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Sample records for af type 2-diabetes

  1. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies. PMID:23528336

  2. Type 2 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your doctor or diabetes educator will help set up a testing schedule for you. Your doctor will help you set a target range for your blood sugar numbers. Keep these factors in mind: Most people with type 2 diabetes only need ...

  3. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes Your chance of getting type 2 diabetes—which used to be called adult-onset diabetes— ... steps to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes by reaching and maintaining a healthy weight, moving ...

  4. Type 2 diabetes - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic (lifelong) disease. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using the insulin ... get too high. Over time, people with type 2 diabetes may not have enough insulin. Most people ...

  5. Pomegranate and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Saleem; Swedan, Samer; Alguraan, Ziyad

    2013-05-01

    Over the last decade, various studies have linked pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn), a fruit native to the Middle East, with type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment. This review focuses on current laboratory and clinical research related to the effects of pomegranate fractions (peels, flowers, and seeds) and some of their active components on biochemical and metabolic variables associated with the pathologic markers of type 2 diabetes. This review systematically presents findings from cell culture and animal studies as well as clinical human research. One key mechanism by which pomegranate fractions affect the type 2 diabetic condition is by reducing oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. This reduction may occur by directly neutralizing the generated reactive oxygen species, increasing certain antioxidant enzyme activities, inducing metal chelation activity, reducing resistin formation, and inhibiting or activating certain transcriptional factors, such as nuclear factor κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. Fasting blood glucose levels were decreased significantly by punicic acid, methanolic seed extract, and pomegranate peel extract. Known compounds in pomegranate, such as punicalagin and ellagic, gallic, oleanolic, ursolic, and uallic acids, have been identified as having anti-diabetic actions. Furthermore, the juice sugar fraction was found to have unique antioxidant polyphenols (tannins and anthocyanins), which could be beneficial to control conditions in type 2 diabetes. These findings provide evidence for the anti-diabetic activity of pomegranate fruit; however, before pomegranate or any of its extracts can be medically recommended for the management of type 2 diabetes, controlled, clinical studies, are needed. PMID:23684435

  6. Type 2 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease. Alternative Names Noninsulin-dependent diabetes; Diabetes - type 2; Adult-onset diabetes Images Diabetes and exercise Diabetic emergency supplies Starchy foods Low blood sugar symptoms ...

  7. [Obesity and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Toplak, Hermann; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Wascher, Thomas C; Schindler, Karin; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes are nowadays summarized as "diabesity". That is due to the fact that obesity is frequently preceding and the most important risk factor in the increase of Type 2 Diabetes. The body mass index (BMI) is a crude measure of body fatness. Even normal weight persons can have lack in muscles (sarcopenia), which leads to the recommendation to measure waist und body fatness (e.g. BIA). Lifestyle management including nutrition and physical activity are important for diabetes prevention. In the therapy of Type 2 Diabetes body weight is increasingly used as secondary target. Also the choice of the anti-diabetic medication and concomitant medications is increasingly influenced by body weight. The significance of anti-obesity medications in the therapy of type 2 diabetes will have to be clarified by future studies. Bariatric surgery is at present indicated with a BMI above BMI > 35 kg/m(2) and can lead at least to partial diabetes remission but has to be part of a lifelong care concept. PMID:27052246

  8. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Sheri R.; Sigal, Ronald J.; Fernhall, Bo; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Blissmer, Bryan J.; Rubin, Richard R.; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Albright, Ann L.; Braun, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Although physical activity (PA) is a key element in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes, many with this chronic disease do not become or remain regularly active. High-quality studies establishing the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes were lacking until recently, but it is now well established that participation in regular PA improves blood glucose control and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes, along with positively affecting lipids, blood pressure, cardiovascular events, mortality, and quality of life. Structured interventions combining PA and modest weight loss have been shown to lower type 2 diabetes risk by up to 58% in high-risk populations. Most benefits of PA on diabetes management are realized through acute and chronic improvements in insulin action, accomplished with both aerobic and resistance training. The benefits of physical training are discussed, along with recommendations for varying activities, PA-associated blood glucose management, diabetes prevention, gestational diabetes mellitus, and safe and effective practices for PA with diabetes-related complications. PMID:21115758

  9. Psoriasis Tied to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158526.html Psoriasis Tied to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes A genetic link is one ... prove that psoriasis causes type 2 diabetes or obesity or vice versa, Lonnberg added. However, the study ...

  10. Type 2 Diabetes and Spina Bifida

    MedlinePlus

    ... called metabolic syndrome. What Causes Type 2 Diabetes? Obesity is the main cause of type 2 diabetes. ... 95th percentile, a person is considered overweight; and obesity occurs when BMI is greater than the 95th ...

  11. Type 2 diabetes - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000328.htm Type 2 diabetes - self-care To use the sharing features on ... seeing a diabetes educator. Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes You may not have any symptoms. If you ...

  12. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table ... pre-diabetes have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, and for ...

  13. Psoriasis Tied to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158526.html Psoriasis Tied to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes A genetic link is one ... prove that psoriasis causes type 2 diabetes or obesity or vice versa, Lonnberg added. However, the study ...

  14. Genetics of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of interaction between environmental factors and a strong hereditary component. We review the heritability of T2D as well as the history of genetic and genomic research in this area. Very few T2D risk genes were identified using candidate gene and linkage-based studies, but the advent of genome-wide association studies has led to the identification of multiple genes, including several that were not previously known to play any role in T2D. Highly replicated genes, for example TCF7L2, KCNQ1 and KCNJ11, are discussed in greater detail. Taken together, the genetic loci discovered to date explain only a small proportion of the observed heritability. We discuss possible explanations for this “missing heritability”, including the role of rare variants, gene-environment interactions and epigenetics. The clinical utility of current findings and avenues of future research are also discussed. PMID:23961321

  15. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease. People ...

  16. [Chronic nicotinamide overload and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shi-Sheng; Li, Da; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Sun, Wu-Ping; Liu, Xing-Xing; Lun, Yong-Zhi

    2010-02-25

    Type 2 diabetes is a major global health problem. It is generally accepted that type 2 diabetes is the result of gene-environmental interaction. However, the mechanism underlying the interaction is unclear. Diet change is known to play an important role in type 2 diabetes. The fact that the global high prevalence of type 2 diabetes has occurred following the spread of food fortification worldwide suggests a possible involvement of excess niacin intake. Our recent study found that nicotinamide overload and low nicotinamide detoxification may induce oxidative stress associated with insulin resistance. Based on the relevant facts, this review briefly summarized the relationship between the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and the nicotinamide metabolism changes induced by excess niacin intake, aldehyde oxidase inhibitors, liver diseases and functional defects of skin. We speculate that the gene-environmental interaction in type 2 diabetes may be a reflection of the outcome of the association of chronic nicotinamide overload-induced toxicity and the relatively low detoxification/excretion capacity of the body. Reducing the content of niacin in foods may be a promising strategy for the control of type 2 diabetes. PMID:20179894

  17. Pedal Away from Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159835.html Pedal Away From Type 2 Diabetes Study finds biking may help adults avoid ... TUESDAY, July 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Opting for two wheels rather than four could lower your risk ...

  18. Somatotype in elderly type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Buffa, Roberto; Floris, Giovanni; Putzu, Paolo F; Carboni, Luciano; Marini, Elisabetta

    2007-09-01

    Somatotyping is a practical technique for the description of physique. Individuals with Type 2 diabetes are characterized by physical peculiarities, such as overweight, obesity and a central pattern of body fat distribution. Somatotype applications to diabetes are limited. The objective of this study is to describe the somatotype of elderly type 2 diabetes patients. The sample consisted of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes (45 men, mean age 69.4 +/- 7.0 years; 65 women, mean age 72.9 +/- 7.1 years). The pathological subjects were compared with a control group consisting of 280 healthy individuals (134 men, mean age 74.2 +/- 7.3 years; 146 women, mean age 74.9 +/- 7.4 years). The Heath-Carter somatotype was applied. Diabetic men and women (mean somatotype, respectively: 6.8-5.6-0.6 and 8.6-6.4-0.2) presented significantly higher values of endomorphy than the controls (p = 0.043 in men, p = 0.003 in women); men also had a lower mesomorphic component (p = 0.000). The somatotype method revealed physical peculiarities in type 2 diabetes patients. The marked endomorphy in the pathological individuals can be related to general fatness, which is a well known disease risk factor. The somatotype appears to be a suitable technique for the assessment of physique in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:18041381

  19. [Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD)].

    PubMed

    Concha L, Luciana; Durruty A, Pilar; García de Los Ríos A, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD) is presently a well-defined clinical entity, characterized by a debut with severe hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis similar to the presenting form of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1). However, it appears in subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) phenotype. This situation is caused by an acute, reversible dysfunction of the beta cell in individuals with insulin resistance. Once the acute stage subsides, patients behave as having a DM2 and do not require insulin treatment. They should be kept on a diet and oral hypoglycemic drugs due to their susceptibility to have recurrent acute ketotic decompensations. PMID:26530207

  20. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarry-Horn, Jill L.; Evans, Barbara J.; Kerrigan, James R.

    2003-01-01

    In the United States, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in children and adolescents has been increasing at an alarming rate. Early recognition and intervention can delay the onset of type 2 DM and prevent the long-term complications. School nurses have an essential role in implementing the American Diabetes Association (ADA)…

  1. Conceptualizing type 2 diabetes and its management.

    PubMed

    Tsasis, Peter; Wu, Jianhong; An, Aijun; Wong, Hannah J; An, Xiandong; Mei, Zhen; Hains, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is growing worldwide due to population growth, increased rates of obesity, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity. Risk assessment methods can effectively evaluate the risk of diabetes, and a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce risk or prevent complications of type 2 diabetes. However, risk assessment alone has not significantly improved poor adherence to recommended medical interventions and lifestyle changes. This paper focuses on the challenge of nonadherence and posits that improving adherence requires tailoring interventions that explicitly consider the social determinants of health. PMID:27099510

  2. [Surgical treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Muciño-Bermejo, María Jimena

    2014-01-01

    Sustained remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus and significantly improved hyperlipidemia and arterial hypertension, control has been achieves in both lean and obese patient after bariatric surgery procedures or other gastrointestinal surgical procedures. It has been demonstrated that the metabolic effects of bariatric surgery in these patients derives not only in reducing weight and caloric intake, but also endocrine changes resulting from surgical manifestation gastrointestinal tract. In this article we review the clinical outcomes of such interventions (collectively called "metabolic surgery") and the perspectives on the role that these surgeries play in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25312324

  3. Conceptualizing type 2 diabetes and its management

    PubMed Central

    Tsasis, Peter; Wu, Jianhong; An, Aijun; Wong, Hannah J; An, Xiandong; Mei, Zhen; Hains, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is growing worldwide due to population growth, increased rates of obesity, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity. Risk assessment methods can effectively evaluate the risk of diabetes, and a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce risk or prevent complications of type 2 diabetes. However, risk assessment alone has not significantly improved poor adherence to recommended medical interventions and lifestyle changes. This paper focuses on the challenge of nonadherence and posits that improving adherence requires tailoring interventions that explicitly consider the social determinants of health. PMID:27099510

  4. Type 2 Diabetes and Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Naim M.

    2008-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased propensity for uric acid nephrolithiasis. In individuals with diabetes, this increased risk is due to a lower urine pH that results from obesity, dietary factors, and impaired renal ammoniagenesis. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of uric acid stone disease in patients with diabetes are hereby reviewed, and potential molecular mechanisms are proposed.

  5. New therapeutic approaches in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a progressive chronic disease resulting from a dynamic interaction between defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. New molecules have recently been launched and many others are under clinical investigation. Besides classical sulfonylureas and glinides, new insulin secretagogues are now available, which target the incretin gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Indeed, oral incretin enhancers acting as antagonists of the enzyme DPP-4 (dipeptidylpeptidase-4), which inactivates natural GLP-1,and injectable incretin mimetics (exenatide) or analogues (liraglutide), which reproduce the actions of GLP-1 while resisting to DPP-4, represent new opportunities to stimulate insulin secretion, without increasing the risk of hypoglycaemia and weight gain. Among insulin sensitizers, metformin remains unequivocally the first drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, whereas promising drugs as thiazolidinediones (glitazones) were recently challenged because of various safety issues. When insulin is required, insulin analogues, both short-acting and basal ones, may offer some advantages regarding better control of postprandial hyperglycaemia, reduced risk of hypoglycaemia and/or lower weight gain in patients with type 2 diabetes. Emphasis should be put on early detection and intensive management of type 2 diabetes, individualized glucose lowering treatments and goals, stepwise pharmacological strategy avoiding therapeutic inertia, and multiple cardiovascular risk--targeted approach. PMID:19170358

  6. Managing type 2 diabetes in Black patients.

    PubMed

    Akindana, Adeola; Ogunedo, Chioma

    2015-09-13

    Despite many novel treatments available for managing type 2 diabetes mellitus, Black patients continue to disproportionately suffer complications associated with poor glycemic control. This article describes a comprehensive approach to managing diabetes mellitus in these patients while addressing cultural nuances that may be barriers to positive outcomes. PMID:26259037

  7. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents One- ... survey data, researchers found that the prevalence of diabetes in U.S. adults is continuing to rise. And despite efforts to ...

  8. Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... because the body can't use glucose for energy properly. previous continue Complications of Diabetes Sometimes, kids and teens with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, or obesity might develop thick, dark, velvet-like skin around the neck, armpits, groin, ...

  9. Epidemiology of fractures in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann V

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes affects an increasing proportion of older adults, the population that is also at elevated risk of fracture. Type 2 diabetes itself increases the risk of fracture, particularly in African-American and Latino populations. In Western countries, overweight and obesity, associated with reduced fracture risk, are highly prevalent in diabetic patients. Studies in East Asian countries that have a lower prevalence of obesity with diabetes may help to disentangle the effects of diabetes and obesity on the skeleton. Type 2 diabetes is also associated with higher bone density, and as a result standard tools for fracture prediction tend to underestimate fracture risk in this population, an important challenge for risk assessment in the clinical setting. Contributing factors to the increased fracture risk in type 2 diabetes include more frequent falls and deficits in diabetic bone, not captured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), that are as yet not clearly understood. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that poor glycemic control contributes to increased fracture risk although intensive lowering of A1C is not effective in preventing fracture. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Bone and diabetes". PMID:26027505

  10. The Genetic Basis of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swapan Kumar; Elbein, Steven C

    2006-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes results from a complex physiologic process that includes the pancreatic beta cells, peripheral glucose uptake in muscle, the secretion of multiple cytokines and hormone-like molecules from adipocytes, hepatic glucose production, and likely the central nervous system. Consistent with the complex web of physiologic defects, the emerging picture of the genetics will involve a large number of risk susceptibility genes, each individually with relatively small effect (odds ratios below 1.2 in most cases). The challenge for the future will include cataloging and confirming the genetic risk factors, and understanding how these risk factors interact with each other and with the known environmental and lifestyle risk factors that increase the propensity to type 2 diabetes. PMID:16892160

  11. Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    In the UK, diabetes mellitus affects around 3 million people, of whom over 90% have type 2 diabetes. Aims of treatment include minimising long-term complications (e.g. cardiovascular disease, blindness, chronic kidney disease, premature mortality) and avoiding unwanted effects of treatment (e.g. severe hypoglycaemia, weight gain). Management of diabetes includes patient support and education; addressing symptoms; lifestyle modification; targeting associated risk factors for cardiovascular disease; and surveillance for, and management of, complications including treatment-related hypoglycaemia. Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) belongs to a new class of oral glucose-lowering drugs that inhibit renal glucose reabsorption and promote glycosuria. It is licensed in the UK in adults with type 2 diabetes as monotherapy when diet and exercise alone do not provide adequate glycaemic control and who are unable to tolerate metformin; or, as add-on therapy, with other glucose-lowering agents including insulin, when these, with diet and exercise, do not provide adequate glycaemic control. The company's advertising materials claim that dapagliflozin provides a "novel method of controlling excess glucose" with "secondary benefit of weight loss". Here, we review the evidence for the use of dapagliflozin in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24030968

  12. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M; Mahajan, Anubha; Agarwala, Vineeta; Gaulton, Kyle J; Ma, Clement; Fontanillas, Pierre; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J; Rivas, Manuel A; Perry, John R B; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W; Robertson, Neil R; Rayner, N William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E; Fernandez Tajes, Juan; Highland, Heather M; Dupuis, Josee; Chines, Peter S; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Hartl, Christopher; Jackson, Anne U; Chen, Han; Huyghe, Jeroen R; van de Bunt, Martijn; Pearson, Richard D; Kumar, Ashish; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Grarup, Niels; Stringham, Heather M; Gamazon, Eric R; Lee, Jaehoon; Chen, Yuhui; Scott, Robert A; Below, Jennifer E; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jinyan; Go, Min Jin; Stitzel, Michael L; Pasko, Dorota; Parker, Stephen C J; Varga, Tibor V; Green, Todd; Beer, Nicola L; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Ferreira, Teresa; Fingerlin, Tasha; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hu, Cheng; Huh, Iksoo; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Min-Seok; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Selyeong; Lin, Keng-Han; Maxwell, Taylor J; Nagai, Yoshihiko; Wang, Xu; Welch, Ryan P; Yoon, Joon; Zhang, Weihua; Barzilai, Nir; Voight, Benjamin F; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Manning, Alisa; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Balkau, Beverley; Stancáková, Alena; Abboud, Hanna E; Boeing, Heiner; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, James; Carey, Jason; Kwan, Phoenix; Grant, George; Smith, Joshua D; Neale, Benjamin M; Purcell, Shaun; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Lee, Heung Man; Lu, Yingchang; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Zhao, Wei; Danesh, John; Lam, Vincent K L; Park, Kyong Soo; Saleheen, Danish; So, Wing Yee; Tam, Claudia H T; Afzal, Uzma; Aguilar, David; Arya, Rector; Aung, Tin; Chan, Edmund; Navarro, Carmen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Palli, Domenico; Correa, Adolfo; Curran, Joanne E; Rybin, Denis; Farook, Vidya S; Fowler, Sharon P; Freedman, Barry I; Griswold, Michael; Hale, Daniel Esten; Hicks, Pamela J; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kumar, Satish; Lehne, Benjamin; Thuillier, Dorothée; Lim, Wei Yen; Liu, Jianjun; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Loh, Marie; Musani, Solomon K; Puppala, Sobha; Scott, William R; Yengo, Loïc; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Taylor, Herman A; Thameem, Farook; Wilson, Gregory; Wong, Tien Yin; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Levy, Jonathan C; Mangino, Massimo; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Fadista, João; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Herder, Christian; Groves, Christopher J; Wieland, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Koistinen, Heikki A; Doney, Alex S F; Kinnunen, Leena; Esko, Tõnu; Farmer, Andrew J; Hakaste, Liisa; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Kravic, Jasmina; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Hollensted, Mette; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Ladenvall, Claes; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kriebel, Jennifer; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lannfelt, Lars; Lauritzen, Torsten; Narisu, Narisu; Linneberg, Allan; Melander, Olle; Milani, Lili; Neville, Matt; Orho-Melander, Marju; Qi, Lu; Qi, Qibin; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Swift, Amy; Rosengren, Anders H; Stirrups, Kathleen; Wood, Andrew R; Mihailov, Evelin; Blancher, Christine; Carneiro, Mauricio O; Maguire, Jared; Poplin, Ryan; Shakir, Khalid; Fennell, Timothy; DePristo, Mark; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Deloukas, Panos; Gjesing, Anette P; Jun, Goo; Nilsson, Peter; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Onofrio, Robert; Thorand, Barbara; Hansen, Torben; Meisinger, Christa; Hu, Frank B; Isomaa, Bo; Karpe, Fredrik; Liang, Liming; Peters, Annette; Huth, Cornelia; O'Rahilly, Stephen P; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Oluf; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Watanabe, Richard M; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bergman, Richard N; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Bottinger, Erwin P; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chan, Juliana C N; Chia, Kee Seng; Daly, Mark J; Ebrahim, Shah B; Langenberg, Claudia; Elliott, Paul; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Lehman, Donna M; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C W; Pollin, Toni I; Sandhu, Manjinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Froguel, Philippe; Barroso, Inês; Teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Loos, Ruth J F; Small, Kerrin S; Ried, Janina S; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Grallert, Harald; Glaser, Benjamin; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J; Walker, Mark; Banks, Eric; Gieger, Christian; Ingelsson, Erik; Im, Hae Kyung; Illig, Thomas; Franks, Paul W; Buck, Gemma; Trakalo, Joseph; Buck, David; Prokopenko, Inga; Mägi, Reedik; Lind, Lars; Farjoun, Yossi; Owen, Katharine R; Gloyn, Anna L; Strauch, Konstantin; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lee, Jong-Young; Park, Taesung

    2016-08-01

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate, these explain only a fraction of the heritability of this disease. Here, to test the hypothesis that lower-frequency variants explain much of the remainder, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia performed whole-genome sequencing in 2,657 European individuals with and without diabetes, and exome sequencing in 12,940 individuals from five ancestry groups. To increase statistical power, we expanded the sample size via genotyping and imputation in a further 111,548 subjects. Variants associated with type 2 diabetes after sequencing were overwhelmingly common and most fell within regions previously identified by genome-wide association studies. Comprehensive enumeration of sequence variation is necessary to identify functional alleles that provide important clues to disease pathophysiology, but large-scale sequencing does not support the idea that lower-frequency variants have a major role in predisposition to type 2 diabetes. PMID:27398621

  13. Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Marchie, Augustine; Jenkins, Alexandra L; Augustin, Livia S A; Ludwig, David S; Barnard, Neal D; Anderson, James W

    2003-09-01

    Based on what is known of the components of plant-based diets and their effects from cohort studies, there is reason to believe that vegetarian diets would have advantages in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. At present there are few data on vegetarian diets in diabetes that do not in addition have weight loss or exercise components. Nevertheless, the use of whole-grain or traditionally processed cereals and legumes has been associated with improved glycemic control in both diabetic and insulin-resistant individuals. Long-term cohort studies have indicated that whole-grain consumption reduces the risk of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, nuts (eg, almonds), viscous fibers (eg, fibers from oats and barley), soy proteins, and plant sterols, which may be part of the vegetarian diet, reduce serum lipids. In combination, these plant food components may have a very significant impact on cardiovascular disease, one of the major complications of diabetes. Furthermore, substituting soy or other vegetable proteins for animal protein may also decrease renal hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and renal acid load and in the long term reduce the risk of developing renal disease in type 2 diabetes. The vegetarian diet, therefore, contains a portfolio of natural products and food forms of benefit for both the carbohydrate and lipid abnormalities in diabetes. It is anticipated that their combined use in vegetarian diets will produce very significant metabolic advantages for the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its complications. PMID:12936955

  14. Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159330.html Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Prognosis may ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prospects for people with type 2 diabetes and heart disease may be grimmer than ...

  15. Spare the Meat, Skip the Type 2 Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159363.html Spare the Meat, Skip the Type 2 Diabetes? A mostly plant-based diet may help ... grains -- may significantly lower your risk of type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. "This study highlights ...

  16. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Small Steps, Big Rewards": Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Past Issues / Fall ... These are the plain facts in "Small Steps. Big Rewards: Prevent Type 2 Diabetes," an education campaign ...

  17. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": You Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Steps, Big Rewards": You Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table of Contents For ... million Americans are at risk for type 2 diabetes." "Fifty four million Americans are at risk for ...

  18. Study Suggests Type 2 Diabetes-Cancer Link

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159814.html Study Suggests Type 2 Diabetes-Cancer Link It hints at -- but doesn' ... decade before -- and three months following -- a type 2 diabetes diagnosis, new research suggests. Although it's not ...

  19. Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avoiding Pregnancy Articles Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Problems of Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well ...

  20. Management of type 2 diabetes: evolving strategies for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A.; Jerkins, Terri W.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Kitabchi, Abbas E.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to increase at an alarming rate around the world, with even more people being affected by prediabetes. Although the pathogenesis and long-term complications of type 2 diabetes are fairly well known, its treatment has remained challenging, with only half of the patients achieving the recommended hemoglobin A1c target. This narrative review explores the pathogenetic rationale for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, with the view of fostering better understanding of the evolving treatment modalities. The diagnostic criteria including the role of hemoglobin A1c in the diagnosis of diabetes are discussed. Due attention is given to the different therapeutic maneuvers and their utility in the management of the diabetic patient. The evidence supporting the role of exercise, medical nutrition therapy, glucose monitoring, and antiobesity measures including pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery is discussed. The controversial subject of optimum glycemic control in hospitalized and ambulatory patients is discussed in detail. An update of the available pharmacologic options for the management of type 2 diabetes is provided with particular emphasis on newer and emerging modalities. Special attention has been given to the initiation of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, with explanation of the pathophysiologic basis for insulin therapy in the ambulatory diabetic patient. A review of the evidence supporting the efficacy of the different preventive measures is also provided. PMID:21134520

  1. Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, S; Edelman, S V

    2001-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a common disorder often accompanied by numerous metabolic abnormalities leading to a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Results from the UKPDS have confirmed that intensive glucose control delays the onset and retards the progression of microvascular disease and possibly of macrovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. In the early stages of the disease, insulin resistance plays a major role in the development of hyperglycemia and other metabolic abnormalities, and patients with type 2 diabetes often benefit from measures to improve insulin sensitivity such as weight loss, dietary changes, and exercise. Later, the use of oral insulin secretagogues and insulin sensitizers as monotherapy and in combination helps maintain glycemia for varying periods of time. Ultimately, because of the progressive nature of the disease and the progressive decline in pancreatic beta-cell function, insulin therapy is almost always obligatory to achieve optimal glycemic goals. Not all patients are candidates for aggressive insulin management; therefore, the goals of therapy should be modified, especially in elderly individuals and those with co-morbid conditions. Candidates for intensive management should be motivated, compliant, and educable, without other major medical conditions and physical limitations that would preclude accurate and reliable HGM and insulin administration. In selected patients, combination therapy with insulin and oral antidiabetic medications can be an effective method for normalizing glycemia without the need for rigorous multiple-injection regimens. The patients for whom combination therapy is most commonly successful are those who do not achieve adequate glycemic control using daytime oral agents but who still show some evidence of responsiveness to the medications. Bedtime intermediate-acting or predinner premixed intermediate- and rapid-acting insulin is administered and progressively increased until the FPG

  2. [Type 2 diabetes: what therapeutic strategy?].

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, A; Hartemann-Heurtier, A

    2001-02-17

    GOAL OF TREATMENT: Prevention of diabetic micro and macroangiopathy is the goal of treatment in type 2 diabetes mellitus. A well-controlled glucose level is the key to prevention of microangiopathy; there is no threshold level. Antihypertensive treatment, with the goal of blood pressure below 130/80 mmHg is also beneficial in preventing aggravation of microangiopathy. For macroangiopathy, prevention is based in priority on treatment of other risk factors for cardiovascular disease; the threshold level for drug treatment and the therapeutic objective are those defined for secondary prevention in non-diabetic patients, i.e. blood pressure below 140/80 mmHg and LDL cholesterol under 1.30 g/l. The beneficial effect of lower glucose levels on preventing macrovascular risk was not formally demonstrated by the UKPDS, probably because the difference between the control and the treatment group HbA1c levels was minimal, 0.9 points. REVISITING STRATEGY: It is thus time to revisit the preventive strategy for type 2 diabetes mellitus, i.e. step-by-step increments, as currently proposed for worsening glucose levels. Metformine should be prescribed if the HbA1c is above normal in order to achieve the demonstrated benefit in prevention of microangiopathy and in the hope, motivated by pathophysiology data, of preventing insulin failure. Slow-release insulin at bedtime should be added to the oral hypoglycemiants if fasting glucose exceeds 1.60 or 1.80 g/l, even if the HbA1c remains below 8%. NEW HYPOGLYCEMIANTS: The role of these new agents in this more "aggressive" strategy remains to be defined. Glinides will have to demonstrate their superiority over sulfamides (fewer episodes of hypoglycemia with comparable efficacy) to justify their high cost. Glitazones will have to demonstrate a beneficial effect in second intention combination with metformine on cardiovascular morbidity mortality in type 2 diabetes patients with a metabolic insulin-resistance syndrome and visceral obesity

  3. Genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuo; Shojima, Nobuhiro; Hosoe, Jun; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2014-09-19

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 70 loci associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Most genetic variants associated with T2D are common variants with modest effects on T2D and are shared with major ancestry groups. To what extent the genetic component of T2D can be explained by common variants relies upon the shape of the genetic architecture of T2D. Fine mapping utilizing populations with different patterns of linkage disequilibrium and functional annotation derived from experiments in relevant tissues are mandatory to track down causal variants responsible for the pathogenesis of T2D. PMID:25111817

  4. Pharmacologic Therapy of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jennifer J; Tylee, Tracy S

    2016-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a common condition. Treatment of diabetes and related complications can be complex. In addition to lifestyle changes, medications play an important role in controlling patients' blood glucose levels and preventing complications. From an individual and societal standpoint, it is also an expensive disease. Medical spending attributed to diabetes per individual is significant. With appropriate therapy, patients can lead full, healthy lives with the disease, so making informed decisions regarding pharmacotherapy for T2DM is clearly of great importance. PMID:27235609

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and exercise impairment.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Jane E B; Bridenstine, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2013-03-01

    Limitations in physical fitness, a consistent finding in individuals with both type I and type 2 diabetes mellitus, correlate strongly with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. These limitations may significantly contribute to the persistent excess cardiovascular mortality affecting this group. Exercise impairments in VO2 peak and VO2 kinetics manifest early on in diabetes, even with good glycemic control and in the absence of clinically apparent complications. Subclinical cardiac dysfunction is often present but does not fully explain the observed defect in exercise capacity in persons with diabetes. In part, the cardiac limitations are secondary to decreased perfusion with exercise challenge. This is a reversible defect. Similarly, in the skeletal muscle, impairments in nutritive blood flow correlate with slowed (or inefficient) exercise kinetics and decreased exercise capacity. Several correlations highlight the likelihood of endothelial-specific impairments as mediators of exercise dysfunction in diabetes, including insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, decreased myocardial perfusion, slowed tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and impairment in mitochondrial function. Both exercise training and therapies targeted at improving insulin sensitivity and endothelial function improve physical fitness in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Optimization of exercise functions in people with diabetes has implications for diabetes prevention and reductions in mortality risk. Understanding the molecular details of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes may provide specific therapeutic targets for the remediation of this defect. Rat models to test this hypothesis are under study. PMID:23299658

  6. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Stephen J

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to fluoroquinolone antibiotics is postulated as a risk factor for subsequent development of type 2 diabetes. It is hypothesized that fluoroquinolones induce an intracellular magnesium deficit that can lead to insulin resistance. A temporal correlation is reported between the rate of outpatient prescription of quinolones and the incidence of diabetes during the period 1980-2011 with a lag of approximately two years (R(2)=0.86, P<10(-9)). The increase in incidence of diabetes after 1990 and the recent decrease in the number of new cases are both reflected in the fluoroquinolone prescription rates. A geographical correlation is reported (adj. R(2)=0.7, P<0.0001) between rates of increase in prevalence of diabetes in each U.S. state and a model using only local rates of outpatient fluoroquinolone prescription, local rates of increase in the prevalence of obesity, and local rates of population growth as predictor variables. Prescription rates of non-quinolone antibiotics correlated less well with the local rates of increase in prevalence of diabetes. The data are consistent with fluoroquinolone exposure predisposing an individual to develop diabetes with a probability that strongly depends upon factors that also lead to an increase in obesity. According to the hypothesis, much of the increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes in the U.S. from 1990 to the present can be attributed to fluoroquinolone exposure. PMID:24947193

  7. Incretin agents in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Stuart A.; Ekoé, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To evaluate the emerging classes of antihyperglycemic agents that target the incretin pathway, including their therapeutic efficacy and side effect profiles, in order to help identify their place among the treatment options for patients with type 2 diabetes. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched. Most evidence is level I and II. MAIN MESSAGE Two classes of incretin agents are currently available: glucagonlike peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors, both of which lower hyperglycemia considerably without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia. The GLP1 receptor agonists have a greater effect on patients’ glycated hemoglobin A1c levels and cause sustained weight loss, whereas the DPP4 inhibitors are weight-neutral. CONCLUSION The GLP1 and DPP4 incretin agents, promising and versatile antihyperglycemic agents, are finding their way into the therapeutic algorithm for treating type 2 diabetes. They can be used in patients not adequately controlled by metformin monotherapy or as initial therapy in those for whom metformin is contraindicated. PMID:20631270

  8. Basal insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hedrington, Maka S; Pulliam, Lindsay; Davis, Stephen N

    2011-06-01

    Insulin glargine is the first 24-h recombinant DNA insulin analog introduced to the market. Substitution of glycine for asparagine and addition of two arginine residues raise the isoelectric point of insulin glargine and result in microprecipitates, delaying absorption from subcutaneous tissue. This delayed absorption result in fairly flat 24-h insulin concentration profiles with no discernible peak. Large, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials in patients with type 2 diabetes show that although NPH insulin and insulin glargine are equally effective in lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c) and fasting blood glucose, there is a clear advantage of insulin glargine over NPH insulin in reducing nocturnal and overall hypoglycemia. Lower risk of hypoglycemia with glargine was also consistently demonstrated by trials comparing insulin glargine and premixed analog insulins. These studies also showed greater reduction in A1c with twice-daily premixed insulins compared with glargine, when insulin glargine was administered without mealtime insulin coverage. Insulin glargine was also compared with another insulin analog, insulin detemir. Trials showed that both insulin analogs are equally effective in lowering A1c and have comparable risk of hypoglycemia. Trials comparing insulin glargine with glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists showed comparable significant reductions in A1c with both regimens. Insulin glargine is well tolerated, has low immunogenicity, reduced risks for acute myocardial infarction, and a lower risk of hypoglycemia compared with NPH insulin in individuals with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21668335

  9. Basal Insulin Treatment in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hedrington, Maka S.; Pulliam, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Insulin glargine is the first 24-h recombinant DNA insulin analog introduced to the market. Substitution of glycine for asparagine and addition of two arginine residues raise the isoelectric point of insulin glargine and result in microprecipitates, delaying absorption from subcutaneous tissue. This delayed absorption result in fairly flat 24-h insulin concentration profiles with no discernible peak. Large, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials in patients with type 2 diabetes show that although NPH insulin and insulin glargine are equally effective in lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c) and fasting blood glucose, there is a clear advantage of insulin glargine over NPH insulin in reducing nocturnal and overall hypoglycemia. Lower risk of hypoglycemia with glargine was also consistently demonstrated by trials comparing insulin glargine and premixed analog insulins. These studies also showed greater reduction in A1c with twice-daily premixed insulins compared with glargine, when insulin glargine was administered without mealtime insulin coverage. Insulin glargine was also compared with another insulin analog, insulin detemir. Trials showed that both insulin analogs are equally effective in lowering A1c and have comparable risk of hypoglycemia. Trials comparing insulin glargine with glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists showed comparable significant reductions in A1c with both regimens. Insulin glargine is well tolerated, has low immunogenicity, reduced risks for acute myocardial infarction, and a lower risk of hypoglycemia compared with NPH insulin in individuals with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21668335

  10. Vitamins and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Ramos, Roxana; Ana Laura, Guadarrama-López; Elina, Martínez-Carrillo Beatriz; Donají, Benítez-Arciniega Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    The present review evaluates the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and individual or combined vitamins. Antioxidant vitamins A, C and E are found decreased in diabetic subjects, possibly due to an increased need to control the excessive oxidative stress produced by abnormalities in glucose metabolism. On the other hand, retinol binding protein exerts a modulating effect, as it has adipokine functions. With respect to the B group vitamins, thiamin, pyridoxine and biotin have been found decreased but the mechanisms are not clear, however supplementation has shown some improvement of the metabolic control in diabetic patients. The absorption of folic acid and vitamin B12 is importantly decreased by the prolongued use of metformin, which is the first choice drug in uncomplicated diabetes, thus these two nutrients have been found deficient in the disease and most probably need to be supplemented regularly. On the other hand, vitamin D is considered a risk factor for the development of diabetes as well as its complications, particularly cardiovascular ones. Although some studies have found an association of vitamin K intake with glucose metabolism further research is needed. Studies on the use of multivitamin supplements have shown unconclusive results. After reviewing the evidence, no real recommendation on the use of vitamin supplements in type 2 diabetes mellitus can be issued, however patients using metformin during prolongued periods may need folic acid and vitamin B12. PMID:25388747

  11. [Dietary advice in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Rigalleau, Vincent; Gonzalez, Concepcion; Raffaitin, Christelle; Gin, Henri

    2010-04-20

    The dietary advice is a part of the global care for type 2 diabetes. First, overweight implies a caloric restriction. When poor glucose control is associated with weight gain, important errors are obvious (excess fat and sugar), providing more pills or insulin without correcting them is poorly effective, but promotes further weight gain. Normal body weight, or poor glucose control despite loss of weight, needs to reappraise the diagnosis: diabetes type, intercurrent disease. The cofactors of the "metabolic syndrom" are usually present, so saturated fat has to be reduced, while maintaining fish, fruits, vegetables and whole grain cereals. Blood pressure and dyslipidemia may need further counselling about dietary sodium, carbohydrates, cholesterol. When insulin, sulfonylurea or glinids are indicated, the dietary intake of carbohydrates has to be regular to avoid hypoglycemia. PMID:20465121

  12. Renal Biopsy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Eugenia; Agraz, Irene; Ibernon, Meritxell; Ramos, Natalia; Fort, Joan; Serón, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The majority of diabetic patients with renal involvement are not biopsied. Studies evaluating histological findings in renal biopsies performed in diabetic patients have shown that approximately one third of the cases will show pure diabetic nephropathy, one third a non-diabetic condition and another third will show diabetic nephropathy with a superimposed disease. Early diagnosis of treatable non-diabetic diseases in diabetic patients is important to ameliorate renal prognosis. The publication of the International Consensus Document for the classification of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has provided common criteria for the classification of diabetic nephropathy and its utility to stratify risk for renal failure has already been demonstrated in different retrospective studies. The availability of new drugs with the potential to modify the natural history of diabetic nephropathy has raised the question whether renal biopsies may allow a better design of clinical trials aimed to delay the progression of chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients. PMID:26239461

  13. Bariatric surgery, safety and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Spanakis, Elias; Gragnoli, Claudia

    2009-03-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) represent major health concerns in the USA. Weight loss is the most important aspect in T2D management, as it reduces both morbidity and mortality. Available lifestyle, behavioral, and pharmacological strategies provide just mild to moderate weight loss. The greatest degree of T2D prevention or T2D amelioration in obese subjects has been reported in subjects who underwent bariatric surgery. In the current review, we will describe various types of bariatric surgery, related safety profiles, and their effect on T2D, as well as the potential mechanisms involved in the remission of T2D. Finally, we hereby examine whether bariatric surgery may be considered a treatment for T2D in pregnant women, children, adolescents and subjects at least 65 years old. PMID:18830788

  14. [New therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Puig-Domingo, Manuel; Pellitero, Silvia

    2015-06-22

    The increasing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has led to a growing interest in the investigation of new therapies. Treatment of T2DM has focused on the insulinopenia and insulin resistance. However, in the last 10 years, new lines of research have emerged for the treatment of T2DM and preclinical studies appear promising. The possibility of using these drugs in combination with other currently available drugs will enhance the antidiabetic effect and promote weight loss with fewer side effects. The data provided by post-marketing monitoring will help us to better understand their safety profile and potential long-term effects on target organs, especially the cardiovascular risk. PMID:25194974

  15. The prevention of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Jill P; Knowler, William C; Kahn, Steven E; Marrero, David; Florez, Jose C; Bray, George A; Haffner, Steven M; Hoskin, Mary; Nathan, David M

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects more than 7% of adults in the US and leads to substantial personal and economic burden. In prediabetic states insulin secretion and action—potential targets of preventive interventions—are impaired. In trials lifestyle modification (i.e. weight loss and exercise) has proven effective in preventing incident T2DM in high-risk groups, although weight loss has the greatest effect. Various medications (e.g. metformin, thiazolidinediones and acarbose) can also prevent or delay T2DM. Whether diabetes-prevention strategies also ultimately prevent the development of diabetic vascular complications is unknown, but cardiovascular risk factors are favorably affected. Preventive strategies that can be implemented in routine clinical settings have been developed and evaluated. Widespread application has, however, been limited by local financial considerations, even though cost-effectiveness might be achieved at the population level. PMID:18493227

  16. In the clinic. Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vijan, Sandeep

    2015-03-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Type 2 Diabetes focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:25732301

  17. [TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND DEPRESSION].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, A Ya; Esaulenko, I E; Sahnenko, V V; Budnevskyj, A V; Podvygyn, S N

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance of type 2 diabetes mellitus is not confined to metabolic disorders. A serious problem is also affective pathology that occurs in the majority (30-70%) of patients. However, diagnostics and correction of anxiety and depressive disorders associated with diabetes are often given insufficient attention. Many studies showed relationship between affective disorders and low adherence to the prescribed treatment resulting in general deterioration of clinical prognosis of diabetes. This review article describes the basic mechanisms behind the interrelation of affective disorders and diabetes. The role of persistent subclinical inflammation in diabetes and depression is discussed. The influence of emotional stress on the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on the overproduction of cortisol is emphasized. The similarity of some structural changes in the brain tissue in diabetes and depression is discussed. Effect of endocrine disruption in the emotional sphere is demonstrated. Mechanisms responsible for the development of diabetes and its complications provoked by depression are considered. PMID:27459757

  18. Psychoneuroimmune implications of type 2 diabetes: redux.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Jason C; Johnson, Daniel R; Freund, Gregory G

    2009-05-01

    A sizable body of knowledge has arisen demonstrating that type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with alterations in the innate immune system. The resulting proinflammatory-leaning imbalance is implicated in the development of secondary disease complications and comorbidities, such as delayed wound healing, accelerated progress of atherosclerosis, and retinopathy, in people who have T2D. New experimental data and the results of recently published health-related quality-of-life surveys indicate that individuals who have T2D experience diminished feelings of happiness, well being, and satisfaction with life. These emotional and psychological consequences of T2D point to altered neuroimmunity as a previously unappreciated complication of T2D. This article discusses recent data detailing the impact of T2D on a person's PNI response. PMID:19389586

  19. Type 2 diabetes in pregnancy - An increasing problem.

    PubMed

    Temple, Rosemary; Murphy, Helen

    2010-08-01

    The worldwide epidemic in type 2 diabetes has been associated with an increased diagnosis in young adults. This has lead to a rapid rise in the number of pregnancies complicated by type 2 diabetes. Studies have shown risk of serious adverse outcome, including congenital malformation and perinatal mortality, is the same, or increased, in type 2 diabetes compared to type 1 diabetes. Despite improved glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes compared to type 1 diabetes, rates of perinatal morbidity, including preterm birth and macrosomia, appear to be similar. Risk factors associated with poor pregnancy outcome in women with type 2 diabetes include obesity, ethnicity and poor pregnancy preparation. This review will cover practical aspects of management of type 2 diabetes before, during and after pregnancy, including prepregnancy care, safety of oral hypoglycaemic agents, glycaemic management during labour, and choice of effective contraception. PMID:20832738

  20. Nurse Practitioner Management of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Gail Carr; Derouin, Anne L; Vorderstrasse, Allison A; Hipkens, James; Thompson, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Context Multifactorial barriers prevent primary care clinicians from helping their adult patients with type 2 diabetes achieve good control of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Patients’ depression and low self-efficacy can complicate diabetes management by impairing tasks needed for effective disease self-management. Objectives: To evaluate whether nurse practitioners in collaborative practices with primary care clinicians are effective in helping improve control of HbA1c, blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, and to assess whether nurse practitioner-guided care affects depression and self-efficacy in these patients. Design: De-identified preintervention and postintervention data were collected from prospective review of medical charts of patients in a managed care organization’s primary care clinics. Main Outcome Measures: Preintervention and postintervention HbA1c values were evaluated as the primary outcome measure. Preintervention and postintervention values for BP, LDL-C, body weight, and depression and self-efficacy scores were secondary outcome measures. Results: After intervention, 50% of 26 patients achieved HbA1c benchmarks, 95.6% achieved systolic and diastolic BP benchmarks, and 57.8% achieved LDL-C benchmarks. Wilcoxon paired samples tests showed significantly increased self-efficacy (z = −3.42, p < 0.001) from preintervention to postintervention. Depression scores decreased slightly from preintervention (mean = 0.44, standard deviation = 1.34, median < 0.001) to postintervention values (mean = 0.18, standard deviation = 0.73, median < 0.001), but this decrease was not significant. Conclusion: Integrating nurse practitioners into primary care teams to provide innovative methods of support to adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia improves clinical outcomes and self-efficacy for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24867560

  1. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus: new treatments].

    PubMed

    Ascaso, Juan F

    2014-08-01

    The benefits and problems associated with traditional hypoglycemic drugs, such as failure of beta cells, hypoglycemia and weight gain, that lead to a worsening of diabetes, are reviewed. New hypoglycemic drugs with incretin effect (glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors), achieve, in a glucose dependent manner, an glycosylated hemoglobin reduction without hypoglycemia or increase in body weight. Recently, another group of oral hypoglycemic drugs, sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors, have demonstrated efficacy in diabetes control by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption. However, long-term effects and cardiovascular prevention remain to be demonstrated. We have more and better drugs nowadays. Hypoglycemic treatment should be customized (glycosylated hemoglobin levels, risk-benefit, risk of hypoglycemia, weight changes, cardiovascular risk), with a combination of drugs being necessary in most cases. However, we do not have yet an ideal hypoglycemic drug. Moreover we must remember that an early and intensive treatment of dyslipidemia and hypertension is essential for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23937815

  2. Causes of type 2 diabetes in China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ronald Ching Wan; Lin, Xu; Jia, Weiping

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in China has increased substantially over recent decades, with more than 100 million people estimated to be affected by the disease presently. During this period there has been an increase in the rates of obesity and a reduction in physical activity. Many of the changes in lifestyle and diet are a result of increased economic development and urbanisation. In addition to an increasingly westernised diet, the traditional Chinese diet also plays a part, with the quantity and quality of rice intake linked to the risk of type 2 diabetes. Familial factors including inherited genetic variants are important, although differences in the genetic architecture suggest a different combination of genetic variants could be most relevant in Chinese when compared with Europeans. Recent advances have also emphasised the role of early life factors in the epidemic of diabetes and non-communicable diseases: maternal undernutrition, maternal obesity, and gestational diabetes are all linked to increased risk of diabetes in offspring. A mismatch between developmentally programmed biology and the modern environment is relevant for countries like China where there has been rapid economic transformation. Multisectoral efforts to address the risks will be needed at different stages throughout the lifecourse to reduce the burden of diabetes. PMID:25218727

  3. In the clinic. Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vijan, Sandeep

    2010-03-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of type 2 diabetes focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. Readers can complete the accompanying CME quiz for 1.5 credits. Only ACP members and individual subscribers can access the electronic features of In the Clinic. Non-subscribers who wish to access this issue of In the Clinic can elect "Pay for View." Subscribers can receive 1.5 category 1 CME credits by completing the CME quiz that accompanies this issue of In the Clinic. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including PIER (Physicians' Information and Education Resource) and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing division and with assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from PIER and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult www.acponline.org, http://pier.acponline.org, and other resources referenced within each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:20194231

  4. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and renal stones

    PubMed Central

    Nerli, Rajendra; Jali, Mallikarjuna; Guntaka, Ajay Kumar; Patne, Pravin; Patil, Shivagouda; Hiremath, Murigendra Basayya

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of urinary stone disease has shown a steep rise in recent decades along with marked modifications in dietary habits and life- style. There has been an increased prevalence of urinary stone disease in patients with diabetes. We took up this study to determine the association of diabetes mellitus with kidney stones in patients undergoing surgical treatment. Materials and Methods: Patients presenting with renal stones for surgical management formed the study group. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated by noting the weight and height of the patient. The extracted stone/stone fragments were analyzed to determine the chemical composition. Urinary pH was similarly noted in all. Results: The mean BMI among the diabetics was 26.35 ± 5.20 (range 17.75-35.60), whereas the mean BMI among the non-diabetics was 23.41 ± 2.85 (range 17.71-31.62) (P < 0.0004). The incidence of uric acid calculi in the diabetics was significantly high (P < 0.03). The mean urinary pH among the diabetics was 5.61 ± 0.36 and among the non-diabetics was 6.87 ± 0.32, which was significantly lower (P < 0.000044). Conclusions: There is a strong association between type 2 diabetes and uric acid stone formation. There is also a strong association between diabetes mellitus, BMI, and also with lower urinary pH. PMID:26605219

  5. Multidisciplinary management of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Michael E; Rothman, Russell L

    2010-01-01

    Although once considered a disease of adults, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in youth is increasing at a significant rate. Similar to adults, youth with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for developing hypertension, lipid abnormalities, renal disease, and other diabetes-related complications. However, children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes also face many unique management challenges that are different from adults with type 2 diabetes or children with type 1 diabetes. To deliver safe, effective, high-quality, cost-effective health care to adolescents with type 2 diabetes, reorganization and redesign of health care systems are needed. Multidisciplinary health care teams, which allow individuals with specialized training to maximally utilize their skills within an organized diabetes treatment team, may increase efficiency and effectiveness and may improve outcomes in children with type 2 diabetes. This review article provides a brief review of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, provides an overview of multidisciplinary health care teams, and discusses the role of multidisciplinary health care management in youth with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21197360

  6. Tips for Kids: Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Today, more kids have type 2 diabetes than ever before. This colorful, easy-to-read tip sheet encourages young people to take steps to lower their risk for type 2 diabetes. A list of warning signs and a healthy eating guide is offered, along with a list of websites to learn more. [This brochure was prepared by the Department of Health and Human…

  7. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Reinehr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is emerging as a new clinical problem within pediatric practice. Recent reports indicate an increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents around the world in all ethnicities, even if the prevalence of obesity is not increasing any more. The majority of young people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus was found in specific ethnic subgroups such as African-American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islanders and American Indians. Clinicians should be aware of the frequent mild or asymptomatic manifestation of type 2 diabetes mellitus in childhood. Therefore, a screening seems meaningful especially in high risk groups such as children and adolescents with obesity, relatives with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and clinical features of insulin resistance (hypertension, dyslipidemia, polycystic ovarian syndrome, or acanthosis nigricans). Treatment of choice is lifestyle intervention followed by pharmacological treatment (e.g., metformin). New drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors or glucagon like peptide 1 mimetics are in the pipeline for treatment of youth with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, recent reports indicate a high dropout of the medical care system of adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus suggesting that management of children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus requires some remodeling of current healthcare practices. PMID:24379917

  8. Tips for Kids with Type 2 Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to be called “insulin dependent” or “juvenile diabetes.” In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes some insulin but the ... to see how you are doing. Kids with type 2 diabetes may need to take insulin or pills to ...

  9. Dulaglutide: A Review in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Burness, Celeste B; Scott, Lesley J

    2015-12-01

    Dulaglutide (Trulicity™) is a once-weekly subcutaneously administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist produced by recombinant DNA technology and approved in numerous countries as an adjunct to diet and exercise for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). In randomized controlled trials in patients with T2DM, dulaglutide monotherapy was noninferior to once-daily subcutaneous liraglutide monotherapy and significantly more effective than oral metformin monotherapy in improving glycemic control at 26 weeks. When used in combination with other agents (including metformin, metformin and a sulfonylurea, metformin and oral pioglitazone, and prandial insulin ± metformin), dulaglutide was noninferior to once-daily liraglutide and significantly more effective than once-daily oral sitagliptin, twice-daily subcutaneous exenatide, and once-daily subcutaneous insulin glargine in terms of improvements in glycated hemoglobin from baseline at 26 or 52 weeks, in trials of 26-104 weeks' duration. Moreover, dulaglutide 1.5 mg once weekly, but not 0.75 mg once weekly, was associated with consistent reductions form baseline in bodyweight. Improvements in glycemic control and bodyweight were maintained during long-term treatment (up to 2 years). Dulaglutide was generally well tolerated, with a low inherent risk of hypoglycemia. The most frequently reported adverse events in clinical trials were gastrointestinal-related (e.g., nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea). Thus, dulaglutide is a useful option for the treatment of adult patients with T2DM. PMID:26423061

  10. Insulin Signaling in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Brännmark, Cecilia; Nyman, Elin; Fagerholm, Siri; Bergenholm, Linnéa; Ekstrand, Eva-Maria; Cedersund, Gunnar; Strålfors, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes originates in an expanding adipose tissue that for unknown reasons becomes insulin resistant. Insulin resistance reflects impairments in insulin signaling, but mechanisms involved are unclear because current research is fragmented. We report a systems level mechanistic understanding of insulin resistance, using systems wide and internally consistent data from human adipocytes. Based on quantitative steady-state and dynamic time course data on signaling intermediaries, normally and in diabetes, we developed a dynamic mathematical model of insulin signaling. The model structure and parameters are identical in the normal and diabetic states of the model, except for three parameters that change in diabetes: (i) reduced concentration of insulin receptor, (ii) reduced concentration of insulin-regulated glucose transporter GLUT4, and (iii) changed feedback from mammalian target of rapamycin in complex with raptor (mTORC1). Modeling reveals that at the core of insulin resistance in human adipocytes is attenuation of a positive feedback from mTORC1 to the insulin receptor substrate-1, which explains reduced sensitivity and signal strength throughout the signaling network. Model simulations with inhibition of mTORC1 are comparable with experimental data on inhibition of mTORC1 using rapamycin in human adipocytes. We demonstrate the potential of the model for identification of drug targets, e.g. increasing the feedback restores insulin signaling, both at the cellular level and, using a multilevel model, at the whole body level. Our findings suggest that insulin resistance in an expanded adipose tissue results from cell growth restriction to prevent cell necrosis. PMID:23400783

  11. Type 2 diabetes: the genetic conflict hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Denic, S; Emerald, S; Nicholls, M G

    2013-04-01

    We propose that conflict between paternally and maternally derived genes in the fetus explains three apparently unrelated observations in epidemiological studies of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2): (i) low birth weight is a risk factor for the development of DM2, (ii) there is a high prevalence of low birth weight among babies of fathers who develop DM2, and (iii) an exceptionally high prevalence of DM2 exists in modern day Arabs. Genetic conflict is caused by a particular relationship between the parents, their genes and their offspring: (i) mothers are sometimes polyandrous i.e. have children with more than one man, (ii) mothers provide more biological resources to the fetus than fathers, and (iii) the genes that regulate fetal growth come from both parents and both sets of genes determine the use of resources which are only those of the mother. There is a tendency for maternally derived genes (that promote fetal growth) to be suppressed, in order to spare use of mother's resources, while the same paternally derived genes tend to be expressed (to enhance use of the mother's resources). These same genes are pleiotropic: they affect not only fetal growth (birth weight) but also insulin resistance and hence the development of DM2. Polyandry increases differences in the expression between two parental alleles in the fetus i.e. increases genetic conflict and results in the production of bigger babies whereas monandry has the opposite effect. Consequently, parent-of-origin-biased expression of pleiotropic developmental genes could explain why smaller babies are more common when the fathers have DM2. Similarly less genetic conflict in Arabs (resulting from the tradition of strict monandry, the practice of levirate, and preference for a paternal cousin as spouse) could explain, at least in part, their exceptionally high prevalence of DM2. This hypothesis links human mate selection with the risk of developing DM2. PMID:23374424

  12. Clinical Characteristics of Young Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjia; Cai, Xiaoling; Han, Xueyao; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly in the young population. The clinical characteristics and risk factors for young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis are not fully explicated. The aim of the present study was to investigate various clinical and biochemical characteristics of young type 2 diabetic patients with atherosclerosis. Design and Methods This was a cross-sectional study. The study involved 2199 hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes. The young patients were classified into the atherosclerotic group or the non-atherosclerotic group, and we also enrolled an older group with peripheral atherosclerosis disease and an age of at least 45 years. Comparisons were made between the different groups to investigate the cardiovascular and metabolic risk profiles of young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis. We also used logistic regression models to assess the atherosclerosis risk factors for young patients. Results Compared to older type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis, young patients with atherosclerosis had more deleterious profiles of weight and hyperlipidemia. Only age and diabetes duration were found to be significant independent risk factors for atherosclerosis in young patients. The ratio of the presence of atherosclerosis in the lower extremity arteries alone was significantly higher in young patients than older patients (26.4% vs. 14.0%, P = 0.000). Conclusion Young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis have more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles and inadequate control of these risk factors. Lower extremity examination is of high importance in young patients. PMID:27391819

  13. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented with early pharmacological intervention.

    PubMed

    DeFronzo, Ralph A; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad

    2011-05-01

    In the U.S., ∼ 21 × 10(6) individuals have type 2 diabetes, and twice as many have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Approximately 40-50% of individuals with IGT will progress to type 2 diabetes over their lifetime. Therefore, treatment of high-risk individuals with IGT to prevent type 2 diabetes has important medical, economic, social, and human implications. Weight loss, although effective in reducing the conversion of IGT to type 2 diabetes, is difficult to achieve and maintain. Moreover, 40-50% of IGT subjects progress to type 2 diabetes despite successful weight reduction. In contrast, pharmacological treatment of IGT with oral antidiabetic agents that improve insulin sensitivity and preserve β-cell function--the characteristic pathophysiological abnormalities present in IGT and type 2 diabetes--uniformly have been shown to prevent progression of IGT to type 2 diabetes. The most consistent results have been observed with the thiazolidinediones (Troglitazone in the Prevention of Diabetes [TRIPOD], Pioglitazone in the Prevention of Diabetes [PIPOD], Diabetes Reduction Assessment with Ramipril and Rosiglitazone Medication [DREAM], and Actos Now for the Prevention of Diabetes [ACT NOW]), with a 50-70% reduction in IGT conversion to diabetes. Metformin in the U.S. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) reduced the development of type 2 diabetes by 31% and has been recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for treating high-risk individuals with IGT. The glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs, which augment insulin secretion, preserve β-cell function, and promote weight loss, also would be expected to be efficacious in preventing the progression of IGT to type 2 diabetes. Because individuals in the upper tertile of IGT are maximally/near-maximally insulin resistant, have lost 70-80% of their β-cell function, and have an ∼ 10% incidence of diabetic retinopathy, pharmacological intervention, in combination with diet plus exercise, should be instituted. PMID

  14. Management of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Boinpally, Tara; Jovanovic, Lois

    2009-06-01

    Although previously thought to be predominantly transient gestational diabetes, diabetes in pregnancy can be attributed more and more to type 2 diabetes today. Although all types of diabetes in pregnancy pose a threat to the health and future well-being of both the mother and child affected, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes can be significantly more devastating in complications because of effects starting from conception. This rise of type 2 diabetes thus imparts a great sense of urgency to uncover undiagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes in pregnancy and to take active measures in establishing tight glucose control. From preconception care before pregnancy to medical treatment postpartum, it is essential that immediate care be taken to help mediate the effects of diabetes in pregnancy. PMID:19421970

  15. [Management of Type 2 Diabetes: a Practical Approach].

    PubMed

    Donath, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Over the last years, the therapeutic aims for patients with type 2 diabetes have changed and several novel drugs have been introduced. In this Mini-Review we discuss these aims and how to achieve them. PMID:27269776

  16. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Diet (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tailored to a person's medical needs, lifestyle, and personal preferences. TYPE 2 DIABETES AND MEAL TIMING — Consistently eating at the same times every day is important for some people, especially those who take long- ...

  17. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... a day five times a week choosing healthy foods and reducing calories and fat in the diet These are the plain facts in "Small Steps. Big Rewards: Prevent Type 2 Diabetes," an education campaign ...

  18. Type 2 Diabetes and Dietary Supplements: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Type 2 Diabetes and Dietary Supplements: What the Science Says Share: November 2013 © The National Institute of ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  19. Spare the Meat, Skip the Type 2 Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meat, Skip the Type 2 Diabetes? A mostly plant-based diet may help lower risk of the ... June 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a mainly plant-based diet -- especially one with lots of healthy ...

  20. Mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rabøl, Rasmus

    2011-04-01

    Reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial function has been proposed to lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. It has been known for several years that oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle is reduced in patients with type 2 diabetes compared to weight matched controls. The reduction in oxidative capacity supposedly leads to the accumulation of intramyocellular lipid which inhibits insulin signalling and causes insulin resistance. It is not known whether this reduction in mitochondrial capacity is the cause or the effect of type 2 diabetes. This PhD-thesis describes the effect of different pharmacological interventions on mitochondrial function in type 2 diabetes and describe whether mitochondrial function is uniformly distributed to both upper and lower extremities. Furthermore, a hypothesis on the molecular mechanism for weight gain observed with anthyperglycaemic treatment will be presented. PMID:21466770

  1. Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alexandria, Virginia October 10, 2013 Early puberty ... 08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ...

  2. Global Team Taps into DNA Behind Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159810.html Global Team Taps Into DNA Behind Type 2 Diabetes Many common gene variations ... the researchers assessed the influence of rare, "private" DNA differences along with common DNA differences that many ...

  3. Correlations between anthropometry and lipid profile in type 2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Himabindu, Yalamanchali; Sriharibabu, Manne; Alekhya, Katamreddy; Saisumanth, Kandula; Lakshmanrao, Nambaru; Komali, Kanagala

    2013-01-01

    Over a period of time, anthropometric parameters have evolved into reliable indicators for predicting the incidence of diabetes mellitus. A number of studies have shown correlations between anthropometry and lipid profiles in healthy volunteers. This study examined correlations between anthropometry and lipid profile in type 2 diabetics. The limited observations made in this study reveal that anthropometric parameters are not ideal for predicting lipid profile abnormalities in type 2 diabetics. PMID:23961494

  4. Understanding type 2 diabetes: from genetics to epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Longo, Michele; Parrillo, Luca; Ciccarelli, Marco; Mirra, Paola; Ungaro, Paola; Formisano, Pietro; Miele, Claudia; Béguinot, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    The known genetic variability (common DNA polymorphisms) does not account either for the current epidemics of type 2 diabetes or for the family transmission of this disorder. However, clinical, epidemiological and, more recently, experimental evidence indicates that environmental factors have an extraordinary impact on the natural history of type 2 diabetes. Some of these environmental hits are often shared in family groups and proved to be capable to induce epigenetic changes which alter the function of genes affecting major diabetes traits. Thus, epigenetic mechanisms may explain the environmental origin as well as the familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes much easier than common polymorphisms. In the murine model, exposure of parents to environmental hits known to cause epigenetic changes reprograms insulin sensitivity as well as beta-cell function in the progeny, indicating that certain epigenetic changes can be transgenerationally transmitted. Studies from different laboratories revealed that, in humans, lifestyle intervention modulates the epigenome and reverts environmentally induced epigenetic modifications at specific target genes. Finally, specific human epigenotypes have been identified which predict adiposity and type 2 diabetes with much greater power than any polymorphism so far identified. These epigenotypes can be recognized in easily accessible white cells from peripheral blood, indicating that, in the future, epigenetic profiling may enable effective type 2 diabetes prediction. This review discusses recent evidence from the literature supporting the immediate need for further investigation to uncover the power of epigenetics in the prediction, prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25841587

  5. Fetal growth and the ethnic origins of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Skilton, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    Birthweight is known to differ by ethnicity, with South Asian, black African and Caribbean, and Hispanic ethnic groups having lower birthweight on average, when compared with people of white European ethnicity. Birthweight is the most frequently used proxy of fetal growth, and represents the net effect of a host of genetic, physiological and pathophysiological factors. These same ethnic groups that have lower average birthweight also tend to have a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adulthood. It is not unreasonable to propose that the well-established inverse association between birthweight and risk of type 2 diabetes may at least partially contribute to these differences in prevalence of type 2 diabetes between ethnic groups. This hypothesis would rely on the mechanisms that drive the ethnic differences in birthweight aligning with those that modify the risk of type 2 diabetes. In this issue of Diabetologia (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-014-3474-7), Nightingale et al have furthered this field by determining whether ethnic differences in markers of cardio-metabolic risk are consistent with the differences in birthweight in an ethnically diverse cohort of children. The likely contribution of fetal growth to ethnic differences in risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease is discussed, particularly in light of the magnitude of the birthweight differences, as are implications for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25567103

  6. Bariatric surgery: an IDF statement for obese Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J B; Zimmet, P; Alberti, K G; Rubino, F

    2011-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation Taskforce on Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes convened a consensus working group of diabetologists, endocrinologists, surgeons and public health experts to review the appropriate role of surgery and other gastrointestinal interventions in the treatment and prevention of Type 2 diabetes. The specific goals were: to develop practical recommendations for clinicians on patient selection; to identify barriers to surgical access and suggest interventions for health policy changes that ensure equitable access to surgery when indicated; and to identify priorities for research. Bariatric surgery can significantly improve glycaemic control in severely obese patients with Type 2 diabetes. It is an effective, safe and cost-effective therapy for obese Type 2 diabetes. Surgery can be considered an appropriate treatment for people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity not achieving recommended treatment targets with medical therapies, especially in the presence of other major co-morbidities. The procedures must be performed within accepted guidelines and require appropriate multidisciplinary assessment for the procedure, comprehensive patient education and ongoing care, as well as safe and standardized surgical procedures. National guidelines for bariatric surgery need to be developed for people with Type 2 diabetes and a BMI of 35 kg/m2 or more. PMID:21480973

  7. Correlation between Microalbuminuria and Hypertension in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alia; Taj, Azeem; Amin, Muhammad Joher; Iqbal, Farrukh; Iqbal, Zafar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is commonly found in patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD). Microalbuminuria is the first clinical sign of involvement of kidneys in patients with type 2 diabetes. Uncontrolled hypertension induces a higher risk of cardiovascular events, including death, increasing proteinuria and progression to kidney disease. Objectives: To determine the correlation between microalbuminuria and hypertension and their association with other risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: One hundred and thirteen type 2 diabetic patients attending the diabetic clinic of Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore, Pakistan were screened for microalbuminuria and raised blood pressure. The study was conducted from November 2012 to June 2013. Results: Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1, those with normoalbuminuria (n=63) and Group 2, those having microalbuminuria (n=50). Group 2 patients showed higher blood pressure values as compared to Group 1. The results were statistically significant and showed poor glycemic control as a contributing risk factor. Conclusion: The study concluded that there is high frequency of hypertension among type 2 diabetics but still much higher among those having microalbuminuria. So, early recognition of renal dysfunction through detection of microalbuminuria and to start treatment without any delay will confer future protection from end stage renal disease as well as hypertension and its complications in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:24948969

  8. Linagliptin: farmacology, efficacy and safety in type 2 diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Erika Paniago; Hohl, Alexandre; de Melo, Thais Gomes; Lauand, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has a high prevalence and incidence around the world. The complex pathophysiology mechanism is among the barriers for diabetes treatment. Type 2 diabetes patients have dysfunction in incretin hormones (as glucagon-like peptide-1 or GLP-1, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide or GIP). By inhibiting the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) enzyme, it is possible to slow the inactivation of GLP-1 and GIP, promoting blood glucose level reduction in a glucose-dependent manner. Linagliptin is a highly specific and potent inhibitor of DPP-4 that is currently indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Clinical studies with linagliptin demonstrated efficacy in reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in type 2 diabetes patients, while maintaining a placebo-like safety and tolerability profile. Linagliptin has an interesting pharmacokinetic profile in terms of its predominantly non-renal elimination and the main implication of this characteristic is that no dose adjustment is necessary in patients with renal disease. Also, no dose adjustment is required in patients with hepatic insufficiency, as well in elderly or obese patients. This article will review the pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy data and safety aspects of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:23697612

  9. Linagliptin: farmacology, efficacy and safety in type 2 diabetes treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has a high prevalence and incidence around the world. The complex pathophysiology mechanism is among the barriers for diabetes treatment. Type 2 diabetes patients have dysfunction in incretin hormones (as glucagon-like peptide-1 or GLP-1, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide or GIP). By inhibiting the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) enzyme, it is possible to slow the inactivation of GLP-1 and GIP, promoting blood glucose level reduction in a glucose-dependent manner. Linagliptin is a highly specific and potent inhibitor of DPP-4 that is currently indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Clinical studies with linagliptin demonstrated efficacy in reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in type 2 diabetes patients, while maintaining a placebo-like safety and tolerability profile. Linagliptin has an interesting pharmacokinetic profile in terms of its predominantly non-renal elimination and the main implication of this characteristic is that no dose adjustment is necessary in patients with renal disease. Also, no dose adjustment is required in patients with hepatic insufficiency, as well in elderly or obese patients. This article will review the pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy data and safety aspects of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:23697612

  10. Blood metals concentration in type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Forte, Giovanni; Bocca, Beatrice; Peruzzu, Angela; Tolu, Francesco; Asara, Yolande; Farace, Cristiano; Oggiano, Riccardo; Madeddu, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms for the onset of diabetes and the development of diabetic complications remain under extensive investigations. One of these mechanisms is abnormal homeostasis of metals, as either deficiency or excess of metals, can contribute to certain diabetic outcomes. Therefore, this paper will report the blood levels of chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn) in subjects with type 1 diabetes (n = 192, mean age 48.8 years, mean disease duration 20.6 years), type 2 diabetes (n = 68, mean age 68.4 years, mean disease duration 10.2 years), and in control subjects (n = 59, mean age 57.2 years), and discuss the results indicating their possible role in diabetes. The metal concentrations were measured by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave-induced acid digestion of blood samples. The accuracy was checked using a blood-based certified reference material, and recoveries of all elements were in the range of 92-101 % of certified values. Type 1 diabetes was found to be associated with Cr (p = 0.02), Mn (p < 0.001), Ni (p < 0.001), Pb (p = 0.02), and Zn (p < 0.001) deficiency, and type 2 diabetes with Cr (p = 0.014), Mn (p < 0.001), and Ni (p < 0.001) deficiency. These deficiencies were appreciated also subdividing the understudied patients for gender and age groups. Furthermore, in type 1 diabetes, there was a positive correlation between Pb and age (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.400) and Pb and BMI (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.309), while a negative correlation between Fe and age (p = 0.002, ρ = -0.218). In type 2 diabetes, there was a negative correlation between Fe and age (p = 0.017, ρ = -0.294) and Fe and BMI (p = 0.026, ρ = -0.301). Thus, these elements may play a role in both forms of diabetes and combined mineral supplementations could have beneficial effects. PMID:24222606

  11. Treating young adults with type 2 diabetes or monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Owen, Katharine R

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly recognised that diabetes in young adults has a wide differential diagnosis. There are many monogenic causes, including monogenic beta-cell dysfunction, mitochondrial diabetes and severe insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes in the young is becoming more prevalent, particularly after adolescence. It's important to understand the clinical features and diagnostic tools available to classify the different forms of young adult diabetes. Classic type 1 diabetes is characterised by positive β-cell antibodies and absence of endogenous insulin secretion. Young type 2 diabetes is accompanied by metabolic syndrome with obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Monogenic β-cell dysfunction is characterised by non-autoimmune, C-peptide positive diabetes with a strong family history, while mitochondrial diabetes features deafness and other neurological involvement. Severe insulin resistance involves a young-onset metabolic syndrome often with a disproportionately low BMI. A suspected diagnosis of monogenic diabetes is confirmed with genetic testing, which is widely available in specialist centres across the world. Treatment of young adult diabetes is similarly diverse. Mutations in the transcription factors HNF1A and HNF4A and in the β-cell potassium ATP channel components cause diabetes which responds to low dose and high dose sulfonylurea agents, respectively, while glucokinase mutations require no treatment. Monogenic insulin resistance and young-onset type 2 diabetes are both challenging to treat, but first line management involves insulin sensitisers and aggressive management of cardiovascular risk. Outcomes are poor in young-onset type 2 diabetes compared to both older onset type 2 and type 1 diabetes diagnosed at a similar age. The evidence base for treatments in monogenic and young-onset type 2 diabetes relies on studies of moderate quality at best and largely on extrapolation from work conducted in older type 2 diabetes subjects. Better quality

  12. [Important epidemiological features of the treatment of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Seguí Díaz, M

    2014-07-01

    According to the various clinical practice guidelines, the recommendations for the treatment of type 2 diabetes are well-established, thus leading to homogenization of clinical practice and avoiding variability. However, it is well known that, depending on factors such as effectiveness, physiopathology, cost, adverse effects, preferences, and comorbidities, each patient will, in the long-term, receive different treatment of type 2 diabetes. The consensus document published last year and approved by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes recommends distinct targets for each patient with type 2 diabetes and argues for the individualization of the management and treatment of this disease. In other words, the document advocates a patient-centered approach, in which the various therapeutic alternatives are related mainly to distinct physiopathological factors, adverse effects, and the patient's comorbidities, as well as the patient's preferences. PMID:25311714

  13. Epidemiology of paediatric metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    De Ferranti, Sarah D; Osganian, Stavroula K

    2007-12-01

    The epidemic in childhood obesity is a driving force behind the increase in paediatric metabolic syndrome, a collection of abnormalities that is associated in adults with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although there is no clear consensus about the paediatric definition for metabolic syndrome, the prevalence of this syndrome is clearly rising. Children with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk for metabolic syndrome in adulthood. A late consequence of metabolic syndrome is type 2 diabetes, which increasingly affects adolescents. The rise in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes in children is almost sure to lead to an increase in associated complications in young adulthood, including early cardiovascular disease. This epidemic will bear fruit in forthcoming decades, putting further stress on the healthcare system and probably leading to increased morbidity and a shorter lifespan for future generations. PMID:18158698

  14. Type 2 Diabetes Treatment in the Patient with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Malin, Steven K; Kashyap, Sangeeta R

    2016-09-01

    Lifestyle modification is the cornerstone treatment of type 2 diabetes in the obese patient, and is highly effective at promoting glucose regulation. However, many individuals struggle over time to maintain optimal glycemic control and/or body weight with lifestyle modification. Therefore, additional therapeutic approaches are needed. Pharmacologic interventions have shown promising results for obesity-related diabetes complications. Not surprisingly though lifestyle modification and pharmacology may become ineffective for treating diabetes over time. Bariatric surgery is considered by some, but not all, to be the most effective and durable treatment for combating obesity. In fact many patients with type 2 diabetes have normalized glucose concentrations within days postoperation. Taken together, treatment of obesity in the patient with type 2 diabetes requires a multi-faceted approach. PMID:27519130

  15. Cardiac Abnormalities in Youth with Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bacha, Fida; Gidding, Samuel S

    2016-07-01

    Childhood obesity has been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adulthood. Of great concern is the expected increase in the population's CVD burden in relation to childhood obesity. This is compounded by the risk related to chronic hyperglycemia exposure in youth with type 2 diabetes. We herein provide an overview of the spectrum of early cardiovascular disease manifestation in youth with obesity and type 2 diabetes, in particular abnormalities in cardiac structure and function. Cardiac remodeling and adverse target organ damage is already evident in the pediatric age group in children with obesity and type 2 diabetes. This supports the importance of intensifying obesity prevention efforts and early intervention to treat comorbidities of obesity in the pediatric age group to prevent cardiac events in early adulthood. PMID:27168062

  16. Decelerating gastric emptying: therapeutic possibilities in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W T; Schwartz, J G

    1996-09-01

    There is clear evidence of a positive correlation between carbohydrate absorption, plasma concentration of glucose, and the rate of gastric emptying. This suggests that clinical manipulation of gastric emptying rates may have therapeutic potential in glycaemic control. Cholecystokinin (CCK-8) has been shown to delay gastric emptying in individuals with Type 2 diabetes, but its potential as a therapy is limited by the need to administer it intravenously. The preferred routes of administration would be intramuscular injections, an intranasal spray or the use of orally ingested CCK analogues. Alternatively, the oral administration of an agent that enhances endogenous release of CCK could represent an important approach to the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Agents such as POT II may have a therapeutic indication in patients with recently diagnosed Type 2 diabetes. PMID:8894471

  17. Type 2 Diabetes and TZDs (Thiazolidinediones)

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... Women's Health Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ...

  18. Identifying patients at risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Savill, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At present there are nearly 3 million people with diabetes in the UK. It is predicted that this number will almost double by 2025. Nine out of ten of these individuals will have type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that one in seven adults have impaired glucose regulation and up to 12% of these will develop type 2 diabetes each year. The impact of obesity on the development of type 2 diabetes cannot be overemphasised, with a 1 kg/m2 increase in BMI raising the risk of impaired fasting glycaemia by 9.5% and of developing new-onset type 2 diabetes by 8.4%. A 1 cm increase in waist circumference increases the risks by 3.2% and 3.5% respectively. NICE advises using a validated risk assessment tool to identify patients at risk of diabetes. Risk factors used by such tools include: age; ethnicity; weight; first-degree relative with type 2 diabetes; low birthweight and sedentary lifestyle. Certain comorbidities increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, these include: cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease; polycystic ovary syndrome; a history of gestational diabetes; and mental health problems. The initial screening blood test could be a fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or an oral glucose tolerance test, according to WHO criteria. NICE recommends that high-risk patients should be offered a programme encouraging them to undertake a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity a week, gradually lose weight to reach and maintain a BMI within the healthy range, increase consumption of whole grains, vegetables, and other foods that are high in dietary fibre, reduce the total amount of fat in their diet and eat less saturated fat. PMID:22988703

  19. Weight-Loss Surgery Helps Treat Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159002.html Weight-Loss Surgery Helps Treat Type 2 Diabetes 45 professional groups say the procedure improves blood ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Diabetes Type 2 Weight Loss Surgery Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus ...

  20. Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159330.html Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Prognosis may be ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Diabetes Type 2 Heart Diseases Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health ...

  1. [New targets in pharmacotherapy of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Verspohl, Eugen J

    2016-02-01

    The number of people with diabetes is expected to increase worldwide to 360 million within the next 15 years of which 90% will have type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). Established therapies mainly focus on the following principles: increase in plasma insulin, improving insulin sensitivity of tissues, reducing the rate of carbohydrate absorption and gluconeogenesis. The demand on compounds with new mechanisms of action is obvious. This articles summarizes new targets and compounds under development for pharmacotherapy of typ 2 diabetes; at present approx. 180 compounds are going to be developed worldwide. PMID:26983332

  2. Using Drosophila to discover mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alfa, Ronald W.; Kim, Seung K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanisms of glucose homeostasis are remarkably well conserved between the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and mammals. From the initial characterization of insulin signaling in the fly came the identification of downstream metabolic pathways for nutrient storage and utilization. Defects in these pathways lead to phenotypes that are analogous to diabetic states in mammals. These discoveries have stimulated interest in leveraging the fly to better understand the genetics of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans. Type 2 diabetes results from insulin insufficiency in the context of ongoing insulin resistance. Although genetic susceptibility is thought to govern the propensity of individuals to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus under appropriate environmental conditions, many of the human genes associated with the disease in genome-wide association studies have not been functionally studied. Recent advances in the phenotyping of metabolic defects have positioned Drosophila as an excellent model for the functional characterization of large numbers of genes associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we examine results from studies modeling metabolic disease in the fruit fly and compare findings to proposed mechanisms for diabetic phenotypes in mammals. We provide a systematic framework for assessing the contribution of gene candidates to insulin-secretion or insulin-resistance pathways relevant to diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:27053133

  3. [Type 2 Diabetes mellitus-screening and prevention: Update 2016].

    PubMed

    Stadler, Marietta; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; Prager, Rudolf

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing in westernized countries. In addition, about half of all patients suffering from diabetes are not diagnosed. The current article represents the recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association for the screening and prevention of type 2 diabetes, based on currently available evidence. PMID:27052220

  4. It's Not Too Late to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children & Adolescents Risk & Prevention for Adults Risk for Children & Adolescents Health Care Professionals Community Organizations​ ​​ Alternate Versions It’s Not Too Late to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes (PDF, 1.4 MB) Spanish Version You can also order ...

  5. Glucocorticoids and Type 2 Diabetes: From Physiology to Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Di Dalmazi, Guido; Pagotto, Uberto; Pasquali, Renato; Vicennati, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the result of interaction between genetic and environmental factors, leading to heterogeneous and progressive pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Overweight and obesity are major contributors to the development of insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. The inability of β cells to secrete enough insulin produces type 2 diabetes. Abnormalities in other hormones such as reduced secretion of the incretin glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), hyperglucagonemia, and raised concentrations of other counterregulatory hormones also contribute to insulin resistance, reduced insulin secretion, and hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes. Clinical-overt and experimental cortisol excess is associated with profound metabolic disturbances of intermediate metabolism resulting in abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and low HDL-cholesterol levels, which can lead to diabetes. It was therefore suggested that subtle abnormalities in cortisol secretion and action are one of the missing links between insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this paper is to address the role of glucocorticoids on glucose homeostasis and to explain the relationship between hypercortisolism and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23316348

  6. Cardiac abnormalities in youth with obesity and type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Childhood obesity has been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adulthood. Of great concern is the expected increase in the population's CVD burden in relation to childhood obesity. This is compounded by the risk related to chronic hyperglycemia exposure in youth with type 2 diabetes. We h...

  7. [Type 2 diabetes, obesity and nutrition, a paradigm shift].

    PubMed

    Bourcelot, Emilie; Combes, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are two complex and multifactorial chronic diseases. Nutritional management is based on an educational and bio-psycho-sensory approach centred on the patient using cognitive-behavioural and emotionally-focused therapy tools. PMID:27157552

  8. Type 2 Diabetes in Han Chinese in Hubei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo Saif Dehwah, Mustafa; Shuang, Zhang; Yan, Wang; Chan, Peng; Huang, Qing-Yang

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARγ2 gene and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Han Chinese in Hubei. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptorγ2 (PPARγ2) is a nuclear receptor plays a key role in regulation of adipocyte differentiation, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). There are various studies have provided evidence for the association between common Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARγ2 gene and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but the results are controversial and depend on ethnicity. So we conducted a case-control association study among 330 T2DM patients and 212 controls with family-based and random case-control designs. The genotypes of the PPARγ2 Pro12Ala polymorphism were detected by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFL) method. The result indicated that the Pro12 allele was associated with type 2 diabetes in this study population.

  9. Male gonadal axis function in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Pablo R; Knoblovits, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes have lower serum testosterone levels and a higher prevalence of hypogonadism than non-diabetic patients, independently of the metabolic control of disease. The mechanisms underlying a decrease in testosterone might be related to age, obesity and insulin resistance, often present in patients with type 2 diabetes. The increase in estrogens due to higher aromatase enzyme activity in increased adipose tissue might exert negative-feedback inhibition centrally. Insulin stimulates gonadal axis activity at all three levels and therefore insulin resistance might account for the lower testosterone production. Leptin exerts a central stimulatory effect but inhibits testicular testosterone secretion. Thus, resistance to leptin in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes determines lower central effects of leptin with lower gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and, on the other hand, hyperleptinemia secondary to leptin resistance inhibits testosterone secretion at the testicular level. However, lower testosterone levels in patients with diabetes are observed independently of age, weight and body mass index, which leads to the assumption that hyperglycemia per se might play a role in the decrease in testosterone. Several studies have shown that an overload of glucose results in decreased serum testosterone levels. The aim of this review is to assess changes in the male gonadal axis that occur in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27071157

  10. Hierarchical clusters in families with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    García-Solano, Beatriz; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther C; Gómez-Meza, Marco V; García-Madrid, Guillermina; Flores-Merlo, Marcela; García-Solano, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Families represent more than a set of individuals; family is more than a sum of its individual members. With this classification, nurses can identify the family health-illness beliefs obey family as a unit concept, and plan family inclusion into the type 2 diabetes treatment, whom is not considered in public policy, despite families share diet, exercise, and self-monitoring with a member who suffers type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the characteristics, functionality, routines, and family and individual health in type 2 diabetes describes the differences and similarities between families to consider them as a unit. We performed an exploratory, descriptive hierarchical cluster analysis of 61 families using three instruments and a questionnaire, in addition to weight, height, body fat percentage, hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein. The analysis produced three groups of families. Wilk’s lambda demonstrated statistically significant differences provided by age (Λ = 0.778, F = 2.098, p = 0.010) and family health (Λ = 0.813, F = 2.650, p = 0.023). A post hoc Tukey test coincided with the three subsets. Families with type 2 diabetes have common elements that make them similar, while sharing differences that make them unique. PMID:27347419

  11. Metabolomics: Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) develops over many years, providing an opportunity to consider early prognostic tools that guide interventions to thwart disease. Advancements in analytical chemistry enable quantitation of hundreds of metabolites in biofluids and tissues (metabolomics), providing in...

  12. Altered body composition in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The styd objectives were to identify differences in amount and distribution of fat and lean soft tissue in a cross-sectional study of subjects with and without type 2 diabetes, and to determine whether any differences are affected by race/ethnicity or sex. Participants were overweight and obese (bod...

  13. Prevalence of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrutia-Rojas, Ximena; Menchaca, John

    2006-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 3 children born in 2000 in the United States will become diabetic. The odds are higher for African American and Hispanic children as nearly 50% of them will develop diabetes. Random screening is not effective in identifying children at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM);…

  14. Cardiovascular effects of intensive lifestyle intervention in type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weight loss is recommended for overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of short-term studies, but long-term effects on cardiovascular disease remain unknown. We examined whether an intensive lifestyle intervention for weight loss would decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mor...

  15. Increased gluconeogenesis in youth with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of increased gluconeogenesis as an important contributor to fasting hyperglycaemia at diabetes onset is not known. We evaluated the contribution of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis to fasting hyperglycaemia in newly diagnosed youths with type 2 diabetes following an overnight fast. Basal ...

  16. Type 2 diabetes express highway, where is the 'U' turn?

    PubMed

    Iyer, S R

    2003-05-01

    The 'U' turn in Type 2 Diabetes Express Highway probably lies in lifestyle modifications--going back to traditional lifestyle with use of modern technology to achieve happiness. There is a difference between technology for comfort and technology for happiness. PMID:12974434

  17. Sedentary behavior as a mediator of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Marc T.; Hamilton, Deborah G.; Zderic, Theodore W.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, the fastest growing new area of physical activity research centered around the concept that the large amount of time people spend sitting inactive may have significant physiological consequences hazardous to human health, including risk for type 2 diabetes and poor metabolism of lipids and glucose. Meta-analysis (10 studies) suggest there is a 112% greater relative risk associated with a large duration of sedentary behavior for type 2 diabetes. Meta-analysis also indicates significantly greater odds for metabolic syndrome. We also summarize results for 7 studies using objective measures of total sedentary time and focusing on cardiometabolic risks in persons at high risk for type 2 diabetes or already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The underlying hypothesis introduced in 2004 by the inactivity physiology paradigm, has been that frequent and abundant contractile activity by certain types of skeletal muscle can have a potent influence on key physiological processes, even when the intensity is below that achieved through exercise. We explain some of the mechanisms for why the metabolism in slow-twitch oxidative skeletal muscle is key for understanding the healthy responses to low intensity physical activity (LIPA). Findings from objective measures from inclinometry indicated that the quartile range for weekly sedentary time is ~29 hours/week. The total daily time that people sit, stand, and accumulate non-exercise steps is independent of traditionally recommended moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). The large amount of sedentary time associated with risk for disease can only be reduced significantly with safe and non-fatiguing LIPA, especially in the most at risk proportion of the population. Importantly, experimental studies are starting to indicate that it will be especially insightful to understand the acute dose-response effects of LIPA in order to understand why reducing sedentary time can improve lipid and glucose metabolism for

  18. Altered body composition in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Heshka, Stanley; Ruggiero, Andrea; Bray, George A.; Foreyt, John; Kahn, Stephen E.; Lewis, Cora E.; Saad, Mohammed; Schwartz, Ann V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify differences in amount and distribution of fat and lean soft tissue in subjects with and without type 2 diabetes and to determine whether any differences are affected by race/ethnicity or sex. Design Overweight and obese (body mass index, BMI≥25 kg/m2) Black, White and Hispanic men (490) and women (825) with type 2 diabetes ([mean±SD] age 58.5±6.6; BMI 35.3±5.3) who had a baseline dual energy x-ray absorptiometry whole body scan at the time of enrollment in the Look Ahead clinical trial, and 242 healthy controls, 91 males and 151 females (age 55.3±8.6 y, BMI 30.7±4.2 kg/m2) who were participating in unrelated research and were scanned on the same densitometers. Results Adjusted for covariates, total fat mass was smaller in persons with type 2 diabetes than in controls (−1.4±0.3[SE]; 34.5 vs 35.8 kg, p<0.001) while trunk fat was larger (1.3±0.2[SE]; 19.9 vs 18.6 kg, p<0.001) and leg fat was smaller (−1.5±0.2[SE]; 10.7 vs 12.3 kg, p<0.001). The arms of subjects with type 2 diabetes did not have significantly less fat compared to controls. Adjusted trunk lean mass was larger in type 2 diabetes by 0.6 kg (28.4 vs 27.8 kg, p<0.001) while leg lean was smaller by 0.5 kg (18.1 vs 18.6 kg, p<0.001). Conclusions Type 2 diabetes is associated with less total fat, leg fat and leg lean mass and more truncal fat and lean mass than controls. The physiological processes producing these deviations in tissue distribution and their metabolic significance warrant further investigation. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00017953) PMID:18227843

  19. Effect of diet on type 2 diabetes mellitus: a review.

    PubMed

    Khazrai, Y M; Defeudis, G; Pozzilli, P

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is one of the fastest growing diseases; the number of people affected by diabetes will soon reach 552 million worldwide, with associated increases in complications and healthcare expenditure. Lifestyle and medical nutrition therapy are considered the keystones of type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment, but there is no definite consensus on how to treat this disease with these therapies. The American Diabetes Association has made several recommendations regarding the medical nutrition therapy of diabetes; these emphasize the importance of minimizing macrovascular and microvascular complications in people with diabetes. Four types of diets were reviewed for their effects on diabetes: the Mediterranean diet, a low-carbohydrate/high-protein diet, a vegan diet and a vegetarian diet. Each of the four types of diet has been shown to improve metabolic conditions, but the degree of improvement varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate a patient's pathophysiological characteristics in order to determine the diet that will achieve metabolic improvement in each individual. Many dietary regimens are available for patients with type 2 diabetes to choose from, according to personal taste and cultural tradition. It is important to provide a tailor-made diet wherever possible in order to maximize the efficacy of the diet on reducing diabetes symptoms and to encourage patient adherence. Additional randomized studies, both short term (to analyse physiological responses) and long term, could help reduce the multitude of diets currently recommended and focus on a shorter list of useful regimens. PMID:24352832

  20. DRESS syndrome associated with type 2 diabetes in a child

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Bag, Ozlem; Karkiner, Canan Sule Unsal; Korkmaz, Huseyin Anil; Can, Demet

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is an uncommon, life-threatening drug reaction. The basic findings are skin rash, multiorgan involvement, and eosinophilia. Most of the aromatic anticonvulsants, such as phenytoin, phenobarbital and carbamazepine can induce DRESS. Herein we report a 14-year-old patient with DRESS syndrome related to carbamazepine use. The patient presented with signs of involvement of the skin, lungs, liver, and microscopic hematuria. Carbamazepine treatment was discontinued; antihistamines and steroids were started. Hyperglycemia, commencing on the first dose of the steroid given, persisted even after the discontinuation of steroids and improvement of other signs. There were no signs of pancreatitis or type 1 diabetes clinically in laboratory tests. Her blood glucose levels were regulated at first with insulin and later with metformin. Within 1 year of follow-up, still regulated with oral antidiabetics, she has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Formerly, long-term sequelae related to “drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome” such as hepatic and renal failure, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Grave's disease, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and lupus have also been reported. However, up to date, no cases with type 2 diabetes have been reported as long-term sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature presenting with type 2 diabetes as long-term sequelae. PMID:26862317

  1. Genetics of drug response in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tkáč, Ivan

    2015-07-01

    The introduction of several new drug groups into the treatment of type 2 diabetes in the past few decades leads to an increased requirement for an individualized treatment approach. A personalized treatment is important from the point of view of both efficacy and safety. Recent guidelines are based mainly on entirely phenotypic characteristics such as diabetes duration, presence of macrovascular complications, or risk of hypoglycemia with the use of individual drugs. So far, genetic knowledge is used to guide treatment in the monogenic forms of diabetes. With the accumulating pharmacogenetic evidence in type 2 diabetes, there are reasonable expectations that genetics might help in the adjustment of drug doses to reduce severe side effects, as well as to make better therapeutic choices among the drugs available for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:25975599

  2. Anakinra treatment in patients with gout and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Antonio; Cantarini, Luca; Rigante, Donato; Bardelli, Marco; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    We report three Caucasian patients affected by gout and type 2 diabetes, who were treated with the recombinant nonglycosylated human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra (100 mg/day subcutaneously) after an unsatisfactory or incomplete response to urate-lowering therapy, colchicine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and prednisone. The remarkable clinical improvement in joint symptoms within 24 h and in glycemic control during a 6-month period gives anakinra a potential therapeutic role in the management of gout and type 2 diabetes. When anakinra was discontinued, a gout attack occurred within 3-25 days in all three patients. The contribution of anakinra in the treatment of such syndromes is encouraging, but requires further studies to establish its long-term efficacy. PMID:24733251

  3. Targeting the gastrointestinal tract to treat type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Paige V; Duca, Frank A

    2016-09-01

    The rising global rates of type 2 diabetes and obesity present a significant economic and social burden, underscoring the importance for effective and safe therapeutic options. The success of glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, along with the potent glucose-lowering effects of bariatric surgery, highlight the gastrointestinal tract as a potential target for diabetes treatment. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that the gut plays a prominent role in the ability of metformin to lower glucose levels. As such, the current review highlights some of the current and potential pathways in the gut that could be targeted to improve glucose homeostasis, such as changes in nutrient sensing, gut peptides, gut microbiota and bile acids. A better understanding of these pathways will lay the groundwork for novel gut-targeted antidiabetic therapies, some of which have already shown initial promise. PMID:27496374

  4. Type 2 diabetes: A 21st century epidemic.

    PubMed

    Jaacks, Lindsay M; Siegel, Karen R; Gujral, Unjali P; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2016-06-01

    Around 415 million people around the world have diabetes (9% of adults), and the vast majority live in low- and middle-income countries. Over the next decade, this number is predicted to increase to 642 million people. Given that diabetes is a major cause of mortality, morbidity, and health care expenditures, addressing this chronic disease represents one of the greatest global health challenges of our time. The objectives of this article are three-fold: (1) to present data on the global burden of type 2 diabetes (which makes up 87-91% of the total diabetes burden), both in terms of prevalence and incidence; (2) to give an overview of the risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and to describe obesity and the developmental origins of disease risk in detail; and (3) to discuss the implications of the global burden and point out important research gaps. PMID:27432069

  5. Novel Agents for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Triplitt, Curtis L.; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; Cersosimo, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Impaired insulin secretion, increased hepatic glucose production, and decreased peripheral glucose utilization are the core defects responsible for the development and progression of type 2 diabetes. However, the pathophysiology of this disease also includes adipocyte insulin resistance (increased lipolysis), reduced incretin secretion/sensitivity, increased glucagon secretion, enhanced renal glucose reabsorption, and brain insulin resistance/neurotransmitter dysfunction. Although current diabetes management focuses on lowering blood glucose, the goal of therapy should be to delay disease progression and eventual treatment failure. Recent innovative treatment approaches target the multiple pathophysiological defects present in type 2 diabetes. Optimal management should include early initiation of combination therapy using multiple drugs with different mechanisms of action. This review examines novel therapeutic options that hold particular promise. PMID:26246766

  6. Vegetarian and vegan diets in type 2 diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Neal D; Katcher, Heather I; Jenkins, David J A; Cohen, Joshua; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle

    2009-05-01

    Vegetarian and vegan diets offer significant benefits for diabetes management. In observational studies, individuals following vegetarian diets are about half as likely to develop diabetes, compared with non-vegetarians. In clinical trials in individuals with type 2 diabetes, low-fat vegan diets improve glycemic control to a greater extent than conventional diabetes diets. Although this effect is primarily attributable to greater weight loss, evidence also suggests that reduced intake of saturated fats and high-glycemic-index foods, increased intake of dietary fiber and vegetable protein, reduced intramyocellular lipid concentrations, and decreased iron stores mediate the influence of plant-based diets on glycemia. Vegetarian and vegan diets also improve plasma lipid concentrations and have been shown to reverse atherosclerosis progression. In clinical studies, the reported acceptability of vegetarian and vegan diets is comparable to other therapeutic regimens. The presently available literature indicates that vegetarian and vegan diets present potential advantages for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19386029

  7. [The cure of type 2 diabetes and patient education].

    PubMed

    Lagger, G; Chambouleyron, M; Correia, J C; Sittarame, F; Miganne, G; Lasserre Moutet, A; Golay, A

    2015-03-25

    Type 2 diabetes is a potentially reversible disease. Patient education encompasses a deep investment of the health care providers, who with the aid of pedagogic tools, help the pa tient commit to this path. This facilitates the learning of uncommon knowledge and skills required. Whether or not it leads to a complete remission of the disease may not be the main purpose. The main goal lies in the patient's motivation to learn and change on a long term basis. PMID:26027202

  8. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds. PMID:27028201

  9. Does type 2 diabetes influence the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Neale, R E; Doecke, J D; Pandeya, N; Sadhegi, S; Green, A C; Webb, P M; Whiteman, D C

    2009-01-01

    Since hyperinsulinaemia may promote obesity-linked cancers, we compared type 2 diabetes prevalence among oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) patients and population controls. Diabetes increased the risk of OAC (adjusted odds ratio 1.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04–2.43), although the risk was attenuated after further adjusting for body mass index (1.32, 95% CI 0.85–2.05). PMID:19190630

  10. Pre- and early postnatal nongenetic determinants of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ozanne, Susan E; Hales, C Nick

    2002-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed strong and internationally reproducible links between early growth restriction and subsequent risk of developing type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome (glucose intolerance, hypertension and hypertriglyceridaemia). This effect can exist independently of genetic factors. There is also direct evidence that poor maternal nutrition and maternal smoking cause both a reduction in birthweight and subsequent loss of glucose tolerance. High rates of growth in childhood may add to these effects. The 'thrifty phenotype' hypothesis attempts to explain these associations in terms of an altered programming of growth and metabolism that aids survival both pre- and postnatally. Type 2 diabetes is envisaged as a consequence of a clash of this programming with adult obesity. Tests of this hypothesis in animal models have shown that both the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes can result from early growth restriction in rats consequent upon rat dams being fed a reduced protein, isocaloric diet (in which the protein is replaced by an equal quantity of nonprotein energy). A variety of other models of early growth restriction in rats lead to a similar phenotype. Several structural and gene expression changes have been shown in many tissues, including pancreas, liver, kidney, muscle and adipose tissue. Changes in gene expression include those concerned with hormone receptors, signalling and glycolytic enzymes. Many important questions remain for future research. PMID:14987383

  11. Clinical efficacy of Mehamudgara vati in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tanna, Ila; Chandola, H. M.; Joshi, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance is the main problem that is associated with a cluster of conditions such as obesity and hyperlipidemia. The present study was designed with the objective to evaluate the role of Mehamudgara vati (MMV), which was expected to work at the level of Medodhatwagni due to its Medohara properties, to have an effective control on type 2 diabetes. To fulfill the objective, known patients of type 2 diabetes attending the OPD and IPD of Kayachikitsa Department, IPGT and RA, were selected and were divided in two groups. In Group A, MMV was given 3 tab. thrice a day with lukewarm water for 3 months and in Group B, the patients who were already taking modern antidiabetic treatment, although their blood sugar level was not well under control, were additionally given MMV in the same manner. The formulation has shown a highly significant decrease in the fasting and post-prandial blood sugar level. The formulation has also shown a synergistic action when combined with the modern antidiabetic drugs due to its known hypolipidemic, hypocholesterolemic, hepatoprotective, antihyperglycemic, antistress, antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities. PMID:22131755

  12. SGLT2 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Monica Reddy, R P; Inzucchi, Silvio E

    2016-08-01

    The glucose-lowering pharmacopeia continues to grow for patients with type 2 diabetes. The latest drug category, the SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glycated hemoglobin concentrations by increasing urinary excretion of glucose. They are used mainly in combination with metformin and other antihyperglycemic agents, including insulin. Their glucose-lowering potency is modest. Advantages include lack of hypoglycemia as a side effect, and mild reduction in blood pressure and body weight. Side effects include increased urinary frequency, owing to their mild diuretic action, symptoms of hypovolemia, genitourinary infections. There are also recent reports of rare cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occurring in insulin-treated patients. Recently, a large cardiovascular outcome trial reported that a specific SGLT2 inhibitor, empagliflozin, led to a reduction in the primary endpoint of major cardiovascular events. This effect was mainly the result of a surprising 38 % reduction in cardiovascular death, and the drug was also associated with nearly as large a reduction in heart failure hospitalization. These findings were notable because most drugs used in type 2 diabetes have not been shown to improve cardiovascular outcomes. Accordingly, there is growing interest in empagliflozin and the entire SGLT2 inhibitor class as drugs that could potentially change the manner in which we approach the management of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27270407

  13. Alogliptin benzoate for management of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Saisho, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, a new class of oral hypoglycemic agents, augment glucose-dependent insulin secretion and suppress glucagon levels through enhancement of the action of endogenous incretin by inhibiting DPP-4, an incretin-degrading enzyme. DPP-4 inhibitors are generally well tolerated because of their low risk of hypoglycemia and other adverse events. Moreover, with their potential to improve beta cell function, a core defect of type 2 diabetes, DPP-4 inhibitors are becoming a major component of treatment of type 2 diabetes. Alogliptin benzoate is a newly developed, highly selective DPP-4 inhibitor which has been approved in many countries throughout the world. Once-daily administration of alogliptin as either monotherapy or combination therapy with other oral antidiabetic drugs or insulin has a potent glucose-lowering effect which is similar to that of other DPP-4 inhibitors, with a low risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain. The cardiovascular safety of this drug has been confirmed in a recent randomized controlled trial. This review summarizes the efficacy and safety of alogliptin, and discusses the role of DPP-4 inhibitors in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25914541

  14. Optimal Pharmacologic Treatment Strategies in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Gayotri; Shinkazh, Nataliya; Davis, Nichola

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased to pandemic levels worldwide and is related to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Metabolic comorbidities are commonly associated with obesity and include metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Even if the prevalence of obesity remains stable until 2030, the anticipated numbers of people with diabetes will more than double as a consequence of population aging and urbanization. Weight reduction is integral in the prevention of diabetes among obese adults with pre-diabetes. Lifestyle intervention and weight reduction are also key in the management of type 2 diabetes. Weight loss is challenging for most obese patients, but for those with diabetes, it can pose an even greater challenge due to the weight gain associated with many treatment regimens. This article will review optimal treatment strategies for patients with comorbid obesity and type 2 diabetes. The role of anti-obesity agents in diabetes will also be reviewed. This literature review will provide readers with current strategies for the pharmacologic treatment of obesity and diabetes with a focus on the weight outcomes related to diabetes treatments. PMID:26237392

  15. Pharmacotherapy of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Navigating Current and New Therapies.

    PubMed

    Lew, Kelley Newlin; Wick, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The keys to optimal glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes are early diagnosis and interventions that include lifestyle changes and pharmacotherapy. This review discusses therapeutic goals and current options for treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26863705

  16. 6 Things to Know about Type 2 Diabetes and Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... know about taking dietary supplements for type 2 diabetes. A healthy diet, physical activity, and blood glucose testing are the basic tools for managing type 2 diabetes. Your health care providers will help you learn ...

  17. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and risk of type 2 diabetes in women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D may modify risk of type 2 diabetes; however, the association between vitamin D and type 2 diabetes is uncertain. To determine prospectively the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration and risk of incident type 2 diabetes, independent of obesity and other known diabet...

  18. Skeletal Metabolism, Fracture Risk, and Fracture Outcomes in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sellmeyer, Deborah E; Civitelli, Roberto; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Khosla, Sundeep; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Schwartz, Ann V

    2016-07-01

    Fracture risk is significantly increased in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and individuals with diabetes experience worse fracture outcomes than normoglycemic individuals. Factors that increase fracture risk include lower bone mass in type 1 diabetes and compromised skeletal quality and strength despite preserved bone density in type 2 diabetes, as well as the effects of comorbidities such as diabetic macro- and microvascular complications. In this Perspective, we assess the developing scientific knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of skeletal fragility in patients with diabetes and the emerging data on the prediction, treatment, and outcomes of fractures in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27329951

  19. Heart Failure Considerations of Antihyperglycemic Medications for Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Standl, Eberhard; Schnell, Oliver; McGuire, Darren K

    2016-05-27

    Prevalent and incident heart failure (HF) is increased in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, with risk directly associated with the severity of hyperglycemia. Furthermore, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, mortality is increased ≈10-fold in patients with versus without HF. Reducing HF with antihyperglycemic therapies, however, has been unsuccessful until recently. In fact, HF as an important outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus seems to be heterogeneously modulated by antihyperglycemic medications, as evidenced by results from cardiovascular outcome trials (CVOTs) and large observational cohort studies. Appropriately powered and executed CVOTs are necessary to truly evaluate cardiovascular safety and efficacy of new antihyperglycemic medications, as reflected by the guidance of the US Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory agencies since 2008. In light of the best available evidence at present, metformin and the sodium-glucose-co-transporter 2-inhibitor empagliflozin seem to be especially advantageous with regard to HF effects, with their use associated with reduced HF events and improved mortality. Acarbose, the dipeptidyl-peptidase 4-inhibitor sitagliptin, the glucagon-like peptide 1-receptor agonist lixisenatide based on presently available CVOT results comprise reasonable additional options, as significant harm in terms of HF has been excluded for those drugs. Additions to this list are anticipated pending results of ongoing CVOTs. Although no HF harm was seen in CVOTs for insulin or sulfonylureas, they should be used only with caution in patients with HF, given their established high risk for hypoglycemia and some uncertainties on their safety in patients with HF derived from epidemiological observations. Pioglitazone is contraindicated in patients with HF>New York Heart Association I, despite some benefits suggested by CVOT subanalyses. PMID:27230644

  20. Pharmacogenetics: Implications for Modern Type 2 Diabetes Therapy.

    PubMed

    Staiger, Harald; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Many clinical treatment studies have reported remarkable interindividual variability in the response to pharmaceutical drugs, and uncovered the existence of inadequate treatment response, non-response, and even adverse drug reactions. Pharmacogenetics addresses the impact of genetic variants on treatment outcome including side-effects. In recent years, it has also entered the field of clinical diabetes research. In modern type 2 diabetes therapy, metformin is established as first-line drug. The latest pharmaceutical developments, including incretin mimetics, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (gliptins), and sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (gliflozins), are currently experiencing a marked increase in clinical use, while the prescriptions of α-glucosidase inhibitors, sulfonylureas, meglitinides (glinides), and thiazolidinediones (glitazones) are declining, predominantly because of reported side-effects. This review summarizes the current knowledge about gene-drug interactions observed in therapy studies with the above drugs. We report drug interactions with candidate genes involved in the pharmacokinetics (e.g., drug transporters) and pharmacodynamics (drug targets and downstream signaling steps) of the drugs, with known type 2 diabetes risk genes and previously unknown genes derived from hypothesis-free approaches such as genome-wide association studies. Moreover, some new and promising candidate genes for future pharmacogenetic assessment are highlighted. Finally, we critically appraise the current state of type 2 diabetes pharmacogenetics in the light of its impact on therapeutic decisions, and we refer to major problems, and make suggestions for future efforts in this field to help improve the clinical relevance of the results, and to establish genetically determined treatment failure. PMID:27111121

  1. Strategies to Make Ramadan Fasting Safer in Type 2 Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Lee, Jun Yang; Tan, Christina San San; Wong, Chee Piau

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ramadan is the holy month for Muslims whereby they fast from predawn to after sunset and is observed by all healthy Muslim adults as well as a large population of type 2 diabetic Muslims. To determine the comparative effectiveness of various strategies that have been used for type 2 diabetic Muslim who fast during Ramadan. A systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies (RCT) as well as observational studies for patients with type 2 diabetes who fasted during Ramadan was conducted. Eight databases were searched from January 1980 through October 2015 for relevant studies. Two reviewers independently screened and assessed study for eligibility, assessed the risk of bias, and extracted relevant data. A network meta-analysis for each outcome was fitted separately, combining direct and indirect evidence for each comparison. Twenty-nine studies, 16 RCTs and 13 observational studies each met the inclusion criteria. The most common strategy used was drug changes during the Ramadan period, which found that the use of DPP-4 (Dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitor -4) inhibitors were associated with a reduction in incidence of experiencing hypoglycemia during Ramadan in both RCTs (pooled relative risk: 0.56; 95% confidence interval: 0.44–0.72) as well as in observational studies (pooled relative risk: 0.27; 0.09–0.75). Ramadan-focused education was shown to be beneficial in reducing hypoglycemia in observational studies but not RCTs (0.25 versus 1.00). Network meta-analyses suggest that incretin mimetics can reduce the risk of hypoglycemia by nearly 1.5 times. The newer antidiabetic agents appear to lower the risk of hypoglycemia and improved glycemic control when compared with sulfonylureas. Ramadan-focused education shows to be a promising strategy but more rigorous examination from RCTs are required. PMID:26765440

  2. Sexual Dysfunction in Women with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Elyasi, Forouzan; Kashi, Zahra; Tasfieh, Bentolhoda; Bahar, Adele; Khademloo, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexual dysfunction (SD) is one of the important problems in diabetic patients. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of sexual problems in Iranian women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among type 2 diabetic women who visited two outpatient endocrine clinics, namely Imam Hospital and Tuba clinic (Sari, Iran) in 2012. Patients were asked to complete two validated questionnaires: Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) as well as a demographic questionnaire. Analysis was performed using descriptive and analytical tests. P<0.05 was considered to be significant. Results One hundred and fifty women with type 2 diabetes were investigated. Most of the cases aged 40-44 years old. The mean of the total score of the FSFI questionnaire was 22. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 78.7% (CI: 71.4-84.4); among these, 58% (CI: 50.0-65.6) reported problems in lubrication, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9) complained of decreased sexual desire, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9) had problems with arousal, 47.3% (CI: 39.5-55.3) had dyspareunia, 32.7% (CI: 25.7-40.5) complained of orgasmic dysfunction and 42.7% (CI: 35.0-50.7) reported problems in sexual satisfaction. With regard to the results of the HADS questionnaire, 58.7% (CI: 50.7-66.2) of the patients had depression and 96.7% (CI: 92.4-98.6) had anxiety. Conclusion This study showed the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction in diabetic women, especially among those complaining of depression. Health care professionals dealing with diabetic patients should be aware of possible presence of sexual dysfunction in female patients. PMID:25999619

  3. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Nsiah, Kwabena; Shang, V Owusua; Boateng, K Agyenim; Mensah, FO

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diabetic condition is influenced by several factors, some of which can accelerate the disease's progression to various complications that aggravate the morbidity. Aims: This study aimed at determining the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components and the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 150 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and was conducted at the Diabetes Centre of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, the Ashanti Region of Ghana, from February, 2013 to April, 2013. The study involved the use of a questionnaire to obtain some information on the diabetics, undertaking anthropometric measurements, as well as collecting blood samples for the measurement of some biochemical parameters; fasting blood glucose and lipid profile. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results: The prevalence of MetS was 58% in the studied Ghanaian population. Hypertension was the commonest risk factor (60%), followed by central obesity (48.67%) and dyslipidemia (37%). Female type 2 diabetics had a higher prevalence of MetS, and carried more components than their male counterparts. Regression analysis showed three factors; femininity, high body mass index and low educational status were the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS, according to this study. Conclusion: With hypertension being the commonest component, future cardiovascular disease prevention strategies should focus attention on its management and prevention, through education. PMID:26097823

  4. A proteomic approach to obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    López-Villar, Elena; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Chowen, Julie A; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of obesity and type diabetes 2 has increased dramatically resulting in an increased interest in its biomedical relevance. However, the mechanisms that trigger the development of diabetes type 2 in obese patients remain largely unknown. Scientific, clinical and pharmaceutical communities are dedicating vast resources to unravel this issue by applying different omics tools. During the last decade, the advances in proteomic approaches and the Human Proteome Organization have opened and are opening a new door that may be helpful in the identification of patients at risk and to improve current therapies. Here, we briefly review some of the advances in our understanding of type 2 diabetes that have occurred through the application of proteomics. We also review, in detail, the current improvements in proteomic methodologies and new strategies that could be employed to further advance our understanding of this pathology. By applying these new proteomic advances, novel therapeutic and/or diagnostic protein targets will be discovered in the obesity/Type 2 diabetes area. PMID:25960181

  5. A proteomic approach to obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Villar, Elena; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Chowen, Julie A; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and type diabetes 2 has increased dramatically resulting in an increased interest in its biomedical relevance. However, the mechanisms that trigger the development of diabetes type 2 in obese patients remain largely unknown. Scientific, clinical and pharmaceutical communities are dedicating vast resources to unravel this issue by applying different omics tools. During the last decade, the advances in proteomic approaches and the Human Proteome Organization have opened and are opening a new door that may be helpful in the identification of patients at risk and to improve current therapies. Here, we briefly review some of the advances in our understanding of type 2 diabetes that have occurred through the application of proteomics. We also review, in detail, the current improvements in proteomic methodologies and new strategies that could be employed to further advance our understanding of this pathology. By applying these new proteomic advances, novel therapeutic and/or diagnostic protein targets will be discovered in the obesity/Type 2 diabetes area. PMID:25960181

  6. Falls risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Vinik, Etta J; Colberg, Sheri R; Morrison, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Falls are a major health issue for older adults, especially for those who develop type 2 diabetes who must contend with age-related declines in balance, muscle strength, and walking ability. They must also contend with health-related issues specific to the disease process. Given the general association between these variables and falls, being able to identify which measures negatively impact on balance in older diabetic persons is a critical step. Moreover, designing specific interventions to target these physiologic functions underlying balance and gait control will produce the greatest benefit for reducing falls in older persons with diabetes. PMID:25453303

  7. [Prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Lebherz, Corinna; Lehrke, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The modern life style is often characterized by a lack of physical activity as well as unhealthy diet leading to a worldwide rise in obesity. This goes along with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes, accompanied by an accelerated atherosclerosis. Life style changes and normalization of body weight therefore represent the cornerstones of diabetes prevention. In addition, a multi-factorial approach focusing on cardiovascular risk factors like dyslipidemia, hypertension and hyperglycemia enables an effective means for the prevention of micro- or macrovascular complications. PMID:25924043

  8. Type 2 Diabetes and ADP Receptor Blocker Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Samoš, Matej; Fedor, Marián; Kovář, František; Mokáň, Michal; Bolek, Tomáš; Galajda, Peter; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with several abnormalities in haemostasis predisposing to thrombosis. Moreover, T2D was recently connected with a failure in antiplatelet response to clopidogrel, the most commonly used ADP receptor blocker in clinical practice. Clopidogrel high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) was repeatedly associated with the risk of ischemic adverse events. Patients with T2D show significantly higher residual platelet reactivity on ADP receptor blocker therapy and are more frequently represented in the group of patients with HTPR. This paper reviews the current knowledge about possible interactions between T2D and ADP receptor blocker therapy. PMID:26824047

  9. Management of Pediatric and Adolescent Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Constantine Samaan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) was an adult disease until recently, but the rising rates of obesity around the world have resulted in a younger age at presentation. Children who have T2D have several comorbidities and complications reminiscent of adult diabetes, but these are appearing in teens instead of midlife. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation and management options for youth with T2D. We discuss the elements of lifestyle intervention programs and allude to pharmacotherapeutic options used in the treatment of T2D youth. We also discuss comorbidities and complications seen in T2D in children and adolescents. PMID:24260037

  10. Impaired Retinal Vasodilator Responses in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Mary E.J.; Slocomb, Julia E.; Shivkumar, Vikram; Smith, Bruce; Quillen, David; Gabbay, Robert A.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Bettermann, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In diabetes, endothelial dysfunction and subsequent structural damage to blood vessels can lead to heart attacks, retinopathy and strokes. However, it is unclear whether prediabetic subjects exhibit microvascular dysfunction indicating early stages of arteriosclerosis and vascular risk. The purpose of this study was to examine whether retinal reactivity may be impaired early in the hyperglycemic continuum and may be associated with markers of inflammation. Methods Individuals with prediabetes (n = 22), type 2 diabetes (n = 25) and healthy age and body composition matched controls (n = 19) were studied. We used the Dynamic Vessel Analyzer to assess retinal vasoreactivity (percent change in vessel diameter) during a flickering light stimulation. Fasting highly sensitive c-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a marker of inflammation, was measured in blood plasma. Results Prediabetic and diabetic individuals had attenuated peak vasodilator and relative amplitude changes in retinal vein diameters to the flickering light stimulus compared to healthy controls (peak dilation: prediabetic subjects 3.3 ± 1.8 %, diabetic subjects 3.3 ± 2.1% controls 5.6 ± 2.6%, p = .001; relative amplitude: prediabetic subjects 4.3 ± 2.2%, diabetic subjects 5.0 ± 2.6% and control subjects 7.2 ± 3.2%, p = .003). Similar findings were observed in retinal arteries. Levels of hs-CRP were not associated with either retinal vessel response parameters. Conclusion Retinal reactivity was impaired in prediabetic and type 2 diabetic individuals in parallel with reduced insulin sensitivity but not associated with levels of hs-CRP. Retinal vasoreactivity measurements may be a sensitive tool to assess early vascular risk. PMID:23742315

  11. Salivary gland dysfunction markers in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Aitken-Saavedra, Juan; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Maturana-Ramírez, Andrea; Escobar-Álvarez, Alejandro; Cortes-Coloma, Andrea; Reyes-Rojas, Montserrat; Viera -Sapiain, Valentina; Villablanca-Martínez, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease of the carbohydrate metabolism that, when not rigorously controlled, compromises systemic and organ integrity, thereby causing renal diseases, blindness, neuropathy, arteriosclerosis, infections, and glandular dysfunction, including the salivary glands. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the qualitative and quantitative parameters of salivary alteration, which are indicators of salivary gland dysfunction, and the level of metabolic control of type 2 diabetes patients. Material and Methods A convenience sample of 74 voluntary patients with type 2 DM was selected, each of whom donated a sample of unstimulated saliva. Salivary parameters such as salivary flow rate, protein concentration, pH, and xerostomia were studied. Results There is a positive relationship between the level of metabolic control measured with HbA1 and the protein concentration in saliva (Spearman rho = 0.329 and p = 0.004). The same assay showed an inverse correlation between HbA1 and pH (Spearman rho = -0.225 and p = 0.05). Conclusions The protein concentration in saliva and, to a lesser extent, the pH may be useful as glandular dysfunction indicators in DM2 patients. Key words:Saliva, type 2 diabetes mellitus, pH, protein concentration, xerostomia. PMID:26535097

  12. Implications of Type 2 Diabetes on Adolescent Reproductive Health Risk

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Julie S.; Arslanian, Silva; de Bruin, Wändi Bruine; Copeland, Valire Carr; Doswell, Willa; Herman, William; Lain, Kristine; Mansfield, Joan; Murray, Pamela J.; White, Neil; Charron-Prochownik, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article was to summarize scientific knowledge from an expert panel on reproductive health among adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Using a mental model approach, a panel of experts—representing perspectives on diabetes, adolescents, preconception counseling, and reproductive health—was convened to discuss reproductive health issues for female adolescents with T2D. Results Several critical issues emerged. Compared with adolescents with type 1 diabetes, (1) adolescents with T2D may perceive their disease as less severe and have less experience managing it, putting them at risk for complications; (2) T2D is more prevalent among African Americans, who may be less trusting of the medical establishment; (3) T2D is associated with obesity, and it is often difficult to change one’s lifestyle within family environments practicing sedentary and dietary behaviors leading to obesity; (4) teens with T2D could be more fertile, because obesity is related to earlier puberty; (5) although obese teens with T2D have a higher risk of polycystic ovary syndrome, which is associated with infertility, treatment with metformin can increase fertility; and (6) women with type 2 diabetes are routinely transferred to insulin before or during pregnancy to allow more intensive management. Conclusions Findings from the expert panel provide compelling reasons to provide early, developmentally appropriate, culturally sensitive preconception counseling for teens with T2D. PMID:20944055

  13. Depression, neighborhood deprivation and risk of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mezuk, Briana; Chaikiat, Åsa; Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Neighborhood characteristics have been associated with both depression and diabetes, but to date little attention has been paid to whether the association between depression and diabetes varies across different types of neighborhoods. This prospective study examined the relationship between depression, neighborhood deprivation, and risk of type 2 diabetes among 336,340 adults from a national-representative sample of primary care centers in Sweden (2001–2007). Multi-level logistic regression models were used to assess associations between depression and risk of type 2 diabetes across affluent and deprived neighborhoods. After accounting for demographic, individual-level socioeconomic, and health characteristics, depression was significantly associated with risk of diabetes (odds ratio (OR): 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06–1.14), as was neighborhood deprivation (OR for high vs. low deprivation: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.22–1.34). The interaction term between depression and neighborhood deprivation was non-significant, indicating that the relationship between depression and diabetes risk is similar across levels of neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation. PMID:23771166

  14. Determinants of preclinical atherosclerosis are different in type 1 and type 2 diabetic women.

    PubMed

    Piťhová, P; Štechová, K; Piťha, J; Lánská, V; Kvapil, M

    2016-06-20

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 ranks among the strongest predictors of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) while the association of type 1 diabetes with CVD is more complex. We studied differences between type 1 and 2 diabetic women regarding association of cardiovascular risk factors with preclinical atherosclerosis expressed as intima-media thickness of common carotid (IMT CCA) and femoral arteries (IMT CFA) measured by high resolution ultrasound. Women with type 1 (n=203) and type 2 diabetes (n=123) were examined with regard to the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. In type 1 diabetic women strong association between IMT CCA and body mass index, waist circumference, and total body fat was found in contrast to type 2 diabetic women. In type 2 diabetic women strong association between IMT CCA and fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and atherogenic index of plasma (log TG/HDL cholesterol) was observed in contrast to type 1 diabetic women. In type 1 diabetic women, IMT CFA was associated with body fat in contrast to type 2 diabetic women. Preclinical atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetic women was strongly associated with factors reflecting body fat and its distribution, while in type 2 diabetic women preclinical atherosclerosis was associated with markers reflecting glucose and lipid metabolic disorders. PMID:26447509

  15. Clinically significant chronic liver disease in people with Type 2 diabetes: the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Fallowfield, J.A.; Guha, I.N.; Williamson, R.M.; Ali, M.; Glancy, S.; Strachan, M.W.J.; Price, J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes is an independent risk factor for chronic liver disease, however disease burden estimates and knowledge of prognostic indicators are lacking in community populations. Aims: To describe the prevalence and incidence of clinically significant chronic liver disease amongst community-based older people with Type 2 diabetes and to determine risk factors which might assist in discriminating patients with unknown prevalent or incident disease. Design: Prospective cohort study. Methods: Nine hundred and thirty-nine participants in the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study underwent investigation including liver ultrasound and non-invasive measures of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), hepatic fibrosis and systemic inflammation. Over 6-years, cases of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma were collated from multiple sources. Results: Eight patients had known prevalent disease with 13 further unknown cases identified (prevalence 2.2%) and 15 incident cases (IR 2.9/1000 person-years). Higher levels of systemic inflammation, NASH and hepatic fibrosis markers were associated with both unknown prevalent and incident clinically significant chronic liver disease (all P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study investigations increased the known prevalence of clinically significant chronic liver disease by over 150%, confirming the suspicion of a large burden of undiagnosed disease. The disease incidence rate was lower than anticipated but still much higher than the general population rate. The ability to identify patients both with and at risk of developing clinically significant chronic liver disease allows for early intervention and clinical monitoring strategies. Ongoing work, with longer follow-up, including analysis of rates of liver function decline, will be used to define optimal risk prediction tools. PMID:26454513

  16. Sphingolipids in Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Russo, S.B.; Ross, J.S.; Cowart, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disease, including obesity and type 2 diabetes, constitutes a major emerging health crisis in Western nations. Although the symptoms and clinical pathology and physiology of these conditions are well understood, the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease process have largely remained obscure. Sphingolipids, a lipid class with both signaling and structural properties, have recently emerged as key players in most major tissues affected by diabetes and are required components in the molecular etiology of this disease. Indeed, sphingolipids have been shown to mediate loss of insulin sensitivity, to promote the characteristic diabetic pro-inflammatory state, and to induce cell death and dysfunction in important organs such as the pancreas and heart. Furthermore, plasma sphingolipid levels are emerging as potential biomarkers for the decompensation of insulin resistance to frank type 2 diabetes. Despite these discoveries, the roles of specific sphingolipid species and sphingolipid metabolic pathways remain obscure, and newly developed experimental approaches must be employed to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms necessary for rational drug development and other clinical applications. PMID:23563667

  17. Low cost sensing technology for type 2 diabetes monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarswat, Prashant; Free, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Alpha-hydroxybutyrate (2-hydroxybutyrate or α-HB) is becoming more widely recognized as an important metabolic biomarker that has been shown to be highly correlated with prediabetes and other metabolic diseases. In 2012 there were 86 million Americans with prediabetes, many of whom are not aware they have prediabetes, but could be diagnosed and treated to prevent type 2 diabetes if a simple, low-cost, convenient test were available. We have developed new, low-cost, accurate α-HB detection methods that can be used for the detection and monitoring of diseases such as prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, β-cell dysfunction, and early hyperglycemia. The new sensing method utilizes a diol recognition moiety, additives and a photoinitiator to detect α-HB at levels near 1 micro g/l in the presence of serum compounds such as lactic acid, sodium pyruvate, and glucose. The objective of this research is to improve the understanding of the interactions that enhance α-HB detection to enable additional improvements in α-HB detection as well as improvements in other biosensor applications.

  18. Glycemic Control and Implant Stabilization in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Oates, T.W.; Dowell, S.; Robinson, M.; McMahan, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered a relative contra-indication for implant therapy. However, the effect of glycemic level on implant integration in persons with diabetes remains poorly understood. The hypothesis of this research was that poor glycemic control is directly related to short-term-impairment implant stabilization. This prospective clinical study evaluated 10 non-diabetic individuals (12 implants) and 20 persons with type 2 diabetes (30 implants). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels ranged from 4.7-12.6%. Implant stability was assessed by resonance frequency analysis over 4 months following placement. Minimum stability levels were observed 2-6 weeks following placement for all 42 implants. Persons with HbA1c ≥ 8.1% had a greater maximum decrease in stability from baseline and required a longer time for healing, as indicated by return of stability level to baseline. This study demonstrates alterations in implant stability consistent with impaired implant integration for persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus in direct relation to hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:19407159

  19. Homocysteine Metabolism in ZDF (Type 2) Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wijekoon, Enoka P.; Hall, Beatrice; Ratnam, Shobhitha; Brosnan, Margaret E.; Zeisel, Steven H.; Brosnan, John T.

    2008-01-01

    Mild hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for many diseases, including cardiovascular disease. We determined the effects of insulin resistance and of type 2 diabetes on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism using Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF/Gmi fa/fa and ZDF/Gmi fa/?). Plasma total Hcy was reduced in ZDF fa/fa rats by 24% in the pre-diabetic insulin-resistant stage, while in the frank diabetic stage there was a 59% reduction. Hepatic activities of several enzymes that play a role in the removal of Hcy: cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase, and betaine:Hcy methyltransferase (BHMT) were increased as was methionine adenosyltransferase. CBS and BHMT mRNA levels and the hepatic level of S-adenosylmethionine were also increased in the ZDF fa/fa rats. Studies with primary hepatocytes showed that Hcy export and the transsulfuration flux in cells from ZDF fa/fa rats were particularly sensitive to betaine. Interestingly, liver betaine concentration was found to be significantly lower in the ZDf fa/fa rats at both 5 and 11 weeks. These results emphasize the importance of betaine metabolism in determining plasma Hcy levels in type 2 diabetes. PMID:16249451

  20. Nutritional supplementation for type 2 diabetes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Hannah E; Eperjesi, Frank

    2008-11-01

    The role of nutritional supplementation is of increasing interest with regard to ocular disease. Randomised controlled trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of supplementation for age-related macular degeneration, and formulations are now being developed for use by people with diabetes and diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this review was to synthesise the evidence for use of nutritional supplementation in type 2 diabetes. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched using a systematic approach. Only double-masked randomised controlled trials were selected. A total of 50 trials were identified as suitable for inclusion. The potential role of alpha-lipoic acid, chromium, folic acid, isoflavones, magnesium, Pycnogenol, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc in the treatment of type 2 diabetes is discussed. The review of trials identifies positive effects of these nutrients on various outcome measures relating to insulin resistance and cardiovascular factors. Chromium was the most studied supplement, accounting for 16 of the 50 trials. A majority of the trials found a positive effect of chromium on fasting plasma glucose. Isoflavones were found to have a positive effect on insulin resistance and cardiovascular outcome measures, but only when combined with soy proteins. Vitamin E is reported to reduce oxidative stress at levels of 200 mg day(-1) or more. PMID:19076553

  1. Dulaglutide (LY-2189265) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2016-01-01

    Dulaglutide is a new once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for the management of hyperglycemia in adult patients with type 2 diabetes. It stimulates dose-dependent insulin secretion and reduces glucagon secretion, both in a glucose-dependent manner. Efficacy on blood glucose control and safety were demonstrated in the large AWARD program in type 2 diabetic patients treated with diet, metformin, dual oral therapy or insulin lispro with or without metformin, confirming findings of pilot studies in Caucasian patients and data in Japanese patients. Dulaglutide 1.5 mg once weekly was superior to metformin, sitagliptin, insulin glargine and exenatide twice daily, and non-inferior to liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily regarding the reduction in glycated hemoglobin. A modest but significant weight loss was consistently observed. Most frequent adverse events were transient and generally mild gastrointestinal disturbances. Clinical outcomes of dulaglutide will not be known until the large prospective cardiovascular outcome trial REWIND is complete. PMID:26761217

  2. Gene Expression Profile Analysis of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases. PMID:23469233

  3. Empagliflozin reduces cardiovascular events and mortality in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Review of: Zinnam, B, Wanner C, Lachin JM, et al. Empagliflozin, Cardiovascular Outcomes, and Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes. New England Journal of Medicine. 2015; 373: 2117-2128. Patients were required to have a history of established cardiovascular disease, along with Type 2 Diabetes but were either not on antidiabetic therapy for the preceding 12 weeks, with a glycated hemoglobin level between 7% and 9%, or were on stable antidiabetic therapy for the preceding 12 weeks, with a glycated hemoglobin between 7.0% and 10.0%. Patients were randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to either empagliflozin 10 mg or 25 mg or matching placebo. Antidiabetic therapy was not to be changed for the first 12 weeks after randomization, with intensification of antidiabetic therapy allowed if the patient had a confirmed glucose of >240 mg/dl (>13.3 mmol/l). Physicians were encouraged to treat other cardiac risk factors like hyperlipidemia according to local guidelines. The primary outcome was a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Results showed a significant reduction in the rates of death from cardiovascular causes, overall mortality, and in hospital admissions for heart failure, while there was no reduction in the rates of non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke. PMID:27043258

  4. Daily physical activity and type 2 diabetes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity improves glycemic control and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Moderate to vigorous physical activity is recommended to manage T2D; however, patients with T2D can be physically weak, making it difficult to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Daily physical activity includes various activities performed during both occupational and leisure time such as walking, gardening, and housework that type 2 diabetic patients should be able to perform without considerable physical burden. This review focuses on the association between daily physical activity and T2D. Walking was the most common form of daily physical activity, with numerous studies demonstrating its beneficial effects on reducing the risk of T2D, CVD, and mortality. Walking for at least 30 min per day was shown to reduce the risk of T2D by approximately 50%. Additionally, walking was associated with a reduction in mortality. In contrast, evidence was extremely limited regarding other daily physical activities such as gardening and housework in patients with T2D. Recent studies have suggested daily physical activity, including non-exercise activity thermogenesis, to be favorably associated with metabolic risks and mortality. However, well-designed longitudinal studies are warranted to elucidate its effects on overall health. PMID:27350847

  5. Daily physical activity and type 2 diabetes: A review.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka

    2016-06-25

    Physical activity improves glycemic control and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Moderate to vigorous physical activity is recommended to manage T2D; however, patients with T2D can be physically weak, making it difficult to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Daily physical activity includes various activities performed during both occupational and leisure time such as walking, gardening, and housework that type 2 diabetic patients should be able to perform without considerable physical burden. This review focuses on the association between daily physical activity and T2D. Walking was the most common form of daily physical activity, with numerous studies demonstrating its beneficial effects on reducing the risk of T2D, CVD, and mortality. Walking for at least 30 min per day was shown to reduce the risk of T2D by approximately 50%. Additionally, walking was associated with a reduction in mortality. In contrast, evidence was extremely limited regarding other daily physical activities such as gardening and housework in patients with T2D. Recent studies have suggested daily physical activity, including non-exercise activity thermogenesis, to be favorably associated with metabolic risks and mortality. However, well-designed longitudinal studies are warranted to elucidate its effects on overall health. PMID:27350847

  6. Attitudes and beliefs among Mexican Americans about type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Coronado, Gloria D; Thompson, Beti; Tejeda, Silvia; Godina, Ruby

    2004-11-01

    Hispanics in the United States have a disproportionately high risk for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes) compared with non-Hispanic whites. Little is known of the attitudes and beliefs about diabetes in this group. Using data from six focus groups of 42 Mexican Americans (14 men and 28 women), we characterized perceptions about the causes of and treatments for type 2 diabetes. Many participants believed diabetes is caused by having a family history of the disease, eating a diet high in fat or sugar, and engaging in minimal exercise. Experiencing strong emotions such as fright (susto), intense anger (coraje), or sadness and depression (tristeza) was also thought to precipitate diabetes. Nearly all participants expressed the belief that it is important to follow doctors' recommendations for diet and exercise, oral medication or insulin; many also cited herbal therapies, such as prickly pear cactus (nopal) and aloe vera (savila) as effective treatments. These findings may be useful in designing interventions to reduce the burden of diabetes in Hispanic populations. PMID:15531816

  7. Cardioprotective effects of magnesium valproate in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhoomika M; Raghunathan, Suchi; Porwal, Urvashi

    2014-04-01

    We have evaluated the effect of magnesium valproate (210 mg/kg/day, p.o.) in type 2 diabetes induced cardiovascular complications induced by streptozotocin (STZ, 90 mg/kg, i.p.) in neonatal wistar rats. Various biochemical, cardiovascular and hemodynamic parameters were measured at the end of 8 weeks of treatment. STZ produced significant hyperglycaemia, hypoinsulinemia and dyslipidemia, which was prevented by magnesium valproate treatment. STZ produced increase in Creatinine Kinase, C-reactive protein and lactate dehydrogenase levels and treatment with magnesium valproate produced reduction in these levels. STZ produced increase in cardiac and LV hypertrophy index, LV/RV ratio, LV collagen deposition and LV cardiomyocyte diameter which were decreased by magnesium valproate treatment. Magnesium valproate also prevented STZ induced hemodynamic alterations and oxidative stress. These results were further supported by histopathological studies in which magnesium valproate showed marked reduction in fibrosis and cardiac fiber disarray. In conclusion, our data suggests that magnesium valproate is beneficial as an anti-diabetic agent in type-2 diabetes mellitus and also prevents its cardiac complications. PMID:24530414

  8. Total Antioxidant Status in Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Akram T; Darwish, Hisham M; Akkawi, Mutaz A; Ashareef, Abdelkareem A; Almasri, Zaher A; Bader, Khaldoun A; Khammash, Umaiyeh M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the level of total antioxidant status (TAS) in type 2 diabetic and normal Palestinian subjects as well as the major factors influencing TAS levels. A sample of convenience composed of 212 type 2 diabetic and 208 normal subjects above the age of 40 were recruited. Only 9.8% of the subjects had normal body mass index (BMI) levels (<25), 29% were overweight (≥25 to <30), and 61.2% were obese (≥30). The mean levels of TAS were significantly higher in diabetic compared to control subjects (2.18 versus 1.84 mM Trolox, P = 0.001) and in hypertensive subjects compared to subjects with normal blood pressure (BP). Mean TAS levels were higher in obese compared to nonobese subjects (2.12 versus 1.85 mM Trolox, P = 0.001). Mean TAS levels were similarly higher in subjects with high fasting plasma glucose (FPG) compared to normal FPG (2.19 versus 1.90 mM Trolox) and high HbA1c (≥6.5%) compared to HbA1c < 6.5% (2.14 versus 1.91 mM Trolox). Multivariate analysis revealed that only diabetic status (P = 0.032) and the level of education (P = 0.036) were significantly associated with TAS. In conclusion diabetic patients had 18.5% increase in TAS levels compared to control subjects. PMID:26090472

  9. [Treatment of type 2 diabetes in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Díez-Espino, Javier; Formiga, Francesc; Lafita Tejedor, Javier; Rodríguez Mañas, Leocadio; González-Sarmiento, Enrique; Menéndez, Edelmiro; Sangrós, Javier

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes in the elderly represents a major challenge both in terms of clinical management and public health. Aging is causing a marked increase in the pandemic of diabetes in elderly people. However, scientific evidence to support the most appropriate treatment for diabetes in the elderly is scarce. Given the heterogeneity of the elderly population, which includes subjects with very different functional and cognitive capacities, co-morbidities, and life expectancy, it is critical to make a comprehensive assessment from a biopsychosocial perspective, to address the vascular risk factors integrally, and to establish individually tailored targets for glycemic control. In frail elderly or individuals with a short life expectancy, it may be reasonable to maintain HbA1c between 7.6%-8.5%. The therapeutic strategy for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes should be individualized and agreed with the patient and their caregivers, according to the objective. Improving quality of life, assuring patient safety and avoiding the adverse effects of antidiabetic treatment should be prioritized. Given the increased susceptibility of the elderly to severe hypoglycemia and its consequences, antidiabetic therapies that minimize the risk of hypoglycemic events should be selected. PMID:23199835

  10. The effects of bariatric surgeries on type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerd Ng, Jia; Ortiz, Roberto; Hughes, Tyler; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Allen, Roland

    2012-10-01

    We consider a scientific mystery which is of central importance in treating the most rapidly emerging national and global health threat: type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mystery involves a surprising effect of certain bariatric surgeries, and specifically Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), a procedure which bypasses most of the stomach and upper intestine. An unanticipated result is that RYGB is usually found to contribute within only a few days to glucose homeostasis. This means the surgery can immediately cure patients even before they start losing weight. We are investigating this wondrous biochemical response with a quantitative model which includes the most important mechanisms. One of the major contributors is glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an incretin whose concentration is found to increase by a large amount right after the RYGB surgical procedure. However, our results, in conjunction with the experimental and medical data, indicate that other substances must also contribute. If these substances can be definitively identified, it may be possible to replace the surgery with pharmaceuticals as the preferred treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  11. Is insulin resistance the principal cause of type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Gerich, J E

    1999-09-01

    The data presented from these recent studies raise serious doubt concerning the commonly held view that insulin resistance is the principal cause of type 2 diabetes: first of all they provide evidence that insulin resistance may not be the primary genetic factor for type 2 diabetes; secondly, they demonstrate that at least under certain circumstances insulin resistance is not essential for diabetes to occur, and then finally, they indicate that insulin resistance may not be the predominant factor determining the degree of hyperglycaemia. Although these studies suggest that the role of insulin resistance relative to that of beta-cell dysfunction in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes has been generally overestimated, one should not be left with the impression that insulin resistance is not important. It is certainly an important factor in determining the degree of hyperglycaemia or glucose intolerance present at a given level of beta-cell function. The improvement in glycaemic control after weight loss which lessens insulin resistance or after the administration of pharmacologic agents that improve insulin sensitivity clearly argue that insulin resistance is important in this regard. In addition to influencing the severity of glucose intolerance, insulin resistance is probably also important in determining the time of onset of diabetes. It may do this simply by altering the balance between the body's demand for insulin and the ability of the pancreas to provide insulin. It might adversely affect beta-cell function in addition to increasing the demand for insulin. This concept is schematically represented in figure 3. It is well established that beta-cell function normally deteriorates as a function of age [41]. Although the prevalence of type 2 diabetes increases as a function of age, this by itself obviously does not result in diabetes in the great majority of people. In such individuals their insulin sensitivity is sufficient to maintain the balance between the

  12. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, glycemic control, and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Onitilo, Adedayo A; Stankowski, Rachel V; Berg, Richard L; Engel, Jessica M; Glurich, Ingrid; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by prolonged hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and progressive hyperglycemia. Disease management relies on glycemic control through diet, exercise, and pharmacological intervention. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of glycemic control and the use of glucose-lowering medication on the risk of breast, prostate, and colon cancer. Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N=9486) between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2009 were identified and data on glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c, glucose), glucose-lowering medication use (insulin, metformin, sulfonylurea), age, BMI, date of diabetes diagnosis, insurance status, comorbidities, smoking history, location of residence, and cancer diagnoses were electronically abstracted. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to examine the relationship between glycemic control, including medication use, and cancer risk. The results varied by cancer type and medication exposure. There was no association between glycemic control and breast or colon cancer; however, prostate cancer risk was significantly higher with better glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c ≤ 7.0%). Insulin use was associated with increased colon cancer incidence in women, but not with colon cancer in men or breast or prostate cancer risk. Metformin exposure was associated with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence, but had no association with colon cancer risk. Sulfonylurea exposure was not associated with risk of any type of cancer. The data reported here support hyperinsulinemia, rather than hyperglycemia, as a major diabetes-related factor associated with increased risk of breast and colon cancer. In contrast, hyperglycemia appears to be protective in the case of prostate cancer. PMID:23962874

  13. Effects of Intensive Glucose Lowering in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies have shown a relationship between glycated hemoglobin levels and cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether intensive therapy to target normal glycated hemoglobin levels would reduce cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes who had either established cardiovascular disease or additional cardiovascular risk factors. Methods In this randomized study, 10,251 patients (mean age, 62.2 years) with a median glycated hemoglobin level of 8.1% were assigned to receive intensive therapy (targeting a glycated hemoglobin level below 6.0%) or standard therapy (targeting a level from 7.0 to 7.9%). Of these patients, 38% were women, and 35% had had a previous cardiovascular event. The primary outcome was a composite of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes. The finding higher mortality in the intensive-therapy group led to a discontinuation of intensive therapy after a mean of 3.5 years of follow-up. Results At 1 year, stable median glycated hemoglobin levels of 6.4% and 7.5% were achieved in the intensive-therapy group and the standard-therapy group, respectively. During follow-up, the primary outcome occurred in 352 patients in the intensive-therapy group, as compared with 371 in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 1.04; P = 0.16). At the same time, 257 patients in the intensive-therapy group died, as compared with 203 patients in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.46; P = 0.04). Hypoglycemia requiring assistance and weight gain of more than 10 kg were more frequent in the intensive-therapy group (P<0.001). Conclusions As compared with standard therapy, the use of intensive therapy to target normal glycated hemoglobin levels for 3.5 years increased mortality and did not significantly reduce major cardiovascular events. These findings identify a previously unrecognized

  14. Empagliflozin and Progression of Kidney Disease in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Christoph; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Lachin, John M; Fitchett, David; von Eynatten, Maximilian; Mattheus, Michaela; Johansen, Odd Erik; Woerle, Hans J; Broedl, Uli C; Zinman, Bernard

    2016-07-28

    Background Diabetes confers an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular and renal events. In the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial, empagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, reduced the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes at high risk for cardiovascular events. We wanted to determine the long-term renal effects of empagliflozin, an analysis that was a prespecified component of the secondary microvascular outcome of that trial. Methods We randomly assigned patients with type 2 diabetes and an estimated glomerular filtration rate of at least 30 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2) of body-surface area to receive either empagliflozin (at a dose of 10 mg or 25 mg) or placebo once daily. Prespecified renal outcomes included incident or worsening nephropathy (progression to macroalbuminuria, doubling of the serum creatinine level, initiation of renal-replacement therapy, or death from renal disease) and incident albuminuria. Results Incident or worsening nephropathy occurred in 525 of 4124 patients (12.7%) in the empagliflozin group and in 388 of 2061 (18.8%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the empagliflozin group, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.53 to 0.70; P<0.001). Doubling of the serum creatinine level occurred in 70 of 4645 patients (1.5%) in the empagliflozin group and in 60 of 2323 (2.6%) in the placebo group, a significant relative risk reduction of 44%. Renal-replacement therapy was initiated in 13 of 4687 patients (0.3%) in the empagliflozin group and in 14 of 2333 patients (0.6%) in the placebo group, representing a 55% lower relative risk in the empagliflozin group. There was no significant between-group difference in the rate of incident albuminuria. The adverse-event profile of empagliflozin in patients with impaired kidney function at baseline was similar to that reported in the overall trial population. Conclusions In patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk, empagliflozin was associated with

  15. Type 2 diabetic rats are sensitive to thioacetamide hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Dnyanmote, Ankur V.; Warbritton, Alan; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-03-15

    Previously, we reported high hepatotoxic sensitivity of type 2 diabetic (DB) rats to three dissimilar hepatotoxicants. Additional work revealed that a normally nonlethal dose of CCl{sub 4} was lethal in DB rats due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair. The present study was conducted to investigate the importance of compensatory tissue repair in determining the final outcome of hepatotoxicity in diabetes, using another structurally and mechanistically dissimilar hepatotoxicant, thioacetamide (TA), to initiate liver injury. A normally nonlethal dose of TA (300 mg/kg, ip), caused 100% mortality in DB rats. Time course studies (0 to 96 h) showed that in the non-DB rats, liver injury initiated by TA as assessed by plasma alanine or aspartate aminotransferase and hepatic necrosis progressed up to 48 h and regressed to normal at 96 h resulting in 100% survival. In the DB rats, liver injury rapidly progressed resulting in progressively deteriorating liver due to rapidly expanding injury, hepatic failure, and 100% mortality between 24 and 48 h post-TA treatment. Covalent binding of {sup 14}C-TA-derived radiolabel to liver tissue did not differ from that observed in the non-DB rats, indicating similar bioactivation-based initiation of hepatotoxicity. S-phase DNA synthesis measured by [{sup 3}H]-thymidine incorporation, and advancement of cells through the cell division cycle measured by PCNA immunohistochemistry, were substantially inhibited in the DB rats compared to the non-DB rats challenged with TA. Thus, inhibited cell division and compromised tissue repair in the DB rats resulted in progressive expansion of liver injury culminating in mortality. In conclusion, it appears that similar to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes also increases sensitivity to dissimilar hepatotoxicants due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair, suggesting that sensitivity to hepatotoxicity in diabetes occurs in the absence as well as presence of insulin.

  16. Dopaminergic drugs in type 2 diabetes and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lopez Vicchi, Felicitas; Luque, Guillermina Maria; Brie, Belen; Nogueira, Juan Patricio; Garcia Tornadu, Isabel; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia

    2016-07-01

    The importance of dopamine in central nervous system function is well known, but its effects on glucose homeostasis and pancreatic β cell function are beginning to be unraveled. Mutant mice lacking dopamine type 2 receptors (D2R) are glucose intolerant and have abnormal insulin secretion. In humans, administration of neuroleptic drugs, which block dopamine receptors, may cause hyperinsulinemia, increased weight gain and glucose intolerance. Conversely, treatment with the dopamine precursor l-DOPA in patients with Parkinson's disease reduces insulin secretion upon oral glucose tolerance test, and bromocriptine improves glycemic control and glucose tolerance in obese type 2 diabetic patients as well as in non diabetic obese animals and humans. The actions of dopamine on glucose homeostasis and food intake impact both the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Different central actions of the dopamine system may mediate its metabolic effects such as: (i) regulation of hypothalamic noradrenaline output, (ii) participation in appetite control, and (iii) maintenance of the biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. On the other hand, dopamine inhibits prolactin, which has metabolic functions; and, at the pancreatic beta cell dopamine D2 receptors inhibit insulin secretion. We review the evidence obtained in animal models and clinical studies that posited dopamine receptors as key elements in glucose homeostasis and ultimately led to the FDA approval of bromocriptine in adults with type 2 diabetes to improve glycemic control. Furthermore, we discuss the metabolic consequences of treatment with neuroleptics which target the D2R, that should be monitored in psychiatric patients to prevent the development in diabetes, weight gain, and hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:26748034

  17. Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, Carbohydrates, and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Darren C.; Threapleton, Diane E.; Evans, Charlotte E.L.; Cleghorn, Christine L.; Nykjaer, Camilla; Woodhead, Charlotte; Burley, Victoria J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diets with high glycemic index (GI), with high glycemic load (GL), or high in all carbohydrates may predispose to higher blood glucose and insulin concentrations, glucose intolerance, and risk of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to conduct a systematic literature review and dose–response meta-analysis of evidence from prospective cohorts. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in-process, Embase, CAB Abstracts, ISI Web of Science, and BIOSIS for prospective studies of GI, GL, and total carbohydrates in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes up to 17 July 2012. Data were extracted from 24 publications on 21 cohort studies. Studies using different exposure categories were combined on the same scale using linear and nonlinear dose–response trends. Summary relative risks (RRs) were estimated using random-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS The summary RR was 1.08 per 5 GI units (95% CI 1.02–1.15; P = 0.01), 1.03 per 20 GL units (95% CI 1.00–1.05; P = 0.02), and 0.97 per 50 g/day of carbohydrate (95% CI 0.90–1.06; P = 0.5). Dose–response trends were linear for GI and GL but more complex for total carbohydrate intake. Heterogeneity was high for all exposures (I2 >50%), partly accounted for by different covariate adjustment and length of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Included studies were observational and should be interpreted cautiously. However, our findings are consistent with protective effects of low dietary GI and GL, quantifying the range of intakes associated with lower risk. Future research could focus on the type of sugars and other carbohydrates associated with greatest risk. PMID:24265366

  18. Survival Association Rule Mining Towards Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gyorgy J.; Schrom, John; Castro, M. Regina; Li, Peter W.; Caraballo, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus is a growing epidemic that often leads to severe complications. Effective preventive measures exist and identifying patients at high risk of diabetes is a major health-care need. The use of association rule mining (ARM) is advantageous, as it was specifically developed to identify associations between risk factors in an interpretable form. Unfortunately, traditional ARM is not directly applicable to survival outcomes and it lacks the ability to compensate for confounders and to incorporate dosage effects. In this work, we propose Survival Association Rule (SAR) Mining, which addresses these shortcomings. We demonstrate on a real diabetes data set that SARs are naturally more interpretable than the traditional association rules, and predictive models built on top of these rules are very competitive relative to state of the art survival models and substantially outperform the most widely used diabetes index, the Framingham score. PMID:24551408

  19. Mechanisms of beta-cell death in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Donath, Marc Y; Ehses, Jan A; Maedler, Kathrin; Schumann, Desiree M; Ellingsgaard, Helga; Eppler, Elisabeth; Reinecke, Manfred

    2005-12-01

    A decrease in the number of functional insulin-producing beta-cells contributes to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. Opinions diverge regarding the relative contribution of a decrease in beta-cell mass versus an intrinsic defect in the secretory machinery. Here we review the evidence that glucose, dyslipidemia, cytokines, leptin, autoimmunity, and some sulfonylureas may contribute to the maladaptation of beta-cells. With respect to these causal factors, we focus on Fas, the ATP-sensitive K+ channel, insulin receptor substrate 2, oxidative stress, nuclear factor-kappaB, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction as their respective mechanisms of action. Interestingly, most of these factors are involved in inflammatory processes in addition to playing a role in both the regulation of beta-cell secretory function and cell turnover. Thus, the mechanisms regulating beta-cell proliferation, apoptosis, and function are inseparable processes. PMID:16306327

  20. Functional herbal food ingredients used in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Li, Yunman

    2012-01-01

    From many reports it is clear that diabetes will be one of the major diseases in the coming years. As a result there is a rapidly increasing interest in searching new medicines, or even better searching prophylactic methods. Based on a large number of chemical and pharmacological research work, numerous bioactive compounds have been found in functional herbal food ingredients for diabetes. The present paper reviews functional herbal food ingredients with regards to their anti-diabetic active principles and pharmacological test results, which are commonly used in Asian culinary system and medical system and have demonstrated clinical or/and experimental anti-diabetic effectiveness. Our idea of reviewing this article is to give more attention to these functional food ingredients as targets medicinal foods in order to prevent or slow down the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:22654403

  1. Animal Models of GWAS-Identified Type 2 Diabetes Genes

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Bellomo, Elisa A.; McGinty, James A.; French, Paul M.; Rutter, Guy A.

    2013-01-01

    More than 65 loci, encoding up to 500 different genes, have been implicated by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) as conferring an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). Whilst mouse models have in the past been central to understanding the mechanisms through which more penetrant risk genes for T2D, for example, those responsible for neonatal or maturity-onset diabetes of the young, only a few of those identified by GWAS, notably TCF7L2 and ZnT8/SLC30A8, have to date been examined in mouse models. We discuss here the animal models available for the latter genes and provide perspectives for future, higher throughput approaches towards efficiently mining the information provided by human genetics. PMID:23710470

  2. Air Pollution as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiaoquan; Patel, Priti; Puett, Robin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies in both humans and animals suggest that air pollution is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the mechanism by which air pollution mediates propensity to diabetes is not fully understood. While a number of epidemiologic studies have shown a positive association between ambient air pollution exposure and risk for T2DM, some studies have not found such a relationship. Experimental studies in susceptible disease models do support this association and suggest the involvement of tissues involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM such as the immune system, adipose, liver, and central nervous system. This review summarizes the epidemiologic and experimental evidence between ambient outdoor air pollution and T2DM. PMID:25628401

  3. Vascular repair strategies in type 2 diabetes: novel insights

    PubMed Central

    Kuschnerus, Kira; Landmesser, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Impaired functions of vascular cells are responsible for the majority of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently a better understanding of mechanisms contributing to development of vascular dysfunction and the role of systemic inflammatory activation and functional alterations of several secretory organs, of which adipose tissue has more recently been investigated, has been achieved. Notably, the progression of vascular disease within the context of T2D appears to be driven by a multitude of incremental signaling shifts. Hence, successful therapies need to target several mechanisms in parallel, and over a long time period. This review will summarize the latest molecular strategies and translational developments of cardiovascular therapy in patients with T2D. PMID:26543824

  4. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in elderly institutionalized patients.

    PubMed

    Cano Megias, M; Guisado Vasco, P

    2014-12-01

    A 93-year-old woman is admitted to a conventional hospital ward for an acute respiratory infection. The patient has type 2 diabetes mellitus of approximately 15 years evolution and has no other associated comorbidities, except for progressive dependence due to senescence and a previous hospitalization for pneumonia 6 months ago. She is currently in an assisted-living residence. A recent laboratory test revealed an HbA1c level of 7.8%, with a serum creatinine level of 1.3mg/dl (MDRD, 45ml/min). Her standard treatment consists of 5mg of glibenclamide a day and 850mg of metformin every 12hours. What regimen should we follow once she is hospitalized? Does she require any change in her treatment at discharge? PMID:24703988

  5. Nephropathy in youth and young adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Solis-Herrera, Carolina; Triplitt, Curtis L; Lynch, Jane L

    2014-02-01

    The occurrence and progression of nephropathy associated with early onset type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a consequence of the ongoing epidemic of childhood obesity. Minimal evidence regarding treatment effectiveness of renovascular comorbidities in youth with early onset T2D is available, due to the relatively recent emergence of T2D in youth and young adults. Extrapolation of adult therapy guidelines is not an ideal approach to making therapeutic decisions in this population. Evolving management and intervention strategies are based on accumulating longitudinal data from cohorts of well characterized youth and young adults with T2D. The degree of similarity in histologic findings and disease specific characteristics of kidney disease in patients with early onset T2D and albuminuria compared with affected adults is not well characterized. Early aggressive therapies to minimize the impact of nephropathy are indicated as the evidence for best therapies in youth with T2D are further explored. PMID:24398660

  6. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appears to underlie the development of cardiovascular disease, T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidative stress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM. PMID:25897356

  7. Mechanisms of Islet Amyloidosis Toxicity in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Abedini, Andisheh; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid formation by the neuropancreatic hormone, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin), one of the most amyloidogenic sequences known, leads to islet amyloidosis in type 2 diabetes and to islet transplant failure. Under normal conditions, IAPP plays a role in the maintenance of energy homeostasis by regulating several metabolic parameters, such as satiety, blood glucose levels, adiposity and body weight. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation, the nature of IAPP toxic species and the cellular pathways that lead to pancreatic β-cell toxicity are not well characterized. Several mechanisms of toxicity, including receptor and non-receptor-mediated events, have been proposed. Analogs of IAPP have been approved for the treatment of diabetes and are under investigation for the treatment of obesity. PMID:23337872

  8. Incretin response in Asian type 2 diabetes: Are Indians different?

    PubMed

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Incretin-based therapy has clearly emerged as one of the most sought out strategy in managing type 2 diabetes, primarily because they generally do not causes hypoglycemia and possess weight-neutral or weight losing properties. Efficacy-wise too, these agents, are more or less similar to commonly used drugs metformin and sulfonylureas. Interestingly, some studies recently suggested that glycemic response to these incretin-based therapies could also differ ethnicity-wise. Subsequently, meta-analysis from these studies also suggested that Asians may have better response to these incretin-based therapies. This review will be an attempt to critically analyze those studies available in literature and to address as to why East-Asians and South-Asians may have different incretin response compared to non-Asians. PMID:25593823

  9. Canagliflozin Treatment in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Triplitt, Curtis; Cornell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) indicate a patient-centered approach that should go beyond glycemic control. Of the many antihyperglycemic agents available for treatment of T2DM, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors offer the advantages of reduced glycated hemoglobin (A1C), body weight (BW), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and are associated with a low risk of hypoglycemia when used either as monotherapy or with other agents not typically associated with increased risk of hypoglycemia. Collaborative, multidisciplinary teams are best suited to provide care to patients with diabetes, and clinical pharmacists can enhance the care provided by these teams. This review aims to provide insight into the mode of action, pharmacology, potential drug–drug interactions, clinical benefits, and safety considerations associated with use of the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin in patients with T2DM and to provide information to enhance clinical pharmacists’ understanding of canagliflozin. PMID:26523120

  10. Behavioral Contributions to the Pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Cook, Lauren; O’Reilly, Gillian A.; Page, Kathleen A.; Quinn, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral Contributions to the pathogenesis of prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) include lifestyle behaviors including dietary intake, exercise, sedentariness, sleep, and stress. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence for the metabolic pathways by which the behavior is linked to T2D. Evidence for interventions which change each of the lifestyle behaviors is discussed. The article will close with a brief discussion on how new technologies may provide opportunities to better understand relationships between moment-to-moment fluctuations in behaviors and diabetes pathogenesis, as well as provide opportunities to personalize and adapt interventions to achieve successful behavior change and maintenance of that change. Especially promising are new technologies which assist in tracking lifestyle behaviors along with clinical and metabolic outcomes. PMID:24604714

  11. Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents on atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Pramyothin, Pornpoj; Khaodhiar, Lalita

    2015-08-01

    Youth receiving treatment with antipsychotics are particularly susceptible to weight gain, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and associated metabolic disorders, which is directly associated with excess morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable population. The risk of T2D is 2- to 3-fold that of the general population, starts early in the course of treatment, and reflects the effects of weight gain in conjunction with direct effects of antipsychotics on the hypothalamus, pancreatic beta cells, and insulin-sensitive peripheral tissues. Close monitoring with early intervention through lifestyle intervention, switching away from antipsychotics with deleterious metabolic effects, and adjunctive treatment with metformin are modalities available to mitigate weight gain and improve cardiometabolic health in these patients. Despite rapidly advancing knowledge in the field, patient's access to metabolic screening and quality care remains limited. Efforts must be made to broaden reach of early cardiometabolic intervention among these patients in order to avert serious cardiovascular disease burden in the future. PMID:26084582

  12. Current view from Alzheimer disease to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Mahmood; Malik, Arif; Qazi, Aamer M; Sheikh, Ishfaq A; Manan, Abdul; Shaheen, Sumaira; Qazi, Mahmood H; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Asif, Muhammad; Alqahtani, Mohammed H; Iqbal, Zafar; Shaik, Munvar M; Gan, Siew H; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to memory problems. It has been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus at both the molecular and biochemical level. Pancreatic cells have molecular similarities to the brain at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels. Several genes have been reported to be responsible for both AD and diabetes. Currently, no proper treatment is available but various therapeutic approaches are utilized worldwide for the management of these disorders and may be nanoparticles and herbal treatment of Bacopa monnieri will make promise for the treatment of AD in future. The formation of amyloids in neurons and the formation of amylin in pancreatic cells are potential links between these two disorders, which can be silent killers. PMID:24059295

  13. Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes: the Power of Isolated Populations.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mette Korre; Pedersen, Casper-Emil Tingskov; Moltke, Ida; Hansen, Torben; Albrechtsen, Anders; Grarup, Niels

    2016-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) affects millions of people worldwide. Improving the understanding of the underlying mechanisms and ultimately improving the treatment strategies are, thus, of great interest. To achieve this, identification of genetic variation predisposing to T2D is important. A large number of variants have been identified in large outbred populations, mainly from Europe and Asia. However, to elucidate additional variation, isolated populations have a number of advantageous properties, including increased amounts of linkage disequilibrium, and increased probability for presence of high frequency disease-associated variants due to genetic drift. Collectively, this increases the statistical power to detect association signals in isolated populations compared to large outbred populations. In this review, we elaborate on why isolated populations are a powerful resource for the identification of complex disease variants and describe their contributions to the understanding of the genetics of T2D. PMID:27189761

  14. Novel treatment approaches in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Castro Torres, Yaniel; Katholi, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension represent two common conditions worldwide. Their frequent association with cardiovascular diseases makes management of hypertensive patients with T2DM an important clinical priority. Carvedilol and renal denervation are two promising choices to reduce plasma glucose levels and blood pressure in hypertensive patients with T2DM to reduce future complications and improve clinical outcomes and prognosis. Pathophysiological mechanisms of both options are under investigation, but one of the most accepted is an attenuation in sympathetic nervous system activity which lowers blood pressure and improves insulin sensitivity. Choice of these therapeutic approaches should be individualized based on specific characteristics of each patient. Further investigations are needed to determine when to consider their use in clinical practice. PMID:25126399

  15. Type 2 Diabetes as a Protein Misfolding Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Abhisek; Morales-Scheihing, Diego; Butler, Peter C.; Soto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a highly prevalent and chronic metabolic disorder. Recent evidence suggests that formation of toxic aggregates of the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) might contribute to β-cell dysfunction and disease. However, the mechanism of protein aggregation and associated toxicity is still unclear. Misfolding, aggregation and accumulation of diverse proteins in different organs is the hallmark in the group of protein misfolding disorders (PMDs), including highly prevalent illnesses affecting the central nervous system such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. In this review we will discuss the current understanding of the mechanisms implicated in the formation of protein aggregates in pancreas and associated toxicity in the light of the longstanding knowledge from neurodegenerative disorders associated with protein misfolding. PMID:25998900

  16. What Have Metabolomics Approaches Taught Us About Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Burkart, Alison M; Isganaitis, Elvira; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide, making identification of biomarkers for detection, staging, and effective prevention strategies an especially critical scientific and medical goal. Fortunately, advances in metabolomics techniques, together with improvements in bioinformatics and mathematical modeling approaches, have provided the scientific community with new tools to describe the T2D metabolome. The metabolomics signatures associated with T2D and obesity include increased levels of lactate, glycolytic intermediates, branched-chain and aromatic amino acids, and long-chain fatty acids. Conversely, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, betaine, and other metabolites decrease. Future studies will be required to fully integrate these and other findings into our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology and to identify biomarkers of disease risk, stage, and responsiveness to specific treatments. PMID:27319324

  17. Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes and Clinical Utility

    PubMed Central

    Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Liu, Jianjun; Boehm, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of heritability of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been attributed to inherent genetics. Recent genetic studies, especially genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have identified a multitude of variants associated with T2D. It is thus reasonable to question if these findings may be utilized in a clinical setting. Here we briefly review the identification of risk loci for T2D and discuss recent efforts and propose future work to utilize these loci in clinical setting—for the identification of individuals who are at particularly high risks of developing T2D and for the stratification of specific health-care approaches for those who would benefit most from such interventions. PMID:26110315

  18. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sang Youl

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibits broad clinical characteristics and various consequences and is known as one of the major macrovascular complications of T2DM. Atherosclerosis is recognized as the most direct and important cause of PAD, but acute or chronic limb ischemia may be the result of various risk factors. In light of the increasing number of patients who undergo peripheral vascular procedures, the number of subjects who are exposed to the risks for PAD and related complications is increasing. In this review, we will discuss the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of PAD, as well as the clinical significance of PAD in T2DM subjects. PMID:26301189

  19. [What is the natural history of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kawamori, Ryuzo

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is widely accepted as the progressive disease. It is natural to think, if the newly diagnosed patient does not change the life-style habits and does not receive any medications, the state of T2DM will become more seriously. However, in this article, how to arrest the natural history of T2DM will be discussed by summarizing the recent findings on this topic. Those are; autophagy of pancreatic β cell: a sweet process to diabetes, hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress on β cell function, zinc, insulin and the liver, and so on. In short, the important things are; people should know the reasons why minor abnormalities have happened, and the practitioners have to try hard to remove such causes triggering T2DM. PMID:25812360

  20. Type 2 diabetes in Brazil: epidemiology and management

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida-Pititto, Bianca; Dias, Monike Lourenço; de Moraes, Ana Carolina Franco; Ferreira, Sandra RG; Franco, Denise Reis; Eliaschewitz, Freddy Goldberg

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most important epidemic diseases in the world this century, and accounts for 90% of cases of diabetes globally. Brazil is one of the most important examples of the alarming picture of T2DM in emergent societies, being the country with the fourth largest number of people with diabetes. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on diabetes in Brazil, specifically looking at the epidemiology and management of T2DM. A literature search was conducted using PubMed and LILACS to identify articles containing information on diabetes in Brazil. Official documents from the Brazilian government, World Health Organization, and International Diabetes Federation were also reviewed. PMID:25609989

  1. Liraglutide in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Lisbeth V; Flint, Anne; Olsen, Anette K; Ingwersen, Steen H

    2016-06-01

    Liraglutide is an acylated glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue with 97 % amino acid homology with native glucagon-like peptide-1 and greatly protracted action. It is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and administered by subcutaneous injection once daily. The pharmacokinetic properties of liraglutide enable 24-h exposure coverage, a requirement for 24-h glycaemic control with once-daily dosing. The mechanism of protraction relates to slowed release from the injection site, and a reduced elimination rate owing to metabolic stabilisation and reduced renal filtration. Drug exposure is largely independent of injection site, as well as age, race and ethnicity. Increasing body weight and male sex are associated with reduced concentrations, but there is substantial overlap between subgroups; therefore, dose escalation should be based on individual treatment outcome. Exposure is reduced with mild, moderate or severe renal or hepatic impairment. There are no clinically relevant changes in overall concentrations of various drugs (e.g. paracetamol, atorvastatin, griseofulvin, digoxin, lisinopril and oral combination contraceptives) when co-administered with liraglutide. Pharmacodynamic studies show multiple beneficial actions with liraglutide, including improved fasting and postprandial glycaemic control (mediated by increased insulin and reduced glucagon levels and minor delays in gastric emptying), reduced appetite and energy intake, and effects on postprandial lipid profiles. The counter-regulatory hormone response to hypoglycaemia is largely unaltered. The effects of liraglutide on insulin and glucagon secretion are glucose dependent, and hence the risk of hypoglycaemia is low. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of liraglutide make it an important treatment option for many patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26597252

  2. Effects of platycodins on liver complications of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Luan, Haiyan; Yang, Limin; Liu, Lei; Liu, Shuang; Zhao, Xiaolian; Sui, Hongyu; Wang, Jingtao; Wang, Shuqiu

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the therapeutic effects and mechanism of platycodin in liver complications of type 2 diabetes. All rats were randomly divided into two groups: The control group (normal diet) and the model group (a high‑fat and high‑sugar diet). The model group was injected with 2% streptozocin (25 mg/kg body weight) through the tail vein following 4 weeks of dieting. After a total of 8 weeks of dieting, fasting blood glucose (FBG) and liver function were examined. The high‑fat and high‑sugar diet was continued in the successful model rats, which were randomly divided into four groups and treated with the following doses of platycodins: The untreated, and 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight/day groups. Platycodins treatment lasted for 12 weeks. Platycodins treatment at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight/day reduced the FBG, glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), glutamic oxalacetic transaminase, triglycerides, total cholesterol (TC), low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) and liver index levels compared with the untreated group (P<0.05), while the high‑density lipoprotein levels increased (P<0.05). Furthermore, FBG, GPT, TC and LDL levels were returned to the normal level. This dose also increased the expression of BMP‑9 mRNA and BMP‑9 protein, and reduced the expression of Smad‑4 mRNA and Smad‑4 protein. These findings indicate that platycodins can rectify disorders of blood glucose and lipid metabolism, improve liver index and protect liver function in liver complications of type 2 diabetes. The current study suggests that this therapeutic effect is mediated through the BMP‑9/Smad‑4 pathway. PMID:25017203

  3. Type 2 diabetes in Belgians of Turkish and Moroccan origin

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To compare the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adults aged 35 to 74 years of the Turkish and Moroccan communities in Belgium with the prevalence in native Belgians. To examine the determinants and specific mechanisms responsible for differences in diabetes between these communities. Method Both objectives were examined using the Health Interview Surveys of 1997, 2001 and 2004. Stepwise logistic regression analyses were performed with diabetes as the outcome variable. The variables 'age', 'sex', 'ethnic origin', 'body mass index', 'lack of physical activity', 'educational attainment' and 'income' were introduced in the model in consecutive steps. Results In 35- to 74-year-olds, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is higher in Belgians of Tur-kish and Moroccan origin than in native Belgians. In native Belgian men, the prevalence amounts to 5.0%. In 35- to 74-year-old men of Turkish and Moroccan origin, the diabetes prevalence is 5.8% and 6.5% respectively. 4.3%, 18.7% and 11.9% of the women of Belgian, Turkish and Moroccan origin respectively suffer from diabetes. In men, differences in the prevalence of diabetes are strongly reduced after controlling for lack of physical activity and educational attainment. In women, differences remain high, although they become smaller after accounting for BMI and educational attainment. Conclusions In men, the differences in diabetes prevalence are explained by lifestyle factors and educational attainment. In women, the community differences in diabetes prevalence persist, although lifestyle factors and educational attainment play an important part in understanding these differences.

  4. Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Korean Women with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Sook; Jang, Hye-Jung; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Moon-Young; Ko, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate maternal and neonatal outcomes in Korean women with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Methods We performed a retrospective survey of 163 pregnancies in women with type 1 diabetes (n=13) and type 2 diabetes (n=150) treated from 2003 to 2010 at Cheil General Hospital & Women's Healthcare Center, Korea. We compared maternal characteristics as well as maternal and neonatal outcomes between groups. Results Differences in glycosylated hemoglobin between type 1 and type 2 diabetes were not significant. Birth weight (3,501±689.6 g vs. 3,366±531.4 g) and rate of major congenital malformations (7.7% vs. 5.6%) were not significantly different. However, women with type 1 diabetes had higher rates of preeclampsia (38.5% vs. 8.2%, P=0.006), large for gestational age (LGA; 46.2% vs. 20.4%, P=0.004), macrosomia (38.5% vs. 13.4%, P=0.032), and admission for neonatal care (41.7% vs. 14.8%, P=0.03) than women with type 2 diabetes. Conclusion Maternal and neonatal outcomes for women with type 1 diabetes were poorer than for women with type 2 diabetes, especially preeclampsia, LGA, macrosomia and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:26301193

  5. Is the risk and nature of CVD the same in type 1 and type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Duca, Lindsey; Sippl, Rachel; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is increasing globally, most likely explained by environmental changes, such as changing exposures to foods, viruses, and toxins, and by increasing obesity. While cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality has been declining recently, this global epidemic of diabetes threatens to stall this trend. CVD is the leading cause of death in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with at least a two- to fourfold increased risk in patients with diabetes. In this review, the risk factors for CVD are discussed in the context of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity are greater in type 2 patients than in type 1 diabetes, they explain only about half of the increased CVD risk. The role for diabetes-specific risk factors, including hyperglycemia and kidney complications, is discussed in the context of new study findings. PMID:23519720

  6. Hypomagnesemia in Type 2 Diabetes: A Vicious Circle?

    PubMed

    Gommers, Lisanne M M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M; de Baaij, Jeroen H F

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, hypomagnesemia (serum Mg(2+) <0.7 mmol/L) has been strongly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with hypomagnesemia show a more rapid disease progression and have an increased risk for diabetes complications. Clinical studies demonstrate that T2DM patients with hypomagnesemia have reduced pancreatic β-cell activity and are more insulin resistant. Moreover, dietary Mg(2+) supplementation for patients with T2DM improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Intracellular Mg(2+) regulates glucokinase, KATP channels, and L-type Ca(2+) channels in pancreatic β-cells, preceding insulin secretion. Moreover, insulin receptor autophosphorylation is dependent on intracellular Mg(2+) concentrations, making Mg(2+) a direct factor in the development of insulin resistance. Conversely, insulin is an important regulator of Mg(2+) homeostasis. In the kidney, insulin activates the renal Mg(2+) channel transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 that determines the final urinary Mg(2+) excretion. Consequently, patients with T2DM and hypomagnesemia enter a vicious circle in which hypomagnesemia causes insulin resistance and insulin resistance reduces serum Mg(2+) concentrations. This Perspective provides a systematic overview of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of Mg(2+) on insulin secretion and insulin signaling. In addition to providing a review of current knowledge, we provide novel directions for future research and identify previously neglected contributors to hypomagnesemia in T2DM. PMID:26696633

  7. Significant asymptomatic bacteriuria among Nigerian type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed Central

    Alebiosu, C. O.; Osinupebi, O. A.; Olajubu, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    Significant asymptomatic bacteriuria is a risk factor for symptomatic urinary infection and septicemia among predisposed individuals such as diabetics. We investigated the pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria among our type 2 diabetics with a view to documenting the prevalence, type of organisms responsible and the antibiotic susceptibility pattern. One hundred and twenty-four type 2 Nigerian diabetics (55 males and 69 females) submitted midstream urine specimens for culture. Thirty-three patients had significant bacteriuria (9 males and 24 females), showing the frequency of occurrence of asymptomatic bacteriuria to be 26.6%. The most common organism isolated was Klebsiella pneumonia at 42.4%. Gram-negative bacilli made up about 23 (69.7%) of the isolates. Isolates were poorly sensitive to the readily available antibiotics (ampicillin, tetracycline and cotrimoxazole), but a large number of the organisms isolated were sensitive to nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. Sensitivity to erythromycin, nalidixic acid and cefuroxime was moderate. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is, thus, more prevalent among the Nigerian diabetic population than in the non-diabetics. A changing pattern of disease is observed with Klebsiella sp. now accounting for the majority of asymptomatic bacteriuria among diabetics. The organisms are not sensitive to the commonly available antibacterial agents. PMID:12793791

  8. Human cerebral neuropathology of Type 2 diabetes mellitus⋆

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Peter T.; Smith, Charles D.; Abner, Erin A.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Scheff, Stephen W.; Davis, Gregory J.; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Davis, Daron; Wang-Xia, Wang; Hartman, Adria; Katz, Douglas G.; Markesbery, William R.

    2010-01-01

    The cerebral neuropathology of Type 2 diabetes (CNDM2) has not been positively defined. This review includes a description of CNDM2 research from before the ‘Pubmed Era’. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on cerebrovascular and white matter pathology. These and prior studies about cerebrovascular histopathology in diabetes are reviewed. Evidence is also described for and against the link between CNDM2 and Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. To study this matter directly, we evaluated data from University of Kentucky Alzheimer’s Disease Center (UK ADC) patients recruited while non-demented and followed longitudinally. Of patients who had come to autopsy (N=234), 139 met inclusion criteria. These patients provided the basis for comparing the prevalence of pathological and clinical indices between well-characterized cases with (N=50) or without (N=89) the premortem diagnosis of diabetes. In diabetics, cerebrovascular pathology was more frequent and Alzheimer-type pathology was less frequent than in non-diabetics. Finally, a series of photomicrographs demonstrates histopathological features (including clinical–radiographical correlation) observed in brains of persons that died after a history of diabetes. These preliminary, correlative, and descriptive studies may help develop new hypotheses about CNDM2. We conclude that more work should be performed on human material in the context of CNDM2. PMID:18789386

  9. Pharmacologic Treatment Strategies in Children with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Urakami, Tatsuhiko; Kuwabara, Remi; Habu, Masako; Yoshida, Ayako; Okuno, Misako; Suzuki, Junichi; Takahashi, Shori; Mugishima, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    We treated 80 obese and 28 nonobese children diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Among these patients, 26 obese and 23 nonobese children were assigned to pharmacologic therapies during the course of diabetes. Pharmacologic therapies were started if the HbA1c (NGSP) value exceeded 7.0% despite dietary and exercise management. For the 26 obese patients, metformin alone or in combination with an additional medication was frequently used. Only 2 patients independently received sulfonylureas (SUs) in the form of glimepiride. In addition, 9 patients were treated with basal insulin supported with oral hypoglycemic drugs (OHDs) or biphasic premix insulin. On the other hand, the 23 nonobese patients were frequently treated with insulin alone or in combination with an additional medication followed by SUs. The nonobese patients tended to require pharmacologic therapies, in particular insulin, at an earlier stage of diabetes as compared with the obese patients. New antidiabetic drugs, DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists, seemed to exert positive effects on glycemic control without occurrence of hypoglycemic episodes in some patients regardless of the type of diabetes. These results suggest that pharmacologic treatment strategies in childhood T2DM should be tailored to individual patient characteristics. PMID:23966754

  10. Empagliflozin/Linagliptin: A Review in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Esther S; Deeks, Emma D

    2015-09-01

    Empagliflozin/linagliptin (Glyxambi(®)) is a once-daily sodium glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor fixed-dose combination product that is approved in the USA as an adjunct to diet and exercise in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) when treatment with both empagliflozin and linagliptin is appropriate. This article reviews the clinical efficacy and tolerability of oral empagliflozin/linagliptin in patients with T2D and summarizes the pharmacological properties of the agents. Results of two randomized controlled trials of 52 weeks' duration in adults with T2D demonstrated that empagliflozin/linagliptin improved glycaemic control significantly more than linagliptin when administered as initial therapy (whereas results vs. empagliflozin were mixed in this setting) and significantly more than linagliptin or empagliflozin when administered as an add-on therapy to metformin. In addition to glycaemic control, empagliflozin/linagliptin provided significant weight loss compared with linagliptin in both trials. Empagliflozin/linagliptin was generally well tolerated in patients with T2D, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and no reports of exacerbations of, or hospitalizations for, heart failure during the trials. As the first SGLT2 inhibitor/DPP-4 inhibitor fixed-dose combination available, empagliflozin/linagliptin is a useful new option for patients with T2D. PMID:26323340

  11. Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rohini; Dent, Tom; Meads, Catherine; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate current risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes and inform selection and implementation of these in practice. Design Systematic review using standard (quantitative) and realist (mainly qualitative) methodology. Inclusion criteria Papers in any language describing the development or external validation, or both, of models and scores to predict the risk of an adult developing type 2 diabetes. Data sources Medline, PreMedline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. Included studies were citation tracked in Google Scholar to identify follow-on studies of usability or impact. Data extraction Data were extracted on statistical properties of models, details of internal or external validation, and use of risk scores beyond the studies that developed them. Quantitative data were tabulated to compare model components and statistical properties. Qualitative data were analysed thematically to identify mechanisms by which use of the risk model or score might improve patient outcomes. Results 8864 titles were scanned, 115 full text papers considered, and 43 papers included in the final sample. These described the prospective development or validation, or both, of 145 risk prediction models and scores, 94 of which were studied in detail here. They had been tested on 6.88 million participants followed for up to 28 years. Heterogeneity of primary studies precluded meta-analysis. Some but not all risk models or scores had robust statistical properties (for example, good discrimination and calibration) and had been externally validated on a different population. Genetic markers added nothing to models over clinical and sociodemographic factors. Most authors described their score as “simple” or “easily implemented,” although few were specific about the intended users and under what circumstances. Ten mechanisms were identified by which measuring diabetes risk might improve outcomes. Follow-on studies that applied a risk score as part of an

  12. Pharmacogenetic studies update in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shalini; Usman, Kauser; Banerjee, Monisha

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a silent progressive polygenic metabolic disorder resulting from ineffective insulin cascading in the body. World-wide, about 415 million people are suffering from T2DM with a projected rise to 642 million in 2040. T2DM is treated with several classes of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) viz. biguanides, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, etc. Treatment strategies for T2DM are to minimize long-term micro and macro vascular complications by achieving an optimized glycemic control. Genetic variations in the human genome not only disclose the risk of T2DM development but also predict the personalized response to drug therapy. Inter-individual variability in response to OADs is due to polymorphisms in genes encoding drug receptors, transporters, and metabolizing enzymes for example, genetic variants in solute carrier transporters (SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC22A3, SLC47A1 and SLC47A2) are actively involved in glycemic/HbA1c management of metformin. In addition, CYP gene encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes also play a crucial role with respect to metabolism of drugs. Pharmacogenetic studies provide insights on the relationship between individual genetic variants and variable therapeutic outcomes of various OADs. Clinical utility of pharmacogenetic study is to predict the therapeutic dose of various OADs on individual basis. Pharmacogenetics therefore, is a step towards personalized medicine which will greatly improve the efficacy of diabetes treatment. PMID:27555891

  13. Pharmacogenetic studies update in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Usman, Kauser; Banerjee, Monisha

    2016-08-10

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a silent progressive polygenic metabolic disorder resulting from ineffective insulin cascading in the body. World-wide, about 415 million people are suffering from T2DM with a projected rise to 642 million in 2040. T2DM is treated with several classes of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) viz. biguanides, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, etc. Treatment strategies for T2DM are to minimize long-term micro and macro vascular complications by achieving an optimized glycemic control. Genetic variations in the human genome not only disclose the risk of T2DM development but also predict the personalized response to drug therapy. Inter-individual variability in response to OADs is due to polymorphisms in genes encoding drug receptors, transporters, and metabolizing enzymes for example, genetic variants in solute carrier transporters (SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC22A3, SLC47A1 and SLC47A2) are actively involved in glycemic/HbA1c management of metformin. In addition, CYP gene encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes also play a crucial role with respect to metabolism of drugs. Pharmacogenetic studies provide insights on the relationship between individual genetic variants and variable therapeutic outcomes of various OADs. Clinical utility of pharmacogenetic study is to predict the therapeutic dose of various OADs on individual basis. Pharmacogenetics therefore, is a step towards personalized medicine which will greatly improve the efficacy of diabetes treatment. PMID:27555891

  14. DNA methylation in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Vanessa Derenji Ferreira; Pulkkinen, Leena; Lalli, Marianne; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Uusitupa, Matti

    2014-05-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms related to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and other degenerative diseases at a molecular level, a better understanding of the changes in the chromatin structure and the corresponding functional changes in molecular pathways is still needed. For example, persons with low birth weight are at a high risk for development of T2D later in life, suggesting that the intrauterine environment contributes to the disease. One of the hypotheses is that epigenetic regulation, including changes in DNA methylation leading to modifications in chromatin structure, are behind metabolic alterations, e.g. leading to the phenomenon termed metabolic memory. Altered DNA methylation has been shown to affect healthy aging and also to promote age-related health problems. There is suggestive evidence that lifestyle changes including weight loss can have an impact on DNA methylation and consequently gene expression. In this review we provide an overview of human studies investigating DNA methylation in obesity and T2D and associated risk factors behind these diseases. PMID:24779963

  15. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential Abnormalities in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sharat; Baweja, Pooja; Mittal, Shallu; Kumar, Avnish; Singh, Kamal D; Sharma, Raghuvansh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus represents a syndrome complex in which multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system, are affected. Aim: The study was conducted to determine the changes in the brainstem auditory evoked potentials in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 126 diabetic males, aged 35-50 years, and 106 age-matched, healthy male volunteers. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials were recorded and the results were analyzed statistically using student's unpaired t-test. The data consisted of wave latencies I, II, III, IV, V and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V, separately for both ears. Results: The latency of wave IV was significantly delayed only in the right ear, while the latency of waves III, V and interpeak latencies III-V, I-V showed a significant delay bilaterally in diabetic males. However, no significant difference was found between diabetic and control subjects as regards to the latency of wave IV unilaterally in the left ear and the latencies of waves I, II and interpeak latency I-III bilaterally. Conclusion: Diabetes patients have an early involvement of central auditory pathway, which can be detected with fair accuracy with auditory evoked potential studies. PMID:23378959

  16. Type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment: linking mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Luchsinger, José A.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript provides a brief review of current concepts in the mechanisms potentially linking type-2-diabetes (T2D) with cognitive impairment. Existing epidemiologic studies, imaging studies, autopsy studies and clinical trials provide insights into the mechanisms linking T2D and cognitive impairment. There seems to be little dispute that T2D can cause cerebrovascular disease and thus cause vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Whether T2D can cause late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) remains to be elucidated. Many epidemiologic studies show an association between T2D and cognitive impairment, but the association with VCI seems to be stronger compared to LOAD, suggesting that cerebrovascular disease may be the main mechanism linking T2D and cognitive impairment. Imaging studies show an association between T2D and imaging markers of LOAD, but these observations could still be explained by cerebrovascular mechanisms. Autopsy studies are few and conflicting, with some suggesting a predominantly cerebrovascular mechanism, and others providing support for a neurodegenerative mechanism. Thus far, the evidence from clinical trials is mixed in supporting a causal association between T2D and cognitive impairment, and most clinical trials that can answer this question are yet to be reported or finished. Given the epidemic of T2D in the world, it is important to elucidate whether the association between T2D and cognitive impairment, particularly LOAD, is causal, and if so, what are the mechanisms. PMID:22433668

  17. Natural Products for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ríos, José Luis; Francini, Flavio; Schinella, Guillermo R

    2015-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia. High blood sugar can produce long-term complications such as cardiovascular and renal disorders, retinopathy, and poor blood flow. Its development can be prevented or delayed in people with impaired glucose tolerance by implementing lifestyle changes or the use of therapeutic agents. Some of these drugs have been obtained from plants or have a microbial origin, such as galegine isolated from Galega officinalis, which has a great similarity to the antidiabetic drug metformin. Picnogenol, acarbose, miglitol, and voglibose are other antidiabetic products of natural origin. This review compiles the principal articles on medicinal plants used for treating diabetes and its comorbidities, as well as mechanisms of natural products as antidiabetic agents. Inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, effects on glucose uptake and glucose transporters, modification of mechanisms mediated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity, modification of gene expression, and activities of hormones involved in glucose homeostasis such as adiponectin, resistin, and incretin, and reduction of oxidative stress are some of the mechanisms in which natural products are involved. We also review the most relevant clinical trials performed with medicinal plants and natural products such as aloe, banaba, bitter melon, caper, cinnamon, cocoa, coffee, fenugreek, garlic, guava, gymnema, nettle, sage, soybean, green and black tea, turmeric, walnut, and yerba mate. Compounds of high interest as potential antidiabetics are: fukugetin, palmatine, berberine, honokiol, amorfrutins, trigonelline, gymnemic acids, gurmarin, and phlorizin. PMID:26132858

  18. Metabolic surgery: A paradigm shift in type 2 diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    Pappachan, Joseph M; Viswanath, Ananth K

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are major public health issues globally over the past few decades. Despite dietary interventions, lifestyle modifications and the availability of several pharmaceutical agents, management of T2DM with obesity is a major challenge to clinicians. Metabolic surgery is emerging as a promising treatment option for the management of T2DM in the obese population in recent years. Several observational studies and a few randomised controlled trials have shown clear benefits of various bariatric procedures in obese individuals in terms of improvement or remission of T2DM and multiple other health benefits such as improvement of hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea, osteoarthritis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Uncertainties about the long-term implications of metabolic surgery such as relapse of T2DM after initial remission, nutritional and psychosocial complications and the optimal body mass index for different ethnic groups exist. The article discusses the major paradigm shift in recent years in the management of T2DM after the introduction of metabolic surgery. PMID:26240695

  19. Subclinical hyperthyroidism in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro

    2012-08-01

    Both subclinical hyperthyroidism and type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been associated with an increase in cardiovascular disease risk and mortality. We aimed to assess the prevalence of newly diagnosed subclinical hyperthyroidism in a cohort of patients with T2D, and also to analyse the relationships between diabetes-related characteristics and the presence of subclinical hyperthyroidism. 933 diabetic patients without previous history of thyroid disease (45.4% females, mean age 66.3 years, median duration of diabetes 10 years) were evaluated. A sample of 911 non-diabetic subjects without known thyroid dysfunction was studied as control group. Serum concentrations of thyrotropin were measured in all subjects. Subclinical hyperthyroidism was present in 4.3% of female and 3.5% of male diabetic patients. Relative risk was significant only for the female gender (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.56-8.71). In comparison with diabetic patients without thyroid hyperfunction, patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism were older, had longer duration of diabetes, showed lower fasting glucose levels, had greater proportion of goitre and diet therapy, and had lower proportion of treatment with oral agents. Logistic regression analysis showed that age and the presence of goitre were significantly related to subclinical hyperthyroidism in patients with T2D. The risk for subclinical hyperthyroidism is increased in women with T2D. Advanced age and the presence of goitre are significantly and independently related with the presence of subclinical hyperthyroidism in diabetic population. PMID:22327927

  20. Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in Children: Epidemiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pulgaron, Elizabeth R.; Delamater, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of overweight and obesity among children has increased dramatically in recent decades, with about one-third of children in the U.S. currently being either overweight or obese. Being overweight in early childhood increases risk for later obesity. There is evidence for the efficacy of family-based behavioral treatment to control weight and improve health outcomes. Obesity-related health risks have been documented, including metabolic syndrome. There is also increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among youth in recent years, with obesity and family history of T2D generally present. Lower income and ethnic minority status are associated with both obesity and T2D in youth. Most youth with T2D do not achieve optimal glycemic control, and are at high risk for later health complications. Obesity and T2D represent significant public health issues with potentially great personal and societal cost. Research addressing the prevention of obesity and T2D among youth is urgently needed. PMID:24919749

  1. Whole food approach for type 2 diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Xi, Pan; Liu, Rui Hai

    2016-08-01

    Diet is intimately associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently, attention has focused on the contributions of individual nutrients, food groups and eating patterns to the outcome of T2D. High consumption of coffee, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and nuts are each independently associated with the reduced risk of T2D in high risk, glucose intolerant individuals. Experimental and clinical trials have given insight to the diverse mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed protective effects of certain foods on T2D, including nutrients, phytochemicals and dietary fiber, weight control, enhanced satiety and improvement in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients. Elevated consumption of refined grains and sugar-sweetened beverages has shown to significantly elevate the risk of incident T2D. An overall healthy diet primarily comprising whole plant-based foods, together with regular physical activity and weight manage, could significantly reduce the risk of T2D. The present review consolidates current research and delineates major food groups shown to significantly influence risk of T2D. Documenting and quantifying the effects of diet on the outcome of T2D are of great scientific and public health importance as there is urgent need to implement dietary strategies to prevent and manage the outcome of T2D. PMID:27159643

  2. Effects of metformin on endothelial function in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    WU, SONGLIN; LI, XIAOYAN; ZHANG, HONGMING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of metformin on endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In total, 93 patients with T2DM and dissatisfactory glycemic control were randomly assigned to the metformin and pioglitazone groups and changes in vascular endothelial function were subsequently observed. Blood sugar levels and the insulin resistance (IR) index of the patients prior to treatment were lower than those following 12 months of treatment. In addition, fasting and postprandial insulin levels and the insulin function index were higher compared with those obtained following 12 months of treatment (P<0.05). Following 12 months of treatment, the body mass index (BMI) in the metformin group was lower than that in the pioglitazone group (P<0.05). Vascular endothelial function had improved in the groups following 12 months of treatment, when compared with the levels prior to treatment (P<0.05). Following 12 months of treatment, endothelial function in the metformin group had improved markedly compared with that in the pioglitazone group (P<0.05). Therefore, the administration of metformin and pioglitazone in patients with T2DM may improve insulin function, reduce the role of IR and improve endothelial function. Metformin is more successful than pioglitazone in reducing BMI and improving endothelial function. PMID:24940437

  3. Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Helen L; Zaki, Marco Y W; Day, Christopher P

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second commonest cause of cancer death worldwide. Rather than falling as a result of prevention and treatments for viral hepatitis, an increase is evident in developed nations consequent to the rising prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)-the two major risk factors for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The majority of patients with HCC complicating these conditions present with advanced disease as the tools for surveillance are inadequate, and the "at-risk" population is not well characterized. This review will summarize the epidemiological evidence linking obesity, T2DM, and NAFLD with HCC, what is known about the pathogenic mechanisms involved, as well as their relevance for clinicians managing patients at risk. There will also be an overview of the "unmet needs" surrounding this topic, with suggestions for the direction translational research should take in order to prevent progression of NAFLD to HCC, to improve early detection of HCC in those with NAFLD, as well as to improve outcomes for those affected. PMID:26921078

  4. Type 2 diabetes and obesity: genomics and the clinic.

    PubMed

    Travers, Mary E; McCarthy, Mark I

    2011-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity represent major challenges for global public health. They are at the forefront of international efforts to identify the genetic variation contributing to complex disease susceptibility, and recent years have seen considerable success in identifying common risk-variants. Given the clinical impact of molecular diagnostics in rarer monogenic forms of these diseases, expectations have been high that genetic discoveries will transform the prospects for risk stratification, development of novel therapeutics and personalised medicine. However, so far, clinical translation has been limited. Difficulties in defining the alleles and transcripts mediating association effects have frustrated efforts to gain early biological insights, whilst the fact that variants identified account for only a modest proportion of observed familiarity has limited their value in guiding treatment of individual patients. Ongoing efforts to track causal variants through fine-mapping and to illuminate the biological mechanisms through which they act, as well as sequence-based discovery of lower-frequency alleles (of potentially larger effect), should provide welcome acceleration in the capacity for clinical translation. This review will summarise recent advances in identifying risk alleles for T2D and obesity, and existing contributions to understanding disease pathology. It will consider the progress made in translating genetic knowledge into clinical utility, the challenges remaining, and the realistic potential for further progress. PMID:21647602

  5. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Samuel A J; Weidemann, Benjamin J; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD(+) metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP(+) and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  6. Clinical translation of genetic predictors for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Majithia, Amit R.; Florez, Jose C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight recent type 2 diabetes (T2D)-associated genetic discoveries and their potential for clinical application Recent findings The advent of genome-wide association screening has uncovered many loci newly associated with T2D. This review describes the techniques applied to discover novel T2D genes and compares their relative strengths, biases, and findings to date. The results of large-scale genome-wide association studies carried out since 2007 are summarized, and limitations of interpreting this preliminary data are offered. Recent studies exploring the clinical potential of these discoveries are reviewed, focusing on insights into T2D pathogenesis, risk prediction of future diabetes, and utility in guiding pharmacotherapy. The new T2D-associated loci have been implicated in β-cell development and function, highlighting insulin secretion in the disease process. Preliminary risk prediction studies show that more loci are needed to improve T2D risk indices. Studies have also revealed that genes may play a role in the pharmacologic response to anti-diabetic medications. Summary Since 2007 genome-wide association studies have rapidly increased the number of T2D-associated loci. This review summarizes the history of genetic association studies, the results from the new genome-wide association studies and the clinical application of these findings. PMID:19306524

  7. Vitamin D replacement and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Issa, Claire M; Zantout, Mira S; Azar, Sami T

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the evidence testing the possible benefit of vitamin D replacement on diabetes control and complications. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM 2) has become a significant global health care problem and its reported incidence is increasing at an alarming rate. Despite the improvement in therapy and development of new drugs, treatment is still not optimal especially with the associated adverse effects of most of the available drugs. New efforts are shifted toward disease prevention and a search for safer drugs. New mounting evidence is associating low vitamin D to diabetes mellitus and as such many studies were conducted to test the effect of vitamin D replacement on incidence of diabetes, diabetes control as well as diabetes complications. Although these studies present several limitations, vitamin D replacement seems to have beneficial effect on all aspects of diabetes: incidence, control and complications. Further longer term and more powered controlled trials are necessary to draw firmer conclusions on this beneficial role of vitamin D treatment on DM. PMID:25495839

  8. Intensifying Insulin Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes: Choices & Challenges.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Kesavadev, Jothydev; Sethi, Bipin; Jain, Sunil M; Guruprasad, C S; Shah, Siddharth N

    2015-05-01

    Insulin therapy remains the cornerstone of effective diabetes management. Timely intensification of insulin therapy reduces the progression of diabetes and the development of diabetes-related complications. Given that overall hyperglycaemia is a relative contribution of both fasting and postprandial hyperglycaemia, use of basal insulin alone may not achieve optimal glucose control due to its inability to cover postprandial glucose excursions. Intensifying therapy with addition of bolus insulin or switching to premixed insulin is a viable option in patients failing on basal alone therapy. Although the benefits of early insulin treatment are well established, a considerable delay in intensifying insulin therapy in patients with sub-optimal glycaemic control is still observed. Most of the patients and physicians are reluctant to intensify therapy due to the fear of hypoglycaemia, regimen complexity, and increased burden of multiple daily injections. In this context, there is a need for a flexible, alternative intensification option taking into account individual patient considerations to achieve or maintain individual glycaemic targets. An ideal insulin regimen should mimic physiological insulin release while providing optimal glycaemic control with low risk of hypoglycaemia, weight gain and fewer daily injections. The current paper reviews the challenges of insulin intensification in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus poorly controlled on current treatment regimens. PMID:26548029

  9. The Management of Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Hypoglycaemic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Man-Wo

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by chronic hyperglycemia with disturbance in carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism due to insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction. Epidemiological studies have confirmed a global pandemic of T2DM, which has created an enormous burden on society, with regard to morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditures. Life style modifications are fundamental not only in early stages of disease management but need to be intensified as disease progresses. United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) has demonstrated the progressive nature of T2DM, and as disease progresses, a combination agents—oral antidiabetic drugs (OAD) and insulin—are needed in order to maintain good sugar control. The general consensus of HbA1c target for most patients is less than 7%, and various guidelines and algorithms have provided guidance in patient management to keep patient at goal. As our understanding of pathophysiological defects advances, targeting treatment at underlying defects not only enables us to achieve HbA1c goal but also reduces morbidities, mortalities, and progression of the disease. Traditional oral agents like metformin and sulfonylureas have failed to arrest the progression of T2DM. New agents such as TZD, DPP-4 inhibitor, and SGLT-2 may increase our armamentariums against T2DM. PMID:22645689

  10. AMPK activation: a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Kimberly A; Valentine, Rudy J; Ruderman, Neil B; Saha, Asish K

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and elevated hepatic glucose output. Over 350 million people worldwide have T2D, and the International Diabetes Federation projects that this number will increase to nearly 600 million by 2035. There is a great need for more effective treatments for maintaining glucose homeostasis and improving insulin sensitivity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase whose activation elicits insulin-sensitizing effects, making it an ideal therapeutic target for T2D. AMPK is an energy-sensing enzyme that is activated when cellular energy levels are low, and it signals to stimulate glucose uptake in skeletal muscles, fatty acid oxidation in adipose (and other) tissues, and reduces hepatic glucose production. There is substantial evidence suggesting that AMPK is dysregulated in animals and humans with metabolic syndrome or T2D, and that AMPK activation (physiological or pharmacological) can improve insulin sensitivity and metabolic health. Numerous pharmacological agents, natural compounds, and hormones are known to activate AMPK, either directly or indirectly – some of which (for example, metformin and thiazolidinediones) are currently used to treat T2D. This paper will review the regulation of the AMPK pathway and its role in T2D, some of the known AMPK activators and their mechanisms of action, and the potential for future improvements in targeting AMPK for the treatment of T2D. PMID:25018645

  11. Meat consumption as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Neal; Levin, Susan; Trapp, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Disease risk factors identified in epidemiological studies serve as important public health tools, helping clinicians identify individuals who may benefit from more aggressive screening or risk-modification procedures, allowing policymakers to prioritize intervention programs, and encouraging at-risk individuals to modify behavior and improve their health. These factors have been based primarily on evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies, as most do not lend themselves to randomized trials. While some risk factors are not modifiable, eating habits are subject to change through both individual action and broader policy initiatives. Meat consumption has been frequently investigated as a variable associated with diabetes risk, but it has not yet been described as a diabetes risk factor. In this article, we evaluate the evidence supporting the use of meat consumption as a clinically useful risk factor for type 2 diabetes, based on studies evaluating the risks associated with meat consumption as a categorical dietary characteristic (i.e., meat consumption versus no meat consumption), as a scalar variable (i.e., gradations of meat consumption), or as part of a broader dietary pattern. PMID:24566443

  12. Meat Consumption as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Neal; Levin, Susan; Trapp, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Disease risk factors identified in epidemiological studies serve as important public health tools, helping clinicians identify individuals who may benefit from more aggressive screening or risk-modification procedures, allowing policymakers to prioritize intervention programs, and encouraging at-risk individuals to modify behavior and improve their health. These factors have been based primarily on evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies, as most do not lend themselves to randomized trials. While some risk factors are not modifiable, eating habits are subject to change through both individual action and broader policy initiatives. Meat consumption has been frequently investigated as a variable associated with diabetes risk, but it has not yet been described as a diabetes risk factor. In this article, we evaluate the evidence supporting the use of meat consumption as a clinically useful risk factor for type 2 diabetes, based on studies evaluating the risks associated with meat consumption as a categorical dietary characteristic (i.e., meat consumption versus no meat consumption), as a scalar variable (i.e., gradations of meat consumption), or as part of a broader dietary pattern. PMID:24566443

  13. Exercise and type 2 diabetes: focus on metabolism and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2016-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with metabolic dysregulation and chronic inflammation, and regular exercise may provide a strong stimulus for improving both. In this review, we first discuss the link between inflammation and metabolism. Next, we give an update on the clinical metabolic effects of exercise in T2DM patients with special focus on which parameters to consider for optimizing metabolic improvements. We then discuss the mechanisms whereby exercise exerts its anti-inflammatory and related metabolic effects. Evidence exists that interleukin (IL)-1β is involved in pancreatic β-cell damage, whereas tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α appears to be a key molecule in peripheral insulin resistance. Mechanistic studies in humans suggest that moderate acute elevations in IL-6, as provoked by exercise, exert direct anti-inflammatory effects by an inhibition of TNF-α and by stimulating IL-1ra (IL-1 receptor antagonist), thereby limiting IL-1β signaling. In addition, IL-6 has direct impact on glucose and lipid metabolism. Moreover, indirect anti-inflammatory effects of exercise may be mediated via improvements in, for example, body composition. While waiting for the outcome of long-term randomized clinical training studies with hard end points, it should be emphasized that physical activity represents a natural strong anti-inflammatory and metabolism-improving strategy with minor side effects. PMID:26568029

  14. Type 2 diabetes among Asian Americans: Prevalence and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tam H; Nguyen, Thuc-Nhi; Fischer, Taylor; Ha, Won; Tran, Thanh V

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing problem among Asian Americans. Based on the Centers for Disease Control, the age-adjusted prevalence of T2DM for Asian Americans is 9%, placing them at “moderate risk”. However differential patterns of disease burden emerge when examining disaggregated data across Asian American ethnic groups; with Filipino, Pacific Islander, Japanese, and South Asian groups consistently described as having the highest prevalence of T2DM. Disentangling and strengthening prevalence data is vital for on-going prevention efforts. The strongest evidence currently available to guide the prevention of T2DM in the United States comes from a large multicenter randomized clinical control trial called the Diabetes Prevention Program, which targets individual lifestyle behavior changes. It has been translated and adopted for some Asian American groups, and shows promise. However stronger study designs and attention to several key methodological considerations will improve the science. Increased attention has also been directed toward population level downstream prevention efforts. Building an infrastructure that includes both individual and population approaches is needed to prevent T2DM among Asian American populations, and is essential for reducing health disparities. PMID:25987951

  15. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Samuel A.J.; Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S.; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H.; Yorek, Mark A.; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD+ metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP+ and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  16. Lixisenatide in type 2 diabetes: latest evidence and clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sarah L.; Trujillo, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a highly prevalent disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. The hallmark of T2D is hyperglycemia and, while many treatment modalities exist, achieving and maintaining glycemic control can be challenging. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (RAs) are an appealing treatment option as they improve glycemic control, reduce weight, and limit the risk of hypoglycemia. Lixisenatide is a once-daily GLP-1 RA that has been evaluated in the GetGoal clinical trial program and has demonstrated efficacy and tolerability across a spectrum of patients. The feature that most distinguishes lixisenatide from other GLP-1 RAs is its ability to substantially reduce postprandial glucose (PPG) for the meal immediately following injection. Because of its positive effects on PPG, lixisenatide is being considered as a replacement for prandial insulin, and a fixed dose combination product containing lixisenatide and basal insulin is in development. Lixisenatide is a promising new addition to the antidiabetic armamentarium, but due to the lack of real-world experience with the drug, its exact place in therapy is unknown. PMID:26770666

  17. Phytochemicals targeting genes relevant for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2013-06-01

    Nutrigenomic approaches based on ethnopharmacology and phytotherapy concepts have revealed that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may be susceptible to dietary intervention. Interaction between bioactive food components and the genome may influence cell processes and modulate the onset and progression of the disease. T2DM, characterized by insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction, is one of the leading causes of death and disability. Despite the great advances that have been made in the understanding and management of this complex, multifactorial disease, T2DM has become a worldwide epidemic in the 21st century. Population and family studies have revealed a strong genetic component of T2DM, and a number of candidate genes have been identified in humans. Variations in the gene sequences such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, explain the individual differences in traits like disease susceptibility and response to treatment. A clear understanding of how nutrients affect the expression of genes should facilitate the development of individualized intervention and, eventually, treatment strategies for T2DM. Review of the literature identified many phytochemicals/extracts from traditional medicinal plants that can target diabetogenic genes. This review focuses on the genetic aspects of T2DM, nutrient modification of genes relevant for diabetes, and future prospects of nutritional therapy of T2DM. PMID:23745945

  18. Treating Hispanic patients for type 2 diabetes mellitus: special considerations.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeffrey S

    2008-05-01

    The number of Hispanic people in the United States with diagnosed diabetes mellitus is projected to increase by 107% by 2020. The author presents the case of a 62-year-old obese Hispanic man, with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), diabetic peripheral neuropathy, background retinopathy, and diabetic nephropathy. The patient also had diagnosed hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, and hyperlipidemia. The treatment plan for this patient included the following medications: pioglitazone hydrochloride (a thiazolidinedione, 30 mg/d); irbesartan (an angiotensin receptor blocker, 150 mg/d titrated to 300 mg/d); hydrochlorothiazide (an antikaliuretic agent, 12.5 mg/d); and aspirin (325 mg/d). Sitagliptin phosphate (a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor, 50 mg/d) was added to the treatment regimen to improve glycemic control. Simvastatin (20 mg/d) and niacin (1 g/d) were used for lipid management. Therapy also included a low-protein diet and walking program. At 6-month follow-up, the patient showed substantial improvement in his glycosylated hemoglobin level, lipid profile, blood pressure, creatinine clearance rate, and urine albumin level. There were also improvements in his peripheral vascular disease and diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Furthermore, the patient demonstrated encouraging progress in diet and lifestyle modification and in mental attitude. PMID:18519840

  19. Update on type 2 diabetes-related osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Wongdee, Kannikar; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2015-01-01

    It was previously understood that body weight gain and obesity observed in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) could be beneficial since body weight increase elevated bone mineral density and thus helped maintain the skeletal framework. However, a number of recent findings in humans and rodents have revealed that T2DM is not only associated with trabecular defects but also increases cortical porosity, and compromised bone cell function and bone mechanical properties. Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in T2DM may further induce osteoblast apoptosis and uncoupling bone turnover. Prolonged accumulation of advanced glycation end products and diminished activity of lysyl oxidase, an essential enzyme for collagen cross-link, can lead to structural abnormalities of bone collagen fibrils, brittle matrix, and fragility fractures. Our studies in T2DM rats showed that dyslipidemia, which often occurs in T2DM, could obscure the T2DM-associated changes in bone microstructure and osteopenia. Longitudinal bone growth regulated by the growth plate chondrocytes is also impaired by T2DM since differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes is arrested and retained in the resting state while only a small number of cells undergo hypertrophic differentiation. Such a delayed chondrocyte differentiation may have also resulted from premature apoptosis of the growth plate chondrocytes. Nevertheless, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and growth plate chondrocytes remain to be investigated. PMID:26069716

  20. Cost effectiveness of type 2 diabetes screening: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Behzad; Farzadfar, Farshad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Hadian, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although studies reported diabetes mellitus screening cost effective, the mass screening for type2 diabetes remains controversial. In this study we reviewed the recently evidence about the cost effectiveness of mass screening systematically. Methods: We reviewed the MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science (WOS), and Cochrane library databases by MeSH terms to identify relevant studies from 2000 to 2013. We had 4 inclusion and 6 exclusion criteria and used the Drummond’s checklist for appraising the quality of studies. Results: The initial search yielded 358 potentially related studies from selected databases. 6 studies met our inclusion and exclusion criteria and included in final review. 3 and 2 of them were conducted in Europe and America and only one of them in Asia. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) was the main outcome to appraise the effectiveness in the studies. Incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) was computed in range from $516.33 to $126,238 per QALY in the studies. Conclusion: A review of previous diabetes screening cost effectiveness analysis showed that the studies varied in some aspects but reached similar conclusions. They concluded that the screening may be cost effective, however further studies is required to support the diabetes mass screening. PMID:27390696

  1. Preventing type 2 diabetes mellitus: a call for personalized intervention.

    PubMed

    Glauber, Harry; Karnieli, Eddy

    2013-01-01

    In parallel with the rising prevalence of obesity worldwide, especially in younger people, there has been a dramatic increase in recent decades in the incidence and prevalence of metabolic consequences of obesity, in particular prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Although approximately one-third of US adults now meet one or more diagnostic criteria for prediabetes, only a minority of those so identified as being at risk for DM2 actually progress to diabetes, and some may regress to normal status. Given the uncertain prognosis of prediabetes, it is not clear who is most likely to benefit from lifestyle change or medication interventions that are known to reduce DM2 risk. We review the many factors known to influence risk of developing DM2 and summarize treatment trials demonstrating the possibility of preventing DM2. Applying the concepts of personalized medicine and the potential of "big data" approaches to analysis of massive amounts of routinely gathered clinical and laboratory data from large populations, we call for the development of tools to more precisely estimate individual risk of DM2. PMID:24355893

  2. Lixisenatide in type 2 diabetes: latest evidence and clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sarah L; Trujillo, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a highly prevalent disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. The hallmark of T2D is hyperglycemia and, while many treatment modalities exist, achieving and maintaining glycemic control can be challenging. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (RAs) are an appealing treatment option as they improve glycemic control, reduce weight, and limit the risk of hypoglycemia. Lixisenatide is a once-daily GLP-1 RA that has been evaluated in the GetGoal clinical trial program and has demonstrated efficacy and tolerability across a spectrum of patients. The feature that most distinguishes lixisenatide from other GLP-1 RAs is its ability to substantially reduce postprandial glucose (PPG) for the meal immediately following injection. Because of its positive effects on PPG, lixisenatide is being considered as a replacement for prandial insulin, and a fixed dose combination product containing lixisenatide and basal insulin is in development. Lixisenatide is a promising new addition to the antidiabetic armamentarium, but due to the lack of real-world experience with the drug, its exact place in therapy is unknown. PMID:26770666

  3. Effects of coffee on type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Akash, Muhammad Sajid Hamid; Rehman, Kanwal; Chen, Shuqing

    2014-01-01

    This review provides the epidemiologic and research evidences documenting the effects of coffee consumption on type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We summarize the literature concerning the effects of coffee consumption on different mechanistic factors involving in pathogenesis of T2DM, such as glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, insulin resistance, glucose-6-phosphatase, intestinal glucose absorption, antioxidant activity, inflammatory biomarkers, nuclear factor-κB inhibition, glucose uptake, glucose homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and insulin secretion. These factors play a crucial role in influencing the normal levels of glucose in blood. Overall, the experimental and epidemiologic evidences presented here elucidate the protective effects of coffee consumption on T2DM, involving multiple preventive mechanisms. Despite the firm evidences available through a growing literature base, it is still uncertain whether the use of coffee should be recommended to patients with diabetes and/or any patient who might be at the risk of T2DM as a supplementary therapy to prevent further progression of T2DM. PMID:24984989

  4. Type 2 diabetes among Asian Americans: Prevalence and prevention.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tam H; Nguyen, Thuc-Nhi; Fischer, Taylor; Ha, Won; Tran, Thanh V

    2015-05-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing problem among Asian Americans. Based on the Centers for Disease Control, the age-adjusted prevalence of T2DM for Asian Americans is 9%, placing them at "moderate risk". However differential patterns of disease burden emerge when examining disaggregated data across Asian American ethnic groups; with Filipino, Pacific Islander, Japanese, and South Asian groups consistently described as having the highest prevalence of T2DM. Disentangling and strengthening prevalence data is vital for on-going prevention efforts. The strongest evidence currently available to guide the prevention of T2DM in the United States comes from a large multicenter randomized clinical control trial called the Diabetes Prevention Program, which targets individual lifestyle behavior changes. It has been translated and adopted for some Asian American groups, and shows promise. However stronger study designs and attention to several key methodological considerations will improve the science. Increased attention has also been directed toward population level downstream prevention efforts. Building an infrastructure that includes both individual and population approaches is needed to prevent T2DM among Asian American populations, and is essential for reducing health disparities. PMID:25987951

  5. Update on type 2 diabetes-related osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Wongdee, Kannikar; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2015-06-10

    It was previously understood that body weight gain and obesity observed in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) could be beneficial since body weight increase elevated bone mineral density and thus helped maintain the skeletal framework. However, a number of recent findings in humans and rodents have revealed that T2DM is not only associated with trabecular defects but also increases cortical porosity, and compromised bone cell function and bone mechanical properties. Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in T2DM may further induce osteoblast apoptosis and uncoupling bone turnover. Prolonged accumulation of advanced glycation end products and diminished activity of lysyl oxidase, an essential enzyme for collagen cross-link, can lead to structural abnormalities of bone collagen fibrils, brittle matrix, and fragility fractures. Our studies in T2DM rats showed that dyslipidemia, which often occurs in T2DM, could obscure the T2DM-associated changes in bone microstructure and osteopenia. Longitudinal bone growth regulated by the growth plate chondrocytes is also impaired by T2DM since differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes is arrested and retained in the resting state while only a small number of cells undergo hypertrophic differentiation. Such a delayed chondrocyte differentiation may have also resulted from premature apoptosis of the growth plate chondrocytes. Nevertheless, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and growth plate chondrocytes remain to be investigated. PMID:26069716

  6. Module Based Differential Coexpression Analysis Method for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lin; Zheng, Chun-Hou; Xia, Jun-Feng; Huang, De-Shuang

    2015-01-01

    More and more studies have shown that many complex diseases are contributed jointly by alterations of numerous genes. Genes often coordinate together as a functional biological pathway or network and are highly correlated. Differential coexpression analysis, as a more comprehensive technique to the differential expression analysis, was raised to research gene regulatory networks and biological pathways of phenotypic changes through measuring gene correlation changes between disease and normal conditions. In this paper, we propose a gene differential coexpression analysis algorithm in the level of gene sets and apply the algorithm to a publicly available type 2 diabetes (T2D) expression dataset. Firstly, we calculate coexpression biweight midcorrelation coefficients between all gene pairs. Then, we select informative correlation pairs using the “differential coexpression threshold” strategy. Finally, we identify the differential coexpression gene modules using maximum clique concept and k-clique algorithm. We apply the proposed differential coexpression analysis method on simulated data and T2D data. Two differential coexpression gene modules about T2D were detected, which should be useful for exploring the biological function of the related genes. PMID:26339648

  7. Genetic polymorphisms of cytokine genes in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Monisha; Saxena, Madhukar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a combined metabolic disorder which includes hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, stroke and several other complications. Various groups all over the world are relentlessly working out the possible role of a vast number of genes associated with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Inflammation is an important outcome of any kind of imbalance in the body and is therefore an indicator of several diseases, including T2DM. Various ethnic populations around the world show different levels of variations in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The present review was undertaken to explore the association of cytokine gene polymorphisms with T2DM in populations of different ethnicities. This will lead to the understanding of the role of cytokine genes in T2DM risk and development. Association studies of genotypes of SNPs present in cytokine genes will help to identify risk haplotype(s) for disease susceptibility by developing prognostic markers and alter treatment strategies for T2DM and related complications. This will enable individuals at risk to take prior precautionary measures and avoid or delay the onset of the disease. Future challenges will be to understand the genotypic interactions between SNPs in one cytokine gene or several genes at different loci and study their association with T2DM. PMID:25126395

  8. Metals in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Minerals are one of the components of food, though they are not synthesized in the body but they are essential for optimal health. Several essential metals are required for the proper functioning of many enzymes, transcriptional factors and proteins important in various biochemical pathways. For example Zn, Mg and Mn are cofactors of hundreds of enzymes, and Zn is involved in the synthesis and secretion of insulin from the pancreatic beta-cells. Similarly, Cr enhances the insulin receptor activity on target tissues, especially in muscle cells. Insulin is the key hormone required to maintain the blood glucose level in normal range. In case of insulin deficiency or resistance, blood glucose concentration exceeds the upper limit of the normal range of 126 mg/dl. Persistent increase of blood serum glucose level leads to overt chronic hyperglycemia, which is a major clinical symptom of diabetes mellitus. Poor glycemic control and diabetes alters the levels of essential trace elements such as Zn, Mg, Mn, Cr, Fe etc. by increasing urinary excretion and their concomitant decrease in the blood. Hence, the main purpose of this review is to discuss the important roles of essential trace elements in normal homeostasis and physiological functioning. Moreover, perturbation of essential trace elements is also discussed in perspective of type 2 diabetes pathobiology. PMID:24401367

  9. Persistent organic pollutants as risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Elvis Ndonwi; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Tiedeu-Atogho, Barbara; Mofo-Mato, Edith-Pascale; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major and fast growing public health problem. Although obesity is considered to be the main driver of the pandemic of T2DM, a possible contribution of some environmental contaminants, of which persistent organic pollutants (POPs) form a particular class, has been suggested. POPs are organic compounds that are resistant to environmental degradation through chemical, biological, and photolytic processes which enable them to persist in the environment, to be capable of long-range transport, bio accumulate in human and animal tissue, bio accumulate in food chains, and to have potential significant impacts on human health and the environment. Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between persistent organic pollutants and diabetes risk. These findings have been replicated in experimental studies both in human (in-vitro) and animals (in-vivo and in-vitro), and patho-physiological derangements through which these pollutants exercise their harmful effect on diabetes risk postulated. This review summarizes available studies, emphasises on limitations so as to enable subsequent studies to be centralized on possible pathways and bring out clearly the role of POPs on diabetes risk. PMID:25987904

  10. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  11. Optimal therapy of type 2 diabetes: a controversial challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dardano, Angela; Penno, Giuseppe; Del Prato, Stefano; Miccoli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most common chronic disorders in older adults and the number of elderly diabetic subjects is growing worldwide. Nonetheless, the diagnosis of T2DM in elderly population is often missed or delayed until an acute metabolic emergency occurs. Accumulating evidence suggests that both aging and environmental factors contribute to the high prevalence of diabetes in the elderly. Clinical management of T2DM in elderly subjects presents unique challenges because of the multifaceted geriatric scenario. Diabetes significantly lowers the chances of “successful” aging, notably it increases functional limitations and impairs quality of life. In this regard, older diabetic patients have a high burden of comorbidities, diabetes-related complications, physical disability, cognitive impairment and malnutrition, and they are more susceptible to the complications of dysglycemia and polypharmacy. Several national and international organizations have delivered guidelines to implement optimal therapy in older diabetic patients based on individualized treatment goals. This means appreciation of the heterogeneity of the disease as generated by life expectancy, functional reserve, social support, as well as personal preference. This paper will review current treatments for achieving glycemic targets in elderly diabetic patients, and discuss the potential role of emerging treatments in this patient population. PMID:24753144

  12. Genetic Determinants of Type 2 Diabetes in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Q; Wang, X; Strizich, G; Wang, T

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become a major health problem throughout the world and the epidemic is particularly severe in Asian countries. Compared with European populations, Asians tend to develop diabetes at a younger age and at much higher incidence rates given the same amount of weight gain. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 70 loci associated with T2D. Although the majority of GWAS results were conducted in populations of European ancestry, recent GWAS in Asians have made important contributions to the identification of T2D susceptibility loci. These studies not only confirmed T2D susceptibility loci initially identified in European populations, but also identified novel susceptibility loci that provide new insights into the pathophysiology of diseases. In this article, we review GWAS results of T2D conducted in East and South Asians and compare them to those of European populations. Currently identified T2D genetic variants do not appear to explain the phenomenon that Asians are more susceptible to T2D than European populations, suggesting further studies in Asian populations are needed.

  13. Cardiovascular Control during Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Green, Simon; Egaña, Mikel; Baldi, J. Chris; Lamberts, Regis; Regensteiner, Judith G.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled studies of male and female subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) of short duration (~3–5 years) show that DM reduces peak V˙O2 (L·min−1 and mL·kg−1·min−1) by an average of 12–15% and induces a greater slowing of the dynamic response of pulmonary V˙O2 during submaximal exercise. These effects occur in individuals less than 60 years of age but are reduced or absent in older males and are consistently associated with significant increases in the exercise pressor response despite normal resting blood pressure. This exaggerated pressor response, evidence of exertional hypertension in DM, is manifest during moderate submaximal exercise and coincides with a more constrained vasodilation in contracting muscles. Maximum vasodilation during contractions involving single muscle groups is reduced by DM, and the dynamic response of vasodilation during submaximal contractions is slowed. Such vascular constraint most likely contributes to exertional hypertension, impairs dynamic and peak V˙O2 responses, and reduces exercise tolerance. There is a need to establish the effect of DM on dynamic aspects of vascular control in skeletal muscle during whole-body exercise and to clarify contributions of altered cardiovascular control and increased arterial stiffness to exertional hypertension. PMID:25918732

  14. Early life factors and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinli; Ma, Huijie; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a multifactorial disease, and its aetiology involves a complex interplay between genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. In recent years, evidences from both human and animal experiments have correlated early life factors with programming diabetes risk in adult life. Fetal and neonatal period is crucial for organ development. Many maternal factors during pregnancy may increase the risk of diabetes of offsprings in later life, which include malnutrition, healthy (hyperglycemia and obesity), behavior (smoking, drinking, and junk food diet), hormone administration, and even stress. In neonates, catch-up growth, lactation, glucocorticoids administration, and stress have all been found to increase the risk of insulin resistance or T2DM. Unfavorable environments (socioeconomic situation and famine) or obesity also has long-term negative effects on children by causing increased susceptibility to T2DM in adults. We also address the potential mechanisms that may underlie the developmental programming of T2DM. Therefore, it might be possible to prevent or delay the risk for T2DM by improving pre- and/or postnatal factors. PMID:24455747

  15. Type 2 Diabetes Dysregulates Glucose Metabolism in Cardiac Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Salabei, Joshua K; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K; Mehra, Parul; Gibb, Andrew A; Haberzettl, Petra; Hong, Kyung U; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Qianhong; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Bolli, Roberto; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Hill, Bradford G

    2016-06-24

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased mortality and progression to heart failure. Recent studies suggest that diabetes also impairs reparative responses after cell therapy. In this study, we examined potential mechanisms by which diabetes affects cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). CPCs isolated from the diabetic heart showed diminished proliferation, a propensity for cell death, and a pro-adipogenic phenotype. The diabetic CPCs were insulin-resistant, and they showed higher energetic reliance on glycolysis, which was associated with up-regulation of the pro-glycolytic enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3). In WT CPCs, expression of a mutant form of PFKFB, which mimics PFKFB3 activity and increases glycolytic rate, was sufficient to phenocopy the mitochondrial and proliferative deficiencies found in diabetic cells. Consistent with activation of phosphofructokinase in diabetic cells, stable isotope carbon tracing in diabetic CPCs showed dysregulation of the pentose phosphate and glycero(phospho)lipid synthesis pathways. We describe diabetes-induced dysregulation of carbon partitioning using stable isotope metabolomics-based coupling quotients, which relate relative flux values between metabolic pathways. These findings suggest that diabetes causes an imbalance in glucose carbon allocation by uncoupling biosynthetic pathway activity, which could diminish the efficacy of CPCs for myocardial repair. PMID:27151219

  16. Dulaglutide for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amblee, A

    2014-04-01

    Dulaglutide is a novel glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist with a unique structure that supports once-weekly dosing in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), most of whom have a big pill burden. It appears to be efficacious in reducing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) up to 1.59% and promotes modest weight loss up to 3 kg with a low incidence of hypoglycemia and mild to moderate gastrointestinal adverse events. Convenient weekly dosing could improve compliance and help attain sustained glycemic goals. Addressing obesity is an integral part of T2DM management and weight loss may contribute to better glycemic and cardiovascular benefits. Results of ongoing clinical trials on cardiovascular safety are important to determine the risk-to-benefit ratio. As with any drug, patient selection and ongoing monitoring will be important. If approved, dulaglutide will be one of the first weekly GLP-1 receptor agonist to be available in a ready-to-use pen device with an automatic injector. PMID:24918645

  17. Glucagon and heart in type 2 diabetes: new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, Antonio; Genovese, Stefano; Mannucci, Edoardo; Gronda, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Increased levels of glucagon in type 2 diabetes are well known and, until now, have been considered deleterious. However, glucagon has an important role in the maintenance of both heart and kidney function. Moreover, in the past, glucagon has been therapeutically used for heart failure treatment. The new antidiabetic drugs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors, are able to decrease and to increase glucagon levels, respectively, while contrasting data have been reported regarding the glucagon like peptide 1 receptors agonists. The cardiovascular outcome trials, requested by the FDA, raised some concerns about the possibility that the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors can precipitate the heart failure, while, at least for empagliflozin, a positive effect has been shown in decreasing both cardiovascular death and heart failure. The recent LEADER Trial, showed a significant reduction of cardiovascular death with liraglutide, but a neutral effect on heart failure. A possible explanation of the results with the DPPIV inhibitors and empagliflozin might be related to their divergent effect on glucagon levels. Due to unclear effects of glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists on glucagon, the possible role of this hormone in the Leader trial remains unclear. PMID:27568179

  18. Youth-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Consensus Report: Current Status, Challenges, and Priorities.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Kristen J; Anderson, Barbara J; Berg, Erika G; Chiang, Jane L; Chou, Hubert; Copeland, Kenneth C; Hannon, Tamara S; Huang, Terry T-K; Lynch, Jane L; Powell, Jeff; Sellers, Elizabeth; Tamborlane, William V; Zeitler, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a significant and increasing burden in adolescents and young adults. Clear strategies for research, prevention, and treatment of the disease in these vulnerable patients are needed. Evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes in children is different not only from type 1 but also from type 2 diabetes in adults. Understanding the unique pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in youth, as well as the risk of complications and the psychosocial impact, will enable industry, academia, funding agencies, advocacy groups, and regulators to collectively evaluate both current and future research, treatment, and prevention approaches. This Consensus Report characterizes type 2 diabetes in children, evaluates the fundamental differences between childhood and adult disease, describes the current therapeutic options, and discusses challenges to and approaches for developing new treatments. PMID:27486237

  19. Physical activity in youth with well-controlled versus poorly controlled type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes increases risk of chronic disease. The existing guidelines are for American youth to attain at least 60 minutes of daily physical activity (PA). Fewer than 20% achieve this goal. This study examines differences between blood glucose control and PA in youth with type 2 diabetes durin...

  20. The Effectiveness of Different Diet Strategies to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Megan L.; Garnett, Sarah P.; Baur, Louise A.; Lister, Natalie B.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a prominent clinical issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of young people have risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly obesity, indicating the need for effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. The aim of this review was to identify specific dietary strategies that optimize improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth and hence reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Our review of the current literature indicates that dietary interventions lead to weight loss when intervention adherence is high. However, in addition to weight loss, a diet that is reduced in carbohydrates may optimize improvements in other type 2 diabetes risk factors, including insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. While further research is needed to confirm this finding, reduced carbohydrate diets may include a very low-carbohydrate diet, a very low-energy diet, a lower-glycemic-index diet, and/or an intermittent fasting diet. This array of dietary strategies provides a suite of intervention options for clinicians to recommend to young people at risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these findings are in contrast to current guidelines for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults which recommends a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. PMID:27517953

  1. All about Your Risk for Prediabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent type 2 diabetes and heart disease—by losing weight through eating fewer calories and less fat and being more active. Astudy of people at ... can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by • losing weight • cutting back on calories and saturated fat • increasing your daily physical activity Losing 7% of ...

  2. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes: Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford, Kristin I.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. Exercise improves whole body metabolic health in people with type 2 diabetes, and adaptations to skeletal muscle are essential for this improvement. An acute bout of exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, while chronic exercise training improves mitochondrial…

  3. Applying the Transtheoretical Model to Investigate Behavioural Change in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shu-Ping; Wang, Ming-Jye

    2013-01-01

    Background: Long-term behaviour change in type 2 diabetic patients may provide effective glycemic control. Purpose: To investigate the key factors that promote behaviour change in diabetic subjects using the transtheoretical model. Methods: Subjects were selected by purposive sampling from type 2 diabetes outpatients. Self-administered…

  4. Bay Leaves Improve Glucose and Lipid Profile of People with Type 2 Diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bay leaves (Laurus nobilis) have been shown to improve insulin function in vitro but the effects on people have not been determined. The objective of this study was to determine if bay leaves may be important in the prevention and/or alleviation of type 2 diabetes. Forty people with type 2 diabet...

  5. Low-frequency variants in HMGA1 are not associated with type 2 diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Marcel; Huyvaert, Marlène; Perry, John R B; Pearson, Richard D; Falchi, Mario; Morris, Andrew P; Vivequin, Sidonie; Lobbens, Stéphane; Yengo, Loïc; Gaget, Stefan; Pattou, Francois; Poulain-Godefroy, Odile; Charpentier, Guillaume; Carlsson, Lena M S; Jacobson, Peter; Sjöström, Lars; Lantieri, Olivier; Heude, Barbara; Walley, Andrew; Balkau, Beverley; Marre, Michel; Froguel, Philippe; Cauchi, Stéphane

    2012-02-01

    It has recently been suggested that the low-frequency c.136-14_136-13insC variant in high-mobility group A1 (HMGA1) may strongly contribute to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes risk. In our study, we attempted to confirm that HMGA1 is a novel type 2 diabetes locus in French Caucasians. The gene was sequenced in 368 type 2 diabetic case subjects with a family history of type 2 diabetes and 372 normoglycemic control subjects without a family history of type 2 diabetes. None of the 41 genetic variations identified were associated with type 2 diabetes. The lack of association between the c.136-14_136-13insC variant and type 2 diabetes was confirmed in an independent French group of 4,538 case subjects and 4,015 control subjects and in a large meta-analysis of 16,605 case subjects and 46,179 control subjects. Finally, this variant had no effects on metabolic traits and was not involved in variations of HMGA1 and insulin receptor (INSR) expressions. The c.136-14_136-13insC variant was not associated with type 2 diabetes in individuals of European descent. Our study emphasizes the need to analyze a large number of subjects to reliably assess the association of low-frequency variants with the disease. PMID:22210315

  6. Association of an intensive lifestyle intervention with remission of Type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The frequency of remission of type 2 diabetes achievable with lifestyle intervention is unclear. To examine the association of a long-term intensive weight-loss intervention with the frequency of remission from type 2 diabetes to prediabetes or normoglycemia. Ancillary observational analysis of a ...

  7. Issues of Cause and Control in Patient Accounts of Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, O.; Peel, E.; Douglas, M.; Lawton, J.

    2006-01-01

    Patients experience considerable difficulties in making and sustaining health-related lifestyle changes. Many Type 2 diabetes patients struggle to follow disease risk-management advice even when they receive extensive information and support. Drawing on a qualitative study of patients with Type 2 diabetes, the paper uses discourse analysis to…

  8. Sedentary behavior and physical activity in youth with recent onset of type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the rise of type 2 diabetes in youth, it is critical to investigate factors such as physical activity (PA) and time spent sedentary that may be contributing to this public health problem. This article describes PA and sedentary time in a large cohort of youth with type 2 diabetes and compares t...

  9. The Effectiveness of Different Diet Strategies to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Youth.

    PubMed

    Gow, Megan L; Garnett, Sarah P; Baur, Louise A; Lister, Natalie B

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a prominent clinical issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of young people have risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly obesity, indicating the need for effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. The aim of this review was to identify specific dietary strategies that optimize improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth and hence reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Our review of the current literature indicates that dietary interventions lead to weight loss when intervention adherence is high. However, in addition to weight loss, a diet that is reduced in carbohydrates may optimize improvements in other type 2 diabetes risk factors, including insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. While further research is needed to confirm this finding, reduced carbohydrate diets may include a very low-carbohydrate diet, a very low-energy diet, a lower-glycemic-index diet, and/or an intermittent fasting diet. This array of dietary strategies provides a suite of intervention options for clinicians to recommend to young people at risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these findings are in contrast to current guidelines for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults which recommends a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. PMID:27517953

  10. Pregnancy outcomes in youth with type 2 diabetes: The TODAY Study experience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated pregnancy outcomes, maternal and fetal/neonatal, during the Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study. The TODAY study was a randomized controlled trial comparing three treatment options for youth with type 2 diabetes. Informed consent included the req...

  11. Topical Naltrexone as Treatment for Type 2 Diabetic Cutaneous Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Immonen, Jessica A.; Zagon, Ian S.; McLaughlin, Patricia J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with impaired cutaneous wound healing and can result in ulceration, infection, and/or amputation. More than 25 million people in the United States have T2D and are vulnerable to epithelial-related complications. Current therapies are limited in their efficacy. New treatments for full-thickness cutaneous wounds that focus on underlying diabetic pathways are needed. Approach: Topical application of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (NTX) dissolved in cream reverses delayed wound closure in type 1 diabetic rat by the acceleration of reepithelialization and enhancement of angiogenesis and remodeling. NTX blocks the opioid growth factor (OGF)–OGF receptor (OGFr) axis and upregulates DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. To investigate whether NTX is an effective therapy for T2D wound closure, genetically obese mice (db/db) and normal C57Bl/6J mice received full-thickness cutaneous wounds. Wounds (5 mm in diameter) were treated topically three times daily with 10−5 M NTX or sterile saline dissolved in cream and photographed every 2 days. Results: Wounds in db/db mice treated with saline were 11–92% larger than those in normal mice throughout the 2-week observation. Topical NTX therapy in T2D mice reduced the residual wound size by 13–30% between days 8 and 14 relative to diabetic mice receiving saline. Reepithelialization and DNA synthesis, as analyzed by epithelial thickness and BrdU labeling indexes, respectively, were accelerated in NTX-treated wounds. Innovation and Conclusion: These data suggest that the OGF-OGFr axis plays a role in epithelial-related complications of T2D and that blockade of this pathway by NTX may be an effective treatment for wound repair. PMID:24940556

  12. Mendelian randomization studies of biomarkers and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Many biomarkers are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in epidemiological observations. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize current evidence for causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. A systematic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE (until April 2015) was done to identify Mendelian randomization studies that examined potential causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. To replicate the findings of identified studies, data from two large-scale, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were used: DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAMv3) for T2D and the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) for glycaemic traits. GWAS summary statistics were extracted for the same genetic variants (or proxy variants), which were used in the original Mendelian randomization studies. Of the 21 biomarkers (from 28 studies), ten have been reported to be causally associated with T2D in Mendelian randomization. Most biomarkers were investigated in a single cohort study or population. Of the ten biomarkers that were identified, nominally significant associations with T2D or glycaemic traits were reached for those genetic variants related to bilirubin, pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, delta-6 desaturase and dimethylglycine based on the summary data from DIAGRAMv3 or MAGIC. Several Mendelian randomization studies investigated the nature of associations of biomarkers with T2D. However, there were only a few biomarkers that may have causal effects on T2D. Further research is needed to broadly evaluate the causal effects of multiple biomarkers on T2D and glycaemic traits using data from large-scale cohorts or GWAS including many different genetic variants. PMID:26446360

  13. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P. V.

    2015-01-01

    A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM). T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis), usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS). The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126–200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <8.5. Insulin is recommended when blood glucose is >200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s) are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis. PMID:25941651

  14. Drugs on the horizon for treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rachman, J; Turner, R C

    1995-06-01

    The only new pharmaceutical therapy for Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes that has become available for clinical use in the last 40 years is the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose, which reduces postprandial glucose levels by retarding digestion of complex carbohydrates in the gut. It has proved difficult to find other new metabolically active drugs that lack toxicity. Agents that reduce insulin resistance include the thiazolidinediones, which are very effective in animals. Of these, the only one that has been maintained in clinical evaluation appears from preliminary data to have an effect that although still useful, is not greater than that reported for current oral agents. Agents that reduce non-esterified fatty acid levels by inhibiting lipolysis, thereby allowing increased peripheral uptake of glucose, have so far given minimal reduction in glycaemia. The development of fatty acid oxidation inhibitors to reduce gluconeogenesis in the liver has been hampered by toxicity, but additional new agents are being studied. The most promising new approach for enhancing insulin secretion has been suggested by the demonstration that pharmacological doses of GLP-1 (7-36 amide), a natural enteric incretin hormone, improves pancreatic beta-cell and alpha-cell sensitivity to glucose and can induce normal basal glucose levels in diabetic man. The future development of GLP-1 agonists will be of great interest. This is timely as other insulin secretogogues, such as alpha 2 adrenergic blockers have proved relatively ineffective. Anti-obesity agents would in theory be beneficial, but have either had limited efficacy or have been avoided because of concern about long-term safety. Until new pharmaceutical agents become available, if near-normal glycaemia is to be achieved, many more Type 2 diabetic patients will need insulin therapy. When full insulin replacement therapy is not feasible, reducing the fasting blood glucose level towards normal with a single daily basal

  15. Parasitic helminths and their beneficial impact on type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Berbudi, Afiat; Ajendra, Jesuthas; Wardani, Ajeng P F; Hoerauf, Achim; Hübner, Marc P

    2016-03-01

    It is estimated that by the year 2035 almost 600 million people will suffer from diabetes. In the case of type 2 diabetes, the strongest increase of diabetes incidence occurs in developing and newly industrialized countries. This increase correlates not only with a progressing sedentary lifestyle and nutritional changes, but also environmental changes. Similarly, the increase of type 1 diabetes incidence in industrialized countries over the past decades cannot be explained by genetic factors alone, suggesting that environmental changes are also involved. One such environmental change is a reduced exposure to pathogens because of improved hygiene. Parasitic helminths modulate the immune system of their hosts and induce type 2 as well as regulatory immune responses. As pro-inflammatory immune responses are crucial for the onset of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, helminth-induced immunomodulation may prevent diabetes onset and ameliorate insulin sensitivity. Several epidemiological studies in human and experimental animal models support such a protective effect of helminths for autoimmune diabetes. Recent studies further suggest that helminths may also provide such a beneficial effect for type 2 diabetes. In this review we summarize studies that investigated parasitic helminths and helminth-derived products and their impact on both type 1 and type 2 diabetes highlighting potential protective mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26119261

  16. Mood and metabolism: Anhedonia as a clinical target in Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jasmine; Swardfager, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests a bidirectional relationship between depression and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In Type 2 diabetes, depression affects behavioural factors such as diet and physical activity that promote positive energy balance and influence diabetes outcomes. Examinations of depressive symptoms by dimension have suggested that anhedonia, the inability to anticipate, seek, choose and enjoy reward, may be of particular clinical importance. Structural and functional brain changes in Type 2 diabetes distributed throughout the principally dopaminergic reward circuitry suggest a neurobiological basis for motivational and decisional aspects of anhedonia. Interrelated neuroendocrine, bio-energetic, oxidative and inflammatory changes suggest mechanisms underlying neuronal damage and dopaminergic deficits. A consequential shift in effort-related reward choices and their effects on energy expenditure, self-care and eating behaviours is suggested to affect Type 2 diabetes outcomes. The clinical implications for screening and psychopharmacology of depressive symptoms in people with Type 2 diabetes are discussed. PMID:27088371

  17. Teriparatide in patients with osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann V; Pavo, Imre; Alam, Jahangir; Disch, Damon P; Schuster, Dara; Harris, Jennifer M; Krege, John H

    2016-10-01

    Despite evidence for higher fracture risk, clinical effects of osteoporosis treatments in type 2 diabetes (T2D) are largely unknown. Post hoc analyses of the DANCE observational study compared T2D patients and patients without diabetes to assess the effect of teriparatide, an osteoanabolic therapy on skeletal outcomes and safety. Patients included ambulatory men and women with osteoporosis receiving teriparatide 20μg/day SQ up to 24months followed by observation up to 24months. Main outcome measures included nonvertebral fracture incidence comparing 0-6months with 6+ months of teriparatide, change from baseline in BMD and back pain severity, and serious adverse events. Analyses included 4042 patients; 291 with T2D, 3751 without diabetes. Treatment exposure did not differ by group. For T2D patients, fracture incidence was 3.5 per 100 patient-years during 0-6months treatment, and 1.6 during 6months to treatment end (47% of baseline, 95% CI 12-187%); during similar periods, for patients without diabetes, fracture incidence was 3.2 and 1.8 (57% of baseline, 95% CI 39-83%). As determinants of fracture outcome during teriparatide treatment, diabetes was not a significant factor (P=0.858), treatment duration was significant (P=0.003), and the effect of duration was not significantly different between the groups (interaction P=0.792). Increases in spine and total hip BMD did not differ between groups; increase in femoral neck BMD was greater in T2D patients than in patients without diabetes (+0.34 and +0.004g/cm(2), respectively; P=0.014). Back pain severity decreased in both groups. Teriparatide was well tolerated without new safety findings. In conclusion, during teriparatide treatment, reduction in nonvertebral fracture incidence, increase in BMD, and decrease in back pain were similar in T2D and non-diabetic patients. PMID:27374026

  18. Experimentally induced rodent models of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Wilson, Rachel Dorothy

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the major global public health problems and is gradually getting worse particularly in developing nations where 95% of patients are suffering from type 2 diabetes (T2D). Animal models in diabetes research are very common where rodents are the best choice of use due to being smaller in size, easy to handle, omnivorous in nature, and non-wild tranquil behavior. Normally rodent models are classified into two major classes namely: (1) genetic or spontaneously induced models and (2) non-genetic or experimentally induced models. Non-genetic models are more popular compared to genetic models due to lower cost, wider availability, easier to induce diabetes, and of course easier to maintain compared to genetic models. A number of non-genetic models have been developed in last three decades for diabetes research including adult alloxan/streptozotocin (STZ) models, partial pancreatectomy model, high-fat (HF) diet-fed models, fructose-fed models, HF diet-fed STZ models, nicotinamide-STZ models, monosodium-glutamate (MSG) induced models, and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) models. A T2D model should have the all major pathogenesis of the disease usually found in humans; however, none of the above-mentioned models are without limitations. This chapter comparatively evaluates most of the experimentally induced rodent models of T2D with their limitations, advantages, disadvantages, and criticality of development in order to help diabetes research groups to more appropriately select the animal models to work on their specific research question. PMID:22893406

  19. Future glucose-lowering drugs for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Clifford J; Tahrani, Abd A; Barnett, Anthony H

    2016-04-01

    The multivariable and progressive natural history of type 2 diabetes limits the effectiveness of available glucose-lowering drugs. Constraints imposed by comorbidities (notably cardiovascular disease and renal impairment) and the need to avoid hypoglycaemia, weight gain, and drug interactions further complicate the treatment process. These challenges have prompted the development of new formulations and delivery methods for existing drugs alongside research into novel pharmacological entities. Advances in incretin-based therapies include a miniature implantable osmotic pump to give continuous delivery of a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for 6-12 months and once-weekly tablets of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. Hybrid molecules that combine the properties of selected incretins and other peptides are at early stages of development, and proof of concept has been shown for small non-peptide molecules to activate glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors. Additional sodium-glucose co-transporter inhibitors are progressing in development as well as possible new insulin-releasing biological agents and small-molecule inhibitors of glucagon action. Adiponectin receptor agonists, selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor modulators, cellular glucocorticoid inhibitors, and analogues of fibroblast growth factor 21 are being considered as potential new approaches to glucose lowering. Compounds that can enhance insulin receptor and post-receptor signalling cascades or directly promote selected pathways of glucose metabolism have suggested opportunities for future treatments. However, pharmacological interventions that are able to restore normal β-cell function and β-cell mass, normalise insulin action, and fully correct glucose homoeostasis are a distant vision. PMID:26809680

  20. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G.; Arruda, L.C.M.; Lopes, S.L.B.; Benze, B.G.; Del Vale, A.M.; Malmegrim, K.C.R.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old) with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old) who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05). The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01). In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease. PMID:27007651

  1. Strategies for preventing type 2 diabetes: an update for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Khavandi, Kaivan; Amer, Halima; Ibrahim, Bashar; Brownrigg, Jack

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes is a major and growing public health challenge which threatens to overwhelm medical services in the future. Type 2 diabetes confers significant morbidity and mortality, most notably with target organ damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. The magnitude of cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes is best illustrated by its position as a coronary heart disease risk equivalent. Complications related to neuropathy are also vast, often working in concert with vascular abnormalities and resulting in serious clinical consequences such as foot ulceration. Increased understanding of the natural history of this disorder has generated the potential to intervene and halt pathological progression before overt disease ensues, after which point management becomes increasingly challenging. The concept of prediabetes as a formal diagnosis has begun to be translated from the research setting to clinical practice, but with continually updated guidelines, varied nomenclature, emerging pharmacotherapies and an ever-changing evidence base, clinicians may be left uncertain of best practice in identifying and managing patients at the prediabetic stage. This review aims to summarize the epidemiological data, new concepts in disease pathogenesis and guideline recommendations in addition to lifestyle, pharmacological and surgical therapies targeted at stopping progression of prediabetes to diabetes. While antidiabetic medications, with newer anti-obesity medications and interventional bariatric procedures have shown some promising benefits, diet and therapeutic lifestyle change remains the mainstay of management to improve the metabolic profile of individuals with glucose dysregulation. New risk stratification tools to identify at-risk individuals, coupled with unselected population level intervention hold promise in future practice. PMID:23997928

  2. Myocardial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ofstad, Anne Pernille

    2016-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is strongly associated with increased risk of myocardial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease (CVD), two separate conditions which often co-exist and influence each other's course. The prevalence of myocardial dysfunction may be as high as 75% in T2DM populations but is often overlooked due to the initial asymptomatic nature of the disease, complicating co-morbidities such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and obesity, and the lack of consensus on diagnostic criteria. More sensitive echocardiographic applications are furthermore needed to improve detection of early subclinical changes in myocardial function which do not affect conventional echocardiographic parameters. The pathophysiology of the diabetic myocardial dysfunction is not fully elucidated, but involves hyperglycemia and high levels of free fatty acids. It evolves over several years and increases the risk of developing overt HF, and is suggested to at least in part account for the worse outcome seen in T2DM individuals after cardiac events. CAD and stroke are the most frequent CV manifestations among T2DM patients and relate to a large degree to the accelerated atherosclerosis driven by inflammation. Diagnosing CAD is challenging due to the lower sensitivity inherent in the diagnostic tests and there is thus a need for new biomarkers to improve prediction and detection of CAD. It seems that a multi-factorial approach (i.e. targeting several CV risk factors simultaneously) is superior to a strict glucose lowering strategy in reducing risk for macrovascular events, and recent research may even support an effect also on HF outcomes. PMID:27071642

  3. Obesity and type 2 diabetes: which patients are at risk?

    PubMed

    Garber, A J

    2012-05-01

    An estimated 72.5 million American adults are obese, and the growing US obesity epidemic is responsible for substantial increase in morbidity and mortality, as well as increased health care costs. Obesity results from a combination of personal and societal factors, but is often viewed as a character flaw rather than a medical condition. This leads to stigma and discrimination towards obese individuals and decreases the likelihood of effective intervention. Conditions related to obesity are increasingly common, such as metabolic syndrome, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), all of which indicate high risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM). This paper reviews the progression from obesity to diabetes, identifying physiological changes that occur along this path as well as opportunities for patient identification and disease prevention. Patients with prediabetes (defined as having IFG, IGT or both) and/or metabolic syndrome require interventions designed to preserve insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, both of which start to deteriorate prior to T2DM diagnosis. Lifestyle modification, including both healthy eating choices and increased physical activity, is essential for weight management and diabetes prevention. Although sustained weight loss is often considered by patients and physicians as being impossible to achieve, effective interventions do exist. Specifically, the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and programs modelled along its parameters have shown repeated successes, even with long-term maintenance. Recent setbacks in the development of medications for weight loss further stress the importance of lifestyle management. By viewing obesity as a metabolic disorder rather than a personal weakness, we can work with patients to address this increasingly prevalent condition and improve long-term health outcomes. PMID:22074144

  4. Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus through Telemedicine

    PubMed Central

    Cipolla, Maurizio; Merante, Valentina; Medaglia, Valeria; Irace, Concetta; Gnasso, Agostino

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus T2DM has a huge and growing burden on public health, whereas new care models are not implemented into clinical practice; in fact the purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a program of integrated care for T2DM, compared with ordinary diligence. Methods "Progetto Diabete Calabria" is a new organizational model for the management of patients with diabetes mellitus, based on General Practitioners (GPs) empowerment and the use of a web-based electronic health record, shared in remote consultations among GPs and Hospital Consultants. One-year change in glucose and main cardiovascular risk factors control in 104 patients (Cases) following this integrated care program has been evaluated and compared with that of 208 control patients (Controls) matched for age, gender, and cardiometabolic profile, and followed in an ordinary outpatient medical management by the Consultants only. Both patient groups had Day Hospitals before and after the study period. Results The mean number of accesses to the Consultants during the study was 0.6±0.9 for Cases, and 1.3±1.5 for Controls (p<0.0001). At follow-up, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) significantly decreased from 58±6 to 54±8 mmol/mol in Cases only (p=0.01); LDL cholesterol decreased in both groups; body mass index decreased in Cases only, from 31.0±4.8 to 30.5±4.6 kg/m2 (p=0.03). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that a health care program based on GPs empowerment and taking care plus remote consultation with Consultants is at least as effective as standard outpatient management, in order to improve the control of T2DM. PMID:25974092

  5. Direct Medical Cost of Type 2 Diabetes in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Shuyu Ng, Charmaine; Toh, Matthias Paul Han Sim; Ko, Yu; Yu-Chia Lee, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Due to the chronic nature of diabetes along with their complications, they have been recognised as a major health issue, which results in significant economic burden. This study aims to estimate the direct medical cost associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Singapore in 2010 and to examine both the relationship between demographic and clinical state variables with the total estimated expenditure. The National Healthcare Group (NHG) Chronic Disease Management System (CDMS) database was used to identify patients with T2DM in the year 2010. DM-attributable costs estimated included hospitalisations, accident and emergency (A&E) room visits, outpatient physician visits, medications, laboratory tests and allied health services. All charges and unit costs were provided by the NHG. A total of 500 patients with DM were identified for the analyses. The mean annual direct medical cost was found to be $2,034, of which 61% was accounted for by inpatient services, 35% by outpatient services, and 4% by A&E services. Independent determinants of total costs were DM treatments such as the use of insulin only (p<0.001) and the combination of both oral medications and insulin (p=0.047) as well as having complications such as cerebrovascular disease (p<0.001), cardiovascular disease (p=0.002), peripheral vascular disease (p=0.001), and nephropathy (p=0.041). In this study, the cost of DM treatments and DM-related complications were found to be strong determinants of costs. This finding suggests an imperative need to address the economic burden associated with diabetes with urgency and to reorganise resources required to improve healthcare costs. PMID:25816299

  6. The oral microflora in obesity and type-2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shillitoe, Edward; Weinstock, Ruth; Kim, Taewan; Simon, Howard; Planer, Jessica; Noonan, Susan; Cooney, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is prevalent in people with obesity. It has been proposed that these conditions are related to specific features of the microflora of the mouth and lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Hyperglycemia often resolves quickly after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) but the role of the GI microflora cannot be examined easily because of reduced intestinal mobility. We propose that the study of microorganisms present in the mouth of patients undergoing RYGB will contribute to our understanding of the role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of T2DM. Objective To conduct a feasibility study to examine differences in oral microbes in obese patients with and without T2DM and to determine whether it is feasible to measure changes after gastric bypass surgery. Methods Individuals with morbid obesity (n=29), of whom 13 had T2DM, were studied. Oral rinses, stool samples, and blood samples were obtained before RYGB, and oral rinses and blood samples were obtained at 2 and 12 weeks postsurgery. Results Prior to surgery, participants with T2DM had slightly higher total levels of oral bacteria than those without diabetes. Those with HbA1c > 6.5% had rather lower levels of Bifidobacteria in the mouth and stool. At 2 weeks post-RYGB, patients with T2DM were able to reduce or discontinue their hypoglycemic medications. Stool samples could not be obtained but oral rinses were readily available. The levels of oral Bifidobacteria had increased tenfold and levels of circulating endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha had decreased. Conclusions The study of oral bacteria before and after RYGB is feasible and should be tested in larger patient populations to increase our understanding of the role of microorganisms in the pathogenesis of obesity and T2DM. PMID:23119124

  7. Teneligliptin in management of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Panneerselvam, A; Singh, KP; Parmar, Girish; Gadge, Pradeep; Swami, Onkar C

    2016-01-01

    Teneligliptin is a recently developed oral dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor indicated for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in adults along with diet and exercise. Teneligliptin has been recently available in Japan (Teneria®), Argentina (Teneglucon®), and India (Tenepure; Teneza) at relatively affordable price. This is a positive step toward the management of T2DM in developing countries, where the cost of medicine is out-of-pocket expenditure and is a limiting factor for health care. This review evaluates the efficacy and safety of teneligliptin in the management of T2DM. Teneligliptin has been systematically evaluated in T2DM as monotherapy with diet and exercise and in combination with metformin, glimepiride, pioglitazone, and insulin in short-term (12 weeks) and long-term (52 weeks) studies. These studies have reported a reduction in HbA1c of 0.8%–0.9% within 12 weeks of therapy. Two 52-week studies reported sustained improvement in glycemic control with teneligliptin. Teneligliptin has been found to be well tolerated, and the safety profile is similar to other dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors. Hypoglycemia and constipation are the main adverse events. Teneligliptin can be administered safely to patients with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease without dose adjustment. Similarly, it can be used in patients with mild-to-moderate hepatic impairment. Teneligliptin is effective and well tolerated and may have an important role in the management of T2DM. PMID:27574456

  8. Chlorinated persistent organic pollutants, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duk-Hee; Porta, Miquel; Jacobs, David R; Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-08-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are lipophilic compounds that travel with lipids and accumulate mainly in adipose tissue. Recent human evidence links low-dose POPs to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Because humans are contaminated by POP mixtures and POPs possibly have nonmonotonic dose-response relations with T2D, critical methodological issues arise in evaluating human findings. This review summarizes epidemiological results on chlorinated POPs and T2D, and relevant experimental evidence. It also discusses how features of POPs can affect inferences in humans. The evidence as a whole suggests that, rather than a few individual POPs, background exposure to POP mixtures-including organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls-can increase T2D risk in humans. Inconsistent statistical significance for individual POPs may arise due to distributional differences in POP mixtures among populations. Differences in the observed shape of the dose-response curves among human studies may reflect an inverted U-shaped association secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction or endocrine disruption. Finally, we examine the relationship between POPs and obesity. There is evidence in animal studies that low-dose POP mixtures are obesogenic. However, relationships between POPs and obesity in humans have been inconsistent. Adipose tissue plays a dual role of promoting T2D and providing a relatively safe place to store POPs. Large prospective studies with serial measurements of a broad range of POPs, adiposity, and clinically relevant biomarkers are needed to disentangle the interrelationships among POPs, obesity, and the development of T2D. Also needed are laboratory experiments that more closely mimic real-world POP doses, mixtures, and exposure duration in humans. PMID:24483949

  9. Abdominal Obesity and Brain Atrophy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Callisaya, Michele; Blizzard, Leigh; Sharman, James E.; Venn, Alison; Phan, Thanh G.; Beare, Richard; Forbes, Josephine; Blackburn, Nicholas B.; Srikanth, Velandai

    2015-01-01

    Aim Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with gray matter atrophy. Adiposity and physical inactivity are risk factors for T2D and brain atrophy. We studied whether the associations of T2D with total gray matter volume (GMV) and hippocampal volume (HV) are dependent on obesity and physical activity. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, we measured waist-hip ratio (WHR), body mass index (BMI), mean steps/day and brain volumes in a community dwelling cohort of people with and without T2D. Using multivariable linear regression, we examined whether WHR, BMI and physical activity mediated or modified the association between T2D, GMV and HV. Results There were 258 participants with (mean age 67±7 years) and 302 without (mean age 72±7 years) T2D. Adjusting for age, sex and intracranial volume, T2D was independently associated with lower total GMV (p = 0.001) and HV (p<0.001), greater WHR (p<0.001) and BMI (p<0.001), and lower mean steps/day (p = 0.002). After adjusting for covariates, the inclusion of BMI and mean steps/day did not significantly affect the T2D-GMV association, but WHR attenuated it by 32% while remaining independently associated with lower GMV (p<0.01). The T2D-HV association was minimally changed by the addition of BMI, steps/day or WHR in the model. No statistical interactions were observed between T2D and measures of obesity and physical activity in explaining brain volumes. Conclusions Abdominal obesity or its downstream effects may partially mediate the adverse effect of T2D on brain atrophy. This requires confirmation in longitudinal studies. PMID:26560876

  10. Teneligliptin in management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Panneerselvam, A; Singh, K P; Parmar, Girish; Gadge, Pradeep; Swami, Onkar C

    2016-01-01

    Teneligliptin is a recently developed oral dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor indicated for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in adults along with diet and exercise. Teneligliptin has been recently available in Japan (Teneria(®)), Argentina (Teneglucon(®)), and India (Tenepure; Teneza) at relatively affordable price. This is a positive step toward the management of T2DM in developing countries, where the cost of medicine is out-of-pocket expenditure and is a limiting factor for health care. This review evaluates the efficacy and safety of teneligliptin in the management of T2DM. Teneligliptin has been systematically evaluated in T2DM as monotherapy with diet and exercise and in combination with metformin, glimepiride, pioglitazone, and insulin in short-term (12 weeks) and long-term (52 weeks) studies. These studies have reported a reduction in HbA1c of 0.8%-0.9% within 12 weeks of therapy. Two 52-week studies reported sustained improvement in glycemic control with teneligliptin. Teneligliptin has been found to be well tolerated, and the safety profile is similar to other dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors. Hypoglycemia and constipation are the main adverse events. Teneligliptin can be administered safely to patients with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease without dose adjustment. Similarly, it can be used in patients with mild-to-moderate hepatic impairment. Teneligliptin is effective and well tolerated and may have an important role in the management of T2DM. PMID:27574456

  11. Predicting erythropoietin resistance in hemodialysis patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance to ESAs (erythropoietin stimulating agents) is highly prevalent in hemodialysis patients with diabetes and associated with an increased mortality. The aim of this study was to identify predictors for ESA resistance and to develop a prediction model for the risk stratification in these patients. Methods A post-hoc analysis was conducted of the 4D study, including 1015 patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing hemodialysis. Determinants of ESA resistance were identified by univariate logistic regression analyses. Subsequently, multivariate models were performed with stepwise inclusion of significant predictors from clinical parameters, routine laboratory and specific biomarkers. Results In the model restricted to clinical parameters, male sex, shorter dialysis vintage, lower BMI, history of CHF, use of ACE-inhibitors and a higher heart rate were identified as independent predictors of ESA resistance. In regard to routine laboratory markers, lower albumin, lower iron saturation, higher creatinine and higher potassium levels were independently associated with ESA resistance. With respect to specific biomarkers, higher ADMA and CRP levels as well as lower Osteocalcin levels were predictors of ESA resistance. Conclusions Easily obtainable clinical parameters and routine laboratory parameters can predict ESA resistance in diabetic hemodialysis patients with good discrimination. Specific biomarkers did not meaningfully further improve the risk prediction of ESA resistance. Routinely assessed data can be used in clinical practice to stratify patients according to the risk of ESA resistance, which may help to assign appropriate treatment strategies. Clinical trial registration The study was registered at the German medical authority (BfArM; registration number 401 3206). The sponsor protocol ID and clinical trial unique identified number was CT-981-423-239. The results of the study are published and available at http

  12. Waist circumference threshold values for type 2 diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Karl E

    2009-07-01

    Adult gains in body weight, excess adiposity, and intra-abdominal fat have each been associated with risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), forming the basis for preventive medicine guidelines and actuarial predictions using practical indices of weight (e.g., body mass index [BMI]) and waist circumference (WC). As obesity-related disease spreads beyond affluent western countries, application of WC thresholds to other populations has highlighted issues of their generalizability. For example, U.S. national health goals based on BMI < 25 kg/m(2) and WC < 89 cm (women) and <102 cm (men) differ considerably with a recent law in Japan mandating intervention for older adults with WC exceeding 90 cm (women) and 85 cm (men). The U.S. military has also faced issues of generalizability of WC-based adiposity standards that are fair and achievable. Data from many studies indicate that WC is a reliable biomarker for T2DM risk, suggesting that, for adult men and women, action thresholds should be more stringent than current U.S. guidelines, and it would not be harmful to set worldwide targets somewhere below 90 cm for men and women, regardless of weight status. Medical technology has provided many great insights into disease, including modern imaging technologies that have differentiated fat depots that have the greatest influence on T2DM, but ultimately, an inexpensive measuring tape provides the most useful and cost-effective preventive measure for T2DM today. At some point in the future, a Star Trek-like abdominal body fat "tricorder" noninvasive assessment of tissue composition may provide an advantage over abdominal girth. PMID:20144326

  13. Screening for Coronary Artery Disease in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Eugene J.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical Context: Sensitive tools are available to diagnose occult ischemic and atherosclerotic coronary disease, yet screening for coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been shown to reduce cardiac events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Professional guidelines are inconsistent regarding CAD screening recommendations, but it is suggested that those at highest risk (10-yr risk ≥20%) for cardiac events may benefit. Evidence Acquisition: We reviewed bibliographies of professional CAD screening guidelines, review articles, and clinical trials published within the last 10 yr, although we have included relevant older studies. We excluded studies that did not focus on T2DM or explicitly analyze that subgroup. Evidence Synthesis: Although screening for coronary ischemia or atherosclerosis does provide incremental prognostic information in patients with T2DM and previously undiagnosed CAD, this has not been found to significantly impact outcomes. This appears to result from comparable efficacy of revascularization and optimal medical therapy in stable CAD. Limited evidence supports the hypothesis that those with more severe CAD (three-vessel, left main, proximal left anterior descending) amenable to bypass surgery may be potential beneficiaries of screening. However, the low prevalence of such candidates in the asymptomatic population, continuing advances with percutaneous intervention, and the lack of prospective trials makes such a recommendation currently unsupportable. Conclusions: Findings to date do not support widespread screening for CAD in patients with T2DM. A future strategy identifying those at highest risk as screening candidates may ultimately be effective, but the optimal method for selecting those subjects or subsequent treatment is unknown. PMID:22419711

  14. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Trujillo, Isabel; González-Pascual, Montserrat; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; de Miguel-Yanes, José Mª; Méndez-Bailón, Manuel; de Miguel-Diez, Javier; Salinero-Fort, Miguel Ángel; Perez-Farinos, Napoleón; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; López-de-Andrés, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe trends in the rates of discharge due to thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) among patients with and without type 2 diabetes in Spain (2001–2012). We used national hospital discharge data to select all of the patients who were discharged from the hospital after TAAD. We focused our analysis on patients with TAAD in the primary diagnosis field. Discharges were grouped by diabetes status (diabetic or nondiabetic). Incidence was calculated overall and stratified by diabetes status. We divided the study period into 4 periods of 3 years each. We analyzed diagnostic and surgical procedures, length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. We identified 48,746 patients who were discharged with TAAD. The rates of discharge due to TAAD increased significantly in both diabetic patients (12.65 cases per 100,000 in 2001/2003 to 23.92 cases per 100,000 in 2010/2012) and nondiabetic patients (17.39 to 21.75, respectively). The incidence was higher among nondiabetic patients than diabetic patients in 3 of the 4 time periods. The percentage of patients who underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair increased in both groups, whereas the percentage of patients who underwent open repair decreased. The frequency of hospitalization increased at a higher rate among diabetic patients (incidence rate ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07–1.20) than among nondiabetic patients (incidence rate ratio 1.08, 95% CI 1.07–1.11). The in-hospital mortality was lower in diabetic patients than in nondiabetic patients (odds ratio 0.83, 95% CI 0.69–0.99). The incidence rates were higher in nondiabetic patients. Hospitalizations seemed to increase at a higher rate among diabetic patients. Diabetic patients had a significantly lower mortality, possibly because of earlier diagnoses, and improved and more readily available treatments. PMID:27149499

  15. Considerations regarding the diagnosis and treatment of childhood type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zeitler, Philip

    2010-05-01

    The prevalence of diabetes among children and adolescents has been steadily increasing, making it even more important that diabetes be adequately managed in this patient population. A basic distinction between type 1 and type 2 diabetes has long been understood. Type 1 diabetes results from a primary loss of pancreatic insulin production, usually as a consequence of autoimmune destruction of pancreatic cells; in type 2 diabetes, insulin production continues and may even be exaggerated, but is insufficient to adequately compensate for resistance to insulin action, leading to the loss of glycemic control. Regardless of the type of diabetes, the treatment goal is to control hyperglycemia. However, the optimal treatment strategy depends on the underlying cause of hyperglycemia. It is therefore important to accurately diagnose whether a patient has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Historically, this has been thought possible based on the different clinical presentations and age of onset of the conditions. More recently, with the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes among adolescents and the trend toward a more obese society, the distinction has become less clear. This has led to the need for the differential diagnosis of diabetes to be confirmed using biochemical and immunological testing. In addition, because the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the pediatric population is a relatively new phenomenon, available treatments for type 2 diabetes have been studied predominantly in adult populations. With type 2 diabetes becoming increasingly common in pediatric centers, there is a need to evaluate the optimal treatments for children and adolescents. PMID:20463418

  16. Flu Shot Tied to Fewer Hospitalizations, Deaths in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160085.html Flu Shot Tied to Fewer Hospitalizations, Deaths in Type ... TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The seasonal flu vaccine may offer people with type 2 diabetes ...

  17. Central Regulation of Glucose Production May Be Impaired in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Esterson, Yonah B; Carey, Michelle; Boucai, Laura; Goyal, Akankasha; Raghavan, Pooja; Zhang, Kehao; Mehta, Deeksha; Feng, Daorong; Wu, Licheng; Kehlenbrink, Sylvia; Koppaka, Sudha; Kishore, Preeti; Hawkins, Meredith

    2016-09-01

    The challenges of achieving optimal glycemic control in type 2 diabetes highlight the need for new therapies. Inappropriately elevated endogenous glucose production (EGP) is the main source of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. Because activation of central ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels suppresses EGP in nondiabetic rodents and humans, this study examined whether type 2 diabetic humans and rodents retain central regulation of EGP. The KATP channel activator diazoxide was administered in a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover design to eight type 2 diabetic subjects and seven age- and BMI-matched healthy control subjects. Comprehensive measures of glucose turnover and insulin sensitivity were performed during euglycemic pancreatic clamp studies following diazoxide and placebo administration. Complementary rodent clamp studies were performed in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. In type 2 diabetic subjects, extrapancreatic KATP channel activation with diazoxide under fixed hormonal conditions failed to suppress EGP, whereas matched control subjects demonstrated a 27% reduction in EGP (P = 0.002) with diazoxide. Diazoxide also failed to suppress EGP in diabetic rats. These results suggest that suppression of EGP by central KATP channel activation may be lost in type 2 diabetes. Restoration of central regulation of glucose metabolism could be a promising therapeutic target to reduce hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. PMID:27207526

  18. Relationship between blood pressure reverse dipping and type 2 diabetes in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lu; Yan, Bin; Gao, Ya; Su, Dan; Peng, Liyuan; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Yuhuan; Han, Donggang; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that nocturnal variations of blood pressure (BP) were closely related to type 2 diabetes. However, little information has been revealed about the relationship between reverse-dipper pattern of BP and type 2 diabetes. In this cross-sectional study, BP variations of 531 hypertensive patients were evaluated with ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Diagnosis of diabetes in Chinese adults was made according to diabetes diagnostic criteria of 2015. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between type 2 diabetes and ABPM results. In the study, patients with reverse-dipper pattern (32.3%) had the highest prevalence of type 2 diabetes compared with dippers (21.4%) and nondippers (23.3%). After multivariate logistic regression, reverse-dipper BP pattern (OR 2.067, P = 0.024) and nondipper BP pattern (OR 1.637, P = 0.039) were found to be correlated with type 2 diabetes compared with dipper pattern. The results of our study also suggested that type 2 diabetes might contribute to the reverse-dipper pattern of BP (OR 1.691, P = 0.023). In addition, fasting glucose was negatively correlated with the decline rate of nocturnal SBP (r = -0.095, P = 0.029). Reverse-dipper pattern of BP in ABPM may be independently associated with type 2 diabetes in patients with hypertension. PMID:27109832

  19. Risk Factors Contributing to Type 2 Diabetes and Recent Advances in the Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanling; Ding, Yanping; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a serious and common chronic disease resulting from a complex inheritance-environment interaction along with other risk factors such as obesity and sedentary lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes and its complications constitute a major worldwide public health problem, affecting almost all populations in both developed and developing countries with high rates of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has been increasing exponentially, and a high prevalence rate has been observed in developing countries and in populations undergoing “westernization” or modernization. Multiple risk factors of diabetes, delayed diagnosis until micro- and macro-vascular complications arise, life-threatening complications, failure of the current therapies, and financial costs for the treatment of this disease, make it necessary to develop new efficient therapy strategies and appropriate prevention measures for the control of type 2 diabetes. Herein, we summarize our current understanding about the epidemiology of type 2 diabetes, the roles of genes, lifestyle and other factors contributing to rapid increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes. The core aims are to bring forward the new therapy strategies and cost-effective intervention trials of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25249787

  20. Risk factors contributing to type 2 diabetes and recent advances in the treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanling; Ding, Yanping; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a serious and common chronic disease resulting from a complex inheritance-environment interaction along with other risk factors such as obesity and sedentary lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes and its complications constitute a major worldwide public health problem, affecting almost all populations in both developed and developing countries with high rates of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has been increasing exponentially, and a high prevalence rate has been observed in developing countries and in populations undergoing "westernization" or modernization. Multiple risk factors of diabetes, delayed diagnosis until micro- and macro-vascular complications arise, life-threatening complications, failure of the current therapies, and financial costs for the treatment of this disease, make it necessary to develop new efficient therapy strategies and appropriate prevention measures for the control of type 2 diabetes. Herein, we summarize our current understanding about the epidemiology of type 2 diabetes, the roles of genes, lifestyle and other factors contributing to rapid increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes. The core aims are to bring forward the new therapy strategies and cost-effective intervention trials of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25249787

  1. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Allele Loci in the Qatari Population

    PubMed Central

    Abi Khalil, Charbel; Fakhro, Khalid A.; Robay, Amal; Ramstetter, Monica D.; Al-Azwani, Iman K.; Malek, Joel A.; Zirie, Mahmoud; Jayyousi, Amin; Badii, Ramin; Al-Nabet Al-Marri, Ajayeb; Chiuchiolo, Maria J.; Al-Shakaki, Alya; Chidiac, Omar; Gharbiah, Maey; Bener, Abdulbari; Stadler, Dora; Hackett, Neil R.; Mezey, Jason G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing in the Middle East. However, the genetic risk factors for T2D in the Middle Eastern populations are not known, as the majority of studies of genetic risk for T2D are in Europeans and Asians. Methods All subjects were ≥3 generation Qataris. Cases with T2D (n = 1,124) and controls (n = 590) were randomly recruited and assigned to the 3 known Qatari genetic subpopulations [Bedouin (Q1), Persian/South Asian (Q2) and African (Q3)]. Subjects underwent genotyping for 37 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 29 genes known to be associated with T2D in Europeans and/or Asian populations, and an additional 27 tag SNPs related to these susceptibility loci. Pre-study power analysis suggested that with the known incidence of T2D in adult Qataris (22%), the study population size would be sufficient to detect significant differences if the SNPs were risk factors among Qataris, assuming that the odds ratio (OR) for T2D SNPs in Qatari’s is greater than or equal to the SNP with highest known OR in other populations. Results Haplotype analysis demonstrated that Qatari haplotypes in the region of known T2D risk alleles in Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations were similar to European haplotypes. After Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment for multiple testing, only two SNPs (rs7903146 and rs4506565), both associated with transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2), achieved statistical significance in the whole study population. When T2D subjects and control subjects were assigned to the known 3 Qatari subpopulations, and analyzed individually and with the Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations combined, one of these SNPs (rs4506565) was also significant in the admixed group. No other SNPs associated with T2D in all Qataris or individual genetic subpopulations. Conclusions With the caveats of the power analysis, the European/Asian T2D SNPs do not contribute significantly to the high prevalence of T2D in the Qatari population, suggesting

  2. Behavioral economics survey of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Emoto, Naoya; Okajima, Fumitaka; Sugihara, Hitoshi; Goto, Rei

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to treatment and the metabolic control of diabetes are challenging in many patients with diabetes. The theory of neuroeconomics can provide important clues for understanding unreasonable human behavior concerning decisions between outcomes occurring at different time points. Objective We investigated patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes to determine whether patients who are at a risk of developing complications are less risk averse. We also examined whether patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different behavioral traits in decision making under risk. Methods We conducted a behavioral economics survey of 219 outpatients, 66 with type 1 diabetes and 153 with type 2 diabetes. All patients had been referred by general practitioners or other departments in the hospital. At the time of the survey, levels of hemoglobin A1c were not significantly different between patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Results Patients with type 2 diabetes showed a lower response rate to the survey compared with patients with type 1 diabetes (71.9% vs 87.9%, P<0.01). Logistic regression analysis indicated that diabetic retinopathy was negatively associated with risk averse in pricing of hypothetical lotteries, myopic time preference, willingness to pay for preventive medicine, and levels of satisfaction with life. Diabetic nephropathy was also negatively associated with risk averse in pricing of hypothetical lotteries. Detailed analysis revealed that a lower proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes (22.7%) were categorized as risk averse compared with patients with type 1 diabetes (43.1%, P<0.05) in hypothetical lottery risk estimation. Conclusion This is the first report that investigated patients with diabetes in a clinical setting using a method based on behavioral economics. The results suggest that the attitude of patients toward risk plays an important role in the progress of the complications of diabetes. Different educational and

  3. Liver Fat Content in Type 2 Diabetes: Relationship With Hepatic Perfusion and Substrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rijzewijk, Luuk J.; van der Meer, Rutger W.; Lubberink, Mark; Lamb, Hildo J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; de Roos, Albert; Twisk, Jos W.; Heine, Robert J.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Smit, Johannes W.A.; Diamant, Michaela

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hepatic steatosis is common in type 2 diabetes. It is causally linked to the features of the metabolic syndrome, liver cirrhosis, and cardiovascular disease. Experimental data have indicated that increased liver fat may impair hepatic perfusion and metabolism. The aim of the current study was to assess hepatic parenchymal perfusion, together with glucose and fatty acid metabolism, in relation to hepatic triglyceride content. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fifty-nine men with well controlled type 2 diabetes and 18 age-matched healthy normoglycemic men were studied using positron emission tomography to assess hepatic tissue perfusion, insulin-stimulated glucose, and fasting fatty acid metabolism, respectively, in relation to hepatic triglyceride content, quantified by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Patients were divided into two groups with hepatic triglyceride content below (type 2 diabetes-low) or above (type 2 diabetes-high) the median of 8.6%. RESULTS Type 2 diabetes-high patients had the highest BMI and A1C and lowest whole-body insulin sensitivity (ANOVA, all P < 0.001). Compared with control subjects and type 2 diabetes-low patients, type 2 diabetes-high patients had the lowest hepatic parenchymal perfusion (P = 0.004) and insulin-stimulated hepatic glucose uptake (P = 0.013). The observed decrease in hepatic fatty acid influx rate constant, however, only reached borderline significance (P = 0.088). In type 2 diabetic patients, hepatic parenchymal perfusion (r = −0.360, P = 0.007) and hepatic fatty acid influx rate constant (r = −0.407, P = 0.007) correlated inversely with hepatic triglyceride content. In a pooled analysis, hepatic fat correlated with hepatic glucose uptake (r = −0.329, P = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS In conclusion, type 2 diabetic patients with increased hepatic triglyceride content showed decreased hepatic parenchymal perfusion and hepatic insulin mediated glucose uptake, suggesting a potential modulating effect of hepatic fat

  4. Parental History of Type 2 Diabetes in Patients with Nonaffective Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Miller, Brian; Bernardo, Miguel; Donner, Thomas; Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We attempted to replicate two previous studies which found an increased risk of diabetes in the relatives of schizophrenia probands. Methods N=34 patients with newly-diagnosed nonaffective psychosis and N=52 non-psychiatric controls were interviewed for parental history of Type 2 diabetes. Results In a logistic regression model that included multiple potential confounders, psychosis was a significant predictor of Type 2 diabetes in either parent (p<0.04). Discussion We found an increased prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in the parents of nonaffective psychosis subjects. This association may be due to shared environmental or genetic risk factors, or both. PMID:18031995

  5. [Novel therapeutic options in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Laubner, Katharina; Seufert, Jochen

    2016-06-01

    SGLT2 inhibitors represent a novel therapeutic approach for the tretment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Beyond glucose control, these drugs also induce weight loss and blod pressure reduction. In a specific cardiovascular outcome trial (EMPA-REG-OUTCOME), the SGLT 2 inhibitor empagliflozin has for the first time demonstrated to reduce cardiovascular and overall mortality as well as hospitalization for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. These results will drastically affect future recommendations for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.). PMID:27176455

  6. [The German Program for Disease Management Guidelines Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetic Foot Guideline 2006. Short review].

    PubMed

    Ollenschläger, Günter; Kopp, Ina; Thole, Henning; Lelgemann, Monika

    2007-03-15

    In Germany, the first national consensus between 14 medical scientific associations on evidence-based recommendations for prevention and therapy of foot problems in type 2 diabetes was reached in fall 2006. The recommendations' main sources are the NICE Guideline 2003 on foot problems in type 2 diabetes, as well as existing German guidelines and reviews of recent scientific evidence. The article gives an overview on authors, sources, and key recommendations of the German National Disease Management Guideline Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetic Foot 2006 (www.diabetes.versorgungsleitlinien.de). PMID:17345021

  7. Turning the tide: type 2 diabetes trends in offspring of mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, Lois

    2005-01-01

    In this review, the thesis is presented that maternal hyperglycemia produces an overnourished, fat fetus. If the fetus has a predisposition for type 2 diabetes, then the fat deposition in the fetus is predominantly in the fetal visceral cavity. Visceral fat deposition is the origin of insulin resistance. The fat fetus begins life with its pancreatic output of insulin compromised. Thus, the stage is set for developing type 2 diabetes in its lifetime. This review supports the hypothesis that normalization of maternal nutrition and fucose will decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes. PMID:18370792

  8. Differences in emotional distress among inpatients with type 1, obese type 2, and non-obese type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Yoshiko; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Okauchi, Yukiyoshi; Sudo, Yoshiko; Fujiwara, Yuko; Omote, Yayoko; Imagawa, Akihisa; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in emotional distress among three groups of inpatients with type 1, obese type 2, and non-obese type 2 diabetes during hospitalization. Methods The 42 participating inpatients were divided into three groups: type 1 diabetes (n=11), obese type 2 diabetes [body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m(2); n=24], and non-obese type 2 diabetes (BMI <25 kg/m(2); n=7). The Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale, which is a self-administered questionnaire to assess emotional distress in the patients with diabetes, was performed at admission and discharge. Results The total PAID score was similar and tended to improve during hospitalization in all three groups, although there were differences among the groups in the scores of particular questions. At admission, the score of the question "worrying about low blood sugar reactions?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with type 1 diabetes. At discharge, the score of "not accepting diabetes?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with non-obese type 2 diabetes, while that of "feeling unsatisfied with your diabetes physician?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with obese type 2 diabetes. The score of "feelings of deprivation regarding food and meals?" significantly worsened in the patients with obese type 2 diabetes during hospitalization compared with the patients in with non-obese type 2 diabetes. Conclusion The characteristics of emotional distress during hospitalization varied among the patients with the three types of diabetes, thus emphasizing the importance of tailoring support according to the type of diabetes. PMID:26466689

  9. Improving self-management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is an increasingly common life-long condition, which has significant physical, psychological and behavioural implications for individuals. Self-management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes can be complex and challenging. A collaborative approach to care, between healthcare professionals and patients, is essential to promote self-management skills and knowledge to help patients engage in shared decision making and manage any difficulties associated with a diagnosis of diabetes. PMID:26938421

  10. The Effect of Perceived Stress and Family Functioning on People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Bhagyashree; Rao, Satheesh; T.S., Sanal

    2013-01-01

    Background: Various studies have suggested that support from a patient’s family can facilitate his/her recovery from a physical illness and improve the ability of the patient to deal with consequences of Type 2 Diabetes. Stress is considered to play a major role in influencing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Aim: To determine the roles of Perceived Stress and Family functioning on behaviours of individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Material and Methods: The present study included 250 Diabetics as per the WHO criteria and 250 Non-Diabetics. Questionnaires were given to them to obtain data. Results: Stress was found to be high among Diabetics (22.17%) as compared to that in non-Diabetics (16.92%). Family assessment showed a significant difference among its subscales when it was compared between Diabetics and Non-Diabetics. Conclusion: Perceived stress influences Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Role played by the Family is significant in managing Diabetes. PMID:24551677

  11. Type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery and the risk of subsequent gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Steven, S; Woodcock, S; Small, P K; Taylor, R

    2011-01-01

    Women with pre-existing abnormal glucose regulation are certain to develop gestational diabetes in pregnancy and pre-gestational type 2 diabetes will become more difficult to control. However, an increasing number of women with type 2 diabetes have had bariatric surgery. In this group, the effect of pregnancy on glucose metabolism is unknown. We report two women with type 2 diabetes who underwent laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery with normalization of plasma glucose levels. During subsequent pregnancy, maternal blood glucose levels remained completely normal throughout. This is remarkable given the predisposition to abnormal glucose tolerance and the ongoing obesity, in the face of the insulin resistance of pregnancy. Women with prior type 2 diabetes reversed by gastric bypass surgery are not at high risk for gestational diabetes.

  12. Small Steps, Big Rewards: Your Game Plan to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to be called adult-onset diabetes. At one time, type 2 diabetes was more common in people over age 45. But now more young people, even children, have the disease because many are overweight or ...

  13. Bariatric Surgery: A Potential Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes in Youth.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amy S; D'Alessio, David; Ford-Adams, Martha E; Desai, Ashish P; Inge, Thomas H

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes, once referred to as "adult-onset" diabetes, has now emerged as a formidable threat to the health of obese adolescents. Although there is growing evidence regarding the epidemiology of type 2 diabetes in youth and its multisystem health consequences, treatment options have lagged and progression of disease occurs even with aggressive medical therapy. Increasing interest in the application of bariatric surgery for adolescents with type 2 diabetes has evolved in part because of the evidence demonstrating improvement or remission in many adults with diabetes after surgery. Here, we review the burden of type 2 diabetes in youth including its associated complications, discuss the outcomes and complications of bariatric surgery in adolescents with diabetes, and conclude with recommendations for future research and options for refinement of the use of bariatric surgery in this patient population. PMID:27222551

  14. Widely Used Type 2 Diabetes Drug May Reduce Cancer Death Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Used Type 2 Diabetes Drug May Reduce Cancer Death Risk Older women taking metformin saw a boost ... a risk factor for cancer and cancer-related death, and metformin therapy, compared to other diabetes medications, ...

  15. High Prevalence of Arcobacter Carriage in Older Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fera, Maria Teresa; Russo, Giuseppina T.; Di Benedetto, Antonino; La Camera, Erminia; Orlando, Angelo; Giandalia, Annalisa; Ruffa, Vincenzo F.; Lanza, Giulia; Lentini, Valeria; Perdichizzi, Giuseppa; Cucinotta, Domenico

    2010-01-01

    Arcobacters are potential pathogens related to diarrheic infections and, rarely, septicaemia. This study evaluated the prevalence of arcobacters in stool samples of subjects with (n = 38) and without (n = 61) type 2 diabetes by using cultural and molecular techniques. Three Arcobacter positive cultures were found, all among diabetic subjects, whereas molecular analysis showed a carriage rate of 79% and 26.2% in subjects with and without type 2 diabetes (P < .001), respectively. The multivariate analysis showed that type 2 diabetes (β = 1.913; 95%CI: 2.378–19.285; P < .0001) and age (β = 1.744; 95%CI: 2.077–15.766; P = .001) were the only factors independently associated with arcobacters colonization in this population. Our study demonstrated a high prevalence of arcobacters colonization in type 2 diabetic and older subjects. The clinical significance and the potential health risk associated with these emerging species remain to be determined. PMID:20508853

  16. Weight-Loss Surgery May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes in Long Run

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_158126.html Weight-Loss Surgery May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes in Long Run After 5 ... States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 70,000 people die ...

  17. Optimizing the treatment of type 2 diabetes using current and future insulin technologies.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Mary E

    2008-12-01

    Good glycemic control is crucial to improving outcomes in both surgical and non-surgical patients with type 2 diabetes. New developments in insulin treatment and delivery devices can help to achieve and maintain blood glucose targets. PMID:19248402

  18. Aqueous extract of Ficus religiosa linn. reduces oxidative stress in experimentally induced type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kirana, H; Agrawal, S S; Srinivasan, B P

    2009-10-01

    One of the major etiologies in pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes especially complications is oxidative stress. Aqueous extract of Ficus religiosa at a dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg orally decreased the fasting blood glucose in streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetic rats. The drug had enzyme induction effect with respect to catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, however decreased the exaggerated activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in type 2 diabetic rats. F. religiosa modulated the enzymes of antioxidant defence system to combat oxidative stress. As a result, glutathione (GSH-reduced form) was restored and inhibited the formation of malondialdehyde. Drug at higher dose (200 mg/kg) had more pronounced effect. F. religiosa, a rasayana group of plant drug having anti-diabetic activity along with antioxidant potential was beneficial in treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:20112810

  19. Intensive Blood Sugar Control May Be Too Much for Some with Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159225.html Intensive Blood Sugar Control May Be Too Much for Some With ... 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive treatment of blood sugar levels in some people with type 2 diabetes ...

  20. Pancreatic islet enhancer clusters enriched in type 2 diabetes risk-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Lorenzo; Gaulton, Kyle J; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Mularoni, Loris; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Akerman, Ildem; Tena, Juan J; Morán, Ignasi; Gómez-Marín, Carlos; van de Bunt, Martijn; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Castro, Natalia; Nammo, Takao; Cebola, Inês; García-Hurtado, Javier; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Pattou, François; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Berney, Thierry; Gloyn, Anna L; Ravassard, Philippe; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Müller, Ferenc; McCarthy, Mark I; Ferrer, Jorge

    2014-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes affects over 300 million people, causing severe complications and premature death, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Pancreatic islet dysfunction is central in type 2 diabetes pathogenesis, and understanding islet genome regulation could therefore provide valuable mechanistic insights. We have now mapped and examined the function of human islet cis-regulatory networks. We identify genomic sequences that are targeted by islet transcription factors to drive islet-specific gene activity and show that most such sequences reside in clusters of enhancers that form physical three-dimensional chromatin domains. We find that sequence variants associated with type 2 diabetes and fasting glycemia are enriched in these clustered islet enhancers and identify trait-associated variants that disrupt DNA binding and islet enhancer activity. Our studies illustrate how islet transcription factors interact functionally with the epigenome and provide systematic evidence that the dysregulation of islet enhancers is relevant to the mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes. PMID:24413736

  1. Pancreatic islet enhancer clusters enriched in type 2 diabetes risk–associated variants

    PubMed Central

    Mularoni, Loris; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Akerman, İldem; Tena, Juan J.; Morán, Ignasi; Gómez-Marín, Carlos; van de Bunt, Martijn; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Castro, Natalia; Nammo, Takao; Cebola, Inês; García-Hurtado, Javier; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Pattou, François; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Berney, Thierry; Gloyn, Anna L.; Ravassard, Philippe; Skarmeta, José Luis Gómez; Müller, Ferenc; McCarthy, Mark I.; Ferrer, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes affects over 300 million people, causing severe complications and premature death, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Pancreatic islet dysfunction is central for type 2 diabetes pathogenesis, and therefore understanding islet genome regulation could provide valuable mechanistic insights. We have now mapped and examined the function of human islet cis-regulatory networks. We identify genomic sequences that are targeted by islet transcription factors to drive islet-specific gene activity, and show that most such sequences reside in clusters of enhancers that form physical 3D chromatin domains. We find that sequence variants associated with type 2 diabetes and fasting glycemia are enriched in these clustered islet enhancers, and identify trait-associated variants that disrupt DNA-binding and islet enhancer activity. Our studies illustrate how islet transcription factors interact functionally with the epigenome, and provide systematic evidence that dysregulation of islet enhancers is relevant to the mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes. PMID:24413736

  2. Vascular effects of ultrafine particles in persons with type 2 diabetes

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes confers an increased risk for cardiovascular effects of airborne particles. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that inhalation of elemental carbon ultrafine particles (UFP) would activate blood platelets and vascular endothelium in people with type 2 diabetes. ...

  3. Capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension and the effect of antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Fegan, P Gerard; Tooke, John E; Gooding, Kim M; Tullett, Jayne M; MacLeod, Kenneth M; Shore, Angela C

    2003-05-01

    Raised capillary pressure has been implicated in the formation of diabetic microangiopathy in type I diabetes, in which it is elevated in those with the earliest signs of diabetic kidney disease but remains normal in those without complications. In subjects with type 2 diabetes without complications, capillary pressure is normal, although alterations in the pressure waveforms suggested enhanced wave reflections. The nature of skin capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension remains to be elucidated, as does the effect of blood pressure-lowering therapy on capillary pressure in these subjects. Three studies were performed in well-matched groups. First, capillary pressure was elevated in hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with normotensive subjects with type 2 diabetes (20.2 [17.4 to 22.7] mm Hg versus 17.7 [16.1 to 18.9] mm Hg, respectively, P<0.03, Mann-Whitney U test). Second, no significant difference was detected between hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertensive subjects without type 2 diabetes (19.4 [15.8 to 21.3] mm Hg versus 17.2 [15.1 to 19.8] mm Hg, respectively, P=0.5, Mann-Whitney U test). Finally, patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited to a case-control study. Seven subjects received blood pressure-lowering therapy and 8 did not. Therapy reduced capillary pressure from 18.2 [15.8 to 20.1] mm Hg to 15.9 [15.4 to 17.0] mm Hg (P=0.024 ANOVA), in contrast to the lack of effect of time alone. Mean arterial pressure was reduced from 110 [102 to 115] mm Hg to 105 [101 to 111] mm Hg (P=0.006, ANOVA). These findings provide a plausible mechanism by which reducing arterial hypertension may reduce the risk of microangiopathy in type 2 diabetes. PMID:12695416

  4. A case of hypothyroidism and type 2 diabetes associated with type V hyperlipoproteinemia and eruptive xanthomas.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Rang; Jung, Tae Sik; Jung, Jung Hwa; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Kim, Me Ae; Park, Ki-Jong; Kim, Deok Ryong; Chang, Se-Ho; Chung, Soon Il; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

    2005-06-01

    Primary hypothyroidism and type 2 diabetes are both typically associated with the increased level of triglycerides. To date, there have been only a few case reports of type 2 diabetes patients with both type V hyperlipoproteinemia and eruptive xanthomas, but there have been no reports of hypothyroidism patients associated with eruptive xanthomas. We report here on a case of a 48-yr old female patient who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and primary hypothyroidism associated with both type V hyperlipoproteinemia and eruptive xanthomas. We found rouleaux formation of RBCs in peripheral blood smear, elevated TSH, and low free T4 level, and dyslipidemia (total cholesterol 18.1 mM/L, triglyceride 61.64 mM/L, HDL 3.0 mM/L, and LDL 2.54 mM/L). She has taken fenofibrate, levothyroxine, and oral hypoglycemic agent for 4 months. After treatment, both TSH level and lipid concentration returned to normal range, and her yellowish skin nodules have also disappeared. PMID:15953878

  5. Disordered Control of Intestinal Sweet Taste Receptor Expression and Glucose Absorption in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Young, Richard L.; Chia, Bridgette; Isaacs, Nicole J.; Ma, Jing; Khoo, Joan; Wu, Tongzhi; Horowitz, Michael; Rayner, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    We previously established that the intestinal sweet taste receptors (STRs), T1R2 and T1R3, were expressed in distinct epithelial cells in the human proximal intestine and that their transcript levels varied with glycemic status in patients with type 2 diabetes. Here we determined whether STR expression was 1) acutely regulated by changes in luminal and systemic glucose levels, 2) disordered in type 2 diabetes, and 3) linked to glucose absorption. Fourteen healthy subjects and 13 patients with type 2 diabetes were studied twice, at euglycemia (5.2 ± 0.2 mmol/L) or hyperglycemia (12.3 ± 0.2 mmol/L). Endoscopic biopsy specimens were collected from the duodenum at baseline and after a 30-min intraduodenal glucose infusion of 30 g/150 mL water plus 3 g 3-O-methylglucose (3-OMG). STR transcripts were quantified by RT-PCR, and plasma was assayed for 3-OMG concentration. Intestinal STR transcript levels at baseline were unaffected by acute variations in glycemia in healthy subjects and in type 2 diabetic patients. T1R2 transcript levels increased after luminal glucose infusion in both groups during euglycemia (+5.8 × 104 and +5.8 × 104 copies, respectively) but decreased in healthy subjects during hyperglycemia (−1.4 × 104 copies). T1R2 levels increased significantly in type 2 diabetic patients under the same conditions (+6.9 × 105 copies). Plasma 3-OMG concentrations were significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients than in healthy control subjects during acute hyperglycemia. Intestinal T1R2 expression is reciprocally regulated by luminal glucose in health according to glycemic status but is disordered in type 2 diabetes during acute hyperglycemia. This defect may enhance glucose absorption in type 2 diabetic patients and exacerbate postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:23761104

  6. Sleep duration does not mediate or modify association of common genetic variants with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tare, Archana; Lane, Jacqueline M.; Cade, Brian E.; Grant, Struan F. A.; Chen, Ting-hsu; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Lauderdale, Diane S.; Zee, Phyllis C.; Gharib, Sina A.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.; Redline, Susan; Saxena, Richa

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Short and long sleep duration are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to investigate whether genetic variants for fasting glucose or type 2 diabetes associate with short or long sleep duration and whether sleep duration modifies the association of genetic variants with these traits. Methods We examined the cross-sectional relationship between self-reported habitual sleep duration and prevalence of type 2 diabetes in individuals of European descent participating in five studies included in the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe), totalling 1,474 cases and 8,323 controls. We tested for association of 16 fasting glucose-associated variants, 27 type 2 diabetes-associated variants and aggregate genetic risk scores with continuous and dichotomised (≤5 h or ≥9 h) sleep duration using regression models adjusted for age, sex and BMI. Finally, we tested whether a gene × behaviour interaction of variants with sleep duration had an impact on fasting glucose or type 2 diabetes risk. Results Short sleep duration was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes in CARe (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.08, 1.61; p = 0.008). Variants previously associated with fasting glucose or type 2 diabetes and genetic risk scores were not associated with sleep duration. Furthermore, no study-wide significant interaction was observed between sleep duration and these variants on glycaemic traits. Nominal interactions were observed for sleep duration and PPARG rs1801282, CRY2 rs7943320 and HNF1B rs4430796 in influencing risk of type 2 diabetes (p < 0.05). Conclusions/interpretation Our findings suggest that differences in habitual sleep duration do not mediate or modify the relationship between common variants underlying glycaemic traits (including in circadian rhythm genes) and diabetes. PMID:24280871

  7. Knowledge about type 2 diabetes risk and prevention of African-American and Hispanic adults and adolescents with family history of type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to assess type 2 diabetes knowledge, perceptions, risk factor awareness, and prevention practices among African-American and Hispanic families with a history of diabetes. Ninth and tenth grade Houston area students who had a parent who spoke English or Spanish and had a...

  8. Type 2 diabetes, but not obesity, prevalence is positively associated with ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, John R.; Heidari-Bakavoli, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure stimulates energy expenditure and glucose disposal. If these factors play a significant role in whole body energy balance, and glucose homeostasis, it is predicted that both obesity and type 2 diabetes prevalence would be lower where it is colder. Previous studies have noted connections between ambient temperature and obesity, but the direction of the effect is confused. No previous studies have explored the link of type 2 diabetes to ambient temperature. We used county level data for obesity and diabetes prevalence across the mainland USA and matched this to county level ambient temperature data. Average ambient temperature explained 5.7% of the spatial variation in obesity and 29.6% of the spatial variation in type 2 diabetes prevalence. Correcting the type 2 diabetes data for the effect of obesity reduced the explained variation to 26.8%. Even when correcting for obesity, poverty and race, ambient temperature explained 12.4% of the variation in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and this significant effect remained when latitude was entered into the model as a predictor. When obesity prevalence was corrected for poverty and race the significant effect of temperature disappeared. Enhancing energy expenditure by cold exposure will likely not impact obesity significantly, but may be useful to combat type 2 diabetes. PMID:27477955

  9. Morphometric Changes in Lateral Ventricles of Patients with Recent-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Perry F.; Kim, Tae-Suk; Jung, Jiyoung J.; Choi, Yera; Kim, Binna N.; Jacobson, Alan M.; Lyoo, In Kyoon

    2013-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that type 2 diabetes mellitus can have effects on global and regional brain morphology. Ventricular enlargement reflecting cerebral atrophy has been reported particularly in elderly type 2 diabetes patients. However, little is known about its timing through the disease course and morphological variability. Using the combined volumetric and advanced three-dimensional morphological approach, we identified differences in size and shape of the lateral ventricles between recent-onset type 2 diabetes patients and healthy individuals. High-resolution T1-weighted images were obtained from 23 type 2 diabetes patients whose illness duration was less than 1 year and 23 carefully matched healthy individuals. By volume measurement, we found enlarged lateral and third ventricles in type 2 diabetes patients, relative to healthy individuals (F1,41 = 7.96, P = 0.007; F1,41 = 11.16, P = 0.002, respectively). Morphological analysis revealed that the expansion of lateral ventricles in the diabetic brain was prominent in the bilateral frontal horns. The current findings suggest that atrophic changes particularly of the anterior frontal lobe can occur as early as the first year after the clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:23593231

  10. Beta amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau deposits in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Miklossy, J.; Miller, L.; Qing, H.; Radenovic, A.; Kis, A.; Vileno, B.; Laszlo, F.; Martins, R.N.; Waeber, G.; Mooser, V.; Bosman, F.; Khalili, K.; Darbinian, N.; McGeer, P.L.

    2008-08-25

    Strong epidemiologic evidence suggests an association between Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes. To determine if amyloid beta (A{beta}) and hyperphosphorylated tau occurs in type 2 diabetes, pancreas tissues from 21 autopsy cases (10 type 2 diabetes and 11 controls) were analyzed. APP and tau mRNAs were identified in human pancreas and in cultured insulinoma beta cells (INS-1) by RT-PCR. Prominent APP and tau bands were detected by Western blotting in pancreatic extracts. Aggregated A{beta}, hyperphosphorylated tau, ubiquitin, apolipoprotein E, apolipoprotein(a), IB1/JIP-1 and JNK1 were detected in Langerhans islets in type 2 diabetic patients. A{beta} was co-localized with amylin in islet amyloid deposits. In situ beta sheet formation of islet amyloid deposits was shown by infrared microspectroscopy (SIRMS). LPS increased APP in non-neuronal cells as well. We conclude that A{beta} deposits and hyperphosphorylated tau are also associated with type 2 diabetes, highlighting common pathogenetic features in neurodegenerative disorders, including AD and type 2 diabetes and suggesting that A{beta} deposits and hyperphosphorylated tau may also occur in other organs than the brain.

  11. Gut microorganisms as promising targets for the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Delzenne, Nathalie M; Cani, Patrice D; Everard, Amandine; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Bindels, Laure B

    2015-10-01

    Each human intestine harbours not only hundreds of trillions of bacteria but also bacteriophage particles, viruses, fungi and archaea, which constitute a complex and dynamic ecosystem referred to as the gut microbiota. An increasing number of data obtained during the last 10 years have indicated changes in gut bacterial composition or function in type 2 diabetic patients. Analysis of this 'dysbiosis' enables the detection of alterations in specific bacteria, clusters of bacteria or bacterial functions associated with the occurrence or evolution of type 2 diabetes; these bacteria are predominantly involved in the control of inflammation and energy homeostasis. Our review focuses on two key questions: does gut dysbiosis truly play a role in the occurrence of type 2 diabetes, and will recent discoveries linking the gut microbiota to host health be helpful for the development of novel therapeutic approaches for type 2 diabetes? Here we review how pharmacological, surgical and nutritional interventions for type 2 diabetic patients may impact the gut microbiota. Experimental studies in animals are identifying which bacterial metabolites and components act on host immune homeostasis and glucose metabolism, primarily by targeting intestinal cells involved in endocrine and gut barrier functions. We discuss novel approaches (e.g. probiotics, prebiotics and faecal transfer) and the need for research and adequate intervention studies to evaluate the feasibility and relevance of these new therapies for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26224102

  12. Standardization of Type 2 Diabetes Outpatient Expenditure with Bundled Payment Method in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guo-Chao; Luo, Yun; Li, Qian; Wu, Meng-Fan; Zhou, Zi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent years, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes among Chinese population has been increasing by years, directly leading to an average annual growth rate of 19.90% of medical expenditure. Therefore, it is urgent to work on strategies to control the growth of medical expenditure on type 2 diabetes on the basis of the reality of China. Therefore, in this study, we explored the feasibility of implementing bundled payment in China through analyzing bundled payment standards of type 2 diabetes outpatient services. Methods: This study analyzed the outpatient expenditure on type 2 diabetes with Beijing Urban Employee's Basic Medical Insurance from 2010 to 2012. Based on the analysis of outpatient expenditure and its influential factors, we adopted decision tree approach to conduct a case-mix analysis. In the end, we built a case-mix model to calculate the standard expenditure and the upper limit of each combination. Results: We found that age, job status, and whether with complication were significant factors that influence outpatient expenditure for type 2 diabetes. Through the analysis of the decision tree, we used six variables (complication, age, diabetic foot, diabetic nephropathy, cardiac-cerebrovascular disease, and neuropathy) to group the cases, and obtained 11 case-mix groups. Conclusions: We argued that it is feasible to implement bundled payment on type 2 diabetes outpatient services. Bundled payment is effective to control the increase of outpatient expenditure. Further improvements are needed for the implementation of bundled payment reimbursement standards, together with relevant policies and measures. PMID:27064041

  13. Type 2 diabetes, but not obesity, prevalence is positively associated with ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R; Heidari-Bakavoli, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure stimulates energy expenditure and glucose disposal. If these factors play a significant role in whole body energy balance, and glucose homeostasis, it is predicted that both obesity and type 2 diabetes prevalence would be lower where it is colder. Previous studies have noted connections between ambient temperature and obesity, but the direction of the effect is confused. No previous studies have explored the link of type 2 diabetes to ambient temperature. We used county level data for obesity and diabetes prevalence across the mainland USA and matched this to county level ambient temperature data. Average ambient temperature explained 5.7% of the spatial variation in obesity and 29.6% of the spatial variation in type 2 diabetes prevalence. Correcting the type 2 diabetes data for the effect of obesity reduced the explained variation to 26.8%. Even when correcting for obesity, poverty and race, ambient temperature explained 12.4% of the variation in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and this significant effect remained when latitude was entered into the model as a predictor. When obesity prevalence was corrected for poverty and race the significant effect of temperature disappeared. Enhancing energy expenditure by cold exposure will likely not impact obesity significantly, but may be useful to combat type 2 diabetes. PMID:27477955

  14. Brain Activation during Memory Encoding in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Discordant Twin Pair Study.

    PubMed

    Wood, Amanda G; Chen, Jian; Moran, Christopher; Phan, Thanh; Beare, Richard; Cooper, Kimberley; Litras, Stacey; Srikanth, Velandai

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus increases the risk of dementia and neuronal dysfunction may occur years before perceptible cognitive decline. We aimed to study the impact of type 2 diabetes on brain activation during memory encoding in middle-aged people, controlling for age, sex, genes, and early-shared environment. Twenty-two twin pairs discordant for type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean age 60.9 years) without neurological disease were recruited from the Australian Twin Registry (ATR) and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a memory encoding task, cognitive tests, and structural MRI. Type 2 diabetes was associated with significantly reduced activation in left hemisphere temporoparietal regions including angular gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and middle temporal gyrus and significantly increased activation in bilateral posteriorly distributed regions. These findings were present in the absence of within-pair differences in standard cognitive test scores, brain volumes, or vascular lesion load. Differences in activation were more pronounced among monozygotic (MZ) pairs, with MZ individuals with diabetes also displaying greater frontal activation. These results provide evidence for preclinical memory-related neuronal dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. They support the search for modifiable later-life environmental factors or epigenetic mechanisms linking type 2 diabetes and cognitive decline. PMID:27314047

  15. Vildagliptin: a review of its use in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2014-04-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin (Galvus®) is approved for use as monotherapy and combination therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus. A fixed-dose combination of vildagliptin/metformin (Eucreas®) is also available. This article reviews the clinical efficacy and tolerability of vildagliptin in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, as well as summarizing its pharmacological properties. Results of randomized controlled trials demonstrated that oral vildagliptin improved glycaemic control when administered as monotherapy, as dual therapy in combination with metformin, a sulfonylurea or a thiazolidinedione, as triple therapy in combination with metformin plus a sulfonylurea, and in combination with insulin with or without metformin. Improvements in glycaemic control were also seen with vildagliptin in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes and in patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate or severe renal impairment. Vildagliptin was generally well tolerated in patients with type 2 diabetes, was weight neutral and was associated with a low risk of hypoglycaemia, reflecting its glucose-dependent mechanism of action. Thus, oral vildagliptin is a useful option as monotherapy or as add-on therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24638989

  16. Brain Activation during Memory Encoding in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Discordant Twin Pair Study

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Amanda G.; Chen, Jian; Moran, Christopher; Phan, Thanh; Beare, Richard; Cooper, Kimberley; Litras, Stacey; Srikanth, Velandai

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus increases the risk of dementia and neuronal dysfunction may occur years before perceptible cognitive decline. We aimed to study the impact of type 2 diabetes on brain activation during memory encoding in middle-aged people, controlling for age, sex, genes, and early-shared environment. Twenty-two twin pairs discordant for type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean age 60.9 years) without neurological disease were recruited from the Australian Twin Registry (ATR) and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a memory encoding task, cognitive tests, and structural MRI. Type 2 diabetes was associated with significantly reduced activation in left hemisphere temporoparietal regions including angular gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and middle temporal gyrus and significantly increased activation in bilateral posteriorly distributed regions. These findings were present in the absence of within-pair differences in standard cognitive test scores, brain volumes, or vascular lesion load. Differences in activation were more pronounced among monozygotic (MZ) pairs, with MZ individuals with diabetes also displaying greater frontal activation. These results provide evidence for preclinical memory-related neuronal dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. They support the search for modifiable later-life environmental factors or epigenetic mechanisms linking type 2 diabetes and cognitive decline. PMID:27314047

  17. Do Variants Associated with Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer and Type 2 Diabetes Reciprocally Affect Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lang; Rabe, Kari G.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although type 2 diabetes mellitus is a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the existence of shared genetic susceptibility is largely unknown. We evaluated whether any reported genetic risk variants of either disease found by genome-wide association studies reciprocally confer susceptibility. Methods Data that were generated in previous genome-wide association studies (GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes; PanScan) were obtained through the National Institutes of Health database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). Using the PanScan datasets, we tested for association of 38 variants within 37 genomic regions known to be susceptibility factors for type 2 diabetes. We further examined whether type 2 diabetes variants predispose to pancreatic cancer risk stratified by diabetes status. Correspondingly, we examined the association of fourteen pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants within eight genomic regions in the GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes dataset. Results Four plausible associations of diabetes variants and pancreatic cancer risk were detected at a significance threshold of p = 0.05, and one pancreatic cancer susceptibility variant was associated with diabetes risk at threshold of p = 0.05, but none remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusion Currently identified GWAS susceptibility variants are unlikely to explain the potential shared genetic etiology between Type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer. PMID:25658847

  18. Increased GABA concentrations in type 2 diabetes mellitus are related to lower cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Frank C G; Backes, Walter H; Hofman, Paul A M; Puts, Nicolaas A J; Edden, Richard A E; van Boxtel, Martin P J; Schram, Miranda T; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Wildberger, Joachim E; Jansen, Jacobus F A

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with accelerated cognitive decline. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms still remain to be elucidated although it is known that insulin signaling modulates neurotransmitter activity, including inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and excitatory glutamate (Glu) receptors. Therefore, we examined whether levels of GABA and Glu are related to diabetes status and cognitive performance.Forty-one participants with type 2 diabetes and 39 participants without type 2 diabetes underwent detailed cognitive assessments and 3-Tesla proton MR spectroscopy. The associations of neurotransmitters with type 2 diabetes and cognitive performance were examined using multivariate regression analyses controlling for age, sex, education, BMI, and percentage gray/white matter ratio in spectroscopic voxel.Analysis revealed higher GABA+ levels in participants with type 2 diabetes, in participants with higher fasting blood glucose levels and in participants with higher HbA1c levels, and higher GABA+ levels in participants with both high HbA1c levels and less cognitive performance.To conclude, participants with type 2 diabetes have alterations in the GABAergic neurotransmitter system, which are related to lower cognitive functioning, and hint at the involvement of an underlying metabolic mechanism. PMID:27603392

  19. Predictors of type 2 diabetes in a nationally representative sample of adults with psychosis.

    PubMed

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; McGrath, John J; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2014-06-01

    Antipsychotic drugs such as clozapine and olanzapine are associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, but relatively little is known about the relationship between risk factors for type 2 diabetes established in the general population and type 2 diabetes in people with psychosis. We estimated the prevalence of established risk factors and their association with type 2 diabetes in a nationally representative sample of people with an ICD-10 psychosis (N=1642) who gave a fasting blood sample (N=1155). Logistic regression was used to summarize associations adjusted for age and sex. In this sample, whose mean duration of psychosis was 14.7 years, 12.1% (13.1% of women and 11.5% of men) had type 2 diabetes at age 18-64 years based on current fasting blood glucose levels or treatment with a hypoglycaemic drug. Risk was greatly increased in young adults compared with the general population and peaked in middle age. Risk factors in the general population were common in people with psychosis and strongly associated with type 2 diabetes in those people. Treatment with clozapine was associated with an increased risk and treatment with olanzapine with a decreased risk for type 2 diabetes. The development of diabetes or pre-diabetes may therefore influence the likelihood of treatment with olanzapine over time. The strongest predictors of type 2 diabetes in a multivariate model were a body mass index of at least 40 and treated hypercholesterolemia, followed by a body mass index between 35 and 39.9, a family history of diabetes and treated hypertension. There was minimal to no confounding of the association between type 2 diabetes and current clozapine or olanzapine treatment, but neither association remained significant after adjustment for other predictors. Longitudinal relationships among predictors are likely to be complex, and previous antipsychotic drug treatment may at least partly explain risks associated with severe obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension. A

  20. Digital Games for Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Underpinning Theory With Three Illustrative Examples

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Shauna; Dixon, Mavis C; MacRury, Sandra M; Fergusson, Michael J; Miranda Rodrigues, Francisco; Mourinho Baptista, Telmo; Yang, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Digital games are an important class of eHealth interventions in diabetes, made possible by the Internet and a good range of affordable mobile devices (eg, mobile phones and tablets) available to consumers these days. Gamifying disease management can help children, adolescents, and adults with diabetes to better cope with their lifelong condition. Gamification and social in-game components are used to motivate players/patients and positively change their behavior and lifestyle. In this paper, we start by presenting the main challenges facing people with diabetes—children/adolescents and adults—from a clinical perspective, followed by three short illustrative examples of mobile and desktop game apps and platforms designed by Ayogo Health, Inc. (Vancouver, BC, Canada) for type 1 diabetes (one example) and type 2 diabetes (two examples). The games target different age groups with different needs—children with type 1 diabetes versus adults with type 2 diabetes. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive review of all digital game offerings available for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but rather to serve as a taster of a few of the game genres on offer today for both types of diabetes, with a brief discussion of (1) some of the underpinning psychological mechanisms of gamified digital interventions and platforms as self-management adherence tools, and more, in diabetes, and (2) some of the hypothesized potential benefits that might be gained from their routine use by people with diabetes. More research evidence from full-scale evaluation studies is needed and expected in the near future that will quantify, qualify, and establish the evidence base concerning this gamification potential, such as what works in each age group/patient type, what does not, and under which settings and criteria. PMID:25791276

  1. Digital games for type 1 and type 2 diabetes: underpinning theory with three illustrative examples.

    PubMed

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Gammon, Shauna; Dixon, Mavis C; MacRury, Sandra M; Fergusson, Michael J; Miranda Rodrigues, Francisco; Mourinho Baptista, Telmo; Yang, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Digital games are an important class of eHealth interventions in diabetes, made possible by the Internet and a good range of affordable mobile devices (eg, mobile phones and tablets) available to consumers these days. Gamifying disease management can help children, adolescents, and adults with diabetes to better cope with their lifelong condition. Gamification and social in-game components are used to motivate players/patients and positively change their behavior and lifestyle. In this paper, we start by presenting the main challenges facing people with diabetes-children/adolescents and adults-from a clinical perspective, followed by three short illustrative examples of mobile and desktop game apps and platforms designed by Ayogo Health, Inc. (Vancouver, BC, Canada) for type 1 diabetes (one example) and type 2 diabetes (two examples). The games target different age groups with different needs-children with type 1 diabetes versus adults with type 2 diabetes. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive review of all digital game offerings available for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but rather to serve as a taster of a few of the game genres on offer today for both types of diabetes, with a brief discussion of (1) some of the underpinning psychological mechanisms of gamified digital interventions and platforms as self-management adherence tools, and more, in diabetes, and (2) some of the hypothesized potential benefits that might be gained from their routine use by people with diabetes. More research evidence from full-scale evaluation studies is needed and expected in the near future that will quantify, qualify, and establish the evidence base concerning this gamification potential, such as what works in each age group/patient type, what does not, and under which settings and criteria. PMID:25791276

  2. Psychiatric co-morbidity with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Coclami, T; Cross, M

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of diabetes comorbidity in Greek psychiatric patients, differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetics and the outcome of psychiatric disorder. Of 800 psychiatric patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 82 (10.2%) had diabetes mellitus; 28% type 1 and 72% type 2. The mean age at onset of mental illness was earlierfortype 1 diabetics (mean 26.95, SD 9.09 years) than type 2 (mean 33.22, SD 10.71 years) (P < 0.015) and the duration of untreated mental illness was shorter (mean 2.86, SD 3.06 years compared with mean 4.13, SD 6.24 years for type 2 diabetics). Schizophrenia was the commonest psychiatric diagnosis in both types of diabetes. There was no significant difference in outcome of psychiatric disorder between the 2 types of diabetics. Existence of diabetes mellitus (regardless of type), duration of untreated mental illness and lack of patient therapeutic education were negative predictors of (unfavourable) outcome. These findings provide evidence of a high prevalence of diabetes in psychiatric patients and that having diabetes has an adverse effect on outcome of psychiatric illness. PMID:22256413

  3. Adiponectin as a Protective Factor Against the Progression Toward Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Darabi, Hossein; Raeisi, Alireza; Kalantarhormozi, Mohammad Reza; Ostovar, Afshin; Assadi, Majid; Asadipooya, Kamyar; Vahdat, Katayoun; Dobaradaran, Sina; Nabipour, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Serum adiponectin levels have been suggested to be predictors of type 2 diabetes mellitus in diverse populations. However, the relationship between circulating adiponectin levels and the risk of development of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women has not been investigated. A total of 382 healthy postmenopausal women who participated in a prospective cohort study were followed for 5.8 years. Type 2 diabetes mellitus was defined according to the criteria set out by the American Diabetes Association. Adiponectin, osteoprotegerin (OPG), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were measured using ELISA. Of 195 women who did not have diabetes at baseline and who were reexamined in the second phase of the study for diabetic status, 35 subjects (17.9%) developed type 2 diabetes mellitus during the 5.8 years follow-up period. The women with type 2 diabetes had lower adiponectin levels than the healthy postmenopausal women. Multiple regression analysis showed that, after adjustments were made for age, cardiovascular risk factors, OPG, and hs-CRP levels, higher baseline adiponectin levels were associated with a lower relative risk (RR) of having type 2 (RR = 0.07, confidence interval [CI]: 0.01–0.66, P = 0.021). Higher baseline adiponectin levels functioned as a predictor of a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus among postmenopausal women during a 5.8 years follow-up study. Therefore, it is suggested that elevated adiponectin levels may offer protection against the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus after the menopause. PMID:26287420

  4. Increased number of islet-associated macrophages in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ehses, Jan A; Perren, Aurel; Eppler, Elisabeth; Ribaux, Pascale; Pospisilik, John A; Maor-Cahn, Ranit; Gueripel, Xavier; Ellingsgaard, Helga; Schneider, Marten K J; Biollaz, Gregoire; Fontana, Adriano; Reinecke, Manfred; Homo-Delarche, Francoise; Donath, Marc Y

    2007-09-01

    Activation of the innate immune system in obesity is a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the current study was to investigate the notion that increased numbers of macrophages exist in the islets of type 2 diabetes patients and that this may be explained by a dysregulation of islet-derived inflammatory factors. Increased islet-associated immune cells were observed in human type 2 diabetic patients, high-fat-fed C57BL/6J mice, the GK rat, and the db/db mouse. When cultured islets were exposed to a type 2 diabetic milieu or when islets were isolated from high-fat-fed mice, increased islet-derived inflammatory factors were produced and released, including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, chemokine KC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha. The specificity of this response was investigated by direct comparison to nonislet pancreatic tissue and beta-cell lines and was not mimicked by the induction of islet cell death. Further, this inflammatory response was found to be biologically functional, as conditioned medium from human islets exposed to a type 2 diabetic milieu could induce increased migration of monocytes and neutrophils. This migration was blocked by IL-8 neutralization, and IL-8 was localized to the human pancreatic alpha-cell. Therefore, islet-derived inflammatory factors are regulated by a type 2 diabetic milieu and may contribute to the macrophage infiltration of pancreatic islets that we observe in type 2 diabetes. PMID:17579207

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents: a review from a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Kiess, W; Böttner, A; Raile, K; Kapellen, T; Müller, G; Galler, A; Paschke, R; Wabitsch, M

    2003-01-01

    Changes in food consumption and exercise are fueling a worldwide increase in obesity in children and adolescents. As a consequence of this dramatic development, an increasing rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been recorded in children and adolescents in the USA and, more recently, in many countries around the world. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Lower susceptibility in white Caucasians and higher susceptibility in Asians, Hispanics and blacks have been noted. There is a high hidden prevalence and a lack of exact data on the epidemiology of the disease in Europe: in Germany only 70 patients below the age of 15 years were identified in the systematic, nationwide DPV (Diabetessoftware für prospektive Verlaufsdokumentation) diabetes survey, but our calculations suggest that more than 5000 young people in Germany at present would meet the diagnostic criteria of type 2 diabetes. In Australasia, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is reportedly high in some ethnic groups and again is linked very closely to the obesity epidemic. No uniform and evidence-based treatment strategy is available: many groups use metformin, exercise programmes and nutritional education as a comprehensive approach to treat type 2 diabetes in childhood and adolescence. The lack of clear epidemiological data and a strong need for accepted treatment strategies point to the key role of preventive programmes. Prevention of obesity will help to counteract the emerging worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes in youth. Preventive programmes should focus on exercise training and reducing sedentary behaviour such as television viewing, encouraging healthy nutrition and supporting general education programmes since shorter school education is clearly associated with higher rates of obesity and hence the susceptibility of an individual to acquire type 2 diabetes. PMID:12566725

  6. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Vasanti S.; Popkin, Barry M.; Bray, George A.; Després, Jean-Pierre; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), which include soft drinks, fruit drinks, iced tea, and energy and vitamin water drinks has risen across the globe. Regular consumption of SSBs has been associated with weight gain and risk of overweight and obesity, but the role of SSBs in the development of related chronic metabolic diseases, such as metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, has not been quantitatively reviewed. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We searched the MEDLINE database up to May 2010 for prospective cohort studies of SSB intake and risk of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. We identified 11 studies (three for metabolic syndrome and eight for type 2 diabetes) for inclusion in a random-effects meta-analysis comparing SSB intake in the highest to lowest quantiles in relation to risk of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. RESULTS Based on data from these studies, including 310,819 participants and 15,043 cases of type 2 diabetes, individuals in the highest quantile of SSB intake (most often 1–2 servings/day) had a 26% greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those in the lowest quantile (none or <1 serving/month) (relative risk [RR] 1.26 [95% CI 1.12–1.41]). Among studies evaluating metabolic syndrome, including 19,431 participants and 5,803 cases, the pooled RR was 1.20 [1.02–1.42]. CONCLUSIONS In addition to weight gain, higher consumption of SSBs is associated with development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. These data provide empirical evidence that intake of SSBs should be limited to reduce obesity-related risk of chronic metabolic diseases. PMID:20693348

  7. Sex Differences in the Association Between Birth Weight and Adult Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Esther; Gamborg, Michael; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Baker, Jennifer L

    2015-12-01

    Low birth weight is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but the risk at high birth weight levels remains uncertain. Potential sex differences in the associations are unexplored. We investigated whether sex influences the association of birth weight and adult type 2 diabetes, using a cohort of 113,801 men and 109,298 women, born 1936-1983, from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, Denmark. During 5.6 million person-years of follow-up, 7,750 men and 4,736 women had a diagnosis of adult type 2 diabetes (30 years of age or older) obtained from national registers. When birth weights between 3.251 and 3.750 kg were used as the reference group for each sex separately, women with birth weights in the categories of 2.000 to 2.750 kg and 4.751 to 5.500 kg had hazard ratios [HRs] of type 2 diabetes of 1.46 (95% CI, 1.34-1.59) and 1.56 (1.20-2.04), respectively, whereas men had HRs of 1.20 (1.12-1.30) and 0.93 (0.76-1.15). Thus, sex modified the association, with stronger risk estimates of type 2 diabetes in women at both low and high birth weights compared with men (P = 0.001). In conclusion, birth weight is more strongly associated with type 2 diabetes in women than in men. Future search for sex-specific causal mechanisms may provide new insights into the early origins of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26253610

  8. Anxiety and risk of type 2 diabetes: Evidence from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lauren E.; Mezuk, Briana

    2012-01-01

    Objective Depression is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and is also commonly comorbid with anxiety. However, few studies have examined whether anxiety is predictive of diabetes risk. The objectives of this study are to examine the prospective relationship between anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and agoraphobia) and risk of type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period, and to investigate the association between anxiety and risk of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes. Methods Data come from the 1993/6 and 2004/5 waves of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (N=1920), a population-based prospective cohort. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The prospective association between anxiety and incident type 2 diabetes was evaluated using a series of nested multivariable logistic regression models. Results At baseline, 315 participants (21.8%) had an anxiety disorder. The relationship between anxiety and risk of developing type 2 diabetes was not statistically significant after controlling for demographic characteristics (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.75, 2.18). There was no relationship between anxiety and diabetes risk after controlling for health behaviors and depression status (OR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.89). There was no significant relationship between anxiety and development of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 0.61, 6.74). Conclusion Anxiety disorders are not associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes or risk of diabetes complications among those who have diabetes in the present study. PMID:23148808

  9. Pleiotropy and pathway analyses of genetic variants associated with both type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raynor, LA; Pankow, James S; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Tang, Weihong; Prizment, Anna; Couper, David J

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Epidemiological evidence shows that diabetes is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. The objective of this study was to identify genes that may contribute to both type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer outcomes and the biological pathways these diseases may share. Methods: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study is a population-based prospective cohort study in four U.S. communities that included a baseline examination in 1987-89 and three follow-up exams at three year intervals. Participants were 45-64 years old at baseline. We conducted a genomewide association (GWA) study of incident type 2 diabetes in males, summarized variation across genetic loci into a polygenic risk score, and determined if that diabetes risk score was also associated with incident prostate cancer in the same study population. Secondarily we conducted a separate GWA study of prostate cancer, performed a pathway analysis of both type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer, and qualitatively determined if any of the biochemical pathways identified were shared between the two outcomes. Results: We found that the polygenic risk score for type 2 diabetes was not statistically significantly associated with prostate cancer. The pathway analysis also found no overlap between pathways associated with type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer. However, it did find that the growth hormone signaling pathway was statistically significantly associated with type 2 diabetes (p=0.0001). Conclusion: The inability of this study to find an association between type 2 diabetes polygenic risk scores with prostate cancer or biological pathways in common suggests that shared genetic variants may not contribute significantly to explaining shared etiology. PMID:23565322

  10. Effectiveness of a Regional Prepregnancy Care Program in Women With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Helen R.; Roland, Jonathan M; Skinner, Timothy C.; Simmons, David; Gurnell, Eleanor; Morrish, Nicholas J.; Soo, Shiu-Ching; Kelly, Suzannah; Lim, Boon; Randall, Joanne; Thompsett, Sarah; Temple, Rosemary C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To implement and evaluate a regional prepregnancy care program in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Prepregnancy care was promoted among patients and health professionals and delivered across 10 regional maternity units. A prospective cohort study of 680 pregnancies in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes was performed. Primary outcomes were adverse pregnancy outcome (congenital malformation, stillbirth, or neonatal death), congenital malformation, and indicators of pregnancy preparation (5 mg folic acid, gestational age, and A1C). Comparisons were made with a historical cohort (n = 613 pregnancies) from the same units during 1999–2004. RESULTS A total of 181 (27%) women attended, and 499 women (73%) did not attend prepregnancy care. Women with prepregnancy care presented earlier (6.7 vs. 7.7 weeks; P < 0.001), were more likely to take 5 mg preconception folic acid (88.2 vs. 26.7%; P < 0.0001) and had lower A1C levels (A1C 6.9 vs. 7.6%; P < 0.0001). They had fewer adverse pregnancy outcomes (1.3 vs. 7.8%; P = 0.009). Multivariate logistic regression confirmed that in addition to glycemic control, lack of prepregnancy care was independently associated with adverse outcome (odds ratio 0.2 [95% CI 0.05–0.89]; P = 0.03). Compared with 1999–2004, folic acid supplementation increased (40.7 vs. 32.5%; P = 0.006) and congenital malformations decreased (4.3 vs. 7.3%; P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS Regional prepregnancy care was associated with improved pregnancy preparation and reduced risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Prepregnancy care had benefits beyond improved glycemic control and was a stronger predictor of pregnancy outcome than maternal obesity, ethnicity, or social disadvantage. PMID:21115765

  11. Association Between Maternal Diabetes in Utero and Age at Offspring's Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pettitt, David J.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Beyer, Jennifer; Hillier, Teresa A.; Liese, Angela D.; Mayer-Davis, Beth; Loots, Beth; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Liu, Lenna; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Linder, Barbara; Dabelea, Dana

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to examine age of diabetes diagnosis in youth who have a parent with diabetes by diabetes type and whether the parent's diabetes was diagnosed before or after the youth's birth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The cohort comprised SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study participants (diabetes diagnosis 2001–2005) with a diabetic parent. SEARCH is a multicenter survey of youth with diabetes diagnosed before age 20 years. RESULTS—Youth with type 2 diabetes were more likely to have a parent with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes (mother 39.3%; father 21.2%) than youth with type 1 diabetes (5.3 and 6.7%, respectively, P < 0.001 for each). Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed 1.68 years earlier among those exposed to diabetes in utero (n = 174) than among those whose mothers’ diabetes was diagnosed later (P = 0.018, controlled for maternal diagnosis age, paternal diabetes, sex, and race/ethnicity). Age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes for 269 youth with and without in utero exposure did not differ significantly (difference 0.96 year, P = 0.403 after adjustment). Controlled for the father's age of diagnosis, father's diabetes before the child's birth was not associated with age at diagnosis (P = 0.078 for type 1 diabetes; P = 0.140 for type 2 diabetes). CONCLUSIONS—Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed at younger ages among those exposed to hyperglycemia in utero. Among youth with type 1 diabetes, the effect of the intrauterine exposure was not significant when controlled for mother's age of diagnosis. This study helps explain why other studies have found higher age-specific rates of type 2 diabetes among offspring of women with diabetes. PMID:18694977

  12. [Diabetes in Pregnancy - Type 1/Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kleinwechter, Helmut; Demandt, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    In Germany in 5.5% of all births diabetes is registered. In patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes planning pregnancy, preconception counseling, diabetologic care with optimized periconceptional metabolic control and folic acid supplementation are essential for good pregnancy outcome. Gestational diabetes (GDM) should be diagnosed timely and managed according to existing guidelines. GDM is treated with insulin in approximately 20%. In 1-2% of GDM cases a glucokinase gene mutation is present (MODY 2). Pregnancies after bariatric-metabolic surgery are increasing and show high risks. PMID:27598916

  13. Chronic Kidney Disease and Associated Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Chinese with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Qing-Lin; Ouyang, Xiao-Jun; Gu, Liu-Bao; Mo, Yong-Zhen; Ma, Ronald; Nan, Jennifer; Kong, Alice; So, Wing-Yee; Ko, Gary; Chan, Juliana; Chow, Chun-Chung

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the frequency of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its associated risk factors in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, we conducted a cross-sectional study in Nanjing, China, in the period between January 2008 and December 2009. Methods Patients with type 2 diabetes under the care by Jiangsu Province Official Hospital, Nanjing, China were invited for assessment. CKD was defined as the presence of albuminuria or estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Albuminuria was defined as urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g. Results We recruited 1,521 urban Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age, 63.9±12.0 years). The frequency of CKD and albuminuria was 31.0% and 28.9%, respectively. After adjusted by age and sex, hypertension, anemia and duration of diabetes were significantly associated with CKD with odds ratio (95% confidence interval) being 1.93 (1.28 to 2.93), 1.70 (1.09 to 2.64), and 1.03 (1.00 to 1.06), respectively. Conclusion In conclusion, CKD was common in the urban Nanjing Chinese with type 2 diabetes. Strategies to prevent or delay progression of kidney disease in diabetes should be carried out at the early disease course of type 2 diabetes. PMID:23275937

  14. The potential for deprescribing in care home residents with Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Lillan Mo; Kjome, Reidun Lisbet Skeide; Sølvik, Una Ørvim; Houghton, Julie; Desborough, James Antony

    2016-08-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is a common diagnosis in care home residents that is associated with potentially inappropriate prescribing and thus risk of additional suffering. Previous studies found that diabetes medicines can be safely withdrawn in care home residents, encouraging further investigation of the potential for deprescribing amongst these patients. Objectives Describe comorbidities and medicine use in care home residents with Type 2 diabetes; identify number of potentially inappropriate medicines prescribed for these residents using a medicines optimisation tool; assess clinical applicability of the tool. Setting Thirty care homes for older people, East Anglia, UK. Method Data on diagnoses and medicines were extracted from medical records of 826 residents. Potentially inappropriate medicines were identified using the tool 'Optimising Safe and Appropriate Medicines Use'. Twenty percent of results were validated by a care home physician. Main outcome measure Number of potentially inappropriate medicines. Results The 106 residents with Type 2 diabetes had more comorbidities and prescriptions than those without. Over 90 % of residents with Type 2 diabetes had at least one potentially inappropriate medication. The most common was absence of valid indication. The physician unreservedly endorsed 39 % of the suggested deprescribing, and would consider discontinuing all but one of the remaining medicines following access to additional information. Conclusion UK care home residents with Type 2 diabetes had an increased burden of comorbidities and prescriptions. The majority of these patients were prescribed potentially inappropriate medicines. Validation by a care home physician supported the clinical applicability of the medicines optimisation tool. PMID:27241345

  15. Influence of type 2 diabetes on symbolic analysis and complexity of heart rate variability in men

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with diabetes may develop cardiac autonomic dysfunction that may be evaluated by heart rate variability (HRV). The aim was evaluated heart rate variability (HRV) of individuals with type 2 diabetes, without cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), in response to active postural maneuver by means of nonlinear analysis (symbolic analysis, Shannon and conditional entropy) and correlate HRV parameters between them, glycated hemoglobin and diabetes duration. Methods Nineteen men with type 2 diabetes without CAN (T2D) and nineteen healthy men (CG), age-range from 40 to 60 years were studied. We assessed HRV in supine and orthostatic position using symbolic analysis (0V%, 1V%, 2LV% and 2UV%), Shannon and conditional entropy (SE and NCI). Results In supine position T2D presented higher sympathetic modulation (0V%) than CG. However, there was not any difference between groups for indexes of complexity (SE and NCI). Furthermore, T2D presented a preserved response of cardiac autonomic modulation after active postural maneuver. Conclusions The present study showed that individuals with type 2 diabetes without CAN presented higher cardiac sympathetic modulation. However, the complexity of HRV was not influenced by imbalance of the autonomic modulation in individuals with type 2 diabetes. In addition, the response of autonomic nervous system in the heart remains preserved after active postural maneuver in individuals with type 2 diabetes, possibly due to the lack of CAN in this group. PMID:24485048

  16. Pharmacogenetics and individual responses to treatment of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Engelbrechtsen, Line; Andersson, Ehm; Roepstorff, Soeren; Hansen, Torben; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to summarize current knowledge and provide perspectives on the relationships between human genetic variants, type 2 diabetes, antidiabetic treatment, and disease progression. Type 2 diabetes is a complex disease with clear-cut diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines. Yet, the interindividual response to therapy and slope of disease progression varies markedly among patients with type 2 diabetes. Gene-gene, gene-environment, and gene-treatment interactions may explain some of the variation in disease progression. Several genetic variants have been suggested to be associated with response to antidiabetic drugs. Some are present in drug receptors or drug metabolizers (OCT genes, KCNJ11, ABCC8, and CYP2C9). Numerous type 2 diabetes risk variants have been identified, but genetic risk score models applying these variants have failed to identify 'disease progressors' among patients with diabetes. Although genetic risk scores are based on a few known loci and only explain a fraction of the heritability of type 2 diabetes, it seems that the genes responsible for the development of diabetes may not be the same driving disease progression after the diagnosis has been made. Pharmacogenetic interactions explain some of the interindividual variation in responses to antidiabetic treatment and may provide the foundation for future genotype-based treatment standards. PMID:26181639

  17. Diabetes education improves depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Xiyao; Xu, Xiuping; Lv, Xiaofeng; Yao, Lu; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xueying; Liu, Baozhu; Li, Qiang; Cui, Can

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The prevalence of depression is relatively high in individuals with diabetes. However, screening and monitoring of depressive state in patients with diabetes is still neglected in developing countries and the treatment of diabetes-related depression is rarely performed in these countries. In this study, our aim was to study the role of diabetes education in the improvement of depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The Dutch version of the center for epidemiological studies depression scale (CES-D scale) and the problem areas in diabetes (PAID) questionnaire were used to assess depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress in 1200 newly diagnosed male adult patients with type 2 diabetes before and after a two-week diabetes education by professionally trained nurses. Pearson correlation and regression analysis were used to analyze the factors related to depression in patients with type 2 diabetes. Results: The incidence of depression in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes was 28%, and the rate of diabetes-specific emotional distress was 65.5%. High education levels, low income were correlated to depression in individuals with diabetes. After two weeks of diabetes education, the incidence of depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress decreased significantly to 20.5% (P < 0.05) and 11% (P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: The incidence of depression, especially diabetes-specific emotional distress, was relatively high in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. The depression state could be improved by diabetes education. PMID:24353709

  18. Alogliptin: a review of its use in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2015-05-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor alogliptin (Nesina®, Vipidia®) is approved in numerous countries worldwide for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fixed-dose combinations of alogliptin/metformin (Kazano®, Vipdomet®) and alogliptin/pioglitazone (Oseni®, Incresync®) are also available. This article reviews the clinical efficacy and tolerability of oral alogliptin in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Results of randomized controlled trials demonstrated that oral alogliptin improved glycaemic control when administered as monotherapy, as dual therapy in combination with metformin, pioglitazone, a sulfonylurea, voglibose or insulin, or as triple therapy in combination with metformin plus pioglitazone. Alogliptin was generally well tolerated in patients with type 2 diabetes and was weight neutral, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia. Results of the large, well designed EXAMINE trial revealed that alogliptin was not associated with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes and recent acute coronary syndrome. In conclusion, alogliptin is a useful option for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25855222

  19. Recommendations for health-enhancing physical activities in type 2 diabetes patients

    PubMed Central

    Mynarski, Władysław; Cholewa, Jarosław; Rozpara, Michał; Borek, Zbigniew; Strojek, Krzysztof; Nawrocka, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a disease of civilization with epidemiological coverage. An integral component of a comprehensive process of type 2 diabetes mellitus prevention and treatment is reasonably proportioned exercise. The aim of the study was to evaluate the weekly physical activity of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and healthy subjects with respect to recommendations of the American College of Sports Medicine and American Diabetes Association. [Subjects] The study involved 31 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (treatment duration 9 ± 0.8) and 31 healthy people. [Methods] Physical activity levels were determined by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. A χ2 test was applied to determine the percentage of people who met recommendations. [Results] Analysis of the obtained results demonstrated that the intensity of physical activity in patients with diabetes was moderate or low. The men in the control group met the recommendations for standard health-related activities significantly more often than the patients with diabetes. In women, there was no such relationship, since most of the women were insufficiently physically active. [Conclusion] The conclusion to be drawn is that there is an urgent need to develop and implement effective programs to enhance physical activity among people at risk of diseases of civilization, including type 2 diabetes. PMID:26356173

  20. Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Have all risk factors the same strength?

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; Segura-Galindo, Amparo; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that occurs when the body cannot produce enough or effectively use of insulin. Compared with individuals without diabetes, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a considerably higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease. Most of this excess risk is it associated with an augmented prevalence of well-known risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity in these patients. However the improved cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients can not be attributed solely to the higher prevalence of traditional risk factors. Therefore other non-traditional risk factors may be important in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiovascular disease is increased in type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects due to a complex combination of various traditional and non-traditional risk factors that have an important role to play in the beginning and the evolution of atherosclerosis over its long natural history from endothelial function to clinical events. Many of these risk factors could be common history for both diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, reinforcing the postulate that both disorders come independently from “common soil”. The objective of this review is to highlight the weight of traditional and non-traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the setting of type 2 diabetes mellitus and discuss their position in the pathogenesis of the excess cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity in these patients. PMID:25126392

  1. Predicting Type 2 diabetes using an electronic nose-based artificial neural network analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, E I; Linder, R; Perriello, G; Di Daniele, N; Pöppl, S J; De Lorenzo, A

    2002-08-01

    Diabetes is a major health problem in both industrial and developing countries, and its incidence is rising. Although detection of diabetes is improving, about half of the patients with Type 2 diabetes are undiagnosed and the delay from disease onset to diagnosis may exceed 10 yr. Thus, earlier detection of Type 2 diabetes and treatment of hyperglycaemia and related metabolic abnormalities is of vital importance. The objectives of the present study were to examine urine samples from Type 2 diabetic patients and healthy volunteers using the electronic nose technology and to evaluate possible application of data classification methods such as self-learning artificial neural networks (ANN) and logistic regression (LR) in comparison with principal components analysis (PCA). Urine samples from Type 2 diabetic patients and healthy controls were processed randomly using a simple 8-sensors electronic nose and individual electronic nose patterns were qualitatively classified using the "Approximation and Classification of Medical Data" (ACMD) network based on 2 output neurons, binary LR analysis and PCA. Distinct classes were found for Type 2 diabetic subjects and controls using PCA, which had a 96.0% successful classification percentage mean while qualitative ANN analysis and LR analysis had successful classification percentages of 92.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Therefore, the ACMD network is suitable for classifying medical and clinical data. PMID:12416658

  2. Burden of cancer associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Japan, 2010-2030.

    PubMed

    Saito, Eiko; Charvat, Hadrien; Goto, Atsushi; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus constitutes a major disease burden globally, and the prevalence of diabetes continues to increase worldwide. We aimed to estimate the burden of cancer associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Japan between 2010 and 2030. In this study, we estimated the population attributable fraction of cancer risk associated with type 2 diabetes in 2010 and 2030 using the prevalence estimates of type 2 diabetes in Japan from 1990 to 2030, summary hazard ratios of diabetes and cancer risk from a pooled analysis of eight large-scale Japanese cohort studies, observed incidence/mortality of cancer in 2010 and predicted incidence/mortality for 2030 derived from the age-period-cohort model. Our results showed that between 2010 and 2030, the total numbers of cancer incidence and mortality were predicted to increase by 38.9% and 10.5% in adults aged above 20 years, respectively. In the number of excess incident cancer cases associated with type 2 diabetes, an increase of 26.5% in men and 53.2% in women is expected between 2010 and 2030. The age-specific analysis showed that the population attributable fraction of cancer will increase in adults aged >60 years over time, but will not change in adults aged 20-59 years. In conclusion, this study suggests a modest but steady increase in cancers associated with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27079439

  3. Bone marrow stromal cells inhibits HMGB1-mediated inflammation after stroke in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Liu, B; Zhao, Q; Jin, P; Hua, F; Zhang, Z; Liu, Y; Zan, K; Cui, G; Ye, X

    2016-06-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ligand of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), functions as a proinflammatory factor. It is mainly involved in inflammatory activation and contributes to the initiation and progression of stroke. By using a model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) in type 2 diabetic rats, we investigated the changes of pro-inflammation mediators, blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage and functional outcome after stroke. Type 2 diabetic rats did not show an increased lesion volume, but exhibited significantly increased expression of HMGB1 and RAGE, BBB leakage, as well as decreased functional outcome after stroke compared with control rats. Injection of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) into type 2 diabetic rats significantly reduced the expression of HMGB1 and RAGE, attenuated BBB leakage, and improved functional outcome after stroke. BMSCs-treated type 2 diabetic rats inhibited inflammation and improved functional outcome after stroke. Furthermore, in vitro data support the hypothesis that BMSCs-induced reduction of HMGB1 and RAGE in T2DM-MCAo rats contributed to attenuated inflammatory response in the ischemic brain, which may lead to the beneficial effects of BMSCs treatment. Further investigation of BMSCs treatment in type 2 diabetic stroke is warranted. PMID:26946264

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of gastroparesis-related symptoms among patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Almogbel, Rakan A; Alhussan, Fulwa A; Alnasser, Sulaiman A; Algeffari, Metab A

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of gastroparesis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) vary widely. Our aim is to estimate the prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and explore the relationship between gastroparesis and other risk factors. Methods A cross-sectional study evaluating 147 type 2 diabetics using the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptoms Index (GCSI). A GCSI Total Score ≥ 1.90 were chosen as having definite symptoms of gastroparesis. All patients completed a demographic questionnaire and interviewed to complete the. Demographic Data, disease duration, Medication, comorbidities, recent blood glucose and HbA1C were collected and investigated. Results The prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis among type 2 diabetics was 10.8%. Clinical symptoms of gastroparesis were significantly correlated to HbA1c (p=0.001), blood glucose (p= 0.003), duration of diabetes (p= 0.02) and comorbidities (p=0.009). The most common symptoms were bloating, stomach fullness and early satiety (63.94%, 55.1% and 48.3% respectively). In logistic regression analysis, female gender emerged as significant independent predictors of the presence of at least one symptom. Conclusions The prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis observed in the Saudi patientsdiagnosedwithtype2 diabetes was 10.8% and is independently associated with poor controlled diabetes, hyperglycemia, and long duration of diabetes and history of Co-morbid conditions. PMID:27610063

  5. Coexistent Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and type 2 diabetes mellitus neuropathies in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Sun, A-Ping; Tang, Lu; Liao, Qin; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Ying-Shuang; Zhang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is caused by duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene on chromosome 17. It is the most common inherited demyelinating neuropathy. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder that frequently causes predominantly sensory neuropathy. In this study, we report the occurrence of CMT1A in a Chinese family affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this family, seven individuals had duplication of the PMP22 gene, although only four had clinical features of polyneuropathy. All CMT1A patients with a clinical phenotype also presented with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The other three individuals had no signs of CMT1A or type 2 diabetes mellitus. We believe that there may be a genetic link between these two diseases. PMID:26692872

  6. Coexistent Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and type 2 diabetes mellitus neuropathies in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Sun, A-ping; Tang, Lu; Liao, Qin; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Ying-shuang; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is caused by duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene on chromosome 17. It is the most common inherited demyelinating neuropathy. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder that frequently causes predominantly sensory neuropathy. In this study, we report the occurrence of CMT1A in a Chinese family affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this family, seven individuals had duplication of the PMP22 gene, although only four had clinical features of polyneuropathy. All CMT1A patients with a clinical phenotype also presented with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The other three individuals had no signs of CMT1A or type 2 diabetes mellitus. We believe that there may be a genetic link between these two diseases. PMID:26692872

  7. Impact of Intensive Glycemic Control on the Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation and Associated Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (from the ACCORD Study)

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Omid; Yuriditsky, Eugene; Tsioufis, Costas; Tsachris, Demetrios; Morgan, Timothy; Basile, Jan; Bigger, Thomas; Cushman, William; Goff, David; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Thomas, Abraham; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and is associated with markers of poor glycemic control; however the impact of glycemic control on incident AF and outcomes is unknown. We sought to prospectively evaluate if intensive glycemic control in individuals with DM impacts incident AF, and to evaluate morbidity and mortality among individuals with DM and incident AF. We studied 10,082 individuals with DM from the ACCORD cohort in a randomized, double-blind fashion. Participants were randomized to an intensive therapeutic strategy targeting a glycated hemoglobin level of <6.0%, or a standard strategy targeting a glycated hemoglobin of 7.0-7.9%. Incident AF occurred in 159 patients (1.58%) over the follow-up period at a rate of 5.9/1,000 person-years in the intensive-therapy group, and a rate of 6.37/1,000 person-years in the standard-therapy group (p=0.52). In a multivariate model, predictors of incident AF were age, weight, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and heart failure history. Patients with DM and new-onset AF had a HR of 2.65 for all-cause mortality (95% CI 1.8-3.86, p<0.0001), HR of 2.1 for myocardial infarction (95% CI 1.33-3.31, p=0.0015), and HR of 3.80 for development of heart failure (95% CI 2.48-5.84, p<0.0001). In conclusion, intensive glycemic control did not impact rate of new-onset AF. Patients with DM and incident AF had an increased risk for morbidity and mortality as compared to those without AF. PMID:25159234

  8. High processed meat consumption is a risk factor of type 2 diabetes in the ATBC study

    PubMed Central

    Männistö, Satu; Kontto, Jukka; Kataja-Tuomola, Merja; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo

    2012-01-01

    Relatively small lifestyle modifications related to weight reduction, physical activity and diet has been shown to decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes. Connected with diet, low consumption of meat has been suggested as a protective factor of diabetes. The aim was to examine the association between the consumption of total meat or the specific types of meat and risk of type 2 diabetes. The ATBC cohort included middle aged male smokers. During up to 12 years of follow-up, 1098 incident cases of diabetes were diagnosed from 24,845 participants through the nationwide register. Food consumption was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. In the age and intervention group adjusted model, high total meat consumption was a risk factor of type 2 diabetes (relative risk (RR) 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23, 1.82, highest vs. lowest quintile). The result was similar after adjustment for environmental factors and foods related to diabetes and meat consumption. The RR of type 2 diabetes was 1.37 for processed meat (95% CI: 1.11, 1.71) in the multivariate model. The results were explained more by intakes of sodium than intakes of saturated fatty acids, protein, cholesterol, heme iron, magnesium and nitrate, and were not modified by obesity. No association was found between red meat, poultry and the risk of type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, it may help to prevent the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes by reducing the consumption of processed meat. It seems that sodium of processed meat may explain the association. PMID:20187985

  9. Consumption of restaurant foods and incidence of type 2 diabetes in African American women123

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Supriya; Coogan, Patricia F; Boggs, Deborah A; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes is a major problem in Western nations. Profound secular changes in the food environment and eating habits may play a role. In particular, consumption of foods prepared outside the home has greatly increased. Objective: We investigated the relation of restaurant meal consumption to incidence of type 2 diabetes among African American women with the use of data from the prospective Black Women's Health Study. Design: The participants have completed mailed follow-up questionnaires every 2 y since 1995, including food-frequency questionnaires that asked about the frequency of eating restaurant meals of various types. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate incidence rate ratios and 95% CIs for the association of type 2 diabetes incidence with various categories of consumption of each restaurant food relative to the lowest category, with adjustment for diabetes risk factors. Results: Among 44,072 participants aged 30–69 y and free of diabetes at baseline, 2873 incident cases of type 2 diabetes occurred during 10 y of follow-up. Consumption of restaurant meals of hamburgers, fried chicken, fried fish, and Chinese food were independently associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Incidence rate ratios for ≥2 such meals per week relative to none were 1.40 (95% CI: 1.14, 1.73) for hamburgers and 1.68 (95% CI: 1.36, 2.08) for fried chicken. Control for body mass index greatly reduced the estimates, which suggests that the associations are mediated through weight gain and obesity. Conclusion: The present study has identified a risk factor for type 2 diabetes that may be readily modifiable by dietary changes. PMID:20016014

  10. Imeglimin: A Potential New Multi-Target Drug for Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vuylsteke, Valerie; Chastain, Lisa M; Maggu, Geeta A; Brown, Crystal

    2015-09-01

    Imeglimin is a novel agent currently in development to treat type 2 diabetes. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that it has the potential to impact the three main pathophysiologic components of type 2 diabetes: impaired glucose uptake by muscle tissue, excess hepatic gluconeogenesis, and increased beta-cell apoptosis. Preliminary human studies that have been published within the last 2 years demonstrate that imeglimin improves hemoglobin A1c and fasting plasma glucose similarly when compared with metformin and with sitagliptin. There has also been a low incidence of adverse effects, especially hypoglycemia, reported in these early human studies. Currently, imeglimin is lacking long-term evidence to demonstrate any effects on its cardiovascular safety, and data on morbidity and mortality, though some studies are currently in progress. There is great potential for imeglimin, if FDA approved, to play a significant role in the type 2 diabetes management algorithm. PMID:26254210

  11. The role of hepatic lipids in hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel J; Samuel, Varman T; Petersen, Kitt F; Shulman, Gerald I

    2014-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its downstream sequelae, hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, are rapidly growing epidemics, which lead to increased morbidity and mortality rates, and soaring health-care costs. Developing interventions requires a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms by which excess hepatic lipid develops and causes hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Proposed mechanisms implicate various lipid species, inflammatory signalling and other cellular modifications. Studies in mice and humans have elucidated a key role for hepatic diacylglycerol activation of protein kinase Cε in triggering hepatic insulin resistance. Therapeutic approaches based on this mechanism could alleviate the related epidemics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24899308

  12. Benefits of caloric restriction for cardiometabolic health, including type 2 diabetes mellitus risk.

    PubMed

    Soare, Andreea; Weiss, Edward P; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    In the United States, life expectancy has markedly increased during the past century, and population ageing is expected to double within the next 25 years. The process of ageing in a population is associated with the development of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, that can be prevented, and even reversed, with the implementation of healthy lifestyle interventions. The evidence to date, consolidated by the numerous epidemiological studies and clinical trials conducted, suggests that caloric restriction is an effective nutritional intervention for preventing most of these age-related conditions. At a metabolic level, caloric restriction with adequate nutrition has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity, reduce fasting glucose and insulin concentration and prevent obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and chronic inflammation. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge of the metabolic and clinical implications of caloric restriction with adequate nutrition for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24532291

  13. Participant Experiences of Talking Circles on Type 2 Diabetes in Two Northern Plains American Indian Tribes

    PubMed Central

    Struthers, Roxanne; Hodge, Felicia Schanche; Geishirt-Cantrell, Betty; De Cora, Lorelei

    2011-01-01

    The Talking Circle, a culturally appropriate, 12-week educational intervention, was employed on two Northern Plains American Indian reservations to provide information on type 2 diabetes. In a phenomenological study, funded as a minority supplement to the Talking Circle intervention, the authors asked 8 American Indian participants of the Talking Circle to describe their experience of being an American Indian Talking Circle participant. Seven common themes describe the phenomenon of participating in a Talking Circle diabetic intervention. The Talking Circle technique was effective in providing information on type 2 diabetes through culturally appropriate community sharing. Type 2 diabetes is viewed by both outsiders and those involved as a chronic disease of the utmost concern in American Indian communities. PMID:14556421

  14. Genome-Wide Studies of Type 2 Diabetes and Lipid Traits in Hispanics.

    PubMed

    Below, Jennifer E; Parra, Esteban J

    2016-05-01

    Although disproportionately affected by increasing rates of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemias, Hispanic populations are underrepresented in efforts to understand genetic susceptibility to these disorders. Where research has been undertaken, these populations have provided substantial insight into identification of novel risk-associated genes and have aided in the ability to fine map previously described risk loci. Genome-wide analyses in Hispanic and trans-ethnic populations have resulted in identification of more than 40 replicated or novel genes with significant effects for type 2 diabetes or lipid traits. Initial investigations into rare variant effects have identified new risk-associated variants private to Hispanic populations, and preliminary results suggest metagenomic approaches in Hispanic populations, such as characterizing the gut microbiome, will enable the development of new predictive tools and therapeutic targets for type 2 diabetes. Future genome-wide studies in expanded cohorts of Hispanics are likely to result in new insights into the genetic etiology of metabolic health. PMID:27007718

  15. Treatment urgency: The importance of getting people with type 2 diabetes to target promptly.

    PubMed

    Felton, Anne-Marie; LaSalle, James; McGill, Margaret

    2016-07-01

    The burgeoning population of individuals with type 2 diabetes provides challenges for management in terms of risk of diabetes-related complications. Early, intensive glycemic control particularly in newly-diagnosed people with type 2 diabetes has been shown to be beneficial in terms of reducing diabetic complications, indeed various national and international guidelines now routinely recommend intensive blood glucose control as an essential element of type 2 diabetes management. However, despite this, current management of glycemia is suboptimal and not enough people achieve their glucose targets worldwide. The Global Partnership for Effective Diabetes Management believe that an improved understanding of these contributing factors should enable the development of practice and guidance that will promote a drive toward better quality clinical outcomes. PMID:27329028

  16. Multiple type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes following genome-wide association scan in UK samples

    PubMed Central

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Weedon, Michael N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Lango, Hana; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Perry, John R.B.; Rayner, Nigel W.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Shields, Beverley; Morris, Andrew P.; Ellard, Sian; Groves, Christopher J.; Harries, Lorna W.; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Owen, Katharine R.; Knight, Beatrice; Cardon, Lon R.; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham A.; Morris, Andrew D.; Doney, Alex S.F.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the development of type 2 diabetes are poorly understood. Starting from genome-wide genotype data for 1,924 diabetic cases and 2,938 population controls generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, we set out to detect replicated diabetes association signals through analysis of 3,757 additional cases and 5,346 controls, and by integration of our findings with equivalent data from other international consortia. We detected diabetes susceptibility loci in and around the genes CDKAL1, CDKN2A/CDKN2B and IGF2BP2 and confirmed the recently described associations at HHEX/IDE and SLC30A8. Our findings provide insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes, emphasizing the contribution of multiple variants of modest effect. The regions identified underscore the importance of pathways influencing pancreatic beta cell development and function in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. PMID:17463249

  17. Diabetic Retinopathy Is Strongly Predictive of Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Jong-Jer; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chen, Shu-Fang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Liu, Rue-Tsuan

    2016-01-01

    A well-established, comprehensive, and simple test battery was used here to re-evaluate risk factors for cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in type 2 diabetes. One hundred and seventy-four patients with type 2 diabetes were evaluated through the methods of deep breathing and Valsalva maneuver for correlation with factors that might influence the presence and severity of CAN. The Composite Autonomic Scoring Scale (CASS) was used to grade the severity of autonomic impairment, and CAN was defined as a CASS score ≥2. Results showed that nephropathy, duration of diabetes, blood pressure, uric acid, and the presence of retinopathy and metabolic syndrome significantly correlated with the CASS score. Age may not be a risk factor for diabetic CAN. However, the effects of diabetes on CAN are more prominent in younger patients than in older ones. Diabetic retinopathy is the most significant risk factor predictive of the presence of CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26955641

  18. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors in the early treatment of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    van de Laar, Floris Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) are drugs that inhibit the absorption of carbohydrates from the gut and may be used in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. There is currently no evidence that AGIs are beneficial to prevent or delay mortality or micro- or macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetes. Its beneficial effects on glycated hemoglobin are comparable to metformin or thiazolidinediones, and probably slightly inferior to sulphonylurea. In view of the total body of evidence metformin seems to be superior to AGIs. More long-term studies are needed to study the effects of AGIs compared to other drugs. For patient with impaired glucose tolerance AGIs may prevent, delay or mask the occurrence of type 2 diabetes. A possible beneficial effect on cardiovascular events should be confirmed in new studies. PMID:19337532

  19. The evolving world of GLP-1 agonist therapies for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Baynes, Kevin C. R.

    2010-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist drugs have attractions as a treatment for type 2 diabetes since they positively alter a number of key pathophysiological defects. These include increasing insulin release, reducing glucagon release, slowing gastric emptying and reducing food intake. In numerous clinical trials these agents have been shown to reduce DCCT-aligned HbA1c between 0.8% and 1.1% in patients with moderately controlled type 2 diabetes, whilst also being associated with some weight loss. Whilst medium-term safety and side-effect profiles are now well established, there are as yet no long-term studies on the safety of this group of drugs. The place of the GLP-1 agonists in the treatment paradigm for type 2 diabetes will evolve over the next decade. PMID:23148151

  20. Treatment of type 2 diabetes, lifestyle, GLP1 agonists and DPP4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the treatment focus for type 2 diabetes has shifted to prevention by lifestyle change and to more aggressive reduction of blood sugars during the early stage of treatment. Weight reduction is an important goal for many people with type 2 diabetes. Bariatric surgery is no longer considered a last resort treatment. Glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists given by injection are emerging as a useful treatment since they not only lower blood sugar but are associated with a modest weight reduction. The role of the oral dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors is emerging as second line treatment ahead of sulphonylureas due to a possible beneficial effect on the beta cell and weight neutrality. Drugs which inhibit glucose re-absorption in the kidney, sodium/glucose co-transport 2 inhibitors, may have a role in the treatment of diabetes. Insulin treatment still remains the cornerstone of treatment in many patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25317241

  1. Clinical Implications of Canagliflozin Treatment in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hinnen, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antihyperglycemic agents that lower blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. SGLT2 inhibitors have an insulin-independent mechanism of action, acting to inhibit the reabsorption of glucose in the kidney, which leads to increases in urinary glucose excretion in individuals with elevated blood glucose levels. This article provides an overview of the role of the kidney in type 2 diabetes, describes the rationale for renal SGLT2 as a new target for glycemic control, and focuses on the clinical implications of incorporating the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin into type 2 diabetes treatment regimens based on data from phase 3 studies. PMID:25653467

  2. The role of hepatic lipids in hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Rachel J.; Samuel, Varman T.; Petersen, Kitt F.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its downstream sequelae, hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, are rapidly growing epidemics, which lead to increased morbidity and mortality rates, and soaring health-care costs. Developing interventions requires a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms by which excess hepatic lipid develops and causes hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Proposed mechanisms implicate various lipid species, inflammatory signalling and other cellular modifications. Studies in mice and humans have elucidated a key role for hepatic diacylglycerol activation of protein kinase Cε in triggering hepatic insulin resistance. Therapeutic approaches based on this mechanism could alleviate the related epidemics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24899308

  3. Islet amyloid inhibitors improve glucose homeostasis in a transgenic mouse model of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wijesekara, N; Ahrens, R; Wu, L; Ha, K; Liu, Y; Wheeler, M B; Fraser, P E

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence points to the cytotoxicity of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) aggregates as a major contributor to the loss of β-cell mass in type 2 diabetes. Prevention of IAPP formation represents a potential treatment to increase β-cell survival and function. The IAPP inhibitory peptide, D-ANFLVH, has been previously shown to prevent islet amyloid accumulation in cultured human islets. To assess its activity in vivo, D-ANFLVH was administered by intraperitoneal injection into a human IAPP transgenic mouse model, which replicates type 2 diabetes islet amyloid pathology. The peptide was a potent inhibitor of islet amyloid deposition, resulting in reduced islet cell apoptosis and preservation of β-cell area leading to improved glucose tolerance. These findings provide support for a key role of islet amyloid in β-cell survival and validate the application of anti-amyloid compounds as therapeutic strategies to maintain normal insulin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26095311

  4. The role of diet in prevention and management of type 2 diabetes: implications for public health.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Chrystalleni; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes; Matalas, Antonia-Leda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to examine the current scientific knowledge on the relationship between diet and Type 2 diabetes and consider further implications for public health. The review focuses on the main nutritional elements which have been identified as significant in the prevention and management of Type 2 diabetes. Research findings on the role of carbohydrate, fiber, alcohol, and individual fatty acids are discussed, while the role of specific micro-nutrients and the influence of obesity are comprehensively presented. The association between dietary habits and Type 2 diabetes etiology and management is also reviewed, in order to examine the positive effects of adherence to a healthy dietary pattern, including the plausible role of the Mediterranean diet. PMID:22369258

  5. Novel approaches to the treatment of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Galligan, A; Greenaway, T M

    2016-05-01

    Control of hyperglycaemia is a fundamental therapeutic goal in patients with type 2 diabetes. The progressive nature of β-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes leads to the need for escalating anti-hyperglycaemic treatment, including insulin, in most patients. Given the prevalence of complications such as weight gain and hypoglycaemia associated with traditional anti-hyperglycaemic agents (AHA), including sulphonylureas and insulin, it is unsurprising that recent years have seen the development of novel agents to treat hyperglycaemia. With increasing evidence supporting the need for a multi-faceted approach to the prevention of adverse cardiovascular events in people with type 2 diabetes, a patient-centred and individualised management strategy addressing lifestyle, cardiovascular risk factor modification and glycaemic control remains critical in improving outcomes in these patients. PMID:27170238

  6. Heterogeneity of Pre-diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes: Implications for Prediction, Prevention and Treatment Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Faerch, Kristine; Hulmán, Adam; Solomon, Thomas P J

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a heterogeneous disease with large variation in the relative contributions of insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction between subgroups and individuals. Some of these differences are reflected in the way people are diagnosed. However, differences in glucose regulation exist among individuals even in those with comparable diagnostic glucose levels. In this review we address the heterogeneity of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes with special emphasis on differences in the pathophysiology and treatment responses related to the diagnostic criteria. We also discuss whether novel glycaemic markers of diabetes risk can provide additional information to the established diagnostic criteria. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for elevated fasting versus postprandial glucose concentration, as well as knowledge about the expected responsiveness to treatment in individuals with different clinical characteristics at diagnosis, may contribute to optimising strategies for management of hyperglycaemia in both pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25877695

  7. Effects of Intensive Therapy and Antecedent Hypoglycemia on Counterregulatory Responses to Hypoglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Stephen N.; Mann, Stephanie; Briscoe, Vanessa J.; Ertl, Andrew C.; Tate, Donna B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The physiology of counterregulatory responses during hypoglycemia in intensively treated type 2 diabetic subjects is largely unknown. Therefore, the specific aims of the study tested the hypothesis that 1) 6 months of intensive therapy to lower A1C <7.0% would blunt autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses to hypoglycemia, and 2) antecedent hypoglycemia will result in counterregulatory failure during subsequent hypoglycemia in patients with suboptimal and good glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Fifteen type 2 diabetic patients (8 men/7 women) underwent 6-month combination therapy of metformin, glipizide XL, and acarbose to lower A1C to 6.7% and 2-day repeated hypoglycemic clamp studies before and after intensive therapy. A control group of eight nondiabetic subjects participated in a single 2-day repeated hypoglycemic clamp study. RESULTS—Six-month therapy reduced A1C from 10.2 ± 0.5 to 6.7 ± 0.3%. Rates of hypoglycemia increased to 3.2 episodes per patient/month by study end. Hypoglycemia (3.3 ± 0.1 mmol/l) and insulinemia (1,722 ± 198 pmol/l) were similar during all clamp studies. Intensive therapy reduced (P < 0.05) ANS and metabolic counterregulatory responses during hypoglycemia. Antecedent hypoglycemia produced widespread blunting (P < 0.05) of neuroendocrine, ANS, and metabolic counterregulatory responses during subsequent hypoglycemia before and after intensive therapy in type 2 diabetic patients and in nondiabetic control subjects. CONCLUSIONS—Intensive oral combination therapy and antecedent hypoglycemia both blunt physiological defenses against subsequent hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes. Prior hypoglycemia of only 3.3 ± 0.1 mmol/l can result in counterregulatory failure in type 2 diabetic patients with suboptimal control and can further impair physiological defenses against hypoglycemia in intensively treated type 2 diabetes. PMID:19073776

  8. Effect of current glycemic control on qualitative body composition in sedentary ambulatory Type 2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Jayesh Dalpatbhai; Makwana, Amit H.; Mehta, Hemant B.; Kamdar, Panna; Gokhale, Pradnya A.; Shah, Chinmay J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus are on rise with cause–effect relationship. Diabetics monitor blood sugar, neglecting qualitative body composition, leaving residual threat of ectopic fat unattended. We tried to correlate glycemic triad with parameters of body composition derived objectively by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Materials and Methods: A sample of 78 under treatment sedentary Type 2 diabetics of either sex with known glycemic and lipidemic control from our city. Following baseline assessment measurement was done by instrument Omron Karada Scan (Model HBF-510, China) using the principle of tetra poplar BIA to derive parameters of body composition. We tried to correlate glycemic triad with these parameters, both directly as well as after defining them as per established cutoff norms. Results: We found poor glycemic control in the study group (20% for Hb1AC), high body mass index, subcutaneous fat, visceral fat (VF), total body fat (TBF), and lesser mass of skeletal muscle in Type 2 diabetics. However, there were small, insignificant, and inconsistent difference of these parameters while directly correlating with the fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, and glycosylated hemoglobin. On qualitative assessment, the impact of glycemic control as per standard norms, the risk of high VF, high TBF, low skeletal muscle mass was though high (between 1 and 2) in Type 2 diabetics with poor glycemic control as compared to good glycemics, but each strength lacks statistical significance. Conclusion: BIA reveals that Type 2 diabetics have more ectopic fat on expense of skeletal muscle that do not correlate with current glycemic status, both quantitatively and qualitatively. Measurement of body composition can be included and subjects can be motivated for lifestyle modification strategies while managing metabolic derangements of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27185972

  9. A priori-defined Diet Quality Indexes and Risk of Type 2 diabetes: The Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Simone; Harmon, Brook E.; Boushey, Carol J.; Morimoto, Yukiko; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kröger, Janine; Schulze, Matthias B.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2014-01-01

    Aim Dietary patterns have been associated with type 2 diabetes incidence, but little is known about the impact of ethnicity on this relation. This study evaluated the association of four a priori dietary quality indexes and type 2 diabetes risk among whites, Japanese Americans, and Native Hawaiians in the Hawaii component of the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC). Methods After excluding participants with prevalent diabetes and missing values, the analysis included 89,185 participants (11,217 cases). Dietary intake was assessed at baseline with a quantitative food frequency questionnaire designed for use in the relevant ethnic populations. Sex- and ethnicity-specific hazard ratios were calculated for the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), the alternative HEI-2010 (AHEI-2010), the alternate Mediterranean diet score (aMED), and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH). Results We observed significant inverse associations between higher scores of the DASH index and type 2 diabetes risk in white men and women, as well as in Japanese American women and Native Hawaiian men with respective risk reductions of 37, 31, 19 and 21% (highest compared to lowest index category). A higher adherence to the AHEI-2010 and aMED diet was related to a 13–28% lower type 2 diabetes risk in white participants but not in other ethnic groups. No significant associations with type 2 diabetes risk were observed for the HEI-2010 index. Conclusions The small ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes risk associated with scores of a priori-defined dietary patterns may be due to different consumption patterns of food components and the fact that the original indexes were not based on Asians and Pacific Islanders. PMID:25319012

  10. Mortality reduction among persons with type 2 diabetes: (-)-Epicatechin as add-on therapy to metformin?

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Moreno-Ulloa, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes has become a worldwide epidemic, and is growing at a rapid rate with drastic projections for developing countries. Mexico occupies the ninth place worldwide for type 2 diabetes prevalence, and in the foreseeable future, it is expected rise to the seventh place. Myocardial infarction is the most common cause of death in these patients. Although several drugs are approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes that reduce factors associated with myocardial infarction, an excess risk of death is still present. In this regard, the American Diabetes Association recommends metformin (oral glucose lowering drug) as the first-line therapy in type 2 diabetic subjects, based on its amply confirmed positive metabolic effects; however, its capacity to reduce cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetic subjects is inconclusive. Thus, mortality reduction in these patients has been an elusive goal, and is therefore, imperative to evaluate new pharmacological interventions that may favorably impact mortality in these individuals. On the other hand, epidemiological studies have suggested that moderate consumption of cacao-derived products (i.e., chocolate and cocoa) may reduce the risk of diabetes, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular disease-associated mortality. Moreover, interventional studies have also suggested that dark chocolate and cocoa consumption is vasculoprotective in normal and type 2 diabetic individuals. (-)-Epicatechin ((-)-EPI) is the main flavanol present in cacao, and suggested to be responsible for the beneficial effects observed after dark chocolate/cocoa consumption. Interestingly, in vivo studies have evidenced the capacity of (-)-EPI to reduce infarct size, and preserve cardiac mechanics in rodent models of ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Nonetheless, long-term studies using (-)-EPI and evaluating its effects on mortality are lacking. Thus, based on their particular properties, it is valid to speculate that (-)-EPI and metformin in conjunction may

  11. ROLE OF YOGA ON CARDIC AUTONOMIC FUNCTION TESTS AND COGNITION IN TYPE 2 DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Santhakumari Nagothu; Indla, Yogananda Reddy; Archana, R; Rajesh, P

    2016-01-01

    According to International Diabetic Federation, type 2 diabetic population is on the rise globally and cognitive decline is one of the complications seen in type 2 diabetes. The present study is aimed at exploring the role of regular practice of yoga on cognition in type 2 diabetes and also to study the relation between the cognition and functional status of autonomic nervous system by considering the Cardiac Autonomic (CAN) function tests. Ten type 2 diabetic subjects of both the sex, aged between 35-55 years, who practiced yoga for a period of six months at Yogi Vemana Yoga Research Institute were recruited as test group. Age and sex matched ten type 2 diabetic subjects were recruited as control group; both the group subjects are on oral hypoglycemic agents. Glycosylated hemoglobin concentration was estimated with Bio-Rad instrument, cognition was assessed with Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination Revised battery and Cardiac autonomic function tests were also conducted. Unpaired student t test was performed and p<0.05 is considered statistically significant. The mean HbA1c concentration in control and test group subjects is 7.8±1.84 and 6.9±0.4% (p=0.03) respectively. Mean cognitive scores in test and control group subjects are 93±4.5 and 85±4.0 (p=0.008) respectively. CAN test results didn't showed any significance between the test and control group. But CAN functions are affected in both the groups. Regular practice of yoga in combination with oral hypoglycemic agents has a positive effect on cognition in type 2 diabetes. PMID:27390720

  12. Dietary Patterns and Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Chinese Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Odegaard, Andrew O.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Butler, Lesley M.; Duval, Sue; Gross, Myron D.; Yu, Mimi C.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Pereira, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To empirically derive dietary patterns and examine their association with incident type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, including 43,176 Chinese men and women (aged 45–74 years), free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline (1993–1998) and followed up through 2004. Two major dietary patterns were identified using principal components analysis: a vegetable, fruit, and soy-rich pattern (VFS) and a dim sum and meat-rich pattern (DSM). Pattern scores for each participant were calculated and examined with type 2 diabetes risk using Cox regression. RESULTS The associations of the two dietary patterns with diabetes risk were modified by smoking status. Neither pattern was associated with risk of diabetes in ever smokers. In never smokers, the VFS dietary pattern was inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. Compared with the lowest quintile of the VFS dietary pattern score, the hazard ratios (HRs) for quintiles 2–5 were 0.91, 0.82, 0.73, and 0.75 (P = 0.0005 for trend). The DSM dietary pattern was positively associated with risk of type 2 diabetes in never smokers, with HRs for quintiles 2–5 of 1.07, 1.25, 1.18, and 1.47 (P < 0.0001 for trend). CONCLUSIONS A dietary pattern with higher intake of vegetables, fruits, and soy foods was inversely associated with risk of incident type 2 diabetes, and a pattern with higher intake of dim sum, meat and processed meat, sweetened foods and beverages, and fried foods was associated with a significantly increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Chinese men and women in Singapore. PMID:21330641

  13. High intakes of protein and processed meat associate with increased incidence of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Gullberg, Bo; Hellstrand, Sophie; Hindy, George; Wirfält, Elisabet; Orho-Melander, Marju

    2013-03-28

    Diets high in protein have shown positive effects on short-term weight reduction and glycaemic control. However, the understanding of how dietary macronutrient composition relates to long-term risk of type 2 diabetes is limited. The aim of the present study was to examine intakes of macronutrients, fibre and protein sources in relation to incident type 2 diabetes. In total, 27 140 individuals, aged 45-74 years, from the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort, were included. Dietary data were collected with a modified diet history method, including registration of cooked meals. During 12 years of follow-up, 1709 incident type 2 diabetes cases were identified. High protein intake was associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio (HR) 1.27 for highest compared with lowest quintile; 95 % CI 1.08, 1.49; P for trend = 0.01). When protein consumption increased by 5 % of energy at the expense of carbohydrates (HR 1.20; 95 % CI 1.09, 1.33) or fat (HR 1.21; 95 % CI 1.09, 1.33), increased diabetes risk was observed. Intakes in the highest quintiles of processed meat (HR 1.16; 95 % CI 1.00, 1.36; P for trend = 0.01) and eggs (HR 1.21; 95 % CI 1.04, 1.41; P for trend = 0.02) were associated with increased risk. Intake of fibre-rich bread and cereals was inversely associated with type 2 diabetes (HR 0.84; 95 % CI 0.73, 0.98; P for trend = 0.004). In conclusion, results from the present large population-based prospective study indicate that high protein intake is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Replacing protein with carbohydrates may be favourable, especially if fibre-rich breads and cereals are chosen as carbohydrate sources. PMID:22850191

  14. Dietary patterns in urban Ghana and risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Frank, Laura K; Kröger, Janine; Schulze, Matthias B; Bedu-Addo, George; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Danquah, Ina

    2014-07-14

    There is epidemiological evidence for associations between dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes. However, for sub-Saharan Africa, information on dietary patterns and their contribution to diabetes is lacking. The aim of the present study was to identify dietary patterns and their associations with type 2 diabetes in an urban Ghanaian population. In a hospital-based case-control study on risk factors for type 2 diabetes in Kumasi, a FFQ was administered to 675 controls and 542 cases. Dietary patterns were identified by using factor analysis including thirty-three food items. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations of dietary patterns with type 2 diabetes. Overall, two dietary patterns were identified: (1) a 'purchase' dietary pattern which positively correlated with the consumption of sweets, rice, meat, fruits and vegetables and (2) a 'traditional' dietary pattern that correlated with the intake of fruits, plantain, green leafy vegetables, fish, fermented maize products and palm oil. In the highest quintile of the 'purchase' dietary pattern, participants were younger, leaner and of higher socio-economic status than those in the lower quintiles. In contrast, participants in the highest quintile of the 'traditional' dietary pattern were older, heavier and more deprived compared with those in the lower quintiles. In the multivariate model, the 'purchase' dietary pattern was inversely associated with type 2 diabetes (OR per 1 sd 0·41, 95% CI 0·33, 0·50); the 'traditional' dietary pattern increased the odds of diabetes per 1 sd by 54% (95% CI 1·35, 1·81). In conclusion, two diverse dietary patterns were identified and associated with type 2 diabetes in urban Ghana. The determinants of pattern adherence require further investigation. PMID:24708913

  15. Dynapenic Obesity and Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes in Middle-Aged Japanese Men

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Ryoko; Sawada, Susumu S.; Lee, I-Min; Matsushita, Munehiro; Gando, Yuko; Okamoto, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Koji; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Miyachi, Motohiko; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Background The independent and combined associations of muscle strength and obesity on the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Japanese men remain unclear. Methods Hand grip strength was cross-sectionally evaluated between 2011 and 2013 to assess muscle strength in 5039 male workers aged 40 to 64 years. Weight and height were measured, and overweight/obesity was defined as a body mass index ≥25 kg/m2. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes, defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥126 mg/dL and/or hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5% and/or self-reported physician-diagnosed diabetes, was evaluated. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the prevalence of type 2 diabetes were obtained using a logistic regression model. Results In total, 611 participants had type 2 diabetes, and 1763 participants were overweight/obese. After adjustment for covariates, we found an inverse association between muscle strength and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (P for trend <0.01). In addition, when the analyses were stratified by obesity status, the multivariable-adjusted OR per 2-standard-deviation increase in muscle strength was 0.64 (95% CI, 0.49–0.83) in the overweight/obese group, compared to a weaker relationship in the normal-weight group (OR 0.79 per 2-standard-deviation increase; 95% CI, 0.60–1.06). Conclusions Dynapenia, an age-related decrease in muscle strength, is associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and this relationship is stronger in overweight/obese middle-aged Japanese men than in normal-weight men. PMID:26256772

  16. Serum Chromium Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients and Its Association with Glycaemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, Senthil; Nair, Lal Devayanivasudevan; Karuthodiyil, Rajendran; Vijayarajan, Nikhilan; Gnanasekar, Rajiv; Kapil, Vivian V.; Mohamed, Azeem S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chromium is an essential micronutrient which is required for the normal functioning of insulin and regulation of blood sugar levels. It acts as a vital antioxidant for maintaining insulin homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the free radical production is increased and levels of antioxidants like chromium, vanadium, selenium and manganese are reduced. There have been previous studies to suggest that low serum levels of chromium are associated with poorer glycaemic control. Aim To study the level of serum chromium in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its association with glycaemic control. Materials and Methods Serum chromium concentration was determined by using inductively coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectophotometry in 42 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients without any pre-existing complications. They were divided into 2 groups – well controlled (HbA1c ≤7.0%) and uncontrolled groups (HbA1c >7.0%). Results Mean serum chromium concentration measured in uncontrolled type 2 diabetic patients was significantly lower (0.065 ± 0.03 mcg/L vs 0.103 ± 0.04 mcg/L, p< 0.05). There was a statistically significant inverse linear correlation of the HbA1c values and the serum chromium concentration (r= -0.6514, p < 0.0001). There was also a decrease in chromium levels across both the groups with advancing age and the decrease being significant beyond 40 years of age (p<0.05). Conclusion The results of our study describes the relationship between serum chromium levels and control of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Significant reduction in chromium levels are probable indicators of metabolic response to oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further large scale studies relating serum chromium and type 2 diabetes mellitus may help to understand more about the exact relationship. PMID:26676175

  17. Assessment of trace elements levels in patients with Type 2 diabetes using multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Badran, M; Morsy, R; Soliman, H; Elnimr, T

    2016-01-01

    The trace elements metabolism has been reported to possess specific roles in the pathogenesis and progress of diabetes mellitus. Due to the continuous increase in the population of patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2D), this study aims to assess the levels and inter-relationships of fast blood glucose (FBG) and serum trace elements in Type 2 diabetic patients. This study was conducted on 40 Egyptian Type 2 diabetic patients and 36 healthy volunteers (Hospital of Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt). The blood serum was digested and then used to determine the levels of 24 trace elements using an inductive coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Multivariate statistical analysis depended on correlation coefficient, cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA), were used to analysis the data. The results exhibited significant changes in FBG and eight of trace elements, Zn, Cu, Se, Fe, Mn, Cr, Mg, and As, levels in the blood serum of Type 2 diabetic patients relative to those of healthy controls. The statistical analyses using multivariate statistical techniques were obvious in the reduction of the experimental variables, and grouping the trace elements in patients into three clusters. The application of PCA revealed a distinct difference in associations of trace elements and their clustering patterns in control and patients group in particular for Mg, Fe, Cu, and Zn that appeared to be the most crucial factors which related with Type 2 diabetes. Therefore, on the basis of this study, the contributors of trace elements content in Type 2 diabetic patients can be determine and specify with correlation relationship and multivariate statistical analysis, which confirm that the alteration of some essential trace metals may play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26653752

  18. ANTIOXIDANT EFFECTS OF ZINC SUPPLEMENTATION IN TUNISIAN PEOPLE WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Study was designed to determine the effects of zinc (Zn) supplementation on oxidative stress in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM). Tunisian adult subjects with HbA1C > 7.5% were supplemented for 6 months with 30 mg/d of Zn as Zn gluconate or placebo. The effects of supplementation on...

  19. Effects of long-term selenium supplementation on the incidence of Type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Oxidative stress is associated with insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Observational studies have reported a protective role of dietary anti-oxidants in the development of type 2 DM. Moreover, findings from animal models suggest benefici...

  20. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and type 2 diabetes: a study of 897 cases and 1010 controls

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, P F; Mowbray, C; Patel, S K; Elson, J L; Sampson, M; Hitman, G A; McCarthy, M I; Hattersley, A T; Walker, M

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in the secretion of insulin by pancreatic β‐cells, and pathogenic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause diabetes. The aetiology of type 2 diabetes has a strong genetic component, raising the possibility that genetic variants of mtDNA alter the risk of developing the disorder. Recent studies have produced conflicting results. By studying 897 UK cases of type 2 diabetes and 1010 population‐matched controls, it is shown that European mtDNA haplogroups are unlikely to play a major role in the risk of developing the disorder. PMID:17551080

  1. Pulmonary Function Tests in Type 2 Diabetics and Non-Diabetic People -A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Background: The complications which are associated with type 2 Diabetes mellitus are mostly caused by macro vascular and micro vascular damages. The pulmonary complications of diabetes mellitus have been poorly characterised. The present study has focused on the mechanical aspects of lung dysfunction which are attributable to type 2 Diabetes Mellitus; maximal forced Spiro metric Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) like Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in 1sec (FEV1),. FEV1/FVC % and Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), to be specific. Aims and objectives: 1. To do a comparative analysis of the PFTs in type 2 diabetics and non-diabetics by using computerised spirometry. 2. To assess the effects of chronic hyperglycaemia on lung functions and functional limitations of activities of daily living which are ascribable to pulmonary complications, in patients with type 2 diabetes. Material and Methods: Spirometry was performed by using a computerised electronic spirometer, (RMS Helios 401, version 3-1-59, transducer number 4-16-1669) on 40 type 2 diabetics who were between 40-65 years of age and on 40 controls (who were matched for age, sex and BMI). Any person with a H/O smoking or any condition which affected the lung functions, was excluded from the study. The study was a cross sectional and a retrospective study. Data was analyzed and processed with the help of EPI INFO statistical software by using unpaired Student’s ‘t’–test (two-tailed). The level of significance was taken as a p–value of <0.025. Results: This study clearly showed a statistically significant reduction in FVC, FEV1, PEFR in type 2 diabetics as compared to those in the controls. FEV1/FVC% was increased in type 2 diabetics as compared to that in controls and the increase was statistically significant. Conclusion: This study concluded that type 2 diabetes adversely affects the mechanical functions of the lung, the pattern of disease being primarily restrictive in nature. PMID

  2. Newer oral and noninsulin therapies to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hermayer, Kathie L; Dake, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus involves several biologic mechanisms and no single medication addresses them all. Most patients require more than one medication to adequately treat their diabetes, needing drugs with unique and complementary mechanisms of action to address and balance insulin and glucagon levels. In the past decade, several therapeutic drug classes have been developed for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Each provides therapeutic options with novel mechanisms of action to help clinicians achieve the goal of glucose homeostasis while controlling adverse events, especially reducing the risk of hypoglycemia. PMID:27176678

  3. The health behavior of Sri Lankan Buddhist nuns with type 2 diabetes: duty, devotion, and detachment.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, Sunny; Mendelson, Cindy

    2013-12-01

    Sri Lanka has experienced an increase in the rate of type 2 diabetes. Selfmanagement of diabetes among Sri Lanka's Buddhist nuns, who depend on food donations and limit physical activity in accord with the monastic code of conduct, presents unique challenges and has not been previously studied. The purpose of this focused ethnographic study of 10 Buddhist nuns was to understand how they managed their illness within the restrictions on diet and physical activity. Three themes-duty, devotion, and detachment-explained and described their health behavior regarding type 2 diabetes within the context of their daily routines and obligations. PMID:22395758

  4. Fixed-dose combination of sitagliptin and metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Jonathan K

    2009-01-01

    JanumetTM, a fixed dose combination of sitagliptin/metformin HCL manufactured by Merck Pharmaceuticals, has received US Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes, that are inadequately controlled, either by sitagliptin or metformin alone or together in free-dose combination form. Sitagliptin, an inhibitor of the enzyme DDP-4, assists patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to achieve glycemic control. It has been shown to be safe and effective at 100 mg daily doses. The effect of giving sitagliptin in combination with metformin is thought to have a complimentary and possibly additive effect on glycemic control. PMID:21437126

  5. Transferability and fine mapping of type 2 diabetes loci in African Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource Plus Study.

    PubMed

    Ng, Maggie C Y; Saxena, Richa; Li, Jiang; Palmer, Nicholette D; Dimitrov, Latchezar; Xu, Jianzhao; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Zmuda, Joseph M; Siscovick, David S; Patel, Sanjay R; Crook, Errol D; Sims, Mario; Chen, Yii-Der I; Bertoni, Alain G; Li, Mingyao; Grant, Struan F A; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B; Psaty, Bruce M; Pankow, James S; Langefeld, Carl D; Freedman, Barry I; Rotter, Jerome I; Wilson, James G; Bowden, Donald W

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) disproportionally affects African Americans (AfA) but, to date, genetic variants identified from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are primarily from European and Asian populations. We examined the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and locus transferability of 40 reported T2D loci in six AfA GWAS consisting of 2,806 T2D case subjects with or without end-stage renal disease and 4,265 control subjects from the Candidate Gene Association Resource Plus Study. Our results revealed that seven index SNPs at the TCF7L2, KLF14, KCNQ1, ADCY5, CDKAL1, JAZF1, and GCKR loci were significantly associated with T2D (P < 0.05). The strongest association was observed at TCF7L2 rs7903146 (odds ratio [OR] 1.30; P = 6.86 × 10⁻⁸). Locus-wide analysis demonstrated significant associations (P(emp) < 0.05) at regional best SNPs in the TCF7L2, KLF14, and HMGA2 loci as well as suggestive signals in KCNQ1 after correction for the effective number of SNPs at each locus. Of these loci, the regional best SNPs were in differential linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the index and adjacent SNPs. Our findings suggest that some loci discovered in prior reports affect T2D susceptibility in AfA with similar effect sizes. The reduced and differential LD pattern in AfA compared with European and Asian populations may facilitate fine mapping of causal variants at loci shared across populations. PMID:23193183

  6. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": You Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood glucose levels but not yet diabetes). "Fifty four million Americans are at risk for type 2 ... by losing five to seven percent of their body weight through increased physical activity and a reduced fat, ...

  7. Underactive Thyroid May Raise Odds for Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... HealthDay News) -- People with an underactive thyroid, or hypothyroidism, may be at greater risk for type 2 ... gain, the scientists said. Prior studies suggested that hypothyroidism is tied to reduced insulin sensitivity -- a precursor ...

  8. Implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes: a protocol for mixed methods research

    PubMed Central

    Busetto, Loraine; Luijkx, Katrien Ger; Vrijhoef, Hubertus Johannes Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While integrated care for diabetes mellitus type 2 has achieved good results in terms of intermediate clinical and process outcomes, the evidence-based knowledge on its implementation is scarce, and insights generalisable to other settings therefore remain limited. Objective This study protocol provides a description of the design and methodology of a mixed methods study on the implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes. The aim of the proposed research is to investigate the mechanisms by which and the context in which integrated care for type 2 diabetes has been implemented, which outcomes have been achieved and how the context and mechanisms have affected the outcomes. Methods This article describes a convergent parallel mixed methods research design, including a systematic literature review on the implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes as well as a case study on two Dutch best practices on integrated care for type 2 diabetes. Discussion The implementation of integrated care for diabetes type 2 is an under-researched area. Insights from this study could be applied to other settings as well as other chronic conditions to strengthen the evidence on the implementation of integrated care. PMID:25550689

  9. Characterization of the chlorpropamide-alcohol-flush in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pontiroli, A E; De Pasqua, A; Colombo, R; Ricordi, C; Pozza, G

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the present paper was to evaluate the prevalence of the chlorpropamide-alcohol-flush (CPAF) in patients with type 2 and with type 1 diabetes. Ninety-seven patients with type 2 diabetes and 33 with type 1 diabetes drank 40 ml vermouth 12 h after placebo and again 12 h after 1 tablet of chlorpropamide (250 mg) or 12 h after the last of repeated administrations of chlorpropamide (250 mg b.i.d. for 2 days). Skin temperature was recorded in all patients by a thermocouple probe connected to the left cheek. In 47 patients serum concentrations of chlorpropamide and of its metabolite CBSU were also determined. The prevalence of CPAF was similar in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, was greater in women than in men, and was significantly greater after repeated administrations than after one single administration of chlorpropamide. The increase of skin temperature during a 30-min period was significantly higher in patients with CPAF than in patients without CPAF. Serum concentrations of chlorpropamide and of its metabolite CBSU were more elevated after 4 than after 1 tablet of chlorpropamide, but were not significantly different in patients with and without CPAF. These data indicate that both genetic factors and the amount of chlorpropamide used affect the appearance of CPAF. To assess the possible role of serotonin and of dopamine in the CPAF, some patients with CPAF were tested again after treatment with metergoline, an antiserotonin agent, or with bromocriptine, a dopamine-agonist. Neither drug influenced the CPAF, indicating that the two neurotransmitters are not involved in the CPAF. PMID:6880563

  10. Enhanced ROS production and oxidative damage in subcutaneous white adipose tissue mitochondria in obese and type 2 diabetes subjects.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Mrittika; Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Chatterjee, Gargi; Ganguly, Anirban; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in the insulin target tissues has been implicated in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. The study has examined the oxidative stress parameters in the mitochondria of subcutaneous white adipose tissue from obese and non-obese subjects with or without type 2 diabetes. An accumulation of protein carbonyls, fluorescent lipid peroxidation products, and malondialdehyde occurs in the adipose tissue mitochondria of obese type 2 diabetic, non-diabetic obese, and non-obese diabetic subjects with the maximum increase noticed in the obese type 2 diabetes patients and the minimum in non-obese type 2 diabetics. The mitochondria from obese type 2 diabetics, non-diabetic obese, and non-obese type 2 diabetics also produce significantly more reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro compared to those of controls, and apparently the mitochondrial ROS production rate in each group is proportional to the respective load of oxidative damage markers. Likewise, the mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase show decreased activities most markedly in obese type 2 diabetes subjects and to a lesser degree in non-obese type 2 diabetes or non-diabetic obese subjects in comparison to control. The results imply that mitochondrial dysfunction with enhanced ROS production may contribute to the metabolic abnormality of adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes. PMID:25312902

  11. FDA OKs New Injectable Type 2 Diabetes Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... shouldn't be used to treat people with type 1 diabetes. It also shouldn't be used by anyone with increased ketones (a sign that the body isn't getting enough insulin) in their blood or urine, or extremely elevated ketones (diabetic ketoacidosis), the FDA said. Common side effects of ...

  12. The prevention and control the type-2 diabetes by changing lifestyle and dietary pattern

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Type-2 diabetes is a major, non-communicable disease with increasing prevalence at a global level. Type-2 diabetes results when the body does not make enough insulin or the body cannot use the insulin it produces. Type-2 diabetes is the leading cause of premature deaths. Improperly managed, it can lead to a number of health issues, including heart diseases, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage, leg and foot amputations, and death. Type-2 diabetes or adult-onset diabetes is most common type of diabetes, usually begins when a person is in his or her mid-50s, but diabetes is not inevitable. Minor changes in your lifestyle can greatly reduce your chances of getting this disease. Therefore, in order to prevent this condition, action should be taken regarding the modifiable factors that influence its development-lifestyle and dietary habits. However, with proper testing, treatment and lifestyle changes, healthy eating as a strategy, promote walking, exercise, and other physical activities have beneficial effects on human health and prevention or treatment of diabetes, promoting adherence to this pattern is of considerable public health importance. PMID:24741641

  13. Genetic Variants of TPCN2 Associated with Type 2 Diabetes Risk in the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Fan, Xiaofang; Zhang, Ning; Zheng, Hui; Song, Yuping; Shen, Chunfang; Shen, Jiayi; Ren, Fengdong; Yang, Jialin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine whether TPCN2 genetic variants are associated with type 2 diabetes and to elucidate which variants in TPCN2 confer diabetes susceptibility in the Chinese population. Research Design and Methods The sample population included 384 patients with type 2 diabetes and 1468 controls. Anthropometric parameters, glycemic and lipid profiles and insulin resistance were measured. We selected 6 TPCN2 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs35264875, rs267603153, rs267603154, rs3829241, rs1551305, and rs3750965). Genotypes were determined using a Sequenom MassARRAY SNP genotyping system. Results Ultimately, we genotyped 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs3750965, rs3829241, and rs1551305) in all individuals. There was a 5.1% higher prevalence of the rs1551305 variant allele in type 2 diabetes individuals (A) compared with wild-type homozygous individuals (G). The AA genotype of rs1551305 was associated with a higher diabetes risk (p<0.05). The distributions of rs3829241 and rs3750965 polymorphisms were not significantly different between the two groups. HOMA-%B of subjects harboring the AA genotype of rs1551305 decreased by 14.87% relative to the GG genotype. Conclusions TPCN2 plays a role in metabolic regulation, and the rs1551305 single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with type 2 diabetes risk. Future work will begin to unravel the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26918892

  14. Exenatide Extended-Release: An Updated Review of Its Use in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Syed, Yahiya Y; McCormack, Paul L

    2015-07-01

    Exenatide extended-release (exenatide ER) [Bydureon(®)] is a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is injected subcutaneously by patients once weekly, with no dose titration required. This article updates an earlier review of exenatide ER in the management of type 2 diabetes, focusing on recently published data. In randomized, controlled trials, adjunctive exenatide ER 2 mg once weekly for 24-30 weeks significantly improved glycaemic control and reduced bodyweight in patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes despite diet plus exercise and/or oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (OADs). These beneficial effects of exenatide ER were maintained after up to 6 years of treatment. In patients receiving one or more OADs, addition of exenatide ER provided better glycaemic control than an immediate-release formulation of exenatide (exenatide twice daily), sitagliptin, pioglitazone, insulin glargine or insulin detemir, and was slightly less effective than liraglutide. In patients treated with diet plus exercise alone, adjunctive exenatide ER was noninferior to metformin and superior to sitagliptin, but was not noninferior to pioglitazone. Exenatide ER was generally well tolerated, with a low inherent risk of hypoglycaemia. The most common adverse events were mild to moderate gastrointestinal events, injection-site reactions and headache. Thus, exenatide ER is a useful treatment option in the management of type 2 diabetes. It offers a convenient, once-weekly regimen and can be administered by patients via a pen injection system or syringes and needles. PMID:26071140

  15. DIETARY ENERGY INTAKE IS ASSOCIATED WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES RISK MARKERS IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Donin, Angela S; Nightingale, Claire M; Owen, Christopher G; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Jebb, Susan A; Ambrosini, Gina L; Stephen, Alison M; Cook, Derek G; Whincup, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    Objective Energy intake, energy density and nutrient intakes are implicated in type 2 diabetes risk in adults, but little is known about their influence on emerging type 2 diabetes risk in childhood. We examined these associations in a multi-ethnic population of children. Research Design and Methods Cross-sectional study of 2017 children predominantly of white European, South Asian and black African-Caribbean origin aged 9-10 years who had a detailed 24 hour dietary recall, measurements of body composition and provided a fasting blood sample for measurements of plasma glucose, HbA1c and serum insulin; HOMA insulin resistance was also derived. Results Energy intake was positively associated with insulin resistance. After the removal of 176 participants with implausible energy intakes (unlikely to be representative of habitual intake), energy intake was more strongly associated with insulin resistance, and was also associated with glucose and fat mass index. Energy density was also positively associated with insulin resistance and fat mass index. However, in mutually adjusted analyses, the associations for energy intake remained while those for energy density became non-significant. Individual nutrient intakes showed no associations with type 2 diabetes risk markers. Conclusions Higher total energy intake was strongly associated with high levels of insulin resistance and may help to explain emerging type 2 diabetes risk in childhood. Studies are needed to establish whether reducing energy intake produces sustained favourable changes in insulin resistance and circulating glucose levels. PMID:23939542

  16. Disrupted White Matter Network and Cognitive Decline in Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junying; Liu, Zhen; Li, Zixiao; Wang, Yunxia; Chen, Yaojing; Li, Xin; Chen, Kewei; Shu, Ni; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2016-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is accompanied by cognitive impairment and is associated with an increased risk of dementia. Damage to brain structures such as white matter network disruption may underlie this cognitive disturbance. In the present study, 886 non-diabetic and 163 type 2 diabetic participants completed a battery of neuropsychological tests. Among them, 38 diabetic patients and 34 non-diabetic participants that matched the patients for age/sex/education received a magnetic resonance imaging-based diffusion tensor imaging. Then we calculated the topological properties of the white matter network using a graph theoretical method to investigate network efficiency differences between groups. We found that type 2 diabetic patients had inferior performances compared to the non-diabetic controls, in several cognitive domains involving executive function, spatial processing, memory, and attention. We also found that diabetic patients exhibited a disrupted topological organization of the white matter network (including the global network properties, i.e., network strength, global efficiency, local efficiency and shortest path length, and the nodal efficiency of the right rolandic operculum) in the brain. Moreover, those global network properties and the nodal efficiency of the right rolandic operculum both had positive correlations with executive function in the patient group. The results suggest that type 2 diabetes mellitus leads to an alteration in the topological organization of the cortical white matter network and this alteration may account for the observed cognitive decline. PMID:27163818

  17. A Brief Culturally Tailored Intervention for Puerto Ricans with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Amico, K. R.; Cruz, Noemi; O'Connell, Ann A.; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael; Kalichman, Seth C.; Wolf, Scott A.; Fisher, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    The information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model of health behavior change informed the design of a brief, culturally tailored diabetes self-care intervention for Puerto Ricans with type 2 diabetes. Participants (n = 118) were recruited from an outpatient, primary care clinic at an urban hospital in the northeast United States. ANCOVA…

  18. Are Self-Management Interventions Suitable for All? Comparing Obese Versus Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroese, Floor M.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; De Ridder, Denise T. D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to compare obese and nonobese type 2 diabetes patients at baseline and after participating in an existing self-management intervention (i.e., "Beyond Good Intentions") on cognitive, self-care, and behavioral measures to examine whether both groups are equally prepared and able to adopt…

  19. Spouse Control and Type 2 Diabetes Management: Moderating Effects of Dyadic Expectations for Spouse Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Amber J.; Franks, Melissa M.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Rook, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    For married patients, chronic illness management often includes involvement of their spouses. We examined expectations regarding spouse involvement in the health of a partner with type 2 diabetes (N = 139 couples) from the perspectives of the patient and spouse. Partners' dyadic expectations and spouses' gender were posited to moderate spouses'…

  20. Mexican American Parents' Perceptions of Childhood Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, Barbara J.; Barr, Kathleen L.; Baker, Sharon K.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the norms, values, and perceptions of urban immigrant Mexican American (MA) parents of school children relative to physical activity, healthy eating, and child risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Investigators facilitated five focus groups in an urban elementary school setting and analyzed data using qualitative…

  1. Management of Type 2 Diabetes: A Challenge for Patient and Physician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Arend, I. J. M.; Stolk, R. P.; Krans, H. M. J.; Grobbee, D. E.; Schrijvers, A. J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses obstacles involved in the routine clinical practice for type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, a disease associated with serious complications and co-morbidity. States that educating patients to take an active role in their care by changing their diet and habits is a challenge to health care educators. Lists tools patients will need to learn to help…

  2. Preventing and Treating Type 2 Diabetes through a Physically Active Lifestyle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Raymond W.; Kamla, Jim; Lee, Man-Cheong; Mak, Jennifer Y.

    2007-01-01

    The general decrease in physical activity in the United States population has led to an increase of cases of type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, NIDDM), obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and arteriosclerosis. Remarkable scientific advancements have been made toward understanding the beneficial effects of physical activity…

  3. Is Acanthosis Nigricans a Reliable Indicator for Risk of Type 2 Diabetes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lisa H.; Ficca, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a thickening and hyperpigmentation of the skin commonly found on the neck, axilla, or groin and is generally caused by hyperinsulinemia, a consequence of insulin resistance associated with obesity. Insulin resistance is a primary risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and…

  4. Lowering Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in High-Risk Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobo, Nichole; Schantz, Shirley; Kaufman, Francine R.; Kollipara, Sobha

    2009-01-01

    Among children and youth who develop type 2 diabetes (T2DM) there are a number of genetic and environmental factors that lead to a combination of insulin resistance and relative-cell secretory failure of the pancreas. These factors include ethnicity (highest in American Indian youth), obesity, sedentary behavior, family history of T2DM, puberty,…

  5. Searching for the Kinkeepers: Historian Gender, Age, and Type 2 Diabetes Family History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordimaina, Alicia M.; Sheldon, Jane P.; Kiedrowski, Lesli A.; Jayaratne, Toby Epstein

    2015-01-01

    Kinkeepers facilitate family communication and may be key to family medical history collection and dissemination. Middle-aged women are frequently kinkeepers. Using type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as a model, we explored whether the predicted gender and age effects of kinkeeping can be extended to family medical historians. Through a U.S. telephone survey,…

  6. Metabolic factors, adipose tissue, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in Type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) production by adipose tissue is increased in obesity, and its circulating levels are high in type 2 diabetes. PAI-1 increases cardiovascular risk by favoring clot stability, interfering with vascular remodeling, or both. We investigated in obese diabetic per...

  7. Determinants of glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes at randomization in the TODAY study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate insulin sensitivity and secretion indices and determinants of glycemic control in youth with recent-onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) at randomization in the TODAY study, the largest study of youth with T2DM to date. We examined estimates of insulin sensitivit...

  8. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors with insulin in type 2 diabetes: Clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    John, Mathew; Gopinath, Deepa; Jagesh, Rejitha

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of type 2 diabetes is a challenging problem. Most subjects with type 2 diabetes have progression of beta cell failure necessitating the addition of multiple antidiabetic agents and eventually use of insulin. Intensification of insulin leads to weight gain and increased risk of hypoglycemia. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a class of antihyperglycemic agents which act by blocking the SGLT2 in the proximal tubule of the kidney. They have potential benefits in terms of weight loss and reduction of blood pressure in addition to improvements in glycemic control. Further, one of the SGLT2 inhibitors, empagliflozin has proven benefits in reducing adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in a CV outcome trial. Adding SGLT2 inhibitors to insulin in subjects with type 2 diabetes produced favorable effects on glycemic control without the weight gain and hypoglycemic risks associated with insulin therapy. The general risks of increased genital mycotic infections, urinary tract infections, volume, and osmosis-related adverse effects in these subjects were similar to the pooled data of individual SGLT2 inhibitors. There are subsets of subjects with type 2 diabetes who may have insulin deficiency, beta cell autoimmunity, or is prone to diabetic ketoacidosis. In these subjects, SGLT2 inhibitors should be used with caution to prevent the rare risks of ketoacidosis. PMID:26904465

  9. Progressive deterioration of beta-cell function in obese youth with type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In adults, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is characterized with progressive deterioration in insulin secretion. Data are scanty in youth. We investigated prospectively the change in ß-cell function and in insulin sensitivity in youth with T2DM. Six adolescents with T2DM [hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) 6.6 +/- 1.0%]...

  10. Correlation between the levels of circulating adhesion molecules and atherosclerosis in type-2 diabetic normotensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Serrano, Alberto Maceda; Lozano-Nuevo, Jose Juan; Escalante-Acosta, Bruno Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a common feature in type-2 diabetic patients and is associated with inflammation, increased levels of circulating soluble adhesion molecules and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the levels of circulating soluble adhesion molecules and the degree of atherosclerosis in normotensive type-2 diabetic patients. Results: We found significant correlations between ICAM-1 (r = 0.69, p < 0.001 95% IC 0.65 to 0.82) and VCAM-1 (r = 0.4, p < 0.03, 95% IC 0.65 to 0.82) levels and maximal carotid artery intimal-medial thickness, whereas no correlation was observed with E-selectin. Methods: We studied 30 normotensive type-2 diabetic patients in whom VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin were measured by ELISA. Additionally, the intimal-medial thickness of both the common and internal carotid arteries was measured (B-mode ultrasound). The levels of circulating adhesion molecules and maximal carotid artery intimal-medial thicknesses were correlated using the Spearman correlation coefficient test. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA. Conclusion: Our results suggest that ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are markers associated, and correlated with the degree of atherosclerosis in normotensive type-2 diabetic patients. PMID:19717975

  11. Cooking Schools Improve Nutrient Intake Patterns of People with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archuleta, Martha; VanLeeuwen, Dawn; Halderson, Karen; Jackson, K'Dawn; Bock, Margaret Ann; Eastman, Wanda; Powell, Jennifer; Titone, Michelle; Marr, Carol; Wells, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether cooking classes offered by the Cooperative Extension Service improved nutrient intake patterns in people with type 2 diabetes. Design: Quasi-experimental using pretest, posttest comparisons. Setting: Community locations including schools, churches, and senior centers. Participants: One hundred seventeen people with…

  12. Field of Dreams Program Evaluation: Empowering the Latino Population in Type2 Diabetes Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urteaga, Edie

    2011-01-01

    Adult onset, type2 diabetes affects Latino families at a higher rate than other ethnicities and negatively impacting their quality of life, ability to financially succeed, and ultimately impacting our overall economy. Multiple resources are available in the country to help people learn how to prevent, control, and manage diabetes. However, the…

  13. Adults Living with Type 2 Diabetes: Kept Personal Health Information Items as Expressions of Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whetstone, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated personal information behavior and information needs that 21 adults managing life with Type 2 diabetes identify explicitly and implicitly during discussions of item acquisition and use of health information items that are kept in their homes. Research drew upon a naturalistic lens, in that semi-structured interviews were…

  14. Metabolomics - the complementary field in systems biology: a review on obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Abu Bakar, Mohamad Hafizi; Sarmidi, Mohamad Roji; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Ali Khan, Abid; Suan, Chua Lee; Zaman Huri, Hasniza; Yaakob, Harisun

    2015-07-01

    Metabolomic studies on obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus have led to a number of mechanistic insights into biomarker discovery and comprehension of disease progression at metabolic levels. This article reviews a series of metabolomic studies carried out in previous and recent years on obesity and type 2 diabetes, which have shown potential metabolic biomarkers for further evaluation of the diseases. Literature including journals and books from Web of Science, Pubmed and related databases reporting on the metabolomics in these particular disorders are reviewed. We herein discuss the potential of reported metabolic biomarkers for a novel understanding of disease processes. These biomarkers include fatty acids, TCA cycle intermediates, carbohydrates, amino acids, choline and bile acids. The biological activities and aetiological pathways of metabolites of interest in driving these intricate processes are explained. The data from various publications supported metabolomics as an effective strategy in the identification of novel biomarkers for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Accelerating interest in the perspective of metabolomics to complement other fields in systems biology towards the in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the diseases is also well appreciated. In conclusion, metabolomics can be used as one of the alternative approaches in biomarker discovery and the novel understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms in obesity and type 2 diabetes. It can be foreseen that there will be an increasing research interest to combine metabolomics with other omics platforms towards the establishment of detailed mechanistic evidence associated with the disease processes. PMID:25919044

  15. [Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus oral Chinese patent medicine literature metrology analysis].

    PubMed

    Cui, Tong-hua; Li, Yuan-yuan

    2012-09-01

    The CBM, CNKI database 1979-2012 included oral Chinese patent medicine treatment diabetes literature, and the literature published time, periodical distribution, sources of literature and statistical analysis, to explore the treatment of type 2 diabetes medicine clinical literature distribution law and development trend, as in diabetes research related to the clinical and scientific research personnel to provide reference. PMID:23236770

  16. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Without Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jae-Seung; Cha, Seon-Ah; Lim, Tae-Seok; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ki-Ho; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Kim, Joon-Sung; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the factors that might influence the development of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). From January 2000 to December 2005, a total of 595 patients who had type 2 diabetes without DPN between the ages of 25 and 75 years, and had no prior history of DFUs were consecutively enrolled in the study. A cardiovascular autonomic function test was performed to diagnose cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) using heart rate variability parameters. The median follow-up time was 13.3 years. Among the 449 (75.4%) patients who completed the follow-up evaluation, 22 (4.9%) patients developed new ulcers, and 6 (1.3%) patients underwent the procedure for lower extremity amputations. The patients in the DFUs group had a longer duration of diabetes, higher baseline HbA1c levels, higher rates of nephropathy, and CAN. A Cox hazard regression analysis results revealed that the development of DFUs was significantly associated with the presence of CAN (normal vs definite CAN; HR, 4.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.29–15.33) after adjusting for possible confounding factors. The development of DFUs was independently associated with CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes without DPN. We suggested the importance of CAN as a predictor of DFUs even in the patients without DPN, and the need to pay attention to patients with definite CAN and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27015188

  17. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes and obesity in rural Mapuche population from Chile.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bravo, F; Carrasco, E; Santos, J L; Calvillán, M; Larenas, G; Albala, C

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and obesity in the Mapuche natives from rural areas in Chile. This cross-sectional study involved men (n = 95) and women (n = 224) older than 20 y from an aboriginal ethnic group (Mapuches), residing in rural communities from the south of Chile. Prevalence of Type 2 diabetes and IGT was calculated according to the World Health Organization criteria. Data on age, degree of ancestral purity, obesity, and hypertension were also obtained. The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in rural Mapuche natives was estimated as 3.2% (95% CI: 0.7--9.0) in men and 4.5% (95% CI: 2.2--8.1) in women. The overall prevalence of obesity was 56.1% (95% CI: 50.5--61.6): 40.0% (95% CI: 30.1--40.8) in men and 62.9% (95% CI: 56.3--69.3) in women (P value < 0.001). These data suggest that the prevalence of obesity and Type 2 diabetes has been increasing during recent years in the Mapuche communities. The prevalence estimated in this study is higher than that reported 15 y ago. This suggests an important role of lifestyle changes as a possible explanation for epidemiologic transition. PMID:11312066

  18. METABOLIC CONTROL IN YOUTH WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES SUMMER VS. SCHOOL YEAR PATTERNS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is now a problem of youth. Proper management of T2D includes consistency in eating patterns, activity and medication, with weight reduction, if needed. Seasonal changes in diet may impact hemoglobin A1C levels (A1C). This study compared A1C level and dietary intake of 75 T2D yo...

  19. Bay leaves improve glucose and lipid profile of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bay Leaves (Laurus nobilis) have been shown to improve insulin function, in vitro, but the effects on people have not been determined. The objective of this study was to determine if bay leaves may be important in the prevention and/or alleviation of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Forty people wit...

  20. Lifestyle change and mobility in obese adults with type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus often have limitations in mobility that increase with age. An intensive lifestyle intervention that produces weight loss and improves fitness could slow the loss of mobility in such patients. Methods We randomly assigned 5145 overweight or obese adults...

  1. Phenotype of subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus may determine clinical response to chromium suppplementation.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study was to assess which patient characteristics best determine response to supplemental chromium (Cr). We assessed response to Cr using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps before and after Cr supplementation in 38 subjects with Type 2 diabetes. The evaluations were double-blinded,...

  2. Predicted 25-hydroxyvitamin D Score and incident type 2 diabetes in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vitamin D is involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our objective was to examine the relation between vitamin D status and incidence of T2D. We used a subsample of 1972 Framingham Offspring Study participants to develop a regression model to predict...

  3. Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes among Youth: A Systematic Review, Implications for the School Nurse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackney, Dana E.; Cutshall, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity and the early development of type 2 diabetes (T2 DM) place students at risk for chronic health problems. The school nurse is uniquely situated to promote school health initiatives that influence health behavior. The purpose of this review was to determine effective nonpharmacological interventions for prevention of T2 DM in…

  4. Sudomotor function assessment as a screening tool for microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Eranki, V G; Santosh, R; Rajitha, K; Pillai, A; Sowmya, P; Dupin, J; Calvet, J H

    2013-09-01

    Sudoscan, a non invasive, quick, and simple method to measure sweat function, was evaluated as a screening tool for microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes. AUC of the ROC curve for detection of microvascular complication was 0.75 for an autonomic risk score, with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 61%. PMID:23880037

  5. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors with insulin in type 2 diabetes: Clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    John, Mathew; Gopinath, Deepa; Jagesh, Rejitha

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of type 2 diabetes is a challenging problem. Most subjects with type 2 diabetes have progression of beta cell failure necessitating the addition of multiple antidiabetic agents and eventually use of insulin. Intensification of insulin leads to weight gain and increased risk of hypoglycemia. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a class of antihyperglycemic agents which act by blocking the SGLT2 in the proximal tubule of the kidney. They have potential benefits in terms of weight loss and reduction of blood pressure in addition to improvements in glycemic control. Further, one of the SGLT2 inhibitors, empagliflozin has proven benefits in reducing adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in a CV outcome trial. Adding SGLT2 inhibitors to insulin in subjects with type 2 diabetes produced favorable effects on glycemic control without the weight gain and hypoglycemic risks associated with insulin therapy. The general risks of increased genital mycotic infections, urinary tract infections, volume, and osmosis-related adverse effects in these subjects were similar to the pooled data of individual SGLT2 inhibitors. There are subsets of subjects with type 2 diabetes who may have insulin deficiency, beta cell autoimmunity, or is prone to diabetic ketoacidosis. In these subjects, SGLT2 inhibitors should be used with caution to prevent the rare risks of ketoacidosis. PMID:26904465

  6. Metformin Ameliorates Podocyte Damage by Restoring Renal Tissue Podocalyxin Expression in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Limin; Gu, Junfei; Yang, Di; Wang, Wei; Ye, Shandong

    2015-01-01

    Podocalyxin (PCX) is a signature molecule of the glomerular podocyte and of maintaining integrity of filtration function of glomerulus. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of different doses of metformin on renal tissue PCX expression in type 2 diabetic rats and clarify its protection on glomerular podocytes. Type 2 diabetic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in which diabetes was induced by high-fat diet/streptozotocin (HFD-STZ) were treated with different doses of metformin (150, 300, and 500 mg/kg per day, resp.) for 8 weeks. Various biochemical parameters, kidney histopathology, and renal tissue PCX expression levels were examined. In type 2 diabetic rats, severe hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia were developed. Urinary albumin and PCX were markedly increased. Diabetes induced significant alterations in renal glomerular structure. In addition, protein and mRNA expression of renal tissue PCX were highly decreased. However, treatment of rats with different doses of metformin restored all these changes to a varying degree. These results suggested that metformin can ameliorate glomerular podocyte damage in type 2 diabetic rats, which may be partly associated with its role in restoring PCX expression and inhibiting urinary excretion of PCX with dose dependence. PMID:26075281

  7. Understanding "masculinity" and the challenges of managing type-2 diabetes among African-American men.

    PubMed Central

    Liburd, Leandris C.; Namageyo-Funa, Apophia; Jack, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    African-American men bear a greater burden of type-2 diabetes and its associated complications. The purpose of this analysis was to explore in greater depth themes that emerged in illness narratives of a small sample of African-American men living with type-2 diabetes. The primary theme that is the focus of this article is the lived experience of black manhood and masculinity and its intersection with the challenges of diabetes self-management. In-depth interviews with 16 African-American men who had established type-2 diabetes yielded thematic analyses of four questions: (1) What do you fear most about having diabetes? (2) In what ways have people in your life treated you differently after learning you have diabetes? (3) In what ways has knowing you have diabetes affected the way you see yourself? and (4) What are some reactions when you tell people you have diabetes? This preliminary study suggests that the requirements of diabetes self-management often run counter to the traditional sex roles and learned behaviors of African-American men, and this can contribute to nonadherence to medications and poor glycemic control. Gender identity is a key cultural factor that influences health-related behaviors, including how men with type-2 diabetes engage with the healthcare system and manage their diabetes. Understanding African-American men's gender identity is an important component of cultural competency for physicians and can be consequential in patient outcomes. PMID:17534013

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Participatory Empowerment Group for Chinese Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lou, Vivian W. Q.; Zhang, Yiqi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of a Participatory Empowerment Group (PEG) for Chinese type 2 diabetes patients in Shanghai. Method: A randomized waiting list control and pretest and posttest comparisons were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention by comparing blood sugar level and health-related quality of life.…

  9. Satisfaction with Life and Psychosocial Factors among Underserved Minorities with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Kenneth W.; Hodgson, Jennifer L.; Lamson, Angela L.; Swanson, Melvin S.; White, Mark B.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between biomedical markers of disease management and psychosocial constructs, while also assessing the correlates and predictors of variability for satisfaction with life (SWL) among African American and Hispanic participants with type 2 diabetes. Data were collected from 142 participants…

  10. TCM Formula Xiaoyaosan Decoction Improves Depressive-Like Behaviors in Rats with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Liu, Qun; Li, Xiao-Juan; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Yue-Yun; Zhao, Hong-Bo; Jin, Zhong-Ye; Jing, Yu-Xia; Yan, Zhi-Yi; Chen, Jia-Xu

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of depression with type 2 diabetes remains elusive, requiring further study. Objective. To evaluate the effect of TCM formula Xiaoyaosan on depressive-like behaviors in rats with type 2 diabetes. Methods. Rats were divided into 5 groups and drugs were administered during the model period of 21 days. The model of depressive-like behaviors in rats with type 2 diabetes was induced by a high fat diet, low doses of STZ injection, and chronic restraint stress for 21 days. The body weight, fasting blood glucose, ITT, OGTT, 5-HT, DA, depression behaviors, and morphological changes of formation were measured and observed. Results. After modeling, marked changes were found in model rats; behavioral analyses of rats indicated that this modeling method negatively impacts locomotor function. In the H&E staining, changes were found predominately in the CA1 and DG subregions of the hippocampus. After 21 days of treatment by fluoxetine and Xiaoyaosan, rats' body weights, behaviors and fasting blood glucose, and hippocampal formation were modified. Conclusions. A new model of depressive-like behaviors in rats with type 2 diabetes was successfully created. Xiaoyaosan and fluoxetine in this study independently contribute to exacerbate the disease progression. PMID:26508978

  11. Noninvasive Screening for Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes in Young, Rural, Caucasian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Sharon; Sheffer, Sarah; Long Roth, Sara; Bennett, Paul A.; Lloyd, Les

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play an important role in identifying students who are at risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Few studies have screened Caucasian students, and none have targeted rural, low-income, elementary children. The five noninvasive risk factors used for this study were family history, high body mass index (BMI) for age/sex,…

  12. Lifestyle change and mobility in obese adults with type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus often have limitations in mobility that increase with age. An intensive lifestyle intervention that produces weight loss and improves fitness could slow the loss of mobility in such patients. We randomly assigned 5145 overweight or obese adults between the ages o...

  13. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin suppresses mouse colon tumorigenesis in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Naoki; Inoue, Takuya; Iguchi, Munetaka; Fujiwara, Kaori; Kakimoto, Kazuki; Nouda, Sadaharu; Okada, Toshihiko; Kawakami, Ken; Abe, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-02-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to have an increased risk of colorectal neoplasia. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been used as a new therapeutic tool for type 2 diabetes. Since the substrates for DPP-4 include intestinotrophic hormones and chemokines such as GLP-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), which are associated with tumor progression, DPP-4 inhibitors may increase the risk of colorectal tumors. However, the influence of DPP-4 inhibitors on colorectal neoplasia in patients with type 2 diabetes remains unknown. In the present study, we show that long-term administration of a DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin (STG), suppressed colon carcinogenesis in leptin-deficient (ob/ob) C57BL/6J mice. Colonic mucosal concentrations of glucagon‑like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-2 were significantly elevated in the ob/ob mice. However, mucosal GLP concentrations and the plasma level of SDF-1 were not affected by the administration of STG. Real‑time PCR analysis revealed that colonic mucosal IL-6 mRNA expression, which was significantly upregulated in the ob/ob mice, was significantly suppressed by the long-term administration of STG. These results suggest that a DPP-4 inhibitor may suppress colon carcinogenesis in mice with type 2 diabetes in a GLP-independent manner. Since DPP-4 has multiple biological functions, further studies analyzing other factors related to colon carcinogenesis are needed. PMID:26573958

  14. Imaging Features of Pulmonary CT in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongbo; Ren, Yanwei; Lu, Xiwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Until now, radiographic manifestations of multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (MDR- TB) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have not been reported. We conducted a study to investigate the imaging features of pulmonary computed tomography (CT) for type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients with MDR-TB. Methods The clinical data and pulmonary CT findings of 39 type 2 diabetic patients with MDR-TB, 46 type 2 diabetic patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis (DS-TB), and 72 pure drug-susceptible TB cases (without T2DM and MDR) treated at Dalian Tuberculosis Hospital from 2012 to 2015 were collected, and the clinical features and imaging differences of the three groups were compared. Results The clinical characteristics of the three groups of patients were not significantly different except with respect to age and previous treatment history. However, on imaging, the patients with MDR-TB showed consolidation in and above the pulmonary segments was significantly more extensive than that seen in the DS-TB group with or without T2DM. Conclusion Consolidation in or above multiple pulmonary segments with multiple mouth-eaten cavities and bronchial damage on pulmonary CT images in type 2 diabetic patients with tuberculosis suggests the possibility of multi-drug resistance. PMID:27022735

  15. A genomewide search for type 2 diabetes-susceptibility genes in indigenous Australians.

    PubMed

    Busfield, Frances; Duffy, David L; Kesting, Janine B; Walker, Shelley M; Lovelock, Paul K; Good, David; Tate, Heather; Watego, Denise; Marczak, Maureen; Hayman, Noel; Shaw, Joanne T E

    2002-02-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes among Australian residents is 7.5%; however, prevalence rates up to six times higher have been reported for indigenous Australian communities. Epidemiological evidence implicates genetic factors in the susceptibility of indigenous Australians to type 2 diabetes and supports the hypothesis of the "thrifty genotype," but, to date, the nature of the genetic predisposition is unknown. We have ascertained clinical details from a community of indigenous Australian descent in North Stradbroke Island, Queensland. In this population, the phenotype is characterized by severe insulin resistance. We have conducted a genomewide scan, at an average resolution of 10 cM, for type 2 diabetes-susceptibility genes in a large multigeneration pedigree from this community. Parametric linkage analysis undertaken using FASTLINK version 4.1p yielded a maximum two-point LOD score of +2.97 at marker D2S2345. Multipoint analysis yielded a peak LOD score of +3.9 <1 cM from marker D2S2345, with an 18-cM 3-LOD support interval. Secondary peak LOD scores were noted on chromosome 3 (+1.8 at recombination fraction [theta] 0.05, at marker D3S1311) and chromosome 8 (+1.77 at theta=0.0, at marker D8S549). These chromosomal regions are likely to harbor novel susceptibility genes for type 2 diabetes in the indigenous Australian population. PMID:11742441

  16. Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions for individuals with severe obesity and type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVEdRates of severe obesity (BMI$40 kg/m2) are on the rise, and effective treatment options are needed.We examined the effect of an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) on weight loss, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and program adherence in participants with type 2 diabetes who were seve...

  17. Peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes and postprandial lipidaemia: Is there a link?

    PubMed

    Valdivielso, Pedro; Ramírez-Bollero, José; Pérez-López, Carmen

    2014-10-15

    Peripheral arterial disease, manifested as intermittent claudication or critical ischaemia, or identified by an ankle/brachial index < 0.9, is present in at least one in every four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several reasons exist for peripheral arterial disease in diabetes. In addition to hyperglycaemia, smoking and hypertension, the dyslipidaemia that accompanies type 2 diabetes and is characterised by increased triglyceride levels and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations also seems to contribute to this association. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in postprandial lipidaemia, as a result of various prospective studies showing that non-fasting triglycerides predict the onset of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease better than fasting measurements do. Additionally, the use of certain specific postprandial particle markers, such as apolipoprotein B-48, makes it easier and more simple to approach the postprandial phenomenon. Despite this, only a few studies have evaluated the role of postprandial triglycerides in the development of peripheral arterial disease and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in type 2 diabetes, focusing on the role of postprandial triglycerides and particles. PMID:25317236

  18. Polymorphisms within Novel Risk Loci for Type 2 Diabetes Determine β-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Staiger, Harald; Machicao, Fausto; Stefan, Norbert; Tschritter, Otto; Thamer, Claus; Kantartzis, Konstantinos; Schäfer, Silke A.; Kirchhoff, Kerstin; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes arises when insulin resistance-induced compensatory insulin secretion exhausts. Insulin resistance and/or β-cell dysfunction result from the interaction of environmental factors (high-caloric diet and reduced physical activity) with a predisposing polygenic background. Very recently, genetic variations within four novel genetic loci (SLC30A8, HHEX, EXT2, and LOC387761) were reported to be more frequent in subjects with type 2 diabetes than in healthy controls. However, associations of these variations with insulin resistance and/or β-cell dysfunction were not assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings By genotyping of 921 metabolically characterized German subjects for the reported candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we show that the major alleles of the SLC30A8 SNP rs13266634 and the HHEX SNP rs7923837 associate with reduced insulin secretion stimulated by orally or intravenously administered glucose, but not with insulin resistance. In contrast, the other reported type 2 diabetes candidate SNPs within the EXT2 and LOC387761 loci did not associate with insulin resistance or β-cell dysfunction, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The HHEX and SLC30A8 genes encode for proteins that were shown to be required for organogenesis of the ventral pancreas and for insulin maturation/storage, respectively. Therefore, the major alleles of type 2 diabetes candidate SNPs within these genetic loci represent crucial alleles for β-cell dysfunction and, thus, might confer increased susceptibility of β-cells towards adverse environmental factors. PMID:17786204

  19. Triglyceride-increasing alleles associated with protection against type-2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) levels are an established risk factor for type-2 diabetes (T2D). However, recent studies have hinted at the possibility that genetic risk for TG may paradoxically protect against T2D. In this study, we examined the association of genetic risk for TG with incident T2...

  20. Peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes and postprandial lipidaemia: Is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    Valdivielso, Pedro; Ramírez-Bollero, José; Pérez-López, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease, manifested as intermittent claudication or critical ischaemia, or identified by an ankle/brachial index < 0.9, is present in at least one in every four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several reasons exist for peripheral arterial disease in diabetes. In addition to hyperglycaemia, smoking and hypertension, the dyslipidaemia that accompanies type 2 diabetes and is characterised by increased triglyceride levels and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations also seems to contribute to this association. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in postprandial lipidaemia, as a result of various prospective studies showing that non-fasting triglycerides predict the onset of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease better than fasting measurements do. Additionally, the use of certain specific postprandial particle markers, such as apolipoprotein B-48, makes it easier and more simple to approach the postprandial phenomenon. Despite this, only a few studies have evaluated the role of postprandial triglycerides in the development of peripheral arterial disease and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in type 2 diabetes, focusing on the role of postprandial triglycerides and particles. PMID:25317236

  1. Modeling Type 2 Diabetes GWAS Candidate Gene Function in hESCs.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Guy A

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a complex polygenic disorder that affects about 1 in 12 adults. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Zeng et al. (2016) elegantly combine CRISPR-based gene editing in hESCs with directed β cell differentiation to investigate the functions of genes highlighted by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for this disease. PMID:27588741

  2. Novel lean type 2 diabetic rat model using gestational low-protein programming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) in lean individuals is not well studied and up to 26% of diabetes occurs in these individuals. Although the cause is not well understood, it has been primarily attributed to nutritional issues during early development. Our objective was to develop a lean T2D model using gestati...

  3. Cortical thinning in type 2 diabetes mellitus and recovering effects of insulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiye; Sun, Jie; Yang, Yang; Lou, Xin; Wang, Yulin; Wang, Yan; Ma, Lin

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the brain structural changes in type 2 diabetes and the effect of insulin on the brain using a surface-based cortical thickness analysis. High-resolution three-dimensional T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled echo MRI were obtained from 11 patients with type 2 diabetes before and after insulin therapy. The cortical thickness over the entire brain was calculated, and cross-sectional and longitudinal surface-based cortical thickness analyses were also performed. Regional cortical thinning was demonstrated in the middle temporal gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus, right lateral occipital gyrus and entorhinal cortex bilaterally for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus compared with normal controls. Cortical thickening was seen in the middle temporal gyrus, entorhinal cortex and left inferior temporal gyrus bilaterally after patients underwent 1 year of insulin therapy. These findings suggest that insulin therapy may have recovering effects on the brain cortex in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The precise mechanism should be investigated further. PMID:25439756

  4. Resistance training alters cytokine gene expression in skeletal muscle of adults with type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance training results in muscle hypertrophy and improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Whether resistance training modulates inflammation in muscles of diabetic patients remains unknown. We examined the expression of genes encoding the cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-al...

  5. Predicted 25-hydroxyvitamin D score and incident type 2 diabetes in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vitamin D is involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our objective was to examine the relation between vitamin D status and incidence of T2D. We used a subsample of 1972 Framingham Offspring Study participants to develop a regression model to predict...

  6. The renin-angiotensin system in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Gijs H

    2012-01-01

    Increased activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been related to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Most randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that RAS blockade reduces the incidence of type 2 diabetes, which has been explained by improved insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. In this review, an overview of the mechanisms that may underlie the association between the RAS and type 2 diabetes will be provided, with focus on skeletal muscle and adipose tissue function. This will include discussion of several human studies performed in our laboratory to investigate the metabolic and hemodynamic effects of the RAS, combining in vivo measurements of whole-body and tissue metabolism with molecular and immunohistochemical approaches. Available data suggest that the detrimental effects of the RAS on insulin secretion are mediated by a reduction in pancreatic blood flow and induction of islet fibrosis, oxidative stress as well as inflammation, whereas both impaired skeletal muscle function and adipose tissue dysfunction may underlie RAS-induced insulin resistance. Thus, although future studies in humans are warranted, current evidence supports that targeting the RAS in intervention studies may improve metabolic and cardiovascular function in conditions of insulin resistance like obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:22986649

  7. Effectiveness and Safety of High-Intensity Interval Training in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francois, Monique E.

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF Recent research has shown that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) can promote improvements in glucose control and cardiovascular health in individuals with type 2 diabetes. This article summarizes the evidence and highlights the ways in which HIIT might be safely implemented as an adjunct to more traditional exercise approaches. PMID:25717277

  8. Retinopathy in youth with type 2 diabetes participating in the TODAY clinical trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of retinopathy in 517 youth with type 2 diabetes of 2–8 years duration enrolled in the TODAY study. Retinal photographs were graded centrally for retinopathy using established standards. Retinopathy was identified in 13.7% of subjects. Prev...

  9. I Can Lower My Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide for American Indians

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Can Lower My Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide for American Indians Research Gives Hope Diabetes Can Be Prevented "After I started exercising and ... other risk factors for heart disease. What is diabetes? Diabetes causes blood glucose levels to be above ...

  10. Therapies for type 2 diabetes: lowering HbA1c and associated cardiovascular risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To summarize data supporting the effects of antidiabetes agents on glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Studies reporting on the effects of antidiabetes agents on glycemic control, body weight, lipid levels, and blood pressure parameters are reviewed and summarized for the purpose of selecting optimal therapeutic regimens for patients with type 2 diabetes. Results National guidelines recommend the aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes, including weight loss and achieving lipid and blood pressure treatment goals. All antidiabetes pharmacotherapies lower glucose; however, effects on cardiovascular risk factors vary greatly among agents. While thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, and insulin are associated with weight gain, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are considered weight neutral and metformin can be weight neutral or associated with a small weight loss. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylinomimetics (e.g. pramlintide) result in weight loss. Additionally, metformin, thiazolidinediones, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated beneficial effects on lipid and blood pressure parameters. Conclusion Management of the cardiovascular risk factors experienced by patients with type 2 diabetes requires a multidisciplinary approach with implementation of treatment strategies to achieve not only glycemic goals but to improve and/or correct the underlying cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:20804556

  11. School factors as barriers to and facilitators of a preventive intervention for pediatric type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    School-based interventions are essential to prevent pediatric obesity and type 2 diabetes. School environmental factors influence implementation of these interventions. This article examines how school factors acted as barriers to and facilitators of the HEALTHY intervention. The HEALTHY study was a...

  12. Type 2 diabetes in Sudanese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Hala A M; Elsadek, Nadia; Abdullah, Mohamed A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of T2 DM among children and adolescents attending a paediatric and adolescent diabetic clinic in Khartoum –Sudan and to find out the etiological factors, clinical presentation, management and associated co morbidities. This was a retrospective, descriptive hospital based study. The records of all children attending the clinic at Jabir Abu Izz Diabetic Center from January 2006 to December 2009 were reviewed and those who were diagnosed as type 2 DM were identified. Out of 985 patients 38 (4%) were labeled as having type 2 DM. Out of these, 35 (92.1%) had onset between 11–18 years of age and were all pubertal. Three patients (7.9%) were under 10. Female to male ratio was 1.2: 1. Thirty two (84.2%) were from tribes of Arab origin. There were no cases from tribes of southern Sudan of African origin. Risk factors for obesity included: diabetes during pregnancy 15 (39.5%), large for dates 16 (43%) small for dates 12(32%), family history of obesity 10 (26.3%), lack of exercise 32 (87.6%), TV watching for long hours 32(84.3%) and consumption of fast foods. Almost 70% were symptomatic at presentation. Co morbidities included hypertension 22(57.9%), microalbuminuria 7 (18.4%), hyperlipidaemia 6(7%) and none had retinopathy. The mean HbA1C was 9.1% gm/dl. This data confirms that T2 DM is emerging as a health problem among children and adolescents in Sudan mostly as a result of obesity particularly among high socioeconomic group in urban areas and more prevalent in certain ethnic groups. PMID:27493369

  13. Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in Japan: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Atsushi; Goto, Maki; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2013-01-01

    Background The definition of incident type 2 diabetes varies across studies; hence, the actual incidence of type 2 diabetes in Japan is unclear. Here, we reviewed the various definitions of incident type 2 diabetes used in previous epidemiologic studies and estimated the diabetes incidence rate in Japan. Methods We searched for related literature in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Ichushi databases through September 2012. Two reviewers selected studies that evaluated incident type 2 diabetes in the Japanese population. Results From 1824 relevant articles, we included 33 studies with 386,803 participants. The follow-up period ranged from 2.3 to 14 years and the studies were initiated between 1980 and 2003. The random-effects model indicated that the pooled incidence rate of diabetes was 8.8 (95% confidence interval, 7.4–10.4) per 1000 person-years. We observed a high degree of heterogeneity in the results (I2 = 99.2%; p < 0.001), with incidence rates ranging from 2.3 to 52.6 per 1000 person-years. Three studies based their definition of incident type 2 diabetes on self-reports only, 10 on laboratory data only, and 20 on self-reports and laboratory data. Compared with studies defining diabetes using laboratory data (n = 30; pooled incidence rate = 9.6; 95% confidence interval = 8.3–11.1), studies based on self-reports alone tended to show a lower incidence rate (n = 3; pooled incidence rate = 4.0; 95% confidence interval = 3.2–5.0; p for interaction < 0.001). However, stratified analyses could not entirely explain the heterogeneity in the results. Conclusions Our systematic review and meta-analysis indicated the presence of a high degree of heterogeneity, which suggests that there is a considerable amount of uncertainty regarding the incidence of type 2 diabetes in Japan. They also suggested that laboratory data may be important for the accurate estimation of the incidence of type 2 diabetes. PMID:24040326

  14. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M.; Ingul, Charlotte B.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min-1·kg-1, 10.4 %), p < 0.01, and 1.4 mL·min-1·kg-1 (4.6 %), p = 0.03, respectively). Only HIIE reduced body fat percentage (4.5 %, p = 0.04) and two minute heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key points Low volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetes The weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for

  15. Nitric Oxide Synthesis Is Reduced in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes and Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tessari, Paolo; Cecchet, Diego; Cosma, Alessandra; Vettore, Monica; Coracina, Anna; Millioni, Renato; Iori, Elisabetta; Puricelli, Lucia; Avogaro, Angelo; Vedovato, Monica

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Nitric oxide (NO) is a key metabolic and vascular regulator. Its production is stimulated by insulin. A reduced urinary excretion of NO products (NOx) is frequently found in type 2 diabetes, particularly in association with nephropathy. However, whether the decreased NOx excretion in type 2 diabetes is caused by a defective NOx production from arginine in response to hyperinsulinemia has never been studied. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured NOx fractional (FSR) and absolute (ASR) synthesis rates in type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy and in control subjects, after l-[15N2-guanidino]-arginine infusion, and use of precursor–product relationships. The study was conducted both before and after an euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (∼1,000–1,200 pmol/l) clamp. RESULTS In type 2 diabetes, NOx FSR was reduced both under basal (19.3 ± 3.9% per day, vs. 22.9 ± 4.5% per day in control subjects) and hyperinsulinemic states (24.0 ± 5.6% per day, vs. 37.9 ± 6.4% per day in control subjects; P < 0.03 by ANOVA). Similarly, in type 2 diabetes, NOx ASR was lower than in control subjects under both conditions (basal, 0.32 ± 0.06 vs. 0.89 ± 0.34 mol per day; hyperinsulinemia, 0.35 ± 0.07 vs. 1.15 ± 0.38 mol per day; P = 0.01 by ANOVA). In type 2 diabetes, the ability of insulin to stimulate both the FSR (4.7 ± 3.2% per day) and the ASR (0.03 ± 0.04 mol per day) of NOx was several-fold lower than that in control subjects (15.0 ± 2.9% per day and 0.25 ± 0.07 mol per day, P < 0.03 and P < 0.02, respectively). Also the fraction of arginine flux converted to NOx (basal, 0.22 ± 0.05% vs. 0.65 ± 0.25%; hyperinsulinemia, 0.32 ± 0.06% vs. 1.03 ± 0.33%) was sharply reduced in the patients (P < 0.01 by ANOVA). CONCLUSIONS In type 2 diabetic patients with nephropathy, intravascular NOx synthesis from arginine is decreased under both basal and hyperinsulinemic states. This defect extends the concept of insulin resistance to NO metabolism. PMID

  16. Lack of lipotoxicity effect on {beta}-cell dysfunction in ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Umpierrez, Guillermo E; Smiley, Dawn; Robalino, Gonzalo; Peng, Limin; Gosmanov, Aidar R; Kitabchi, Abbas E

    2010-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Over half of newly diagnosed obese African Americans with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) discontinue insulin therapy and go through a period of near-normoglycemia remission. This subtype of diabetes is known as ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes (KPDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS To investigate the role of lipotoxicity on beta-cell function, eight obese African Americans with KPDM, eight obese subjects with type 2 diabetes with severe hyperglycemia without ketosis (ketosis-resistant type 2 diabetes), and nine nondiabetic obese control subjects underwent intravenous infusion of 20% intralipid at 40 ml/h for 48 h. beta-Cell function was assessed by changes in insulin and C-peptide concentration during infusions and by changes in acute insulin response to arginine stimulation (AIR(arg)) before and after lipid infusion. RESULTS The mean time to discontinue insulin therapy was 11.0 +/- 8.0 weeks in KPDM and 9.6 +/- 2.2 weeks in ketosis-resistant type 2 diabetes (P = NS). At remission, KPDM and ketosis-resistant type 2 diabetes had similar glucose (94 +/- 14 vs. 109 +/- 20 mg/dl), A1C (5.7 +/- 0.4 vs. 6.3 +/- 1.1%), and baseline AIR(arg) response (34.8 +/- 30 vs. 64 +/- 69 microU/ml). P = NS despite a fourfold increase in free fatty acid (FFA) levels (0.4 +/- 0.3 to 1.8 +/- 1.1 mmol/l, P < 0.01) during the 48-h intralipid infusion; the response to AIR(arg) stimulation, as well as changes in insulin and C-peptide levels, were similar among obese patients with KPDM, patients with ketosis-resistant type 2 diabetes, and nondiabetic control subjects. CONCLUSIONS Near-normoglycemia remission in obese African American patients with KPDM and ketosis-resistant type 2 diabetes is associated with a remarkable recovery in basal and stimulated insulin secretion. A high FFA level by intralipid infusion for 48 h was not associated with beta-cell decompensation (lipotoxicity) in KPDM patients. PMID:20028938

  17. Cardiorespiratory fitness and the incidence of type 2 diabetes: a cohort study of Japanese male athletes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Japan, although the incidence of overweight (BMI ≥ 25) is still low compared with that in Europe and the United States, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has increased over the last 15 years,. In both Japanese and Caucasian populations it has been reported that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness protects against the development of type 2 diabetes. However, there are no reports focused specifically on athletes that investigate whether high cardiorespiratory fitness at a young age can prevent disease later in life. We examined the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness at a young age and the development of type 2 diabetes in Japanese athletes using a cohort study. Methods The cardiorespiratory fitness of male alumni of the physical education department of Juntendo University, as measured by stored data of a 1,500-m endurance run in college (1971–1991) was compared with their incidence of type 2 diabetes as determined by follow-up questionnaires (2007–2009). This study used Cox’s proportional hazards models and adjusted for age, year of graduation, BMI, smoking, and sports club participation at college age. Results We collected data on cardiorespiratory fitness at college age and medical history survey data during 2007–2009 from 570 male alumni. The median follow-up period was 26 years (IQR: 23–29 years), and 22 men had developed type 2 diabetes. An inverse relationship was observed between incidence of type 2 diabetes and level of cardiorespiratory fitness at time of college after adjustment for age, year of graduation, BMI, smoking, and sports participation. The adjusted hazards ratio and 95% CI by category (low, medium, and high) were 1.00 (reference), 0.40 (0.14–1.13) and 0.26 (0.07–1.00) (p = 0.03 for trend). Conclusions A high level of cardiorespiratory fitness at a young age can help prevent type 2 diabetes later in life. PMID:24885699

  18. Circadian Gene Variants and Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, M. Ann; Rees, Simon D.; Hydrie, M. Zafar I.; Shera, A. Samad; Bellary, Srikanth; O’Hare, J. Paul; Kumar, Sudhesh; Taheri, Shahrad; Basit, Abdul; Barnett, Anthony H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Disruption of endogenous circadian rhythms has been shown to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, suggesting that circadian genes might play a role in determining disease susceptibility. We present the results of a pilot study investigating the association between type 2 diabetes and selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in/near nine circadian genes. The variants were chosen based on their previously reported association with prostate cancer, a disease that has been suggested to have a genetic link with type 2 diabetes through a number of shared inherited risk determinants. Methodology/Principal Findings The pilot study was performed using two genetically homogeneous Punjabi cohorts, one resident in the United Kingdom and one indigenous to Pakistan. Subjects with (N = 1732) and without (N = 1780) type 2 diabetes were genotyped for thirteen circadian variants using a competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. Associations between the SNPs and type 2 diabetes were investigated using logistic regression. The results were also combined with in silico data from other South Asian datasets (SAT2D consortium) and white European cohorts (DIAGRAM+) using meta-analysis. The rs7602358G allele near PER2 was negatively associated with type 2 diabetes in our Punjabi cohorts (combined odds ratio [OR] = 0.75 [0.66–0.86], p = 3.18×10−5), while the BMAL1 rs11022775T allele was associated with an increased risk of the disease (combined OR = 1.22 [1.07–1.39], p = 0.003). Neither of these associations was replicated in the SAT2D or DIAGRAM+ datasets, however. Meta-analysis of all the cohorts identified disease associations with two variants, rs2292912 in CRY2 and rs12315175 near CRY1, although statistical significance was nominal (combined OR = 1.05 [1.01–1.08], p = 0.008 and OR = 0.95 [0.91–0.99], p = 0.015 respectively). Conclusions/significance None of the selected circadian gene

  19. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M; Ingul, Charlotte B

    2016-06-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), 10.4 %), p < 0.01, and 1.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) (4.6 %), p = 0.03, respectively). Only HIIE reduced body fat percentage (4.5 %, p = 0.04) and two minute heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key pointsLow volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetesThe weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes.However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for

  20. Association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and incident type 2 diabetes: a mendelian randomisation study

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zheng; Sharp, Stephen J; Burgess, Stephen; Scott, Robert A; Imamura, Fumiaki; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; Forouhi, Nita G

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Low circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D), a marker of vitamin D status, are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, but whether this association is causal remains unclear. We aimed to estimate the unconfounded, causal association between 25(OH)D concentration and risk of type 2 diabetes using a mendelian randomisation approach. Methods Using several data sources from populations of European descent, including type 2 diabetes cases and non-cases, we did a mendelian randomisation analysis using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within or near four genes related to 25(OH)D synthesis and metabolism: DHCR7 (related to vitamin D synthesis), CYP2R1 (hepatic 25-hydroxylation), DBP (also known as GC; transport), and CYP24A1 (catabolism). We assessed each SNP for an association with circulating 25(OH)D concentration (5449 non-cases; two studies), risk of type 2 diabetes (28 144 cases, 76 344 non-cases; five studies), and glycaemic traits (concentrations of fasting glucose, 2-h glucose, fasting insulin, and HbA1c; 46 368 non-cases; study consortium). We combined these associations in a likelihood-based mendelian randomisation analysis to estimate the causal association of 25(OH)D concentration with type 2 diabetes and the glycaemic traits, and compared them with that from a meta-analysis of data from observational studies (8492 cases, 89 698 non-cases; 22 studies) that assessed the association between 25(OH)D concentration and type 2 diabetes. Findings All four SNPs were associated with 25(OH)D concentrations (p<10−6). The mendelian randomisation-derived unconfounded odds ratio for type 2 diabetes was 1·01 (95% CI 0·75–1·36; p=0·94) per 25·0 nmol/L (1 SD) lower 25(OH)D concentration. The corresponding (potentially confounded) relative risk from the meta-analysis of data from observational studies was 1·21 (1·16–1·27; p=7·3 × 10−19). The mendelian randomisation-derived estimates for

  1. Previously Associated Type 2 Diabetes Variants May Interact With Physical Activity to Modify the Risk of Impaired Glucose Regulation and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Ema C.; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Renström, Frida; Berglund, Göran; Nilsson, Peter M.; Groop, Leif; Franks, Paul W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent advances in type 2 diabetes genetics have culminated in the discovery and confirmation of multiple risk variants. Two important and largely unanswered questions are whether this information can be used to identify individuals most susceptible to the adverse consequences of sedentary behavior and to predict their response to lifestyle intervention; such evidence would be mechanistically informative and provide a rationale for targeting genetically susceptible subgroups of the population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Gene × physical activity interactions were assessed for 17 polymorphisms in a prospective population-based cohort of initially nondiabetic middle-aged adults. Outcomes were 1) impaired glucose regulation (IGR) versus normal glucose regulation determined with either fasting or 2-h plasma glucose concentrations (n = 16,003), 2) glucose intolerance (in mmol/l, n = 8,860), or 3) incident type 2 diabetes (n = 2,063 events). RESULTS Tests of gene × physical activity interactions on IGR risk for 3 of the 17 polymorphisms were nominally statistically significant:CDKN2A/B rs10811661 (Pinteraction = 0.015), HNF1B rs4430796 (Pinteraction = 0.026), and PPARG rs1801282 (Pinteraction = 0.04). Consistent interactions were observed for the CDKN2A/B (Pinteraction = 0.013) and HNF1B (Pinteraction = 0.0009) variants on 2-h glucose concentrations. Where type 2 diabetes was the outcome, only one statistically significant interaction effect was observed, and this was for the HNF1B rs4430796 variant (Pinteraction = 0.0004). The interaction effects for HNF1B on IGR risk and incident diabetes remained significant after correction for multiple testing (Pinteraction = 0.015 and 0.0068, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Our observations suggest that the genetic predisposition to hyperglycemia is partially dependent on a person's lifestyle. PMID:19324937

  2. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  3. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  4. Initial combination therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus: is it ready for prime time?

    PubMed

    Zinman, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is primarily being driven by the increasing global rates of overweight/obesity. Given the magnitude of this epidemic, we can expect these metabolic abnormalities to play an increasing role in the development of cardiovascular disease. In a pathophysiologic sense, type 2 diabetes is a multiorgan, multifactorial condition, characterized by β-cell dysfunction, insulin resistance in peripheral tissues and the liver, defective incretin activity, and elevated levels of free fatty acids and proinflammatory mediators. Despite the considerable burden of disease associated with type 2 diabetes, most patients are not at, or are unable to achieve, recommended glycemic control guideline targets. In part, this is because of the relentlessly progressive nature of the disease, but it may also be attributable to the current diabetes treatment paradigm, which is characterized by ineffective lifestyle interventions, followed by monotherapy and frequent early treatment failure with prolonged periods of elevated glucose as a consequence of clinical inertia. Thus, it is most appropriate to rethink the current treatment paradigm for type 2 diabetes in the context of a more aggressive initial therapy; specifically with early initiation of combination therapy. Our current understanding of the complex pathophysiology of the disease and the progressive deterioration in glycemic control over time supports the philosophy of earlier intervention with a more comprehensive initial therapy. Thus, while control of hyperglycemia remains the paramount goal, focusing on the underlying pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes is increasingly becoming the therapeutic strategy, with the aim of potentially providing disease modification. Although this is a logical approach, it remains to be demonstrated that early combination therapy will result in disease modification in a clinical setting. Not surprisingly, the incretin-based therapies have gained a great

  5. Plasma adiponectin concentrations are associated with dietary glycemic index in Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Loh, Beng-In; Sathyasuryan, Daniel Robert; Mohamed, Hamid Jan Jan

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived hormone has been implicated in the control of blood glucose and chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes. However, limited studies have evaluated dietary factors on plasma adiponectin levels, especially among type 2 diabetic patients in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of dietary glycemic index on plasma adiponectin concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 305 type 2 diabetic patients aged 19-75 years from the Penang General Hospital, Malaysia. Socio-demographic information was collected using a standard questionnaire while dietary details were determined by using a pre-validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometry measurement included weight, height, BMI and waist circumference. Plasma adiponectin concentrations were measured using a commercial ELISA kit. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression. After multivariate adjustment, dietary glycemic index was inversely associated with plasma adiponectin concentrations (β =-0.272, 95% CI -0.262, - 0.094; p<0.001). It was found that in individuals who consumed 1 unit of foods containing high dietary glycemic index that plasma adiponectin level reduced by 0.3 μg/mL. Thirty two percent (31.9%) of the variation in adiponectin concentrations was explained by age, sex, race, smoking status, BMI, waist circumference, HDL-C, triglycerides, magnesium, fiber and dietary glycemic index according to the multiple linear regression model (R2=0.319). These results support the hypothesis that dietary glycemic index influences plasma adiponectin concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlled clinical trials are required to confirm our findings and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. PMID:23635368

  6. A role for coding functional variants in HNF4A in Type 2 Diabetes susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Jafar-Mohammadi, B; Groves, C J; Gjesing, A P; Herrera, B M; Winckler, W; Stringham, H M; Morris, A P; Lauritzen, T; Doney, A S F; Morris, A D; Weedon, M N; Swift, A J; Kuusisto, J; Laakso, M; Altshuler, D; Hattersley, A T; Collins, F S; Boehnke, M; Hansen, T; Pedersen, O; Palmer, C N A; Frayling, T M; Gloyn, A L; McCarthy, M I

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Rare mutations in the gene (HNF4A) encoding the transcription factor HNF-4A account for ~5% of cases of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) and more frequent variants in this gene may be involved in multifactorial forms of diabetes. Two low frequency, non-synonymous variants in HNF4A (V255M, minor allele frequency [MAF] ~0.1%, T130I, MAF ~3.0%), known to influence downstream HNF-4A target gene expression, are of interest but previous type 2 diabetes association reports were inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate the contribution of these variants to type 2 diabetes susceptibility through large-scale association analysis. Methods We genotyped both variants in at least 5745 cases and 14756 population controls from the UK and Denmark. We also undertook an expanded association-analysis including previously reported and novel genotype data obtained in Danish, Finnish, Canadian and Swedish samples. A meta-analysis incorporating all published association studies of the T130I variant was subsequently carried out in a maximum sample size of 14279 cases and 26835 controls. Results We found no association between V255M and type 2 diabetes in either the initial (p=0.28) or expanded analysis (p=0.44). However, T130I demonstrated a modest association with type 2 diabetes in the UK and Danish samples (additive per allele OR 1.17 [1.08-1.28]; p=1.5×10−4), which was strengthened in the meta-analysis (OR 1.20 [1.10-1.30]; p=2.1×10−5). Conclusions/interpretation Our data are consistent with T130I as a low frequency variant influencing type 2 diabetes risk, but are not conclusive when judged against stringent standards for genome-wide significance. This study exemplifies the difficulties encountered in association testing of low frequency variants. PMID:20878384

  7. Very-low-energy diet for type 2 diabetes: An underutilized therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Rothberg, Amy E.; McEwen, Laura N.; Kraftson, Andrew T.; Fowler, Christine E.; Herman, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Current approaches to the management of type 2 diabetes focus on the early initiation of novel pharmacologic therapies and bariatric surgery. Objective The purpose of this study was to revisit the use of intensive, outpatient, behavioral weight management programs for the management of type 2 diabetes. Design Prospective observational study of 66 patients with type 2 diabetes and BMI ≥ 32 kg/m2 who enrolled in a program designed to produce 15% weight reduction over 12 weeks using total meal replacement and low- to moderate-intensity physical activity. Results Patients were 53 ± 7 years of age (mean ± SD) and 53% were men. After 12 weeks, BMI fell from 40.1 ± 6.6 to 35.1 ± 6.5 kg/m2. HbA1c fell from 7.4 ± 1.3% to 6.5 ± 1.2% (57.4 ± 12.3 to 47.7 ± 12.9 mmol/mol) in patients with established diabetes: 76% of patients with established diabetes and 100% of patients with newly diagnosed diabetes achieved HbA1c <7.0% (53.0 mmol/mol). Improvement in HbA1c over 12 weeks was associated with higher baseline HbA1c and greater reduction in BMI. Conclusions An intensive, outpatient, behavioral weight management program significantly improved HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes over 12 weeks. The use of such programs should be encouraged among obese patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24849710

  8. Factors associated with psychological and behavioral functioning in people with type 2 diabetes living in France

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To identify demographic and clinical factors associated with psychological and behavioral functioning (PBF) in people with type 2 diabetes living in France. Methods In March 2002, approximately 10,000 adults, who had been reimbursed for at least one hypoglycemic treatment or insulin dose during the last quarter of 2001, received a questionnaire about their health status and PBF (3,646 responders). For this analysis, the 3,090 persons with type 2 diabetes, aged 18-85 years old were selected. PBF was measured with the adapted version of the Diabetes Health Profile for people with type 2 diabetes. This permitted the calculation of three functional scores - psychological distress (PD), barriers to activity (BA), and disinhibited eating (DE) - from 0 (worst) to 100 (best). Results Major negative associations were observed with PBF for microvascular complications (a difference of 6.7 in the BA score between persons with and without microvascular complications) and severe hypoglycemia (difference of 7.9 in the BA score), insulin treatment (-8.5 & -9.5 in the PD & BA scores respectively, as compared to treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents), non-adherence to treatment (-12.3 in the DE score for persons forgetting their weekly treatment), increasing weight (-8.5 & -9.7 in the PD & DE scores respectively, as compared to stable weight), at least one psychiatrist visit in 2001 (-8.9 in the DE score), and universal medical insurance coverage (-7.9 in the PD score) (due to low income). Conclusion Prevention and management of microvascular complications or adherence to treatment (modifiable factors) could be essential to preserving or improving PBF among people with type 2 diabetes. A specific approach to type 2 diabetes management may be required in groups with a low socioeconomic profile (particularly people with universal medical insurance coverage), or other non modifiable factors. PMID:21044345

  9. Prevalence of Microvascular Complications in Newly Diagnosed Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alia; Iqbal, Farrukh; Taj, Azeem; Iqbal, Zafar; Amin, Muhammad Joher; Iqbal, Qasim Zafar

    2013-01-01

    Background & Objective: Microvascular complications are the major outcome of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus progression, which reduce the quality of life, incur heavy economic burdens to the health care system and increase diabetic mortality. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of microvascular complications among newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients and to analyze the association between these complications and poor glycemic control. Methods: This cross sectional hospital based study was carried out in Diabetic Clinic of Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore Pakistan. The study was conducted from November 2011 to November 2012 among newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients. Relevant information of all patients was recorded with the help of a proforma. They were investigated for retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Results: We have divided the patients into two groups: Group I with good glycemic control (HbA1c <6.5) and group II with poor glycemic control (HbA1c >6.5). In group II microvascular complications were 89.8%. Neuropathy, nephropathy and retinopathy were present in 68.5%, 56.2% and 31.4% respectively. These similar percentages in Group I were 50%, 0% and 31% respectively and are significantly lower. Conclusion: The study showed that even in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients who had poor glycemic control, frequency of microvascular complications is much higher as compared to those who had average glycemic control. Thus tight glycemic control does count even in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics to prevent and minimize the occurrence of complications. PMID:24353655

  10. Combating the dual burden: therapeutic targeting of common pathways in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J; Van Gaal, Luc F

    2014-11-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is contributing substantially to the ongoing epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Abdominal adiposity, a feature of ectopic fat syndrome, is associated with silent inflammation, abnormal hormone secretion, and various metabolic disturbances that contribute to insulin resistance and insulin secretory defects, resulting in type 2 diabetes, and induce a toxic pattern that leads to cardiovascular disease, liver pathologies, and cancer. Despite the importance of weight control strategies in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes, long-term results from lifestyle or drug interventions are generally disappointing. Furthermore, most of the classic glucose-lowering drugs have a side-effect of weight gain, which renders the management of most overweight or obese people with type 2 diabetes even more challenging. Many anti-obesity pharmacological drugs targeting central control of appetite were withdrawn from the market because of safety concerns. The gastrointestinal lipase inhibitor orlistat was the only anti-obesity drug available until the recent US, but not European, launch of phentermine-controlled-release topiramate and lorcaserin. Improved knowledge about bodyweight regulation opens new prospects for the potential use of peptides derived from the gut or the adipose tissue. Combination therapy will probably be necessary to avoid compensatory mechanisms and potentiate initial weight loss while avoiding weight regain. New glucose-lowering treatments, especially glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and sodium glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors, offer advantages over traditional antidiabetic drugs by promoting weight loss while improving glucose control. In this Review, we explore the overlapping pathophysiology and also how various treatments can, alone or in combination, combat the dual burden of obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24731666

  11. Lipoprotein(a) is strongly associated with coronary artery calcification in type-2 diabetic women

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Atif N.; Martin, Seth S.; Mehta, Nehal N.; Wolfe, Megan L.; Park, James; Schwartz, Stanley; Schutta, Mark; Iqbal, Nayyar; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Lp(a), implicated in both atherogenesis and thrombosis pathways, varies significantly by demographic and metabolic factors, providing challenges for its use in Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether type-2 diabetic subjects, relative to non-diabetics, might benefit more from Lp(a) measurement in the prediction of CHD risk, as measured by coronary artery calcium (CAC). Methods We performed cross sectional analyses in two community-based studies: the Penn Diabetes Heart Study [N=1299 with type-2 diabetes] and the Study of Inherited Risk of Coronary Atherosclerosis [N=860 without diabetes]. Results Blacks had 2–3 fold higher Lp(a) levels than whites in diabetic and non-diabetic samples. There was significant difference by gender (interaction p<0.001), but not race, in the association of Lp(a) with CAC in type-2 diabetic subjects. In age and race adjusted analysis of diabetic women, Lp(a) was associated with CAC [Tobit regression ratio 2.76 (95% CI 1.73–4.40), p<0.001]. Adjustment for exercise, medications, Framingham risk score, metabolic syndrome, BMI, CRP and hemoglobin A1c attenuated this effect, but the association of Lp(a) with CAC remained significant [2.25, (1.34–3.79), p=0.002]. This relationship was further maintained in women stratified by race, or by the use of HRT or lipid lowering drugs. In contrast, Lp(a) was not associated with CAC in diabetic men, nor in non-diabetic men and women. Conclusions Lp(a) is a strong independent predictor of CAC in type-2 diabetic women, regardless of race, but not in men. Lp(a) does not relate to CAC in men or women without type-2 diabetes. PMID:20303190

  12. Discovery and verification of urinary peptides in type 2 diabetes mellitus with kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guangzhen; Du, Ye; Chu, Lina; Zhang, Man

    2016-06-01

    Varying degrees of renal injury could lead to different changes in urinary protein composition. We want to find urinary candidate peptide biomarkers in type 2 diabetic patients with different extents of kidney injury. Two sets of patients were recruited. Discovery set: weak cationic-exchange magnetic beads coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used to profile the low-molecular weight peptidome in urine samples from type 2 diabetes patients with normoalbuminura and microalbuminuria. The differently expressed urinary peptides were screened by ClinProTools2.1 bioinformatics software and identified through nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Verification set: the above screened urinary peptides were validated by use matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry on another group of type 2 diabetes patients with different extents use of kidney injury. In the screening and identification stages, seven urinary peptides were selected as the most promising biomarker candidates, and they were identified as fragments of vitronectin precursor, isoform 1 of fibrinogen alpha chain precursor, prothrombin precursor and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4. The diagnostic efficacy of these urinary peptides was evaluated by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and they were 0.767, 0.768, 0.868, 0.910, 0.860, 0.843, and 0.865, respectively. In the verification stage, m/z 1743.9, 2154, 2175.5, and 2184.9 were decreased as albumin-to-creatinine (Alb/Cre) increased and m/z 2231.1, 2430.8, and 2756.1 were elevated as Alb/Cre rose. These small molecule peptides are related to type 2 diabetes kidney damage, and they may play an important role in monitoring type 2 diabetes. PMID:26846977

  13. The Adiponectin Variants Contribute to the Genetic Background of Type 2 Diabetes in Turkish Population.

    PubMed

    Arikoglu, Hilal; Ozdemir, Hulya; Kaya, Dudu Erkoc; Ipekci, Suleyman Hilmi; Arslan, Ahmet; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Gonen, Mustafa Sait

    2013-10-26

    Adiponectin, an adipose tissue specific protein encoded by the Adiponectin gene, modulates insulin sensitivity and plays an important role in regulating energy homeostasis. Many studies have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Adiponectin gene are associated with low plasma adiponectin levels, insulin resistance and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of the Adiponectin gene polymorphisms in genetic background of type 2 diabetes in a Turkish population. In total, 169 unrelated and non-obese diabetic patients and 119 age- and BMI-matched non-diabetic individuals with no family history of diabetes were enrolled in this study. We detected a significant association between type 2 diabetes and two SNPs: SNP -11391G>A, which is located in the promoter region of the Adiponectin gene, and SNP +276G>T, which is found in intron 2 of the gene (P<0.05). The silence SNP G15G (+45T>G) in exon 1 and SNP +349A>G in intron 2 also showed a weak association with type 2 diabetes (P=0.06 and P=0.07, respectively), while SNPs -3971A>G in intron 1 and Y111H, R112C and H241P in exon 3 showed no association (P>0.05). In conclusion, these findings suggest that Adiponectin gene polymorphisms might be effective on susceptibility for type 2 diabetes development which emerged from the interactions between multiple genes, variants and environmental factors. PMID:24513330

  14. Total Testosterone Levels and the Effect of Sildenafil on Type 2 Diabetics with Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hadeed, Nabeel Najib Fadhil; Thanoon, Imad Abdul-Jabar; Al-Mukhtar, Samir Burhanaldin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hypotestosteronemia has been reported in approximately half of type 2 diabetic men in general. This study aims to assess serum total testosterone levels in type 2 diabetics with erectile dysfunction and to correlate the degree of improvement between sildenafil citrate and testosterone levels. Methods A cross sectional and prospective comparative interventional study was conducted at the Diabetic Clinic of Assalam Teaching Hospital in Mosul, during the period from January 1, 2009 through to December 31, 2011. The study enrolled 120 type 2 diabetic males with erectile dysfunction who were analyzed with regard to age, duration of diabetes, duration and severity of erectile dysfunction, serum total testosteron levels and the degree of response to sildenafil citrate in terms of testosterone levels. The data were statistically analyzed using the independent two-sample Student t test, χ2 test and Pearson correlation test. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Thirty six percent of type 2 diabetic males with erectile dysfunction were found to have low serum testosterone levels. The hypotestosteronemic and normotestosteronemic subgroups were not significantly different in terms of mean age, duration of diabetes, reduction of libido, and reduction in erectile function. The rate and the degree of improvement of erection by sildenafil in the normo-and-hypotestosteronemic respondents were not significantly different, but the degree of improvement by sildenafil was significantly correlated to testosterone levels among the hypotestosteronemic group. Conclusion Hypotestosteronemia was found in 36% of type 2 diabetic males with erectile dysfunction. The degree of improvement of erectile dysfunction by sildenafil was directly proportional to the serum testosterone levels among the hypotestosteronemic group. Therapeutic supplement with testosterone preparation in the hypotestosteronemic diabetics with erectile dysfunction may improve their

  15. The association between neighbourhood greenspace and type 2 diabetes in a large cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Bodicoat, Danielle H; O'Donovan, Gary; Dalton, Alice M; Gray, Laura J; Yates, Thomas; Edwardson, Charlotte; Hill, Sian; Webb, David R; Khunti, Kamlesh; Davies, Melanie J; Jones, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between neighbourhood greenspace and type 2 diabetes. Design Cross-sectional. Setting 3 diabetes screening studies conducted in Leicestershire, UK in 2004–2011. The percentage of greenspace in the participant's home neighbourhood (3 km radius around home postcode) was obtained from a Land Cover Map. Demographic and biomedical variables were measured at screening. Participants 10 476 individuals (6200 from general population; 4276 from high-risk population) aged 20–75 years (mean 59 years); 47% female; 21% non-white ethnicity. Main outcome measure Screen-detected type 2 diabetes (WHO 2011 criteria). Results Increased neighbourhood greenspace was associated with significantly lower levels of screen-detected type 2 diabetes. The ORs (95% CI) for screen-detected type 2 diabetes were 0.97 (0.80 to 1.17), 0.78 (0.62 to 0.98) and 0.67 (0.49 to 0.93) for increasing quartiles of neighbourhood greenspace compared with the lowest quartile after adjusting for ethnicity, age, sex, area social deprivation score and urban/rural status (Ptrend=0.01). This association remained on further adjustment for body mass index, physical activity, fasting glucose, 2 h glucose and cholesterol (OR (95% CI) for highest vs lowest quartile: 0.53 (0.35 to 0.82); Ptrend=0.01). Conclusions Neighbourhood greenspace was inversely associated with screen-detected type 2 diabetes, highlighting a potential area for targeted screening as well as a possible public health area for diabetes prevention. However, none of the risk factors that we considered appeared to explain this association, and thus further research is required to elicit underlying mechanisms. Trial registration number This study uses data from three studies (NCT00318032, NCT00677937, NCT00941954). PMID:25537783

  16. Correlates of perceived self-care activities and diabetes control among Dutch type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Lieke G M; Martens, Marloes K; Bagchus, Charlotte; de Weerdt, Inge; de Vries, Nanne K; Kremers, Stef P J

    2015-06-01

    This study examined how Dutch type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients' perceived autonomy support, as well as their perceived competence and treatment self-regulation, are associated with their diabetes self-care activities (healthy diet, physical activity, monitoring blood glucose, medication use) and general diabetes control. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted among 143 type 1 diabetics and 384 type 2 diabetics. Overall, participants felt competent, supported in their autonomy, and perceived to autonomously self-regulate their diabetes. Our results underline the importance of perceived competence in type 1 and 2 diabetics, as this was strongly associated with adhering to a healthy diet and general diabetes control. Our findings also emphasize the need for autonomy supportive health care professionals in diabetes care. Interestingly, perceived competence partially mediated the influence of autonomy support on general diabetes control. PMID:25627667

  17. Preliminary Testing of a Program to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes among High-Risk Youth.(research Papers)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey, Margaret; Berry, Diane; Davidson, Maryanne; Galasso, Pam; Gustafson, Elaine; Melkus, Gail

    2004-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is increasing among youth, with minority youth at highest risk. This preliminary study tested the feasibility of a school-based program to prevent type 2 diabetes in youth at risk. Forty-one participants (age 12.6 [+ or -] 1.1 years; 63% female, 51% African American, 44% Hispanic, and 5% Caucasian) were randomly assigned to one of…

  18. Is Acanthosis Nigricans a Reliable Indicator for Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Obese Children and Adolescents?: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Cilymol; Rozmus, Cathy L.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes is becoming a major health problem affecting children and adolescents in the United States. This article reviews the current literature examining the association between the presence of acanthosis nigricans (AN) and risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in obese children and adolescents. Ethnicity, family…

  19. Does vitamin D deficiency contribute to increased rates of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes among African Americans?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African Americans have higher rates of type 2 diabetes and some forms of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with European Americans. They also have much higher rates of vitamin D deficiency. There is emerging evidence that vitamin D deficiency may be a risk factor for hypertension, type 2 diabete...

  20. HEALTHY study rationale, design and methods: