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Sample records for af type 2-diabetes

  1. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies. PMID:23528336

  2. Type 2 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your doctor or diabetes educator will help set up a testing schedule for you. Your doctor will help you set a target range for your blood sugar numbers. Keep these factors in mind: Most people with type 2 diabetes only need ...

  3. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes Your chance of getting type 2 diabetes—which used to be called adult-onset diabetes— ... steps to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes by reaching and maintaining a healthy weight, moving ...

  4. Type 2 diabetes - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic (lifelong) disease. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using the insulin ... get too high. Over time, people with type 2 diabetes may not have enough insulin. Most people ...

  5. Pomegranate and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Saleem; Swedan, Samer; Alguraan, Ziyad

    2013-05-01

    Over the last decade, various studies have linked pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn), a fruit native to the Middle East, with type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment. This review focuses on current laboratory and clinical research related to the effects of pomegranate fractions (peels, flowers, and seeds) and some of their active components on biochemical and metabolic variables associated with the pathologic markers of type 2 diabetes. This review systematically presents findings from cell culture and animal studies as well as clinical human research. One key mechanism by which pomegranate fractions affect the type 2 diabetic condition is by reducing oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. This reduction may occur by directly neutralizing the generated reactive oxygen species, increasing certain antioxidant enzyme activities, inducing metal chelation activity, reducing resistin formation, and inhibiting or activating certain transcriptional factors, such as nuclear factor κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. Fasting blood glucose levels were decreased significantly by punicic acid, methanolic seed extract, and pomegranate peel extract. Known compounds in pomegranate, such as punicalagin and ellagic, gallic, oleanolic, ursolic, and uallic acids, have been identified as having anti-diabetic actions. Furthermore, the juice sugar fraction was found to have unique antioxidant polyphenols (tannins and anthocyanins), which could be beneficial to control conditions in type 2 diabetes. These findings provide evidence for the anti-diabetic activity of pomegranate fruit; however, before pomegranate or any of its extracts can be medically recommended for the management of type 2 diabetes, controlled, clinical studies, are needed. PMID:23684435

  6. Type 2 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease. Alternative Names Noninsulin-dependent diabetes; Diabetes - type 2; Adult-onset diabetes Images Diabetes and exercise Diabetic emergency supplies Starchy foods Low blood sugar symptoms ...

  7. [Obesity and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Toplak, Hermann; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Wascher, Thomas C; Schindler, Karin; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes are nowadays summarized as "diabesity". That is due to the fact that obesity is frequently preceding and the most important risk factor in the increase of Type 2 Diabetes. The body mass index (BMI) is a crude measure of body fatness. Even normal weight persons can have lack in muscles (sarcopenia), which leads to the recommendation to measure waist und body fatness (e.g. BIA). Lifestyle management including nutrition and physical activity are important for diabetes prevention. In the therapy of Type 2 Diabetes body weight is increasingly used as secondary target. Also the choice of the anti-diabetic medication and concomitant medications is increasingly influenced by body weight. The significance of anti-obesity medications in the therapy of type 2 diabetes will have to be clarified by future studies. Bariatric surgery is at present indicated with a BMI above BMI > 35 kg/m(2) and can lead at least to partial diabetes remission but has to be part of a lifelong care concept. PMID:27052246

  8. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Sheri R.; Sigal, Ronald J.; Fernhall, Bo; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Blissmer, Bryan J.; Rubin, Richard R.; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Albright, Ann L.; Braun, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Although physical activity (PA) is a key element in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes, many with this chronic disease do not become or remain regularly active. High-quality studies establishing the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes were lacking until recently, but it is now well established that participation in regular PA improves blood glucose control and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes, along with positively affecting lipids, blood pressure, cardiovascular events, mortality, and quality of life. Structured interventions combining PA and modest weight loss have been shown to lower type 2 diabetes risk by up to 58% in high-risk populations. Most benefits of PA on diabetes management are realized through acute and chronic improvements in insulin action, accomplished with both aerobic and resistance training. The benefits of physical training are discussed, along with recommendations for varying activities, PA-associated blood glucose management, diabetes prevention, gestational diabetes mellitus, and safe and effective practices for PA with diabetes-related complications. PMID:21115758

  9. Psoriasis Tied to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158526.html Psoriasis Tied to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes A genetic link is one ... prove that psoriasis causes type 2 diabetes or obesity or vice versa, Lonnberg added. However, the study ...

  10. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table ... pre-diabetes have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, and for ...

  11. Psoriasis Tied to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158526.html Psoriasis Tied to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes A genetic link is one ... prove that psoriasis causes type 2 diabetes or obesity or vice versa, Lonnberg added. However, the study ...

  12. Type 2 Diabetes and Spina Bifida

    MedlinePlus

    ... called metabolic syndrome. What Causes Type 2 Diabetes? Obesity is the main cause of type 2 diabetes. ... 95th percentile, a person is considered overweight; and obesity occurs when BMI is greater than the 95th ...

  13. Type 2 diabetes - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000328.htm Type 2 diabetes - self-care To use the sharing features on ... seeing a diabetes educator. Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes You may not have any symptoms. If you ...

  14. Genetics of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of interaction between environmental factors and a strong hereditary component. We review the heritability of T2D as well as the history of genetic and genomic research in this area. Very few T2D risk genes were identified using candidate gene and linkage-based studies, but the advent of genome-wide association studies has led to the identification of multiple genes, including several that were not previously known to play any role in T2D. Highly replicated genes, for example TCF7L2, KCNQ1 and KCNJ11, are discussed in greater detail. Taken together, the genetic loci discovered to date explain only a small proportion of the observed heritability. We discuss possible explanations for this “missing heritability”, including the role of rare variants, gene-environment interactions and epigenetics. The clinical utility of current findings and avenues of future research are also discussed. PMID:23961321

  15. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease. People ...

  16. [Chronic nicotinamide overload and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shi-Sheng; Li, Da; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Sun, Wu-Ping; Liu, Xing-Xing; Lun, Yong-Zhi

    2010-02-25

    Type 2 diabetes is a major global health problem. It is generally accepted that type 2 diabetes is the result of gene-environmental interaction. However, the mechanism underlying the interaction is unclear. Diet change is known to play an important role in type 2 diabetes. The fact that the global high prevalence of type 2 diabetes has occurred following the spread of food fortification worldwide suggests a possible involvement of excess niacin intake. Our recent study found that nicotinamide overload and low nicotinamide detoxification may induce oxidative stress associated with insulin resistance. Based on the relevant facts, this review briefly summarized the relationship between the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and the nicotinamide metabolism changes induced by excess niacin intake, aldehyde oxidase inhibitors, liver diseases and functional defects of skin. We speculate that the gene-environmental interaction in type 2 diabetes may be a reflection of the outcome of the association of chronic nicotinamide overload-induced toxicity and the relatively low detoxification/excretion capacity of the body. Reducing the content of niacin in foods may be a promising strategy for the control of type 2 diabetes. PMID:20179894

  17. Pedal Away from Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159835.html Pedal Away From Type 2 Diabetes Study finds biking may help adults avoid ... TUESDAY, July 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Opting for two wheels rather than four could lower your risk ...

  18. Somatotype in elderly type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Buffa, Roberto; Floris, Giovanni; Putzu, Paolo F; Carboni, Luciano; Marini, Elisabetta

    2007-09-01

    Somatotyping is a practical technique for the description of physique. Individuals with Type 2 diabetes are characterized by physical peculiarities, such as overweight, obesity and a central pattern of body fat distribution. Somatotype applications to diabetes are limited. The objective of this study is to describe the somatotype of elderly type 2 diabetes patients. The sample consisted of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes (45 men, mean age 69.4 +/- 7.0 years; 65 women, mean age 72.9 +/- 7.1 years). The pathological subjects were compared with a control group consisting of 280 healthy individuals (134 men, mean age 74.2 +/- 7.3 years; 146 women, mean age 74.9 +/- 7.4 years). The Heath-Carter somatotype was applied. Diabetic men and women (mean somatotype, respectively: 6.8-5.6-0.6 and 8.6-6.4-0.2) presented significantly higher values of endomorphy than the controls (p = 0.043 in men, p = 0.003 in women); men also had a lower mesomorphic component (p = 0.000). The somatotype method revealed physical peculiarities in type 2 diabetes patients. The marked endomorphy in the pathological individuals can be related to general fatness, which is a well known disease risk factor. The somatotype appears to be a suitable technique for the assessment of physique in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:18041381

  19. [Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD)].

    PubMed

    Concha L, Luciana; Durruty A, Pilar; García de Los Ríos A, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD) is presently a well-defined clinical entity, characterized by a debut with severe hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis similar to the presenting form of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1). However, it appears in subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) phenotype. This situation is caused by an acute, reversible dysfunction of the beta cell in individuals with insulin resistance. Once the acute stage subsides, patients behave as having a DM2 and do not require insulin treatment. They should be kept on a diet and oral hypoglycemic drugs due to their susceptibility to have recurrent acute ketotic decompensations. PMID:26530207

  20. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarry-Horn, Jill L.; Evans, Barbara J.; Kerrigan, James R.

    2003-01-01

    In the United States, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in children and adolescents has been increasing at an alarming rate. Early recognition and intervention can delay the onset of type 2 DM and prevent the long-term complications. School nurses have an essential role in implementing the American Diabetes Association (ADA)…

  1. Conceptualizing type 2 diabetes and its management.

    PubMed

    Tsasis, Peter; Wu, Jianhong; An, Aijun; Wong, Hannah J; An, Xiandong; Mei, Zhen; Hains, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is growing worldwide due to population growth, increased rates of obesity, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity. Risk assessment methods can effectively evaluate the risk of diabetes, and a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce risk or prevent complications of type 2 diabetes. However, risk assessment alone has not significantly improved poor adherence to recommended medical interventions and lifestyle changes. This paper focuses on the challenge of nonadherence and posits that improving adherence requires tailoring interventions that explicitly consider the social determinants of health. PMID:27099510

  2. [Surgical treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Muciño-Bermejo, María Jimena

    2014-01-01

    Sustained remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus and significantly improved hyperlipidemia and arterial hypertension, control has been achieves in both lean and obese patient after bariatric surgery procedures or other gastrointestinal surgical procedures. It has been demonstrated that the metabolic effects of bariatric surgery in these patients derives not only in reducing weight and caloric intake, but also endocrine changes resulting from surgical manifestation gastrointestinal tract. In this article we review the clinical outcomes of such interventions (collectively called "metabolic surgery") and the perspectives on the role that these surgeries play in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25312324

  3. Conceptualizing type 2 diabetes and its management

    PubMed Central

    Tsasis, Peter; Wu, Jianhong; An, Aijun; Wong, Hannah J; An, Xiandong; Mei, Zhen; Hains, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is growing worldwide due to population growth, increased rates of obesity, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity. Risk assessment methods can effectively evaluate the risk of diabetes, and a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce risk or prevent complications of type 2 diabetes. However, risk assessment alone has not significantly improved poor adherence to recommended medical interventions and lifestyle changes. This paper focuses on the challenge of nonadherence and posits that improving adherence requires tailoring interventions that explicitly consider the social determinants of health. PMID:27099510

  4. Epidemiology of fractures in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann V

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes affects an increasing proportion of older adults, the population that is also at elevated risk of fracture. Type 2 diabetes itself increases the risk of fracture, particularly in African-American and Latino populations. In Western countries, overweight and obesity, associated with reduced fracture risk, are highly prevalent in diabetic patients. Studies in East Asian countries that have a lower prevalence of obesity with diabetes may help to disentangle the effects of diabetes and obesity on the skeleton. Type 2 diabetes is also associated with higher bone density, and as a result standard tools for fracture prediction tend to underestimate fracture risk in this population, an important challenge for risk assessment in the clinical setting. Contributing factors to the increased fracture risk in type 2 diabetes include more frequent falls and deficits in diabetic bone, not captured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), that are as yet not clearly understood. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that poor glycemic control contributes to increased fracture risk although intensive lowering of A1C is not effective in preventing fracture. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Bone and diabetes". PMID:26027505

  5. Type 2 Diabetes and Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Naim M.

    2008-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased propensity for uric acid nephrolithiasis. In individuals with diabetes, this increased risk is due to a lower urine pH that results from obesity, dietary factors, and impaired renal ammoniagenesis. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of uric acid stone disease in patients with diabetes are hereby reviewed, and potential molecular mechanisms are proposed.

  6. New therapeutic approaches in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a progressive chronic disease resulting from a dynamic interaction between defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. New molecules have recently been launched and many others are under clinical investigation. Besides classical sulfonylureas and glinides, new insulin secretagogues are now available, which target the incretin gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Indeed, oral incretin enhancers acting as antagonists of the enzyme DPP-4 (dipeptidylpeptidase-4), which inactivates natural GLP-1,and injectable incretin mimetics (exenatide) or analogues (liraglutide), which reproduce the actions of GLP-1 while resisting to DPP-4, represent new opportunities to stimulate insulin secretion, without increasing the risk of hypoglycaemia and weight gain. Among insulin sensitizers, metformin remains unequivocally the first drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, whereas promising drugs as thiazolidinediones (glitazones) were recently challenged because of various safety issues. When insulin is required, insulin analogues, both short-acting and basal ones, may offer some advantages regarding better control of postprandial hyperglycaemia, reduced risk of hypoglycaemia and/or lower weight gain in patients with type 2 diabetes. Emphasis should be put on early detection and intensive management of type 2 diabetes, individualized glucose lowering treatments and goals, stepwise pharmacological strategy avoiding therapeutic inertia, and multiple cardiovascular risk--targeted approach. PMID:19170358

  7. Managing type 2 diabetes in Black patients.

    PubMed

    Akindana, Adeola; Ogunedo, Chioma

    2015-09-13

    Despite many novel treatments available for managing type 2 diabetes mellitus, Black patients continue to disproportionately suffer complications associated with poor glycemic control. This article describes a comprehensive approach to managing diabetes mellitus in these patients while addressing cultural nuances that may be barriers to positive outcomes. PMID:26259037

  8. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents One- ... survey data, researchers found that the prevalence of diabetes in U.S. adults is continuing to rise. And despite efforts to ...

  9. Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... because the body can't use glucose for energy properly. previous continue Complications of Diabetes Sometimes, kids and teens with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, or obesity might develop thick, dark, velvet-like skin around the neck, armpits, groin, ...

  10. The Genetic Basis of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swapan Kumar; Elbein, Steven C

    2006-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes results from a complex physiologic process that includes the pancreatic beta cells, peripheral glucose uptake in muscle, the secretion of multiple cytokines and hormone-like molecules from adipocytes, hepatic glucose production, and likely the central nervous system. Consistent with the complex web of physiologic defects, the emerging picture of the genetics will involve a large number of risk susceptibility genes, each individually with relatively small effect (odds ratios below 1.2 in most cases). The challenge for the future will include cataloging and confirming the genetic risk factors, and understanding how these risk factors interact with each other and with the known environmental and lifestyle risk factors that increase the propensity to type 2 diabetes. PMID:16892160

  11. Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Marchie, Augustine; Jenkins, Alexandra L; Augustin, Livia S A; Ludwig, David S; Barnard, Neal D; Anderson, James W

    2003-09-01

    Based on what is known of the components of plant-based diets and their effects from cohort studies, there is reason to believe that vegetarian diets would have advantages in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. At present there are few data on vegetarian diets in diabetes that do not in addition have weight loss or exercise components. Nevertheless, the use of whole-grain or traditionally processed cereals and legumes has been associated with improved glycemic control in both diabetic and insulin-resistant individuals. Long-term cohort studies have indicated that whole-grain consumption reduces the risk of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, nuts (eg, almonds), viscous fibers (eg, fibers from oats and barley), soy proteins, and plant sterols, which may be part of the vegetarian diet, reduce serum lipids. In combination, these plant food components may have a very significant impact on cardiovascular disease, one of the major complications of diabetes. Furthermore, substituting soy or other vegetable proteins for animal protein may also decrease renal hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and renal acid load and in the long term reduce the risk of developing renal disease in type 2 diabetes. The vegetarian diet, therefore, contains a portfolio of natural products and food forms of benefit for both the carbohydrate and lipid abnormalities in diabetes. It is anticipated that their combined use in vegetarian diets will produce very significant metabolic advantages for the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its complications. PMID:12936955

  12. Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    In the UK, diabetes mellitus affects around 3 million people, of whom over 90% have type 2 diabetes. Aims of treatment include minimising long-term complications (e.g. cardiovascular disease, blindness, chronic kidney disease, premature mortality) and avoiding unwanted effects of treatment (e.g. severe hypoglycaemia, weight gain). Management of diabetes includes patient support and education; addressing symptoms; lifestyle modification; targeting associated risk factors for cardiovascular disease; and surveillance for, and management of, complications including treatment-related hypoglycaemia. Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) belongs to a new class of oral glucose-lowering drugs that inhibit renal glucose reabsorption and promote glycosuria. It is licensed in the UK in adults with type 2 diabetes as monotherapy when diet and exercise alone do not provide adequate glycaemic control and who are unable to tolerate metformin; or, as add-on therapy, with other glucose-lowering agents including insulin, when these, with diet and exercise, do not provide adequate glycaemic control. The company's advertising materials claim that dapagliflozin provides a "novel method of controlling excess glucose" with "secondary benefit of weight loss". Here, we review the evidence for the use of dapagliflozin in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24030968

  13. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M; Mahajan, Anubha; Agarwala, Vineeta; Gaulton, Kyle J; Ma, Clement; Fontanillas, Pierre; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J; Rivas, Manuel A; Perry, John R B; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W; Robertson, Neil R; Rayner, N William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E; Fernandez Tajes, Juan; Highland, Heather M; Dupuis, Josee; Chines, Peter S; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Hartl, Christopher; Jackson, Anne U; Chen, Han; Huyghe, Jeroen R; van de Bunt, Martijn; Pearson, Richard D; Kumar, Ashish; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Grarup, Niels; Stringham, Heather M; Gamazon, Eric R; Lee, Jaehoon; Chen, Yuhui; Scott, Robert A; Below, Jennifer E; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jinyan; Go, Min Jin; Stitzel, Michael L; Pasko, Dorota; Parker, Stephen C J; Varga, Tibor V; Green, Todd; Beer, Nicola L; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Ferreira, Teresa; Fingerlin, Tasha; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hu, Cheng; Huh, Iksoo; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Min-Seok; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Selyeong; Lin, Keng-Han; Maxwell, Taylor J; Nagai, Yoshihiko; Wang, Xu; Welch, Ryan P; Yoon, Joon; Zhang, Weihua; Barzilai, Nir; Voight, Benjamin F; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Manning, Alisa; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Balkau, Beverley; Stancáková, Alena; Abboud, Hanna E; Boeing, Heiner; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, James; Carey, Jason; Kwan, Phoenix; Grant, George; Smith, Joshua D; Neale, Benjamin M; Purcell, Shaun; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Lee, Heung Man; Lu, Yingchang; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Zhao, Wei; Danesh, John; Lam, Vincent K L; Park, Kyong Soo; Saleheen, Danish; So, Wing Yee; Tam, Claudia H T; Afzal, Uzma; Aguilar, David; Arya, Rector; Aung, Tin; Chan, Edmund; Navarro, Carmen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Palli, Domenico; Correa, Adolfo; Curran, Joanne E; Rybin, Denis; Farook, Vidya S; Fowler, Sharon P; Freedman, Barry I; Griswold, Michael; Hale, Daniel Esten; Hicks, Pamela J; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kumar, Satish; Lehne, Benjamin; Thuillier, Dorothée; Lim, Wei Yen; Liu, Jianjun; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Loh, Marie; Musani, Solomon K; Puppala, Sobha; Scott, William R; Yengo, Loïc; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Taylor, Herman A; Thameem, Farook; Wilson, Gregory; Wong, Tien Yin; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Levy, Jonathan C; Mangino, Massimo; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Fadista, João; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Herder, Christian; Groves, Christopher J; Wieland, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Koistinen, Heikki A; Doney, Alex S F; Kinnunen, Leena; Esko, Tõnu; Farmer, Andrew J; Hakaste, Liisa; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Kravic, Jasmina; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Hollensted, Mette; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Ladenvall, Claes; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kriebel, Jennifer; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lannfelt, Lars; Lauritzen, Torsten; Narisu, Narisu; Linneberg, Allan; Melander, Olle; Milani, Lili; Neville, Matt; Orho-Melander, Marju; Qi, Lu; Qi, Qibin; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Swift, Amy; Rosengren, Anders H; Stirrups, Kathleen; Wood, Andrew R; Mihailov, Evelin; Blancher, Christine; Carneiro, Mauricio O; Maguire, Jared; Poplin, Ryan; Shakir, Khalid; Fennell, Timothy; DePristo, Mark; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Deloukas, Panos; Gjesing, Anette P; Jun, Goo; Nilsson, Peter; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Onofrio, Robert; Thorand, Barbara; Hansen, Torben; Meisinger, Christa; Hu, Frank B; Isomaa, Bo; Karpe, Fredrik; Liang, Liming; Peters, Annette; Huth, Cornelia; O'Rahilly, Stephen P; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Oluf; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Watanabe, Richard M; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bergman, Richard N; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Bottinger, Erwin P; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chan, Juliana C N; Chia, Kee Seng; Daly, Mark J; Ebrahim, Shah B; Langenberg, Claudia; Elliott, Paul; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Lehman, Donna M; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C W; Pollin, Toni I; Sandhu, Manjinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Froguel, Philippe; Barroso, Inês; Teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Loos, Ruth J F; Small, Kerrin S; Ried, Janina S; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Grallert, Harald; Glaser, Benjamin; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J; Walker, Mark; Banks, Eric; Gieger, Christian; Ingelsson, Erik; Im, Hae Kyung; Illig, Thomas; Franks, Paul W; Buck, Gemma; Trakalo, Joseph; Buck, David; Prokopenko, Inga; Mägi, Reedik; Lind, Lars; Farjoun, Yossi; Owen, Katharine R; Gloyn, Anna L; Strauch, Konstantin; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lee, Jong-Young; Park, Taesung

    2016-08-01

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate, these explain only a fraction of the heritability of this disease. Here, to test the hypothesis that lower-frequency variants explain much of the remainder, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia performed whole-genome sequencing in 2,657 European individuals with and without diabetes, and exome sequencing in 12,940 individuals from five ancestry groups. To increase statistical power, we expanded the sample size via genotyping and imputation in a further 111,548 subjects. Variants associated with type 2 diabetes after sequencing were overwhelmingly common and most fell within regions previously identified by genome-wide association studies. Comprehensive enumeration of sequence variation is necessary to identify functional alleles that provide important clues to disease pathophysiology, but large-scale sequencing does not support the idea that lower-frequency variants have a major role in predisposition to type 2 diabetes. PMID:27398621

  14. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": You Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Steps, Big Rewards": You Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table of Contents For ... million Americans are at risk for type 2 diabetes." "Fifty four million Americans are at risk for ...

  15. Study Suggests Type 2 Diabetes-Cancer Link

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159814.html Study Suggests Type 2 Diabetes-Cancer Link It hints at -- but doesn' ... decade before -- and three months following -- a type 2 diabetes diagnosis, new research suggests. Although it's not ...

  16. Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159330.html Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Prognosis may ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prospects for people with type 2 diabetes and heart disease may be grimmer than ...

  17. Spare the Meat, Skip the Type 2 Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159363.html Spare the Meat, Skip the Type 2 Diabetes? A mostly plant-based diet may help ... grains -- may significantly lower your risk of type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. "This study highlights ...

  18. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Small Steps, Big Rewards": Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Past Issues / Fall ... These are the plain facts in "Small Steps. Big Rewards: Prevent Type 2 Diabetes," an education campaign ...

  19. Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avoiding Pregnancy Articles Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Problems of Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well ...

  20. Management of type 2 diabetes: evolving strategies for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A.; Jerkins, Terri W.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Kitabchi, Abbas E.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to increase at an alarming rate around the world, with even more people being affected by prediabetes. Although the pathogenesis and long-term complications of type 2 diabetes are fairly well known, its treatment has remained challenging, with only half of the patients achieving the recommended hemoglobin A1c target. This narrative review explores the pathogenetic rationale for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, with the view of fostering better understanding of the evolving treatment modalities. The diagnostic criteria including the role of hemoglobin A1c in the diagnosis of diabetes are discussed. Due attention is given to the different therapeutic maneuvers and their utility in the management of the diabetic patient. The evidence supporting the role of exercise, medical nutrition therapy, glucose monitoring, and antiobesity measures including pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery is discussed. The controversial subject of optimum glycemic control in hospitalized and ambulatory patients is discussed in detail. An update of the available pharmacologic options for the management of type 2 diabetes is provided with particular emphasis on newer and emerging modalities. Special attention has been given to the initiation of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, with explanation of the pathophysiologic basis for insulin therapy in the ambulatory diabetic patient. A review of the evidence supporting the efficacy of the different preventive measures is also provided. PMID:21134520

  1. Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, S; Edelman, S V

    2001-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a common disorder often accompanied by numerous metabolic abnormalities leading to a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Results from the UKPDS have confirmed that intensive glucose control delays the onset and retards the progression of microvascular disease and possibly of macrovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. In the early stages of the disease, insulin resistance plays a major role in the development of hyperglycemia and other metabolic abnormalities, and patients with type 2 diabetes often benefit from measures to improve insulin sensitivity such as weight loss, dietary changes, and exercise. Later, the use of oral insulin secretagogues and insulin sensitizers as monotherapy and in combination helps maintain glycemia for varying periods of time. Ultimately, because of the progressive nature of the disease and the progressive decline in pancreatic beta-cell function, insulin therapy is almost always obligatory to achieve optimal glycemic goals. Not all patients are candidates for aggressive insulin management; therefore, the goals of therapy should be modified, especially in elderly individuals and those with co-morbid conditions. Candidates for intensive management should be motivated, compliant, and educable, without other major medical conditions and physical limitations that would preclude accurate and reliable HGM and insulin administration. In selected patients, combination therapy with insulin and oral antidiabetic medications can be an effective method for normalizing glycemia without the need for rigorous multiple-injection regimens. The patients for whom combination therapy is most commonly successful are those who do not achieve adequate glycemic control using daytime oral agents but who still show some evidence of responsiveness to the medications. Bedtime intermediate-acting or predinner premixed intermediate- and rapid-acting insulin is administered and progressively increased until the FPG

  2. [Type 2 diabetes: what therapeutic strategy?].

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, A; Hartemann-Heurtier, A

    2001-02-17

    GOAL OF TREATMENT: Prevention of diabetic micro and macroangiopathy is the goal of treatment in type 2 diabetes mellitus. A well-controlled glucose level is the key to prevention of microangiopathy; there is no threshold level. Antihypertensive treatment, with the goal of blood pressure below 130/80 mmHg is also beneficial in preventing aggravation of microangiopathy. For macroangiopathy, prevention is based in priority on treatment of other risk factors for cardiovascular disease; the threshold level for drug treatment and the therapeutic objective are those defined for secondary prevention in non-diabetic patients, i.e. blood pressure below 140/80 mmHg and LDL cholesterol under 1.30 g/l. The beneficial effect of lower glucose levels on preventing macrovascular risk was not formally demonstrated by the UKPDS, probably because the difference between the control and the treatment group HbA1c levels was minimal, 0.9 points. REVISITING STRATEGY: It is thus time to revisit the preventive strategy for type 2 diabetes mellitus, i.e. step-by-step increments, as currently proposed for worsening glucose levels. Metformine should be prescribed if the HbA1c is above normal in order to achieve the demonstrated benefit in prevention of microangiopathy and in the hope, motivated by pathophysiology data, of preventing insulin failure. Slow-release insulin at bedtime should be added to the oral hypoglycemiants if fasting glucose exceeds 1.60 or 1.80 g/l, even if the HbA1c remains below 8%. NEW HYPOGLYCEMIANTS: The role of these new agents in this more "aggressive" strategy remains to be defined. Glinides will have to demonstrate their superiority over sulfamides (fewer episodes of hypoglycemia with comparable efficacy) to justify their high cost. Glitazones will have to demonstrate a beneficial effect in second intention combination with metformine on cardiovascular morbidity mortality in type 2 diabetes patients with a metabolic insulin-resistance syndrome and visceral obesity

  3. Genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuo; Shojima, Nobuhiro; Hosoe, Jun; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2014-09-19

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 70 loci associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Most genetic variants associated with T2D are common variants with modest effects on T2D and are shared with major ancestry groups. To what extent the genetic component of T2D can be explained by common variants relies upon the shape of the genetic architecture of T2D. Fine mapping utilizing populations with different patterns of linkage disequilibrium and functional annotation derived from experiments in relevant tissues are mandatory to track down causal variants responsible for the pathogenesis of T2D. PMID:25111817

  4. Pharmacologic Therapy of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jennifer J; Tylee, Tracy S

    2016-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a common condition. Treatment of diabetes and related complications can be complex. In addition to lifestyle changes, medications play an important role in controlling patients' blood glucose levels and preventing complications. From an individual and societal standpoint, it is also an expensive disease. Medical spending attributed to diabetes per individual is significant. With appropriate therapy, patients can lead full, healthy lives with the disease, so making informed decisions regarding pharmacotherapy for T2DM is clearly of great importance. PMID:27235609

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and exercise impairment.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Jane E B; Bridenstine, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2013-03-01

    Limitations in physical fitness, a consistent finding in individuals with both type I and type 2 diabetes mellitus, correlate strongly with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. These limitations may significantly contribute to the persistent excess cardiovascular mortality affecting this group. Exercise impairments in VO2 peak and VO2 kinetics manifest early on in diabetes, even with good glycemic control and in the absence of clinically apparent complications. Subclinical cardiac dysfunction is often present but does not fully explain the observed defect in exercise capacity in persons with diabetes. In part, the cardiac limitations are secondary to decreased perfusion with exercise challenge. This is a reversible defect. Similarly, in the skeletal muscle, impairments in nutritive blood flow correlate with slowed (or inefficient) exercise kinetics and decreased exercise capacity. Several correlations highlight the likelihood of endothelial-specific impairments as mediators of exercise dysfunction in diabetes, including insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, decreased myocardial perfusion, slowed tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and impairment in mitochondrial function. Both exercise training and therapies targeted at improving insulin sensitivity and endothelial function improve physical fitness in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Optimization of exercise functions in people with diabetes has implications for diabetes prevention and reductions in mortality risk. Understanding the molecular details of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes may provide specific therapeutic targets for the remediation of this defect. Rat models to test this hypothesis are under study. PMID:23299658

  6. Vitamins and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Ramos, Roxana; Ana Laura, Guadarrama-López; Elina, Martínez-Carrillo Beatriz; Donají, Benítez-Arciniega Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    The present review evaluates the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and individual or combined vitamins. Antioxidant vitamins A, C and E are found decreased in diabetic subjects, possibly due to an increased need to control the excessive oxidative stress produced by abnormalities in glucose metabolism. On the other hand, retinol binding protein exerts a modulating effect, as it has adipokine functions. With respect to the B group vitamins, thiamin, pyridoxine and biotin have been found decreased but the mechanisms are not clear, however supplementation has shown some improvement of the metabolic control in diabetic patients. The absorption of folic acid and vitamin B12 is importantly decreased by the prolongued use of metformin, which is the first choice drug in uncomplicated diabetes, thus these two nutrients have been found deficient in the disease and most probably need to be supplemented regularly. On the other hand, vitamin D is considered a risk factor for the development of diabetes as well as its complications, particularly cardiovascular ones. Although some studies have found an association of vitamin K intake with glucose metabolism further research is needed. Studies on the use of multivitamin supplements have shown unconclusive results. After reviewing the evidence, no real recommendation on the use of vitamin supplements in type 2 diabetes mellitus can be issued, however patients using metformin during prolongued periods may need folic acid and vitamin B12. PMID:25388747

  7. Basal insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hedrington, Maka S; Pulliam, Lindsay; Davis, Stephen N

    2011-06-01

    Insulin glargine is the first 24-h recombinant DNA insulin analog introduced to the market. Substitution of glycine for asparagine and addition of two arginine residues raise the isoelectric point of insulin glargine and result in microprecipitates, delaying absorption from subcutaneous tissue. This delayed absorption result in fairly flat 24-h insulin concentration profiles with no discernible peak. Large, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials in patients with type 2 diabetes show that although NPH insulin and insulin glargine are equally effective in lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c) and fasting blood glucose, there is a clear advantage of insulin glargine over NPH insulin in reducing nocturnal and overall hypoglycemia. Lower risk of hypoglycemia with glargine was also consistently demonstrated by trials comparing insulin glargine and premixed analog insulins. These studies also showed greater reduction in A1c with twice-daily premixed insulins compared with glargine, when insulin glargine was administered without mealtime insulin coverage. Insulin glargine was also compared with another insulin analog, insulin detemir. Trials showed that both insulin analogs are equally effective in lowering A1c and have comparable risk of hypoglycemia. Trials comparing insulin glargine with glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists showed comparable significant reductions in A1c with both regimens. Insulin glargine is well tolerated, has low immunogenicity, reduced risks for acute myocardial infarction, and a lower risk of hypoglycemia compared with NPH insulin in individuals with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21668335

  8. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Stephen J

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to fluoroquinolone antibiotics is postulated as a risk factor for subsequent development of type 2 diabetes. It is hypothesized that fluoroquinolones induce an intracellular magnesium deficit that can lead to insulin resistance. A temporal correlation is reported between the rate of outpatient prescription of quinolones and the incidence of diabetes during the period 1980-2011 with a lag of approximately two years (R(2)=0.86, P<10(-9)). The increase in incidence of diabetes after 1990 and the recent decrease in the number of new cases are both reflected in the fluoroquinolone prescription rates. A geographical correlation is reported (adj. R(2)=0.7, P<0.0001) between rates of increase in prevalence of diabetes in each U.S. state and a model using only local rates of outpatient fluoroquinolone prescription, local rates of increase in the prevalence of obesity, and local rates of population growth as predictor variables. Prescription rates of non-quinolone antibiotics correlated less well with the local rates of increase in prevalence of diabetes. The data are consistent with fluoroquinolone exposure predisposing an individual to develop diabetes with a probability that strongly depends upon factors that also lead to an increase in obesity. According to the hypothesis, much of the increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes in the U.S. from 1990 to the present can be attributed to fluoroquinolone exposure. PMID:24947193

  9. Incretin agents in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Stuart A.; Ekoé, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To evaluate the emerging classes of antihyperglycemic agents that target the incretin pathway, including their therapeutic efficacy and side effect profiles, in order to help identify their place among the treatment options for patients with type 2 diabetes. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched. Most evidence is level I and II. MAIN MESSAGE Two classes of incretin agents are currently available: glucagonlike peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors, both of which lower hyperglycemia considerably without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia. The GLP1 receptor agonists have a greater effect on patients’ glycated hemoglobin A1c levels and cause sustained weight loss, whereas the DPP4 inhibitors are weight-neutral. CONCLUSION The GLP1 and DPP4 incretin agents, promising and versatile antihyperglycemic agents, are finding their way into the therapeutic algorithm for treating type 2 diabetes. They can be used in patients not adequately controlled by metformin monotherapy or as initial therapy in those for whom metformin is contraindicated. PMID:20631270

  10. Basal Insulin Treatment in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hedrington, Maka S.; Pulliam, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Insulin glargine is the first 24-h recombinant DNA insulin analog introduced to the market. Substitution of glycine for asparagine and addition of two arginine residues raise the isoelectric point of insulin glargine and result in microprecipitates, delaying absorption from subcutaneous tissue. This delayed absorption result in fairly flat 24-h insulin concentration profiles with no discernible peak. Large, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials in patients with type 2 diabetes show that although NPH insulin and insulin glargine are equally effective in lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c) and fasting blood glucose, there is a clear advantage of insulin glargine over NPH insulin in reducing nocturnal and overall hypoglycemia. Lower risk of hypoglycemia with glargine was also consistently demonstrated by trials comparing insulin glargine and premixed analog insulins. These studies also showed greater reduction in A1c with twice-daily premixed insulins compared with glargine, when insulin glargine was administered without mealtime insulin coverage. Insulin glargine was also compared with another insulin analog, insulin detemir. Trials showed that both insulin analogs are equally effective in lowering A1c and have comparable risk of hypoglycemia. Trials comparing insulin glargine with glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists showed comparable significant reductions in A1c with both regimens. Insulin glargine is well tolerated, has low immunogenicity, reduced risks for acute myocardial infarction, and a lower risk of hypoglycemia compared with NPH insulin in individuals with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21668335

  11. [Dietary advice in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Rigalleau, Vincent; Gonzalez, Concepcion; Raffaitin, Christelle; Gin, Henri

    2010-04-20

    The dietary advice is a part of the global care for type 2 diabetes. First, overweight implies a caloric restriction. When poor glucose control is associated with weight gain, important errors are obvious (excess fat and sugar), providing more pills or insulin without correcting them is poorly effective, but promotes further weight gain. Normal body weight, or poor glucose control despite loss of weight, needs to reappraise the diagnosis: diabetes type, intercurrent disease. The cofactors of the "metabolic syndrom" are usually present, so saturated fat has to be reduced, while maintaining fish, fruits, vegetables and whole grain cereals. Blood pressure and dyslipidemia may need further counselling about dietary sodium, carbohydrates, cholesterol. When insulin, sulfonylurea or glinids are indicated, the dietary intake of carbohydrates has to be regular to avoid hypoglycemia. PMID:20465121

  12. Renal Biopsy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Eugenia; Agraz, Irene; Ibernon, Meritxell; Ramos, Natalia; Fort, Joan; Serón, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The majority of diabetic patients with renal involvement are not biopsied. Studies evaluating histological findings in renal biopsies performed in diabetic patients have shown that approximately one third of the cases will show pure diabetic nephropathy, one third a non-diabetic condition and another third will show diabetic nephropathy with a superimposed disease. Early diagnosis of treatable non-diabetic diseases in diabetic patients is important to ameliorate renal prognosis. The publication of the International Consensus Document for the classification of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has provided common criteria for the classification of diabetic nephropathy and its utility to stratify risk for renal failure has already been demonstrated in different retrospective studies. The availability of new drugs with the potential to modify the natural history of diabetic nephropathy has raised the question whether renal biopsies may allow a better design of clinical trials aimed to delay the progression of chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients. PMID:26239461

  13. Bariatric surgery, safety and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Spanakis, Elias; Gragnoli, Claudia

    2009-03-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) represent major health concerns in the USA. Weight loss is the most important aspect in T2D management, as it reduces both morbidity and mortality. Available lifestyle, behavioral, and pharmacological strategies provide just mild to moderate weight loss. The greatest degree of T2D prevention or T2D amelioration in obese subjects has been reported in subjects who underwent bariatric surgery. In the current review, we will describe various types of bariatric surgery, related safety profiles, and their effect on T2D, as well as the potential mechanisms involved in the remission of T2D. Finally, we hereby examine whether bariatric surgery may be considered a treatment for T2D in pregnant women, children, adolescents and subjects at least 65 years old. PMID:18830788

  14. [TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND DEPRESSION].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, A Ya; Esaulenko, I E; Sahnenko, V V; Budnevskyj, A V; Podvygyn, S N

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance of type 2 diabetes mellitus is not confined to metabolic disorders. A serious problem is also affective pathology that occurs in the majority (30-70%) of patients. However, diagnostics and correction of anxiety and depressive disorders associated with diabetes are often given insufficient attention. Many studies showed relationship between affective disorders and low adherence to the prescribed treatment resulting in general deterioration of clinical prognosis of diabetes. This review article describes the basic mechanisms behind the interrelation of affective disorders and diabetes. The role of persistent subclinical inflammation in diabetes and depression is discussed. The influence of emotional stress on the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on the overproduction of cortisol is emphasized. The similarity of some structural changes in the brain tissue in diabetes and depression is discussed. Effect of endocrine disruption in the emotional sphere is demonstrated. Mechanisms responsible for the development of diabetes and its complications provoked by depression are considered. PMID:27459757

  15. The prevention of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Jill P; Knowler, William C; Kahn, Steven E; Marrero, David; Florez, Jose C; Bray, George A; Haffner, Steven M; Hoskin, Mary; Nathan, David M

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects more than 7% of adults in the US and leads to substantial personal and economic burden. In prediabetic states insulin secretion and action—potential targets of preventive interventions—are impaired. In trials lifestyle modification (i.e. weight loss and exercise) has proven effective in preventing incident T2DM in high-risk groups, although weight loss has the greatest effect. Various medications (e.g. metformin, thiazolidinediones and acarbose) can also prevent or delay T2DM. Whether diabetes-prevention strategies also ultimately prevent the development of diabetic vascular complications is unknown, but cardiovascular risk factors are favorably affected. Preventive strategies that can be implemented in routine clinical settings have been developed and evaluated. Widespread application has, however, been limited by local financial considerations, even though cost-effectiveness might be achieved at the population level. PMID:18493227

  16. [New therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Puig-Domingo, Manuel; Pellitero, Silvia

    2015-06-22

    The increasing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has led to a growing interest in the investigation of new therapies. Treatment of T2DM has focused on the insulinopenia and insulin resistance. However, in the last 10 years, new lines of research have emerged for the treatment of T2DM and preclinical studies appear promising. The possibility of using these drugs in combination with other currently available drugs will enhance the antidiabetic effect and promote weight loss with fewer side effects. The data provided by post-marketing monitoring will help us to better understand their safety profile and potential long-term effects on target organs, especially the cardiovascular risk. PMID:25194974

  17. Psychoneuroimmune implications of type 2 diabetes: redux.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Jason C; Johnson, Daniel R; Freund, Gregory G

    2009-05-01

    A sizable body of knowledge has arisen demonstrating that type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with alterations in the innate immune system. The resulting proinflammatory-leaning imbalance is implicated in the development of secondary disease complications and comorbidities, such as delayed wound healing, accelerated progress of atherosclerosis, and retinopathy, in people who have T2D. New experimental data and the results of recently published health-related quality-of-life surveys indicate that individuals who have T2D experience diminished feelings of happiness, well being, and satisfaction with life. These emotional and psychological consequences of T2D point to altered neuroimmunity as a previously unappreciated complication of T2D. This article discusses recent data detailing the impact of T2D on a person's PNI response. PMID:19389586

  18. In the clinic. Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vijan, Sandeep

    2015-03-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Type 2 Diabetes focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:25732301

  19. Type 2 diabetes in pregnancy - An increasing problem.

    PubMed

    Temple, Rosemary; Murphy, Helen

    2010-08-01

    The worldwide epidemic in type 2 diabetes has been associated with an increased diagnosis in young adults. This has lead to a rapid rise in the number of pregnancies complicated by type 2 diabetes. Studies have shown risk of serious adverse outcome, including congenital malformation and perinatal mortality, is the same, or increased, in type 2 diabetes compared to type 1 diabetes. Despite improved glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes compared to type 1 diabetes, rates of perinatal morbidity, including preterm birth and macrosomia, appear to be similar. Risk factors associated with poor pregnancy outcome in women with type 2 diabetes include obesity, ethnicity and poor pregnancy preparation. This review will cover practical aspects of management of type 2 diabetes before, during and after pregnancy, including prepregnancy care, safety of oral hypoglycaemic agents, glycaemic management during labour, and choice of effective contraception. PMID:20832738

  20. Nurse Practitioner Management of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Gail Carr; Derouin, Anne L; Vorderstrasse, Allison A; Hipkens, James; Thompson, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Context Multifactorial barriers prevent primary care clinicians from helping their adult patients with type 2 diabetes achieve good control of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Patients’ depression and low self-efficacy can complicate diabetes management by impairing tasks needed for effective disease self-management. Objectives: To evaluate whether nurse practitioners in collaborative practices with primary care clinicians are effective in helping improve control of HbA1c, blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, and to assess whether nurse practitioner-guided care affects depression and self-efficacy in these patients. Design: De-identified preintervention and postintervention data were collected from prospective review of medical charts of patients in a managed care organization’s primary care clinics. Main Outcome Measures: Preintervention and postintervention HbA1c values were evaluated as the primary outcome measure. Preintervention and postintervention values for BP, LDL-C, body weight, and depression and self-efficacy scores were secondary outcome measures. Results: After intervention, 50% of 26 patients achieved HbA1c benchmarks, 95.6% achieved systolic and diastolic BP benchmarks, and 57.8% achieved LDL-C benchmarks. Wilcoxon paired samples tests showed significantly increased self-efficacy (z = −3.42, p < 0.001) from preintervention to postintervention. Depression scores decreased slightly from preintervention (mean = 0.44, standard deviation = 1.34, median < 0.001) to postintervention values (mean = 0.18, standard deviation = 0.73, median < 0.001), but this decrease was not significant. Conclusion: Integrating nurse practitioners into primary care teams to provide innovative methods of support to adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia improves clinical outcomes and self-efficacy for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24867560

  1. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus: new treatments].

    PubMed

    Ascaso, Juan F

    2014-08-01

    The benefits and problems associated with traditional hypoglycemic drugs, such as failure of beta cells, hypoglycemia and weight gain, that lead to a worsening of diabetes, are reviewed. New hypoglycemic drugs with incretin effect (glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors), achieve, in a glucose dependent manner, an glycosylated hemoglobin reduction without hypoglycemia or increase in body weight. Recently, another group of oral hypoglycemic drugs, sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors, have demonstrated efficacy in diabetes control by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption. However, long-term effects and cardiovascular prevention remain to be demonstrated. We have more and better drugs nowadays. Hypoglycemic treatment should be customized (glycosylated hemoglobin levels, risk-benefit, risk of hypoglycemia, weight changes, cardiovascular risk), with a combination of drugs being necessary in most cases. However, we do not have yet an ideal hypoglycemic drug. Moreover we must remember that an early and intensive treatment of dyslipidemia and hypertension is essential for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23937815

  2. Causes of type 2 diabetes in China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ronald Ching Wan; Lin, Xu; Jia, Weiping

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in China has increased substantially over recent decades, with more than 100 million people estimated to be affected by the disease presently. During this period there has been an increase in the rates of obesity and a reduction in physical activity. Many of the changes in lifestyle and diet are a result of increased economic development and urbanisation. In addition to an increasingly westernised diet, the traditional Chinese diet also plays a part, with the quantity and quality of rice intake linked to the risk of type 2 diabetes. Familial factors including inherited genetic variants are important, although differences in the genetic architecture suggest a different combination of genetic variants could be most relevant in Chinese when compared with Europeans. Recent advances have also emphasised the role of early life factors in the epidemic of diabetes and non-communicable diseases: maternal undernutrition, maternal obesity, and gestational diabetes are all linked to increased risk of diabetes in offspring. A mismatch between developmentally programmed biology and the modern environment is relevant for countries like China where there has been rapid economic transformation. Multisectoral efforts to address the risks will be needed at different stages throughout the lifecourse to reduce the burden of diabetes. PMID:25218727

  3. In the clinic. Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vijan, Sandeep

    2010-03-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of type 2 diabetes focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. Readers can complete the accompanying CME quiz for 1.5 credits. Only ACP members and individual subscribers can access the electronic features of In the Clinic. Non-subscribers who wish to access this issue of In the Clinic can elect "Pay for View." Subscribers can receive 1.5 category 1 CME credits by completing the CME quiz that accompanies this issue of In the Clinic. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including PIER (Physicians' Information and Education Resource) and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing division and with assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from PIER and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult www.acponline.org, http://pier.acponline.org, and other resources referenced within each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:20194231

  4. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and renal stones

    PubMed Central

    Nerli, Rajendra; Jali, Mallikarjuna; Guntaka, Ajay Kumar; Patne, Pravin; Patil, Shivagouda; Hiremath, Murigendra Basayya

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of urinary stone disease has shown a steep rise in recent decades along with marked modifications in dietary habits and life- style. There has been an increased prevalence of urinary stone disease in patients with diabetes. We took up this study to determine the association of diabetes mellitus with kidney stones in patients undergoing surgical treatment. Materials and Methods: Patients presenting with renal stones for surgical management formed the study group. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated by noting the weight and height of the patient. The extracted stone/stone fragments were analyzed to determine the chemical composition. Urinary pH was similarly noted in all. Results: The mean BMI among the diabetics was 26.35 ± 5.20 (range 17.75-35.60), whereas the mean BMI among the non-diabetics was 23.41 ± 2.85 (range 17.71-31.62) (P < 0.0004). The incidence of uric acid calculi in the diabetics was significantly high (P < 0.03). The mean urinary pH among the diabetics was 5.61 ± 0.36 and among the non-diabetics was 6.87 ± 0.32, which was significantly lower (P < 0.000044). Conclusions: There is a strong association between type 2 diabetes and uric acid stone formation. There is also a strong association between diabetes mellitus, BMI, and also with lower urinary pH. PMID:26605219

  5. Multidisciplinary management of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Michael E; Rothman, Russell L

    2010-01-01

    Although once considered a disease of adults, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in youth is increasing at a significant rate. Similar to adults, youth with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for developing hypertension, lipid abnormalities, renal disease, and other diabetes-related complications. However, children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes also face many unique management challenges that are different from adults with type 2 diabetes or children with type 1 diabetes. To deliver safe, effective, high-quality, cost-effective health care to adolescents with type 2 diabetes, reorganization and redesign of health care systems are needed. Multidisciplinary health care teams, which allow individuals with specialized training to maximally utilize their skills within an organized diabetes treatment team, may increase efficiency and effectiveness and may improve outcomes in children with type 2 diabetes. This review article provides a brief review of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, provides an overview of multidisciplinary health care teams, and discusses the role of multidisciplinary health care management in youth with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21197360

  6. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Reinehr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is emerging as a new clinical problem within pediatric practice. Recent reports indicate an increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents around the world in all ethnicities, even if the prevalence of obesity is not increasing any more. The majority of young people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus was found in specific ethnic subgroups such as African-American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islanders and American Indians. Clinicians should be aware of the frequent mild or asymptomatic manifestation of type 2 diabetes mellitus in childhood. Therefore, a screening seems meaningful especially in high risk groups such as children and adolescents with obesity, relatives with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and clinical features of insulin resistance (hypertension, dyslipidemia, polycystic ovarian syndrome, or acanthosis nigricans). Treatment of choice is lifestyle intervention followed by pharmacological treatment (e.g., metformin). New drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors or glucagon like peptide 1 mimetics are in the pipeline for treatment of youth with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, recent reports indicate a high dropout of the medical care system of adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus suggesting that management of children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus requires some remodeling of current healthcare practices. PMID:24379917

  7. Tips for Kids: Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Today, more kids have type 2 diabetes than ever before. This colorful, easy-to-read tip sheet encourages young people to take steps to lower their risk for type 2 diabetes. A list of warning signs and a healthy eating guide is offered, along with a list of websites to learn more. [This brochure was prepared by the Department of Health and Human…

  8. Tips for Kids with Type 2 Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to be called “insulin dependent” or “juvenile diabetes.” In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes some insulin but the ... to see how you are doing. Kids with type 2 diabetes may need to take insulin or pills to ...

  9. Type 2 diabetes: the genetic conflict hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Denic, S; Emerald, S; Nicholls, M G

    2013-04-01

    We propose that conflict between paternally and maternally derived genes in the fetus explains three apparently unrelated observations in epidemiological studies of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2): (i) low birth weight is a risk factor for the development of DM2, (ii) there is a high prevalence of low birth weight among babies of fathers who develop DM2, and (iii) an exceptionally high prevalence of DM2 exists in modern day Arabs. Genetic conflict is caused by a particular relationship between the parents, their genes and their offspring: (i) mothers are sometimes polyandrous i.e. have children with more than one man, (ii) mothers provide more biological resources to the fetus than fathers, and (iii) the genes that regulate fetal growth come from both parents and both sets of genes determine the use of resources which are only those of the mother. There is a tendency for maternally derived genes (that promote fetal growth) to be suppressed, in order to spare use of mother's resources, while the same paternally derived genes tend to be expressed (to enhance use of the mother's resources). These same genes are pleiotropic: they affect not only fetal growth (birth weight) but also insulin resistance and hence the development of DM2. Polyandry increases differences in the expression between two parental alleles in the fetus i.e. increases genetic conflict and results in the production of bigger babies whereas monandry has the opposite effect. Consequently, parent-of-origin-biased expression of pleiotropic developmental genes could explain why smaller babies are more common when the fathers have DM2. Similarly less genetic conflict in Arabs (resulting from the tradition of strict monandry, the practice of levirate, and preference for a paternal cousin as spouse) could explain, at least in part, their exceptionally high prevalence of DM2. This hypothesis links human mate selection with the risk of developing DM2. PMID:23374424

  10. Dulaglutide: A Review in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Burness, Celeste B; Scott, Lesley J

    2015-12-01

    Dulaglutide (Trulicity™) is a once-weekly subcutaneously administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist produced by recombinant DNA technology and approved in numerous countries as an adjunct to diet and exercise for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). In randomized controlled trials in patients with T2DM, dulaglutide monotherapy was noninferior to once-daily subcutaneous liraglutide monotherapy and significantly more effective than oral metformin monotherapy in improving glycemic control at 26 weeks. When used in combination with other agents (including metformin, metformin and a sulfonylurea, metformin and oral pioglitazone, and prandial insulin ± metformin), dulaglutide was noninferior to once-daily liraglutide and significantly more effective than once-daily oral sitagliptin, twice-daily subcutaneous exenatide, and once-daily subcutaneous insulin glargine in terms of improvements in glycated hemoglobin from baseline at 26 or 52 weeks, in trials of 26-104 weeks' duration. Moreover, dulaglutide 1.5 mg once weekly, but not 0.75 mg once weekly, was associated with consistent reductions form baseline in bodyweight. Improvements in glycemic control and bodyweight were maintained during long-term treatment (up to 2 years). Dulaglutide was generally well tolerated, with a low inherent risk of hypoglycemia. The most frequently reported adverse events in clinical trials were gastrointestinal-related (e.g., nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea). Thus, dulaglutide is a useful option for the treatment of adult patients with T2DM. PMID:26423061

  11. Insulin Signaling in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Brännmark, Cecilia; Nyman, Elin; Fagerholm, Siri; Bergenholm, Linnéa; Ekstrand, Eva-Maria; Cedersund, Gunnar; Strålfors, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes originates in an expanding adipose tissue that for unknown reasons becomes insulin resistant. Insulin resistance reflects impairments in insulin signaling, but mechanisms involved are unclear because current research is fragmented. We report a systems level mechanistic understanding of insulin resistance, using systems wide and internally consistent data from human adipocytes. Based on quantitative steady-state and dynamic time course data on signaling intermediaries, normally and in diabetes, we developed a dynamic mathematical model of insulin signaling. The model structure and parameters are identical in the normal and diabetic states of the model, except for three parameters that change in diabetes: (i) reduced concentration of insulin receptor, (ii) reduced concentration of insulin-regulated glucose transporter GLUT4, and (iii) changed feedback from mammalian target of rapamycin in complex with raptor (mTORC1). Modeling reveals that at the core of insulin resistance in human adipocytes is attenuation of a positive feedback from mTORC1 to the insulin receptor substrate-1, which explains reduced sensitivity and signal strength throughout the signaling network. Model simulations with inhibition of mTORC1 are comparable with experimental data on inhibition of mTORC1 using rapamycin in human adipocytes. We demonstrate the potential of the model for identification of drug targets, e.g. increasing the feedback restores insulin signaling, both at the cellular level and, using a multilevel model, at the whole body level. Our findings suggest that insulin resistance in an expanded adipose tissue results from cell growth restriction to prevent cell necrosis. PMID:23400783

  12. Clinical Characteristics of Young Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjia; Cai, Xiaoling; Han, Xueyao; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly in the young population. The clinical characteristics and risk factors for young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis are not fully explicated. The aim of the present study was to investigate various clinical and biochemical characteristics of young type 2 diabetic patients with atherosclerosis. Design and Methods This was a cross-sectional study. The study involved 2199 hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes. The young patients were classified into the atherosclerotic group or the non-atherosclerotic group, and we also enrolled an older group with peripheral atherosclerosis disease and an age of at least 45 years. Comparisons were made between the different groups to investigate the cardiovascular and metabolic risk profiles of young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis. We also used logistic regression models to assess the atherosclerosis risk factors for young patients. Results Compared to older type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis, young patients with atherosclerosis had more deleterious profiles of weight and hyperlipidemia. Only age and diabetes duration were found to be significant independent risk factors for atherosclerosis in young patients. The ratio of the presence of atherosclerosis in the lower extremity arteries alone was significantly higher in young patients than older patients (26.4% vs. 14.0%, P = 0.000). Conclusion Young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis have more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles and inadequate control of these risk factors. Lower extremity examination is of high importance in young patients. PMID:27391819

  13. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented with early pharmacological intervention.

    PubMed

    DeFronzo, Ralph A; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad

    2011-05-01

    In the U.S., ∼ 21 × 10(6) individuals have type 2 diabetes, and twice as many have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Approximately 40-50% of individuals with IGT will progress to type 2 diabetes over their lifetime. Therefore, treatment of high-risk individuals with IGT to prevent type 2 diabetes has important medical, economic, social, and human implications. Weight loss, although effective in reducing the conversion of IGT to type 2 diabetes, is difficult to achieve and maintain. Moreover, 40-50% of IGT subjects progress to type 2 diabetes despite successful weight reduction. In contrast, pharmacological treatment of IGT with oral antidiabetic agents that improve insulin sensitivity and preserve β-cell function--the characteristic pathophysiological abnormalities present in IGT and type 2 diabetes--uniformly have been shown to prevent progression of IGT to type 2 diabetes. The most consistent results have been observed with the thiazolidinediones (Troglitazone in the Prevention of Diabetes [TRIPOD], Pioglitazone in the Prevention of Diabetes [PIPOD], Diabetes Reduction Assessment with Ramipril and Rosiglitazone Medication [DREAM], and Actos Now for the Prevention of Diabetes [ACT NOW]), with a 50-70% reduction in IGT conversion to diabetes. Metformin in the U.S. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) reduced the development of type 2 diabetes by 31% and has been recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for treating high-risk individuals with IGT. The glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs, which augment insulin secretion, preserve β-cell function, and promote weight loss, also would be expected to be efficacious in preventing the progression of IGT to type 2 diabetes. Because individuals in the upper tertile of IGT are maximally/near-maximally insulin resistant, have lost 70-80% of their β-cell function, and have an ∼ 10% incidence of diabetic retinopathy, pharmacological intervention, in combination with diet plus exercise, should be instituted. PMID

  14. Management of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Boinpally, Tara; Jovanovic, Lois

    2009-06-01

    Although previously thought to be predominantly transient gestational diabetes, diabetes in pregnancy can be attributed more and more to type 2 diabetes today. Although all types of diabetes in pregnancy pose a threat to the health and future well-being of both the mother and child affected, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes can be significantly more devastating in complications because of effects starting from conception. This rise of type 2 diabetes thus imparts a great sense of urgency to uncover undiagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes in pregnancy and to take active measures in establishing tight glucose control. From preconception care before pregnancy to medical treatment postpartum, it is essential that immediate care be taken to help mediate the effects of diabetes in pregnancy. PMID:19421970

  15. Mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rabøl, Rasmus

    2011-04-01

    Reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial function has been proposed to lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. It has been known for several years that oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle is reduced in patients with type 2 diabetes compared to weight matched controls. The reduction in oxidative capacity supposedly leads to the accumulation of intramyocellular lipid which inhibits insulin signalling and causes insulin resistance. It is not known whether this reduction in mitochondrial capacity is the cause or the effect of type 2 diabetes. This PhD-thesis describes the effect of different pharmacological interventions on mitochondrial function in type 2 diabetes and describe whether mitochondrial function is uniformly distributed to both upper and lower extremities. Furthermore, a hypothesis on the molecular mechanism for weight gain observed with anthyperglycaemic treatment will be presented. PMID:21466770

  16. Type 2 Diabetes and Dietary Supplements: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Type 2 Diabetes and Dietary Supplements: What the Science Says Share: November 2013 © The National Institute of ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  17. [Management of Type 2 Diabetes: a Practical Approach].

    PubMed

    Donath, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Over the last years, the therapeutic aims for patients with type 2 diabetes have changed and several novel drugs have been introduced. In this Mini-Review we discuss these aims and how to achieve them. PMID:27269776

  18. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Diet (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tailored to a person's medical needs, lifestyle, and personal preferences. TYPE 2 DIABETES AND MEAL TIMING — Consistently eating at the same times every day is important for some people, especially those who take long- ...

  19. Spare the Meat, Skip the Type 2 Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meat, Skip the Type 2 Diabetes? A mostly plant-based diet may help lower risk of the ... June 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a mainly plant-based diet -- especially one with lots of healthy ...

  20. Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alexandria, Virginia October 10, 2013 Early puberty ... 08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ...

  1. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... a day five times a week choosing healthy foods and reducing calories and fat in the diet These are the plain facts in "Small Steps. Big Rewards: Prevent Type 2 Diabetes," an education campaign ...

  2. Global Team Taps into DNA Behind Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159810.html Global Team Taps Into DNA Behind Type 2 Diabetes Many common gene variations ... the researchers assessed the influence of rare, "private" DNA differences along with common DNA differences that many ...

  3. Correlations between anthropometry and lipid profile in type 2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Himabindu, Yalamanchali; Sriharibabu, Manne; Alekhya, Katamreddy; Saisumanth, Kandula; Lakshmanrao, Nambaru; Komali, Kanagala

    2013-01-01

    Over a period of time, anthropometric parameters have evolved into reliable indicators for predicting the incidence of diabetes mellitus. A number of studies have shown correlations between anthropometry and lipid profiles in healthy volunteers. This study examined correlations between anthropometry and lipid profile in type 2 diabetics. The limited observations made in this study reveal that anthropometric parameters are not ideal for predicting lipid profile abnormalities in type 2 diabetics. PMID:23961494

  4. Understanding type 2 diabetes: from genetics to epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Longo, Michele; Parrillo, Luca; Ciccarelli, Marco; Mirra, Paola; Ungaro, Paola; Formisano, Pietro; Miele, Claudia; Béguinot, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    The known genetic variability (common DNA polymorphisms) does not account either for the current epidemics of type 2 diabetes or for the family transmission of this disorder. However, clinical, epidemiological and, more recently, experimental evidence indicates that environmental factors have an extraordinary impact on the natural history of type 2 diabetes. Some of these environmental hits are often shared in family groups and proved to be capable to induce epigenetic changes which alter the function of genes affecting major diabetes traits. Thus, epigenetic mechanisms may explain the environmental origin as well as the familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes much easier than common polymorphisms. In the murine model, exposure of parents to environmental hits known to cause epigenetic changes reprograms insulin sensitivity as well as beta-cell function in the progeny, indicating that certain epigenetic changes can be transgenerationally transmitted. Studies from different laboratories revealed that, in humans, lifestyle intervention modulates the epigenome and reverts environmentally induced epigenetic modifications at specific target genes. Finally, specific human epigenotypes have been identified which predict adiposity and type 2 diabetes with much greater power than any polymorphism so far identified. These epigenotypes can be recognized in easily accessible white cells from peripheral blood, indicating that, in the future, epigenetic profiling may enable effective type 2 diabetes prediction. This review discusses recent evidence from the literature supporting the immediate need for further investigation to uncover the power of epigenetics in the prediction, prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25841587

  5. Fetal growth and the ethnic origins of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Skilton, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    Birthweight is known to differ by ethnicity, with South Asian, black African and Caribbean, and Hispanic ethnic groups having lower birthweight on average, when compared with people of white European ethnicity. Birthweight is the most frequently used proxy of fetal growth, and represents the net effect of a host of genetic, physiological and pathophysiological factors. These same ethnic groups that have lower average birthweight also tend to have a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adulthood. It is not unreasonable to propose that the well-established inverse association between birthweight and risk of type 2 diabetes may at least partially contribute to these differences in prevalence of type 2 diabetes between ethnic groups. This hypothesis would rely on the mechanisms that drive the ethnic differences in birthweight aligning with those that modify the risk of type 2 diabetes. In this issue of Diabetologia (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-014-3474-7), Nightingale et al have furthered this field by determining whether ethnic differences in markers of cardio-metabolic risk are consistent with the differences in birthweight in an ethnically diverse cohort of children. The likely contribution of fetal growth to ethnic differences in risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease is discussed, particularly in light of the magnitude of the birthweight differences, as are implications for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25567103

  6. Bariatric surgery: an IDF statement for obese Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J B; Zimmet, P; Alberti, K G; Rubino, F

    2011-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation Taskforce on Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes convened a consensus working group of diabetologists, endocrinologists, surgeons and public health experts to review the appropriate role of surgery and other gastrointestinal interventions in the treatment and prevention of Type 2 diabetes. The specific goals were: to develop practical recommendations for clinicians on patient selection; to identify barriers to surgical access and suggest interventions for health policy changes that ensure equitable access to surgery when indicated; and to identify priorities for research. Bariatric surgery can significantly improve glycaemic control in severely obese patients with Type 2 diabetes. It is an effective, safe and cost-effective therapy for obese Type 2 diabetes. Surgery can be considered an appropriate treatment for people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity not achieving recommended treatment targets with medical therapies, especially in the presence of other major co-morbidities. The procedures must be performed within accepted guidelines and require appropriate multidisciplinary assessment for the procedure, comprehensive patient education and ongoing care, as well as safe and standardized surgical procedures. National guidelines for bariatric surgery need to be developed for people with Type 2 diabetes and a BMI of 35 kg/m2 or more. PMID:21480973

  7. Correlation between Microalbuminuria and Hypertension in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alia; Taj, Azeem; Amin, Muhammad Joher; Iqbal, Farrukh; Iqbal, Zafar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is commonly found in patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD). Microalbuminuria is the first clinical sign of involvement of kidneys in patients with type 2 diabetes. Uncontrolled hypertension induces a higher risk of cardiovascular events, including death, increasing proteinuria and progression to kidney disease. Objectives: To determine the correlation between microalbuminuria and hypertension and their association with other risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: One hundred and thirteen type 2 diabetic patients attending the diabetic clinic of Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore, Pakistan were screened for microalbuminuria and raised blood pressure. The study was conducted from November 2012 to June 2013. Results: Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1, those with normoalbuminuria (n=63) and Group 2, those having microalbuminuria (n=50). Group 2 patients showed higher blood pressure values as compared to Group 1. The results were statistically significant and showed poor glycemic control as a contributing risk factor. Conclusion: The study concluded that there is high frequency of hypertension among type 2 diabetics but still much higher among those having microalbuminuria. So, early recognition of renal dysfunction through detection of microalbuminuria and to start treatment without any delay will confer future protection from end stage renal disease as well as hypertension and its complications in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:24948969

  8. Linagliptin: farmacology, efficacy and safety in type 2 diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Erika Paniago; Hohl, Alexandre; de Melo, Thais Gomes; Lauand, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has a high prevalence and incidence around the world. The complex pathophysiology mechanism is among the barriers for diabetes treatment. Type 2 diabetes patients have dysfunction in incretin hormones (as glucagon-like peptide-1 or GLP-1, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide or GIP). By inhibiting the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) enzyme, it is possible to slow the inactivation of GLP-1 and GIP, promoting blood glucose level reduction in a glucose-dependent manner. Linagliptin is a highly specific and potent inhibitor of DPP-4 that is currently indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Clinical studies with linagliptin demonstrated efficacy in reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in type 2 diabetes patients, while maintaining a placebo-like safety and tolerability profile. Linagliptin has an interesting pharmacokinetic profile in terms of its predominantly non-renal elimination and the main implication of this characteristic is that no dose adjustment is necessary in patients with renal disease. Also, no dose adjustment is required in patients with hepatic insufficiency, as well in elderly or obese patients. This article will review the pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy data and safety aspects of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:23697612

  9. Linagliptin: farmacology, efficacy and safety in type 2 diabetes treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has a high prevalence and incidence around the world. The complex pathophysiology mechanism is among the barriers for diabetes treatment. Type 2 diabetes patients have dysfunction in incretin hormones (as glucagon-like peptide-1 or GLP-1, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide or GIP). By inhibiting the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) enzyme, it is possible to slow the inactivation of GLP-1 and GIP, promoting blood glucose level reduction in a glucose-dependent manner. Linagliptin is a highly specific and potent inhibitor of DPP-4 that is currently indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Clinical studies with linagliptin demonstrated efficacy in reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in type 2 diabetes patients, while maintaining a placebo-like safety and tolerability profile. Linagliptin has an interesting pharmacokinetic profile in terms of its predominantly non-renal elimination and the main implication of this characteristic is that no dose adjustment is necessary in patients with renal disease. Also, no dose adjustment is required in patients with hepatic insufficiency, as well in elderly or obese patients. This article will review the pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy data and safety aspects of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:23697612

  10. Blood metals concentration in type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Forte, Giovanni; Bocca, Beatrice; Peruzzu, Angela; Tolu, Francesco; Asara, Yolande; Farace, Cristiano; Oggiano, Riccardo; Madeddu, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms for the onset of diabetes and the development of diabetic complications remain under extensive investigations. One of these mechanisms is abnormal homeostasis of metals, as either deficiency or excess of metals, can contribute to certain diabetic outcomes. Therefore, this paper will report the blood levels of chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn) in subjects with type 1 diabetes (n = 192, mean age 48.8 years, mean disease duration 20.6 years), type 2 diabetes (n = 68, mean age 68.4 years, mean disease duration 10.2 years), and in control subjects (n = 59, mean age 57.2 years), and discuss the results indicating their possible role in diabetes. The metal concentrations were measured by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave-induced acid digestion of blood samples. The accuracy was checked using a blood-based certified reference material, and recoveries of all elements were in the range of 92-101 % of certified values. Type 1 diabetes was found to be associated with Cr (p = 0.02), Mn (p < 0.001), Ni (p < 0.001), Pb (p = 0.02), and Zn (p < 0.001) deficiency, and type 2 diabetes with Cr (p = 0.014), Mn (p < 0.001), and Ni (p < 0.001) deficiency. These deficiencies were appreciated also subdividing the understudied patients for gender and age groups. Furthermore, in type 1 diabetes, there was a positive correlation between Pb and age (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.400) and Pb and BMI (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.309), while a negative correlation between Fe and age (p = 0.002, ρ = -0.218). In type 2 diabetes, there was a negative correlation between Fe and age (p = 0.017, ρ = -0.294) and Fe and BMI (p = 0.026, ρ = -0.301). Thus, these elements may play a role in both forms of diabetes and combined mineral supplementations could have beneficial effects. PMID:24222606

  11. Treating young adults with type 2 diabetes or monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Owen, Katharine R

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly recognised that diabetes in young adults has a wide differential diagnosis. There are many monogenic causes, including monogenic beta-cell dysfunction, mitochondrial diabetes and severe insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes in the young is becoming more prevalent, particularly after adolescence. It's important to understand the clinical features and diagnostic tools available to classify the different forms of young adult diabetes. Classic type 1 diabetes is characterised by positive β-cell antibodies and absence of endogenous insulin secretion. Young type 2 diabetes is accompanied by metabolic syndrome with obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Monogenic β-cell dysfunction is characterised by non-autoimmune, C-peptide positive diabetes with a strong family history, while mitochondrial diabetes features deafness and other neurological involvement. Severe insulin resistance involves a young-onset metabolic syndrome often with a disproportionately low BMI. A suspected diagnosis of monogenic diabetes is confirmed with genetic testing, which is widely available in specialist centres across the world. Treatment of young adult diabetes is similarly diverse. Mutations in the transcription factors HNF1A and HNF4A and in the β-cell potassium ATP channel components cause diabetes which responds to low dose and high dose sulfonylurea agents, respectively, while glucokinase mutations require no treatment. Monogenic insulin resistance and young-onset type 2 diabetes are both challenging to treat, but first line management involves insulin sensitisers and aggressive management of cardiovascular risk. Outcomes are poor in young-onset type 2 diabetes compared to both older onset type 2 and type 1 diabetes diagnosed at a similar age. The evidence base for treatments in monogenic and young-onset type 2 diabetes relies on studies of moderate quality at best and largely on extrapolation from work conducted in older type 2 diabetes subjects. Better quality

  12. Cardiac Abnormalities in Youth with Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bacha, Fida; Gidding, Samuel S

    2016-07-01

    Childhood obesity has been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adulthood. Of great concern is the expected increase in the population's CVD burden in relation to childhood obesity. This is compounded by the risk related to chronic hyperglycemia exposure in youth with type 2 diabetes. We herein provide an overview of the spectrum of early cardiovascular disease manifestation in youth with obesity and type 2 diabetes, in particular abnormalities in cardiac structure and function. Cardiac remodeling and adverse target organ damage is already evident in the pediatric age group in children with obesity and type 2 diabetes. This supports the importance of intensifying obesity prevention efforts and early intervention to treat comorbidities of obesity in the pediatric age group to prevent cardiac events in early adulthood. PMID:27168062

  13. Epidemiology of paediatric metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    De Ferranti, Sarah D; Osganian, Stavroula K

    2007-12-01

    The epidemic in childhood obesity is a driving force behind the increase in paediatric metabolic syndrome, a collection of abnormalities that is associated in adults with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although there is no clear consensus about the paediatric definition for metabolic syndrome, the prevalence of this syndrome is clearly rising. Children with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk for metabolic syndrome in adulthood. A late consequence of metabolic syndrome is type 2 diabetes, which increasingly affects adolescents. The rise in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes in children is almost sure to lead to an increase in associated complications in young adulthood, including early cardiovascular disease. This epidemic will bear fruit in forthcoming decades, putting further stress on the healthcare system and probably leading to increased morbidity and a shorter lifespan for future generations. PMID:18158698

  14. Type 2 Diabetes Treatment in the Patient with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Malin, Steven K; Kashyap, Sangeeta R

    2016-09-01

    Lifestyle modification is the cornerstone treatment of type 2 diabetes in the obese patient, and is highly effective at promoting glucose regulation. However, many individuals struggle over time to maintain optimal glycemic control and/or body weight with lifestyle modification. Therefore, additional therapeutic approaches are needed. Pharmacologic interventions have shown promising results for obesity-related diabetes complications. Not surprisingly though lifestyle modification and pharmacology may become ineffective for treating diabetes over time. Bariatric surgery is considered by some, but not all, to be the most effective and durable treatment for combating obesity. In fact many patients with type 2 diabetes have normalized glucose concentrations within days postoperation. Taken together, treatment of obesity in the patient with type 2 diabetes requires a multi-faceted approach. PMID:27519130

  15. [Important epidemiological features of the treatment of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Seguí Díaz, M

    2014-07-01

    According to the various clinical practice guidelines, the recommendations for the treatment of type 2 diabetes are well-established, thus leading to homogenization of clinical practice and avoiding variability. However, it is well known that, depending on factors such as effectiveness, physiopathology, cost, adverse effects, preferences, and comorbidities, each patient will, in the long-term, receive different treatment of type 2 diabetes. The consensus document published last year and approved by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes recommends distinct targets for each patient with type 2 diabetes and argues for the individualization of the management and treatment of this disease. In other words, the document advocates a patient-centered approach, in which the various therapeutic alternatives are related mainly to distinct physiopathological factors, adverse effects, and the patient's comorbidities, as well as the patient's preferences. PMID:25311714

  16. Decelerating gastric emptying: therapeutic possibilities in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W T; Schwartz, J G

    1996-09-01

    There is clear evidence of a positive correlation between carbohydrate absorption, plasma concentration of glucose, and the rate of gastric emptying. This suggests that clinical manipulation of gastric emptying rates may have therapeutic potential in glycaemic control. Cholecystokinin (CCK-8) has been shown to delay gastric emptying in individuals with Type 2 diabetes, but its potential as a therapy is limited by the need to administer it intravenously. The preferred routes of administration would be intramuscular injections, an intranasal spray or the use of orally ingested CCK analogues. Alternatively, the oral administration of an agent that enhances endogenous release of CCK could represent an important approach to the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Agents such as POT II may have a therapeutic indication in patients with recently diagnosed Type 2 diabetes. PMID:8894471

  17. Type 2 Diabetes and TZDs (Thiazolidinediones)

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... Women's Health Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ...

  18. Identifying patients at risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Savill, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At present there are nearly 3 million people with diabetes in the UK. It is predicted that this number will almost double by 2025. Nine out of ten of these individuals will have type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that one in seven adults have impaired glucose regulation and up to 12% of these will develop type 2 diabetes each year. The impact of obesity on the development of type 2 diabetes cannot be overemphasised, with a 1 kg/m2 increase in BMI raising the risk of impaired fasting glycaemia by 9.5% and of developing new-onset type 2 diabetes by 8.4%. A 1 cm increase in waist circumference increases the risks by 3.2% and 3.5% respectively. NICE advises using a validated risk assessment tool to identify patients at risk of diabetes. Risk factors used by such tools include: age; ethnicity; weight; first-degree relative with type 2 diabetes; low birthweight and sedentary lifestyle. Certain comorbidities increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, these include: cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease; polycystic ovary syndrome; a history of gestational diabetes; and mental health problems. The initial screening blood test could be a fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or an oral glucose tolerance test, according to WHO criteria. NICE recommends that high-risk patients should be offered a programme encouraging them to undertake a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity a week, gradually lose weight to reach and maintain a BMI within the healthy range, increase consumption of whole grains, vegetables, and other foods that are high in dietary fibre, reduce the total amount of fat in their diet and eat less saturated fat. PMID:22988703

  19. Weight-Loss Surgery Helps Treat Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159002.html Weight-Loss Surgery Helps Treat Type 2 Diabetes 45 professional groups say the procedure improves blood ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Diabetes Type 2 Weight Loss Surgery Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus ...

  20. Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159330.html Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Prognosis may be ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Diabetes Type 2 Heart Diseases Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health ...

  1. [New targets in pharmacotherapy of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Verspohl, Eugen J

    2016-02-01

    The number of people with diabetes is expected to increase worldwide to 360 million within the next 15 years of which 90% will have type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). Established therapies mainly focus on the following principles: increase in plasma insulin, improving insulin sensitivity of tissues, reducing the rate of carbohydrate absorption and gluconeogenesis. The demand on compounds with new mechanisms of action is obvious. This articles summarizes new targets and compounds under development for pharmacotherapy of typ 2 diabetes; at present approx. 180 compounds are going to be developed worldwide. PMID:26983332

  2. Cardiac abnormalities in youth with obesity and type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Childhood obesity has been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adulthood. Of great concern is the expected increase in the population's CVD burden in relation to childhood obesity. This is compounded by the risk related to chronic hyperglycemia exposure in youth with type 2 diabetes. We h...

  3. [Type 2 diabetes, obesity and nutrition, a paradigm shift].

    PubMed

    Bourcelot, Emilie; Combes, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are two complex and multifactorial chronic diseases. Nutritional management is based on an educational and bio-psycho-sensory approach centred on the patient using cognitive-behavioural and emotionally-focused therapy tools. PMID:27157552

  4. Type 2 Diabetes in Han Chinese in Hubei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo Saif Dehwah, Mustafa; Shuang, Zhang; Yan, Wang; Chan, Peng; Huang, Qing-Yang

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARγ2 gene and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Han Chinese in Hubei. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptorγ2 (PPARγ2) is a nuclear receptor plays a key role in regulation of adipocyte differentiation, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). There are various studies have provided evidence for the association between common Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARγ2 gene and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but the results are controversial and depend on ethnicity. So we conducted a case-control association study among 330 T2DM patients and 212 controls with family-based and random case-control designs. The genotypes of the PPARγ2 Pro12Ala polymorphism were detected by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFL) method. The result indicated that the Pro12 allele was associated with type 2 diabetes in this study population.

  5. Male gonadal axis function in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Pablo R; Knoblovits, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes have lower serum testosterone levels and a higher prevalence of hypogonadism than non-diabetic patients, independently of the metabolic control of disease. The mechanisms underlying a decrease in testosterone might be related to age, obesity and insulin resistance, often present in patients with type 2 diabetes. The increase in estrogens due to higher aromatase enzyme activity in increased adipose tissue might exert negative-feedback inhibition centrally. Insulin stimulates gonadal axis activity at all three levels and therefore insulin resistance might account for the lower testosterone production. Leptin exerts a central stimulatory effect but inhibits testicular testosterone secretion. Thus, resistance to leptin in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes determines lower central effects of leptin with lower gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and, on the other hand, hyperleptinemia secondary to leptin resistance inhibits testosterone secretion at the testicular level. However, lower testosterone levels in patients with diabetes are observed independently of age, weight and body mass index, which leads to the assumption that hyperglycemia per se might play a role in the decrease in testosterone. Several studies have shown that an overload of glucose results in decreased serum testosterone levels. The aim of this review is to assess changes in the male gonadal axis that occur in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27071157

  6. Hierarchical clusters in families with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    García-Solano, Beatriz; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther C; Gómez-Meza, Marco V; García-Madrid, Guillermina; Flores-Merlo, Marcela; García-Solano, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Families represent more than a set of individuals; family is more than a sum of its individual members. With this classification, nurses can identify the family health-illness beliefs obey family as a unit concept, and plan family inclusion into the type 2 diabetes treatment, whom is not considered in public policy, despite families share diet, exercise, and self-monitoring with a member who suffers type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the characteristics, functionality, routines, and family and individual health in type 2 diabetes describes the differences and similarities between families to consider them as a unit. We performed an exploratory, descriptive hierarchical cluster analysis of 61 families using three instruments and a questionnaire, in addition to weight, height, body fat percentage, hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein. The analysis produced three groups of families. Wilk’s lambda demonstrated statistically significant differences provided by age (Λ = 0.778, F = 2.098, p = 0.010) and family health (Λ = 0.813, F = 2.650, p = 0.023). A post hoc Tukey test coincided with the three subsets. Families with type 2 diabetes have common elements that make them similar, while sharing differences that make them unique. PMID:27347419

  7. Metabolomics: Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) develops over many years, providing an opportunity to consider early prognostic tools that guide interventions to thwart disease. Advancements in analytical chemistry enable quantitation of hundreds of metabolites in biofluids and tissues (metabolomics), providing in...

  8. Using Drosophila to discover mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alfa, Ronald W.; Kim, Seung K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanisms of glucose homeostasis are remarkably well conserved between the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and mammals. From the initial characterization of insulin signaling in the fly came the identification of downstream metabolic pathways for nutrient storage and utilization. Defects in these pathways lead to phenotypes that are analogous to diabetic states in mammals. These discoveries have stimulated interest in leveraging the fly to better understand the genetics of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans. Type 2 diabetes results from insulin insufficiency in the context of ongoing insulin resistance. Although genetic susceptibility is thought to govern the propensity of individuals to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus under appropriate environmental conditions, many of the human genes associated with the disease in genome-wide association studies have not been functionally studied. Recent advances in the phenotyping of metabolic defects have positioned Drosophila as an excellent model for the functional characterization of large numbers of genes associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we examine results from studies modeling metabolic disease in the fruit fly and compare findings to proposed mechanisms for diabetic phenotypes in mammals. We provide a systematic framework for assessing the contribution of gene candidates to insulin-secretion or insulin-resistance pathways relevant to diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:27053133

  9. [Type 2 Diabetes mellitus-screening and prevention: Update 2016].

    PubMed

    Stadler, Marietta; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; Prager, Rudolf

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing in westernized countries. In addition, about half of all patients suffering from diabetes are not diagnosed. The current article represents the recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association for the screening and prevention of type 2 diabetes, based on currently available evidence. PMID:27052220

  10. It's Not Too Late to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children & Adolescents Risk & Prevention for Adults Risk for Children & Adolescents Health Care Professionals Community Organizations​ ​​ Alternate Versions It’s Not Too Late to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes (PDF, 1.4 MB) Spanish Version You can also order ...

  11. Glucocorticoids and Type 2 Diabetes: From Physiology to Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Di Dalmazi, Guido; Pagotto, Uberto; Pasquali, Renato; Vicennati, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the result of interaction between genetic and environmental factors, leading to heterogeneous and progressive pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Overweight and obesity are major contributors to the development of insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. The inability of β cells to secrete enough insulin produces type 2 diabetes. Abnormalities in other hormones such as reduced secretion of the incretin glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), hyperglucagonemia, and raised concentrations of other counterregulatory hormones also contribute to insulin resistance, reduced insulin secretion, and hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes. Clinical-overt and experimental cortisol excess is associated with profound metabolic disturbances of intermediate metabolism resulting in abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and low HDL-cholesterol levels, which can lead to diabetes. It was therefore suggested that subtle abnormalities in cortisol secretion and action are one of the missing links between insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this paper is to address the role of glucocorticoids on glucose homeostasis and to explain the relationship between hypercortisolism and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23316348

  12. Type 2 diabetes express highway, where is the 'U' turn?

    PubMed

    Iyer, S R

    2003-05-01

    The 'U' turn in Type 2 Diabetes Express Highway probably lies in lifestyle modifications--going back to traditional lifestyle with use of modern technology to achieve happiness. There is a difference between technology for comfort and technology for happiness. PMID:12974434

  13. Altered body composition in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The styd objectives were to identify differences in amount and distribution of fat and lean soft tissue in a cross-sectional study of subjects with and without type 2 diabetes, and to determine whether any differences are affected by race/ethnicity or sex. Participants were overweight and obese (bod...

  14. Prevalence of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrutia-Rojas, Ximena; Menchaca, John

    2006-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 3 children born in 2000 in the United States will become diabetic. The odds are higher for African American and Hispanic children as nearly 50% of them will develop diabetes. Random screening is not effective in identifying children at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM);…

  15. Cardiovascular effects of intensive lifestyle intervention in type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weight loss is recommended for overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of short-term studies, but long-term effects on cardiovascular disease remain unknown. We examined whether an intensive lifestyle intervention for weight loss would decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mor...

  16. Increased gluconeogenesis in youth with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of increased gluconeogenesis as an important contributor to fasting hyperglycaemia at diabetes onset is not known. We evaluated the contribution of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis to fasting hyperglycaemia in newly diagnosed youths with type 2 diabetes following an overnight fast. Basal ...

  17. Sedentary behavior as a mediator of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Marc T.; Hamilton, Deborah G.; Zderic, Theodore W.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, the fastest growing new area of physical activity research centered around the concept that the large amount of time people spend sitting inactive may have significant physiological consequences hazardous to human health, including risk for type 2 diabetes and poor metabolism of lipids and glucose. Meta-analysis (10 studies) suggest there is a 112% greater relative risk associated with a large duration of sedentary behavior for type 2 diabetes. Meta-analysis also indicates significantly greater odds for metabolic syndrome. We also summarize results for 7 studies using objective measures of total sedentary time and focusing on cardiometabolic risks in persons at high risk for type 2 diabetes or already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The underlying hypothesis introduced in 2004 by the inactivity physiology paradigm, has been that frequent and abundant contractile activity by certain types of skeletal muscle can have a potent influence on key physiological processes, even when the intensity is below that achieved through exercise. We explain some of the mechanisms for why the metabolism in slow-twitch oxidative skeletal muscle is key for understanding the healthy responses to low intensity physical activity (LIPA). Findings from objective measures from inclinometry indicated that the quartile range for weekly sedentary time is ~29 hours/week. The total daily time that people sit, stand, and accumulate non-exercise steps is independent of traditionally recommended moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). The large amount of sedentary time associated with risk for disease can only be reduced significantly with safe and non-fatiguing LIPA, especially in the most at risk proportion of the population. Importantly, experimental studies are starting to indicate that it will be especially insightful to understand the acute dose-response effects of LIPA in order to understand why reducing sedentary time can improve lipid and glucose metabolism for

  18. Altered body composition in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Heshka, Stanley; Ruggiero, Andrea; Bray, George A.; Foreyt, John; Kahn, Stephen E.; Lewis, Cora E.; Saad, Mohammed; Schwartz, Ann V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify differences in amount and distribution of fat and lean soft tissue in subjects with and without type 2 diabetes and to determine whether any differences are affected by race/ethnicity or sex. Design Overweight and obese (body mass index, BMI≥25 kg/m2) Black, White and Hispanic men (490) and women (825) with type 2 diabetes ([mean±SD] age 58.5±6.6; BMI 35.3±5.3) who had a baseline dual energy x-ray absorptiometry whole body scan at the time of enrollment in the Look Ahead clinical trial, and 242 healthy controls, 91 males and 151 females (age 55.3±8.6 y, BMI 30.7±4.2 kg/m2) who were participating in unrelated research and were scanned on the same densitometers. Results Adjusted for covariates, total fat mass was smaller in persons with type 2 diabetes than in controls (−1.4±0.3[SE]; 34.5 vs 35.8 kg, p<0.001) while trunk fat was larger (1.3±0.2[SE]; 19.9 vs 18.6 kg, p<0.001) and leg fat was smaller (−1.5±0.2[SE]; 10.7 vs 12.3 kg, p<0.001). The arms of subjects with type 2 diabetes did not have significantly less fat compared to controls. Adjusted trunk lean mass was larger in type 2 diabetes by 0.6 kg (28.4 vs 27.8 kg, p<0.001) while leg lean was smaller by 0.5 kg (18.1 vs 18.6 kg, p<0.001). Conclusions Type 2 diabetes is associated with less total fat, leg fat and leg lean mass and more truncal fat and lean mass than controls. The physiological processes producing these deviations in tissue distribution and their metabolic significance warrant further investigation. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00017953) PMID:18227843

  19. Effect of diet on type 2 diabetes mellitus: a review.

    PubMed

    Khazrai, Y M; Defeudis, G; Pozzilli, P

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is one of the fastest growing diseases; the number of people affected by diabetes will soon reach 552 million worldwide, with associated increases in complications and healthcare expenditure. Lifestyle and medical nutrition therapy are considered the keystones of type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment, but there is no definite consensus on how to treat this disease with these therapies. The American Diabetes Association has made several recommendations regarding the medical nutrition therapy of diabetes; these emphasize the importance of minimizing macrovascular and microvascular complications in people with diabetes. Four types of diets were reviewed for their effects on diabetes: the Mediterranean diet, a low-carbohydrate/high-protein diet, a vegan diet and a vegetarian diet. Each of the four types of diet has been shown to improve metabolic conditions, but the degree of improvement varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate a patient's pathophysiological characteristics in order to determine the diet that will achieve metabolic improvement in each individual. Many dietary regimens are available for patients with type 2 diabetes to choose from, according to personal taste and cultural tradition. It is important to provide a tailor-made diet wherever possible in order to maximize the efficacy of the diet on reducing diabetes symptoms and to encourage patient adherence. Additional randomized studies, both short term (to analyse physiological responses) and long term, could help reduce the multitude of diets currently recommended and focus on a shorter list of useful regimens. PMID:24352832

  20. DRESS syndrome associated with type 2 diabetes in a child

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Bag, Ozlem; Karkiner, Canan Sule Unsal; Korkmaz, Huseyin Anil; Can, Demet

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is an uncommon, life-threatening drug reaction. The basic findings are skin rash, multiorgan involvement, and eosinophilia. Most of the aromatic anticonvulsants, such as phenytoin, phenobarbital and carbamazepine can induce DRESS. Herein we report a 14-year-old patient with DRESS syndrome related to carbamazepine use. The patient presented with signs of involvement of the skin, lungs, liver, and microscopic hematuria. Carbamazepine treatment was discontinued; antihistamines and steroids were started. Hyperglycemia, commencing on the first dose of the steroid given, persisted even after the discontinuation of steroids and improvement of other signs. There were no signs of pancreatitis or type 1 diabetes clinically in laboratory tests. Her blood glucose levels were regulated at first with insulin and later with metformin. Within 1 year of follow-up, still regulated with oral antidiabetics, she has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Formerly, long-term sequelae related to “drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome” such as hepatic and renal failure, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Grave's disease, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and lupus have also been reported. However, up to date, no cases with type 2 diabetes have been reported as long-term sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature presenting with type 2 diabetes as long-term sequelae. PMID:26862317

  1. Targeting the gastrointestinal tract to treat type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Paige V; Duca, Frank A

    2016-09-01

    The rising global rates of type 2 diabetes and obesity present a significant economic and social burden, underscoring the importance for effective and safe therapeutic options. The success of glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, along with the potent glucose-lowering effects of bariatric surgery, highlight the gastrointestinal tract as a potential target for diabetes treatment. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that the gut plays a prominent role in the ability of metformin to lower glucose levels. As such, the current review highlights some of the current and potential pathways in the gut that could be targeted to improve glucose homeostasis, such as changes in nutrient sensing, gut peptides, gut microbiota and bile acids. A better understanding of these pathways will lay the groundwork for novel gut-targeted antidiabetic therapies, some of which have already shown initial promise. PMID:27496374

  2. Type 2 diabetes: A 21st century epidemic.

    PubMed

    Jaacks, Lindsay M; Siegel, Karen R; Gujral, Unjali P; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2016-06-01

    Around 415 million people around the world have diabetes (9% of adults), and the vast majority live in low- and middle-income countries. Over the next decade, this number is predicted to increase to 642 million people. Given that diabetes is a major cause of mortality, morbidity, and health care expenditures, addressing this chronic disease represents one of the greatest global health challenges of our time. The objectives of this article are three-fold: (1) to present data on the global burden of type 2 diabetes (which makes up 87-91% of the total diabetes burden), both in terms of prevalence and incidence; (2) to give an overview of the risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and to describe obesity and the developmental origins of disease risk in detail; and (3) to discuss the implications of the global burden and point out important research gaps. PMID:27432069

  3. Novel Agents for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Triplitt, Curtis L.; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; Cersosimo, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Impaired insulin secretion, increased hepatic glucose production, and decreased peripheral glucose utilization are the core defects responsible for the development and progression of type 2 diabetes. However, the pathophysiology of this disease also includes adipocyte insulin resistance (increased lipolysis), reduced incretin secretion/sensitivity, increased glucagon secretion, enhanced renal glucose reabsorption, and brain insulin resistance/neurotransmitter dysfunction. Although current diabetes management focuses on lowering blood glucose, the goal of therapy should be to delay disease progression and eventual treatment failure. Recent innovative treatment approaches target the multiple pathophysiological defects present in type 2 diabetes. Optimal management should include early initiation of combination therapy using multiple drugs with different mechanisms of action. This review examines novel therapeutic options that hold particular promise. PMID:26246766

  4. Genetics of drug response in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tkáč, Ivan

    2015-07-01

    The introduction of several new drug groups into the treatment of type 2 diabetes in the past few decades leads to an increased requirement for an individualized treatment approach. A personalized treatment is important from the point of view of both efficacy and safety. Recent guidelines are based mainly on entirely phenotypic characteristics such as diabetes duration, presence of macrovascular complications, or risk of hypoglycemia with the use of individual drugs. So far, genetic knowledge is used to guide treatment in the monogenic forms of diabetes. With the accumulating pharmacogenetic evidence in type 2 diabetes, there are reasonable expectations that genetics might help in the adjustment of drug doses to reduce severe side effects, as well as to make better therapeutic choices among the drugs available for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:25975599

  5. Anakinra treatment in patients with gout and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Antonio; Cantarini, Luca; Rigante, Donato; Bardelli, Marco; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    We report three Caucasian patients affected by gout and type 2 diabetes, who were treated with the recombinant nonglycosylated human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra (100 mg/day subcutaneously) after an unsatisfactory or incomplete response to urate-lowering therapy, colchicine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and prednisone. The remarkable clinical improvement in joint symptoms within 24 h and in glycemic control during a 6-month period gives anakinra a potential therapeutic role in the management of gout and type 2 diabetes. When anakinra was discontinued, a gout attack occurred within 3-25 days in all three patients. The contribution of anakinra in the treatment of such syndromes is encouraging, but requires further studies to establish its long-term efficacy. PMID:24733251

  6. Vegetarian and vegan diets in type 2 diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Neal D; Katcher, Heather I; Jenkins, David J A; Cohen, Joshua; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle

    2009-05-01

    Vegetarian and vegan diets offer significant benefits for diabetes management. In observational studies, individuals following vegetarian diets are about half as likely to develop diabetes, compared with non-vegetarians. In clinical trials in individuals with type 2 diabetes, low-fat vegan diets improve glycemic control to a greater extent than conventional diabetes diets. Although this effect is primarily attributable to greater weight loss, evidence also suggests that reduced intake of saturated fats and high-glycemic-index foods, increased intake of dietary fiber and vegetable protein, reduced intramyocellular lipid concentrations, and decreased iron stores mediate the influence of plant-based diets on glycemia. Vegetarian and vegan diets also improve plasma lipid concentrations and have been shown to reverse atherosclerosis progression. In clinical studies, the reported acceptability of vegetarian and vegan diets is comparable to other therapeutic regimens. The presently available literature indicates that vegetarian and vegan diets present potential advantages for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19386029

  7. Does type 2 diabetes influence the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Neale, R E; Doecke, J D; Pandeya, N; Sadhegi, S; Green, A C; Webb, P M; Whiteman, D C

    2009-01-01

    Since hyperinsulinaemia may promote obesity-linked cancers, we compared type 2 diabetes prevalence among oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) patients and population controls. Diabetes increased the risk of OAC (adjusted odds ratio 1.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04–2.43), although the risk was attenuated after further adjusting for body mass index (1.32, 95% CI 0.85–2.05). PMID:19190630

  8. [The cure of type 2 diabetes and patient education].

    PubMed

    Lagger, G; Chambouleyron, M; Correia, J C; Sittarame, F; Miganne, G; Lasserre Moutet, A; Golay, A

    2015-03-25

    Type 2 diabetes is a potentially reversible disease. Patient education encompasses a deep investment of the health care providers, who with the aid of pedagogic tools, help the pa tient commit to this path. This facilitates the learning of uncommon knowledge and skills required. Whether or not it leads to a complete remission of the disease may not be the main purpose. The main goal lies in the patient's motivation to learn and change on a long term basis. PMID:26027202

  9. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds. PMID:27028201

  10. Pre- and early postnatal nongenetic determinants of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ozanne, Susan E; Hales, C Nick

    2002-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed strong and internationally reproducible links between early growth restriction and subsequent risk of developing type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome (glucose intolerance, hypertension and hypertriglyceridaemia). This effect can exist independently of genetic factors. There is also direct evidence that poor maternal nutrition and maternal smoking cause both a reduction in birthweight and subsequent loss of glucose tolerance. High rates of growth in childhood may add to these effects. The 'thrifty phenotype' hypothesis attempts to explain these associations in terms of an altered programming of growth and metabolism that aids survival both pre- and postnatally. Type 2 diabetes is envisaged as a consequence of a clash of this programming with adult obesity. Tests of this hypothesis in animal models have shown that both the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes can result from early growth restriction in rats consequent upon rat dams being fed a reduced protein, isocaloric diet (in which the protein is replaced by an equal quantity of nonprotein energy). A variety of other models of early growth restriction in rats lead to a similar phenotype. Several structural and gene expression changes have been shown in many tissues, including pancreas, liver, kidney, muscle and adipose tissue. Changes in gene expression include those concerned with hormone receptors, signalling and glycolytic enzymes. Many important questions remain for future research. PMID:14987383

  11. Clinical efficacy of Mehamudgara vati in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tanna, Ila; Chandola, H. M.; Joshi, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance is the main problem that is associated with a cluster of conditions such as obesity and hyperlipidemia. The present study was designed with the objective to evaluate the role of Mehamudgara vati (MMV), which was expected to work at the level of Medodhatwagni due to its Medohara properties, to have an effective control on type 2 diabetes. To fulfill the objective, known patients of type 2 diabetes attending the OPD and IPD of Kayachikitsa Department, IPGT and RA, were selected and were divided in two groups. In Group A, MMV was given 3 tab. thrice a day with lukewarm water for 3 months and in Group B, the patients who were already taking modern antidiabetic treatment, although their blood sugar level was not well under control, were additionally given MMV in the same manner. The formulation has shown a highly significant decrease in the fasting and post-prandial blood sugar level. The formulation has also shown a synergistic action when combined with the modern antidiabetic drugs due to its known hypolipidemic, hypocholesterolemic, hepatoprotective, antihyperglycemic, antistress, antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities. PMID:22131755

  12. SGLT2 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Monica Reddy, R P; Inzucchi, Silvio E

    2016-08-01

    The glucose-lowering pharmacopeia continues to grow for patients with type 2 diabetes. The latest drug category, the SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glycated hemoglobin concentrations by increasing urinary excretion of glucose. They are used mainly in combination with metformin and other antihyperglycemic agents, including insulin. Their glucose-lowering potency is modest. Advantages include lack of hypoglycemia as a side effect, and mild reduction in blood pressure and body weight. Side effects include increased urinary frequency, owing to their mild diuretic action, symptoms of hypovolemia, genitourinary infections. There are also recent reports of rare cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occurring in insulin-treated patients. Recently, a large cardiovascular outcome trial reported that a specific SGLT2 inhibitor, empagliflozin, led to a reduction in the primary endpoint of major cardiovascular events. This effect was mainly the result of a surprising 38 % reduction in cardiovascular death, and the drug was also associated with nearly as large a reduction in heart failure hospitalization. These findings were notable because most drugs used in type 2 diabetes have not been shown to improve cardiovascular outcomes. Accordingly, there is growing interest in empagliflozin and the entire SGLT2 inhibitor class as drugs that could potentially change the manner in which we approach the management of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27270407

  13. Alogliptin benzoate for management of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Saisho, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, a new class of oral hypoglycemic agents, augment glucose-dependent insulin secretion and suppress glucagon levels through enhancement of the action of endogenous incretin by inhibiting DPP-4, an incretin-degrading enzyme. DPP-4 inhibitors are generally well tolerated because of their low risk of hypoglycemia and other adverse events. Moreover, with their potential to improve beta cell function, a core defect of type 2 diabetes, DPP-4 inhibitors are becoming a major component of treatment of type 2 diabetes. Alogliptin benzoate is a newly developed, highly selective DPP-4 inhibitor which has been approved in many countries throughout the world. Once-daily administration of alogliptin as either monotherapy or combination therapy with other oral antidiabetic drugs or insulin has a potent glucose-lowering effect which is similar to that of other DPP-4 inhibitors, with a low risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain. The cardiovascular safety of this drug has been confirmed in a recent randomized controlled trial. This review summarizes the efficacy and safety of alogliptin, and discusses the role of DPP-4 inhibitors in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25914541

  14. Optimal Pharmacologic Treatment Strategies in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Gayotri; Shinkazh, Nataliya; Davis, Nichola

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased to pandemic levels worldwide and is related to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Metabolic comorbidities are commonly associated with obesity and include metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Even if the prevalence of obesity remains stable until 2030, the anticipated numbers of people with diabetes will more than double as a consequence of population aging and urbanization. Weight reduction is integral in the prevention of diabetes among obese adults with pre-diabetes. Lifestyle intervention and weight reduction are also key in the management of type 2 diabetes. Weight loss is challenging for most obese patients, but for those with diabetes, it can pose an even greater challenge due to the weight gain associated with many treatment regimens. This article will review optimal treatment strategies for patients with comorbid obesity and type 2 diabetes. The role of anti-obesity agents in diabetes will also be reviewed. This literature review will provide readers with current strategies for the pharmacologic treatment of obesity and diabetes with a focus on the weight outcomes related to diabetes treatments. PMID:26237392

  15. Pharmacotherapy of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Navigating Current and New Therapies.

    PubMed

    Lew, Kelley Newlin; Wick, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The keys to optimal glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes are early diagnosis and interventions that include lifestyle changes and pharmacotherapy. This review discusses therapeutic goals and current options for treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26863705

  16. 6 Things to Know about Type 2 Diabetes and Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... know about taking dietary supplements for type 2 diabetes. A healthy diet, physical activity, and blood glucose testing are the basic tools for managing type 2 diabetes. Your health care providers will help you learn ...

  17. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and risk of type 2 diabetes in women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D may modify risk of type 2 diabetes; however, the association between vitamin D and type 2 diabetes is uncertain. To determine prospectively the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration and risk of incident type 2 diabetes, independent of obesity and other known diabet...

  18. Skeletal Metabolism, Fracture Risk, and Fracture Outcomes in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sellmeyer, Deborah E; Civitelli, Roberto; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Khosla, Sundeep; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Schwartz, Ann V

    2016-07-01

    Fracture risk is significantly increased in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and individuals with diabetes experience worse fracture outcomes than normoglycemic individuals. Factors that increase fracture risk include lower bone mass in type 1 diabetes and compromised skeletal quality and strength despite preserved bone density in type 2 diabetes, as well as the effects of comorbidities such as diabetic macro- and microvascular complications. In this Perspective, we assess the developing scientific knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of skeletal fragility in patients with diabetes and the emerging data on the prediction, treatment, and outcomes of fractures in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27329951

  19. Strategies to Make Ramadan Fasting Safer in Type 2 Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Lee, Jun Yang; Tan, Christina San San; Wong, Chee Piau

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ramadan is the holy month for Muslims whereby they fast from predawn to after sunset and is observed by all healthy Muslim adults as well as a large population of type 2 diabetic Muslims. To determine the comparative effectiveness of various strategies that have been used for type 2 diabetic Muslim who fast during Ramadan. A systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies (RCT) as well as observational studies for patients with type 2 diabetes who fasted during Ramadan was conducted. Eight databases were searched from January 1980 through October 2015 for relevant studies. Two reviewers independently screened and assessed study for eligibility, assessed the risk of bias, and extracted relevant data. A network meta-analysis for each outcome was fitted separately, combining direct and indirect evidence for each comparison. Twenty-nine studies, 16 RCTs and 13 observational studies each met the inclusion criteria. The most common strategy used was drug changes during the Ramadan period, which found that the use of DPP-4 (Dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitor -4) inhibitors were associated with a reduction in incidence of experiencing hypoglycemia during Ramadan in both RCTs (pooled relative risk: 0.56; 95% confidence interval: 0.44–0.72) as well as in observational studies (pooled relative risk: 0.27; 0.09–0.75). Ramadan-focused education was shown to be beneficial in reducing hypoglycemia in observational studies but not RCTs (0.25 versus 1.00). Network meta-analyses suggest that incretin mimetics can reduce the risk of hypoglycemia by nearly 1.5 times. The newer antidiabetic agents appear to lower the risk of hypoglycemia and improved glycemic control when compared with sulfonylureas. Ramadan-focused education shows to be a promising strategy but more rigorous examination from RCTs are required. PMID:26765440

  20. Heart Failure Considerations of Antihyperglycemic Medications for Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Standl, Eberhard; Schnell, Oliver; McGuire, Darren K

    2016-05-27

    Prevalent and incident heart failure (HF) is increased in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, with risk directly associated with the severity of hyperglycemia. Furthermore, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, mortality is increased ≈10-fold in patients with versus without HF. Reducing HF with antihyperglycemic therapies, however, has been unsuccessful until recently. In fact, HF as an important outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus seems to be heterogeneously modulated by antihyperglycemic medications, as evidenced by results from cardiovascular outcome trials (CVOTs) and large observational cohort studies. Appropriately powered and executed CVOTs are necessary to truly evaluate cardiovascular safety and efficacy of new antihyperglycemic medications, as reflected by the guidance of the US Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory agencies since 2008. In light of the best available evidence at present, metformin and the sodium-glucose-co-transporter 2-inhibitor empagliflozin seem to be especially advantageous with regard to HF effects, with their use associated with reduced HF events and improved mortality. Acarbose, the dipeptidyl-peptidase 4-inhibitor sitagliptin, the glucagon-like peptide 1-receptor agonist lixisenatide based on presently available CVOT results comprise reasonable additional options, as significant harm in terms of HF has been excluded for those drugs. Additions to this list are anticipated pending results of ongoing CVOTs. Although no HF harm was seen in CVOTs for insulin or sulfonylureas, they should be used only with caution in patients with HF, given their established high risk for hypoglycemia and some uncertainties on their safety in patients with HF derived from epidemiological observations. Pioglitazone is contraindicated in patients with HF>New York Heart Association I, despite some benefits suggested by CVOT subanalyses. PMID:27230644

  1. Pharmacogenetics: Implications for Modern Type 2 Diabetes Therapy.

    PubMed

    Staiger, Harald; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Many clinical treatment studies have reported remarkable interindividual variability in the response to pharmaceutical drugs, and uncovered the existence of inadequate treatment response, non-response, and even adverse drug reactions. Pharmacogenetics addresses the impact of genetic variants on treatment outcome including side-effects. In recent years, it has also entered the field of clinical diabetes research. In modern type 2 diabetes therapy, metformin is established as first-line drug. The latest pharmaceutical developments, including incretin mimetics, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (gliptins), and sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (gliflozins), are currently experiencing a marked increase in clinical use, while the prescriptions of α-glucosidase inhibitors, sulfonylureas, meglitinides (glinides), and thiazolidinediones (glitazones) are declining, predominantly because of reported side-effects. This review summarizes the current knowledge about gene-drug interactions observed in therapy studies with the above drugs. We report drug interactions with candidate genes involved in the pharmacokinetics (e.g., drug transporters) and pharmacodynamics (drug targets and downstream signaling steps) of the drugs, with known type 2 diabetes risk genes and previously unknown genes derived from hypothesis-free approaches such as genome-wide association studies. Moreover, some new and promising candidate genes for future pharmacogenetic assessment are highlighted. Finally, we critically appraise the current state of type 2 diabetes pharmacogenetics in the light of its impact on therapeutic decisions, and we refer to major problems, and make suggestions for future efforts in this field to help improve the clinical relevance of the results, and to establish genetically determined treatment failure. PMID:27111121

  2. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Nsiah, Kwabena; Shang, V Owusua; Boateng, K Agyenim; Mensah, FO

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diabetic condition is influenced by several factors, some of which can accelerate the disease's progression to various complications that aggravate the morbidity. Aims: This study aimed at determining the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components and the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 150 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and was conducted at the Diabetes Centre of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, the Ashanti Region of Ghana, from February, 2013 to April, 2013. The study involved the use of a questionnaire to obtain some information on the diabetics, undertaking anthropometric measurements, as well as collecting blood samples for the measurement of some biochemical parameters; fasting blood glucose and lipid profile. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results: The prevalence of MetS was 58% in the studied Ghanaian population. Hypertension was the commonest risk factor (60%), followed by central obesity (48.67%) and dyslipidemia (37%). Female type 2 diabetics had a higher prevalence of MetS, and carried more components than their male counterparts. Regression analysis showed three factors; femininity, high body mass index and low educational status were the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS, according to this study. Conclusion: With hypertension being the commonest component, future cardiovascular disease prevention strategies should focus attention on its management and prevention, through education. PMID:26097823

  3. Sexual Dysfunction in Women with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Elyasi, Forouzan; Kashi, Zahra; Tasfieh, Bentolhoda; Bahar, Adele; Khademloo, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexual dysfunction (SD) is one of the important problems in diabetic patients. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of sexual problems in Iranian women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among type 2 diabetic women who visited two outpatient endocrine clinics, namely Imam Hospital and Tuba clinic (Sari, Iran) in 2012. Patients were asked to complete two validated questionnaires: Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) as well as a demographic questionnaire. Analysis was performed using descriptive and analytical tests. P<0.05 was considered to be significant. Results One hundred and fifty women with type 2 diabetes were investigated. Most of the cases aged 40-44 years old. The mean of the total score of the FSFI questionnaire was 22. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 78.7% (CI: 71.4-84.4); among these, 58% (CI: 50.0-65.6) reported problems in lubrication, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9) complained of decreased sexual desire, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9) had problems with arousal, 47.3% (CI: 39.5-55.3) had dyspareunia, 32.7% (CI: 25.7-40.5) complained of orgasmic dysfunction and 42.7% (CI: 35.0-50.7) reported problems in sexual satisfaction. With regard to the results of the HADS questionnaire, 58.7% (CI: 50.7-66.2) of the patients had depression and 96.7% (CI: 92.4-98.6) had anxiety. Conclusion This study showed the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction in diabetic women, especially among those complaining of depression. Health care professionals dealing with diabetic patients should be aware of possible presence of sexual dysfunction in female patients. PMID:25999619

  4. A proteomic approach to obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Villar, Elena; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Chowen, Julie A; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and type diabetes 2 has increased dramatically resulting in an increased interest in its biomedical relevance. However, the mechanisms that trigger the development of diabetes type 2 in obese patients remain largely unknown. Scientific, clinical and pharmaceutical communities are dedicating vast resources to unravel this issue by applying different omics tools. During the last decade, the advances in proteomic approaches and the Human Proteome Organization have opened and are opening a new door that may be helpful in the identification of patients at risk and to improve current therapies. Here, we briefly review some of the advances in our understanding of type 2 diabetes that have occurred through the application of proteomics. We also review, in detail, the current improvements in proteomic methodologies and new strategies that could be employed to further advance our understanding of this pathology. By applying these new proteomic advances, novel therapeutic and/or diagnostic protein targets will be discovered in the obesity/Type 2 diabetes area. PMID:25960181

  5. A proteomic approach to obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    López-Villar, Elena; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Chowen, Julie A; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of obesity and type diabetes 2 has increased dramatically resulting in an increased interest in its biomedical relevance. However, the mechanisms that trigger the development of diabetes type 2 in obese patients remain largely unknown. Scientific, clinical and pharmaceutical communities are dedicating vast resources to unravel this issue by applying different omics tools. During the last decade, the advances in proteomic approaches and the Human Proteome Organization have opened and are opening a new door that may be helpful in the identification of patients at risk and to improve current therapies. Here, we briefly review some of the advances in our understanding of type 2 diabetes that have occurred through the application of proteomics. We also review, in detail, the current improvements in proteomic methodologies and new strategies that could be employed to further advance our understanding of this pathology. By applying these new proteomic advances, novel therapeutic and/or diagnostic protein targets will be discovered in the obesity/Type 2 diabetes area. PMID:25960181

  6. Type 2 Diabetes and ADP Receptor Blocker Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Samoš, Matej; Fedor, Marián; Kovář, František; Mokáň, Michal; Bolek, Tomáš; Galajda, Peter; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with several abnormalities in haemostasis predisposing to thrombosis. Moreover, T2D was recently connected with a failure in antiplatelet response to clopidogrel, the most commonly used ADP receptor blocker in clinical practice. Clopidogrel high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) was repeatedly associated with the risk of ischemic adverse events. Patients with T2D show significantly higher residual platelet reactivity on ADP receptor blocker therapy and are more frequently represented in the group of patients with HTPR. This paper reviews the current knowledge about possible interactions between T2D and ADP receptor blocker therapy. PMID:26824047

  7. Management of Pediatric and Adolescent Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Constantine Samaan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) was an adult disease until recently, but the rising rates of obesity around the world have resulted in a younger age at presentation. Children who have T2D have several comorbidities and complications reminiscent of adult diabetes, but these are appearing in teens instead of midlife. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation and management options for youth with T2D. We discuss the elements of lifestyle intervention programs and allude to pharmacotherapeutic options used in the treatment of T2D youth. We also discuss comorbidities and complications seen in T2D in children and adolescents. PMID:24260037

  8. Falls risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Vinik, Etta J; Colberg, Sheri R; Morrison, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Falls are a major health issue for older adults, especially for those who develop type 2 diabetes who must contend with age-related declines in balance, muscle strength, and walking ability. They must also contend with health-related issues specific to the disease process. Given the general association between these variables and falls, being able to identify which measures negatively impact on balance in older diabetic persons is a critical step. Moreover, designing specific interventions to target these physiologic functions underlying balance and gait control will produce the greatest benefit for reducing falls in older persons with diabetes. PMID:25453303

  9. [Prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Lebherz, Corinna; Lehrke, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The modern life style is often characterized by a lack of physical activity as well as unhealthy diet leading to a worldwide rise in obesity. This goes along with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes, accompanied by an accelerated atherosclerosis. Life style changes and normalization of body weight therefore represent the cornerstones of diabetes prevention. In addition, a multi-factorial approach focusing on cardiovascular risk factors like dyslipidemia, hypertension and hyperglycemia enables an effective means for the prevention of micro- or macrovascular complications. PMID:25924043

  10. Impaired Retinal Vasodilator Responses in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Mary E.J.; Slocomb, Julia E.; Shivkumar, Vikram; Smith, Bruce; Quillen, David; Gabbay, Robert A.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Bettermann, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In diabetes, endothelial dysfunction and subsequent structural damage to blood vessels can lead to heart attacks, retinopathy and strokes. However, it is unclear whether prediabetic subjects exhibit microvascular dysfunction indicating early stages of arteriosclerosis and vascular risk. The purpose of this study was to examine whether retinal reactivity may be impaired early in the hyperglycemic continuum and may be associated with markers of inflammation. Methods Individuals with prediabetes (n = 22), type 2 diabetes (n = 25) and healthy age and body composition matched controls (n = 19) were studied. We used the Dynamic Vessel Analyzer to assess retinal vasoreactivity (percent change in vessel diameter) during a flickering light stimulation. Fasting highly sensitive c-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a marker of inflammation, was measured in blood plasma. Results Prediabetic and diabetic individuals had attenuated peak vasodilator and relative amplitude changes in retinal vein diameters to the flickering light stimulus compared to healthy controls (peak dilation: prediabetic subjects 3.3 ± 1.8 %, diabetic subjects 3.3 ± 2.1% controls 5.6 ± 2.6%, p = .001; relative amplitude: prediabetic subjects 4.3 ± 2.2%, diabetic subjects 5.0 ± 2.6% and control subjects 7.2 ± 3.2%, p = .003). Similar findings were observed in retinal arteries. Levels of hs-CRP were not associated with either retinal vessel response parameters. Conclusion Retinal reactivity was impaired in prediabetic and type 2 diabetic individuals in parallel with reduced insulin sensitivity but not associated with levels of hs-CRP. Retinal vasoreactivity measurements may be a sensitive tool to assess early vascular risk. PMID:23742315

  11. Salivary gland dysfunction markers in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Aitken-Saavedra, Juan; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Maturana-Ramírez, Andrea; Escobar-Álvarez, Alejandro; Cortes-Coloma, Andrea; Reyes-Rojas, Montserrat; Viera -Sapiain, Valentina; Villablanca-Martínez, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease of the carbohydrate metabolism that, when not rigorously controlled, compromises systemic and organ integrity, thereby causing renal diseases, blindness, neuropathy, arteriosclerosis, infections, and glandular dysfunction, including the salivary glands. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the qualitative and quantitative parameters of salivary alteration, which are indicators of salivary gland dysfunction, and the level of metabolic control of type 2 diabetes patients. Material and Methods A convenience sample of 74 voluntary patients with type 2 DM was selected, each of whom donated a sample of unstimulated saliva. Salivary parameters such as salivary flow rate, protein concentration, pH, and xerostomia were studied. Results There is a positive relationship between the level of metabolic control measured with HbA1 and the protein concentration in saliva (Spearman rho = 0.329 and p = 0.004). The same assay showed an inverse correlation between HbA1 and pH (Spearman rho = -0.225 and p = 0.05). Conclusions The protein concentration in saliva and, to a lesser extent, the pH may be useful as glandular dysfunction indicators in DM2 patients. Key words:Saliva, type 2 diabetes mellitus, pH, protein concentration, xerostomia. PMID:26535097

  12. Implications of Type 2 Diabetes on Adolescent Reproductive Health Risk

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Julie S.; Arslanian, Silva; de Bruin, Wändi Bruine; Copeland, Valire Carr; Doswell, Willa; Herman, William; Lain, Kristine; Mansfield, Joan; Murray, Pamela J.; White, Neil; Charron-Prochownik, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article was to summarize scientific knowledge from an expert panel on reproductive health among adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Using a mental model approach, a panel of experts—representing perspectives on diabetes, adolescents, preconception counseling, and reproductive health—was convened to discuss reproductive health issues for female adolescents with T2D. Results Several critical issues emerged. Compared with adolescents with type 1 diabetes, (1) adolescents with T2D may perceive their disease as less severe and have less experience managing it, putting them at risk for complications; (2) T2D is more prevalent among African Americans, who may be less trusting of the medical establishment; (3) T2D is associated with obesity, and it is often difficult to change one’s lifestyle within family environments practicing sedentary and dietary behaviors leading to obesity; (4) teens with T2D could be more fertile, because obesity is related to earlier puberty; (5) although obese teens with T2D have a higher risk of polycystic ovary syndrome, which is associated with infertility, treatment with metformin can increase fertility; and (6) women with type 2 diabetes are routinely transferred to insulin before or during pregnancy to allow more intensive management. Conclusions Findings from the expert panel provide compelling reasons to provide early, developmentally appropriate, culturally sensitive preconception counseling for teens with T2D. PMID:20944055

  13. Depression, neighborhood deprivation and risk of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mezuk, Briana; Chaikiat, Åsa; Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Neighborhood characteristics have been associated with both depression and diabetes, but to date little attention has been paid to whether the association between depression and diabetes varies across different types of neighborhoods. This prospective study examined the relationship between depression, neighborhood deprivation, and risk of type 2 diabetes among 336,340 adults from a national-representative sample of primary care centers in Sweden (2001–2007). Multi-level logistic regression models were used to assess associations between depression and risk of type 2 diabetes across affluent and deprived neighborhoods. After accounting for demographic, individual-level socioeconomic, and health characteristics, depression was significantly associated with risk of diabetes (odds ratio (OR): 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06–1.14), as was neighborhood deprivation (OR for high vs. low deprivation: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.22–1.34). The interaction term between depression and neighborhood deprivation was non-significant, indicating that the relationship between depression and diabetes risk is similar across levels of neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation. PMID:23771166

  14. Determinants of preclinical atherosclerosis are different in type 1 and type 2 diabetic women.

    PubMed

    Piťhová, P; Štechová, K; Piťha, J; Lánská, V; Kvapil, M

    2016-06-20

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 ranks among the strongest predictors of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) while the association of type 1 diabetes with CVD is more complex. We studied differences between type 1 and 2 diabetic women regarding association of cardiovascular risk factors with preclinical atherosclerosis expressed as intima-media thickness of common carotid (IMT CCA) and femoral arteries (IMT CFA) measured by high resolution ultrasound. Women with type 1 (n=203) and type 2 diabetes (n=123) were examined with regard to the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. In type 1 diabetic women strong association between IMT CCA and body mass index, waist circumference, and total body fat was found in contrast to type 2 diabetic women. In type 2 diabetic women strong association between IMT CCA and fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and atherogenic index of plasma (log TG/HDL cholesterol) was observed in contrast to type 1 diabetic women. In type 1 diabetic women, IMT CFA was associated with body fat in contrast to type 2 diabetic women. Preclinical atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetic women was strongly associated with factors reflecting body fat and its distribution, while in type 2 diabetic women preclinical atherosclerosis was associated with markers reflecting glucose and lipid metabolic disorders. PMID:26447509

  15. Clinically significant chronic liver disease in people with Type 2 diabetes: the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Fallowfield, J.A.; Guha, I.N.; Williamson, R.M.; Ali, M.; Glancy, S.; Strachan, M.W.J.; Price, J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes is an independent risk factor for chronic liver disease, however disease burden estimates and knowledge of prognostic indicators are lacking in community populations. Aims: To describe the prevalence and incidence of clinically significant chronic liver disease amongst community-based older people with Type 2 diabetes and to determine risk factors which might assist in discriminating patients with unknown prevalent or incident disease. Design: Prospective cohort study. Methods: Nine hundred and thirty-nine participants in the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study underwent investigation including liver ultrasound and non-invasive measures of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), hepatic fibrosis and systemic inflammation. Over 6-years, cases of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma were collated from multiple sources. Results: Eight patients had known prevalent disease with 13 further unknown cases identified (prevalence 2.2%) and 15 incident cases (IR 2.9/1000 person-years). Higher levels of systemic inflammation, NASH and hepatic fibrosis markers were associated with both unknown prevalent and incident clinically significant chronic liver disease (all P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study investigations increased the known prevalence of clinically significant chronic liver disease by over 150%, confirming the suspicion of a large burden of undiagnosed disease. The disease incidence rate was lower than anticipated but still much higher than the general population rate. The ability to identify patients both with and at risk of developing clinically significant chronic liver disease allows for early intervention and clinical monitoring strategies. Ongoing work, with longer follow-up, including analysis of rates of liver function decline, will be used to define optimal risk prediction tools. PMID:26454513

  16. The effects of bariatric surgeries on type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerd Ng, Jia; Ortiz, Roberto; Hughes, Tyler; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Allen, Roland

    2012-10-01

    We consider a scientific mystery which is of central importance in treating the most rapidly emerging national and global health threat: type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mystery involves a surprising effect of certain bariatric surgeries, and specifically Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), a procedure which bypasses most of the stomach and upper intestine. An unanticipated result is that RYGB is usually found to contribute within only a few days to glucose homeostasis. This means the surgery can immediately cure patients even before they start losing weight. We are investigating this wondrous biochemical response with a quantitative model which includes the most important mechanisms. One of the major contributors is glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an incretin whose concentration is found to increase by a large amount right after the RYGB surgical procedure. However, our results, in conjunction with the experimental and medical data, indicate that other substances must also contribute. If these substances can be definitively identified, it may be possible to replace the surgery with pharmaceuticals as the preferred treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  17. Dulaglutide (LY-2189265) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2016-01-01

    Dulaglutide is a new once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for the management of hyperglycemia in adult patients with type 2 diabetes. It stimulates dose-dependent insulin secretion and reduces glucagon secretion, both in a glucose-dependent manner. Efficacy on blood glucose control and safety were demonstrated in the large AWARD program in type 2 diabetic patients treated with diet, metformin, dual oral therapy or insulin lispro with or without metformin, confirming findings of pilot studies in Caucasian patients and data in Japanese patients. Dulaglutide 1.5 mg once weekly was superior to metformin, sitagliptin, insulin glargine and exenatide twice daily, and non-inferior to liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily regarding the reduction in glycated hemoglobin. A modest but significant weight loss was consistently observed. Most frequent adverse events were transient and generally mild gastrointestinal disturbances. Clinical outcomes of dulaglutide will not be known until the large prospective cardiovascular outcome trial REWIND is complete. PMID:26761217

  18. Gene Expression Profile Analysis of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases. PMID:23469233

  19. Empagliflozin reduces cardiovascular events and mortality in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Review of: Zinnam, B, Wanner C, Lachin JM, et al. Empagliflozin, Cardiovascular Outcomes, and Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes. New England Journal of Medicine. 2015; 373: 2117-2128. Patients were required to have a history of established cardiovascular disease, along with Type 2 Diabetes but were either not on antidiabetic therapy for the preceding 12 weeks, with a glycated hemoglobin level between 7% and 9%, or were on stable antidiabetic therapy for the preceding 12 weeks, with a glycated hemoglobin between 7.0% and 10.0%. Patients were randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to either empagliflozin 10 mg or 25 mg or matching placebo. Antidiabetic therapy was not to be changed for the first 12 weeks after randomization, with intensification of antidiabetic therapy allowed if the patient had a confirmed glucose of >240 mg/dl (>13.3 mmol/l). Physicians were encouraged to treat other cardiac risk factors like hyperlipidemia according to local guidelines. The primary outcome was a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Results showed a significant reduction in the rates of death from cardiovascular causes, overall mortality, and in hospital admissions for heart failure, while there was no reduction in the rates of non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke. PMID:27043258

  20. Daily physical activity and type 2 diabetes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity improves glycemic control and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Moderate to vigorous physical activity is recommended to manage T2D; however, patients with T2D can be physically weak, making it difficult to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Daily physical activity includes various activities performed during both occupational and leisure time such as walking, gardening, and housework that type 2 diabetic patients should be able to perform without considerable physical burden. This review focuses on the association between daily physical activity and T2D. Walking was the most common form of daily physical activity, with numerous studies demonstrating its beneficial effects on reducing the risk of T2D, CVD, and mortality. Walking for at least 30 min per day was shown to reduce the risk of T2D by approximately 50%. Additionally, walking was associated with a reduction in mortality. In contrast, evidence was extremely limited regarding other daily physical activities such as gardening and housework in patients with T2D. Recent studies have suggested daily physical activity, including non-exercise activity thermogenesis, to be favorably associated with metabolic risks and mortality. However, well-designed longitudinal studies are warranted to elucidate its effects on overall health. PMID:27350847

  1. Daily physical activity and type 2 diabetes: A review.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka

    2016-06-25

    Physical activity improves glycemic control and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Moderate to vigorous physical activity is recommended to manage T2D; however, patients with T2D can be physically weak, making it difficult to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Daily physical activity includes various activities performed during both occupational and leisure time such as walking, gardening, and housework that type 2 diabetic patients should be able to perform without considerable physical burden. This review focuses on the association between daily physical activity and T2D. Walking was the most common form of daily physical activity, with numerous studies demonstrating its beneficial effects on reducing the risk of T2D, CVD, and mortality. Walking for at least 30 min per day was shown to reduce the risk of T2D by approximately 50%. Additionally, walking was associated with a reduction in mortality. In contrast, evidence was extremely limited regarding other daily physical activities such as gardening and housework in patients with T2D. Recent studies have suggested daily physical activity, including non-exercise activity thermogenesis, to be favorably associated with metabolic risks and mortality. However, well-designed longitudinal studies are warranted to elucidate its effects on overall health. PMID:27350847

  2. Sphingolipids in Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Russo, S.B.; Ross, J.S.; Cowart, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disease, including obesity and type 2 diabetes, constitutes a major emerging health crisis in Western nations. Although the symptoms and clinical pathology and physiology of these conditions are well understood, the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease process have largely remained obscure. Sphingolipids, a lipid class with both signaling and structural properties, have recently emerged as key players in most major tissues affected by diabetes and are required components in the molecular etiology of this disease. Indeed, sphingolipids have been shown to mediate loss of insulin sensitivity, to promote the characteristic diabetic pro-inflammatory state, and to induce cell death and dysfunction in important organs such as the pancreas and heart. Furthermore, plasma sphingolipid levels are emerging as potential biomarkers for the decompensation of insulin resistance to frank type 2 diabetes. Despite these discoveries, the roles of specific sphingolipid species and sphingolipid metabolic pathways remain obscure, and newly developed experimental approaches must be employed to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms necessary for rational drug development and other clinical applications. PMID:23563667

  3. Low cost sensing technology for type 2 diabetes monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarswat, Prashant; Free, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Alpha-hydroxybutyrate (2-hydroxybutyrate or α-HB) is becoming more widely recognized as an important metabolic biomarker that has been shown to be highly correlated with prediabetes and other metabolic diseases. In 2012 there were 86 million Americans with prediabetes, many of whom are not aware they have prediabetes, but could be diagnosed and treated to prevent type 2 diabetes if a simple, low-cost, convenient test were available. We have developed new, low-cost, accurate α-HB detection methods that can be used for the detection and monitoring of diseases such as prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, β-cell dysfunction, and early hyperglycemia. The new sensing method utilizes a diol recognition moiety, additives and a photoinitiator to detect α-HB at levels near 1 micro g/l in the presence of serum compounds such as lactic acid, sodium pyruvate, and glucose. The objective of this research is to improve the understanding of the interactions that enhance α-HB detection to enable additional improvements in α-HB detection as well as improvements in other biosensor applications.

  4. Glycemic Control and Implant Stabilization in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Oates, T.W.; Dowell, S.; Robinson, M.; McMahan, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered a relative contra-indication for implant therapy. However, the effect of glycemic level on implant integration in persons with diabetes remains poorly understood. The hypothesis of this research was that poor glycemic control is directly related to short-term-impairment implant stabilization. This prospective clinical study evaluated 10 non-diabetic individuals (12 implants) and 20 persons with type 2 diabetes (30 implants). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels ranged from 4.7-12.6%. Implant stability was assessed by resonance frequency analysis over 4 months following placement. Minimum stability levels were observed 2-6 weeks following placement for all 42 implants. Persons with HbA1c ≥ 8.1% had a greater maximum decrease in stability from baseline and required a longer time for healing, as indicated by return of stability level to baseline. This study demonstrates alterations in implant stability consistent with impaired implant integration for persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus in direct relation to hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:19407159

  5. Homocysteine Metabolism in ZDF (Type 2) Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wijekoon, Enoka P.; Hall, Beatrice; Ratnam, Shobhitha; Brosnan, Margaret E.; Zeisel, Steven H.; Brosnan, John T.

    2008-01-01

    Mild hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for many diseases, including cardiovascular disease. We determined the effects of insulin resistance and of type 2 diabetes on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism using Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF/Gmi fa/fa and ZDF/Gmi fa/?). Plasma total Hcy was reduced in ZDF fa/fa rats by 24% in the pre-diabetic insulin-resistant stage, while in the frank diabetic stage there was a 59% reduction. Hepatic activities of several enzymes that play a role in the removal of Hcy: cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase, and betaine:Hcy methyltransferase (BHMT) were increased as was methionine adenosyltransferase. CBS and BHMT mRNA levels and the hepatic level of S-adenosylmethionine were also increased in the ZDF fa/fa rats. Studies with primary hepatocytes showed that Hcy export and the transsulfuration flux in cells from ZDF fa/fa rats were particularly sensitive to betaine. Interestingly, liver betaine concentration was found to be significantly lower in the ZDf fa/fa rats at both 5 and 11 weeks. These results emphasize the importance of betaine metabolism in determining plasma Hcy levels in type 2 diabetes. PMID:16249451

  6. Nutritional supplementation for type 2 diabetes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Hannah E; Eperjesi, Frank

    2008-11-01

    The role of nutritional supplementation is of increasing interest with regard to ocular disease. Randomised controlled trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of supplementation for age-related macular degeneration, and formulations are now being developed for use by people with diabetes and diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this review was to synthesise the evidence for use of nutritional supplementation in type 2 diabetes. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched using a systematic approach. Only double-masked randomised controlled trials were selected. A total of 50 trials were identified as suitable for inclusion. The potential role of alpha-lipoic acid, chromium, folic acid, isoflavones, magnesium, Pycnogenol, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc in the treatment of type 2 diabetes is discussed. The review of trials identifies positive effects of these nutrients on various outcome measures relating to insulin resistance and cardiovascular factors. Chromium was the most studied supplement, accounting for 16 of the 50 trials. A majority of the trials found a positive effect of chromium on fasting plasma glucose. Isoflavones were found to have a positive effect on insulin resistance and cardiovascular outcome measures, but only when combined with soy proteins. Vitamin E is reported to reduce oxidative stress at levels of 200 mg day(-1) or more. PMID:19076553

  7. Total Antioxidant Status in Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Akram T; Darwish, Hisham M; Akkawi, Mutaz A; Ashareef, Abdelkareem A; Almasri, Zaher A; Bader, Khaldoun A; Khammash, Umaiyeh M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the level of total antioxidant status (TAS) in type 2 diabetic and normal Palestinian subjects as well as the major factors influencing TAS levels. A sample of convenience composed of 212 type 2 diabetic and 208 normal subjects above the age of 40 were recruited. Only 9.8% of the subjects had normal body mass index (BMI) levels (<25), 29% were overweight (≥25 to <30), and 61.2% were obese (≥30). The mean levels of TAS were significantly higher in diabetic compared to control subjects (2.18 versus 1.84 mM Trolox, P = 0.001) and in hypertensive subjects compared to subjects with normal blood pressure (BP). Mean TAS levels were higher in obese compared to nonobese subjects (2.12 versus 1.85 mM Trolox, P = 0.001). Mean TAS levels were similarly higher in subjects with high fasting plasma glucose (FPG) compared to normal FPG (2.19 versus 1.90 mM Trolox) and high HbA1c (≥6.5%) compared to HbA1c < 6.5% (2.14 versus 1.91 mM Trolox). Multivariate analysis revealed that only diabetic status (P = 0.032) and the level of education (P = 0.036) were significantly associated with TAS. In conclusion diabetic patients had 18.5% increase in TAS levels compared to control subjects. PMID:26090472

  8. [Treatment of type 2 diabetes in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Díez-Espino, Javier; Formiga, Francesc; Lafita Tejedor, Javier; Rodríguez Mañas, Leocadio; González-Sarmiento, Enrique; Menéndez, Edelmiro; Sangrós, Javier

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes in the elderly represents a major challenge both in terms of clinical management and public health. Aging is causing a marked increase in the pandemic of diabetes in elderly people. However, scientific evidence to support the most appropriate treatment for diabetes in the elderly is scarce. Given the heterogeneity of the elderly population, which includes subjects with very different functional and cognitive capacities, co-morbidities, and life expectancy, it is critical to make a comprehensive assessment from a biopsychosocial perspective, to address the vascular risk factors integrally, and to establish individually tailored targets for glycemic control. In frail elderly or individuals with a short life expectancy, it may be reasonable to maintain HbA1c between 7.6%-8.5%. The therapeutic strategy for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes should be individualized and agreed with the patient and their caregivers, according to the objective. Improving quality of life, assuring patient safety and avoiding the adverse effects of antidiabetic treatment should be prioritized. Given the increased susceptibility of the elderly to severe hypoglycemia and its consequences, antidiabetic therapies that minimize the risk of hypoglycemic events should be selected. PMID:23199835

  9. Cardioprotective effects of magnesium valproate in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhoomika M; Raghunathan, Suchi; Porwal, Urvashi

    2014-04-01

    We have evaluated the effect of magnesium valproate (210 mg/kg/day, p.o.) in type 2 diabetes induced cardiovascular complications induced by streptozotocin (STZ, 90 mg/kg, i.p.) in neonatal wistar rats. Various biochemical, cardiovascular and hemodynamic parameters were measured at the end of 8 weeks of treatment. STZ produced significant hyperglycaemia, hypoinsulinemia and dyslipidemia, which was prevented by magnesium valproate treatment. STZ produced increase in Creatinine Kinase, C-reactive protein and lactate dehydrogenase levels and treatment with magnesium valproate produced reduction in these levels. STZ produced increase in cardiac and LV hypertrophy index, LV/RV ratio, LV collagen deposition and LV cardiomyocyte diameter which were decreased by magnesium valproate treatment. Magnesium valproate also prevented STZ induced hemodynamic alterations and oxidative stress. These results were further supported by histopathological studies in which magnesium valproate showed marked reduction in fibrosis and cardiac fiber disarray. In conclusion, our data suggests that magnesium valproate is beneficial as an anti-diabetic agent in type-2 diabetes mellitus and also prevents its cardiac complications. PMID:24530414

  10. Attitudes and beliefs among Mexican Americans about type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Coronado, Gloria D; Thompson, Beti; Tejeda, Silvia; Godina, Ruby

    2004-11-01

    Hispanics in the United States have a disproportionately high risk for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes) compared with non-Hispanic whites. Little is known of the attitudes and beliefs about diabetes in this group. Using data from six focus groups of 42 Mexican Americans (14 men and 28 women), we characterized perceptions about the causes of and treatments for type 2 diabetes. Many participants believed diabetes is caused by having a family history of the disease, eating a diet high in fat or sugar, and engaging in minimal exercise. Experiencing strong emotions such as fright (susto), intense anger (coraje), or sadness and depression (tristeza) was also thought to precipitate diabetes. Nearly all participants expressed the belief that it is important to follow doctors' recommendations for diet and exercise, oral medication or insulin; many also cited herbal therapies, such as prickly pear cactus (nopal) and aloe vera (savila) as effective treatments. These findings may be useful in designing interventions to reduce the burden of diabetes in Hispanic populations. PMID:15531816

  11. Is insulin resistance the principal cause of type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Gerich, J E

    1999-09-01

    The data presented from these recent studies raise serious doubt concerning the commonly held view that insulin resistance is the principal cause of type 2 diabetes: first of all they provide evidence that insulin resistance may not be the primary genetic factor for type 2 diabetes; secondly, they demonstrate that at least under certain circumstances insulin resistance is not essential for diabetes to occur, and then finally, they indicate that insulin resistance may not be the predominant factor determining the degree of hyperglycaemia. Although these studies suggest that the role of insulin resistance relative to that of beta-cell dysfunction in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes has been generally overestimated, one should not be left with the impression that insulin resistance is not important. It is certainly an important factor in determining the degree of hyperglycaemia or glucose intolerance present at a given level of beta-cell function. The improvement in glycaemic control after weight loss which lessens insulin resistance or after the administration of pharmacologic agents that improve insulin sensitivity clearly argue that insulin resistance is important in this regard. In addition to influencing the severity of glucose intolerance, insulin resistance is probably also important in determining the time of onset of diabetes. It may do this simply by altering the balance between the body's demand for insulin and the ability of the pancreas to provide insulin. It might adversely affect beta-cell function in addition to increasing the demand for insulin. This concept is schematically represented in figure 3. It is well established that beta-cell function normally deteriorates as a function of age [41]. Although the prevalence of type 2 diabetes increases as a function of age, this by itself obviously does not result in diabetes in the great majority of people. In such individuals their insulin sensitivity is sufficient to maintain the balance between the

  12. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, glycemic control, and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Onitilo, Adedayo A; Stankowski, Rachel V; Berg, Richard L; Engel, Jessica M; Glurich, Ingrid; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by prolonged hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and progressive hyperglycemia. Disease management relies on glycemic control through diet, exercise, and pharmacological intervention. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of glycemic control and the use of glucose-lowering medication on the risk of breast, prostate, and colon cancer. Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N=9486) between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2009 were identified and data on glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c, glucose), glucose-lowering medication use (insulin, metformin, sulfonylurea), age, BMI, date of diabetes diagnosis, insurance status, comorbidities, smoking history, location of residence, and cancer diagnoses were electronically abstracted. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to examine the relationship between glycemic control, including medication use, and cancer risk. The results varied by cancer type and medication exposure. There was no association between glycemic control and breast or colon cancer; however, prostate cancer risk was significantly higher with better glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c ≤ 7.0%). Insulin use was associated with increased colon cancer incidence in women, but not with colon cancer in men or breast or prostate cancer risk. Metformin exposure was associated with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence, but had no association with colon cancer risk. Sulfonylurea exposure was not associated with risk of any type of cancer. The data reported here support hyperinsulinemia, rather than hyperglycemia, as a major diabetes-related factor associated with increased risk of breast and colon cancer. In contrast, hyperglycemia appears to be protective in the case of prostate cancer. PMID:23962874

  13. Empagliflozin and Progression of Kidney Disease in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Christoph; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Lachin, John M; Fitchett, David; von Eynatten, Maximilian; Mattheus, Michaela; Johansen, Odd Erik; Woerle, Hans J; Broedl, Uli C; Zinman, Bernard

    2016-07-28

    Background Diabetes confers an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular and renal events. In the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial, empagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, reduced the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes at high risk for cardiovascular events. We wanted to determine the long-term renal effects of empagliflozin, an analysis that was a prespecified component of the secondary microvascular outcome of that trial. Methods We randomly assigned patients with type 2 diabetes and an estimated glomerular filtration rate of at least 30 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2) of body-surface area to receive either empagliflozin (at a dose of 10 mg or 25 mg) or placebo once daily. Prespecified renal outcomes included incident or worsening nephropathy (progression to macroalbuminuria, doubling of the serum creatinine level, initiation of renal-replacement therapy, or death from renal disease) and incident albuminuria. Results Incident or worsening nephropathy occurred in 525 of 4124 patients (12.7%) in the empagliflozin group and in 388 of 2061 (18.8%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the empagliflozin group, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.53 to 0.70; P<0.001). Doubling of the serum creatinine level occurred in 70 of 4645 patients (1.5%) in the empagliflozin group and in 60 of 2323 (2.6%) in the placebo group, a significant relative risk reduction of 44%. Renal-replacement therapy was initiated in 13 of 4687 patients (0.3%) in the empagliflozin group and in 14 of 2333 patients (0.6%) in the placebo group, representing a 55% lower relative risk in the empagliflozin group. There was no significant between-group difference in the rate of incident albuminuria. The adverse-event profile of empagliflozin in patients with impaired kidney function at baseline was similar to that reported in the overall trial population. Conclusions In patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk, empagliflozin was associated with

  14. Effects of Intensive Glucose Lowering in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies have shown a relationship between glycated hemoglobin levels and cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether intensive therapy to target normal glycated hemoglobin levels would reduce cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes who had either established cardiovascular disease or additional cardiovascular risk factors. Methods In this randomized study, 10,251 patients (mean age, 62.2 years) with a median glycated hemoglobin level of 8.1% were assigned to receive intensive therapy (targeting a glycated hemoglobin level below 6.0%) or standard therapy (targeting a level from 7.0 to 7.9%). Of these patients, 38% were women, and 35% had had a previous cardiovascular event. The primary outcome was a composite of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes. The finding higher mortality in the intensive-therapy group led to a discontinuation of intensive therapy after a mean of 3.5 years of follow-up. Results At 1 year, stable median glycated hemoglobin levels of 6.4% and 7.5% were achieved in the intensive-therapy group and the standard-therapy group, respectively. During follow-up, the primary outcome occurred in 352 patients in the intensive-therapy group, as compared with 371 in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 1.04; P = 0.16). At the same time, 257 patients in the intensive-therapy group died, as compared with 203 patients in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.46; P = 0.04). Hypoglycemia requiring assistance and weight gain of more than 10 kg were more frequent in the intensive-therapy group (P<0.001). Conclusions As compared with standard therapy, the use of intensive therapy to target normal glycated hemoglobin levels for 3.5 years increased mortality and did not significantly reduce major cardiovascular events. These findings identify a previously unrecognized

  15. Dopaminergic drugs in type 2 diabetes and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lopez Vicchi, Felicitas; Luque, Guillermina Maria; Brie, Belen; Nogueira, Juan Patricio; Garcia Tornadu, Isabel; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia

    2016-07-01

    The importance of dopamine in central nervous system function is well known, but its effects on glucose homeostasis and pancreatic β cell function are beginning to be unraveled. Mutant mice lacking dopamine type 2 receptors (D2R) are glucose intolerant and have abnormal insulin secretion. In humans, administration of neuroleptic drugs, which block dopamine receptors, may cause hyperinsulinemia, increased weight gain and glucose intolerance. Conversely, treatment with the dopamine precursor l-DOPA in patients with Parkinson's disease reduces insulin secretion upon oral glucose tolerance test, and bromocriptine improves glycemic control and glucose tolerance in obese type 2 diabetic patients as well as in non diabetic obese animals and humans. The actions of dopamine on glucose homeostasis and food intake impact both the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Different central actions of the dopamine system may mediate its metabolic effects such as: (i) regulation of hypothalamic noradrenaline output, (ii) participation in appetite control, and (iii) maintenance of the biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. On the other hand, dopamine inhibits prolactin, which has metabolic functions; and, at the pancreatic beta cell dopamine D2 receptors inhibit insulin secretion. We review the evidence obtained in animal models and clinical studies that posited dopamine receptors as key elements in glucose homeostasis and ultimately led to the FDA approval of bromocriptine in adults with type 2 diabetes to improve glycemic control. Furthermore, we discuss the metabolic consequences of treatment with neuroleptics which target the D2R, that should be monitored in psychiatric patients to prevent the development in diabetes, weight gain, and hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:26748034

  16. Type 2 diabetic rats are sensitive to thioacetamide hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Dnyanmote, Ankur V.; Warbritton, Alan; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-03-15

    Previously, we reported high hepatotoxic sensitivity of type 2 diabetic (DB) rats to three dissimilar hepatotoxicants. Additional work revealed that a normally nonlethal dose of CCl{sub 4} was lethal in DB rats due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair. The present study was conducted to investigate the importance of compensatory tissue repair in determining the final outcome of hepatotoxicity in diabetes, using another structurally and mechanistically dissimilar hepatotoxicant, thioacetamide (TA), to initiate liver injury. A normally nonlethal dose of TA (300 mg/kg, ip), caused 100% mortality in DB rats. Time course studies (0 to 96 h) showed that in the non-DB rats, liver injury initiated by TA as assessed by plasma alanine or aspartate aminotransferase and hepatic necrosis progressed up to 48 h and regressed to normal at 96 h resulting in 100% survival. In the DB rats, liver injury rapidly progressed resulting in progressively deteriorating liver due to rapidly expanding injury, hepatic failure, and 100% mortality between 24 and 48 h post-TA treatment. Covalent binding of {sup 14}C-TA-derived radiolabel to liver tissue did not differ from that observed in the non-DB rats, indicating similar bioactivation-based initiation of hepatotoxicity. S-phase DNA synthesis measured by [{sup 3}H]-thymidine incorporation, and advancement of cells through the cell division cycle measured by PCNA immunohistochemistry, were substantially inhibited in the DB rats compared to the non-DB rats challenged with TA. Thus, inhibited cell division and compromised tissue repair in the DB rats resulted in progressive expansion of liver injury culminating in mortality. In conclusion, it appears that similar to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes also increases sensitivity to dissimilar hepatotoxicants due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair, suggesting that sensitivity to hepatotoxicity in diabetes occurs in the absence as well as presence of insulin.

  17. Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, Carbohydrates, and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Darren C.; Threapleton, Diane E.; Evans, Charlotte E.L.; Cleghorn, Christine L.; Nykjaer, Camilla; Woodhead, Charlotte; Burley, Victoria J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diets with high glycemic index (GI), with high glycemic load (GL), or high in all carbohydrates may predispose to higher blood glucose and insulin concentrations, glucose intolerance, and risk of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to conduct a systematic literature review and dose–response meta-analysis of evidence from prospective cohorts. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in-process, Embase, CAB Abstracts, ISI Web of Science, and BIOSIS for prospective studies of GI, GL, and total carbohydrates in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes up to 17 July 2012. Data were extracted from 24 publications on 21 cohort studies. Studies using different exposure categories were combined on the same scale using linear and nonlinear dose–response trends. Summary relative risks (RRs) were estimated using random-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS The summary RR was 1.08 per 5 GI units (95% CI 1.02–1.15; P = 0.01), 1.03 per 20 GL units (95% CI 1.00–1.05; P = 0.02), and 0.97 per 50 g/day of carbohydrate (95% CI 0.90–1.06; P = 0.5). Dose–response trends were linear for GI and GL but more complex for total carbohydrate intake. Heterogeneity was high for all exposures (I2 >50%), partly accounted for by different covariate adjustment and length of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Included studies were observational and should be interpreted cautiously. However, our findings are consistent with protective effects of low dietary GI and GL, quantifying the range of intakes associated with lower risk. Future research could focus on the type of sugars and other carbohydrates associated with greatest risk. PMID:24265366

  18. What Have Metabolomics Approaches Taught Us About Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Burkart, Alison M; Isganaitis, Elvira; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide, making identification of biomarkers for detection, staging, and effective prevention strategies an especially critical scientific and medical goal. Fortunately, advances in metabolomics techniques, together with improvements in bioinformatics and mathematical modeling approaches, have provided the scientific community with new tools to describe the T2D metabolome. The metabolomics signatures associated with T2D and obesity include increased levels of lactate, glycolytic intermediates, branched-chain and aromatic amino acids, and long-chain fatty acids. Conversely, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, betaine, and other metabolites decrease. Future studies will be required to fully integrate these and other findings into our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology and to identify biomarkers of disease risk, stage, and responsiveness to specific treatments. PMID:27319324

  19. Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes and Clinical Utility

    PubMed Central

    Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Liu, Jianjun; Boehm, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of heritability of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been attributed to inherent genetics. Recent genetic studies, especially genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have identified a multitude of variants associated with T2D. It is thus reasonable to question if these findings may be utilized in a clinical setting. Here we briefly review the identification of risk loci for T2D and discuss recent efforts and propose future work to utilize these loci in clinical setting—for the identification of individuals who are at particularly high risks of developing T2D and for the stratification of specific health-care approaches for those who would benefit most from such interventions. PMID:26110315

  20. Nephropathy in youth and young adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Solis-Herrera, Carolina; Triplitt, Curtis L; Lynch, Jane L

    2014-02-01

    The occurrence and progression of nephropathy associated with early onset type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a consequence of the ongoing epidemic of childhood obesity. Minimal evidence regarding treatment effectiveness of renovascular comorbidities in youth with early onset T2D is available, due to the relatively recent emergence of T2D in youth and young adults. Extrapolation of adult therapy guidelines is not an ideal approach to making therapeutic decisions in this population. Evolving management and intervention strategies are based on accumulating longitudinal data from cohorts of well characterized youth and young adults with T2D. The degree of similarity in histologic findings and disease specific characteristics of kidney disease in patients with early onset T2D and albuminuria compared with affected adults is not well characterized. Early aggressive therapies to minimize the impact of nephropathy are indicated as the evidence for best therapies in youth with T2D are further explored. PMID:24398660

  1. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appears to underlie the development of cardiovascular disease, T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidative stress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM. PMID:25897356

  2. Mechanisms of Islet Amyloidosis Toxicity in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Abedini, Andisheh; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid formation by the neuropancreatic hormone, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin), one of the most amyloidogenic sequences known, leads to islet amyloidosis in type 2 diabetes and to islet transplant failure. Under normal conditions, IAPP plays a role in the maintenance of energy homeostasis by regulating several metabolic parameters, such as satiety, blood glucose levels, adiposity and body weight. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation, the nature of IAPP toxic species and the cellular pathways that lead to pancreatic β-cell toxicity are not well characterized. Several mechanisms of toxicity, including receptor and non-receptor-mediated events, have been proposed. Analogs of IAPP have been approved for the treatment of diabetes and are under investigation for the treatment of obesity. PMID:23337872

  3. Incretin response in Asian type 2 diabetes: Are Indians different?

    PubMed

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Incretin-based therapy has clearly emerged as one of the most sought out strategy in managing type 2 diabetes, primarily because they generally do not causes hypoglycemia and possess weight-neutral or weight losing properties. Efficacy-wise too, these agents, are more or less similar to commonly used drugs metformin and sulfonylureas. Interestingly, some studies recently suggested that glycemic response to these incretin-based therapies could also differ ethnicity-wise. Subsequently, meta-analysis from these studies also suggested that Asians may have better response to these incretin-based therapies. This review will be an attempt to critically analyze those studies available in literature and to address as to why East-Asians and South-Asians may have different incretin response compared to non-Asians. PMID:25593823

  4. Canagliflozin Treatment in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Triplitt, Curtis; Cornell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) indicate a patient-centered approach that should go beyond glycemic control. Of the many antihyperglycemic agents available for treatment of T2DM, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors offer the advantages of reduced glycated hemoglobin (A1C), body weight (BW), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and are associated with a low risk of hypoglycemia when used either as monotherapy or with other agents not typically associated with increased risk of hypoglycemia. Collaborative, multidisciplinary teams are best suited to provide care to patients with diabetes, and clinical pharmacists can enhance the care provided by these teams. This review aims to provide insight into the mode of action, pharmacology, potential drug–drug interactions, clinical benefits, and safety considerations associated with use of the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin in patients with T2DM and to provide information to enhance clinical pharmacists’ understanding of canagliflozin. PMID:26523120

  5. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sang Youl

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibits broad clinical characteristics and various consequences and is known as one of the major macrovascular complications of T2DM. Atherosclerosis is recognized as the most direct and important cause of PAD, but acute or chronic limb ischemia may be the result of various risk factors. In light of the increasing number of patients who undergo peripheral vascular procedures, the number of subjects who are exposed to the risks for PAD and related complications is increasing. In this review, we will discuss the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of PAD, as well as the clinical significance of PAD in T2DM subjects. PMID:26301189

  6. Survival Association Rule Mining Towards Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gyorgy J.; Schrom, John; Castro, M. Regina; Li, Peter W.; Caraballo, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus is a growing epidemic that often leads to severe complications. Effective preventive measures exist and identifying patients at high risk of diabetes is a major health-care need. The use of association rule mining (ARM) is advantageous, as it was specifically developed to identify associations between risk factors in an interpretable form. Unfortunately, traditional ARM is not directly applicable to survival outcomes and it lacks the ability to compensate for confounders and to incorporate dosage effects. In this work, we propose Survival Association Rule (SAR) Mining, which addresses these shortcomings. We demonstrate on a real diabetes data set that SARs are naturally more interpretable than the traditional association rules, and predictive models built on top of these rules are very competitive relative to state of the art survival models and substantially outperform the most widely used diabetes index, the Framingham score. PMID:24551408

  7. Mechanisms of beta-cell death in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Donath, Marc Y; Ehses, Jan A; Maedler, Kathrin; Schumann, Desiree M; Ellingsgaard, Helga; Eppler, Elisabeth; Reinecke, Manfred

    2005-12-01

    A decrease in the number of functional insulin-producing beta-cells contributes to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. Opinions diverge regarding the relative contribution of a decrease in beta-cell mass versus an intrinsic defect in the secretory machinery. Here we review the evidence that glucose, dyslipidemia, cytokines, leptin, autoimmunity, and some sulfonylureas may contribute to the maladaptation of beta-cells. With respect to these causal factors, we focus on Fas, the ATP-sensitive K+ channel, insulin receptor substrate 2, oxidative stress, nuclear factor-kappaB, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction as their respective mechanisms of action. Interestingly, most of these factors are involved in inflammatory processes in addition to playing a role in both the regulation of beta-cell secretory function and cell turnover. Thus, the mechanisms regulating beta-cell proliferation, apoptosis, and function are inseparable processes. PMID:16306327

  8. Functional herbal food ingredients used in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Li, Yunman

    2012-01-01

    From many reports it is clear that diabetes will be one of the major diseases in the coming years. As a result there is a rapidly increasing interest in searching new medicines, or even better searching prophylactic methods. Based on a large number of chemical and pharmacological research work, numerous bioactive compounds have been found in functional herbal food ingredients for diabetes. The present paper reviews functional herbal food ingredients with regards to their anti-diabetic active principles and pharmacological test results, which are commonly used in Asian culinary system and medical system and have demonstrated clinical or/and experimental anti-diabetic effectiveness. Our idea of reviewing this article is to give more attention to these functional food ingredients as targets medicinal foods in order to prevent or slow down the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:22654403

  9. Animal Models of GWAS-Identified Type 2 Diabetes Genes

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Bellomo, Elisa A.; McGinty, James A.; French, Paul M.; Rutter, Guy A.

    2013-01-01

    More than 65 loci, encoding up to 500 different genes, have been implicated by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) as conferring an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). Whilst mouse models have in the past been central to understanding the mechanisms through which more penetrant risk genes for T2D, for example, those responsible for neonatal or maturity-onset diabetes of the young, only a few of those identified by GWAS, notably TCF7L2 and ZnT8/SLC30A8, have to date been examined in mouse models. We discuss here the animal models available for the latter genes and provide perspectives for future, higher throughput approaches towards efficiently mining the information provided by human genetics. PMID:23710470

  10. Air Pollution as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiaoquan; Patel, Priti; Puett, Robin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies in both humans and animals suggest that air pollution is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the mechanism by which air pollution mediates propensity to diabetes is not fully understood. While a number of epidemiologic studies have shown a positive association between ambient air pollution exposure and risk for T2DM, some studies have not found such a relationship. Experimental studies in susceptible disease models do support this association and suggest the involvement of tissues involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM such as the immune system, adipose, liver, and central nervous system. This review summarizes the epidemiologic and experimental evidence between ambient outdoor air pollution and T2DM. PMID:25628401

  11. Vascular repair strategies in type 2 diabetes: novel insights

    PubMed Central

    Kuschnerus, Kira; Landmesser, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Impaired functions of vascular cells are responsible for the majority of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently a better understanding of mechanisms contributing to development of vascular dysfunction and the role of systemic inflammatory activation and functional alterations of several secretory organs, of which adipose tissue has more recently been investigated, has been achieved. Notably, the progression of vascular disease within the context of T2D appears to be driven by a multitude of incremental signaling shifts. Hence, successful therapies need to target several mechanisms in parallel, and over a long time period. This review will summarize the latest molecular strategies and translational developments of cardiovascular therapy in patients with T2D. PMID:26543824

  12. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in elderly institutionalized patients.

    PubMed

    Cano Megias, M; Guisado Vasco, P

    2014-12-01

    A 93-year-old woman is admitted to a conventional hospital ward for an acute respiratory infection. The patient has type 2 diabetes mellitus of approximately 15 years evolution and has no other associated comorbidities, except for progressive dependence due to senescence and a previous hospitalization for pneumonia 6 months ago. She is currently in an assisted-living residence. A recent laboratory test revealed an HbA1c level of 7.8%, with a serum creatinine level of 1.3mg/dl (MDRD, 45ml/min). Her standard treatment consists of 5mg of glibenclamide a day and 850mg of metformin every 12hours. What regimen should we follow once she is hospitalized? Does she require any change in her treatment at discharge? PMID:24703988

  13. [What is the natural history of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kawamori, Ryuzo

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is widely accepted as the progressive disease. It is natural to think, if the newly diagnosed patient does not change the life-style habits and does not receive any medications, the state of T2DM will become more seriously. However, in this article, how to arrest the natural history of T2DM will be discussed by summarizing the recent findings on this topic. Those are; autophagy of pancreatic β cell: a sweet process to diabetes, hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress on β cell function, zinc, insulin and the liver, and so on. In short, the important things are; people should know the reasons why minor abnormalities have happened, and the practitioners have to try hard to remove such causes triggering T2DM. PMID:25812360

  14. Type 2 Diabetes as a Protein Misfolding Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Abhisek; Morales-Scheihing, Diego; Butler, Peter C.; Soto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a highly prevalent and chronic metabolic disorder. Recent evidence suggests that formation of toxic aggregates of the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) might contribute to β-cell dysfunction and disease. However, the mechanism of protein aggregation and associated toxicity is still unclear. Misfolding, aggregation and accumulation of diverse proteins in different organs is the hallmark in the group of protein misfolding disorders (PMDs), including highly prevalent illnesses affecting the central nervous system such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. In this review we will discuss the current understanding of the mechanisms implicated in the formation of protein aggregates in pancreas and associated toxicity in the light of the longstanding knowledge from neurodegenerative disorders associated with protein misfolding. PMID:25998900

  15. Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes: the Power of Isolated Populations.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mette Korre; Pedersen, Casper-Emil Tingskov; Moltke, Ida; Hansen, Torben; Albrechtsen, Anders; Grarup, Niels

    2016-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) affects millions of people worldwide. Improving the understanding of the underlying mechanisms and ultimately improving the treatment strategies are, thus, of great interest. To achieve this, identification of genetic variation predisposing to T2D is important. A large number of variants have been identified in large outbred populations, mainly from Europe and Asia. However, to elucidate additional variation, isolated populations have a number of advantageous properties, including increased amounts of linkage disequilibrium, and increased probability for presence of high frequency disease-associated variants due to genetic drift. Collectively, this increases the statistical power to detect association signals in isolated populations compared to large outbred populations. In this review, we elaborate on why isolated populations are a powerful resource for the identification of complex disease variants and describe their contributions to the understanding of the genetics of T2D. PMID:27189761

  16. Novel treatment approaches in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Castro Torres, Yaniel; Katholi, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension represent two common conditions worldwide. Their frequent association with cardiovascular diseases makes management of hypertensive patients with T2DM an important clinical priority. Carvedilol and renal denervation are two promising choices to reduce plasma glucose levels and blood pressure in hypertensive patients with T2DM to reduce future complications and improve clinical outcomes and prognosis. Pathophysiological mechanisms of both options are under investigation, but one of the most accepted is an attenuation in sympathetic nervous system activity which lowers blood pressure and improves insulin sensitivity. Choice of these therapeutic approaches should be individualized based on specific characteristics of each patient. Further investigations are needed to determine when to consider their use in clinical practice. PMID:25126399

  17. Behavioral Contributions to the Pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Cook, Lauren; O’Reilly, Gillian A.; Page, Kathleen A.; Quinn, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral Contributions to the pathogenesis of prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) include lifestyle behaviors including dietary intake, exercise, sedentariness, sleep, and stress. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence for the metabolic pathways by which the behavior is linked to T2D. Evidence for interventions which change each of the lifestyle behaviors is discussed. The article will close with a brief discussion on how new technologies may provide opportunities to better understand relationships between moment-to-moment fluctuations in behaviors and diabetes pathogenesis, as well as provide opportunities to personalize and adapt interventions to achieve successful behavior change and maintenance of that change. Especially promising are new technologies which assist in tracking lifestyle behaviors along with clinical and metabolic outcomes. PMID:24604714

  18. Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents on atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Pramyothin, Pornpoj; Khaodhiar, Lalita

    2015-08-01

    Youth receiving treatment with antipsychotics are particularly susceptible to weight gain, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and associated metabolic disorders, which is directly associated with excess morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable population. The risk of T2D is 2- to 3-fold that of the general population, starts early in the course of treatment, and reflects the effects of weight gain in conjunction with direct effects of antipsychotics on the hypothalamus, pancreatic beta cells, and insulin-sensitive peripheral tissues. Close monitoring with early intervention through lifestyle intervention, switching away from antipsychotics with deleterious metabolic effects, and adjunctive treatment with metformin are modalities available to mitigate weight gain and improve cardiometabolic health in these patients. Despite rapidly advancing knowledge in the field, patient's access to metabolic screening and quality care remains limited. Efforts must be made to broaden reach of early cardiometabolic intervention among these patients in order to avert serious cardiovascular disease burden in the future. PMID:26084582

  19. Current view from Alzheimer disease to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Mahmood; Malik, Arif; Qazi, Aamer M; Sheikh, Ishfaq A; Manan, Abdul; Shaheen, Sumaira; Qazi, Mahmood H; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Asif, Muhammad; Alqahtani, Mohammed H; Iqbal, Zafar; Shaik, Munvar M; Gan, Siew H; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to memory problems. It has been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus at both the molecular and biochemical level. Pancreatic cells have molecular similarities to the brain at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels. Several genes have been reported to be responsible for both AD and diabetes. Currently, no proper treatment is available but various therapeutic approaches are utilized worldwide for the management of these disorders and may be nanoparticles and herbal treatment of Bacopa monnieri will make promise for the treatment of AD in future. The formation of amyloids in neurons and the formation of amylin in pancreatic cells are potential links between these two disorders, which can be silent killers. PMID:24059295

  20. Type 2 diabetes in Brazil: epidemiology and management

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida-Pititto, Bianca; Dias, Monike Lourenço; de Moraes, Ana Carolina Franco; Ferreira, Sandra RG; Franco, Denise Reis; Eliaschewitz, Freddy Goldberg

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most important epidemic diseases in the world this century, and accounts for 90% of cases of diabetes globally. Brazil is one of the most important examples of the alarming picture of T2DM in emergent societies, being the country with the fourth largest number of people with diabetes. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on diabetes in Brazil, specifically looking at the epidemiology and management of T2DM. A literature search was conducted using PubMed and LILACS to identify articles containing information on diabetes in Brazil. Official documents from the Brazilian government, World Health Organization, and International Diabetes Federation were also reviewed. PMID:25609989

  1. Type 2 diabetes in Belgians of Turkish and Moroccan origin

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To compare the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adults aged 35 to 74 years of the Turkish and Moroccan communities in Belgium with the prevalence in native Belgians. To examine the determinants and specific mechanisms responsible for differences in diabetes between these communities. Method Both objectives were examined using the Health Interview Surveys of 1997, 2001 and 2004. Stepwise logistic regression analyses were performed with diabetes as the outcome variable. The variables 'age', 'sex', 'ethnic origin', 'body mass index', 'lack of physical activity', 'educational attainment' and 'income' were introduced in the model in consecutive steps. Results In 35- to 74-year-olds, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is higher in Belgians of Tur-kish and Moroccan origin than in native Belgians. In native Belgian men, the prevalence amounts to 5.0%. In 35- to 74-year-old men of Turkish and Moroccan origin, the diabetes prevalence is 5.8% and 6.5% respectively. 4.3%, 18.7% and 11.9% of the women of Belgian, Turkish and Moroccan origin respectively suffer from diabetes. In men, differences in the prevalence of diabetes are strongly reduced after controlling for lack of physical activity and educational attainment. In women, differences remain high, although they become smaller after accounting for BMI and educational attainment. Conclusions In men, the differences in diabetes prevalence are explained by lifestyle factors and educational attainment. In women, the community differences in diabetes prevalence persist, although lifestyle factors and educational attainment play an important part in understanding these differences.

  2. Liraglutide in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Lisbeth V; Flint, Anne; Olsen, Anette K; Ingwersen, Steen H

    2016-06-01

    Liraglutide is an acylated glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue with 97 % amino acid homology with native glucagon-like peptide-1 and greatly protracted action. It is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and administered by subcutaneous injection once daily. The pharmacokinetic properties of liraglutide enable 24-h exposure coverage, a requirement for 24-h glycaemic control with once-daily dosing. The mechanism of protraction relates to slowed release from the injection site, and a reduced elimination rate owing to metabolic stabilisation and reduced renal filtration. Drug exposure is largely independent of injection site, as well as age, race and ethnicity. Increasing body weight and male sex are associated with reduced concentrations, but there is substantial overlap between subgroups; therefore, dose escalation should be based on individual treatment outcome. Exposure is reduced with mild, moderate or severe renal or hepatic impairment. There are no clinically relevant changes in overall concentrations of various drugs (e.g. paracetamol, atorvastatin, griseofulvin, digoxin, lisinopril and oral combination contraceptives) when co-administered with liraglutide. Pharmacodynamic studies show multiple beneficial actions with liraglutide, including improved fasting and postprandial glycaemic control (mediated by increased insulin and reduced glucagon levels and minor delays in gastric emptying), reduced appetite and energy intake, and effects on postprandial lipid profiles. The counter-regulatory hormone response to hypoglycaemia is largely unaltered. The effects of liraglutide on insulin and glucagon secretion are glucose dependent, and hence the risk of hypoglycaemia is low. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of liraglutide make it an important treatment option for many patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26597252

  3. Effects of platycodins on liver complications of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Luan, Haiyan; Yang, Limin; Liu, Lei; Liu, Shuang; Zhao, Xiaolian; Sui, Hongyu; Wang, Jingtao; Wang, Shuqiu

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the therapeutic effects and mechanism of platycodin in liver complications of type 2 diabetes. All rats were randomly divided into two groups: The control group (normal diet) and the model group (a high‑fat and high‑sugar diet). The model group was injected with 2% streptozocin (25 mg/kg body weight) through the tail vein following 4 weeks of dieting. After a total of 8 weeks of dieting, fasting blood glucose (FBG) and liver function were examined. The high‑fat and high‑sugar diet was continued in the successful model rats, which were randomly divided into four groups and treated with the following doses of platycodins: The untreated, and 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight/day groups. Platycodins treatment lasted for 12 weeks. Platycodins treatment at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight/day reduced the FBG, glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), glutamic oxalacetic transaminase, triglycerides, total cholesterol (TC), low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) and liver index levels compared with the untreated group (P<0.05), while the high‑density lipoprotein levels increased (P<0.05). Furthermore, FBG, GPT, TC and LDL levels were returned to the normal level. This dose also increased the expression of BMP‑9 mRNA and BMP‑9 protein, and reduced the expression of Smad‑4 mRNA and Smad‑4 protein. These findings indicate that platycodins can rectify disorders of blood glucose and lipid metabolism, improve liver index and protect liver function in liver complications of type 2 diabetes. The current study suggests that this therapeutic effect is mediated through the BMP‑9/Smad‑4 pathway. PMID:25017203

  4. Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Korean Women with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Sook; Jang, Hye-Jung; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Moon-Young; Ko, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate maternal and neonatal outcomes in Korean women with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Methods We performed a retrospective survey of 163 pregnancies in women with type 1 diabetes (n=13) and type 2 diabetes (n=150) treated from 2003 to 2010 at Cheil General Hospital & Women's Healthcare Center, Korea. We compared maternal characteristics as well as maternal and neonatal outcomes between groups. Results Differences in glycosylated hemoglobin between type 1 and type 2 diabetes were not significant. Birth weight (3,501±689.6 g vs. 3,366±531.4 g) and rate of major congenital malformations (7.7% vs. 5.6%) were not significantly different. However, women with type 1 diabetes had higher rates of preeclampsia (38.5% vs. 8.2%, P=0.006), large for gestational age (LGA; 46.2% vs. 20.4%, P=0.004), macrosomia (38.5% vs. 13.4%, P=0.032), and admission for neonatal care (41.7% vs. 14.8%, P=0.03) than women with type 2 diabetes. Conclusion Maternal and neonatal outcomes for women with type 1 diabetes were poorer than for women with type 2 diabetes, especially preeclampsia, LGA, macrosomia and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:26301193

  5. Is the risk and nature of CVD the same in type 1 and type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Duca, Lindsey; Sippl, Rachel; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is increasing globally, most likely explained by environmental changes, such as changing exposures to foods, viruses, and toxins, and by increasing obesity. While cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality has been declining recently, this global epidemic of diabetes threatens to stall this trend. CVD is the leading cause of death in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with at least a two- to fourfold increased risk in patients with diabetes. In this review, the risk factors for CVD are discussed in the context of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity are greater in type 2 patients than in type 1 diabetes, they explain only about half of the increased CVD risk. The role for diabetes-specific risk factors, including hyperglycemia and kidney complications, is discussed in the context of new study findings. PMID:23519720

  6. Hypomagnesemia in Type 2 Diabetes: A Vicious Circle?

    PubMed

    Gommers, Lisanne M M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M; de Baaij, Jeroen H F

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, hypomagnesemia (serum Mg(2+) <0.7 mmol/L) has been strongly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with hypomagnesemia show a more rapid disease progression and have an increased risk for diabetes complications. Clinical studies demonstrate that T2DM patients with hypomagnesemia have reduced pancreatic β-cell activity and are more insulin resistant. Moreover, dietary Mg(2+) supplementation for patients with T2DM improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Intracellular Mg(2+) regulates glucokinase, KATP channels, and L-type Ca(2+) channels in pancreatic β-cells, preceding insulin secretion. Moreover, insulin receptor autophosphorylation is dependent on intracellular Mg(2+) concentrations, making Mg(2+) a direct factor in the development of insulin resistance. Conversely, insulin is an important regulator of Mg(2+) homeostasis. In the kidney, insulin activates the renal Mg(2+) channel transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 that determines the final urinary Mg(2+) excretion. Consequently, patients with T2DM and hypomagnesemia enter a vicious circle in which hypomagnesemia causes insulin resistance and insulin resistance reduces serum Mg(2+) concentrations. This Perspective provides a systematic overview of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of Mg(2+) on insulin secretion and insulin signaling. In addition to providing a review of current knowledge, we provide novel directions for future research and identify previously neglected contributors to hypomagnesemia in T2DM. PMID:26696633

  7. Significant asymptomatic bacteriuria among Nigerian type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed Central

    Alebiosu, C. O.; Osinupebi, O. A.; Olajubu, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    Significant asymptomatic bacteriuria is a risk factor for symptomatic urinary infection and septicemia among predisposed individuals such as diabetics. We investigated the pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria among our type 2 diabetics with a view to documenting the prevalence, type of organisms responsible and the antibiotic susceptibility pattern. One hundred and twenty-four type 2 Nigerian diabetics (55 males and 69 females) submitted midstream urine specimens for culture. Thirty-three patients had significant bacteriuria (9 males and 24 females), showing the frequency of occurrence of asymptomatic bacteriuria to be 26.6%. The most common organism isolated was Klebsiella pneumonia at 42.4%. Gram-negative bacilli made up about 23 (69.7%) of the isolates. Isolates were poorly sensitive to the readily available antibiotics (ampicillin, tetracycline and cotrimoxazole), but a large number of the organisms isolated were sensitive to nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. Sensitivity to erythromycin, nalidixic acid and cefuroxime was moderate. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is, thus, more prevalent among the Nigerian diabetic population than in the non-diabetics. A changing pattern of disease is observed with Klebsiella sp. now accounting for the majority of asymptomatic bacteriuria among diabetics. The organisms are not sensitive to the commonly available antibacterial agents. PMID:12793791

  8. Pharmacologic Treatment Strategies in Children with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Urakami, Tatsuhiko; Kuwabara, Remi; Habu, Masako; Yoshida, Ayako; Okuno, Misako; Suzuki, Junichi; Takahashi, Shori; Mugishima, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    We treated 80 obese and 28 nonobese children diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Among these patients, 26 obese and 23 nonobese children were assigned to pharmacologic therapies during the course of diabetes. Pharmacologic therapies were started if the HbA1c (NGSP) value exceeded 7.0% despite dietary and exercise management. For the 26 obese patients, metformin alone or in combination with an additional medication was frequently used. Only 2 patients independently received sulfonylureas (SUs) in the form of glimepiride. In addition, 9 patients were treated with basal insulin supported with oral hypoglycemic drugs (OHDs) or biphasic premix insulin. On the other hand, the 23 nonobese patients were frequently treated with insulin alone or in combination with an additional medication followed by SUs. The nonobese patients tended to require pharmacologic therapies, in particular insulin, at an earlier stage of diabetes as compared with the obese patients. New antidiabetic drugs, DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists, seemed to exert positive effects on glycemic control without occurrence of hypoglycemic episodes in some patients regardless of the type of diabetes. These results suggest that pharmacologic treatment strategies in childhood T2DM should be tailored to individual patient characteristics. PMID:23966754

  9. Human cerebral neuropathology of Type 2 diabetes mellitus⋆

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Peter T.; Smith, Charles D.; Abner, Erin A.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Scheff, Stephen W.; Davis, Gregory J.; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Davis, Daron; Wang-Xia, Wang; Hartman, Adria; Katz, Douglas G.; Markesbery, William R.

    2010-01-01

    The cerebral neuropathology of Type 2 diabetes (CNDM2) has not been positively defined. This review includes a description of CNDM2 research from before the ‘Pubmed Era’. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on cerebrovascular and white matter pathology. These and prior studies about cerebrovascular histopathology in diabetes are reviewed. Evidence is also described for and against the link between CNDM2 and Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. To study this matter directly, we evaluated data from University of Kentucky Alzheimer’s Disease Center (UK ADC) patients recruited while non-demented and followed longitudinally. Of patients who had come to autopsy (N=234), 139 met inclusion criteria. These patients provided the basis for comparing the prevalence of pathological and clinical indices between well-characterized cases with (N=50) or without (N=89) the premortem diagnosis of diabetes. In diabetics, cerebrovascular pathology was more frequent and Alzheimer-type pathology was less frequent than in non-diabetics. Finally, a series of photomicrographs demonstrates histopathological features (including clinical–radiographical correlation) observed in brains of persons that died after a history of diabetes. These preliminary, correlative, and descriptive studies may help develop new hypotheses about CNDM2. We conclude that more work should be performed on human material in the context of CNDM2. PMID:18789386

  10. Empagliflozin/Linagliptin: A Review in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Esther S; Deeks, Emma D

    2015-09-01

    Empagliflozin/linagliptin (Glyxambi(®)) is a once-daily sodium glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor fixed-dose combination product that is approved in the USA as an adjunct to diet and exercise in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) when treatment with both empagliflozin and linagliptin is appropriate. This article reviews the clinical efficacy and tolerability of oral empagliflozin/linagliptin in patients with T2D and summarizes the pharmacological properties of the agents. Results of two randomized controlled trials of 52 weeks' duration in adults with T2D demonstrated that empagliflozin/linagliptin improved glycaemic control significantly more than linagliptin when administered as initial therapy (whereas results vs. empagliflozin were mixed in this setting) and significantly more than linagliptin or empagliflozin when administered as an add-on therapy to metformin. In addition to glycaemic control, empagliflozin/linagliptin provided significant weight loss compared with linagliptin in both trials. Empagliflozin/linagliptin was generally well tolerated in patients with T2D, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and no reports of exacerbations of, or hospitalizations for, heart failure during the trials. As the first SGLT2 inhibitor/DPP-4 inhibitor fixed-dose combination available, empagliflozin/linagliptin is a useful new option for patients with T2D. PMID:26323340

  11. Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rohini; Dent, Tom; Meads, Catherine; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate current risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes and inform selection and implementation of these in practice. Design Systematic review using standard (quantitative) and realist (mainly qualitative) methodology. Inclusion criteria Papers in any language describing the development or external validation, or both, of models and scores to predict the risk of an adult developing type 2 diabetes. Data sources Medline, PreMedline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. Included studies were citation tracked in Google Scholar to identify follow-on studies of usability or impact. Data extraction Data were extracted on statistical properties of models, details of internal or external validation, and use of risk scores beyond the studies that developed them. Quantitative data were tabulated to compare model components and statistical properties. Qualitative data were analysed thematically to identify mechanisms by which use of the risk model or score might improve patient outcomes. Results 8864 titles were scanned, 115 full text papers considered, and 43 papers included in the final sample. These described the prospective development or validation, or both, of 145 risk prediction models and scores, 94 of which were studied in detail here. They had been tested on 6.88 million participants followed for up to 28 years. Heterogeneity of primary studies precluded meta-analysis. Some but not all risk models or scores had robust statistical properties (for example, good discrimination and calibration) and had been externally validated on a different population. Genetic markers added nothing to models over clinical and sociodemographic factors. Most authors described their score as “simple” or “easily implemented,” although few were specific about the intended users and under what circumstances. Ten mechanisms were identified by which measuring diabetes risk might improve outcomes. Follow-on studies that applied a risk score as part of an

  12. Genetic Determinants of Type 2 Diabetes in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Q; Wang, X; Strizich, G; Wang, T

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become a major health problem throughout the world and the epidemic is particularly severe in Asian countries. Compared with European populations, Asians tend to develop diabetes at a younger age and at much higher incidence rates given the same amount of weight gain. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 70 loci associated with T2D. Although the majority of GWAS results were conducted in populations of European ancestry, recent GWAS in Asians have made important contributions to the identification of T2D susceptibility loci. These studies not only confirmed T2D susceptibility loci initially identified in European populations, but also identified novel susceptibility loci that provide new insights into the pathophysiology of diseases. In this article, we review GWAS results of T2D conducted in East and South Asians and compare them to those of European populations. Currently identified T2D genetic variants do not appear to explain the phenomenon that Asians are more susceptible to T2D than European populations, suggesting further studies in Asian populations are needed.

  13. Type 2 diabetes among Asian Americans: Prevalence and prevention.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tam H; Nguyen, Thuc-Nhi; Fischer, Taylor; Ha, Won; Tran, Thanh V

    2015-05-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing problem among Asian Americans. Based on the Centers for Disease Control, the age-adjusted prevalence of T2DM for Asian Americans is 9%, placing them at "moderate risk". However differential patterns of disease burden emerge when examining disaggregated data across Asian American ethnic groups; with Filipino, Pacific Islander, Japanese, and South Asian groups consistently described as having the highest prevalence of T2DM. Disentangling and strengthening prevalence data is vital for on-going prevention efforts. The strongest evidence currently available to guide the prevention of T2DM in the United States comes from a large multicenter randomized clinical control trial called the Diabetes Prevention Program, which targets individual lifestyle behavior changes. It has been translated and adopted for some Asian American groups, and shows promise. However stronger study designs and attention to several key methodological considerations will improve the science. Increased attention has also been directed toward population level downstream prevention efforts. Building an infrastructure that includes both individual and population approaches is needed to prevent T2DM among Asian American populations, and is essential for reducing health disparities. PMID:25987951

  14. Update on type 2 diabetes-related osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Wongdee, Kannikar; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2015-06-10

    It was previously understood that body weight gain and obesity observed in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) could be beneficial since body weight increase elevated bone mineral density and thus helped maintain the skeletal framework. However, a number of recent findings in humans and rodents have revealed that T2DM is not only associated with trabecular defects but also increases cortical porosity, and compromised bone cell function and bone mechanical properties. Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in T2DM may further induce osteoblast apoptosis and uncoupling bone turnover. Prolonged accumulation of advanced glycation end products and diminished activity of lysyl oxidase, an essential enzyme for collagen cross-link, can lead to structural abnormalities of bone collagen fibrils, brittle matrix, and fragility fractures. Our studies in T2DM rats showed that dyslipidemia, which often occurs in T2DM, could obscure the T2DM-associated changes in bone microstructure and osteopenia. Longitudinal bone growth regulated by the growth plate chondrocytes is also impaired by T2DM since differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes is arrested and retained in the resting state while only a small number of cells undergo hypertrophic differentiation. Such a delayed chondrocyte differentiation may have also resulted from premature apoptosis of the growth plate chondrocytes. Nevertheless, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and growth plate chondrocytes remain to be investigated. PMID:26069716

  15. Metabolic surgery: A paradigm shift in type 2 diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    Pappachan, Joseph M; Viswanath, Ananth K

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are major public health issues globally over the past few decades. Despite dietary interventions, lifestyle modifications and the availability of several pharmaceutical agents, management of T2DM with obesity is a major challenge to clinicians. Metabolic surgery is emerging as a promising treatment option for the management of T2DM in the obese population in recent years. Several observational studies and a few randomised controlled trials have shown clear benefits of various bariatric procedures in obese individuals in terms of improvement or remission of T2DM and multiple other health benefits such as improvement of hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea, osteoarthritis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Uncertainties about the long-term implications of metabolic surgery such as relapse of T2DM after initial remission, nutritional and psychosocial complications and the optimal body mass index for different ethnic groups exist. The article discusses the major paradigm shift in recent years in the management of T2DM after the introduction of metabolic surgery. PMID:26240695

  16. Subclinical hyperthyroidism in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro

    2012-08-01

    Both subclinical hyperthyroidism and type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been associated with an increase in cardiovascular disease risk and mortality. We aimed to assess the prevalence of newly diagnosed subclinical hyperthyroidism in a cohort of patients with T2D, and also to analyse the relationships between diabetes-related characteristics and the presence of subclinical hyperthyroidism. 933 diabetic patients without previous history of thyroid disease (45.4% females, mean age 66.3 years, median duration of diabetes 10 years) were evaluated. A sample of 911 non-diabetic subjects without known thyroid dysfunction was studied as control group. Serum concentrations of thyrotropin were measured in all subjects. Subclinical hyperthyroidism was present in 4.3% of female and 3.5% of male diabetic patients. Relative risk was significant only for the female gender (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.56-8.71). In comparison with diabetic patients without thyroid hyperfunction, patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism were older, had longer duration of diabetes, showed lower fasting glucose levels, had greater proportion of goitre and diet therapy, and had lower proportion of treatment with oral agents. Logistic regression analysis showed that age and the presence of goitre were significantly related to subclinical hyperthyroidism in patients with T2D. The risk for subclinical hyperthyroidism is increased in women with T2D. Advanced age and the presence of goitre are significantly and independently related with the presence of subclinical hyperthyroidism in diabetic population. PMID:22327927

  17. Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in Children: Epidemiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pulgaron, Elizabeth R.; Delamater, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of overweight and obesity among children has increased dramatically in recent decades, with about one-third of children in the U.S. currently being either overweight or obese. Being overweight in early childhood increases risk for later obesity. There is evidence for the efficacy of family-based behavioral treatment to control weight and improve health outcomes. Obesity-related health risks have been documented, including metabolic syndrome. There is also increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among youth in recent years, with obesity and family history of T2D generally present. Lower income and ethnic minority status are associated with both obesity and T2D in youth. Most youth with T2D do not achieve optimal glycemic control, and are at high risk for later health complications. Obesity and T2D represent significant public health issues with potentially great personal and societal cost. Research addressing the prevention of obesity and T2D among youth is urgently needed. PMID:24919749

  18. Whole food approach for type 2 diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Xi, Pan; Liu, Rui Hai

    2016-08-01

    Diet is intimately associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently, attention has focused on the contributions of individual nutrients, food groups and eating patterns to the outcome of T2D. High consumption of coffee, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and nuts are each independently associated with the reduced risk of T2D in high risk, glucose intolerant individuals. Experimental and clinical trials have given insight to the diverse mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed protective effects of certain foods on T2D, including nutrients, phytochemicals and dietary fiber, weight control, enhanced satiety and improvement in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients. Elevated consumption of refined grains and sugar-sweetened beverages has shown to significantly elevate the risk of incident T2D. An overall healthy diet primarily comprising whole plant-based foods, together with regular physical activity and weight manage, could significantly reduce the risk of T2D. The present review consolidates current research and delineates major food groups shown to significantly influence risk of T2D. Documenting and quantifying the effects of diet on the outcome of T2D are of great scientific and public health importance as there is urgent need to implement dietary strategies to prevent and manage the outcome of T2D. PMID:27159643

  19. Effects of metformin on endothelial function in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    WU, SONGLIN; LI, XIAOYAN; ZHANG, HONGMING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of metformin on endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In total, 93 patients with T2DM and dissatisfactory glycemic control were randomly assigned to the metformin and pioglitazone groups and changes in vascular endothelial function were subsequently observed. Blood sugar levels and the insulin resistance (IR) index of the patients prior to treatment were lower than those following 12 months of treatment. In addition, fasting and postprandial insulin levels and the insulin function index were higher compared with those obtained following 12 months of treatment (P<0.05). Following 12 months of treatment, the body mass index (BMI) in the metformin group was lower than that in the pioglitazone group (P<0.05). Vascular endothelial function had improved in the groups following 12 months of treatment, when compared with the levels prior to treatment (P<0.05). Following 12 months of treatment, endothelial function in the metformin group had improved markedly compared with that in the pioglitazone group (P<0.05). Therefore, the administration of metformin and pioglitazone in patients with T2DM may improve insulin function, reduce the role of IR and improve endothelial function. Metformin is more successful than pioglitazone in reducing BMI and improving endothelial function. PMID:24940437

  20. Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Helen L; Zaki, Marco Y W; Day, Christopher P

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second commonest cause of cancer death worldwide. Rather than falling as a result of prevention and treatments for viral hepatitis, an increase is evident in developed nations consequent to the rising prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)-the two major risk factors for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The majority of patients with HCC complicating these conditions present with advanced disease as the tools for surveillance are inadequate, and the "at-risk" population is not well characterized. This review will summarize the epidemiological evidence linking obesity, T2DM, and NAFLD with HCC, what is known about the pathogenic mechanisms involved, as well as their relevance for clinicians managing patients at risk. There will also be an overview of the "unmet needs" surrounding this topic, with suggestions for the direction translational research should take in order to prevent progression of NAFLD to HCC, to improve early detection of HCC in those with NAFLD, as well as to improve outcomes for those affected. PMID:26921078

  1. Type 2 diabetes and obesity: genomics and the clinic.

    PubMed

    Travers, Mary E; McCarthy, Mark I

    2011-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity represent major challenges for global public health. They are at the forefront of international efforts to identify the genetic variation contributing to complex disease susceptibility, and recent years have seen considerable success in identifying common risk-variants. Given the clinical impact of molecular diagnostics in rarer monogenic forms of these diseases, expectations have been high that genetic discoveries will transform the prospects for risk stratification, development of novel therapeutics and personalised medicine. However, so far, clinical translation has been limited. Difficulties in defining the alleles and transcripts mediating association effects have frustrated efforts to gain early biological insights, whilst the fact that variants identified account for only a modest proportion of observed familiarity has limited their value in guiding treatment of individual patients. Ongoing efforts to track causal variants through fine-mapping and to illuminate the biological mechanisms through which they act, as well as sequence-based discovery of lower-frequency alleles (of potentially larger effect), should provide welcome acceleration in the capacity for clinical translation. This review will summarise recent advances in identifying risk alleles for T2D and obesity, and existing contributions to understanding disease pathology. It will consider the progress made in translating genetic knowledge into clinical utility, the challenges remaining, and the realistic potential for further progress. PMID:21647602

  2. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Samuel A J; Weidemann, Benjamin J; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD(+) metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP(+) and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  3. Clinical translation of genetic predictors for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Majithia, Amit R.; Florez, Jose C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight recent type 2 diabetes (T2D)-associated genetic discoveries and their potential for clinical application Recent findings The advent of genome-wide association screening has uncovered many loci newly associated with T2D. This review describes the techniques applied to discover novel T2D genes and compares their relative strengths, biases, and findings to date. The results of large-scale genome-wide association studies carried out since 2007 are summarized, and limitations of interpreting this preliminary data are offered. Recent studies exploring the clinical potential of these discoveries are reviewed, focusing on insights into T2D pathogenesis, risk prediction of future diabetes, and utility in guiding pharmacotherapy. The new T2D-associated loci have been implicated in β-cell development and function, highlighting insulin secretion in the disease process. Preliminary risk prediction studies show that more loci are needed to improve T2D risk indices. Studies have also revealed that genes may play a role in the pharmacologic response to anti-diabetic medications. Summary Since 2007 genome-wide association studies have rapidly increased the number of T2D-associated loci. This review summarizes the history of genetic association studies, the results from the new genome-wide association studies and the clinical application of these findings. PMID:19306524

  4. Vitamin D replacement and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Issa, Claire M; Zantout, Mira S; Azar, Sami T

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the evidence testing the possible benefit of vitamin D replacement on diabetes control and complications. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM 2) has become a significant global health care problem and its reported incidence is increasing at an alarming rate. Despite the improvement in therapy and development of new drugs, treatment is still not optimal especially with the associated adverse effects of most of the available drugs. New efforts are shifted toward disease prevention and a search for safer drugs. New mounting evidence is associating low vitamin D to diabetes mellitus and as such many studies were conducted to test the effect of vitamin D replacement on incidence of diabetes, diabetes control as well as diabetes complications. Although these studies present several limitations, vitamin D replacement seems to have beneficial effect on all aspects of diabetes: incidence, control and complications. Further longer term and more powered controlled trials are necessary to draw firmer conclusions on this beneficial role of vitamin D treatment on DM. PMID:25495839

  5. Intensifying Insulin Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes: Choices & Challenges.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Kesavadev, Jothydev; Sethi, Bipin; Jain, Sunil M; Guruprasad, C S; Shah, Siddharth N

    2015-05-01

    Insulin therapy remains the cornerstone of effective diabetes management. Timely intensification of insulin therapy reduces the progression of diabetes and the development of diabetes-related complications. Given that overall hyperglycaemia is a relative contribution of both fasting and postprandial hyperglycaemia, use of basal insulin alone may not achieve optimal glucose control due to its inability to cover postprandial glucose excursions. Intensifying therapy with addition of bolus insulin or switching to premixed insulin is a viable option in patients failing on basal alone therapy. Although the benefits of early insulin treatment are well established, a considerable delay in intensifying insulin therapy in patients with sub-optimal glycaemic control is still observed. Most of the patients and physicians are reluctant to intensify therapy due to the fear of hypoglycaemia, regimen complexity, and increased burden of multiple daily injections. In this context, there is a need for a flexible, alternative intensification option taking into account individual patient considerations to achieve or maintain individual glycaemic targets. An ideal insulin regimen should mimic physiological insulin release while providing optimal glycaemic control with low risk of hypoglycaemia, weight gain and fewer daily injections. The current paper reviews the challenges of insulin intensification in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus poorly controlled on current treatment regimens. PMID:26548029

  6. The Management of Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Hypoglycaemic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Man-Wo

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by chronic hyperglycemia with disturbance in carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism due to insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction. Epidemiological studies have confirmed a global pandemic of T2DM, which has created an enormous burden on society, with regard to morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditures. Life style modifications are fundamental not only in early stages of disease management but need to be intensified as disease progresses. United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) has demonstrated the progressive nature of T2DM, and as disease progresses, a combination agents—oral antidiabetic drugs (OAD) and insulin—are needed in order to maintain good sugar control. The general consensus of HbA1c target for most patients is less than 7%, and various guidelines and algorithms have provided guidance in patient management to keep patient at goal. As our understanding of pathophysiological defects advances, targeting treatment at underlying defects not only enables us to achieve HbA1c goal but also reduces morbidities, mortalities, and progression of the disease. Traditional oral agents like metformin and sulfonylureas have failed to arrest the progression of T2DM. New agents such as TZD, DPP-4 inhibitor, and SGLT-2 may increase our armamentariums against T2DM. PMID:22645689

  7. AMPK activation: a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Kimberly A; Valentine, Rudy J; Ruderman, Neil B; Saha, Asish K

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and elevated hepatic glucose output. Over 350 million people worldwide have T2D, and the International Diabetes Federation projects that this number will increase to nearly 600 million by 2035. There is a great need for more effective treatments for maintaining glucose homeostasis and improving insulin sensitivity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase whose activation elicits insulin-sensitizing effects, making it an ideal therapeutic target for T2D. AMPK is an energy-sensing enzyme that is activated when cellular energy levels are low, and it signals to stimulate glucose uptake in skeletal muscles, fatty acid oxidation in adipose (and other) tissues, and reduces hepatic glucose production. There is substantial evidence suggesting that AMPK is dysregulated in animals and humans with metabolic syndrome or T2D, and that AMPK activation (physiological or pharmacological) can improve insulin sensitivity and metabolic health. Numerous pharmacological agents, natural compounds, and hormones are known to activate AMPK, either directly or indirectly – some of which (for example, metformin and thiazolidinediones) are currently used to treat T2D. This paper will review the regulation of the AMPK pathway and its role in T2D, some of the known AMPK activators and their mechanisms of action, and the potential for future improvements in targeting AMPK for the treatment of T2D. PMID:25018645

  8. Meat consumption as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Neal; Levin, Susan; Trapp, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Disease risk factors identified in epidemiological studies serve as important public health tools, helping clinicians identify individuals who may benefit from more aggressive screening or risk-modification procedures, allowing policymakers to prioritize intervention programs, and encouraging at-risk individuals to modify behavior and improve their health. These factors have been based primarily on evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies, as most do not lend themselves to randomized trials. While some risk factors are not modifiable, eating habits are subject to change through both individual action and broader policy initiatives. Meat consumption has been frequently investigated as a variable associated with diabetes risk, but it has not yet been described as a diabetes risk factor. In this article, we evaluate the evidence supporting the use of meat consumption as a clinically useful risk factor for type 2 diabetes, based on studies evaluating the risks associated with meat consumption as a categorical dietary characteristic (i.e., meat consumption versus no meat consumption), as a scalar variable (i.e., gradations of meat consumption), or as part of a broader dietary pattern. PMID:24566443

  9. Meat Consumption as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Neal; Levin, Susan; Trapp, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Disease risk factors identified in epidemiological studies serve as important public health tools, helping clinicians identify individuals who may benefit from more aggressive screening or risk-modification procedures, allowing policymakers to prioritize intervention programs, and encouraging at-risk individuals to modify behavior and improve their health. These factors have been based primarily on evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies, as most do not lend themselves to randomized trials. While some risk factors are not modifiable, eating habits are subject to change through both individual action and broader policy initiatives. Meat consumption has been frequently investigated as a variable associated with diabetes risk, but it has not yet been described as a diabetes risk factor. In this article, we evaluate the evidence supporting the use of meat consumption as a clinically useful risk factor for type 2 diabetes, based on studies evaluating the risks associated with meat consumption as a categorical dietary characteristic (i.e., meat consumption versus no meat consumption), as a scalar variable (i.e., gradations of meat consumption), or as part of a broader dietary pattern. PMID:24566443

  10. Exercise and type 2 diabetes: focus on metabolism and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2016-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with metabolic dysregulation and chronic inflammation, and regular exercise may provide a strong stimulus for improving both. In this review, we first discuss the link between inflammation and metabolism. Next, we give an update on the clinical metabolic effects of exercise in T2DM patients with special focus on which parameters to consider for optimizing metabolic improvements. We then discuss the mechanisms whereby exercise exerts its anti-inflammatory and related metabolic effects. Evidence exists that interleukin (IL)-1β is involved in pancreatic β-cell damage, whereas tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α appears to be a key molecule in peripheral insulin resistance. Mechanistic studies in humans suggest that moderate acute elevations in IL-6, as provoked by exercise, exert direct anti-inflammatory effects by an inhibition of TNF-α and by stimulating IL-1ra (IL-1 receptor antagonist), thereby limiting IL-1β signaling. In addition, IL-6 has direct impact on glucose and lipid metabolism. Moreover, indirect anti-inflammatory effects of exercise may be mediated via improvements in, for example, body composition. While waiting for the outcome of long-term randomized clinical training studies with hard end points, it should be emphasized that physical activity represents a natural strong anti-inflammatory and metabolism-improving strategy with minor side effects. PMID:26568029

  11. Type 2 diabetes among Asian Americans: Prevalence and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tam H; Nguyen, Thuc-Nhi; Fischer, Taylor; Ha, Won; Tran, Thanh V

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing problem among Asian Americans. Based on the Centers for Disease Control, the age-adjusted prevalence of T2DM for Asian Americans is 9%, placing them at “moderate risk”. However differential patterns of disease burden emerge when examining disaggregated data across Asian American ethnic groups; with Filipino, Pacific Islander, Japanese, and South Asian groups consistently described as having the highest prevalence of T2DM. Disentangling and strengthening prevalence data is vital for on-going prevention efforts. The strongest evidence currently available to guide the prevention of T2DM in the United States comes from a large multicenter randomized clinical control trial called the Diabetes Prevention Program, which targets individual lifestyle behavior changes. It has been translated and adopted for some Asian American groups, and shows promise. However stronger study designs and attention to several key methodological considerations will improve the science. Increased attention has also been directed toward population level downstream prevention efforts. Building an infrastructure that includes both individual and population approaches is needed to prevent T2DM among Asian American populations, and is essential for reducing health disparities. PMID:25987951

  12. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Samuel A.J.; Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S.; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H.; Yorek, Mark A.; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD+ metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP+ and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  13. Lixisenatide in type 2 diabetes: latest evidence and clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sarah L.; Trujillo, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a highly prevalent disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. The hallmark of T2D is hyperglycemia and, while many treatment modalities exist, achieving and maintaining glycemic control can be challenging. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (RAs) are an appealing treatment option as they improve glycemic control, reduce weight, and limit the risk of hypoglycemia. Lixisenatide is a once-daily GLP-1 RA that has been evaluated in the GetGoal clinical trial program and has demonstrated efficacy and tolerability across a spectrum of patients. The feature that most distinguishes lixisenatide from other GLP-1 RAs is its ability to substantially reduce postprandial glucose (PPG) for the meal immediately following injection. Because of its positive effects on PPG, lixisenatide is being considered as a replacement for prandial insulin, and a fixed dose combination product containing lixisenatide and basal insulin is in development. Lixisenatide is a promising new addition to the antidiabetic armamentarium, but due to the lack of real-world experience with the drug, its exact place in therapy is unknown. PMID:26770666

  14. Phytochemicals targeting genes relevant for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2013-06-01

    Nutrigenomic approaches based on ethnopharmacology and phytotherapy concepts have revealed that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may be susceptible to dietary intervention. Interaction between bioactive food components and the genome may influence cell processes and modulate the onset and progression of the disease. T2DM, characterized by insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction, is one of the leading causes of death and disability. Despite the great advances that have been made in the understanding and management of this complex, multifactorial disease, T2DM has become a worldwide epidemic in the 21st century. Population and family studies have revealed a strong genetic component of T2DM, and a number of candidate genes have been identified in humans. Variations in the gene sequences such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, explain the individual differences in traits like disease susceptibility and response to treatment. A clear understanding of how nutrients affect the expression of genes should facilitate the development of individualized intervention and, eventually, treatment strategies for T2DM. Review of the literature identified many phytochemicals/extracts from traditional medicinal plants that can target diabetogenic genes. This review focuses on the genetic aspects of T2DM, nutrient modification of genes relevant for diabetes, and future prospects of nutritional therapy of T2DM. PMID:23745945

  15. Treating Hispanic patients for type 2 diabetes mellitus: special considerations.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeffrey S

    2008-05-01

    The number of Hispanic people in the United States with diagnosed diabetes mellitus is projected to increase by 107% by 2020. The author presents the case of a 62-year-old obese Hispanic man, with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), diabetic peripheral neuropathy, background retinopathy, and diabetic nephropathy. The patient also had diagnosed hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, and hyperlipidemia. The treatment plan for this patient included the following medications: pioglitazone hydrochloride (a thiazolidinedione, 30 mg/d); irbesartan (an angiotensin receptor blocker, 150 mg/d titrated to 300 mg/d); hydrochlorothiazide (an antikaliuretic agent, 12.5 mg/d); and aspirin (325 mg/d). Sitagliptin phosphate (a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor, 50 mg/d) was added to the treatment regimen to improve glycemic control. Simvastatin (20 mg/d) and niacin (1 g/d) were used for lipid management. Therapy also included a low-protein diet and walking program. At 6-month follow-up, the patient showed substantial improvement in his glycosylated hemoglobin level, lipid profile, blood pressure, creatinine clearance rate, and urine albumin level. There were also improvements in his peripheral vascular disease and diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Furthermore, the patient demonstrated encouraging progress in diet and lifestyle modification and in mental attitude. PMID:18519840

  16. Cardiovascular Control during Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Green, Simon; Egaña, Mikel; Baldi, J. Chris; Lamberts, Regis; Regensteiner, Judith G.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled studies of male and female subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) of short duration (~3–5 years) show that DM reduces peak V˙O2 (L·min−1 and mL·kg−1·min−1) by an average of 12–15% and induces a greater slowing of the dynamic response of pulmonary V˙O2 during submaximal exercise. These effects occur in individuals less than 60 years of age but are reduced or absent in older males and are consistently associated with significant increases in the exercise pressor response despite normal resting blood pressure. This exaggerated pressor response, evidence of exertional hypertension in DM, is manifest during moderate submaximal exercise and coincides with a more constrained vasodilation in contracting muscles. Maximum vasodilation during contractions involving single muscle groups is reduced by DM, and the dynamic response of vasodilation during submaximal contractions is slowed. Such vascular constraint most likely contributes to exertional hypertension, impairs dynamic and peak V˙O2 responses, and reduces exercise tolerance. There is a need to establish the effect of DM on dynamic aspects of vascular control in skeletal muscle during whole-body exercise and to clarify contributions of altered cardiovascular control and increased arterial stiffness to exertional hypertension. PMID:25918732

  17. Early life factors and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinli; Ma, Huijie; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a multifactorial disease, and its aetiology involves a complex interplay between genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. In recent years, evidences from both human and animal experiments have correlated early life factors with programming diabetes risk in adult life. Fetal and neonatal period is crucial for organ development. Many maternal factors during pregnancy may increase the risk of diabetes of offsprings in later life, which include malnutrition, healthy (hyperglycemia and obesity), behavior (smoking, drinking, and junk food diet), hormone administration, and even stress. In neonates, catch-up growth, lactation, glucocorticoids administration, and stress have all been found to increase the risk of insulin resistance or T2DM. Unfavorable environments (socioeconomic situation and famine) or obesity also has long-term negative effects on children by causing increased susceptibility to T2DM in adults. We also address the potential mechanisms that may underlie the developmental programming of T2DM. Therefore, it might be possible to prevent or delay the risk for T2DM by improving pre- and/or postnatal factors. PMID:24455747

  18. Pharmacogenetic studies update in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shalini; Usman, Kauser; Banerjee, Monisha

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a silent progressive polygenic metabolic disorder resulting from ineffective insulin cascading in the body. World-wide, about 415 million people are suffering from T2DM with a projected rise to 642 million in 2040. T2DM is treated with several classes of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) viz. biguanides, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, etc. Treatment strategies for T2DM are to minimize long-term micro and macro vascular complications by achieving an optimized glycemic control. Genetic variations in the human genome not only disclose the risk of T2DM development but also predict the personalized response to drug therapy. Inter-individual variability in response to OADs is due to polymorphisms in genes encoding drug receptors, transporters, and metabolizing enzymes for example, genetic variants in solute carrier transporters (SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC22A3, SLC47A1 and SLC47A2) are actively involved in glycemic/HbA1c management of metformin. In addition, CYP gene encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes also play a crucial role with respect to metabolism of drugs. Pharmacogenetic studies provide insights on the relationship between individual genetic variants and variable therapeutic outcomes of various OADs. Clinical utility of pharmacogenetic study is to predict the therapeutic dose of various OADs on individual basis. Pharmacogenetics therefore, is a step towards personalized medicine which will greatly improve the efficacy of diabetes treatment. PMID:27555891

  19. Pharmacogenetic studies update in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Usman, Kauser; Banerjee, Monisha

    2016-08-10

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a silent progressive polygenic metabolic disorder resulting from ineffective insulin cascading in the body. World-wide, about 415 million people are suffering from T2DM with a projected rise to 642 million in 2040. T2DM is treated with several classes of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) viz. biguanides, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, etc. Treatment strategies for T2DM are to minimize long-term micro and macro vascular complications by achieving an optimized glycemic control. Genetic variations in the human genome not only disclose the risk of T2DM development but also predict the personalized response to drug therapy. Inter-individual variability in response to OADs is due to polymorphisms in genes encoding drug receptors, transporters, and metabolizing enzymes for example, genetic variants in solute carrier transporters (SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC22A3, SLC47A1 and SLC47A2) are actively involved in glycemic/HbA1c management of metformin. In addition, CYP gene encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes also play a crucial role with respect to metabolism of drugs. Pharmacogenetic studies provide insights on the relationship between individual genetic variants and variable therapeutic outcomes of various OADs. Clinical utility of pharmacogenetic study is to predict the therapeutic dose of various OADs on individual basis. Pharmacogenetics therefore, is a step towards personalized medicine which will greatly improve the efficacy of diabetes treatment. PMID:27555891

  20. DNA methylation in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Vanessa Derenji Ferreira; Pulkkinen, Leena; Lalli, Marianne; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Uusitupa, Matti

    2014-05-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms related to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and other degenerative diseases at a molecular level, a better understanding of the changes in the chromatin structure and the corresponding functional changes in molecular pathways is still needed. For example, persons with low birth weight are at a high risk for development of T2D later in life, suggesting that the intrauterine environment contributes to the disease. One of the hypotheses is that epigenetic regulation, including changes in DNA methylation leading to modifications in chromatin structure, are behind metabolic alterations, e.g. leading to the phenomenon termed metabolic memory. Altered DNA methylation has been shown to affect healthy aging and also to promote age-related health problems. There is suggestive evidence that lifestyle changes including weight loss can have an impact on DNA methylation and consequently gene expression. In this review we provide an overview of human studies investigating DNA methylation in obesity and T2D and associated risk factors behind these diseases. PMID:24779963

  1. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential Abnormalities in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sharat; Baweja, Pooja; Mittal, Shallu; Kumar, Avnish; Singh, Kamal D; Sharma, Raghuvansh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus represents a syndrome complex in which multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system, are affected. Aim: The study was conducted to determine the changes in the brainstem auditory evoked potentials in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 126 diabetic males, aged 35-50 years, and 106 age-matched, healthy male volunteers. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials were recorded and the results were analyzed statistically using student's unpaired t-test. The data consisted of wave latencies I, II, III, IV, V and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V, separately for both ears. Results: The latency of wave IV was significantly delayed only in the right ear, while the latency of waves III, V and interpeak latencies III-V, I-V showed a significant delay bilaterally in diabetic males. However, no significant difference was found between diabetic and control subjects as regards to the latency of wave IV unilaterally in the left ear and the latencies of waves I, II and interpeak latency I-III bilaterally. Conclusion: Diabetes patients have an early involvement of central auditory pathway, which can be detected with fair accuracy with auditory evoked potential studies. PMID:23378959

  2. Type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment: linking mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Luchsinger, José A.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript provides a brief review of current concepts in the mechanisms potentially linking type-2-diabetes (T2D) with cognitive impairment. Existing epidemiologic studies, imaging studies, autopsy studies and clinical trials provide insights into the mechanisms linking T2D and cognitive impairment. There seems to be little dispute that T2D can cause cerebrovascular disease and thus cause vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Whether T2D can cause late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) remains to be elucidated. Many epidemiologic studies show an association between T2D and cognitive impairment, but the association with VCI seems to be stronger compared to LOAD, suggesting that cerebrovascular disease may be the main mechanism linking T2D and cognitive impairment. Imaging studies show an association between T2D and imaging markers of LOAD, but these observations could still be explained by cerebrovascular mechanisms. Autopsy studies are few and conflicting, with some suggesting a predominantly cerebrovascular mechanism, and others providing support for a neurodegenerative mechanism. Thus far, the evidence from clinical trials is mixed in supporting a causal association between T2D and cognitive impairment, and most clinical trials that can answer this question are yet to be reported or finished. Given the epidemic of T2D in the world, it is important to elucidate whether the association between T2D and cognitive impairment, particularly LOAD, is causal, and if so, what are the mechanisms. PMID:22433668

  3. Natural Products for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ríos, José Luis; Francini, Flavio; Schinella, Guillermo R

    2015-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia. High blood sugar can produce long-term complications such as cardiovascular and renal disorders, retinopathy, and poor blood flow. Its development can be prevented or delayed in people with impaired glucose tolerance by implementing lifestyle changes or the use of therapeutic agents. Some of these drugs have been obtained from plants or have a microbial origin, such as galegine isolated from Galega officinalis, which has a great similarity to the antidiabetic drug metformin. Picnogenol, acarbose, miglitol, and voglibose are other antidiabetic products of natural origin. This review compiles the principal articles on medicinal plants used for treating diabetes and its comorbidities, as well as mechanisms of natural products as antidiabetic agents. Inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, effects on glucose uptake and glucose transporters, modification of mechanisms mediated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity, modification of gene expression, and activities of hormones involved in glucose homeostasis such as adiponectin, resistin, and incretin, and reduction of oxidative stress are some of the mechanisms in which natural products are involved. We also review the most relevant clinical trials performed with medicinal plants and natural products such as aloe, banaba, bitter melon, caper, cinnamon, cocoa, coffee, fenugreek, garlic, guava, gymnema, nettle, sage, soybean, green and black tea, turmeric, walnut, and yerba mate. Compounds of high interest as potential antidiabetics are: fukugetin, palmatine, berberine, honokiol, amorfrutins, trigonelline, gymnemic acids, gurmarin, and phlorizin. PMID:26132858

  4. Metals in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Minerals are one of the components of food, though they are not synthesized in the body but they are essential for optimal health. Several essential metals are required for the proper functioning of many enzymes, transcriptional factors and proteins important in various biochemical pathways. For example Zn, Mg and Mn are cofactors of hundreds of enzymes, and Zn is involved in the synthesis and secretion of insulin from the pancreatic beta-cells. Similarly, Cr enhances the insulin receptor activity on target tissues, especially in muscle cells. Insulin is the key hormone required to maintain the blood glucose level in normal range. In case of insulin deficiency or resistance, blood glucose concentration exceeds the upper limit of the normal range of 126 mg/dl. Persistent increase of blood serum glucose level leads to overt chronic hyperglycemia, which is a major clinical symptom of diabetes mellitus. Poor glycemic control and diabetes alters the levels of essential trace elements such as Zn, Mg, Mn, Cr, Fe etc. by increasing urinary excretion and their concomitant decrease in the blood. Hence, the main purpose of this review is to discuss the important roles of essential trace elements in normal homeostasis and physiological functioning. Moreover, perturbation of essential trace elements is also discussed in perspective of type 2 diabetes pathobiology. PMID:24401367

  5. Effects of coffee on type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Akash, Muhammad Sajid Hamid; Rehman, Kanwal; Chen, Shuqing

    2014-01-01

    This review provides the epidemiologic and research evidences documenting the effects of coffee consumption on type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We summarize the literature concerning the effects of coffee consumption on different mechanistic factors involving in pathogenesis of T2DM, such as glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, insulin resistance, glucose-6-phosphatase, intestinal glucose absorption, antioxidant activity, inflammatory biomarkers, nuclear factor-κB inhibition, glucose uptake, glucose homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and insulin secretion. These factors play a crucial role in influencing the normal levels of glucose in blood. Overall, the experimental and epidemiologic evidences presented here elucidate the protective effects of coffee consumption on T2DM, involving multiple preventive mechanisms. Despite the firm evidences available through a growing literature base, it is still uncertain whether the use of coffee should be recommended to patients with diabetes and/or any patient who might be at the risk of T2DM as a supplementary therapy to prevent further progression of T2DM. PMID:24984989

  6. Persistent organic pollutants as risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Elvis Ndonwi; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Tiedeu-Atogho, Barbara; Mofo-Mato, Edith-Pascale; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major and fast growing public health problem. Although obesity is considered to be the main driver of the pandemic of T2DM, a possible contribution of some environmental contaminants, of which persistent organic pollutants (POPs) form a particular class, has been suggested. POPs are organic compounds that are resistant to environmental degradation through chemical, biological, and photolytic processes which enable them to persist in the environment, to be capable of long-range transport, bio accumulate in human and animal tissue, bio accumulate in food chains, and to have potential significant impacts on human health and the environment. Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between persistent organic pollutants and diabetes risk. These findings have been replicated in experimental studies both in human (in-vitro) and animals (in-vivo and in-vitro), and patho-physiological derangements through which these pollutants exercise their harmful effect on diabetes risk postulated. This review summarizes available studies, emphasises on limitations so as to enable subsequent studies to be centralized on possible pathways and bring out clearly the role of POPs on diabetes risk. PMID:25987904

  7. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  8. Optimal therapy of type 2 diabetes: a controversial challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dardano, Angela; Penno, Giuseppe; Del Prato, Stefano; Miccoli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most common chronic disorders in older adults and the number of elderly diabetic subjects is growing worldwide. Nonetheless, the diagnosis of T2DM in elderly population is often missed or delayed until an acute metabolic emergency occurs. Accumulating evidence suggests that both aging and environmental factors contribute to the high prevalence of diabetes in the elderly. Clinical management of T2DM in elderly subjects presents unique challenges because of the multifaceted geriatric scenario. Diabetes significantly lowers the chances of “successful” aging, notably it increases functional limitations and impairs quality of life. In this regard, older diabetic patients have a high burden of comorbidities, diabetes-related complications, physical disability, cognitive impairment and malnutrition, and they are more susceptible to the complications of dysglycemia and polypharmacy. Several national and international organizations have delivered guidelines to implement optimal therapy in older diabetic patients based on individualized treatment goals. This means appreciation of the heterogeneity of the disease as generated by life expectancy, functional reserve, social support, as well as personal preference. This paper will review current treatments for achieving glycemic targets in elderly diabetic patients, and discuss the potential role of emerging treatments in this patient population. PMID:24753144

  9. Dulaglutide for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amblee, A

    2014-04-01

    Dulaglutide is a novel glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist with a unique structure that supports once-weekly dosing in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), most of whom have a big pill burden. It appears to be efficacious in reducing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) up to 1.59% and promotes modest weight loss up to 3 kg with a low incidence of hypoglycemia and mild to moderate gastrointestinal adverse events. Convenient weekly dosing could improve compliance and help attain sustained glycemic goals. Addressing obesity is an integral part of T2DM management and weight loss may contribute to better glycemic and cardiovascular benefits. Results of ongoing clinical trials on cardiovascular safety are important to determine the risk-to-benefit ratio. As with any drug, patient selection and ongoing monitoring will be important. If approved, dulaglutide will be one of the first weekly GLP-1 receptor agonist to be available in a ready-to-use pen device with an automatic injector. PMID:24918645

  10. Glucagon and heart in type 2 diabetes: new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, Antonio; Genovese, Stefano; Mannucci, Edoardo; Gronda, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Increased levels of glucagon in type 2 diabetes are well known and, until now, have been considered deleterious. However, glucagon has an important role in the maintenance of both heart and kidney function. Moreover, in the past, glucagon has been therapeutically used for heart failure treatment. The new antidiabetic drugs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors, are able to decrease and to increase glucagon levels, respectively, while contrasting data have been reported regarding the glucagon like peptide 1 receptors agonists. The cardiovascular outcome trials, requested by the FDA, raised some concerns about the possibility that the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors can precipitate the heart failure, while, at least for empagliflozin, a positive effect has been shown in decreasing both cardiovascular death and heart failure. The recent LEADER Trial, showed a significant reduction of cardiovascular death with liraglutide, but a neutral effect on heart failure. A possible explanation of the results with the DPPIV inhibitors and empagliflozin might be related to their divergent effect on glucagon levels. Due to unclear effects of glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists on glucagon, the possible role of this hormone in the Leader trial remains unclear. PMID:27568179