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Sample records for affect colonization parameters

  1. ANALYSIS OF BIOMECHANICAL PARAMETERS IN COLONIC ANASTOMOSIS

    PubMed Central

    IWANAGA, Tiago Cavalcanti; AGUIAR, José Lamartine de Andrade; MARTINS-FILHO, Euclides Dias; KREIMER, Flávio; SILVA-FILHO, Fernando Luiz; de ALBUQUERQUE, Amanda Vasconcelos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The use of measures in colonic anastomoses to prevent dehiscences is of great medical interest. Sugarcane molasses, which has adequate tolerability and compatibility in vivo, has not yet been tested for this purpose. Aim: To analyze the biomechanical parameters of colonic suture in rats undergoing colectomy, using sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as tape or gel. Methods: 45 Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) were randomized into three groups of 15 animals: irrigation of enteric sutures with 0.9% saline solution; application of sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as tape; and sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as gel. The rats underwent colon ressection, with subsequent reanastomosis using polypropylene suture; they were treated according to their respective groups. Five rats from each group were evaluated at different times after the procedure: 30, 90 and 180 days postoperatively. The following variables were evaluated: maximum rupture force, modulus of elasticity and specific deformation of maximum force. Results: The biomechanical variables among the scheduled times and treatment groups were statistically calculated. The characteristics of maximum rupture force and modulus of elasticity of the specimens remained identical, regardless of treatment with saline, polysaccharide gel or tape, and treatment time. However, it was found that the specific deformation of maximum force of the intestinal wall was higher after 180 days in the group treated with sugarcane polysaccharide gel (p=0.09). Conclusion: Compared to control, it was detected greater elasticity of the intestinal wall in mice treated with sugarcane polysaccharide gel, without changing other biomechanical characteristics, regardless of type or time of treatment. PMID:27438033

  2. Model-based recovery of histological parameters from multispectral images of the colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidovic-Rowe, Dzena; Claridge, Ela

    2005-04-01

    Colon cancer alters the macroarchitecture of the colon tissue. Common changes include angiogenesis and the distortion of the tissue collagen matrix. Such changes affect the colon colouration. This paper presents the principles of a novel optical imaging method capable of extracting parameters depicting histological quantities of the colon. The method is based on a computational, physics-based model of light interaction with tissue. The colon structure is represented by three layers: mucosa, submucosa and muscle layer. Optical properties of the layers are defined by molar concentration and absorption coefficients of haemoglobins; the size and density of collagen fibres; the thickness of the layer and the refractive indexes of collagen and the medium. Using the entire histologically plausible ranges for these parameters, a cross-reference is created computationally between the histological quantities and the associated spectra. The output of the model was compared to experimental data acquired in vivo from 57 histologically confirmed normal and abnormal tissue samples and histological parameters were extracted. The model produced spectra which match well the measured data, with the corresponding spectral parameters being well within histologically plausible ranges. Parameters extracted for the abnormal spectra showed the increase in blood volume fraction and changes in collagen pattern characteristic of the colon cancer. The spectra extracted from multi-spectral images of ex-vivo colon including adenocarcinoma show the characteristic features associated with normal and abnormal colon tissue. These findings suggest that it should be possible to compute histological quantities for the colon from the multi-spectral images.

  3. Correlations between clinical activity, endoscopic severity, and biological parameters in colonic or ileocolonic Crohn's disease. A prospective multicentre study of 121 cases. The Groupe d'Etudes Thérapeutiques des Affections Inflammatoires Digestives.

    PubMed Central

    Cellier, C; Sahmoud, T; Froguel, E; Adenis, A; Belaiche, J; Bretagne, J F; Florent, C; Bouvry, M; Mary, J Y; Modigliani, R

    1994-01-01

    The relationships between clinical activity, endoscopic severity, and biological parameters in Crohn's disease have not been thoroughly investigated and a link was therefore sought between these three elements. The following parameters were determined simultaneously in 121 consecutive patients with colonic or ileocolonic Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease activity index, Crohn's disease endoscopic index of severity, and serum albumin, alpha 2-globulin, alpha 1-antitrypsin, orosomucoid, C reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, platelets, lymphocyte and polymorphonuclear cell counts, haematocrit, and faecal alpha 1-antitrypsin concentration. The distribution of these parameters was studied and transformation was used so that data matched the normal distribution closely. A weak but significant correlation (r = 0.32; p < 0.001) was found between clinical and endoscopic indices in the whole group of patients and this correlation seemed to be homogenous in various patient subgroups (clinically quiescent or active disease, pure colonic disease, untreated patients). Endoscopic or clinical indices were also found to be weakly linked with biological parameters (r < 0.50). Stepwise linear regression identified C reactive protein as predictive of the clinical index, and, successively, alpha 2-globulin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, faecal alpha 1-antitrypsin, serum orosomucoid, and alpha 1-antitrypsin as predictive of the endoscopic index. Both predictions were poor--the biological variables accounting for only 22 and 44% respectively of the clinical and endoscopic index variations. In conclusion, Crohn's disease clinical activity seems to be virtually independent of the severity of the mucosal lesions and biological activity. PMID:7508411

  4. Biobanking of Fresh-Frozen Human Adenocarcinomatous and Normal Colon Tissues: Which Parameters Influence RNA Quality?

    PubMed

    Galissier, Thibaut; Schneider, Christophe; Nasri, Saviz; Kanagaratnam, Lukshe; Fichel, Caroline; Coquelet, Christelle; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bellon, Georges; Dedieu, Stéphane; Marchal Bressenot, Aude; Boulagnon-Rombi, Camille

    2016-01-01

    Medical research projects become increasingly dependent on biobanked tissue of high quality because the reliability of gene expression is affected by the quality of extracted RNA. Hence, the present study aimed to determine if clinical, surgical, histological, and molecular parameters influence RNA quality of normal and tumoral frozen colonic tissues. RNA Quality Index (RQI) was evaluated on 241 adenocarcinomas and 115 matched normal frozen colon tissues collected between October 2006 and December 2012. RQI results were compared to patients' age and sex, tumor site, kind of surgery, anastomosis failure, adenocarcinoma type and grade, tumor cell percentage, necrosis extent, HIF-1α and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, and BRAF, KRAS and microsatellites status. The RQI was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue than in matched normal tissue. RQI from left-sided colonic cancers was significantly higher than RQI from right-sided cancers. The RNA quality was not affected by ischemia and storage duration. According to histological control, 7.9% of the samples were unsatisfactory because of inadequate sampling. Biobanked tumoral tissues with RQI ≥5 had lower malignant cells to stromal cells ratio than samples with RQI <5 (p <0.05). Cellularity, necrosis extent and mucinous component did not influence RQI results. Cleaved caspase-3 and HIF-1α immunolabelling were not correlated to RQI. BRAF, KRAS and microsatellites molecular status did not influence RNA quality. Multivariate analysis revealed that the tumor location, the surgical approach (laparoscopy versus open colectomy) and the occurrence of anastomotic leakage were the only parameters influencing significantly RQI results of tumor samples. We failed to identify parameter influencing RQI of normal colon samples. These data suggest that RNA quality of colonic adenocarcinoma biospecimens is determined by clinical and surgical parameters. More attention should be paid during the biobanking procedure of

  5. Biobanking of Fresh-Frozen Human Adenocarcinomatous and Normal Colon Tissues: Which Parameters Influence RNA Quality?

    PubMed Central

    Galissier, Thibaut; Schneider, Christophe; Nasri, Saviz; Kanagaratnam, Lukshe; Fichel, Caroline; Coquelet, Christelle; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bellon, Georges; Dedieu, Stéphane; Marchal Bressenot, Aude

    2016-01-01

    Medical research projects become increasingly dependent on biobanked tissue of high quality because the reliability of gene expression is affected by the quality of extracted RNA. Hence, the present study aimed to determine if clinical, surgical, histological, and molecular parameters influence RNA quality of normal and tumoral frozen colonic tissues. RNA Quality Index (RQI) was evaluated on 241 adenocarcinomas and 115 matched normal frozen colon tissues collected between October 2006 and December 2012. RQI results were compared to patients’ age and sex, tumor site, kind of surgery, anastomosis failure, adenocarcinoma type and grade, tumor cell percentage, necrosis extent, HIF-1α and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, and BRAF, KRAS and microsatellites status. The RQI was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue than in matched normal tissue. RQI from left-sided colonic cancers was significantly higher than RQI from right-sided cancers. The RNA quality was not affected by ischemia and storage duration. According to histological control, 7.9% of the samples were unsatisfactory because of inadequate sampling. Biobanked tumoral tissues with RQI ≥5 had lower malignant cells to stromal cells ratio than samples with RQI <5 (p <0.05). Cellularity, necrosis extent and mucinous component did not influence RQI results. Cleaved caspase-3 and HIF-1α immunolabelling were not correlated to RQI. BRAF, KRAS and microsatellites molecular status did not influence RNA quality. Multivariate analysis revealed that the tumor location, the surgical approach (laparoscopy versus open colectomy) and the occurrence of anastomotic leakage were the only parameters influencing significantly RQI results of tumor samples. We failed to identify parameter influencing RQI of normal colon samples. These data suggest that RNA quality of colonic adenocarcinoma biospecimens is determined by clinical and surgical parameters. More attention should be paid during the biobanking procedure of

  6. Model based recovery of histological parameters starting from reflectance spectra of the colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidovic-Rowe, Dzena; Claridge, Ela

    2005-06-01

    Colon cancer alters the tissue macro-architecture. Changes include increase in blood content and distortion of the collagen matrix, which affect the reflectance spectra of the colon and its colouration. We have developed a physics-based model for predicting colon tissue spectra. The colon structure is represented by three layers: mucosa, submucosa and smooth muscle. Each layer is represented by parameters defining its optical properties: molar concentration and absorption coefficients of haemoglobins, describing absorption of light; size and density of collagen fibres; refractive index of the medium and collagen fibres, describing light scattering; and layer thicknesses. Spectra were calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The output of the model was compared to experimental data comprising 50 spectra acquired in vivo from normal tissue. The extracted histological parameters showed good agreement with known values. An experiment was carried out to study the differences between normal and abnormal tissue. These were characterised by increased blood content and decreased collagen density, which is consistent with known differences between normal and abnormal tissue. This suggests that histological quantities of the colon could be computed from its reflectance spectra. The method is likely to have diagnostic value in the early detection of colon cancer.

  7. Does gender or the menstrual cycle affect colonic transit?

    PubMed

    Hinds, J P; Stoney, B; Wald, A

    1989-02-01

    Controversy exists as to whether slowing of colonic transit occurs in the high progesterone luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. To clarify this issue, colonic transit studies using radiopaque markers were performed on 10 women in the follicular phase, 10 women in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and five women on oral contraceptives, and the results were compared with transit times in 11 male controls. No significant differences in colonic transit were found between either phase of the menstrual cycle. Colonic transit in women was slower than in men, but this was not statistically significant. In the clinical setting, therefore, colonic transit studies can be performed throughout the menstrual cycle or when taking oral contraceptives. In addition, a single standard for normal values can be used for both men and women. PMID:2916519

  8. Yersinia enterocolitica Affects Intestinal Barrier Function in the Colon.

    PubMed

    Hering, Nina A; Fromm, Anja; Kikhney, Judith; Lee, In-Fah M; Moter, Annette; Schulzke, Jörg D; Bücker, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Infection with Yersinia enterocolitica causes acute diarrhea in early childhood. A mouse infection model presents new findings on pathological mechanisms in the colon. Symptoms involve diarrhea with watery feces and weight loss that have their functional correlates in decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and increased fluorescein permeability. Y. enterocolitica was present within the murine mucosa of both ileum and colon. Here, the bacterial insult was of focal nature and led to changes in tight junction protein expression and architecture. These findings are in concordance with observations from former cell culture studies and suggest a leak flux mechanism of diarrhea. PMID:26621910

  9. Parameters affecting seat belt use in Greece.

    PubMed

    Yannis, G; Laiou, A; Vardaki, S; Papadimitriou, E; Dragomanovits, A; Kanellaidis, G

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this research is the exploration of seat belt use in Greece and particularly the identification of the parameters affecting seat belt use in Greece. A national field survey was conducted for the analytical recording of seat belt use. A binary logistic regression model was developed, and the impact of each parameter on seat belt use in Greece was quantified. Parameters included in the model concern characteristics of car occupants (gender, age and position in the car), the type of the car and the type of the road network. The data collection revealed that in Greece, the non-use of seat belt on the urban road network was higher than on the national and rural road network and young and older men use seat belts the least. The developed model showed that travelling on a national road is negative for not wearing the seat belt. Finally, the variable with the highest impact on not wearing a seat belt is being a passenger on the back seats. PMID:21452095

  10. Physical parameters affecting living cells in space.

    PubMed

    Langbein, D

    1986-01-01

    The question is posed: Why does a living cell react to the absence of gravity? What sensors may it have? Does it note pressure, sedimentation, convection, or other parameters? If somewhere in a liquid volume sodium ions are replaced by potassium ions, the density of the liquid changes locally: the heavier regions sink, the lighter regions rise. This may contribute to species transport, to the metabolism. Under microgravity this mechanism is strongly reduced. On the other hand, other reasons for convection like thermal and solutal interface convection are left. Do they affect species transport? Another important effect of gravity is the hydrostatic pressure. On the macroscopic side, the pressure between our head and feet changes by 0.35 atmospheres. On the microscopic level the hydrostatic pressure on the upper half of a cell membrane is lower than on the lower half. This, by affecting the ion transport through the membrane, may change the surrounding electric potential. It has been suggested to be one of the reasons for graviperception. Following the discussion of these and other effects possibly important in life sciences in space, an order of magnitude analysis of the residual accelerations tolerable during experiments in materials sciences is outlined. In the field of life sciences only rough estimates are available at present. PMID:11537842

  11. The influence of distal colon irritation on the changes of cystometry parameters to esophagus and colon distentions.

    PubMed

    Kaddumi, Ezidin G

    2016-01-01

    The co-occurrence of multiple pathologies in the pelvic viscera in the same patient, such as, irritable bowel syndrome and interstitial cystitis, indicates the complexity of viscero-visceral interactions and the necessity to study these interactions under multiple pathological conditions. In the present study, the effect of distal colon irritation (DCI) on the urinary bladder interaction with distal esophagus distention (DED), distal colon distention (DCD), and electrical stimulation of the abdominal branches of vagus nerve (abd-vagus) were investigated using cystometry parameters. The DCI significantly decreased the intercontraction time (ICT) by decreasing the storage time (ST); nonetheless, DED and Abd-vagus were still able to significantly decrease the ICT and ST following DCI. However, DCD had no effect on ICT following the DCI. The DCI, also, significantly decreased the Intravesical pressure amplitude (P-amplitude) by increasing the resting pressure (RP). Although DED has no effect on the P-amplitude, both in the intact and the irritated animals, the abd-vagus significantly increased the P-amplitude following DCI by increasing the maximum pressure (MP). In the contrary, 3mL DCD significantly increased the P-amplitude by increasing the MP and lost that effect following the DCI. Concerning the pressure threshold (PT), none of the stimuli had any significant changes in the intact animals. However, DCI significantly decreased the PT, also, the abd-vagus and 3mL DCD significantly decreased the PT. The results of this study indicate that chemical irritation of colon complicates the effects of mechanical irritation of esophagus and colon on urinary bladder function. PMID:27286126

  12. The influence of distal colon irritation on the changes of cystometry parameters to esophagus and colon distentions

    PubMed Central

    Kaddumi, Ezidin G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The co-occurrence of multiple pathologies in the pelvic viscera in the same patient, such as, irritable bowel syndrome and interstitial cystitis, indicates the complexity of viscero-visceral interactions and the necessity to study these interactions under multiple pathological conditions. In the present study, the effect of distal colon irritation (DCI) on the urinary bladder interaction with distal esophagus distention (DED), distal colon distention (DCD), and electrical stimulation of the abdominal branches of vagus nerve (abd-vagus) were investigated using cystometry parameters. The DCI significantly decreased the intercontraction time (ICT) by decreasing the storage time (ST); nonetheless, DED and Abd-vagus were still able to significantly decrease the ICT and ST following DCI. However, DCD had no effect on ICT following the DCI. The DCI, also, significantly decreased the Intravesical pressure amplitude (P-amplitude) by increasing the resting pressure (RP). Although DED has no effect on the P-amplitude, both in the intact and the irritated animals, the abd-vagus significantly increased the P-amplitude following DCI by increasing the maximum pressure (MP). In the contrary, 3mL DCD significantly increased the P-amplitude by increasing the MP and lost that effect following the DCI. Concerning the pressure threshold (PT), none of the stimuli had any significant changes in the intact animals. However, DCI significantly decreased the PT, also, the abd-vagus and 3mL DCD significantly decreased the PT. The results of this study indicate that chemical irritation of colon complicates the effects of mechanical irritation of esophagus and colon on urinary bladder function. PMID:27286126

  13. Biotic interactions affect the colonization behavior of aquatic detritivorous macroinvertebrates in a heterogeneous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschut, Thomas A.; Meineri, Eric; Basset, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    It has previously been suggested that macroinvertebrates actively search for suitable patches to colonize. However, it is not well understood how the spatial arrangement of patches can affect colonization rates. In this study, we determined the importance of the environmental factors (distance, connectivity and resource availability) for patch colonization in an experimental system using Gammarus aequicauda (Amphipoda), Lekanesphaera hookeri (Isopoda) and Ecrobia ventrosa (Gastropoda). Furthermore, we also assessed how the relative importance of each of these environmental factors differed in interactions between the three species. The single species experiments showed that distance was the most important factor for G. aequicauda and E. ventrosa. However, while E. ventrosa preferred patches close to the release point, G. aequicauda strongly preferred patches further from the release point. High resource availability was a strong determinant for the patch colonization of G. aequicauda and L. hookeri. Connectivity was only of moderate importance in the study system for L. hookeri and E. ventrosa. The effects of the environmental factors were strongly affected by interspecific interactions in the multispecies experiments. For G. aequicauda, the distance preference was lowered in the presence of E. ventrosa. Moreover, while for L. hookeri the effect of resource availability was ruled out by the species interactions, resource availability gained importance for E. ventrosa in the presence of any of the other species. Our results suggest a strong link between environmental factors and biotic interactions in the colonization of habitat patches and indicate that the effect of biotic interactions is especially important for species sharing similar traits.

  14. FAK and HAS inhibition synergistically decrease colon cancer cell viability and affect expression of critical genes.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Melissa; Golubovskaya, Vita M; Conroy, Jeffrey; Liu, Song; Wang, Dan; Cance, William G; Dunn, Kelli B

    2013-05-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), hyaluronan (HA), and hyaluronan synthase-3 (HAS3) have been implicated in cancer growth and progression. FAK inhibition with the small molecule inhibitor Y15 decreases colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. HAS3 inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases FAK expression and activation, and exogenous HA increases FAK activation. We sought to determine the genes affected by HAS and FAK inhibition and hypothesized that dual inhibition would synergistically inhibit viability. Y15 (FAK inhibitor) and the HAS inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) decreased viability in a dose dependent manner; viability was further inhibited by treatment with Y15 and 4-MU in colon cancer cells. HAS inhibited cells treated with 2 μM of Y15 showed significantly decreased viability compared to HAS scrambled cells treated with the same dose (p < 0.05) demonstrating synergistic inhibition of viability with dual FAK/HAS inhibition. Microarray analysis showed more than 2-fold up- or down-regulation of 121 genes by HAS inhibition, and 696 genes by FAK inhibition (p < 0.05) and revealed 29 common genes affected by both signaling. Among the genes affected by FAK or HAS3 inhibition were genes, playing role in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, adhesion, transcription, heatshock and WNT pathways. Thus, FAK or HAS inhibition decreases SW620 viability and affects several similar genes, which are involved in the regulation of tumor survival. Dual inhibition of FAK and HAS3 decreases viability to a greater degree than with either agent alone, and suggests that synergistic inhibition of colon cancer cell growth can result from affecting similar genetic pathways. PMID:22934709

  15. Terahertz absorption and reflection imaging of carcinoma-affected colon tissues embedded in paraffin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Venckevicius, Rimvydas; Seliuta, Dalius; Valusis, Gintaras; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Molis, Gediminas; Carneiro, Fatima; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Granja, Pedro L.

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, dehydrated human colon tissues embedded in paraffin were studied at THz frequency. A compact THz imaging system with high numerical aperture optics was developed for the analysis of adenocarcinoma-affected colon sections, in transmission and reflection geometry. A comprehensive analysis of the THz images revealed a contrast up to 23% between the neoplastic and control tissues. Absorption and reflection THz images demonstrated the possibility to distinguish adenocarcinoma-affected areas even without water in the tissue, as the main contrast mechanism in THz measurements has been observed to be water absorption in in vivo or freshly excised tissues. The present results corroborate with previous histologic findings in the same tissues, and confirm that the contrast prevails even in dehydrated tissues.

  16. Host-related metabolic cues affect colonization strategies of a root endophyte

    PubMed Central

    Lahrmann, Urs; Ding, Yi; Banhara, Aline; Rath, Magnus; Hajirezaei, Mohammad R.; Döhlemann, Stefanie; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Parniske, Martin; Zuccaro, Alga

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underpinning broad compatibility in root symbiosis are largely unexplored. The generalist root endophyte Piriformospora indica establishes long-lasting interactions with morphologically and biochemically different hosts, stimulating their growth, alleviating salt stress, and inducing local and systemic resistance to pathogens. Cytological studies and global investigations of fungal transcriptional responses to colonization of barley and Arabidopsis at different symbiotic stages identified host-dependent colonization strategies and host-specifically induced effector candidates. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, P. indica establishes and maintains biotrophic nutrition within living epidermal cells, whereas in barley the symbiont undergoes a nutritional switch to saprotrophy that is associated with the production of secondary thinner hyphae in dead cortex cells. Consistent with a diversified trophic behavior and with the occurrence of nitrogen deficiency at the onset of saprotrophy in barley, fungal genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes and nutrient transporters were highly induced in this host but not in Arabidopsis. Silencing of the high-affinity ammonium transporter PiAMT1 gene, whose transcripts are accumulating during nitrogen starvation and in barley, resulted in enhanced colonization of this host, whereas it had no effect on the colonization of Arabidopsis. Increased levels of free amino acids and reduced enzymatic activity for the cell-death marker VPE (vacuolar-processing enzyme) in colonized barley roots coincided with an extended biotrophic lifestyle of P. indica upon silencing of PiAMT1. This suggests that PiAmt1 functions as a nitrogen sensor mediating the signal that triggers the in planta activation of the saprotrophic program. Thus, host-related metabolic cues affect the expression of P. indica’s alternative lifestyles. PMID:23918389

  17. Campylobacter jejuni pdxA Affects Flagellum-Mediated Motility to Alter Host Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Hashii, Noritaka; Uema, Masashi; Kawasaki, Nana; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Igimi, Shizunobu; Yamamoto, Shigeki

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, PLP) is linked to a variety of biological functions in prokaryotes. Here, we report that the pdxA (putative 4-hydroxy-L-threonine phosphate dehydrogenase) gene plays a pivotal role in the PLP-dependent regulation of flagellar motility, thereby altering host colonization in a leading foodborne pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni. A C. jejuni pdxA mutant failed to produce PLP and exhibited a coincident loss of flagellar motility. Mass spectrometric analyses showed a 3-fold reduction in the main flagellar glycan pseudaminic acid (Pse) associated with the disruption of pdxA. The pdxA mutant also exhibited reduced growth rates compared with the WT strain. Comparative metabolomic analyses revealed differences in respiratory/energy metabolism between WT C. jejuni and the pdxA mutant, providing a possible explanation for the differential growth fitness between the two strains. Consistent with the lack of flagellar motility, the pdxA mutant showed impaired motility-mediated responses (bacterial adhesion, ERK1/2 activation, and IL-8 production) in INT407 cells and reduced colonization of chickens compared with the WT strain. Overall, this study demonstrated that the pdxA gene affects the PLP-mediated flagellar motility function, mainly through alteration of Pse modification, and the disruption of this gene also alters the respiratory/energy metabolisms to potentially affect host colonization. Our data therefore present novel implications regarding the utility of PLP and its dependent enzymes as potent target(s) for the control of this pathogen in the poultry host. PMID:23936426

  18. A review of the meteorological parameters which affect aerial application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, L. S.; Frost, W.

    1979-01-01

    The ambient wind field and temperature gradient were found to be the most important parameters. Investigation results indicated that the majority of meteorological parameters affecting dispersion were interdependent and the exact mechanism by which these factors influence the particle dispersion was largely unknown. The types and approximately ranges of instrumented capabilities for a systematic study of the significant meteorological parameters influencing aerial applications were defined. Current mathematical dispersion models were also briefly reviewed. Unfortunately, a rigorous dispersion model which could be applied to aerial application was not available.

  19. Impact of model parameters on Monte Carlo simulations of backscattering Mueller matrix images of colon tissue

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Maria-Rosaria; Pierangelo, Angelo; Novikova, Tatiana; Validire, Pierre; Benali, Abdelali; Gayet, Brice; De Martino, Antonello

    2011-01-01

    Polarimetric imaging is emerging as a viable technique for tumor detection and staging. As a preliminary step towards a thorough understanding of the observed contrasts, we present a set of numerical Monte Carlo simulations of the polarimetric response of multilayer structures representing colon samples in the backscattering geometry. In a first instance, a typical colon sample was modeled as one or two scattering “slabs” with monodisperse non absorbing scatterers representing the most superficial tissue layers (the mucosa and submucosa), above a totally depolarizing Lambertian lumping the contributions of the deeper layers (muscularis and pericolic tissue). The model parameters were the number of layers, their thicknesses and morphology, the sizes and concentrations of the scatterers, the optical index contrast between the scatterers and the surrounding medium, and the Lambertian albedo. With quite similar results for single and double layer structures, this model does not reproduce the experimentally observed stability of the relative magnitudes of the depolarizing powers for incident linear and circular polarizations. This issue was solved by considering bimodal populations including large and small scatterers in a single layer above the Lambertian, a result which shows the importance of taking into account the various types of scatterers (nuclei, collagen fibers and organelles) in the same model. PMID:21750762

  20. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model

    PubMed Central

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L.; Schauer, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  1. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L; Schauer, Christine; Brune, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  2. DIETARY ARSENITE AFFECTS DIMETHYLHYDRAZINE (DMH)-INDUCED ABERRANT CRYPT FORMATION IN COLON AND GLOBAL DNA METHYLATION IN LIVER OF RATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous work has shown that arsenic (As) affects methionine metabolism. Alterations in methionine metabolism can affect cancer processes. To determine the effect of dietary As on DMH-induced aberrant crypt formation in colon Fisher-344 male, weanling rats (N=20/group) were fed diets containing 0, 0...

  3. Regulation of the proliferation of colon cancer cells by compounds that affect glycolysis, including 3-bromopyruvate, 2-deoxyglucose and biguanides.

    PubMed

    Lea, Michael A; Qureshi, Mehreen S; Buxhoeveden, Michael; Gengel, Nicolette; Kleinschmit, Jessica; Desbordes, Charles

    2013-02-01

    In previous studies performed by our group, we observed that 2-deoxyglucose blocked the acidification of the medium used for culture of colon cancer cells caused by incubation with biguanides and it had an additive inhibitory effect on growth. In the present work, we found that 3-bromopyruvate can also prevent the lowering of pH caused by biguanide treatment. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited colonic cancer cell proliferation, but the effect was not always additive to that of biguanides and an additive effect was more notable in combined treatment with 3-bromopyruvate and 2-deoxyglucose. The induction of alkaline phosphatase activity by butyrate was not consistently affected by combination with other agents that modified glucose metabolism. The drug combinations that were examined inhibited proliferation of wild-type and p53-null cells and affected colonic cancer lines with different growth rates. PMID:23393330

  4. Association between the expression levels of TAZ, AXL and CTGF and clinicopathological parameters in patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, SHU-DONG; MCCRUDDEN, CIAN M.; YUEN, HIU-FUNG; LEUNG, KA LAI; HONG, WAN-JIN; KWOK, HANG FAI

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer accounts for a large proportion of all the cancer-associated morbidities worldwide. Genetic analysis and stratification of patients based on survival may identify genetic signatures potentially useful for prognostic or treatment planning purposes. Previous studies have reported that the messenger (m)RNA expression levels of tafazzin (TAZ), AXL receptor tyrosine kinase (AXL) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were able to predict the survival of patients with colon cancer in two independent colon cancer datasets. However, limited clinicopathological data were available from these two datasets. By contrast, a large colon cancer dataset comprising 566 patients has been recently published in the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which contains data regarding tumor stage and location, and genetic status of mismatch repair (MMR), Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), B-Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) and tumor protein p53 (TP53). In the present study, the mRNA expression levels of TAZ, AXL and CTGF were evaluated, and the TAZ-AXL-CTGF signature was correlated with the available pathological parameters and survival data. Overexpression of TAZ, AXL and CTGF was observed to be associated with severe pathological stage, deficiency in MMR, colon cancer subtype C4 and mutations in the BRAF gene. In addition, overexpression of TAZ-AXL-CTGF was associated with short overall survival in patients with mutations in the TP53 gene, colon cancer subtype C6, proficient MMR and wild-type status of the KRAS and BRAF genes. Furthermore, the prognostic value of TAZ-AXL-CTGF overexpression was observed to be independent of all the clinicopathological parameters and mutational statuses analyzed. The results of the present study confirm the previously reported findings, and suggest that the TAZ-AXL-CTGF mRNA signature is a potential prognostic indicator in colon cancer. PMID:26893723

  5. Biofilm Formation by the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium columnare: Development and Parameters Affecting Surface Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenlong; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium columnare is a bacterial fish pathogen that affects many freshwater species worldwide. The natural reservoir of this pathogen is unknown, but its resilience in closed aquaculture systems posits biofilm as the source of contagion for farmed fish. The objectives of this study were (i) to characterize the dynamics of biofilm formation and morphology under static and flow conditions and (ii) to evaluate the effects of temperature, pH, salinity, hardness, and carbohydrates on biofilm formation. Nineteen F. columnare strains, including representatives of all of the defined genetic groups (genomovars), were compared in this study. The structure of biofilm was characterized by light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. F. columnare was able to attach to and colonize inert surfaces by producing biofilm. Surface colonization started within 6 h postinoculation, and microcolonies were observed within 24 h. Extracellular polysaccharide substances and water channels were observed in mature biofilms (24 to 48 h). A similar time course was observed when F. columnare formed biofilm in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions. The virulence potential of biofilm was confirmed by cutaneous inoculation of channel catfish fingerlings with mature biofilm. Several physicochemical parameters modulate attachment to surfaces, with the largest influence being exerted by hardness, salinity, and the presence of mannose. Maintenance of hardness and salinity values within certain ranges could prevent biofilm formation by F. columnare in aquaculture systems. PMID:23851087

  6. Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug etoricoxib on the hematological parameters and enzymes of colon and kidney.

    PubMed

    Behal, N; Singh Kanwar, S; Sharma, P; Sanyal, S N

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of a selective COX-2 inhibitor, etoricoxib in rats on the hematological and toxicity parameters in colon and kidney at two different doses of the drug, one within the therapeutic anti-inflammatory range as based on the reported ED50 value (Eto-1) while the other at ten times higher (Eto-2), relative to the toxicity studies which have not been reported so far. The results showed that the control and the drug treated animals achieved similar linear growth rate and also showed no major alterations in the histological parameters in the liver and kidney tissue. The animals treated with lower dose of etoricoxib showed an overall decrease in total leukocytes counts as well as in the number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and eosinophills while the higher dose of the drug produced a highly significant increase in all the cell counts. However, the drug treatment at both the dose level produced significant fall in the activities of alkaline phosphatase, sucrase, lactase and maltase in the kidney but increased the activity of alkaline phosphatase in colon. The treatment of etoricoxib did not produce any change in the nitric oxide and citrulline levels in kidney while an increase was noted in the colonic tissue. It was concluded that etoricoxib is a relatively safe drug at its anti-inflammatory ED50 dose in rats when the hematological parameters and the structural and functional characteristics of kidney and colonic tissues were studied. PMID:19721906

  7. [Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Affects U0126-Induced Cytotoxicity in Colon Cancer Cell Line (HCT116)].

    PubMed

    Ljujic, M; Mijatovic, S; Bulatovic, M Z; Mojic, M; Maksimovic-Ivanic, D; Radojkovic, D; Topic, A

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), an acute phase protein, is the principal circulatory anti-protease. This multifunctional protein is encoded by the SERPINA1 gene. Although AAT was recognised as a potential tumour marker, its role in cancer biology remains unknown. Given that it has been demonstrated that AAT has an anti-apoptotic property against non-malignant cells, we aimed to investigate whether AAT affects apoptosis in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116). The presence of AAT in the HCT116 cell culture antagonized cytotoxicity of blockers of MEK1/2, PI3K/Akt pathways as well as NF-κB. The dominantly recovered cell viability was observed in the co-treatment with MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. In addition, it was revealed that AAT almost completely abolished U0126-induced apoptosis through maintenance of the autophagy process. Our study revealed for the first time that the observed cyto-protection triggered by AAT was accompanied by sustained autophagy which opposed apoptosis. These results may contribute to understanding of the role of AAT in cancer development and evaluation of efficacy of cancer therapy. PMID:27028823

  8. Laboratory measurements of parameters affecting wet deposition of methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Maeck, W.J.; Honkus, R.J.; Keller, J.H.; Voilleque, P.G.

    1984-09-01

    The transfer of gaseous methyl iodide (CH/sub 3/I) to raindrops and the initial retention by vegetation of CH/sub 3/I in raindrops have been studied in a laboratory experimental program. The measured air-to-drop transfer parameters and initial retention factors both affect the wet deposition of methyl iodide onto vegetation. No large effects on the air-to-drop transfer due to methyl iodide concentration, temperature, acidity, or rain type were observed. Differences between laboratory measurements and theoretical values of the mass transfer coefficient were found. Pasture grass, lettuce, and alfalfa were used to study the initial retention of methyl iodide by vegetation. Only a small fraction of the incident CH/sub 3/I in raindrops was held by any of the three vegetation types.

  9. Global sensitivity analysis and Bayesian parameter inference for solute transport in porous media colonized by biofilms.

    PubMed

    Younes, A; Delay, F; Fajraoui, N; Fahs, M; Mara, T A

    2016-08-01

    The concept of dual flowing continuum is a promising approach for modeling solute transport in porous media that includes biofilm phases. The highly dispersed transit time distributions often generated by these media are taken into consideration by simply stipulating that advection-dispersion transport occurs through both the porous and the biofilm phases. Both phases are coupled but assigned with contrasting hydrodynamic properties. However, the dual flowing continuum suffers from intrinsic equifinality in the sense that the outlet solute concentration can be the result of several parameter sets of the two flowing phases. To assess the applicability of the dual flowing continuum, we investigate how the model behaves with respect to its parameters. For the purpose of this study, a Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) and a Statistical Calibration (SC) of model parameters are performed for two transport scenarios that differ by the strength of interaction between the flowing phases. The GSA is shown to be a valuable tool to understand how the complex system behaves. The results indicate that the rate of mass transfer between the two phases is a key parameter of the model behavior and influences the identifiability of the other parameters. For weak mass exchanges, the output concentration is mainly controlled by the velocity in the porous medium and by the porosity of both flowing phases. In the case of large mass exchanges, the kinetics of this exchange also controls the output concentration. The SC results show that transport with large mass exchange between the flowing phases is more likely affected by equifinality than transport with weak exchange. The SC also indicates that weakly sensitive parameters, such as the dispersion in each phase, can be accurately identified. Removing them from calibration procedures is not recommended because it might result in biased estimations of the highly sensitive parameters. PMID:27182791

  10. Global sensitivity analysis and Bayesian parameter inference for solute transport in porous media colonized by biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, A.; Delay, F.; Fajraoui, N.; Fahs, M.; Mara, T. A.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of dual flowing continuum is a promising approach for modeling solute transport in porous media that includes biofilm phases. The highly dispersed transit time distributions often generated by these media are taken into consideration by simply stipulating that advection-dispersion transport occurs through both the porous and the biofilm phases. Both phases are coupled but assigned with contrasting hydrodynamic properties. However, the dual flowing continuum suffers from intrinsic equifinality in the sense that the outlet solute concentration can be the result of several parameter sets of the two flowing phases. To assess the applicability of the dual flowing continuum, we investigate how the model behaves with respect to its parameters. For the purpose of this study, a Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) and a Statistical Calibration (SC) of model parameters are performed for two transport scenarios that differ by the strength of interaction between the flowing phases. The GSA is shown to be a valuable tool to understand how the complex system behaves. The results indicate that the rate of mass transfer between the two phases is a key parameter of the model behavior and influences the identifiability of the other parameters. For weak mass exchanges, the output concentration is mainly controlled by the velocity in the porous medium and by the porosity of both flowing phases. In the case of large mass exchanges, the kinetics of this exchange also controls the output concentration. The SC results show that transport with large mass exchange between the flowing phases is more likely affected by equifinality than transport with weak exchange. The SC also indicates that weakly sensitive parameters, such as the dispersion in each phase, can be accurately identified. Removing them from calibration procedures is not recommended because it might result in biased estimations of the highly sensitive parameters.

  11. Parameters affecting greywater quality and its safety for reuse.

    PubMed

    Maimon, Adi; Friedler, Eran; Gross, Amit

    2014-07-15

    Reusing greywater (GW) for on-site irrigation is becoming a common practice worldwide. Alongside its benefits, GW reuse might pose health and environmental risks. The current study assesses the risks associated with on-site GW reuse and the main factors affecting them. GW from 34 households in Israel was analyzed for physicochemical parameters, Escherichia coli (as an indicator for rotavirus), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Each participating household filled out a questionnaire about their GW sources, treatment and usages. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) was performed based on the measured microbial quality, and on exposure scenarios derived from the questionnaires and literature data. The type of treatment was found to have a significant effect on the quality of the treated GW. The average E. coli counts in GW (which exclude kitchen effluent) treated by professionally-designed system resulted in acceptable risk under all exposure scenarios while the risk from inadequately-treated GW was above the accepted level as set by the WHO. In conclusion, safe GW reuse requires a suitable and well-designed treatment system. A risk-assessment approach should be used to adjust the current regulations/guidelines and to assess the performance of GW treatment and reuse systems. PMID:24751591

  12. Both population size and patch quality affect local extinctions and colonizations.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Markus; Nilsson, Sven G

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the habitat of many species is fragmented, resulting in small local populations with individuals occasionally dispersing between the remaining habitat patches. In a solitary bee metapopulation, extinction probability was related to both local bee population sizes and pollen resources measured as host plant population size. Patch size, on the other hand, had no additional predictive power. The turnover rate of local bee populations in 63 habitat patches over 4 years was high, with 72 extinction events and 31 colonization events, but the pollen plant population was stable with no extinctions or colonizations. Both pollen resources and bee populations had strong and independent effects on extinction probability, but connectivity was not of importance. Colonizations occurred more frequently within larger host plant populations. For metapopulation survival of the bee, large pollen plant populations are essential, independent of current bee population size. PMID:19793747

  13. Folate supplementation differently affects uracil content in DNA in the mouse colon and liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High folate intake may increase the risk of cancer, especially in the elderly. The present study examined the effects of ageing and dietary folate on uracil misincorporation into DNA, which has a mutagenic effect, in the mouse colon and liver. Old (18 months; n 42) and young (4 months; n 42) male C5...

  14. Folic Acid Supplementation Adversely Affects Chemosensitivity of Colon Cancer Cells to 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Lisa; Yang, Michael; Sohn, Kyoung-Jin; Streutker, Catherine J; Grin, Andrea; Croxford, Ruth; Kim, Young-In

    2016-07-01

    Folic acid (FA) fortification and widespread supplemental use have significantly increased folate status in North America. Furthermore, >50% of colorectal cancer patients use FA supplement. The increased folate status may interfere with cancer chemotherapy. We investigated the effect of FA supplementation on chemosensitivity of human colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) using a xenograft model. Mice harboring human HCT116 colon cancer xenografts were randomized to receive the control, or 4× or 12.5× supplemental levels of FA. Within each diet group, mice were randomized to receive 5-FU+leucovorin or saline and xenograft growth and characteristics were determined. The expression of genes involved in folate metabolism and cancer treatment was determined. FA supplementation and 5-FU significantly interacted to influence xenograft growth (P < 0.007). At the control level, 5-FU significantly inhibited the growth of the xenografts (P < 0.0001). However, at the 4× supplemental level, 5-FU-treated xenografts grew faster than untreated xenografts (P = 0.048) while at the 12.5× supplemental level, 5-FU exhibited no effect. Cell proliferation, degree of necrosis, and expression of the selected genes did not significantly differ by the supplemental levels of FA. Our data suggest that FA supplementation may be detrimental to 5-FU chemotherapy of colon cancer and pose public health concern. PMID:27175995

  15. High dietary intake of sodium selenite does not affect gene mutation frequency in rat colon and liver.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Uthus, Eric O; Ross, Sharon A; Davis, Cindy D

    2009-10-01

    Our previous studies have shown that selenium (Se) is protective against dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced preneoplastic colon cancer lesions, and protection against DNA damage has been hypothesized to be one mechanism for the anticancer effect of Se. The present study was designed to determine whether dietary selenite affects somatic mutation frequency in vivo. We used the Big Blue transgenic model to evaluate the in vivo mutation frequency of the cII gene in rats fed either a Se-deficient (0 microg Se/g diet) or Se-supplemented diet (0.2 or 2 microg Se/g diet; n = 3 rats/diet in experiment 1 and n = 5 rats/group in experiment 2) and injected with DMH (25 mg/kg body weight, i.p.). There were no significant differences in body weight between the Se-deficient and Se-supplemented (0.2 or 2 microg Se/g diet) rats, but the activities of liver glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase and concentration of liver Se were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) in Se-deficient rats compared to rats supplemented with Se. We found no effect of dietary Se on liver 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Gene mutation frequency was significantly lower in liver (p < 0.001) than that of colon regardless of dietary Se. However, there were no differences in gene mutation frequency in DNA from colon mucosa or liver from rats fed the Se-deficient diet compared to those fed the Se-supplemented (0.2 or 2 microg Se/g diet) diet. Although gene mutations have been implicated in the etiology of cancer, our data suggest that decreasing gene mutation is not likely a key mechanism through which dietary selenite exerts its anticancer action against DMH-induced preneoplastic colon cancer lesions in a Big Blue transgenic rat model. PMID:19263001

  16. Importance and sensitivity of parameters affecting the Zion Seismic Risk

    SciTech Connect

    George, L.L.; O'Connell, W.J.

    1985-06-01

    This report presents the results of a study on the importance and sensitivity of structures, systems, equipment, components and design parameters used in the Zion Seismic Risk Calculations. This study is part of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) supported by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objective of this study is to provide the NRC with results on the importance and sensitivity of parameters used to evaluate seismic risk. These results can assist the NRC in making decisions dealing with the allocation of research resources on seismic issues. This study uses marginal analysis in addition to importance and sensitivity analysis to identify subject areas (input parameter areas) for improvements that reduce risk, estimate how much the improvement dfforts reduce risk, and rank the subject areas for improvements. Importance analysis identifies the systems, components, and parameters that are important to risk. Sensitivity analysis estimates the change in risk per unit improvement. Marginal analysis indicates the reduction in risk or uncertainty for improvement effort made in each subject area. The results described in this study were generated using the SEISIM (Systematic Evaluation of Important Safety Improvement Measures) and CHAIN computer codes. Part 1 of the SEISIM computer code generated the failure probabilities and risk values. Part 2 of SEISIM, along with the CHAIN computer code, generated the importance and sensitivity measures.

  17. How Does Calibration Timing and Seasonality Affect Item Parameter Estimates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Babcock, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Continuously administered examination programs, particularly credentialing programs that require graduation from educational programs, often experience seasonality where distributions of examine ability may differ over time. Such seasonality may affect the quality of important statistical processes, such as item response theory (IRT) item…

  18. How SN Ia host-galaxy properties affect cosmological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, H.; Fraser, M.; Gilmore, G.

    2016-04-01

    We present a systematic study of the relationship between Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) properties, and the characteristics of their host galaxies, using a sample of 581 SNe Ia from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) SN Survey. We also investigate the effects of this on the cosmological constraints derived from SNe Ia. Compared to previous studies, our sample is larger by a factor of >4, and covers a substantially larger redshift range (up to z ˜ 0.5), which is directly applicable to the volume of cosmological interest. We measure a significant correlation (>5σ) between the host-galaxy stellar-mass and the SN Ia Hubble Residuals (HR). We find a weak correlation (1.4σ) between the host-galaxy metallicity as measured from emission lines in the spectra, and the SN Ia HR. We also find evidence that the slope of the correlation between host-galaxy mass and HR is -0.11 mag/log(Mhost/M⊙) steeper in lower metallicity galaxies. We test the effects on a cosmological analysis using both the derived best-fitting correlations between host parameters and HR, and by allowing an additional free parameter in the fit to account for host properties which we then marginalize over when determining cosmological parameters. We see a shift towards more negative values of the equation-of-state parameter w, along with a shift to lower values of Ωm after applying mass or metallicity corrections. The shift in cosmological parameters with host-galaxy stellar-mass correction is consistent with previous studies. We find a best-fitting cosmology of Ω m =0.266_{-0.016}^{+0.016}, Ω _{Λ }=0.740_{-0.018}^{+0.018} and w=-1.151_{-0.121}^{+0.123} (statistical errors only).

  19. Can a Short Term of Repeated Ejaculations Affect Seminal Parameters?

    PubMed Central

    Mayorga-Torres, Jose Manuel; Agarwal, Ashok; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Cadavid, Angela; Cardona-Maya, Walter Dario

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to assess the effect of four repeated ejaculations on the same day at two-hour intervals on conventional and functional semen parameters. Methods: Three healthy men (32±3.6 years) donated the first semen samples after 3–4 days of sexual abstinence followed by three subsequent samples on the same day at two-hour interval each. Semen samples were processed and analyzed according to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2010 guidelines. Furthermore, intracellular reactive oxygen (ROS) production, sperm DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial function were evaluated by flow cytometry. Results: An overall decreasing trend was noted in the conventional semen parameters at second, third and fourth evaluations after two hours of abstinence in comparison to first evaluation after 3–4 days of abstinence. The statistical comparison of the conventional semen parameters at fourth evaluation after 2 hr of abstinence revealed significant reduction (p<0.05) in the parameters of concentration, total sperm count and total motile sperm count at fourth evaluation. The functional parameter of intracellular ROS production showed a decreasing trend with each subsequent evaluation, the difference being significant (p<0.05) at fourth evaluation in comparison to first evaluation. An increasing trend was noted for DNA fragmentation index (DFI), although it remained within acceptable levels (<29%). The ΔΨm high permatozoa and the integrity of the plasma membrane remained stable throughout the evaluations. Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicate the potential use of additional semen samples with repeated ejaculations at short abstinence times in assisted reproduction procedures particularly from severe oligospermic men. PMID:27478772

  20. Proteome analysis of the macroscopically affected colonic mucosa of Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rukmangadachar, Lokesh A.; Makharia, Govind K.; Mishra, Asha; Das, Prasenjit; Hariprasad, Gururao; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Ahuja, Vineet; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn’s disease (CD) is challenging in geographical regions where both these diseases are prevalent. There is a need of biomarkers for differentiation between these two disorders. Colonic biopsies from inflamed mucosa of treatment-naive patients with ITB, CD and controls were used for analysis. Protein extracted from biopsies was digested with trypsin and resulting peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents. The peptides were subsequently analyzed using LC-MS/MS for identification and quantification. Gene ontology annotation for proteins was analyzed in PANTHER. Validation experiments were done for six differentially expressed proteins using immunohistochemistry. 533 proteins were identified and 241 proteins were quantified from 5 sets of iTRAQ experiments. While 63 were differentially expressed in colonic mucosa of patients with CD and ITB in at least one set of iTRAQ experiment, 11 proteins were differentially expressed in more than one set of experiments. Six proteins used for validation using immunohistochemistry in a larger cohort of patients; none of them however was differentially expressed in patients with ITB and CD. There are differentially expressed proteins in tissue proteome of CD and ITB. Further experiments are required using a larger cohort of homogeneous tissue samples. PMID:26988818

  1. Methanolic extracts of bitter melon inhibit colon cancer stem cells by affecting energy homeostasis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kwatra, Deep; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Ramamoorthy, Prabhu; Standing, David; Moran, Elizabeth; Velayutham, Ravichandiran; Mitra, Ashim; Umar, Shahid; Anant, Shrikant

    2013-01-01

    Bitter melon fruit is recommended in ancient Indian and Chinese medicine for prevention/treatment of diabetes. However its effects on cancer progression are not well understood. Here, we have determined the efficacy of methanolic extracts of bitter melon on colon cancer stem and progenitor cells. Both, whole fruit (BMW) and skin (BMSk) extracts showed significant inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation, with BMW showing greater efficacy. In addition, the cells were arrested at the S phase of cell cycle. Moreover, BMW induced the cleavage of LC3B but not caspase 3/7, suggesting that the cells were undergoing autophagy and not apoptosis. Further confirmation of autophagy was obtained when western blots showed reduced Bcl-2 and increased Beclin-1, Atg 7 and 12 upon BMW treatment. BMW reduced cellular ATP levels coupled with activation of AMP activated protein kinase; on the other hand, exogenous additions of ATP lead to revival of cell proliferation. Finally, BMW treatment results in a dose-dependent reduction in the number and size of colonospheres. The extracts also decreased the expression of DCLK1 and Lgr5, markers of quiescent, and activated stem cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the extracts of bitter melon can be an effective preventive/therapeutic agent for colon cancer. PMID:23533514

  2. MDM2 promoter SNP55 (rs2870820) affects risk of colon cancer but not breast-, lung-, or prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Helwa, Reham; Gansmo, Liv B; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Vatten, Lars; Ryan, Bríd M; Harris, Curtis C; Lønning, Per E; Knappskog, Stian

    2016-01-01

    Two functional SNPs (SNP285G > C; rs117039649 and SNP309T > G; rs2279744) have previously been reported to modulate Sp1 transcription factor binding to the promoter of the proto-oncogene MDM2, and to influence cancer risk. Recently, a third SNP (SNP55C > T; rs2870820) was also reported to affect Sp1 binding and MDM2 transcription. In this large population based case-control study, we genotyped MDM2 SNP55 in 10,779 Caucasian individuals, previously genotyped for SNP309 and SNP285, including cases of colon (n = 1,524), lung (n = 1,323), breast (n = 1,709) and prostate cancer (n = 2,488) and 3,735 non-cancer controls, as well as 299 healthy African-Americans. Applying the dominant model, we found an elevated risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring SNP55TT/CT genotypes compared to the SNP55CC genotype (OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.01-1.30). The risk was found to be highest for left-sided colon cancer (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00-1.45) and among females (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.01-1.74). Assessing combined genotypes, we found the highest risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring the SNP55TT or CT together with the SNP309TG genotype (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00-1.46). Supporting the conclusions from the risk estimates, we found colon cancer cases carrying the SNP55TT/CT genotypes to be diagnosed at younger age as compared to SNP55CC (p = 0.053), in particular among patients carrying the SNP309TG/TT genotypes (p = 0.009). PMID:27624283

  3. Altered expression of KLC3 may affect semen parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kargar- Dastjerdy, Pegah; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Salehi, Mansoor; Falahati, Mojtaba; Izadi, Tayebeh; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: KLC3 protein as a member of the kinesin light-chain protein family plays an important role in spermatogenesis, during formation of mitochondrial sheath in the mid piece of the sperm tail. Objective: This study for the first time aims to compare the expression of the KLC3 gene between fertile and infertile individuals. Materials and Methods: Semen samples were collected from 19 fertile individuals who were selected from embryo-donor volunteers and 57 infertile individuals who had abnormal sperm parameters according to world health organization criteria. Sperm parameters using computer assisted sperm analysis and the quantitative KLC3-gene expression using the real-time PCR method were measured. Results: Our results revealed a significant correlations between sperm concentration with relative expression of KLC3 only in infertile groups (r=0.45, p=0.00). A significant correlation was not found between KLC3 expression and sperm motility; however, the relative expression of KLC3 was significantly higher in asthenozoospermic compared to non-asthenozoospermic individuals. Conclusion: Low expression of KLC3 may result in improper function of midpiece, which has important function in sperm motility. The results of this study show that aberrant expression of KLC3 might be associated with phenomena like oligozoospermia and asthenozoospermia. This article is extracted from student’s thesis. PMID:27141544

  4. Does Methylphenidate Affect Cystometric Parameters in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Khae Hawn; Jung, Ha Bum; Choi, Don Kyoung; Park, Geun Ho; Cho, Sung Tae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Methylphenidate (MPH) is one of the most commonly prescribed psychostimulants for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, there is limited research on its effects on lower urinary tract function. This study investigated changes in cystometric parameters after intragastric administration of MPH in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), an animal model of ADHD. Methods: Fourteen- to 16-week-old male SHRs (n=10), weighing between 280 and 315 g, were used. Three micturition cycles were recorded before administering MPH. One hour after each intragastric MPH injection, three cycles of cystometrogram were obtained in the awake condition. Various cystometric parameters were evaluated, including basal pressure (BP), maximal pressure (MP), threshold pressure (TP), bladder capacity (BC), micturition volume (MV), micturition interval (MI), and residual volume (RV). The data were analyzed using paired Student t-tests. Results: Five SHRs were each administered a dose of 3-mg/kg MPH, and the other five received a dose of 6-mg/kg MPH. BP and MP increased significantly in the rats that received the 3-mg/kg MPH injection, but not in those that received the 6-mg/kg injection. BC, MV, and MI significantly increased in the rats that received the 6-mg/kg MPH injection, but not in those that received the 3-mg/kg injection. There were no significant changes in TP after either injection. Conclusions: Significant increases in BC, MV, and MI after the 6-mg/kg MPH injection suggest that the peripheral and the central nervous systems may play important roles in bladder function in those receiving MPH for ADHD. PMID:26126435

  5. Parameters affecting of Akkuyu's safety assessment for severe core damages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavun, Yusuf; Karasulu, Muzaffer

    2015-07-01

    We have looked at all past core meltdowns (Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents) and postulated the fourth one might be taking place in the future most probably in a newly built reactors anywhere of the earth in any type of NPP. The probability of this observation is high considering the nature of the machine and human interaction. Operation experience is a very significant parameter as well as the safety culture of the host nation. The concerns is not just a lack of experience with industry with the new comers, but also the infrastructure and established institutions who will be dealing with the Emergencies. Lack of trained and educated Emergency Response Organizations (ERO) is a major concern. The culture on simple fire drills even makes the difference when a severe condition occurs in the industry. The study assumes the fourth event will be taking place at the Akkuyu NGS and works backwards as required by the "what went wrong " scenarios and comes up with interesting results. The differences studied in depth to determine the impact to the severe accidents. The all four design have now core catchers. We have looked at the operator errors'like in TMI); Operator errors combined with design deficiencies(like in Chernobyl) and natural disasters( like in Fukushima) and found operator errors to be more probable event on the Akkuyu's postulated next incident. With respect to experiences of the operators we do not have any data except for long and successful operating history of the Soviet design reactors up until the Chernobyl incident. Since the Akkuyu will be built, own and operated by the Russians we have found no alarming concerns at the moment. At the moment, there is no body be able to operate those units in Turkey. Turkey is planning to build the required manpower during the transition period. The resolution of the observed parameters lies to work and educate, train of the host nation and exercise together.

  6. A new Vibrio cholerae sRNA modulates colonization and affects release of outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tianyan; Mika, Franziska; Lindmark, Barbro; Liu, Zhi; Schild, Stefan; Bishop, Anne; Zhu, Jun; Camilli, Andrew; Johansson, Jörgen; Vogel, Jörg; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2008-01-01

    We discovered a new small non-coding RNA (sRNA) gene, vrrA of Vibrio cholerae O1 strain A1552. A vrrA mutant overproduces OmpA porin, and we demonstrate that the 140 nt VrrA RNA represses ompA translation by base-pairing with the 5′ region of the mRNA. The RNA chaperone Hfq is not stringently required for VrrA action, but expression of the vrrA gene requires the membrane stress sigma factor, σE, suggesting that VrrA acts on ompA in response to periplasmic protein folding stress. We also observed that OmpA levels inversely correlated with the number of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), and that VrrA increased OMV production comparable to loss of OmpA. VrrA is the first sRNA known to control OMV formation. Moreover, a vrrA mutant showed a fivefold increased ability to colonize the intestines of infant mice as compared with the wild type. There was increased expression of the main colonization factor of V. cholerae, the toxin co-regulated pili, in the vrrA mutant as monitored by immunoblot detection of the TcpA protein. VrrA overproduction caused a distinct reduction in the TcpA protein level. Our findings suggest that VrrA contributes to bacterial fitness in certain stressful environments, and modulates infection of the host intestinal tract. PMID:18681937

  7. Does Wheat Genetically Modified for Disease Resistance Affect Root-Colonizing Pseudomonads and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi?

    PubMed Central

    Foetzki, Andrea; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael; Kneubühler, Yvan; Matasci, Caterina; Mascher-Frutschi, Fabio; Kalinina, Olena; Boller, Thomas; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM) wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method to characterize the diversity of the pqqC gene, which is involved in Pseudomonas phosphate solubilization. A major result was that in the first field season Pseudomonas abundances and diversity on roots of GM pm3b lines, but also on non-GM sister lines were different from those of the parental lines and conventional wheat cultivars. This indicates a strong effect of the procedures by which these plants were created, as GM and sister lines were generated via tissue cultures and propagated in the greenhouse. Moreover, Pseudomonas population sizes and DGGE profiles varied considerably between individual GM lines with different genomic locations of the pm3b transgene. At individual time points, differences in Pseudomonas and AMF accumulation between GM and control lines were detected, but they were not consistent and much less pronounced than differences detected between young and old plants, different conventional wheat cultivars or at different locations and field seasons. Thus, we conclude that impacts of GM wheat on plant-beneficial root-colonizing microorganisms are minor and not of ecological importance. The cultivation-independent pqqC-DGGE approach proved to be a useful tool for monitoring the dynamics of Pseudomonas populations in a wheat field and even sensitive enough for detecting population responses to altered plant physiology. PMID:23372672

  8. Determination of the key parameters affecting historic communications satellite trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1984-01-01

    Data representing 13 series of commercial communications satellites procured between 1968 and 1982 were analyzed to determine the factors that have contributed to the general reduction over time of the per circuit cost of communications satellites. The model by which the data were analyzed was derived from a general telecommunications application and modified to be more directly applicable for communications satellites. In this model satellite mass, bandwidth-years, and technological change were the variable parameters. A linear, least squares, multiple regression routine was used to obtain the measure of significance of the model. Correlation was measured by coefficient of determination (R super 2) and t-statistic. The results showed that no correlation could be established with satellite mass. Bandwidth-year however, did show a significant correlation. Technological change in the bandwidth-year case was a significant factor in the model. This analysis and the conclusions derived are based on mature technologies, i.e., satellite designs that are evolutions of earlier designs rather than the first of a new generation. The findings, therefore, are appropriate to future satellites only if they are a continuation of design evolution.

  9. Cell surface lectin array: parameters affecting cell glycan signature.

    PubMed

    Landemarre, Ludovic; Cancellieri, Perrine; Duverger, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Among the "omics", glycomics is one of the most complex fields and needs complementary strategies of analysis to decipher the "glycan dictionary". As an alternative method, which has developed since the beginning of the 21st century, lectin array technology could generate relevant information related to glycan motifs, accessibility and a number of other valuable insights from molecules (purified and non-purified) or cells. Based on a cell line model, this study deals with the key parameters that influence the whole cell surface glycan interaction with lectin arrays and the consequences on the interpretation and reliability of the results. The comparison between the adherent and suspension forms of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, showed respective glycan signatures, which could be inhibited specifically by neoglycoproteins. The modifications of the respective glycan signatures were also revealed according to the detachment modes and cell growth conditions. Finally the power of lectin array technology was highlighted by the possibility of selecting and characterizing a specific clone from the mother cell line, based on the slight difference determination in the respective glycan signatures. PMID:22899543

  10. Drug membrane transporters and CYP3A4 are affected by hypericin, hyperforin or aristoforin in colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Šemeláková, M; Jendželovský, R; Fedoročko, P

    2016-07-01

    Our previous results have shown that the combination of hypericin-mediated photodynamic therapy (HY-PDT) at sub-optimal dose with hyperforin (HP) (compounds of Hypericum sp.), or its stable derivative aristoforin (AR) stimulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to antitumour activity. This enhanced oxidative stress evoked the need for an explanation for HY accumulation in colon cancer cells pretreated with HP or AR. Generally, the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutics is limited by drug resistance related to the overexpression of drug efflux transporters in tumour cells. Therefore, the impact of non-activated hypericin (HY), HY-PDT, HP and AR on cell membrane transporter systems (Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1-MRP1/ABCC1, Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2-MRP2/ABCC2, Breast cancer resistance protein - BCRP/ABCG2, P-glycoprotein-P-gp/ABCC1) and cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) was evaluated. The different effects of the three compounds on their expression, protein level and activity was determined under specific PDT light (T0+, T6+) or dark conditions (T0- T6-). We found that HP or AR treatment affected the protein levels of MRP2 and P-gp, whereas HP decreased MRP2 and P-gp expression mostly in the T0+ and T6+ conditions, while AR decreased MRP2 in T0- and T6+. Moreover, HY-PDT treatment induced the expression of MRP1. Our data demonstrate that HP or AR treatment in light or dark PDT conditions had an inhibitory effect on the activity of individual membrane transport proteins and significantly decreased CYP3A4 activity in HT-29 cells. We found that HP or AR significantly affected intracellular accumulation of HY in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. These results suggest that HY, HP and AR might affect the efficiency of anti-cancer drugs, through interaction with membrane transporters and CYP3A4. PMID:27261575

  11. Microbial colonization affects the efficiency of photovoltaic panels in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Marcia A; Zilles, Roberto; Mocelin, Andre; Gaylarde, Christine C; Gorbushina, Anna; Heidrich, Gabriele; Giudice, Mauro C; Del Negro, Gilda M B; John, Vanderley M

    2015-07-01

    Sub-aerial biofilm (SAB) development on solar panels was studied in São Paulo. After 6, 12 and 18 months' exposure, photovoltaic panels were covered by increasing proportions of organic matter (42%, 53% and 58%, respectively). Fungi were an important component of these biofilms; very few phototrophs were found. Major microorganisms detected were melanised meristematic ascomycetes and pigmented bacterial genera Arthrobacter and Tetracoccus. While diverse algae, cyanobacteria and bacteria were identified in biofilms at 6 and 12 months, diversity at a later stage was reduced to that typical for SAB: the only fungal group detected in 18 month biofilm was the meristematic Dothideomycetes and the only phototrophs Ulothrix and Chlorella. Photovoltaic modules showed significant power reductions after 6, 12 (both 7%) and 18 (11%) months. The lack of difference in power reduction between 6 and 12 months reflects the dual nature of soiling, which can result from the deposition of particulates as well as from SAB fouling. Although 12-month old SAB demonstrated an almost 10-fold increase in fungal colonization and a higher organic content, the larger non-microbial particles (above 10 μm), which were important for efficiency reduction of lightly-biofilmed panels, were removed by high rainfall just before the 12-month sampling. PMID:25909440

  12. Physcomitrella patens mutants affected on heat dissipation clarify the evolution of photoprotection mechanisms upon land colonization

    PubMed Central

    Alboresi, Alessandro; Gerotto, Caterina; Giacometti, Giorgio M.; Bassi, Roberto; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    Light is the source of energy for photosynthetic organisms; when in excess, however, it also drives the formation of reactive oxygen species and, consequently, photoinhibition. Plants and algae have evolved mechanisms to regulate light harvesting efficiency in response to variable light intensity so as to avoid oxidative damage. Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) consists of the rapid dissipation of excess excitation energy as heat. Although widespread among oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, NPQ shows important differences in its machinery. In land plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, NPQ depends on the presence of PSBS, whereas in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it requires a different protein called LHCSR. In this work, we show that both proteins are present in the moss Physcomitrella patens. By generating KO mutants lacking PSBS and/or LHCSR, we also demonstrate that both gene products are active in NPQ. Plants lacking both proteins are more susceptible to high light stress than WT, implying that they are active in photoprotection. These results suggest that NPQ is a fundamental mechanism for survival in excess light and that upon land colonization, photosynthetic organisms evolved a unique mechanism for excess energy dissipation before losing the ancestral one found in algae. PMID:20505121

  13. Total colonic aganglionosis and imperforate anus in a severely affected infant with Pallister-Hall syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Mindy H; Eberhard, Moriah; Mudd, Pamela; Javia, Luv; Zimmerman, Robert; Khalek, Nahla; Zackai, Elaine H

    2015-03-01

    Pallister-Hall syndrome is a complex malformation syndrome characterized by a wide range of anomalies including hypothalamic hamartoma, polydactyly, bifid epiglottis, and genitourinary abnormalities. It is usually caused by truncating frameshift/nonsense and splicing mutations in the middle third of GLI3. The clinical course ranges from mild to lethal in the neonatal period. We present the first patient with Pallister-Hall syndrome reported with total colonic aganglionosis, a rare form of Hirschsprung disease with poor long-term outcome. The patient also had an imperforate anus, which is the third individual with Pallister-Hall syndrome reported with both Hirschsprung disease and an imperforate anus. Molecular testing via amniocentesis showed an apparently de novo novel nonsense mutation c.2641 C>T (p.Gln881*). His overall medical course was difficult and was complicated by respiratory failure and pan-hypopituitarism. Invasive care was ultimately withdrawn, and the patient expired at three months of age. This patient's phenotype was complex with unusual gastrointestinal features ultimately leading to a unfavorable prognosis and outcome, highlighting the range of clinical severity in patients with Pallister-Hall syndrome. PMID:25604768

  14. Affective State Influences Perception by Affecting Decision Parameters Underlying Bias and Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Spencer K.; Zhang, Xuan; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the effect of affect on perception often show consistent directional effects of a person’s affective state on perception. Unpleasant emotions have been associated with a “locally focused” style of stimulus evaluation, and positive emotions with a “globally focused” style. Typically, however, studies of affect and perception have not been conducted under the conditions of perceptual uncertainty and behavioral risk inherent to perceptual judgments outside the laboratory. We investigated the influence of perceivers’ experience affect (valence and arousal) on the utility of social threat perception by combining signal detection theory and behavioral economics. We created three perceptual decision environments that systematically differed with respect to factors that underlie uncertainty and risk: the base rate of threat, the costs of incorrect identification threat, and the perceptual similarity of threats and non-threats. We found that no single affective state yielded the best performance on the threat perception task across the three environments. Unpleasant valence promoted calibration of response bias to base rate and costs, high arousal promoted calibration of perceptual sensitivity to perceptual similarity, and low arousal was associated with an optimal adjustment of bias to sensitivity. However, the strength of these associations was conditional upon the difficulty of attaining optimal bias and high sensitivity, such that the effect of the perceiver’s affective state on perception differed with the cause and/or level of uncertainty and risk. PMID:22251054

  15. Dietary interactions and interventions affecting Escherichia coli 0157 colonization and shedding in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli O157 is an important foodborne pathogen affecting human health and the beef cattle industry. Contamination of carcasses at slaughter is correlated to the prevalence of E. coli O157 in cattle feces. Many associations have been made between dietary factors and E. coli O157 prevalenc...

  16. BAY61-3606 Affects the Viability of Colon Cancer Cells in a Genotype-Directed Manner

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Ken S.; Zhang, Tinghu; Kendall, Krystle R.; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Gray, Nathanael S.; Haigis, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Background K-RAS mutation poses a particularly difficult problem for cancer therapy. Activating mutations in K-RAS are common in cancers of the lung, pancreas, and colon and are associated with poor response to therapy. As such, targeted therapies that abrogate K-RAS-induced oncogenicity would be of tremendous value. Methods We searched for small molecule kinase inhibitors that preferentially affect the growth of colorectal cancer cells expressing mutant K-RAS. The mechanism of action of one inhibitor was explored using chemical and genetic approaches. Results We identified BAY61-3606 as an inhibitor of proliferation in colorectal cancer cells expressing mutant forms of K-RAS, but not in isogenic cells expressing wild-type K-RAS. In addition to its anti-proliferative effects in mutant cells, BAY61-3606 exhibited a distinct biological property in wild-type cells in that it conferred sensitivity to inhibition of RAF. In this context, BAY61-3606 acted by inhibiting MAP4K2 (GCK), which normally activates NFκβ signaling in wild-type cells in response to inhibition of RAF. As a result of MAP4K2 inhibition, wild-type cells became sensitive to AZ-628, a RAF inhibitor, when also treated with BAY61-3606. Conclusions These studies indicate that BAY61-3606 exerts distinct biological activities in different genetic contexts. PMID:22815993

  17. Virosecurinine induces apoptosis by affecting Bcl-2 and Bax expression in human colon cancer SW480 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan-Rong; Xia, Yong-Hui; Yao, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Ying; Ji, Zhao-Ning

    2012-04-01

    Virosecurinine, the major alkaloid isolated from Securinega suffruticosa Pall Rehd was found to exhibit growth inhibition and cytotoxicity against huaman colon cancer SW480 cells via the microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Due to its greater cytotoxic potency and selectivity towards SW480 cells, flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell cycle distribution of control and treated SW480 cells whereas Annexin V-FITC/PI flow cytometry analysis was carried out to confirm apoptosis induced by virosecurinine in SW480 cells. Apoptotic regulatory genes were determined by RT-PCR analysis. Virosecurinine was found to induce G1/S cell cycle arrest which led to predominantly apoptotic mode of cell death. Mechanistically, virosecurinine was found to up-regulated the Bax gene expression and down-regulated the Bcl-2 expression in SW480, The ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax was significantly decreased. Hence, we suggest that virosecurinine induced apoptosis in SW480 cells by affecting the expression of bcl-2 and bax. PMID:22570942

  18. Study on spectral parameters and the support vector machine in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of serum for the detection of colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Yang, Tianyue; Li, Siqi; Yao, Jun; Song, Youtao; Wang, Deli; Ding, Jianhua

    2015-11-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been recognized as an effective tool for the analysis of tissue samples and biofluids. In this work, a total of 27 spectral parameters were chosen and compared using SERS. Four parameters with the highest prediction ability were selected for further support vector machine (SVM) analysis. As a comparison, principal component analysis (PCA) was used on the same dataset for feature extraction. SVM was used with the above two data reduction methods separately to differentiate colon cancer and the control groups. Serum taken from 52 colon cancer patients and 60 healthy volunteers were collected and tested by SERS. The accuracy for Parameter-SVM was 95.0%, the sensitivity was 96.2%, and the specificity was 95.5%, which was much higher than the results using only one parameter, while for PCA-SVM, the results are 93.3%, 92.3%, and 92.9%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the SERS analysis method can be used to identify serum differences between colon cancer patients and normal people.

  19. Elective cesarean delivery affects gut maturation and delays microbial colonization but does not increase necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Siggers, R H; Thymann, T; Jensen, B B; Mølbak, L; Heegaard, P M H; Schmidt, M; Buddington, R K; Sangild, P T

    2008-03-01

    Although preterm birth and formula feeding increase the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), the influences of cesarean section (CS) and vaginal delivery (VD) are unknown. Therefore, gut characteristics and NEC incidence and severity were evaluated in preterm pigs (92% gestation) delivered by CS or VD. An initial study showed that newborn CS pigs (n = 6) had decreased gastric acid secretion, absorption of intact proteins, activity of brush-border enzymes and pancreatic hydrolases, plasma cortisol, rectal temperature, and changes in blood chemistry, indicating impaired respiratory function, compared with VD littermates (n = 6). In a second experiment, preterm CS (n = 16) and VD (n = 16) pigs were given total parenteral nutrition (36 h) then fed porcine colostrum (VD-COL, n = 6; CS-COL, n = 6) or infant milk formula (VD-FORM, n = 10; CS-FORM, n = 10) for 2 days. Across delivery, FORM pigs showed significantly higher NEC incidence, tissue proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-gamma and IL-6), Clostridium colonization, and impaired intestinal function, compared with COL pigs. NEC incidence was equal for CS (6/16) and VD (6/16) pigs, CS pigs had decreased bacterial diversity and density, higher villus heights, and increased brush-border enzyme activities (lactase, aminopeptidases) compared with VD pigs. In particular, VD-FORM pigs showed reduced mucosal proportions, reduced lactase and aminopeptidases, and increased proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 compared with CS-FORM (P < 0.06). Despite the initial improvement of intestinal and metabolic functions following VD, gut function, and inflammation were similar, or more negatively affected in VD neonates than CS neonates. Both delivery modes exhibited positive and negative influences on the preterm gut, which may explain the similar NEC incidence. PMID:18160527

  20. Measures of GCM Performance as Functions of Model Parameters Affecting Clouds and Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Mu, Q.; Sen, M.; Stoffa, P.

    2002-05-01

    This abstract is one of three related presentations at this meeting dealing with several issues surrounding optimal parameter and uncertainty estimation of model predictions of climate. Uncertainty in model predictions of climate depends in part on the uncertainty produced by model approximations or parameterizations of unresolved physics. Evaluating these uncertainties is computationally expensive because one needs to evaluate how arbitrary choices for any given combination of model parameters affects model performance. Because the computational effort grows exponentially with the number of parameters being investigated, it is important to choose parameters carefully. Evaluating whether a parameter is worth investigating depends on two considerations: 1) does reasonable choices of parameter values produce a large range in model response relative to observational uncertainty? and 2) does the model response depend non-linearly on various combinations of model parameters? We have decided to narrow our attention to selecting parameters that affect clouds and radiation, as it is likely that these parameters will dominate uncertainties in model predictions of future climate. We present preliminary results of ~20 to 30 AMIPII style climate model integrations using NCAR's CCM3.10 that show model performance as functions of individual parameters controlling 1) critical relative humidity for cloud formation (RHMIN), and 2) boundary layer critical Richardson number (RICR). We also explore various definitions of model performance that include some or all observational data sources (surface air temperature and pressure, meridional and zonal winds, clouds, long and short-wave cloud forcings, etc...) and evaluate in a few select cases whether the model's response depends non-linearly on the parameter values we have selected.

  1. Inactivation of the LysR regulator Cj1000 of Campylobacter jejuni affects host colonization and respiration.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Virginie; Li, Jennifer; Flint, Annika; Rosenfeld, Eric; Rivoal, Katell; Georgeault, Sylvie; Alazzam, Bachar; Ermel, Gwennola; Stintzi, Alain; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Baysse, Christine

    2013-06-01

    Transcriptional regulation mediates adaptation of pathogens to environmental stimuli and is important for host colonization. The Campylobacter jejuni genome sequence reveals a surprisingly small set of regulators, mostly of unknown function, suggesting an intricate regulatory network. Interestingly, C. jejuni lacks the homologues of ubiquitous regulators involved in stress response found in many other Gram-negative bacteria. Nonetheless, cj1000 is predicted to encode the sole LysR-type regulator in the C. jejuni genome, and thus may be involved in major adaptation pathways. A cj1000 mutant strain was constructed and found to be attenuated in its ability to colonize 1-day-old chicks. Complementation of the cj1000 mutation restored the colonization ability to wild-type levels. The mutant strain was also outcompeted in a competitive colonization assay of the piglet intestine. Oxygraphy was carried out for what is believed to be the first time with the Oroboros Oxygraph-2k on C. jejuni and revealed a role for Cj1000 in controlling O2 consumption. Furthermore, microarray analysis of the cj1000 mutant revealed both direct and indirect regulatory targets, including genes involved in energy metabolism and oxidative stress defences. These results highlight the importance of Cj1000 regulation in host colonization and in major physiological pathways. PMID:23558264

  2. Students' Perspective (Age Wise, Gender Wise and Year Wise) of Parameters Affecting the Undergraduate Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumari, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study is to examine the students' perspective (age wise, gender wise and year wise) of parameters affecting the undergraduate engineering education system present in a private technical institution in NCR [National Capital Region], Haryana. It is a descriptive type of research in nature. The data has been collected with the…

  3. A Case Study Showing Parameters Affecting the Quality of Education: Faculty Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumari, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    The study aims to examine the faculty members' perspective (age Wise, Gender Wise and Work Experience wise) of parameters affecting the quality of education in an affiliated Undergraduate Engineering Institution in Haryana. It is a descriptive type of research. The data has been collected with the help of 'Questionnaire Based Survey'. The sample…

  4. Colonic Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colonic polyps grow in the large intestine, or colon. Most polyps are not dangerous. However, some polyps ... member with polyps Have a family history of colon cancer Most colon polyps do not cause symptoms. ...

  5. Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Levels by Calcium Lactate Affects Colon Cancer Cell Motility through Calcium-Dependent Calpain

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer. PMID:25629974

  6. Correlation Between the Clinical Parameters and Tissue Phenotype in Patients Affected by Deep-Infiltrating Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Giovanna; Arkwright, Sylviane; Audebourg, Anne; Radenen, Brigitte; Chapron, Charles; Borghese, Bruno; Dousset, Bertrand; Mehats, Celine; Vaiman, Daniel; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile; Gogusev, Jean

    2016-09-01

    The current study aimed to identify and validate an applicable immunohistochemistry panel including Ki-67, c-MYC, estrogen receptor-α (ER-α), and progesterone receptor isoforms A/B (PR-A/B) in correlation with clinicopathological parameters in patients affected by deep infiltrating endometriosis. Tissue microarrays were prepared from a cohort of 113 patients. Phenotypic profile of the panel molecules was evaluated in glands and stroma in parallel with microvessels and stroma density measurements. Principal component analysis was performed on 8 immunohistochemical variables, 2 histological variables, and 8 subgroups of clinical parameters. The immunohistochemical profiling showed consistent Ki-67 immunostaining in 17.9% of the samples and c-MYC in 83.1%, while intense ER-α immunoreactivity was detected in 84% of the samples and PR-A/B isoforms in 24.1% of them. The combination of clinical parameters and tissue phenotype allowed a stratification of endometriosis-affected patients. Such novel phenotypical and clinical correlation could be helpful in the future studies for a better stratification of the disease aiming at a personalized patient care. PMID:26994067

  7. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  8. Acid production and conversion of konjac glucomannan during in vitro colonic fermentation affected by exogenous microorganisms and tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin-Huai; Geng, Qian

    2016-05-01

    Impacts of exogenous microorganisms and tea polyphenols on acid production and conversion during in vitro colonic fermentation of konjac glucomannan (KGM) were assessed in this study. Colonic fermentation of KGM by the fecal extract of healthy adults resulted in a propionate-rich profile, as acetic, propionic, butyric and lactic acids production were 16.1, 13.0, 3.3 and 20.2 mmol/L, respectively. Inoculation of one of ten exogenous microorganisms in the fermentative systems increased acetic, propionic and butyric acids production by 50-230%, 9-190% and 110-350%, respectively, and also accelerated lactic acid conversion by 14-40%. Tea polyphenols in the fermentative systems showed clear inhibition on both acid production and conversion; however, this inhibition could be partially or mostly antagonised by the inoculated exogenous microorganisms, resulting in improved acid production and conversion. In total, Lactobacillus brevis and Sterptococcus thermophilus were more able to increase acid production, and the propionate-rich profile was not changed in all cases. PMID:26902110

  9. Study of design parameters affecting the motion of DNA for nanoinjection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Regis A.; Jensen, Brian D.; Black, Justin L.; Burnett, Sandra H.; Howell, Larry L.

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports the effects of various parameters on the attraction and repulsion of DNA to and from a silicon lance. An understanding of DNA motion is crucial for a new approach to insert DNA, or other foreign microscopic matter, into a living cell. The approach, called nanoinjection, uses electrical forces to attract and repel the desired substance to a micromachined lance designed to pierce the cell membranes. We have developed mathematical models to predict the trajectory of DNA. The mathematical model allows investigation of the attraction/repulsion process by varying specific parameters. We find that the ground electrode placement, lance orientation and lance penetration significantly affect attraction or repulsion efficiency, while the gap, lance direction, lance tip width, lance tip half-angle and lance tip height do not.

  10. Identifying Critical Road Geometry Parameters Affecting Crash Rate and Crash Type

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Sarbaz; Thomson, Robert; Lannér, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this traffic safety investigation was to find critical road parameters affecting crash rate (CR). The study was based on crash and road maintenance data from Western Sweden. More than 3000 crashes, reported from 2000 to 2005 on median-separated roads, were collected and combined with road geometric and surface data. The statistical analysis showed variations in CR when road elements changed confirming that road characteristics affect CR. The findings indicated that large radii right-turn curves were more dangerous than left curves, in particular, during lane changing manoeuvres. However sharper curves are more dangerous in both left and right curves. Moreover, motorway carriageways with no or limited shoulders have the highest CR when compared to other carriageway widths, while one lane carriageway sections on 2+1 roads were the safest. Road surface results showed that both wheel rut depth and road roughness have negative impacts on traffic safety. PMID:20184841

  11. Variation in Growth, Colonization of Maize, and Metabolic Parameters of GFP- and DsRed-Labeled Fusarium verticillioides Strains.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Conner, R L; Wang, Xiaoming; Xu, Rongqi; Li, Hongjie

    2016-08-01

    Autofluorescent proteins are frequently applied as visual markers in the labeling of filamentous fungi. Genes gfp and DsRed were transformed into the genome of Fusarium verticillioides via the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. The selected transformants displayed a bright green or red fluorescence in all the organelles of the growing fungal mycelia and spores (except for the vacuoles) both in cultures and in the maize (Zea mays) roots they colonized. The results of gene-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and the thermal asymmetrical interlaced (TAIL)-PCR analysis demonstrated that gfp and DsRed were integrated on different chromosomes of the fungus. Reductions in the colony growth on the plates at pH 4.0 and 5.5 was observed for the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transformant G3 and the DsRed-transformant R4, but transformants G4 and R1 grew as well as the wild-type strain at pH 4.0. The speed of growth of all the transformants was similar to the wild-type strain at pH ≥ 7. The insertion of gfp and DsRed did not alter the production of extracellular enzymes and fumonisin B by F. verticillioides. The transformants expressing GFP and DsRed proteins were able to colonize maize roots. However, the four transformants examined produced fewer CFU in the root samples than the wild-type strain during a sampling period of 7 to 28 days after inoculation. PMID:27088391

  12. Experimental Analyses of the Major Parameters Affecting the Intensity of Outbursts of Coal and Gas

    PubMed Central

    Nie, W.; Peng, S. J.; Xu, J.; Liu, L. R.; Wang, G.; Geng, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in mining depth and production, the intensity and frequency of outburst of coal and gas have a tendency to increase. Estimating the intensity of outbursts of coal and gas plays an important role because of its relation with the risk value. In this paper, we described the semiquantitative relations between major parameters and intensity of outburst based on physical experiments. The results showed increment of geostress simulated by horizontal load (from 1.4, 2.4, 3.2, to 3.4 MPa) or vertical load (from 2, 3, 3.6, to 4 MPa) improved the relative intensity rate (3.763–7.403% and 1.273–7.99%); the increment of porosity (from 1.57, 2.51, 3, to 3.6%) improved the relative intensity rate from 3.8 to 13.8%; the increment of gas pressure (from 0, 0.5, 0.65, 0.72, 1, to 1.5 Mpa) induced the relative intensity rate to decrease from 38.22 to 0%; the increment of water content (from 0, 2, 4, to 8%) caused the relative intensity rate to drop from 5.425 to 0.5%. Furthermore, sensitivity and range analysis evaluates coupled factors affecting the relative intensity. In addition, the distinction with initiation of outburst of coal and gas affected by these parameters is discussed by the relative threshold of gas content rate. PMID:25162042

  13. Curcumin-Loading-Dependent Stability of PEGMEMA-Based Micelles Affects Endocytosis and Exocytosis in Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Teddy; Trench, David; Putnam, Joshua; Stenzel, Martina H; Lord, Megan S

    2016-03-01

    Polymeric micelles were formed from poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate)-block-poly(styrene) (P(PEGMEMA)-b-PS) block copolymer of two different chain lengths. The micelles formed were approximately 16 and 46 nm in diameter and used to encapsulate curcumin. Upon loading of the curcumin into the micelles, their size increased to approximately 34 and 80 nm in diameter, respectively, with a loading efficiency of 58%. The unloaded micelles were not cytotoxic to human colon carcinoma cells, whereas only the smaller loaded micelles were cytotoxic after 72 h of exposure. The micelles were rapidly internalized by the cells within minutes of exposure, with the loaded micelles internalized to a greater extent owing to their enhanced stability compared to that of the unloaded micelles. The larger micelles were more rapidly internalized and exocytosed than the smaller micelles, demonstrating the effect of micelle size and drug loading on drug delivery and cytotoxicity. PMID:26755445

  14. Modeling of mouse eye and errors in ocular parameters affecting refractive state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawa, Gurinder

    Rodents eye are particularly used to study refractive error state of an eye and development of refractive eye. Genetic organization of rodents is similar to that of humans, which makes them interesting candidates to be researched upon. From rodents family mice models are encouraged over rats because of availability of genetically engineered models. Despite of extensive work that has been performed on mice and rat models, still no one is able to quantify an optical model, due to variability in the reported ocular parameters. In this Dissertation, we have extracted ocular parameters and generated schematics of eye from the raw data from School of Medicine, Detroit. In order to see how the rays would travel through an eye and the defects associated with an eye; ray tracing has been performed using ocular parameters. Finally we have systematically evaluated the contribution of various ocular parameters, such as radii of curvature of ocular surfaces, thicknesses of ocular components, and refractive indices of ocular refractive media, using variational analysis and a computational model of the rodent eye. Variational analysis revealed that variation in all the ocular parameters does affect the refractive status of the eye, but depending upon the magnitude of the impact those parameters are listed as critical or non critical. Variation in the depth of the vitreous chamber, thickness of the lens, radius of the anterior surface of the cornea, radius of the anterior surface of the lens, as well as refractive indices for the lens and vitreous, appears to have the largest impact on the refractive error and thus are categorized as critical ocular parameters. The radii of the posterior surfaces of the cornea and lens have much smaller contributions to the refractive state, while the radii of the anterior and posterior surfaces of the retina have no effect on the refractive error. These data provide the framework for further refinement of the optical models of the rat and mouse

  15. Assessment, modeling and optimization of parameters affecting the formation of disinfection by-products in water.

    PubMed

    Gougoutsa, Chrysa; Christophoridis, Christophoros; Zacharis, Constantinos K; Fytianos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    This study focused on (a) the development of a screening methodology, in order to determine the main experimental variables affecting chlorinated and brominated disinfection by-product (DBP) formation in water during chlorination experiments and (b) the application of a central composite design (CCD) using response surface methodology (RSM) for the mathematical description and optimization of DBP formation. Chlorine dose and total organic carbon (TOC) were proven to be the main factors affecting the formation of total chlorinated DBPs, while chlorine dose and bromide concentration were the main parameters affecting the total brominated THMs. Longer contact time promoted a rise in chlorinated DBPs' concentration even in the presence of a minimal amount of organic matter. A maximum production of chlorinated DBPs was observed under a medium TOC value and it reduced at high TOC concentrations, possibly due to the competitive production of brominated THMs. The highest concentrations of chlorinated THMs were observed at chlorine dose 10 mg L(-1) and TOC 5.5 mg L(-1). The formation of brominated DBPs is possible even with a minimum amount of NaOCl in the presence of high concentration of bromide ions. Brominated DBPs were observed in maximum concentrations using 8 mg L(-1) of chlorine in the presence of 300 μg L(-1) bromides. PMID:27178297

  16. Pre-Analytical Parameters Affecting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Measurement in Plasma: Identifying Confounders

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Johanna M.; Boehringer, Daniel; Deissler, Heidrun L.; Faerber, Lothar; Goepfert, Jens C.; Heiduschka, Peter; Kleeberger, Susannah M.; Klettner, Alexa; Krohne, Tim U.; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Ziemssen, Focke; Stahl, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is intensively investigated in various medical fields. However, comparing VEGF-A measurements is difficult because sample acquisition and pre-analytic procedures differ between studies. We therefore investigated which variables act as confounders of VEGF-A measurements. Methods Following a standardized protocol, blood was taken at three clinical sites from six healthy participants (one male and one female participant at each center) twice one week apart. The following pre-analytical parameters were varied in order to analyze their impact on VEGF-A measurements: analyzing center, anticoagulant (EDTA vs. PECT / CTAD), cannula (butterfly vs. neonatal), type of centrifuge (swing-out vs. fixed-angle), time before and after centrifugation, filling level (completely filled vs. half-filled tubes) and analyzing method (ELISA vs. multiplex bead array). Additionally, intrapersonal variations over time and sex differences were explored. Statistical analysis was performed using a linear regression model. Results The following parameters were identified as statistically significant independent confounders of VEGF-A measurements: analyzing center, anticoagulant, centrifuge, analyzing method and sex of the proband. The following parameters were no significant confounders in our data set: intrapersonal variation over one week, cannula, time before and after centrifugation and filling level of collection tubes. Conclusion VEGF-A measurement results can be affected significantly by the identified pre-analytical parameters. We recommend the use of CTAD anticoagulant, a standardized type of centrifuge and one central laboratory using the same analyzing method for all samples. PMID:26730574

  17. Selection of meteorological parameters affecting rainfall estimation using neuro-fuzzy computing methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Roslan; Roy, Chandrabhushan; Motamedi, Shervin; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Petković, Dalibor; Gocic, Milan; Lee, Siew Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Rainfall is a complex atmospheric process that varies over time and space. Researchers have used various empirical and numerical methods to enhance estimation of rainfall intensity. We developed a novel prediction model in this study, with the emphasis on accuracy to identify the most significant meteorological parameters having effect on rainfall. For this, we used five input parameters: wet day frequency (dwet), vapor pressure (e̅a), and maximum and minimum air temperatures (Tmax and Tmin) as well as cloud cover (cc). The data were obtained from the Indian Meteorological Department for the Patna city, Bihar, India. Further, a type of soft-computing method, known as the adaptive-neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), was applied to the available data. In this respect, the observation data from 1901 to 2000 were employed for testing, validating, and estimating monthly rainfall via the simulated model. In addition, the ANFIS process for variable selection was implemented to detect the predominant variables affecting the rainfall prediction. Finally, the performance of the model was compared to other soft-computing approaches, including the artificial neural network (ANN), support vector machine (SVM), extreme learning machine (ELM), and genetic programming (GP). The results revealed that ANN, ELM, ANFIS, SVM, and GP had R2 of 0.9531, 0.9572, 0.9764, 0.9525, and 0.9526, respectively. Therefore, we conclude that the ANFIS is the best method among all to predict monthly rainfall. Moreover, dwet was found to be the most influential parameter for rainfall prediction, and the best predictor of accuracy. This study also identified sets of two and three meteorological parameters that show the best predictions.

  18. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P N; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5mM at 24h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential. PMID:26319435

  19. Campylobacter Colonization and Proliferation in the Broiler Chicken upon Natural Field Challenge Is Not Affected by the Bird Growth Rate or Breed

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Richard A.; Watson, Kellie A.; McAdam, Jim; Avendaño, Santiago; Stanley, William A.; Koerhuis, Alfons N. M.

    2014-01-01

    The zoonotic association between Campylobacter bacteria in poultry and humans has been characterized by decades of research which has attempted to elucidate the epidemiology of this complex relationship and to reduce carriage within poultry. While much work has focused on the mechanisms facilitating its success in contaminating chicken flocks (and other animal hosts), it remains difficult to consistently exclude Campylobacter under field conditions. Within the United Kingdom poultry industry, various bird genotypes with widely varying growth rates are available to meet market needs and consumer preferences. However, little is known about whether any differences in Campylobacter carriage exist across this modern broiler range. The aim of this study was to establish if a relationship exists between growth rate or breed and cecal Campylobacter concentration after natural commercial flock Campylobacter challenge. In one investigation, four pure line genotypes of various growth rates were grown together, while in the second, eight different commercial broiler genotypes were grown individually. In both studies, the Campylobacter concentration was measured in the ceca at 42 days of age, revealing no significant difference in cecal load between birds of different genotypes both in mixed- and single-genotype pens. This is important from a public health perspective and suggests that other underlying reasons beyond genotype are likely to control and affect Campylobacter colonization within chickens. Further studies to gain a better understanding of colonization dynamics and subsequent proliferation are needed, as are novel approaches to reduce the burden in poultry. PMID:25172857

  20. Key Parameters Affecting Quantitative Analysis of STEM-EDS Spectrum Images

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Luke; Parish, Chad M

    2010-06-01

    In this article, we use simulated and experimental data to explore how three operator-controllable parameters - (1) signal level, (2) detector resolution, and (3) number of factors chosen for analysis - affect quantitative analyses of scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy spectrum images processed by principal component analysis (PCA). We find that improvements in both signal level and detector resolution improve the precision of quantitative analyses, but that signal level is the most important. We also find that if the rank of the PCA solution is not chosen properly, it may be possible to improperly fit the underlying data and degrade the accuracy of results. Additionally, precision is degraded in the case when too many factors are included in the model.

  1. Parameters affecting image quality with Time-Resolved Optical Integrative Neutron (TRION) detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Feldman, G.; Dangendorf, V.; Bar, D.; Goldberg, M. B.; Tittelmeier, K.; Bromberger, B.; Weierganz, M.; Brandis, M.

    2011-06-01

    We have investigated by simulations and experimentally the parameters that affect image quality (contrast and spatial-resolution) of the fast neutron TRION detector. A scintillating fiber screen with 0.5×0.5 mm 2 square fibers, few centimeters thick, provides superior spatial-resolution to that of a slab scintillator of the same thickness. A detailed calculation of the neutron interaction processes that influence the point-spread function (PSF) in the scintillating screen has been performed using the GEANT 3.21 code. The calculations showed that neutron scattering within the screen accounts for a significant loss of image contrast. The factors that limit the spatial-resolution of the image are the cross-sectional scintillating-fiber dimensions within the screen and the spatial response of the image-intensifier. A deconvolution method has been applied for restoring the contrast and the spatial-resolution of the fast neutron image.

  2. Parameters affecting temporal resolution of Time Resolved Integrative Optical Neutron Detector (TRION)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Dangendorf, V.; Bar, D.; Feldman, G.; Goldberg, M. B.; Tittelmeier, K.; Bromberger, B.; Brandis, M.; Weierganz, M.

    2013-11-01

    The Time-Resolved Integrative Optical Neutron (TRION) detector was developed for Fast Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR), a fast-neutron transmission imaging method that exploits characteristic energy-variations of the total scattering cross-section in the En = 1-10 MeV range to detect specific elements within a radiographed object. As opposed to classical event-counting time of flight (ECTOF), it integrates the detector signal during a well-defined neutron Time of Flight window corresponding to a pre-selected energy bin, e.g., the energy-interval spanning a cross-section resonance of an element such as C, O and N. The integrative characteristic of the detector permits loss-free operation at very intense, pulsed neutron fluxes, at a cost however, of recorded temporal resolution degradation This work presents a theoretical and experimental evaluation of detector related parameters which affect temporal resolution of the TRION system.

  3. Factors affecting the distribution of hydrocarbon contaminants and hydrogeochemical parameters in a shallow sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Cheon, J Y; Lee, K K; Lee, S Y; Lee, M H

    2001-07-01

    The distributions of hydrocarbon contaminants and hydrogeochemical parameters were investigated in a shallow sand aquifer highly contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons leaked from solvent storage tanks. For these purposes, a variety of field investigations and studies were performed, which included installation of over 100 groundwater monitoring wells and piezometers at various depths, soil logging and analyses during well and piezometer installation, chemical analysis of groundwater, pump tests, and slug tests. Continuous water level monitoring at three selected wells using automatic data-logger and manual measuring at other wells were also conducted. Based on analyses of the various investigations and tests, a number of factors were identified to explain the distribution of the hydrocarbon contaminants and hydrogeochemical parameters. These factors include indigenous biodegradation, hydrostratigraphy, preliminary pump-and-treat remedy, recharge by rainfall, and subsequent water level fluctuation. The permeable sandy layer, in which the mean water table elevation is maintained, provided a dominant pathway for contaminant transport. The preliminary pump-and-treat action accelerated the movement of the hydrocarbon contaminants and affected the redox evolution pattern. Seasonal recharge by rain, together with indigenous biodegradation, played an important role in the natural attenuation of the petroleum hydrocarbons via mixing/dilution and biodegradation. The water level fluctuations redistributed the hydrocarbon contaminants by partitioning them into the soil and groundwater. The identified factors are not independent but closely inter-correlated. PMID:11475158

  4. Effect of welding parameters on the heat-affected zone of AISI409 ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbarnodeh, Eslam; Hanke, Stefanie; Weiss, Sabine; Fischer, Alfons

    2012-10-01

    One of the main problems during the welding of ferritic stainless steels is severe grain growth within the heat-affected zone (HAZ). In the present study, the microstructural characteristics of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AISI409 ferritic stainless steel were investigated by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and the effects of welding parameters on the grain size, local misorientation, and low-angle grain boundaries were studied. A 3-D finite element model (FEM) was developed to predict the effects of welding parameters on the holding time of the HAZ above the critical temperature of grain growth. It is found that the base metal is not fully recrystallized. During the welding, complete recrystallization is followed by severe grain growth. A decrease in the number of low-angle grain boundaries is observed within the HAZ. FEM results show that the final state of residual strains is caused by competition between welding plastic strains and their release by recrystallization. Still, the decisive factor for grain growth is heat input.

  5. External Load Affects Ground Reaction Force Parameters Non-uniformly during Running in Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John; Schaffner, Grant; Laughlin, Mitzi; Loehr, James; Hagan, R. Donald

    2004-01-01

    Long-term exposure to microgravity induces detrimefits to the musculcskdetal system (Schneider et al., 1995; LeBlanc et al., 2000). Treadmill exercise is used onboard the International Space Station as an exercise countermeasure to musculoskeletal deconditioning due to spaceflight. During locomotive exercise in weightlessness (0G), crewmembers wear a harness attached to an external loading mechanism (EL). The EL pulls the crewmember toward the treadmill, and provides resistive load during the impact and propulsive phases of gait. The resulting forces may be important in stimulating bone maintenance (Turner, 1998). The EL can be applied via a bungee and carabineer clip configuration attached to the harness and can be manipulated to create varying amounts of load levels during exercise. Ground-based research performed using a vertically mounted treadmill found that peak ground reaction forces (GRF) during running at an EL of less than one body weight (BW) are less than those that occur during running in normal gravity (1G) (Davis et al., 1996). However, it is not known how the GRF are affected by the EL in a true OG environment. Locomotion while suspended may result in biomechanics that differ from free running. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how EL affects peak impact force, peak propulsive force, loading rate, and impulse of the GRF during running in 0G. It was hypothesized that increasing EL would result in increases in each GRF parameter.

  6. Atmospheric parameters affecting sea ice losses in the context of gravity desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Gu, Wei; Chao, Jinlong; Li, Lantao; Liu, Chengyu; Xu, Yinjun; Chang, Zhiyun; Wu, Linhong; Chen, Jie

    2015-08-01

    Gravity desalination is an important method for obtaining fresh water from sea ice; however, the large amount of ice that is exposed to air for long periods of time sublimates and evaporates, which results in a reduction of the freshwater resource. This paper describes a study of sea ice sublimation and evaporation performed during the winter of 2013 at the western shore of Bohai Bay, China, to determine the relationship between the amount of sublimation and evaporation and the atmospheric parameters. Substantial amounts of the Bohai sea ice sublimated and evaporated, ranging from 15 to 35 % of the total. The sublimation and evaporation amount was significantly different between the day and night and was greater in the daytime because of the relative humidity difference. Sublimation and evaporation is primarily affected by atmospheric parameters, and the amount of sublimation and evaporation exhibits a good linear relationship with the relative humidity and the wind speed; a comprehensive parameters formula was determined for the Bohai Rim in China. A 10 % increase of daily relative humidity will reduce approximately 1.5 kg/m2/day of the sublimation and evaporation, and the amount of sublimation and evaporation increases by 1.76 kg/m2/day when the daily wind speed increases by 1 m/s. To reduce the sublimation and evaporation and maximize the amount of this freshwater resource, gravity desalination sites should be selected where the wind speed is low and the relative humidity is high, i.e., the sea ice should be configured to reduce the adverse effects of sunlight, low humidity, and air turbulence.

  7. CONTINUOSLY STIRRED TANK REACTOR PARAMETERS THAT AFFECT SLUDGE BATCH 6 SIMULANT PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, J.; Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Fernandez, A.

    2010-05-28

    ). Precipitated MnO{sub 2} is combined with metal nitrates and fed into the CSTR. The metals are precipitated by a caustic NaOH stream. The rates at which these streams are added allows for pH adjustment of the mixture. A graphical representation of this process is given in Figure 1. In using the CSTR method for developing simulant, there are various parameters that can be adjusted in order to effectuate a physical change in the resulting simulant: pH, temperature, mixing speed, and flow rate. How will changing these parameters affect the physical properties of the sludge simulant? The ability to determine which parameter affects a particular property could allow one to develop a simulant that would better match the physical characteristics of HLW sludge.

  8. Parameters affecting in vitro oxidation/folding of maurotoxin, a four-disulphide-bridged scorpion toxin.

    PubMed Central

    di Luccio, E; Azulay, D O; Regaya, I; Fajloun, Z; Sandoz, G; Mansuelle, P; Kharrat, R; Fathallah, M; Carrega, L; Estève, E; Rochat, H; De Waard, M; Sabatier, J M

    2001-01-01

    Maurotoxin (MTX) is a 34-mer scorpion toxin cross-linked by four disulphide bridges that acts on various K(+) channel subtypes. MTX adopts a disulphide bridge organization of the type C1-C5, C2-C6, C3-C4 and C7-C8, and folds according to the common alpha/beta scaffold reported for other known scorpion toxins. Here we have investigated the process and kinetics of the in vitro oxidation/folding of reduced synthetic L-MTX (L-sMTX, where L-MTX contains only L-amino acid residues). During the oxidation/folding of reduced L-sMTX, the oxidation intermediates were blocked by iodoacetamide alkylation of free cysteine residues, and analysed by MS. The L-sMTX intermediates appeared sequentially over time from the least (intermediates with one disulphide bridge) to the most oxidized species (native-like, four-disulphide-bridged L-sMTX). The mathematical formulation of the diffusion-collision model being inadequate to accurately describe the kinetics of oxidation/folding of L-sMTX, we have formulated a derived mathematical description that better fits the experimental data. Using this mathematical description, we have compared for the first time the oxidation/folding of L-sMTX with that of D-sMTX, its stereoisomer that contains only D-amino acid residues. Several experimental parameters, likely to affect the oxidation/folding process, were studied further; these included temperature, pH, ionic strength, redox potential and concentration of reduced toxin. We also assessed the effects of some cellular enzymes, peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) and protein disulphide isomerase (PDI), on the folding pathways of reduced L-sMTX and D-sMTX. All the parameters tested affect the oxidative folding of sMTX, and the kinetics of this process were indistinguishable for L-sMTX and D-sMTX, except when stereospecific enzymes were used. The most efficient conditions were found to be: 50 mM Tris/HCl/1.4 mM EDTA, pH 7.5, supplemented by 0.5 mM PPIase and 50 units/ml PDI for 0.1 m

  9. Acute exposure to the biopesticide azadirachtin affects parameters in the gills of common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Murussi, Camila R; Costa, Maiara D; Leitemperger, Jossiele W; Flores-Lopes, Fábio; Menezes, Charlene C; Loebens, Luisa; de Avila, Luis Antonio; Rizzetti, Tiele M; Adaime, Martha B; Zanella, Renato; Loro, Vania L

    2016-02-01

    The biopesticide, azadirachtin (Aza) is less hazardous to the environment, but may cause several toxic effects in aquatic organisms. The Cyprinus carpio (n=12, for all concentrations) after 10days of acclimation under controlled conditions, were exposed at 20, 40, and 60μL/L of Aza during 96h. After this period, fish were anesthetized and euthanized then mucus layer and gills collected. In this study, the effects of exposure to different Aza concentrations were analysed through a set of biomarkers: Na(+)/K(+-)ATPase, lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein carbonyl (PC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), non-protein thiols (NPSH), ascorbic acid (AsA) and histological parameters and, yet, protein and glucose concentration in the surface area of mucous layer. Na(+)K(+-)ATPase was inhibited at 40 and 60μL/L compared to control. TBARS decreased at 40μL/L compared to control. PC, SOD and GST increased at 60μL/L in comparison to control. CAT increased at 20 and 60μL/L, and GPx increased in all Aza concentrations compared to control. NPSH decreased and AsA increased in all concentrations in comparison to control. Histological analyses demonstrated an increase in the intensity of the damage with increasing Aza concentration. Alterations in histological examination were elevation and hypertrophy of the epithelial cells of the secondary filament, hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the mucous and chlorate cells and lamellar aneurism. Glucose and protein concentrations in mucus layer increased at 60μL/L compared to control. In general, we suggest that 60μL/L Aza concentration affected several parameters causing disruptions carp metabolism. PMID:26689640

  10. Annual change in spirometric parameters among patients affected in Bhopal gas disaster: A retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    De, Sajal

    2013-01-01

    Background: The involvement of respiratory system due to inhalation of methyl isocyanate (MIC) during Bhopal gas disaster was particularly severe. We retrospectively evaluated the annual changes in spirometric parameters among those who were affected in this disaster (exposed survivors) and had respiratory symptoms. Materials and Methods: Spirometry reports of exposed survivors that were carried out in our institution were retrospectively reviewed and we identified 252 subjects who had performed spirometry at least twice with interval of more than one year. The annual changes in spirometric indices of them were calculated. Results: The average age of study population was 55.7 years and 72% were male. Annual decline of FEV1 ≥ 40 ml/yr was observed among 48% exposed survivors. The mean annual decline of FEV1 among symptomatic exposed survivors with initial normal spirometry was 91 ml (95% CI: 52 ml to 130 ml) and this was more than the patients with initial obstructive pattern. Among fifty four patients with initial normal spirometry, ten patients (18.5%) developed obstructive and two patients (5%) developed restrictive lung function abnormalities during follow up spirometry. Conclusion: The exposed survivors with chronic respiratory symptoms had accelerated decline in lung function and they are at higher risk of developing obstructive lung function. PMID:23741089

  11. Parameters affecting the photocatalytic degradation of dyes using TiO2: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza, Khan Mamun; Kurny, ASW; Gulshan, Fahmida

    2015-12-01

    Traditional chemical, physical and biological processes for treating wastewater containing textile dye have such disadvantages as high cost, high energy requirement and generation of secondary pollution during treatment process. The advanced oxidation processes technology has been attracting growing attention for the decomposition of organic dyes. Such processes are based on the light-enhanced generation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which oxidize the organic matter in solution and convert it completely into water, CO2 and inorganic compounds. In this presentation, the photocatalytic degradation of dyes in aqueous solution using TiO2 as photocatalyst under solar and UV irradiation has been reviewed. It is observed that the degradation of dyes depends on several parameters such as pH, catalyst concentration, substrate concentration and the presence of oxidants. Reaction temperature and the intensity of light also affect the degradation of dyes. Particle size, BET-surface area and different mineral forms of TiO2 also have influence on the degradation rate.

  12. A study of the parameters affecting the effectiveness of Moringa oleifera in drinking water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M.; Craven, T.; Mkandawire, T.; Edmondson, A. S.; O'Neill, J. G.

    The powder obtained from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree has been shown to be an effective primary coagulant for water treatment. When the seeds are dried, dehusked, crushed and added to water, the powder acts as a coagulant binding colloidal particles and bacteria to form agglomerated particles (flocs), which settle allowing the clarified supernatant to be poured off. Very little research has been undertaken on the parameters affecting the effectiveness of M. oleifera, especially in Malawi, for purification of drinking water and there is a great need for further testing in this area. Conclusive data needs to be compiled to demonstrate the effects of various water parameters have on the efficiency of the seeds. A parametric study was undertaken at Leeds Metropolitan University, UK, with the aim to establish the most appropriate dosing method; the optimum dosage for removal of turbidity; the influence of pH and temperature; together with the shelf life of the M. oleifera seeds. The study revealed that the most suitable dosing method was to mix the powder into a concentrated paste, hence forming a stock suspension. The optimum M. oleifera dose, for turbidity values between 40 and 200 NTU, ranged between 30 and 55 mg/l. With turbidity set at 130 NTU and a M. oleifera dose within the optimum range at 50 mg/l, pH levels were varied between 4 and 9. It was discovered that the coagulant performance was not too sensitive to pH fluctuations when conditions were within the optimum range. The most efficient coagulation, determined by the greatest reduction in turbidity, occurred at pH 6.5. Alkaline conditions were overall more favourable than acidic conditions; pH 9 had an efficiency of 65% of optimum, whilst at pH 5 the efficiency dropped to around 55%. The efficiency further dropped at pH 4, where the powder only produced results of around 10% of optimum conditions. A temperature range of 4-60 °C was studied in this research. Colder waters (<15 °C) were found to

  13. Sensitivity analysis of hydrogeological parameters affecting groundwater storage change caused by sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, J.; Kim, K.-H.; Lee, K.-K.

    2012-04-01

    Sea level rise, which is one of the representative phenomena of climate changes caused by global warming, can affect groundwater system. The rising trend of the sea level caused by the global warming is reported to be about 3 mm/year for the most recent 10 year average (IPCC, 2007). The rate of sea level rise around the Korean peninsula is reported to be 2.30±2.22 mm/yr during the 1960-1999 period (Cho, 2002) and 2.16±1.77 mm/yr (Kim et al., 2009) during the 1968-2007 period. Both of these rates are faster than the 1.8±0.5 mm/yr global average for the similar 1961-2003 period (IPCC, 2007). In this study, we analyzed changes in the groundwater environment affected by the sea level rise by using an analytical methodology. We tried to find the most effective parameters of groundwater amount change in order to estimate the change in fresh water amount in coastal groundwater. A hypothetical island model of a cylindrical shape in considered. The groundwater storage change is bi-directional as the sea level rises according to the natural and hydrogeological conditions. Analysis of the computation results shows that topographic slope and hydraulic conductivity are the most sensitive factors. The contributions of the groundwater recharge rate and the thickness of aquifer below sea level are relatively less effective. In the island with steep seashore slopes larger than 1~2 degrees or so, the storage amount of fresh water in a coastal area increases as sea level rises. On the other hand, when sea level drops, the storage amount decreases. This is because the groundwater level also rises with the rising sea level in steep seashores. For relatively flat seashores, where the slope is smaller than around 1-2 degrees, the storage amount of coastal fresh water decreases when the sea level rises because the area flooded by the rising sea water is increased. The volume of aquifer fresh water in this circumstance is greatly reduced in proportion to the flooded area with the sea

  14. Genetically Determined Dosage of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Affects Male Reproductive Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Grigorova, Marina; Punab, Margus; Ẑilaitienė, Birutė; Erenpreiss, Juris; Ausmees, Kristo; Matuleviĉius, Valentinas; Tsarev, Igor; Jørgensen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Context: The detailed role of FSH in contributing to male testicular function and fertility has been debated. We have previously identified the association between the T-allele of the FSHB promoter polymorphism (rs10835638; G/T, −211 bp from the mRNA start) and significantly reduced male serum FSH. Objective: In the current study, the T-allele carriers of the FSHB −211 G/T single nucleotide polymorphism represented a natural model for documenting downstream phenotypic consequences of insufficient FSH action. Design and Subjects: We genotyped rs10835638 in the population-based Baltic cohort of young men (n = 1054; GG carriers, n = 796; GT carriers, n = 244; TT carriers, n = 14) recruited by Andrology Centres in Tartu, Estonia; Riga, Latvia; and Kaunas, Lithuania. Marker-trait association testing was performed using linear regression (additive, recessive models) adjusted by age, body mass index, smoking, and recruitment center. Results: Serum hormones directly correlated with the T-allele dosage of rs10835638 included FSH (additive model, P = 1.11 × 10−6; T-allele effect, −0.41 IU/liter), inhibin-B (P = 2.16 × 10−3; T-allele effect, −14.67 pg/ml), and total testosterone (P = 9.30 × 10−3; T-allele effect, −1.46 nmol/liter). Parameters altered only among TT homozygotes were reduced testicular volume (recessive model, P = 1.19 × 10−4; TT genotype effect, −9.47 ml) and increased serum LH (P = 2.25 × 10−2; TT genotype effect, 1.07 IU/liter). The carrier status of rs10835638 alternative genotypes did not affect sperm motility and morphology, calculated free testosterone, serum SHBG, and estradiol concentrations. Conclusion: We showed for the first time that genetically determined low FSH may have wider downstream effects on the male reproductive system, including impaired testes development, altered testicular hormone levels (inhibin-B, total testosterone, LH), and affected male reproductive potential. PMID:21733993

  15. Sperm treatment affects capacitation parameters and penetration ability of ejaculated and epididymal boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Matás, C; Sansegundo, M; Ruiz, S; García-Vázquez, F A; Gadea, J; Romar, R; Coy, P

    2010-11-01

    This work was designed to study how this ability is affected by different sperm treatments routinely used for in vitro fertilization (IVF) assay. In this study, boar sperm samples from epididymal or ejaculated origin were processed by three different methods: left unwashed (NW group), washed in Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline supplemented with 0.1% BSA (BSA group), and washed on a Percoll(®) gradient (PERCOLL group). After preparation of semen samples, changes in motility patterns were studied by CASA, calcium uptake by spectrofluorimetry, and ROS generation, spontaneous acrosome reaction, and lipid disorder by means of flow cytometry. Finally IVF assays were also performed with the different semen samples and penetrability results evaluated at 2 and 4 h post insemination (hpi). Independently of the sperm treatment, epididymal spermatozoa showed higher values of progressive motility, percentage of live cells with low lipid disorder, and penetration ability at 4 hpi than the corresponding ejaculated spermatozoa. Ejaculated spermatozoa showed higher levels of calcium uptake, ROS generation and percentage of spontaneous acrosome reaction than epididymal sperm. Regarding sperm treatments, PERCOLL group showed the highest values for some motility parameters (linearity of the curvilinear trajectory, straightness, and average path velocity/curvilinear velocity), ROS generation and penetration ability at 2 and 4 hpi; however this same group showed the lowest values for sperm curvilinear velocity and lateral head displacement. From all experimental groups, ejaculated-PERCOLL-treated spermatozoa showed the highest fertilization ability after 2 hpi. Results suggest that capacitation pathways can be regulated by suitable treatments making the ejaculated sperm able to reach capacitation and fertilize oocytes in similar levels than epididymal spermatozoa, although most of the studied capacitation-associated changes do not correlate with this ability. PMID:20688369

  16. Parameters Affecting Spore Recovery from Wipes Used in Biological Surface Sampling ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Sandra M.; Filliben, James J.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2011-01-01

    The need for the precise and reliable collection of potential biothreat contaminants has motivated research in developing a better understanding of the variability in biological surface sampling methods. In this context, the objective of this work was to determine parameters affecting the efficiency of extracting Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores from commonly used wipe sampling materials and to describe performance using the interfacial energy concept. In addition, surface thermodynamics was applied to understand and predict surface sampling performance. Wipe materials were directly inoculated with known concentrations of B. anthracis spores and placed into extraction solutions, followed by sonication or vortexing. Experimental factors investigated included wipe material (polyester, cotton, and polyester-rayon), extraction solution (sterile deionized water [H2O], deionized water with 0.04% Tween 80 [H2O-T], phosphate-buffered saline [PBS], and PBS with 0.04% Tween 80 [PBST]), and physical dissociation method (vortexing or sonication). The most efficient extraction from wipes was observed for solutions containing the nonionic surfactant Tween 80. The increase in extraction efficiency due to surfactant addition was attributed to an attractive interfacial energy between Tween 80 and the centrifuge tube wall, which prevented spore adhesion. Extraction solution significantly impacted the extraction efficiency, as determined by statistical analysis (P < 0.05). Moreover, the extraction solution was the most important factor in extraction performance, followed by the wipe material. Polyester-rayon was the most efficient wipe material for releasing spores into solution by rank; however, no statistically significant difference between polyester-rayon and cotton was observed (P > 0.05). Vortexing provided higher spore recovery in H2O and H2O-T than sonication, when all three wipe materials and the reference control were considered (P < 0.05). PMID:21296945

  17. Emissions from Electronic Cigarettes: Key Parameters Affecting the Release of Harmful Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Logue, Jennifer M; Montesinos, V Nahuel; Russell, Marion L; Litter, Marta I; Gundel, Lara A; Destaillats, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Use of electronic cigarettes has grown exponentially over the past few years, raising concerns about harmful emissions. This study quantified potentially toxic compounds in the vapor and identified key parameters affecting emissions. Six principal constituents in three different refill "e-liquids" were propylene glycol (PG), glycerin, nicotine, ethanol, acetol, and propylene oxide. The latter, with mass concentrations of 0.4-0.6%, is a possible carcinogen and respiratory irritant. Aerosols generated with vaporizers contained up to 31 compounds, including nicotine, nicotyrine, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, glycidol, acrolein, acetol, and diacetyl. Glycidol is a probable carcinogen not previously identified in the vapor, and acrolein is a powerful irritant. Emission rates ranged from tens to thousands of nanograms of toxicants per milligram of e-liquid vaporized, and they were significantly higher for a single-coil vs a double-coil vaporizer (by up to an order of magnitude for aldehydes). By increasing the voltage applied to a single-coil device from 3.3 to 4.8 V, the mass of e-liquid consumed doubled from 3.7 to 7.5 mg puff(-1) and the total aldehyde emission rates tripled from 53 to 165 μg puff(-1), with acrolein rates growing by a factor of 10. Aldehyde emissions increased by more than 60% after the device was reused several times, likely due to the buildup of polymerization byproducts that degraded upon heating. These findings suggest that thermal degradation byproducts are formed during vapor generation. Glycidol and acrolein were primarily produced by glycerin degradation. Acetol and 2-propen-1-ol were produced mostly from PG, while other compounds (e.g., formaldehyde) originated from both. Because emissions originate from reaction of the most common e-liquid constituents (solvents), harmful emissions are expected to be ubiquitous when e-cigarette vapor is present. PMID:27461870

  18. Sensorless Control of Synchronous Reluctance Motors Using an On-Line Parameter Identification Method not Affected by Position Estimation Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Akitoshi; Ichikawa, Shinji; Tomita, Mutuwo; Doki, Shinji; Okuma, Shigeru

    This paper presents a novel on-line parameter identification method for sensorless control of Synchronous Reluctance Motors (SynRMs). Although conventional sensorless control methods based on mathematical models usually need some complex measurements of motor parameters in advance, the proposed identification method does not require them and can be realized on-line. The proposed method identifies motor parameters under sensorless control, so rotor position and velocity can not be used to identify these parameters. However, the proposed method does not need rotor position and veocity, identified parameters are not affected by these estimation errors. The sensorless control using identified motor parameters is realized, and effective of the proposed method is verified by experimental results.

  19. Intestinal Epithelial Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Affects Epithelial Function and Colonic Microbiota and Promotes a Risk for Transmissible Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Dheer, Rishu; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Davies, Julie M.; Lang, Jessica K.; Phillips, Matthew C.; Pastorini, Cristhine; Vazquez-Pertejo, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence obtained from gene knockout studies supports the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in intestinal inflammation and microbiota recognition. Increased epithelial TLR4 expression is observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, little is known of the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on intestinal homeostasis. Here, we examined the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on epithelial function and microbiota by using transgenic villin-TLR4 mice that overexpress TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium. Our results revealed that villin-TLR4 mice are characterized by increases in the density of mucosa-associated bacteria and bacterial translocation. Furthermore, increased epithelial TLR4 signaling was associated with an impaired epithelial barrier, altered expression of antimicrobial peptide genes, and altered epithelial cell differentiation. The composition of the colonic luminal and mucosa-associated microbiota differed between villin-TLR4 and wild-type (WT) littermates. Interestingly, WT mice cohoused with villin-TLR4 mice displayed greater susceptibility to acute colitis than singly housed WT mice did. The results of this study suggest that epithelial TLR4 expression shapes the microbiota and affects the functional properties of the epithelium. The changes in the microbiota induced by increased epithelial TLR4 signaling are transmissible and exacerbate dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Together, our findings imply that host innate immune signaling can modulate intestinal bacteria and ultimately the host's susceptibility to colitis. PMID:26755160

  20. Intestinal Epithelial Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Affects Epithelial Function and Colonic Microbiota and Promotes a Risk for Transmissible Colitis.

    PubMed

    Dheer, Rishu; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Davies, Julie M; Lang, Jessica K; Phillips, Matthew C; Pastorini, Cristhine; Vazquez-Pertejo, Maria T; Abreu, Maria T

    2016-03-01

    Evidence obtained from gene knockout studies supports the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in intestinal inflammation and microbiota recognition. Increased epithelial TLR4 expression is observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, little is known of the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on intestinal homeostasis. Here, we examined the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on epithelial function and microbiota by using transgenic villin-TLR4 mice that overexpress TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium. Our results revealed that villin-TLR4 mice are characterized by increases in the density of mucosa-associated bacteria and bacterial translocation. Furthermore, increased epithelial TLR4 signaling was associated with an impaired epithelial barrier, altered expression of antimicrobial peptide genes, and altered epithelial cell differentiation. The composition of the colonic luminal and mucosa-associated microbiota differed between villin-TLR4 and wild-type (WT) littermates. Interestingly, WT mice cohoused with villin-TLR4 mice displayed greater susceptibility to acute colitis than singly housed WT mice did. The results of this study suggest that epithelial TLR4 expression shapes the microbiota and affects the functional properties of the epithelium. The changes in the microbiota induced by increased epithelial TLR4 signaling are transmissible and exacerbate dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Together, our findings imply that host innate immune signaling can modulate intestinal bacteria and ultimately the host's susceptibility to colitis. PMID:26755160

  1. Dietary supplementation of arachidonic acid increases arachidonic acid and lipoxin A4 contents in colon, but does not affect severity or prostaglandin E2 content in murine colitis model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid (ARA) is an essential fatty acid and a major constituent of biomembranes. It is converted into various lipid mediators, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and lipoxin A4 (LXA4). The effects of dietary ARA on colon maintenance are unclear because PGE2 has both mucosal protective and proinflammatory effects, and LXA4 has an anti-inflammatory role. Our objective is to clarify the effects of dietary ARA on an experimental murine colitis model. Methods C57BL/6 mice were fed three types of ARA diet (0.075%, 0.15% or 0.305% ARA in diet), DHA diet (0.315% DHA) or control diet for 6 weeks, and were then administered dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) for 7 days to induce colitis. We evaluated colitis severity, fatty acid and lipid mediator contents in colonic tissue, and the expression of genes related to lipid mediator formation. Results ARA composition of colon phospholipids was significantly elevated in an ARA dose-dependent manner. ARA, as well as DHA, did not affect colitis severity (body weight loss, colon shortening, diarrhea and hemoccult phenomena) and histological features. PGE2 contents in the colon were unchanged by dietary ARA, while LXA4 contents increased in an ARA dose-dependent manner. Gene expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 was unchanged, while that of 12/15-lipoxgenase (LOX) was significantly increased by dietary ARA. ARA composition did not correlate with neither colon length nor PGE2 contents, but significantly correlated with LXA4 content. Conclusion These results suggest that dietary ARA increases ARA and LXA4 contents in colon, but that it has no effect on severity and PGE2 content in a DSS-induced murine colitis model. PMID:24507383

  2. Soil moisture affects fatty acids and oil quality parameters in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought affects yield of peanut, but its effect on oleic and linoleic acids that influence its oil quality of peanut genotypes with different levels of drought resistance has not been clearly investigated. Therefore, the aims of this research were to determine whether soil water levels could affect...

  3. Stability of Intercellular Exchange of Biochemical Substances Affected by Variability of Environmental Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailović, Dragutin T.; Budinčević, Mirko; Balaž, Igor; Mihailović, Anja

    Communication between cells is realized by exchange of biochemical substances. Due to internal organization of living systems and variability of external parameters, the exchange is heavily influenced by perturbations of various parameters at almost all stages of the process. Since communication is one of essential processes for functioning of living systems it is of interest to investigate conditions for its stability. Using previously developed simplified model of bacterial communication in a form of coupled difference logistic equations we investigate stability of exchange of signaling molecules under variability of internal and external parameters.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of Parameters Affecting Protection of Water Resources at Hanford WA

    SciTech Connect

    DAVIS, J.D.

    2002-02-08

    The scope of this analysis was to assess the sensitivity of contaminant fluxes from the vadose zone to the water table, to several parameters, some of which can be controlled by operational considerations.

  5. Fungal infection of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Praneenararat, Surat

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are pathogens that commonly infect immunocompromised patients and can affect any organs of the body, including the colon. However, the literature provides limited details on colonic infections caused by fungi. This article is an intensive review of information available on the fungi that can cause colon infections. It uses a comparative style so that its conclusions may be accessible for clinical application. PMID:25364269

  6. Do malignant diseases affect semen quality? Sperm parameters of men with cancers.

    PubMed

    Caponecchia, L; Cimino, G; Sacchetto, R; Fiori, C; Sebastianelli, A; Salacone, P; Marcucci, I; Tomassini, S; Rago, R

    2016-04-01

    The advent of modern treatments together with the improvement of the surgical techniques has significantly increased 5-year survival rates of young patients with cancer. Although the deleterious effects of chemotherapy and radiation are well documented, controversies exist about the effect of cancer itself on semen parameters before treatment. We collected data on 236 patients representative of different types of cancers reoffered at our institution for sperm cryopreservation with the aim to correlate the pre-freeze semen parameters with type of cancer, disease stage and with semen quality of 102 fertile and healthy men. The median baseline semen parameters of all our patients with cancer are placed above the 5th percentile of the World Health Organization reference value, but the type of cancer may impact the sperm parameters. In testicular tumours and in Hodgkin lymphoma, we show a semen concentration statistically lower than in the fertile population, while in patients with other cancers, there is no difference with the healthy men. We found no correlation between semen quality and disease stage. Eighty-six per cent of our patients do not have children at the time of semen cryopreservation, and the only established clinical option for preserving fertility of these men is cryopreservation of spermatozoa. PMID:26173956

  7. Factors Affecting the Item Parameter Estimation and Classification Accuracy of the DINA Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Jimmy; Hong, Yuan; Deng, Weiling

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the statistical properties of the deterministic inputs, noisy "and" gate cognitive diagnosis (DINA) model, the impact of several factors on the quality of the item parameter estimates and classification accuracy was investigated. Results of the simulation study indicate that the fully Bayes approach is most accurate when the…

  8. Plunger Kinematic Parameters Affecting Quality of High-Pressure Die-Cast Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorese, Elena; Bonollo, Franco

    2016-07-01

    The selection of the optimal process parameters in high-pressure die casting has been long recognized as a complex problem due to the involvement of a large number of interconnected variables. Among these variables, the effect of the plunger motion has been proved to play a prominent role, even if a thorough and exhaustive study is still missing in the literature. To overcome this gap, this work aims at identifying the most relevant plunger kinematic parameters and estimates their correlation with the casting quality, by means of a statistically significant sample manufactured with different plunger motion profiles. In particular, slow and fast shot velocities and switching position between two stages have been varied randomly in accordance with design of experiment methodology. The quality has been assessed through the static mechanical properties and porosity percentage. As a further proof, the percentage of oxides has been estimated on the fracture surfaces. These measurements have been correlated to novel parameters, representing the mechanical energy and the inertial force related to the plunger motion, that have been extracted from the time-history of the displacement curves. The application of statistical methods demonstrates that these novel parameters accurately explain and predict the overall quality of castings.

  9. Plunger Kinematic Parameters Affecting Quality of High-Pressure Die-Cast Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorese, Elena; Bonollo, Franco

    2016-04-01

    The selection of the optimal process parameters in high-pressure die casting has been long recognized as a complex problem due to the involvement of a large number of interconnected variables. Among these variables, the effect of the plunger motion has been proved to play a prominent role, even if a thorough and exhaustive study is still missing in the literature. To overcome this gap, this work aims at identifying the most relevant plunger kinematic parameters and estimates their correlation with the casting quality, by means of a statistically significant sample manufactured with different plunger motion profiles. In particular, slow and fast shot velocities and switching position between two stages have been varied randomly in accordance with design of experiment methodology. The quality has been assessed through the static mechanical properties and porosity percentage. As a further proof, the percentage of oxides has been estimated on the fracture surfaces. These measurements have been correlated to novel parameters, representing the mechanical energy and the inertial force related to the plunger motion, that have been extracted from the time-history of the displacement curves. The application of statistical methods demonstrates that these novel parameters accurately explain and predict the overall quality of castings.

  10. Study on dipolar orientation and relaxation characteristics of guest-host polymers affected by corona poling parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Binfeng; Hu, Guohua; Lu, Changgui; Cui, Yiping

    2009-05-01

    The dipolar orientation and relaxation characteristics of guest-host polymers poled by corona poling have been studied in detail. The mechanisms of dipolar orientation affected by poling parameters (voltage, temperature, time and cooling velocity) in polymers have been analyzed by UV-Vis absorption spectra and microscope. The results show that with increasing poling voltage, the orientation order parameter increases to maximum and then drops. Also the same trend of orientation order parameter has been obtained with increasing poling temperature. While the orientation order parameter increases to saturation with increasing poling time. With the biexponential model analyzing, it is shown that the relaxation of dipolar orientation can be slowed by slowing the cooling velocity during the poling process.

  11. Investigation of parameters affecting treatment time in MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Djin, W. A.; Burtnyk, M.; Chopra, R.; Bronskill, M. J.

    2010-03-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy shows promise for minimally invasive treatment of localized prostate cancer. Real-time MR temperature feedback enables the 3D control of thermal therapy to define an accurate region within the prostate. Previous in-vivo canine studies showed the feasibility of this method using transurethral planar transducers. The aim of this simulation study was to reduce the procedure time, while maintaining treatment accuracy by investigating new combinations of treatment parameters. A numerical model was used to simulate a multi-element heating applicator rotating inside the urethra in 10 human prostates. Acoustic power and rotation rate were varied based on the feedback of the temperature in the prostate. Several parameters were investigated for improving the treatment time. Maximum acoustic power and rotation rate were optimized interdependently as a function of prostate radius and transducer operating frequency, while avoiding temperatures >90° C in the prostate. Other trials were performed on each parameter separately, with the other parameter fixed. The concept of using dual-frequency transducers was studied, using the fundamental frequency or the 3rd harmonic component depending on the prostate radius. The maximum acoustic power which could be used decreased as a function of the prostate radius and the frequency. Decreasing the frequency (9.7-3.0 MHz) or increasing the power (10-20 W.cm-2) led to treatment times shorter by up to 50% under appropriate conditions. Dual-frequency configurations, while helpful, tended to have less impact on treatment times. Treatment accuracy was maintained and critical adjacent tissues like the rectal wall remained protected. The interdependence between power and frequency may require integrating multi-parametric functions inside the controller for future optimizations. As a first approach, however, even slight modifications of key parameters can be sufficient to reduce treatment time.

  12. Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine differentially affects hemostatic parameters in diverse conditions in rats: an investigation via thromboelastography.

    PubMed

    Cam, Betul; Sagdilek, Engin; Yildirim, Nalan; Savci, Vahide

    2015-04-01

    Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) has several physiological and pharmacological effects on various bodily functions, including hemostasis. This study determined the impact of CDP-choline on hemostasis in a trauma-hemorrhage (T-H) model in rats or under in vitro conditions or after chronic treatment via thromboelastography. Trauma-hemorrhage resuscitation was induced, and either saline (1 mL/kg) or CDP-choline (50 mg/kg) was injected intravenously just prior to resuscitation in the T-H group and at the same time point in the sham-control group. The effects of CDP-choline on thromboelastogram parameters, coagulation markers, and platelet aggregation were investigated under in vitro conditions (1.5 mM, 30- or 3-min incubation in blood or plasma) and after chronic use (50 mg/kg, i.p., 10 days). Acute CDP-choline treatment was shown to decrease the initial and maximum clot formation time, accelerate clotting rapidity, reduce the lysis percentage, and increase the coagulation index in the T-H resuscitation group, whereas the same treatment in the sham-control rats did not alter any of the thromboelastogram parameters. However, the incubation of whole blood with CDP-choline prolonged the initial and maximum clot formation time, and CDP-choline treatment significantly decreased the slopes of the disaggregation and aggregation curves when platelets were stimulated with ADP and collagen, respectively. Interestingly, the chronic use of this drug did not influence any of these hemostatic parameters. These data implicate that acute but not chronic CDP-choline administration may differentially alter the hemostatic parameters under diverse conditions. The drug may produce a hypercoagulable state in activated situations but cause opposite effects under normal in vitro conditions. PMID:25394251

  13. Experimental Parameters Affecting Stripping of Rare Earth Elements from Loaded Sorptive Media in Simulated Geothermal Brines

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dean Stull

    2016-05-24

    Experimental results from several studies exploring the impact of pH and acid volume on the stripping of rare earth elements (REEs) loaded onto ligand-based media via an active column. The REEs in this experiment were loaded onto the media through exposure to a simulated geothermal brine with known mineral concentrations. The data include the experiment results, rare earth element concentrations, and the experimental parameters varied.

  14. Application of ANN to evaluate effective parameters affecting failure load and displacement of RC buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakan Arslan, M.

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated the efficiency of an artificial neural network (ANN) in predicting and determining failure load and failure displacement of multi story reinforced concrete (RC) buildings. The study modeled a RC building with four stories and three bays, with a load bearing system composed of columns and beams. Non-linear static pushover analysis of the key parameters in change defined in Turkish Earthquake Code (TEC-2007) for columns and beams was carried out and the capacity curves, failure loads and displacements were obtained. Totally 720 RC buildings were analyzed according to the change intervals of the parameters chosen. The input parameters were selected as longitudinal bar ratio (ρl) of columns, transverse reinforcement ratio (Asw/sc), axial load level (N/No), column and beam cross section, strength of concrete (fc) and the compression bar ratio (ρ'/ρ) on the beam supports. Data from the nonlinear analysis were assessed with ANN in terms of failure load and failure displacement. For all outputs, ANN was trained and tested using of 11 back-propagation methods. All of the ANN models were found to perform well for both failure loads and displacements. The analyses also indicated that a considerable portion of existing RC building stock in Turkey may not meet the safety standards of the Turkish Earthquake Code (TEC-2007).

  15. Coated or doped carbon nanotube network sensors as affected by environmental parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods for using modified single wall carbon nanotubes ("SWCNTs") to detect presence and/or concentration of a gas component, such as a halogen (e.g., Cl.sub.2), hydrogen halides (e.g., HCl), a hydrocarbon (e.g., C.sub.nH.sub.2n+2), an alcohol, an aldehyde or a ketone, to which an unmodified SWCNT is substantially non-reactive. In a first embodiment, a connected network of SWCNTs is coated with a selected polymer, such as chlorosulfonated polyethylene, hydroxypropyl cellulose, polystyrene and/or polyvinylalcohol, and change in an electrical parameter or response value (e.g., conductance, current, voltage difference or resistance) of the coated versus uncoated SWCNT networks is analyzed. In a second embodiment, the network is doped with a transition element, such as Pd, Pt, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os and/or Au, and change in an electrical parameter value is again analyzed. The parameter change value depends monotonically, not necessarily linearly, upon concentration of the gas component. Two general algorithms are presented for estimating concentration value(s), or upper or lower concentration bounds on such values, from measured differences of response values.

  16. Cryopreservation affects bovine sperm intracellular parameters associated with capacitation and acrosome exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Bailey, Janice L; Leclerc, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Although semen cryopreservation is widely and commonly used in the bovine breeding industry, half the spermatozoa do not survive and most of those that do survive undergo numerous physiological changes that affect their fertilising ability. The aim of the present study was to determine how cryopreservation affects the intracellular events involved in sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction. Immediately after thawing and washing, almost 50% of spermatozoa were capacitated and more than 20% had lost their acrosome. The sperm cAMP concentration was lower than that in freshly ejaculated spermatozoa, but the cytosolic pH (pHcyt) was in the expected range. The free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) was higher than in fresh spermatozoa and cryopreserved spermatozoa had internally stored Ca2+. Phenylarsine oxide increased pHcyt and both cytosolic and stored Ca2+ concentrations, whereas orthovanadate enhanced acrosome loss and protein tyrosine phosphorylation (P-Tyr). Heparin increased the percentage of spermatozoa expressing the B (capacitated) chlortetracycline binding pattern, pHcyt, P-Tyr and Ca2+ storage. Moreover, positive correlations exist between capacitation, cAMP, P-Tyr and stored Ca2+, whereas the acrosome reaction is positively correlated with pHcyt and [Ca2+]cyt. These results demonstrate that sperm regulatory mechanisms may be affected by the cryopreservation procedure, but frozen-thawed sperm can still regulate their capacitation and acrosome reaction signalling pathways. PMID:19383259

  17. Parameter sensitivities affecting the flutter speed of a MW-sized blade.

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, Donald Wayne, Jr.

    2004-10-01

    With the current trend toward larger and larger horizontal axis wind turbines, classical flutter is becoming a more critical issue. Recent studies have indicated that for a single blade turning in still air the flutter speed for a modern 35 m blade occurs at approximately twice its operating speed (2 per rev), whereas for smaller blades (5-9 m), both modern and early designs, the flutter speeds are in the range of 3.5-6 per rev. Scaling studies demonstrate that the per rev flutter speed should not change with scale. Thus, design requirements that change with increasing blade size are producing the concurrent reduction in per rev flutter speeds. In comparison with an early small blade design (5 m blade), flutter computations indicate that the non rotating modes which combine to create the flutter mode change as the blade becomes larger (i.e., for the larger blade the second flapwise mode, as opposed to the first flapwise mode for the smaller blade, combines with the first torsional mode to produce the flutter mode). For the more modern smaller blade design (9 m blade), results show that the non rotating modes that couple are similar to those of the larger blade. For the wings of fixed-wing aircraft, it is common knowledge that judicious selection of certain design parameters can increase the airspeed associated with the onset of flutter. Two parameters, the chordwise location of the center of mass and the ratio of the flapwise natural frequency to the torsional natural frequency, are especially significant. In this paper studies are performed to determine the sensitivity of the per rev flutter speed to these parameters for a 35 m wind turbine blade. Additional studies are performed to determine which structural characteristics of the blade are most significant in explaining the previously mentioned per rev flutter speed differences. As a point of interest, flutter results are also reported for two recently designed 9 m twist/coupled blades.

  18. Parameter sensitivities affecting the flutter speed of a MW-sized blade.

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, Donald Wayne, Jr.

    2005-08-01

    With the current trend toward larger and larger horizontal axis wind turbines, classical flutter is becoming a more critical issue. Recent studies have indicated that for a single blade turning in still air the flutter speed for a modern 35 m blade occurs at approximately twice its operating speed (2 per rev), whereas for smaller blades (5-9 m), both modern and early designs, the flutter speeds are in the range of 3.5-6 per rev. Scaling studies demonstrate that the per rev flutter speed should not change with scale. Thus, design requirements that change with increasing blade size are producing the concurrent reduction in per rev flutter speeds. In comparison with an early small blade design (5 m blade), flutter computations indicate that the non rotating modes which combine to create the flutter mode change as the blade becomes larger (i.e., for the larger blade the second flapwise mode, as opposed to the first flapwise mode for the smaller blade, combines with the first torsional mode to produce the flutter mode). For the more modern smaller blade design (9 m blade), results show that the non rotating modes that couple are similar to those of the larger blade. For the wings of fixed-wing aircraft, it is common knowledge that judicious selection of certain design parameters can increase the airspeed associated with the onset of flutter. Two parameters, the chordwise location of the center of mass and the ratio of the flapwise natural frequency to the torsional natural frequency, are especially significant. In this paper studies are performed to determine the sensitivity of the per rev flutter speed to these parameters for a 35 m wind turbine blade. Additional studies are performed to determine which structural characteristics of the blade are most significant in explaining the previously mentioned per rev flutter speed differences. As a point of interest, flutter results are also reported for two recently designed 9 m twist/coupled blades.

  19. Parameters affecting resin-anchored cable bolt performance: Results of in situ evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Zelanko, J.C.; Mucho, T.P.; Compton, C.S.; Long, L.E.; Bailey, P.E.

    1995-11-01

    Cable bolt support techniques, including hardware and anchorage systems, continue to evolve to meet US mining requirements. For cable support systems to be successfully implemented into new ground control areas, the mechanics of this support and the potential range of performance need to be better understood. To contribute to this understanding, a series of 36 pull tests were performed on 10 ft long cable bolts using various combinations of hole diameters, resin formulations, anchor types, and with and without resin dams. These test provided insight as to the influence of these four parameters on cable system performance. Performance was assessed in terms of support capacity (maximum load attained in a pull test), system stiffness (assessed from two intervals of load-deformation), and from the general load-deformation response. Three characteristic load-deformation responses were observed. An Analysis of Variance identified a number of main effects and interactions of significance to support capacity and stiffness. The factorial experiment performed in this study provides insight to the effects of several design parameters associated with resin-anchored cable bolts.

  20. Parameters affecting the occurrence and removal of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in twenty Canadian wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, M; Guerra, P; Theocharides, M; Barclay, K; Smyth, S A; Alaee, M

    2013-05-01

    This study determined PBDE levels in influent, primary effluent, and final effluent collected from diverse treatment processes including four aerated lagoons, two facultative lagoons, four primary treatments, eight secondary biological treatments and two advanced treatments. Parameters examined for correlation included seasonal temperature, community sizes, industrial inputs, and operational conditions. PBDE levels in influent were 21-1000 ng/L (median 190 ng/L). Higher concentrations in influent samples were found during summer, and in WWTPs which treated leachate and higher proportions of industrial wastewater vs. residential wastewater. Final effluent levels ranged between 3 and 270 ng/L (median 12 ng/L). Among all congeners, the sum of BDE-209, -47 and -99 accounted for 79 and 71% of total PBDEs in influent and final effluent, respectively, with BDE-209 having the highest proportion. Median removal efficiencies for all process types exceeded 90% except primary treatment at 70%. PBDE levels and removals were correlated to the levels and removals of conventional parameters that represent wastewater strength, such as chemical oxygen demand and total suspended solids. The role of the primary clarifier was significant (∼82% removal) and removal was associated with hydraulic retention time (HRT) and surface loading rate. Best removal of PBDEs was achieved at greater than 2000 mg/L mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS), longer than 10 h of HRT, and 9 days of solids retention time. PMID:23466032

  1. Does Body Mass Index in Pregnant Women Affect Laboratory Parameters in the Newborn?

    PubMed Central

    Raguž, Marjana Jerković; Brzica, Jerko

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the effect of body mass index (BMI) during pregnancy in laboratory parameters in the serum of the three groups of pregnant women and in their newborns. Methods This prospective study is comparison between the three groups of pregnant women and their newborns categorized according to their BMI. The study included 128 pregnant women and their newborns. In this study, the concentration of blood count, iron, ferritin, and bilirubin were analyzed in the subjects. Results The pregnant women in the three groups significantly differ in the values of blood count (p < 0.001). Statistically significant difference in iron and ferritin was not found between individual three studied groups of pregnant women (p = 0.947). The newborn of the first group of pregnant women had significantly lower values of ferritin (p < 0.001), leucocytes (p < 0.001), and bilirubin (p < 0.001). Significant positive correlation between BMI of pregnant women and leucocytes, ferritin, and bilirubin of the newborn was found (p < 0.001). Conclusion In this study, the tested pregnant women do not have biochemical signs of anemia, neither do their newborns. It was noted that there was no negative correlation between individual tested biochemical parameters for anemia in pregnant women and their newborns. PMID:27119047

  2. Chronic ethanol consumption impairs spatial remote memory in rats but does not affect cortical cholinergic parameters.

    PubMed

    Pereira, S R; Menezes, G A; Franco, G C; Costa, A E; Ribeiro, A M

    1998-06-01

    We have studied learning, memory and cortical cholinergic parameters after oral administration of 20% v/v ethanol solution to male Fisher rats for 6 months. A group of rats were trained to behave efficiently in an eight-arm radial maze and after that split into two subgroups submitted to ethanol or control treatment. Ethanol-treated rats had more difficulty in relearning the same task 1 year later, compared to ethanol-untreated rats (control). Differences in working memory performance were found, but only in the first 10 training sessions. Another group of rats, which had not been pretrained, was also split into two subgroups submitted to ethanol or control treatment. After that, these rats were trained in the radial maze task for the first time. No significant difference was found between the reference memory performance of the untreated subgroup and the treated one. These two subgroups did not significantly differ in their working memory performance either. Moreover, there were no significant differences between treated and control subjects in the following biochemical brain cortical parameters: in vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and stimulated acetylcholine (ACh) release. This work presents an experimental design that allows assessment of remote memory performance after ethanol chronic consumption and shows that the experimental subject is able to retain the behaviors learned 1 year before. It was concluded that chronic ethanol treatment may cause retrograde amnesia, which does not seem to be linked with a cortical cholinergic deficit. PMID:9632211

  3. An empirical model for parameters affecting energy consumption in boron removal from boron-containing wastewaters by electrocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, A Erdem; Boncukcuoğlu, Recep; Kocakerim, M Muhtar

    2007-06-01

    In this study, it was investigated parameters affecting energy consumption in boron removal from boron containing wastewaters prepared synthetically, via electrocoagulation method. The solution pH, initial boron concentration, dose of supporting electrolyte, current density and temperature of solution were selected as experimental parameters affecting energy consumption. The obtained experimental results showed that boron removal efficiency reached up to 99% under optimum conditions, in which solution pH was 8.0, current density 6.0 mA/cm(2), initial boron concentration 100mg/L and solution temperature 293 K. The current density was an important parameter affecting energy consumption too. High current density applied to electrocoagulation cell increased energy consumption. Increasing solution temperature caused to decrease energy consumption that high temperature decreased potential applied under constant current density. That increasing initial boron concentration and dose of supporting electrolyte caused to increase specific conductivity of solution decreased energy consumption. As a result, it was seen that energy consumption for boron removal via electrocoagulation method could be minimized at optimum conditions. An empirical model was predicted by statistically. Experimentally obtained values were fitted with values predicted from empirical model being as following; [formula in text]. Unfortunately, the conditions obtained for optimum boron removal were not the conditions obtained for minimum energy consumption. It was determined that support electrolyte must be used for increase boron removal and decrease electrical energy consumption. PMID:17084968

  4. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... red or processed meats Have colorectal polyps Have inflammatory bowel disease ( Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis ) Have a family history of colon cancer Have a personal history of breast cancer Some inherited diseases also increase the risk ...

  5. Consumption of prebiotic inulin enriched with oligofructose in combination with the probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium lactis has minor effects on selected immune parameters in polypectomised and colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Roller, Monika; Clune, Yvonne; Collins, Kevin; Rechkemmer, Gerhard; Watzl, Bernhard

    2007-04-01

    Probiotics (PRO) modulate immunity in humans, while the effect of prebiotics (PRE) and synbiotics (SYN) on the human immune system are not well studied yet. The objective of this study was to investigate whether daily intake of a SYN modulates immune functions. In a randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, thirty-four colon cancer patients who had undergone 'curative resection' and forty polypectomised patients participated. Subjects of the SYN group daily received encapsulated bacteria (1 x 10(10) colony-forming units of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and 1 x 10(10) colony-forming units of Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12)) and 10 g of inulin enriched with oligofructose. Controls received encapsulated maltodextrin and 10 g of maltodextrin. Prior to intervention (T1), and 6 (T2) and 12 weeks after the start of the intervention (T3), phagocytic and respiratory burst activity of neutrophils and monocytes, lytic activity of natural killer cells and production of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10 and IL-12, as well as tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were measured. In faeces, the concentrations of transforming growth factor-beta1 and prostaglandin E2 were measured. IL-2 secretion by activated PBMC from the polyp group increased significantly between T1 or T2 and T3 (P < 0.05). In the cancer group, SYN treatment resulted in an increased capacity of PBMC to produce IFN-gamma at T3 (P < 0.05). Other immunity-related parameters were not affected by SYN treatment, neither in the cancer nor in the polyp group. In conclusion, supplementation with this SYN has minor stimulatory effects on the systemic immune system of the two study groups. Further studies in humans should aim to focus on the gut-associated immune system. PMID:17349080

  6. Use of Artificial Neural Networks to Examine Parameters Affecting the Immobilization of Streptokinase in Chitosan

    PubMed Central

    Modaresi, Seyed Mohamad Sadegh; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Soltani, Arash; Baharifar, Hadi; Amani, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Streptokinase is a potent fibrinolytic agent which is widely used in treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) and acute myocardial infarction (MI). Major limitation of this enzyme is its short biological half-life in the blood stream. Our previous report showed that complexing streptokinase with chitosan could be a solution to overcome this limitation. The aim of this research was to establish an artificial neural networks (ANNs) model for identifying main factors influencing the loading efficiency of streptokinase, as an essential parameter determining efficacy of the enzyme. Three variables, namely, chitosan concentration, buffer pH and enzyme concentration were considered as input values and the loading efficiency was used as output. Subsequently, the experimental data were modeled and the model was validated against a set of unseen data. The developed model indicated chitosan concentration as probably the most important factor, having reverse effect on the loading efficiency. PMID:25587327

  7. Use of artificial neural networks to examine parameters affecting the immobilization of streptokinase in chitosan.

    PubMed

    Modaresi, Seyed Mohamad Sadegh; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Soltani, Arash; Baharifar, Hadi; Amani, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Streptokinase is a potent fibrinolytic agent which is widely used in treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) and acute myocardial infarction (MI). Major limitation of this enzyme is its short biological half-life in the blood stream. Our previous report showed that complexing streptokinase with chitosan could be a solution to overcome this limitation. The aim of this research was to establish an artificial neural networks (ANNs) model for identifying main factors influencing the loading efficiency of streptokinase, as an essential parameter determining efficacy of the enzyme. Three variables, namely, chitosan concentration, buffer pH and enzyme concentration were considered as input values and the loading efficiency was used as output. Subsequently, the experimental data were modeled and the model was validated against a set of unseen data. The developed model indicated chitosan concentration as probably the most important factor, having reverse effect on the loading efficiency. PMID:25587327

  8. Quality parameters for alpaca (Vicugna pacos) semen are affected by semen collection procedure.

    PubMed

    Morton, K M; Thomson, P C; Bailey, K; Evans, G; Maxwell, W M C

    2010-08-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) is poorly developed in camelids owing to the difficulty in collecting high quality semen and the highly viscous nature of the semen. Semen collected by artificial vagina (AV) is often of low quality and must be improved before any further development of AI technology can occur. The present study investigated the effects of adding a cervix-like stricture to the AV, presence of females, collecting semen into Androhep, skim-milk or Tris diluents, and catalase supplementation (0, 100, 200 or 600 units/ml) of Tris diluent on alpaca semen quality parameters. The addition of a cervix-like stricture increased mating length (p < 0.05), whilst the presence of females during semen collection did not improve semen quality parameters (p > 0.05). Collection of semen into Tris diluent improved sperm motility (58.0 +/- 11.9%) compared with the control (34.0 +/- 10.8%; p < 0.05), Androhep (33.5 +/- 10.7%) and skim-milk diluents (28.2 +/- 10.4%). Semen viscosity was reduced by collection into Androhep (4.6 +/- 1.7 mm) and skim-milk diluents (3.6 +/- 1.3 mm) compared with Tris diluent (5.7 +/- 2.1 mm) and no collection medium (9.3 +/- 3.5 mm; p < 0.05). Tris diluent supplemented with 100, 200 or 600 units/ml catalase increased semen viscosity (5.0 +/- 3.2 and 4.9 +/- 3.2 mm). Collection of alpaca semen by AV into Tris diluent increased semen quality facilitating further development of AI technology in alpacas. PMID:19144029

  9. Ageing/Menopausal Status in Healthy Women and Ageing in Healthy Men Differently Affect Cardiometabolic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Campesi, Ilaria; Occhioni, Stefano; Tonolo, Giancarlo; Cherchi, Sara; Basili, Stefania; Carru, Ciriaco; Zinellu, Angelo; Franconi, Flavia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gender medicine requires a global analysis of an individual's life. Menopause and ageing induce variations of some cardiometabolic parameters, but, it is unknown if this occurs in a sex-specific manner. Here, some markers of oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction are analysed in men younger and older than 45 years and in pre- and postmenopausal women. Methods: Serum and plasma sample were assayed for TNF-α and IL-6, malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls and for methylated arginines using ELISA kits, colorimetric methods and capillary electrophoresis. Results: Before body weight correction, men overall had higher creatinine, red blood cells and haemoglobin and lower triglycerides than women. Men younger than 45 years had lower levels of TNF-α and malondialdehyde and higher levels of arginine than age-matched women, while postmenopausal women had higher IL-6 concentrations than men, and higher total cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine and IL-6 levels than younger women. Men younger than 45 years had lower total cholesterol and malondialdehyde than older men. After correction, some differences remained, others were amplified, others disappeared and some new differences emerged. Moreover, some parameters showed a correlation with age, and some of them correlated with each other as functions of ageing and ageing/menopausal status. Conclusions: Ageing/menopausal status increased many more cardiovascular risk factors in women than ageing in men, confirming that postmenopausal women had increased vascular vulnerability and indicating the need of early cardiovascular prevention in women. Sex-gender differences are also influenced by body weight, indicating as a matter of debate whether body weight should be seen as a true confounder or as part of the causal pathway. PMID:26941571

  10. A systematic experimental investigation of significant parameters affecting model tire hydroplaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, G. A.; Ehrlich, I. R.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive parametric study of model and small pneumatic tires operating on a wet surface are presented. Hydroplaning inception (spin down) and rolling restoration (spin up) are discussed. Conclusions indicate that hydroplaning inception occurs at a speed significantly higher than the rolling restoration speed. Hydroplaning speed increases considerably with tread depth, surface roughness and tire inflation pressure of footprint pressure, and only moderately with increased load. Water film thickness affects spin down speed only slightly. Spin down speed varies inversely as approximately the one-sixth power of film thickness. Empirical equations relating tire inflation pressure, normal load, tire diameter and water film thickness have been generated for various tire tread and surface configurations.

  11. Potato Production as Affected by Crop Parameters and Meteoro Logical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, André B.; Villa Nova, Nilson A.; Pereira, Antonio R.

    Meteorological elements directly influence crop potential productivity, regulating its transpiration, photosynthesis, and respiration processes in such a way as to control the growth and development of the plants throughout their physiological mechanisms at a given site. The interaction of the meteorological factors with crop responses is complex and has been the target of attention of many researchers from all over the world. There is currently a great deal of interest in estimating crop productivity as a function of climate by means of different crop weather models in order to help growers choose planting locations and timing to produce high yields with good tuber quality under site-specific atmospheric conditions. In this manuscript an agrometeorological model based on maximum carbon dioxide assimilation rates for C3 plants, fraction of photosynthetically active radiation, air temperature, photoperiod duration, and crop parameters is assessed as to its performance under tropical conditions. Crop parameters include leaf areaand harvest indexes, dry matter content of potato tubers, and crop cycles to estimate potato potential yields. Productivity obtained with the cultivar Itararé, grown with adequate soil water supply conditions at four different sites in the State of São Paulo (Itararé, Piracicaba, TatuÍ, and São Manuel), Brazil, were used to test the model. The results showed thatthe agrometeorological model tested under the climatic conditions of the State of São Paulo in general underestimated irrigated potato yield by less than 10%.This justifies the recommendation to test the performance of the model in study in other climaticregions for different crops and genotypes under optimal irrigationconditions in further scientific investigations. We reached the conclusion that the agrometeorological model taking into account information on leaf area index, photoperiod duration, photosynthetically active radiation and air temperature is feasible to estimate

  12. Predictive Blood Chemistry Parameters for Pansteatitis-Affected Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus)

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Robert W.; Somerville, Stephen E.; Guillette, Matthew P.; Botha, Hannes; Hoffman, Andre; Luus-Powell, Wilmien J.; Smit, Willem J.; Lebepe, Jeffrey; Myburgh, Jan; Govender, Danny; Tucker, Jonathan; Boggs, Ashley S. P.

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest river systems in South Africa, the Olifants River, has experienced significant changes in water quality due to anthropogenic activities. Since 2005, there have been various “outbreaks” of the inflammatory disease pansteatitis in several vertebrate species. Large-scale pansteatitis-related mortality events have decimated the crocodile population at Lake Loskop and decreased the population at Kruger National Park. Most pansteatitis-related diagnoses within the region are conducted post-mortem by either gross pathology or histology. The application of a non-lethal approach to assess the prevalence and pervasiveness of pansteatitis in the Olifants River region would be of great importance for the development of a management plan for this disease. In this study, several plasma-based biomarkers accurately classified pansteatitis in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) collected from Lake Loskop using a commercially available benchtop blood chemistry analyzer combined with data interpretation via artificial neural network analysis. According to the model, four blood chemistry parameters (calcium, sodium, total protein and albumin), in combination with total length, diagnose pansteatitis to a predictive accuracy of 92 percent. In addition, several morphometric traits (total length, age, weight) were also associated with pansteatitis. On-going research will focus on further evaluating the use of blood chemistry to classify pansteatitis across different species, trophic levels, and within different sites along the Olifants River. PMID:27115488

  13. Parameters affecting enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction of extruded sunflower meal.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kerry A; Vaca-Medina, Guadalupe; Glatz, Charles E; Pontalier, Pierre-Yves

    2016-10-01

    Microscopic observation of sunflower meal before and after extraction indicated that extensive cellular disruption was achieved by extrusion, but that unextracted oil remained sequestered as coalesced oil within the void spaces of disrupted cotyledon cells. A full factorial design experiment was defined to develop aqueous extraction processing (AEP) with and without enzymes to improve vegetable oil extraction yields of extruded sunflower meal. This experimental design studied the influence of four parameters, agitation, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, and cellulase and protease addition, on extraction yield of lipid and protein. Agitation and addition of cellulases increased oil extraction yield, indicating that emulsification of oil and alteration of the geometry of the confining cellular matrix were important mechanisms for improving yields. Protease and liquid-solid ratio of the extraction mixture did not have significant effects, indicating key differences with previously established soy oil extraction mechanisms. Maximum yields attained for oil and protein extraction were 39% and 90%, respectively, with the aid of a surfactant. PMID:27132846

  14. Dexamethasone acutely regulates endocrine parameters in stallions and subsequently affects gene expression in testicular germ cells.

    PubMed

    Ing, N H; Brinsko, S P; Curley, K O; Forrest, D W; Love, C C; Hinrichs, K; Vogelsang, M M; Varner, D D; Welsh, T H

    2015-01-01

    Testicular steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis are negatively impacted by stress-related hormones such as glucocorticoids. The effects of two injections of a therapeutic dose of dexamethasone (a synthetic glucocorticoid, 0.1mg/kg; i.v.) given 24h apart to each of three stallions were investigated and compared to three saline-injected control stallions. Dexamethasone decreased circulating concentrations of cortisol by 50% at 24h after the initial injection. Serum testosterone decreased by a maximum of 94% from 4 to 20h after the initial injection of dexamethasone. Semen parameters of the dexamethasone-treated stallions were unchanged in the subsequent two weeks. Two weeks after treatment, stallions were castrated. Functional genomic analyses of the testes revealed that, of eight gene products analyzed, dexamethasone depressed concentrations of heat shock protein DNAJC4 and sperm-specific calcium channel CATSPER1 mRNAs by more than 60%. Both genes are expressed in germ cells during spermiogenesis and have been related to male fertility in other species, including humans. This is the first report of decreased DNAJC4 and CATSPER1 mRNA concentrations in testes weeks after dexamethasone treatment. Concentrations of these mRNAs in sperm may be useful as novel markers of fertility in stallions. PMID:25487569

  15. Critical parameters of a noise model that affect fault tolerant quantum computation on a single qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Pavithran; da Silva, Marcus P.; Poulin, David

    In this work, we aim to determine the parameters of a single qubit channel that can tightly bound the logical error rate of the Steane code. We do not assume any a priori structure for the quantum channel, except that it is a CPTP map and we use a concatenated Steane code to encode a single qubit. Unlike the standard Monte Carlo technique that requires many iterations to estimate the logical error rate with sufficient accuracy, we use techniques to compute the complete effect of a physical CPTP map, at the logical level. Using this, we have studied the predictive power of several physical noise metrics on the logical error rate, and show, through numerical simulations with random quantum channels, that, on their own, none of the natural physical metrics lead to accurate predictions about the logical error rate. We then show how machine learning techniques help us to explore which features of a random quantum channel are important in predicting its logical error rate.

  16. Surgical procedure affects physiological parameters in rat myocardial ischemia: need for mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Horstick, G; Berg, O; Heimann, A; Darius, H; Lehr, H A; Bhakdi, S; Kempski, O; Meyer, J

    1999-02-01

    Several surgical approaches are being used to induce myocardial ischemia in rats. The present study investigated two different operative procedures in spontaneously breathing and mechanically ventilated rats under sham conditions. A snare around the left coronary artery (LCA) was achieved without occlusion. Left lateral thoracotomy was performed in spontaneously breathing and mechanically ventilated rats (tidal volume 8 ml/kg) with a respiratory rate of 90 strokes/min at different levels of O2 supplementation (room air and 30, 40, and 90% O2). All animals were observed for 60 min after thoracotomy. Rats operated with exteriorization of the heart through left lateral thoracotomy while breathing spontaneously developed severe hypoxia and hypercapnia despite an intrathoracic operation time of <1 min. Arterial O2 content decreased from 18.7 +/- 0.5 to 3.3 +/- 0.9 vol%. Lactate increased from 1.2 +/- 0.1 to 5.2 +/- 0.3 mmol/l. Significant signs of ischemia were seen in the electrocardiogram up to 60 min. Mechanically ventilated animals exhibited a spectrum ranging from hypoxia (room air) to hyperoxia (90% O2). In order not to jeopardize findings in experimental myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury models, stable physiological parameters can be achieved in mechanically ventilated rats at an O2 application of 30-40% at 90 strokes/min. PMID:9950847

  17. Predictive Blood Chemistry Parameters for Pansteatitis-Affected Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Cantu, Theresa M; Chapman, Robert W; Somerville, Stephen E; Guillette, Matthew P; Botha, Hannes; Hoffman, Andre; Luus-Powell, Wilmien J; Smit, Willem J; Lebepe, Jeffrey; Myburgh, Jan; Govender, Danny; Tucker, Jonathan; Boggs, Ashley S P; Guillette, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest river systems in South Africa, the Olifants River, has experienced significant changes in water quality due to anthropogenic activities. Since 2005, there have been various "outbreaks" of the inflammatory disease pansteatitis in several vertebrate species. Large-scale pansteatitis-related mortality events have decimated the crocodile population at Lake Loskop and decreased the population at Kruger National Park. Most pansteatitis-related diagnoses within the region are conducted post-mortem by either gross pathology or histology. The application of a non-lethal approach to assess the prevalence and pervasiveness of pansteatitis in the Olifants River region would be of great importance for the development of a management plan for this disease. In this study, several plasma-based biomarkers accurately classified pansteatitis in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) collected from Lake Loskop using a commercially available benchtop blood chemistry analyzer combined with data interpretation via artificial neural network analysis. According to the model, four blood chemistry parameters (calcium, sodium, total protein and albumin), in combination with total length, diagnose pansteatitis to a predictive accuracy of 92 percent. In addition, several morphometric traits (total length, age, weight) were also associated with pansteatitis. On-going research will focus on further evaluating the use of blood chemistry to classify pansteatitis across different species, trophic levels, and within different sites along the Olifants River. PMID:27115488

  18. Does aerobic exercise intensity affect health-related parameters in overweight women?

    PubMed

    Botero, João P; Prado, Wagner L; Guerra, Ricardo L F; Speretta, Guilherme F F; Leite, Richard D; Prestes, Jonato; Sanz, Adrián V; Lyons, Scott; de Azevedo, Paulo H S M; Baldissera, Vilmar; Perez, Sergio E A; Dâmaso, Ana; da Silva, Rozinaldo G

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a cycling training programme performed at intensity corresponding to the lowest value of the respiratory quotient (RQ) versus at intensity corresponding to the ventilatory threshold (VT), on body composition and health-related parameters in overweight women. Thirty-two sedentary obese women (27-42 years old) were studied in a randomized trial of either RQ (n = 17) or VT (n = 15). RQ and VT training sessions were equalized by time (60 min) and performed in a cycloergometer. Anthropometry, body composition, lipid profile, glucose, basal metabolic rate (BMR) and fitness (maximal oxygen uptake) were evaluated before and after 12 weeks of intervention. Body weight, body mass index, fatness and fitness were improved in both groups (P<0·001). Triglycerides (TG) levels decreased only in response to RQ (P<0·001) and fat-free mass (FFM) to VT (P = 0·002). No differences were observed between groups. Both exercise intensities seem to be effective for improving health in overweight women. However, low-intensity compared with the high-intensity exercise training appears to have additional benefits on TG levels and to maintenance of FFM. PMID:23898989

  19. A study of the parameters affecting the accuracy of the total pore blocking method.

    PubMed

    Liekens, Anuschka; Cabooter, Deirdre; Denayer, Joeri; Desmet, Gert

    2010-10-22

    We report on a study wherein we investigate the different factors affecting the accuracy of the total pore blocking method to determine the interstitial volume of reversed-phase packed bed columns. Octane, nonane, decane and dodecane were all found to be suitable blocking agents, whereas heptane already dissolves too well in the applied fully aqueous buffers. The method of moments needs to be used to accurately determine the elution times, and a proper correction for the frit volume is needed. Failing to do so can lead to errors on the observed interstitial volume of the order of 2% or more. It has also been shown that the application of a high flow rate or a high pressure does not force the blocking agent out of the mesopores of the particles. The only potential source of loss of blocking agent is dissolution into the mobile phase (even though this is a buffered fully aqueous solution). This effect however only becomes significant after the elution of 400 geometrical column volumes, i.e., orders more than needed for a regular total pore blocking experiment. PMID:20580009

  20. Study of parameters affecting the performance of solar desiccant cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaran, A. A.; Hoo, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of a solar desiccant cooling system depends on the performance of its components, particularly the desiccant dehumidifier and solar collectors. The desiccant dehumidifier performance is affected by the properties of the desiccant, particularly the shape of the isotherm and the regeneration temperature. The performance of a solar collector, as one would expect, depends on its operating temperature, which is very close to the desiccant regeneration temperature. The purpose of this study was to identify the desiccant isotherm shape (characterized by separation factor) that would result in the optimum performance - based on thermal coefficient of performance and cooling capacity - of a desiccant cooling cycle operating in ventilation mode. Different regeneration temperatures ranging from 65 to 160 C were investigated to identify the corresponding optimum isotherm shape at each. Thermal COP dictates the required area of the solar collectors, and the cooling capacity is an indication of the size and cost of the cooling equipment. Staged and no-staged regeneration methods were studied.

  1. Parameters affecting the fusion of unilamellar phospholipid vesicles with planar bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, F S; Akabas, M H; Zimmerberg, J; Finkelstein, A

    1984-03-01

    It was previously shown (Cohen, F. S., J. Zimmerberg, and A. Finkelstein, 1980, J. Gen. Physiol., 75:251-270) that multilamellar phospholipid vesicles can fuse with decane-containing phospholipid bilayer membranes. An essential requirement for fusion was an osmotic gradient across the planar membrane, with the vesicle-containing (cis) side hyperosmotic with respect to the opposite (trans) side. We now report that unilamellar vesicles will fuse with "hydrocarbon-free" membranes subject to these same osmotic conditions. Thus the same conditions that apply to fusion of multilamellar vesicles with planar bilayer membranes also apply to fusion of unilamellar vesicles with these membranes, and hydrocarbon is not required for the fusion process. If the vesicles and/or planar membrane contain negatively charged lipids, divalent cation (approximately 15 mM Ca++) is required in the cis compartment (in addition to the osmotic gradient across the membrane) to obtain substantial fusion rates. On the other hand, vesicles made from uncharged lipids readily fuse with planar phosphatidylethanolamine planar membranes in the near absence of divalent cation with just an osmotic gradient. Vesicles fuse much more readily with phosphatidylethanolamine-containing than with phosphatidylcholine-containing planar membranes. Although hydrocarbon (decane) is not required in the planar membrane for fusion, it does affect the rate of fusion and causes the fusion process to be dependent on stirring in the cis compartment. PMID:6699081

  2. Ciprofloxacin Affects Host Cells by Suppressing Expression of the Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides Cathelicidins and Beta-Defensin-3 in Colon Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Protim; Mily, Akhirunnesa; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Jalal, Shah; Bergman, Peter; Raqib, Rubhana; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H.; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics exert several effects on host cells including regulation of immune components. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), e.g., cathelicidins and defensins display multiple functions in innate immunity. In colonic mucosa, cathelicidins are induced by butyrate, a bacterial fermentation product. Here, we investigated the effect of antibiotics on butyrate-induced expression of cathelicidins and beta-defensins in colon epithelial cells. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ciprofloxacin and clindamycin reduce butyrate-induced transcription of the human cathelicidin LL-37 in the colonic epithelial cell line HT-29. Suppression of LL-37 peptide/protein by ciprofloxacin was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that ciprofloxacin suppresses the rabbit cathelicidin CAP-18 in rectal epithelia of healthy and butyrate-treated Shigella-infected rabbits. Ciprofloxacin also down-regulated butyrate-induced transcription of the human beta-defensin-3 in HT-29 cells. Microarray analysis of HT-29 cells revealed upregulation by butyrate with subsequent down-regulation by ciprofloxacin of additional genes encoding immune factors. Dephosphorylation of histone H3, an epigenetic event provided a possible mechanism of the suppressive effect of ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, LL-37 peptide inhibited Clostridium difficile growth in vitro. In conclusion, ciprofloxacin and clindamycin exert immunomodulatory function by down-regulating AMPs and other immune components in colonic epithelial cells. Suppression of AMPs may contribute to the overgrowth of C. difficile, causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea. PMID:27025750

  3. Developmental methoxychlor exposure affects multiple reproductive parameters and ovarian folliculogenesis and gene expression in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Armenti, AnnMarie E.; Zama, Aparna Mahakali; Passantino, Lisa; Uzumcu, Mehmet

    2008-12-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide with estrogenic, anti-estrogenic, and anti-androgenic properties. To investigate whether transient developmental exposure to MXC could cause adult ovarian dysfunction, we exposed Fischer rats to 20 {mu}g/kg/day (low dose; environmentally relevant dose) or 100 mg/kg/day (high dose) MXC between 19 days post coitum and postnatal day 7. Multiple reproductive parameters, serum hormone levels, and ovarian morphology and molecular markers were examined from prepubertal through adult stages. High dose MXC accelerated pubertal onset and first estrus, reduced litter size, and increased irregular cyclicity (P < 0.05). MXC reduced superovulatory response to exogenous gonadotropins in prepubertal females (P < 0.05). Rats exposed to high dose MXC had increasing irregular estrous cyclicity beginning at 4 months of age, with all animals showing abnormal cycles by 6 months. High dose MXC reduced serum progesterone, but increased luteinizing hormone (LH). Follicular composition analysis revealed an increase in the percentage of preantral and early antral follicles and a reduction in the percentage of corpora lutea in high dose MXC-treated ovaries (P < 0.05). Immunohistochemical staining and quantification of the staining intensity showed that estrogen receptor {beta} was reduced by high dose MXC while anti-Mullerian hormone was upregulated by both low- and high dose MXC in preantral and early antral follicles (P < 0.05). High dose MXC significantly reduced LH receptor expression in large antral follicles (P < 0.01), and down-regulated cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage. These results demonstrated that developmental MXC exposure results in reduced ovulation and fertility and premature aging, possibly by altering ovarian gene expression and folliculogenesis.

  4. How Different Genetically Manipulated Brassica Genotypes Affect Life Table Parameters of Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae).

    PubMed

    Nikooei, Mehrnoosh; Fathipour, Yaghoub; Jalali Javaran, Mokhtar; Soufbaf, Mahmoud

    2015-04-01

    The fitness of Plutella xylostella L. on different genetically manipulated Brassica plants, including canola's progenitor (Brassica rapa L.), two cultivated canola cultivars (Opera and RGS003), one hybrid (Hyula401), one gamma-ray mutant-RGS003, and one transgenic (PF) genotype was compared using two-sex and female-based life table parameters. All experiments were conducted in a growth chamber at 25±1°C, 65±5% relative humidity, and a photoperiod of 16:8 (L:D) h. There were significant differences in duration of different life stages of P. xylostella on different plant genotypes. The shortest (13.92 d) and longest (24.61 d) total developmental time were on Opera and PF, respectively. The intrinsic rate of increase of P. xylostella ranged between 0.236 (Opera) and 0.071 day(-1) (PF). The highest (60.79 offspring) and lowest (7.88 offspring) net reproductive rates were observed on Opera and PF, respectively. Comparison of intrinsic rate of increase, net reproductive rates, finite rate of increase, mean generation time, fecundity, and survivorship of P. xylostella on the plant genotypes suggested that this pest performed well on cultivars (RGS003 and Opera) and performed poorly on the other manipulated genotypes especially on mutant-RGS003 and PF. Glucosinolate levels were significantly higher in damaged plants than undamaged ones and the lowest and highest concentrations of glucosinolates were found in transgenic genotype and canola's progenitor, respectively. Interestingly, our results showed that performance and fitness of this pest was better on canola's progenitor and cultivated plants, which had high levels of glucosinolate. PMID:26470162

  5. Developmental Methoxychlor Exposure Affects Multiple Reproductive Parameters and Ovarian: Folliculogenesis and Gene Expression in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Armenti, AnnMarie E.; Zama, Aparna Mahakali; Passantino, Lisa; Uzumcu, Mehmet

    2008-01-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide with estrogenic, anti-estrogenic, and anti-androgenic properties. To investigate whether transient developmental exposure to MXC could cause adult ovarian dysfunction, we exposed Fischer rats to 20 μg/kg/day (low dose; environmentally relevant dose) or 100 mg/kg/day (high dose) MXC between 19 days post-coitum and postnatal day 7. Multiple reproductive parameters, serum hormone levels, and ovarian morphology and molecular markers were examined from prepubertal through adult stages. High dose MXC accelerated pubertal onset and first estrus, reduced litter size, and increased irregular cyclicity (P < 0.05). MXC reduced superovulatory response to exogenous gonadotropins in prepubertal females (P < 0.05). Rats exposed to high dose MXC had increasing irregular estrous cyclicity beginning at 4 months of age, with all animals showing abnormal cycles by 6 months. High dose MXC reduced serum progesterone, but increased luteinizing hormone (LH). Follicular composition analysis revealed an increase in the percentage of preantral and early antral follicles and a reduction in the percentage of corpora lutea in high dose MXC-treated ovaries (P < 0.05). Immunohistochemical staining and quantification of the staining intensity showed that estrogen receptor β was reduced by high dose MXC while anti-Mullerian hormone was upregulated by both low- and high dose MXC in preantral and early antral follicles (P < 0.05). High dose MXC significantly reduced LH receptor expression in large antral follicles (P < 0.01), and down-regulated cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage. These results demonstrated that developmental MXC exposure results in reduced ovulation and fertility and premature aging, possibly by altering ovarian gene expression and folliculogenesis. PMID:18848953

  6. Do fattening process and biological parameters affect the accumulation of metals in Atlantic bluefin tuna?

    PubMed

    Milatou, Niki; Dassenakis, Manos; Megalofonou, Persefoni

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the current levels of heavy metals and trace elements in Atlantic bluefin tuna muscle tissues and how they are influenced by the fattening process and various life history parameters to ascertain whether the concentrations in muscle tissue exceed the maximum levels defined by the European Commission Decision and to evaluate the health risk posed by fish consumption. A total of 20 bluefin tuna reared in sea cages, ranging from 160 to 295 cm in length and from 80 to 540 kg in weight, were sampled from a bluefin tuna farm in the Ionian Sea. The condition factor K of each specimen was calculated and their age was estimated. Heavy metal and trace element (Hg, Zn, Fe and Cu) contents were determined in muscle tissue using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry and flame and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The total Hg concentrations ranged from 0.28 to 1.28 mg kg(-1) w/w, Zn from 5.81 to 76.37 mg kg(-1) w/w, Fe from 12.14 to 39.58 mg kg(-1) w/w, and Cu from 0.36 to 0.94 mg kg(-1) w/w. Only 5% of the muscle samples of tuna contained Hg above the maximum level laid down by the European Commission Decision. Moreover, 15% of the muscle samples contained Zn above the maximum level, while Fe and Cu concentrations were within the acceptable tolerable guideline values. The reared bluefin tuna had lower concentrations of Hg than the wild ones from the Mediterranean Sea. Hg and Fe concentrations showed a positive relationship with size and age of bluefin tuna, whereas negative relationships were found for the concentrations of Zn and Cu. The estimated dietary intake values of the analysed metals were mostly below the derived guidelines. PMID:25906290

  7. Sample Size Calculation: Inaccurate A Priori Assumptions for Nuisance Parameters Can Greatly Affect the Power of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tavernier, Elsa; Giraudeau, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to examine the extent to which inaccurate assumptions for nuisance parameters used to calculate sample size can affect the power of a randomized controlled trial (RCT). In a simulation study, we separately considered an RCT with continuous, dichotomous or time-to-event outcomes, with associated nuisance parameters of standard deviation, success rate in the control group and survival rate in the control group at some time point, respectively. For each type of outcome, we calculated a required sample size N for a hypothesized treatment effect, an assumed nuisance parameter and a nominal power of 80%. We then assumed a nuisance parameter associated with a relative error at the design stage. For each type of outcome, we randomly drew 10,000 relative errors of the associated nuisance parameter (from empirical distributions derived from a previously published review). Then, retro-fitting the sample size formula, we derived, for the pre-calculated sample size N, the real power of the RCT, taking into account the relative error for the nuisance parameter. In total, 23%, 0% and 18% of RCTs with continuous, binary and time-to-event outcomes, respectively, were underpowered (i.e., the real power was < 60%, as compared with the 80% nominal power); 41%, 16% and 6%, respectively, were overpowered (i.e., with real power > 90%). Even with proper calculation of sample size, a substantial number of trials are underpowered or overpowered because of imprecise knowledge of nuisance parameters. Such findings raise questions about how sample size for RCTs should be determined. PMID:26173007

  8. Calcium phosphate: an alternative calcium compound for dietary prevention of colon cancer? A study on intestinal and faecal parameters in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Cats, A; Mulder, N H; de Vries, E G; Oremus, E T; Kreumer, W M; Kleibeuker, J H

    1993-09-01

    In an effort to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer development, oral calcium carbonate supplementation has been used in previous studies for the precipitation of cytotoxic bile acids and fatty acids. In human intervention trials its effect on mucosal hyperproliferation in the colorectum has not always been satisfactory. Because the complexation of calcium and bile acids requires the formation of calcium phosphate, we performed an intervention study in 14 healthy volunteers, giving them 1,500 mg calcium as Ca3(PO4)2 for 1 week. The effects of tricalcium phosphate on luminal and faecal parameters of cytolytic activity were evaluated before, during, and after calcium phosphate supplementation. The cytolytic activity of faecal water and intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity in faecal water were not affected by supplemental calcium phosphate. In duodenal bile, the proportion of cholic acid tended to increase, whereas that of chenodeoxycholic acid tended to decrease during calcium phosphate supplementation. Neither concentrations of total and individual faecal bile acids, nor that of faecal fat were affected during calcium phosphate supplementation. It is suggested that, although phosphate is involved in bile acid precipitation, phosphate competes for calcium in the binding of fatty acids. This might possibly explain the unchanged cytolytic potency of faecal water, and therefore does not make tricalcium phosphate a suitable calcium compound for dietary intervention. PMID:8401176

  9. Theoretical, numerical and experimental study of geometrical parameters that affect anisotropy measurements in polarization-resolved SHG microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teulon, Claire; Gusachenko, Ivan; Latour, Gaël; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2015-04-01

    Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (P-SHG) microscopy is an efficient imaging modality for in situ observation of biopolymers structure in tissues, providing information about their mean in-plane orientation and their molecular structure and 3D distribution. Nevertheless, P-SHG signal build-up in a strongly focused regime is not throroughly understood yet, preventing reliable and reproducible measurements. In this study, theoretical analysis, vectorial numerical simulations and experiments are performed to understand how geometrical parameters, such as excitation and collection numerical apertures and detection direction, affect P-SHG imaging in homogeneous collagen tissues. A good agreement is obtained in tendon and cornea, showing that detection geometry significantly affects the SHG anisotropy measurements, but not the measurements of collagen in-plane orientation. PMID:25968762

  10. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables. PMID:12506926

  11. Altered membrane lipid composition and functional parameters of circulating cells in cockles (Cerastoderma edule) affected by disseminated neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Le Grand, Fabienne; Soudant, Philippe; Marty, Yanic; Le Goïc, Nelly; Kraffe, Edouard

    2013-01-01

    Membrane lipid composition and morpho-functional parameters were investigated in circulating cells of the edible cockle (Cerastoderma edule) affected by disseminated neoplasia (neoplastic cells) and compared to those from healthy cockles (hemocytes). Membrane sterol levels, phospholipid (PL) class and subclass proportions and their respective fatty acid (FA) compositions were determined. Morpho-functional parameters were evaluated through total hemocyte count (THC), mortality rate, phagocytosis ability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Both morpho-functional parameters and lipid composition were profoundly affected in neoplastic cells. These dedifferentiated cells displayed higher THC (5×), mortality rate (3×) and ROS production with addition of carbonyl cyanide m-chloro phenylhydrazone (1.7×) but lower phagocytosis ability (½×), than unaffected hemocytes. Total PL amounts were higher in neoplastic cells than in hemocytes (12.3 and 5.1 nmol×10(-6) cells, respectively). However, sterols and a particular subclass of PL (plasmalogens; 1-alkenyl-2-acyl PL) were present in similar amounts in both cell type membranes. This led to a two times lower proportion of these membrane lipid constituents in neoplastic cells when compared to hemocytes (20.5% vs. 42.1% of sterols in total membrane lipids and 21.7% vs. 44.2% of plasmalogens among total PL, respectively). Proportions of non-methylene interrupted FA- and 20:1n-11-plasmalogen molecular species were the most impacted in neoplastic cells when compared to hemocytes (⅓× and ¼×, respectively). These changes in response to this leukemia-like disease in bivalves highlight the specific imbalance of plasmalogens and sterols in neoplastic cells, in comparison to the greater stability of other membrane lipid components. PMID:23333874

  12. Development of an auditory emotion recognition function using psychoacoustic parameters based on the International Affective Digitized Sounds.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngimm; Lee, Sungjun; Jung, SungSoo; Choi, In-Mook; Park, Yon-Kyu; Kim, Chobok

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an auditory emotion recognition function that could determine the emotion caused by sounds coming from the environment in our daily life. For this purpose, sound stimuli from the International Affective Digitized Sounds (IADS-2), a standardized database of sounds intended to evoke emotion, were selected, and four psychoacoustic parameters (i.e., loudness, sharpness, roughness, and fluctuation strength) were extracted from the sounds. Also, by using an emotion adjective scale, 140 college students were tested to measure three basic emotions (happiness, sadness, and negativity). From this discriminant analysis to predict basic emotions from the psychoacoustic parameters of sound, a discriminant function with overall discriminant accuracy of 88.9% was produced from training data. In order to validate the discriminant function, the same four psychoacoustic parameters were extracted from 46 sound stimuli collected from another database and substituted into the discriminant function. The results showed that an overall discriminant accuracy of 63.04% was confirmed. Our findings provide the possibility that daily-life sounds, beyond voice and music, can be used in a human-machine interface. PMID:25319038

  13. Optimization of parameters affecting signal intensity in an LTQ-orbitrap in negative ion mode: A design of experiments approach.

    PubMed

    Lemonakis, Nikolaos; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony; Gikas, Evagelos

    2016-01-15

    A multistage optimization of all the parameters affecting detection/response in an LTQ-orbitrap analyzer was performed, using a design of experiments methodology. The signal intensity, a critical issue for mass analysis, was investigated and the optimization process was completed in three successive steps, taking into account the three main regions of an orbitrap, the ion generation, the ion transmission and the ion detection regions. Oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol were selected as the model compounds. Overall, applying this methodology the sensitivity was increased more than 24%, the resolution more than 6.5%, whereas the elapsed scan time was reduced nearly to its half. A high-resolution LTQ Orbitrap Discovery mass spectrometer was used for the determination of the analytes of interest. Thus, oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol were infused via the instruments syringe pump and they were analyzed employing electrospray ionization (ESI) in the negative high-resolution full-scan ion mode. The parameters of the three main regions of the LTQ-orbitrap were independently optimized in terms of maximum sensitivity. In this context, factorial design, response surface model and Plackett-Burman experiments were performed and analysis of variance was carried out to evaluate the validity of the statistical model and to determine the most significant parameters for signal intensity. The optimum MS conditions for each analyte were summarized and the method optimum condition was achieved by maximizing the desirability function. Our observation showed good agreement between the predicted optimum response and the responses collected at the predicted optimum conditions. PMID:26592625

  14. Genetic selection to increase bone strength affects prevalence of keel bone damage and egg parameters in commercially housed laying hens.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, A; Fröhlich, E K F; Gebhardt-Henrich, S G; Harlander-Matauschek, A; Würbel, H; Toscano, M J

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of keel bone damage as well as external egg parameters of 2 pure lines divergently selected for high (H) and low (L) bone strength were investigated in 2 aviary systems under commercial conditions. A standard LSL hybrid was used as a reference group. Birds were kept mixed per genetic line (77 hens of the H and L line and 201 or 206 hens of the LSL line, respectively, per pen) in 8 pens of 2 aviary systems differing in design. Keel bone status and body mass of 20 focal hens per line and pen were assessed at 17, 18, 23, 30, 36, 43, 52, and 63 wk of age. External egg parameters (i.e., egg mass, eggshell breaking strength, thickness, and mass) were measured using 10 eggs per line at both 38 and 57 wk of age. Body parameters (i.e. tarsus and third primary wing feather length to calculate index of wing loading) were recorded at 38 wk of age and mortality per genetic line throughout the laying cycle. Bone mineral density (BMD) of 15 keel bones per genetic line was measured after slaughter to confirm assignment of the experimental lines. We found a greater BMD in the H compared with the L and LSL lines. Fewer keel bone fractures and deviations, a poorer external egg quality, as well as a lower index of wing loading were found in the H compared with the L line. Mortality was lower and production parameters (e.g., laying performance) were higher in the LSL line compared with the 2 experimental lines. Aviary design affected prevalence of keel bone damage, body mass, and mortality. We conclude that selection of specific bone traits associated with bone strength as well as the related differences in body morphology (i.e., lower index of wing loading) have potential to reduce keel bone damage in commercial settings. Also, the housing environment (i.e., aviary design) may have additive effects. PMID:26944960

  15. Serotonin and colonic motility.

    PubMed

    Kendig, D M; Grider, J R

    2015-07-01

    The role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) in gastrointestinal motility has been studied for over 50 years. Most of the 5-HT in the body resides in the gut wall, where it is located in subsets of mucosal cells (enterochromaffin cells) and neurons (descending interneurons). Many studies suggest that 5-HT is important to normal and dysfunctional gut motility and drugs affecting 5-HT receptors, especially 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors, have been used clinically to treat motility disorders; however, cardiovascular side effects have limited the use of these drugs. Recently studies have questioned the importance and necessity of 5-HT in general and mucosal 5-HT in particular for colonic motility. Recent evidence suggests the importance of 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors for initiation and generation of one of the key colonic motility patterns, the colonic migrating motor complex (CMMC), in rat. The findings suggest that 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors are differentially involved in two different types of rat CMMCs: the long distance contraction (LDC) and the rhythmic propulsive motor complex (RPMC). The understanding of the role of serotonin in colonic motility has been influenced by the specific motility pattern(s) studied, the stimulus used to initiate the motility (spontaneous vs induced), and the route of administration of drugs. All of these considerations contribute to the understanding and the controversy that continues to surround the role of serotonin in the gut. PMID:26095115

  16. Dynamic Testing of a Pre-stretched Flexible Tube for Identifying the Factors Affecting Modal Parameter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unnikrishnan, Madhusudanan; Rajan, Akash; Basanthvihar Raghunathan, Binulal; Kochupillai, Jayaraj

    2016-06-01

    Experimental modal analysis is the primary tool for obtaining the fundamental dynamic characteristics like natural frequency, mode shape and modal damping ratio that determine the behaviour of any structure under dynamic loading conditions. This paper discusses about a carefully designed experimental method for calculating the dynamic characteristics of a pre-stretched horizontal flexible tube made of polyurethane material. The factors that affect the modal parameter estimation like the application time of shaker excitation, pause time between successive excitation cycles, averaging and windowing of measured signal, as well as the precautions to be taken during the experiment are explained in detail. The modal parameter estimation is done using MEscopeVESTM software. A finite element based pre-stressed modal analysis of the flexible tube is also done using ANSYS ver.14.0 software. The experimental and analytical results agreed well. The proposed experimental methodology may be extended for carrying out the modal analysis of many flexible structures like inflatables, tires and membranes.

  17. Setting accelerated dissolution test for PLGA microspheres containing peptide, investigation of critical parameters affecting drug release rate and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tomic, I; Vidis-Millward, A; Mueller-Zsigmondy, M; Cardot, J-M

    2016-05-30

    The objective of this study was development of accelerated in vitro release method for peptide loaded PLGA microspheres using flow-through apparatus and assessment of the effect of dissolution parameters (pH, temperature, medium composition) on drug release rate and mechanism. Accelerated release conditions were set as pH 2 and 45°C, in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) 0.02M. When the pH was changed from 2 to 4, diffusion controlled phases (burst and lag) were not affected, while release rate during erosion phase decreased two-fold due to slower ester bonds hydrolyses. Decreasing temperature from 45°C to 40°C, release rate showed three-fold deceleration without significant change in release mechanism. Effect of medium composition on drug release was tested in PBS 0.01M (200 mOsm/kg) and PBS 0.01M with glucose (380 mOsm/kg). Buffer concentration significantly affected drug release rate and mechanism due to the change in osmotic pressure, while ionic strength did not have any effect on peptide release. Furthermore, dialysis sac and sample-and-separate techniques were used, in order to evaluate significance of dissolution technique choice on the release process. After fitting obtained data to different mathematical models, flow-through method was confirmed as the most appropriate for accelerated in vitro dissolution testing for a given formulation. PMID:27025293

  18. How do alternative root water uptake models affect the inverse estimation of soil hydraulic parameters and the prediction of evapotranspiration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayler, Sebastian; Salima-Sultana, Daisy; Selle, Benny; Ingwersen, Joachim; Wizemann, Hans-Dieter; Högy, Petra; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Soil water extraction by roots affects the dynamics and distribution of soil moisture and controls transpiration, which influences soil-vegetation-atmosphere feedback processes. Consequently, root water uptake requires close attention when predicting water fluxes across the land surface, e.g., in agricultural crop models or in land surface schemes of weather and climate models. The key parameters for a successful simultaneous simulation of soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration in Richards equation-based models are the soil hydraulic parameters, which describe the shapes of the soil water retention curve and the soil hydraulic conductivity curve. As measurements of these parameters are expensive and their estimation from basic soil data via pedotransfer functions is rather inaccurate, the values of the soil hydraulic parameters are frequently inversely estimated by fitting the model to measured time series of soil water content and evapotranspiration. It is common to simulate root water uptake and transpiration by simple stress functions, which describe from which soil layer water is absorbed by roots and predict when total crop transpiration is decreased in case of soil water limitations. As for most of the biogeophysical processes simulated in crop and land surface models, there exist several alternative functional relationships for simulating root water uptake and there is no clear reason for preferring one process representation over another. The error associated with alternative representations of root water uptake, however, contributes to structural model uncertainty and the choice of the root water uptake model may have a significant impact on the values of the soil hydraulic parameters estimated inversely. In this study, we use the agroecosystem model system Expert-N to simulate soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration at three agricultural field sites located in two contrasting regions in Southwest Germany (Kraichgau, Swabian Alb). The Richards

  19. TH-C-18A-09: Exam and Patient Parameters Affecting the DNA Damage Response Following CT Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Elgart, S; Adibi, A; Bostani, M; Ruehm, S; Enzmann, D; McNitt-Gray, M; Iwamoto, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To identify exam and patient parameters affecting the biological response to CT studies using in vivo and ex vivo blood samples. Methods: Blood samples were collected under IRB approval from 16 patients undergoing clinically-indicated CT exams. Blood was procured prior to, immediately after and 30minutes following irradiation. A sample of preexam blood was placed on the patient within the exam region for ex vivo analysis. Whole blood samples were fixed immediately following collection and stained for γH2AX to assess DNA damage response (DDR). Median fluorescence of treated samples was compared to non-irradiated control samples for each patient. Patients were characterized by observed biological kinetic response: (a) fast — phosphorylation increased by 2minutes and fell by 30minutes, (b) slow — phosphorylation continued to increase to 30minutes and (c) none — little change was observed or irradiated samples fell below controls. Total dose values were normalized to exam time for an averaged dose-rate in dose/sec for each exam. Relationships between patient biological responses and patient and exam parameters were investigated. Results: A clearer dose response at 30minutes is observed for young patients (<61yoa; R2>0.5) compared to old patients (>61yoa; R{sup 2}<0.11). Fast responding patients were significantly younger than slow responding patients (p<0.05). Unlike in vivo samples, age did not significantly affect the patient response ex vivo. Additionally, fast responding patients received exams with significantly smaller dose-rate than slow responding patients (p<0.05). Conclusion: Age is a significant factor in the biological response suggesting that DDR may be more rapid in a younger population and slower as the population ages. Lack of an agerelated response ex vivo suggests a systemic response to radiation not present when irradiated outside the body. Dose-rate affects the biological response suggesting that patient response may be related to

  20. Factors affecting crystal precipitation from urine in individuals with long-term urinary catheters colonized with urease-positive bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Sunil; Suller, Marc T E; Stickler, David J; Feneley, Roger C L

    2006-06-01

    Weekly urinalysis was conducted for 12 weeks on a group of 21 long-term catheter users with confirmed catheter encrustation and urinary tract colonization with urease-positive bacteria, in order to explore the cause of considerable variation in the severity of encrustation between sufferers. The rapidity of catheter blockage correlated significantly with the pH above which crystals precipitated from urine (the nucleation pH) but not the pH of the voided urine itself. Linear regression showed the nucleation pH to be significantly predicted by a combination of urinary calcium and magnesium concentrations, with calcium being the more influential variable. Reducing the rate of catheter encrustation could be achieved by lowering the urinary concentration of calcium and magnesium, which may only require catheter users to increase their fluid intake. PMID:16453146

  1. Solidifying agent and processing of blood used for the larval diet affect screwworm (Diptera: Calliphoridae) life-history parameters.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, M F; Skoda, S R; Sagel, A

    2011-06-01

    Spray-dried whole bovine blood and a sodium polyacrylate polymer gel as a bulking and solidifying agent are among the constituents of the current larval diet for mass rearing screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Locally available, inexpensive dietary materials could reduce rearing cost and address an uncertain commercial supply of spray-dried blood. We compared efficacy of diet prepared from fresh bovine blood after decoagulation with sodium citrate or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or after mechanical defibrination, with the diet containing spray-dried blood using either gel or cellulose fiber as the bulking and solidifying agent. Several life-history parameters were compared among insects reared on each of the blood and bulking agent diets combination. Diets containing citrated blood yielded the lightest larval and pupal weights and fewest pupae. EDTA-treated blood with the gel also caused reductions. EDTA-treated blood with fiber yielded screwworms that were heavier and more numerous than those from the diet with citrated blood but lighter than those from the control diet using spray-dried blood. A reduction in percentage of adults emerging from pupae occurred from diets with both bulking agents using citrated blood and the diet using EDTA mixed with the gel bulking agent. As a group, the cellulose-fiber diets performed better than the gel diets. Larval diet did not affect adult longevity, weight of the eggs deposited by the females that emerged or subsequent egg hatch. Parameter measurements of insects from both defibrinated blood diets were similar to those from the spray-dried blood diets, indicating that fresh, defibrinated bovine blood can successfully replace the dry blood in the screwworm rearing medium. PMID:21735935

  2. Finite elements/Taguchi method based procedure for the identification of the geometrical parameters significantly affecting the biomechanical behavior of a lumbar disc.

    PubMed

    Cappetti, N; Naddeo, A; Naddeo, F; Solitro, G F

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to show a quick and simple procedure able to identify the geometrical parameters of the intervertebral disc that strongly affect the behavior of the FEM model. First, we allocated a selection criterion for the minimum number of geometrical parameters that describe, with a good degree of approximation, a healthy human vertebra. Next, we carried out a sensitivity analysis using the 'Taguchi orthogonal array' to arrive at a quick identification of the parameters that strongly affect the behavior of the Fem model. PMID:26693883

  3. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  4. In Vitro Acute Exposure to DEHP Affects Oocyte Meiotic Maturation, Energy and Oxidative Stress Parameters in a Large Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Pocar, Paola; Martino, Nicola Antonio; Paternoster, Maria Stefania; Amati, Francesca; Dell'Aquila, Maria Elena

    2011-01-01

    Phthalates are ubiquitous environmental contaminants because of their use in plastics and other common consumer products. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is the most abundant phthalate and it impairs fertility by acting as an endocrine disruptor. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of in vitro acute exposure to DEHP on oocyte maturation, energy and oxidative status in the horse, a large animal model. Cumulus cell (CC) apoptosis and oxidative status were also investigated. Cumulus-oocyte complexes from the ovaries of slaughtered mares were cultured in vitro in presence of 0.12, 12 and 1200 µM DEHP. After in vitro maturation (IVM), CCs were removed and evaluated for apoptosis (cytological assessment and TUNEL) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Oocytes were evaluated for nuclear chromatin configuration. Matured (Metaphase II stage; MII) oocytes were further evaluated for cytoplasmic energy and oxidative parameters. DEHP significantly inhibited oocyte maturation when added at low doses (0.12 µM; P<0.05). This effect was related to increased CC apoptosis (P<0.001) and reduced ROS levels (P<0.0001). At higher doses (12 and 1200 µM), DEHP induced apoptosis (P<0.0001) and ROS increase (P<0.0001) in CCs without affecting oocyte maturation. In DEHP-exposed MII oocytes, mitochondrial distribution patterns, apparent energy status (MitoTracker fluorescence intensity), intracellular ROS localization and levels, mt/ROS colocalization and total SOD activity did not vary, whereas increased ATP content (P<0.05), possibly of glycolytic origin, was found. Co-treatment with N-Acetyl-Cysteine reversed apoptosis and efficiently scavenged excessive ROS in DEHP-treated CCs without enhancing oocyte maturation. In conclusion, acute in vitro exposure to DEHP inhibits equine oocyte maturation without altering ooplasmic energy and oxidative stress parameters in matured oocytes which retain the potential to be fertilized and develop into embryos

  5. Short-term, daily intake of yogurt containing Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bf-6 (LMG 24384) does not affect colonic transit time in women.

    PubMed

    Merenstein, Daniel J; D'Amico, Frank; Palese, Caren; Hahn, Alexander; Sparenborg, Jessy; Tan, Tina; Scott, Hillary; Polzin, Kayla; Kolberg, Lore; Roberts, Robert

    2014-01-28

    The present study investigated the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bf-6 (LMG 24 384) (Bf-6)-supplemented yogurt on colonic transit time (CTT). A triple-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled, two-period cross-over trial was conducted with sixty-eight women with a self-reported history of straining during bowel movements or hard or lumpy stools in the past 2 years. As per regulatory requirements for probiotic studies, eligible women were generally healthy and not actively constipated at the time of enrolment. Participants consumed both Bf-6 and placebo yogurts for 14 d each in a randomised order, with a 6-week washout period between the treatments. The primary outcome, CTT, was assessed via Sitz marker X-rays. The average CTT was 42·1 h for the active period and 43·3 h for the control period (mean difference 1·2 h, 95 % CI - 4·9, 7·4). Since the statistical tests for the cross-over study implied that the mean CTT for the active and control periods in period 2 were biased, the standard protocol suggests examining the results of only period 1 as a traditional randomised controlled trial. This showed that the mean CTT was 35·2 h for the active period v. 52·9 h for the control period (P= 0·015). Bootstrapping demonstrated that both the mean and median differences remained significant (P= 0·016 and P= 0·045, respectively). Few adverse events were noted, with no differences among the active and control periods. The paired analysis showed no differences between the active and control periods during the cross-over trial. Further trials should be conducted in populations with underlying problems associated with disordered transit to determine the potential value of probiotic supplementation more accurately. PMID:24103188

  6. Colon Cancer After Acute Diverticulitis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kwang Hoon; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Je Hoon; Choi, Kyu Un; Han, Myung Sik; Ahn, Jae Hong; Cheon, Gab Jin

    2013-01-01

    Diverticulitis is the most common clinical complication of diverticular disease, affecting 10-25% of the patients with diverticula. The prevalences of diverticulitis and colon cancer tend to increase with age and are higher in industrialized countries. Consequently, diverticulitis and colon cancer have been reported to have similar epidemiological characteristics. However, the relationship between these diseases remains controversial, as is the performance of routine colonoscopy after an episode of diverticulitis to exclude colon cancer. Recently, we experienced three cases of colon cancer after treating acute diverticulitis, based on which we suggest the importance of follow-up colonoscopy after acute diverticulitis. PMID:24032118

  7. An investigation of the optimization of parameters affecting the implementation of fourier transform spectroscopy at 20-500 micron from the C-141 airborne infrared observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. I.; Erickson, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    A program for 20-500 micron spectroscopy from the NASA flying C141 infrared observatory is being carried out with a Michelson interferometer. The parameters affecting the performance of the instrument are studied and an optimal configuration for high performance on the C-141 aircraft is recommended. As each parameter is discussed the relative merits of the two modes of mirror motion (rapid scan or step and integrate) are presented.

  8. Ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of Alnus acuminata from Calilegua National Park (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Becerra, Alejandra; Zak, Marcelo R; Horton, Thomas R; Micolini, Jorge

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine patterns of ectomycorrhizas (ECM) and arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) colonization associated with Alnus acuminata (Andean alder), in relation to soil parameters (electrical conductivity, field H(2)O holding capacity, pH, available P, organic matter, and total N) at two different seasons (autumn and spring). The study was conducted in natural forests of A. acuminata situated in Calilegua National Park (Jujuy, Argentina). Nine ECM morphotypes were found on A. acuminata roots. The ECM colonization was affected by seasonality and associated positively with field H(2)O holding capacity, pH, and total N and negatively associated with organic matter. Two morphotypes (Russula alnijorullensis and Tomentella sp. 3) showed significant differences between seasons. Positive and negative correlations were found between five morphotypes (Alnirhiza silkacea, Lactarius omphaliformis, Tomentella sp. 1, Tomentella sp. 3, and Lactarius sp.) and soil parameters (total N, pH, and P). A significant negative correlation was found between field H(2)O holding capacity and organic matter with AM colonization. Results of this study provide evidence that ECM and AM colonization of A. acuminata can be affected by some soil chemical edaphic parameters and indicate that some ECM morphotypes are sensitive to changes in seasonality and soil parameters. PMID:16034621

  9. Inflammatory response in serrated precursor lesions of the colon classified according to WHO entities, clinical parameters and phenotype–genotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Atreya, Raja; Aust, Daniela; Baretton, Gustavo; Eck, Matthias; Erlenbach‐Wünsch, Katharina; Hartmann, Arndt; Lugli, Alessandro; Stöhr, Robert; Vieth, Michael; Wirsing, Anna M; Zlobec, Inti; Katzenberger, Tiemo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Studies on traditional serrated adenoma (TSA) and sessile serrated adenoma with dysplasia (SSA‐D) are rare due to the low frequency of these lesions, which are well defined by the latest WHO classification. However, introducing new morphological criteria such as intra‐epithelial lymphocytes (IELs) might facilitate colorectal polyp diagnoses. Additionally, the phenotype–genotype correlation needs to be updated as the terminology has repeatedly changed. This study analysed 516 polyps, consisting of 118 classical adenomas (CAD), 116 hyperplastic polyps (HPP), 179 SSAs, 41 SSA‐Ds, and 62 TSAs. The lesions were analysed in relation to the patients’ clinical parameters including gender, age, localisation, and size. The inflammatory background of the polyps was quantified and BRAF and KRAS mutations as well as MLH1 and CDKN2A promoter methylation were assessed. In multivariate analyses, an increase in IELs was an independent and robust new criterion for the diagnosis of SSA‐D (p < 0.001). Superficial erosions and acute neutrophil granulocytes led to reactive changes potentially resembling dysplasia. KRAS and BRAF mutations were associated with CAD/TSA and HPP/SSA, respectively. However, almost half of TSAs had a BRAF mutation and were KRAS wild type. CDKN2A seems to precede MLH1 hyper‐methylation within the serrated carcinogenesis model. The genotyping of WHO‐based entities – and especially SSA – has sharpened in comparison to previously published data. TSAs can be sub‐grouped according to their mutation status. Of note, the higher number of IELs in SSA‐D reflects their close relationship to colorectal cancers with micro‐satellite instability. Therefore, IELs might represent a new diagnostic tool for SSA‐D.

  10. Liver Colonization Competence Governs Colon Cancer Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Tsong-Hong; Kubota, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Furukawa, Toshiharu; Teramoto, Tatuso; Ishibiki, Kyuya; Kitajima, Masaki; Rahim Moosa, A.; Penman, Sheldon; Hoffman, Robert M.

    1995-12-01

    Tumors that metastasize do so to preferred target organs. To explain this apparent specificity, Paget, >100 years ago, formulated his seed and soil hypothesis; i.e., the cells from a given tumor would "seed" only favorable "soil" offered by certain organs. The hypothesis implies that cancer cells must find a suitable "soil" in a target organ-i.e., one that supports colonization-for metastasis to occur. We demonstrate in this report that ability of human colon cancer cells to colonize liver tissue governs whether a particular colon cancer is metastatic. In the model used in this study, human colon tumors are transplanted into the nude mouse colon as intact tissue blocks by surgical orthotopic implantation. These implanted tumors closely simulate the metastatic behavior of the original human patient tumor and are clearly metastatic or nonmetastatic to the liver. Both classes of tumors were equally invasive locally into tissues and blood vessels. However, the cells from each class of tumor behave very differently when directly injected into nude mouse livers. Only cells from metastasizing tumors are competent to colonize after direct intrahepatic injection. Also, tissue blocks from metastatic tumors affixed directly to the liver resulted in colonization, whereas no colonization resulted from nonmetastatic tumor tissue blocks even though some growth occurred within the tissue block itself. Thus, local invasion (injection) and even adhesion to the metastatic target organ (blocks) are not sufficient for metastasis. The results suggest that the ability to colonize the liver is the governing step in the metastasis of human colon cancer.

  11. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli colonization of human colonic epithelium in vitro and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Steven B; Cook, Vivienne; Tighe, Richard; Schüller, Stephanie

    2015-03-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen causing gastroenteritis and more severe complications, such as hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Pathology is most pronounced in the colon, but to date there is no direct clinical evidence showing EHEC binding to the colonic epithelium in patients. In this study, we investigated EHEC adherence to the human colon by using in vitro organ culture (IVOC) of colonic biopsy samples and polarized T84 colon carcinoma cells. We show for the first time that EHEC colonizes human colonic biopsy samples by forming typical attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions which are dependent on EHEC type III secretion (T3S) and binding of the outer membrane protein intimin to the translocated intimin receptor (Tir). A/E lesion formation was dependent on oxygen levels and suppressed under oxygen-rich culture conditions routinely used for IVOC. In contrast, EHEC adherence to polarized T84 cells occurred independently of T3S and intimin and did not involve Tir translocation into the host cell membrane. Colonization of neither biopsy samples nor T84 cells was significantly affected by expression of Shiga toxins. Our study suggests that EHEC colonizes and forms stable A/E lesions on the human colon, which are likely to contribute to intestinal pathology during infection. Furthermore, care needs to be taken when using cell culture models, as they might not reflect the in vivo situation. PMID:25534942

  12. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Colonization of Human Colonic Epithelium In Vitro and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Steven B.; Cook, Vivienne; Tighe, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen causing gastroenteritis and more severe complications, such as hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Pathology is most pronounced in the colon, but to date there is no direct clinical evidence showing EHEC binding to the colonic epithelium in patients. In this study, we investigated EHEC adherence to the human colon by using in vitro organ culture (IVOC) of colonic biopsy samples and polarized T84 colon carcinoma cells. We show for the first time that EHEC colonizes human colonic biopsy samples by forming typical attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions which are dependent on EHEC type III secretion (T3S) and binding of the outer membrane protein intimin to the translocated intimin receptor (Tir). A/E lesion formation was dependent on oxygen levels and suppressed under oxygen-rich culture conditions routinely used for IVOC. In contrast, EHEC adherence to polarized T84 cells occurred independently of T3S and intimin and did not involve Tir translocation into the host cell membrane. Colonization of neither biopsy samples nor T84 cells was significantly affected by expression of Shiga toxins. Our study suggests that EHEC colonizes and forms stable A/E lesions on the human colon, which are likely to contribute to intestinal pathology during infection. Furthermore, care needs to be taken when using cell culture models, as they might not reflect the in vivo situation. PMID:25534942

  13. Evolution of phenotypic plasticity in colonizing species.

    PubMed

    Lande, Russell

    2015-05-01

    I elaborate an hypothesis to explain inconsistent empirical findings comparing phenotypic plasticity in colonizing populations or species with plasticity from their native or ancestral range. Quantitative genetic theory on the evolution of plasticity reveals that colonization of a novel environment can cause a transient increase in plasticity: a rapid initial increase in plasticity accelerates evolution of a new optimal phenotype, followed by slow genetic assimilation of the new phenotype and reduction of plasticity. An association of colonization with increased plasticity depends on the difference in the optimal phenotype between ancestral and colonized environments, the difference in mean, variance and predictability of the environment, the cost of plasticity, and the time elapsed since colonization. The relative importance of these parameters depends on whether a phenotypic character develops by one-shot plasticity to a constant adult phenotype or by labile plasticity involving continuous and reversible development throughout adult life. PMID:25558898

  14. Colon diverticula - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100158.htm Colon diverticula - series To use the sharing features on ... 6 out of 6 Normal anatomy Overview The colon, or large intestine, is a muscular tube that ...

  15. Colon cancer - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100157.htm Colon cancer - Series To use the sharing features on ... 5 out of 5 Normal anatomy Overview The colon, or large intestine, is a muscular tube that ...

  16. Colon cancer - Series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the United States. Risk factors include a diet low ... The treatment of colon cancer depends on the stage of the disease. Stage I cancer is limited to the inner lining of the colon; ...

  17. Defining Optimal Aerobic Exercise Parameters to Affect Complex Motor and Cognitive Outcomes after Stroke: A Systematic Review and Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, S. M. Mahmudul; Rancourt, Samantha N.; Austin, Mark W.; Ploughman, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Although poststroke aerobic exercise (AE) increases markers of neuroplasticity and protects perilesional tissue, the degree to which it enhances complex motor or cognitive outcomes is unknown. Previous research suggests that timing and dosage of exercise may be important. We synthesized data from clinical and animal studies in order to determine optimal AE training parameters and recovery outcomes for future research. Using predefined criteria, we included clinical trials of stroke of any type or duration and animal studies employing any established models of stroke. Of the 5,259 titles returned, 52 articles met our criteria, measuring the effects of AE on balance, lower extremity coordination, upper limb motor skills, learning, processing speed, memory, and executive function. We found that early-initiated low-to-moderate intensity AE improved locomotor coordination in rodents. In clinical trials, AE improved balance and lower limb coordination irrespective of intervention modality or parameter. In contrast, fine upper limb recovery was relatively resistant to AE. In terms of cognitive outcomes, poststroke AE in animals improved memory and learning, except when training was too intense. However, in clinical trials, combined training protocols more consistently improved cognition. We noted a paucity of studies examining the benefits of AE on recovery beyond cessation of the intervention. PMID:26881101

  18. Defining Optimal Aerobic Exercise Parameters to Affect Complex Motor and Cognitive Outcomes after Stroke: A Systematic Review and Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S M Mahmudul; Rancourt, Samantha N; Austin, Mark W; Ploughman, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Although poststroke aerobic exercise (AE) increases markers of neuroplasticity and protects perilesional tissue, the degree to which it enhances complex motor or cognitive outcomes is unknown. Previous research suggests that timing and dosage of exercise may be important. We synthesized data from clinical and animal studies in order to determine optimal AE training parameters and recovery outcomes for future research. Using predefined criteria, we included clinical trials of stroke of any type or duration and animal studies employing any established models of stroke. Of the 5,259 titles returned, 52 articles met our criteria, measuring the effects of AE on balance, lower extremity coordination, upper limb motor skills, learning, processing speed, memory, and executive function. We found that early-initiated low-to-moderate intensity AE improved locomotor coordination in rodents. In clinical trials, AE improved balance and lower limb coordination irrespective of intervention modality or parameter. In contrast, fine upper limb recovery was relatively resistant to AE. In terms of cognitive outcomes, poststroke AE in animals improved memory and learning, except when training was too intense. However, in clinical trials, combined training protocols more consistently improved cognition. We noted a paucity of studies examining the benefits of AE on recovery beyond cessation of the intervention. PMID:26881101

  19. Detecting the specific parameters that affect the maturation of farmed sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) fillets stored in sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Baygar, Taçnur; Alparslan, Yunus; Okumuş, Melis; Güler, Merve

    2014-06-01

    In this study, it was aimed to detect the specific parameters that effect the maturation of farmed sea bass fillets stored in sunflower oil. Sea bass fillets were taken into the pickling solution (2.5% acetic acid and 11% sodium chloride) at 4 °C(±1). Fish meat in each group was analysed for the following parameters; pH, moisture%, acetic acid% and NaCl% in the maturation pickling solution and in sunflower oil. At the end of the 90 days storage, there were not any negative situations about the fish in terms of the scientific approach. It was detected that the skinless samples had the less NaCl and acidity values but scaly and scaleless samples had the higher values. Main reasons are: for the scaly and scaleless samples, the skin acted as a barrier in the pickling solution or oil and for scaly samples, scales depart from the skin and defeat the passing of NaCl and acid to the meat. When evaluating this study results, the fillet group samples which contain more salt and acetic acid are thought to be more appropriate for marinating in terms of shelf-life and quality. PMID:24876656

  20. The Parameters Affecting the Success of Irrigation and Debridement with Component Retention in the Treatment of Acutely Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Gyoon; Bae, Ji Hoon; Lee, Seung Yup; Cho, Won Tae

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims of our study were to evaluate the success rate of irrigation and debridement with component retention (IDCR) for acutely infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (< 4 weeks of symptom duration) and to analyze the factors affecting prognosis of IDCR. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 28 knees treated by IDCR for acutely infected TKA from 2003 to 2012. We evaluated the success rate of IDCR. All variables were compared between the success and failure groups. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was also used to examine the relative contribution of these parameters to the success of IDCR. Results Seventeen knees (60.7%) were successfully treated. Between the success and failure groups, there were significant differences in the time from primary TKA to IDCR (p = 0.021), the preoperative erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR; p = 0.021), microorganism (p = 0.006), and polyethylene liner exchange (p = 0.017). Multivariable logistic regression analysis of parameters affecting the success of IDCR demonstrated that preoperative ESR (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; p = 0.041), microorganism (OR, 12.4; p = 0.006), and polyethylene liner exchange (OR, 0.07; p = 0.021) were significant parameters. Conclusions The results show that 60.7% of the cases were successfully treated by IDCR for acutely infected TKA. The preoperative ESR, microorganism, and polyethylene liner exchange were factors that affected the success of IDCR in acutely infected TKA. PMID:25729521

  1. Cell colonization in degradable 3D porous matrices

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Benjamin J

    2008-01-01

    Cell colonization is an important in a wide variety of biological processes and applications including vascularization, wound healing, tissue engineering, stem cell differentiation and biosensors. During colonization porous 3D structures are used to support and guide the ingrowth of cells into the matrix. In this review, we summarize our understanding of various factors affecting cell colonization in three-dimensional environment. The structural, biological and degradation properties of the matrix all play key roles during colonization. Further, specific scaffold properties such as porosity, pore size, fiber thickness, topography and scaffold stiffness as well as important cell material interactions such as cell adhesion and mechanotransduction also influence colonization. PMID:19262124

  2. A weak pulsed magnetic field affects adenine nucleotide oscillations, and related parameters in aggregating Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae.

    PubMed

    Davies, E; Olliff, C; Wright, I; Woodward, A; Kell, D

    1999-02-01

    A model eukaryotic cell system was used to explore the effect of a weak pulsed magnetic field (PMF) on time-varying physiological parameters. Dictyostelium discoideum cells (V12 strain) were exposed to a pulsed magnetic field (PMF) of flux density 0.4 mT, generated via air-cored coils in trains of 2 ms pulses gated at 20 ms. This signal is similar to those used to treat non-uniting fractures. Samples were taken over periods of 20 min from harvested suspensions of amoebae during early aggregation phase, extracted and derivatised for HPLC fluorescent assay of adenine nucleotides. Analysis of variance showed a significant athermal damping effect (P < 0.002, n = 22) of the PMF on natural adenine nucleotide oscillations and some consistent changes in phase relationships. The technique of nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy (NLDS) revealed a distinctive effect of PMF, caffeine and EGTA in modulating the cellular harmonic response to an applied weak signal. Light scattering studies also showed altered frequency response of cells to PMF, EGTA and caffeine. PMF caused a significant reduction of caffeine induced cell contraction (P < 0.0006, n = 19 by paired t-test) as shown by Malvern particle size analyser, suggesting that intracellular calcium may be involved in mediating the effect of the PMF. PMID:10228582

  3. On the Behavior of Physical Parameters of Aqueous Solutions Affected by the Inerton Field of TESLAR® Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoholovets, Volodymyr; Skliarenko, Sergiy; Strokach, Olexander

    We present studies of the behavior of the permittivity of such liquid systems as pure distilled water, alcohol and 50%-aqueous solutions of alcohol as affected by the inerton field generated by a special signal generator contained within a wrist-watch or bracelet made by so-called Teslar® technology. It has been found that the changes are in fact significant. The method employed has allowed us to fix the value of frequency of the field generated by the Teslar® chip. The frequency has been determined to be approximately 8 Hz. The phenomenological consideration and submicroscopic foundations of a significant increase of the permittivity are studied, taking into account an additional interaction, namely, the mass interaction between polar water molecules, which is caused by the inerton field of the Teslar® chip. This is one more proof of Krasnoholovets' concept regarding the existence of a substructure of the matter waves of moving/vibrating entities, i.e. the inerton field, which has been predicted in a series of his previous works.

  4. Willingness to Use Microbicides Is Affected by the Importance of Product Characteristics, Use Parameters, and Protective Properties

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Kathleen M.; Fava, Joseph L.; Rosen, Rochelle K.; Vargas, Sara; Barroso, Candelaria; Christensen, Anna L.; Woodsong, Cynthia; Severy, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Background Along with efficacy, a microbicide’s acceptability will be integral to its impact on the pandemic. Understanding Product Characteristics that users find most acceptable and determining who will use which type of product are key to optimizing use effectiveness. Objectives To evaluate psychometrically the Important Microbicide Characteristics (IMC) instrument and examine its relationship to willingness to use microbicides. Results Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed 2 IMC subscales (Cronbach’s coefficient α: Product Characteristics subscale (α = 0.84) and Protective Properties subscale (α = 0.89)). Significant differences on Product Characteristics subscale scores were found for history of douching (P = 0.002) and employment status (P = 0.001). Whether a woman used a method to prevent pregnancy or sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the last 3 months (P < 0.001) and whether she used a condom during the last vaginal sex episode (P < 0.001) were significantly related to her rating of the importance of microbicides being contraceptive. Product Characteristics (r = 0.21) and Protective Properties (r = 0.27) subscale scores and whether a microbicide had contraceptive properties (r = 0.24) were all significantly associated (P < 0.001) with willingness to use microbicides. Conclusions Formulation and use characteristics and product function(s) affect willingness to use microbicides and should continue to be addressed in product development. The IMC instrument serves as a template for future studies of candidate microbicides. PMID:17325607

  5. Visible Persistence of Single-Transient Random Dot Patterns: Spatial Parameters Affect the Duration of Fading Percepts.

    PubMed

    Bruchmann, Maximilian; Thaler, Kathrin; Vorberg, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Visible persistence refers to the continuation of visual perception after the physical termination of a stimulus. We studied an extreme case of visible persistence by presenting two matrices of randomly distributed black and white pixels in succession. On the transition from one matrix to the second, the luminance polarity of all pixels within a disk- or annulus-shaped area reversed, physically creating a single second-order transient signal. This transient signal produces the percept of a disk or an annulus with an abrupt onset and a gradual offset. To study the nature of this fading percept we varied spatial parameters, such as the inner and the outer diameter of annuli (Experiment I) and the radius and eccentricity of disks (Experiment III), and measured the duration of visible persistence by having subjects adjust the synchrony of the onset of a reference stimulus with the onset or the offset of the fading percept. We validated this method by comparing two modalities of the reference stimuli (Experiment I) and by comparing the judgments of fading percepts with the judgments of stimuli that actually fade in luminance contrast (Experiment II). The results show that (i) irrespective of the reference modality, participants are able to precisely judge the on- and the offsets of the fading percepts, (ii) auditory reference stimuli lead to higher visible persistence durations than visual ones, (iii) visible persistence duration increases with the thickness of annuli and the diameter of disks, but decreases with the diameter of annuli, irrespective of stimulus eccentricity. These effects cannot be explained by stimulus energy, which suggests that more complex processing mechanisms are involved. Seemingly contradictory effects of disk and annulus diameter can be unified by assuming an abstract filling-in mechanism that speeds up with the strength of the edge signal and takes more time the larger the stimulus area is. PMID:26348616

  6. Visible Persistence of Single-Transient Random Dot Patterns: Spatial Parameters Affect the Duration of Fading Percepts

    PubMed Central

    Bruchmann, Maximilian; Thaler, Kathrin; Vorberg, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Visible persistence refers to the continuation of visual perception after the physical termination of a stimulus. We studied an extreme case of visible persistence by presenting two matrices of randomly distributed black and white pixels in succession. On the transition from one matrix to the second, the luminance polarity of all pixels within a disk- or annulus-shaped area reversed, physically creating a single second-order transient signal. This transient signal produces the percept of a disk or an annulus with an abrupt onset and a gradual offset. To study the nature of this fading percept we varied spatial parameters, such as the inner and the outer diameter of annuli (Experiment I) and the radius and eccentricity of disks (Experiment III), and measured the duration of visible persistence by having subjects adjust the synchrony of the onset of a reference stimulus with the onset or the offset of the fading percept. We validated this method by comparing two modalities of the reference stimuli (Experiment I) and by comparing the judgments of fading percepts with the judgments of stimuli that actually fade in luminance contrast (Experiment II). The results show that (i) irrespective of the reference modality, participants are able to precisely judge the on- and the offsets of the fading percepts, (ii) auditory reference stimuli lead to higher visible persistence durations than visual ones, (iii) visible persistence duration increases with the thickness of annuli and the diameter of disks, but decreases with the diameter of annuli, irrespective of stimulus eccentricity. These effects cannot be explained by stimulus energy, which suggests that more complex processing mechanisms are involved. Seemingly contradictory effects of disk and annulus diameter can be unified by assuming an abstract filling-in mechanism that speeds up with the strength of the edge signal and takes more time the larger the stimulus area is. PMID:26348616

  7. Preoperative Serum Levels of Mesothelin in Patients with Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bostancı, Özgür; Kemik, Özgür; Kemik, Ahu; Battal, Muharrem; Demir, Uygar; Purisa, Sevim; Mihmanlı, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Background. Screening for biochemical markers is important for diagnosing colon cancer. In this study, the reliability of serum mesothelin levels as a potential diagnostic and screening instrument was evaluated concerning colon cancer. Methods. Ninety-five patients who had undergone colonoscopic examination and who were diagnosed with colon cancer were included in the study. The serum mesothelin levels were measured with the ELISA kits and were evaluated in terms of significant difference when compared between colon cancer and control group. Results. Patients with colon cancer had significantly higher mesothelin serum levels (P < 0.001) than the control groups. We found significant associations between serum levels and tumor grade, perineural invasion, and vascular invasion (resp., P < 0.001). Conclusion. Evaluating the serum levels of mesothelin has a potential to detect and screen the colon cancer in affected patients. Our data suggest that mesothelin exhibits effects towards colon cancer and serves as a biomarker for this deadly disease. PMID:25477701

  8. Generation of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone from rhamnose as affected by reaction parameters: experimental design approach.

    PubMed

    Illmann, Silke; Davidek, Tomas; Gouézec, Elisabeth; Rytz, Andreas; Schuchmann, Heike P; Blank, Imre

    2009-04-01

    The formation of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (HDMF) was studied in aqueous model systems containing L-rhamnose and L-lysine. The approach consisted in systematically varying four reaction parameters (rhamnose concentration, rhamnose to lysine ratio, pH, and phosphate concentration) at 3 levels. A fractional factorial design was used to reduce the number of trials. The degradation of rhamnose was followed by high performance anion exchange chromatography and the formation of HDMF by solid phase extraction in combination with GC/MS. The study permitted the identification of critical reaction parameters that affect the formation of HDMF from rhamnose in aqueous systems. Although all studied parameters have some impact on the HDMF formation and rhamnose degradation kinetics, the effect of phosphate is by far the most important, followed by concentration of precursors and pH. The experimental design approach permitted us, with a limited number of experiments, to accurately model the effects of the four investigated reaction parameters on the kinetics of rhamnose degradation and HDMF formation (R(2)>0.93). Overall, the results indicate that rhamnose can be an excellent precursor of HDMF (yield >40 mol%), if the reaction conditions are well mastered. PMID:19256512

  9. Dehydropeptidase 1 promotes metastasis through regulation of E-cadherin expression in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Seon-Jin; Cho, Hee Jun; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Jong-Tae; Kim, Jae Wha; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Yeom, Young Il; Lim, Jong-Seok; Lee, Younghee; Lee, Hee Gu

    2016-01-01

    Dehydropeptidase 1 (DPEP1) is a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase that is expressed aberrantly in several cancers. The role of DPEP1 in cancer remain controversial. In this study, we demonstrate that DPEP1 functions as a positive regulator for colon cancer cell metastasis. The expression of DPEP1 mRNA and proteins were upregulated in colon cancer tissues compared to normal mucosa. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches were used to examine the malignant phenotype of DPEP1-expressing or DPEP1-depleted cells. DPEP1 expression caused a significant increase in colon cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro, and metastasis in vivo. In contrast, DPEP1 depletion induced opposite effects. Furthermore, cilastatin, a DPEP1 inhibitor, suppressed the invasion and metastasis of DPEP1-expressing cells. DPEP1 inhibited the leukotriene D4 signaling pathway and increased the expression of E-cadherin. We also show that DPEP1 mediates TGF-β-induced EMT. TGF-β transcriptionally repressed DPEP1 expression. TGF-β treatment decreased E-cadherin expression and promoted cell invasion in DPEP1-expressing colon cancer cell lines, whereas it did not affect these parameters in DPEP1-depleted cell lines. These results suggest that DPEP1 promotes cancer metastasis by regulating E-cadherin plasticity and that it might be a potential therapeutic target for preventing the progression of colon cancer. PMID:26824987

  10. Clinical significance of HOTAIR expression in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhi-Fen; Zhao, Dan; Li, Xi-Qing; Cui, Yong-Xia; Ma, Ning; Lu, Chuang-Xin; Liu, Ming-Yue; Zhou, Yun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To detect the expression of the long noncoding RNA HOTAIR in colon cancer and analyze its relationship with clinicopathological parameters of colon cancer. METHODS: Total RNA was extracted from 80 colon cancer tissues and matched tumor-adjacent normal colon tissues and reverse transcribed. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of HOTAIR. The relationship between the expression of HOTAIR and clinicopathological parameters of colon cancer was analyzed. RESULTS: The expression of HOTAIR was significantly higher in colon cancer tissues than in matched tumor-adjacent normal colon tissues (P < 0.05). HOTAIR expression was significantly higher in cases with lymph node metastasis than in those without metastasis; in lowly differentiated and undifferentiated cases than in highly and moderately differentiated cases; and in stages III + IV cases than in stages I + II cases (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: HOTAIR expression is upregulated in colon cancer, suggesting that HOTAIR plays an important role in the tumorigenesis, development and metastasis of colon cancer. HOTAIR may act as an oncogene and represents a new molecular target for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27298568

  11. A Case of Sigmoid Colon Tuberculosis Mimicking Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seong-Min; Kim, Min-Dae; Lee, Hee-Ryong; Jung, Peel; Ryu, Tae-Hyun; Choi, Seung-Ho; Lee, Il-Seon

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the sigmoid colon is a rare disorder. An 80-year-old man visited Bongseng Memorial Hospital for medical examination. A colonoscopy was performed, and a lesion in the sigmoid colon that was suspected to be colon cancer was found. A biopsy was performed, and tuberculous enteritis with chronic granulomatous inflammation was diagnosed. Intestinal tuberculosis is most frequent in the ileocecal area, followed by the ascending colon, transverse colon, duodenum, stomach, and sigmoid colon, in descending order. Hence, we report a case of intestinal tuberculosis in the sigmoid colon, which is rare and almost indistinguishable from colon cancer. PMID:23185709

  12. Colonic motility in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Elisabetta; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldoni, Monia; Dore, Maria Pina

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammatory conditions affecting the gut may cause motility disturbances, and ulcerative colitis – one of the main disorders among the inflammatory bowel diseases – may display abnormal colonic motility. Aim To review the abnormalities of the large bowel in ulcerative colitis, by considering the motility, laboratory (in vitro) and pathological studies dealing with this topic. Methods A comprehensive online search of Medline and the Science Citation Index was carried out. Results Patients with ulcerative colitis frequently display colonic motor abnormalities, including lack of contractility, an increase of propulsive contractile waves, an excessive production of nitric oxide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide nerves, interleukin 1 beta, neurotensin, tachykinins levels and the weaker action of substance P, likely related to a neuromuscular dysfunction due to the inflammatory process. Conclusions A better understanding of the pathophysiological grounds of altered colonic motility in ulcerative colitis may lead to a more in-depth knowledge of the accompanying symptoms and to better and more targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:25452840

  13. Colonic diverticulitis in adolescents: an index case and associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santin, Brian J; Prasad, Vinay; Caniano, Donna A

    2009-10-01

    Diverticular disease of the colon, a common problem among adults, is diagnosed rarely in children. We report an adolescent patient with sigmoid diverticulitis who required operative treatment. Pediatric patients with the complications of diverticula typically have conditions that result in genetic alterations affecting the components of the colonic wall. Our patient had Williams-Beuren syndrome, although Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and cystic fibrosis may also be associated with colonic diverticula in adolescence. Pediatric patients with these disorders who experience abdominal pain should be evaluated for the presence of colonic diverticular complications. PMID:19711089

  14. Lunar Colonization and NASA's Exploration Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavert, Raymond B.

    2006-01-01

    Space colonization is not part of NASA's mission planning. NASA's exploration vision, mission goals and program implementations, however, can have an important affect on private lunar programs leading towards colonization. NASA's exploration program has been described as a journey not a race. It is not like the Apollo mission having tight schedules and relatively unchanging direction. NASA of this era has competing demands from the areas of aeronautics, space science, earth science, space operations and, there are competing demands within the exploration program itself. Under the journey not a race conditions, an entrepreneur thinking about building a hotel on the Moon, with a road to an exploration site, might have difficulty determining where and when NASA might be at a particular place on the Moon. Lunar colonization advocates cannot depend on NASA or other nations with space programs to lead the way to colonization. They must set their own visions, mission goals and schedules. In implementing their colonization programs they will be resource limited. They would be like ``hitchhikers'' following the programs of spacefaring nations identifying programs that might have a fit with their vision and be ready to switch to other programs that may take them in the colonization direction. At times they will have to muster their own limited resources and do things themselves where necessary. The purpose of this paper is to examine current changes within NASA, as a lunar colonization advocate might do, in order to see where there might be areas for fitting into a lunar colonization strategy. The approach will help understand how the ``hitchhiking'' technique might be better utilized.

  15. An automatic method for colon segmentation in CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Bert, Alberto; Dmitriev, Ivan; Agliozzo, Silvano; Pietrosemoli, Natalia; Mandelkern, Mark; Gallo, Teresa; Regge, Daniele

    2009-06-01

    An automatic method for the segmentation of the colonic wall is proposed for abdominal computed tomography (CT) of the cleansed and air-inflated colon. This multistage approach uses an adaptive 3D region-growing algorithm, with a self-adjusting growing condition depending on local variations of the intensity at the air-tissue boundary. The method was evaluated using retrospectively collected CT scans based on visual segmentation of the colon by expert radiologists. This evaluation showed that the procedure identifies 97% of the colon segments, representing 99.8% of the colon surface, and accurately replicates the anatomical profile of the colonic wall. The parameter settings and performance of the method are relatively independent of the scanner and acquisition conditions. The method is intended for application to the computer-aided detection of polyps in CT colonography. PMID:19304454

  16. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:26579381

  17. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-06-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:26579381

  18. Investigating how fundamental parameters of XRF sample preparation and analysis affect the observed elemental concentration: an experiment using fluvial sediment from Sabah, Borneo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higton, Sam; Walsh, Rory

    2015-04-01

    X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) is an important technique for measuring the concentrations of geochemical elements and inorganic contaminants adsorbed to sediments as an input to sediment tracing methods used to evaluate sediment transport dynamics in river catchments. In addition to traditional laboratory-based XRF instruments, the advent of increasingly advanced portable handheld XRF devices now mean that samples of fluvial sediment can be analysed in the field or in the laboratory following appropriate sample preparation procedures. There are limitations and sources of error associated with XRF sample preparation and analysis, however. It is therefore important to understand how fundamental parameters involved in sample preparation and analysis, such as sample compression and measurement exposure duration, affect observed variability in measurement results. Such considerations become important if the resulting measurement variability is high relative to the natural variability in element concentrations at a sample site. This paper deployed a simple experimental design to assess the impacts of varying a number of sample preparation and XRF analysis parameters on recorded measurements of elemental concentrations of the fine fraction (<63um) of bed-sediment samples. Specifically the study compared observed elemental concentrations measured using a Rigaku NEX-CG laboratory machine versus a handheld Niton XL3t-900 XRF elemental analyser. Helium purging was used on both machines to enable measurement of lighter geochemical elements. Sediment sub-samples were taken from a larger homogenised sample from a sediment core taken from an in-channel lateral bench deposit of the Brantian river in Sabah, Borneo; the core site is being used for research into multi-proxy sediment fingerprinting as part of the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) project. Some fundamental sample preparation procedures consistent with US EPA Method 6200 were applied to all sediment samples in

  19. Does the antibiotic amoxicillin affect haemocyte parameters in non-target aquatic invertebrates? The clam Ruditapes philippinarum and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis as model organisms.

    PubMed

    Matozzo, Valerio; Bertin, Valeria; Battistara, Margherita; Guidolin, Angelica; Masiero, Luciano; Marisa, Ilaria; Orsetti, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Amoxicillin (AMX) is one of the most widely used antibiotics worldwide, and its levels in aquatic ecosystems are expected to be detectable. At present, information concerning the toxic effects of AMX on non-target aquatic organisms, such as bivalves, is scarce. Consequently, in this study, we investigated for the first time the effects of AMX on the haemocyte parameters of two bivalve species, the clam Ruditapes philippinarum and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, which share the same habitat in the Lagoon of Venice, in order to compare the relative sensitivity of the two species. The bivalves were exposed to 100, 200 and 400 μg AMX/L for 1, 3 and 7 days, and the effects on the total haemocyte count (THC), the diameter and volume of the haemocytes, haemocyte proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in cell-free haemolymph, the haemolymph pH, and the formation of micronuclei were evaluated. The actual concentrations of AMX in the seawater samples from the experimental tanks were also measured. Overall, the obtained results demonstrated that AMX affected slightly the haemocyte parameters of bivalves. In addition, no clear differences in terms of sensitivity to AMX exposure were recorded between the two bivalve species. PMID:27219711

  20. Culture - colonic tissue

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the large intestine. The cause may be bacteria, fungi, or viruses. ... bacteria Cytomegalovirus Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria Salmonella bacteria Shigella bacteria These organisms may lead to diarrhea or infections involving the colon.

  1. Transverse colon conduit diversion

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.D.; Buchsbaum, H.J.

    1986-05-01

    The versatility and other advantages of the transverse colon conduit for urinary diversion have been described and implemented in 50 patients. Because most patients considered for this procedure will be at high risk because of a history of significant pelvic irradiation, underlying malignancy, poor renal function, fistula, and so forth, the technical details of surgery and patient selection cannot be minimized. The transverse colon segment is indicated for primary supravesical diversion as well as for salvage of problems related to ileal conduits. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is an unlikely long-term complication of this form of diversion because the fecal stream is absent. Now that the transverse colon conduit has been used for more than 10 years, meaningful comparisons with ileal segments should soon be available.

  2. [Angiodysplasia of the colon].

    PubMed

    Bruni, R; Rossodivita, I; Santoro, M; La Banca, G; Rollo, R; Putti, R

    1990-01-01

    The Authors report their experience with a case of angiodysplasia of the colon. It is outlined how these lesions can be demonstrated by angiography and colonoscopy. The pathophysiology, diagnosis and management are discussed as well. PMID:2223469

  3. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  4. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test ... death and complications caused by colorectal cancer. SCREENING TESTS There are several ways to screen for colon ...

  5. Apc-driven colon carcinogenesis in Pirc rat is strongly reduced by polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Becherucci, Caterina; Crucitta, Stefania; Caderni, Giovanna

    2015-11-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is one of the most powerful agents in reducing chemically induced carcinogenesis in rat colon. However, contrasting results in Min mice dampened the enthusiasm on this potentially strong and virtually safe, cancer chemopreventing agent. Pirc (F344/NTac-Apc (am1137) ) rats carrying a germline heterozygous mutation in the Apc gene, spontaneously develop multiple tumours in the colon thus modelling both familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). Given this similarity, we thought that these rats could be appropriate to test the efficacy of PEG 8000 in reducing carcinogenesis. Pirc male rats aged one month were treated with 5% PEG in drinking water for 2 or 6 months. Precancerous lesions were dramatically reduced after 2 months of PEG treatment (Mucin depleted foci (MDF)/colon were 99 ± 17 and 12 ± 8 in Controls and PEG-treated rats, respectively; p < 0.001; mean ± SD). Similarly, colon tumors were significantly reduced after 6 months of treatment (tumors/rat were 8.1 ± 2.3 and 3.6 ± 2.2 in Controls and PEG-treated rats, respectively; p < 0.05; mean ± SD). Colon proliferation, a parameter correlated to cancer risk, was also significantly lower in PEG-treated rats than in Controls, while apoptosis was not significantly affected. In conclusion, PEG markedly reduces colon carcinogenesis in Pirc rats mutated in Apc; we thus suggest that PEG may be used as chemopreventive agent to reduce cancer risk in FAP and CRC patients. PMID:25912754

  6. Intestinal colonization resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Trevor D; Walker, Alan W

    2013-01-01

    Dense, complex microbial communities, collectively termed the microbiota, occupy a diverse array of niches along the length of the mammalian intestinal tract. During health and in the absence of antibiotic exposure the microbiota can effectively inhibit colonization and overgrowth by invading microbes such as pathogens. This phenomenon is called ‘colonization resistance’ and is associated with a stable and diverse microbiota in tandem with a controlled lack of inflammation, and involves specific interactions between the mucosal immune system and the microbiota. Here we overview the microbial ecology of the healthy mammalian intestinal tract and highlight the microbe–microbe and microbe–host interactions that promote colonization resistance. Emerging themes highlight immunological (T helper type 17/regulatory T-cell balance), microbiota (diverse and abundant) and metabolic (short-chain fatty acid) signatures of intestinal health and colonization resistance. Intestinal pathogens use specific virulence factors or exploit antibiotic use to subvert colonization resistance for their own benefit by triggering inflammation to disrupt the harmony of the intestinal ecosystem. A holistic view that incorporates immunological and microbiological facets of the intestinal ecosystem should facilitate the development of immunomodulatory and microbe-modulatory therapies that promote intestinal homeostasis and colonization resistance. PMID:23240815

  7. Cathelicidin suppresses colon cancer development by inhibition of cancer associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Michelle; Ho, Samantha; Yoo, Jun Hwan; Tran, Deanna Hoang-Yen; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Su, Bowei; Tran, Diana Hoang-Ngoc; Kubota, Yuzu; Ichikawa, Ryan; Koon, Hon Wai

    2015-01-01

    Background Cathelicidin (LL-37 in humans and mCRAMP in mice) represents a family of endogenous antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides. Cancer-associated fibroblasts can promote the proliferation of colon cancer cells and growth of colon cancer tumors. Methods We examined the role of cathelicidin in the development of colon cancer, using subcutaneous human HT-29 colon-cancer-cell-derived tumor model in nude mice and azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-mediated colon cancer model in C57BL/6 mice. We also determined the indirect antitumoral mechanism of cathelicidin via the inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) of colon cancer cells and fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Results Intravenous administration of cathelicidin expressing adeno-associated virus significantly reduced the size of tumors, tumor-derived collagen expression, and tumor-derived fibroblast expression in HT-29-derived subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Enema administration of the mouse cathelicidin peptide significantly reduced the size and number of colonic tumors in azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-treated mice without inducing apoptosis in tumors and the adjacent normal colonic tissues. Cathelicidin inhibited the collagen expression and vimentin-positive fibroblast expression in colonic tumors. Cathelicidin did not directly affect HT-29 cell viability, but did significantly reduce tumor growth factor-β1-induced EMT of colon cancer cells. Media conditioned by the human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts promoted human colon cancer HT-29 cell proliferation. Cathelicidin pretreatment inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation mediated by media conditioned by human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts. Cathelicidin disrupted tubulin distribution in colonic fibroblasts. Disruption of tubulin in fibroblasts reduced fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Conclusion Cathelicidin effectively inhibits colon cancer development by interfering with EMT and fibroblast

  8. Comparison of Mathematical Models Applied to F1 Dairy Sheep Lactations in Organic Farm and Environmental Factors Affecting Lactation Curve Parameter

    PubMed Central

    Angeles-Hernandez, J. C.; Albarran-Portillo, B.; Gomez Gonzalez, A. V.; Pescador Salas, N.; Gonzalez-Ronquillo, M.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the goodness of fit of four lactation curve models: Wood’s Gamma model (WD), Wilmink (WL), and Pollott’s multiplicative two (POL2) and three parameters (POL3) and to determine the environmental factors affecting the complete lactation curve of F1 dairy sheep under organic management. A total of 5,382 weekly milk yields records from 150 ewes, under organic management were used. Residual mean square (RMS), determination coefficients (R2), and correlation (r) analysis were used as an indicator of goodness of fit for each model. WL model best fitted the lactation curves as indicated by the lower RMS values (0.019), followed by WD (0.023), POL2 (0.025) and POL3 (0.029). The four models provided total milk yield (TMY) estimations that were highly correlated (0.93 to 0.97) with observed TMY (89.9 kg). The four models under estimated peak yield (PY), whereas POL2 and POL3 gave nearer peak time lactation estimations. Ewes lambing in autumn had higher TMY and showed a typical curve shape. Higher TMY were recorded in second and third lambing. Season of lambing, number of lambing and type of lambing had a great influenced over TMY shaping the complete lactation curve of F1 dairy sheep. In general terms WL model showed the best fit to the F1 dairy sheep lactation curve under organic management. PMID:25049892

  9. Advances in understanding colonic function.

    PubMed

    Milla, Peter J

    2009-04-01

    The colon is an organ of conservation that salvages water, electrolytes, and energy. The organization of colonic function is determined by the roles played by the luminal flora, the function of the different mucosal epithelial cell types, immunocompetent cells, and the neuromusculature. These different components of the colon interact with one another and with the colonic flora, and different areas of the colon serve different functions. In the normal adult during the course of a day the colon absorbs approximately 1.5 L of fluid, but under the influence of aldosterone increases up to 5 to 6 L. Diarrhoea occurs when secretion exceeds absorptive processes by either small intestinal secretion overwhelming colonic salvage or salvage being impaired by reduced colonic absorption or increased colonic secretion. PMID:19300122

  10. Egg storage duration and hatch window affect gene expression of nutrient transporters and intestine morphological parameters of early hatched broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, S; Gursel, I; Bilgen, G; Izzetoglu, G T; Horuluoglu, B H; Gucluer, G

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, researchers have given emphasis on the differences in physiological parameters between early and late hatched chicks within a hatch window. Considering the importance of intestine development in newly hatched chicks, however, changes in gene expression of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of early hatched chicks within a hatch window have not been studied yet. This study was conducted to determine the effects of egg storage duration before incubation and hatch window on intestinal development and expression of PepT1 (H+-dependent peptide transporter) and SGLT1 (sodium-glucose co-transporter) genes in the jejunum of early hatched broiler chicks within a 30 h of hatch window. A total of 1218 eggs obtained from 38-week-old Ross 308 broiler breeder flocks were stored for 3 (ES3) or 14 days (ES14) and incubated at the same conditions. Eggs were checked between 475 and 480 h of incubation and 40 chicks from each egg storage duration were weighed; chick length and rectal temperature were measured. The chicks were sampled to evaluate morphological parameters and PepT1 and SGLT1 expression. The remaining chicks that hatched between 475 and 480 h were placed back in the incubator and the same measurements were conducted with those chicks at the end of hatch window at 510 h of incubation. Chick length, chick dry matter content, rectal temperature and weight of small intestine segments increased, whereas chick weight decreased during the hatch window. The increase in the jejunum length and villus width and area during the hatch window were higher for ES3 than ES14 chicks. PepT1 expression was higher for ES3 chicks compared with ES14. There was a 10.2 and 17.6-fold increase in PepT1 and SGLT1 expression of ES3 chicks at the end of hatch window, whereas it was only 2.3 and 3.3-fold, respectively, for ES14 chicks. These results suggested that egg storage duration affected development of early hatched chicks during 30 h of hatch window. It can be concluded that

  11. Dysregulation of hedgehog signaling pathway related components in the evolution of colonic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Sa-Sa; Wei, Gui-Jun; Deng, Zhong-Min; Hu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies report controversial role of Hedgehog (HH) signaling in the progression of colon cancer. This study aimed to investigate the expressions of smoothened (SMO) and downstream glioma-associated oncogene homology-1 (GLI1) in colon cancer, colonic adenoma and normal tissues. Colon cancer and normal tissue samples were collected from 49 patients with colon cancer while colonic adenoma tissue samples were obtained from 34 patients with colonic adenoma. Then the expressions of SMO and GLI1 were investigated using immunohistochemistry (IHC). For the detection of SMO and GLI1 expression, IHC staining results indicated that SMO was mainly expressed on the membrane while GLI1 was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm. The positive rates of SMO and GLI1 protein expressions were significantly increased in colon cancer tissue and colonic adenoma tissue when compared with normal colon tissue. In contrast, the significant difference was not found in the positive rates of SMO and GLI1 protein expressions between colon cancer tissue and colonic adenoma tissue. More importantly, it was found that SMO and GLI1 expressions possibly increased gradually from the normal colon to colonic adenoma to the colon cancer. Furthermore, no distinct correlations were detected between the expression levels of SMO and GLI1 and clinicopathological parameters, including age, gender, differentiation and Dukes stage. The present results provided some new information to the possible role of HH signaling in colon cancer progression. SMO and GLI1 maybe suggested asbiomarkers to identify colon cancerous, precancerous and normal tissues as well astherapeutic targets for colon cancer treatment. PMID:26885080

  12. ARMc8 indicates aggressive colon cancers and promotes invasiveness and migration of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guiyang; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Xiupeng; Fan, Chuifeng; Wang, Liang; Xu, Hongtao; Yu, Juanhan; Wang, Enhua

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have implicated ARMc8 in promoting tumor formation in non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer; however, so far, no studies have revealed the expression pattern or cellular function of ARMc8 in colon cancer. In this study, we used immunohistochemical staining to measure ARMc8 expression in 206 cases of colon cancer and matched adjacent normal colon tissue. Clinically important behaviors of cells, including invasiveness and migration, were evaluated after upregulation of ARMc8 expression in HT29 cells through gene transfection or downregulation of expression in LoVo cells using RNAi. We found that ARMc8 was primarily located in the membrane and cytoplasm of tumor cells, and its expression level was significantly higher in colon cancer in comparison to that in the adjacent normal colon tissues (p < 0.001). ARMc8 expression was closely related to TNM stage (p = 0.006), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.001), and poor prognosis (p = 0.002) of colon cancer. The invasiveness and migration capacity of HT29 cells transfected with ARMc8 were significantly greater than those of control cells (p < 0.001), while ARMc8 siRNA treatment significantly reduced cell invasion and migration in LoVo cells (p < 0.001). Furthermore, we demonstrated that ARMc8 could upregulate the expression of MMP7 and snail and downregulate the expression of p120ctn and α-catenin. Therefore, ARMc8 probably enhanced invasiveness and metastatic capacity by affecting these tumor-associated factors, thereby playing a role in enhancing the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. ARMc8 is likely to become a potential therapeutic target for colon cancer. PMID:26081621

  13. Management of the colonic volvulus in 2016.

    PubMed

    Perrot, L; Fohlen, A; Alves, A; Lubrano, J

    2016-06-01

    Colonic volvulus is the third leading cause of colonic obstruction worldwide, occurring at two principal locations: the sigmoid colon and cecum. In Western countries, sigmoid volvulus preferentially affects elderly men whereas cecal volvulus affects younger women. Some risk factors, such as chronic constipation, high-fiber diet, frequent use of laxatives, personal past history of laparotomy and anatomic predispositions, are common to both locations. Clinical symptomatology is non-specific, including a combination of abdominal pain, gaseous distention, and bowel obstruction. Abdominopelvic computerized tomography is currently the gold standard examination, allowing positive diagnosis as well as detection of complications. Specific management depends on the location, patient comorbidities and colonic wall viability, but treatment is an emergency in every case. If clinical or radiological signs of gravity are present, emergency surgery is mandatory, but is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. For sigmoid volvulus without criteria of gravity, the ideal strategy is an endoscopic detorsion procedure followed, within 2 to 5 days, by surgery that includes a sigmoid colectomy with primary anastomosis. Exclusively endoscopic therapy must be reserved for patients who are at excessive risk for surgical intervention. In cecal volvulus, endoscopy has no role and surgery is the rule. PMID:27132752

  14. [Individualized therapy of synchronous ovarian and colon cancers with lymph].

    PubMed

    Deme, Dániel; Bishr, Abdulfatah M; Nizar, Jamool; Telekes, András

    2015-06-01

    A 71-year-old female patient underwent urgent laparotomy due to severe right lower quadrant abdominal pain and fever. Macroscopically duplex coecal and transverse colon cancer as well as a sigmoid or left ovarian cancer were suspected. Pathological findings revealed synchronous left ovarian and transverse colonic neoplasms. Both primaries metastatized to their regional lymph nodes. Furthermore, the ovarian cancer infiltrating the sigmoid colon gave distant metastasis in the coecum, too. Ovarian cancer histology showed papillary adenocarcinoma, and transverse colon cancer was a tubular adenocarcinoma. The affected lymph nodes were clearly distinguished by immunohistochemistry staining: ovarian metastases were CK7 positive, and colonic metastases were CK20 and CEA positive. The patient was treated with combinated chemotherapy: FOLFOX-4 two weekly and paclitaxel monotherapy every other week. The patient tolerated this combined treatment well. The authors conclude that multiple synchronous neoplasms can be treated with individualized chemotherapeutic protocol with good efficacy and few adverse reactions. PMID:26027602

  15. Colonization, mouse-style

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Several recent papers, including one in BMC Evolutionary Biology, examine the colonization history of house mice. As well as background for the analysis of mouse adaptation, such studies offer a perspective on the history of movements of the humans that accidentally transported the mice. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/10/325 PMID:20977781

  16. Colonic interposition: radiographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Agha, F P; Orringer, M B

    1984-04-01

    This report reviews the clinical and radiographic features of 40 patients who underwent visceral esophageal substitution with colon for benign or malignant lesions of the esophagus. The incidence and radiographic identification of complications are discussed. All patients were routinely examined with barium esophagrams on postoperative day 10. If an anastomotic leak was suspected clinically before this time, studies were performed using water-soluble iodinated contrast material. Follow-up barium esophagrams were obtained 1-96 months after operation (average, 60 months) in 24 patients. Eight patients (21%) demonstrated asymptomatic "jejunization" of the colonic mucosa with no attributable clinical manifestations; this finding resolved in 1-3 months, without sequelae, and has not been reported before. The spectrum of ischemic changes in the colonic segment included mucosal edema, spasm, ulceration, loss of haustration, and frank necrosis. Radiographically detectable early postoperative complications included anastomotic leak in six (three pharyngocolic, three cervical esophagocolic) and aspiration of barium into the tracheobronchial tree due to incoordinated swallowing in eight. Late postoperative complications included anastomotic narrowing (12) malfunctioning of the colon due to impaired emptying (five), recurrent aspiration pneumonia (three), small bowel obstruction (three), transhiatal herniation of small bowel through the diaphragmatic hiatus (one), and reflux into the retained bypassed esophagus (one). PMID:6608225

  17. Salmonella induces prominent gene expression in the rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Wendy; Keijer, Jaap; Kramer, Evelien; Roosing, Susanne; Vink, Carolien; Katan, Martijn B; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2007-01-01

    Background Salmonella enteritidis is suggested to translocate in the small intestine. In vivo it induces gene expression changes in the ileal mucosa and Peyer's patches. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary prebiotics fermented in colon suggests involvement of the colon as well. However, effects of Salmonella on colonic gene expression in vivo are largely unknown. We aimed to characterize time dependent Salmonella-induced changes of colonic mucosal gene expression in rats using whole genome microarrays. For this, rats were orally infected with Salmonella enteritidis to mimic a foodborne infection and colonic gene expression was determined at days 1, 3 and 6 post-infection (n = 8 rats per time-point). As fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) affect colonic physiology, we analyzed colonic mucosal gene expression of FOS-fed versus cellulose-fed rats infected with Salmonella in a separate experiment. Colonic mucosal samples were isolated at day 2 post-infection. Results Salmonella affected transport (e.g. Chloride channel calcium activated 6, H+/K+ transporting Atp-ase), antimicrobial defense (e.g. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein, Defensin 5 and phospholipase A2), inflammation (e.g. calprotectin), oxidative stress related genes (e.g. Dual oxidase 2 and Glutathione peroxidase 2) and Proteolysis (e.g. Ubiquitin D and Proteosome subunit beta type 9). Furthermore, Salmonella translocation increased serum IFNγ and many interferon-related genes in colonic mucosa. The gene most strongly induced by Salmonella infection was Pancreatitis Associated Protein (Pap), showing >100-fold induction at day 6 after oral infection. Results were confirmed by Q-PCR in individual rats. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary FOS was accompanied by enhancement of the Salmonella-induced mucosal processes, not by induction of other processes. Conclusion We conclude that the colon is a target tissue for Salmonella, considering the abundant changes in mucosal gene expression

  18. Detection of colon cancer by terahertz techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Valusis, Gintaras; Bernardo, Luis M.; Almeida, Abílio; Moreira, J. Agostinho; Lopes, Patricia C.; Macutkevic, Jan; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Adomavicius, Ramunas; Henrique, Rui; Lopes, Machado

    2011-05-01

    Normal and cancer affected samples of colon tissue have been measured using transmission time-domain terahertz spectroscopy and continuous wave terahertz imaging. We show that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in the samples when they are fixed in formalin or embedded in paraffin. Plots of the refractive index of normal and cancer affected tissues as well as 2-D transmission THz images are shown. Experimental results will be presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected tissue will be discussed.

  19. Autofluorescence of normal and tumor mucosa of human colon: a comprehensive analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottiroli, Giovanni F.; Marchesini, Renato; Croce, Anna C.; Dal Fante, Marco; Cuzzoni, Carolina; Di Palma, Silvana; Spinelli, Pasquale

    1993-08-01

    Both 'in vivo' and 'ex vivo' spectrofluorometric studies of neoplastic and non-neoplastic mucosa of human colon have been carried out, in order to verify the potentials of tissue natural fluorescence as a possible parameter to distinguish normal from diseased tissues, Spectrofluorometric analysis performed at colonoscopy on patients affected by neoplasia, showed that adenocarcinoma, adenoma and non-neoplastic mucosa differ in the fluorescence emissions. The results have been interpreted according to the data obtained on cryostatic sections from biopsies by means of a microspectrofluorometric analysis carried out on each histological component.

  20. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  1. Computer-aided detection of colonic polyps using volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wei; Qiu, Feng; Marino, Joseph; Kaufman, Arie

    2007-03-01

    This work utilizes a novel pipeline for the computer-aided detection (CAD) of colonic polyps, assisting radiologists in locating polyps when using a virtual colonoscopy system. Our CAD pipeline automatically detects polyps while reducing the number of false positives (FPs). It integrates volume rendering and conformal colon flattening with texture and shape analysis. The colon is first digitally cleansed, segmented, and extracted from the CT dataset of the abdomen. The colon surface is then mapped to a 2D rectangle using conformal mapping. Using this colon flattening method, the CAD problem is converted from 3D into 2D. The flattened image is rendered using a direct volume rendering of the 3D colon dataset with a translucent transfer function. Suspicious polyps are detected by applying a clustering method on the 2D volume rendered image. The FPs are reduced by analyzing shape and texture features of the suspicious areas detected by the clustering step. Compared with shape-based methods, ours is much faster and much more efficient as it avoids computing curvature and other shape parameters for the whole colon wall. We tested our method with 178 datasets and found it to be 100% sensitive to adenomatous polyps with a low rate of FPs. The CAD results are seamlessly integrated into a virtual colonoscopy system, providing the radiologists with visual cues and likelihood indicators of areas likely to contain polyps, and allowing them to quickly inspect the suspicious areas and further exploit the flattened colon view for easy navigation and bookmark placement.

  2. Red meat and colon cancer: dietary haem, but not fat, has cytotoxic and hyperproliferative effects on rat colonic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sesink, A L; Termont, D S; Kleibeuker, J H; Van Der Meer, R

    2000-10-01

    High intake of red meat is associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. It has been suggested that fat from red meat is responsible, because high fat intake increases the concentration of cytotoxic lipids in the colon. Experimental studies have not unequivocally supported such a role for fat, however. Recently, we showed that dietary haem, which is abundant in red meat, increased colonic cytotoxicity and epithelial proliferation. In this study, we wanted to clarify whether dietary fat affects colon cancer risk by itself or by modulating the detrimental effects of haem on the colonic epithelium. Rats were fed control or haem-supplemented diets with 10%, 25% or 40% of the energy derived from fat for 14 days. Faeces were collected for biochemical analyses. Colonic cytotoxicity was determined from the degree of lysis of erythrocytes by faecal water. Colonic epithelial proliferation was measured in vivo using [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. Increasing the fat content of the control diets stimulated faecal disposal of both fatty acids and bile acids. It also increased the concentration of fatty acids, but not that of bile acids, in faecal water in control rats. The cytolytic activity of faecal water and colonic epithelial proliferation were unaffected. Dietary haem increased faecal cation content and cytolytic activity of faecal water at all fat levels, suggesting that the colonic mucosa was exposed to high amounts of luminal irritants. This effect was smaller in rats on the low-fat diet. Dietary haem also increased colonic epithelial proliferation at all fat levels. The haem-induced effects were independent of fatty acids or bile acids in the faecal water. In western societies, 30-40% of ingested energy is supplied by dietary fat, so our results suggest that the association between consumption of red meat and risk of colon cancer is mainly due to its haem content, and is largely independent of dietary fat content. PMID:11023550

  3. Effect of parameter choice in root water uptake models - the arrangement of root hydraulic properties within the root architecture affects dynamics and efficiency of root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechmann, M.; Schneider, C.; Carminati, A.; Vetterlein, D.; Attinger, S.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2014-10-01

    Detailed three-dimensional models of root water uptake have become increasingly popular for investigating the process of root water uptake. However, they suffer from a lack of information on important parameters, particularly on the spatial distribution of root axial and radial conductivities, which vary greatly along a root system. In this paper we explore how the arrangement of those root hydraulic properties and branching within the root system affects modelled uptake dynamics, xylem water potential and the efficiency of root water uptake. We first apply a simple model to illustrate the mechanisms at the scale of single roots. By using two efficiency indices based on (i) the collar xylem potential ("effort") and (ii) the integral amount of unstressed root water uptake ("water yield"), we show that an optimal root length emerges, depending on the ratio between roots axial and radial conductivity. Young roots with high capacity for radial uptake are only efficient when they are short. Branching, in combination with mature transport roots, enables soil exploration and substantially increases active young root length at low collar potentials. Second, we investigate how this shapes uptake dynamics at the plant scale using a comprehensive three-dimensional root water uptake model. Plant-scale dynamics, such as the average uptake depth of entire root systems, were only minimally influenced by the hydraulic parameterization. However, other factors such as hydraulic redistribution, collar potential, internal redistribution patterns and instantaneous uptake depth depended strongly on the arrangement on the arrangement of root hydraulic properties. Root systems were most efficient when assembled of different root types, allowing for separation of root function in uptake (numerous short apical young roots) and transport (longer mature roots). Modelling results became similar when this heterogeneity was accounted for to some degree (i.e. if the root systems contained between

  4. Mucin production by human colonic carcinoma cells correlates with their metastatic potential in animal models of colon cancer metastasis.

    PubMed Central

    Bresalier, R S; Niv, Y; Byrd, J C; Duh, Q Y; Toribara, N W; Rockwell, R W; Dahiya, R; Kim, Y S

    1991-01-01

    Patients with mucinous colorectal cancers characteristically present with advanced disease, however, the relationship between mucin production by colon cancer cells and their metastatic potential remains unclear. We therefore sought to define the relationship between mucin production by human colon cancer cells and metastatic ability by employing animal models of colon cancer metastasis. LS LiM 6, a colon carcinoma cell line with high liver metastasizing ability during cecal growth in nude mice produced twofold more metabolically labeled intracellular mucin and secreted four- to fivefold more mucin into the culture medium compared to poorly metastatic parental line LS174T. This was accompanied by a similar elevation in poly(A)+ RNA detected by blot hybridization with a human intestinal mucin cDNA probe, and increases in mucin core carbohydrate antigens determined immunohistochemically. Variants of LS174T selected for high (HM 7) or low (LM 12) mucin synthesizing capacity also yielded metastases after cecal growth and colonized the liver after splenic-portal injection in proportion to their ability to produce mucin. Inhibition of mucin glycosylation by the arylglycoside benzyl-alpha-N-acetyl-galactosamine greatly reduced liver colonization after splenic-portal injection of the tumor cells. These data suggest that mucin production by human colon cancer cells correlates with their metastatic potential and affects their ability to colonize the liver in experimental model systems. Images PMID:1999484

  5. Sphingolipids in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    García-Barros, Mónica; Coant, Nicolas; Truman, Jean-Philip; Snider, Ashley J.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the major causes of death in the western world. Despite increasing knowledge of the molecular signaling pathways implicated in colon cancer, therapeutic outcomes are still only moderately successful. Sphingolipids, a family of N-acyl linked lipids, have not only structural functions but are also implicated in important biological functions. Ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate are the most important bioactive lipids, and they regulate several key cellular functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that many cancers present alterations in sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes. The aim of this review is to discuss the emerging roles of sphingolipids, both endogenous and dietary, in colon cancer and the interaction of sphingolipids with WNT/β-catenin pathway, one of the most important signaling cascades that regulate development and homeostasis in intestine PMID:24060581

  6. Th22 cells control colon tumorigenesis through STAT3 and Polycomb Repression complex 2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Danfeng; Lin, Yanwei; Hong, Jie; Chen, Haoyan; Nagarsheth, Nisha; Peng, Dongjun; Wei, Shuang; Huang, Emina; Fang, Jingyuan; Kryczek, Ilona; Zou, Weiping

    2016-08-01

    Th22 cells traffic to and retain in the colon cancer microenvironment, and target core stem cell genes and promote colon cancer stemness via STAT3 and H3K79me2 signaling pathway and contribute to colon carcinogenesis. However, whether Th22 cells affect colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis remains unknown. We studied the interaction between Th22 cells and colon cancer cells in the colon cancer microenvironment. Colon cancer proliferation was examined by flow cytometry analysis and H(3) thymidine incorporation. Cell cycle related genes were quantified by real-time PCR and Western blotting. We transfected colon cancer cells with lentiviral vector encoding specific gene shRNAs and used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay to determine the genetic signaling involved in interleukin (IL)-22-mediated colon cancer cell proliferation. We showed that Th22 cells released IL-22 and stimulated colon cancer proliferation. Mechanistically, IL-22 activated STAT3, and subsequently STAT3 bound to the promoter areas of the Polycomb Repression complex 2 (PRC2) components SUZ12 and EED, and stimulated the expression of PRC2. Consequently, the activated PRC2 catalyzed the promoters of the cell cycle check-point genes p16 and p21, and inhibited their expression through H3K27me3-mediated histone methylation, and ultimately caused colon cancer cell proliferation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the levels of IL-22 expression positively correlated with the levels of genes controlling cancer proliferation and cell cycling in colon cancer. In addition to controlling colon cancer stemness, Th22 cells support colon carcinogenesis via affecting colon cancer cell proliferation through a distinct histone modification. PMID:27622053

  7. Th22 cells control colon tumorigenesis through STAT3 and Polycomb Repression complex 2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Danfeng; Lin, Yanwei; Hong, Jie; Chen, Haoyan; Nagarsheth, Nisha; Peng, Dongjun; Wei, Shuang; Huang, Emina; Fang, Jingyuan; Kryczek, Ilona; Zou, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Th22 cells traffic to and retain in the colon cancer microenvironment, and target core stem cell genes and promote colon cancer stemness via STAT3 and H3K79me2 signaling pathway and contribute to colon carcinogenesis. However, whether Th22 cells affect colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis remains unknown. We studied the interaction between Th22 cells and colon cancer cells in the colon cancer microenvironment. Colon cancer proliferation was examined by flow cytometry analysis and H3 thymidine incorporation. Cell cycle related genes were quantified by real-time PCR and Western blotting. We transfected colon cancer cells with lentiviral vector encoding specific gene shRNAs and used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay to determine the genetic signaling involved in interleukin (IL)-22-mediated colon cancer cell proliferation. We showed that Th22 cells released IL-22 and stimulated colon cancer proliferation. Mechanistically, IL-22 activated STAT3, and subsequently STAT3 bound to the promoter areas of the Polycomb Repression complex 2 (PRC2) components SUZ12 and EED, and stimulated the expression of PRC2. Consequently, the activated PRC2 catalyzed the promoters of the cell cycle check-point genes p16 and p21, and inhibited their expression through H3K27me3-mediated histone methylation, and ultimately caused colon cancer cell proliferation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the levels of IL-22 expression positively correlated with the levels of genes controlling cancer proliferation and cell cycling in colon cancer. In addition to controlling colon cancer stemness, Th22 cells support colon carcinogenesis via affecting colon cancer cell proliferation through a distinct histone modification. PMID:27622053

  8. Giant colon lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Yaman, İsmail; Derici, Hayrullah; Demirpolat, Gülen

    2015-01-01

    Colon lipomas are rare, non-epithelial tumors. They are generally smaller than two centimeters and asymptomatic, they are incidentally diagnosed and do not require treatment. Large and symptomatic colon lipomas are rather rare. Its differential diagnosis is generally made by histopathological examination of the resected specimen. A fifty-year-old female patient presented with the symptoms of abdominal pain, swelling in the abdomen and loss of weight. During colonoscopy, there was a submucosal mass of 8×6 cm, which almost completely obstructed the lumen in the hepatic flexure and was covered by a mucosa that was sporadically ulcerated and necrotic in nature. In magnetic resonance imaging, an ovoid mass with a diameter of 8.5 cm at its widest dimension was detected, which had signal intensity similar to that of adipose tissue. Since the patient was symptomatic and differential diagnosis could not be made, she underwent laparoscopic right hemicolectomy. A submucosal lipoma was detected on histopathological examination of the specimen. The patient was discharged without any problems on post-operative day 7. Definite diagnosis of lipomas before surgery is challenging; they may be mistaken for malignancy, especially if the lesion is large and ulcerated. For large and symptomatic colon lipomas, surgery is required to both prevent complications and rule out malignancy. PMID:26170744

  9. Modeling runoff and microbial overland transport with KINEROS2/STWIR model: Accuracy and uncertainty as affected by source of infiltration parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guber, A. K.; Pachepsky, Y. A.; Yakirevich, A. M.; Shelton, D. R.; Whelan, G.; Goodrich, D. C.; Unkrich, C. L.

    2014-11-01

    Infiltration is important to modeling the overland transport of microorganisms in environmental waters. In watershed- and hillslope scale-models, infiltration is commonly described by simple equations relating infiltration rate to soil saturated conductivity and by empirical parameters defining changes in infiltration rate with soil water content. For the microbial transport model KINEROS2/STWIR used in this study, infiltration in unsaturated soil is accounted for by a net capillary drive parameter, G, in the Parlange equation. Scarce experimental data and multiple approaches for estimating parameter G introduce uncertainty, reducing reliability of overland water flow and microbial transport models. Our objectives were to evaluate reliability and robustness of three methods to estimate parameter G and associated accuracy and uncertainty in predicting runoff and fecal coliform (FC) transport. These methods include (i) KINEROS2 fitting to the experimental cumulative runoff data; (ii) estimating solely on soil texture; and (iii) estimating by individual pedotransfer functions (PTFs) and an ensemble of PTFs from basic soil properties. Results show that the most accurate prediction was obtained when the G parameter was fitted to the cumulative runoff. The KINEROS2-recommended parameter slightly overestimated the calibrated value of parameter G and yielded less accurate predictions of runoff, FC concentrations and total FC. The PTFs-estimated parameters systematically deviated from calibrated G values that caused high uncertainty in the KINEROS2/STWIR predictions. Averaging PTF estimates considerably improved model accuracy, reducing the uncertainty of runoff and FC concentration predictions. Overall, ensemble-based PTF estimation of the capillary drive can be efficient for simulations of runoff and bacteria overland transport when a single effective value is used across the study area.

  10. Diffuse lymphoid follicles of the colon associated with colonic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bronen, R A; Glick, S N; Teplick, S K

    1984-01-01

    In four patients aged 59-75 years, colonic carcinoma was associated with diffuse lymphoid follicles in the colon. In one case, the prominence and distribution of the lymphoid follicles corresponded to the progression and regression of the tumor bulk. It is extremely unusual to demonstrate lymphoid follicles, particularly diffuse, on barium enema in patients in this age range. The colonic carcinomas and lymphoid follicles are directly related, possibly representing an immune response. PMID:6606941

  11. Colonization history of the Swiss Rhine basin by the bullhead (Cottus gobio): inference under a Bayesian spatially explicit framework.

    PubMed

    Neuenschwander, Samuel; Largiadèr, Carlo R; Ray, Nicolas; Currat, Mathias; Vonlanthen, Pascal; Excoffier, Laurent

    2008-02-01

    The present distribution of freshwater fish in the Alpine region has been strongly affected by colonization events occurring after the last glacial maximum (LGM), some 20,000 years ago. We use here a spatially explicit simulation framework to model and better understand their colonization dynamics in the Swiss Rhine basin. This approach is applied to the European bullhead (Cottus gobio), which is an ideal model organism to study fish past demographic processes since it has not been managed by humans. The molecular diversity of eight sampled populations is simulated and compared to observed data at six microsatellite loci under an approximate Bayesian computation framework to estimate the parameters of the colonization process. Our demographic estimates fit well with current knowledge about the biology of this species, but they suggest that the Swiss Rhine basin was colonized very recently, after the Younger Dryas some 6600 years ago. We discuss the implication of this result, as well as the strengths and limits of the spatially explicit approach coupled to the approximate Bayesian computation framework. PMID:18194169

  12. Colonic secretory effect in response to enteral feeding in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, T E; Raimundo, A H; Grimble, G K; Silk, D B

    1994-01-01

    Diarrhoea complicating enteral feeding is a common clinical problem affecting up to 25% of patients. Its pathogenesis remains unknown. A new technique of human in vivo segmental colonic perfusion was used to investigate colonic water and electrolyte movement in response to enteral feeding. Four groups of studies were performed in which low and high load polymeric enteral diet infusions were undertaken, either intragastrically or intraduodenally (n = 6 each group). Net absorption of sodium, chloride, and water occurred during fasting throughout the colon in all groups. There was a significant net secretion of sodium, chloride, and water in the ascending colon during low load (sodium: -42 mmol/h; 95% confidence limits -52 to -19, Chloride: -18 mmol/h; -50 to +16, water: -174 ml/h; -348 to -30) and high load (sodium: -24 mmol/h; -60 to +8, chloride: -18 mmol/h; -31 to +16, water: -120 ml/h; -246 to +6) gastric feeding, and during high load duodenal feeding (sodium: -12 mmol/h; -22 to -6, chloride; -6 mmol/h; -16 to +3, water: -72 ml/h; -144 to -6). Net secretion persisted in the distal colon only during high load gastric feeding. In the other three groups there was a net absorption in the distal colon. This study identified a significant colonic secretory response to enteral feeding, which is related to the site and load of the diet infusion. This response may play an important part in the pathogenesis of enteral feeding related diarrhoea. PMID:7829011

  13. Colonic lymphangiomatosis associated with anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Woo Chul; Kim, Hye-Kang; Yoo, Jin Young; Lee, Jeong Rok; Lee, Kang-Moon; Paik, Chang Nyol; Jang, U-Im; Yang, Jin Mo

    2008-01-01

    Lymphangioma is an uncommon malformation of lymphatic system. Multiple colonic lymphangioma named as lymphangiomatosis is considered an extremely rare disease. Although lymphangioma is a benign tumor and most colonic lymphangiomas do not cause symptoms and do not require treatment, resection of lymphangioma is necessary in the presence of symptoms such as abdominal pain, bleeding, intussusceptions. We report a case of colonic lymphangiomatosis in a man who presented with abdominal discomfort and anemia, which was diagnosed and treated with endoscopic snare polypectomy. PMID:18837097

  14. Low serum enterolactone concentration is associated with low colonic Lactobacillus-Enterococcus counts in men but is not affected by a synbiotic mixture in a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over intervention study.

    PubMed

    Holma, Reetta; Kekkonen, Riina A; Hatakka, Katja; Poussa, Tuija; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Adlercreutz, Herman; Korpela, Riitta

    2014-01-28

    The aims of the present study were to assess the possible differences in faecal microbiota between men with a low serum enterolactone concentration and those with a high concentration, and to investigate the impact of a synbiotic mixture on serum enterolactone concentration in men with a low concentration. We compared faecal microbiota between ten men with the lowest serum enterolactone concentration and ten men with the highest concentration at recruitment (n 84). Furthermore, we carried out a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over intervention study (6-week intervention periods and 4-week washout period) to investigate the impact of a synbiotic mixture (two Lactobacillus strains, one Bifidobacterium strain, one Propionibacterium strain and galacto-oligosaccharides (32 g/l)) on serum enterolactone concentration in fifty-two men who had a concentration < 20 nmol/l. Serum sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration was measured at the end of the first intervention period. Men with a low serum enterolactone concentration when compared with those with a high concentration had less faecal bacteria, especially those belonging to the Lactobacillus-Enterococcus group (median 8·2 (interquartile range 7·8-8·4) log10 colony-forming units/g v. median 8·8 (interquartile range 8·5-8·9) log10 colony-forming units/g, P= 0·009). The synbiotic mixture that was used did not have a significant effect on serum enterolactone (synbiotic v. placebo ratio 0·96 (95 % CI 0·76, 1·22), P= 0·724) or serum sensitive CRP (synbiotic v. placebo ratio 0·99 (95 % CI 0·74, 1·33), P= 0·954) concentration. Men with a low serum enterolactone concentration harbour less colonic bacteria, especially those belonging to the Lactobacillus-Enterococcus group. A synbiotic mixture does not increase serum enterolactone concentration. PMID:23919920

  15. The Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy on Experimental Colon Anastomosis After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Ramazan; Can, Mehmet Fatih; Yagci, Gokhan; Ozgurtas, Taner; Guden, Metin; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Ozturk, Erkan; Cetiner, Sadettin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) on colon anastomosis after chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Sixty female Wistar-Albino rats were divided into 5 groups and underwent left colon resection and end-to-end anastomosis. CRT simulation was performed on 2 sham groups before the anastomosis, and 1 of these groups was administered additional postoperative HBOT. Two groups were administered CRT before the anastomosis, and 1 of them received additional postoperative HBOT. On postoperative day 5, all groups underwent relaparotomy; burst pressure was measured and samples were obtained for histopathologic and biochemical analysis. There was a significant weight loss in the CRT groups and postoperative HBOT had an improving effect. Significantly decreased burst pressure values increased up to the levels of the controls after HBOT. Hydroxyproline levels were elevated in all groups compared to the control group. Hydroxyproline levels decreased with HBOT after CRT. No significant difference was observed between the groups regarding fibrosis formation at the anastomosis site. However, regression was observed in fibrosis in the group receiving HBOT after CRT. Preoperative CRT affected anastomosis and wound healing unfavorably. These unfavorable effects were alleviated by postoperative HBOT. HBOT improved the mechanical and biochemical parameters of colon anastomosis in rats. PMID:23438274

  16. Critical rearing parameters of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) as affected by host-plant substrate and host-parasitoid group structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate the potential impact of host-plant substrate types, host-parasitoid group size and host to parasitoid ratios on select fitness parameters of the larval parasitoid Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang, newly introduced for biological control of the invasive eme...

  17. An unusual colon atresia in a calf: at the junction of the distal loop and transverse colon. A brief overview

    PubMed Central

    Lombardero, Matilde; Yllera, María del Mar

    2014-01-01

    Congenital defects are those abnormalities present at birth. During embryogenesis, many anomalies can occur. The primitive gut tube lengthens quickly and rotates, allowing the gastrointestinal tract acquire its final position and orientation. Because the colon of large animals is complex, most changes occur in this segment. Thus, in ruminants, colon atresia is the most frequent malformation, affecting mainly ascending colon, at the level of the spiral loop. There are no previous references about a very atypical colon atresia at the junction of distal loop and transverse colon, such we have described in a 5-day-old calf, after a history of abdominal distention and absence of feces at birth, even with a patent anal opening. Atresia coli was detected at distal position of the typical colon atresia, at the junction of distal loop and transverse colon. In addition, the distal blind end was bent into a U-shape supported by the mesocolon. Besides the anatomical findings of this worthwhile atresia coli we discuss its possible etiology, in which local factors, such as a compromised blood supply during embryogenesis, are more consistent than genetic factors. Finding out the causes of atresia coli would help to reduce its incidence, lessen animal suffering and economic loss. PMID:25495264

  18. Cruciferous vegetables and glutathione: their effects on colon mucosal glutathione level and colon tumor development in rats induced by DMH.

    PubMed

    Chen, M F; Chen, L T; Boyce, H W

    1995-01-01

    The effect of a diet containing 10-40% lyophilized cabbage or broccoli as cruciferous vegetable or 10-40% lyophilized potato as noncruciferous vegetable fed for 14 days on the colon mucosal glutathione (GSH) level was studied in male rats. The GSH levels of the duodenum mucosa and the liver were also measured. Cabbage and broccoli enhanced the colon and duodenum mucosal GSH levels in a dose-related manner; potato had no effect. All three vegetables had no effect on the liver GSH level. The effect of GSH on colon tumorigenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) was also examined in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with DMH (20 mg/kg body wt) weekly for 20 weeks. DMH lowered the colon mucosal GSH level. GSH (100 mg/day/rat) dissolved in the drinking water and given to rats during and after DMH injections had little or no effect on tumor incidence and total number of colon tumors. Tumors were larger in rats that received GSH than in those that received water. This study shows that the colon mucosal GSH level can be enhanced by feeding rats a diet high in cabbage or broccoli and that GSH added to the drinking water did not affect DMH-induced colon tumorigenesis under the experimental conditions used. PMID:7739917

  19. Colonic pseudo-obstruction: a new complication of jejunoileal bypass.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, R E; Benfield, J R; Nicell, P; Bray, G A

    1975-01-01

    Five female patients ranging in age from 25 to 44 years are reported in whom jejunoileal bypass (three end-to-side and two end-to end), performed for morbid obesity, was complicated 1 1/2 to three years later by symptoms of colonic pseudo-obstruction. In each size, the colon was markedly elongated, dilated, and atonic but with no demonstrate organic obstruction. The cause of this complication is not known. Full thickness rectal biopsy in one case showed normal intrinsic nervous plexuses and ganglia. Serum electrolytes were normal. Functional and defunctionalized small bowel were not involved. Symptoms varied from complete colonic paralysis to incapacitating crampy abdominal pain and distention. In the three patients with end-to-side bypass, dilatation affected the entire colon, while, in the two patients with end-to-end bypass, the dilatation was localized to colon distal to the anastomosis with the defunctionalized small bowel. Resection of the affected portion of colon in one case resulted in recurrence distal to the new site of drainage of defunctioned bowel. Treatment with anti-anaerobe antibiotics in two cases produced dramatic but temporary relief of symptoms. PMID:1238312

  20. Pathways to Colonization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David V., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The steps required for space colonization are many to grow from our current 3-person International Space Station, now under construction, to an infrastructure that can support hundreds and eventually thousands of people in space. This paper will summarize the author's findings from numerous studies and workshops on related subjects and identify some of the critical next steps toward space colonization. Findings will be drawn from the author s previous work on space colony design, space infrastructure workshops, and various studies that addressed space policy. In conclusion, this paper will note that significant progress has been made on space facility construction through the International Space Station program, and that significant efforts are needed in the development of new reusable Earth to Orbit transportation systems. The next key steps will include reusable in space transportation systems supported by in space propellant depots, the continued development of inflatable habitat and space elevator technologies, and the resolution of policy issues that will establish a future vision for space development.

  1. Approaches that ascertain the role of dietary compounds in colonic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bordonaro, Michael; Venema, Koen; Putri, Adeline K; Lazarova, Darina

    2014-01-01

    Preventive approaches against cancer have not been fully developed and applied. For example, the incidence of some types of cancer, including colon cancer, is highly dependent upon lifestyle, and therefore, amenable to prevention. Among the lifestyle factors, diet strongly affects the incidence of colon cancer; however, there are no definitive dietary recommendations that protect against this malignancy. The association between diet-derived bioactives and development of colonic neoplasms will remain ill defined if we do not take into account: (1) the identity of the metabolites present in the colonic lumen; (2) their concentrations in the colon; and (3) the effect of the colonic contents on the function of individual bioactives. We review two approaches that address these questions: the use of fecal water and in vitro models of the human colon. Compared to treatment with individual diet-derived compounds, the exposure of colon cancer cells to samples from fecal water or human colon simulators mimics closer the in vitro conditions and allows for more reliable studies on the effects of diet on colon cancer development. The rationale and the advantages of these strategies are discussed from the perspective of a specific question on how to analyze the combined effect of two types of bioactives, butyrate and polyphenol metabolites, on colon cancer cells. PMID:24578783

  2. Bacterial Traits Involved in Colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42

    PubMed Central

    Dietel, Kristin; Beator, Barbara; Budiharjo, Anto; Fan, Ben; Borriss, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Colonization studies previously performed with a green-fluorescent-protein, GFP, labeled derivative of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 revealed that the bacterium behaved different in colonizing surfaces of plant roots of different species (Fan et al., 2012). In order to extend these studies and to elucidate which genes are crucial for root colonization, we applied targeted mutant strains to Arabidopsis seedlings. The fates of root colonization in mutant strains impaired in synthesis of alternative sigma factors, non-ribosomal synthesis of lipopeptides and polyketides, biofilm formation, swarming motility, and plant growth promoting activity were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Whilst the wild-type strain heavily colonized surfaces of root tips and lateral roots, the mutant strains were impaired in their ability to colonize root tips and most of them were unable to colonize lateral roots. Ability to colonize plant roots is not only dependent on the ability to form biofilms or swarming motility. Six mutants, deficient in abrB-, sigH-, sigD-, nrfA-, yusV and RBAM017410, but not affected in biofilm formation, displayed significantly reduced root colonization. The nrfA- and yusV-mutant strains colonized border cells and, partly, root surfaces but did not colonize root tips or lateral roots. PMID:25288929

  3. Hereditary and Familial Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jasperson, Kory W.; Tuohy, Thérèse M.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Burt, Randall W.

    2011-01-01

    Between 2% to 5% of all colon cancers arise in the setting of well defined inherited syndromes, including Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated polyposis, and certain hamartomatous polyposis conditions. Each is associated with a high risk of colon cancer. In addition to the syndromes, up to one-third of colon cancers exhibit increased familial risk, likely related to inheritance. A number of less penetrant, but possibly more frequent susceptibility genes have been identified for this level of inheritance. Clarification of predisposing genes allows for accurate risk assessment and more precise screening approaches. This review examines the colon cancer syndromes, their genetics and management, and also the common familial colon cancers with current genetic advances and screening guidelines. PMID:20420945

  4. Schwannoma of the sigmoid colon.

    PubMed

    Çakır, Tuğrul; Aslaner, Arif; Yaz, Müjgan; Gündüz, Umut rıza

    2015-01-01

    Colonic schwannomas are very rare gastrointestinal tumours originating from Schwann cells, which form the neural sheath. Primary schwannomas of the lower gastrointestinal tract are very rare and usually benign in nature. However, if they are not surgically removed, malign degeneration can occur. We report a case of a 79-year-old woman who presented to our clinic with rectal bleeding and constipation. She underwent a lower gastrointestinal tract endoscopy. A mass subtotally obstructing the lumen of the sigmoid colon was seen and biopsies were taken. Histopathological examination indicated a suspicion of gastrointestinal tumour and the patient underwent sigmoid colon resection after preoperative evaluation by laboratory analysis, abdominal ultrasonography and CT. Her postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on the fifth day for outpatient control. The histopathology report revealed schwannoma of the sigmoid colon. This was a case of schwannoma of the sigmoid colon that was successfully treated with total resection. PMID:25976197

  5. Critical desertification transition in semi-arid ecosystems: The role of local facilitation and colonization rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrado, Raffaele; Cherubini, Anna Maria; Pennetta, Cecilia

    2015-05-01

    In this work we study the effect of two different ecological mechanisms on the desertification transition in arid or semi-arid ecosystems, modeled by a stochastic cellular automaton. Namely we consider the role of the facilitation mechanism, i.e. the local positive effects of plants on their neighborhood and of colonization factors, such as seed production, survival and germination probabilities. Within the model, the strength of these two mechanisms is determined by the parameters f and b, respectively controlling the rates of the recovery and colonization processes. In particular we focus on the full desertification transition occurring at increasing value of the mortality rate m and we discuss how the values of f and b affect the critical mortality mc , the critical exponents β and γσ‧, determining the power-law scaling of the average vegetation density and of the root-mean-square deviation of the density fluctuations, and the character of the transition: continuous or abrupt. We show that mc strongly depends on both f and b, a dependence which accounts for the higher resilience of the ecosystems to external stresses as a consequence of an increased effectiveness of positive feedback effects. On the other hand, concerning the value of the exponents and the character of the transition, our results point out that both these features are unaffected by changes in the strength of the local facilitation. Viceversa, we show that an increase of the colonization factor b significantly modifies the values of the exponents and the order of the transition, changing a continuous transition into an abrupt one. We explain these results in terms of the different range of the interactions characterizing facilitation and colonization mechanisms.

  6. Colonize, evade, flourish

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Erica J; Trent, M Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an adapted gastric pathogen that colonizes the human stomach, causing severe gastritis and gastric cancer. A hallmark of infection is the ability of this organism to evade detection by the human immune system. H. pylori has evolved a number of features to achieve this, many of which involve glyco-conjugates including the lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan layer, glycoproteins, and glucosylated cholesterol. These major bacterial components possess unique features from those of other gram-negative organisms, including differences in structure, assembly, and modification. These defining characteristics of H. pylori glycobiology help the pathogen establish a long-lived infection by providing camouflage, modulating the host immune response, and promoting virulence mechanisms. In this way, glyco-conjugates are essential for H. pylori pathogenicity and survival, allowing it to carve out a niche in the formidable environment of the human stomach. PMID:23859890

  7. [Irritable colon and constipation].

    PubMed

    Meyenberger, C

    1993-04-20

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a very common clinical problem with a broad spectrum of severity. The management includes a combination of positive diagnosis of typical symptoms with limited investigations to exclude underlying structural or biochemical disorders. Therapeutic trials focus on the relief of predominant symptoms. Identification and modification of factors exacerbating symptoms, behavioural techniques and pharmacologic agents directed to the presumed gastrointestinal motor dysfunction are required. Psychological support by the physician is the most important part of treatment. Chronic constipation may be the predominant symptom of irritable bowel syndrome. Underlying organic disorders must be excluded by clinical examination and endoscopy. Severe chronic constipation requires further investigation of colonic motility and defecation. High fibre diet, osmotic laxatives and procinetic agents may lead to an improvement. In rare cases surgery may be indicated. PMID:8488351

  8. Colon interposition for oesophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Pascal A; Gilardoni, Adrian; Trousse, Delphine; D'Journo, Xavier B; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Doddoli, Christophe; Giudicelli, Roger; Fuentes, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The choice of the colon as an oesophageal substitute results primarily from the unavailability of the stomach. However, given its durability and function, colon interposition keeps elective indications in patients with benign or malignant oesophageal disease who are potential candidates for long survival. The choice of the colonic portion used for oesophageal reconstruction depends on the required length of the graft, and the encountered colonic vascular anatomy, the last being characterised by the near-invariability of the left colonic vessels, in contrast to the vascular pattern of the right side of the colon. Accordingly, the transverse colon with all or part of the ascending colon is the substitute of choice, positioned in the isoperistaltic direction, and supplied either from the left colic vessels for long grafts or middle colic vessels for shorter grafts. Technical key points are: full mobilisation of the entire colon, identification of the main colonic vessels and collaterals, and a prolonged clamping test to ensure the permeability of the chosen nourishing pedicle. Transposition through the posterior mediastinum in the oesophageal bed is the shortest one and thereby offers the best functional results. When the oesophageal bed is not available, the retrosternal route is the preferred alternative option. The food bolus travelling mainly by gravity makes straightness of the conduit of paramount importance. The proximal anastomosis is a single-layer hand-fashioned end-to-end anastomosis to prevent narrowing. When the stomach is available, the distal anastomosis is best performed at the posterior part of the antrum for the reasons of pedicle positioning and reflux prevention, and a gastric drainage procedure is added when the oesophagus and vagus nerves have been removed. In the other cases, a Roux-en-Y jejunal loop is preferable to prevent bile reflux into the colon. Additional procedures include re-establishment of the colonic continuity, a careful closure of

  9. Microbial colonization and lung function in adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hector, Andreas; Kirn, Tobias; Ralhan, Anjali; Graepler-Mainka, Ute; Berenbrinker, Sina; Riethmueller, Joachim; Hogardt, Michael; Wagner, Marlies; Pfleger, Andreas; Autenrieth, Ingo; Kappler, Matthias; Griese, Matthias; Eber, Ernst; Martus, Peter; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-05-01

    With intensified antibiotic therapy and longer survival, patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are colonized with a more complex pattern of bacteria and fungi. However, the clinical relevance of these emerging pathogens for lung function remains poorly defined. The aim of this study was to assess the association of bacterial and fungal colonization patterns with lung function in adolescent patients with CF. Microbial colonization patterns and lung function parameters were assessed in 770 adolescent European (German/Austrian) CF patients in a retrospective study (median follow-up time: 10years). Colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA were most strongly associated with loss of lung function, while mainly colonization with Haemophilus influenzae was associated with preserved lung function. Aspergillus fumigatus was the only species that was associated with an increased risk for infection with P. aeruginosa. Microbial interaction analysis revealed three distinct microbial clusters within the longitudinal course of CF lung disease. Collectively, this study identified potentially protective and harmful microbial colonization patterns in adolescent CF patients. Further studies in different patient cohorts are required to evaluate these microbial patterns and to assess their clinical relevance. PMID:26856310

  10. Effect of trimebutine on colonic myoelectrical activity in IBS patients.

    PubMed

    Frexinos, J; Fioramonti, J; Bueno, L

    1985-01-01

    The effect of trimebutine 100 mg i.v. and placebo on colonic myoelectrical activity was investigated in 10 patients with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (5 constipated and 5 diarrhoeic), using an intraluminal probe supporting 8 groups of electrodes. At each site examined from transverse to sigmoid colon, the electromyograms exhibited two kinds of spike bursts: short spike bursts (SSB) localized at one electrode site and appearing rhythmically at 10.3/min, and long spike bursts (LSB), isolated or propagated orally or aborally. Computerized analysis of the duration of each kind of spike burst showed that, as compared to the control, trimebutine 100 mg, selectively inhibited by 43 to 73% the mean duration of LSB activity in the transverse, descending and sigmoid colon, from 0 to 30 min after administration. The inhibitory effect was similar in constipated and diarrhoeic patients. Placebo injection did not significantly affect (p greater than 0.05) the duration of LSB and SSB activity. Variance analysis indicated that the inhibitory effect of trimebutine was significantly greater (p less than 0.05) on LSB activity in the transverse than the descending colon, and that it was absent from the sigmoid colon. The results suggest that trimebutine selectively inhibits the propulsive activity of the proximal two thirds of the colon in IBS patients, and that this effect cannot entirely explain its therapeutic efficacy in IBS. PMID:3987797

  11. Hypokalemia Associated with Colonic Pseudo-Obstruction (Ogilvie's Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Sunnoqrot, Naseem; Reilly, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of hypokalemia resulting from colonic pseudo-obstruction or Ogilvie's syndrome. Colonic pseudo-obstruction is characterized by profuse watery diarrhea that has a low sodium and high potassium concentration. It is seen in a variety of medical and surgical conditions, but its exact cause remains unknown. It is thought to result from an imbalance of sympathetic and parasympathetic input in the distal colon. The diarrhea is secretory and driven by potassium secretion rather than the inhibition of sodium reabsorption or chloride secretion, which are the most common pathophysiologic mechanisms of secretory diarrhea. Affected patients often lose >100 mmol of potassium daily. Colonic pseudo-obstruction is associated with a dramatic upregulation of the maxiK or BK potassium channel. This channel plays a prominent role in flow-mediated potassium secretion in the connecting tubule and collecting duct and is also upregulated in the distal colon in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In vitro studies show that the channel is regulated by catecholamine binding to the β receptor and cyclic AMP upregulation, somatostatin and aldosterone, insights that can be used to help guide pharmacologic therapy. Nephrologists should be aware of colonic pseudo-obstruction as a cause of extrarenal potassium loss. PMID:26120577

  12. Detection of colon cancer by terahertz techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Valusis, Gintaras; Bernardo, Luis M.; Almeida, Abílio; Moreira, Joaquim A.; Lopes, Patricia C.; Macutkevic, Jan; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Adomavicius, Ramunas; Henrique, Rui; Lopes, Machado

    2011-12-01

    Human normal and cancer affected samples of colon tissue have been measured using transmission time-domain terahertz spectroscopy and continuous wave terahertz imaging. We show that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in the samples when they are fixed in formalin or embedded in paraffin. The still noticeable contrast in the dried paraffin-embedded tissues could indicate that there are additional contrast-contributing factors other than water, which is the main goal of the present work. Plots of the refractive index of normal and cancer affected tissues as well as 2-D transmission THz images are shown. Experimental results are presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue are discussed.

  13. Severe Defects in Absorptive Ion Transport in Distal Colons of Mice that Lack ClC-2 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Marcelo A.; Flores, Carlos A.; González-Begne, Mireya; Zhang, Yan; Sepúlveda, Francisco V.; Melvin, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims The fluid secretion model predicts that intestinal obstruction disorders can be alleviated by promoting epithelial Cl− secretion. The cAMP-activated anion channel CFTR mediates Cl−-dependent fluid secretion in the intestine. Although the role of the ClC-2 channel has not been determined in the intestine, this voltage-gated Cl− channel might compensate for the secretory defects observed in patients with cystic fibrosis and other chronic constipation disorders. We investigated whether mice that lack ClC-2 channels (Clcn2−/−) have defects in intestinal ion transport. Methods Immunolocalization and immunoblot analyses were used to determine the cellular localization and the amount of ClC-2 expressed in mouse early (EDC) and late distal colon (LDC). Colon sheets from wildtype and Clcn2−/− littermates were mounted in Ussing chambers to determine transepithelial bioelectrical parameters and Na+, K+ and Cl− flux. Results Expression of ClC-2 was higher in the basolateral membrane of surface cells in the EDC, compared to the LDC, with little expression in crypts. Neither cAMP nor Ca2+-induced secretion of Cl− was affected in the EDC or LDC of Clcn2−/− mice, whereas the amiloride-sensitive short circuit current (ISC) was increased approximately 3-fold in Clcn2−/− EDC, compared to that of control littermates. Conversely, electroneutral Na+, K+ and Cl− absorption were dramatically reduced in colons of Clcn2−/− mice. Conclusions Basolateral ClC-2 channels are required for colonic electroneutral absorption of NaCl and KCl. The increase in the amiloride-sensitive ISC in Clcn2−/− mice revealed a compensatory mechanism that is activated in the colons of mice that lack the ClC-2 channel. PMID:22079595

  14. Clostridium perfringens Type A Enterotoxin Damages the Rabbit Colon

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Jorge P.; Li, Jihong; Shrestha, Archana; Freedman, John C.; Beingesser, Juliann; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin causes the gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of C. perfringens type A food poisoning and CPE-associated non-food-borne human GI diseases. It is well established that CPE induces fluid accumulation and severe tissue damage in ligated small intestinal loops of rabbits and other animals. However, a previous study had also reported that CPE binds to rabbit colonic cells yet does not significantly affect rabbit colonic loops. To the contrary, the current study determined that treatment with 50 or 100 μg/ml of CPE causes significant histologic lesions and luminal fluid accumulation in rabbit colonic loops. Interestingly, a CPE-neutralizing monoclonal antibody blocked the development of CPE-induced histologic damage but not luminal fluid accumulation in these loops. Similar luminal fluid accumulation, without significant histologic damage, also occurred after treatment of colonic loops with heat-inactivated CPE, antibody alone, or bovine serum albumin (BSA), indicating that increased osmolarity was causing or contributing to fluid accumulation in CPE-treated colonic loops. Comparative studies revealed the similar development of histologic damage and luminal fluid accumulation in both small intestinal loops and colonic loops after as little as a 1-h treatment with 50 μg/ml of CPE. Consistent with the CPE sensitivity of the small intestine and colon, Western blotting detected CPE binding and large-complex formation in both organs. In addition, Western blotting demonstrated the presence of the high-affinity CPE receptors claudin-3 and -4 in both organs of rabbits, consistent with the observed toxin binding. Collectively, these results offer support for the possible involvement of the colon in CPE-mediated GI disease. PMID:24643537

  15. Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Trzcinski, Antoine P; Stuckey, David C

    2011-07-01

    This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 °C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO(2) g VS(-1) day(-1). Sanitization of the digestate at 65 °C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L(-1) d(-1) and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO(2) at a rate lower than 25 mg CO(2) g VS(-1) d(-1) after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO(2) g VS(-1) d(-1). The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR. PMID:21419612

  16. Characterization of colonization of the rabbit gastrointestinal tract by Escherichia coli RDEC-1.

    PubMed Central

    Cantey, J R; Hosterman, D S

    1979-01-01

    We have reported previously the isolation of an Escherichia coli strain (RDEC-1) that in rabbits is able to colonize the gut, adhere to mucosal epithelial cells of the ileum, cecum, and colon, and cause diarrhea by a novel mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to characterize more fully the colonization of the rabbit gut by strain RDEC-1. Colonization reached a maximum 3 to 4 days post-inoculation with strain RDEC-1 and did not decrease until 15 days post-inoculation. Diarrhea occurred 3 to 4 days after colonization reached its maximum intensity. Semiquantitative rectal swab cultures were found to be correlated with counts of colony-forming units of strain RDEC-1 per gram of ileum, cecum, and colon and their contents and were used to chart the course of colonization of the rabbit gut. The actual number of colony-forming units per gram was dependent on the stage of colonization and ranged from 4.0 X 10(3) to 2.4 X 20(6) in the ileum to 3.1 X 10(5) to 3.6 X 10(7) in the cecum. The number of colony-forming units per gram was not affected by the presence of diarrhea. E. coli RDEC-1 colonizes the ileum, cecum, and colon of rabbits heavily for a relatively long period of time. PMID:393628

  17. [Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on colonic lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase activities from patients with colonic neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, G; Franchi, A; De Los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Farina, M; Fernández de Gimeno, M A

    2001-01-01

    Lysine clonixinate (LC) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with good gastrointestinal tolerance. Treatment with LC at levels equivalent to those found in plasma following therapeutic doses resulted in significant inhibition of both cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and production of 5 hydroxy-eicosatetraeonic acid (5-HETE) and slightly affected levels of cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) in in vitro studies carried out on human tissues. This study deals with the in vivo effect of the drug on human colon segments. Experiment 1: Five patients about to undergo hemicholectomy due to colon neoplasia were treated preoperatively with a continuous infusion of LC, to achieve a steady-state concentration between 4 and 6 mg/ml. Human colon segments from the five patients and from another five control patients receiving no treatment with [14C]-arachidonic acid were incubated. Human colon segments treated with LC showed significant inhibition of PGE2, the only prostaglandin (PG) synthesised by the tissue, as well as of 5-HETE. Experiment 2: Fifteen patients received an i.v. bolus of LC 100 mg (n1 = 5); LC 200 mg (n2 = 5) or indomethacin (INDO) 50 mg (n3 = 5). Both doses of LC showed greater inhibition of PGE2 synthesis than the INDO bolus. Both NSAIDs studied proved to have different effects on the production of 5-HETE; while treatment with LC elicited significant inhibition, levels with INDO remained unchanged. Western blotting analysis showed expression of both COX isoforms in colon segments, COX-2 levels being 20% higher. Both types of in vivo studies conducted continuous infusion and i.v. bolus, revealed that LC exerted significant inhibition of basal synthesis of PGE2 and 5-HETE. PMID:11721323

  18. The Bacterial and Fungal Diversity of an Aged PAH- and Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil is Affected by Plant Cover and Edaphic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Bourceret, Amélia; Cébron, Aurélie; Tisserant, Emilie; Poupin, Pascal; Bauda, Pascale; Beguiristain, Thierry; Leyval, Corinne

    2016-04-01

    Industrial wasteland soils with aged PAH and heavy metal contaminations are environments where pollutant toxicity has been maintained for decades. Although the communities may be well adapted to the presence of stressors, knowledge about microbial diversity in such soils is scarce. Soil microbial community dynamics can be driven by the presence of plants, but the impact of plant development on selection or diversification of microorganisms in these soils has not been established yet. To test these hypotheses, aged-contaminated soil samples from a field trial were collected. Plots planted with alfalfa were compared to bare soil plots, and bacterial and fungal diversity and abundance were assessed after 2 and 6 years. Using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and ITS amplicons, we showed that the bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and was characterized by low Acidobacteria abundance, while the fungal community was mainly represented by members of the Ascomycota. The short-term toxic impact of pollutants usually reduces the microbial diversity, yet in our samples bacterial and fungal species richness and diversity was high suggesting that the community structure and diversity adapted to the contaminated soil over decades. The presence of plants induced higher bacterial and fungal diversity than in bare soil. It also increased the relative abundance of bacterial members of the Actinomycetales, Rhizobiales, and Xanthomonadales orders and of most fungal orders. Multivariate analysis showed correlations between microbial community structure and heavy metal and PAH concentrations over time, but also with edaphic parameters (C/N, pH, phosphorus, and nitrogen concentrations). PMID:26440298

  19. Tamoxifen affects glucose and lipid metabolism parameters, causes browning of subcutaneous adipose tissue and transient body composition changes in C57BL/6NTac mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hesselbarth, Nico; Pettinelli, Chiara; Gericke, Martin; Berger, Claudia; Kunath, Anne; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Klöting, Nora

    2015-08-28

    Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator which is widely used to generate inducible conditional transgenic mouse models. Activation of ER signaling plays an important role in the regulation of adipose tissue (AT) metabolism. We therefore tested the hypothesis that tamoxifen administration causes changes in AT biology in vivo. 12 weeks old male C57BL/6NTac mice were treated with either tamoxifen (n = 18) or vehicle (n = 18) for 5 consecutive days. Tamoxifen treatment effects on body composition, energy homeostasis, parameters of AT biology, glucose and lipid metabolism were investigated up to an age of 18 weeks. We found that tamoxifen treatment causes: I) significantly increased HbA{sub 1c}, triglyceride and free fatty acid serum concentrations (p < 0.01), II) browning of subcutaneous AT and increased UCP-1 expression, III) increased AT proliferation marker Ki67 mRNA expression, IV) changes in adipocyte size distribution, and V) transient body composition changes. Tamoxifen may induce changes in body composition, whole body glucose and lipid metabolism and has significant effects on AT biology, which need to be considered when using Tamoxifen as a tool to induce conditional transgenic mouse models. Our data further suggest that tamoxifen-treated wildtype mice should be characterized in parallel to experimental transgenic models to control for tamoxifen administration effects. - Highlights: • Tamoxifen treatment causes significantly increased HbA{sub 1c}, triglyceride and free fatty acid serum concentrations. • Tamoxifen induces browning of subcutaneous AT and increased UCP-1 expression. • Tamoxifen changes adipocyte size distribution, and transient body composition.

  20. Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Trzcinski, Antoine P.; Stuckey, David C.

    2011-07-15

    This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 {sup o}C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Sanitization of the digestate at 65 {sup o}C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L{sup -1} d{sup -1} and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO{sub 2} at a rate lower than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1} after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

  1. The effect of apple feeding on markers of colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Morten; Mortensen, Alicja; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Langkilde, Søren; Markowski, Jaroslaw; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2011-01-01

    Regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with reduced risks of certain cancers and other diseases in observational studies and animal models of human diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether feeding of rats with whole raw apple has potentially chemopreventive properties by affecting markers of colon cancer. The end-point was preneoplastic changes in the colon known as aberrant crypt foci (ACF). Rats initiated with the colon carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) were given 0, 5, or 10 g apple/day for 13 wk. The group fed 5 g apple but not 10 g had a significantly lower number of ACF (P = 0.009) compared to the initiated control. DNA damage evaluated by the comet assay was significantly increased in leucocytes of DMH-treated animals (P = 0.021). No antigenotoxic effect of apple feeding was apparent in the colon. Apple feeding tended to lower DNA damage in the liver (P = 0.136 in DMH-initiated and P = 0.284 in noninitiated rats). Liver alanine aminotransferase was significantly increased in rats fed apples (P = 0.008 in DMH-initiated and P = 0.019 in noninitiated rats). In conclusion, feeding whole fresh apple may affect the occurrence of preneoplastic changes in the rat colon, but the effect was not gradual. PMID:21432724

  2. Mycorrhizal colonization mediated by species interactions in arctic tundra.

    PubMed

    Urcelay, Carlos; Bret-Harte, M Syndonia; Díaz, Sandra; Chapin, F Stuart

    2003-11-01

    The Alaskan tussock tundra is a strongly nutrient-limited ecosystem, where almost all vascular plant species are mycorrhizal. We established a long-term removal experiment to document effects of arctic plant species on ecto- and ericoid mycorrhizal fungi and to investigate whether species interactions and/or nutrient availability affect mycorrhizal colonization. The treatments applied were removal of Betula nana ( Betulaceae, dominant deciduous shrub species), removal of Ledum palustre ( Ericaceae, dominant evergreen shrub species), control (no removal), and each of these three treatments with the addition of fertilizer. After 3 years of Ledum removal and fertilization, we found that overall ectomycorrhizal colonization in Betula was significantly reduced. Changes in ectomycorrhizal morphotype composition in removal and fertilized treatments were also observed. These results suggest that the effect of Ledum on Betula's mycorrhizal roots is due to sequestration of nutrients by Ledum, leading to reduced nutrient availability in the soil. In contrast, ericoid mycorrhizal colonization was not affected by fertilization, but the removal of Betula and to a lower degree of Ledum resulted in a reduction of ericoid mycorrhizal colonization suggesting a direct effect of these species on ericoid mycorrhizal colonization. Nutrient availability was only higher in fertilized treatments, but caution should be taken with the interpretation of these data as soil microbes may effectively compete with the ion exchange resins for the nutrients released by plant removal in these nutrient-limited soils. PMID:12905060

  3. Epigenetic maturation in colonic mucosa continues beyond infancy in mice.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monozygotic twin and other epidemiologic studies indicate that epigenetic processes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases that commonly affect the colonic mucosa. The peak onset of these disorders in young adulthood, suggests that epigenetic changes normally o...

  4. Study of various clinical and laboratory parameters among 178 patients affected by hooch tragedy in Ahmedabad, Gujarat (India): A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Jarwani, Bhavesh S; Motiani, Puja D; Sachdev, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose: The outbreak of methanol poisoning described in this paper occurred in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India in July 2009. Our intention is to share the experience of clinical features, laboratory investigations and their relation during this tragedy. Materials and Methods: Single center, retrospective study of clinical features and laboratory parameters of 178 cases of methanol toxicity treated at tertiary care hospital in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. Results: Maximum patients (39.8%, n = 45) were received in 48 h; Mean age of presentation was 41.9 ± 10.2 years. Most of them were men (175 out of 178). On presentation, 83% patients had gastro-intestinal symptoms, 46% had neurological symptoms, 73% had visual symptoms and 32% had dyspnoea. 62% had blurred vision, 10.5% had blindness. Patients with visual symptoms had high mean level of methanol (120.12 ± 23.12 vs. 55.43 ± 29.24, P = 0.014). On fundus examination 52.8% (n = 62) had bilateral hyperaemia of discs, 8.4% (n = 12) had bilateral disc pallor and 4.5% had papilledema (n = 5). Patients with hyperaemia of discs, discs pallor or papilledema, had higher mean methanol level (121.1 ± 32.2 mg% v/s 70.1 ± 23.2 mg%, P = 0.032). Mean of pH values was 7.17 ± 0.22 and bicarbonate was 12.3 ± 7.3 mmol/L. Both pH and bicarbonate levels correlated well with mortality and serum methanol level. Mean serum methanol level was 87.1 mg/dL, and correlated significantly with the mortality (53.1 ± 41 mg/dL v/s 121 ± 92 mg/dL, P value < 0.05). Conclusion: GI symptoms, neurological symptoms and breathlessness are important clue to ED physician for diagnose methanol poisoning. Visual symptoms and fundus findings correlate well with the methanol level. Arterial Blood Gas derived pH and bicarbonate levels correlate significantly with the methanol level and mortality. PMID:23723613

  5. Measurements of IL-6, soluble IL-6 receptor and soluble gp130 in sera of B-cell lymphoma patients. Does viscum album treatment affect these parameters?

    PubMed

    Kovacs, E; Kuehn, J J

    2002-05-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) can be involved in several diseases including lymphoid malignancies. This cytokine binds to soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) circulating in blood, leading to signal transduction via gp130. Soluble IL-6R shows agonistic activity for IL-6, and the soluble form of gp130 (sgp130) an antagonistic effect against the complex IL-6/sIL-6R. Viscum album extract (Iscador) as an immunomodulator is used in the treatment of malignant disorders. In this study we investigated the effect of this treatment on the serum levels of IL-6, sIL-6R and sgp130 in B-cell lymphoma patients (n = 27), in comparison to healthy controls (n = 28). Twenty-one of 27 patients had been treated previously with chemo/radiotherapy. The patients were divided into two groups; those with short-term (investigated before and during treatment) or those with long-term Viscum album (VA) therapy (investigated during therapy). The serum levels of the three parameters were determined by ELISA. In patients having short-term treatment IL-6 values were similar to those of controls. During long-term therapy the values were significantly lower (P<0.05). The values of sIL-6R were elevated only in long-term treated patients (P<0.05), the values of sgp130 in both short-term (P<0.05) and in long-term treated patients (P=0.001). There is a significant correlation (P<0.05) between levels of sIL-6R and sgp130 in both therapy groups at 24 hours after injection. This indicates that the potent effect of sIL-6R on the biological activity of IL-6 could be inhibited by sgp130 as antagonist. Clinical data show that half of the patients (6/12) with long-term treatment had a continuous complete remission, whereas only 2/15 patients with short-term treatment had a complete remission. PMID:12046687

  6. Colon polyps and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kronborg, O

    2004-01-01

    Screening for colorectal neoplasia still is the best method of reducing the mortality due to colorectal cancer, and it is to be hoped that fecal occult blood test programs will expand in the near future and be combined with appropriate endoscopy. There are substantial problems with compliance in large programs with occult blood tests as well as endoscopy. Colonography and DNA testing in feces are not yet suitable for population screening. Diagnostic strategies in symptomatic patients are becoming more selective, in the hope of avoiding many superfluous examinations without increasing the risk of missing cancers. New results have confirmed the preventive effect of long-term aspirin use on adenoma recurrence, but the most cost-effective dosage is not clear; the mechanism of action is also uncertain, but seems to involve cyclooxygenase-2. The risk of adenomas does not appear to be associated with low consumption of folate, but with low intake of fiber. A number of biomarkers have been evaluated in polyp patients, but so far surveillance is still based on endoscopic experience, which is less than optimal. Attempts have been made to restrict the number of surveillance endoscopies and reduce the pathologist's workload. The place of argon plasma coagulation has been clearly defined in connection with piecemeal removal of large sessile adenomas. Advances have been achieved in surgery and radiotherapy for rectal cancer, and acute surgery for colonic cancer with severe obstruction will be less common after the introduction of the metal stent. PMID:14722849

  7. Characterization of pig colonic mucins.

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, F J; Hutton, D A; Jumel, K; Pearson, J P; Harding, S E; Allen, A

    1996-01-01

    Pig colonic mucins isolated from the adherent mucus gel in the presence of proteinase inhibitors were solubilized by homogenization and the component mucins fractionated by CsC1 density-gradient centrifugation. Polymeric and reduced pig colonic mucin were both largely excluded on Sepharose CL-2B, papain-digested colonic mucin was included. The M(r) values of polymeric, reduced and digested mucins were 5.5 x 10(6), 2.1 x 10(6) and 0.6 x 10(6) respectively. This suggests that pig colonic mucin is comprised of 2-3 subunits, each subunit containing 3-4 glycosylated regions. The intrinsic viscosities of polymeric, reduced and digested mucin were 240 ml.g-1, 100 ml.g-1 and 20 ml.g-1 respectively. Polymeric pig colonic mucin comprised 16% protein per mg of glycoprotein and was rich in serine, threonine and proline (43% of total amino acids). There were approx. 150 disulphide bridges and 53 free thiol groups per mucin polymer. A seventh of the protein content was lost on reduction. This protein was particularly rich in proline and the hydrophobic amino acids. Papain-digested pig colonic mucin contained 11% protein per mg of glycoprotein and was rich in serine, threonine, glutamate and aspartate. All types of amino acids with the exception of aspartate were lost on digestion. The amino acid analysis of the proteolytically digested regions of pig colonic mucin are markedly different to the tandem repeat regions of the human mucin genes shown to be expressed in the colon. PMID:8670173

  8. Integrated datasets characterize metabolic interactions between mouse’s colonic mucosa, colonic-cecal contents and feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pattern of metabolites produced by the gut microbiome comprises a phenotype indicative of the means by which that microbiome affects the gut. We characterized that phenotype by conducting metabolomic analyses of the colonic-cecal contents, comparing that to the metabolite patterns of feces and c...

  9. Early colonizing Escherichia coli elicits remodeling of rat colonic epithelium shifting toward a new homeostatic state

    PubMed Central

    Tomas, Julie; Reygner, Julie; Mayeur, Camille; Ducroc, Robert; Bouet, Stephan; Bridonneau, Chantal; Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Thomas, Muriel; Langella, Philippe; Cherbuy, Claire

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of early colonizing bacteria on the colonic epithelium. We isolated dominant bacteria, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus intestinalis, Clostridium innocuum and a novel Fusobacterium spp., from the intestinal contents of conventional suckling rats and transferred them in different combinations into germfree (GF) adult rats. Animals were investigated after various times up to 21 days. Proliferative cell markers (Ki67, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, phospho-histone H3, cyclin A) were higher in rats monocolonized with E. coli than in GF at all time points, but not in rats monocolonized with E. faecalis. The mucin content of goblet cells declined shortly after E. coli administration whereas the mucus layer doubled in thickness. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that E. coli resides in this mucus layer. The epithelial mucin content progressively returned to baseline, following an increase in KLF4 and in the cell cycle arrest-related proteins p21CIP1 and p27KIP1. Markers of colonic differentiated cells involved in electrolyte (carbonic anhydrase II and slc26A3) and water (aquaglyceroporin3 (aqp3)) transport, and secretory responses to carbachol were modulated after E. coli inoculation suggesting that ion transport dynamics were also affected. The colonic responses to simplified microbiotas differed substantially according to whether or not E. coli was combined with the other four bacteria. Thus, proliferation markers increased substantially when E. coli was in the mix, but very much less when it was absent. This work demonstrates that a pioneer strain of E. coli elicits sequential epithelial remodeling affecting the structure, mucus layer and ionic movements and suggests this can result in a microbiota-compliant state. PMID:25012905

  10. [Acute abdomen caused by spontaneous perforation of the colon].

    PubMed

    Balotta, F; Ghidotti, G; Pecchia, G; Santoro, A

    The literature on simple ulcer of the colon is reviewed. Three successfully treated cases of spontaneous perforation of the colon due to ulcer of the sigmoid, and single and multiple ulceration of the caecum are described, with particular reference to their aetiopathogenesis. The view that simple ulcer is caused by mechanical and circulatory factors, with or without inflammation, is expressed. Surgical management of this lesion must take the patient's age and local and general condition into account. These parameters will determine the type of operation employed, ranging from simple colorrhaphy to variously extensive resection of the perforated segment. PMID:7019756

  11. The Use of Flagella and Motility for Plant Colonization and Fitness by Different Strains of the Foodborne Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Lisa; Duhé, Jessica M.; Flaherty, Denise

    2009-01-01

    The role of flagella and motility in the attachment of the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to various surfaces is mixed with some systems requiring flagella for an interaction and others needing only motility for cells to get to the surface. In nature this bacterium is a saprophyte and contaminated produce is an avenue for infection. Previous studies have documented the ability of this organism to attach to and colonize plant tissue. Motility mutants were generated in three wild type strains of L. monocytogenes by deleting either flaA, the gene encoding flagellin, or motAB, genes encoding part of the flagellar motor, and tested for both the ability to colonize sprouts and for the fitness of that colonization. The motAB mutants were not affected in the colonization of alfalfa, radish, and broccoli sprouts; however, some of the flaA mutants showed reduced colonization ability. The best colonizing wild type strain was reduced in colonization on all three sprout types as a result of a flaA deletion. A mutant in another background was only affected on alfalfa. The third, a poor alfalfa colonizer was not affected in colonization ability by any of the deletions. Fitness of colonization was measured in experiments of competition between mixtures of mutant and parent strains on sprouts. Here the flaA and motAB mutants of the three strain backgrounds were impaired in fitness of colonization of alfalfa and radish sprouts, and one strain background showed reduced fitness of both mutant types on broccoli sprouts. Together these data indicate a role for flagella for some strains to physically colonize some plants, while the fitness of that colonization is positively affected by motility in almost all cases. PMID:19357783

  12. Cancers of the colon and rectum: identical or fraternal twins?

    PubMed

    Hong, Theodore S; Clark, Jeffrey W; Haigis, Kevin M

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer represents a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality, with approximately 1.2 million cases and 600,000 deaths worldwide each year. Because of the anatomic continuity of the colon into the rectum, cancers affecting these organs have historically been considered equivalent. In this Prospective, we discuss the clinical and experimental data suggesting that colon cancer and rectal cancer are highly related, but distinct, diseases. Reconsidering the relationship between these cancers has implications for the development of new therapeutic paradigms. PMID:22585856

  13. Correlation of morphological and molecular parameters for colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shuai; Roney, Celeste A.; Li, Qian; Jiang, James; Cable, Alex; Summers, Ronald M.; Chen, Yu

    2010-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. There is great interest in studying the relationship among microstructures and molecular processes of colorectal cancer during its progression at early stages. In this study, we use our multi-modality optical system that could obtain co-registered optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) images simultaneously to study CRC. The overexpressed carbohydrate α-L-fucose on the surfaces of polyps facilitates the bond of adenomatous polyps with UEA-1 and is used as biomarker. Tissue scattering coefficient derived from OCT axial scan is used as quantitative value of structural information. Both structural images from OCT and molecular images show spatial heterogeneity of tumors. Correlations between those values are analyzed and demonstrate that scattering coefficients are positively correlated with FMI signals in conjugated. In UEA-1 conjugated samples (8 polyps and 8 control regions), the correlation coefficient is ranged from 0.45 to 0.99. These findings indicate that the microstructure of polyps is changed gradually during cancer progression and the change is well correlated with certain molecular process. Our study demonstrated that multi-parametric imaging is able to simultaneously detect morphology and molecular information and it can enable spatially and temporally correlated studies of structure-function relationships during tumor progression.

  14. Estimation of AM fungal colonization - Comparability and reliability of classical methods.

    PubMed

    Füzy, Anna; Biró, Ibolya; Kovács, Ramóna; Takács, Tünde

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of mycorrhizal status in hosts can be a good indicator of symbiotic associations in inoculation experiments or in ecological research. The most common microscopic-based observation methods, such as (i) the gridline intersect method, (ii) the magnified intersections method and (iii) the five-class system of Trouvelot were tested to find the most simple, easily executable, effective and objective ones and their appropriate parameters for characterization of mycorrhizal status. In a pot experiment, white clover (Trifolium repens L.) host plant was inoculated with 6 (BEG144; syn. Rhizophagus intradices) in pumice substrate to monitor the AMF colonization properties during host growth. Eleven (seven classical and four new) colonization parameters were estimated by three researchers in twelve sampling times during plant growth. Variations among methods, observers, parallels, or individual plants were determined and analysed to select the most appropriate parameters and sampling times for monitoring. The comparability of the parameters of the three methods was also tested. As a result of the experiment classical parameters were selected for hyphal colonization: colonization frequency in the first stage or colonization density in the later period, and arbuscular richness of roots. A new parameter was recommended to determine vesicule and spore content of colonized roots at later stages of symbiosis. PMID:26689879

  15. Adult colonic intussusception: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sasatomi, T; Oriishi, T; Nakano, R; Nozoe, Y; Tanaka, T; Horiuchi, H; Noake, T; Takeuchi, K; Tsuji, Y; Shirouzu, K

    2001-01-01

    Intussusception accounts for almost all cases of intestinal obstruction in children. In contrast, intussusception in adults is relatively rare. An 86-year-old Japanese female with rectal bleeding came to our hospital via ambulance. At first, colonoscopy findings revealed the sigmoid colon cancer. Ultrasonography showed a hypoechoic mass with a multiple concentric ring sign. Computed tomography showed a round fluid-filled cystic structure. Colon contrast studies demonstrated stenosis in the rectosigmoid colon. A laparotomy was performed. The sigmoid colon was intussuscepted to the rectosigmoid colon. We employed both rectosigmoid and sigmoid colon resection. The resected specimen showed that the disease was advanced sigmoid colon cancer with ulcer formation due to an ischemic change. Tumor was 4.5 cm x 2.0 cm in size. The disease was histopathologically diagnosed as advanced sigmoid colon cancer, well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. We report here a case of adult intussusception due to the sigmoid colon cancer. PMID:11501502

  16. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems. PMID:25727891

  17. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization.

    PubMed

    Ziętara, Natalia; Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo; Krueger, Andreas

    2015-09-21

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling to quantitate individual events of thymus colonization. We applied this method to study thymus colonization in CCR7(-/-)CCR9(-/-) (DKO) mice, whose TSPNs are largely unoccupied. We showed that ∼160-200 TSPNs are present in the adult thymus and, on average, 10 of these TSPNs were open for recolonization at steady state. Preconditioning of wild-type mice revealed a similar number of TSPNs, indicating that preconditioning can generate space efficiently for transplanted T cell progenitors. To identify potential cellular feedback loops restricting thymus colonization, we performed serial transfer experiments. These experiments indicated that thymus seeding was directly restricted by the duration of niche occupancy rather than long-range effects, thus challenging current paradigms of thymus colonization. PMID:26347471

  18. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization

    PubMed Central

    Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling to quantitate individual events of thymus colonization. We applied this method to study thymus colonization in CCR7−/−CCR9−/− (DKO) mice, whose TSPNs are largely unoccupied. We showed that ∼160–200 TSPNs are present in the adult thymus and, on average, 10 of these TSPNs were open for recolonization at steady state. Preconditioning of wild-type mice revealed a similar number of TSPNs, indicating that preconditioning can generate space efficiently for transplanted T cell progenitors. To identify potential cellular feedback loops restricting thymus colonization, we performed serial transfer experiments. These experiments indicated that thymus seeding was directly restricted by the duration of niche occupancy rather than long-range effects, thus challenging current paradigms of thymus colonization. PMID:26347471

  19. Why is initial bacterial colonization of the intestine important to the infant’s and child’s health?

    PubMed Central

    Houghteling, Pearl D.; Walker, W. Allan

    2014-01-01

    Microbial colonization of the infant occurs during a critical time window for immune and gastrointestinal development. Infant colonization sets the stage for the adult microbiome. This review is a broad survey of the factors affecting infant colonization and the downstream effects on gastrointestinal health and disease. Major topics affecting colonization include initial inoculation dependent on birth mode, the impact of breastfeeding, and inside-out modulation of the developing microbiome by the immune system. Major outcomes of colonization include the timing-dependent education of the neonatal immune system, which is interconnected with barrier function and metabolism. These all engage in further continuing cross-talk with the microbiome, genetics and nutrition. This review will also briefly discuss mechanisms of disease resulting from disrupted colonization as well as nutritional and microbial therapies. PMID:25313849

  20. Complete colonic duplication in children

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghnejad Tabari, Ahmad; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Khaleghnejad Tabari, Nasibeh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Complete colonic duplication is a very rare congenital anomaly that may have different presentations according to its location and size. Complete colonic duplication can occur in 15% of gastrointestinal duplication. We report two cases of complete colonic duplications, and their characteristics. Case Presentation: We present two patients with complete colonic duplication with different types and presentations. Case 1: A 2- year old boy presented to the clinic with abdominal protrusion, difficulty to defecate, chronic constipation and mucosal prolaps covered bulging (rectocele) since he was 6 months old. The patient had palpable pelvic mass with doughy consistency. Rectal exam confirmed perirectal mass with soft consistency. The patient underwent a surgical operation that had total tubular colorectal duplication with one blind end and was treated with simple fenestration of distal end, and was discharged without complication. After two years follow up, he had normal defecation and good weight gain. Case 2: A 2 –day old infant was referred with imperforate anus and complete duplication of recto-sigmoid colon, diphallus, double bladder, and hypospadiasis. After clinical and paraclinical investigations, he underwent operations in several stages in different periods, and was discharged without complications. After four years follow up, he led a normal life. Conclusion: The patients with complete duplication have to be examined carefully because of the high incidence of other systemic anomalies. Treatment includes simple resection of distal common wall, fenestration, and repair other associated anomalies. PMID:24358440

  1. Parameters affecting downhole pH

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, J.D.; Jangama, V.R.; Willmon, J.

    1997-09-01

    The presence of acetic and formic acids in the produced water of gas condensate wells has been known for some time by the industry. In traditional water analysis, it has been titrated and reported as alkalinity. The calculation of accurate downhole pH values requires that these ions be analyzed separately in the water and that an organic acid material balance be performed on all three phases in the separator. In this manner, it is then possible to use phase distribution coefficients involving ionic equilibrium to determine how these acids distribute themselves between phases as the pH calculation proceeds downhole. In this paper, the above method of calculation of pH and {Delta}pH is used to examine the effect that various concentrations of these acids have on the downhole pH. Various concentrations of acids are examined, and two cases are calculated in which the effect of condensate on the pH is examined.

  2. Parameters Affecting Solvent Production by Clostridium pasteurianum

    PubMed Central

    Dabrock, Birgit; Bahl, Hubert; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    1992-01-01

    The effect of pH, growth rate, phosphate and iron limitation, carbon monoxide, and carbon source on product formation by Clostridium pasteurianum was determined. Under phosphate limitation, glucose was fermented almost exclusively to acetate and butyrate independently of the pH and growth rate. Iron limitation caused lactate production (38 mol/100 mol) from glucose in batch and continuous culture. At 15% (vol/vol) carbon monoxide in the atmosphere, glucose was fermented to ethanol (24 mol/100 mol), lactate (32 mol/100 mol), and butanol (36 mol/100 mol) in addition to the usual products, acetate (38 mol/100 mol) and butyrate (17 mol/100 mol). During glycerol fermentation, a completely different product pattern was found. In continuous culture under phosphate limitation, acetate and butyrate were produced only in trace amounts, whereas ethanol (30 mol/100 mol), butanol (18 mol/100 mol), and 1,3-propanediol (18 mol/100 mol) were the major products. Under iron limitation, the ratio of these products could be changed in favor of 1,3-propanediol (34 mol/100 mol). In addition, lactate was produced in significant amounts (25 mol/100 mol). The tolerance of C. pasteurianum to glycerol was remarkably high; growth was not inhibited by glycerol concentrations up to 17% (wt/vol). Increasing glycerol concentrations favored the production of 1,3-propanediol. PMID:16348691

  3. Ultrasonographic appearance of colon taeniasis.

    PubMed

    Fabijanić, D; Giunio, L; Ivani, N; Fabijanić, A; Mirić, D; Kardum, D

    2001-03-01

    We present the case of a 50-year-old woman with abdominal pain, nausea, loss of appetite, and frequent stools in whom the routine ultrasonographic examination demonstrated a double-reflective, ribbon-like structure in the lumen of the initial segment of the ascending colon, which suggested colon taeniasis. Because the initial parasitologic analysis yielded negative results and application of albendazol did not have any therapeutic effect, the diagnosis was confirmed by barium enema and subsequently by parasitologic examination of proglottids passed in the stool after application of niclosamide. The double-reflective, ribbon-like structure in the lumen of the intestine seems to be specific to the ultrasonographic appearance of intestinal taeniasis. Transcutaneous ultrasonography of the gastrointestinal tract, performed as a screening method before conventional radiologic or endoscopic examination, can point to the ultimate diagnosis of colon taeniasis. PMID:11270533

  4. Colonization of congenitally immunodeficient mice with probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, R D; Warner, T; Roberts, L; Farmer, J; Balish, E

    1997-01-01

    We assessed the capacity of four probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus casei GG, and Bifidobacterium animalis) to colonize, infect, stimulate immune responses in, and affect the growth and survival of congenitally immunodeficient gnotobiotic beige-athymic (bg/bg-nu/nu) and beige-euthymic (bg/bg-nu/+) mice. The bacteria colonized and persisted, in pure culture, in the alimentary tracts of both mouse strains for the entire study period (12 weeks). Although all adult and neonatal beige-euthymic mice survived probiotic colonization, some infant mortality occurred in beige-athymic pups born to mothers colonized with pure cultures of L. reuteri or L. casei GG. The probiotic bacteria manifested different capacities to adhere to epithelial surfaces, disseminate to internal organs, affect the body weight of adult mice and the growth of neonatal mice, and stimulate immune responses. Although the probiotic species were innocuous for adults, these results suggest that caution and further studies to assess the safety of probiotic bacteria for immunodeficient hosts, especially neonates, are required. PMID:9234796

  5. Taxon interactions control the distributions of cryoconite bacteria colonizing a High Arctic ice cap.

    PubMed

    Gokul, Jarishma K; Hodson, Andrew J; Saetnan, Eli R; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram D L; Westall, Philippa J; Detheridge, Andrew P; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Bussell, Jennifer; Mur, Luis A J; Edwards, Arwyn

    2016-08-01

    Microbial colonization of glacial ice surfaces incurs feedbacks which affect the melting rate of the ice surface. Ecosystems formed as microbe-mineral aggregates termed cryoconite locally reduce ice surface albedo and represent foci of biodiversity and biogeochemical cycling. Consequently, greater understanding the ecological processes in the formation of functional cryoconite ecosystems upon glacier surfaces is sought. Here, we present the first bacterial biogeography of an ice cap, evaluating the respective roles of dispersal, environmental and biotic filtration occurring at local scales in the assembly of cryoconite microbiota. 16S rRNA gene amplicon semiconductor sequencing of cryoconite colonizing a Svalbard ice cap coupled with digital elevation modelling of physical parameters reveals the bacterial community is dominated by a ubiquitous core of generalist taxa, with evidence for a moderate pairwise distance-decay relationship. While geographic position and melt season duration are prominent among environmental predictors of community structure, the core population of taxa appears highly influential in structuring the bacterial community. Taxon co-occurrence network analysis reveals a highly modular community structured by positive interactions with bottleneck taxa, predominantly Actinobacteria affiliated to isolates from soil humus. In contrast, the filamentous cyanobacterial taxon (assigned to Leptolyngbya/Phormidesmis pristleyi) which dominates the community and binds together granular cryoconite are poorly connected to other taxa. While our study targeted one ice cap, the prominent role of generalist core taxa with close environmental relatives across the global cryosphere indicate discrete roles for cosmopolitan Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria as respective keystone taxa and ecosystem engineers of cryoconite ecosystems colonizing ice caps. PMID:27261672

  6. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer This page ... and rectal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Colon Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Camptosar ( ...

  7. Teaching about the Colonization of Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Jay S.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate course, The Colonization of Space, which introduces nonscience majors at the University of North Florida to current topics in the exploration, industrialization, and colonization of space. References to the audiovisual resources and literature are also included. (HM)

  8. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  9. Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159556.html Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer But researchers say ... 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have identified five new gene mutations that may be tied to colon ...

  10. Colon Cancer Rising in People Under 50

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159004.html Colon Cancer Rising in People Under 50 Incidence up ... TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Although overall colon cancer rates are declining, the rates among Americans ...

  11. Evolving colon injury management: a review.

    PubMed

    Greer, Lauren T; Gillern, Suzanne M; Vertrees, Amy E

    2013-02-01

    The colon is the second most commonly injured intra-abdominal organ in penetrating trauma. Management of traumatic colon injuries has evolved significantly over the past 200 years. Traumatic colon injuries can have a wide spectrum of severity, presentation, and management options. There is strong evidence that most non-destructive colon injuries can be successfully managed with primary repair or primary anastomosis. The management of destructive colon injuries remains controversial with most favoring resection with primary anastomosis and others favor colonic diversion in specific circumstances. The historical management of traumatic colon injuries, common mechanisms of injury, demographics, presentation, assessment, diagnosis, management, and complications of traumatic colon injuries both in civilian and military practice are reviewed. The damage control revolution has added another layer of complexity to management with continued controversy. PMID:23336650

  12. STUDIES OF DBP-INDUCED COLON CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of colon carcinomas by trihalomethanes in rats may be relevant to epidemiological findings of increased incidences of colon-rectal cancer associated with exposure to chlorination byproducts. These studies have demonstrated that the brominated THMs in drinking water ind...

  13. Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159556.html Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer But researchers say ... 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have identified five new gene mutations that may be tied to colon ...

  14. Colon Cleansing: Health or Hype?

    MedlinePlus

    ... maintain a healthy bacterial composition, known as your microflora. “Your microflora plays a crucial role in protecting your body ... potassium Kidney damage Plus, colon cleansing changes your microflora. “You may think you’re getting rid of ...

  15. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, plant chemistry, and aboveground herbivory on Senecio jacobaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidinger, Stefan; Eschen, René; Gange, Alan C.; Finch, Paul; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can affect insect herbivores by changing plant growth and chemistry. However, many factors can influence the symbiotic relationship between plant and fungus, potentially obscuring experimental treatments and ecosystem impacts. In a field experiment, we assessed AMF colonization levels of individual ragwort ( Senecio jacobaea) plants growing in grassland plots that were originally sown with 15 or 4 plant species, or were unsown. We measured the concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), and assessed the presence of aboveground insect herbivores on the sampled plants. Total AMF colonization and colonization by arbuscules was lower in plots sown with 15 species than in plots sown with 4 species and unsown plots. AMF colonization was positively related to the cover of oxeye daisy ( Leucanthemum vulgare) and a positive relationship between colonization by arbuscules and the occurrence of a specialist seed-feeding fly ( Pegohylemyia seneciella) was found. The occurrence of stem-boring, leaf-mining and sap-sucking insects was not affected by AMF colonization. Total PA concentrations were negatively related to colonization levels by vesicles, but did not differ among the sowing treatments. No single factor explained the observed differences in AMF colonization among the sowing treatments or insect herbivore occurrence on S. jacobaea. However, correlations across the treatments suggest that some of the variation was due to the abundance of one plant species, which is known to stimulate AMF colonization of neighbouring plants, while AMF colonization was related to the occurrence of a specialist insect herbivore. Our results thus illustrate that in natural systems, the ecosystem impact of AMF through their influence on the occurrence of specialist insects can be recognised, but they also highlight the confounding effect of neighbouring plant species identity. Hence, our results emphasise the importance of field

  16. Relationships between the litter colonization by saprotrophic and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi with depth in a tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Posada, Raúl Hernando; Madriñan, Santiago; Rivera, Emma-Lucía

    2012-07-01

    Fungal colonization of litter has been described mostly in terms of fructification succession in the decomposition process or the process of fungal ligninolysis. No studies have been conducted on litter colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and their relationship with the presence of saprotrophic fungi. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationships that exist in simultaneous leaf litter colonization by AMF and saprotrophic fungi and the relationships between rates of litter and associated root colonization by AMF at different soil depths. We selected Eugenia sp. and Syzygium sp. in a riparian tropical forest, with an abundant production of litter (O horizon), we evaluated litter and root colonization at different depths, its C:N ratios, and the edaphic physico-chemical parameters of the A horizon immediately below the litter layer. Litter colonization by saprotrophic fungi and AMF increased with depth, but the saprotrophic fungal colonization of some litter fragments decreased in the lowermost level of the litter while AMF litter colonization continued to increase. Plant roots were present only in the middle and bottom layers, but their mycorrhizal colonization did not correlate with litter colonization. The external hyphae length of AMF is abundant (ca. 20 m g(-1) sample) and, in common with sample humidity, remained constant with increasing depth. We conclude that in zones of riparian tropical forest with abundant sufficient litter accumulation and abundant AMF external hyphae, the increase in litter colonization by AMF with depth correlates to the colonization by saprotrophic fungi, but their presence in the deepest layers is independent of both litter colonization by saprotrophic fungi and root colonization by AMF. PMID:22749161

  17. Trade-off between competition and facilitation defines gap colonization in mountains.

    PubMed

    Lembrechts, Jonas J; Milbau, Ann; Nijs, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental observations show that gap colonization in small-stature (e.g. grassland and dwarf shrubs) vegetation strongly depends on the abiotic conditions within them. At the same time, within-gap variation in biotic interactions such as competition and facilitation, caused by distance to the gap edge, would affect colonizer performance, but a theoretical framework to explore such patterns is missing. Here, we model how competition, facilitation and environmental conditions together determine the small-scale patterns of gap colonization along a cold gradient in mountains, by simulating colonizer survival in gaps of various sizes. Our model adds another dimension to the known effects of biotic interactions along a stress gradient by focussing on the trade-off between competition and facilitation in the within-gap environment. We show that this trade-off defines a peak in colonizer survival at a specific distance from the gap edge, which progressively shifts closer to the edge as the environment gets colder, ultimately leaving a large fraction of gaps unsuitable for colonization in facilitation-dominated systems. This is reinforced when vegetation size and temperature amelioration are manipulated simultaneously with temperature in order to simulate an elevational gradient more realistically. Interestingly, all other conditions being equal, the magnitude of the realized survival peak was always lower in large than in small gaps, making large gaps harder to colonize. The model is relevant to predict effects of non-native plant invasions and climate warming on colonization processes in mountains. PMID:26558706

  18. Trade-off between competition and facilitation defines gap colonization in mountains

    PubMed Central

    Lembrechts, Jonas J.; Milbau, Ann; Nijs, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental observations show that gap colonization in small-stature (e.g. grassland and dwarf shrubs) vegetation strongly depends on the abiotic conditions within them. At the same time, within-gap variation in biotic interactions such as competition and facilitation, caused by distance to the gap edge, would affect colonizer performance, but a theoretical framework to explore such patterns is missing. Here, we model how competition, facilitation and environmental conditions together determine the small-scale patterns of gap colonization along a cold gradient in mountains, by simulating colonizer survival in gaps of various sizes. Our model adds another dimension to the known effects of biotic interactions along a stress gradient by focussing on the trade-off between competition and facilitation in the within-gap environment. We show that this trade-off defines a peak in colonizer survival at a specific distance from the gap edge, which progressively shifts closer to the edge as the environment gets colder, ultimately leaving a large fraction of gaps unsuitable for colonization in facilitation-dominated systems. This is reinforced when vegetation size and temperature amelioration are manipulated simultaneously with temperature in order to simulate an elevational gradient more realistically. Interestingly, all other conditions being equal, the magnitude of the realized survival peak was always lower in large than in small gaps, making large gaps harder to colonize. The model is relevant to predict effects of non-native plant invasions and climate warming on colonization processes in mountains. PMID:26558706

  19. Pineal gland function is required for colon antipreneoplastic effects of physical exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Frajacomo, F T T; de Paula Garcia, W; Fernandes, C R; Garcia, S B; Kannen, V

    2015-10-01

    Light-at-night exposure enhances the risk of cancer. Colon cancer is among the most dangerous tumors affecting humankind. Physical exercise has shown positive effects against colon cancer. Here, we investigated whether pineal gland modulates antipreneoplastic effects of physical exercise in the colon. Surgical and non-surgical pineal impairments were performed to clarify the relationship between the pineal gland activity and manifestation of colonic preneoplastic lesions. Next, a progressive swimming training was applied in rats exposed or not to either non-surgical pineal impairment or carcinogen treatment for 10 weeks. Both surgical and non-surgical pineal impairments increased the development of colon preneoplasia. It was further found that impairing the pineal gland function, higher rates of DNA damage were induced in colonic epithelial and enteric glial cells. Physical exercise acted positively against preneoplasia, whereas impairing the pineal function with constant light exposure disrupts its positive effects on the development of preneoplastic lesions in the colon. This was yet related to increased DNA damage in glial cells and enteric neuronal activation aside from serum melatonin levels. Our findings suggest that protective effects of physical exercise against colon cancer are dependent on the pineal gland activity. PMID:25487536

  20. Stimulation of epithelial cell proliferation of isolated distal colon of rats by continuous colonic infusion of ammonia or short-chain fatty acids is nonadditive.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, H; Sakata, T

    1998-05-01

    Dietary fibers accelerate colonic epithelial cell proliferation at least in part by modulating bacterial metabolism in the large intestine. Ammonia and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) are major metabolites of hindgut bacteria and are believed to affect epithelial cell kinetics of the colon. However, the effect of luminal ammonia itself and the possible interaction of ammonia with SCFA on colonic epithelial cell proliferation have not yet been studied. The colon of rats was surgically isolated and continuously administered infusates with saline, ammonia, SCFA or both into the isolated colon for 7 d in a two-way factorial design. On d 7, vincrystine sulfate was administered intravenously to cause metaphase arrest. The activity of epithelial cell proliferation in the distal colon was estimated by using a stathmokinetic method and by histologic examination. The crypt size was significantly larger in rats given infusates containing SCFA than in rats given infusates without SCFA. Infusion of ammonia or SCFA significantly stimulated colonic epithelial cell proliferation compared with the saline infusion. Infusion of both ammonia and SCFA resulted in accumulated mitoses per crypt that did not differ from the other three infusions although the value tended to be lower than when SCFA alone were infused. Thus, stimulation of epithelial cell proliferation by ammonia and SCFA is not additive, and the interaction between them should be considered when the effects of dietary fibers on gut epithelial proliferation are investigated. PMID:9566991

  1. Stress Management Affects Outcomes in the Pathophysiology of an Endometriosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Myrella L.; Hernández, Siomara; Thompson, Kenira J.; Bayona, Manuel; Flores, Idhaliz

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown detrimental effects of stress in an animal model of endometriosis. We now investigated whether the ability to control stress can affect disease parameters. Endometriosis was surgically induced in female Sprague-Dawley rats before exposing animals to a controllable (submerged platform) or uncontrollable (no platform) swim stress protocol. Corticosterone levels and fecal pellet numbers were measured as an indicator of stress. Uncontrollable stress increased the number and size of the endometriotic cysts. Rats receiving uncontrollable stress had higher anxiety than those exposed to controllable stress or no stress and higher corticosterone levels. Uncontrollable stressed rats had more colonic damage and uterine cell infiltration compared to no stress, while controllable stress rats showed less of an effect. Uncontrollable stress also increased both colonic and uterine motility. In summary, the level of stress controllability appears to modulate the behavior and pathophysiology of endometriosis and offers evidence for evaluating therapeutic interventions. PMID:25015902

  2. Caesium inhibits the colonization of Medicago truncatula by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Wiesel, Lea; Dubchak, Sergiy; Turnau, Katarzyna; Broadley, Martin R; White, Philip J

    2015-03-01

    Contamination of soils with radioisotopes of caesium (Cs) is of concern because of their emissions of harmful β and γ radiation. Radiocaesium enters the food chain through vegetation and the intake of Cs can affect the health of organisms. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form mutualistic symbioses with plants through colonization of the roots and previous studies on the influence of AM on Cs concentrations in plants have given inconsistent results. These studies did not investigate the influence of Cs on AM fungi and it is therefore not known if Cs has a direct effect on AM colonization. Here, we investigated whether Cs influences AM colonization and if this effect impacts on the influence of Rhizophagus intraradices on Cs accumulation by Medicago truncatula. M. truncatula was grown with or without R. intraradices in pots containing different concentrations of Cs. Here, we present the first evidence that colonization of plants by AM fungi can be negatively affected by increasing Cs concentrations in the soil. Mycorrhizal colonization had little effect on root or shoot Cs concentrations. In conclusion, the colonization by AM fungi is impaired by high Cs concentrations and this direct effect of soil Cs on AM colonization might explain the inconsistent results reported in literature that have shown increased, decreased or unaffected Cs concentrations in AM plants. PMID:25540940

  3. Single cutaneous metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Góes, Heliana Freitas de Oliveira; Lima, Caren dos Santos; de Souza, Mariana Boechat; Estrella, Rogério Ribeiro; Faria, Mônica Ali Novaes; Rochael, Mayra Carrijo

    2016-01-01

    Skin metastases are relatively rare and occur most often when the cancer is already advanced, invading other organs. As to location, they often seem to elect areas located close to the primary tumor, although distant sites, such as the scalp, may be affected with some frequency. We present a case of a 76-year-old woman with colon adenocarcinoma that had a single metastatic lesion on the scalp. PMID:27579752

  4. Post larval, short-term, colonization patterns: The effect of substratum complexity across subtidal, adjacent, habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Sanz, Sara; Tuya, Fernando; Navarro, Pablo G.; Angulo-Preckler, Carlos; Haroun, Ricardo J.

    2012-10-01

    Benthic habitats are colonized by organisms from the water column and adjacent habitats. There are, however, variations in the 'acceptability' of any habitat to potential colonists. We assessed whether the structural complexity of artificial substrata affected patterns of short-term colonization of post larval faunal assemblages across subtidal habitats within a coastal landscape. Specifically, we tested whether short-term colonization patterns on 3 types of artificial substrata encompassing a range of complexities, including a leaf-like unit, a cushion-shaped leaf-like unit and a cushion-shaped unit, were consistent across 4 adjacent habitats: macroalgal-dominated bottoms, urchin-grazed barrens, seagrass meadows and sandy patches, at Gran Canaria (eastern Atlantic). A total of 16,174 organisms were collected after 4 weeks and 4 taxonomic groups (Crustacea, Chordata, Echinodermata and Mollusca) dominated the assemblage. Despite considerable among-taxa variability being observed in response to habitat effects, the total abundance of colonizers, as well as the abundance of Arthropoda, Chordata and Echinodermata, was affected by the habitat where collectors were deployed, but did not differ among types of collectors. Similarly, the assemblage structure of colonizers was mainly affected by the habitat, but not by the type of collector; habitat contributed to explain most variation in the assemblage structure of the four dominant taxonomic groups (from ca. 5.44-19.23%), and obscured, in all cases, variation explained by the type of collector. As a result, the variation in short-term colonization patterns of faunal assemblages into artificial collectors was mostly affected by variation associated with habitats rather than by differences in the structural complexity of collectors. The largest abundances of colonizers, particularly Echinodermata, were found on sandy patches relative to other habitats, suggesting that the 'availability', rather than any particular attribute

  5. Pneumoretroperitoneum and Pneumomediastinum Revealing a Left Colon Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Montori, Giulia; Di Giovanni, Giacomo; Mzoughi, Zeineb; Angot, Cedric; Al Samman, Sophie; Solaini, Leonardo; Cheynel, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Left colon perforation usually occurs in complicated diverticulitis or cancer. The most frequent signs are intraperitoneal abscess or peritonitis. In cases of retroperitoneal colonic perforation, diagnosis may be difficult. A 59-year-old woman presented with left thigh pain and with abdominal discomfort associated with mild dyspnea. Computed tomography scan showed air bubbles and purulent collection in the retroperitoneum, with subcutaneous emphysema extending from the left thigh to the neck. Computed tomography scan also revealed portal vein gas and thrombosis with multiple liver abscesses. An emergency laparotomy revealed a perforation of the proximal left colon. No masses were found. A left colectomy was performed. The retroperitoneum was drained and washed extensively. A negative pressure wound therapy was applied. A second-look laparotomy was performed 48 hours later. The retroperitoneum was drained and an end colostomy was performed. Intensive Care Unit postoperative stay was 9 days, and the patient was discharged on the 32nd postoperative day. Pneumoretroperitoneum and pneumomediastinum are rare signs of colonic retroperitoneal perforation. The diagnosis may be delayed, especially in the absence of peritoneal irritation. Clinical, laboratory, and especially radiologic parameters might be useful. Surgical treatment must be prompt to improve prognosis. PMID:26414818

  6. Competition for space during bacterial colonization of a surface.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Diarmuid P; Allen, Rosalind J

    2015-09-01

    Competition for space is ubiquitous in the ecology of both microorganisms and macro-organisms. We introduce a bacterial model system in which the factors influencing competition for space during colonization of an initially empty habitat can be tracked directly. Using fluorescence microscopy, we follow the fate of individual Escherichia coli bacterial cell lineages as they undergo expansion competition (the race to be the first to colonize a previously empty territory), and as they later compete at boundaries between clonal territories. Our experiments are complemented by computer simulations of a lattice-based model. We find that both expansion competition, manifested as differences in individual cell lag times, and boundary competition, manifested as effects of neighbour cell geometry, can play a role in colonization success, particularly when lineages expand exponentially. This work provides a baseline for investigating how ecological interactions affect colonization of space by bacterial populations, and highlights the potential of bacterial model systems for the testing and development of ecological theory. PMID:26333814

  7. Competition for space during bacterial colonization of a surface

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Diarmuid P.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2015-01-01

    Competition for space is ubiquitous in the ecology of both microorganisms and macro-organisms. We introduce a bacterial model system in which the factors influencing competition for space during colonization of an initially empty habitat can be tracked directly. Using fluorescence microscopy, we follow the fate of individual Escherichia coli bacterial cell lineages as they undergo expansion competition (the race to be the first to colonize a previously empty territory), and as they later compete at boundaries between clonal territories. Our experiments are complemented by computer simulations of a lattice-based model. We find that both expansion competition, manifested as differences in individual cell lag times, and boundary competition, manifested as effects of neighbour cell geometry, can play a role in colonization success, particularly when lineages expand exponentially. This work provides a baseline for investigating how ecological interactions affect colonization of space by bacterial populations, and highlights the potential of bacterial model systems for the testing and development of ecological theory. PMID:26333814

  8. Aberrant Gene Expression Profile of Unaffected Colon Mucosa from Patients with Unifocal Colon Polyp

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Jingjing; Ma, Lili; Yang, Jiayin; Xu, Lili

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate gene expression profiles in unaffected colon mucosa and polyp tissue from patients with unifocal colon polyp to investigate the potential mucosa impairment in normal-appearing colon mucosa from these patients. Material/Methods Colon polyp patients were prospectively recruited. We obtained colon biopsies from the normal-appearing sites and polyp tissue through colonoscopy. Gene expression analysis was performed using microarrays. Gene ontology and clustering were evaluated by bioinformatics. Results We detected a total of 711 genes (274 up-regulated and 437 down-regulated) in polyp tissue and 256 genes (170 up-regulated and 86 down-regulated) in normal-appearing colon mucosa, with at least a 3-fold of change compared to healthy controls. Heatmapping of the gene expression showed similar gene alteration patterns between unaffected colon mucosa and polyp tissue. Gene ontology analyses confirmed the overlapped molecular functions and pathways of altered gene expression between unaffected colon mucosa and polyp tissue from patients with unifocal colon polyp. The most significantly altered genes in normal-appearing tissues in polyp patients include immune response, external side of plasma membrane, nucleus, and cellular response to zinc ion. Conclusions Significant gene expression alterations exist in unaffected colon mucosa from patients with unifocal colon polyp. Unaffected colon mucosa and polyp tissue share great similarity and overlapping of altered gene expression profiles, indicating the potential possibility of recurrence of colon polyps due to underlying molecular abnormalities of colon mucosa in these patients. PMID:26675397

  9. Risk Factors for Acquisition and Loss of Clostridium difficile Colonization in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reske, Kimberly A.; Seiler, Sondra; Hink, Tiffany; Kwon, Jennie H.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.

    2015-01-01

    Asymptomatic colonization may contribute to Clostridium difficile transmission. Few data identify which patients are at risk for colonization. We performed a prospective cohort study of C. difficile colonization and risk factors for C. difficile acquisition and loss in hospitalized patients. Patients admitted to medical or surgical wards at a tertiary care hospital were enrolled; interviews and chart review were performed to determine patient demographics, C. difficile infection (CDI) history, medications, and health care exposures. Stool samples/rectal swabs were collected at enrollment and discharge; stool samples from clinical laboratory tests were also included. Samples were cultured for C. difficile, and the isolates were tested for toxins A and B and ribotyped. Chi-square tests and univariate logistic regression were used for the analyses. Two hundred thirty-five patients were enrolled. Of the patients, 21% were colonized with C. difficile (toxigenic and nontoxigenic) at admission and 24% at discharge. Ribotype 027 accounted for 6% of the strains at admission and 12% at discharge. Of the patients colonized at admission, 78% were also colonized at discharge. Cephalosporin use was associated with C. difficile acquisition (47% of patients who acquired C. difficile versus 25% of patients who did not; P = 0.03). β-lactam–β-lactamase inhibitor combinations were associated with a loss of C. difficile colonization (36% of patients who lost C. difficile colonization versus 8% of patients colonized at both admission and discharge; P = 0.04), as was metronidazole (27% versus 3%; P = 0.03). Antibiotic use affects the epidemiology of asymptomatic C. difficile colonization, including acquisition and loss, and it requires additional study. PMID:25987626

  10. Carprofen-induced oxidative stress in mitochondria of the colonic mucosa of the dog

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Lynne A.; McConnico, Rebecca S.; Morgan, Timothy W.; Hartmann, Erica; Davidson, Jacqueline R.; Hosgood, Giselle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the conductance and mannitol permeability of canine colonic mucosa in response to carprofen or 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) with or without tempol pretreatment. Ten colonic mucosa sections per dog were mounted in Ussing chambers. Treatments were done in duplicate. Mucosa was exposed to carprofen (200 μg/mL) or DNP (0.25 mM), both with and without tempol (1 mM) pretreatment. Conductance was calculated every 15 min for 240 min. Mannitol flux was calculated over 3 consecutive 60-minute periods. Histology or electron microscopy was done after exposure. Conductance over time, mannitol flux, frequency of histologic categories, and electron microscopic changes were analyzed for treatment effects. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) conductance over time for carprofen or DNP-treated colons was not significantly different from control regardless of tempol pretreatment. Period 3 mannitol fluxes for carprofen and DNP-treated colon were not significantly different, but were greater than control. Period 3 mannitol flux for tempol + carprofen was significantly less than tempol + DNP-treated colon. Sloughing of cells and erosions were seen in the mucosa of carprofen-treated colon. Mitochondrial damage was seen more often in carprofen-treated than DNP-treated or control colon. Tempol pretreatment resulted in more ruptured mitochondria in the carprofen-treated colon; however, other mitochondrial changes were not significantly affected by tempol pretreatment in either carprofen or DNP treated colon. Treatment with carprofen or DNP increased the mannitol flux, but pretreatment with tempol mitigated the carprofen effect. It is apparent that structural mitochondrial damage occurs in the canine colonic mucosa after carprofen and DNP exposure. PMID:24982549

  11. A bioassay to measure energy metabolism in mouse colonic crypts, organoids, and sorted stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A; Callaway, Evelyn S; Wright, Gus A; Safe, Stephen; Chapkin, Robert S

    2015-07-01

    Evidence suggests that targeting cancer cell energy metabolism might be an effective therapeutic approach for selective ablation of malignancies. Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we have demonstrated that select environmental agents can alter colonic mitochondrial function by increasing respiration-induced proton leak, thereby inducing apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk. To further probe bioenergetics in primary intestinal cells, we developed methodology that can be modified and adapted to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic crypts, the basic functional unit of the colon, and colonic organoids, an ex vivo 3D culture of colonic crypts. Furthermore, in combination with the MoFlo Astrios High-Speed Cell Sorter, we were able to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic adult stem and daughter cells from Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creER(T2) transgenic mice. We examined the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a full arylhydrocarbon receptor agonist, known to affect gastrointestinal function and cancer risk, on the bioenergetic profiles of intestinal epithelial cells. Mouse colonic crypts, organoids, or sorted single cells were seeded onto Matrigel-precoated Seahorse XF24 microplates for extracellular flux analysis. Temporal analyses revealed distinct energy metabolic profiles in crypts and organoids challenged with TCDD. Furthermore, sorted Lgr5(+) stem cells exhibited a Warburg-like metabolic profile. This is noteworthy because perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the earliest step toward colon tumorigenesis. We propose that our innovative methodology may facilitate future in vivo/ex vivo metabolic studies using environmental agents affecting colonocyte energy metabolism. PMID:25977509

  12. A bioassay to measure energy metabolism in mouse colonic crypts, organoids, and sorted stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A.; Callaway, Evelyn S.; Wright, Gus A.; Safe, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that targeting cancer cell energy metabolism might be an effective therapeutic approach for selective ablation of malignancies. Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we have demonstrated that select environmental agents can alter colonic mitochondrial function by increasing respiration-induced proton leak, thereby inducing apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk. To further probe bioenergetics in primary intestinal cells, we developed methodology that can be modified and adapted to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic crypts, the basic functional unit of the colon, and colonic organoids, an ex vivo 3D culture of colonic crypts. Furthermore, in combination with the MoFlo Astrios High-Speed Cell Sorter, we were able to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic adult stem and daughter cells from Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creERT2 transgenic mice. We examined the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a full arylhydrocarbon receptor agonist, known to affect gastrointestinal function and cancer risk, on the bioenergetic profiles of intestinal epithelial cells. Mouse colonic crypts, organoids, or sorted single cells were seeded onto Matrigel-precoated Seahorse XF24 microplates for extracellular flux analysis. Temporal analyses revealed distinct energy metabolic profiles in crypts and organoids challenged with TCDD. Furthermore, sorted Lgr5+ stem cells exhibited a Warburg-like metabolic profile. This is noteworthy because perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the earliest step toward colon tumorigenesis. We propose that our innovative methodology may facilitate future in vivo/ex vivo metabolic studies using environmental agents affecting colonocyte energy metabolism. PMID:25977509

  13. Westernized diets lower arsenic gastrointestinal bioaccessibility but increase microbial arsenic speciation changes in the colon.

    PubMed

    Alava, Pradeep; Du Laing, Gijs; Tack, Filip; De Ryck, Tine; Van De Wiele, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is an important contaminant present in food and water. Several studies have indicated that the occurrence of As based skin lesions is significantly different when root and gourd rich diets are consumed compared to meat rich diets. Additionally, urinary As speciation from orally exposed individuals appears to depend on the composition of the diet. These observations imply that diet composition can affect both the bioavailable As fraction as the As speciation in the body. In this study, we used the in vitro gastrointestinal method (IVG) to evaluate how an Asian type diet (fiber rich) and a Western type diet (fat and protein rich), differ in their capability to release inorganic As (iAs(V)) and dimethyl arsinate (DMA(V)) from a rice matrix following gastrointestinal digestion. Moreover, we used a validated dynamic gut simulator to investigate whether diet background affects As metabolism by gut microbiota in a colon environment. An Asian diet background resulted in a larger As bioaccessibility (81.2%) than a Western diet background (63.4%). On the other hand, incubation of As contaminated rice with human colon microbiota in the presence of a Western type diet resulted in a larger amount of hazardous As species - monomethyl arsonite and monomethylmonothio arsonate - to be formed after 48 h. The permeability of these As species (60.5% and 50.5% resp.) across a Caco-2 cell line was significantly higher compared to iAs(V) and DMA(V) (46.5% and 28% resp.). We conclude that dietary background is a crucial parameter to incorporate when predicting bioavailability with bioaccessibility measurements and when assessing health risks from As following oral exposure. PMID:25192650

  14. The Relevance of the Colon to Zinc Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Gopalsamy, Geetha Lavaniya; Alpers, David H; Binder, Henry J; Tran, Cuong D; Ramakrishna, B S; Brown, Ian; Manary, Mark; Mortimer, Elissa; Young, Graeme P

    2015-01-01

    Globally, zinc deficiency is widespread, despite decades of research highlighting its negative effects on health, and in particular upon child health in low-income countries. Apart from inadequate dietary intake of bioavailable zinc, other significant contributors to zinc deficiency include the excessive intestinal loss of endogenously secreted zinc and impairment in small intestinal absorptive function. Such changes are likely to occur in children suffering from environmental (or tropical) enteropathy (EE)—an almost universal condition among inhabitants of developing countries characterized by morphologic and functional changes in the small intestine. Changes to the proximal gut in environmental enteropathy will likely influence the nature and amount of zinc delivered into the large intestine. Consequently, we reviewed the current literature to determine if colonic absorption of endogenous or exogenous (dietary) zinc could contribute to overall zinc nutriture. Whilst we found evidence that significant zinc absorption occurs in the rodent colon, and is favoured when microbially-fermentable carbohydrates (specifically resistant starch) are consumed, it is unclear whether this process occur in humans and/or to what degree. Constraints in study design in the few available studies may well have masked a possible colonic contribution to zinc nutrition. Furthermore these few available human studies have failed to include the actual target population that would benefit, namely infants affected by EE where zinc delivery to the colon may be increased and who are also at risk of zinc deficiency. In conducting this review we have not been able to confirm a colonic contribution to zinc absorption in humans. However, given the observations in rodents and that feeding resistant starch to children is feasible, definitive studies utilising the dual stable isotope method in children with EE should be undertaken. PMID:25594440

  15. Colonic diverticular disease. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Gargallo Puyuelo, Carla J; Sopeña, Federico; Lanas Arbeloa, Angel

    2015-12-01

    Diverticular disease represents the most common disease affecting the colon in the Western world. Most cases remain asymptomatic, but some others will have symptoms or develop complications. The aims of treatment in symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease are to prevent complications and reduce the frequency and intensity of symptoms. Fibre, probiotics, mesalazine, rifaximin and their combinations seem to be usually an effective therapy. In the uncomplicated diverticulitis, outpatient management is considered the optimal approach in the majority of patients, and oral antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment. Admission to hospital and intravenous antibiotic are recommended only when the patient is unable to intake food orally, affected by severe comorbidity or does not improve. However, inpatient management and intravenous antibiotics are necessary in complicated diverticulitis. The role of surgery is also changing. Most diverticulitis-associated abscesses can be treated with antibiotics and/or percutaneous drainage and emergency surgery is considered only in patients with acute peritonitis. Finally, patient related factors, and not the number of recurrences, play the most important role in selecting recipients of elective surgery to avoid recurrences. PMID:25979437

  16. Forever competent: deep-sea bivalves are colonized by their chemosynthetic symbionts throughout their lifetime.

    PubMed

    Wentrup, Cecilia; Wendeberg, Annelie; Schimak, Mario; Borowski, Christian; Dubilier, Nicole

    2014-12-01

    Symbiotic bivalves at hydrothermal vents and cold seeps host chemosynthetic bacteria intracellularly in gill cells. In bivalves, the gills grow continuously throughout their lifetime by forming new filaments. We examined how newly developed gill tissues are colonized in bivalves with horizontal and vertical symbiont transmission (Bathymodiolus mussels versus a vesicoymid clam) using fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy. Symbiont colonization was similar in mussels and clams and was independent of the transmission modes. Symbionts were absent in the growth zones of the gills, indicating that symbionts colonize newly formed gill filaments de novo after they are formed and that gill colonization is a continuous process throughout the host's lifetime. Symbiont abundance and distribution suggested that colonization is shaped by the developmental stage of host cells. Self-infection, in which new gill cells are colonized by symbionts from ontogenetically older gill tissues, may also play a role. In mussels, symbiont infection led to changes in gill cell structure similar to those described from other epithelial cells infected by intracellular pathogens, such as the loss of microvilli. A better understanding of the factors that affect symbiont colonization of bivalve gills could provide new insights into interactions between intracellular bacteria and epithelial tissues. PMID:25142549

  17. [Measures to anatomic variations of the colonic vessels in laparoscopic operations].

    PubMed

    Pan, Kai

    2013-10-01

    In laparoscopic colorectal resection, the poor blood supply of the anastomosis after tumor excision is difficult to be determined during the operations sometimes. The change in blood supply of the bowel is mainly due to the mesenteric anatomy and the operative techniques. The direct blood supply of colon is the marginal vessels in the mesentery. The integrity and patency of the marginal vessels determine the vitality of the bowel. However, the marginal vessels are different in diameter, pulsation or even discontinue in various areas, affecting the excision of the colon and following anastomosis. The most common three dangerous areas to anastomosis include:(1)area between ileocolic artery and right colonic artery; (2)area between middle colonic artery and left colonic artery-the Griffiths point. (3)area between the terminal branch of sigmoid colonic artery and superior rectal artery-Sudeck dangerous area. In laparoscopic colorectal resection, one should pay attention to protect the blood supply of the bowel and the marginal blood vessels, and be vigilant to the three vascular variations above mentioned. The vessels should be ligated accurately to ensure sufficient blood supply to the anastomosis and consequent normal healing of the rectal and colonic anastomosis. More attention should be paid to the elderly, morbid, and diabetic patients. If the safety of the anastomosis is unsure, prophylactic ileostomy should be performed. PMID:24158864

  18. Identification of bladder and colon afferents in the nodose ganglia of male rats.

    PubMed

    Herrity, April N; Rau, Kristofer K; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Stirling, David P; Hubscher, Charles H

    2014-11-01

    The sensory neurons innervating the urinary bladder and distal colon project to similar regions of the central nervous system and often are affected simultaneously by various diseases and disorders, including spinal cord injury. Anatomical and physiological commonalities between the two organs involve the participation of shared spinally derived pathways, allowing mechanisms of communication between the bladder and colon. Prior electrophysiological data from our laboratory suggest that the bladder also may receive sensory innervation from a nonspinal source through the vagus nerve, which innervates the distal colon as well. The present study therefore aimed to determine whether anatomical evidence exists for vagal innervation of the male rat urinary bladder and to assess whether those vagal afferents also innervate the colon. Additionally, the relative contribution to bladder and colon sensory innervation of spinal and vagal sources was determined. By using lipophilic tracers, neurons that innervated the bladder and colon in both the nodose ganglia (NG) and L6/S1 and L1/L2 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were quantified. Some single vagal and spinal neurons provided dual innervation to both organs. The proportions of NG afferents labeled from the bladder did not differ from spinal afferents labeled from the bladder when considering the collective population of total neurons from either group. Our results demonstrate evidence for vagal innervation of the bladder and colon and suggest that dichotomizing vagal afferents may provide a neural mechanism for cross-talk between the organs. PMID:24845615

  19. Polymers for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, H.; Sharma, P.; Sharma, S.; Bhandari, A.

    2010-01-01

    The colon targeted drug delivery has a number of important implications in the field of pharmacotherapy. Oral colon targeted drug delivery systems have recently gained importance for delivering a variety of therapeutic agents for both local and systemic administration. Targeting of drugs to the colon via oral administration protect the drug from degradation or release in the stomach and small intestine. It also ensures abrupt or controlled release of the drug in the proximal colon. Various drug delivery systems have been designed that deliver the drug quantitatively to the colon and then trigger the release of drug. This review will cover different types of polymers which can be used in formulation of colon targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:21969739

  20. Historical and Current Trends in Colon Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Causey, Marlin Wayne; Rivadeneira, David E.; Steele, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    The authors discuss the evolution of the evaluation and management of colonic trauma, as well as the debate regarding primary repair versus fecal diversion. Their evidence-based review covers diagnosis, management, surgical approaches, and perioperative care of patients with colon-related trauma. The management of traumatic colon injuries has evolved significantly over the past 50 years; here the authors describe a practical approach to the treatment and management of traumatic injuries to the colon based on the most current research. However, management of traumatic colon injuries remains a challenge and continues to be associated with significant morbidity. Familiarity with the different methods to the approach and management of colonic injuries will allow surgeons to minimize unnecessary complications and mortality. PMID:24294119

  1. The colon: Absorptive, seccretory and metabolic functions.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J G

    1975-01-01

    The role which the human colon fulfils in digestion and metabolism remains largely undocumented. Its capacity to conserve water and electrolytes is well known although how this is controlled is uncertain. In the animal kingdom, calcium and magnesium absorption from the colon are improtant as are absorption and synthesis of vitamins. The abundant microflora of the human colon gives it unique properties. Dietary residue is metabolised forming short-chain fatty acids, hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane; whilst 20% of urea synthesised in man is broken down in the colon to ammonia, which is reabsorbed, and carbonic acid. The microflora also degrades a wide variety of organic compounds including food additives, drugs, bile salts, and cholesterol which may be relevant to the development of colon cancer. Regional differences in colonic function also exist making interpretation of data from this relatively inaccessible organ more difficult. PMID:1205009

  2. Tubular Colonic Duplication Presenting as Rectovestibular Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Bendre, Pradnya; D'souza, Flavia; Ramchandra, Mukunda; Nage, Amol; Palse, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Complete colonic duplication is a very rare congenital anomaly that may have different presentations according to its location and size. Complete colonic duplication can occur in about 15% of all gastrointestinal duplications. Double termination of tubular colonic duplication in the perineum is even more uncommon. We present a case of a Y-shaped tubular colonic duplication which presented with a rectovestibular fistula and a normal anus. Radiological evaluation and initial exploration for sigmoidostomy revealed duplicated colons with a common vascular supply. Endorectal mucosal resection of theduplicated distal segment till the colostomy site with division of the septum of the proximal segment and colostomy closure proved curative without compromise of the continence mechanism. Tubular colonic duplication should always be ruled out when a diagnosis of perineal canal is considered in cases of vestibular fistula alongwith a normal anus. PMID:26473141

  3. Tubular Colonic Duplication Presenting as Rectovestibular Fistula.

    PubMed

    Karkera, Parag J; Bendre, Pradnya; D'souza, Flavia; Ramchandra, Mukunda; Nage, Amol; Palse, Nitin

    2015-09-01

    Complete colonic duplication is a very rare congenital anomaly that may have different presentations according to its location and size. Complete colonic duplication can occur in about 15% of all gastrointestinal duplications. Double termination of tubular colonic duplication in the perineum is even more uncommon. We present a case of a Y-shaped tubular colonic duplication which presented with a rectovestibular fistula and a normal anus. Radiological evaluation and initial exploration for sigmoidostomy revealed duplicated colons with a common vascular supply. Endorectal mucosal resection of theduplicated distal segment till the colostomy site with division of the septum of the proximal segment and colostomy closure proved curative without compromise of the continence mechanism. Tubular colonic duplication should always be ruled out when a diagnosis of perineal canal is considered in cases of vestibular fistula alongwith a normal anus. PMID:26473141

  4. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Alexandra T; Clayton, Steven B; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD. PMID:27144209

  5. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Steven B.; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD. PMID:27144209

  6. Patch quality and context, but not patch number, drive multi-scale colonization dynamics in experimental aquatic landscapes.

    PubMed

    Resetarits, William J; Binckley, Christopher A

    2013-11-01

    Colonization and extinction are primary drivers of local population dynamics, community structure, and spatial patterns of biological diversity. Existing paradigms of island biogeography, metapopulation biology, and metacommunity ecology, as well as habitat management and conservation biology based on those paradigms, emphasize patch size, number, and isolation as primary characteristics influencing colonization and extinction. Habitat selection theory suggests that patch quality could rival size, number, and isolation in determining rates of colonization and resulting community structure. We used naturally colonized experimental landscapes to address four issues: (a) how do colonizing aquatic beetles respond to variation in patch number, (b) how do they respond to variation in patch quality, (c) does patch context affect colonization dynamics, and (d) at what spatial scales do beetles respond to habitat variation? Increasing patch number had no effect on per patch colonization rates, while patch quality and context were critical in determining colonization rates and resulting patterns of abundance and species richness at multiple spatial scales. We graphically illustrate how variation in immigration rates driven by perceived predation risk (habitat quality) can further modify dynamics of the equilibrium theory of island biogeography beyond predator-driven effects on extinction rates. Our data support the importance of patch quality and context as primary determinants of colonization rate, occupancy, abundance, and resulting patterns of species richness, and reinforce the idea that management of metapopulations for species preservation, and metacommunities for local and regional diversity, should incorporate habitat quality into the predictive equation. PMID:23609801

  7. Electrosprayed inulin microparticles for microbiota triggered targeting of colon.

    PubMed

    Jain, Arvind K; Sood, Vishesh; Bora, Meghali; Vasita, Rajesh; Katti, Dhirendra S

    2014-11-01

    Inulin, a naturally occurring polysaccharide, was acetylated to make it processable by electrospraying, a facile and single step method for microparticle fabrication. Electrospraying process parameters were optimized for fabrication of spherical and monodisperse indomethacin (IDM) loaded inulin acetate (INA) microparticles. The apparent entrapment efficiency of IDM was determined to be 100%, whereas working encapsulation efficiency was estimated to be 35.39 ± 1.63%. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed molecular dispersion of IDM in an amorphous state within the INA matrix. Finally, the results from in vitro release study performed in simulated gastro-intestinal fluids demonstrated that IDM was released only in simulated colonic fluid that contained inulinase. Therefore, this study demonstrates that acetylation of inulin does not alter its susceptibility to inulinase and that microparticles fabricated from INA can be developed as a colon targeting drug delivery system. PMID:25129739

  8. Contrasting preferences of arbuscular mycorrhizal and dark septate fungi colonizing boreal and subarctic Avenella flexuosa.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, M; Raveala, K; Wäli, P R; Ruotsalainen, A L

    2014-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and dark septate endophytic (DSE) fungi are ubiquitous in grass roots, but their colonizations may vary according to latitudinal gradient and site conditions. We investigated how vegetation zone (boreal vs. subarctic), humus thickness, and site openness affect root fungal colonizations of the grass Avenella flexuosa. More precisely, we hypothesized that AM and DSE fungal colonizations would have different responses to environmental conditions such that AM fungi could be more common in boreal zone, whereas we expected DSE fungi to be more affected by the amount of humus. We found site openness to affect AM and DSE fungi in a contrasting manner, in interaction with the vegetation zone. AM colonization was high at open coastal dunes, whereas DSE fungi were more common at forested sites, in the boreal zone. Humus thickness affected AM fungi negatively and DSE fungi positively. To conclude, the observed AM and DSE fungal colonization patterns were largely contrasting. AM fungi were favored in seashore conditions characterized by thin humus layer, whereas DSE fungi were favored in conditions of higher humus availability. PMID:24061928

  9. Chicken Caecal Microbiome Modifications Induced by Campylobacter jejuni Colonization and by a Non-Antibiotic Feed Additive

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeau, Alexandre; Fravalo, Philippe; Yergeau, Étienne; Arsenault, Julie; Lahaye, Ludovic; Letellier, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important zoonotic foodborne pathogen causing acute gastroenteritis in humans. Chickens are often colonized at very high numbers by C. jejuni, up to 109 CFU per gram of caecal content, with no detrimental effects on their health. Farm control strategies are being developed to lower the C. jejuni contamination of chicken food products in an effort to reduce human campylobacteriosis incidence. It is believed that intestinal microbiome composition may affect gut colonization by such undesirable bacteria but, although the chicken microbiome is being increasingly characterized, information is lacking on the factors affecting its modulation, especially by foodborne pathogens. This study monitored the effects of C. jejuni chicken caecal colonization on the chicken microbiome in healthy chickens. It also evaluated the capacity of a feed additive to affect caecal bacterial populations and to lower C. jejuni colonization. From day-0, chickens received or not a microencapsulated feed additive and were inoculated or not with C. jejuni at 14 days of age. Fresh caecal content was harvested at 35 days of age. The caecal microbiome was characterized by real time quantitative PCR and Ion Torrent sequencing. We observed that the feed additive lowered C. jejuni caecal count by 0.7 log (p<0.05). Alpha-diversity of the caecal microbiome was not affected by C. jejuni colonization or by the feed additive. C. jejuni colonization modified the caecal beta-diversity while the feed additive did not. We observed that C. jejuni colonization was associated with an increase of Bifidobacterium and affected Clostridia and Mollicutes relative abundances. The feed additive was associated with a lower Streptococcus relative abundance. The caecal microbiome remained relatively unchanged despite high C. jejuni colonization. The feed additive was efficient in lowering C. jejuni colonization while not disturbing the caecal microbiome. PMID:26161743

  10. Treatment of Colonic Injury During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Colonic injury during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) persists despite the advances in technical equipment and interventional radiology techniques. According to the Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications, colonic injury is regarded as a stage IVa complication. Currently, the rate of colonic injury ranges between 0.3% and 0.5%, with an unremarkable difference in incidence between supine and prone PCNL procedures. Colon injury is the most significant complication of PCNL. Colonic injury can result in more complicated open exploration of the abdomen, involving colostomy construction. The necessity of a second operation for the closure of the colostomy causes financial and emotional burden on the patients, patients’ relatives, and surgeons. Currently, the majority of colonic injuries occurring during PCNL are retroperitoneal. The primary treatment option is a conservative approach. It must be kept in mind that the time of diagnosis is as important as the diagnosis itself in colonic injury. Surgeons performing PCNL are advised to be conservative when considering exploratory laparotomy and colostomy construction during treatment of colonic injury. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who underwent left prone PCNL that resulted in retroperitoneal colonic injury, along with a review of the current literature. PMID:26543436

  11. Developmental pathways in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Fred E.; Angus, C. William; Partis, William J.; Sigounas, George

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of cancer is reactivation/alteration of pathways that control cellular differentiation during developmental processes. Evidence indicates that WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways have a role in normal epithelial cell differentiation, and that alterations in these pathways accompany establishment of the tumorigenic state. Interestingly, there is recent evidence that these pathways are intertwined at the molecular level, and these nodes of intersection may provide opportunities for effective targeted therapies. This review will highlight the role of the WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways in colon cancer. PMID:23032367

  12. Milk skimming, heating, acidification, lysozyme, and rennet affect the pattern, repeatability, and predictability of milk coagulation properties and of curd-firming model parameters: A case study of Grana Padano.

    PubMed

    Stocco, G; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A; Calamari, L; Bittante, G

    2015-08-01

    Milk coagulation properties are used to evaluate the cheesemaking aptitude of milk samples. No international standard procedure exists, although laboratories often mimic the production of a full-fat fresh cheese for milk coagulation properties. Questions have arisen about the predictability of such a procedure for different types of cheese production. The aim of this study was to establish a procedure mimicking the production conditions of a long-ripened hard cheese, taking Protected Designation of Origin Grana Padano as a case study. With respect to the traditional conditions (standard procedure; SP), the Grana Padano procedure (GP) modifications were the use of standardized milk, coagulation lower temperature, previous milk acidification, lysozyme addition, and rennet type. Each modification was tested in turn versus the SP and also all together in the GP. Another 3 tests were carried out: SP on naturally creamed milk, SP with double the quantity of rennet, and a simplified GP on a full-fat milk sample. The 10 procedures were tested on 2 subsamples with 2 replicates each and were repeated using individual milk samples from 15 dual-purpose Simmental cows in 4 sessions for a total of 600 tests. Two Formagraph instruments (Foss Electric A/S, Hillerød, Denmark) measuring curd firmness every 15 s were used, prolonging test duration to 60min to obtain 5 traditional single-point milk coagulation properties and 3 parameters of the curd firming model using all 240 points recorded for each replicate. The 8 traits of each replicate were analyzed according to a mixed model with fixed effects of 4 sessions, 10 treatments, 2 instruments, and 16microvats, and random effects of 15 animals and 300 subsamples. Compared with the SP, the coagulation and curd firming was slowed by low temperature and was accelerated by acidification and by adding a double amount of rennet; natural creaming, fat standardization, and rennet with 5% pepsin affected only some traits, whereas lysozyme

  13. Effects of chronic dietary beer and ethanol consumption on experimental colonic carcinogenesis by azoxymethane in rats.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, S R; Hyland, J; McAvinchey, D; Chaudhry, Y; Hartka, L; Kim, H T; Cichon, P; Floyd, J; Turjman, N; Kessie, G

    1987-03-15

    beverage constituents; tumorigenesis in the right and left colon was affected differentially by the levels of alcohol consumption, reflecting complex interactions among the potential mechanisms for alcohol effects in the model used. PMID:3815356

  14. Dietary exposure to soy or whey proteins alters colonic global gene expression profiles during rat colon tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rijin; Badger, Thomas M; Simmen, Frank A

    2005-01-01

    Background We previously reported that lifetime consumption of soy proteins or whey proteins reduced the incidence of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon tumors in rats. To obtain insights into these effects, global gene expression profiles of colons from rats with lifetime ingestion of casein (CAS, control diet), soy protein isolate (SPI), and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) diets were determined. Results Male Sprague Dawley rats, fed one of the three purified diets, were studied at 40 weeks after AOM injection and when tumors had developed in some animals of each group. Total RNA, purified from non-tumor tissue within the proximal half of each colon, was used to prepare biotinylated probes, which were hybridized to Affymetrix RG_U34A rat microarrays containing probes sets for 8799 rat genes. Microarray data were analyzed using DMT (Affymetrix), SAM (Stanford) and pair-wise comparisons. Differentially expressed genes (SPI and/or WPH vs. CAS) were found. We identified 31 induced and 49 repressed genes in the proximal colons of the SPI-fed group and 44 induced and 119 repressed genes in the proximal colons of the WPH-fed group, relative to CAS. Hierarchical clustering identified the co-induction or co-repression of multiple genes by SPI and WPH. The differential expression of I-FABP (2.92-, 3.97-fold down-regulated in SPI and WPH fed rats; P = 0.023, P = 0.01, respectively), cyclin D1 (1.61-, 2.42-fold down-regulated in SPI and WPH fed rats; P = 0.033, P = 0.001, respectively), and the c-neu proto-oncogene (2.46-, 4.10-fold down-regulated in SPI and WPH fed rats; P < 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively) mRNAs were confirmed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. SPI and WPH affected colonic neuro-endocrine gene expression: peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon mRNAs were down-regulated in WPH fed rats, whereas somatostatin mRNA and corresponding circulating protein levels, were enhanced by SPI and WPH. Conclusions The identification of transcripts co- or differentially-regulated by SPI

  15. Shogaol overcomes TRAIL resistance in colon cancer cells via inhibiting of survivin.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Soon; Lee, Hai-Chon; Oh, Sang Cheul; Lee, Dae-Hee; Kwon, Ki Han

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we showed the ability of representative shogaol, which as a major component of ginger, to overcome TRAIL resistance by increasing apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Shogaol increased death receptor 5 (DR5) levels. Furthermore, shogaol decreased the expression level of antiapoptotic proteins (survivin and Bcl-2) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax. Shogaol treatment induced apoptosis and a robust reduction in the levels of the antiapoptotic protein survivin but did not affect the levels of many other apoptosis regulators. Moreover, knockdown of survivin sensitized colon cancer cells to resistant of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Therefore, we showed the functions of shogaol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant colon cancer cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying shogaol as an antitumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant colon tumor therapy. PMID:26063410

  16. Classification of Colon Cancer Patients Based on the Methylation Patterns of Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wonyoung; Lee, Jungwoo; Lee, Jin-Young; Lee, Sun-Min; Kim, Da-Won

    2016-01-01

    Diverse somatic mutations have been reported to serve as cancer drivers. Recently, it has also been reported that epigenetic regulation is closely related to cancer development. However, the effect of epigenetic changes on cancer is still elusive. In this study, we analyzed DNA methylation data on colon cancer taken from The Caner Genome Atlas. We found that several promoters were significantly hypermethylated in colon cancer patients. Through clustering analysis of differentially methylated DNA regions, we were able to define subgroups of patients and observed clinical features associated with each subgroup. In addition, we analyzed the functional ontology of aberrantly methylated genes and identified the G-protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway as one of the major pathways affected epigenetically. In conclusion, our analysis shows the possibility of characterizing the clinical features of colon cancer subgroups based on DNA methylation patterns and provides lists of important genes and pathways possibly involved in colon cancer development. PMID:27445647

  17. Oxytocin decreases colonic motility of cold water stressed rats via oxytocin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao; Xi, Tao-Fang; Li, Yu-Xian; Wang, Hai-Hong; Qin, Ying; Zhang, Jie-Ping; Cai, Wen-Ting; Huang, Meng-Ting; Shen, Ji-Qiao; Fan, Xi-Min; Shi, Xuan-Zheng; Xie, Dong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether cold water intake into the stomach affects colonic motility and the involvement of the oxytocin-oxytocin receptor pathway in rats. METHODS: Female Sprague Dawley rats were used and some of them were ovariectomized. The rats were subjected to gastric instillation with cold (0-4 °C, cold group) or room temperature (20-25 °C, control group) saline for 14 consecutive days. Colon transit was determined with a bead inserted into the colon. Colonic longitudinal muscle strips were prepared to investigate the response to oxytocin in vitro. Plasma concentration of oxytocin was detected by ELISA. Oxytocin receptor expression was investigated by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry was used to locate oxytocin receptors. RESULTS: Colon transit was slower in the cold group than in the control group (P < 0.05). Colonic smooth muscle contractile response to oxytocin decreased, and the inhibitory effect of oxytocin on muscle contractility was enhanced by cold water intake (0.69 ± 0.08 vs 0.88 ± 0.16, P < 0.05). Atosiban and tetrodotoxin inhibited the effect of oxytocin on colonic motility. Oxytocin receptors were located in the myenteric plexus, and their expression was up-regulated in the cold group (P < 0.05). Cold water intake increased blood concentration of oxytocin, but this effect was attenuated in ovariectomized rats (286.99 ± 83.72 pg/mL vs 100.56 ± 92.71 pg/mL, P < 0.05). However, in ovariectomized rats, estradiol treatment increased blood oxytocin, and the response of colonic muscle strips to oxytocin was attenuated. CONCLUSION: Cold water intake inhibits colonic motility partially through oxytocin-oxytocin receptor signaling in the myenteric nervous system pathway, which is estrogen dependent. PMID:25152590

  18. Genetic Control of Plant Root Colonization by the Biocontrol agent, Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Benjamin J.; Fletcher, Meghan; Waters, Jordan; Wetmore, Kelly; Blow, Matthew J.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Dangl, Jeffry L.; Visel, Axel

    2015-03-19

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are a critical component of plant root ecosystems. PGPR promote plant growth by solubilizing inaccessible minerals, suppressing pathogenic microorganisms in the soil, and directly stimulating growth through hormone synthesis. Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-established PGPR isolated from wheat roots that can also colonize the root system of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We have created barcoded transposon insertion mutant libraries suitable for genome-wide transposon-mediated mutagenesis followed by sequencing (TnSeq). These libraries consist of over 105 independent insertions, collectively providing loss-of-function mutants for nearly all genes in the P.fluorescens genome. Each insertion mutant can be unambiguously identified by a randomized 20 nucleotide sequence (barcode) engineered into the transposon sequence. We used these libraries in a gnotobiotic assay to examine the colonization ability of P.fluorescens on A.thaliana roots. Taking advantage of the ability to distinguish individual colonization events using barcode sequences, we assessed the timing and microbial concentration dependence of colonization of the rhizoplane niche. These data provide direct insight into the dynamics of plant root colonization in an in vivo system and define baseline parameters for the systematic identification of the bacterial genes and molecular pathways using TnSeq assays. Having determined parameters that facilitate potential colonization of roots by thousands of independent insertion mutants in a single assay, we are currently establishing a genome-wide functional map of genes required for root colonization in P.fluorescens. Importantly, the approach developed and optimized here for P.fluorescens>A.thaliana colonization will be applicable to a wide range of plant-microbe interactions, including biofuel feedstock plants and microbes known or hypothesized to impact on biofuel-relevant traits including biomass productivity

  19. [Serpins in hyperplastic colon tissue].

    PubMed

    Kit, O I; Frantsiiants, E M; Kozlova, L S; Terpugov, A L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to define α-2-macroglobulin (α-2M) and α-1-proteinase inhibitor (α-1PI) in tissues of malignant tumors and polyps of the lower parts of the colon. 28 patients had malignant tumors of the sigmoid colon or rectum (T3N0-1M0-2), 29 had polyps of the same location. Content of α-2M and α-1PI was studied in cytosols of the central, peripheral and conditionally healthy tissues (of resection line) of the mentioned hyperplasias by the ELISA method using standard test kits. Suppression of a-2M and increase of α-1PI (perifocal zone) were found in malignant tumor tissue, as well as α-1PI maintenance in tumorous focus. Increase of α-2M and decrease of α-1PI were detected in polyp tissue. Changes in physiological balance of serpins were assessed by α-1PI/α-2M ratio in comparison with the resection line. The risk of distortion of proliferation and differentiation processes increases in polyps in ineffective inhibition of proteolysis under the influence of released factors of malignancy. Endogenous or medicamentous restoration of balance of interaction of trypsin-like proteases and kallikrein with inhibitors will probably play the crucial role. PMID:25911925

  20. [Irritable colon and psychosomatic disease].

    PubMed

    Morini, A; Mauceri, P; Pallotta, P; Pelliccia, G

    1984-08-25

    The authors, after having considered the close likeness between the collateral clinical picture described by others in regard to the irritable colon syndrome and the outstanding one pointed out by them in many cases of psychosomatic disorders, have analyzed again a large number of personal cases diagnosed as "psychosomatic" in order to find possible relations between these two unwholesome conditions. At the end of their examination, after having ascertained that the "Irritable colon" has not to be considered an isolated disease but a syndrome caused by many factors, hinged on a predisposing condition likely of constitutional nature, the authors remark how it may nest in the folds of a psychosomatic disorder and sometimes be its outbreaking feature. The authors by this way, don't want to conclude identifying the I.C. with a psychosomatic disorder and suggest that in such cases one may take this syndrome as the main manifestation of a condition marked by an impairment of the digestive tract motility inside a psychosomatic disorder with a somatic expression of this apparatus. PMID:6483246

  1. Interaction between plants and bacteria: glucosinolates and phyllospheric colonization of cruciferous vegetables by Enterobacter radicincitans DSM 16656.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Monika; Krumbein, Angelika; Ruppel, Silke

    2009-01-01

    For determining interactive plant-bacterial effects between glucosinolates and phyllospheric colonization by a plant growth-promoting strain, Enterobacter radicincitans DSM 16656, in cruciferous vegetables, the extent of bacterial colonization was assessed in 5 cruciferous vegetables (Brassica juncea, Brassica campestris, Brassica oleracea var. capitata, Brassica rapa var. alboglabra, Nasturtium officinale) using a species-specific TaqMan probe and quantitative real-time PCR. Colonization ability of inoculated E. radicincitans in the phyllosphere of these species varied from inability to colonize B. rapa up to a very good colonization rate of B. campestris. In addition to morphological factors and other plant compounds, the colonization rate was affected by different individual aromatic and aliphatic glucosinolates and their concentration, revealing that both plant pathogens and plant growth-promoting bacteria were affected by glucosinolates in their colonization behavior. In contrast, after E. radicincitans inoculation neither the total nor the individual glucosinolate concentrations in the phyllosphere of the 5 cruciferous species were affected, indicating that the nonpathogenic E. radicincitans might cause only poor cell damage by metabolizing plant cell components and does not induce a plant defense response and thus subsequently an increased glucosinolate concentration in the phyllosphere. Moreover, E. radicincitans induced no stimulation of indole glucosinolate biosynthesis by additional bacterial auxin supply. PMID:19556746

  2. Regular Doctor Visits Can Help Spot Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159699.html Regular Doctor Visits Can Help Spot Colon Cancer Early detection improves likelihood of survival, researchers ... increases the odds you'll be screened for colon cancer, a new study says. Colon cancer is ...

  3. Giant diverticulum of the sigmoid colon.

    PubMed

    García Flórez, L J; Otero Diez, J; López Muñiz, C; Santamaría Girón, L; Pérez Suárez, A

    2002-12-01

    The giant colonic diverticulum is a very rare clinical entity usually located in the sigmoid colon of elderly patients. A case of an 87-year-old woman recently treated in our hospital is reported hereinafter. The patient was non-surgically treated due to her advanced age and high surgical risk. PMID:12733335

  4. Incidence of retrorenal colon during percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Balasar, Mehmet; Kandemir, Abdülkadir; Poyraz, Necdet; Unal, Yunus; Ozturk, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate retrorenal colon incidence in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) interventions made in our clinic. Materials and Methods Clinical data of 804 PNL patients, accumulated over a 7 year period (2006-2012), was surveyed. The patient files were reviewed retrospectively, and only those who had abdominal computed tomography (CT) images before PNL intervention were included in the study. In the CT images, the position of both the ascending and descending colon in relation to the right and left kidneys were evaluated. Results According to our hospital reports, 394 patients with CT images were included in the present study 27 patients (6.9%) had retrorenal colon, of which 18 (4.6%) were on the left side, 4 (1.0%) on the right side and 5 (1.3%) had bilateral retrorenal colons. Colonic perforation complication was seen only in two patients and the colonic perforation rate was 0.3%. These two cases had no CT images. Conclusions PNL, in the process of becoming the standard treatment modality, is a safe and reliable technique for renal stone treatment. Colonic injury should be taken into consideration during PNL interventions of the lower pole of the kidney (especially on the left side) due to the location of retrorenal colon. PMID:26005968

  5. Analysis of the depolarizing properties of normal and adenomatous polyps in colon mucosa for the early diagnosis of precancerous lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; de Cos-Pérez, Jesús; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-09-01

    Optical characterization of biological tissues by means of polarimetric techniques is an area of growing interest. Polarized light can be used for malignant neoplasms detection. To our knowledge, few studies have so far focused on lesions that are prone to result in cancer. In this work we present a polarimetric study of depolarization in prepathological tissues. Specifically, we will focus on premalignant lesions in human colon due to their clinical relevance. Colonic adenoma, the potential precursor of malignant adenocarcinoma, provokes significant structural modifications in colon mucosa that affect light depolarization. The depolarizing properties of normal and adenomatous polyps mucosa are compared. The average linear degree of polarization is shown to present a strong dependence with the precancerous state of the colonic tissue. This method has the potential to enable an early diagnosis of colon cancer.

  6. Proteases of an early colonizer can hinder Streptococcus mutans colonization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, B-Y; Deutch, A; Hong, J; Kuramitsu, H K

    2011-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary cariogen that produces several virulence factors that are modulated by a competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) signaling system. In this study, we sought to determine if proteases produced by early dental plaque colonizers such as Streptococcus gordonii interfere with the subsequent colonization of S. mutans BM71 on the existing streptococcal biofilms. We demonstrated that S. mutans BM71 colonized much less efficiently in vitro on streptococcal biofilms than on Actinomyces naeslundii biofilms. Several oral streptococci, relative to A. naeslundii, produced proteases that inactivated the S. mutans CSP. We further demonstrated that cell protein extracts from S. gordonii, but not from A. naeslundii, interfered with S. mutans BM71 colonization. In addition, S. mutans BM71 colonized more efficiently on the sgc protease knockout mutant of S. gordonii than on the parent biofilms. In conclusion, proteases of early colonizers can interfere with subsequent colonization by S. mutans in vitro. PMID:21088146

  7. Calcite Precipitation at an Arctic Geothermal Spring Leads to Endolith Colonization and Ecological Succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, V.; Fogel, M. L.; Steele, A.

    2012-12-01

    A critical question in microbial ecology concerns how environmental conditions affect community makeup. Troll Springs, a geothermal spring at 79°23'N, 13°26'E on Svalbard in the high Arctic, provides an opportunity to study microbial communities and succession along steep environmental gradients that impose strong selective pressures. At Troll, warm water is released into cold, dry climate conditions. Precipitation of calcite from the spring's waters has built terraces that host a range of microbial communities. Microorganisms exist in warm water as periphyton, in moist granular materials, and in cold, dry rock as endoliths. Troll therefore has two distinct ecosystems, aquatic and terrestrial, in close proximity, with different underlying environmental factors shaping their microbial communities. We use microscopic and phylogeny-based molecular methods to study microbial community makeup at Troll Springs. Periphyton are entrapped by precipitation of calcite, becoming precursors for endolithic communities. Much of the pore space originally occupied by periphyton becomes inhabited either by organisms that were already present in minor quantities in the periphyton, or by new organisms that colonized an environment for which they were well suited. This process differs from most endolith colonization, where rock predates the communities that colonize it. In the aquatic environments, the strongest dependence of community makeup is on pH and temperature, with gradual changes in community makeup along a pH/temperature gradient among the pools. Illumination (as limited by calcite precipitation) and thermal stability also appear to exert influence. In contrast, in the granular and endolithic terrestrial environments, where water is scarce and therefore exerts selective pressure, there is a strong relationship between community makeup and water content. The richness, evenness, and diversity of microbial taxa are all strongly correlated at Troll Springs. These parameters all

  8. Determination of optical properties of normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro using integrating sphere techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua-Jiang; Xing, Da; Lu, Jian-Jun; Gu, Huai-Min; Wu, Guo-Yong; Jin, Ying

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of the present study is to compare the optical properties of normal human colon mucosa/submucosa and muscle layer/chorion, and adenomatous human colon mucosa/submucosa and muscle layer/chorion in vitro at 476.5, 488, 496.5, 514.5 and 532 nm. We believe these differences in optical properties should help differential diagnosis of human colon tissues by using optical methods. METHODS: In vitro optical properties were investigated for four kinds of tissues: normal human colon mucosa/submucosa and muscle layer/chorion, and adenomatous human colon mucosa/submucosa and muscle layer/chorion. Tissue samples were taken from 13 human colons (13 adenomatous, 13 normal). From the normal human colons a total of 26 tissue samples, with a mean thickness of 0.40 mm, were used (13 from mucosa/submucosa and 13 from muscle layer/chorion), and from the adenomatous human bladders a total of 26 tissue samples, with a mean thickness of 0.40 mm, were used (13 from mucosa/submucosa and 13 from muscle layer/chorion). The measurements were performed using a double-integrating-sphere setup and the optical properties were assessed from these measurements using the adding-doubling method that was considered reliable. RESULTS: The results of measurement showed that there were significant differences in the absorption coefficients and scattering coefficients between normal and adenomatous human colon mucosa/submucosa at the same wavelength, and there were also significant differences in the two optical parameters between both colon muscle layer/chorion at the same wavelength. And there were large differences in the anisotropy factors between both colon mucosa/submucosa at the same wavelength, there were also large differences in the anisotropy factors between both colon muscle layer/chorion at the same wavelength. There were large differences in the value ranges of the absorption coefficients, scattering coefficients and anisotropy factors between both colon mucosa/submucosa, and

  9. Maternal Antibiotic-Induced Early Changes in Microbial Colonization Selectively Modulate Colonic Permeability and Inducible Heat Shock Proteins, and Digesta Concentrations of Alkaline Phosphatase and TLR-Stimulants in Swine Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Arnal, Marie-Edith; Zhang, Jing; Erridge, Clett; Smidt, Hauke; Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Elevated intake of high energy diets is a risk factor for the development of metabolic diseases and obesity. High fat diets cause alterations in colonic microbiota composition and increase gut permeability to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and subsequent low-grade chronic inflammation in mice. Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases are increasing worldwide and may involve alterations in microbiota-host dialog. Metabolic disorders appearing in later life are also suspected to reflect changes in early programming. However, how the latter affects the colon remains poorly studied. Here, we hypothesized that various components of colonic physiology, including permeability, ion exchange and protective inducible heat shock proteins (HSP) are influenced in the short- and long-terms by early disturbances in microbial colonization. The hypothesis was tested in a swine model. Offspring were born to control mothers (n = 12) or mothers treated with the antibiotic (ATB) amoxicillin around parturition (n = 11). Offspring were slaughtered between 14 and 42 days of age to study short-term effects. For long-term effects, young adult offspring from the same litters consumed a normal or a palm oil-enriched diet for 4 weeks between 140 and 169 days of age. ATB treatment transiently modified maternal fecal microbiota although the minor differences observed for offspring colonic microbiota were nonsignificant. In the short-term, consistently higher HSP27 and HSP70 levels and transiently increased horseradish peroxidase permeability in ATB offspring colon were observed. Importantly, long-term consequences included reduced colonic horseradish peroxidase permeability, and increased colonic digesta alkaline phosphatase (AP) and TLR2- and TLR4-stimulant concentrations in rectal digesta in adult ATB offspring. Inducible HSP27 and HSP70 did not change. Interactions between early ATB treatment and later diet were noted for paracellular permeability and concentrations of colonic digesta AP. In

  10. Human small intestinal and colonic tissue mounted in the Ussing chamber as a tool for characterizing the intestinal absorption of drugs.

    PubMed

    Rozehnal, Veronika; Nakai, Daisuke; Hoepner, Ursula; Fischer, Thomas; Kamiyama, Emi; Takahashi, Masayuki; Yasuda, Satoru; Mueller, Juergen

    2012-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to validate human small intestinal and colonic tissue mounted in the Ussing chamber as a tool for predicting the oral drug absorption in humans with the main focus on moderately and poorly permeable compounds. The obtained apparent permeability coefficient (P(app)) of eleven test compounds was compared to their fraction absorbed (Fa) in humans taken from the literature. Beside the conventional P(app) a new parameter, the apparent permeability coefficient total (P(app,total)), involving both the apical-to-basolateral permeability and the time-dependent compound accumulation in the tissue was established. The permeability of lucifer yellow (LY), a fluorescent marker of the paracellular pathway and the test compounds showed no obvious differences between small intestine and colon. Furthermore, small intestinal and colonic tissue from a single donor showed similar permeability of both LY and a transcellularly transported compound metoprolol. All test compounds including low molecular weight hydrophilic compounds such as metformin, atenolol, sulpiride and famotidine showed adequate permeability reflecting human Fa values (R(2)=0.87). The P(app) values of digoxin, a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate, were not significantly affected by the addition of verapamil, a P-gp inhibitor. In contrast, the P(app,total) values of digoxin increased approximately threefold in the presence of verapamil. In conclusion, both small intestinal and colonic tissue mounted in the Ussing chamber provide a good opportunity to predict the oral drug absorption rate in humans even for moderately and poorly absorbed compounds. The novel calculation of P(app,total) allows the study of the carrier-mediated drug-drug interactions in human intestine. PMID:22418036

  11. Colonization of volcanic deserts from productive patches.

    PubMed

    Del Moral, Roger; Eckert, Andrew J

    2005-01-01

    Dense vegetation can augment landscape biodiversity, promote recovery of surrounding ecosystems, and facilitate colonization. However, dispersal limits affect vegetation structure early in succession to a degree that is not widely appreciated. We studied two contrasting densely vegetated habitats located on Mount St. Helens to explore their effects on surrounding vegetation. We sampled refugia and adjacent barrens and compared them to a study conducted 5 yr earlier. We sampled isolated wetlands and their surroundings. Species richness, total cover, cover of most dispersal types, the information statistic (H'), and the complement of Simpson's Index (D) were negatively correlated with distance from the refugia up to 32 m. Compared to 1997, the 2002 transects had higher cover, and adjacent samples were more similar to one another. Dominance had shifted from wind-dispersed species to more persistent species with less effective dispersal mechanisms. The pattern of these results demonstrated that refugia were a major, but indirect source of recruitment for many species. The influence of wetlands on surrounding vegetation recovery was even more spatially localized. This study demonstrates that dispersal from surviving and rapidly recovered vegetation has been overemphasized as a mechanism for vegetation recovery. The effects of dense vegetation did not extend beyond 32 m in our studies, and local effects appear to diminish over time. PMID:21652381

  12. Microbes, Microbiota and Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Cynthia L.; Garrett, Wendy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Colorectal cancer (CRC) presents a considerable disease burden worldwide. The human colon is also an anatomical location with the largest number of microbes. It is natural therefore to anticipate a role for microbes, particularly bacteria, in colorectal carcinogenesis. The increasing accessibility of microbial meta’omics is fueling a surge in our understanding of the role that microbes and the microbiota play in CRC. In this review, we will discuss recent insights into contributions of the microbiota to CRC and explore conceptual frameworks for evaluating the role of microbes in cancer causation. We also highlight new findings on candidate CRC-potentiating species and current knowledge gaps. Finally, we explore the roles of microbial metabolism as it relates to bile acids, xenobiotics, and diet in the etiology and therapeutics of CRC. PMID:24629338

  13. Automated image-based colon cleansing for laxative-free CT colonography computer-aided polyp detection

    SciTech Connect

    Linguraru, Marius George; Panjwani, Neil; Fletcher, Joel G.; Summer, Ronald M.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for detecting colonic polyps at noncathartic computed tomography colonography (CTC) in conjunction with an automated image-based colon cleansing algorithm. Methods: An automated colon cleansing algorithm was designed to detect and subtract tagged-stool, accounting for heterogeneity and poor tagging, to be used in conjunction with a colon CAD system. The method is locally adaptive and combines intensity, shape, and texture analysis with probabilistic optimization. CTC data from cathartic-free bowel preparation were acquired for testing and training the parameters. Patients underwent various colonic preparations with barium or Gastroview in divided doses over 48 h before scanning. No laxatives were administered and no dietary modifications were required. Cases were selected from a polyp-enriched cohort and included scans in which at least 90% of the solid stool was visually estimated to be tagged and each colonic segment was distended in either the prone or supine view. The CAD system was run comparatively with and without the stool subtraction algorithm. Results: The dataset comprised 38 CTC scans from prone and/or supine scans of 19 patients containing 44 polyps larger than 10 mm (22 unique polyps, if matched between prone and supine scans). The results are robust on fine details around folds, thin-stool linings on the colonic wall, near polyps and in large fluid/stool pools. The sensitivity of the CAD system is 70.5% per polyp at a rate of 5.75 false positives/scan without using the stool subtraction module. This detection improved significantly (p = 0.009) after automated colon cleansing on cathartic-free data to 86.4% true positive rate at 5.75 false positives/scan. Conclusions: An automated image-based colon cleansing algorithm designed to overcome the challenges of the noncathartic colon significantly improves the sensitivity of colon CAD by approximately 15%.

  14. Colonization history shaped the immunity of the western house mouse.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jundong; Hofer, Heribert; Greenwood, Alex D; Czirják, Gábor Á

    2015-11-01

    The general development of immune response in the short and long term is a product of the antigenic environment in which a species resides. Colonization of a novel antigenic environment by a species would be expected to alter the immune system. Animals that successfully adapt their immune responses will successfully colonize new locations. However, founder events associated with colonization by limited numbers of individuals from a source population will constrain adaptability. How these contradicting forces shape immunity in widely distributed species is unknown. The western house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus) spread globally from the Indo-Pakistani cradle, often in association with human migration and settlement. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that wild-derived outbred laboratory populations of house mice from their original range (Iran) and historically recent European invasive populations (from France and Germany) present differences in immune functional diversity corresponding to recent historical founder events in Europe and movement to novel antigenic environments. We found that (1) European mice had lower total white blood cell (WBC) counts but higher immunoglobulin E concentrations than their Iranian counterparts, and (2) there were no significant differences in the measured immunological parameters among European populations. The results indicate that founder events in European mice and selection pressure exerted by the composition of local parasitic helminth communities underlie the observed patterns. PMID:26205199

  15. Evaluating Darwin’s Naturalization Hypothesis in Experimental Plant Assemblages: Phylogenetic Relationships Do Not Determine Colonization Success

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Sergio A.; Escobedo, Victor M.; Aranda, Jorge; Carvallo, Gastón O.

    2014-01-01

    Darwin’s naturalization hypothesis (DNH) proposes that colonization is less likely when the colonizing species is related to members of the invaded community, because evolutionary closeness intensifies competition among species that share similar resources. Studies that have evaluated DNH from correlational evidence have yielded controversial results with respect to its occurrence and generality. In the present study we carried out a set of manipulative experiments in which we controlled the phylogenetic relatedness of one colonizing species (Lactuca sativa) with five assemblages of plants (the recipient communities), and evaluated the colonizing success using five indicators (germination, growth, flowering, survival, and recruitment). The evolutionary relatedness was calculated as the mean phylogenetic distance between Lactuca and the members of each assemblage (MPD) and by the mean phylogenetic distance to the nearest neighbor (MNND). The results showed that the colonization success of Lactuca was not affected by MPD or MNND values, findings that do not support DNH. These results disagree with experimental studies made with communities of microorganisms, which show an inverse relation between colonization success and phylogenetic distances. We suggest that these discrepancies may be due to the high phylogenetic distance used, since in our experiments the colonizing species (Lactuca) was a distant relative of the assemblage members, while in the other studies the colonizing taxa have been related at the congeneric and conspecific levels. We suggest that under field conditions the phylogenetic distance is a weak predictor of competition, and it has a limited role in determining colonization success, contrary to prediction of the DNH. More experimental studies are needed to establish the importance of phylogenetic distance between colonizing species and invaded community on colonization success. PMID:25141013

  16. Colonic mucin synthesis is increased by sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Finnie, I A; Dwarakanath, A D; Taylor, B A; Rhodes, J M

    1995-01-01

    The effects of sodium butyrate and sodium bromo-octanoate (an inhibitor of beta oxidation) on colonic mucus glycoprotein (mucin) synthesis have been assessed using tissue from colonic resection samples. Epithelial biopsy specimens were incubated for 16 hours in RPMI 1640 with glutamine, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and N-acetyl-[3H]-glucosamine ([3H]-Glc NAc), and differing concentrations of sodium butyrate. Incorporation of [3H] Glc NAc into mucin by normal epithelium at least 10 cm distant from colonic cancer was increased in the presence of sodium butyrate in a dose dependent manner, with maximum effect (476%) at a concentration of 0.1 mM (number of specimens = 24 from six patients, p < 0.001). The increase in response to butyrate was not seen when specimens were incubated in the presence of the beta oxidation inhibitor sodium bromo-octanoate 0.05 M. The striking increase in mucin synthesis that results when butyrate is added to standard nutrient medium suggests that this may be an important mechanism affecting the rate of mucin synthesis in vivo and may also explain the therapeutic effect of butyrate in colitis. PMID:7890244

  17. Human Colon-Derived Soluble Factors Modulate Gut Microbiota Composition

    PubMed Central

    Hevia, Arancha; Bernardo, David; Montalvillo, Enrique; Al-Hassi, Hafid O.; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Garrote, Jose A.; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Arranz, Eduardo; Knight, Stella C.; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The commensal microbiota modulates immunological and metabolic aspects of the intestinal mucosa contributing to development of human gut diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. The host/microbiota interaction often referred to as a crosstalk, mainly focuses on the effect of the microbiota on the host neglecting effects that the host could elicit on the commensals. Colonic microenvironments from three human healthy controls (obtained from the proximal and distal colon, both in resting conditions and after immune – IL-15- and microbiota – LPS-in vitro challenges) were used to condition a stable fecal population. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene-based analyses were performed to study the effect induced by the host on the microbiota composition and function. Non-supervised principal component analysis (PCA) showed that all microbiotas, which had been conditioned with colonic microenvironments clustered together in terms of relative microbial composition, suggesting that soluble factors were modulating a stable fecal population independently from the treatment or the origin. Our findings confirmed that the host intestinal microenvironment has the capacity to modulate the gut microbiota composition via yet unidentified soluble factors. These findings indicate that an appropriate understanding of the factors of the host mucosal microenvironment affecting microbiota composition and function could improve therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota composition. PMID:25918688

  18. Human colon-derived soluble factors modulate gut microbiota composition.

    PubMed

    Hevia, Arancha; Bernardo, David; Montalvillo, Enrique; Al-Hassi, Hafid O; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Garrote, Jose A; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Arranz, Eduardo; Knight, Stella C; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The commensal microbiota modulates immunological and metabolic aspects of the intestinal mucosa contributing to development of human gut diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. The host/microbiota interaction often referred to as a crosstalk, mainly focuses on the effect of the microbiota on the host neglecting effects that the host could elicit on the commensals. Colonic microenvironments from three human healthy controls (obtained from the proximal and distal colon, both in resting conditions and after immune - IL-15- and microbiota - LPS-in vitro challenges) were used to condition a stable fecal population. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene-based analyses were performed to study the effect induced by the host on the microbiota composition and function. Non-supervised principal component analysis (PCA) showed that all microbiotas, which had been conditioned with colonic microenvironments clustered together in terms of relative microbial composition, suggesting that soluble factors were modulating a stable fecal population independently from the treatment or the origin. Our findings confirmed that the host intestinal microenvironment has the capacity to modulate the gut microbiota composition via yet unidentified soluble factors. These findings indicate that an appropriate understanding of the factors of the host mucosal microenvironment affecting microbiota composition and function could improve therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota composition. PMID:25918688

  19. Bacterial colonization and gut development in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Cilieborg, Malene S; Boye, Mette; Sangild, Per T

    2012-03-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) develops in 5-10% of preterm infants in association with enteral feeding and bacterial colonization. It remains unclear how diet and bacteria interact to protect or provoke the immature gastrointestinal tract. Understanding the factors that control bacterial colonization may provide the clue to prevent NEC, and studies in infants must be combined with animal models to understand the mechanisms of the microbiota-epithelium interactions. Analyses of infant fecal samples show that the density and distribution of bacterial species are highly variable with no consistent effects of gestational age, delivery mode, diet or probiotic administration, while low bacterial diversity and bacterial overgrowth are commonly associated with NEC. A series of recent studies in preterm pigs show that the mucosa-associated microbiota is affected by delivery method, prematurity and NEC progression and that diet has limited effects. Overgrowth of specific groups (e.g. Clostridia) appears to be a consequence of NEC, rather than the cause of NEC. Administration of probiotics either decreases or increases NEC sensitivity in preterm pigs, while in preterm infants probiotics have generally decreased NEC incidence and overall mortality. The optimal nature and amount of probiotic bacteria are unknown and host defense factors appear more important for NEC sensitivity than the nature of the gut microbiota. Host defense is improved by feeding the optimal amount of enteral diets, such as mother's colostrum or milk, that help the immature intestinal immune system to respond appropriately to the highly variable bacterial colonization. PMID:22284985

  20. [Dietary prevention and treatment of diverticular disease of the colon].

    PubMed

    Milewska, Magdalena; Sińska, Beata; Kluciński, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Diverticular disease is more often categorized as a civilization disease that affects both women and men, especially at an old age. The pathophysiology remains complex and arises from the interaction between dietary fiber intake, bowel motility and mucosal changes in the colon. Obesity, smoking, low physical activity, low-fiber diet (poor in vegetables, fruit, whole grain products, seeds and nuts) are among factors that increase the risk for developing diverticular disease. Additionally, the colonic outpouchings may be influenced by involutional changes of the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, the fiber rich diet (25-40 g/day) plays an important role in prevention, as well as nonpharmacological treatment of uncomplicated diverticular disease. The successful goal of the therapy can be achieved by well-balanced diet or fiber supplements intake. Research indicate the effectiveness of probiotics in dietary management during the remission process. Moreover, drinking of appropriate water amount and excluding from the diet products decreasing colonic transit time - should be also applied. PMID:25938392

  1. Colonization dynamics of ciliate morphotypes modified by shifting sandy sediments.

    PubMed

    Risse-Buhl, Ute; Felsmann, Katja; Mutz, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Sandy stream-bed sediments colonized by a diverse ciliate community are subject to various disturbance regimes. In microcosms, we investigated the effect of sediment shifting on the colonization dynamics of 3 ciliate morphotypes differing in morphology, behavior and feeding strategy. The dynamics of the ciliate morphotypes inhabiting sediment pore water and overlying water were observed at 3 sediment shifting frequencies: (1) stable sediments, (2) periodically shifting sediments such as migrating ripples, and (3) continuously shifting sediments as occurring during scour events of the uppermost sediment. Sediment shifting significantly affected the abundance and growth rate of the ciliate morphotypes. The free-swimming filter feeder Dexiostoma campylum was vulnerable to washout by sediment shifting since significantly higher numbers occurred in the overlying water than in pore water. Abundance of D. campylum only increased in pore water of stable sediments. On the contrary, the vagile grasper feeder Chilodonella uncinata and the sessile filter feeder Vorticella convallaria had positive growth rates and successfully colonized sediments that shifted periodically and continuously. Thus, the spatio-temporal pattern of sediment dynamics acts as an essential factor of impact on the structure, distribution and function of ciliate communities in sand-bed streams. PMID:25129834

  2. Fermented Dairy Products Modulate Citrobacter rodentium–Induced Colonic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James W.; Chervaux, Christian; Raymond, Benoit; Derrien, Muriel; Brazeilles, Rémi; Kosta, Artemis; Chambaud, Isabelle; Crepin, Valerie F.; Frankel, Gad

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the protective effects of fermented dairy products (FDPs) in an infection model, using the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium (CR). Treatment of mice with FDP formulas A, B, and C or a control product did not affect CR colonization, organ specificity, or attaching and effacing lesion formation. Fermented dairy product A (FDP-A), but neither the supernatant from FDP-A nor β-irradiated (IR) FDP-A, caused a significant reduction in colonic crypt hyperplasia and CR-associated pathology. Profiling the gut microbiota revealed that IR-FDP-A promoted higher levels of phylotypes belonging to Alcaligenaceae and a decrease in Lachnospiraceae (Ruminococcus) during CR infection. Conversely, FDP-A prevented a decrease in Ruminococcus and increased Turicibacteraceae (Turicibacter). Importantly, loss of Ruminococcus and Turicibacter has been associated with susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate–induced colitis. Our results demonstrate that viable bacteria in FDP-A reduced CR-induced colonic crypt hyperplasia and prevented the loss of key bacterial genera that may contribute to disease pathology. PMID:24706936

  3. Fra-1 is a key driver of colon cancer metastasis and a Fra-1 classifier predicts disease-free survival

    PubMed Central

    Iskit, Sedef; Schlicker, Andreas; Wessels, Lodewyk; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Fra-1 (Fos-related antigen-1) is a member of the AP-1 (activator protein-1) family of transcription factors. We previously showed that Fra-1 is necessary for breast cancer cells to metastasize in vivo, and that a classifier comprising genes that are expressed in a Fra-1-dependent fashion can predict breast cancer outcome. Here, we show that Fra-1 plays an important role also in colon cancer progression. Whereas Fra-1 depletion does not affect 2D proliferation of human colon cancer cells, it impairs growth in soft agar and in suspension. Consistently, subcutaneous tumors formed by Fra-1-depleted colon cancer cells are three times smaller than those produced by control cells. Most remarkably, when injected intravenously, Fra-1 depletion causes a 200-fold reduction in tumor burden. Moreover, a Fra-1 classifier generated by comparing RNA profiles of parental and Fra-1-depleted colon cancer cells can predict the prognosis of colon cancer patients. Functional pathway analysis revealed Wnt as one of the central pathways in the classifier, suggesting a possible mechanism of Fra-1 function in colon cancer metastasis. Our results demonstrate that Fra-1 is an important determinant of the metastatic potential of human colon cancer cells, and that the Fra-1 classifier can be used as a prognostic predictor in colon cancer patients. PMID:26646695

  4. Tolfenamic acid downregulates β-catenin in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Taekyu; Lou, Zhiyuan; Baek, Seung Joon; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2016-06-01

    Tolfenamic acid is one of the fenamic acid-derived non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and has been shown to exhibit anti-cancer activities in several types of cancer. Both mutations and aberrant expression of β-catenin are highly associated with progression of cancer. Therefore, β-catenin is considered to be a promising molecular target for cancer prevention and treatment. The current study investigates the role of tolfenamic acid on β-catenin expression in colon cancer. Treatment with tolfenamic acid led to inhibition of cell growth and down-regulation of β-catenin expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human colon cancer cell lines. Reduction of β-catenin upon tolfenamic acid treatment was associated with ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, without affecting mRNA level and promoter activity of β-catenin. In addition, treatment with tolfenamic acid downregulated Smad2 and Smad3 expression, while overexpression of Smad2, but not Smad3, blocked tolfenamic acid-induced suppression of β-catenin expression. Tolfenamic acid also decreased expression of β-catenin target genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Compared to adjacent normal tissue, intestinal tumor tissues of Apc(Min/+) mice exhibited increased expression of β-catenin, Smad2, Smad3, and VEGF, which were down-regulated with tolfenamic acid treatment at a dose of 50mg/kg body weight. In conclusion, our findings suggest that tolfenamic acid inhibits growth of colon cancer cells through downregulation of Smad2 and, subsequently, facilitating ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated β-catenin degradation in colon cancer. PMID:27089389

  5. Size matters: nest colonization patterns for twig-nesting ants

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Soto, Estelí; Philpott, Stacy M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of ant diversity and co-occurrence in agroecosystems is fundamental because ants participate in interactions that influence agroecosystem processes. Multiple local and regional factors influence ant community assembly. We examined local factors that influence the structure of a twig-nesting ant community in a coffee system in Mexico using an experimental approach. We investigated whether twig characteristics (nest entrance size and diversity of nest entrance sizes) and nest strata (canopy shade tree or coffee shrub) affected occupation, species richness, and community composition of twig-nesting ants and whether frequency of occupation of ant species varied with particular nest entrance sizes or strata. We conducted our study in a shaded coffee farm in Chiapas, Mexico, between March and June 2012. We studied ant nest colonization by placing artificial nests (bamboo twigs) on coffee shrubs and shade trees either in diverse or uniform treatments. We also examined whether differences in vegetation (no. of trees, canopy cover and coffee density) influenced nest colonization. We found 33 ant species occupying 73% of nests placed. Nest colonization did not differ with nest strata or size. Mean species richness of colonizing ants was significantly higher in the diverse nest size entrance treatment, but did not differ with nest strata. Community composition differed between strata and also between the diverse and uniform size treatments on coffee shrubs, but not on shade trees. Some individual ant species were more frequently found in certain nest strata and in nests with certain entrance sizes. Our results indicate that twig-nesting ants are nest-site limited, quickly occupy artificial nests of many sizes, and that trees or shrubs with twigs of a diversity of entrance sizes likely support higher ant species richness. Further, individual ant species more frequently occupy nests with different sized entrances promoting ant richness on individual

  6. Aldosterone induces myofibroblast EGF secretion to regulate epithelial colonic permeability.

    PubMed

    Miró, Lluïsa; Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Maijó, Mònica; Amat, Concepció; Naftalin, Richard J; Moretó, Miquel

    2013-05-01

    In vivo studies show that raised aldosterone (Aldo) during low-Na adaptation regulates the growth of pericryptal myofibroblasts and reduces the permeability of the colonic epithelium. The aim of this study was to reproduce in vitro the in vivo condition of increased Aldo using human CCD-18Co myofibroblasts and T84 colonic epithelial cells to measure myofibroblast and epithelial proliferation and the expression of intercellular junction proteins. Proliferation was quantified by measuring 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation. The myofibroblast expression of EGF, VEGFa, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was measured by real-time PCR and the expression of junctional complex proteins by Western blot. Aldo stimulated the proliferation of myofibroblasts by 70% (P < 0.05) and increased EGF mRNA expression by 30% (P < 0.05) without affecting VEGFa and TGF-β1. EGF concentration in the incubation medium increased by 30% (P < 0.05) 24 h after Aldo addition, and these effects were prevented by the addition of spironolactone. Myofibroblast proliferation in response to Aldo was mediated by EGF receptor (EGFR) and involved both MAPKK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways. When T84 cells were incubated with medium from myofibroblasts stimulated with Aldo (conditioned medium), the expression of β-catenin and claudin IV was increased by 30% (P < 0.05) and proliferation by 40% (P < 0.05). T84 proliferation decreased when α-EGF, or the EGFR antagonist AG1478, was present. Results in vivo indicate that rats fed a low-salt diet showed an increased expression of EGF and EGFR in the colonic mucosa. These results support the view that changes in colonic permeability during low-Na adaptation are mediated by the EGF secreted by myofibroblasts in response to raised Aldo. PMID:23467299

  7. Size matters: nest colonization patterns for twig-nesting ants.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Soto, Estelí; Philpott, Stacy M

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the drivers of ant diversity and co-occurrence in agroecosystems is fundamental because ants participate in interactions that influence agroecosystem processes. Multiple local and regional factors influence ant community assembly.We examined local factors that influence the structure of a twig-nesting ant community in a coffee system in Mexico using an experimental approach. We investigated whether twig characteristics (nest entrance size and diversity of nest entrance sizes) and nest strata (canopy shade tree or coffee shrub) affected occupation, species richness, and community composition of twig-nesting ants and whether frequency of occupation of ant species varied with particular nest entrance sizes or strata.We conducted our study in a shaded coffee farm in Chiapas, Mexico, between March and June 2012. We studied ant nest colonization by placing artificial nests (bamboo twigs) on coffee shrubs and shade trees either in diverse or uniform treatments. We also examined whether differences in vegetation (no. of trees, canopy cover and coffee density) influenced nest colonization.We found 33 ant species occupying 73% of nests placed. Nest colonization did not differ with nest strata or size. Mean species richness of colonizing ants was significantly higher in the diverse nest size entrance treatment, but did not differ with nest strata. Community composition differed between strata and also between the diverse and uniform size treatments on coffee shrubs, but not on shade trees. Some individual ant species were more frequently found in certain nest strata and in nests with certain entrance sizes.Our results indicate that twig-nesting ants are nest-site limited, quickly occupy artificial nests of many sizes, and that trees or shrubs with twigs of a diversity of entrance sizes likely support higher ant species richness. Further, individual ant species more frequently occupy nests with different sized entrances promoting ant richness on individual coffee

  8. Nonlinear optical imaging characteristics of colonic adenocarcinoma using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nenrong; Chen, Rong; Li, Hongsheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), a noninvasive optical method with high resolution and high sensitivity, can obtain detailed microstructures of biotissues at submolecular level. In this study, MPM is used to image microstructure varieties of human colonic mucosa and submucosa with adenocarcinoma. Some parameters, such as gland configuration, SHG/TPEF intensity ratio, and collagen orientation and so on, should serve the indicators of early colorectal cancer. The exploratory results show that it's potential for the development of multiphoton mini-endoscopy in real-time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  9. Effect of new berberine derivatives on colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guamán Ortiz, Luis Miguel; Croce, Anna Leta; Aredia, Francesca; Sapienza, Simone; Fiorillo, Gaetano; Syeda, Tanjia Monir; Buzzetti, Franco; Lombardi, Paolo; Scovassi, Anna Ivana

    2015-10-01

    The natural alkaloid berberine has been recently described as a promising anticancer drug. In order to improve its efficacy and bioavailability, several derivatives have been designed and synthesized and found to be even more potent than the lead compound. Among the series of berberine derivatives we have produced, five compounds were identified to be able to heavily affect the proliferation of human HCT116 and SW613-B3 colon carcinoma cell lines. Remarkably, these active compounds exhibit high fluorescence emission property and ability to induce autophagy. PMID:26341980

  10. Reversible Projection Technique for Colon Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianhua; Chowdhury, Ananda S.; Aman, Javed; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Colon unfolding provides an efficient way to navigate the colon in CT colonography. Most existing unfolding techniques only computed forward projections. When radiologists find abnormalities or conduct measurements on the unfolded view (which is often quicker and easier), it is difficult to locate the corresponding region on the 3D view for further examination (which is more accurate and reliable). To address this, we propose a reversible projection technique for colon unfolding. The method makes use of advanced algorithms including rotation-minimizing frames, recursive ring sets, mesh skinning and cylindrical projection. Both forward and reverse transformations are computed for points on the colon surface. Therefore, it allows for detecting and measuring polyps on the unfolded view and mapping them back to the 3D surface. We generated realistic colon simulation incorporating most colon characteristics such as curved centerline, variable distention, haustral folds, teniae coli and colonic polyps. Our method was tested on both the simulated data and 110 clinical CT colonography data. Comparison of polyp size measurements on the unfolded view and the 3D view clearly demonstrates the importance of our reversible projection technique. PMID:20542756

  11. The Chronic Kidney Disease - Colonic Axis.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Madeleine V; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has long been known to cause significant gastrointestinal and colonic pathology. Recent advances in understanding of the role of colonic bacterial microbiome and its function and composition in health and disease have revealed previously unappreciated effects of CKD-associated colonic pathology on the development of uremic complications. CKD can result in profound changes in the microbiome composition and biosynthetic pattern, and the structure and function of the colon. Increases in bacteria that produce urease, uricase, p-cresol- and indole-forming enzymes and the depletion of bacteria that possess short chain fatty acid forming enzymes have been described in human and animal models. Disruption of the colonic epithelial tight junction in different animal models of CKD has been reported and is largely due to the conversion of luminal urea to ammonia by urease possessing bacteria. Together, these changes contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity by allowing the translocation of endotoxin and microbial fragments into the circulation. Additionally, colonic bacteria are the main source of several well-known pro-inflammatory uremic toxins such as indoxyl sulfate, P-cresol sulfate. This review is intended to provide an overview of the effects of CKD on the colonic microbiome and the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function and their role in the pathogenesis the systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity. PMID:25855516

  12. Colon flattening using heat diffusion Riemannian metric.

    PubMed

    Gurijala, Krishna Chaitanya; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Gu, Xianfeng; Kaufman, Arie

    2013-12-01

    We propose a new colon flattening algorithm that is efficient, shape-preserving, and robust to topological noise. Unlike previous approaches, which require a mandatory topological denoising to remove fake handles, our algorithm directly flattens the colon surface without any denoising. In our method, we replace the original Euclidean metric of the colon surface with a heat diffusion metric that is insensitive to topological noise. Using this heat diffusion metric, we then solve a Laplacian equation followed by an integration step to compute the final flattening. We demonstrate that our method is shape-preserving and the shape of the polyps are well preserved. The flattened colon also provides an efficient way to enhance the navigation and inspection in virtual colonoscopy. We further show how the existing colon registration pipeline is made more robust by using our colon flattening. We have tested our method on several colon wall surfaces and the experimental results demonstrate the robustness and the efficiency of our method. PMID:24051852

  13. The Value of Continuity between Primary Care and Surgical Care in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Luu, Ngoc-Phuong; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2016-01-01

    Background Improving continuity between primary care and cancer care is critical for improving cancer outcomes and curbing cancer costs. A dimension of continuity, we investigated how regularly patients receive their primary care and surgical care for colon cancer from the same hospital and whether this affects mortality and costs. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Registry (SEER)-Medicare data, we performed a retrospective cohort study of stage I-III colon cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. There were 23,305 stage I-III colon cancer patients who received primary care in the year prior to diagnosis and underwent operative care for colon cancer. Patients were assigned to the hospital where they had their surgery and to their primary care provider’s main hospital, and then classified according to whether these two hospitals were same or different. Outcomes examined were hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazard for colon cancer specific mortality, and generalized linear estimate for costs at 12 months, from propensity score matched models. Results Fifty-two percent of stage I-III colon patients received primary care and surgical care from the same hospital. Primary care and surgical care from the same hospital was not associated with reduced all-cause or colon cancer specific mortality, but was associated with lower inpatient, outpatient, and total costs of care. Total cost difference was $8,836 (95% CI $2,746–$14,577), a 20% reduction in total median cost of care at 12 months. Conclusions Receiving primary care and surgical care at the same hospital, compared to different hospitals, was associated with lower costs but still similar survival among stage I-III colon cancer patients. Nonetheless, health care policy which encourages further integration between primary care and cancer care in order to improve outcomes and decrease costs will need to address the significant proportion of patients receiving health care

  14. Butyrate modulates antioxidant enzyme expression in malignant and non-malignant human colon tissues.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Franziska; Wilhelm, Anne; Jablonowski, Nadja; Mothes, Henning; Greulich, Karl Otto; Glei, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The induction of antioxidant enzymes is an important mechanism in colon cancer chemoprevention, but the response of human colon tissue to butyrate, a gut fermentation product derived from dietary fiber, remains largely unknown. Therefore, our study investigated the effect of a butyrate treatment on catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in matched human colon tissues of different transformation stages (n = 3-15 in each group) ex vivo. By performing quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, and spectrophotometric measurements, we found an increase in SOD2 at expression and activity level in colonic adenocarcinomas (mRNA: 1.96-fold; protein: 1.41-fold, activity: 1.8-fold; P < 0.05). No difference was detectable for CAT between normal, adenoma, and carcinoma colon tissues. Treatment of normal colon epithelium (12 h) with a physiologically relevant concentration of butyrate (10 mM) resulted in a significant increase (P < 0.05) in CAT mRNA (1.24-fold) and protein (1.39-fold), without affecting the enzymatic activity. Consequently, preliminary experiments failed to show any protective effect of butyrate against H2 O2 -mediated DNA damage. Despite a significantly lowered SOD2 transcript (0.51-fold, P < 0.01) and, to a lesser extent, protein level (0.86-fold) after butyrate exposure of normal colon cells, the catalytic activity was significantly enhanced (1.19-fold, P < 0.05), suggesting an increased protection against tissue superoxide radicals. In malignant tissues, greater variations in response to butyrate were observed. Furthermore, both enzymes showed an age-dependent decrease in activity in normal colon epithelium (CAT: r = -0.49, P = 0.09; SOD2: r = -0.58, P = 0.049). In conclusion, butyrate exhibited potential antioxidant features ex vivo but cellular consequences need to be investigated more in depth. PMID:24677319

  15. Effect of endogenous insulin-like growth factor and stem cell factor on diabetic colonic dysmotility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Xu, Xin-Yu; Tang, Yu-Rong; Yang, Wei-Wei; Yuan, Yu-Feng; Ning, Yue-Ji; Yu, Yin-Juan; Lin, Lin

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the reduction of stem cell factor (SCF) is mediated by decreased endogenous insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 in diabetic rat colon smooth muscle. METHODS: Sixteen Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: control group and streptozotocin-induced diabetic group. After 8 wk of streptozotocin administration, colonic motility function and contractility of circular muscle strips were measured. The expression of endogenous IGF-1 and SCF was tested in colonic tissues. Colonic smooth muscle cells were cultured from normal adult rats. IGF-1 siRNA transfection was used to investigate whether SCF expression was affected by endogenous IGF-1 expression in smooth muscle cells, and IGF-1 induced SCF expression effects were studied. The effect of high glucose on the expression of endogenous IGF-1 and SCF was also investigated. RESULTS: Diabetic rats showed prolonged colonic transit time (252 ± 16 min vs 168 ± 9 min, P < 0.01) and weakness of circular muscle contraction (0.81 ± 0.09 g vs 2.48 ± 0.23 g, P < 0.01) compared with the control group. Endogenous IGF-1 and SCF protein expression was significantly reduced in the diabetic colonic muscle tissues. IGF-1 and SCF mRNA expression also showed a paralleled reduction in diabetic rats. In the IGF-1 siRNA transfected smooth muscle cells, SCF mRNA and protein expression was significantly decreased. IGF-1 could induce SCF expression in a concentration and time-dependent manner, mainly through the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signal pathway. High glucose inhibited endogenous IGF-1 and SCF expression and the addition of IGF-1 to the medium reversed the SCF expression. CONCLUSION: Myopathy may resolve in colonic motility dysfunction in diabetic rats. Deficiency of endogenous IGF-1 in colonic smooth muscle cells leads to reduction of SCF expression. PMID:23745035

  16. Nutrients and Risk of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinfu; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva; Mery, Les

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fats are thought to be important in the etiology of colon cancer. However, the evidence linking them is inconclusive. Studies on dietary protein, cholesterol and carbohydrate and the risk of colon cancer are also inconsistent. This study examined the association between dietary intake of protein, fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates, and the risk of colon cancer. Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1731 individuals with histologically confirmed cases of colon cancer and 3097 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in seven Canadian provinces. Measurements included socio-economic status, lifestyle habits and diet. A 69-item food frequency questionnaire was used to provide data on eating habits from two years before the study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using unconditional logistic regression. The nutrients were categorized by quartiles based on the distributions among the controls. Intake of polyunsaturated fat, trans-fat and cholesterol were significantly associated with the risk of colon cancer; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.36 (95% CI, 1.02–1.80), 1.37 (95% CI, 1.10–1.71) and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.10–1.84), respectively. The association was stronger with proximal colon cancer (PCC). An increased risk was also observed with increasing intake of sucrose for both proximal and distal colon cancers; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.67 (95% CI, 1.22–2.29) for PCC and 1.58 (95% CI, 1.18–2.10) for distal colon cancer (DCC). An elevated risk of PCC was also found with increased lactose intake. Our findings provide evidence that a diet low in fat and sucrose could reduce the risk of various colon cancers. PMID:24281033

  17. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Causing Colonic Intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, André Costa; Marques, Ana; Lopes, Joanne; Duarte, Alexandre; da Silva, Pedro Correia; Lopes, José Manuel; Maia, J. Costa

    2016-01-01

    Colonic intussusception is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in adults and is caused by a malignant lesion in about 70% of cases. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential. We present a 64-year-old male patient with right colonic intussusception caused by a mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC), presenting as a giant pedunculated polyp (54 mm of largest diameter). The patient underwent right colectomy with primary anastomosis and adjuvant chemotherapy. The diagnosis of intussusception of the colon in adults is difficult because of its rarity and nonspecific clinical presentation. In this case, the cause was a rare histological type malignant tumor (MANEC). PMID:27525153

  18. [Submucosal lipoma of the colon with intussusception].

    PubMed

    Avilés-Salas, Alejandro; Cuéllar-Mendoza, Miguel Enrique

    2012-09-01

    Lipomas are the most frequent benign tumours of the digestive tract and 50% are localized in the colon. Most are found in the submucosa and may vary in their incidence, localization, symptoms and pathogenesis. We present the case of a 49-year-old female with intermittent intestinal subocclusion, abdominal distention and intussusception. Colonoscopy disclosed a submucous tumour in the descending colon. Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy was performed with resection of the lesion. Definitive pathology revealed a submucous colon lipoma. It is important to know the different presentations of these tumours because they can be mistaken for a malignant lesion. PMID:23214352

  19. Effects of female steroid hormones on A-type K+ currents in murine colon.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Elizabeth A H; McCloskey, Conor; O'Kane, Neil; Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don

    2006-06-01

    Idiopathic constipation is higher in women of reproductive age than postmenopausal women or men, suggesting that female steroid hormones influence gastrointestinal motility. How female hormones affect motility is unclear. Colonic motility is regulated by ion channels in colonic myocytes. Voltage-dependent K(+) channels serve to set the excitability of colonic muscles. We investigated regulation of Kv 4.3 channel expression in response to acute or chronic changes in female hormones. Patch clamp experiments and quantitative PCR were used to compare outward currents and transcript expression in colonic myocytes from male, non-pregnant, pregnant and ovariectomized mice. Groups of ovariectomized mice received injections of oestrogen or progesterone to investigate the effects of hormone replacement. The capacitance of colonic myocytes from non-pregnant females was larger than in males. Net outward current density in male and ovariectomized mice was higher than in non-pregnant females and oestrogen-treated ovariectomized mice. Current densities in late pregnancy were lower than in female controls. Progesterone had no effect on outward currents. A-type currents were decreased in non-pregnant females compared with ovariectomized mice, and were further decreased by pregnancy or oestrogen replacement. Kv 4.3 transcripts did not differ significantly between groups; however, expression of the potassium channel interacting protein KChIP1 was elevated in ovariectomized mice compared with female controls and oestrogen-treated ovariectomized mice. Delayed rectifier currents were not affected by oestrogen. In the mouse colon, oestrogen suppresses A-type currents, which are important for regulating excitability. These observations suggest a possible link between female hormones and altered colonic motility associated with menses, pregnancy and menopause. PMID:16581861

  20. Characterization of the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of colonic tissues: experimental activity and constitutive formulation.

    PubMed

    Carniel, E L; Gramigna, V; Fontanella, C G; Frigo, A; Stefanini, C; Rubini, A; Natali, A N

    2014-05-01

    The aim was to investigate the biomechanical behaviour of colonic tissues by a coupled experimental and numerical approach. The wall of the colon is composed of different tissue layers. Within each layer, different fibre families are distributed according to specific spatial orientations, which lead to a strongly anisotropic configuration. Accounting for the complex histology of the tissues, mechanical tests must be planned and designed to evaluate the behaviour of the colonic wall in different directions. Uni-axial tensile tests were performed on tissue specimens from 15 fresh pig colons, accounting for six different loading directions (five specimens for each loading direction). The next step of the investigation was to define an appropriate constitutive framework and develop a procedure for identification of the constitutive parameters. A specific hyperelastic formulation was developed that accounted for the multilayered conformation of the colonic wall and the fibre-reinforced configuration of the tissues. The parameters were identified by inverse analyses of the mechanical tests. The comparison of model results with experimental data, together with the evaluation of satisfaction of material thermomechanics principles, confirmed the reliability of the analysis developed. This work forms the basis for more comprehensive activities that aim to provide computational tools for the interpretation of surgical procedures that involve the gastrointestinal tract, considering the specific biomedical devices adopted. PMID:24486449

  1. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina; Redal, María Ana; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Shamy, Magdy; Muñoz, Manuel J.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5′ untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. - Highlights: • Airborne particulate matter (PM10) affects alternative splicing in colon cells. • PM10 upregulates one of the two mRNA variants of the growth factor BMP-4. • This variant has a longer 5′ unstranslated region and introduces an upstream AUG. • By regulating BMP-4 mRNA splicing PM10 inhibits total expression of BMP-4 protein. • BMP-4 downregulation was previously reported to be associated to colon cancer.

  2. Non-surgical factors influencing lymph node yield in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Patrick; Peirce, Colin; Mulsow, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous factors which can affect the lymph node (LN) yield in colon cancer specimens. The aim of this paper was to identify both modifiable and non-modifiable factors that have been demonstrated to affect colonic resection specimen LN yield and to summarise the pertinent literature on these topics. A literature review of PubMed was performed to identify the potential factors which may influence the LN yield in colon cancer resection specimens. The terms used for the search were: LN, lymphadenectomy, LN yield, LN harvest, LN number, colon cancer and colorectal cancer. Both non-modifiable and modifiable factors were identified. The review identified fifteen non-surgical factors: (13 non-modifiable, 2 modifiable) which may influence LN yield. LN yield is frequently reduced in older, obese patients and those with male sex and increased in patients with right sided, large, and poorly differentiated tumours. Patient ethnicity and lower socioeconomic class may negatively influence LN yield. Pre-operative tumour tattooing appears to increase LN yield. There are many factors that potentially influence the LN yield, although the strength of the association between the two varies greatly. Perfecting oncological resection and pathological analysis remain the cornerstones to achieving good quality and quantity LN yields in patients with colon cancer. PMID:27190586

  3. A two-level approach towards semantic colon segmentation: removing extra-colonic findings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Le; Wolf, Matthias; Liang, Jianming; Dundar, Murat; Bi, Jinbo; Salganicoff, Marcos

    2009-01-01

    Computer aided detection (CAD) of colonic polyps in computed tomographic colonography has tremendously impacted colorectal cancer diagnosis using 3D medical imaging. It is a prerequisite for all CAD systems to extract the air-distended colon segments from 3D abdomen computed tomography scans. In this paper, we present a two-level statistical approach of first separating colon segments from small intestine, stomach and other extra-colonic parts by classification on a new geometric feature set; then evaluating the overall performance confidence using distance and geometry statistics over patients. The proposed method is fully automatic and validated using both the classification results in the first level and its numerical impacts on false positive reduction of extra-colonic findings in a CAD system. It shows superior performance than the state-of-art knowledge or anatomy based colon segmentation algorithms. PMID:20426210

  4. Integrating multiple analytical datasets to compare metabolite profiles of mouse colonic-cecal contents and feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pattern of metabolites produced by the gut microbiome comprises a phenotype indicative of the means by which that microbiome affects the gut. We characterized that phenotype in mice by conducting metabolomic analyses of the colonic-cecal contents, comparing that to the metabolite patterns of fec...

  5. Genetics of the pig tapeworm in Madagascar reveal a history of human dispersal and colonization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An intricate history of human dispersal and geographic colonization has strongly affected the distribution of obligate parasites circulating among people. Among these parasites, the pig tapeworm Taenia solium occurs throughout the world as the causative agent of cysticercosis, one of the most serio...

  6. Foliar Application of Phosphorus Has Minimal Impact on 'Pinot noir' Growth, Mycorrhizal Colonization, or Fruit Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grapevines grown in low phosphorus (P) soils typical of western Oregon vineyards may benefit from additional P applied to the canopy using foliar sprays. Alternatively, vines may be negatively affected by foliar P sprays because lower root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) could red...

  7. Cytotoxicity of Shiga toxin for primary cultures of human colonic and ileal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, M P; Dixon, P S; Rothman, S W; Brown, J E

    1987-01-01

    Shiga toxin purified from Shigella dysenteriae 1 was cytotoxic to cultured epithelial cells from human colon and ileum. The cytotoxicity, which affected only about 50% of treated cells, was neutralized by rabbit antiserum monospecific for Shiga toxin and mediated by protein synthesis inhibition. PMID:3570477

  8. Clinical utility of colonic manometry in slow transit constipation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Siddharth; Heady, Sarah; Coss-Adame, Enrique; Rao, Satish S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The clinical significance of colorectal sensori-motor evaluation in patients with slow transit constipation (STC) is unclear. We investigated whether colonic manometric evaluation is useful for characterizing colonic sensorimotor dysfunction and for guiding therapy in STC. Methods 24-hour ambulatory colonic manometry was performed in 80 patients (70 females) with STC by placing a 6 sensor solid state probe, along with assessment of colonic sensation with barostat. Anorectal manometry was also performed. Manometrically, patients were categorized as having colonic neuropathy or myopathy based on gastrocolonic response, waking response and high amplitude propagated contractions (HAPC); and based on colonic sensation, as colonic hyposensitivity or hypersensitivity. Clinical response to pharmacological, biofeedback and surgical treatment was assessed at 1yr and correlated with manometric findings. Results 59% of patients had abnormal colonic manometry with features suggestive of neuropathy (26%), and myopathy (33%); 41% had normal colonic manometry. 74% patients had abnormal colonic sensation and 61% had overlapping dyssynergic defecation. Patients with neuropathy were more likely to have colonic hyposensitivity. 64% of patients with colonic myopathy or normal manometry improved with medical/biofeedback therapy when compared to 15% with colonic neuropathy (p<0.01). Selected patients with colonic neuropathy had excellent response to surgery, but many developed bacterial overgrowth. Conclusions Colonic manometry demonstrates significant colonic sensori-motor dysfunction in STC patients and reveals considerable pathophysiological heterogeneity. It can be useful for characterizing the underlying pathophysiology and for guiding clinical management in STC, especially surgery. PMID:23384415

  9. Marine worms (genus Osedax) colonize cow bones

    PubMed Central

    Jones, William J; Johnson, Shannon B; Rouse, Greg W; Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2007-01-01

    Bone-eating worms of the genus Osedax colonized and grew on cow bones deployed at depths ranging from 385 to 2893 m in Monterey Bay, California. Colonization occurred as rapidly as two months following deployment of the cow bones, similar to the time it takes to colonize exposed whalebones. Some Osedax females found on the cow bones were producing eggs and some hosted dwarf males in their tubes. Morphological and molecular examinations of these worms confirmed the presence of six Osedax species, out of the eight species presently known from Monterey Bay. The ability of Osedax species to colonize, grow and reproduce on cow bones challenges previous notions that these worms are ‘whale-fall specialists.’ PMID:18077256

  10. Preventing Second Cancers in Colon Cancer Survivors

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III trial, people who have had curative surgery for colon cancer will be randomly assigned to take sulindac and a placebo, eflornithine and a placebo, both sulindac and eflornithine, or two placebo pills for 36 months.

  11. Redefining Adjuvant Therapy for Colon Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with resected stage III colon cancer are being randomly assigned to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy for either 3 or 6 months and to take either a pill called celecoxib or a matching placebo pill for 3 years.

  12. Colon Cancer Rising in People Under 50

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159004.html Colon Cancer Rising in People Under 50 Incidence up more than 10 percent in ... cancer rates are declining, the rates among Americans under 50 have jumped more than 11 percent in ...

  13. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  14. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Cancer.gov

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  15. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... explains the most commonly used screening methods, including test preparation, in simple language. View video Narrator : If ... cancer or even going for a colon cancer test can be frightening to you. “What if they ...

  16. Intestinal Colonization Dynamics of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Pruss, Kali; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    To cause the diarrheal disease cholera, Vibrio cholerae must effectively colonize the small intestine. In order to do so, the bacterium needs to successfully travel through the stomach and withstand the presence of agents such as bile and antimicrobial peptides in the intestinal lumen and mucus. The bacterial cells penetrate the viscous mucus layer covering the epithelium and attach and proliferate on its surface. In this review, we discuss recent developments and known aspects of the early stages of V. cholerae intestinal colonization and highlight areas that remain to be fully understood. We propose mechanisms and postulate a model that covers some of the steps that are required in order for the bacterium to efficiently colonize the human host. A deeper understanding of the colonization dynamics of V. cholerae and other intestinal pathogens will provide us with a variety of novel targets and strategies to avoid the diseases caused by these organisms. PMID:25996593

  17. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-01-01

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health. PMID:24713325

  18. Contained colonic perforation due to cecal retroflexion

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Zhuo; Agrawal, Deepak; Singal, Amit G; Kircher, Stephen; Gupta, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Complications of cecal retroflexion performed during colonoscopy have not previously been reported to occur. We report a case of contained colonic perforation secondary to using cecal retroflexion technique to examine the colon, and review available published reports of complications associated with this technique. We conclude that complications may rarely occur with use of cecal retroflexion, and that the clinical benefit of this technique is uncertain. PMID:27004007

  19. Oncolytic reovirus against ovarian and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Sandra G; Norman, Kara L; Alain, Tommy; Kossakowska, Anna; Lee, Patrick W K

    2002-03-15

    Reovirus selectively replicates in and destroys cancer cells with an activated Ras signaling pathway. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using reovirus (serotype 3, strain Dearing) as an antihuman colon and ovarian cancer agent. In in vitro studies, reovirus infection in human colon and ovarian cell lines was assessed by cytopathic effect as detected by light microscopy, [(35)S]Methionine labeling of infected cells for viral protein synthesis and progeny virus production by plaque assay. We observed that reovirus efficiently infected all five human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, DLD-1, HCT-116, HT-29, and SW48) and four human ovarian cancer cell lines (MDAH2774, PA-1, SKOV3, and SW626) which were tested, but not a normal colon cell line (CCD-18Co) or a normal ovarian cell line (NOV-31). We also observed that the Ras activity in the human colon and ovarian cancer cell lines was elevated compared with that in normal colon and ovarian cell lines. In animal models, intraneoplastic as well as i.v. inoculation of reovirus resulted in significant regression of established s.c. human colon and ovarian tumors implanted at the hind flank. Histological studies revealed that reovirus infection in vivo was restricted to tumor cells, whereas the surrounding normal tissue remained uninfected. Additionally, in an i.p. human ovarian cancer xenograft model, inhibition of ascites tumor formation and the survival of animals treated with live reovirus was significantly greater than of control mice treated with UV-inactivated reovirus. Reovirus infection in ex vivo primary human ovarian tumor surgical samples was also confirmed, further demonstrating the potential of reovirus therapy. These results suggest that reovirus holds promise as a novel agent for human colon and ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:11912142

  20. Effects of morphine and naloxone on feline colonic transit

    SciTech Connect

    Krevsky, B.; Libster, B.; Maurer, A.H.; Chase, B.J.; Fisher, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of endogenous and exogenous opioid substances on feline colonic transit were evaluated using colonic transit scintigraphy. Naloxone accelerated emptying of the cecum and ascending colon, and filling of the transverse colon. Endogenous opioid peptides thus appear to play a significant role in the regulation of colonic transit. At a moderate dose of morphine cecum and ascending colon transit was accelerated, while at a larger dose morphine had no effect. Since naloxone, a relatively nonspecific opioid antagonist, and morphine, a principally mu opioid receptor agonist, both accelerate proximal colonic transit, a decelerating role for at least one of the other opioid receptors is inferred.

  1. [Physiological role of mucins in the colonic barrier integrity].

    PubMed

    Gaudier, Estelle; Hoebler, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Colonic mucus is a key element of colonic barrier as it is located at the frontier between luminal microflora and colonic mucosa itself. Colonic mucus is mainly composed of high molecular weight glycoproteins called mucins that can be either secreted or membrane-linked. The expression of various colonic mucins is altered in colorectal cancers or inflammations. The aim of this review is to highlight the crucial role played by colonic mucins in the maintenance of colonic barrier integrity, both because they are part of the protective mucus layer, and because they individually exert specific functions involved in epithelial barrier, like cell growth and differentiation, immunomodulation, signal transduction or cell adhesion. PMID:17075443

  2. Root hairs play a key role in the endophytic colonization of olive roots by Pseudomonas spp. with biocontrol activity.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pilar; Schilirò, Elisabetta; Maldonado-González, María Mercedes; Valderrama, Raquel; Barroso-Albarracín, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2011-08-01

    The use of indigenous bacterial root endophytes with biocontrol activity against soil-borne phytopathogens is an environmentally-friendly and ecologically-efficient action within an integrated disease management framework. The earliest steps of olive root colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 and Pseudomonas putida PICP2, effective biocontrol agents (BCAs) against Verticillium wilt of olive (Olea europaea L.) caused by the fungus Verticillium dahliae Kleb., are here described. A gnotobiotic study system using in vitro propagated olive plants, differential fluorescent-protein tagging of bacteria, and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis have been successfully used to examine olive roots-Pseudomonas spp. interactions at the single-cell level. In vivo simultaneous visualization of PICF7 and PICP2 cells on/in root tissues enabled to discard competition between the two bacterial strains during root colonization. Results demonstrated that both BCAs are able to endophytically colonized olive root tissues. Moreover, results suggest a pivotal role of root hairs in root colonization by both biocontrol Pseudomonas spp. However, colonization of root hairs appeared to be a highly specific event, and only a very low number of root hairs were effectively colonized by introduced bacteria. Strains PICF7 and PICP2 can simultaneously colonize the same root hair, demonstrating that early colonization of a given root hair by one strain did not hinder subsequent attachment and penetration by the other. Since many environmental factors can affect the number, anatomy, development, and physiology of root hairs, colonization competence and biocontrol effectiveness of BCAs may be greatly influenced by root hair's fitness. Finally, the in vitro study system here reported has shown to be a suitable tool to investigate colonization processes of woody plant roots by microorganisms with biocontrol potential. PMID:21347721

  3. The colon: from banal to brilliant.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Rani S; Morton, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The colon serves as the habitat for trillions of microbes, which it must maintain, regulate, and sequester. This is managed by what is termed the mucosal barrier. The mucosal barrier separates the gut flora from the host tissues; regulates the absorption of water, electrolytes, minerals, and vitamins; and facilitates host-flora interactions. Colonic homeostasis depends on a complex interaction between the microflora and the mucosal epithelium, immune system, vasculature, stroma, and nervous system. Disruptions in the colonic microenvironment such as changes in microbial composition, epithelial cell function/proliferation/differentiation, mucus production/makeup, immune function, diet, motility, or blood flow may have substantial local and systemic consequences. Understanding the complex activities of the colon in health and disease is important in drug development, as xenobiotics can impact all segments of the colon. Direct and indirect effects of pharmaceuticals on intestinal function can produce adverse findings in laboratory animals and humans and can negatively impact drug development. This review will discuss normal colon homeostasis with examples, where applicable, of xenobiotics that disrupt normal function. PMID:24129758

  4. Colonic microbiome is altered in alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Ece A.; Gillevet, Patrick M.; Rangwala, Huzefa; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Naqvi, Ammar; Engen, Phillip A.; Kwasny, Mary; Lau, Cynthia K.

    2012-01-01

    Several studies indicate the importance of colonic microbiota in metabolic and inflammatory disorders and importance of diet on microbiota composition. The effects of alcohol, one of the prominent components of diet, on colonic bacterial composition is largely unknown. Mounting evidence suggests that gut-derived bacterial endotoxins are cofactors for alcohol-induced tissue injury and organ failure like alcoholic liver disease (ALD) that only occur in a subset of alcoholics. We hypothesized that chronic alcohol consumption results in alterations of the gut microbiome in a subgroup of alcoholics, and this may be responsible for the observed inflammatory state and endotoxemia in alcoholics. Thus we interrogated the mucosa-associated colonic microbiome in 48 alcoholics with and without ALD as well as 18 healthy subjects. Colonic biopsy samples from subjects were analyzed for microbiota composition using length heterogeneity PCR fingerprinting and multitag pyrosequencing. A subgroup of alcoholics have an altered colonic microbiome (dysbiosis). The alcoholics with dysbiosis had lower median abundances of Bacteroidetes and higher ones of Proteobacteria. The observed alterations appear to correlate with high levels of serum endotoxin in a subset of the samples. Network topology analysis indicated that alcohol use is correlated with decreased connectivity of the microbial network, and this alteration is seen even after an extended period of sobriety. We show that the colonic mucosa-associated bacterial microbiome is altered in a subset of alcoholics. The altered microbiota composition is persistent and correlates with endotoxemia in a subgroup of alcoholics. PMID:22241860

  5. Is there an efficient trap or collection method for sampling Anopheles darlingi and other malaria vectors that can describe the essential parameters affecting transmission dynamics as effectively as human landing catches? - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lima, José Bento Pereira; Rosa-Freitas, Maria Goreti; Rodovalho, Cynara Melo; Santos, Fátima; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Distribution, abundance, feeding behaviour, host preference, parity status and human-biting and infection rates are among the medical entomological parameters evaluated when determining the vector capacity of mosquito species. To evaluate these parameters, mosquitoes must be collected using an appropriate method. Malaria is primarily transmitted by anthropophilic and synanthropic anophelines. Thus, collection methods must result in the identification of the anthropophilic species and efficiently evaluate the parameters involved in malaria transmission dynamics. Consequently, human landing catches would be the most appropriate method if not for their inherent risk. The choice of alternative anopheline collection methods, such as traps, must consider their effectiveness in reproducing the efficiency of human attraction. Collection methods lure mosquitoes by using a mixture of olfactory, visual and thermal cues. Here, we reviewed, classified and compared the efficiency of anopheline collection methods, with an emphasis on Neotropical anthropophilic species, especially Anopheles darlingi, in distinct malaria epidemiological conditions in Brazil. PMID:25185008

  6. A simulation of microbial competition in the human colonic ecosystem.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, M E; Dreesen, D W; Wiegert, R G

    1996-01-01

    Many investigations of the interactions of microbial competitors in the gastrointestinal tract used continuous-flow anaerobic cultures. The simulation reported here was a deterministic 11-compartment model coded by using the C programming language and based on parameters from published in vitro studies and assumptions were data were unavailable. The resource compartments were glucose, lactose and sucrose, starch, sorbose, and serine. Six microbial competitors included indigenous nonpathogenic colonizers of the human gastrointestinal tract (Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Bacteroids ovatus, Fusobacterium varium, and Enterococcus faecalis) and the potential human enteropathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Flows of carbon from the resources to the microbes were modified by resource and space controls. Partitioning of resources to the competitors that could utilize them was calculated at each iteration on the basis of availability of all resources by feeding preference functions. Resources did not accumulate during iterations of the model. The results of the computer simulation of microbial competition model and for various modifications of the model. The results were based on few measured parameters but may be useful in the design of user-friendly software to aid researchers in defining and manipulating the microbial ecology of colonic ecosystems as relates to food-borne disease. PMID:8837418

  7. Type I Interferons Direct Gammaherpesvirus Host Colonization.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cindy S E; Lawler, Clara; May, Janet S; Belz, Gabrielle T; Stevenson, Philip G

    2016-05-01

    Gamma-herpesviruses colonise lymphocytes. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) infects B cells via epithelial to myeloid to lymphoid transfer. This indirect route entails exposure to host defences, and type I interferons (IFN-I) limit infection while viral evasion promotes it. To understand how IFN-I and its evasion both control infection outcomes, we used Mx1-cre mice to tag floxed viral genomes in IFN-I responding cells. Epithelial-derived MuHV-4 showed low IFN-I exposure, and neither disrupting viral evasion nor blocking IFN-I signalling markedly affected acute viral replication in the lungs. Maximising IFN-I induction with poly(I:C) increased virus tagging in lung macrophages, but the tagged virus spread poorly. Lymphoid-derived MuHV-4 showed contrastingly high IFN-I exposure. This occurred mainly in B cells. IFN-I induction increased tagging without reducing viral loads; disrupting viral evasion caused marked attenuation; and blocking IFN-I signalling opened up new lytic spread between macrophages. Thus, the impact of IFN-I on viral replication was strongly cell type-dependent: epithelial infection induced little response; IFN-I largely suppressed macrophage infection; and viral evasion allowed passage through B cells despite IFN-I responses. As a result, IFN-I and its evasion promoted a switch in infection from acutely lytic in myeloid cells to chronically latent in B cells. Murine cytomegalovirus also showed a capacity to pass through IFN-I-responding cells, arguing that this is a core feature of herpesvirus host colonization. PMID:27223694

  8. Type I Interferons Direct Gammaherpesvirus Host Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cindy S. E.; Lawler, Clara; May, Janet S.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-herpesviruses colonise lymphocytes. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) infects B cells via epithelial to myeloid to lymphoid transfer. This indirect route entails exposure to host defences, and type I interferons (IFN-I) limit infection while viral evasion promotes it. To understand how IFN-I and its evasion both control infection outcomes, we used Mx1-cre mice to tag floxed viral genomes in IFN-I responding cells. Epithelial-derived MuHV-4 showed low IFN-I exposure, and neither disrupting viral evasion nor blocking IFN-I signalling markedly affected acute viral replication in the lungs. Maximising IFN-I induction with poly(I:C) increased virus tagging in lung macrophages, but the tagged virus spread poorly. Lymphoid-derived MuHV-4 showed contrastingly high IFN-I exposure. This occurred mainly in B cells. IFN-I induction increased tagging without reducing viral loads; disrupting viral evasion caused marked attenuation; and blocking IFN-I signalling opened up new lytic spread between macrophages. Thus, the impact of IFN-I on viral replication was strongly cell type-dependent: epithelial infection induced little response; IFN-I largely suppressed macrophage infection; and viral evasion allowed passage through B cells despite IFN-I responses. As a result, IFN-I and its evasion promoted a switch in infection from acutely lytic in myeloid cells to chronically latent in B cells. Murine cytomegalovirus also showed a capacity to pass through IFN-I-responding cells, arguing that this is a core feature of herpesvirus host colonization. PMID:27223694

  9. Affective responses to dance.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julia F; Pollick, Frank E; Lambrechts, Anna; Gomila, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present work was the characterization of mechanisms by which affective experiences are elicited in observers when watching dance movements. A total of 203 dance stimuli from a normed stimuli library were used in a series of independent experiments. The following measures were obtained: (i) subjective measures of 97 dance-naïve participants' affective responses (Likert scale ratings, interviews); and (ii) objective measures of the physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy, luminance), and of the movements represented in the stimuli (roundedness, impressiveness). Results showed that (i) participants' ratings of felt and perceived affect differed, (ii) felt and perceived valence but not arousal ratings correlated with physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy and luminance), (iii) roundedness in posture shape was related to the experience of more positive emotion than edgy shapes (1 of 3 assessed rounded shapes showed a clear effect on positiveness ratings while a second reached trend level significance), (iv) more impressive movements resulted in more positive affective responses, (v) dance triggered affective experiences through the imagery and autobiographical memories it elicited in some people, and (vi) the physical parameters of the video stimuli correlated only weakly and negatively with the aesthetics ratings of beauty, liking and interest. The novelty of the present approach was twofold; (i) the assessment of multiple affect-inducing mechanisms, and (ii) the use of one single normed stimulus set. The results from this approach lend support to both previous and present findings. Results are discussed with regards to current literature in the field of empirical aesthetics and affective neuroscience. PMID:27235953

  10. Influence of feeding regimens on rat gut fluids and colonic metabolism of diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Amélia C F; Murdan, Sudaxshina; Serra, Arménio C; Veiga, Francisco J; Gonsalves, António M d'A Rocha; Basit, Abdul W

    2014-11-01

    Feeding states may affect the performance of colonic prodrugs. The aim is to investigate the influence of feeding regimen in Wistar rats on: (i) distribution and pH contents along the gut and (ii) metabolism of two colonic prodrugs, diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin and a commercially available control, sulfasalazine, within the caecal and colonic contents. Male Wistar rats were subject to four different feeding regimens, the gut contents characterized (mass and pH) and the metabolism of prodrugs investigated. The feeding regimen affects gut contents (mass and pH), more specifically in the stomach and lower intestine, and affects the rate of metabolism of diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin, but not that of sulfasalazine. The latter's degradation is much faster than that of diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin while the metabolism of both prodrugs is faster in colonic (versus caecal) contents. Fasting results in most rapid degradation of diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin, possibly due to lack of competition (absence of food) for microbial enzymatic activity. PMID:25129806

  11. Prognostic significance of preoperative fibrinogen in patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen-Qiang; Han, Xiao-Na; Wang, Hai-Jiang; Tang, Yong; Zhao, Ze-Liang; Qu, Yan-Li; Xu, Rui-Wei; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yu, Xian-Bo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic significance of preoperative fibrinogen levels in colon cancer patients. METHODS: A total of 255 colon cancer patients treated at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University from June 1st 2005 to June 1st 2008 were enrolled in the study. All patients received radical surgery as their primary treatment method. Preoperative fibrinogen was detected by the Clauss method, and all patients were followed up after surgery. Preoperative fibrinogen measurements were correlated with a number of clinicopathological parameters using the Student t test and analysis of variance. Survival analyses were performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modeling to measure 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: The mean preoperative fibrinogen concentration of all colon cancer patients was 3.17 ± 0.88 g/L. Statistically significant differences were found between preoperative fibrinogen levels and the clinicopathological parameters of age, smoking status, tumor size, tumor location, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, modified Glasgow prognostic scores (mGPS), white blood cell (WBC) count, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. Univariate survival analysis showed that TNM stage, tumor cell differentiation grade, vascular invasion, mGPS score, preoperative fibrinogen, WBC, NLR, PLR and CEA all correlated with both OS and DFS. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and body mass index correlated only with OS. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that both OS and DFS of the total cohort, as well as of the stage II and III patients, were higher in the hypofibrinogen group compared to the hyperfibrinogen group (all P < 0.05). In contrast, there was no significant difference between OS and DFS in stage I patients with low or high fibrinogen levels. Cox regression analysis indicated preoperative fibrinogen levels, TNM stage, mGPS score, CEA, and

  12. Colon centerline extraction in fragmented segmentations.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Karthik; Madrosiya, Akshay; Desai, Nasir

    2015-08-01

    In virtual colonoscopy, the clinical need is a smooth centered path from the rectum to the cecum, for interactive navigation along the colonic lumen. The primary challenge is breakages in the colon, due to fecal residue, abnormalities, poor insufflation and inadequate electronic cleansing. Here we propose a method, that is a modification of the classic energy minimized geodesic, that extracts centered paths through fragmented colons. To begin, we perform electronic cleansing, automatically localize 4 points: rectum, cecum, sphlenic and hepatic flexures; followed by region growing and heuristic approaches to generate the initial segmentation. This is followed by a daisy chaining procedure to link possibly large colon blobs that may have been missed as weaker candidate segmentations. We then perform a front propagation to extract a minimal energy path through the ordered set of points. This propagation is guided by multiple forces: (a) A strong force given by the distance to the colon segmentation surface (b) A weak force derived from the CT intensity (c) A weak force from the distance to the surface of weaker candidate colon segmentations (d) A geodesic repulsive force, where the other points exhibit an repelling force in their voronoi partition, the force proportional to the geodesic distance to the point. Our contribution is a path extraction method for the colon that is the energy minimized geodesic (a) favouring centeredness (b) punching through gaps, traversing in so far as possible through lower intensity regions and possibly centered within these gaps (c) ordered through the feature points. Results show improvements of the method over the standard minimal energy path approach. PMID:26736927

  13. Electrical properties of pig colonic mucosa measured during early post-natal development.

    PubMed Central

    Hénin, S; Smith, M W

    1976-01-01

    Microvillar membrane (Vm) and transmural (Vt) potential differences were measured in proximal colon taken from pigs at birth and up to 10 days of age. 2. Vm remained independent of the age of the animal provided it was measured in the absence of methionine. The over-all mean was -43-3 mV. Adding methionine to fluid bathing the mucosal surface of new-born pig colon caused a 9-8 mV depolarization of Vm and a 6-7 mV increase in Vt. These effects, which were Na+-dependent, were not seen in the 10-day-old animal. 3. Substituting SO4(2-) for Cl- in methionine-free medium caused a hyperpolarization in Vm. Increasing the concentration of K+ caused corresponding depolarization. Substituting choline for Na+ had no effect on VmCl- and K+ movement across the microvillar membrane together account for the bulk of the measured membrane potential. These results apply to all stages of development. 4. Na+ uptake across the microvillar membrane of the new-born pig colon was increased in the presence of methionine. This effect disappeared in older animals. Na+ uptake in the absence of methionine doubled during the first 24 h of post-natal life. This increase was maintained using colons taken from older animals. 5. Methionine depolarization of Vm in the new-born pig colon is probably caused by the electrogenic influx of Na+. The ability of the colon to actively concentrate methionine within tis mucosa disappears at the same time as methionine ceases to affect Vm and Vt. It is suggested that methionine and Na+ form a ternary complex with a carrier in the brush border of the new-born pig colon and that this carrier is lost or modified during early post-natal development. PMID:994037

  14. An association between maternal diet and colonic diverticulosis in an animal model.

    PubMed Central

    Wess, L; Eastwood, M; Busuttil, A; Edwards, C; Miller, A

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Maternal diet may have an effect on the health of the offspring in middle and later life. This study used the laboratory rat as an animal model to examine whether the fibre content of the maternal diet during pregnancy affected subsequent development of colonic diverticula in the offspring fed lifelong fibre deficient or higher fibre diets. METHODS: The parents of experimental animals were fed either a diet that was known to predispose to colonic diverticulosis or a control diet for one month prior to mating. The offspring were fed one of these diets for 18 months. The incidence of colonic diverticulosis, submucosal collagen content, collagen solubility in weak acid, and the composition of intestinal contents were then measured. RESULTS: Offspring of rats fed a higher fibre diet from higher fibre diet fed parents had 0% incidence of colonic diverticulosis. When offspring (regardless of parental diet) were fed a low fibre diet for life the acid solubility was lowered compared with rats fed lifelong higher fibre diet mean (SD) (0.044 (0.0007) v 0.073 (0.0015) sigmoid colon (ratio of soluble:insoluble collagen)); 21.1% had diverticulosis and there was reduced fibre fermentation. However, when the diet of the parents of the fibre deficient diet fed rats was considered, the animals whose mothers had a fibre deficient diet had lower acid solubility (0.032 (0.0007)) and an increased incidence of colonic diverticulosis (42.1%) than the animals fed a fibre deficient diet from higher fibre diet fed parents (p < 0.01 in all instances). CONCLUSION: Maternal diet and the subsequent nutrition of the progeny seem to be of importance in the development of colonic diverticulosis in the rat. PMID:8949648

  15. Differential expression of nanog1 and nanogp8 in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Sato, Ai; Ohata, Hirokazu; Sakai, Hiroaki; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Koji

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in a majority of colon cancer cell lines examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both nanog1 and nanogp8 are expressed in colon cancer cells with varying ratios. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog mediates cell proliferation of colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog predominantly localizes in cytoplasm of colon cancer cells. -- Abstract: Nanog, a homeodomain transcription factor, is an essential regulator for promotion of self-renewal of embryonic stem cells and inhibition of their differentiation. It has been demonstrated that nanog1 as well as nanogp8, a retrogene of nanog1, is preferentially expressed in advanced stages of several types of cancer, suggesting their involvement during cancer progression. Here, we investigated the expression of Nanog in well-characterized colon cancer cell lines. Expression of Nanog was detectable in 5 (HCT116, HT29, RKO, SW48, SW620) out of seven cell lines examined. RNA expression analyses of nanog1 and nanogp8 indicated that, while nanog1 was a major form in SW620 as well as in teratoma cells Tera-2, nanogp8 was preferentially expressed in HT29 and HCT116. In accordance with this, shRNA-mediated knockdown of nanog1 caused the reduction of Nanog in SW620 but not in HT29. Inhibition of Nanog in SW620 cells negatively affected cell proliferation and tumor formation in mouse xenograft. Biochemical subcellular fractionation and immunostaining analyses revealed predominant localization of Nanog in cytoplasm in SW620 and HT29, while it was mainly localized in nucleus in Tera-2. Our data indicate that nanog1 and nanogp8 are differentially expressed in colon cancer cells, and suggest that their expression contributes to proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  16. Affective Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles T.

    This paper addresses itself to the question, "What does feeling have to do with knowing?" Two movements in affective education are discussed which have come into focus in recent years and which attempt to define the relationship between knowing and feeling. The first, a conscious application of the role of arousal in learning, emphasizes arousal…

  17. Pharmacological inhibition of polycomb repressive complex-2 activity induces apoptosis in human colon cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Yannick D.; Witherspoon, Mavee S.; Laursen, Kristian B.; Guezguez, Amel; Beauséjour, Marco; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois; Lipkin, Steven M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the leading causes of cancer death in the USA. The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), including core components SUZ12 and EZH2, represents a key epigenetic regulator of digestive epithelial cell physiology and was previously shown to promote deleterious effects in a number of human cancers, including colon. Using colon cancer stem cells (CCSC) isolated from human primary colorectal tumors, we demonstrate that SUZ12 knockdown and treatment with DZNep, one of the most potent EZH2 inhibitors, increase apoptosis levels, marked by decreased Akt phosphorylation, in CCSCs, while embryonic stem (ES) cell survival is not affected. Moreover, DZNep treatments lead to increased PTEN expression in these highly tumorigenic cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of PRC2 histone methyltransferase activity may constitute a new, epigenetic therapeutic strategy to target highly tumorigenic and metastatic colon cancer stem cells. PMID:23588203

  18. Chemopreventive effect of the non-psychotropic phytocannabinoid cannabidiol on experimental colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Aviello, Gabriella; Romano, Barbara; Borrelli, Francesca; Capasso, Raffaele; Gallo, Laura; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Izzo, Angelo A

    2012-08-01

    Colon cancer affects millions of individuals in Western countries. Cannabidiol, a safe and non-psychotropic ingredient of Cannabis sativa, exerts pharmacological actions (antioxidant and intestinal antinflammatory) and mechanisms (inhibition of endocannabinoid enzymatic degradation) potentially beneficial for colon carcinogenesis. Thus, we investigated its possible chemopreventive effect in the model of colon cancer induced by azoxymethane (AOM) in mice. AOM treatment was associated with aberrant crypt foci (ACF, preneoplastic lesions), polyps, and tumour formation, up-regulation of phospho-Akt, iNOS and COX-2 and down-regulation of caspase-3. Cannabidiol-reduced ACF, polyps and tumours and counteracted AOM-induced phospho-Akt and caspase-3 changes. In colorectal carcinoma cell lines, cannabidiol protected DNA from oxidative damage, increased endocannabinoid levels and reduced cell proliferation in a CB(1)-, TRPV1- and PPARγ-antagonists sensitive manner. It is concluded that cannabidiol exerts chemopreventive effect in vivo and reduces cell proliferation through multiple mechanisms. PMID:22231745

  19. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina; Redal, María Ana; Alghamdi, Mansour A; Khoder, Mamdouh I; Shamy, Magdy; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2015-07-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5' untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. PMID:25863591

  20. Colonic Patch and colonic SILT development are independent and differentially-regulated events

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, AP; Olivier, BJ; Goverse, G; Greuter, M; Knippenberg, M; Kusser, K; Domingues, RG.; Veiga-Fernandes, H; Luster, AD; Lugering, A; Randall, TD; Cupedo, T; Mebius, RE

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal lymphoid tissues have to simultaneously ensure protection against pathogens and tolerance towards commensals. Despite such vital functions, their development in the colon is poorly understood. Here, we show that the two distinct lymphoid tissues of the colon–colonic patches and colonic SILTs–can easily be distinguished based on anatomical location, developmental timeframe and cellular organization. Furthermore, whereas colonic patch development depended on CXCL13-mediated LTi cell clustering followed by LTα-mediated consolidation, early LTi clustering at SILT anlagen did not require CXCL13, CCR6 or CXCR3. Subsequent dendritic cell recruitment to and gp38+VCAM-1+ lymphoid stromal cell differentiation within SILTs required LTα; B cell recruitment and follicular dendritic cell differentiation depended on MyD88-mediated signalling, but not the microflora. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that different mechanisms, mediated mainly by programmed stimuli, induce the formation of distinct colonic lymphoid tissues, therefore suggesting that these tissues may have different functions. PMID:22990625

  1. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  2. Laparoscopic colonic resection for rectosigmoid colonic tumours: a retrospective analysis and comparison with open resection.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Kurumboor; Varma, Deepak; Rajan, Mahendra; Kamlesh, Naduthottam Palanisamy; Zacharias, Prakash; Ganesh Narayanan, Ramesh; Philip, Mathew

    2010-08-01

    Laparoscopic approach for treatment of colorectal malignancy is gaining acceptance gradually; however the benefits of laparoscopic surgery in colonic and rectal tumours is still open to debate. This study aims at a retrospective analysis of operative and short term outcome of patients with rectosigmoid tumours. A retrospective analysis of operative, postoperative and short-term outcome of 62 patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resection for cancer of rectosigmoid region were compared with a same number of parameters-matched patients who underwent open colorectal resection. Blood transfusion requirement was significantly more in the open group compared to the laparoscopy group (38.7% versus 6.4%, p = 0.001). ICU stay was less in the laparoscopy group (p = <0.05) and they were started on oral liquid diet earlier (p = 0.013). The number of the lymph nodes retrieved, positive distal margin and radial involvement were similar in both groups. The hospital stay was significantly shorter in laparoscopy group (8.4 versus 13.8 days, p < 0.05). Radical operation for rectosigmoid tumors is technically feasible with laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic approach is associated with less blood loss, transfusion and significantly less ICU stay. Laparoscopic group recovers early and needs less hospital stay. PMID:21938195

  3. Integrating Multiple Analytical Datasets to Compare Metabolite Profiles of Mouse Colonic-Cecal Contents and Feces

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Huawei; Grapov, Dmitry; Jackson, Matthew I.; Fahrmann, Johannes; Fiehn, Oliver; Combs, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of metabolites produced by the gut microbiome comprises a phenotype indicative of the means by which that microbiome affects the gut. We characterized that phenotype in mice by conducting metabolomic analyses of the colonic-cecal contents, comparing that to the metabolite patterns of feces in order to determine the suitability of fecal specimens as proxies for assessing the metabolic impact of the gut microbiome. We detected a total of 270 low molecular weight metabolites in colonic-cecal contents and feces by gas chromatograph, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography, quadrapole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF). Of that number, 251 (93%) were present in both types of specimen, representing almost all known biochemical pathways related to the amino acid, carbohydrate, energy, lipid, membrane transport, nucleotide, genetic information processing, and cancer-related metabolism. A total of 115 metabolites differed significantly in relative abundance between both colonic-cecal contents and feces. These data comprise the first characterization of relationships among metabolites present in the colonic-cecal contents and feces in a healthy mouse model, and shows that feces can be a useful proxy for assessing the pattern of metabolites to which the colonic mucosum is exposed. PMID:26378591

  4. The role of acetylcholine in the regulation of ion transport by rat colon mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Browning, J. G.; Hardcastle, Jacqueline; Hardcastle, P. T.; Sanford, P. A.

    1977-01-01

    1. Acetylcholine increases the potential difference across rat proximal colon both in vivo and in vitro. 2. There is a sigmoid relationship between the change in potential difference and the logarithm of the dose of acetylcholine. The dose—response curve is shifted to the left by neostigmine and to the right by atropine, suggesting that the action of acetylcholine is mediated by a muscarinic type of receptor. 3. The dose-response curve for acetylcholine in vivo is not altered by the ganglion-blocking agents hexamethonium and pentolinium, suggesting a direct effect of this transmitter on the colon. 4. Acetylcholine causes an increase in potential difference, a small decrease in resistance and hence a rise in the current generated by both normal and stripped everted sacs of rat colon. 5. In the absence of sodium, the calculated current change produced by acetylcholine is reduced, and the removal of chloride has a similar inhibitory effect. The absence of bicarbonate does not significantly affect the response. 6. Acetylcholine virtually abolished net sodium movement and induced net chloride secretion and these changes accounted for the increased short-circuit current. 7. Acetylcholine had no effect on oxygen consumption by rings of colon. 8. Tracts staining for acetylcholinesterase were observed running from the submucous plexus towards the mucosal epithelium. 9. This study shows that acetylcholine can influence ion movement by rat colonic mucosa and suggests that the autonomic nervous system might be involved in the regulation of transport mechanisms in this tissue. ImagesPlate 1 PMID:592212

  5. Securing the demographic and genetic future of tuatara through assisted colonization.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kimberly A; Miller, Hilary C; Moore, Jennifer A; Mitchell, Nicola J; Cree, Alison; Allendorf, Fred W; Sarre, Stephen D; Keall, Susan N; Nelson, Nicola J

    2012-10-01

    Climate change poses a particular threat to species with fragmented distributions and little or no capacity to migrate. Assisted colonization, moving species into regions where they have not previously occurred, aims to establish populations where they are expected to survive as climatic envelopes shift. However, adaptation to the source environment may affect whether species successfully establish in new regions. Assisted colonization has spurred debate among conservation biologists and ecologists over whether the potential benefits to the threatened species outweigh the potential disruption to recipient communities. In our opinion, the debate has been distracted by controversial examples, rather than cases where assisted colonization may be a viable strategy. We present a strategic plan for the assisted migration of tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), an endemic New Zealand reptile. The plan includes use of extant populations as reference points for comparisons with assisted-colonization populations with respect to demography, phenotypic plasticity, and phenology; optimization of genetic variation; research to fill knowledge gaps; consideration of host and recipient communities; and inclusion of stakeholders in the planning stage. When strategically planned and monitored, assisted colonization could meet conservation and research goals and ultimately result in the establishment of long-term sustainable populations capable of persisting during rapid changes in climate. PMID:22827440

  6. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin suppresses mouse colon tumorigenesis in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Naoki; Inoue, Takuya; Iguchi, Munetaka; Fujiwara, Kaori; Kakimoto, Kazuki; Nouda, Sadaharu; Okada, Toshihiko; Kawakami, Ken; Abe, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-02-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to have an increased risk of colorectal neoplasia. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been used as a new therapeutic tool for type 2 diabetes. Since the substrates for DPP-4 include intestinotrophic hormones and chemokines such as GLP-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), which are associated with tumor progression, DPP-4 inhibitors may increase the risk of colorectal tumors. However, the influence of DPP-4 inhibitors on colorectal neoplasia in patients with type 2 diabetes remains unknown. In the present study, we show that long-term administration of a DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin (STG), suppressed colon carcinogenesis in leptin-deficient (ob/ob) C57BL/6J mice. Colonic mucosal concentrations of glucagon‑like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-2 were significantly elevated in the ob/ob mice. However, mucosal GLP concentrations and the plasma level of SDF-1 were not affected by the administration of STG. Real‑time PCR analysis revealed that colonic mucosal IL-6 mRNA expression, which was significantly upregulated in the ob/ob mice, was significantly suppressed by the long-term administration of STG. These results suggest that a DPP-4 inhibitor may suppress colon carcinogenesis in mice with type 2 diabetes in a GLP-independent manner. Since DPP-4 has multiple biological functions, further studies analyzing other factors related to colon carcinogenesis are needed. PMID:26573958

  7. Preferential edge habitat colonization by a specialist weevil, Rhinoncomimus latipes (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Hough-Goldstein, J A; Lake, E; D'Amico, V; Berg, S H

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the behavioral basis of dispersal and colonization is critical in biological control systems, where success of a natural enemy depends in part on its ability to find and move to new host patches. We studied behavior of the specialist weevil Rhinoncomimus latipes Korotyaev, a biological control agent of mile-a-minute weed, Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross, by releasing weevils at the forest edge and monitoring their colonization of potted host plants arrayed along the edge, out into the open field, and into the forest. Both distance from the release cage and habitat where plants were located affected colonization, with more than twice as many weevils found on plants at 2 m than at 6 or 14 m; at 14 m, 6-8 times as many weevils colonized plants along the forest edge compared with plants in the open field or within the forest. In a second experiment, weevils that were released in an open field 12 m from the forest edge initially flew in all directions, but again ultimately colonized more plants at the edge than out in the open field. This species may be adapted to seek host plants at the forest edge, because P. perfoliata generally is found in riparian corridors in its native range and along forest edges in North America. Results suggest that R. latipes will move successfully to new P. perfoliata patches along wooded edges, but may not readily locate isolated patches in the open or those embedded in forests. PMID:23321094

  8. Transcriptional recapitulation and subversion of embryonic colon development by mouse colon tumor models and human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Sergio; Park, Young-Kyu; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Halberg, Richard B; Yu, Ming; Jessen, Walter J; Freudenberg, Johannes; Chen, Xiaodi; Haigis, Kevin; Jegga, Anil G; Kong, Sue; Sakthivel, Bhuvaneswari; Xu, Huan; Reichling, Timothy; Azhar, Mohammad; Boivin, Gregory P; Roberts, Reade B; Bissahoyo, Anika C; Gonzales, Fausto; Bloom, Greg C; Eschrich, Steven; Carter, Scott L; Aronow, Jeremy E; Kleimeyer, John; Kleimeyer, Michael; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Settle, Stephen H; Boone, Braden; Levy, Shawn; Graff, Jonathan M; Doetschman, Thomas; Groden, Joanna; Dove, William F; Threadgill, David W; Yeatman, Timothy J; Coffey, Robert J; Aronow, Bruce J

    2007-01-01

    Background The expression of carcino-embryonic antigen by colorectal cancer is an example of oncogenic activation of embryonic gene expression. Hypothesizing that oncogenesis-recapitulating-ontogenesis may represent a broad programmatic commitment, we compared gene expression patterns of human colorectal cancers (CRCs) and mouse colon tumor models to those of mouse colon development embryonic days 13.5-18.5. Results We report here that 39 colon tumors from four independent mouse models and 100 human CRCs encompassing all clinical stages shared a striking recapitulation of embryonic colon gene expression. Compared to normal adult colon, all mouse and human tumors over-expressed a large cluster of genes highly enriched for functional association to the control of cell cycle progression, proliferation, and migration, including those encoding MYC, AKT2, PLK1 and SPARC. Mouse tumors positive for nuclear β-catenin shifted the shared embryonic pattern to that of early development. Human and mouse tumors differed from normal embryonic colon by their loss of expression modules enriched for tumor suppressors (EDNRB, HSPE, KIT and LSP1). Human CRC adenocarcinomas lost an additional suppressor module (IGFBP4, MAP4K1, PDGFRA, STAB1 and WNT4). Many human tumor samples also gained expression of a coordinately regulated module associated with advanced malignancy (ABCC1, FOXO3A, LIF, PIK3R1, PRNP, TNC, TIMP3 and VEGF). Conclusion Cross-species, developmental, and multi-model gene expression patterning comparisons provide an integrated and versatile framework for definition of transcriptional programs associated with oncogenesis. This approach also provides a general method for identifying pattern-specific biomarkers and therapeutic targets. This delineation and categorization of developmental and non-developmental activator and suppressor gene modules can thus facilitate the formulation of sophisticated hypotheses to evaluate potential synergistic effects of targeting within- and

  9. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M.; Rajendran, Reshmi; Ng, Mary; Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank; Jenner, Andrew Michael

    2011-10-01

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  10. Ecology of Root Colonizing Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ofek, Maya; Hadar, Yitzhak; Minz, Dror

    2012-01-01

    Background Ecologically meaningful classification of bacterial populations is essential for understanding the structure and function of bacterial communities. As in soils, the ecological strategy of the majority of root-colonizing bacteria is mostly unknown. Among those are Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae), a major group of rhizosphere and root colonizing bacteria of many plant species. Methodology/Principal Findings The ecology of Massilia was explored in cucumber root and seed, and compared to that of Agrobacterium population, using culture-independent tools, including DNA-based pyrosequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR. Seed- and root-colonizing Massilia were primarily affiliated with other members of the genus described in soil and rhizosphere. Massilia colonized and proliferated on the seed coat, radicle, roots, and also on hyphae of phytopathogenic Pythium aphanidermatum infecting seeds. High variation in Massilia abundance was found in relation to plant developmental stage, along with sensitivity to plant growth medium modification (amendment with organic matter) and potential competitors. Massilia absolute abundance and relative abundance (dominance) were positively related, and peaked (up to 85%) at early stages of succession of the root microbiome. In comparison, variation in abundance of Agrobacterium was moderate and their dominance increased at later stages of succession. Conclusions In accordance with contemporary models for microbial ecology classification, copiotrophic and competition-sensitive root colonization by Massilia is suggested. These bacteria exploit, in a transient way, a window of opportunity within the succession of communities within this niche. PMID:22808103

  11. Triclosan Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Adnan K.; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G.; Boles, Blaise R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. PMID:24713325

  12. Right colon cancer presenting as hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Tomoyuki; Konishi, Kazuo; Yamazaki, Takahisa; Kitamura, Katsuya; Katagiri, Atsushi; Muramoto, Takashi; Kubota, Yutaro; Yano, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Yoshiya; Yamochi, Toshiko; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Masahiko; Gokan, Takehiko; Yoshikawa, Nozomi; Imawari, Michio

    2011-02-15

    A 67-year-old man visited our hospital with a history of continuous hematochezia leading to hemorrhagic shock. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a large mass in the ascending colon invading the duodenum and pancreatic head as well as extravasation of blood from the gastroduodenal artery (GDA) into the colon. Colonoscopy revealed an irregular ulcerative lesion and stenosis in the ascending colon. Therefore, right hemicolectomy combined with pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histologically, the tumor was classified as a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Moreover, cancer cells were mainly located in the colon but had also invaded the duodenum and pancreas and involved the GDA. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin (CK)20 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) but not for CK7 and carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9. The patient died 23 d after the surgery because he had another episode of arterial bleeding from the anastomosis site. Although En bloc resection of the tumor with pancreaticoduodenectomy and colectomy performed for locally advanced colon cancer can ensure long-term survival, patients undergoing these procedures should be carefully monitored, particularly when the tumor involves the main artery. PMID:21607161

  13. Space Colonization-Benefits for the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegfried, W. H.

    2003-01-01

    We have begun to colonize space, even to the extent of early space tourism. Our early Vostok, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Spacehab, Mir and now ISS are humankind's first ventures toward colonization. Efforts are underway to provide short space tours, and endeavors such as the X-Prize are encouraging entrepreneurs to provide new systems. Many believe that extended space travel (colonization) will do for the 21st century what aviation did for the 20th. Our current concerns including terrorism, hunger, disease, and problems of air quality, safe abundant water, poverty, and weather vagaries tend to overshadow long-term activities such as Space Colonization in the minds of many. Our leading ``think tanks'' such as the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Brookings Institute do not rate space travel high on lists of future beneficial undertakings even though many of the concerns listed above are prominently featured. It is the contention of this paper that Space Colonization will lead toward solutions to many of the emerging problems of our Earth, both technological and sociological. The breadth of the enterprise far exceeds the scope of our normal single-purpose missions and, therefore, its benefits will be greater.

  14. Piriformospora indica requires kaurene synthase activity for successful plant colonization.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Chen, Xi; Ma, Chaoyang; Wu, Hongqing; Qi, Shuting

    2016-05-01

    Ent-kaurene (KS) synthases and ent-kaurene-like (KSL) synthases are involved in the biosynthesis of phytoalexins and/or gibberellins which play a role in plant immunity and development. The relationship between expression of five synthase genes (HvKSL1, HvKS2, HvKS4, HvKS5, HvKSL4) and plant colonization by the endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica was assessed in barley (Hordeum vulgare). The KS gene family is differently up-regulated at 1, 3 and 7 day after P. indica inoculation. By comparison, the HvKSL4 gene expression pattern is more significantly affected by UV irradiation and P. indica colonization. The characterizations of two silencing lines (HvKSL1-RNAi, HvKSL4-RNAi) also were analyzed. HvKSL1-RNAi and HvKSL4-RNAi lines in the first generation lead to less dark green leaves and slower plant development. Further, reduced spikelet fertility in progenies of RNAi plants heterozygous for HvKSL1 were observed, but not for HvKSL4. T2 generation of HvKSL1-RNAi line showed semi-dwarf phenotype while the wild type phenotype could be restored by applying GA3. Silencing of HvKSL4 and HvKSL1 resulted in reduced colonization by P. indica especially in the HvKSL1-RNAi line. These results probably suggest the presence of two ent-KS synthase in barley, one (HvKSL1) that participates in the biosynthesis of GAs and another (HvKSL4) that is involved in the biosynthesis of phytoalexins. PMID:26943021

  15. An integrated analysis of the effects of past land use on forest herb colonization at the landscape scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verheyen, K.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Biesbrouck, B.; Hermy, M.

    2003-01-01

    1 A framework that summarizes the direct and indirect effects of past land use on forest herb recolonization is proposed, and used to analyse the colonization patterns of forest under storey herbaceous species in a 360-ha mixed forest, grassland and arable landscape in the Dijle river valley (central Belgium). 2 Fine-scale distribution maps were constructed for 14 species. The species were mapped in 15946 forest plots and outside forests (along parcel margins) in 5188 plots. Forest stands varied in age between 1 and more than 224 years. Detailed land-use history data were combined with the species distribution maps to identify species-specific colonization sources and to calculate colonization distances. 3 The six most frequent species were selected for more detailed statistical analysis. 4 Logistic regression models indicated that species frcquency in forest parcels was a function of secondary forest age, distance from the nearest colonization source and their interaction. Similar age and distance effects were found within hedgerows. 5 In 199 forest stands, data about soils, canopy structure and the cover of competitive species were collected. The relative importance of habitat quality and spatio-temporal isolation tor the colonization of the forest herb species was quantified using structural equation modelling (SEM), within the framework proposed for the effects of past land use. 6 The results of the SEM indicate that, except for the better colonizing species, the measured habitat quality variables are of minor importance in explaining colonization patterns, compared with the combination of secondary forest age and distance from colonization sources. 7 Our results suggest the existence of a two-stage colonization process in which diaspore availability determines the initial pattern, which is affected by environmental sorting at later stages.

  16. An integrated analysis of the effects of past land use on forest herb colonization at the landscape scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verheyen, K.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Beisbrouck, B.; Hermy, M.

    2003-01-01

    1. A framework that summarizes the direct and indirect effects of past land use on forest herb recolonization is proposed, and used to analyse the colonization patterns of forest understorey herbaceous species in a 360-ha mixed forest, grassland and arable landscape in the Dijle river valley (central Belgium). 2. Fine-scale distribution maps were constructed for 14 species. The species were mapped in 15 946 forest plots and outside forests (along parcel margins) in 5188 plots. Forest stands varied in age between 1 and more than 224 years. Detailed land-use history data were combined with the species distribution maps to identify species-specific colonization sources and to calculate colonization distances. 3. The six most frequent species were selected for more detailed statistical analysis. 4. Logistic regression models indicated that species frequency in forest parcels was a function of secondary forest age, distance from the nearest colonization source and their interaction. Similar age and distance effects were found within hedgerows. 5. In 199 forest stands, data about soils, canopy structure and the cover of competitive species were collected. The relative importance of habitat quality and spatio-temporal isolation for the colonization of the forest herb species was quantified using structural equation modelling (SEM), within the framework proposed for the effects of past land use. 6. The results of the SEM indicate that, except for the better colonizing species, the measured habitat quality variables are of minor importance in explaining colonization patterns, compared with the combination of secondary forest age and distance from colonization sources. 7. Our results suggest the existence of a two-stage colonization process in which diaspore availability determines the initial pattern, which is affected by environmental sorting at later stages.

  17. Campylobacter jejuni Colonization Is Associated with a Dysbiosis in the Cecal Microbiota of Mice in the Absence of Prominent Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Abdul G.; Selinger, L. Brent; Uwiera, Richard R. E.; Xu, Yong; Inglis, G. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni causes enterocolitis in humans, but does not incite disease in asymptomatic carrier animals. To survive in the intestine, C. jejuni must successfully compete with the microbiota and overcome the host immune defense. Campylobacter jejuni colonization success varies considerably amongst individual mice, and we examined the degree to which the intestinal microbiota was affected in mice (i.e. a model carrier animal) colonized by C. jejuni at high relative to low densities. Methods Mice were inoculated with C. jejuni or buffer, and pathogen shedding and intestinal colonization were measured. Histopathologic scoring and quantification of mRNA expression for α-defensins, toll-like receptors, and cytokine genes were conducted. Mucosa-associated bacterial communities were characterized by two approaches: multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results Two C. jejuni treatments were established based on the degree of cecal and colonic colonization; C. jejuni Group A animals were colonized at high cell densities, and C. jejuni Group B animals were colonized at lower cell densities. Histological examination of cecal and colonic tissues indicated that C. jejuni did not incite visible pathologic changes. Although there was no significant difference among treatments in expression of mRNA for α-defensins, toll-like receptors, or cytokine genes, a trend for increased expression of toll-like receptors and cytokine genes was observed for C. jejuni Group A. The results of the two methods to characterize bacterial communities indicated that the composition of the cecal microbiota of C. jejuni Group A mice differed significantly from C. jejuni Group B and Control mice. This difference was due to a reduction in load, diversity and richness of bacteria associated with the cecal mucosa of C. jejuni Group A mice. Conclusions High density colonization by C. jejuni is associated with a dysbiosis in

  18. Endometriosis mimicking colonic stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Vaibhav; Slattery, Eoin; Garud, Sagar; Sethi, Saurabh; Wang, Helen; Poylin, Vitaliy Y.; Berzin, Tyler M.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is defined as the presence of endometrial glands and stroma at extra-uterine sites; it is a common disease affecting women of reproductive age. Endometrial tissue can implant itself to various organs, including the gastrointestinal tract, and can cause significant gastrointestinal symptoms. These ectopic endometrial tissue implants are usually located in the pelvis but can be present almost anywhere in the body. Endometriosis seems to be the most frequent cause of chronic pelvic pain in women of reproductive age and may cause prolonged suffering and disability that negatively affect health-related quality of life. We report a case in a generally healthy young female patient who presented for evaluation of diarrhea. PMID:25725039

  19. Colonization properties of Campylobacter jejuni in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Pielsticker, C.; Glünder, G.; Rautenschlein, S.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter is the most common bacterial food-borne pathogen worldwide. Poultry and specifically chicken and raw chicken meat is the main source for human Campylobacter infection. Whilst being colonized by Campylobacter spp. chicken in contrast to human, do scarcely develop pathological lesions. The immune mechanisms controlling Campylobacter colonization and infection in chickens are still not clear. Previous studies and our investigations indicate that the ability to colonize the chicken varies significantly not only between Campylobacter strains but also depending on the original source of the infecting isolate. The data provides circumstantial evidence that early immune mechanisms in the gut may play an important role in the fate of Campylobacter in the host. PMID:24611122

  20. Extensive colonic stricture due to pelvic actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Cho, M K; Yook, J W; Choe, G Y; Lee, I C

    1995-04-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented with a palpable tender mass at the left lower quadrant of the abdomen. She had suffered from constipation for five years and had a previous history of intrauterine device-use for one year. Preoperative barium enema and abdominopelvic CT showed a compatible finding of rectosigmoid colon cancer or left ovary cancer. She underwent segmental resection of the sigmoid colon along with the removal of left distal ureter, left ovary and salpinx. Pathologic examination revealed actinomycotic abscesses containing sulfur granules. Thereafter, she took parenteral ampicillin (50mg/kg/day) for one month and oral amoxicillin (250mg, tid) for 2 months consecutively. The patient has no specific problems for 6 months after surgical resection and long-term antibiotic therapy. This report may be the first of intrauterine device-associated pelvic actinomycosis involving both sigmoid colon and rectum extensively. PMID:7576294

  1. Fungal Parasitism of Heterodera glycines Eggs as Influenced by Egg Age and Pre-colonization of Cysts by Other Fungi.

    PubMed

    Chen, S Y; Chen, F J

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of egg age and pre-colonization of cysts by a saprophytic or parasitic fungus on parasitism of Heterodera glycines eggs by other parasitic fungi. In agar and in soil tests, fungi generally parasitized more eggs in early developmental stages than eggs containing a juvenile. The effect of pre-colonization of cysts by a fungus on parasitism of eggs by other fungi depended on the fungi involved. In most cases, pre-colonization of cysts by an unidentified, saprophytic fungal isolate (A-1-24) did not affect parasitism of eggs in the cysts subsequently treated with other fungi. However, pre-colonization of cysts by A-1-24 reduced fungal parasitism of eggs in cysts subsequently treated with Cylindrocarpon destructans isolate 3. In agar tests, pre-colonization of cysts by Chaetomium cochliodes, a saprophytic or weakly parasitic fungus, reduced parasitism of eggs in cysts subsequently treated with Verticillium chlamydosporium Florida isolate, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, ARF18, and another sterile fungus. However, in soil tests, pre-colonization of cysts by C. cochliodes had no effect on parasitism of eggs by subsequent fungal parasites. In another test, parasitism of eggs by V. chlamydosporium in cysts was not affected by pre-colonizing fungi C. destructans, F. oxysporum, and F. solani but was reduced by Mortierella sp., Pyrenochaeta terrestris, and C. cochliodes. Parasitism of eggs in cysts by ARF18 was reduced by pre-colonizing fungi C. destructans, F. oxysporum, F. solani, P. terrestris, and C. cochliodes but not Mortierella sp. PMID:19262761

  2. Supergranular Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2016-07-01

    I study the complexity of supergranular cells using intensity patterns from Kodaikanal solar observatory. The chaotic and turbulent aspect of the solar supergranulation can be studied by examining the interrelationships amongst the parameters characterizing supergranular cells namely size, horizontal flow field, lifetime and physical dimensions of the cells and the fractal dimension deduced from the size data. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The Data consists of visually identified supergranular cells, from which a fractal dimension 'D' for supergranulation is obtained according to the relation P α AD/2 where 'A' is the area and 'P' is the perimeter of the supergranular cells. I find a fractal dimension close to about 1.3 which is consistent with that for isobars and suggests a possible turbulent origin. The cell circularity shows a dependence on the perimeter with a peak around (1.1-1.2) x 105 m. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence.

  3. Colonic luminal surface retention of meloxicam microsponges delivered by erosion based colon-targeted matrix tablet.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rishabh; Kumar, Deepesh; Pathak, Kamla

    2012-05-10

    The work was aimed at developing calcium-pectinate matrix tablet for colon-targeted delivery of meloxicam (MLX) microsponges. Modified quassi-emulsion solvent diffusion method was used to formulate microsponges (MS), based on 3(2) full factorial design. The effects of volume of dichloromethane and EudragitRS100 content (independent variables) were determined on the particle size, entrapment efficiency and %cumulative drug release of MS1-MS9. The optimized formulation, MS5 (d(mean)=44.47 μm, %EE=98.73, %CDR=97.32 and followed zero order release) was developed into colon-targeted matrix tablet using calcium pectinate as the matrix. The optimized colon-targeted tablet (MS5T2) shielded MLX loaded microsponges in gastrointestinal region and selectively delivered them to colon, as vizualized by vivo fluoroscopy in rabbits. The pharmacokinetic evaluation of MS5T2 in rabbits, revealed appearance of drug appeared in plasma after a lag time of 7h; a t(max) of 30 h with Fr=61.047%, thus presenting a formulation suitable for targeted colonic delivery. CLSM studies provided an evidence for colonic luminal retentive ability of microsponges at the end of 8h upon oral administration of MS5T2. Thus calcium pectinate matrix tablet loaded with MLX microsponges was developed as a promising system for the colon-specific delivery that has potential for use as an adjuvant therapy for colorectal cancer. PMID:22306039

  4. How to improve colon cancer screening rates

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo; Garcia, Diego Paim Carvalho; Coelho, Debora Lucciola; De Lima, David Correa Alves; Petroianu, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a common cause of death throughout the world and may be prevented by routine control, which can detect precancerous neoplasms and early cancers before they undergo malignant transformation or metastasis. Three strategies may improve colon cancer screening rates: convince the population about the importance of undergoing a screening test; achieve higher efficacy in standard screening tests and make them more available to the community and develop new more sensitive and efficacious screening methods and make them available as routine tests. In this light, the present study seeks to review these three means through which to increase colon cancer screening rates. PMID:26688708

  5. Metastatic colonization by circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C

    2016-01-21

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in people with cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating tumour cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are only now starting to understand. These include infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue. They make metastasis a highly inefficient process. However, once metastases have been established, current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. An improved understanding of the mechanistic determinants of such colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  6. Experimental ulcerative disease of the colon.

    PubMed

    Watt, J; Marcus, R

    1975-01-01

    The oral administration to guinea-pigs of an aqueous solution of carrageenan derived from the red seaweed, Eucheuma spinosum, provides a useful, readily available experimental model for the study of ulcerative disease of the colon. Two types of ulcerative disease can be produced within a 4-6 week period, viz., ulceration localised mainly to the caecum by using 1% undegraded carrageenan in the drinking fluid, and extensive ulceration involving caecum, colon, and rectum by using 5% degraded carrageenan. Ulceration is probably due to the local action of carrageenan in the bowel. PMID:1202321

  7. Prehistoric human colonization of India.

    PubMed

    Misra, V N

    2001-11-01

    Human colonization in India encompasses a span of at least half-a-million years and is divided into two broad periods, namely the prehistoric (before the emergence of writing) and the historic (after writing). The prehistoric period is divided into stone, bronze and iron ages. The stone age is further divided into palaeolithic, mesolithic and neolithic periods. As the name suggests, the technology in these periods was primarily based on stone. Economically, the palaeolithic and mesolithic periods represented a nomadic, hunting-gathering way of life, while the neolithic period represented a settled, food-producing way of life. Subsequently copper was introduced as a new material and this period was designated as the chalcolithic period. The invention of agriculture, which took place about 8000 years ago, brought about dramatic changes in the economy, technology and demography of human societies. Human habitat in the hunting-gathering stage was essentially on hilly, rocky and forested regions, which had ample wild plant and animal food resources. The introduction of agriculture saw it shifting to the alluvial plains which had fertile soil and perennial availability of water. Hills and forests, which had so far been areas of attraction, now turned into areas of isolation. Agriculture led to the emergence of villages and towns and brought with it the division of society into occupational groups. The first urbanization took place during the bronze age in the arid and semi-arid region of northwest India in the valleys of the Indus and the Saraswati rivers, the latter represented by the now dry Ghaggar-Hakra bed. This urbanization is known as the Indus or Harappan civilization which flourished during 3500-1500 B.C. The rest of India during this period was inhabited by neolithic and chalcolithic farmers and mesolithic hunter-gatherers. With the introduction of iron technology about 3000 years ago, the focus of development shifted eastward into the Indo-Gangetic divide and

  8. Colon distention induces persistent visceral hypersensitivity by mechanotranscription of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, You-Min; Fu, Yu; Wu, Chester C; Xu, Guang-Yin; Huang, Li-Yen; Shi, Xuan-Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal pain and distention are major complaints in irritable bowel syndrome. Abdominal distention is mainly attributed to intraluminal retention of gas or solid contents, which may cause mechanical stress to the gut wall. Visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) may account for abdominal pain. We sought to determine whether tonic colon distention causes persistent VHS and if so whether mechanical stress-induced expression (mechanotranscription) of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a role in VHS. Human colonic SMCs were isolated and stretched in vitro to investigate whether mechanical stress upregulates expression of the pain mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Rat colon was distended with a 5-cm-long balloon, and gene expression of COX-2, visceromotor response (VMR), and sensory neuron excitability were determined. Static stretch of colonic SMCs induced marked expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein in a force- and time-dependent manner. Subnoxious tonic distention of the distal colon at ∼30-40 mmHg for 20 or 40 min induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in colonic smooth muscle, but not in the mucosa layer. Lumen distention also increased VMR in a force- and time-dependent manner. The increase of VMR persisted for at least 3 days. Patch-clamp experiments showed that the excitability of colon projecting sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia was markedly augmented, 24 h after lumen distention. Administration of COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 partially but significantly attenuated distention-induced VHS. In conclusion, tonic lumen distention upregulates expression of COX-2 in colonic SMC, and COX-2 contributes to persistent VHS. PMID:25540231

  9. Fluctuations of cell population in a colonic crypt.

    PubMed

    Pei, Qi-ming; Zhan, Xuan; Yang, Li-jian; Bao, Chun; Cao, Wei; Li, An-bang; Rozi, Anvar; Jia, Ya

    2014-03-01

    The number of stem cells in a colonic crypt is often very small, which leads to large intrinsic fluctuations in the cell population. Based on the model of cell population dynamics with linear feedback in a colonic crypt, we present a stochastic dynamics of the cell population [including stem cells (SCs), transit amplifying cells (TACs), and fully differentiated cells (FDCs)]. The Fano factor, covariance, and susceptibility formulas of the cell population around the steady state are derived by using the Langevin theory. In the range of physiologically reasonable parameter values, it is found that the stationary populations of TACs and FDCs exhibit an approximately threshold behavior as a function of the net growth rate of TACs, and the reproductions of TACs and FDCs can be classified into three regimens: controlled, crossover, and uncontrolled. With the increasing of the net growth rate of TACs, there is a maximum of the relative intrinsic fluctuations (i.e., the Fano factors) of TACs and FDCs in the crossover region. For a fixed differentiation rate and the net growth rate of SCs, the covariance of fluctuations between SCs and TACs has a maximum in the crossover region. However, the susceptibilities of both TACs and FDCs to the net growth rate of TACs have a minimum in the crossover region. PMID:24730882

  10. Fluctuations of cell population in a colonic crypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Qi-ming; Zhan, Xuan; Yang, Li-jian; Bao, Chun; Cao, Wei; Li, An-bang; Rozi, Anvar; Jia, Ya

    2014-03-01

    The number of stem cells in a colonic crypt is often very small, which leads to large intrinsic fluctuations in the cell population. Based on the model of cell population dynamics with linear feedback in a colonic crypt, we present a stochastic dynamics of the cell population [including stem cells (SCs), transit amplifying cells (TACs), and fully differentiated cells (FDCs)]. The Fano factor, covariance, and susceptibility formulas of the cell population around the steady state are derived by using the Langevin theory. In the range of physiologically reasonable parameter values, it is found that the stationary populations of TACs and FDCs exhibit an approximately threshold behavior as a function of the net growth rate of TACs, and the reproductions of TACs and FDCs can be classified into three regimens: controlled, crossover, and uncontrolled. With the increasing of the net growth rate of TACs, there is a maximum of the relative intrinsic fluctuations (i.e., the Fano factors) of TACs and FDCs in the crossover region. For a fixed differentiation rate and the net growth rate of SCs, the covariance of fluctuations between SCs and TACs has a maximum in the crossover region. However, the susceptibilities of both TACs and FDCs to the net growth rate of TACs have a minimum in the crossover region.

  11. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts

    PubMed Central

    Arena, Ellen T.; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host–pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host–pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent. PMID:26056271

  12. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ellen T; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2015-06-23

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host-pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host-pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent. PMID:26056271

  13. Order of arrival structures arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of plants.

    PubMed

    Werner, Gijsbert D A; Kiers, E Toby

    2015-03-01

    Priority effects - the impact of a species' arrival on subsequent community development - have been shown to influence species composition in many organisms. Whether priority effects among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) structure fungal root communities is not well understood. Here, we investigated whether priority effects influence the success of two closely related AMF species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Glomus aggregatum), hypothesizing that a resident AMF suppresses invader success, this effect is time-dependent and a resident will experience reduced growth when invaded. We performed two glasshouse experiments using modified pots, which permitted direct inoculation of resident and invading AMF on the roots. We quantified intraradical AMF abundances using quantitative PCR and visual colonization percentages. We found that both fungi suppressed the invading species and that this effect was strongly dependent on the time lag between inoculations. In contrast to our expectations, neither resident AMF was negatively affected by invasion. We show that order of arrival can influence the abundance of AMF species colonizing a host. These priority effects can have important implications for AMF ecology and the use of fungal inocula in sustainable agriculture. PMID:25298030

  14. The balance between two isoforms of LEF-1 regulates colon carcinoma growth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colon cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with a very poor prognosis. Although it has been suggested that different isoforms of the lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF-1) have opposing biological activities, the biological outcome of aberrant LEF-1 activation in colon cancer is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the different LEF-1 phenotypes on the growth of colon carcinoma cell lines. A deeper understanding of these processes might improve the targeted therapies for colon cancer by regulating the expression of LEF-1. Methods The role of different isoforms of LEF-1 on the growth of human colon carcinoma cell lines (SW480 and HT-29) was studied using various in vitro and in vivo assays. In vitro proliferation, migration, adhesion and apoptosis of the cells stably transfected of different isoforms of LEF-1 were monitored by MTT assay, carboxyfluorescein diacetate–succinimidyl ester staining, annexin V staining, ECM adhesion assay and transwell assay, respectively. In nude mice, the formation of neovasculature in the tumors formed by our constructed cells was measured by immunohistochemistry. All the data were analyzed using a t test, and data were treated as significant when p < 0.05. Results Overexpression of truncated LEF-1 (LEF-1-ΔL) in the colon cell lines, SW480 and HT29, inhibited their growth significantly in vitro and in vivo, but the full-length LEF-1 (LEF-1-FL) promoted the proliferation of HT29. Inactivation of Wnt signaling by LEF-1-ΔL reduced the expression of CXCR4 in colon cell lines, which may lead to a decrease in activities such as migration, adhesion and survival. In nude mice, the formation of neovasculature as well as an increase in tumor volume were inhibited by the short isoform of LEF-1. LEF-1-FL, however, caused an increase in all these parameters compared with controls. Conclusions These findings suggest that LEF-1 might play an important role in colon carcinogenesis by

  15. Directional wavelet based features for colonic polyp classification.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Georg; Tamaki, Toru; Tischendorf, J J W; Häfner, Michael; Yoshida, Shigeto; Tanaka, Shinji; Uhl, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    In this work, various wavelet based methods like the discrete wavelet transform, the dual-tree complex wavelet transform, the Gabor wavelet transform, curvelets, contourlets and shearlets are applied for the automated classification of colonic polyps. The methods are tested on 8 HD-endoscopic image databases, where each database is acquired using different imaging modalities (Pentax's i-Scan technology combined with or without staining the mucosa), 2 NBI high-magnification databases and one database with chromoscopy high-magnification images. To evaluate the suitability of the wavelet based methods with respect to the classification of colonic polyps, the classification performances of 3 wavelet transforms and the more recent curvelets, contourlets and shearlets are compared using a common framework. Wavelet transforms were already often and successfully applied to the classification of colonic polyps, whereas curvelets, contourlets and shearlets have not been used for this purpose so far. We apply different feature extraction techniques to extract the information of the subbands of the wavelet based methods. Most of the in total 25 approaches were already published in different texture classification contexts. Thus, the aim is also to assess and compare their classification performance using a common framework. Three of the 25 approaches are novel. These three approaches extract Weibull features from the subbands of curvelets, contourlets and shearlets. Additionally, 5 state-of-the-art non wavelet based methods are applied to our databases so that we can compare their results with those of the wavelet based methods. It turned out that extracting Weibull distribution parameters from the subband coefficients generally leads to high classification results, especially for the dual-tree complex wavelet transform, the Gabor wavelet transform and the Shearlet transform. These three wavelet based transforms in combination with Weibull features even outperform the state

  16. Novel diet-related mouse model of colon cancer parallels human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Anil R; Prasad, Shilpa; Nguyen, Huy; Facista, Alexander; Lewis, Cristy; Zaitlin, Beryl; Bernstein, Harris; Bernstein, Carol

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the close parallels between our novel diet-related mouse model of colon cancer and human colon cancer. METHODS: Twenty-two wild-type female mice (ages 6-8 wk) were fed the standard control diet (AIN-93G) and an additional 22 female mice (ages 6-8 wk) were fed the control diet supplemented with 0.2% deoxycholic acid [diet + deoxycholic acid (DOC)] for 10 mo. Tumors occurred in the colons of mice fed diet + DOC and showed progression to colon cancer [adenocarcinoma (AC)]. This progression is through the stages of tubular adenoma (TA), TA with high grade dysplasia or adenoma with sessile serrated morphology, intramucosal AC, AC stage T1, and AC stage T2. The mouse tumors were compared to human tumors at the same stages by histopathological analysis. Sections of the small and large intestines of mice and humans were evaluated for glandular architecture, cellular and nuclear morphology including cellular orientation, cellular and nuclear atypia, pleomorphism, mitotic activity, frequency of goblet cells, crypt architecture, ulceration, penetration of crypts through the muscularis mucosa and presence of malignant crypts in the muscularis propria. In addition, preserved colonic tissues from genetically similar male mice, obtained from a prior experiment, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The male mice had been fed the control diet or diet + DOC. Four molecular markers were evaluated: 8-OH-dG, DNA repair protein ERCC1, autophagy protein beclin-1 and the nuclear location of beta-catenin in the stem cell region of crypts. Also, male mice fed diet + DOC plus 0.007% chlorogenic acid (diet + DOC + CGA) were evaluated for ERCC1, beclin-1 and nuclear location of beta-catenin. RESULTS: Humans with high levels of diet-related DOC in their colons are at a substantially increased risk of developing colon cancer. The mice fed diet + DOC had levels of DOC in their colons comparable to that of humans on a high fat diet. The 22 mice without added DOC in their diet

  17. Six Ways to Reduce Your Risk of Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Six Ways to Reduce Your Risk of Colon Cancer Diet, weight and physical activity play a significant ... March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Half of the colon cancer cases in the United States could be prevented ...

  18. A Little Excess Weight May Boost Colon Cancer Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... 158930.html A Little Excess Weight May Boost Colon Cancer Survival Researchers saw an effect, but experts ... a surprise, a new study found that overweight colon cancer patients tended to have better survival than ...

  19. Sigmoid volvulus after laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Sadatomo, Ai; Miyakura, Yasuyuki; Zuiki, Toru; Koinuma, Koji; Horie, Hisanaga; Lefor, Alan T; Yasuda, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-01

    We report the first case of sigmoid volvulus after laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon cancer. The patient is a 75-year-old man who presented with the sudden onset of severe abdominal pain. He had undergone laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer 2 years before presentation. CT scan showed a distended sigmoid colon with a mesenteric twist, or "whirl sign." Colonoscopy showed a mucosal spiral and luminal stenosis with dilated sigmoid colon distally and ischemic mucosa. The diagnosis of ischemic colonic necrosis due to sigmoid volvulus was established. Resection of the necrotic sigmoid colon was performed and a descending colon stoma was created. A long remnant sigmoid colon and chronic constipation may contribute to the development of sigmoid volvulus after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy. Prompt diagnosis is essential for adequate treatment, and colonoscopy aids in the diagnosis of ischemic changes in patients without definitive findings of a gangrenous colon. PMID:23879414

  20. Researchers Get Closer to Test Predicting Colon Cancer's Return

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Closer to Test Predicting Colon Cancer's Return DNA-based screen would aid treatment decisions for people ... News) -- A blood test that detects bits of DNA shed from colon cancers may someday help doctors ...

  1. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy. PMID:23888587

  2. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  3. Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer is an area of controversy in medical oncology. Adjuvant chemotherapy aims to eradicate micrometastatic disease present at the time of surgery, preventing the development of distant metastatic disease and thereby curing those patients of their cancer. National and international guidelines for the adjuvant treatment of stage II colon cancer recommend a range of treatment options from observation to chemotherapy with single-agent or combination regimens, depending on the presence or absence of high-risk features (poorly differentiated histology, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of perineural invasion, report of < 12 lymph nodes, bowel obstruction, localized perforation, or positive margins). In the one prospective study designed to address the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer, a small but statistically significant benefit in overall survival was seen for those patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy; however, multiple meta-analyses and retrospective subgroup analyses have called these findings into question. Though there may be a role for adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer, its incremental benefit is small, at best, and comes with the risks of real and rarely fatal complications of chemotherapy. PMID:26648796

  4. Colonizing Mars - The new human migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    1993-09-01

    A four-step plan for colonizing Mars is discussed. The provision of water and oxygen by the colonists from Martian sources is addressed along with the need for terraforming. An argument is made for the immediate planning of such a colony.

  5. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats.

    PubMed

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body's H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  6. Colonization factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, T P Vipin; Sakellaris, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of life-threatening diarrheal disease around the world. The major aspects of ETEC virulence are colonization of the small intestine and the secretion of enterotoxins which elicit diarrhea. Intestinal colonization is mediated, in part, by adhesins displayed on the bacterial cell surface. As colonization of the intestine is the critical first step in the establishment of an infection, it represents a potential point of intervention for the prevention of infections. Therefore, colonization factors (CFs) have been important subjects of research in the field of ETEC virulence. Research in this field has revealed that ETEC possesses a large array of serologically distinct CFs that differ in composition, structure, and function. Most ETEC CFs are pili (fimbriae) or related fibrous structures, while other adhesins are simple outer membrane proteins lacking any macromolecular structure. This chapter reviews the genetics, structure, function, and regulation of ETEC CFs and how such studies have contributed to our understanding of ETEC virulence and opened up potential opportunities for the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. PMID:25596032

  7. Peri-colonic haematoma following routine colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Page, Felicity; Adedeji, Olfunso

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We present a case of an extra-luminal haematoma following routine colonoscopy. This case highlights an uncommon but potentially life threatening complication in which there is little published literature to date. Presentation of case A 73 year old male presented with abdominal pain and a reduction in haemoglobin following an uneventful colonoscopy. The imaging had been required as part of colorectal cancer follow up. Initial differential diagnosis included colonic perforation and the patient was admitted for further investigations. Same day CT scan imaging revealed an extra-luminal haematoma in the mid descending colon. The patient was managed non-operatively and was discharged with antibiotics following a period of observation. Discussion Colonoscopy is a highly effective imaging modality for direct visualisation of the lower gastrointestinal tract and for simultaneous diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. In recent years the use of colonoscopy has increased greatly, this is largely due to an increasingly aging population, increased availability of the resource and as a consequence of the implementation of the Bowel Cancer Screening Programme. Extra-colonic bleeding following colonoscopy is rare. Causes that have been identified in the literature include splenic injury, mesenteric tears, hepatic injury and retroperitoneal haemorrhage. To the authors' knowledge, there is very little published literature specifically on isolated peri-colonic haematomas following colonoscopy. Conclusion This case highlights an unusual but potentially life threatening complication following colonoscopy. Endoscopists and clinicians should be aware of the diagnosis to allow for early recognition and appropriate management. PMID:26900460

  8. Cancer of the Colon and Rectum

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 134,490 % of All New Cancer Cases 8.0% Estimated Deaths in 2016 49,190 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 1,177,556 people living with colon and ...

  9. Prostate, Lung, Colon, and Ovary Prospective Study

    Cancer.gov

    A large cohort study of etiologic determinants of cancer carried out within an NCI trial for the evaluation of screening procedures for the early detection of prostate, lung, colon, and ovarian cancer (the PLCO Trial) at 10 U.S. screening centers

  10. Barium granuloma of the transverse colon.

    PubMed Central

    McKee, P. H.; Cameron, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    A case of barium sulphate granuloma of the transverse colon following gunshot wounds to the abdomen has been described. Scanning electron microscopy with electron probe microanalysis was used to confirm the presence of barium sulphate and the absence of lead or other elements related to the gunshot wounds. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:740599

  11. Stability of peptide drugs in the colon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Yadav, Vipul; Smart, Alice L; Tajiri, Shinichiro; Basit, Abdul W

    2015-10-12

    This study was the first to investigate the colonic stability of 17 peptide molecules (insulin, calcitonin, glucagon, secretin, somatostatin, desmopressin, oxytocin, Arg-vasopressin, octreotide, ciclosporin, leuprolide, nafarelin, buserelin, histrelin, [D-Ser(4)]-gonadorelin, deslorelin, and goserelin) in a model of the large intestine using mixed human faecal bacteria. Of these, the larger peptides - insulin, calcitonin, somatostatin, glucagon and secretin - were metabolized rapidly, with complete degradation observed within 5 min. In contrast, a number of the smaller peptides - Arg-vasopressin, desmopressin, oxytocin, gonadorelin, goserelin, buserelin, leuprolide, nafarelin and deslorelin - degraded more slowly, while octreotide, histrelin and ciclosporin were seen to be more stable as compared to the other small peptides under the same conditions. Peptide degradation rate was directly correlated to peptide lipophilicity (logP); those peptides with a higher logP were more stable in the colonic model (R(2)=0.94). In the absence of human faecal bacteria, all peptides were stable. This study highlights the impact of the colonic environment - in particular, the gut microbiota - on the metabolism of peptide drugs, and identifies potential peptide candidates for drug delivery to the colon. PMID:26111980

  12. Colonic perianastomotic carcinogenesis in an experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Holanda, Sergio; Rodrigo, Luis; Pinyol-Felis, Carme; Vinyas-Salas, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Background To examine the effect of anastomosis on experimental carcinogenesis in the colon of rats. Methods Forty-three 10-week-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were operated on by performing an end-to-side ileorectostomy. Group A:16 rats received no treatment. Group B: 27 rats received 18 subcutaneous injections weekly at a dose of 21 mg/kg wt of 1–2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH), from the eighth day after the intervention. Animals were sacrificed between 25–27 weeks. The number of tumours, their localization, size and microscopic characteristics were recorded. A paired chi-squared analysis was performed comparing tumoral induction in the perianastomotic zone with the rest of colon with faeces. Results No tumours appeared in the dimethylhydrazine-free group. The percentage tumoral area was greater in the perianastomotic zone compared to tumours which had developed in the rest of colon with faeces (p = 0.014). Conclusion We found a cocarcinogenic effect due to the creation of an anastomosis, when using an experimental model of colonic carcinogenesis induced by DMH in rats. PMID:18667092

  13. Colonic stenting in malignant large bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Rajadurai, Vinita A; Levitt, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In patients who are surgical candidates, colonic stenting is beneficial for preoperative decompression in large bowel obstruction, as it can convert a surgical procedure from an emergent two-step approach into an elective one-step resection with a primary anastomosis. PMID:27398210

  14. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body’s H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  15. Microbial dysbiosis and colon carcinogenesis: could colon cancer be considered a bacteria-related disease?

    PubMed Central

    Amiot, Aurelien; Le Baleur, Yann; Levy, Michael; Auriault, Marie-Luce; Van Nhieu, Jeanne Tran; Delchier, Jean Charles

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is posing an increasingly important burden on the health care system, with western countries seeing a growing incidence of the disease. Except for germline DNA mutations which have been attributed to less than 5% of patients, little is known about the main causes of CRC. However, environment factors such as food, lifestyle and medication are now suspected to have a major influence on inducing cancers. Today, exhaustive quantitative and qualitative evaluation of all environmental factors is not possible. Various environment-induced diseases have been characterized based on colon microflora, also called microbiota, analyses. Growing data have shown specific changes in microflora (i.e. dysbiosis) in the stools of patients with colon cancer or those adherent to the colonic mucosa. Thus, it appears that microbiota may be considered a platform offering host and environment interactions for studying CRCs. The hypothesis that colon cancer might be a bacteria-related disease is suggested and perspectives are discussed. PMID:23634186

  16. [Brazilian colonization in the Paraguayan agricultural frontier].

    PubMed

    Neupert, R F

    1991-04-01

    This work briefly describes Brazilian colonization of the Paraguayan agricultural frontier, analyzes factors responsible for expelling population from Brazil and for attracting Brazilians to Paraguay, and assesses the economic and social consequences of immigration to the area. Paraguay's vast and sparsely populated agricultural frontier in areas outside the Central subregion underwent a process of intense colonization from the early 1960s to the mid-1980s. The Paraguayan government initiated an ambitious colonization program in 1963 to increase production, relieve population pressure and subdivision of small parcels in the Central subregion, encourage agricultural modernization, and produce a more diversified agriculture. Paraguayan agriculture in the early 1960s suffered from excessive concentration of land in a few hands and resulting exclusion of around 3/4 of workers from ownership and from any possibility of obtaining credit to fund technological improvements. Results of studies 2 decades after implementation of the colonization plan suggest that it has failed in significant areas. Although a considerable population redistribution alleviated pressure in the Central subregion, it apparently resulted more from spontaneous movement of peasants outside the colonization areas than from the official program. Concentration of lands is now occurring in the colonization area. Assistance for agricultural modernization and diversification of production in the peasant sector has been minimal. On the other hand, production of soy, wheat, and cotton for export increased substantially, because of an entrepreneurial agriculture capitalized by foreign as well as national interests The unmet goals of the colonization program would have required structural reforms rather than simple spatial redistribution of the population. Many of the colonists in the 1970s were Brazilian families displaced by mechanized agriculture in the southern states of Parana, Santa Catarina, and Rio

  17. The effects of scalpel, harmonic scalpel and monopolar electrocautery on the healing of colonic anastomosis after colonic resection

    PubMed Central

    Pekcici, M. Recep; Altunkaya, Canan; Fidanci, Vildan; Kilinc, Aytul; Ozer, Huseyin; Tekeli, Ahmet; Aydinuraz, Kuzey; Guler, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In our study, the effects of harmonic scalpel, scalpel, and monopolar electrocautery usage on the health and healing of colon anastomosis after resection was investigated. Methods In this study, 120 female albino Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups each containing 40 rats. Group A, resection with scalpel; group B, resection with monopolar electrocautery; group C, resection with harmonic scalpel. The groups were divided into 4 subgroups consisting of 10 rats and analysed in the postoperative 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 7th days. Anastomotic bursting pressures, hydroxyproline levels and histopathological parameters were surrogate parameters for evaluating wound healing. Results The tissue hydroxyproline levels did not show any significant difference between the groups and subgroups. The mean bursting pressure of group A on the 5th day was significantly higher than groups B and C (P < 0.001). When the fibroblast and fibrosis scores were evaluated, scores of group C on the 5th day were significantly higher than the other groups, but the results of bursting pressures and biochemical parameters did not support the fibroblast and fibrosis scores. There were not any significant differences between the groups in other histopathologic parameters. Conclusion The use of monopolar electrocautery needs more attention since the device causes tissue destruction. The obliterating effect of harmonic scalpel on luminal organs is an important problem, especially if an anastomosis is planned. Despite the disadvantages of scalpel, its efficacy on early wound healing is better than the other devices. PMID:27274507

  18. Postoperative differences between colonization and infection after pediatric cardiac surgery-a propensity matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to identify the postoperative risk factors associated with the conversion of colonization to postoperative infection in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods Following approval from the Institutional Review Board, patient demographics, co-morbidities, surgery details, transfusion requirements, inotropic infusions, laboratory parameters and positive microbial results were recorded during the hospital stay, and the patients were divided into two groups: patients with clinical signs of infection and patients with only positive cultures but without infection during the postoperative period. Using propensity scores, 141 patients with infection were matched to 141 patients with positive microbial cultures but without signs of infection. Our database consisted of 1665 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent cardiac surgery between January 2004 and December 2008 at a single center. The association between the patient group with infection and the group with colonization was analyzed after propensity score matching of the perioperative variables. Results 179 patients (9.3%) had infection, and 253 patients (15.2%) had colonization. The occurrence of Gram-positive species was significantly greater in the colonization group (p = 0.004). The C-reactive protein levels on the first and second postoperative days were significantly greater in the infection group (p = 0.02 and p = 0.05, respectively). The sum of all the positive cultures obtained during the postoperative period was greater in the infection group compared to the colonization group (p = 0.02). The length of the intensive care unit stay (p < 0.001) was significantly longer in the infection group compared to the control group. Conclusions Based on our results, we uncovered independent relationships between the conversion of colonization to infection regarding positive S. aureus and bloodstream results, as well as significant differences

  19. An Adaptive Paradigm for Computer-Aided Detection of Colonic Polyps

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huafeng; Liang, Zhengrong; Li, Lihong C.; Han, Hao; Song, Bowen; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Barish, Matthew A.; Lascarides, Chris E.

    2015-01-01

    Most previous efforts in developing computer-aided detection (CADe) of colonic polyps apply similar measures or parameters to detect polyps regardless their locations under an implicit assumption that all the polyps reside in a similar local environment, e.g., on a relatively flat colon wall. In reality, this implicit assumption is frequently invalid, because the haustral folds can have a very different local environment from that of the relatively flat colon wall. We conjecture that this assumption may be a major cause of missing detection of polyps, especially small polyps (<10mm linear size) located on the haustral folds. In this paper, we take the concept of adaptive-ness and present an adaptive paradigm for CADe of colonic polyps. Firstly, we decompose the complicated colon structure into two simplified sub-structures, each of which has similar properties, of (1) relatively flat colon wall and (2) ridge-shaped haustral folds. Then we develop local environment descriptions to adaptively reflect each of these two simplified sub-structures. To show the impact of the adaptive-ness of the local environment descriptions upon the polyp detection task, we focus on the local geometrical measures of the volume data for both the detection of initial polyp candidates (IPCs) and the reduction of false positives (FPs) in the IPC pool. The experimental outcome using the local geometrical measures is very impressive such that not only the previously-missed small polyps on the folds are detected, but also the previously miss-removed small polyps on the folds during FP reduction are retained. It is expected that this adaptive paradigm will have a great impact on detecting the small polyps, measuring their volumes and volume changes over time, and optimizing their management plan. PMID:26348125

  20. Effect of relative humidity on fungal colonization of fiberglass insulation.

    PubMed Central

    Ezeonu, I M; Noble, J A; Simmons, R B; Price, D L; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    1994-01-01

    Fiberglass duct liners and fiberglass duct boards from eight buildings whose occupants complained of unacceptable or moldy odors in the air were found to be heavily colonized by fungi, particularly by Aspergillus versicolor. Unused fiberglass was found to be susceptible to fungal colonization in environmental chambers dependent upon relative humidity. No colonization was observed at relative humidities below 50%. Images PMID:8031101

  1. 21 CFR 876.5220 - Colonic irrigation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Colonic irrigation system. 876.5220 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5220 Colonic irrigation system. (a) Identification. A colonic irrigation system is a device intended to instill water into the...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5220 - Colonic irrigation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Colonic irrigation system. 876.5220 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5220 Colonic irrigation system. (a) Identification. A colonic irrigation system is a device intended to instill water into the...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5220 - Colonic irrigation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Colonic irrigation system. 876.5220 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5220 Colonic irrigation system. (a) Identification. A colonic irrigation system is a device intended to instill water into the...

  4. Functions of the Colon: An Empirical Test of Scholarly Character.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    "Titular colonicity" (presence of colon in title) is observed to discriminate among degrees of scholarly character in the order specified: theoretical journals exhibited the greatest colonicity (34 percent), empirical next (18 percent) and pedagogical least (10 percent). Implications for theory and research are noted. (Author/RL)

  5. 21 CFR 876.5220 - Colonic irrigation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colonic irrigation system. 876.5220 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5220 Colonic irrigation system. (a) Identification. A colonic irrigation system is a device intended to instill water into the...

  6. Digital bowel cleansing free detection method of colonic polyp from fecal tagging CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mori, Kensaku; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Takayama, Tetsuji; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Nawano, Shigeru

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a digital bowel cleansing (DBC) free detection method of colonic polyp from fecal tagging CT images. Virtual colonoscopy (VC) or CT colonography is a new colon diagnostic method to examine the inside of the colon. However, since the colon has many haustra and its shape is long and convoluted, there is a risk of overlooking of lesions existing in blinded areas caused by haustra. Automated polyp detection from colonic CT images will reduce the risk of overlooking. Although many methods for polyp detection have been proposed, these methods needed DBC to detect polyps surrounded by tagged fecal material (TFM). However, DBC may changes shapes of polyps or haustra while removing TFM and it adversely affect polyp detection. We propose a colonic polyp detection method that enables us to detect polyps surrounded by either the air or the TFM simultaneously without any DBC processes. CT values inside polyps surrounded by the air and polyps surrounded by the TFM regions tend to gradually increase (blob structure) and decrease (inverse-blob structure) from outward to inward, respectively. We thus employ blob and inverse-blob structure enhancement filters based on the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix to detect polyps using intensity characteristic of polyps. False positive elimination is performed using three feature values: the volume, maximum value of the filter outputs, and the standard deviation of CT values inside polyp candidate regions. We applied the proposed method to 104 cases of abdominal CT images. Sensitivity for polyps >= 6 mm was 91.2% with 7.8 FPs/case.

  7. Strong Spatial Influence on Colonization Rates in a Pioneer Zooplankton Metacommunity

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Dagmar; Cottenie, Karl; Badosa, Anna; Green, Andy J.

    2012-01-01

    The magnitude of community-wide dispersal is central to metacommunity models, yet dispersal is notoriously difficult to quantify in passive and cryptic dispersers such as many freshwater invertebrates. By overcoming the problem of quantifying dispersal rates, colonization rates into new habitats can provide a useful estimate of the magnitude of effective dispersal. Here we study the influence of spatial and local processes on colonization rates into new ponds that indicate differential dispersal limitation of major zooplankton taxa, with important implications for metacommunity dynamics. We identify regional and local factors that affect zooplankton colonization rates and spatial patterns in a large-scale experimental system. Our study differs from others in the unique setup of the experimental pond area by which we were able to test spatial and environmental variables at a large spatial scale. We quantified colonization rates separately for the Copepoda, Cladocera and Rotifera from samples collected over a period of 21 months in 48 newly constructed temporary ponds of 0.18–2.95 ha distributed in a restored wetland area of 2,700 ha in Doñana National Park, Southern Spain. Species richness upon initial sampling of new ponds was about one third of that in reference ponds, although the rate of detection of new species from thereon were not significantly different, probably owing to high turnover in the dynamic, temporary reference ponds. Environmental heterogeneity had no detectable effect on colonization rates in new ponds. In contrast, connectivity, space (based on latitude and longitude) and surface area were key determinants of colonization rates for copepods and cladocerans. This suggests dispersal limitation in cladocerans and copepods, but not in rotifers, possibly due to differences in propagule size and abundance. PMID:22792241

  8. Cyclic AMP-induced K+ secretion occurs independently of Cl- secretion in rat distal colon.

    PubMed

    Sandle, Geoffrey I; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M

    2012-08-01

    cAMP induces both active Cl(-) and active K(+) secretion in mammalian colon. It is generally assumed that a mechanism for K(+) exit is essential to maintain cells in the hyperpolarized state, thus favoring a sustained Cl(-) secretion. Both Kcnn4c and Kcnma1 channels are located in colon, and this study addressed the questions of whether Kcnn4c and/or Kcnma1 channels mediate cAMP-induced K(+) secretion and whether cAMP-induced K(+) secretion provides the driving force for Cl(-) secretion. Forskolin (FSK)-enhanced short-circuit current (indicator of net electrogenic ion transport) and K(+) fluxes were measured simultaneously in colonic mucosa under voltage-clamp conditions. Mucosal Na(+) orthovanadate (P-type ATPase inhibitor) inhibited active K(+) absorption normally present in rat distal colon. In the presence of mucosal Na(+) orthovanadate, serosal FSK induced both K(+) and Cl(-) secretion. FSK-induced K(+) secretion was 1) not inhibited by either mucosal or serosal 1-[(2-chlorophenyl) diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34; a Kcnn4 channel blocker), 2) inhibited (92%) by mucosal iberiotoxin (Kcnma1 channel blocker), and 3) not affected by mucosal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator inhibitor (CFTR(inh)-172). By contrast, FSK-induced Cl(-) secretion was 1) completely inhibited by serosal TRAM-34, 2) not inhibited by either mucosal or serosal iberiotoxin, and 3) completely inhibited by mucosal CFTR(inh)-172. These results indicate that cAMP-induced colonic K(+) secretion is mediated via Kcnma1 channels located in the apical membrane and most likely contributes to stool K(+) losses in secretory diarrhea. On the other hand, cAMP-induced colonic Cl(-) secretion requires the activity of Kcnn4b channels located in the basolateral membrane and is not dependent on the concurrent activation of apical Kcnma1 channels. PMID:22648950

  9. Role of urokinase and its receptor in basal and stimulated colonic epithelial cell migration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A; Gibson, P

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Migration of colonic epithelial cells is important for mucosal repair following injury. The urokinase (u-PA) system regulates migration in other cell types.
AIM—To examine the role of u-PA and its receptor (u-PAR) in colonic epithelial cell migration.
METHODS—Migration was assessed over 24 hours in circular wounds made in confluent monolayers of LIM1215 and Caco-2 human colon cancer cells. The function of u-PA and u-PAR was ablated with antisense oligonucleotides to block expression, with synthetic u-PA peptides to block interaction, and with aprotinin to block u-PA mediated proteolysis.
RESULTS—Migration was stimulated two to threefold by exogenous u-PA, an effect dependent on u-PAR binding but independent of u-PA mediated mitogenesis and proteolysis. Expression of u-PA and u-PAR was inhibited by 80% by the appropriate antisense oligonucleotide. Basal migration and the motogenic effects of butyrate, epidermal growth factor, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate were suppressed by the u-PAR antisense oligonucleotide (40-60%) but were at best minimally affected following inhibition of u-PA expression and binding. 
CONCLUSIONS—In an in vitro model of wounded colonic epithelium, u-PAR promotes cell migration through mechanisms that are not exclusively dependent on u-PA binding. Therefore, u-PA and u-PAR may contribute to colonic mucosal repair in vivo.


Keywords: colon; migration; urokinase; urokinase receptor; epidermal growth factor; butyrate; protein kinase C PMID:10861271

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates cell motility in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ssu-Ming; Lin, Chingju; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Chiu, Chien-Ming; Fang, Chia-Wei; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Dar-Ren; Yeh, Wei-Lan

    2015-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that has been shown to affect cancer cell metastasis and migration. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of BDNF-induced cell migration in colon cancer cells. The migratory activities of two colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and SW480, were found to be increased in the presence of human BDNF. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO)-1 is known to be involved in the development and progression of tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie HO-1 in the regulation of colon cancer cell migration remain unclear. Expression of HO-1 protein and mRNA increased in response to BDNF stimulation. The BDNF-induced increase in cell migration was antagonized by a HO-1 inhibitor and HO-1 siRNA. Furthermore, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also increased in response to BDNF stimulation, as did VEGF mRNA expression and transcriptional activity. The increase in BDNF-induced cancer cell migration was antagonized by a VEGF-neutralizing antibody. Moreover, transfection with HO-1 siRNA effectively reduced the increased VEGF expression induced by BDNF. The BDNF-induced cell migration was regulated by the ERK, p38, and Akt signaling pathways. Furthermore, BDNF-increased HO-1 and VEGF promoter transcriptional activity were inhibited by ERK, p38, and AKT pharmacological inhibitors and dominant-negative mutants in colon cancer cells. These results indicate that BDNF increases the migration of colon cancer cells by regulating VEGF/HO-1 activation through the ERK, p38, and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. The results of this study may provide a relevant contribution to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which BDNF promotes colon cancer cell motility. PMID:25876647

  11. Folate depletion impairs DNA excision repair in the colon of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Choi, S; Kim, Y; Weitzel, J; Mason, J

    1998-01-01

    Background/Aims—Diminished folate status appears to promote colonic carcinogenesis by, as of yet, undefined mechanisms. Impaired DNA repair plays a significant role in the evolution of many colon cancers. Since folate is essential for the de novo synthesis of nucleotides and since folate depletion has previously been associated with excessive DNA strand breaks, it was hypothesised that folate depletion may impair DNA repair. Studies were therefore performed to examine whether folate depletion affects the two major categories of DNA repair. 
Methods—Study 1: eight weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed on diets containing either 0 or 8 mg folate/kg diet with 1% succinylsulphathiazole for four weeks. After viable colonocytes had been harvested, DNA excision repair was evaluated by a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. Study 2: eighteen animals were fed on similar diets for five weeks. Also in study 2, 18 additional rats were fed on the same defined diet without succinylsulphathiazole for 15 weeks. Weekly injections with the procarcinogen, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (20 mg base/kg), were administered to the latter group of animals. Five microsatellite loci from different chromosomes were investigated for instability in hepatic and colonic DNA. 
Results—In study 1, a significantly retarded rate of DNA excision repair was observed in the folate deficient colonocytes compared with controls (p<0.05). In study 2, there was no evidence of instability at the five microsatellite loci associated with either short or long term folate depletion. 
Conclusions—Folate deficiency impairs DNA excision repair in rat colonic mucosa; a similar degree of deficiency, even when administered in conjunction with a colonic carcinogen, did not produce evidence of a widespread defect in mismatch repair. 

 Keywords: folate; colon cancer; DNA repair; single cell gel electrophoresis; microsatellite instability; rat PMID:9771411

  12. Dynamic occupancy models for explicit colonization processes.

    PubMed

    Broms, Kristin M; Hooten, Mevin B; Johnson, Devin S; Altwegg, Res; Conquest, Loveday L

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic, multi-season occupancy model framework has become a popular tool for modeling open populations with occupancies that change over time through local colonizations and extinctions. However, few versions of the model relate these probabilities to the occupancies of neighboring sites or patches. We present a modeling framework that incorporates this information and is capable of describing a wide variety of spatiotemporal colonization and extinction processes. A key feature of the model is that it is based on a simple set of small-scale rules describing how the process evolves. The result is a dynamic process that can account for complicated large-scale features. In our model, a site is more likely to be colonized if more of its neighbors were previously occupied and if it provides more appealing environmental characteristics than its neighboring sites. Additionally, a site without occupied neighbors may also become colonized through the inclusion of a long-distance dispersal process. Although similar model specifications have been developed for epidemiological applications, ours formally accounts for detectability using the well-known occupancy modeling framework. After demonstrating the viability and potential of this new form of dynamic occupancy model in a simulation study, we use it to obtain inference for the ongoing Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) invasion in South Africa. Our results suggest that the Common Myna continues to enlarge its distribution and its spread via short distance movement, rather than long-distance dispersal. Overall, this new modeling framework provides a powerful tool for managers examining the drivers of colonization including short- vs. long-distance dispersal, habitat quality, and distance from source populations. PMID:27008788

  13. Dynamic occupancy models fo