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical properties help to constrain the relationship between aerosol mass and optical depth because aerosol extinction at ambient RH is a function of the abundance, composition and size distribution of the aerosol. We use vertical profiles of humidity and dry aerosol extinction observed in the southeastern United States (U.S.) to examine the relationship between submicron aerosol mass concentration and extinction at ambient RH. We show that the κ-Köhler parameterization directly, and without additional Mie calculations, describes the change in extinction with varying RH as a function of composition for both aged aerosols typical of the polluted summertime continental boundary layer and the biomass burning aerosols we encountered. We calculate how AOD and the direct radiative effect in the eastern U.S. have likely changed due to trends in aerosol composition in recent decades. We also examine the sensitivity of AOD to the RH profile and to aerosol composition, size distribution and abundance.

  4. Investigation of aerosol optical properties for remote sensing through DRAGON (distributed regional aerosol gridded observation networks) campaign in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joon Young; Park, Jin-Soo; Hong, You-Deok; Han, Jin-Seok; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-11-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere, including dust and pollutants, scatters/absorbs solar radiation and change the microphysics of clouds, thus influencing the Earth's energy budget, climate, air quality, visibility, agriculture and water circulation. Pollutants have also been reported to threaten the human health. The present research collaborated with the U.S. NASA and the U.S. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is to study the aerosol characteristics in East Asia and improve the long-distance transportation monitoring technology by analyzing the observations of aerosol characteristics in East Asia during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March 2012-May 2012). The sun photometers that measure the aerosol optical characteristics were placed evenly throughout the Korean Peninsula and concentrated in Seoul and the metropolitan area. Observation data are obtained from the DRAGON campaign and the first year (2012) observation data (aerosol optical depth and aerosol spatial distribution) are analyzed. Sun photometer observations, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), are utilized to validate satellite observations from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Additional analysis is performed associated with the Northeast Asia, the Korean Peninsula in particular, to determine the spatial distribution of the aerosol.

  5. Optical characterization of continental and biomass-burning aerosols over Bozeman, Montana: A case study of the aerosol direct effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, Amin R.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Reagan, John A.; Carlsten, John L.

    2011-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol optical properties were observed from 21 to 27 September 2009 over Bozeman, Montana, during a transitional period in which background polluted rural continental aerosols and well-aged biomass-burning aerosols were the dominant aerosol types of extremely fresh biomass-burning aerosols resulting from forest fires burning in the northwestern United States and Canada. Aerosol optical properties and relative humidity profiles were retrieved using an eye-safe micropulse water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) (MP-DIAL), a single-channel backscatter lidar, a CIMEL solar radiometer as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), a ground-based integrating nephelometer, and aerosol products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra and Aqua. Aerosol optical depths (AODs) measured during the case study ranged between 0.03 and 0.17 (0.015 and 0.075) at 532 nm (830 nm) as episodic combinations of fresh and aged biomass-burning aerosols dominated the optical depth of the pristinely clean background air. Here, a pristinely clean background refers to very low AOD conditions, not that the aerosol scattering and absorption properties are necessarily representative of a clean aerosol type. Diurnal variability in the aerosol extinction to backscatter ratio (Sa) of the background atmosphere derived from the two lidars, which ranged between 55 and 95 sr (50 and 90 sr) at 532 nm (830 nm), showed good agreement with retrievals from AERONET sun and sky measurements over the same time period but were consistently higher than some aerosol models had predicted. Sa measured during the episodic smoke events ranged on average from 60 to 80 sr (50 to 70 sr) at 532 nm (830 nm) while the very fresh biomass-burning aerosols were shown to exhibit significantly lower Sa ranging between 20 and 40 sr. The shortwave direct radiative forcing that was due to the intrusion of biomass-burning aerosols was calculated to be on average -10 W/m2 and was shown to compare favorably with regional-scale forcing calculations using MODIS-Terra and AERONET data in an effort to assess the accuracy of estimating the regional-scale aerosol direct radiative forcing effect using aerosol optical properties measured from a single rural site such as Bozeman, Montana.

  6. Optoelectronic tweezers for microparticle and cell manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 .mu.m or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or groups of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  7. Optoelectronic Tweezers for Microparticle and Cell Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei-Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 micromillimeters or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or group of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  8. Exploring unconventional capabilities of holographic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, R. J.; Pagliusi, P.; Provenzano, C.; Cipparrone, G.

    2011-06-01

    We report an investigation of manipulation and trapping capabilities of polarization holographic tweezers. A polarization gradient connected with a modulation of the ellipticity shows an optical force related to the polarization of the light that can influence optically isotropic particles. While in the case of birefringent particles an unconventional trapping in circularly polarized fringes is observed. A liquid crystal emulsion has been adopted to investigate the capabilities of the holographic tweezers. The unusual trapping observed for rotating bipolar nematic droplets has suggested the involvement of the lift hydrodynamic force responsible of the Magnus effect, originating from the peculiar optical force field. We show that the Magnus force which is ignored in the common approach can contribute to unconventional optohydrodynamic trapping and manipulation.

  9. Seasonal variability of aerosol optical depth over Indian subcontinent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prasad, A.K.; Singh, R.P.; Singh, A.; Kafatos, M.

    2005-01-01

    Ganga basin extends 2000 km E-W and about 400 km N-S and is bounded by Himalayas in the north. This basin is unequivocally found to be affected by high aerosols optical depth (AOD) (>0.6) throughout the year. Himalayas restricts movement of aerosols toward north and as a result dynamic nature of aerosol is seen over the Ganga basin. High AOD in this region has detrimental effects on health of more than 460 million people living in this part of India besides adversely affecting clouds formation, monsoonal rainfall pattern and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Severe drought events (year 2002) in Ganga basin and unexpected failure of monsoon several times, occurred in different parts of Indian subcontinent. Significant rise in AOD (18.7%) over the central part of basin (Kanpur region) have been found to cause substantial decrease in NDVI (8.1%) since 2000. A negative relationship is observed between AOD and NDVI, magnitude of which differs from region to region. Efforts have been made to determine general distribution of AOD and its dominant departure in recent years spatially using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. The seasonal changes in aerosol optical depth over the Indo-Gangetic basin is found to very significant as a result of the increasing dust storm events in recent years. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  10. A lab-on-a-chip for hypoxic patch clamp measurements combined with optical tweezers and spectroscopy- first investigations of single biological cells.

    PubMed

    Alrifaiy, Ahmed; Borg, Johan; Lindahl, Olof A; Ramser, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    The response and the reaction of the brain system to hypoxia is a vital research subject that requires special instrumentation. With this research subject in focus, a new multifunctional lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system with control over the oxygen content for studies on biological cells was developed. The chip was designed to incorporate the patch clamp technique, optical tweezers and absorption spectroscopy. The performance of the LOC was tested by a series of experiments. The oxygen content within the channels of the LOC was monitored by an oxygen sensor and verified by simultaneously studying the oxygenation state of chicken red blood cells (RBCs) with absorption spectra. The chicken RBCs were manipulated optically and steered in three dimensions towards a patch-clamp micropipette in a closed microfluidic channel. The oxygen level within the channels could be changed from a normoxic value of 18% O 2 to an anoxic value of 0.0-0.5% O 2. A time series of 3 experiments were performed, showing that the spectral transfer from the oxygenated to the deoxygenated state occurred after about 227 ± 1 s and a fully developed deoxygenated spectrum was observed after 298 ± 1 s, a mean value of 3 experiments. The tightness of the chamber to oxygen diffusion was verified by stopping the flow into the channel system while continuously recording absorption spectra showing an unchanged deoxygenated state during 5400 ± 2 s. A transfer of the oxygenated absorption spectra was achieved after 426 ± 1 s when exposing the cell to normoxic buffer. This showed the long time viability of the investigated cells. Successful patching and sealing were established on a trapped RBC and the whole-cell access (Ra) and membrane (Rm) resistances were measured to be 5.033 ± 0.412 M Ω and 889.7 ± 1.74 M Ω respectively. PMID:25907197

  11. High spectral resolution lidar to measure optical scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols. I - Theory and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipley, S. T.; Tracy, D. H.; Eloranta, E. W.; Roesler, F. L.; Weinman, J. A.; Trauger, J. T.; Sroga, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A high spectral resolution lidar technique to measure optical scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols is described. Light backscattered by the atmosphere from a narrowband optically pumped oscillator-amplifier dye laser is separated into its Doppler broadened molecular and elastically scattered aerosol components by a two-channel Fabry-Perot polyetalon interferometer. Aerosol optical properties, such as the backscatter ratio, optical depth, extinction cross section, scattering cross section, and the backscatter phase function, are derived from the two-channel measurements.

  12. Cloud-Driven Changes in Aerosol Optical Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2007-09-30

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  13. Quantifying Aerosol Direct Effects from Broadband Irradiance and Spectral Aerosol Optical Depth Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Creekmore, Torreon N.; Joseph, Everette; Long, Charles N.; Li, Siwei

    2014-05-16

    We outline a methodology using broadband and spectral irradiances to quantify aerosol direct effects on the surface diffuse shortwave (SW) irradiance. Best Estimate Flux data span a 13 year timeframe at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Screened clear-sky irradiances and aerosol optical depth (AOD), for solar zenith angles ≤ 65°, are used to estimate clear-sky diffuse irradiances. We validate against detected clear-sky observations from SGP’s Basic Radiation System (BRS). BRS diffuse irradiances were in accordance with estimates, producing a root-mean-square error and mean bias errors of 4.0 W/m2 and -1.4 W/m2, respectively. Absolute differences show 99% of estimates within ±10 W/m2 (10%) of the mean BRS observations. Clear-sky diffuse estimates are used to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol radiative effects, represented as the aerosol diffuse irradiance (ADI). ADI is the contribution of diffuse SW to global SW, attributable to scattering of atmospheric transmission by natural plus anthropogenic aerosols. Estimated slope for the ADI as a function of AOD indicates an increase of ~22 W/m2 in diffuse SW for every 0.1 increase in AOD. Such significant increases in the diffuse fraction could possibly increase photosynthesis. Annual mean ADI is 28.2 W/m2, and heavy aerosol loading at SGP provides up to a maximum increase of 120 W/m2 in diffuse SW over background conditions. With regard to seasonal variation, the mean diffuse forcings are 17.2, 33.3, 39.0, and 23.6 W/m2 for winter, spring, summer, and fall, respectively.

  14. Optical and Chemical Characterization of Aerosols Produced from Cooked Meats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedziela, R. F.; Foreman, E.; Blanc, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    Cooking processes can release a variety compounds into the air immediately above a cooking surface. The distribution of compounds will largely depend on the type of food that is being processed and the temperatures at which the food is prepared. High temperatures release compounds from foods like meats and carry them away from the preparation surface into cooler regions where condensation into particles can occur. Aerosols formed in this manner can impact air quality, particularly in urban areas where the amount of food preparation is high. Reported here are the results of laboratory experiments designed to optically and chemically characterize aerosols derived from cooking several types of meats including ground beef, salmon, chicken, and pork both in an inert atmosphere and in synthetic air. The laboratory-generated aerosols are studied using a laminar flow cell that is configured to accommodate simultaneous optical characterization in the mid-infrared and collection of particles for subsequent chemical analysis by gas chromatography. Preliminary optical results in the visible and ultra-violet will also be presented.

  15. Improved retrieval of aerosol optical depth by satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, Easan Evans

    Atmospheric aerosols are of major concern for public health and climate change, but their sources and atmospheric distributions remain poorly constrained. Satellite-borne radiometers offer a new constraint on aerosol sources and processes by providing global aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals. However, quantitative evaluation of chemical transport models (CTMs) with AOD products retrieved from satellite backscattered reflectances can be compromised by inconsistent assumptions of aerosol optical properties and errors in surface reflectance estimates. We present an improved AOD retrieval algorithm for the MODIS satellite instrument using locally derived surface reflectances and CTM aerosol optical properties. Assuming negligible atmospheric reflectance at 2.13 in cloud-free conditions, we derive 0.47/2.13 and 0.65/2.13 surface reflectance ratios at 1°x1.25° horizontal resolution for the continental United States in summer 2004 from the subset of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance data with minimal aerosol reflectance. We find higher ratios over arid regions than those assumed in the operational MODIS AOD retrieval algorithm, explaining the high AOD bias found in these regions. We simulate TOA reflectances for each MODIS scene using local aerosol optical properties from the GEOS-Chem CTM, and fit these reflectances to the observed MODIS TOA reflectances for a best estimate of AODs for each scene. Comparison with coincident ground-based (AERONET) AOD observations in the western and central United States during the summer of 2004 shows considerable improvement over the operational MODIS AOD products in this region. We find the AOD retrieval is more accurate at 0.47 than at 0.65 mum because of the higher signal to noise ratio, and that the correlation between MODIS and AERONET AODs improves as averaging time increases. We further improve the AOD retrieval method using an extensive ensemble of aircraft, ground-based, and satellite aerosol observations during the ICARTT field campaign over eastern North America in summer 2004. The aircraft measurements show narrower aerosol size distributions than those typically assumed in models, and correcting this leads to higher model and satellite retrieved AODs. We find that single scattering albedos calculated assuming externally mixed aerosol more closely represent observations than those calculated assuming internal mixing. Our improved MODIS AOD retrieval compares well to the ground-based AERONET data (R = 0.84, slope = 1.02), significantly improving on the MODIS operational products. Inference of surface PM2.5 from our MODIS AOD retrieval shows good correlation to the EPA-AQS data (R = 0.78) but a high regression slope (slope = 1.48). The high slope is seen in all AOD inferred PM2 5 concentrations (AERONET: slope = 2.04; MODIS c005: slope = 1.51) and is caused by an overestimate of PM2 5 over strong source regions which could reflect the mid day peak in sulfate concentrations corresponding to AOD sampling times.

  16. Single-sided lateral-field and phototransistor-based optoelectronic tweezers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohta, Aaron (Inventor); Chiou, Pei-Yu (Inventor); Hsu, Hsan-Yin (Inventor); Jamshidi, Arash (Inventor); Wu, Ming-Chiang (Inventor); Neale, Steven L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Described herein are single-sided lateral-field optoelectronic tweezers (LOET) devices which use photosensitive electrode arrays to create optically-induced dielectrophoretic forces in an electric field that is parallel to the plane of the device. In addition, phototransistor-based optoelectronic tweezers (PhOET) devices are described that allow for optoelectronic tweezers (OET) operation in high-conductivity physiological buffer and cell culture media.

  17. Aerosol optical depth increase in partly cloudy conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, Duli; Wood, R.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Rasch, Philip J.; Miller, Steven D.; Schichtel, Bret; Moore, Tom

    2012-09-14

    Remote sensing observations of aerosol from surface and satellite instruments are extensively used for atmospheric and climate research. From passive sensors, the apparent cloud-free atmosphere in the vicinity of clouds often appears to be brighter then further away from the clouds, leading to an enhancement in the retrieved aerosol optical depth. Mechanisms contributing to this enhancement, including contamination by undetected clouds, hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles, and meteorological conditions, have been debated in recent literature, but an extent to which each of these factors influence the observed enhancement is poorly known. Here we used 11 years of daily global observations at 10x10 km2 resolution from the MODIS on the NASA Terra satellite to quantify as a function of cloud fraction (CF). Our analysis reveals that, averaged over the globe, the clear sky is enhanced by ? = 0.05 which corresponds to relative enhancements of 25% in cloudy conditions (CF=0.8-0.9) compared with relatively clear conditions (CF=0.1-0.2). Unlike the absolute enhancement ?, the relative increase in ? is rather consistent in all seasons and is 25-35% in the subtropics and 15-25% at mid and higher latitudes. Using a simple Gaussian probability density function model to connect cloud cover and the distribution of relative humidity, we argue that much of the enhancement is consistent with aerosol hygroscopic growth in the humid environment surrounding clouds. Consideration of these cloud-dependent effects will facilitate understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and reduce the uncertainty in estimates of aerosol radiative forcing by global climate models.

  18. Aerosol optical properties in the southeastern United States in summer - Part 2: Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth to relative humidity and aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Charles A.; Wagner, Nicholas L.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Gordon, Timothy D.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Lack, Daniel A.; Liao, Jin; Markovic, Milos Z.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Perring, Anne E.; Richardson, Matthews S.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Welti, Andre; Ziemba, Luke D.; Murphy, Daniel M.

    2016-04-01

    Aircraft observations of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties were made between May and September 2013 in the southeastern United States (US). Regionally representative aggregate vertical profiles of median and interdecile ranges of the measured parameters were constructed from 37 individual aircraft profiles made in the afternoon when a well-mixed boundary layer with typical fair-weather cumulus was present (Wagner et al., 2015). We use these 0-4 km aggregate profiles and a simple model to calculate the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) to changes in dry aerosol mass, relative humidity, mixed-layer height, the central diameter and width of the particle size distribution, hygroscopicity, and dry and wet refractive index, while holding the other parameters constant. The calculated sensitivity is a result of both the intrinsic sensitivity and the observed range of variation in these parameters. These observationally based sensitivity studies indicate that the relationship between AOD and dry aerosol mass in these conditions in the southeastern US can be highly variable and is especially sensitive to relative humidity (RH). For example, calculated AOD ranged from 0.137 to 0.305 as the RH was varied between the 10th and 90th percentile profiles with dry aerosol mass held constant. Calculated AOD was somewhat less sensitive to aerosol hygroscopicity, mean size, and geometric standard deviation, σg. However, some chemistry-climate models prescribe values of σg substantially larger than we or others observe, leading to potential high biases in model-calculated AOD of ˜ 25 %. Finally, AOD was least sensitive to observed variations in dry and wet aerosol refractive index and to changes in the height of the well-mixed surface layer. We expect these findings to be applicable to other moderately polluted and background continental air masses in which an accumulation mode between 0.1-0.5 µm diameter dominates aerosol extinction.

  19. Aerosol optical properties in the southeastern United States in summer - Part 2: Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth to relative humidity and aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Wagner, N. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Markovic, M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Schwarz, J. P.; Welti, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-11-01

    Aircraft observations of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties were made between May and September 2013. Regionally representative aggregate vertical profiles of median and interdecile ranges of the measured parameters were constructed from 37 individual aircraft profiles made in the afternoon when a well-mixed boundary layer with typical fair-weather cumulus was present (Wagner et al., 2015). We use these 0-4 km aggregate profiles and a simple model to calculate the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) to changes in dry aerosol mass, relative humidity, mixed layer height, the central diameter and width of the particle size distribution, hygroscopicity, and dry and wet refractive index, while holding the other parameters constant. The calculated sensitivity is a result of both the intrinsic sensitivity and the observed range of variation of these parameters. These observationally based sensitivity studies indicate that the relationship between AOD and dry aerosol mass in these conditions in the southeastern US can be highly variable and is especially sensitive to relative humidity (RH). For example, calculated AOD ranged from 0.137 to 0.305 as the RH was varied between the 10th and 90th percentile profiles with dry aerosol mass held constant. Calculated AOD was somewhat less sensitive to aerosol hygroscopicity, mean size, and geometric standard deviation, σg. However, some chemistry-climate models prescribe values of σg substantially larger than we or others observe, leading to potential high biases in model-calculated AOD of ~ 25 %. Finally, AOD was least sensitive to observed variations in dry and wet aerosol refractive index and to changes in the height of the well-mixed surface layer. We expect these findings to be applicable to other moderately polluted and background continental airmasses in which an accumulation mode between 0.1-0.5 μm diameter dominates aerosol extinction.

  20. Uncertainties of simulated aerosol optical properties induced by assumptions on aerosol physical and chemical properties: an AQMEII-2 perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. In the framework of the AQMEII-2 model in...

  1. Variability of aerosol optical thickness and atmospheric turbidity in Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masmoudi, M.; Chaabane, M.; Medhioub, K.; Elleuch, F.

    The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) τa computed from the spectral sun photometer in Thala (Tunisia) exhibited variability ranging from approximately 0.03 to greater than 2.0 at 870 nm for March-October 2001. These measurements are compared to the aerosol optical thickness computed in Ouagadougou (Burkina-Faso), Banizoumbou (Niger), IMC Oristano (Sardinia) and Rome Tor Vergata (Italy). Analysis of τa data from this observation network suggests that there is a high temporal and spatial variability of τa in the different sites. The Angström wavelength exponent α was found to vary with the magnitude of the aerosol optical thickness, with values as high as 1.5 for very low τa, and values of -0.1 for high τa situations. The relationship between the two parameters τa and α is investigated. Values of the turbidity coefficient β have been determined in Thala (Tunisia) for 8 months in 2001 based on a direct fitting method of the Angström power law expression using sun photometer data. The monthly averaged values of the turbidity coefficient β vary between 0.15 and 0.33. The months of July and October experienced the highest turbidity, while April experienced the lowest aerosol loading on average. The turbidity shows a maximum and minimum values for the Southwest and the Northwest wind directions, respectively. The single scattering albedo ωo for the 870 nm wavelength obtained from solar aureole data in Thala is analysed according to the particles' origin.

  2. Comparison of simulated and observed aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laulainen, Nels; Ghan, Steven; Easter, Richard; Zaveri, Rahul

    2000-08-01

    A variety of measurements have been used to evaluate the treatment of aerosol radiative properties and radiative impacts of aerosols simulated by the Model for Integrated Research on Atmospheric Global Exchanges (MIRAGE). This paper focuses on comparisons of simulated and measured aerosol optical depth (AOD). When the analyzed relative humidity is used to calculate aerosol water uptake in MIRAGE, the simulated AOD agrees with most surface measurements after cloudy conditions are filtered out and differences between model and station elevations are accounted for. Simulated AODs are low over sites in Brazil during the biomass burning season and over sites in central Canada during the wildfire season, which can be attributed to limitations in the organic and black carbon emissions data used by MIRAGE. The simulated AODs are mostly within a factor of two of satellite estimates, but MIRAGE simulates excessively high AODs off the east coast of the US and China, and too little dust off the coast of West Africa and in the Arabian Sea.

  3. On factors controlling marine boundary layer aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tao; Yuan, Renmin; Wang, Zhien

    2014-03-01

    Sea spray aerosol is one of the largest natural contributors to the global aerosol loading and thus plays an important role in the global radiative budget through both direct and indirect effects. Previous studies have shown either strong or weak relationships between marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol optical depth (τ) and the near-surface wind speed. However, the marine τ is influenced by a wide range of factors. This study attempts to examine extra contributing factors beyond wind to better characterize MBL τ variations over the global ocean by using 4 year A-train data (2006-2010). The results show that among many factors controlling MBL τ, surface wind speed and MBL depth are the two most important factors. This suggests that not only mechanical production of sea spray particles driven by near-surface wind processes but also vertical redistribution driven by turbulent and shallow convective mixing in the MBL controls MBL τ variations. A new two-parameter parameterization of τ was derived based on satellite measurements. Evaluations with independent data show that the new parameterization improves the prediction of MBL τ. The comparisons between the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model calculations and Aqua Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System observations showed that the new parameterization improves the estimation of aerosol radiative forcing.

  4. Recent Trends in Aerosol Optical Properties Derived from AERONET Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, J.; Carlson, B. E.; Dubovik, O.; Lacis, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) has been providing high-quality retrievals of aerosol optical properties from the surface at worldwide locations for more than a decade. Many sites have continuous and consistent records for more than 10 years, which enables the investigation of long-term trends in aerosol properties at these locations. In this study, we present the results of a trend analysis at selected stations with long data records. In addition to commonly studied parameters such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angström exponent (AE), we also focus on inversion products including absorption aerosol optical depth (ABS), single-scattering albedo (SSA) and the absorption Angström exponent (AAE). Level 2.0 quality assured data are the primary source. However, due to the scarcity of level 2.0 inversion products resulting from the strict AOD quality control threshold, we have also analyzed level 1.5 data, with some quality control screening to provide a reference for global results. Two statistical methods are used to detect and estimate the trend: the Mann-Kendall test associated with Sen's slope and linear least-squares fitting. The results of these statistical tests agree well in terms of the significance of the trend for the majority of the cases. The results indicate that Europe and North America experienced a uniform decrease in AOD, while significant ( is great than 90 %) increases in these two parameters are found for North India and the Arabian Peninsula. The AE trends turn out to be different for North America and Europe, with increases for the former and decreases for the latter, suggesting opposite changes in fine/coarse-mode fraction. For level 2.0 inversion parameters, Beijing and Kanpur both experienced an increase in SSA. Beijing also shows a reduction in ABS, while the SSA increase for Kanpur is mainly due the increase in scattering aerosols. Increased absorption and reduced SSA are found at Solar Village. At level 1.5, most European and North American sites also show positive SSA and negative ABS trends, although the data are more uncertain. The AAE trends are less spatially coherent due to large uncertainties, except for a robust increase at three sites in West Africa, which suggests a possible reduction in black carbon. Overall, the trends do not exhibit obvious seasonality for the majority of parameters and stations.

  5. On the effects of the organic aerosol optical properties due to relative humidity and water contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C.; Lee, J.; Kim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol poses serious problems not only human health but also weather and climate. It can scatter or absorb solar radiation, which modifies the atmospheric radiative balance. Among the various aerosol constitutes, the effect of the organic compounds in the aerosols on the incoming solar radiation is still remained as a large uncertainty. Especially, on the effects of the water soluble organic aerosol optical properties due to the water uptake needs to be investigated in order to properly understand the effects of atmospheric aerosol on radiative budgets. In this study, the optical properties for polydispersed aerosol size distribution due to relative humidity were investigated based on the experimental observation data. Inorganic aerosol water contents are calculated based on the aerosol thermodynamic model (SCAPE) and the change of the size distribution due to the condensational growing water is simulated using the aerosol dynamic model. Especially, Water Soluble Organic Carbon aerosols (WSOC) are assumed to absorb water and the effects of WSOC on aerosol optical properties are sensitively simulated. The extinction coefficient and the Ångstrom exponent were calculated based on the Mie theory according to the relative humidity. Both homogeneous internal mixture and core-shell mixture were considered. The results showed that the water soluble organic aerosols play an important role in calculating the change of aerosol optical properties as a function of relative humidity.

  6. Aerosol optical depth, aerosol composition and air pollution during summer and winter conditions in Budapest.

    PubMed

    Alföldy, B; Osán, J; Tóth, Z; Török, S; Harbusch, A; Jahn, C; Emeis, S; Schäfer, K

    2007-09-20

    The dependence of aerosol optical depth (AOD) on air particulate concentrations in the mixing layer height (MLH) was studied in Budapest in July 2003 and January 2004. During the campaigns gaseous (CO, SO(2), NO(x), O(3)), solid components (PM(2.5), PM(10)), as well as ionic species (ammonium, sulfate and nitrate) were measured at several urban and suburban sites. Additional data were collected from the Budapest air quality monitoring network. AOD was measured by a ground-based sun photometer. The mixing layer height and other common meteorological parameters were recorded. A linear relationship was found between the AOD and the columnar aerosol burden; the best linear fit (R(2)=0.96) was obtained for the secondary sulfate aerosol due to its mostly homogeneous spatial distribution and its optically active size range. The linear relationship is less pronounced for the PM(2.5) and PM(10) fractions since local emissions are very heterogeneous in time and space. The results indicate the importance of the mixing layer height in determining pollutant concentrations. During the winter campaign, when the boundary layer decreases to levels in between the altitudes of the sampling stations, measured concentrations showed significant differences due to different local sources and long-range transport. In the MLH time series unexpected nocturnal peaks were observed. The nocturnal increase of the MLH coincided with decreasing concentrations of all pollutants except for ozone; the ozone concentration increase indicates nocturnal vertical mixing between different air layers. PMID:17570465

  7. The Aerosol Limb Imager: acousto-optic imaging of limb scattered sunlight for stratospheric aerosol profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elash, B. J.; Bourassa, A. E.; Loewen, P. R.; Lloyd, N. D.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Aerosol Limb Imager (ALI) is an optical remote sensing instrument designed to image scattered sunlight from the atmospheric limb. These measurements are used to retrieve spatially resolved information of the stratospheric aerosol distribution, including spectral extinction coefficient and particle size. Here we present the design, development and test results of an ALI prototype instrument. The long term goal of this work is the eventual realization of ALI on a satellite platform in low earth orbit, where it can provide high spatial resolution observations, both in the vertical and cross-track. The instrument design uses a large aperture Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter (AOTF) to image the sunlit stratospheric limb in a selectable narrow wavelength band ranging from the visible to the near infrared. The ALI prototype was tested on a stratospheric balloon flight from the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) launch facility in Timmins, Canada, in September 2014. Preliminary analysis of the hyperspectral images indicate that the radiance measurements are of high quality, and we have used these to retrieve vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient from 650-1000 nm, along with one moment of the particle size distribution. Those preliminary results are promising and development of a satellite prototype of ALI within the Canadian Space Agency is ongoing.

  8. The Smallest Tweezers in the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewalle, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    A pair of fine tweezers and a steady hand may well be enough to pick up a grain of sand, but what would you use to hold something hundreds of times smaller still, the size of only one micron? The answer is to use a device that is not mechanical in nature but that relies instead on the tiny forces that light exerts on small particles: "optical

  9. Optical Properties of Mixed Black Carbon, Inorganic and Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, S E

    2012-05-30

    Summarizes the achievements of the project, which are divided into four areas: 1) Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols; 2) Development and of a polar nephelometer to measure aerosol optical properties and theoretical approaches to several optical analysis problems, 3) Studies on the accuracy of measurements of absorbing carbon by several methods, and 4) Environmental impacts of biodiesel.

  10. Optical Absorptivity versus Molecular Composition of Model Organic Aerosol Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón, Angela G.; Guzmán, Marcelo I.; Hoffmann, M. R.; Colussi, A. J.

    2009-08-01

    Aerosol particles affect the Earth's energy balance by absorbing and scattering radiation according to their chemical composition, size, and shape. It is generally believed that their optical properties could be deduced from the molecular composition of the complex organic matter contained in these particles, a goal pursued by many groups via high-resolution mass spectrometry, although: (1) absorptivity is associated with structural chromophores rather than with molecular formulas, (2) compositional space is a small projection of structural space, and (3) mixtures of polar polyfunctional species usually exhibit supramolecular interactions. Here we report a suite of experiments showing that the photolysis of aqueous pyruvic acid (a proxy for aerosol α-dicarbonyls absorbing at λ > 300 nm) generates mixtures of identifiable aliphatic polyfunctional oligomers that develop absorptions in the visible upon standing in the dark. These absorptions and their induced fluorescence emissions can be repeatedly bleached and retrieved without carbon loss or ostensible changes in the electrospray mass spectra of the corresponding mixtures and display unambiguous signatures of supramolecular effects. The nonlinear additivity of the properties of the components of these mixtures supports the notion that full structural speciation is insufficient and possibly unnecessary for understanding the optical properties of aerosol particles and their responses to changing ambient conditions.

  11. Aerosol Optical Properties During The SAMUM-2 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledano, C.; Freudenthaler, V.; Gross, S.; Seefeldner, M.; Gasteiger, J.; Garhammer, M.; Esselborn, M.; Wiegner, M.; Koepke, P.

    2009-03-01

    A field campaign of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM-2) took place in the Cape Verde islands in January-February 2008, to investigate the properties of long-range transported dust over the Atlantic. The Meteorological Institute of the University of Munich deployed a set of active and passive remote sensing instruments: one sun photometer, for the measurement of the direct sun irradiance and sky radiances; a broad-band UV radiometer; and 2 tropospheric lidar systems. The measurements were made in close cooperation with the other participating groups. During the measurement period the aerosol scenario over Cape Verde mostly consisted of a dust layer below 2 km and a smoke layer above 2 km height. The Saharan dust arrived in the site from the NE, whereas the smoke originated in the African equatorial region is transported from the SE. The aerosol load was also very variable over this area, with AOD (500 nm) ranging from 0.04 to 0.74. The optical properties of the layers are shown: extinction and particle depolarization ratio profiles at 3 wavelengths, as well as aerosol optical depth (in the range 340-1550 nm), ngstrm exponent, size distribution and single scattering albedo.

  12. Optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Measurements of aerosol properties in Kishinev, Moldova are being carried out within the framework of the international AERONET program managed by NASA/GSFC since 1999. Direct solar and sky diffuse radiances are measured by using of sunphotometer Cimel-318. Aerosol optical properties are retrieved from measured radiances by using of smart computational procedures developed by the AERONET's team. The instrument is situated at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station giving the opportunity to make simultaneous spectral (win sunphotometer) and broadband (with the set of sensors from radiometric complex) solar radiation. Detailed description of the station and investigations in progress can be found at the http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E; 205 m a.s.l). Summary of aerosol optical and microphysical properties retrieved from direct solar and diffuse sky radiance observations at Moldova site from September 1999 to June 2009 are presented below. Number of measurements (total): 1695 Number of measurements (for ?o, n, k): 223 Range of aerosol optical depth (AOD) @440 nm: 0.03 < ?(440) < 2.30, < ?(440)>=0.25 Range of Ångström parameter < α440_870 >: 0.14 < α < 2.28 Asymmetry factor (440/670/870/1020): 0.70/0.63/0.59/0.58 ±0.04 Refraction (n) and absorption (k) indices@440 nm: 1.41 ± 0.06; 0.009 ± 0.005 Single scattering albedo < ?o >(440/670/870/1020): 0.93/0.92/0.90/0.89 ±0.04 Parameters of volume particle size distribution function: (fine mode) volume median radius r v,f , μm: 0.17 ± 0.06 particle volume concentration Cv,f, μm3/μm2: 0.04 ± 0.03 (coarse mode) volume median radius rv,c , μm: 3.08 ± 0.64 particle volume concentration Cv,c, μm3/μm2: 0.03 ± 0.03 Climatic norms of AOD@500 nm and Ångström parameter < α440_870 > at the site of observation are equal to 0.21 ± 0.06 and 1.45 ± 0.14, respectively. The aerosol type in Moldova may be considered as 'urban-industrial and mixed' in accordance with the classification of aerosol type models systematized and developed by AERONET team (O.Dubovik et al., 2002, J. Atmosph. Sci., 59, 590-608) on the basis of datasets acquired from worldwide observations at the network of sunphotometers. It should be noted the presence of increased value of absorption index and reduced values of albedo. This may be due to influence of absorptive aerosols (soot). These aerosols are originated from local dust sources and exhausts from intensive urban traffic, from sources of biomass and household garbage burning both in and around the city, and from long-range transport over regions with high loading of aerosols (dust, smoke).

  13. Simulations of the Aerosol Index and the Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth and Comparisons with OMI Retrievals During ARCTAS-2008 Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    We have computed the Aerosol Index (AI) at 354 nm, useful for observing the presence of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere, from aerosol simulations conducted with the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) module running online the GEOS-5 Atmospheric GCM. The model simulates five aerosol types: dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon and sulfate aerosol and can be run in replay or data assimilation modes. In the assimilation mode, information's provided by the space-based MODIS and MISR sensors constrains the model aerosol state. Aerosol optical properties are then derived from the simulated mass concentration and the Al is determined at the OMI footprint using the radiative transfer code VLIDORT. In parallel, model derived Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) is compared with OMI retrievals. We have focused our study during ARCTAS (June - July 2008), a period with a good sampling of dust and biomass burning events. Our ultimate goal is to use OMI measurements as independent validation for our MODIS/MISR assimilation. Towards this goal we document the limitation of OMI aerosol absorption measurements on a global scale, in particular sensitivity to aerosol vertical profile and cloud contamination effects, deriving the appropriate averaging kernels. More specifically, model simulated (full) column integrated AAOD is compared with model derived Al, this way identifying those regions and conditions under which OMI cannot detect absorbing aerosols. Making use of ATrain cloud measurements from MODIS, C1oudSat and CALIPSO we also investigate the global impact on clouds on OMI derived Al, and the extent to which GEOS-5 clouds can offer a first order representation of these effects.

  14. A new real non-invasive single fiber tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Zhihai; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2012-02-01

    A new real non-invasive two-core single fiber optical tweezers is proposed and fabricated by fiber grinding and polishing technology. The yeast cells trapping performance of this special designed truncated cone tip fiber probe is demonstrated and investigated. The distributions of the optical field emerging from the truncated cone fiber tip are simulated by Beam Prop Method. Both axial and transverse trapping forces are calculated by FDTD method. This new optical tweezers can realize truly non-invasive remote trapping and manipulating bio-cells.

  15. Combining remote sensing and in situ aerosol measurements for the determination of aerosol optical properties and radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redemann, Jens

    1999-10-01

    The largest uncertainty in the estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from the uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction which in turn determines the optical properties of the aerosols. In this thesis, methodologies to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during NASA's Pacific Exploratory Mission West-B (PEM West-B) and the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) are developed. In particular, the remote sensing of aerosols with airborne lidar is utilized to derive vertical profiles of aerosol backscatter. For the PEM West-B data analysis, a modified Klett inversion algorithm was adopted to utilize the aerosol in situ size distribution data to provide the height dependent lidar ratio and the aerosol backscatter at the aircraft altitude. In all three PEM West-B cases studied, the aerosol measurements could be explained using a two-layer aerosol model with distinct aerosol refractive indices as indicated by a best-fit backscatter refractive index estimation method. The real parts of the aerosol refractive indices retrieved are in between 1.42 and 1.60, while the imaginary part ranges from 10-6 to 0.163. For the TARFOX data analysis, the incorporation of aerosol optical depth measurements obtained using an airborne sunphotometer system yields an additional constraint on the estimate of the complex aerosol index of refraction. The aerosol refractive indices thus retrieved are generally smaller than the values estimated for the PEM study, with values ranging from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part, respectively. The methodology devised in this study provides, for the first time, a complete set of vertically resolved aerosol size distribution and refractive index data, yielding the vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties required for the determination of aerosol induced radiative flux changes. Calculations with the 18 channel broadband Fu-Liou radiative transfer model indicate instantaneous shortwave aerosol radiative forcings at the top of the atmosphere between -0.5 Wm-2 and +4.5 Wm-2 for the PEM case studies and values of the order of -36 Wm-2 for the TARFOX case studies, respectively. The vertical structure of the aerosol induced flux changes is important to climate studies, since it affects local heating rates and thereby convective processes, the formation and lifetime of clouds, and the distribution of chemical constituents in the troposphere. To the author's knowledge, the calculations carried out in this work represent the first observationally-based estimate of the vertical structure of the aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, these results are quite significant for the design of future field campaigns aimed at the determination of aerosol climatic effects.

  16. Investigation of aerosol optical properties in Bangkok and suburbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjai, S.; Suntaropas, S.; Nunez, M.

    2009-05-01

    Aerosol optical depth and Angstrom coefficients for three sites in Bangkok and suburbs are examined: Silpakorn University at Nakhon Pathom, NP (13.82°N, 100.04°E), the Asian Institute of Technology at Phatum Thani, AIT (14.08°N, 100.62°E) and the Thai Meteorological Department at Bangkok, BK (13.73°N, 100.57°E). Sunphotometers have been used to measure direct normal spectral irradiance at these sites for a period of 2 years (2004-2005). Cloudless conditions were selected and Bouguer’s law was employed to obtain aerosol optical depth. All three sites exhibit strong seasonal variations, with the highest values occurring at the height of the dry season in April, and the lowest occurring during the rainy season in July. April turbidity conditions are very high, as evidenced by maximum 500 nm optical depths of between 1.4 to 2.0 that were measured at all three locations. The Angstrom exponent α also showed a marked seasonal change, with highest values at the height of the dry season.

  17. Influence of shape on the optical properties of hematite aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veghte, Daniel P.; Moore, Justin E.; Jensen, Lasse; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2015-07-01

    Mineral dust particles are the second highest emitted aerosol type by mass. Due to changes in particle size, composition, and shape that are caused by physical processes and reactive chemistry, optical properties vary during transport, contributing uncertainty in the calculation of radiative forcing. Hematite is the major absorbing species of mineral dust. In this study, we analyzed the extinction cross sections of nigrosin and hematite particles using cavity ring-down aerosol extinction spectroscopy (CRD-AES) and have measured particle shape and size distributions using transmission electron microscopy. Nigrosin was also used in this study as a spherical standard for absorbing particles. The size-selected nigrosin particles have a narrow size distribution, with extinction cross sections that are described by Mie theory. In contrast, the size distribution of size-selected hematite particles is more polydisperse. The extinction cross sections were modeled using Mie theory and the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The DDA was used to model more complex shapes that account for the surface roughness and particle geometry. Of the four models used, Mie theory was the simplest to implement, but had significant error with a 26.1% difference from the CRD-AES results. By increasing the complexity of the models using the DDA, we determined that spheroids had a 14.7% difference, roughened spheres a 12.8% difference, and roughened spheroids a 11.2% difference from the experimental results. Using additional parameters that account for particle shape is necessary to model the optical properties of hematite particles and leads to improved extinction cross sections for modeling aerosol optical properties.

  18. Aerosol direct radiative effect on solar radiation on planetary scale based on 7-year spectral aerosol optical properties from MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimas, C. D.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Vardavas, I.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can cause climate change through their direct, indirect and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. However, the quantification of the aerosol effects is difficult because aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties are highly variable in space and time. Another difficulty is the lack of continuous and long-term measurements of aerosol properties. In the present study the mean monthly direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols on solar radiation is estimated on global scale for a 7-year period (March 2000 - February 2007), by using a deterministic spectral radiation transfer model and long-term satellite spectral aerosol data. The model uses climatological input data for various surface and atmospheric parameters, taken from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP-D2), the National Centers for Environmental Prediction - National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP-NCAR) Global Reanalysis project, and other global data bases. The aerosol DRE computations are performed in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared, spanning the total shortwave (SW) spectral range 0.2-10 m. The model computes the aerosol effect on the SW radiation budget of the Earth-atmosphere system, namely at the top of atmosphere (TOA reflected solar radiation), within the atmosphere (absorbed solar radiation), and at the surface (incoming and absorbed solar radiation). The multiyear global distributions of spectral aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth, AOD, asymmetry parameter, gaer, and single scattering albedo, ?aer), which are of primary importance for aerosol DREs, are taken from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and they are supplemented by the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). More specifically, we use MODIS AOD and gaer data at 7 wavelengths extending from 470 to 2130 nm, over land and ocean. The computations of aerosol DREs are performed at a spatial resolution of 2.5°x2.5° latitude-longitude. According to the model results, the 7-year global mean aerosol direct radiative effect on the outgoing (reflected) SW radiation at TOA (DRETOA) is equal -2.88 W/m2, indicating thus a significant planetary cooling. At the regional scale, however, the cooling effect is much stronger, while a planetary warming is found over highly reflecting surfaces like deserts. The global effect of aerosols on the atmospheric absorption of SW radiation (DREatmab) is equal to 3.94 W/m2, indicating an atmospheric warming due to aerosols. In addition, aerosols are found to decrease the downward SW radiation at the Earth's surface (FSurfDown) by -7.97 W/m2, producing thus a very important surface radiative cooling. Based on the model computations, the inter-annual change of aerosol DRE from 2000 to 2007 is -3.7% for DRETOA (less aerosol planetary cooling), -13.4% for DREatmab (less aerosol atmospheric warming) and -10.4% for DREsurf (less aerosol surface cooling). Our results indicate that a significant reduction in the magnitude of aerosol radiative effects has taken place from 2000 to 2007, which is primarily due to a corresponding decrease in aerosol loads over many world regions, Asian, European and American countries included.

  19. Retrieval and Validation of Aerosol Optical Properties over East Asia from TANSO-Cloud and Aerosol Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghee; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Mijin; Choi, Myungje; Go, Sujung; Lim, HyunKwang; Ou, Mi-Lim; Goo, Tae-Young; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol is a significant component on air quality and climate change. In particular, spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol shows large variability over East Asia, thus has large effect in retrieving carbon dioxide from Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS). An aerosol retrieval algorithm was developed from TANSO- Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI) onboard the GOSAT. The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD), size distribution of aerosol, and aerosol type in 0.1 degree grid resolution and surface reflectance was estimated using the clear sky composite method. To test aerosol absorptivity, the reflectance difference method was considered using channels of TANSO-CAI. In this study, the retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) was compared with those of Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) and MODerate resolution Imaging Sensor (MODIS) dataset from September 2011 and August 2014. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and CAI show the reasonably good correlation with correlation coefficient of 0.77 and regression slope of 0.87 for the whole period. Moreover, those between MODIS and CAI for the same period show correlations with correlation coefficient of 0.7 ~ 0.9 and regression slope of 0.7 ~ 1.2, depending on season and comparison regions however, the largest error source in aerosol retrieval has been surface reflectance. Over ocean and some Land, surface reflectance tends to be overestimated, and thereby CAI-AOD tends to be underestimated. Based on the results with CAI algorithm developed, the algorithm is continuously improved for better performance.

  20. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Experiments and modeling studies have shown that deliquesced aerosols can be present not only as one-phase system containing organics, inorganic salts and water, but often as two-phase systems consisting of a predominantly organic and a predominantly inorganic aqueous phase 1,2. Recent laboratory studies conducted with model mixtures representing tropospheric aerosols1,2,3, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from smog chamber experiments4, and field measurements5 suggest that liquid- liquid phase separations (LLPS) is indeed a common phenomenon in mixed organic/ ammonium sulfate (AS) particles. During LLPS, particles may adopt different morphologies mainly core- shell and partially engulfed. A core- shell configuration will have consequences for heterogeneous chemistry and hygroscopicity and as a result will alter the optical properties of the particles since the aqueous inorganic-rich phase will be totally enclosed by a probably highly viscous organic coating with low diffusivity for reactants and water. The primary objective of this project is to establish a method for investigating the morphology of mixed inorganic and absorbing organic compounds of atmospheric relevance and study their radiative properties before, during, and after phase transitions mainly during LLPS. This will be the first study looking into the radiative effect of LLPS in detail. In this first experiment, the behavior of single droplets of carminic acid (CA)/ AS/ H2O mixture was monitored during relative humidity (RH) cycles using optical microscopy. The same mixture particle was levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and the change in its absorption properties was measured at varying RH. We also intend to determine the occurrence of LLPS in accumulation- sized particles and the change in their absorption using a cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer. If LLPS alters the absorptive properties of the suggested model aerosols significantly, absorption measurements of accumulation mode particles of the same composition would allow proving that LLPS indeed occurs in particles of atmospheric relevant size ranges. Up to now this prove is missing. References: 1. Bertram, et al. Atmos. Chem & Phys, 11(21), 10995-11006, 2011. 2. Krieger, et al. Chemical Society Reviews, 41(19), 6631-6662, 2012 3. Song, M. et al. Geophys Res Lett, 39(19), 2012b 4. Smith et al. Atmos Chem & Phys, 12(20), 9613- 9628, 2012. 5. You, Y. et al. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(33), 13188-13193, 2012.

  1. Aerosol optical depth estimates based on nephelometer measurements at the SGP arm site

    SciTech Connect

    Bergin, M.H.; Ogren, J.A.; Halthore, R.

    1996-03-01

    The scattering of shortwave radiation by anthropogenic aerosols during clear-sky conditions, termed direct aerosol forcing, has been estimated to be roughly 1 W/m{sup 2} on a global annual average and may be as high as 50 W/m{sup 2} locally and instantaneously new source regions. The extent of the direct aerosol forcing effect at a given time and place depends primarily in the aerosol optical depth, {tau}, as well as on other factors including the solar zenith angle, aerosol upscatter fraction, and the single scatter albedo (ratio of light scattering to total extinction). The aerosol optical depth at a given wavelength ({tau}{sub {lambda}}) can be written as the integral with height to the top of the atmosphere (toa) of the aerosol extinction coefficient, b{sub ext,p}. Where b{sub ext,p} is the sum of the aerosol extinction (b{sub ap}) and scattering (b{sub sp}) coefficients. The objectives of this research are to use nephelometer measurements of the scattering coefficient to estimate the aerosol optical depth at a specific wavelength (530 nm), and to compare these results with optical depths measured by a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Cimel Sun Photometer. This comparison will used to determine if all of the key parameters related to aerosol optical depth are being measured at the SGP ARM site.

  2. Retrieval of aerosol optical thickness over snow using AATSR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomina, Larysa; von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang; Rozanov, Vladimir; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Burrows, John P.

    Remote sensing of aerosols experiences lack of products over very bright surfaces, such as deserts and snow, due to difficulties with the subtraction of the surface reflection contribution, when a small error in accounting for surface reflectance can cause a large error in retrieved aerosol optical thickness (AOT). Cloud screening over bright surface is also not easy because of low contrast between clouds and surface in visible range of spectrum, and additional infrared chan-nels are not always available. Luckily, AATSR instrument onboard ENVISAT has necessary features to solve both of these problems. In current work we present an improved version of discussed earlier [1,2] dual-view algorithm to retrieve AOT over snow. The retrieval algorithm still consists of cloud screening, based on spectral shape analysis of AATSR pixel in order to extract clear snow pixels, and of AOT retrieval over snow and water. Current version of AOT retrieval over open ocean now contains improved accounting for ocean reflectance (in previous version the ocean was assumed to be absolutely black). The AOT retrieval over snow has been improved to account more accurately for the bidirectional features of the surface reflection function. For this we now use the approach described in [4] instead of [3], which has been used in the previous version of the retrieval. The accuracy of both approaches [3] and [4] has been evaluated via comparison to forward radiative-transfer model for the case of a very bright surface. The new algorithm has been applied to various scenes in European Arctic and Alaska in different scales, up to global AOT maps. The correspondence of AOT over snow to AOT over water is quite good, which proves the reliability of the retrieval. The algorithm has been validated against AERONET and other Arctic ground based AOT data and shows reasonably good correlation. The presented cloud screening method has been validated via comparison to MODIS cloud mask and Micro Pulse Lidar data. 1. L.G. Istomina, W. Von Hoyningen-Huene, A.A.Kokhanovsky, V.V. Rozanov, M. Schreier, K. Dethloff, M.Stock, R. Treffeisen, A. Herber, J.P.Burrows (2008). Sensitivity study of the dual-view algorithm for aerosol optical thickness retrieval over snow and ice, Proceedings of the 2nd MERIS/(A)ATSR User Workshop, 22-26 September 2008, ESRIN, Frascati, Italy. 2. L.G. Istomina, W. Von Hoyningen-Huene, A.A. Kokhanovsky, J.P. Burrows (2009) Retrieval of aerosol optical thickness in Arctic region using dual-view AATSR observations, Proceedings of ESA Atmospheric Science Conference, 9-11 September 2009, Barcelona, Spain. 3. Y.R. Kaufman, D. Tanre, H.R. Gordon, T. Nakajima, J. Lenoble, R. Frouin, H. Grassl, B.M. Herman, M.D. King, P.M. Teillet (1997) Passive remote sensing of tropospheric aerosol and atmorpheric correction for the aerosol effect. J. Geophys. Res. 102, 16.815-16.830 4. D.Tanre, M. Herman, P.Y.Deschamps, A. De Leffe (1979) Atmosperic modeling for space measurements of ground reflectances, including bidirectional properties. Appl. Optics, 18, 21. 3587-3594

  3. Optical Properties of Smoke Aerosol Over Los Alamos, New Mexico, Derived From AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, G.; Henderson, B.; Dubey, M.; Petr, C.; Porch, W.

    2005-12-01

    Significant amounts of atmospheric aerosols are annually generated from wildfires and biomass burning events. Smoke aerosol, from biomass combustion, is a leading source of natural and anthropogenic pollution affecting Earth's radiation budget. Recent improvements in the detailed knowledge of smoke aerosol optical properties have reduced uncertainties in the role of biomass burning on climate forcing. The increase in smoke aerosol knowledge has been largely advanced with data acquired through the global network of AERONET (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/index.html) sun/sky radiometers. Previous studies using AERONET data have revealed variability in smoke aerosol properties generated from different biomes throughout the world. Here we present AERONET measurements over Los Alamos, New Mexico to assess the influence of smoke aerosol over a region where seasonal variations in biomass burning occur regularly and research on smoke aerosol properties has remained minimal. During June of 2005, a series of wildfires resulted in heavy aerosol loading throughout the Southwestern United States. Significant variations in aerosol optical thickness were observed during this period over the Los Alamos AERONET site (35.87 N, 106.33 W). Computed back trajectories using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model (https://www.arl.noaa.gov/ready/hysplit4.html) revealed advection of smoke aerosol from fire sites in Arizona, Nevada, Utah, and New Mexico. Aerosol optical depth, size distribution, and single scattering albedo measurements from AERONET at Los Alamos were analyzed for this period and compared to periods not dominated by the presence of smoke aerosol. Results indicated that the influence of smoke aerosol increased aerosol optical thickness by a factor of five at 440nm, and resulted in bimodal size distributions dominated by fine mode accumulation particles. Single scattering albedo values were typically .95 on days dominated by smoke aerosol. Relationships among single scattering albedo and size distributions will be further discussed.

  4. Development of an Internet accessible software: optics and spectroscopy of gas-aerosol media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Kashirskii, D. E.; Egorov, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    A description of an Internet accessible software «Optics and spectroscopy of gas-aerosol media» is represented. The new software is focused on research in the field of direct and inverse problems of optics and spectroscopy of gas-aerosol media.

  5. Calibrated sky imager for aerosol optical properties determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, A.; Shields, J. E.; Karr, M. E.; Burden, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2008-11-01

    The calibrated ground-based sky imager developed in the Marine Physical Laboratory, the Whole Sky Imager (WSI), has been tested to determine optical properties of the atmospheric aerosol. Different neural network-based models calculate the aerosol optical depth (AOD) for three wavelengths using the radiance extracted from the principal plane of sky images from the WSI as input parameters. The models use data from a CIMEL CE318 photometer for training and validation and the wavelengths used correspond to the closest wavelengths in both instruments. The spectral dependency of the AOD, characterized by the Ångström exponent α in the interval 440 870, is also derived using the standard AERONET procedure and also with a neural network-based model using the values obtained with a CIMEL CE318. The deviations between the WSI derived AOD and the AOD retrieved by AERONET are within the nominal uncertainty assigned to the AERONET AOD calculation (±0.01), in 80% of the cases. The explanation of data variance by the model is over 92% in all cases. In the case of α, the deviation is within the uncertainty assigned to the AERONET α (±0.1) in 50% for the standard method and 84% for the neural network-based model. The explanation of data variance by the model is 63% for the standard method and 77% for the neural network-based model.

  6. Aerosol optical depth retrievals over the Konza Prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegge, Carol J.; Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Markham, Brian; Spanner, Michael; Wrigley, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The aerosol optical depth over the Konza Prairie, near Manhattan, Kansas, was recorded at various locations by five separate teams. These measurements were made in support of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) and used to correct imagery from a variety of satellite and aircraft sensors for the effects of atmospheric scattering and absorption. The results from one instrument are reported here for 26 days in 1987 and for 7 in 1989. Daily averages span a range of 0.05 to 0.28 in the midvisible wavelengths. In addition, diurnal variations are noted in which the afternoon optical depths are greater than those of the morning by as much as 0.07. A comparison between instruments and processing techniques used to determine these aerosol optical depths is provided. The first comparisons are made using summer 1987 data. Differences of as much as 0.05 (midvisible) are observed. Although these data allow reasonable surface reflectance retrievals, they do not agree to within the performance limits typically associated with these types of instruments. With an accuracy goal of 0.02 a preseason calibration/comparison experiment was conducted at a mountain site prior to the final field campaign in 1989. Good calibration data were obtained, and good agreement (0.01, midvisible) was observed in the retrieved optical depth acquired over the Konza. By comparing data from the surface instruments at different locations, spatial inhomogeneities are determined. Then, data from the airborne tracking sunphotometer allow one to determine variations as a function of altitude. Finally, a technique is proposed for using the in situ data to establish an instrument calibration.

  7. Aerosol Effects on Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Optical Properties in the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmot, K. E.; Bennartz, R.; Rausch, J.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius are shown to be underestimated in the South Atlantic Ocean, where biomass-burning aerosols typically reside above low-level, liquid water stratocumulus clouds. A radiative transfer model is used to calculate top of the atmosphere (TOA) reflectances for a case where an aerosol layer is elevated above a liquid cloud in the South Atlantic Ocean. Both absorbing and scattering aerosols are modeled at varying aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 0.86 μm and 2.10 μm. Optimal estimation methods are used to convert reflectance pairs into a retrieved cloud optical depth and effective radius, similar to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, aboard Aqua satellite) algorithm. Absorbing aerosols lead to an underestimation of the retrieved cloud optical depth by up to 60 - 80%, while scattering aerosols can lead to an over- or underestimate of the optical depth by up to 10%, depending on the cloud thickness. Effective radius retrievals can be over- and underestimated if absorbing aerosols are present, depending on the AOD. Scattering aerosols result in an overestimation of effective radius by up to 0 - 10%. A-Train satellite observations from August 2006 - December 2010 in the South Atlantic Ocean also show that the MODIS biases in cloud optical depth and effective radius are likely affecting retrieved properties and hence retrieved cloud droplet number concentrations when the aerosol layer is vertically separated from the cloud.

  8. AERONET-based microphysical and optical properties of smoke-dominated aerosol near source regions and transported over oceans, and implications for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-09-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad ''families'' of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA ∼0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA ∼0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savannah at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA ∼0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysical/optical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  9. Influence of Observed Diurnal Cycles of Aerosol Optical Depth on Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Eck, T. F.; Huttunen, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Lindfors, A. V.; Myhre, G.; Smirinov, A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Yu, H.

    2013-01-01

    The diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be significant, depending on location and dominant aerosol type. However, these diurnal cycles have rarely been taken into account in measurement-based estimates of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) or aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE). The objective of our study was to estimate the influence of diurnal aerosol variability at the top of the atmosphere ADRE estimates. By including all the possible AERONET sites, we wanted to assess the influence on global ADRE estimates. While focusing also in more detail on some selected sites of strongest impact, our goal was to also see the possible impact regionally.We calculated ADRE with different assumptions about the daily AOD variability: taking the observed daily AOD cycle into account and assuming diurnally constant AOD. Moreover, we estimated the corresponding differences in ADREs, if the single AOD value for the daily mean was taken from the the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra or Aqua overpass times, instead of accounting for the true observed daily variability. The mean impact of diurnal AOD variability on 24 h ADRE estimates, averaged over all AERONET sites, was rather small and it was relatively small even for the cases when AOD was chosen to correspond to the Terra or Aqua overpass time. This was true on average over all AERONET sites, while clearly there can be much stronger impact in individual sites. Examples of some selected sites demonstrated that the strongest observed AOD variability (the strongest morning afternoon contrast) does not typically result in a significant impact on 24 h ADRE. In those cases, the morning and afternoon AOD patterns are opposite and thus the impact on 24 h ADRE, when integrated over all solar zenith angles, is reduced. The most significant effect on daily ADRE was induced by AOD cycles with either maximum or minimum AOD close to local noon. In these cases, the impact on 24 h ADRE was typically around 0.1-0.2W/sq m (both positive and negative) in absolute values, 5-10% in relative ones.

  10. Validation of MODIS aerosol optical depth over the Mediterranean Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daz-Martnez, J. Vicente; Segura, Sara; Estells, Vctor; Utrillas, M. Pilar; Martnez-Lozano, J. Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, due to their high spatial and temporal variability, are considered one of the largest sources of uncertainty in different processes affecting visibility, air quality, human health, and climate. Among their effects on climate, they play an important role in the energy balance of the Earth. On one hand they have a direct effect by scattering and absorbing solar radiation; on the other, they also have an impact in precipitation, modifying clouds, or affecting air quality. The application of remote sensing techniques to investigate aerosol effects on climate has advanced significatively over last years. In this work, the products employed have been obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). MODIS is a sensor located onboard both Earth Observing Systems (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites, which provide almost complete global coverage every day. These satellites have been acquiring data since early 2000 (Terra) and mid 2002 (Aqua) and offer different products for land, ocean and atmosphere. Atmospheric aerosol products are presented as level 2 products with a pixel size of 10 x 10 km2 in nadir. MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) is retrieved by different algorithms depending on the pixel surface, distinguishing between land and ocean. For its validation, ground based sunphotometer data from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) has been employed. AERONET is an international operative network of Cimel CE318 sky-sunphotometers that provides the most extensive aerosol data base globally available of ground-based measurements. The ground sunphotometric technique is considered the most accurate for the retrieval of radiative properties of aerosols in the atmospheric column. In this study we present a validation of MODIS C051 AOD employing AERONET measurements over different Mediterranean coastal sites centered over an area of 50 x 50 km2, which includes both pixels over land and ocean. The validation is done comparing spatial statistics from MODIS with corresponding temporal statistics from AERONET, as proposed by Ichoku et al. (2002). Eight Mediterranean coastal sites (in Spain, France, Italy, Crete, Turkey and Israel) with available AERONET and MODIS data have been used. These stations have been selected following QA criteria (minimum 1000 days of level 2.0 data) and a maximum distance of 8 km from the coast line. Results of the validation over each site show analogous behaviour, giving similar results regarding to the accuracy of the algorithms. Greatest differences are found for the AOD obtained over land, especially for drier regions, where the surface tends to be brighter. In general, the MODIS AOD has better a agreement with AERONET retrievals for the ocean algorithm than the land algorithm when validated over coastal sites, and the agreement is within the expected uncertainty estimated for MODIS data. References: - C. Ichoku et al., "A spatio-temporal approach for global validation and analysis of MODIS aerosol products", Geophysical Research Letters, 219, 12, 10.1029/2001GL013206, 2002.

  11. Evaluation of sulfate aerosol optical depths over the North Atlantic and comparison with satellite observations

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, C.M.; Ghan, S.J.; Benkovitz, C.M.; Wagener, R.; Nemesure, S.; Schwartz, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    It has been postulated that scattering of sunlight by aerosols can significantly reduce the amount of solar energy absorbed by the climate system. Aerosol measurement programs alone cannot provide all the information needed to evaluate the radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosols. Thus, comprehensive global-scale aerosol models, properly validated against surface-based and satellite measurements, are a fundamental tool for evaluating the impacts of aerosols on the planetary radiation balance. Analyzed meteorological fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts are used to drive a modified version of the PNL Global Chemistry Model, applied to the atmospheric sulfur cycle. The resulting sulfate fields are used to calculate aerosol optical depths, which in turn are compared to estimates of aerosol optical depth based on satellite observations.

  12. Preliminary results of the aerosol optical depth retrieval in Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. Q.; Kanniah, K. D.; Lau, A. M. S.

    2014-02-01

    Monitoring of atmospheric aerosols over the urban area is important as tremendous amounts of pollutants are released by industrial activities and heavy traffic flow. Air quality monitoring by satellite observation provides better spatial coverage, however, detailed aerosol properties retrieval remains a challenge. This is due to the limitation of aerosol retrieval algorithm on high reflectance (bright surface) areas. The aim of this study is to retrieve aerosol optical depth over urban areas of Iskandar Malaysia; the main southern development zone in Johor state, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 500 m resolution data. One of the important steps is the aerosol optical depth retrieval is to characterise different types of aerosols in the study area. This information will be used to construct a Look Up Table containing the simulated aerosol reflectance and corresponding aerosol optical depth. Thus, in this study we have characterised different aerosol types in the study area using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data. These data were processed using cluster analysis and the preliminary results show that the area is consisting of coastal urban (65%), polluted urban (27.5%), dust particles (6%) and heavy pollution (1.5%) aerosols.

  13. Field Studies of Broadband Aerosol Optical Extinction in the Ultraviolet Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross sections and complex refractive indices. In the case of brown carbon, its wavelength-dependent absorption in the ultraviolet spectral region has been suggested as an important component of aerosol radiative forcing. We describe a new field instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360-390 and 385-420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED) and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. We deployed this instrument during the Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment during Fall 2012 to measure biomass burning aerosol, and again during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study in summer 2013 to measure organic aerosol in the Southeastern U.S. In both field experiments, we determined aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength and can interpret this together with size distribution and composition measurements to characterize the aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing.

  14. Optical modeling of aerosol extinction for remote sensing in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloshin, G. A.

    2013-05-01

    A microphysical model is presented for the surface layer marine and coastal atmospheric aerosols that is based on long-term observations of size distributions for 0.01-100 μm particles in different geographic sites. The fundamental feature of the model is a parameterization of amplitudes and widths for aerosol modes of the aerosol size distribution function (ASDF) as functions of fetch and wind speed. The shape of the ASDF and its dependence on meteorological parameters, altitudes above sea level (H), fetch (X), wind speed (U) and relative humidity (RH) are investigated. The spectral profiles of the aerosol extinction coefficients calculated by MaexPro (Marine Aerosol Extinction Profiles) are in good agreement with observational data and the numerical results obtained from the Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) and the Advanced Navy Aerosol Model (ANAM). Moreover, MaexPro was found to be an accurate and reliable tool for investigation of the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  15. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth Above Clouds from OMI Observations: Sensitivity Analysis, Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol load reaching the free troposphere is frequently located above low clouds. Most commonly observed aerosols above clouds are carbonaceous particles generally associated with biomass burning and boreal forest fires, and mineral aerosols originated in arid and semi-arid regions and transported across large distances, often above clouds. Because these aerosols absorb solar radiation, their role in the radiative transfer balance of the earth atmosphere system is especially important. The generally negative (cooling) top of the atmosphere direct effect of absorbing aerosols, may turn into warming when the light-absorbing particles are located above clouds. The actual effect depends on the aerosol load and the single scattering albedo, and on the geometric cloud fraction. In spite of its potential significance, the role of aerosols above clouds is not adequately accounted for in the assessment of aerosol radiative forcing effects due to the lack of measurements. In this paper we discuss the basis of a simple technique that uses near-UV observations to simultaneously derive the optical depth of both the aerosol layer and the underlying cloud for overcast conditions. The two-parameter retrieval method described here makes use of the UV aerosol index and reflectance measurements at 388 nm. A detailed sensitivity analysis indicates that the measured radiances depend mainly on the aerosol absorption exponent and aerosol-cloud separation. The technique was applied to above-cloud aerosol events over the Southern Atlantic Ocean yielding realistic results as indicated by indirect evaluation methods. An error analysis indicates that for typical overcast cloudy conditions and aerosol loads, the aerosol optical depth can be retrieved with an accuracy of approximately 54% whereas the cloud optical depth can be derived within 17% of the true value.

  16. ModelE2-TOMAS development and evaluation using aerosol optical depths, mass and number concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Shindell, D. T.

    2014-09-01

    The TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional microphysics model (TOMAS) has been integrated into the state-of-the-art general circulation model, GISS ModelE2. TOMAS has the flexibility to select a size resolution as well as the lower size cutoff. A computationally efficient version of TOMAS is used here, which has 15 size bins covering 3 nm to 10 μm aerosol dry diameter. For each bin, it simulates the total aerosol number concentration and mass concentrations of sulphate, pure elementary carbon (hydrophobic), mixed elemental carbon (hydrophilic), hydrophobic organic matter, hydrophilic organic matter, sea salt, mineral dust, ammonium, and aerosol-associated water. This paper provides a detailed description of the ModelE2-TOMAS model and evaluates the model against various observations including aerosol precursor gas concentrations, aerosol mass and number concentrations, and aerosol optical depths. Additionally, global budgets in ModelE2-TOMAS are compared with those of other global aerosol models, and the TOMAS model is compared to the default aerosol model in ModelE2, which is a bulk aerosol model. Overall, the ModelE2-TOMAS predictions are within the range of other global aerosol model predictions, and the model has a reasonable agreement with observations of sulphur species and other aerosol components as well as aerosol optical depth. However, ModelE2-TOMAS (as well as the bulk aerosol model) cannot capture the observed vertical distribution of sulphur dioxide over the Pacific Ocean possibly due to overly strong convective transport. The TOMAS model successfully captures observed aerosol number concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Anthropogenic aerosol burdens in the bulk aerosol model running in the same host model as TOMAS (ModelE2) differ by a few percent to a factor of 2 regionally, mainly due to differences in aerosol processes including deposition, cloud processing, and emission parameterizations. Larger differences are found for naturally emitted aerosols such as sea salt and mineral dust. With TOMAS, ModelE2 has three different aerosol models (the bulk aerosol model and modal-based aerosol microphysics model, MATRIX) and allows exploration of the uncertainties associated with aerosol modelling within the same host model, NASA GISS ModelE2.

  17. DNA zipper-based tweezers.

    PubMed

    Landon, Preston B; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Gillman, Alan; Gidron, Timothy; Yoon, Dosuk; Lal, Ratnesh

    2012-01-10

    Here we report the design and development of DNA zippers and tweezers. Essentially a zipper system consists of a normal strand (N), a weak strand (W), and an opening strand (O). N strand is made up of normal DNA bases, while W is engineered to have inosine substituting for guanine. By altering the number and order of inosine, W is engineered to provide less than natural bonding affinities to N in forming the [N:W] helix. When O is introduced (a natural complement of N), it competitively displaces W from [N:W] and forms [N:O]. This principle is incorporated in the development of a molecular device that can perform the functions of tweezers (sense, hold, and release). Tweezers were constructed by holding N and W together using a hinge at one end. Thus, when the tweezers open, N and W remain in the same vicinity. This allows the tweezers to cycle among open and close positions by their opening and closing strands. Control over their opening and closing kinetics is demonstrated. In contrast to the previously reported DNA tweezers, the zipper mechanism makes it possible to operate them with opening strands that do not contain single-stranded DNA overhangs. Our approach yields a robust, compact, and regenerative tweezer system that could potentially be integrated into complex nanomachines. PMID:21875130

  18. Aerosol optical depth trend over the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingmüller, Klaus; Pozzer, Andrea; Metzger, Swen; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-04-01

    We use the combined Dark Target/Deep Blue aerosol optical depth (AOD) satellite product of the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 6 to study trends over the Middle East between 2000 and 2015. Our analysis corroborates a previously identified positive AOD trend over large parts of the Middle East during the period 2001 to 2012. We relate the annual AOD to precipitation, soil moisture and surface winds to identify regions where these attributes are directly related to the AOD over Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran. Regarding precipitation and soil moisture, a relatively small area in and surrounding Iraq turns out to be of prime importance for the AOD over these countries. Regarding surface wind speed, the African Red Sea coastal area is relevant for the Saudi Arabian AOD. Using multiple linear regression we show that AOD trends and interannual variability can be attributed to soil moisture, precipitation and surface winds, being the main factors controlling the dust cycle. Our results confirm the dust driven AOD trends and variability, supported by a decreasing MODIS-derived Ångström exponent and a decreasing AERONET-derived fine mode fraction that accompany the AOD increase over Saudi Arabia. The positive AOD trend relates to a negative soil moisture trend. As a lower soil moisture translates into enhanced dust emissions, it is not needed to assume growing anthropogenic aerosol and aerosol precursor emissions to explain the observations. Instead, our results suggest that increasing temperature and decreasing relative humidity in the last decade have promoted soil drying, leading to increased dust emissions and AOD; consequently an AOD increase is expected due to climate change.

  19. Deriving atmospheric visibility from satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffler, M.; Schneider, Ch.; Popp, Ch.; Wunderle, S.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric visibility is a measure that reflects different physical and chemical properties of the atmosphere. In general, poor visibility conditions come along with risks for transportation (e.g. road traffic, aviation) and can negatively impact human health since visibility impairment often implies the presence of atmospheric pollution. Ambient pollutants, particulate matter, and few gaseous species decrease the perceptibility of distant objects. Common estimations of this parameter are usually based on human observations or devices that measure the transmittance of light from an artificial light source over a short distance. Such measurements are mainly performed at airports and some meteorological stations. A major disadvantage of these observations is the gap between the measurements, leaving large areas without any information. As aerosols are one of the most important factors influencing atmospheric visibility in the visible range, the knowledge of their spatial distribution can be used to infer visibility with the so called Koschmieder equation, which relates visibility and atmospheric extinction. In this study, we evaluate the applicability of satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to infer atmospheric visibility on large spatial scale. First results applying AOD values scaled with the planetary boundary layer height are promising. For the comparison we use a full automated and objective procedure for the estimation of atmospheric visibility with the help of a digital panorama camera serving as ground truth. To further investigate the relation between the vertical measure of AOD and the horizontal visibility data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site Laegeren (Switzerland), where the digital camera is mounted, are included as well. Finally, the derived visibility maps are compared with synoptical observations in central Europe.

  20. Aerosol optical hygroscopicity measurements during the 2010 CARES campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. B.; Radney, J. G.; Lum, J.; Kolesar, K. R.; Cziczo, D. J.; Pekour, M. S.; Zhang, Q.; Setyan, A.; Zelenyuk, A.; Cappa, C. D.

    2015-04-01

    Measurements of the effect of water uptake on particulate light extinction or scattering made at two locations during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) study around Sacramento, CA are reported. The observed influence of water uptake, characterized through the dimensionless optical hygroscopicity parameter γ, is compared with calculations constrained by observed particle size distributions and size-dependent particle composition. A closure assessment has been carried out that allowed for determination of the average hygroscopic growth factors (GFs) at 85% relative humidity and the dimensionless hygroscopicity parameter κ for oxygenated organic aerosol (OA) and for supermicron particles (defined here as particles with aerodynamic diameters between 1 and 2.5 microns), yielding κ = 0.1-0.15 and 0.9-1.0, respectively. The derived range of oxygenated OA κ values are in line with previous observations. The relatively large values for supermicron particles is consistent with substantial contributions of sea-salt-containing particles in this size range. Analysis of time-dependent variations in the supermicron particle hygroscopicity suggest that atmospheric processing, specifically chloride displacement by nitrate and the accumulation of secondary organics on supermicron particles, can lead to substantial depression of the observed GF.

  1. Aerosol optical hygroscopicity measurements during the 2010 CARES campaign

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Atkinson, D. B.; Radney, J. G.; Lum, J.; Kolesar, K. R.; Cziczo, D. J.; Pekour, M. S.; Zhang, Q.; Setyan, A.; Zelenyuk, A.; Cappa, C. D.

    2015-04-17

    Measurements of the effect of water uptake on particulate light extinction or scattering made at two locations during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) study around Sacramento, CA are reported. The observed influence of water uptake, characterized through the dimensionless optical hygroscopicity parameter γ, is compared with calculations constrained by observed particle size distributions and size-dependent particle composition. A closure assessment has been carried out that allowed for determination of the average hygroscopic growth factors (GFs) at 85% relative humidity and the dimensionless hygroscopicity parameter κ for oxygenated organic aerosol (OA) and for supermicron particles (defined heremore » as particles with aerodynamic diameters between 1 and 2.5 microns), yielding κ = 0.1–0.15 and 0.9–1.0, respectively. The derived range of oxygenated OA κ values are in line with previous observations. The relatively large values for supermicron particles is consistent with substantial contributions of sea-salt-containing particles in this size range. Analysis of time-dependent variations in the supermicron particle hygroscopicity suggest that atmospheric processing, specifically chloride displacement by nitrate and the accumulation of secondary organics on supermicron particles, can lead to substantial depression of the observed GF.« less

  2. Climatology of aerosol optical properties at ACRF sites in the tropical warm pool region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bangsheng; Min, Qilong

    2013-03-01

    long-term multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer measurements at three Atmospheric Radiation Measurements Climate Research Facility sites of Darwin, Nauru, and Manus have been processed to develop the climatology of aerosols in the tropical warm pool region at the interannual, seasonal, and diurnal temporal scales. Due to their unique geolocations and associated large-scale circulation patterns, aerosols at the Nauru site exhibit background oceanic characteristics (strongly correlated with the sea surface wind), aerosols at the Darwin site show strong influences by biomass-burning aerosols, particularly in the dry season, and aerosols at the Manus site have climatologic characteristics in between the Darwin and Nauru sites. There are no obvious trends of aerosol loading for past decades at all three sites. El Nio/Southern Oscillation has its impacts on aerosol optical depth, as well as particle size and composition, at all three sites. Madden-Julian Oscillation modulates aerosol optical depth at the Manus and Nauru sites along the equator but has no apparent impact at the Darwin site. The annual or seasonal variation of aerosols is closely linked with Indo-Australian monsoons, exhibiting wet and dry season differences. The aerosol loading is significant lower with relatively larger particles in the wet season than in the dry season. There are significant diurnal cycles in both aerosol optical depth and Angstrom exponent at the Darwin site: low values of aerosol optical depth and Angstrom exponent in the midday and the two peaks in the early morning and late afternoon. There are noticeable changes between the dry and wet seasons. The amplitude of diurnal variation during La Nia periods is greater than that during El Nio periods. However, there are no significant diurnal variations of aerosol loading at the Manus and Nauru sites.

  3. Aeronet-based Microphysical and Optical Properties of Smoke-dominated Aerosol near Source Regions and Transported over Oceans, and Implications for Satellite Retrievals of Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad families of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA 0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA 0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savanna at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA 0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysicaloptical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  4. Aerosol Optical Depth: A study using Thailand based Brewer Spectrophotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumharn, Wilawan; Sudhibrabha, Sumridh; Hanprasert, Kesrin

    2015-12-01

    The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) was retrieved from the direct-sun Brewer observation by the application of the Beer's law for the years 1997-2011 at two monitoring sites in Thailand (Bangkok and Songkhla). AOD values measured in Bangkok exhibited higher values than Songkhla. In addition, AOD values were higher in the morning and evening in Bangkok. In contrast, the AOD values in Songkhla were slightly lower during the mornings and late afternoons. The variation of AOD was seasonal in Bangkok, with the higher values found in summer (from Mid-February to Mid-May) compared with rainy season (Mid-May to Mid-October), whilst there was no clear seasonal pattern of AOD in Songkhla.

  5. A 10-year global gridded Aerosol Optical Thickness Reanalysis for climate and applied applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, P.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Westphal, D. L.; Campbell, J. R.; Curtis, C. A.; Hegg, D.; Hyer, E. J.; Sessions, W.; Shi, Y.; Turk, J.

    2013-12-01

    While standalone satellite and model aerosol products see wide utilization, there is a significant need of a best-available fused product on a regular grid for numerous climate and applied applications. Remote sensing and modeling technologies have now advanced to a point where aerosol data assimilation is an operational reality at numerous centers. It is inevitable that, like meteorological reanalyses, aerosol reanalyses will see heavy use in the near future. A first long term, 2003-2012 global 1x1 degree and 6-hourly aerosol optical thickness (AOT) reanalysis product has been generated. The goal of this effort is not only for climate applications, but to generate a dataset that can be used by the US Navy to understand operationally hindering aerosol events, aerosol impacts on numerical weather prediction, and application of electro-optical technologies. The reanalysis utilizes Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) at its core and assimilates quality controlled collection 5 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD with minor corrections from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRaditometer (MISR). A subset of this product includes Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) lidar assimilation since its launch in mid-2006. Surface aerosol sources, including dust and smoke, in the aerosol model have been regionally tuned so that fine and coarse mode AOTs best match those resolve by ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The AOT difference between the model and satellite AOT is then used to adjust other aerosol processes, eg., sources, dry deposition, etc. Aerosol wet deposition is constrained with satellite-retrieved precipitation. The final AOT reanalysis is shown to exhibit good agreement with AERONET. Here we review the development of the reanalysis and consider issues particular to aerosol reanalyses that make them distinct from standard meteorological reanalyses. Considerations are also made for extending such work outside of the NASA A-Train. Examples of how the aerosol reanalysis can be applied or fused with other model or remote sensing products are given.

  6. Aerosol optical depth during episodes of Asian dust storms and biomass burning at Kwangju, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunjobi, K. O.; He, Z.; Kim, K. W.; Kim, Y. J.

    Spectral daily aerosol optical depths (τ a λ) estimated from a multi-filter radiometer over Kwangju were analyzed from January 1999 to August 2001 (total of 277 days). Optical depths obtained showed a pronounced temporal trend, with maximum dust loading observed during spring time and biomass burning aerosol in early summer and autumn of each year. Result indicates that τ a501 nm increased from spring average of 0.45±0.02 to values >0.7 on 7 April 2000, and 13 April 2001. Daily mean spectral variations in the Ångström exponents α were also computed for various episode periods under consideration. A dramatic change in α value is noted especially at high aerosol optical depth when coarse mode aerosol dominates over the influence of accumulation-mode aerosol. High values of τ a λ associated with high values of α in early June and October are characteristics of smoke aerosol predominantly from biomass burning aerosol. Also, volume size distribution is investigated for different pollution episodes with result indicating that the peak in the distribution of the coarse mode volume radius and fine mode particles of dust and biomass-burning aerosol respectively increases as aerosol optical depth increases at Kwangju. Air-mass trajectory were developed on 7-8 April and 19-20 October, 2000 to explain the transport of Asian dust particle and biomass burning to Kwangju.

  7. Aerosol optical properties over the midcontinental United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Markham, Brian L.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Aro, Theo. O.

    1992-01-01

    Solar and sky radiation measurements were analyzed to obtain aerosol properties such as the optical thickness and the size distribution. The measurements were conducted as part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment during the second intensive field campaign (IFC) from June 25 to July 14, 1987, and the fifth IFC from July 25 to August 12, 1989, on the Konza Prairie near Manhattan, Kansas. Correlations with climatological and meteorological parameters show that during the period of observations in 1987, two types of air masses dominated the area: an air mass with low optical thickness and low temperature air associated with a northerly breeze, commonly referred to as the continental air, and an air mass with a higher optical thickness and higher temperature air associated with a southerly wind which we call 'Gulf air'. The size distributions show a predominance of the larger size particles in 'Gulf air'. Because of the presence of two contrasting air masses, correlations with parameters such as relative humidity, specific humidity, pressure, temperature, and North Star sky radiance reveal some interesting aspects. In 1989, clear distinctions between continental and Gulf air cannot be made; the reason for this will be discussed.

  8. Are Satellite-Retrieved Correlations Between Cloud-Top-Height and Aerosol Optical Depth Evidence of Aerosol Invigoration of Convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, P.; Gryspeerdt, E.; Grandey, B. S.; Wagner, T. M.; Kipling, Z.

    2013-12-01

    A robust negative correlation between cloud top pressure (CTP) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been documented in a number of studies and triggered hypotheses on aerosol invigoration of convective clouds. However, correlation based analysis is limited in its explanatory power as it does not directly establish physical causality between the correlated properties which may be cross-correlated with other meteorological factors. In this study we combine the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAM with mechanistic coupling of the aerosol microphysics (HAM) to the two-moment cloud microphysics in the Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) and satellite data from SEVIRI, MODIS, ISCCP, CALIOP and CloudSat. CCFM explicitly simulates a spectrum of convective cloud top heights within each grid box, providing enhanced realism over traditional mass flux schemes. Consistency is established through sampling of the models at satellite overpass times and the use of ISCCP and COSP satellite simulators in the model. We employ this setup to investigate the contributions of aerosol-cloud interactions and meteorological cross-correlations to AOD--CTP correlations. Our analysis shows that a significant fraction of the observed AOD-CTP relationship is driven by the meteorological link between CTP and cloud fraction (CF), which itself is strongly linked to AOD via the humidification of aerosol in humid (hence preferentially cloudy) environments. Our results shed light on this controversial issue with potentially significant climate implications and emphasise the difficulty to constrain for meteorological variability in observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions.

  9. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects (supplement)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A digest of technical papers is presented. Topics include aerosol size distribution from spectral attenuation with scattering measurements; comparison of extinction and backscattering coefficients for measured and analytic stratospheric aerosol size distributions; using hybrid methods to solve problems in radiative transfer and in multiple scattering; blue moon phenomena; absorption refractive index of aerosols in the Denver pollution cloud; a two dimensional stratospheric model of the dispersion of aerosols from the Fuego volcanic eruption; the variation of the aerosol volume to light scattering coefficient; spectrophone in situ measurements of the absorption of visible light by aerosols; a reassessment of the Krakatoa volcanic turbidity, and multiple scattering in the sky radiance.

  10. Measurement of urban aerosol optical properties by ground counter-look elastic lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Changbo; Boselli, Antonella; He, Yuntao; Sannino, Alessia; Spinelli, Nicola; Wang, Xuan

    2015-04-01

    Many lidar systems have been developed and implemented for measurements of aerosol optical properties and for air pollution studies in urban areas. However, most of these lidar systems are elastic lidar. In order to retrieve aerosol optical properties from elastic backscatter lidar returns, it is necessary to assume some hypotheses that directly regard the nature of the particles, such as lidar ratio. In this paper, a new elastic lidar, named counter-look elastic lidar, will be presented. This counter-look elastic lidar utilizes two identical elastic lidars to measure aerosol optical properties without any hypotheses. The two elastic lidars are located at different places and face to each other. Each lidar receives the return signal scattered by the same aerosol and molecules in laser irradiation path between two places. Then a simple retrieval method can be used to calculate the aerosol optical properties between the two places. Compared to Elastic-Raman lidar and High Spectral Resolution Lidar, the proposed counter-look elastic lidar can use low power eye-safe laser and all available wavelengths. The counter-look elastic lidar is low cost and can be used in both day time and night time. With this lidar, urban aerosol optical properties and their spatial distribution can be directly measured, including backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient and lidar ratio. To demonstrate the proposed measurement, a couple of counter-look elastic lidars have been developed and tested by using 532nm wavelength laser and elastic receiving channels. In this experiment, two elastic lidars were put in two different places to across an urban area. Lidar return signal has been acquired in both day and night time and urban aerosol optical properties have been calculated directly basing on those signals. According to aerosol optical properties, the characterization of aerosols was obtained and the aerosol of anthropic and natural origin can be distinguished.

  11. Diurnal variation of aerosol optical depth and angstrom exponent from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) Yonsei AErosol Retrieval (YAER) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myungje; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Jaehwa

    2015-04-01

    Over the East Asia, aerosol optical properties (AOPs) can be changed very quickly and diversely during a day because mineral dust or heavy anthropogenic aerosol events occur sporadically and frequently. When severe aerosol event occurs from source region, long-range transported can be appeared over East Asia within one day so that multi-temporal satellite observation during a day is essential to detect aerosol diurnal variation in East Asia. Although it has been possible from previous meteorological sensors in geostationary earth orbit, only aerosol optical depth (AOD) at one channel can be retrieved and accuracy of retrieved AOD is worse than those of multi-channel sensors such as MODIS, SeaWiFS, or VIIRS because appropriate aerosol model selection is difficult using single channel information. The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) is one of sensor onboard COMS geostationary satellite. It has 8 channels in visible, which are similar with SeaWiFS and MODIS ocean color channels. It observes East Asia, including East China, Korean Peninsula, and Japan, hourly during the daytime (8 times observation in daytime). Because of geostationary and multi-channel characteristics, accurate AOPs such as AOD and Angstrom exponent (AE) can be retrieved from GOCI Yonsei Aerosol retrieval (YAER) algorithm as high spatial (6 km x 6 km) and temporal (1 hour) resolution. In this study, GOCI YAER AOD and AE are compared with those from AERONET (ground-based observation) and MODIS Collection 6 Dark Target and Deep Blue algorithm (satellite-based observation) as high frequency time series during a day and few days over AERONET sites. This can show the accuracy of GOCI YAER algorithm in compare with AERONET. In specific transport cases such as dust or haze, instantaneous increase of AOD and change of aerosol size from AE can be also detect from GOCI. These GOCI YEAR products can be used effectively as input observation data of air-quality monitoring and forecasting.

  12. How safe is gamete micromanipulation by laser tweezers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Tadir, Yona; Berns, Michael W.

    1998-04-01

    Laser tweezers, used as novel sterile micromanipulation tools of living cells, are employed in laser-assisted in vitro fertilization (IVF). For example, controlled spermatozoa transport with 1064 nm tweezers to human egg cells has been performed in European clinics in cases of male infertility. The interaction of approximately 100 mW near infrared (NIR) trapping beams at MW/cm2 intensity with human gametes results in low mean less than 2 K temperature increases and less than 100 pN trapping forces. Therefore, photothermal or photomechanical induced destructive effects appear unlikely. However, the high photon flux densities may induce simultaneous absorption of two NIR photons resulting in nonlinear interactions. These nonlinear interactions imply non-resonant two-photon excitation of endogenous cellular chromophores. In the case of less than 800 nm tweezers, UV- like damage effects may occur. The destructive effect is amplified when multimode cw lasers are used as tweezer sources due to longitudinal mode-beating effects and partial mode- locking. Spermatozoa damage within seconds using 760 nm traps due to formation of unstable ps pulses in a cw Ti:Sa ring laser is demonstrated. We recommend the use of greater than or equal to 800 nm traps for optical gamete micromanipulation. To our opinion, further basic studies on the influence of nonlinear effects of laser tweezers on human gamete are necessary.

  13. Parallel trapping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with optoelectronic tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Jamshidi, Arash; Valley, Justin K.; Satcher, Joe H.; Wu, Ming C.

    2009-01-01

    Here we report the use of optoelectronic tweezers and dynamic virtual electrodes to address multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with trap stiffness values of approximately 50 fN∕μm. Both high-speed translation (>200 μm∕s) of individual-MWCNTs and two-dimensional trapping of MWCNT ensembles are achieved using 100,000 times less optical power density than single beam laser tweezers. Modulating the virtual electrode’s intensity enables tuning of the MWCNT ensemble’s number density by an order of magnitude on the time scale of seconds promising a broad range of applications in MWCNT science and technology. PMID:19884988

  14. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, G.; Flores, J. M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2010-10-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Hi-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While extensive BB is not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m=1.53(±0.03)+0.07i(±0.03), during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m=1.54(±0.01)+0.04i(±0.01) compared to m=1.49(±0.01)+0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  15. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, G.; Flores, J. M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-02-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While these types of extensive BB events are not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m = 1.53(±0.03) + 0.07i(±0.03), during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m = 1.54(±0.01) + 0.04i(±0.01) compared to m = 1.49(±0.01) + 0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  16. Fast hologram computation and aberration control for holographic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reicherter, M.; Haist, T.; Zwick, S.; Burla, A.; Seifert, L.; Osten, W.

    2005-08-01

    Holographic tweezers offer a very versatile tool in many trapping applications. Compared to tweezers working with acousto optical modulators or using the generalized phase contrast, holographic tweezers so far were relatively slow. The computation time for a hologram was much longer than the modulation frequency of the modulator. To overcome this drawback we present a method using modified algorithms which run on state of the art graphics boards and not on the CPU. This gives the potential for a fast manipulation of many traps, for cell sorting for example, as well as for a real-time aberration control. The control of aberrations which can vary spatially or temporally is relevant to many real world applications. This can be accomplished by applying an iterative approach based on image processing.

  17. A case study of modeled aerosol optical properties during the SAFARI 2000 campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmanoski, Maja; Box, M. A.; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Redemann, Jens

    2007-08-01

    We present modeled aerosol optical properties (single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter and lidar ratio) in two layers with different aerosol loadings and particle sizes, observed during the SAFARI 2000 campaign. The optical properties were calculated from aerosol size distributions retrieved from aerosol layer optical thickness spectra, measured using the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel Sunphotometer (AATS-14), and the refractive index based on the available information on aerosol chemical composition. The study focuses on differences between the results of two models for the mixture of absorbing and non-absorbing aerosol components: a layered sphere with absorbing core and non-absorbing shell, and an effective medium model. In addition, comparisons of modeled optical properties with the measurements are discussed. Because of the large difference between the single scattering albedo values (~ 0.1 at mid-visible wavelengths) obtained from different measurement methods for the case with high amount of biomass burning particles, radiative transfer calculations were carried out to estimate the radiative effect of the implied difference in aerosol absorption. For that purpose, the volume fraction of black carbon was varied to obtain a range of single scattering albedo values (0.81 – 0.91 at λ = 0.50 μm). The difference in absorption resulted in a significant difference in the instantaneous radiative forcing at the surface and the top of the atmosphere (TOA), and can result in a change of the sign of the aerosol forcing at TOA from negative to positive.

  18. Aerosol Optical Depth Trends in Switzerland from 1995 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyeki, S.; Halios, C.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Wehrli, C.; Groebner, J.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate and long-term measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) serve as an important contribution to studies assessing the effect of aerosols on climate change. In this study re-calibrated and updated AOD climatologies are reported for two sites in Switzerland for 1995 - 2010, (Davos, 1580 m and Jungfraujoch, 3580 m), as well as a new data-set for an urban site Bern (560 m asl). At Davos and Jungfraujoch AOD observations were conducted using an SPM2000 sun-photometer system until 2003 and with precision filter radiometers (PFR) from 1999 onwards, while continuous AOD measurements were conducted at Bern over the 1998 - 2006 period with SPM2000. In order to homogenize these diverse data-sets, procedures and algorithms of the GAW-PFR (Global Atmosphere Watch - Precision Filter Radiometer, WMO) program to derive AOD are used here. GAW-PFR procedures and algorithms use: 1) in-situ air pressure data, ii) in-situ or satellite ozone data, 3) commonly-used algorithms for cloud-screening, airmass calculation etc. The AOD average for the available 1-month data-set was 0.026 (± 0.013; ± 1 stdev) at Jungfraujoch, 0.069 (± 0.037) at Davos and 0.174 (± 0.054) at Bern illustrating the typical increase in average AOD with decreasing altitude due to surface aerosol sources, and to boundary layer/free troposphere dynamics. A trend analysis was performed using the seasonal Kendall test, and Sen's slope estimator on logarithmized AOD data. The seasonal Kendall test is an extension of the Mann-Kendall test, a non-parametric technique which determines if a monotonic increasing or de-creasing long-term trend exists. As AOD data are log-normally distributed, the logarithm of AOD was used for analysis. Statistically significant linear trends was found only at Jungfraujoch while for Davos and Bern even though no statistically significant trends were observed, significant trends during certain months were detected (e.g. during May, July, and December for Bern). Factors which could mask the true AOD trends at all three Swiss stations are further discussed. The influence of Pinatubo on AOD in Switzerland after 1994 was examined using the SAGE stratospheric AOD database and the volcanic component was modeled with an exponential decay and subtracted from Jungfraujoch and Davos data-sets. Further, the influence of boundary layer conditions to Jungfraujoch measurements, which are generally representative of undisturbed conditions in the lower Free Troposphere, was assessed and the trends of the undisturbed free troposphere AOD measurements were calculated. Finally, the effect of the North Atlantic Oscillation on the AOD datasets was examined.

  19. The Global Ozone and Aerosol Profiles and Aerosol Hygroscopic Effect and Absorption Optical Depth (GOA2HEAD) Network Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Frost, G. J.; McComiskey, A. C.; Murphy, D. M.; Ogren, J. A.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Inverse modeling using measurements of ozone (O3) and aerosol is a powerful tool for deriving pollutant emissions. Because they have relatively long lifetimes, O3 and aerosol are transported over large distances. Frequent and globally spaced vertical profiles rather than ground-based measurements alone are therefore highly desired. Three requirements necessary for a successful global monitoring program are: Low equipment cost, low operation cost, and reliable measurements of known uncertainty. Conventional profiling using aircraft provides excellent data, but is cost prohibitive on a large scale. Here we describe a new platform and instruments meeting all three global monitoring requirements. The platform consists of a small balloon and an auto-homing glider. The glider is released from the balloon at about 5 km altitude, returning the light instrument package to the launch location, and allowing for consistent recovery of the payload. Atmospheric profiling can be performed either during ascent or descent (or both) depending on measurement requirements. We will present the specifications for two instrument packages currently under development. The first measures O3, RH, p, T, dry aerosol particle number and size distribution, and aerosol optical depth. The second measures dry aerosol particle number and size distribution, and aerosol absorption coefficient. Other potential instrument packages and the desired spatial/temporal resolution for the GOA2HEAD monitoring initiative will also be discussed.

  20. Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) Global Aerosol Optical Depth Validation Based on 2 Years of Coincident Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Gaitley, Barbara J.; Martonchik, John V.; Diner, David J.; Crean, Kathleen A.; Holben, Brent

    2005-01-01

    Performance of the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) early postlaunch aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm is assessed quantitatively over land and ocean by comparison with a 2-year measurement record of globally distributed AERONET Sun photometers. There are sufficient coincident observations to stratify the data set by season and expected aerosol type. In addition to reporting uncertainty envelopes, we identify trends and outliers, and investigate their likely causes, with the aim of refining algorithm performance. Overall, about 2/3 of the MISR-retrieved AOT values fall within [0.05 or 20% x AOT] of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). More than a third are within [0.03 or 10% x AOT]. Correlation coefficients are highest for maritime stations (approx.0.9), and lowest for dusty sites (more than approx.0.7). Retrieved spectral slopes closely match Sun photometer values for Biomass burning and continental aerosol types. Detailed comparisons suggest that adding to the algorithm climatology more absorbing spherical particles, more realistic dust analogs, and a richer selection of multimodal aerosol mixtures would reduce the remaining discrepancies for MISR retrievals over land; in addition, refining instrument low-light-level calibration could reduce or eliminate a small but systematic offset in maritime AOT values. On the basis of cases for which current particle models are representative, a second-generation MISR aerosol retrieval algorithm incorporating these improvements could provide AOT accuracy unprecedented for a spaceborne technique.

  1. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, G.; Flores, M.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols of a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Hi-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While extensive BB is not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). EBRI during the smoldering phase of the fires was m=1.54(±0.01)+0.04i(±0.01) compared to m=1.49(±0.01)+0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  2. A COMPARISON OF AEROSOL OPTICAL DEPTH SIMULATED USING CMAQ WITH SATELLITE ESTIMATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Satellite data provide new opportunities to study the regional distribution of particulate matter. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) - a derived estimate from the satellite measured irradiance, can be compared against model derived estimate to provide an evaluation of the columnar ...

  3. A closure study of aerosol optical properties at a regional background mountainous site in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Xiao, Hui; Yu, Xingna; Hao, Jian; Chen, Kui; Liu, Chao

    2016-04-15

    There is a large uncertainty in evaluating the radiative forcing from aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions due to the limited knowledge on aerosol properties. In-situ measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were carried out in 2012 at Mt. Huang (the Yellow Mountain), a continental background mountainous site in eastern China. An aerosol optical closure study was performed to verify the model outputs by using the measured aerosol optical properties, in which a spherical Mie model with assumptions of external and core-shell mixtures on the basis of a two-component optical aerosol model and high size-segregated element carbon (EC) ratio was applied. Although the spherical Mie model would underestimate the real scattering with increasing particle diameters, excellent agreement between the calculated and measured values was achieved with correlation coefficients above 0.98. Sensitivity experiments showed that the EC ratio had a negligible effect on the calculated scattering coefficient, but largely influenced the calculated absorption coefficient. The high size-segregated EC ratio averaged over the study period in the closure was enough to reconstruct the aerosol absorption coefficient in the Mie model, indicating EC size resolution was more important than time resolution in retrieving the absorption coefficient in the model. The uncertainties of calculated scattering and absorption coefficients due to the uncertainties of measurements and model assumptions yielded by a Monte Carlo simulation were ±6% and ±14% for external mixture and ±9% and ±31% for core-shell mixture, respectively. This study provided an insight into the inherent relationship between aerosol optical properties and physicochemical characteristics in eastern China, which could supplement the database of aerosol optical properties for background sites in eastern China and provide a method for regions with similar climate. PMID:26851881

  4. Automated transportation of single cells using robot-tweezer manipulation system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Songyu; Sun, Dong

    2011-08-01

    Manipulation of biological cells becomes increasingly important in biomedical engineering to address challenge issues in cell-cell interaction, drug discovery, and tissue engineering. Significant demand for both accuracy and productivity in cell manipulation highlights the need for automated cell transportation with integrated robotics and micro/nano manipulation technologies. Optical tweezers, which use highly focused low-power laser beams to trap and manipulate particles at micro/nanoscale, have emerged as an essential tool for manipulating single cells. In this article, we propose to use a robot-tweezer manipulation system to solve the problem of automatic transportation of biological cells, where optical tweezers function as special robot end effectors. Dynamics equation of the cell in optical tweezers is analyzed. A closed-loop controller is designed for transporting and positioning cells. Experiments are performed on live cells to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in effective cell positioning. PMID:21764021

  5. Study on distribution of aerosol optical depth in Chongqing urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shiqi; Liu, Can; Gao, Yanghua

    2015-12-01

    This paper selected 6S (second simulation of the satellite signal in the solar spectrum) model with dark pixel method to inversion aerosol optical depth by MODIS data, and got the spatial distribution and the temporal distribution of Chongqing urban area. By comparing with the sun photometer and API data, the result showed that the inversion method can be used in aerosol optical thickness monitoring in Chongqing urban area.

  6. Aerosol optical depth derived from lidar measurements during VELETA-2002 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molero, Francisco; Pujadas, Manuel; Fernandez, Jose M.; Utrillas, Maria P.; Martinez-Lozano, Jose A.; Pedros, Roberto; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Lorente, Jeronimo; Cachorro, Victoria; Diaz Rodriguez, Ana M.; Labajo, Antonio; De la Morena, Benito; Rodrigues, Jose Antonio; Silva, Ana Maria; Horvath, Helmuth

    2004-02-01

    We present measurements of the vertical structure of the aerosol extinction coefficient in the lower troposphere, up to five kilometers. Lidar profiles were collected at Armilla (680 m asl) and Pitres (1252 m asl) during the VELETA-2002 campaign, organized to analyze the effect of altitude and aerosols on ground-level UV spectral irradiance. Single-wavelength lidar signals are inverted to derive vertically resolved aerosol extinction coefficient and integrated to provide aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 532 nm. These results are compared with measurements of the aerosol optical depth at the same wavelength provided by Licor LI-1800 spectroradiometers located at several altitudes. Lidar traces show that most of the aerosol loading is present in the first 2.5 km layer before a high-dust Saharan air mass overflew the site. On the 17th of July evening, an elevated aerosol layer was detected between 2.5 and 3.5 km and during the following three days the aerosol vertical profile of the lower atmosphere showed Sahara dust layers, producing relatively high values for the optical depth.

  7. Aerosol optical depth at ALOMAR Observatory (Andøya, Norway) in summer 2002 and 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledano, Carlos; Cachorro, Victoria; Berjón, Alberto; Sorribas, Mar; Vergaz, Ricardo; de Frutos, Ángel; Antón, Manuel; Gausa, Michael

    2006-07-01

    Two intensive campaigns were carried out by the Atmospheric Optics Group of Valladolid University (GOA-UVA) during summer 2002 and 2003 at ALOMAR station (Andøya island, Norway, 69°16'N, 16°00'E), allowing an aerosol characterization and classification in this coastal Arctic region during the summer. Aerosol measurements were performed with a Cimel sun photometer at the four nominal aerosol wavelengths 440 nm, 670 nm, 870 nm and 1020 nm. Spectral measurements in the range 300-1100 nm with a field spectroradiometer Licor-1800 were also performed during 2003, allowing a comparison with Cimel data. The agreement between both instruments is inside the current error for field aerosol optical depth retrieval, namely, 0.02. Although aerosol optical depth (AOD) at the nominal wavelength of 440 nm has an average value below 0.12, values range from 0.04 to 0.36. Derived Ångström alpha coefficient gives an average value about 1.6 (STD 0.2), meaning predominance of fine particles. These values do not fit the typical maritime aerosol characteristics. Continental and long-range transport air masses seem to influence this area, giving rise to mixed aerosols. Back trajectory analysis shows the predominance of Atlantic air masses with low AOD, while continental air masses show in general larger aerosol loading.

  8. Climatological Aspects of the Optical Properties of Fine/Coarse Mode Aerosol Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Sinyuk, A.; Pinker, R. T.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.; Chatenet, B.; Li, Z.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S.N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Dubovik O.; O'Neill, N. T.; Smirnov, A.; Wang, P.; Xia, X.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol mixtures composed of coarse mode desert dust combined with fine mode combustion generated aerosols (from fossil fuel and biomass burning sources) were investigated at three locations that are in and/or downwind of major global aerosol emission source regions. Multiyear monitoring data at Aerosol Robotic Network sites in Beijing (central eastern China), Kanpur (Indo-Gangetic Plain, northern India), and Ilorin (Nigeria, Sudanian zone of West Africa) were utilized to study the climatological characteristics of aerosol optical properties. Multiyear climatological averages of spectral single scattering albedo (SSA) versus fine mode fraction (FMF) of aerosol optical depth at 675 nm at all three sites exhibited relatively linear trends up to 50% FMF. This suggests the possibility that external linear mixing of both fine and coarse mode components (weighted by FMF) dominates the SSA variation, where the SSA of each component remains relatively constant for this range of FMF only. However, it is likely that a combination of other factors is also involved in determining the dynamics of SSA as a function of FMF, such as fine mode particles adhering to coarse mode dust. The spectral variation of the climatological averaged aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) was nearly linear in logarithmic coordinates over the wavelength range of 440-870 nm for both the Kanpur and Ilorin sites. However, at two sites in China (Beijing and Xianghe), a distinct nonlinearity in spectral AAOD in logarithmic space was observed, suggesting the possibility of anomalously strong absorption in coarse mode aerosols increasing the 870 nm AAOD.

  9. Observations of Saharan Aerosols: Results of ECLATS Field Experiment. Part I: Optical Thicknesses and Aerosol Size Distributions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquart, Y.; Bonnel, B.; Chaoui Roquai, M.; Santer, R.; Cerf, A.

    1987-01-01

    A series of ground-based and airborne observations of desert aerosols, the ECLATS experiment was carried out in December 1980 in the vicinity of Niamey (Niger). This paper deals with aerosol optical thicknesses and size distributions derived from (i) in situ measurements using singe particle optical counters (a Kratel and a Knollenberg FSSP), (ii) a ground-based cascade impactor, and (iii) ground-based measurements of the spectral variation of the sober extinction.During the experiment, aerosol optical thicknesses (at 550 nm) varied from 0.20 on very clear days to 1.5 during a so-called `dry haze' episode.Comparisons between size distributions derived from in situ measurements from ground-based cascade impactor, and from inversion of the spectral optical thicknesses, showed that the optical counters drastically underestimated the concentration of small (r<0.5 m) particles It was shown that the occurrence of a `dry haze' episode was characterized by a large increase (an order of magnitude in this particular case) of the intermediate particles (r0.5 m), whereas the concentration in very (r<0.2 m) and large (r>1 m) particles remained roughly constant.

  10. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic matter, and dust found for the ACE Asia aerosol are comparable to values estimated for ACE 1, Aerosols99, and INDOEX. Unique to the ACE Asia aerosol was the large mass fractions of dust, the dominance of dust in controlling the aerosol optical properties, and the interaction of dust with soot aerosol.

  11. Measurements of total column ozone, precipitable water content and aerosol optical depth at Sofia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleyna, P.; Kolev, N.; Savov, P.; Evgenieva, Ts.; Danchovski, V.; Muhtarov, P.

    2016-03-01

    This article reports the results of a study related to variations in total ozone content, aerosol optical depth, water vapor content and Ångström coefficients from summer campaign carried out in June-July 2014, at two sites in the city of Sofia (Astronomical Observatory in the Borisova Gradina Park and National Institute of Geophysics, Geodesy and Geography (NIGGG)). The results of data analysis indicate the following: Spectral dependence of aerosol optical depth (AOD); Greater AOD values due to greater portion of aerosols; Inverse relationship between the time variations of AOD or water vapor and ozone.

  12. Characterisation of solution-based pressurised metered-dose inhaler aerosols with an optical particle counter.

    PubMed

    Kuhli, M; Weiss, M; Steckel, H

    2010-08-01

    The White Light Aerosol Spectrometer (welas(R)) is an alternative method to multistage cascade impaction in the analysis of particle-size distribution (PSD) that allows measurements in high concentrations by single particle measurement. Correspondence of the PSD measured by the welas(R) system in combination with a new aerosol sampling system has been discussed before for aqueous aerosols from nebulisers [M. Kuhli, M. Weiss, H. Steckel, A sampling and dilution system for droplet aerosols from medical nebulisers developed for use with an optical particle counter, Journal of Aerosol Science 40 (2009) 523-533]. For aerosols from solution-based pressurised metered-dose inhalers (pMDI), both the apparent density and the dynamic shape factor of the dry solid particles come into account for correlation of aerodynamic to scattered light equivalent diameter. The aim of this study was to enable welas(R) measurements for pMDI aerosols. Equal particle drying properties in cascade impaction (Next Generation Impactor, NGI) and the aerosol sampling system for the welas(R) should be assured. Therefore, an additional, optionally preheated, extension device was included to modify the aerosol sampling system. The PSD measured with the aerosol sampling system that allowed most complete particle drying was compared to the PSD measured by NGI. The introduction of an empiric calibration allows correlation of NGI and welas(R) measurements for the investigated solution-based pMDIs. PMID:20347974

  13. Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Profiles and Optical Properties during INDOEX 1999 Using Micro-Pulse Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Campbell, James R.; Spinhirne, James D.; Gordon, Howard R.; Johnson, James E.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Micro-pulse lidar systems (MPL) were used to measure aerosol properties during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) 1999 field phase. Measurements were made from two platforms: the NOAA ship RN Ronald H. Brown, and the Kaashidhoo Climate Observatory (KCO) in the Maldives. Sunphotometers were used to provide aerosol optical depths (AOD) needed to calibrate the MPL. This study focuses on the height distribution and optical properties (at 523 nm) of aerosols observed during the campaign. The height of the highest aerosols (top height) was calculated and found to be below 4 km for most of the cruise. The marine boundary layer (MBL) top was calculated and found to be less than 1 km. MPL results were combined with air mass trajectories, radiosonde profiles of temperature and humidity, and aerosol concentration and optical measurements. Humidity varied from approximately 80% near the surface to 50% near the top height during the entire cruise. The average value and standard deviation of aerosol optical parameters were determined for characteristic air mass regimes. Marine aerosols in the absence of any continental influence were found to have an AOD of 0.05 +/- 0.03, an extinction-to-backscatter ratio (S-ratio) of 33 +/- 6 sr, and peak extinction values around 0.05/km (near the MBL top). The marine results are shown to be in agreement with previously measured and expected values. Polluted marine areas over the Indian Ocean, influenced by continental aerosols, had AOD values in excess of 0.2, S-ratios well above 40 sr, and peak extinction values approximately 0.20/km (near the MBL top). The polluted marine results are shown to be similar to previously published values for continental aerosols. Comparisons between MPL derived extinction near the ship (75 m) and extinction calculated at ship-level using scattering measured by a nephelometer and absorption using a PSAP were conducted. The comparisons indicated that the MPL algorithm (using a constant S-ratio throughout the lower troposphere) calculates extinction near the surface in agreement with the ship-level measurements only when the MBL aerosols are well mixed with aerosols above. Finally, a review of the MPL extinction profiles showed that the model of aerosol vertical extinction developed during an earlier INDOEX field campaign (at the Maldives) did not correctly describe the true vertical distribution over the greater Indian Ocean region. Using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions, a new model of aerosol vertical extinction was determined for marine atmospheres over the Indian Ocean. A new model of aerosol vertical extinction for polluted marine atmospheres was also developed using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions influenced by continental aerosols.

  14. Coupling aerosol optics to the chemical transport model MATCH (v5.5.0) and aerosol dynamics module SALSA (v1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    Modelling aerosol optical properties is a notoriously difficult task due to the particles' complex morphologies and compositions. Yet aerosols and their optical properties are important for Earth system modelling and remote sensing applications. Operational optics models often make drastic and non realistic approximations regarding morphological properties, which can introduce errors. In this study a new aerosol optics model is implemented, in which more realistic morphologies and mixing states are assumed, especially for black carbon aerosols. The model includes both external and internal mixing of all chemical species, it treats externally mixed black carbon as fractal aggregates, and it accounts for inhomogeneous internal mixing of black carbon by use of a novel "core-grey shell" model. Simulated results of radiative fluxes, backscattering coefficients and the Ångström exponent from the new optics model are compared with results from another model simulating particles as externally mixed homogeneous spheres. To gauge the impact on the optical properties from the new optics model, the known and important effects from using aerosol dynamics serves as a reference. The results show that using a more detailed description of particle morphology and mixing states influences the optical properties to the same degree as aerosol dynamics. This is an important finding suggesting that over-simplified optics models coupled to a chemical transport model can introduce considerable errors; this can strongly effect simulations of radiative fluxes in Earth-system models, and it can compromise the use of remote sensing observations of aerosols in model evaluations and chemical data assimilation.

  15. Vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Liu, Xingang; Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Peiren; Ren, Gang; Jin, Lijun; Li, Runjun; Dong, Zipeng; Li, Yiyu; Yang, Junmei

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau were measured for the first time during a summertime aircraft campaign, 2013 in Shanxi, China. Data from four flights were analyzed. The vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficients (σsc), absorption coefficients (σab), Angström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (ω), backscattering ratio (βsc), aerosol mass scattering proficiency (Qsc) and aerosol surface scattering proficiency (Qsc(')) were obtained. The mean statistical values of σsc were 77.45 Mm(-1) (at 450 nm), 50.72 Mm(-1) (at 550n m), and 32.02 Mm(-1) (at 700 nm). The mean value of σab was 7.62 Mm(-1) (at 550 nm). The mean values of α, βsc and ω were 1.93, 0.15, and 0.91, respectively. Aerosol concentration decreased with altitude. Most effective diameters (ED) of aerosols were less than 0.8 μm. The vertical profiles of σsc,, α, βsc, Qsc and Qsc(') showed that the aerosol scattering properties at lower levels contributed the most to the total aerosol radiative forcing. Both α and βsc had relatively large values, suggesting that most aerosols in the observational region were small particles. The mean values of σsc, α, βsc, Qsc, Qsc('), σab and ω at different height ranges showed that most of the parameters decreased with altitude. The forty-eight hour backward trajectories of air masses during the observation days indicated that the majority of aerosols in the lower level contributed the most to the total aerosol loading, and most of these particles originated from local or regional pollution emissions. PMID:26257345

  16. Spatiotemporal modeling of irregularly spaced Aerosol Optical Depth data

    PubMed Central

    Oleson, Jacob J.; Kumar, Naresh; Smith, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Many advancements have been introduced to tackle spatial and temporal structures in data. When the spatial and/or temporal domains are relatively large, assumptions must be made to account for the sheer size of the data. The large data size, coupled with realities that come with observational data, make it difficult for all of these assumptions to be met. In particular, air quality data are very sparse across geographic space and time, due to a limited air pollution monitoring network. These “missing” values make it diffcult to incorporate most dimension reduction techniques developed for high-dimensional spatiotemporal data. This article examines aerosol optical depth (AOD), an indirect measure of radiative forcing, and air quality. The spatiotemporal distribution of AOD can be influenced by both natural (e.g., meteorological conditions) and anthropogenic factors (e.g., emission from industries and transport). After accounting for natural factors influencing AOD, we examine the spatiotemporal relationship in the remaining human influenced portion of AOD. The presented data cover a portion of India surrounding New Delhi from 2000 – 2006. The proposed method is demonstrated showing how it can handle the large spatiotemporal structure containing so much missing data for both meteorologic conditions and AOD over time and space. PMID:24470786

  17. Aerosol optical hygroscopicity measurements during the 2010 CARES Campaign

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Atkinson, D. B.; Radney, J. G.; Lum, J.; Kolesar, K. R.; Cziczo, D. J.; Pekour, M. S.; Zhang, Q.; Setyan, A.; Zelenyuk, A.; Cappa, C. D.

    2014-12-10

    Measurements of the effect of water uptake on particulate light extinction or scattering made at two locations during the 2010 CARES study around Sacramento, CA are reported. The observed influence of water uptake, characterized through the dimensionless optical hygroscopicity parameter γ, is compared with calculations constrained by observed particle size distributions and size-dependent particle composition. A closure assessment has been carried out that allowed for determination of the average hygroscopic growth factors (GF) at 85% relative humidity and the dimensionless hygroscopicity parameter κ for oxygenated organic aerosol (OA) and for supermicron particles, yielding κ = 0.1–0.15 and 0.9–1.0, respectively. Themore » derived range of oxygenated OA κ values are in line with previous observations. The relatively large values for supermicron particles is consistent with substantial contributions of sea salt-containing particles in this size range. Analysis of time-dependent variations in the supermicron particle hygroscopicity suggest that atmospheric processing, specifically chloride displacement by nitrate and the accumulation of secondary organics on supermicron particles, can lead to substantial depression of the observed GF.« less

  18. Ground-based remote sensing of aerosol climatology in China: Aerosol optical properties, direct radiative effect and its parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, X.; Che, H.; Zhu, J.; Chen, H.; Cong, Z.; Deng, X.; Fan, X.; Fu, Y.; Goloub, P.; Jiang, H.; Liu, Q.; Mai, B.; Wang, P.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal variation of aerosol optical properties and aerosol direct radiative effects (ADRE) are studied based on high quality aerosol data at 21 sunphotometer stations with at least 4-months worth of measurements in China mainland and Hong Kong. A parameterization is proposed to describe the relationship of ADREs to aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD) and single scattering albedo at 550 nm (SSA). In the middle-east and south China, the maximum AOD is always observed in the burning season, indicating a significant contribution of biomass burning to AOD. Dust aerosols contribute to AOD significantly in spring and their influence decreases from the source regions to the downwind regions. The occurrence frequencies of background level AOD (AOD < 0.10) in the middle-east, south and northwest China are very limited (0.4%, 1.3% and 2.8%, respectively). However, it is 15.7% in north China. Atmosphere is pristine in the Tibetan Plateau where 92.0% of AODs are <0.10. Regional mean SSAs at 550 nm are 0.89-0.90, although SSAs show substantial site and season dependence. ADREs at the top and bottom of the atmosphere for solar zenith angle of 60 ± 5° are -16--37 W m-2 and -66--111 W m-2, respectively. ADRE efficiency shows slight regional dependence. AOD and SSA together account for more than 94 and 87% of ADRE variability at the bottom and top of the atmosphere. The overall picture of ADRE in China is that aerosols cool the climate system, reduce surface solar radiation and heat the atmosphere.

  19. VIIRS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) Products for Air Quality Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, A. K.; Zhang, H.; Kondragunta, S.; Laszlo, I.

    2014-12-01

    The air quality community uses satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) for a variety of applications, including daily air quality forecasting, retrospective event analysis, and justification for Exceptional Events. AOD is suitable for ambient air quality applications because is related to particulate matter (e.g., PM2.5) concentrations in the atmosphere; higher values of AOD correspond to higher concentrations of particulate matter. AOD is useful for identifying and tracking areas of high PM2.5 concentrations that correspond to air quality events, such as wildfires, dust storms, or haze episodes. Currently, the air quality community utilizes AOD from the MODIS instrument on NASA's polar-orbiting Terra and Aqua satellites and from NOAA's GOES geostationary satellites (e.g, GASP). The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on the Suomi-NPP satellite is making AOD measurements that are similar to MODIS AOD, but with higher spatial resolution. Two AOD products are available from VIIRS: the 750 m nadir resolution Intermediate Product (IP) and the 6 km resolution Environmental Data Record (EDR) product, which is aggregated from IP measurements. These VIIRS AOD products offer a substantial increase in spatial resolution compared to the MODIS AOD 3 km and 10 km AOD products, respectively. True color (RGB) imagery is also available from VIIRS as a decision aid for air quality applications. It serves as a complement to AOD measurements by providing visible information about areas of smoke, haze, and blowing dust in the atmosphere. Case studies of VIIRS AOD and RGB data for recent air quality events will be presented, with a focus on wildfires, and the relative pros and cons of the VIIRS AOD IP and EDR for air quality applications will be discussed in comparison to MODIS AOD products. Improvements to VIIRS aerosol products based on user feedback as part of the NOAA Satellite Air Quality Proving Ground (AQPG) will be outlined, and an overview of future outreach activities will be provided, including training events designed to build the capacity of users.

  20. Aerosol optical properties and radiative effects over Manora Peak in the Himalayan foothills: seasonal variability and role of transported aerosols.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A K; Ram, K; Singh, Sachchidanand; Kumar, Sanjeev; Tiwari, S

    2015-01-01

    The higher altitude regions of Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau are influenced by the dust and black carbon (BC) aerosols from the emissions and long-range transport from the adjoining areas. In this study, we present impacts of advection of polluted air masses of natural and anthropogenic emissions, on aerosol optical and radiative properties at Manora Peak (~2000 m amsl) in central Himalaya over a period of more than two years (February 2006-May 2008). We used the most updated and comprehensive data of chemical and optical properties available in one of the most climatically sensitive region, the Himalaya, to estimate atmospheric radiative forcing and heating rate. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) was found to vary from 0.04 to 0.45 with significantly higher values in summer mainly due to an increase in mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols due to transport. In contrast, single scattering albedo (SSA) varied from 0.74 to 0.88 with relatively lower values during summer, suggesting an increase in absorbing BC and mineral dust aerosols. As a result, a large positive atmospheric radiative forcing (about 28 ± 5 Wm(-2)) and high values of corresponding heating rate (0.80 ± 0.14 Kday(-1)) has been found during summer. During the entire observation period, radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere varied from -2 to +14 Wm(-2) and from -3 to -50 Wm(-2) at the surface whereas atmospheric forcing was in the range of 3 to 65 Wm(-2) resulting in a heating rate of 0.1-1.8 Kday(-1). PMID:25261819

  1. Effect of Wind Speed on Aerosol Optical Depth over Remote Oceans, Based on Data from the Maritime Aerosol Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smirnov, A.; Sayer, A. M.; Holben, B. N.; Hsu, N. C.; Sakerin, S. M.; Macke, A.; Nelson, N. B.; Courcoux, Y.; Smyth, T. J.; Croot, P.; Quinn, P. K.; Sciare, J.; Gulev, S. K.; Piketh, S.; Losno, R.; Kinne, S.; Radionov, V. F.

    2012-01-01

    The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) has been collecting data over the oceans since November 2006. The MAN archive provides a valuable resource for aerosol studies in maritime environments. In the current paper we investigate correlations between ship-borne aerosol optical depth (AOD) and near-surface wind speed, either measured (onboard or from satellite) or modeled (NCEP). According to our analysis, wind speed influences columnar aerosol optical depth, although the slope of the linear regression between AOD and wind speed is not steep (approx. 0.004 - 0.005), even for strong winds over 10m/s. The relationships show significant scatter (correlation coefficients typically in the range 0.3 - 0.5); the majority of this scatter can be explained by the uncertainty on the input data. The various wind speed sources considered yield similar patterns. Results are in good agreement with the majority of previously published relationships between surface wind speed and ship-based or satellite-based AOD measurements. The basic relationships are similar for all the wind speed sources considered; however, the gradient of the relationship varies by around a factor of two depending on the wind data used

  2. Assessment of 10 Year Record of Aerosol Optical Depth from OMI UV Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Changwoo; Torres, Omar; Jethva, Hiren

    2014-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the EOS-Aura satellite provides information on aerosol optical properties by making use of the large sensitivity to aerosol absorption in the near-ultraviolet (UV) spectral region. Another important advantage of using near UV observations for aerosol characterization is the low surface albedo of all terrestrial surfaces in this spectral region that reduces retrieval errors associated with land surface reflectance characterization. In spite of the 13 × 24 square kilometers coarse sensor footprint, the OMI near UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single-scattering albedo under cloud-free conditions from radiance measurements at 354 and 388 nanometers. We present validation results of OMI AOD against space and time collocated Aerosol Robotic Network measured AOD values over multiple stations representing major aerosol episodes and regimes. OMAERUV's performance is also evaluated with respect to those of the Aqua-MODIS Deep Blue and Terra-MISR AOD algorithms over arid and semi-arid regions in Northern Africa. The outcome of the evaluation analysis indicates that in spite of the "row anomaly" problem, affecting the sensor since mid-2007, the long-term aerosol record shows remarkable sensor stability.

  3. Sensitivity of Multiangle Imaging to the Optical and Microphysical Properties of Biomass Burning Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Kahn, Ralph A.; Nelson, David; Yau, Kevin; Seinfeld, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of biomass burning (BB) carbonaceous particles in the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Standard Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm is assessed, and algorithm refinements are suggested, based on a theoretical sensitivity analysis and comparisons with near-coincident AERONET measurements at representative BB sites. Over the natural ranges of BB aerosol microphysical and optical properties observed in past field campaigns, patterns of retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), particle size, and single scattering albedo (SSA) are evaluated. On the basis of the theoretical analysis, assuming total column AOD of 0.2, over a dark, uniform surface, MISR can distinguish two to three groups in each of size and SSA, except when the assumed atmospheric particles are significantly absorbing (mid-visible SSA approx.0.84), or of medium sizes (mean radius approx.0.13 pin); sensitivity to absorbing, medium-large size particles increases considerably when the assumed column AOD is raised to 0.5. MISR Research Aerosol Retrievals confirm the theoretical results, based on coincident AERONET inversions under BB-dominated conditions. When BB is externally mixed with dust in the atmosphere, dust optical model and surface reflection uncertainties, along with spatial variability, contribute to differences between the Research Retrievals and AERONET. These results suggest specific refinements to the MISR Standard Aerosol Algorithm complement of component particles and mixtures. They also highlight the importance for satellite aerosol retrievals of surface reflectance characterization, with accuracies that can be difficult to achieve with coupled surface-aerosol algorithms in some higher AOD situations.

  4. Aerosol optical properties in the Marine Environment during the TCAP-I campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, D.; Berg, L. K.; Barnard, J.; Berkowitz, C. M.; Burton, S. P.; Chapman, E. G.; Comstock, J. M.; Fast, J. D.; Ferrare, R. A.; Connor, F. J.; Hair, J. W.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hubbe, J.; Kluzek, C.; Mei, F.; Pekour, M. S.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Schmid, B.; Shilling, J. E.; Shinozuka, Y.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk-Imre, A.

    2013-12-01

    The role of direct radiative forcing by atmospheric aerosol is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in predicting climate change. Much of this uncertainty comes from the limited knowledge of observed aerosol optical properties. In this presentation we discuss derived aerosol optical properties based on measurements made during the summer 2012 Two-Column Aerosol Project-I (TCAP) campaign and relate these properties to the corresponding chemical and physical properties of the aerosol. TCAP was designed to provide simultaneous, in-situ observations of the size distribution, chemical properties, and optical properties of aerosol within and between two atmospheric columns over the Atlantic Ocean near the eastern seaboard of the United States. These columns are separated by 200-300 km and were sampled in July 2012 during a summer intensive operation period (IOP) using the U.S. Department of Energy's Gulfstream-1 (G-1) and NASA's B200 aircraft, winter IOP using G-1 aircraft in February 2013, and the surface-based DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) located on Cape Cod. In this presentation we examine the spectral dependence of the aerosol optical properties measured from the aircraft over the TCAP-I domain, with an emphasis on in-situ derived intensive properties measured by a 3-λ Nephelometer, a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), a humidograph (f(RH)), and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Preliminary results indicate that the aerosol are more light-absorbing as well as more hygroscopic at higher altitudes (2-4 km) compared to the corresponding values made within residual layers near the surface (0-2 km altitude). The average column (0-4 km) single scattering albedo (ω) and hygroscopic scattering factor (F) are found to be ~0.96 and 1.25, respectively. Additional results on key aerosol intensive properties such as the angstrom exponent (å), asymmetry parameter (g), backscattering fraction (b), and gamma parameter (γ) will be presented and discussed.

  5. An AeroCom Initial Assessment - Optical Properties in Aerosol Component Modules of Global Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.; Textor, C.; Guibert, S.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Berglen, T.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Collins, W.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Feichter, H.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Grini, A.; Hendricks, J.; Herzog, M.; Horrowitz, L.; Isaksen, I.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Kloster, S.; Koch, D.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Krol, M.; Lauer, A.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lesins, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, U.; Montanaro, V.; Myhre, G.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tie, X.

    2006-05-29

    The AeroCom exercise diagnoses multi-component aerosol modules in global modeling. In an initial assessment global fields for mass and for mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (aot) were compared among aerosol component modules of 21 different global models. There is general agreement among models for the annual global mean of component combined aot. At 0.12 to 0.14, simulated aot values are at the lower end of global averages suggested by remote sensing from ground (AERONET ca 0.14) and space (MODIS-MISR composite ca 0.16). More detailed comparisons, however, reveal that larger differences in regional distribution and significant differences in compositional mixture have remained. Of particular concern is the large model diversity for contributions by dust and carbon, because it leads to significant uncertainty in aerosol absorption (aab). Since not only aot but also aab influence the aerosol impact on the radiative energy-balance, aerosol (direct) forcing uncertainty in modeling is larger than differences in aot might suggest. New diagnostic approaches are proposed to trace model differences in terms of aerosol processing and transport: These include the prescription of common input (e.g. amount, size and injection of aerosol component emissions) and the use of observational capabilities from ground (e.g. measurements networks) and space (e.g. correlations between retrieved aerosol and cloud properties).

  6. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties Performed at CNR- IMAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, L.; Amodeo, A.; Cornacchia, C.; D'Amico, G.; Madonna, F.; Pandolfi, M.; Pappalardo, G.

    2005-12-01

    The lidar system for tropospheric aerosol study, located at CNR-IMAA in Tito Scalo, Potenza (40 °36'N, 15°44' E, 760 m above sea level), is a Raman/elastic lidar system operational since May 2000 in the framework of EARLINET (European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork), the first lidar network for tropospheric aerosol study on continental scale. It provides independent measurements of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles at 355 nm and aerosol backscatter profiles at 532 nm. Both the IMAA aerosol lidar system and the used algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol optical parameters have been successfully tested with different intercomparison exercises in the frame of the EARLINET quality assurance program. In the frame of EARLINET, regular measurements are performed three times per week, allowing to study the aerosol content typically present in the planetary boundary layer over Potenza. Particular attention is devoted to Saharan dust intrusions in Europe, and Saharan dust forecasts are distributed to all EARLINET stations. The large dataset of Saharan dust optical properties profiles collected at IMAA allowed to study the contribution of dust particles to the aerosol load typically present in our area as well as to investigate transformations of aerosol optical properties during the transport. Several intensive measurement campaigns have been performed at IMAA with this system to study optical properties of different types of aerosol, and how the transport and modification mechanisms and the water content affect these optical properties. In particular, direct transport of volcanic aerosol emitted in 2002 during the Etna eruptions was observed, and in summer 2004, aerosol layers related to forest fires smoke or pollution plume transported from Alaska, Canada and North America were observed at IMAA during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) field campaign. Moreover, this system has been used during the Italian phase of the European AQUA Thermodynamic Experiment (EAQUATE) measurements campaign (6-10 September 2005) together with a water vapor Raman lidar for an integrated study of aerosol, water vapor and clouds. In order to obtain more information about microphysical properties of the particles, the IMAA lidar system for aerosol has been upgraded to increase the number of retrievable parameters. In particular, since July 2005, this system can provide independent measurements of aerosol extinction and backscatter profiles at 355 and 532 nm, and of aerosol backscatter profiles at 1064 nm. Moreover, other receiving channels were added to perform depolarization ratio measurements in order to obtain information about shape and orientation of aerosolic particles. Starting from October 2005, this upgraded system will be employed in the validation program of aerosol data products from the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite mission. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The support of this work by the European Commission under grant EVRI-CT1999-40003 is gratefully acknowledged. The CNR-IMAA ground based facility for Earth Observation has been partly funded by PON 2000-2006, Misura II.1, MIUR.

  7. Long term measurements of the estimated hygroscopic enhancement of aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervo, Maxime; Sellegri, Karine; Pichon, Jean Marc; Roger, Jean Claude; Laj, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Water vapour has a major impact on aerosol optical properties, thus on the Radiative Forcing for aerosol-radiation interaction (RFari). However there is few studies measuring this impact over a large period. Optical properties of aerosols were measured at the GAW Puy de Dôme station (1465m) over a seven year period (2006-2012). The impact of hygroscopicity on aerosol optical properties was calculated over a two year period (2010-2011). The analysis of the spatial and temporal variability of the dry optical properties showed that while no long term trend was found, a clear seasonal and diurnal variation was observed on the extensive parameters (scattering, absorption). Scattering and absorption coefficients were highest during the warm season and daytime, in concordance with the seasonality and diurnal variation of the planetary boundary layer height reaching the site. Intensive parameters (single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, refractive index) did not show such a strong diurnal variability, but still indicated different values depending on the season. Both extensive and intensive optical parameters were sensitive to the air mass origin. A strong impact of hygroscopicity on aerosol optical properties was calculated, mainly on aerosol scattering, with a dependence on the aerosol type and the season. At 90% humidity, the scattering factor enhancement (fsca) was more than 4.4 for oceanic aerosol that have mixed with a pollution plume. Consequently, the aerosol radiative forcing was estimated to be 2.8 times higher at RH= 90% and 1.75 times higher at ambient RH when hygroscopic growth of the aerosol was considered. The hygroscopicity enhancement factor of the scattering coefficient was parameterized as a function of humidity and air mass type. To our knowledge, these results are one of the first presenting the impact of water vapour on the aerosol optical properties for a long period, and the first for a site at the border between the planetary boundary layer and the free troposphere. Acknowledgements. The authors would like to acknowledge the OPGC and its staff and INSU/CNRS for their contribution to establishing and maintaining the PdD measurement site. This work was performed in the frame of the european EUSAAR (R113-CT-2006-026140) and EUCAARI (0136833-2) and the french ORAURE SOERE.

  8. Determination of motility forces on isolated chromosomes with laser tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatibzadeh, Nima; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Bui, Ann A. M.; Rocha, Yesenia; Cruz, Gladys M.; Loke, Vince; Shi, Linda Z.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Berns, Michael W.

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative determination of the motility forces of chromosomes during cell division is fundamental to understanding a process that is universal among eukaryotic organisms. Using an optical tweezers system, isolated mammalian chromosomes were held in a 1064 nm laser trap. The minimum force required to move a single chromosome was determined to be ~0.8-5 pN. The maximum transverse trapping efficiency of the isolated chromosomes was calculated as ~0.01-0.02. These results confirm theoretical force calculations of ~0.1-12 pN to move a chromosome on the mitotic or meiotic spindle. The verification of these results was carried out by calibration of the optical tweezers when trapping microspheres with a diameter of 4.5-15 µm in media with 1-7 cP viscosity. The results of the chromosome and microsphere trapping experiments agree with optical models developed to simulate trapping of cylindrical and spherical specimens.

  9. Regional Aerosol Optical Depth Characteristics from Satellite Observations: ACE-1, TARFOX and ACE-2 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durkee, P. A.; Nielsen, K. E.; Smith, P. J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Holben, B. N.; Tomasi, C.; Vitale, V.; Collins, D.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the aerosol properties during 3 recent international field campaigns ACE-1, TARFOX and ACE-2 are described using satellite retrievals from NOAA AVHRR data. Validation of the satellite retrieval procedure is performed with airborne, shipboard, and land-based sunphotometry during ACE-2. The intercomparison between satellite and surface optical depths has a correlation coefficient of 0.93 for 630 nm wavelength and 0.92 for 860 nm wavelength, The standard error of estimate is 0.025 for 630 nm wavelength and 0.023 for 860 nm wavelength. Regional aerosol properties are examined in composite analysis of aerosol optical properties from the ACE-1, TARFOX and ACE-2 regions. ACE-1 and ACE-2 regions have strong modes in the distribution of optical depth around 0.1, but the ACE-2 tails toward higher values yielding an average of 0.16 consistent with pollution and dust aerosol intrusions. The TARFOX region has a noticeable mode of 0.2, but has significant spread of aerosol optical depth values consistent with the varied continental aerosol constituents off the eastern North American Coast.

  10. Comparative Optical Measurements of Airspeed and Aerosols on a DC-8 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney; McGann, Rick; Wagener, Thomas; Abbiss, John; Smart, Anthony

    1997-01-01

    NASA Dryden supported a cooperative flight test program on the NASA DC-8 aircraft in November 1993. This program evaluated optical airspeed and aerosol measurement techniques. Three brassboard optical systems were tested. Two were laser Doppler systems designed to measure free-stream-referenced airspeed. The third system was designed to characterize the natural aerosol statistics and airspeed. These systems relied on optical backscatter from natural aerosols for operation. The DC-8 aircraft carried instrumentation that provided real-time flight situation information and reference data on the aerosol environment. This test is believed to be the first to include multiple optical airspeed systems on the same carrier aircraft, so performance could be directly compared. During 23 hr of flight, a broad range of atmospheric conditions was encountered, including aerosol-rich layers, visible clouds, and unusually clean (aerosol-poor) regions. Substantial amounts of data were obtained. Important insights regarding the use of laser-based systems of this type in an aircraft environment were gained. This paper describes the sensors used and flight operations conducted to support the experiments. The paper also briefly describes the general results of the experiments.

  11. Coupling aerosol optics to the MATCH (v5.5.0) chemical transport model and the SALSA (v1) aerosol microphysics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Emma; Kahnert, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A new aerosol-optics model is implemented in which realistic morphologies and mixing states are assumed, especially for black carbon particles. The model includes both external and internal mixing of all chemical species, it treats externally mixed black carbon as fractal aggregates, and it accounts for inhomogeneous internal mixing of black carbon by use of a novel "core-grey-shell" model. Simulated results of aerosol optical properties, such as aerosol optical depth, backscattering coefficients and the Ångström exponent, as well as radiative fluxes are computed with the new optics model and compared with results from an older optics-model version that treats all particles as externally mixed homogeneous spheres. The results show that using a more detailed description of particle morphology and mixing state impacts the aerosol optical properties to a degree of the same order of magnitude as the effects of aerosol-microphysical processes. For instance, the aerosol optical depth computed for two cases in 2007 shows a relative difference between the two optics models that varies over the European region between -28 and 18 %, while the differences caused by the inclusion or omission of the aerosol-microphysical processes range from -50 to 37 %. This is an important finding, suggesting that a simple optics model coupled to a chemical transport model can introduce considerable errors affecting radiative fluxes in chemistry-climate models, compromising comparisons of model results with remote sensing observations of aerosols, and impeding the assimilation of satellite products for aerosols into chemical-transport models.

  12. Aerosol Optical Properties at the Ground Sites during the 2010 CARES Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. B.; Radney, J. G.; Harworth, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Preliminary results from the ground sites at the 2010 CARES field campaign (T0 near Sacramento, CA and T1 near Cool, CA) will be presented. A number of aerosol optical properties were measured at high time resolution for the four week study period using custom instruments. The aerosol extinction coefficient was measured at T0 using a cavity ring-down transmissometer (CRDT) at two wavelengths (532 and 1064 nm) and the aerosol scattering coefficient was measured at 532 nm using a Radiance Research M903 nephelometer. At T1, a new CRDT instrument was deployed that measured the extinction coefficient at three wavelengths (355, 532, and 1064 nm) for sub-10 μm (nominal) and sub-2.5 μm aerosols at ambient, elevated, and reduced relative humidity. A new type of custom nephelometer that measures the aerosol scattering coefficient at 532 nm using an array detector was also deployed at T1.

  13. Monitoring and tracking the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols using multi-satellite aerosol optical depth retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeger, A. R.; Gupta, P.; Zavodsky, B.; McGrath, K. M.

    2015-10-01

    The primary goal of this study was to generate a near-real time (NRT) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product capable of providing a comprehensive understanding of the aerosol spatial distribution over the Pacific Ocean in order to better monitor and track the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols. Therefore, we developed a NRT product that takes advantage of observations from both low-earth orbiting and geostationary satellites. In particular, we utilize AOD products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellites. Then, we combine these AOD products with our own retrieval algorithms developed for the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-15) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT-2) to generate a NRT daily AOD composite product. We present examples of the daily AOD composite product for a case study of trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution and dust aerosols in mid-March 2014. Overall, the new product successfully tracks this aerosol plume during its trans-Pacific transport to the west coast of North America. However, we identify several areas across the domain of interest from Asia to North America where the new product can encounter significant uncertainties due to the inclusion of the geostationary AOD retrievals. The uncertainties associated with geostationary AOD retrievals are expected to be minimized after the successful launch of the next-generation advanced NOAA GOES-R and recently launched JMA Himawari satellites. Observations from these advanced satellites will ultimately provide an enhanced understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols over the Pacific.

  14. Modeling the spectral optical properties of ammonium sulfate and biomass burning aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K.E.; Chuang, C.C.; Grossman, A.S.; Penner, J.E.

    1997-09-01

    The importance of including the global and regional radiative effects of aerosols in climate models has increasingly been realized. Accurate modeling of solar radiative forcing due to aerosols from anthropogenic sulfate and biomass burning emissions requires adequate spectral resolution and treatment of spatial and temporal variability. The variation of aerosol spectral optical properties with local relative humidity and dry aerosol composition must be considered. Because the cost of directly including Mie calculations within a climate model is prohibitive, parameterizations from offline calculations must be used. Starting from a log-normal size distribution of dry ammonium sulfate, we developed optical properties for tropospheric sulfate aerosol at 15 relative humidities up to 99 percent. The resulting aerosol size distributions were then used to calculate bulk optical properties at wavelengths between 0.175 {micro}m and 4 {micro}m. Finally, functional fits of optical properties were made for each of 12 wavelength bands as a function of relative humidity. Significant variations in optical properties occurred across the total solar spectrum. Relative increases in specific extinction and asymmetry factor with increasing relative humidity became larger at longer wavelengths. Significant variation in single-scattering albedo was found only in the longest near-IR band. This is also the band with the lowest albedo. A similar treatment was done for aerosols from biomass burning. In this case, size distributions were taken as having two carbonaceous size modes and a larger dust mode. The two carbonaceous modes were considered to be humidity dependent. Equilibrium size distributions and compositions were calculated for 15 relative humidities and five black carbon fractions. Mie calculations and Chandrasekhar averages of optical properties were done for each of the resulting 75 cases. Finally, fits were made for each of 12 spectral bands as functions of relative humidity and black carbon fraction.

  15. Ultrahigh Frequency Lensless Ultrasonic Transducers for Acoustic Tweezers Application

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Lin, Anderson; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Eun Sok; Shung, Kirk Koping

    2014-01-01

    Similar to optical tweezers, a tightly focused ultrasound microbeam is needed to manipulate microparticles in acoustic tweezers. The development of highly sensitive ultrahigh frequency ultrasonic transducers is crucial for trapping particles or cells with a size of a few microns. As an extra lens would cause excessive attenuation at ultrahigh frequencies, two types of 200-MHz lensless transducer design were developed as an ultrasound microbeam device for acoustic tweezers application. Lithium niobate single crystal press-focused (PF) transducer and zinc oxide self-focused transducer were designed, fabricated and characterized. Tightly focused acoustic beams produced by these transducers were shown to be capable of manipulating single microspheres as small as 5 μm two-dimensionally within a range of hundreds of micrometers in distilled water. The size of the trapped microspheres is the smallest ever reported in the literature of acoustic PF devices. These results suggest that these lensless ultrahigh frequency ultrasonic transducers are capable of manipulating particles at the cellular level and that acoustic tweezers may be a useful tool to manipulate a single cell or molecule for a wide range of biomedical applications. PMID:23042219

  16. First measurements of aerosol optical depth and Angstrom exponent number from AERONET's Kuching site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Santo V.; Chew, Boon N.; Mohamad, M.; Mahmud, M.; Liew, Soo C.

    2013-10-01

    We report our first measurements, over the 2011 dry season period, of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent number and its fine mode counterpart obtained from photometric measurements at AERONET's newest site located at the city of Kuching, Sarawak, East Malaysia. This site was set up as part of the collaborative efforts of the Seven South East Asian Studies (7SEAS) regional aerosol measurements initiative. Located at the converging zone between peninsular Malaysia and the land masses of Sumatra, Borneo, Java and Sulawesi, this site is expected to provide first hand evidence about the physical and optical characteristics of the regional aerosol environment, specially during the biomass burning months. Moreover, given its relative proximity to our Singapore radiation measurement super-site, Kuching is expected to provide further insight on aerosol transport pathways caused by seasonal winds transporting smoke to other parts of the maritime continent and the South Asia region.

  17. Aerosol optical properties and their effect on the UV solar irradiance at Uccle, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitidou, Efterpi; De Bock, Veerle; De Backer, Hugo; Kazantzidis, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates the influences of aerosols optical properties on the UV solar irradiance reaching the ground. It does so using ground-based spectroradiometric measurements taken over the Uccle atmosphere during July 2006 to May 2010. Calculations with the radiative transfer code UVSPEC (LibRadtran package) are used in order to estimate the aerosol effect in the UV and the single scattering albedo. The results are compared with those from a collocated Cimel instrument, part of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The accuracy of the single scattering albedo estimation depends on the aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the solar zenith angle (SZA) at the time of the measurement and is higher for high AOD.

  18. Complex experiment on studying the microphysical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosol particles and estimating the contribution of atmospheric aerosol-to-earth radiation budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, G. G.; Belan, B. D.; Panchenko, M. V.; Romanovskii, O. A.; Sakerin, S. M.; Kabanov, D. M.; Turchinovich, S. A.; Turchinovich, Y. S.; Eremina, T. A.; Kozlov, V. S.; Terpugova, S. A.; Pol'kin, V. V.; Yausheva, E. P.; Chernov, D. G.; Zhuravleva, T. B.; Bedareva, T. V.; Odintsov, S. L.; Burlakov, V. D.; Nevzorov, A. V.; Arshinov, M. Y.; Ivlev, G. A.; Savkin, D. E.; Fofonov, A. V.; Gladkikh, V. A.; Kamardin, A. P.; Balin, Y. S.; Kokhanenko, G. P.; Penner, I. E.; Samoilova, S. V.; Antokhin, P. N.; Arshinova, V. G.; Davydov, D. K.; Kozlov, A. V.; Pestunov, D. A.; Rasskazchikova, T. M.; Simonenkov, D. V.; Sklyadneva, T. K.; Tolmachev, G. N.; Belan, S. B.; Shmargunov, V. P.; Kozlov, A. S.; Malyshkin, S. B.

    2015-10-01

    The primary objective of this complex aerosol experiment was the measurement of microphysical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosol particles in the surface air layer and free atmosphere. The measurement data were used to retrieve the whole set of aerosol