Science.gov

Sample records for affecting carbon fluxes

  1. Do volcanic emissions affect carbon gas fluxes in peatlands?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Nicola; Delmelle, Pierre; Toet, Sylvia; Gauci, Vincent; Ineson, Phil

    2010-05-01

    Recently, a link has been suggested between volcanic deposition of SO4 and the suppression of CH4 emissions in northern peatlands (Gauci et al., 2008). This link stems from the widely accepted idea that acid rain SO4 additions to peatlands can cause a shift in microbial communities as SO4 reducing bacteria out-compete methanogens for substrates, which results in a suppression of CH4 emission. However, volcanic emissions contain besides S other chemically reactive species that are potentially harmful to the environment. In particular, gaseous and particulate F emissions from volcanoes constitute a steady or intermittent source of F emission and deposition into the environment both close to the source and within fallout range of large eruptions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of volcanic depositions of SO4, both alone and in combination with F, on CH4 emission in peatlands. Peat mesocosms collected from Pennine uplands in the UK were treated with weekly pulses of Na2SO4 and NaF over 20 weeks in doses of 74 kg SO4/ ha and 13.5 and 135 kg F /ha. CH4 emissions were measured at regular intervals by taking headspace samples, which were analysed by GC-FID. CO2 fluxes were also measured using a portable Infra Red Gas Analyser (IRGA). No significant differences in CH4 and CO2 emissions were observed for any of the treatments when compared to the controls, which had only received deionised water. These findings are in contrast with previous studies where SO4 reduces CH4 emission in peatlands. The reason for this is unclear but may be due to the heterogeneous nature of peat soils. An alternative explanation relates to the previous history of the soils used in the mesocosms which are known to have been previously exposed to large volumes of anthropogenic S pollution. This may have caused microbial communities to evolve and become acclimatised to high levels of S addition. In either case, the assumption that CH4 suppression in peatlands occurs upon

  2. Carbon dioxide flux as affected by tillage and irrigation in soil converted from perennial forages to annual crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the most significant contributors to regional and global warming as well as climatic change. However, CO2 flux from the soil surface to the atmosphere can be affected by modifications in soil physical properties resulting from changes in land ma...

  3. Climatic Versus Biotic Constraints on Carbon and Water Fluxes in Seasonally Drought-affected Ponderosa Pine Ecosystems. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, P. A.; Law, B. E.; Williams, M.; Irvine, J.; Kurpius, M.; Moore, D.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the relative importance of climatic versus biotic controls on gross primary production (GPP) and water vapor fluxes in seasonally drought-affected ponderosa pine forests. The study was conducted in young (YS), mature (MS), and old stands (OS) over 4 years at the AmeriFlux Metolius sites. Model simulations showed that interannual variation of GPP did not follow the same trends as precipitation, and effects of climatic variation were smallest at the OS (50%), and intermediate at the YS (<20%). In the young, developing stand, interannual variation in leaf area has larger effects on fluxes than climate, although leaf area is a function of climate in that climate can interact with age-related shifts in carbon allocation and affect whole-tree hydraulic conductance. Older forests, with well-established root systems, appear to be better buffered from effects of seasonal drought and interannual climatic variation. Interannual variation of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was also lowest at the OS, where NEE is controlled more by interannual variation of ecosystem respiration, 70% of which is from soil, than by the variation of GPP, whereas variation in GPP is the primary reason for interannual changes in NEE at the YS and MS. Across spatially heterogeneous landscapes with high frequency of younger stands resulting from natural and anthropogenic disturbances, interannual climatic variation and change in leaf area are likely to result in large interannual variation in GPP and NEE.

  4. Processes Affecting Carbon Fluxes of Grassland Ecosystems Under Elevated CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Owensby, C.E.; Ham, J.M.; Rice, C.W.; Knapp, A.K.

    1998-03-14

    Final report of a project which exposed native tallgrass prairie to twice-ambient atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Improved water use efficiency increased biomass production and increased soil organic matter. Twice ambient CO{sub 2} decreased canopy evapotranspiration by 22%, but, maintained an increased net carbon sequestration.

  5. How Seasonal Drought Affect Carbon and Water Fluxes of Alternative Energy Crops in the US?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, E.; Hussain, M. Z.; Zeri, M.; Masters, M.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; DeLucia, E. H.; Bernacchi, C.

    2014-12-01

    The cellulosic biomass of Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), Miscanthus (Miscanthus giganteus) and native prairie are considered candidate second-generation biofuels, potentially resulting in partial replacement annual row crops within the Midwestern US. There is an increasing focus to study the environmental impact of agricultural crops, however not much is known on the influence on the energy, carbon and water cycles of energy crops, especially under drought conditions. This study compares the impact of drought episodes (in 2011 and 2012) on evapotranspiration (ET), net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and water use efficiency (WUE; equals to NEP/ET) for Switchgrass (SW), Miscanthus (MXG), Maize (MZ) and native prairie (NP) grown in Central Illinois using the eddy covariance technique. Due to the prolonged drought and the rapid growth development with increasing ET of MXG in 2012, large water deficit (precipitation-ET) was observed for each species up to the highest deficit of -360 mm for this species. The gross primary production (GPP) of MZ was radically decreased by the drought in 2011 and 2012, while SW and NP were not influenced. MXG increased NEP throughout the typically wet and drought years, mainly due to the decrease in respiration and by the largest GPP upon the drought in 2012. Despite having the largest water deficit, MXG showed an enhanced WUE of 12.8 and 11.4 Kg C ha-1mm-1 in 2011 and 2012, respectively, in comparison to years typical to the region with WUE of 3.7-7.3 Kg C ha-1mm-1. Other species did not show a significant enhancement of WUE. Therefore we conclude that out of the studied species, MXG has more access to water, and uses this water the most efficiently to store carbon, under drought conditions.

  6. California's Future Carbon Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K.; Gertz, M.

    2008-12-01

    The diversity of the climate and vegetation systems in the state of California provides a unique opportunity to study carton dioxide exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. In order to accurately calculate the carbon flux, this study couples the sophisticated analytical surface layer model ACASA (Advance Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm, developed in the University of California, Davis) with the newest version of mesoscale model WRF (the Weather Research & Forecasting Model, developed by NCAR and several other agencies). As a multilayer, steady state model, ACASA incorporates higher-order representations of vertical temperature variations, CO2 concentration, radiation, wind speed, turbulent statistics, and plant physiology. The WRF-ACASA coupling is designed to identify how multiple environmental factors, in particularly climate variability, population density, and vegetation distribution, impact on future carbon cycle prediction across a wide geographical range such as in California.

  7. Suspended particulate matter fluxes along with their associated metals, organic matter and carbonates in a coastal Mediterranean area affected by mining activities.

    PubMed

    Helali, Mohamed Amine; Zaaboub, Noureddine; Oueslati, Walid; Added, Ayed; Aleya, Lotfi

    2016-03-15

    A study of suspended particulate matter (SPM) fluxes along with their associated metals, organic matter and carbonates, was conducted off the Mejerda River outlet in May 2011 and in March and July 2012 at depths of 10, 20 and 40 m using sediment traps. SPM fluxes are more significant near the Mejerda outlet, especially in winter, but dissipate further offshore. Normalization reveals that the Mejerda is a major source of Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Co, all of which are the result of human activities. In contrast, Fe, Mn and N are of authigenic origin. The enrichment factor shows that Pb, Zn and especially Cd are the most highly polluting metals off the Mejerda outlet. This confirms the trend observed on the shores of the Mejerda prodelta and is consistent with the type of mining activities conducted in the Mejerda catchment. PMID:26869095

  8. Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M

    2005-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

  9. Foliar uptake, carbon fluxes and water status are affected by the timing of daily fog in saplings from a threatened cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Berry, Z Carter; White, Joseph C; Smith, William K

    2014-05-01

    In cloud forests, foliar uptake (FU) of water has been reported for numerous species, possibly acting to relieve daily water and carbon stress. While the prevalence of FU seems common, how daily variation in fog timing may affect this process has not been studied. We examined the quantity of FU, water potentials, gas exchange and abiotic variation at the beginning and end of a 9-day exposure to fog in a glasshouse setting. Saplings of Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir. and Picea rubens Sarg. were exposed to morning (MF), afternoon (AF) or evening fog (EF) regimes to assess the ability to utilize fog water at different times of day and after sustained exposure to simulated fog. The greatest amount of FU occurred during MF (up to 50%), followed by AF (up to 23%) and then EF, which surprisingly had no FU. There was also a positive relationship between leaf conductance and FU, suggesting a role of stomata in FU. Moreover, MF and AF lead to the greatest improvements in daily water balance and carbon gain, respectively. Foliar uptake was important for improving plant ecophysiology but was influenced by diurnal variation in fog. With climate change scenarios predicting changes to cloud patterns and frequency that will likely alter diurnal patterns, cloud forests that rely on this water subsidy could be affected. PMID:24835239

  10. The influence of organic carbon flux on benthic foraminiferal proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corliss, B. H.; Sun, X.; Brown, C. W.; Showers, W. J.

    2005-12-01

    During the last 30 years, deep-sea benthic foraminifera have been widely used in reconstructing environmental conditions in the deep sea. Initial suggestions of faunal-water mass associations were never substantiated and, instead, organic carbon flux was identified as a primary influence on species and assemblage patterns. Organic carbon flux also impacts the chemistry of deep water masses and is reflected in the stable isotopic and trace element composition of a number of deep-sea taxa. The timing of delivery of organic carbon can also have an affect on foraminiferal chemistry. Carbon-13 data of Holocene Epistominella exigua from the North Atlantic show a 0.9 per mil change over 60 degrees of latitude that can be correlated to seasonality of productivity, based on a comparison of SeaWIFS satellite imagery. Seasonality and mean annual primary productivity do not affect the carbon-13 of Planulina wuellerstorfi in the North Atlantic, although P. wuellerstorfi exhibits significant variability. Our results suggest that the carbon-13 of E. exigua in conjunction with P. wuellerstorfi can be used to reconstruct seasonality of primary productivity. These findings raise the possibility that other geochemical proxies influenced by particle flux from the surface may be affected by periodic flux events that create phytodetritus layers and change the chemistry of the microhabitats occupied by some benthic foraminiferal species. Existing studies suggest that organic carbon flux and seasonality of flux influence both faunal and geochemical signals from benthic foraminiferal. These relationships can be used to reconstruct primary productivity and seasonality, in addition to deep-water circulation, and illustrate the importance of incorporating ecological information in the interpretation of geochemical data from deep sea taxa.

  11. Can subterranean cave systems affect soil CO2 fluxes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnc, Bor; Ferlan, Mitja; Ogrinc, Nives

    2015-04-01

    Main factors affecting soil CO2 fluxes in most ecosystems are soil temperature and soil moisture. Nevertheless occasionally high soil CO2 fluxes were observed at carst areas, which could result from ventilation of subterranean cavities (Ferlan et al., 2011). The aim of this work was to determine the influence of cave ventilation to soil CO2 fluxes. Research was done in a dead-end passage of Postojna cave (Pisani rov) and on the surface area above the passage (Velika Jeršanova dolina) in south-western Slovenia. Inside the cave we measured CO2 concentrations, its carbon (13C) stable isotope composition, 222Rn activity concentrations, temperatures and air pressure. At the surface we had chosen two sampling plots; test plot above the cave and control. At both plots we measured soil CO2 fluxes with automatic chambers, CO2 concentrations, temperatures and carbon stable isotope composition of soil air at three different depths (0.2 m, 0.5 m and 0.8 m) and different meteorological parameters such as: air temperature, air pressure, wind speed an precipitation. To detect the cave influence, we compared two surface CO2 flux measurements with air temperatures and changes of CO2 concentrations in the cave atmosphere. Our results on CO2 concentrations in the gallery of the cave indicated that the ventilation of this particular gallery also depends on outside air temperatures. Outside temperature increased and corresponded to higher CO2 concentrations, whereas at lower temperatures (T < 9 oC) cave started to ventilate and exhaled CO2 reach air through unknown fissures and cracks. At the control plot the soil CO2 fluxes were in a good correlation with soil temperatures (r = 0.789, p =0.01), where greater soil temperatures correspond to greater soil CO2 fluxes. Soil CO2 fluxes at the plot above the cave did not show statistically significant correlations with soil temperatures or soil moisture indicating that other factors possibly cave ventilation could influence it. References

  12. Gas and aerosol fluxes. [emphasizing sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The development of remote sensing techniques to address the global need for accurate distribution and flux determinations of both man made and natural materials which affect the chemical composition of the atmosphere, the heat budget of the Earth, and the depletion, of stratospheric ozone is considered. Specifically, trace gas fluxes, sea salt aerosol production, and the effect of sea surface microlayer on gas and aerosol fluxes are examined. Volatile sulfur, carbon, nitrogen, and halocarbon compounds are discussed including a statement of the problem associated with each compound or group of compounds, a brief summary of current understanding, and suggestions for needed research.

  13. Net carbon flux in organic and conventional olive production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeid Mohamad, Ramez; Verrastro, Vincenzo; Bitar, Lina Al; Roma, Rocco; Moretti, Michele; Chami, Ziad Al

    2014-05-01

    Agricultural systems are considered as one of the most relevant sources of atmospheric carbon. However, agriculture has the potentiality to mitigate carbon dioxide mainly through soil carbon sequestration. Some agricultural practices, particularly fertilization and soil management, can play a dual role in the agricultural systems regarding the carbon cycle contributing to the emissions and to the sequestration process in the soil. Good soil and input managements affect positively Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) changes and consequently the carbon cycle. The present study aimed at comparing the carbon footprint of organic and conventional olive systems and to link it to the efficiency of both systems on carbon sequestration by calculating the net carbon flux. Data were collected at farm level through a specific and detailed questionnaire based on one hectare as a functional unit and a system boundary limited to olive production. Using LCA databases particularly ecoinvent one, IPCC GWP 100a impact assessment method was used to calculate carbon emissions from agricultural practices of both systems. Soil organic carbon has been measured, at 0-30 cm depth, based on soil analyses done at the IAMB laboratory and based on reference value of SOC, the annual change of SOC has been calculated. Substracting sequestrated carbon in the soil from the emitted on resulted in net carbon flux calculation. Results showed higher environmental impact of the organic system on Global Warming Potential (1.07 t CO2 eq. yr-1) comparing to 0.76 t CO2 eq. yr-1 in the conventional system due to the higher GHG emissions caused by manure fertilizers compared to the use of synthetic foliar fertilizers in the conventional system. However, manure was the main reason behind the higher SOC content and sequestration in the organic system. As a resultant, the organic system showed higher net carbon flux (-1.7 t C ha-1 yr-1 than -0.52 t C ha-1 yr-1 in the conventional system reflecting higher efficiency as a

  14. Forest Disturbance and North American Carbon Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goward, Samuel N.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Cohen, Warren; Moisen, Gretchen; Collatz, G. James; Healey, Sean; Houghton, R. A.; Huang, Chengquan; Kennedy, Robert; Law, Beverly; Powell, Scott; Turner, David; Wulder, Michael A.

    2008-03-01

    North America's forests are thought to be a significant sink for atmospheric carbon. Currently, the rate of sequestration by forests on the continent has been estimated at 0.23 petagrams of carbon per year, though the uncertainty about this estimate is nearly 50%. This offsets about 13% of the fossil fuel emissions from the continent [Pacala et al., 2007]. However, the high level of uncertainty in this estimate and the scientific community's limited ability to predict the future direction of the forest carbon flux reflect a lack of detailed knowledge about the effects of forest disturbance and recovery across the continent.

  15. Partitioning Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Fluxes Using Correlation Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Partitioning of eddy covariance flux measurements is routinely done to quantify the contributions of separate processes to the overall fluxes. Measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes represent the difference between gross ecosystem photosynthesis and total respiration, while measurements of water vapo...

  16. Fluxes of dissolved organic carbon from Chesapeake Bay sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Burdige, D.J.; Homstead, J. )

    1994-08-01

    Benthic fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were measured over an annual cycle at two contrasting sites in Chesapeake Bay. At an organic-rich, sulfidic site in the mesohaline portion of the Bay (site M) DOC fluxes from the sediments ranged from 1.4 to 2.9 mmol/m[sup 2]/d. Measured benthic DOC fluxes at site M corresponded to [approximately]3-13% of the depth-integrated benthic C remineralization rates ([Sigma]OCR), and agreed well with calculated diffusive DOC fluxes based on porewater DOC profiles. This agreement suggests that DOC fluxes from site M sediments were likely controlled by molecular diffusion. The second site that was studied is a heavily bioturbated site in the southern Bay (site S). The activity of macrobenthos did not appear to enhance DOC fluxes from these sediments, since measured benthic DOC fluxes (>0.5 mmol/m[sup 2]/d) were lower than those at site M. The ratios of benthic DOC fluxes to [Sigma]OCR values at site S were also slightly smaller than those observed at site M. Benthic DOC fluxes from Chesapeake Bay sediments do not appear to significantly affect the transport of DOC through this estuary, although uncertainties in the reactivity of DOC in estuaries makes this conclusion somewhat tentative at this time. However, when these results are used to make a lower limit estimate of the globally integrated benthic DOC flux from marine sediments, a value similar to that previously calculated by Burdige et al. is obtained. This observation further supports suggestions in this paper about the importance of benthic DOC fluxes in the oceanic C cycle.

  17. Carbon Flux in Drylands: The Forgotten Dimensions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, J.; Turnbull, L.

    2014-12-01

    There has been a significant emphasis recently on the rôle of vegetation change and land degradation in drylands on carbon sequestration and the provision of related ecosystem services. Studies have typically focussed on the storage of carbon in biomass over short timescales. Over intermediate timescales, an important component of carbon-related ecohydrological processes is the way in which carbon is transferred from biomass to soil organic matter. These transfers are also significantly affected by land degradation via erosion processes which result in redistribution and net loss of carbon from the local system. Many drylands are underlain by significant stores of inorganic carbon, some of which is deposited from aeolian material, but vertical transfer from the surface stores is also an important process. Numerous studies suggest that these stores are in place from thousands to millions of years and thus contain carbon that has long been taken out of the global cycle. As progressive land degradation occurs, these stores are increasingly being exposed at the surface, and thus reactivated as part of the global cycle. In the context of climate change where increasingly stormy conditions are likely to accelerate the mobilization of sediment and associated carbon, and where increasingly acidic rainfall exacerbates dissolution of inorganic carbon, there is the potential for a significant addition to atmospheric carbon at regional and global scales. We will evaluate the relative importance of this mechanism compared to sequestration in vegetation and discuss the implications for maximizing ecosystem-service provision in drylands.

  18. Carbon Flux Explorer observations of ocean carbon sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J. K.; Wood, T.

    2011-12-01

    The strength of natural biotic organic carbon sedimentation from the base of sunlit zone of the ocean is estimated to be 10 Pg C/y globally. This biological sequestration of carbon to deeper waters plays a key role in the atmophere/ocean carbon balance. It is impossible to predict whether the ocean biological carbon pump will strengthen or weaken in the face of climate change and ocean acidification because there are scant observations of the sinking carbon flux and remineralization in the upper 1000 m. We report progress on the development and deployment of the fully robotic and autonomous Ocean Carbon Flux Explorer (CFE) which is designed to follow hourly variations of carbon sedimentation for seasons at depths to 1500 m. The CFE relays observations to shore in real time via Iridium satellite links. The Carbon Flux Explorer is the integration of the Scripps Sounding Oceanographic Lagrangian Observer (SOLO) with the LBNL/UC Berkeley Optical Sedimentation Recorder (OSR). The OSR intercepts sinking particles and images them using dark field, transmitted, and transmitted cross polarized modes of illumination. OSR's modified to collect samples have been deployed to enable translation image data on particle albedo, optical density, and birefringence to carbon units. Our aim is fully autonomous operations in 2012. In this progress update, we report highlights of CFE deployments in the Santa Catalina Basin (October 2010, May 2011) and Santa Cruz Basin (May 2011), and California Current waters (August through September 2011). In many cases CFE data shows order of magnitude variation of particle sedimentation on diurnal time scales, a view of sedimentation here-to-fore not attained.

  19. Estimates of carbon cycle surface fluxes from the NASA Carbon Monitoring System Flux Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, K. W.; Liu, J.; Lee, M.; Gurney, K. R.; Menemenlis, D.; Brix, H.; Hill, C. N.; Denning, S.; Haynes, K.; Baker, I. T.; Henze, D. K.; Bousserez, N.; Marland, G.; Marland, E.; Badurek, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of NASA Carbon Monitoring Study (CMS) Flux Pilot Project is to incorporate the full suite of NASA observational, modeling, and assimilation capabilities in order to attribute changes in globally distributed CO2 concentrations to spatially resolved surface fluxes across the entire carbon cycle. To that end, CMS has initiated a coordinated effort between land surface, ocean, fossil fuel, and atmospheric scientists to provide global estimates of CO2 constrained by satellite observations and informed by contemporaneous estimates of 'bottom up' fluxes from land surface, ocean, and fossil fuel models. The CMS Flux has evolved to incorporate a spatially explicit fossil fuel data assimilation system (FFDAS), an updated ECCO2 Darwin biogeochemical adjoint ocean state estimation system, and the new Simple Biospheric Model (Sib4) terrestrial ecosystem model. We compare GOSAT xCO2 observations, processed by the JPL ACOS v33, to predicted CMS Flux atmospheric CO2 concentrations for 2010-2011, and attribute the differences to spatially-resolved fluxes. We examine these fluxes in terms of interannual variability, correlative satellite measurements, and uncertainty across the carbon cycle

  20. Ecosystem carbon fluxes and Amazonian forest metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleska, Scott; da Rocha, Humberto; Kruijt, Bart; Nobre, Antonio

    Long-term measurements of ecosystem-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, water, and energy, via eddy flux towers, give insight into three key questions about Amazonian forest function. First, what is the carbon balance of Amazon forests? Some towers give accurate site-specific carbon balances, as validated by independent methods, but decisive resolution of the large-scale question will also require integration of remote sensing techniques (to detect and encompass the distribution of naturally induced disturbance states across the landscape of old growth forests) with eddy flux process studies (to characterize the association between carbon balance and forest disturbance states). Second, what is the seasonality of ecosystem metabolism in Amazonian forests? Models have historically simulated dry season declines in photosynthetic metabolism, a consequence of modeled water limitation. Tower sites in equatorial Amazonian forests, however, show that photosynthetic metabolism increases during dry seasons ("green up"), perhaps because deep roots buffer trees from dry season water stress, while phenological rhythms trigger leaf flush, associated with increased solar irradiance. Third, how does ecosystem metabolism vary across biome types and land use patterns? As dry season length increases from equatorial forest, to drier southern forests, to savanna, fluxes show seasonal patterns consistent with increasing water stress, including a switch from dry season green up to "brown down." Land use change in forest ecosystems removes deep roots, artificially inducing the same trend toward brown down. In the final part, this review suggests that eddy tower network and satellite-based insights into seasonal responses provide a model for detecting responses to extreme interannual climate variations that can test whether forests are vulnerable to model-simulated Amazonian forest collapse under climate change.

  1. Carbon fluxes from an urban tropical grassland.

    PubMed

    Ng, B J L; Hutyra, L R; Nguyen, H; Cobb, A R; Kai, F M; Harvey, C; Gandois, L

    2015-08-01

    Turfgrass covers a large fraction of the urbanized landscape, but the carbon exchange of urban lawns is poorly understood. We used eddy covariance and flux chambers in a grassland field manipulative experiment to quantify the carbon mass balance in a Singapore tropical turfgrass. We also assessed how management and variations in environmental factors influenced CO2 respiration. Standing aboveground turfgrass biomass was 80 gC m(-2), with a mean ecosystem respiration of 7.9 ± 1.1 μmol m(-2) s(-1). The contribution of autotrophic respiration was 49-76% of total ecosystem respiration. Both chamber and eddy covariance measurements suggest the system was in approximate carbon balance. While we did not observe a significant relationship between the respiration rates and soil temperature or moisture, daytime fluxes increased during the rainy interval, indicating strong overall moisture sensitivity. Turfgrass biomass is small, but given its abundance across the urban landscape, it significantly influences diurnal CO2 concentrations. PMID:24998996

  2. Soil carbon flux following pulse precipitation events in the shortgrass steppe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munson, S.M.; Benton, T.J.; Lauenroth, W.K.; Burke, I.C.

    2010-01-01

    Pulses of water availability characterize semiarid and arid ecosystems. Most precipitation events in these ecosystems are small (???10 mm), but can stimulate carbon flux. The large proportion of carbon stored belowground and small carbon inputs create the potential for these small precipitation events to have large effects on carbon cycling. Land-use change can modify these effects through alteration of the biota and soil resources. The goal of our research was to determine how small precipitation events (2, 5, and 10 mm) affected the dynamics of soil carbon flux and water loss in previously cultivated Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) fields and undisturbed shortgrass steppe. Total carbon loss and duration of elevated carbon flux increased as event size increased in all field types. Time since cultivation increased in importance for carbon flux as event size increased. A comparison of water loss rates to carbon flux suggests that water is limiting to carbon flux for the smallest events, but is less limiting for events above 5 mm. We also describe how water availability interacts with temperature in controlling carbon flux rate. We conclude that small precipitation events have the potential for large short-term losses of carbon in the shortgrass steppe. ?? 2009 The Ecological Society of Japan.

  3. Monitoring Energy and Carbon Fluxes in a Mediterranean City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, S.; Sirca, C.; Bellucco, V.; Arca, A.; Ventura, A.; Duce, P.; Spano, D.

    2015-12-01

    Cities and the surrounding areas play an important role in altering and/or contributing to the natural processes of the Earth system. Specifically, cities affect the amount and partitioning of energy fluxes, as well as the carbon budget. It is recognized that increased greenhouse gases (GHG) concentration (mainly carbon dioxide) and air temperature values are typically experienced by cities, due to their structural and morphological characteristics and to human activities in urban areas (such as traffic, domestic heating/cooling, etc.). This will impact the urban climate. Reducing the impact of urbanization on climate requires the knowledge of the interactions and links between human activities and the land-atmosphere system. Each city has different characteristics and conditions, so planning strategies helping in reducing carbon emissions should take into account local features. In this contest, monitoring activities are crucial to study the exchange of energy, water, and carbon over the city, evaluate their impact on human livability, and understand the role of the city on climate. A research activity is carried out in the Mediterranean city of Sassari, in the North of Sardinia island (Italy) to monitor urban fluxes and distinguish the main sources of GHG emissions, which could help the municipality to identify possible actions for reducing them. An Eddy Covariance tower was set up in the city center to directly monitor energy and carbon exchanges at half-hourly time step. Even if the measurement period only consists of few months, the daily trend of urban fluxes clearly shows that traffic is one of the main carbon emission sources, while the contribution of vegetation in sequestering carbon is low due to the reduced amount of green areas in the measurements footprint (< 20%). In addition, differences between working days and holiday periods can be distinguished.

  4. Reduced soil wettability can affect greenhouse gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Qassem, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture is known to be an important factor affecting the carbon (C) dynamics in soils including decomposition of organic matter and exchange of gases like CO2 and CH4 between the soil and the atmosphere. Most studies and process models looking at the soil C dynamics assume, however, that soils are easily wettable and water is relatively uniformly distributed within the soil pores. Most soils, however, do not wet spontaneously when dry or moderately moist, but instead exhibit some degree of soil water repellency (i.e. hydrophobicity), which can restrict infiltration and conductivity of water for weeks or months. This is world-wide occurring phenomenon which affects all soil textural types but is particularly common under permanent vegetation e.g. forest, grass and shrub vegetation. Soil water repellency is most profound during drier seasons, when the soil moisture content is relatively low. Although prolonged contact with water can gradually decrease water repellency, some soils do not recover to being completely wettable even after very wet winter months or substantial rainfall events. It has been recognized that with the predicted climatic changes the phenomenon of soil water repellency will become even more pronounced and severe, additionally it may occur in the areas and climatic zones where the effect have not been currently recognized. One of the main implications of soil water repellency is restricted water infiltration and reduced conductivity, which results in reduced soil water availability for plants and soil biota, even after prolonged periods of rainfall. As the process of C mineralization and consequently CO2 efflux from soil is driven by the accessibility of organic matter to decomposing organisms, which in turn is directly dependent on (i) soil moisture and (ii) soil temperature it is, therefore hypothesised that carbon decomposition and CO2 efflux in water repellent soils will also be affected when soil in the water repellent state. The CO2

  5. Carbon in, Carbon out: Reevaluating Carbon Fluxes in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction zones exert a fundamental control on the deep carbon cycle. We reevaluated carbon inputs and outputs in convergent margins considering new estimates of C concentration in subducting mantle peridotites, carbonate solubility in aqueous fluids along subduction geotherms, melting and diapirism of carbon-bearing metasediments, and diffuse degassing from arcs. Our updated estimate of carbon inputs to the global subduction system, which includes estimates for C in altered peridotite, is 40-66 megatons carbon/year (MtC/y). We find that estimates of C lost from slabs (14-66 MtC/y) must take into account the high CaCO3 solubility in aqueous fluids, which contributes significant C that must be added to that derived from mineral decarbonation reactions. When taken together with hydrous silicate and carbonatite melts and metasediment diapirs, nearly all C can be scavenged from subducting lithosphere. The return of C to the atmosphere via arc-volcano degassing is only 18-43 MtC/y, but consideration deep volatile saturation of arc magmas, magma ponding in the middle and deep arc crust, and CO2 venting in forearcs can account for the remaining C lost from the slab. Thus, whereas previous studies concluded that about half the subducting carbon is returned to the convecting mantle, we find that relatively little carbon may be recycled. If so, substantial quantities of carbon are stored in the mantle lithosphere and crust and the carbon content of the mantle lithosphere + crust + ocean + atmosphere must be increasing, at least over the last 5-10 My. This is consistent with inferences from noble gas data. Recycled carbon in diamonds is a small fraction of the global carbon inventory.

  6. Sampling frequency affects estimates of annual nitrous oxide fluxes.

    PubMed

    Barton, L; Wolf, B; Rowlings, D; Scheer, C; Kiese, R; Grace, P; Stefanova, K; Butterbach-Bahl, K

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes, a potent greenhouse gas, from soils is necessary to improve our knowledge of terrestrial N2O losses. Developing universal sampling frequencies for calculating annual N2O fluxes is difficult, as fluxes are renowned for their high temporal variability. We demonstrate daily sampling was largely required to achieve annual N2O fluxes within 10% of the 'best' estimate for 28 annual datasets collected from three continents--Australia, Europe and Asia. Decreasing the regularity of measurements either under- or overestimated annual N2O fluxes, with a maximum overestimation of 935%. Measurement frequency was lowered using a sampling strategy based on environmental factors known to affect temporal variability, but still required sampling more than once a week. Consequently, uncertainty in current global terrestrial N2O budgets associated with the upscaling of field-based datasets can be decreased significantly using adequate sampling frequencies. PMID:26522228

  7. Sampling frequency affects estimates of annual nitrous oxide fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, L.; Wolf, B.; Rowlings, D.; Scheer, C.; Kiese, R.; Grace, P.; Stefanova, K.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2015-11-01

    Quantifying nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes, a potent greenhouse gas, from soils is necessary to improve our knowledge of terrestrial N2O losses. Developing universal sampling frequencies for calculating annual N2O fluxes is difficult, as fluxes are renowned for their high temporal variability. We demonstrate daily sampling was largely required to achieve annual N2O fluxes within 10% of the ‘best’ estimate for 28 annual datasets collected from three continents—Australia, Europe and Asia. Decreasing the regularity of measurements either under- or overestimated annual N2O fluxes, with a maximum overestimation of 935%. Measurement frequency was lowered using a sampling strategy based on environmental factors known to affect temporal variability, but still required sampling more than once a week. Consequently, uncertainty in current global terrestrial N2O budgets associated with the upscaling of field-based datasets can be decreased significantly using adequate sampling frequencies.

  8. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUX DURING THE FIRST YEAR FOLLOWING SWITCHGRASS ESTABLISHMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial grasslands managed for biofuel production could provide additional environmental benefits by sequestering carbon in the soil. An eddy covariance flux tower was used to quantify the net carbon dioxide flux during 2005 for a switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L) field that had been planted in 200...

  9. Agriculture's Impact on Microbial Diversity and Associated Fluxes of Carbon Dioxide and Methane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are two gases most responsible for contemporary increases in the radiative forcing of the atmosphere. Fluxes of both gases are affected by agriculture. Soil comprises the largest terrestrial reservoir of carbon, which is oxidized to CO2 upon agricultural conv...

  10. Linking soil functions to carbon fluxes and stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Jørgen E.

    2014-05-01

    Farming practices causing declining returns and inputs of carbon (C) to soils pose threats to sustainable soil functioning by reducing availability of organic matter for soil microbial activities and by affecting soil structure, and soil C stocks that contribute to regulating greenhouse gas emissions. Declines in soil C also affect availability and storage capacity of a range of essential plant nutrients thus affecting needs for external inputs. Soil degradation is considered a serious problem in Europe and a large part of the degradation is caused by agricultural activity with intensive cultivation in arable and mixed farming system contributing to several soil threats. About 45% of European soils are estimated to have low SOM content, principally in southern Europe, but also in areas of France, UK and Germany. The European SOC stocks follow a clear north to south gradient with cooler temperatures favouring higher stocks. However, SOC stocks strongly depend on soil and land management, and there is thus a potential to both increase and lose SOC, although the potential to increase SOC strongly depends on incentives and structures for implementing improved management. Understanding the role of soil C may be better conceptualised by using a soil C flow and stocks concept to assess the impact of C management on crop productivity, soil organic C stocks and other ecosystem services. This concept distinguishes C flows and stocks, which may be hypothesized to have distinctly different effects on biological, chemical and physical soil functions. By separating the roles of carbon flows from the role of carbon stocks, it may become possible to better identify critical levels not only of soil carbon stocks, but also critical levels of carbon inputs, which directly relate to needs for crop and soil management measures. Such critical soil carbon stocks may be linked to soil mineralogy through complexed organic carbon on clay and silt surfaces. Critical levels of soil carbon

  11. Salp contributions to vertical carbon flux in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Joshua P.; Steinberg, Deborah K.

    2016-07-01

    We developed a one-dimensional model to estimate salp contributions to vertical carbon flux at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre for a 17-yr period (April 1994 to December 2011). We based the model parameters on published rates of salp physiology and experimentally determined sinking and decomposition rates of salp carcasses. Salp grazing was low during non-bloom conditions, but routinely exceeded 100% of chlorophyll standing stock and primary production during blooms. Fecal pellet production was the largest source of salp carbon flux (78% of total), followed by respiration below 200 m (19%), sinking of carcasses (3%), and DOC excretion below 200 m (<0.1%). Thalia democratica, Salpa fusiformis, Salpa aspera, Wheelia cylindrica, and Iasis zonaria were the five highest contributors, accounting for 95% of total salp-mediated carbon flux. Seasonally, salp flux was higher during spring-summer than fall-winter, due to seasonal changes in species composition and abundance. Salp carbon export to 200 m was on average 2.3 mg C m-2 d-1 across the entire time series. This is equivalent to 11% of the mean 200 m POC flux measured by sediment traps in the region. During years with significant salp blooms, however, annually-averaged salp carbon export was the equivalent of up to 60% of trap POC flux at 200 m. Salp carbon flux attenuated slowly, and at 3200 m the average modeled carbon from salps was 109% of the POC flux measured in sediment traps at that depth. Migratory and carcass carbon export pathways should also be considered (alongside fecal pellet flux) as facilitating carbon export to sequestration depths in future studies.

  12. The impact of lateral carbon fluxes on the European carbon balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciais, P.; Borges, A. V.; Abril, G.; Meybeck, M.; Folberth, G.; Hauglustaine, D.; Janssens, I. A.

    2008-09-01

    To date, little is known about the impact of processes which cause lateral carbon fluxes over continents, and from continents to oceans on the CO2 and carbon budgets at local, regional and continental scales. Lateral carbon fluxes contribute to regional carbon budgets as follows: Ecosystem CO2 sink=Ecosystem carbon accumulation+Lateral carbon fluxes. We estimated the contribution of wood and food product trade, of emission and oxidation of reduced carbon species, and of river erosion and transport as lateral carbon fluxes to the carbon balance of Europe (EU-25). The analysis is completed by new estimates of the carbon fluxes of coastal seas. We estimated that lateral transport (all processes combined) is a flux of 165 Tg C yr-1 at the scale of EU-25. The magnitude of lateral transport is thus comparable to current estimates of carbon accumulation in European forests. The main process contributing to the total lateral flux out of Europe is the flux of reduced carbon compounds, corresponding to the sum of non-CO2 gaseous species (CH4, CO, hydrocarbons, ...) emitted by ecosystems and exported out of the European boundary layer by the large scale atmospheric circulation.

  13. Coupling soil Carbon Fluxes, Soil Microbes, and High-Resolution Carbon Profiling in Permafrost Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C.; Stegen, J.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Tfaily, M. M.; Huang, M.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial communities play a central role in the functioning of natural ecosystems by heavily influencing biogeochemical cycles. Understanding how shifts in the environment are tied to shifts in biogeochemical rates via changes in microbial communities is particularly relevant in high latitude terrestrial systems underlain by permafrost due to vast carbon stocks currently stored within thawing permafrost. There is limited understanding, however, of the interplay among soil-atmosphere CO2 fluxes, microbial communities, and SOM chemical composition. To address this knowledge gap, we leverage the distinct spatial transitions in permafrost-affected soils at the Caribou Poker Creek Research Watershed, a 104 km2 boreal watershed ~50 km north of Fairbanks, AK. We integrate a variety of data to gain new knowledge of the factors that govern observed patterns in the rates of soil CO2 fluxes associated with permafrost to non-permafrost transition zones. We show that nonlinearities in fluxes are influenced by depth to permafrost, tree stand structure, and soil C composition. Further, using 16S sequencing methods we explore microbial community assembly processes and their connection to CO2 flux across spatial scales, and suggest a path to more mechanistically link microbes to large-scale biogeochemical cycles. Lastly, we use the Community Land Model (CLM) to compare Earth System Model predictions of soil C cycling with empirical measurements. Deviations between CLM predictions and field observations of CO2 flux and soil C stocks will provide insight for how the model may be improved through inclusion of additional biotic (e.g., microbial community composition) and abiotic (e.g., organic carbon composition) features, which will be critical to improve the predictive power of climate models in permafrost-affected regions.

  14. Mapping carbon flux uncertainty and selecting optimal locations for future flux towers in the Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Y.; Howard, D.M.; Wylie, B.K.; Zhang, L.

    2012-01-01

    Flux tower networks (e. g., AmeriFlux, Agriflux) provide continuous observations of ecosystem exchanges of carbon (e. g., net ecosystem exchange), water vapor (e. g., evapotranspiration), and energy between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The long-term time series of flux tower data are essential for studying and understanding terrestrial carbon cycles, ecosystem services, and climate changes. Currently, there are 13 flux towers located within the Great Plains (GP). The towers are sparsely distributed and do not adequately represent the varieties of vegetation cover types, climate conditions, and geophysical and biophysical conditions in the GP. This study assessed how well the available flux towers represent the environmental conditions or "ecological envelopes" across the GP and identified optimal locations for future flux towers in the GP. Regression-based remote sensing and weather-driven net ecosystem production (NEP) models derived from different extrapolation ranges (10 and 50%) were used to identify areas where ecological conditions were poorly represented by the flux tower sites and years previously used for mapping grassland fluxes. The optimal lands suitable for future flux towers within the GP were mapped. Results from this study provide information to optimize the usefulness of future flux towers in the GP and serve as a proxy for the uncertainty of the NEP map.

  15. Anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon fluxes from land to ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, Pierre; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ciais, Philippe; MacKenzie, Fred T.; Gruber, Nicolas; Janssens, Ivan A.; Laruelle, Goulven G.; Lauerwald, Ronny; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Andersson, Andreas J.; Arndt, Sandra; Arnosti, Carol; Borges, Alberto V.; Dale, Andrew W.; Gallego-Sala, Angela; Goddéris, Yves; Goossens, Nicolas; Hartmann, Jens; Heinze, Christoph; Ilyina, Tatiana; Joos, Fortunat; Larowe, Douglas E.; Leifeld, Jens; Meysman, Filip J. R.; Munhoven, Guy; Raymond, Peter A.; Spahni, Renato; Suntharalingam, Parvadha; Thullner, Martin

    2013-08-01

    A substantial amount of the atmospheric carbon taken up on land through photosynthesis and chemical weathering is transported laterally along the aquatic continuum from upland terrestrial ecosystems to the ocean. So far, global carbon budget estimates have implicitly assumed that the transformation and lateral transport of carbon along this aquatic continuum has remained unchanged since pre-industrial times. A synthesis of published work reveals the magnitude of present-day lateral carbon fluxes from land to ocean, and the extent to which human activities have altered these fluxes. We show that anthropogenic perturbation may have increased the flux of carbon to inland waters by as much as 1.0 Pg C yr-1 since pre-industrial times, mainly owing to enhanced carbon export from soils. Most of this additional carbon input to upstream rivers is either emitted back to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide (~0.4 Pg C yr-1) or sequestered in sediments (~0.5 Pg C yr-1) along the continuum of freshwater bodies, estuaries and coastal waters, leaving only a perturbation carbon input of ~0.1 Pg C yr-1 to the open ocean. According to our analysis, terrestrial ecosystems store ~0.9 Pg C yr-1 at present, which is in agreement with results from forest inventories but significantly differs from the figure of 1.5 Pg C yr-1 previously estimated when ignoring changes in lateral carbon fluxes. We suggest that carbon fluxes along the land-ocean aquatic continuum need to be included in global carbon dioxide budgets.

  16. Hydrologic support of carbon dioxide flux revealed by whole-lake carbon budgets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stets, E.G.; Striegl, R.G.; Aiken, G.R.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Winter, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    Freshwater lakes are an important component of the global carbon cycle through both organic carbon (OC) sequestration and carbon dioxide (CO 2) emission. Most lakes have a net annual loss of CO2 to the atmosphere and substantial current evidence suggests that biologic mineralization of allochthonous OC maintains this flux. Because net CO 2 flux to the atmosphere implies net mineralization of OC within the lake ecosystem, it is also commonly assumed that net annual CO2 emission indicates negative net ecosystem production (NEP). We explored the relationship between atmospheric CO2 emission and NEP in two lakes known to have contrasting hydrologie characteristics and net CO2 emission. We calculated NEP for calendar year 2004 using whole-lake OC and inorganic carbon (IC) budgets, NEPoc and NEPIC, respectively, and compared the resulting values to measured annual CO 2 flux from the lakes. In both lakes, NEPIc and NEP Ic were positive, indicating net autotrophy. Therefore CO2 emission from these lakes was apparently not supported by mineralization of allochthonous organic material. In both lakes, hydrologie CO2 inputs, as well as CO2 evolved from netcalcite precipitation, could account for the net CO2 emission. NEP calculated from diel CO2 measurements was also affected by hydrologie inputs of CO2. These results indicate that CO2 emission and positive NEP may coincide in lakes, especially in carbonate terrain, and that all potential geologic, biogeochemical, and hydrologie sources of CO2 need to be accounted for when using CO2 concentrations to infer lake NEP. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. CARBON FLUXES ON NORTH AMERICAN RANGELANDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonal patterns of growth and thus carbon uptake are relevant to both scientists who study ecosystem properties and managers who strive to maintain rangeland productivity. We studied seasonal patterns of net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) on 11 US rangelands over a 6-year period. All sites w...

  18. Microbial Carbon Cycling in Permafrost-Affected Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnivetskaya, T.; Liebner, Susanne; Wilhelm, Ronald; Wagner, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic plays a key role in Earth s climate system as global warming is predicted to be most pronounced at high latitudes and because one third of the global carbon pool is stored in ecosystems of the northern latitudes. In order to improve our understanding of the present and future carbon dynamics in climate sensitive permafrost ecosystems, present studies concentrate on investigations of microbial controls of greenhouse gas fluxes, on the activity and structure of the involved microbial communities, and on their response to changing environmental conditions. Permafrost-affected soils can function as both a source and a sink for carbon dioxide and methane. Under anaerobic conditions, caused by flooding of the active layer and the effect of backwater above the permafrost table, the mineralization of organic matter can only be realized stepwise by specialized microorganisms. Important intermediates of the organic matter decomposition are hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which can be further reduced to methane by methanogenic archaea. Evolution of methane fluxes across the subsurface/atmosphere boundary will thereby strongly depend on the activity of anaerobic methanogenic archaea and obligately aerobic methane oxidizing proteobacteria, which are known to be abundant and to significantly reduce methane emissions in permafrost-affected soils. Therefore current studies on methane-cycling microorganisms are the object of particular attention in permafrost studies, because of their key role in the Arctic methane cycle and consequently of their significance for the global methane budget.

  19. Carbon dioxide fluxes from an urban area in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Wang, Yuesi

    2012-03-01

    A better understanding of urban carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions is important for quantifying urban contributions to the global carbon budget. From January to December 2008, CO 2 fluxes were measured, by eddy covariance at 47 m above ground on a meteorological tower in a high-density residential area in Beijing. The results showed that the urban surface was a net source of CO 2 in the atmosphere. Diurnal flux patterns were similar to those previously observed in other cities and were largely influenced by traffic volume. Carbon uptake by both urban vegetation during the growing season and the reduction of fuel consumption for domestic heating resulted in less-positive daily fluxes in the summer. The average daily flux measured in the summer was 0.48 mg m - 2 s - 1 , which was 82%, 35% and 36% lower than those in the winter, spring and autumn, respectively. The reduction of vehicles on the road during the 29th Olympic and Paralympic Games had a significant impact on CO 2 flux. The flux of 0.40 mg m - 2 s - 1 for September 2008 was approximately 0.17 mg m - 2 s - 1 lower than the flux for September 2007. Annual CO 2 emissions from the study site were estimated at 20.6 kg CO 2 m - 2 y - 1 , considerably higher than yearly emissions obtained from other urban and suburban landscapes.

  20. Soil carbon dioxide fluxes in relation to physical properties as influenced by management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the most significant contributors to regional and global warming as well as climatic change. However, CO2 flux from the soil surface to the atmosphere can be affected by modifications in soil physical properties resulting from changes in land ma...

  1. Effect of a nitrogen-carbon interaction on terrestrial carbon fluxes estimated by biosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, T.; Yamaguchi, Y.

    2007-12-01

    It is important for the global warming to accurately understand the terrestrial carbon fluxes at global scale. Estimating spatial and temporal patterns in the carbon fluxes, recently, many global biosphere models were proposed and developed. However, since the model analyses have always some uncertainties. One of the major uncertainties is an effect of nitrogen cycle on the carbon cycle, as nitrogen largely controls carbon dynamics as plant and soil microbe nutrients. A goal of this study is to investigate the effect of terrestrial carbon-nitrogen interaction on NPP using new biosphere model. Firstly, a new nitrogen cycle model was constructed including twelve main nitrogen flows (nitrogen fixation, deposition, nitrifications, volatilization, nitrate leaching, plant uptake, allocation, translocation, retranslocation, soil organic and inorganic nitrogen dynamics), and fourteen pools (three biomass, four litter fall, five soil organic, and two inorganic). Secondly, the nitrogen model was integrated to the existing biosphere model, BEAMS (Biosphere model integrating Eco-physiological And Mechanistic approaches using Satellite data) [Sasai et al., 2005, 2007]. The new biosphere model was run for 20 years (1982-2001) at a global scale. The inputs datasets used were NCEP/NCAR re-analysis and fPAR/LAI based on NOAA/AVHRR produced by Boston University. The two-dimensional distributions of monthly GPP and NPP were calculated. And, the GPP estimates by the original and new BEAMS were compared with ground measurements at flux-tower sites. We compared seasonal changes in GPP between the new model and eddy covariance measurements at flux sites. As a result, the GPP estimates had good agreement with the GPP measurements (r2 = 0.91). In view of a comparison in GPP between the measurements and the original BEAMS (r2 = 0.84), the new model is better than the original BEAMS. Especially, we could observe an indisputable improvement of the new model on a seasonal change in the growing

  2. Arogenate dehydratase isoenzymes profoundly and differentially modulate carbon flux into lignins.

    PubMed

    Corea, Oliver R A; Ki, Chanyoung; Cardenas, Claudia L; Kim, Sung-Jin; Brewer, Sarah E; Patten, Ann M; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2012-03-30

    How carbon flux differentially occurs in vascular plants following photosynthesis for protein formation, phenylpropanoid metabolism (i.e. lignins), and other metabolic processes is not well understood. Our previous discovery/deduction that a six-membered arogenate dehydratase (ADT1-6) gene family encodes the final step in Phe biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana raised the fascinating question whether individual ADT isoenzymes (or combinations thereof) differentially modulated carbon flux to lignins, proteins, etc. If so, unlike all other lignin pathway manipulations that target cell wall/cytosolic processes, this would be the first example of a plastid (chloroplast)-associated metabolic process influencing cell wall formation. Homozygous T-DNA insertion lines were thus obtained for five of the six ADTs and used to generate double, triple, and quadruple knockouts (KOs) in different combinations. The various mutants so obtained gave phenotypes with profound but distinct reductions in lignin amounts, encompassing a range spanning from near wild type levels to reductions of up to ∼68%. In the various KOs, there were also marked changes in guaiacyl:syringyl ratios ranging from ∼3:1 to 1:1, respectively; these changes were attributed to differential carbon flux into vascular bundles versus that into fiber cells. Laser microscope dissection/pyrolysis GC/MS, histochemical staining/lignin analyses, and pADT::GUS localization indicated that ADT5 preferentially affects carbon flux into the vascular bundles, whereas the adt3456 knock-out additionally greatly reduced carbon flux into fiber cells. This plastid-localized metabolic step can thus profoundly differentially affect carbon flux into lignins in distinct anatomical regions and provides incisive new insight into different factors affecting guaiacyl:syringyl ratios and lignin primary structure. PMID:22311980

  3. Arogenate Dehydratase Isoenzymes Profoundly and Differentially Modulate Carbon Flux into Lignins*

    PubMed Central

    Corea, Oliver R. A.; Ki, Chanyoung; Cardenas, Claudia L.; Kim, Sung-Jin; Brewer, Sarah E.; Patten, Ann M.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2012-01-01

    How carbon flux differentially occurs in vascular plants following photosynthesis for protein formation, phenylpropanoid metabolism (i.e. lignins), and other metabolic processes is not well understood. Our previous discovery/deduction that a six-membered arogenate dehydratase (ADT1–6) gene family encodes the final step in Phe biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana raised the fascinating question whether individual ADT isoenzymes (or combinations thereof) differentially modulated carbon flux to lignins, proteins, etc. If so, unlike all other lignin pathway manipulations that target cell wall/cytosolic processes, this would be the first example of a plastid (chloroplast)-associated metabolic process influencing cell wall formation. Homozygous T-DNA insertion lines were thus obtained for five of the six ADTs and used to generate double, triple, and quadruple knockouts (KOs) in different combinations. The various mutants so obtained gave phenotypes with profound but distinct reductions in lignin amounts, encompassing a range spanning from near wild type levels to reductions of up to ∼68%. In the various KOs, there were also marked changes in guaiacyl:syringyl ratios ranging from ∼3:1 to 1:1, respectively; these changes were attributed to differential carbon flux into vascular bundles versus that into fiber cells. Laser microscope dissection/pyrolysis GC/MS, histochemical staining/lignin analyses, and pADT::GUS localization indicated that ADT5 preferentially affects carbon flux into the vascular bundles, whereas the adt3456 knock-out additionally greatly reduced carbon flux into fiber cells. This plastid-localized metabolic step can thus profoundly differentially affect carbon flux into lignins in distinct anatomical regions and provides incisive new insight into different factors affecting guaiacyl:syringyl ratios and lignin primary structure. PMID:22311980

  4. Acidification, not carbonation, is the major regulator of carbon fluxes in the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi.

    PubMed

    Kottmeier, Dorothee M; Rokitta, Sebastian D; Rost, Björn

    2016-07-01

    A combined increase in seawater [CO2 ] and [H(+) ] was recently shown to induce a shift from photosynthetic HCO3 (-) to CO2 uptake in Emiliania huxleyi. This shift occurred within minutes, whereas acclimation to ocean acidification (OA) did not affect the carbon source. To identify the driver of this shift, we exposed low- and high-light acclimated E. huxleyi to a matrix of two levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (1400, 2800 μmol kg(-1) ) and pH (8.15, 7.85) and directly measured cellular O2 , CO2 and HCO3 (-) fluxes under these conditions. Exposure to increased [CO2 ] had little effect on the photosynthetic fluxes, whereas increased [H(+) ] led to a significant decline in HCO3 (-) uptake. Low-light acclimated cells overcompensated for the inhibition of HCO3 (-) uptake by increasing CO2 uptake. High-light acclimated cells, relying on higher proportions of HCO3 (-) uptake, could not increase CO2 uptake and photosynthetic O2 evolution consequently became carbon-limited. These regulations indicate that OA responses in photosynthesis are caused by [H(+) ] rather than by [CO2 ]. The impaired HCO3 (-) uptake also provides a mechanistic explanation for lowered calcification under OA. Moreover, it explains the OA-dependent decrease in photosynthesis observed in high-light grown phytoplankton. PMID:26918275

  5. Information for seasonal models of carbon fluxes in terrestrial biomes

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.W.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1985-06-01

    This report is a compilation of information that can be used in developing seasonal carbon flux models for several principal terrestrial biome types. The information includes flux data as well as models made either to simulate such data or to deduce fluxes not directly measurable. The report is divided into three sections that examine (1) photosynthetic production, (2) litterfall, and (3) decomposition during a year. The sections on photosynthetic production and decomposition discuss a large number of models that relate the processes to basic abiotic variables in each of several biome types. The information on litterfall, however, is largely empirical phenology data. A fourth section demonstrates the application of this compiled information to a compartment model of seasonal carbon flux in terrestrial biomes. 14 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. Forest carbon fluxes: A satellite perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Douglas C.

    2016-04-01

    Reducing deforestation and forest degradation offers a quick win for climate mitigation. Using satellite data we are now able to better constrain pantropical estimates of forest loss, reshaping our understanding of the annual to decadal variability in land sources and sinks in the global carbon cycle.

  7. Global estimates of boreal forest carbon stocks and flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Corey J. A.; Warkentin, Ian G.

    2015-05-01

    The boreal ecosystem is an important global reservoir of stored carbon and a haven for diverse biological communities. The natural disturbance dynamics there have historically been driven by fire and insects, with human-mediated disturbances increasing faster than in other biomes globally. Previous research on the total boreal carbon stock and predictions of its future flux reveal high uncertainty in regional patterns. We reviewed and standardised this extensive body of quantitative literature to provide the most up-to-date and comprehensive estimates of the global carbon balance in the boreal forest. We also compiled century-scale predictions of the carbon budget flux. Our review and standardisation confirmed high uncertainty in the available data, but there is evidence that the region's total carbon stock has been underestimated. We found a total carbon store of 367.3 to 1715.8 Pg (1015 g), the mid-point of which (1095 Pg) is between 1.3 and 3.8 times larger than any previous mean estimates. Most boreal carbon resides in its soils and peatlands, although estimates are highly uncertain. We found evidence that the region might become a net carbon source following a reduction in carbon uptake rate from at least the 1980s. Given that the boreal potentially constitutes the largest terrestrial carbon source in the world, in one of the most rapidly warming parts of the globe (Walsh, 2014), how we manage these stocks will be influential on future climate dynamics.

  8. Effects of Land Use History on Soil Carbon Dioxide Flux in Ecuadorian Páramo Grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, J.; Harden, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) respiration is a primary mechanism for soil carbon (C) loss and is intricately linked to processes that affect soil C storage. As a result, land-use changes that affect soil CO2 flux (Flux) rates can significantly influence regional C budgets. The páramo grasslands of the high altitude Ecuadorian Andes are important in regional C budgets due to large soil C stocks. Though some forms of land use history have been shown to reduce soil C and affect known drivers of Flux, such as soil moisture (MS) and soil temperature (TS), the effect of land use history on Flux and its role in páramo soil C budgets remains poorly understood. This study investigated Flux differences among sites representing four land-use histories (PA-páramo; PAB-páramo recently burned; NA-native forest; PI-planted pine forest) and assessed the role of MS and TS on Flux rates within and across sites. Flux, MS, and TS were measured over a 3-week period at the Mazar Wildlife Reserve in southern Ecuador. Flux varied significantly among site pairs, except PI and NA. Flux rates were highest in the PI (5.79 g CO2-C m-2 d-1) and NA sites (5.59 g CO2-C m-2 d-1), with Flux rates at PA and PAB of 4.84 g CO2-C m-2 d-1 and 3.76 g CO2-C m-2 d-1, respectively. MS ranged from 29% at PI to 55% at PA, with grass sites having higher MS than forested sites. On average, páramo soils were ~3°C warmer than forested soil, with PI warmer than NA. Across all sites, Flux was weakly, negatively correlated with MS. Flux and TS were positively correlated within each site except PAB; the strongest correlation (p<0.0001) was observed at PI. Our results show that in the Ecuadorian Andes, Flux is significantly affected by land use history with higher Flux rates observed in forested areas than in páramo grasslands. To our knowledge, these are the first Flux rates reported for the Ecuadorian páramo region.

  9. Fast recovery of carbon fluxes in beech saplings after drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blessing, Carola; Barthel, Matti; Gentsch, Lydia; Buchmann, Nina

    2015-04-01

    Drought is known to down-regulate above and belowground gas-exchange and to slow down carbon transport from shoot to the soil/root system of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). However, given more frequent drought spells in a future climate, the resilience of beech to drought will also depend on the speed and magnitude of recovery of above and belowground carbon fluxes. In a climate chamber study with beech saplings, we measured shoot and soil CO2 fluxes and their carbon isotope signature during drought and consecutive recovery using laser spectroscopy. We aimed to determine the speed of recovery from drought after re-watering and to assess the coupling between above and belowground gas-exchange and carbon isotope fluxes at natural abundance during drought and subsequent recovery. CO2 fluxes responded strongly to drought; photosynthesis was decreased by 34%, soil respiration (during light) by 41% and stomatal conductance by 65%. Despite this drastic decrease in gas-exchange, carbon fluxes recovered within few days after re-watering - faster for aboveground physiological variables (four days) compared to soil respiration (seven days) - pointing towards a resilient behaviour of beech saplings to drought. Moreover, the drought response in soil respiration was better explained by stomatal conductance (R2=0.8) rather than photosynthesis (R2=0.62). Consequently, stomatal conductance, and thus water-mediated processes, played a pivotal role driving the coupling of above and belowground CO2 fluxes. Further, drought caused photosynthetic isotope discrimination to decrease by 8o which in turn was reflected in a significant increase in δ13C of recent photoassimilates (1.5-2.5 obar) , and could be also traced to δ13C of soil respiration, which increased by 1-1.5 obar) . However, the coupling between the isotopic signatures of above and belowground carbon fluxes (R2=0.15) was less pronounced compared to the coupling of above and belowground gas-exchange (R2=0.8). In summary, our

  10. Overview of NASA's Carbon Monitoring System Flux-Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Gunson, Michael R.; Jucks, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    NASA's space-based observations of physical, chemical and biological parameters in the Earth System along with state-of-the-art modeling capabilities provide unique capabilities for analyses of the carbon cycle. The Carbon Monitoring System is developing an exploratory framework for detecting carbon in the environment and its changes, with a view towards contributing to national and international monitoring activities. The Flux-Pilot Project aims to provide a unified view of land-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere carbon exchange, using observation-constrained models. Central to the project is the application of NASA's satellite observations (especially MODIS), the ACOS retrievals of the JAXA-GOSAT observations, and the "MERRA" meteorological reanalysis produced with GEOS-S. With a primary objective of estimating uncertainty in computed fluxes, two land- and two ocean-systems are run for 2009-2010 and compared with existing flux estimates. An transport model is used to evaluate simulated CO2 concentrations with in-situ and space-based observations, in order to assess the realism of the fluxes and how uncertainties in fluxes propagate into atmospheric concentrations that can be more readily evaluated. Finally, the atmospheric partial CO2 columns observed from space are inverted to give new estimates of surface fluxes, which are evaluated using the bottom-up estimates and independent datasets. The focus of this presentation will be on the science goals and current achievements of the pilot project, with emphasis on how policy-relevant questions help focus the scientific direction. Examples include the issue of what spatio-temporal resolution of fluxes can be detected from polar-orbiting satellites and whether it is possible to use space-based observations to separate contributions to atmospheric concentrations of (say) fossil-fuel and biological activity

  11. Closing the North American Carbon Budget: Continental Margin Fluxes Matter!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, R.; Benway, H. M.; Siedlecki, S. A.; Boyer, E. W.; Cai, W. J.; Coble, P. G.; Cross, J. N.; Friedrichs, M. A.; Goni, M. A.; Griffith, P. C.; Herrmann, M.; Lohrenz, S. E.; Mathis, J. T.; McKinley, G. A.; Pilskaln, C. H.; Smith, R. A.; Alin, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Despite their relatively small surface area, continental margins are regions of intense carbon and nutrient processing, export and exchange, and thus have a significant impact on global biogeochemical cycles. In response to recommendations for regional synthesis and carbon budget estimation for North America put forth in the North American Continental Margins workshop report (Hales et al., 2008), the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) Program and North American Carbon Program (NACP) began coordinating a series of collaborative, interdisciplinary Coastal CARbon Synthesis (CCARS) research activities in five coastal regions of North America (Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast, Gulf of Mexico, Arctic, Laurentian Great Lakes) to improve quantitative assessments of the North American carbon budget. CCARS workshops and collaborative research activities have resulted in the development of regional coastal carbon budgets based on recent literature- and model-based estimates of major carbon fluxes with estimated uncertainties. Numerous peer-reviewed papers and presentations by involved researchers have highlighted these findings and provided more in-depth analyses of processes underlying key carbon fluxes in continental margin systems. As a culminating outcome of these synthesis efforts, a comprehensive science plan highlights key knowledge gaps identified during this synthesis and provides explicit guidance on future research and observing priorities in continental margin systems to help inform future agency investments in continental margins research. This presentation will provide an overview of regional and flux-based (terrestrial inputs, biological transformations, sedimentary processes, atmospheric exchanges, lateral carbon transport) synthesis findings and key recommendations in the science plan, as well as a set of overarching priorities and recommendations on observations and modeling approaches for continental margin systems.

  12. Comparison of buried soil sensors, surface chambers and above ground measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) flux is an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Accurate measurements of soil CO2 flux aids determinations of carbon budgets. In this study, we investigated soil CO2 fluxes with time and depth and above ground CO2 fluxes in a bare field. CO2 concentrations w...

  13. Carbon and Water Flux Observations from AmeriFlux and Fluxnet: Some Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, B. E.

    2001-12-01

    Flux networks provide a means for scientists to make common measurements of carbon, water, and energy exchange, to share advancements in methods, and synthesize results across the network. AmeriFlux objectives are to: Determine how environmental factors and climate regulate ecosystem CO2 and H2O exchange over the short- and long-term, evaluate impacts of anthropogenic factors, and provide data and new understanding for incorporation into models. AmeriFlux is part of the larger international network, Fluxnet. Among Fluxnet sites, we investigated seasonal and annual CO2 and water vapor exchange, and relations with environmental variables to elucidate generalities within and among biomes. The data showed a strong linkage between carbon gain and water loss, with the highest water-use efficiency values for grasslands, and lowest values for tundra. Ecosystem respiration was only weakly correlated with mean annual temperature across biomes, in spite of sensitivity within site over shorter temporal scales. Mean annual temperature and site water balanced explained much of the variation in gross photosynthesis, whereby water availability limits LAI over the long-term, and inter-annual climate variability limits carbon uptake below the potential of the leaf area available for photosynthesis. We compared BIOME-BGC model results among AmeriFlux coniferous forests, and the model showed that variation in net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) is mostly a function of disturbance history, with important secondary effects from site climate, ecophysiology, and changing atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen deposition.

  14. Interactions between carbon and water vapor fluxes in Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.; Buchmann, N.; Eugster, W.

    2009-04-01

    Tropical ecosystems are particularly sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and have a significant impact on the global climate due to biophysical and biogeochemical feedbacks. It is still unclear how precipitation variability and soil moisture will develop under future climatic conditions, with large implications on ecosystems in the tropics. Thus, an improved understanding of the interactions between carbon and water vapor fluxes in the tropics is needed. However, continuous measurements of these fluxes in tropical regions are sparse in general and only few localities exist in Central America. Our two eddy flux towers were established in Sardinilla, Central Panama (9.3° N, 79.6° W, 70 m a.s.l.) to measure carbon and water vapor fluxes continuously over an afforestation with native tree species and an adjacent, traditionally grazed pasture. Our objective is to understand the variability of carbon and water vapor fluxes, their environmental drivers and their interaction in these two ecosystems. First results from nearly two years of continuous operation will be presented and discussed, focusing particularly on seasonal transition periods and the effects of a prolonged dry season caused by a strong ENSO event (La Niña) in 2008.

  15. Carbon monoxide fluxes over a managed mountain meadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörtnagl, Lukas; Hammerle, Albin; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a toxic trace gas with an atmospheric lifetime of 1-3 months and an average atmospheric concentration of 100 ppb. CO mole fractions exhibit a pronounced seasonal cycle with lows in summer and highs in winter. Carbon monoxide has an indirect global warming potential by increasing the lifetime of methane (CH4), as the main sink of CO is the reaction with the hydroxyl (OH) radical, which in turn is also the main sink for CH4. Regarding the warming potential, it is estimated that 100 kg CO are equivalent to an emission of 5 kg CH4. In addition, carbon monoxide interferes with the building and destruction of ozone. Emission into and uptake from the atmosphere of CO are thus relevant for global climate and regional air quality. Sources and sinks of CO on a global scale are still highly uncertain, mainly due to general scarcity of empirical data and the lack of ecosystem-scale CO exchange measurements, i.e. CO flux data that encompass all sources and sinks within an ecosystem. Here we present eddy covariance CO fluxes over a managed temperate mountain grassland near Neustift, Austria, whereby volume mixing ratios of CO were quantified by a dual-laser mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL). First analyses of fluxes captured in April 2013 showed that the QCL is well able to capture CO fluxes at the study site during springtime. During the same time period, both significant net uptake and deposition of CO were observed, with high emission and deposition fluxes on the order of +/- 5 nmol m-2 s-1, respectively. In addition, CO fluxes exhibited a clear diurnal cycle during certain time periods, indicating a continuous release or uptake of the compound with peak flux rates around noon. In this presentation, we will analyze 12 months of carbon monoxide fluxes between January and December 2013 with regard to possible abiotic and biotic drivers of CO exchange. As an additional step towards a full understanding of the greenhouse gas exchange of the meadow

  16. Rerouting carbon flux to enhance photosynthetic productivity.

    PubMed

    Ducat, Daniel C; Avelar-Rivas, J Abraham; Way, Jeffrey C; Silver, Pamela A

    2012-04-01

    The bioindustrial production of fuels, chemicals, and therapeutics typically relies upon carbohydrate inputs derived from agricultural plants, resulting in the entanglement of food and chemical commodity markets. We demonstrate the efficient production of sucrose from a cyanobacterial species, Synechococcus elongatus, heterologously expressing a symporter of protons and sucrose (cscB). cscB-expressing cyanobacteria export sucrose irreversibly to concentrations of >10 mM without culture toxicity. Moreover, sucrose-exporting cyanobacteria exhibit increased biomass production rates relative to wild-type strains, accompanied by enhanced photosystem II activity, carbon fixation, and chlorophyll content. The genetic modification of sucrose biosynthesis pathways to minimize competing glucose- or sucrose-consuming reactions can further improve sucrose production, allowing the export of sucrose at rates of up to 36.1 mg liter(-1) h illumination(-1). This rate of production exceeds that of previous reports of targeted, photobiological production from microbes. Engineered S. elongatus produces sucrose in sufficient quantities (up to ∼80% of total biomass) such that it may be a viable alternative to sugar synthesis from terrestrial plants, including sugarcane. PMID:22307292

  17. Rerouting Carbon Flux To Enhance Photosynthetic Productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ducat, DC; Avelar-Rivas, JA; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2012-03-23

    The bioindustrial production of fuels, chemicals, and therapeutics typically relies upon carbohydrate inputs derived from agricultural plants, resulting in the entanglement of food and chemical commodity markets. We demonstrate the efficient production of sucrose from a cyanobacterial species, Synechococcus elongatus, heterologously expressing a symporter of protons and sucrose (cscB). cscB-expressing cyanobacteria export sucrose irreversibly to concentrations of >10 mM without culture toxicity. Moreover, sucrose-exporting cyanobacteria exhibit increased biomass production rates relative to wild-type strains, accompanied by enhanced photosystem II activity, carbon fixation, and chlorophyll content. The genetic modification of sucrose biosynthesis pathways to minimize competing glucose-or sucrose-consuming reactions can further improve sucrose production, allowing the export of sucrose at rates of up to 36.1 mg liter(-1) h illumination(-1). This rate of production exceeds that of previous reports of targeted, photobiological production from microbes. Engineered S. elongatus produces sucrose in sufficient quantities (up to similar to 80% of total biomass) such that it may be a viable alternative to sugar synthesis from terrestrial plants, including sugarcane.

  18. Functional diversity of leaf nitrogen concentrations drives grassland carbon fluxes.

    PubMed

    Milcu, Alexandru; Roscher, Christiane; Gessler, Arthur; Bachmann, Dörte; Gockele, Annette; Guderle, Markus; Landais, Damien; Piel, Clément; Escape, Christophe; Devidal, Sebastien; Ravel, Olivier; Buchmann, Nina; Gleixner, Gerd; Hildebrandt, Anke; Roy, Jacques

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the role of plant functional diversity for ecosystem-level carbon (C) fluxes. To fill this knowledge gap, we translocated monoliths hosting communities with four and 16 sown species from a long-term grassland biodiversity experiment ('The Jena Experiment') into a controlled environment facility for ecosystem research (Ecotron). This allowed quantifying the effects of plant diversity on ecosystem C fluxes as well as three parameters of C uptake efficiency (water and nitrogen use efficiencies and apparent quantum yield). By combining data on ecosystem C fluxes with vegetation structure and functional trait-based predictors, we found that increasing plant species and functional diversity led to higher gross and net ecosystem C uptake rates. Path analyses and light response curves unravelled the diversity of leaf nitrogen concentration in the canopy as a key functional predictor of C fluxes, either directly or indirectly via LAI and aboveground biomass. PMID:24393400

  19. Biogenic carbon fluxes from global agricultural production and consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Julie; West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Collatz, G. James; Imhoff, Marc L.

    2015-10-01

    Quantification of biogenic carbon fluxes from agricultural lands is needed to generate comprehensive bottom-up estimates of net carbon exchange for global and regional carbon monitoring. We estimated global agricultural carbon fluxes associated with annual crop net primary production (NPP), harvested biomass, and consumption of biomass by humans and livestock. These estimates were combined for a single estimate of net carbon exchange and spatially distributed to 0.05° resolution using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite land cover data. Global crop NPP in 2011 was estimated at 5.25 ± 0.46 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.05 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-1 was harvested and 0.54 Pg C yr-1 was collected from crop residues for livestock fodder. Total livestock feed intake in 2011 was 2.42 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.31 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CO2, 0.07 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CH4, and 0.04 Pg C yr-1 was contained within milk and egg production. Livestock grazed an estimated 1.27 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, which constituted 52.4% of total feed intake. Global human food intake was 0.57 ± 0.03 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, the majority of which was respired as CO2. Completed global cropland carbon budgets accounted for the ultimate use of approximately 80% of harvested biomass. The spatial distribution of these fluxes may be used for global carbon monitoring, estimation of regional uncertainty, and for use as input to Earth system models.

  20. Biogenic carbon fluxes from global agricultural production and consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Julie; West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Collatz, George; Imhoff, Marc L.

    2015-10-01

    Quantification of biogenic carbon fluxes from agricultural lands is needed to generate comprehensive bottom-up estimates of net carbon exchange for global and regional carbon monitoring. We estimated global agricultural carbon fluxes associated with annual crop net primary production (NPP), harvested biomass, and consumption of biomass by humans and livestock. These estimates were combined for a single estimate of net carbon exchange (NCE) and spatially distributed to 0.05 degree resolution using MODIS satellite land cover data. Global crop NPP in 2011 was estimated at 5.25 ± 0.46 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.05 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-1 was harvested and 0.54 Pg C yr-1 was collected from crop residues for livestock fodder. Total livestock feed intake in 2011 was 2.42 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.31 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CO2, 0.07 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CH4, and 0.04 Pg C yr-1 was contained within milk and egg production. Livestock grazed an estimated 1.27 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, which constituted 52.4% of total feed intake. Global human food intake was 0.57 ± 0.03 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, the majority of which is respired as CO2. Completed global cropland carbon budgets accounted for the ultimate use of ca. 80% of harvested biomass. The spatial distribution of these fluxes may be used for global carbon monitoring, estimation of regional uncertainty, and for use as input to Earth system models.

  1. Large Uncertainties in Estimating Grassland Carbon Fluxes: Can Net Ecosystem Production Be Inferred?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, K. N.; Foley, J. A.; Kucharik, C. J.

    2003-12-01

    Despite interest in estimating ecosystem carbon budgets based on easily collected field data, no previous study to our knowledge has compared various methods of estimating total above- and belowground net primary production (NPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP, the annual carbon accumulated by an ecosystem) from commonly measured biomass and soil surface CO2 flux data in grasslands. Here we used field data from two grassland restorations and a row-crop agriculture treatment enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program as a model for an analysis of methodological uncertainty in estimating ecosystem carbon budgets over a short time period. The goal of this study was to investigate how a range of methods for estimating NPP and NEP suggested in the literature might be used to predict ecosystem carbon budgets based on short-term field measurements. We conclude that it is extremely difficult to close the carbon budget of a temperate grassland using flux-based methods that account for plant-derived carbon inputs and soil surface CO2 losses. Current uncertainties in (1) estimating aboveground NPP, (2) determining belowground NPP, and (3) splitting soil respiration into heterotrophic and autotrophic components strongly affect the magnitude, and even the sign, of NEP. A comparison of these estimates, across a treatment of different plant species mixes and land management, cannot reliably distinguish differences in NEP, nor the absolute sign of the overall carbon budget. These uncertainties likely exist in all grassland carbon budget studies using this approach, so conclusions about whether these systems are truly carbon sinks, or how they should be managed to sequester carbon, must be made with extreme care. Longer-term stocks methods, periodically linked to flux-based measurements of individual processes, may be the only way to close the carbon budget in these systems with any reasonable degree of certainty at the present time.

  2. An Assessment of Global Organic Carbon Flux Along Continental Margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thunell, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This project was designed to use real-time and historical SeaWiFS and AVHRR data, and real-time MODIS data in order to estimate the global vertical carbon flux along continental margins. This required construction of an empirical model relating surface ocean color and physical variables like temperature and wind to vertical settling flux at sites co-located with sediment trap observations (Santa Barbara Basin, Cariaco Basin, Gulf of California, Hawaii, and Bermuda, etc), and application of the model to imagery in order to obtain spatially-weighted estimates.

  3. Effect of restoration on carbon fluxes in urban temperate wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, K. V.; Tripathee, R.; Bohrer, G.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon sequestration as an ecosystem service, has received attraction as a climate change mitigating strategy. The restoration of wetlands has also been an integral part of US management policy, since the clean water act came into effect. How restoration impacts carbon fluxes, however, has seldom been reported. A record of over three years of net carbon exchange from a restored urban temperate wetland, shows that fluxes decreased by 50% concomitant with the management of Phragmites australis, an invasive plant species that has been eliminated by 2011, thus all aboveground biomass has been removed. Likewise, aboveground biomass decreased for Spartina alterniflora, the restored, native species over the same time period as well. The majority of the biomass resides belowground. Comparison between the managed urban wetland and an unmanaged recently restored site nearby shows that the fluxes in the unmanaged wetland in 2011 were significantly higher than those of the managed wetland. Thus, managing wetlands by removing Phragmites may cause diminishing carbon sequestration potential by these wetlands

  4. Export Fluxes of Dissolved Organic Carbon From the Yukon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Cai, Y.; Belzile, C.; MacDonald, R.

    2005-12-01

    Quantitative determination of export fluxes of carbon species through Arctic rivers is required to constrain the carbon budget in the Arctic Ocean and to understand the biogeochemical consequence of climate change in Northern drainage basins. In order to quantify the annual riverine export flux from the Yukon River, monthly or bimonthly water samples were collected at Pilot Station from July 2004 to July 2005 and analyzed for concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Concentration of DOC varied from 182 to 1683 uM (average 441 uM), with the highest concentration during river ice opening and the lowest in April under the ice. In contrast, DIC concentration increased from ice opening in May (1178 uM) to winter frozen season (2128 uM), with an average of 1588 uM. In addition to the DOC maximum during ice opening, an elevated DOC concentration was observed during the early stage of river ice formation, suggesting the rejection of DOC from ice during its formation. There was a positive correlation of DOC with freshwater flow rate whereas DIC correlated negatively with flow, indicating a hydrological control on both components but different source terms and transport mechanisms. Integrated annual export flux during 2004/2005 was 2.78x1012 g-C/y for DOC and 4.53x1012 g-C/y for DIC. Within the annual fluxes, only 5% of DOC and 17% of DIC were exported during the winter period when the river was frozen over. Long-term observations of DOC and DIC together with their molecular and isotopic signatures are needed to understand how the Yukon River Basin responds to a changing climate.

  5. Particle size distribution and estimated carbon flux across the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullier, F.; Berline, L.; Guidi, L.; Durrieu De Madron, X.; Picheral, M.; Sciandra, A.; Pesant, S.; Stemmann, L.

    2014-08-01

    The goal of the Arabian Sea section of the TARA oceans expedition was to study large particulate matter (LPM > 100 μm) distributions and possible impact of associated midwater biological processes on vertical carbon export through the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of this region. We propose that observed spatial patterns in LPM distribution resulted from the timing and location of surface phytoplankton bloom, lateral transport, microbial processes in the core of the OMZ, and enhanced biological processes mediated by bacteria and zooplankton at the lower oxycline. Indeed, satellite-derived net primary production maps showed that the northern stations of the transect were under the influence of a previous major bloom event while the most southern stations were in a more oligotrophic situation. Lagrangian simulations of particle transport showed that deep particles of the northern stations could originate from the surface bloom while the southern stations could be considered as driven by 1-D vertical processes. In the first 200 m of the OMZ core, minima in nitrate concentrations and the intermediate nepheloid layer (INL) coincided with high concentrations of 100 μm < LPM < 200 μm. These particles could correspond to colonies of bacteria or detritus produced by anaerobic microbial activity. However, the calculated carbon flux through this layer was not affected. Vertical profiles of carbon flux indicate low flux attenuation in the OMZ, with a Martin model b exponent value of 0.22. At three stations, the lower oxycline was associated to a deep nepheloid layer, an increase of calculated carbon flux and an increase in mesozooplankton abundance. Enhanced bacterial activity and zooplankton feeding in the deep OMZ is proposed as a mechanism for the observed deep particle aggregation. Estimated lower flux attenuation in the upper OMZ and re-aggregation at the lower oxycline suggest that OMZ may be regions of enhanced carbon flux to the deep sea relative to non OMZ regions.

  6. Urban Evapotranspiration and Carbon Dioxide Flux in Miami - Dade, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, T.; Hopper, W.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) concentrations are leading indicators of secular climate change. With increasing awareness of the consequences of climate change, methods for monitoring this change are becoming more important daily. Of particular interest is the carbon dioxide exchange between natural and urban landscapes and the correlation of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Monitoring Evapotranspiration (ET) is important for assessments of water availability for growing populations. ET is surprisingly understudied in the hydrologic cycle considering ET removes as much as 80 to over 100% of precipitation back into the atmosphere as water vapor. Lack of understanding in spatial and temporal ET estimates can limit the credibility of hydrologic water budgets designed to promote sustainable water use and resolve water-use conflicts. Eddy covariance (EC) methods are commonly used to estimate ET and CO2 fluxes. The EC platform consist of a (CSAT) 3-D Sonic Anemometer and a Li-Cor Open Path CO2/ H2O Analyzer. Measurements collected at 10 Hz create a very large data sets. A EC flux tower located in the Snapper Creek Well Field as part of a study to estimate ET for the Miami Dade County Water and Sewer project. Data has been collected from December 17, 2009 to August 30, 2010. QA/QC is performed with the EdiRe data processing software according to Ameri-flux protocols. ET estimates along with other data--latent-heat flux, sensible-heat flux, rainfall, air temperature, wind speed and direction, solar irradiance, net radiation, soil-heat flux and relative humidity--can be used to aid in the development of water management policies and regulations. Currently, many financial institutions have adopted an understanding about baseline environmental monitoring. The “Equator Principle” is an example of a voluntary standard for managing social and environmental risk in project financing and has changed the way in which projects are financed.

  7. Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes in a hydrologically changed wetland in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Elisa; Berger, Sina; Burger, Magdalena; Forsyth, Jordan; Goebel, Marie; Wagner-Riddle, Claudia; Blodau, Christian; Klemm, Otto

    2015-04-01

    Northern peatlands store about 30 % of the global soil carbon and account for a significant contribution to methane emissions from natural sources. The carbon cycle in peatland ecosystems is very sensitive to hydrological changes so that it is important to quantify and analyze the direction and magnitude of carbon fluxes under such conditions. For example, increased water levels might decrease the carbon dioxide uptake and increase methane emissions. The Luther Bog in Ontario, Canada, has been flooded to create a reservoir in 1952. This changed the hydrological regime of the adjacent areas and the question arises whether the changed ecosystem acts as a sink or source for carbon, and how it affects global warming. In 2014, an eddy covariance measurement station was operated there from May to October to quantify the exchange of water vapor, carbon dioxide and methane between the bog and the atmosphere. The station was located in an area that got wetter through the construction of the dam. The magnitude and direction of the methane fluxes were independent from daily patterns. The constantly high water level excluded the effect of temperature changes on the methane production. A seasonal variation with increased emissions during the summer period was visible despite the slightly decreased water level. However, the difference was small. The study site was found to be a clear methane source. The carbon dioxide fluxes showed typical diurnal courses. Their magnitude was relatively constant during the measurement period apart from a slight decrease in fall. The uptake of carbon clearly overweighed the carbon loss, meaning that the bog is sequestering carbon. However, considering the global warming potential of carbon dioxide and methane the effect on climate change is only slightly negative. This points out that even changed wetland ecosystems can keep their important function of sequestering carbon and thereby counteract global warming. A comparison and combination of this

  8. Carbon fluxes of Kobresia pygmaea pastures on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foken, T.; Biermann, T.; Babel, W.; Ma, Y.

    2013-12-01

    With an approximate cover of 450,000 km2 on the Tibetan Plateau (TP), the Cyperaceae Kobresia pygmaea forms he world's largest alpine ecosystem. This species, especially adapted to grazing pressure, grows to a height of only 2-6 cm and can be found in an altitudinal range of 4000 to 5960 m a.s.l. A special characteristic of this ecosystem is the stable turf layer, which is built up from roots and plays a significant role in protecting soil from erosion. This is of great importance since soils on the TP store 2.5 % of the global soil organic carbon stocks. The aim of the investigation was the study of the carbon storage and the impact of human-induced land use change on these Kobresia pygmaea pastures. We therefore applied eddy-covariance measurements and modelling as a long-term control of the fluxes between the atmosphere and the pastures and 13C labelling for the investigation of flux partitioning, and chamber measurements to investigate the degradation of the pastures. Combining CO2 budgets observed in 2010 with eddy-covariance measurements and relative partitioning of Carbon fluxes estimated with 13C labelling enabled us to characterise the C turnover for the vegetation period with absolute fluxes within the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum. These results revealed that this ecosystem indeed stores a great amount of C in below-ground pools, especially in the root turf layer. To further investigate the importance of the root layer, the experiments in 2012 focused on flux measurements over the different surface types which make up the heterogeneity of the Kobresia pygmaea pastures and might result from degradation due to extensive grazing. The three surface types investigated with a LiCOR long-term monitoring chamber system include Kobresia pygmaea with intact turf layer (IRM), a surface type where the turf layer is still present but the vegetation is sparse and mainly consists of Cryptogam crusts (DRM) and finally areas without the turf layer (BS). According to

  9. Forest carbon stocks and fluxes in physiographic zones of India

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Reducing carbon Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+) is of central importance to combat climate change. Foremost among the challenges is quantifying nation's carbon emissions from deforestation and degradation, which requires information on forest carbon storage. Here we estimated carbon storage in India's forest biomass for the years 2003, 2005 and 2007 and the net flux caused by deforestation and degradation, between two assessment periods i.e., Assessment Period first (ASP I), 2003-2005 and Assessment Period second (ASP II), 2005-2007. Results The total estimated carbon stock in India's forest biomass varied from 3325 to 3161 Mt during the years 2003 to 2007 respectively. There was a net flux of 372 Mt of CO2 in ASP I and 288 Mt of CO2 in ASP II, with an annual emission of 186 and 114 Mt of CO2 respectively. The carbon stock in India's forest biomass decreased continuously from 2003 onwards, despite slight increase in forest cover. The rate of carbon loss from the forest biomass in ASP II has dropped by 38.27% compared to ASP I. Conclusion With the Copenhagen Accord, India along with other BASIC countries China, Brazil and South Africa is voluntarily going to cut emissions. India will voluntary reduce the emission intensity of its GDP by 20-25% by 2020 in comparison to 2005 level, activities like REDD+ can provide a relatively cost-effective way of offsetting emissions, either by increasing the removals of greenhouse gases from the atmosphere by afforestation programmes, managing forests, or by reducing emissions through deforestation and degradation. PMID:22196920

  10. Inverse carbon dioxide flux estimates for the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesters, A. G. C. A.; Tolk, L. F.; Peters, W.; Hutjes, R. W. A.; Vellinga, O. S.; Elbers, J. A.; Vermeulen, A. T.; van der Laan, S.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Dolman, A. J.

    2012-10-01

    CO2 fluxes for the Netherlands and surroundings are estimated for the year 2008, from concentration measurements at four towers, using an inverse model. The results are compared to direct CO2flux measurements by aircraft, for 6 flight tracks over the Netherlands, flown multiple times in each season. We applied the Regional Atmospheric Mesoscale Modeling system (RAMS) coupled to a simple carbon flux scheme (including fossil fuel), which was run at 10 km resolution, and inverted with an Ensemble Kalman Filter. The domain had 6 eco-regions, and inversions were performed for the four seasons separately. Inversion methods with pixel-dependent and -independent parameters for each eco-region were compared. The two inversion methods, in general, yield comparable flux averages for each eco-region and season, whereas the difference from the prior flux may be large. Posterior fluxes co-sampled along the aircraft flight tracks are usually much closer to the observations than the priors, with a comparable performance for both inversion methods, and with best performance for summer and autumn. The inversions showed more negative CO2 fluxes than the priors, though the latter are obtained from a biosphere model optimized using the Fluxnet database, containing observations from more than 200 locations worldwide. The two different crop ecotypes showed very different CO2uptakes, which was unknown from the priors. The annual-average uptake is practically zero for the grassland class and for one of the cropland classes, whereas the other cropland class had a large net uptake, possibly because of the abundance of maize there.

  11. [Hydrochemical Characteristics and the Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Flux in Liuzhou Section of Liujiang Basin].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ya-qiong; He, Shi-yi; Yu, Shi; Sun, Ping-an; Wang, Yan-xue; Wu, Zhao-yun; Li, Xin-gui; Xie, Ming-xian; Liu, Wen; Li, Rui; Zhang, Hua-sheng

    2015-07-01

    An important aspect of the current global change research is using river chemical composition to reveal the chemical weathering process and its effect of carbon sink. In this study, water samples were collected and analyzed 2 ~3 times per month from January to December in 2013. The hydrochemistry belonged to HCO3-Ca type. Ca+ and HCO3- were the main cation and anion, which reflected that the hydrochemical characteristics of river were mainly affected by the dissolution of carbonate rock. The concentration of main ions varied with the seasons, which reflected that the crest value occurred in winter, followed by those in autumn and spring, and the lowest value was observed in summer. Due to the interaction of effect of dilution and effect of C2, the seasonal variation of Ca2+ and HCO3- showed that the highest value was in autumn and the lowest value was in summer. The seasonal variation law of other ions should be attributed to the effect of dilution or agricultural activities or combined action of them. Both carbonic acid and sulfuric acid took part in the chemical weathering of carbonate rocks as evidenced by stoichiometric analysis. Besides, the δ34S of sulfate ion of the river waters (δ34S: from 7. 65 per thousand to 8. 55 per thousand) showed that SO2- was originated mainly from oxidation of sulfide minerals in ore deposits and acid rain. Chemical mass balance method was applied to estimate the proportion of HCO- coming from carbonate weathering by sulfuric acid. The result was 28. 26% . On this basis, the total carbon flux of carbon ( by CO2 calculation) in Liuzhou section calculated month by month was about 8. 95 x 10(5) t . a-1. What's more, the carbon flux showed a positive correlation with flow, which implied that the discharge of catchment was the main influencing factor of carbon flux rather than the HCO3- concentration. PMID:26489309

  12. Ecosystem Warming Affects CO2 Flux in an Agricultural Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global warming seems likely based on present-day climate predictions. Our objective was to characterize and quantify the interactive effects of ecosystem warming (i.e., canopy temperature, TS), soil moisture content ('S) and microbial biomass (BM: bacteria, fungi) on the intra-row soil CO2 flux (FS)...

  13. Aeolian nutrient fluxes following wildfire in sagebrush steppe: Implications for soil carbon storage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hasselquist, N.J.; Germino, M.J.; Sankey, J.B.; Ingram, L.J.; Glenn, N.F.

    2011-01-01

    Pulses of aeolian transport following fire can profoundly affect the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in semi-arid and arid ecosystems. Our objective was to determine horizontal nutrient fluxes during an episodic pulse of aeolian transport that occurred following a wildfire in a semi-arid sagebrush steppe ecosystem in southern Idaho, USA. We also examined how temporal trends in nutrient fluxes were affected by changes in particle sizes of eroded mass as well as nutrient concentrations associated with different particle size classes. In the burned area, total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes were as high as 235 g C m????'1 d????'1 and 19 g N m????'1 d????'1 during the first few months following fire, whereas C and N fluxes were negligible in an adjacent unburned area throughout the study. Temporal variation in C and N fluxes following fire was largely attributable to the redistribution of saltation-sized particles. Total N and organic C concentrations in the soil surface were significantly lower in the burned relative to the unburned area one year after fire. Our results show how an episodic pulse of aeolian transport following fire can affect the spatial distribution of soil C and N, which, in turn, can have important implications for soil C storage. These findings demonstrate how an ecological disturbance can exacerbate a geomorphic process and highlight the need for further research to better understand the role aeolian transport plays in the biogeochemical cycling of C and N in recently burned landscapes. ?? 2011 Author(s).

  14. Particles size distribution and carbon flux across the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullier, F.; Berline, L.; Guidi, L.; Sciandra, A.; Durrieu De Madron, X.; Picheral, M.; Pesant, S.; Stemmann, L.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the Arabian Sea section of the TARA oceans expedition was to study Large Particulate Matter (LPM > 100 μm) distributions and possible impact of associated midwater biological processes on vertical carbon export through the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) of this region. We found that spatial patterns in LPM distribution resulted from the timing and location of surface phytoplankton bloom, lateral transport, microbial processes in the core of the OMZ, and zooplankton activity at the lower oxycline. Indeed, satellite-derived net primary production maps showed that the northern stations of the transect were under the influence of a previous major bloom event while, the most southern stations were in a more oligotrophic situation. Lagrangian simulations of particle transport showed that deep particles of the northern stations could originate from the surface bloom while the southern stations could be considered as driven by 1-D vertical processes. In the first 200 m of the OMZ core, minima in nitrate concentrations and the Intermediate Nepheloid Layer (INL) coincided with high concentrations of 100 μm < LPM < 200 μm. These particles could correspond to colonies of bacteria or detritus produced by anaerobic microbial activity. However, the calculated carbon flux through this layer was not affected. Vertical profiles of carbon flux indicate low flux attenuation in the OMZ, with a Martin model b exponent value of 0.22. At the lower oxycline, a deep nepheloid layer was associated to an increase of carbon flux and an increase in mesozooplankton abundance. Zooplankton feeding on un-mineralized sinking particles in the OMZ is proposed as a mechanism for the observed deep particle aggregation. These results suggest that OMZ may be regions of enhanced carbon flux to the deep sea relative to non-OMZ regions.

  15. Carbon fluxes of Kobresia pygmaea pastures on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, Wolfgang; Biermann, Tobias; Falge, Eva; Ingrisch, Johannes; Leonbacher, Jürgen; Schleuss, Per; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Ma, Yaoming; Miehe, Georg; Foken, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    With an approximate cover of 450,000 km² on the Tibetan Plateau (TP), the Cyperaceae Kobresia pygmaea forms he world's largest alpine ecosystem. This species, especially adapted to grazing pressure, grows to a height of only 2-6 cm and can be found in an altitudinal range of 4000 to 5960 m a.s.l. A special characteristic of this ecosystem is the stable turf layer, which is built up from roots and plays a significant role in protecting soil from erosion. This is of great importance since soils on the TP store 2.5 % of the global soil organic carbon stocks. The aim of the investigation was the study of the carbon storage and the impact of human-induced land use change on these Kobresia pygmaea pastures. We therefore applied eddy-covariance measurements and modelling as a long-term control of the fluxes between the atmosphere and the pastures and 13C labelling for the investigation of flux partitioning, and chamber measurements to investigate the degradation of the pastures. Combining CO2 budgets observed in 2010 with eddy-covariance measurements and relative partitioning of carbon fluxes estimated with 13C labelling enabled us to characterise the C turnover for the vegetation period with absolute fluxes within the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum. These results revealed that this ecosystem indeed stores a great amount of C in below-ground pools, especially in the root turf layer. To further investigate the importance of the root layer, the experiments in 2012 focused on flux measurements over the different surface types which make up the heterogeneity of the Kobresia pygmaea pastures and might result from degradation due to extensive grazing. The three surface types investigated with a LiCOR long-term monitoring chamber system include Kobresia pygmaea with intact turf layer (IRM), a surface type where the turf layer is still present but the vegetation is sparse and mainly consists of Cryptogam crusts (DRM) and finally areas without the turf layer (BS). According to

  16. Testing the Need for Replication of Eddy Covariance Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurements over Agricultural Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. M.; Amiro, B. D.; Gervais, M.

    2015-12-01

    The eddy covariance method directly measures carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes for long periods of time and with footprints up to hundreds of meters in size. Any ecosystem process that alters how gases and energy move between the atmosphere and soil/vegetation can affect these fluxes. Eddy covariance is vulnerable to systematic errors and uncertainy, particular through relying on assumptions about surface characteristics. Additionally, spatial variation within a site can cause more uncertainty in these measurements and lack of replication in many eddy covariance studies makes statistical analysis of carbon fluxes challenging. We tested if there are significant differences between co-located and simultaneous CO2 flux measurements over a uniform crop surface, and if the differences increase if we measure different flux footprint areas over the same field. During the summer of 2014, three matched instrumented 2.5-m high towers were co-located and then periodically separated by moving at 50 m intervals along a north-south transect on an alfalfa/trefoil field and a spring wheat field in Southern Manitoba, Canada to compare CO­2 fluxes. Georeferenced leaf area index measurements were taken in 50 m grid of each field to establish uniformity of the source/sink within a footprint. Diurnal differences of similar magnitude in the CO2 ­fluxes were found in both the co-located experiment and the spatially separated intervals. Despite rigorous calibration during the experiment, some differences were caused by the measurement systems rather than by variation within the field. Interpretation of the spatial variation in leaf area index is being used to determine the contribution caused by difference in source/sink contributions to the flux footprint areas when the towers were spatially separated.

  17. Mantle carbon fluxes and reservoirs: A status update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon masses in and fluxes from the mantle are topics of intense community interest, but remain uncertain. Recent (2010-2015) estimates of ridge carbon fluxes and total mantle C concentrations each vary by a factors of 30 (0.3-8.4 X 1014 g CO2/year) and 38 (20-765 ppm C), respectively. Early estimates of C fluxes at ridges depended chiefly on C/3He ratios, but the recognition of kinetic C/He fractionation during degassing renders these estimates unsound. Methods based on CO2/Nb and CO2/Ba ratios benefit from a greatly expanded set of observations of minimally degassed MORB glasses and melt inclusions, as well as new constraints on the Nb and Ba concentrations of mean oceanic crust. Quite liberal bounds on MORB CO2/Nb and CO2/Ba of 550±250 and 125±50, combined with the ALLMORB (Gale et al. 2013) or global average MORB of Arevalo and McDonough (2010) concentrations of Nb and Ba yield fluxes of 2.1±1.3 X 1014 g CO2/year, thereby reducing the ridge flux uncertainty to a factor of 4. The C flux from oceanic islands, however, remains almost entirely unconstrained. For bulk mantle C, estimates based on He and Ar suffer from problems similar to those related to fluxes - C/He/Ar are strongly fractionated by degassing. As the upper mantle reservoir is well-constrained by sampling from MORB, uncertainty derives chiefly from the deep (OIB source) reservoir . High average mantle C (e.g. 300 or 765 ppm C; Dasgupta and Hirschmann, 2010; Marty, 2012) requires a deep C-rich reservoir that is a large fraction of the mantle (>30%), which means that it must be in part primitive (i.e. it is volatile-rich but cannot be chiefly recycled) and is too large to be "hidden", so should be sampled by OIB. Assuming source Ba and Nb concentrations similar to primitive mantle, bulk mantle with 300 or 765 ppm C require OIB sources with CO2/Ba >700-1400 and CO2/Nb>2800-5200, and would produce magmas (with appropriate Ba and Nb concentrations for OIB) with 20-40 wt.% CO2. These are far beyond any

  18. CarbonTracker-Lagrange: A model-data assimilation system for North American carbon flux estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Chen, Huilin; van der Velde, Ivar; Andrews, Arlyn; Sweeney, Colm; Baker, Ian; Ju, Weimin; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid; Tans, Pieter; Peters, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the regional carbon fluxes is of great importance for climate-related studies. To derive these carbon fluxes, atmospheric inverse modeling methods are often used. Different from global inverse modeling, regional studies need to deal with lateral boundary conditions (BCs) at the outer atmospheric domain studied. Also, regional inverse modeling systems typically use a higher spatial resolution and can be more computation-intensive. In this study, we implement a regional inverse modeling system for atmospheric CO₂ based on the CarbonTracker framework. We combine it with a high-resolution Lagrangian transport model, the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model driven by the Weather Forecast and Research meteorological fields (WRF-STILT). The new system uses independent information from aircraft CO₂ profiles to optimize lateral BCs, while simultaneously optimizing biosphere fluxes with near-surface CO₂ observations from tall towers. This Lagrangian transport model with precalculated footprints is computational more efficient than using an Eulerian model. We take SiBCASA biosphere model results as prior NEE from the terrestrial biosphere. Three different lateral BCs, derived from CarbonTracker North America mole fraction fields, CarbonTracker Europe mole fraction fields and an empirical BC from NOAA aircraft profiles, are employed to investigate the influence of BCs. To estimate the uncertainties of the optimized fluxes from the system and to determine the impacts of system setup on biosphere flux covariances, BC uncertainties and model-data mismatches, we tested various prior biosphere fluxes and BCs. To estimate the transport uncertainties, we also tested an alternative Lagrangian transport model Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model driven by the North American Mesoscale Forecast System meteorological fields (HYSPLIT-NAM12). Based on the above tests, we achieved an ensemble of inverse estimates from our system

  19. Cropland carbon fluxes in the United States: increasing Geospatial Resolution of Inventory-Based Carbon Accounting

    SciTech Connect

    West, Tristram O.; Brandt, Craig C; Baskaran, Latha Malar; Hellwinckel, Chad M; Marland, Gregg; Nelson, Richard G; De La Torre Ugarte, Daniel G; Post, Wilfred M

    2010-01-01

    Net annual soil carbon change, fossil fuel emissions from cropland production, and cropland net primary productivity were estimated and spatially distributed using land cover defined by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and by the Cropland Data Layer (CDL). Spatially resolved estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) were developed. NEE represents net on-site vertical fluxes of carbon. NECB represents all on-site and off-site carbon fluxes associated with crop production. Estimates of cropland NEE using moderate resolution (~1km2) land cover data were generated for the conterminous US and compared with higher resolution (30m) estimates of NEE and with direct measurements of CO2 flux from croplands in Illinois and Nebraska. Estimates of NEE using the CDL (30m resolution) had a higher correlation with eddy covariance flux tower estimates compared with estimates of NEE using MODIS. Estimates of NECB are primarily driven by net soil carbon change, fossil-fuel emissions associated with crop production, and CO2 emissions from the application of agricultural lime. NEE and NECB for US croplands were -274 and 7 Tg C yr-1 for 2004, respectively. Use of moderate to high resolution satellite-based land cover data enables improved estimates of cropland carbon dynamics.

  20. Soil Carbon Dioxide Production and Surface Fluxes: Subsurface Physical Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risk, D.; Kellman, L.; Beltrami, H.

    Soil respiration is a critical determinant of landscape carbon balance. Variations in soil temperature and moisture patterns are important physical processes controlling soil respiration which need to be better understood. Relationships between soil respi- ration and physical controls are typically addressed using only surface flux data but other methods also exist which permit more rigorous interpretation of soil respira- tion processes. Here we use a combination of subsurface CO_{2} concentrations, surface CO_{2} fluxes and detailed physical monitoring of the subsurface envi- ronment to examine physical controls on soil CO_{2} production at four climate observatories in Eastern Canada. Results indicate that subsurface CO_{2} produc- tion is more strongly correlated to the subsurface thermal environment than the surface CO_{2} flux. Soil moisture was also found to have an important influence on sub- surface CO_{2} production, particularly in relation to the soil moisture - soil profile diffusivity relationship. Non-diffusive profile CO_{2} transport appears to be im- portant at these sites, resulting in a de-coupling of summertime surface fluxes from subsurface processes and violating assumptions that surface CO_{2} emissions are the result solely of diffusion. These results have implications for the study of soil respiration across a broad range of terrestrial environments.

  1. Cropland carbon fluxes in the United States: increasing geospatial resolution of inventory-based carbon accounting.

    PubMed

    West, Tristram O; Brandt, Craig C; Baskaran, Latha M; Hellwinckel, Chad M; Mueller, Richard; Bernacchi, Carl J; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Yang, Bai; Wilson, Bradly S; Marland, Gregg; Nelson, Richard G; De la Torre Ugarte, Daniel G; Post, Wilfred M

    2010-06-01

    Net annual soil carbon change, fossil fuel emissions from cropland production, and cropland net primary production were estimated and spatially distributed using land cover defined by NASA's moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) and by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) cropland data layer (CDL). Spatially resolved estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) were developed. The purpose of generating spatial estimates of carbon fluxes, and the primary objective of this research, was to develop a method of carbon accounting that is consistent from field to national scales. NEE represents net on-site vertical fluxes of carbon. NECB represents all on-site and off-site carbon fluxes associated with crop production. Estimates of cropland NEE using moderate resolution (approximately 1 km2) land cover data were generated for the conterminous United States and compared with higher resolution (30-m) estimates of NEE and with direct measurements of CO2 flux from croplands in Illinois and Nebraska, USA. Estimates of NEE using the CDL (30-m resolution) had a higher correlation with eddy covariance flux tower estimates compared with estimates of NEE using MODIS. Estimates of NECB are primarily driven by net soil carbon change, fossil fuel emissions associated with crop production, and CO2 emissions from the application of agricultural lime. NEE and NECB for U.S. croplands were -274 and 7 Tg C/yr for 2004, respectively. Use of moderate- to high-resolution satellite-based land cover data enables improved estimates of cropland carbon dynamics. PMID:20597291

  2. Multi-property modeling of ocean basin carbon fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to elucidate the causal mechanisms in some of the most important features of the global ocean/atomsphere carbon system. These included the interaction of physical and biological processes in the seasonal cycle of surface water pCo2, and links between productivity, surface chlorophyll, and the carbon cycle that would aid global modeling efforts. In addition, several other areas of critical scientific interest involving links between the marine biosphere and the global carbon cycle were successfully pursued; specifically, a possible relation between phytoplankton emitted DMS and climate, and a relation between the location of calcium carbonate burial in the ocean and metamorphic source fluxes of CO2 to the atmosphere. Six published papers covering the following topics are summarized: (1) Mass extinctions, atmospheric sulphur and climatic warming at the K/T boundary; (2) Sensitivity of climate and atmospheric CO2 to deep-ocean and shallow-ocean carbonate burial; (3) Controls on CO2 sources and sinks in the earthscale surface ocean; (4) pre-anthropogenic, earthscale patterns of delta pCO2 between ocean and atmosphere; (5) Effect on atmospheric CO2 from seasonal variations in the high latitude ocean; and (6) Limitations or relating ocean surface chlorophyll to productivity.

  3. Riverbed Bioclogging and the Effects on Infiltration and Carbon Flux under Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomer, M. E.; Hubbard, S. S.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Maier, U.; Schmidt, C.; Thullner, M.; Ulrich, C.; Flipo, N.; Rubin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In California and other regions with Mediterranean climates, losing rivers are common and can introduce dynamic feedbacks affecting total transport of infiltration and nutrients, as well as unsaturated zone formation. Permeability decline from hyporheic zone bioclogging is one such feedback mechanism that is thought to highly depend on the initial grain size distribution during each seasonal cycle. Variability from the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) can influence the initial grain size distribution demonstrating a large scale climate-control on biogeochemical fluxes. To address these questions, we simulated biological growth and carbon dynamics using 1D and 2D MIN3P numerical models, allowing a range of initial grains size distributions to represent ENSO control of riverbed scour. We quantified microbial growth and total carbon and infiltration fluxes. Our results showed that infiltration declines due to bioclogging were greatest in higher permeability sediments (typical of El Niño with greater probability of bankfull discharge). However, in these higher permeability sediments, cumulative carbon fluxes and infiltration volumes were lower than more drought-like, La Niña conditions (less probability of riverbed scour). Additionally, we found the initial sediment grain size distribution exerted strong control on the location of the bioclogging hotspot when an unsaturated zone developed. Our results demonstrate a flow and nutrient transport feedback mechanism where bioclogging and carbon cycling become limited from ENSO controlled initial conditions. These results provide a new understanding of nutrient cycling and hotspot bioclogging in losing rivers worldwide.

  4. Carbon Fluxes and Ocean Acidification in the Irminger Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, Daniela; Barkhouse, Ryan; Olafsson, Jon; Olafsdottir, Solveig; Gulev, Sergej; Wallace, Doug

    2016-04-01

    Complex horizontal and vertical circulation in the Irminger and Labrador Seas has the potential to influence global ocean circulation and climate patterns. Deep water formation coupled with strong winds, and high rates of primary productivity in spring and summer result in these regions of the North Atlantic acting as strong sinks for atmospheric carbon dioxide. An increase in surface water pCO2 over the past two decades at a rate greater than that of the atmosphere has been observed and indicates a decrease in the air-sea pCO2 difference, the driving force of the air-sea CO2 flux. In response to the increasing pCO2, the surface water pH and the aragonite saturation states (Ωar) show a decreasing trend. Much of the previous work in the region has occurred on a few repeated transects over time, or in specific regions the Irminger basin. There is therefore a need for surveys of carbon parameters with broader horizontal spatial coverage to determine the CO2 fluxes and the effect of ocean acidification (OA) in the Irminger Sea. Here, we estimate surface pCO2 and CO2 fluxes, and Ωar over a large portion of the Irminger Sea and adjacent waters in the summer of 2013. These estimates are based on measurements of total alkalinity (TA) and pH from discrete samples in the upper 100m, collected at 83 stations on two cruises during the International Redfish Survey. The present study is designed to provide a baseline of inorganic carbon parameters for future, long-term study in the region. The large spatial scope of this study, and planned future work, will provide data that will help contextualize measures from repeated transect studies, underway measures, as well as measures from fixed observatories such those deployed by Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI).

  5. Seasonal spectral dynamics and carbon fluxes at core EOS sites using EO-1 Hyperion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomasino, D.; Campbell, P.; Price, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    phenology, as well as distinct spectral shapes for each vegetation type. Preliminary results suggest a high correlation (r=0.77-0.86) between CO2 flux and various biophysical indices that were primarily associated with the red-edge inflection point (i.e., 670-780 nm wavelength), regardless of vegetation type. Soil heat flux measurements also correlated well with the biophysical indices. These findings demonstrate the advantages of high-resolution spectral imaging for Earth observations, as well as for monitoring regional and global water and carbon fluxes to understand their affects on climate change.

  6. Fluxes of carbon, phosphorylation, and redox intermediates during growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on different carbon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cortassa, S.; Aon, J.C.; Aon, M.A.

    1995-07-20

    In the present work the authors developed a method for estimating anabolic fluxes when yeast are growing on various carbon substrates (glucose, glycerol, lactate, pyruvate, acetate, or ethanol) in minimal medium. Fluxes through the central amphibolic pathways were calculated from the product of the total required amount of a specified carbon intermediate times the growth rate. The required amount of each carbon intermediate was estimated from the experimentally determined macromolecular composition of cells grown in each carbon source and the monomer composition of macromolecules. Substrates sharing most metabolic pathways such as ethanol and acetate, despite changes in the macromolecular composition, namely carbohydrate content, did not show large variations in the overall fluxes through the main amphibolic pathways. For instance, in order to supply anabolic precursors to sustain growth rates in the range of 0.16/h to 0.205/h, similar large fluxes through Acetyl CoA synthase were required by acetate or ethanol. The V{sub max} activities of key enzymes of the main amphibolic pathways measured in permeabilized yeast cells allowed to confirm, qualitatively, the operation of those pathways for all substrates and were consistent on most substrates with the estimate fluxes required to sustain growth.

  7. Correction to ``Forest disturbance and North American carbon flux''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goward, Samuel N.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Cohen, Warren; Moisen, Gretchen; Collatz, G. James; Healey, Sean; Houghton, R. A.; Huang, Chengquan; Kennedy, Robert; Law, Beverly; Powell, Scott; Turner, David; Wulder, Michael A.

    2008-07-01

    In the article ``Forest disturbance and North American carbon flux,'' published in the 11 March 2008 issue of Eos (89(11)), several author affiliations were incorrect. The corrected affiliations are as follows: Sean Healey, Rocky Mountain Research Station, U.S. Forest Service, Ogden, Utah; R. A. Houghton, Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, Mass; and David Turner, Department of Forest Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis. The authors would also like to acknowledge the NASA Terrestrial Ecosystems and Applied Sciences Programs for providing support for the NAFD and LEDAPS projects discussed in the article.

  8. Fluxes of Carbon Dioxide and Nitric Oxide from a Repeatedly Burned Mediterranean Shrubland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekberg, A.; Buchmann, N.; Gross, S.; Sörgel, K.; Weitz, A.

    2003-04-01

    Ecosystem carbon and nitrogen fluxes are closely coupled. Soil nitrogen availability and organic matter content affect soil carbon turnover as well as emissions of nitrogen oxides. Fire affects nutrient availability, typically leading to peaks in soil-atmosphere gas fluxes. However, little information on this subject is currently available from Mediterranean ecosystems. Our study is carried out within the framework of the EU project SPREAD (Forest Fire Spread Prevention and Mitigation). In the context of SPREAD, we study effects of repeated management fires on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and soil-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitric oxide (NO). The study is performed in a mountain bushland area at Quintos de Mora Biological Station, Montes de Toledo, central Spain (39°23'N, 4°00'W). The experiments are set up in a split plot design where autumn- and spring burns from three consecutive years (1997-1999) and one additional burn from 1994 are compared with unburned controls. During the first field campaign, conducted in November 2002, soil respiration (CO2 emission) was measured from 30 permanently installed frames by a manual chamber technique using infrared gas analysis (LI-6400-09, LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, Nebraska). The preliminary results indicate no significant differences in CO2 emissions between different burns. Emissions of NO were not measured at this occasion, but in future field campaigns, we will use a luminol chemiluminescence detection technique (LMA-3D, Unisearch Associates Inc., Concord, Canada) with dynamic vented chambers to determine soil NO fluxes. Soil physical (bulk density, gravimetric soil water content, water-filled pore space) and chemical (pH, available ammonium a nitrate) properties are also determined. Additional field campaigns are scheduled to March, early summer and late summer 2003.

  9. Carbon flux assessment in cow-calf grazing systems.

    PubMed

    Chiavegato, M B; Rowntree, J E; Powers, W J

    2015-08-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes and soil organic carbon (SOC) accumulation in grassland ecosystems are intimately linked to grazing management. This study assessed the carbon equivalent flux (Ceq) from 1) an irrigated, heavily stocked, low-density grazing system, 2) a nonirrigated, lightly stocked, high-density grazing system, and 3) a grazing-exclusion pasture site on the basis of the GHG emissions from pasture soils and enteric methane emissions from cows grazing different pasture treatments. Soil organic carbon and total soil nitrogen stocks were measured but not included in Ceq determination because of study duration and time needed to observe a change in soil composition. Light- and heavy-stocking systems had 36% and 43% greater Ceq than nongrazed pasture sites, respectively ( < 0.01). The largest contributor to increased Ceq from grazing systems was enteric CH emissions, which represented 15% and 32% of the overall emissions for lightly and heavily stocked grazing systems, respectively. Across years, grazing systems also had increased nitrous oxide (N2O; < 0.01) and CH emissions from pasture soils ( < 0.01) compared with nongrazed pasture sites but, overall, minimally contributed to total emissions. Results indicate no clear difference in Ceqflux between the grazing systems studied when SOC change is not incorporated ( = 0.11). A greater stocking rate potentially increased total SOC stock ( = 0.02), the addition of SOC deeper into the soil horizon ( = 0.01), and soil OM content to 30 cm ( < 0.01). The incorporation of long-term annual carbon sequestration into the determination of Ceq could change results and possibly differentiate the grazing systems studied. PMID:26440199

  10. Nitrogen and carbon interactions in controlling terrestrial greenhouse gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ineson, Phil; Toet, Sylvia; Christiansen, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    The increased input of N to terrestrial systems may have profound impacts on net greenhouse gas (GHGs) fluxes and, consequently, our future climate; however, fully capturing and quantifying these interactions under field conditions urgently requires new, more efficient, measurement approaches. We have recently developed and deployed a novel system for the automation of terrestrial GHG flux measurements at the chamber and plot scales, using the approach of 'flying' a single measurement chamber to multiple points in an experimental field arena. As an example of the value of this approach, we shall describe the results from a field experiment investigating the interactions between increasing inorganic nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) additions on net ecosystem exchanges of N2O, CH4 and CO2, enabling the simultaneous application of 25 treatments, replicated five times in a fully replicated block field design. We will describe how the ability to deliver automated GHG flux measurements, highly replicated in space and time, has revealed hitherto unreported findings on N and C interactions in field soil. In our experiments we found insignificant N2O fluxes from bare field soil, even at very high inorganic N addition rates, but the interactive addition of even small amounts of available C resulted in very large and rapid N2O fluxes. The SkyGas experimental system enabled investigation of the underlying interacting response surfaces on the fluxes of the major soil-derived GHGs (CO2, CH4 and N2O) to increasing N and C inputs, and revealed unexpected interactions. In addition to these results we will also discuss some of the technical problems which have been overcome in developing these 'flying' systems and the potential of the systems for automatically screening the impacts of large numbers of treatments on GHG fluxes, and other ecosystem responses, under field conditions. We describe here technological advances that can facilitate the development of more robust GHG mitigation

  11. Comparing the CarbonTracker and M5-4DVar data assimilation systems for CO2 surface flux inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babenhauserheide, A.; Basu, S.; Houweling, S.; Peters, W.; Butz, A.

    2015-09-01

    Data assimilation systems allow for estimating surface fluxes of greenhouse gases from atmospheric concentration measurements. Good knowledge about fluxes is essential to understand how climate change affects ecosystems and to characterize feedback mechanisms. Based on the assimilation of more than 1 year of atmospheric in situ concentration measurements, we compare the performance of two established data assimilation models, CarbonTracker and TM5-4DVar (Transport Model 5 - Four-Dimensional Variational model), for CO2 flux estimation. CarbonTracker uses an ensemble Kalman filter method to optimize fluxes on ecoregions. TM5-4DVar employs a 4-D variational method and optimizes fluxes on a 6° × 4° longitude-latitude grid. Harmonizing the input data allows for analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of the two approaches by direct comparison of the modeled concentrations and the estimated fluxes. We further assess the sensitivity of the two approaches to the density of observations and operational parameters such as the length of the assimilation time window. Our results show that both models provide optimized CO2 concentration fields of similar quality. In Antarctica CarbonTracker underestimates the wintertime CO2 concentrations, since its 5-week assimilation window does not allow for adjusting the distant surface fluxes in response to the detected concentration mismatch. Flux estimates by CarbonTracker and TM5-4DVar are consistent and robust for regions with good observation coverage, regions with low observation coverage reveal significant differences. In South America, the fluxes estimated by TM5-4DVar suffer from limited representativeness of the few observations. For the North American continent, mimicking the historical increase of the measurement network density shows improving agreement between CarbonTracker and TM5-4DVar flux estimates for increasing observation density.

  12. Flux profiling of photosynthetic carbon metabolism in intact plants.

    PubMed

    Heise, Robert; Arrivault, Stéphanie; Szecowka, Marek; Tohge, Takayuki; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2014-08-01

    Flux analysis has been carried out in plants for decades, but technical innovations are now enabling it to be carried out in photosynthetic tissues in a more precise fashion with respect to the number of metabolites measured. Here we describe a protocol, using gas chromatography (GC)- and liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS), to resolve intracellular fluxes of the central carbon metabolism in illuminated intact Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes using the time course of the unlabeled fractions in 40 major constituents of the metabolome after switching to (13)CO2. We additionally simplify modeling assumptions, specifically to cope with the presence of multiple cellular compartments. We summarize all steps in this 8-10-week-long process, including setting up the chamber; harvesting; liquid extraction and subsequent handling of sample plant material to chemical derivatization procedures such as silylation and methoxymation (necessary for gas chromatography only); choosing instrumentation settings and evaluating the resultant chromatogram in terms of both unlabeled and labeled peaks. Furthermore, we describe how quantitative insights can be gained by estimating both benchmark and previously unknown fluxes from collected data sets. PMID:24992096

  13. Carbon and nitrogen fluxes between beech and their ectomycorrhizal assemblage.

    PubMed

    Valtanen, Kerttu; Eissfeller, Verena; Beyer, Friderike; Hertel, Dietrich; Scheu, Stefan; Polle, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    To determine the exchange of nitrogen and carbon between ectomycorrhiza and host plant, young beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees from natural regeneration in intact soil cores were labelled for one growing season in a greenhouse with (13)CO2 and (15)NO3 (15)NH4. The specific enrichments of (15)N and (13)C were higher in ectomycorrhizas (EMs) than in any other tissue. The enrichments of (13)C and (15)N were also higher in the fine-root segments directly connected with the EM (mainly second-order roots) than that in bulk fine or coarse roots. A strict, positive correlation was found between the specific (15)N enrichment in EM and the attached second-order roots. This finding indicates that strong N accumulators provide more N to their host than low N accumulators. A significant correlation was also found for the specific (13)C enrichment in EM and the attached second-order roots. However, the specific enrichments for (15)N and (13)C in EM were unrelated showing that under long-term conditions, C and N exchange between host and EMs are uncoupled. These findings suggest that EM-mediated N flux to the plant is not the main control on carbon flux to the fungus, probably because EMs provide many different services to their hosts in addition to N provision in their natural assemblages. PMID:24756632

  14. Phytolith-Occluded Carbon Pools and Fluxes: New Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyerson, P. E.; Alexandre, A. E.; Santos, G.

    2015-12-01

    Phytoliths are microscopic grains of silica (SiO2•nH2O) formed within plants. The biomineralization process typically encapsulates small quantities of carbon termed phytC. Upon decomposition, phytoliths are released from biomass and into soils. Recent research has suggested that phytC may be a large sink of atmospheric CO2 in soils. Important steps, therefore, are to quantify phytC cycling across ecosystems and to measure it's importance relative to the organic C cycle as a whole. Thus, information regarding phytC pool sizes and flux rates are needed. To an extent this has been performed. PhytC quantities can be easily estimated as long as 1) phytolith quantities and 2) the amount of C present in phytoliths are known. The quantity of C within phytoliths is still a subject of debate, but recent work has found quantities of less than 0.22%. Older studies, which rely on extraction methods which are now known to incompletely remove surface organic residues, have found phytC quantities from 1% to 20%. Hence, studies of phytC cycling using outdated methods may lead to overestimates. In order to re-estimate phytC dynamics, we compiled an extensive list of published works which document phytolith pools in above-ground biomass and soils, as well as flux rates. From these data phytC quantities were calculated using revised estimates of phytolith C percentages. PhytC quantities were also compared to total organic C (TOC) pools and fluxes. These calculations were then extrapolated to biome and global scales. At the biome scale, our results indicate that phytC within living biomass and soil pools as well as fluxes are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than previously estimated. PhytC is generally less than 0.01% of biomass TOC, and less than 1% of soil TOC. Annual phytC fluxes are less than 0.01% of TOC fluxes. At the global scale, annual phytC production is approximately 0.01% to 0.10% of gross C production. The findings of the present study suggest that direct C

  15. Defaunation affects carbon storage in tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Carolina; Galetti, Mauro; Pizo, Marco A.; Magnago, Luiz Fernando S.; Rocha, Mariana F.; Lima, Renato A. F.; Peres, Carlos A.; Ovaskainen, Otso; Jordano, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Carbon storage is widely acknowledged as one of the most valuable forest ecosystem services. Deforestation, logging, fragmentation, fire, and climate change have significant effects on tropical carbon stocks; however, an elusive and yet undetected decrease in carbon storage may be due to defaunation of large seed dispersers. Many large tropical trees with sizeable contributions to carbon stock rely on large vertebrates for seed dispersal and regeneration, however many of these frugivores are threatened by hunting, illegal trade, and habitat loss. We used a large data set on tree species composition and abundance, seed, fruit, and carbon-related traits, and plant-animal interactions to estimate the loss of carbon storage capacity of tropical forests in defaunated scenarios. By simulating the local extinction of trees that depend on large frugivores in 31 Atlantic Forest communities, we found that defaunation has the potential to significantly erode carbon storage even when only a small proportion of large-seeded trees are extirpated. Although intergovernmental policies to reduce carbon emissions and reforestation programs have been mostly focused on deforestation, our results demonstrate that defaunation, and the loss of key ecological interactions, also poses a serious risk for the maintenance of tropical forest carbon storage. PMID:26824067

  16. Defaunation affects carbon storage in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Bello, Carolina; Galetti, Mauro; Pizo, Marco A; Magnago, Luiz Fernando S; Rocha, Mariana F; Lima, Renato A F; Peres, Carlos A; Ovaskainen, Otso; Jordano, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    Carbon storage is widely acknowledged as one of the most valuable forest ecosystem services. Deforestation, logging, fragmentation, fire, and climate change have significant effects on tropical carbon stocks; however, an elusive and yet undetected decrease in carbon storage may be due to defaunation of large seed dispersers. Many large tropical trees with sizeable contributions to carbon stock rely on large vertebrates for seed dispersal and regeneration, however many of these frugivores are threatened by hunting, illegal trade, and habitat loss. We used a large data set on tree species composition and abundance, seed, fruit, and carbon-related traits, and plant-animal interactions to estimate the loss of carbon storage capacity of tropical forests in defaunated scenarios. By simulating the local extinction of trees that depend on large frugivores in 31 Atlantic Forest communities, we found that defaunation has the potential to significantly erode carbon storage even when only a small proportion of large-seeded trees are extirpated. Although intergovernmental policies to reduce carbon emissions and reforestation programs have been mostly focused on deforestation, our results demonstrate that defaunation, and the loss of key ecological interactions, also poses a serious risk for the maintenance of tropical forest carbon storage. PMID:26824067

  17. Autonomous Particle Recognition and Analysis of Carbon Flux Explorer Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, C. M.; Bishop, J. K.; Wood, T.

    2013-12-01

    The biologically mediated export, or sedimentation, of particulate organic carbon to ocean depths below 100 m is approximately 10 Pg C per year and is highly variable in space and time. Despite the need to understand the biological drivers for export and the depth dependence of carbon remineralization for carbon cycle prediction, there are scant observations of sedimentation dynamics in the upper 1000 m. The Carbon Flux Explorer (CFE) is a robotic ocean profiling system, which combines the Scripps Sounding Oceanographic Lagrangian Observer (SOLO) and the LBNL/Berkeley optical sedimentation recorder. The CFE is designed to conduct high-frequency (hourly) observations of particulate organic and inorganic carbon sedimentation to kilometer depths, absent of ships, in all sea conditions, be reprogrammable and adaptive once deployed, and relay data to shore in near real time via Iridium satellite links for seasons to years. The CFE operates by sequentially imaging settled particles at ~15 micrometer size resolution in transmitted, transmitted cross-polarized, and dark field illumination. At present, these images must be stored on the CFE until recovery. In other words, the CFE is deployable in the context of multi-month long process studies. Here we present progress on particle recognition and quantification methodology, which will enable a 100,000:1 compression of image data needed for efficient satellite telemetry and fully autonomous real-time operation. Our methodology includes corrective thresh-holding, cross imaging comparison, distinction of aggregates from organisms, and the classification of particle properties including particle fractal dimension. We also look at these findings in context of particle vertical velocity, float performance, and oceanic conditions. Data analysis examples drawing on recent CFE missions to California coastal and offshore waters and to the subarctic N Pacific ocean, some lasting 41 days, will be presented.

  18. Hydroclimatic Controls over Global Variations in Phenology and Carbon Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal; Walker, G.; Thornton, Patti; Collatz, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    The connection between phenological and hydroclimatological variations are quantified through joint analyses of global NDVI, LAI, and precipitation datasets. The global distributions of both NDVI and LAI in the warm season are strongly controlled by three quantities: mean annual precipitation, the standard deviation of annual precipitation, and Budyko's index of dryness. Upon demonstrating that these same basic (if biased) relationships are produced by a dynamic vegetation model (the dynamic vegetation and carbon storage components of the NCAR Community Land Model version 4 combined with the water and energy balance framework of the Catchment Land Surface Model of the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office), we use the model to perform a sensitivity study focusing on how phenology and carbon flux might respond to climatic change. The offline (decoupled from the atmosphere) simulations show us, for example, where on the globe a given small increment in precipitation mean or variability would have the greatest impact on carbon uptake. The analysis framework allows us in addition to quantify the degree to which climatic biases in a free-running GCM are manifested as biases in simulated phenology.

  19. Carbon fluxes in the Arabian Sea: Export versus recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixen, Tim; Gaye, Birgit; Ramaswamy, Venkitasubramani

    2016-04-01

    The organic carbon pump strongly influences the exchange of carbon between the ocean and the atmosphere. It is known that it responds to global change but the magnitude and the direction of change are still unpredictable. Sediment trap experiments carried out at various sites in the Arabian Sea between 1986 and 1998 have shown differences in the functioning of the organic carbon pump (OCP). An OCP driven by eukaryotic phytoplankton operated in the upwelling region off Oman and during the spring bloom in the northern Arabian Sea. Cyanobacteria capable of fixing nitrogen seem to dominate the phytoplankton community during all other seasons. The export driven by cyanobacteria was much lower than the export driven by eukaryotic phytoplankton. Productivity and nutrient availability seems to be a main factor controlling fluxes during blooms of eukaryotic phytoplankton. The ballast effect caused by inputs of dust into the ocean and its incorporation into sinking particles seems to be the main factor controlling the export during times when cyanobacteria dominate the phytoplankton community. C/N ratios of organic matter exported from blooms dominated by nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria are enhanced and, furthermore, indicate a more efficient recycling of nutrients at shallower water depth. This implies that the bacterial-driven OCP operates more in a recycling mode that keeps nutrients closer to the euphotic zone whereas the OCP driven by eukaryotic phytoplankton reduces the recycling of nutrients by exporting them into greater water-depth.

  20. Carbon dioxide fluxes associated with synoptic weather events over a southern inland water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Zhang, Q.; Gao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Evidence indicates that inland waters play an important role in regional and global carbon budget through releasing a substantial carbon into the atmosphere. To better quantify how environmental variables affect CO2 exchange between inland waters and the atmosphere and its temporal variations, we have conducted direct, long-term measurements of CO2 fluxes across the water-atmosphere interface over a large southern open water of Ross Barnett Reservoir in central Mississippi. Our data indicate that large CO2 flux pulses occurred occasionally throughout the course of a year with the duration of a few days for each pulse. Here we analyzed and demonstrated that these CO2 flux pulses were associated with the passages of synoptic weather events. Our preliminary results indicated that these synoptic weather events (e.g., extratropical clones and cold air bursts) led to the enhanced mechanical mixing due to increasing wind speeds and the instability of the atmospheric surface layer due to the decreasing air temperature. As a consequence, in-water processes were also substantially altered accordingly. Due to the dramatic decrease in air temperature caused by the events, the temperature in the water surface layer was largely reduced, generating in-water convection conditions and thus leading to the increased depths of the mixing layer in the water, as reflected by the water temperature profiles. The enhanced mechanical mixing in the atmospheric surface layer may have further contributed to the deepened mixing layer in the water. Our suggestions suggest that high CO2 effluxes during the pulse events were largely attributed to changes in the water-side physical processes that are directly linked to rapid changes in atmospheric processes associated with synoptic weather events. Given its substantial contribution of CO2 flux pulses to carbon emission, such physical processes should be taken into account when carbon emissions from inland waters are quantified.

  1. Influence of Leaf Area Index Prescriptions on Simulations of Heat, Moisture, and Carbon Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kala, Jatin; Decker, Mark; Exbrayat, Jean-Francois; Pitman, Andy J.; Carouge, Claire; Evans, Jason P.; Abramowitz, Gab; Mocko, David

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-area index (LAI), the total one-sided surface area of leaf per ground surface area, is a key component of land surface models. We investigate the influence of differing, plausible LAI prescriptions on heat, moisture, and carbon fluxes simulated by the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLEv1.4b) model over the Australian continent. A 15-member ensemble monthly LAI data-set is generated using the MODIS LAI product and gridded observations of temperature and precipitation. Offline simulations lasting 29 years (1980-2008) are carried out at 25 km resolution with the composite monthly means from the MODIS LAI product (control simulation) and compared with simulations using each of the 15-member ensemble monthly-varying LAI data-sets generated. The imposed changes in LAI did not strongly influence the sensible and latent fluxes but the carbon fluxes were more strongly affected. Croplands showed the largest sensitivity in gross primary production with differences ranging from -90 to 60 %. PFTs with high absolute LAI and low inter-annual variability, such as evergreen broadleaf trees, showed the least response to the different LAI prescriptions, whilst those with lower absolute LAI and higher inter-annual variability, such as croplands, were more sensitive. We show that reliance on a single LAI prescription may not accurately reflect the uncertainty in the simulation of the terrestrial carbon fluxes, especially for PFTs with high inter-annual variability. Our study highlights that the accurate representation of LAI in land surface models is key to the simulation of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Hence this will become critical in quantifying the uncertainty in future changes in primary production.

  2. Interannual variability in carbon dioxide fluxes and flux-climate relationships on grazed and ungrazed northern mixed-grass prairie

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The annual carbon (C) budget of grasslands is highly dynamic, dependent on grazing history and on direct and indirect effects of interannual variability (IAV) in climate on carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes. We measured net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) and its diurnal components, daytime ecosystem CO2...

  3. Management practices affects soil carbon dioxide emission and carbon storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural practices contribute about 25% of total anthropogenic carbon dioxide emission, a greenhouse gas responsible for global warming. Soil can act both as sink or source of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide fixed in plant biomass through photosynthesis can be stored in soil as organi...

  4. Dynamics of carbon fluxes above a hemiboreal mixed forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnova, Alisa; Noe, Steffen M.; Niinemets, Ülo; Krasnov, Dmitrii

    2015-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are a major part of the biosphere and control land surface-atmosphere interactions. They influence atmospheric composition and climate significantly being sources and sinks of trace gases and energy. Mixed stands of both coniferous and deciduous tree species are characterized by greater seasonal variability of forest microclimate, canopy shape and density, length of growing season and plant activity and higher biota diversity and compared to pure boreal forests. These factors coupled with physical environment (atmospheric and meteorological conditions, soil properties) influence CO2 exchange between forest and the atmosphere. To explore complex interactions within ecosystem-atmosphere continuum of hemiboreal forest SMEAR Estonia station was established in Järvselja, Estonia. A 24 m height scaffolding tower located in a forest stand dominated by Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) with co-domination of Silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) and Black alder (Alnus glutinosa L.) was used to study eddy-covariance fluxes of CO2. We present the results from the first continuous EC measurements over a hemiboreal mixed forest performed in 2011-2012. The focus of the study is on diurnal and annual dynamics of carbon fluxes and the influence of main environmental drivers.

  5. Factors affecting the behavior of unburned carbon upon steam activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhe

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the factors that could affect the behavior of unburned carbon samples upon steam activation. Through this work, the relationships among the factors that could influence the carbon-steam reaction with the surface area of the produced activated carbon were explored. Statistical analysis was used to relate the chemical and physical properties of the unburned carbon to the surface area of the activated carbon. Six unburned carbons were selected as feedstocks for activated carbon, and marked as UCA through UCF. The unburned carbons were activated using steam at 850°C for 90 minutes, and the surface areas of their activated counterparts were measured using N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The activated carbons produced from different unburned carbon precursors presented different surface areas at similar carbon burn-off levels. Moreover, in different carbon burn-off regions, the sequences for surface area of activated carbons from different unburned carbon samples were different. The factors that may affect the carbon-steam gasification reactions, including the concentration of carbon active sites, the crystallite size of the carbon, the intrinsic porous structure of carbon, and the inorganic impurities, were investigated. All unburned carbons investigated in this study were similar in that they showed the very broad (002) and (10 ) carbon peaks, which are characteristic of highly disordered carbonaceous materials. In this study, the unburned carbon samples contained about 17--48% of inorganic impurities. Compared to coals, the unburned carbon samples contain a larger amount of inorganic impurities as a result of the burn-off, or at lease part, of the carbon during the combustion process. These inorganic particles were divided into two groups in terms of the way they are associated with carbon particles: free single particles, and particles combined with carbon particles. As indicated from the present work, unburned

  6. Upper ocean mixing controls the seasonality of planktonic foraminifer fluxes and associated strength of the carbonate pump in the oligotrophic North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, K. H.; Anand, P.; Sexton, P. F.; Conte, M.

    2015-01-01

    Oligotrophic regions represent up to 75% of Earth's open-ocean environments. They are thus areas of major importance in understanding the plankton community dynamics and biogeochemical fluxes. Here we present fluxes of total planktonic foraminifera and 11 planktonic foraminifer species measured at the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) time series site in the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea, subtropical western North Atlantic Ocean. Foraminifera flux was measured at 1500 m water depth, over two ~ 2.5-year intervals: 1998-2000 and 2007-2010. We find that foraminifera flux was closely correlated with total mass flux, carbonate and organic carbon fluxes. We show that the planktonic foraminifera flux increases approximately 5-fold during the winter-spring, contributing up to ~ 40% of the total carbonate flux. This was primarily driven by increased fluxes of deeper-dwelling globorotaliid species, which contributed up to 90% of the foraminiferal-derived carbonate during late winter-early spring. Interannual variability in total foraminifera flux, and in particular fluxes of the deep-dwelling species (Globorotalia truncatulinoides, Globorotalia hirsuta and Globorotalia inflata), was related to differences in seasonal mixed layer dynamics affecting the strength of the spring phytoplankton bloom and export flux, and by the passage of mesoscale eddies. As these heavily calcified, dense carbonate tests of deeper-dwelling species (3 times denser than surface dwellers) have greater sinking rates, this implies a high seasonality of the biological carbonate pump in oligotrophic oceanic regions. Our data suggest that climate cycles, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, which modulates nutrient supply into the euphotic zone and the strength of the spring bloom, may also in turn modulate the production and flux of these heavily calcified deep-dwelling foraminifera by increasing their food supply, thereby intensifying the biological carbonate pump.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Flux in Mixed-grass Prairie: Response to Interannual Variation in Rainfall and Grazing History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, D.

    2002-12-01

    Grasslands are an important biome in the exchange of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere. However, our understanding of how carbon flux varies due to changes in precipitation, including drought conditions and land use history (grazing intensity) is only rudimentary. In this study we have evaluated the effects of adequate precipitation versus drought on net carbon flux, ecosystem respiration, and gross photosynthesis over three years (1998, 1999, and 2002) using chamber techniques. In addition, during 2002 measurements were taken across three grazing regimes (light, heavy, and ungrazed). Precipitation, or lack thereof, in 2002 made for a drought year compared to 1998 and 1999. The maximum rate of net carbon flux was lowest in 2002 at 3 mmol m-2 s-1 and highest in 1998 at 9 mmol m-2 s-1. Due to the drought conditions of 2002 grazing history had no affect on net flux rates. We propose that precipitation is the overriding factor that controls carbon flux in the mixed-grass prairie ecosystem, while land use has only marginal effects. Further data collected in a non-drought year is needed to corroborate this land use hypothesis.

  8. Aeolian nutrient fluxes following wildfire in sagebrush steppe: Implications for soil carbon storage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hasselquist, N.J.; Germino, M.J.; Sankey, J.B.; Ingram, L.J.; Glenn, N.F.

    2011-01-01

    Pulses of aeolian transport following fire can profoundly affect the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in semi-arid and arid ecosystems. Our objective was to determine horizontal nutrient fluxes occurring in the saltation zone during an episodic pulse of aeolian transport that occurred following a wildfire in a semi-arid sagebrush steppe ecosystem in southern Idaho, USA. We also examined how temporal trends in nutrient fluxes were affected by changes in particle sizes of eroded mass as well as nutrient concentrations associated with different particle size classes. In the burned area, total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes were as high as 235 g C m????'1 d????'1 and 19 g N m????'1 d????'1 during the first few months following fire, whereas C and N fluxes were negligible in an adjacent unburned area throughout the study. Temporal variation in C and N fluxes following fire was largely attributable to the redistribution of saltation-sized particles. Total N and organic C concentrations in the soil surface were significantly lower in the burned relative to the unburned area one year after fire. Our results show how an episodic pulse of aeolian transport following fire can affect the spatial distribution of soil C and N, which, in turn, can have important implications for soil C storage. These findings demonstrate how an ecological disturbance can exacerbate a geomorphic process and highlight the need for further research to better understand the role aeolian transport plays in the biogeochemical cycling of C and N in recently burned landscapes. ?? Author(s) 2011. CC Attribution 3.0 License.

  9. Modelled sensitivities of biogenic carbon fluxes to variations in carbon dioxide and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartau, M.; Engel, A.; Voelker, C.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.; Schroeter, J.

    2003-04-01

    One particular task of marine ecosystem models is to simulate the biogenic transformation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into organic matter and hence to quantify the export of particulate organic carbon (POC) to deep oceanic layers. To date, environmental changes, such as increasing carbon dioxide concentrations (pCO_2) and temperature, are perceived to have an impact on the formation of organic carbon. However, well established nitrogen or phosphorus based ecosystem models are insensitive to variations in the carbonate system. In order to investigate biological responses to pCO_2 variations, ecosystem models need to distinguish between carbon, nitrogen, and/or phosphorus cycles. We present a simple biological model which decouples carbon from nitrogen fluxes such that carbon found in transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) is additionally accounted for. The model regards phytoplankton acclimation to varying environmental conditions, having included parameterizations for phytoplankton growth as proposed by Geider et al.~(1998, L&O). By means of data assimilation, an optimal parameter set is determined, which brings model results into agreement with experimental data. From the optimised model results it is infered that about 50% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exuded by phytoplankton is subsequently transformed into TEP, eventually influencing the amount of POC available for the export flux. Model sensitivity studies are performed at local sites and along a latitudinal transect (30^oN-60^oN at 19^oW) in the North Atlantic. As soon as CO_2 limitation for phytoplankton growth is explicitely considered in the model, the formation of POC shows great sensitivity to pCO_2 variations. Temperature variations alter remineralisation rates and growth efficiencies. With the current model version dependencies between biomass accumulation, the date of nutrient depletion to occur, and the exudation of organic compounds are acquired.

  10. Estimation of terrestrial carbon fluxes over East Asia through AsiaFlux and improved MODIS gross primary production data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Miae; Im, Jungho; Lee, Junghee; Shin, Minso; Lee, Sanggyun

    2014-05-01

    The accurate estimation of carbon fluxes over terrestrial ecosystems provides useful information in studying the global carbon cycle. Estimates of carbon fluxes such as gross primary production (GPP) and net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) have been commonly used as indicators of the global carbon budgets. Eddy covariance (EC) flux towers are operating all over the world, networking each other. The towers provide temporally continuous measurements of carbon, water and energy over terrestrial ecosystems as being the best way to estimate ecosystem fluxes up to date. However, the EC flux towers only cover the scale of footprint, having difficulty in representing fluxes at the regional or continental scale. For upscaling flux tower data, satellite products that cover vast areas at high temporal resolution can be used. While many studies were conducted to estimate carbon fluxes from satellite products using process-based modeling and empirical modeling approaches, there are still great uncertainties in carbon flux estimation due to biases and errors associated with in-situ measurements, spatio-temporal discrepancy between satellite products and in-situ measurements, and relatively less accurate satellite products. In this paper, NEE and GPP were estimated using machine learning techniques including random forest, Cubist, and support vector regression. Various satellite products were used as independent variables such as land surface temperature, normalized difference vegetation index, enhanced vegetation index, leaf area index, fraction of photosynthetically active radiation, GPP, evapotranspiration, rainfall, normalized difference water index obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). However, MODIS GPP based on the light use efficiency (LUE) model has some uncertainties derived from input data used in this model such as coarse spatial resolution of the Data Assimilation Office (DAO) meteorological

  11. Geomorphic controls on riparian zone hydrology, carbon pools and fluxes of dissolved organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabs, T.; Ledesma, J.; Laudon, H.; Seibert, J.; Kohler, S. J.; Bishop, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Near stream (riparian) zones are an important link between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and influence a wide range of processes including solute transport or hydrologic behavior of headwater catchments. Understanding the links between geomorphology and riparian soils, vegetation and hydrology is, thus, a prerequisite for relating small scale processes to observations at the watershed scale. Geographic information systems (GIS) have traditionally been used to study links between geomorphology and properties of terrestrial ecosystems. Applying this approach to riparian zones, however, has only recently become feasible with the availability of high-resolution digital elevation models and the new development of suitable computational methods. In this study we present links between geomorphology and riparian zone hydrology, carbon pools and fluxes of dissolved organic carbon. Geomorphometric attributes were successfully used to predict (1) riparian groundwater levels and flow pathways, (2) the size of riparian soil carbon pools, (3) the vertical variation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in riparian soil profiles, as well as (4) riparian carbon fluxes and turnover times.

  12. Unsaturated zone carbon dioxide flux, mixing, and isotopic composition at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, C. H.; Thordsen, J. J.; Thomas, B.; Haase, K.; Moreo, M. T.; Walvoord, M. A.; Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of tritium, radiocarbon, and volatile organic compounds at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site, adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility, have stimulated research on factors affecting transport of these contaminants. This research includes an examination of unsaturated zone carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, mixing, and isotopic composition, which can help in understanding these factors. In late April 2015 we collected 76 soil-gas samples in multi-layer foil bags from existing 1.5-m deep tubes, both inside and outside the low-level waste area, as well as from two 110-m-deep multilevel gas-sampling boreholes and a distant background site. These samples were analyzed for carbon dioxide concentration and isotopic composition by direct injection into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. Graphical analysis of results indicates mixing of CO2 characteristic of the root zone (δ13C -18 ‰ VPDB), deep soil gas of the capillary fringe (-20‰), and CO2 produced by microbial respiration of organic matter disposed in the waste area trenches (-28‰). Land-surface boundary conditions are being constrained by the application of a novel non-dispersive infrared sensor and traditional concentration and flux measurements, including discrete CO2 flux data using a gas chamber method to complement continuous data from surface- and tower-based CO2 sensors. These results shed light on radionuclide and VOC mobilization and transport mechanisms from this and similar waste disposal facilities.

  13. CARBON STORAGE AND FLUXES IN PONDEROSA PINE AT DIFFERENT SUCCESSIONAL STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared carbon storage and fluxes in young and old ponderosa pine stands in Oregon, including plant and soil storage, net primary productivity, respiration fluxes, and eddy flux estimates of net ecosystem exchange. The young site (Y site) was previously an old-growth pondero...

  14. Carbon flux estimation by using ACTM for the period 2002-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, T.; Patra, P. K.; Kawa, S. R.; Collatz, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    We have estimated carbon flux by using an AGCM (atmospheric general circulation model)-based Chemistry Transport Model (ACTM) in a Bayesian synthesis inversion framework. Firstly, all efforts have been made to check the good performance of ACTM for the representation of synoptic to inter-hemispheric transport time scales using the simulations of SF6, 222Radon, CO2, CH4 and N2O concentrations and comparisons with observations. Thus we expect relatively less bias in estimated carbon fluxes by the inversion. Carbon fluxes were estimated for 84 regions (54 lands + 30 oceans) over the globe during the period of 2002-2011 with CO2 concentration from GLOBALVIEW (2012). Seasonally varying a priori fluxes for atmosphere-ocean exchange are taken from Takahashi et al. (2002, 2009). Interannually varying a priori fossil fuel fluxes (incl. cement production) are taken from EDGAR4.2. 3-hourly and monthly terrestrial biosphere fluxes are taken from the Carnegie Ames and Stanford Approach (CASA) terrestrial biosphere model at the NASA/GSFC. As a result of time-dependent inversions, differences in predicted fluxes with the 3-hourly CASA fluxes and the monthly CASA fluxes are found remarkably in North and South Americas and Australia. Estimated carbon fluxes for ocean regions are almost independent of a priori fluxes (Takahashi et al., 2002 or 2009) except for Southern Ocean. Other sensitivity tests on prior flux dependencies and site selection will be shown in the presentation.

  15. Comparing carbon dioxide (CO2) flux between no-till and conventional tillage agriculture in Lesotho

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil management practices can either sequester or emit carbon (C). Feeding seven billion people mandates that soils be used intensively for food production, but how these soils are managed greatly impacts soil fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2). However, the lack of CO2 flux measurements on African subs...

  16. How Glassy States Affect Brown Carbon Production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Li, Y.; Wang, Y.; Bateman, A. P.; Zhang, Y.; Gong, Z.; Gilles, M. K.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary organic material (SOM) can become light-absorbing (i.e. brown carbon) via multiphase reactions with nitrogen-containing species such as ammonia and amines. The physical states of SOM, however, potentially slow the diffusion of reactant molecules in organic matrix under conditions that semisolids or solids prevail, thus inhibiting the browning reaction pathways. In this study, the physical states and the in-particle diffusivity were investigated by measuring the evaporation kinetics of both water and organics from aromatic-derived SOMs using a quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM). The results indicate that the SOMs derived from aromatic precursors toluene and m-xylene became solid (glassy) and the in particle diffusion was significantly impeded for sufficiently low relative humidity ( < 20% RH) at 293 K. Optical properties and the AMS spectra were measured for toluene-derived SOM after ammonia exposure at varied RHs. The results suggest that the production of light-absorbing nitrogen-containing compounds from multiphase reactions with ammonia was kinetically limited in the glassy organic matrix, which otherwise produce brown carbon. The results of this study have significant implications for production and optical properties of brown carbon in urban atmospheres that ultimately influence the climate and tropospheric photochemistry.

  17. Estimating carbon and energy fluxes in arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokkaya, K.; Jiang, Y.; Rastetter, E.; Shaver, G. R.; Rocha, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic ecosystems are undergoing a very rapid change due to climate change and their response to climate change has important implications for the global energy budget and carbon (C) cycling. Therefore, it is important to understand how (C) and energy fluxes in the Arctic will respond to climate change. However, attribution of these responses to climate is challenging because measured fluxes are the sum of multiple processes that respond differently to environmental factors. For example, net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) is the net result of gross (C) uptake by plant photosynthesis (GPP) and (C) loss by ecosystem respiration (ER) and similarly, evapotranspiration (i.e. latent energy, LE) is the sum of transpiration and evaporation. Partitioning of NEE into GPP and ER requires nighttime measurements of NEE, when photosynthesis does not take place, to be extrapolated to daytime. This is challenging in the Arctic because of the long photoperiod during the growing season and the errors involved during the extrapolation. Transpiration (energy), photosynthesis (carbon), and vegetation phenology are inherently coupled because leaf stomata are the primary regulators of gas exchange. Our objectives in this study are to i) estimate canopy resistance (Rc) based on a light use efficiency model, ii) utilize the estimated Rc to predict GPP and transpiration using a coupled C and energy model and thus improve the partitioning of NEE and LE, and iii) to test ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to estimate model parameters and improve model predictions. Results from one growing season showed that the model predictions can explain 75 and 71% of the variance in GPP and LE in the Arctic tundra ecosystem, respectively. When the model was embedded within the EnKF for estimating Rc, the amount of variance explained for GPP increased to 81% but there was no improvement for the prediction of LE. This suggests that the factors controlling LE are not fully integrated in the model such as the

  18. SIERRA-Flux: Measuring Regional Surface Fluxes of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Water Vapor from an Unmanned Aircraft System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fladeland; Yates, Emma Louise; Bui, Thaopaul Van; Dean-Day, Jonathan; Kolyer, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Eddy-Covariance Method for quantifying surface-atmosphere fluxes is a foundational technique for measuring net ecosystem exchange and validating regional-to-global carbon cycle models. While towers or ships are the most frequent platform for measuring surface-atmosphere exchange, experiments using aircraft for flux measurements have yielded contributions to several large-scale studies including BOREAS, SMACEX, RECAB by providing local-to-regional coverage beyond towers. The low-altitude flight requirements make airborne flux measurements particularly dangerous and well suited for unmanned aircraft.

  19. Carbon fluxes, evapotranspiration, and water use efficiency of terrestrial ecosystems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, J.

    2013-12-01

    The magnitude, spatial patterns, and controlling factors of the carbon and water fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems in China are not well understood due to the lack of ecosystem-level flux observations. We synthesized flux and micrometeorological observations from 22 eddy covariance flux sites across China, and examined the carbon fluxes, evapotranspiration (ET), and water use efficiency (WUE) of terrestrial ecosystems at the annual scale. Our results show that annual carbon and water fluxes exhibited clear latitudinal patterns across sites. Both annual gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) declined with increasing latitude, leading to a declining pattern in net ecosystem productivity (NEP) with increasing latitude. Annual ET also generally declined with increasing latitude. The spatial patterns of annual carbon and water fluxes were mainly driven by annual temperature, precipitation, and growing season length. Carbon fluxes, ET, and water use efficiency (WUE) varied with vegetation type. Overall, forest and cropland sites had higher annual fluxes than grassland sites, and the annual fluxes of coastal wetland sites were similar to or slightly higher than those of forest sites. Annual WUE was associated with annual precipitation, GPP, and growing season length. Higher-productivity ecosystems (forests and coastal wetlands) also had higher WUE than lower-productivity ecosystems (grasslands and croplands). The strong relationships between annual GPP and ET demonstrated the coupling of the carbon and water cycles. Our results show that forest plantations had high annual net carbon uptake and WUE, and provide larger carbon sequestration capacity than natural forests. The coastal salt marsh and mangrove ecosystems also had high carbon sequestration capacity. Efforts to strengthen China's ecosystem carbon sequestration should focus on ecosystems such as forest plantations in southern China where heat and water are ideal for maintaining high

  20. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  1. Influence of water table on carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane fluxes from taiga bog microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, D.W.; Pullmann, E.R.; Peterson, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    Hydrological changes, particularly alterations in water table level, may largely overshadow the more direct effects of global temperature increase upon carbon cycling in arctic and subarctic wetlands. Frozen cores (n=40) of intact soils and vegetation were collected from a bog near Fairbanks, Alaska, and fluxes of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and Co in response to water table variation were studied under controlled conditions in the Duke University phytotron. Core microcosms thawed to a 20-cm depth over 30 days under a 20 hour photoperiod with a day/night temperature regime of 20/10{degrees}C. After 30 days the water table in 20 microcosms was decreased from the soil surface to -15 cm and maintained at the soil surface in 20 control cores. Outward fluxes of CO{sub 2} (9-16 g m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) and CO (3-4 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) were greatest during early thaw and decreased to near zero for both gases before the water table treatment started. Lower water table tripled CO{sub 2} flux to the atmosphere when compared with control cores. Carbon monoxide was emitted at low rates from high water table cores and consumed by low water table cores. Methane fluxes were low (<1 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) in all cores during thaw. High water table cores increased CH{sub 4} flux to 8-9 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1} over 70 days and remained high relative to the low water table cores (<0.74 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}). Although drying of wetland taiga soils may decrease CH{sub 4} emissions to the atmosphere, the associated increase in CO{sub 2} due to aerobic respiration will likely increase the global warming potential of gas emissions from these soils. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  2. The influence of climate on soil carbon turnover times derived from carbon flux and pool data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomik, M.; Reichstein, M.; Schrumpf, M.; Beer, C.; Curiel-Yuste, C. J.; Jenssens, I.; Luyssaert, S.; Subke, J.; Trumbore, S.; Wutzler, T.; Jung, M.; Lasslop, G.; Fluxnet Lathuille Synthesis Team (Cf. Www. Fluxdata. Org)

    2010-12-01

    Our understanding of the climatic controls on the rate of soil organic carbon (SOM) decomposition is still limited and greatly debated, especially the temperature sensitivity of decomposition. This lack of understanding and consensus hinders the ability to develop and improve models of soil carbon dynamics. In light of this, we used annual ecosystem carbon flux measurements and soil organic carbon stocks to derive soil carbon turnover times (TO) for a selection of eddy flux sites (FLUXNET LaThuille dataset) , following a method proposed by Sanderman et al.(2003). We then related these TO to mean annual temperatures (MAT) and found that TO decreased exponentially with increasing MAT, in accordance with Sanderman et al (2003) and other studies. However, upon closer examination, we also found that this exponential relationship was largely driven by the difference in TO between sites located in the boreal climate zone and those in the tropical, Mediterranean and temperate climates, combined. The range of computed TO values in the boreal zone was higher compared to the rest. Likewise, we also analyzed the combined effect of MAT and total annual precipitation (TAP) on TO and found that TAP was also negatively correlated to TO, although not as strongly as MAT. Similar to the response to MAT, the observed overall TAP vs TO relationship was also driven primarily by the difference in the range of TO values computed for sites from the boreal climate zone. The results of this study add to our understanding of the spatial variability of SOM controls and can be used to improve and/or direct future studies on soil carbon cycling. Sanderman, J., R. G. Amundson, and D. D. Baldocchi, Application of eddy covariance measurements to the temperature dependence of soil organic matter mean residence time, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 17(2), 1061, doi:10.1029/2001GB001833, 2003.

  3. Impacts of observation-driven trait variation on carbon fluxes in an earth system projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verheijen, Lieneke; van Bodegom, Peter; Aerts, Rien; Brovkin, Victor

    2014-05-01

    Climate projections are still highly uncertain and differences in predicted terrestrial global carbon budgets by earth system models (ESMs) are large, both with respect to the size and direction of change. Part of these uncertainties in the land carbon dynamics are caused by differences in the modeled functional responses of vegetation in reaction to climatic drivers. In reality, changes in vegetation responses to the environment are driven by processes like species plasticity, acclimation, (genotypic) adaptation, species turnover and shifts in species abundances. These processes can cause shifts within community mean trait values, which in turn are will affect carbon fluxes to and from the system. Because most current dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs, the terrestrial part of ESMs) are not species based, these processes are not or poorly modeled. The recent availability of a large trait database (TRY-database), including both field measurements and experimental data, enables parameterization of the models with observational trait data. Many community mean trait values correlate with local environmental conditions. Such trait-climate relationships can be used to model variation in traits in DGVMs and allow for spatial and temporal variation in functional vegetation responses. The aim of this study was to identify the impacts of observation-driven trait variation on modeled carbon fluxes in climate projections. We determined and incorporated relationships between observational trait and climate data for each plant functional type (PFT) in the DGVM JSBACH. Within each grid cell, traits were varied every year, based on the local climatic conditions in the model. We also included CO2 acclimation of traits based on FACE-experiments, as projections concern elevated CO2 concentrations. Impacts on global carbon budgets were large; in the simulation with variable traits the high latitudes (temperate, boreal and arctic areas) were stronger carbon sinks and the tropical

  4. Carbon dioxide partial pressure and carbon fluxes of air-water interface in Taihu Lake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chengxin; Hu, Weiping; Ford, Phillip W.; Chen, Yuwei; Qu, Wenchuan; Zhang, Lu

    2005-03-01

    To obtain carbon dioxide (CO2) flux between water-air interface of Taihu lake, monthly water samplers at 14 sites and the local meteorological data of the lake were collected and analyzed in 1998. Carbon dioxide partial pressures (pCO2) at air-water interface in the lake were calculated using alkalinity, pH, ionic strength, active coefficient, and water temperature. The carbon fluxes at different sublakes and areas were estimated by concentration gradient between water and air in consideration of Schmidt numbers of 600 and daily mean windspeed at 10 m above water surface. The results indicated that the mean values of pCO2 in Wuli Lake, Meiliang Bay, hydrophyte area, west littoral zone, riverine mouths, and the open lake areas were 1 807.8±1 071.4 (mean±standard deviation) μatm (1atm=1.013 25×105Pa), 416.3±217.0 μatm, 576.5±758.8 μatm, 304.2±243.5 μatm, 1 933.6±1 144.7 μatm, and 448.5±202.6 μatm, respectively. Maximum and minimum pCO2 values were found in the hypertrophic (4 053.7 μatm) and the eutrophic (3.2 μatm) areas. The riverine mouth areas have the maximum fluxes (82.0±62.8 mmol/m2a). But there was no significant difference between eutrophic and mesotrophic areas in pCO2 and the flux of CO2. The hydrophyte area, however, has the minimum (-0.58±12.9 mmol/m2a). In respect to CO2 equilibrium, input of the rivers will obviously influence inorganic carbon distribution in the riverine estuary. For example, the annual mean CO2 flux in Zhihugang River estuary was 19 times of that in Meiliang Bay, although the former is only a part of the latter. The sites in the body of the lake show a clear seasonal cycle with pCO2 higher than atmospheric equilibrium in winter, and much lower than atmospheric in summer due to CO2 consumption by photosynthesis. The CO2 amount of the net annual evasion that enters the atmosphere is 28.42×104 t/a, of which those from the west littoral zone and the open lake account for 53.8% and 36.7%, respectively.

  5. Experimental warming increases soil carbon flux in a recently burned Alaskan boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, B.; Johnstone, J.; Treseder, K. K.

    2002-12-01

    The response of boreal forest soils to global warming remains controversial despite their significance in the global carbon cycle. In particular, our understanding of soil carbon storage is critical to our ability to predict the future response of boreal forests to global warming due to their large carbon sink capacity. Historically, boreal forests have been thought to be carbon sinks over time due to the short growing season which prevents soil microbes from completely decomposing annual primary production. However, recent empirical evidence indicates that climate change, and warming in particular, is already decreasing the amount of carbon stored in boreal forest soils. In addition, forest fires claim an increasing average area of boreal forest each year (1 x 106 acres in Alaska in 2002), and affect a significant portion of this ecosystem. Fire-affected boreal forests may have different responses to global warming than mature forest. Here, we present results from a study in which we experimentally raised the average daily ambient temperature of a recently burned black spruce forest in central Alaska during the growing season by 1 °C (mid-day temperatures increased by 4 °C) using twelve, 1.77 m2 open-top greenhouse chambers and twelve control plots for 3 years after fire. Soil CO2 flux was significantly higher in greenhouses than controls for all measurements taken during the third summer of warming (greenhouse mean: 89 g C m-2 ; control mean: 66 g C m-2 (p < .04); repeated measures ANOVA). BIOLOG ecoplate TM analysis indicates that bacterial diversity and abundance were slightly higher in greenhouse plots. The change in bacterial community composition may be partially responsible for the elevated soil CO2 flux. These results suggest that in a warmer climate, fire-disturbed boreal forests may store less carbon than their present carbon storage. Furthermore, the interaction between global warming and fire may result in a positive feedback to atmospheric CO2, and

  6. Constraining future terrestrial carbon cycle projections using observation-based water and carbon flux estimates.

    PubMed

    Mystakidis, Stefanos; Davin, Edouard L; Gruber, Nicolas; Seneviratne, Sonia I

    2016-06-01

    The terrestrial biosphere is currently acting as a sink for about a third of the total anthropogenic CO2  emissions. However, the future fate of this sink in the coming decades is very uncertain, as current earth system models (ESMs) simulate diverging responses of the terrestrial carbon cycle to upcoming climate change. Here, we use observation-based constraints of water and carbon fluxes to reduce uncertainties in the projected terrestrial carbon cycle response derived from simulations of ESMs conducted as part of the 5th phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). We find in the ESMs a clear linear relationship between present-day evapotranspiration (ET) and gross primary productivity (GPP), as well as between these present-day fluxes and projected changes in GPP, thus providing an emergent constraint on projected GPP. Constraining the ESMs based on their ability to simulate present-day ET and GPP leads to a substantial decrease in the projected GPP and to a ca. 50% reduction in the associated model spread in GPP by the end of the century. Given the strong correlation between projected changes in GPP and in NBP in the ESMs, applying the constraints on net biome productivity (NBP) reduces the model spread in the projected land sink by more than 30% by 2100. Moreover, the projected decline in the land sink is at least doubled in the constrained ensembles and the probability that the terrestrial biosphere is turned into a net carbon source by the end of the century is strongly increased. This indicates that the decline in the future land carbon uptake might be stronger than previously thought, which would have important implications for the rate of increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration and for future climate change. PMID:26732346

  7. Decadal-Scale Increases in Dissolved Carbon Flux from the Western Canadian Arctic to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, S. E.; Striegl, R. G.; McClelland, J. W.; Kokelj, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    The chemical signature of large rivers has a clear effect on the chemistry and biology of the nearshore ocean. At the same time, the flux of riverine constituents to coastal environments can be used to understand changes occurring over broad terrestrial landscapes. This is particularly relevant in the Arctic, where rivers have a disproportionate impact on nearshore ocean function. Additionally, change is playing out rapidly in Arctic regions, as permafrost thaw and changes in temperature and hydrology are exposing previously frozen soils, changing the nature of hydrological linkages between land and water, and affecting the seasonality of riverine chemistry and flux. Here, we examine a 40-year dataset of point-measurement alkalinity (largely dissolved inorganic carbon) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations near the mouth of the Mackenzie River, in addition to similar data from four of the Mackenzie's major sub-catchments. These datasets are coupled with continuous discharge records, and capture flow from the fourth largest river discharging to the Arctic Ocean. Trends near the Mackenzie mouth show that annual fluxes of both alkalinity and DOC are increasing over time, with the proportional changes in DOC (approximately 16% per decade) being much greater than those for alkalinity (approximately 4% per decade). Seasonally, this increase in total flux occurs largely in the winter and late summer, for both constituents. Sub-catchment datasets indicate that these fluxes are increasing in northern, but not southern, sub-catchment regions. These results have clear implications for nearshore ocean function in the western Canadian Arctic. Increases in DOC may fuel increased bacterial metabolism, while differences in the magnitude of change in alkalinity and DOC flux may modify coastal aragonite saturation. Overall, the changing flux of dissolved carbon near the mouth of the Mackenzie River documents broad-scale changes in the carbon cycle of this region, both on

  8. Upper ocean mixing controls the seasonality of planktonic foraminifer fluxes and associated strength of the carbonate pump in the oligotrophic North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, K. H.; Anand, P.; Sexton, P. F.; Conte, M.

    2014-08-01

    Oligotrophic regions represent up to 75% of Earth's open-ocean environments, and are typically characterized by nutrient-limited upper-ocean mixed layers. They are thus areas of major importance in understanding the plankton community dynamics and biogeochemical fluxes. Here we present fluxes of total planktonic foraminifera and eleven planktonic foraminifer species from a bi-weekly sediment trap time series in the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea, subtropical western North Atlantic Ocean at 1500 m water depth, over two ∼2.5 year intervals, 1998-2000 and 2007-2010. Foraminifera flux was closely correlated with total mass flux and with carbonate and organic carbon fluxes. We show that the planktonic foraminifera flux increases approximately five-fold during the winter-spring, contributing up to ∼40% of the total carbonate flux, driven primarily by increased fluxes of deeper dwelling ("globorotaliid") species. Interannual variability in total foraminifera flux, and in particular fluxes of the deep dwelling Globorotalia truncatulinoides, Globorotalia hirsuta, Globorotalia inflata, were related to differences in seasonal mixed layer dynamics affecting the strength of the spring phytoplankton bloom and export flux, and by the passage of mesoscale eddies. The heavily calcified, dense carbonate tests of deeper dwelling species (3 times denser than surface dwellers) can contribute up to 90% of the foraminiferal-derived carbonate in this region during late winter-early spring, implying a high seasonality of the biological carbonate pump in oligotrophic oceanic regions. Our data suggest that climate cycles, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, that modulate the depth of the mixed layer, intensity of nutrient upwelling and primary production could also modulate the strength of the biological carbonate pump in the oligotrophic North Atlantic.

  9. A Carbon Flux Super Site. New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Leclerc, Monique Y.

    2014-11-17

    This final report presents the main activities and results of the project “A Carbon Flux Super Site: New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling” from 10/1/2006 to 9/30/2014. It describes the new AmeriFlux tower site (Aiken) at Savanna River Site (SC) and instrumentation, long term eddy-covariance, sodar, microbarograph, soil and other measurements at the site, and intensive field campaigns of tracer experiment at the Carbon Flux Super Site, SC, in 2009 and at ARM-CF site, Lamont, OK, and experiments in Plains, GA. The main results on tracer experiment and modeling, on low-level jet characteristics and their impact on fluxes, on gravity waves and their influence on eddy fluxes, and other results are briefly described in the report.

  10. Modeling the Relative Importance of Nutrient and Carbon Loads, Boundary Fluxes, and Sediment Fluxes on Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Feist, Timothy J; Pauer, James J; Melendez, Wilson; Lehrter, John C; DePetro, Phillip A; Rygwelski, Kenneth R; Ko, Dong S; Kreis, Russell G

    2016-08-16

    The Louisiana continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico experiences bottom water hypoxia in the summer. In this study, we applied a biogeochemical model that simulates dissolved oxygen concentrations on the shelf in response to varying riverine nutrient and organic carbon loads, boundary fluxes, and sediment fluxes. Five-year model simulations demonstrated that midsummer hypoxic areas were most sensitive to riverine nutrient loads and sediment oxygen demand from settled organic carbon. Hypoxic area predictions were also sensitive to nutrient and organic carbon fluxes from lateral boundaries. The predicted hypoxic area decreased with decreases in nutrient loads, but the extent of change was influenced by the method used to estimate model boundary concentrations. We demonstrated that modeling efforts to predict changes in hypoxic area on the continental shelf in relationship to changes in nutrients should include representative boundary nutrient and organic carbon concentrations and functions for estimating sediment oxygen demand that are linked to settled organic carbon derived from water-column primary production. On the basis of our model analyses using the most representative boundary concentrations, nutrient loads would need to be reduced by 69% to achieve the Gulf of Mexico Nutrient Task Force Action Plan target hypoxic area of 5000 km(2). PMID:27406634

  11. Anthropogenic and climatic influences on carbon fluxes from eastern North America to the Atlantic Ocean: A process-based modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hanqin; Yang, Qichun; Najjar, Raymond G.; Ren, Wei; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Hopkinson, Charles S.; Pan, Shufen

    2015-04-01

    The magnitude, spatiotemporal patterns, and controls of carbon flux from land to the ocean remain uncertain. Here we applied a process-based land model with explicit representation of carbon processes in streams and rivers to examine how changes in climate, land conversion, management practices, atmospheric CO2, and nitrogen deposition affected carbon fluxes from eastern North America to the Atlantic Ocean, specifically the Gulf of Maine (GOM), Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB), and South Atlantic Bight (SAB). Our simulation results indicate that the mean annual fluxes (±1 standard deviation) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the past three decades (1980-2008) were 2.37 ± 0.60, 1.06 ± 0.20, and 3.57 ± 0.72 Tg C yr-1, respectively. Carbon export demonstrated substantial spatial and temporal variability. For the region as a whole, the model simulates a significant decrease in riverine DIC fluxes from 1901 to 2008, whereas there were no significant trends in DOC or POC fluxes. In the SAB, however, there were significant declines in the fluxes of all three forms of carbon, and in the MAB subregion, DIC and POC fluxes declined significantly. The only significant trend in the GOM subregion was an increase in DIC flux. Climate variability was the primary cause of interannual variability in carbon export. Land conversion from cropland to forest was the primary factor contributing to decreases in all forms of C export, while nitrogen deposition and fertilizer use, as well as atmospheric CO2 increases, tended to increase DOC, POC, and DIC fluxes.

  12. Purification ability and carbon dioxide flux from surface flow constructed wetlands treating sewage treatment plant effluent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiming; Lin, Li; Zhang, Jian; Guo, Wenshan; Liang, Shuang; Liu, Hai

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a two-year experiment was carried out to investigate variation of carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from free water surface constructed wetlands (FWS CW) systems treating sewage treatment plant effluent, and treatment performance was also evaluated. The better 74.6-76.6% COD, 92.7-94.4% NH4(+)-N, 60.1-84.7% TN and 49.3-70.7% TP removal efficiencies were achieved in planted CW systems compared with unplanted systems. The planted CW was a net CO2 sink, while the unplanted CW was a net CO2 source in the entire study period. An obvious annual and seasonal variability of CO2 fluxes from different wetland systems was also presented with the average CO2 flux ranging from -592.83mgm(-2)h(-1) to 553.91mgm(-2)h(-1) during 2012-2013. In addition, the net exchange of CO2 between CW systems and the atmosphere was significantly affected by air temperature, and the presence of plants also had the significant effect on total CO2 emissions. PMID:27544264

  13. Estimating Carbon Flux Phenology with Satellite-Derived Land Surface Phenology and Climate Drivers for Different Biomes: A Synthesis of AmeriFlux Observations

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenquan; Chen, Guangsheng; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Jianhong; Mou, Minjie

    2013-01-01

    Carbon Flux Phenology (CFP) can affect the interannual variation in Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. In this study, we proposed a methodology to estimate CFP metrics with satellite-derived Land Surface Phenology (LSP) metrics and climate drivers for 4 biomes (i.e., deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest, grasslands and croplands), using 159 site-years of NEE and climate data from 32 AmeriFlux sites and MODIS vegetation index time-series data. LSP metrics combined with optimal climate drivers can explain the variability in Start of Carbon Uptake (SCU) by more than 70% and End of Carbon Uptake (ECU) by more than 60%. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the estimations was within 8.5 days for both SCU and ECU. The estimation performance for this methodology was primarily dependent on the optimal combination of the LSP retrieval methods, the explanatory climate drivers, the biome types, and the specific CFP metric. This methodology has a potential for allowing extrapolation of CFP metrics for biomes with a distinct and detectable seasonal cycle over large areas, based on synoptic multi-temporal optical satellite data and climate data. PMID:24386441

  14. Spatial and seasonal dynamics of riverine carbon fluxes of the Brantas catchment in East Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrian, Edvin; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Adi, Seno; Prihartanto, null; Sudiana, Nana; Nugroho, Sutopo Purwo

    2008-09-01

    Dissolved and particulate organic and inorganic carbon concentrations and flux were measured from July 2005 to June 2006 in the Brantas River basin, a midsized tropical mountainous river and the second largest in Java. There were large seasonal differences in carbon fluxes. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) fluxes were 9.3 times greater and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes were 532 times greater in the wet season (October to April) than in the dry season. These large contrasts in concentration lead to large differences in load between dry and wet months. In the wet season between January and April, DIC and DOC fluxes are 66% and 87%, respectively, of the total annual fluxes. Most of the annual fluxes of total suspended solids (2.7 × 106 t a-1), total dissolved solids (2.3 × 106 t a-1), DIC (0.26 × 106 t a-1), and DOC (0.2 × 106 t a-1) are transported into the Madura Strait. Accordingly, the Brantas River ranks number 17 among the top 20 rivers that originate at elevations above 3000 m. The concentration of DIC is consistently high all yearlong due to carbonate weathering in the river basin, except in the middle part of the basin, whereas the concentration of DOC is highly seasonal because of variations in biological activities. The total inorganic carbon concentration substantially exceeded the total organic carbon concentration, but the differences decreased from January to April when DOC increased sharply. The carbon budget indicates that the upstream river is a carbon source, and the middle sections of the river are a carbon sink. No carbon trapping was observed by the several impoundments over the basin while sediment trapping was obvious.

  15. Making Sense of Sensors: Stream Carbon Flux Determination at the Five USGS WEBB Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanley, J. B.; Saraceno, J.; Dornblaser, M.; Aulenbach, B. T.; Mast, A.; Clow, D. W.; Walker, J. F.; Hood, K.; Wickland, K.; Pellerin, B. A.; Aiken, G.; Crawford, J. T.; Striegl, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    At the five diverse forested and/or alpine headwater sites of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) program, we measure stream concentrations of all forms of carbon - DOC, PC (assumed to be POC), CO2, CH4, and bicarbonate alkalinity. One goal of this work is to estimate DIC, DOC, and POC fluxes from headwater landscapes. For DOC, POC, and CO2, we utilize high-frequency measurements with in situ sensors. We also take discrete samples over a range of hydrologic conditions for independent flux calculations, and to verify the sensor measurements and test proxy relations. In situ fluorescing dissolved organic matter (FDOM) serves as a proxy for DOC. Turbidity is needed to adjust FDOM, and also serves as a proxy for POC. DIC flux is computed from the discrete alkalinity analyses. Sensor measurements at the five sites - in Colorado, Wisconsin, Vermont, Georgia, and Puerto Rico -- began either in 2011 or 2012. The sensors generally functioned well, but occasional down time required gap filling, typically using strong relations with stream discharge. We computed at least one full year of carbon flux at each site. In this paper we compare sensor-based and sampling-based carbon flux estimates. We interpret the differences among sites in total carbon flux and its relative apportionment among DIC, DOC, and POC, with respect to climate and ecosystem type. Finally, we evaluate the significance of stream carbon flux as a component of the ecosystem carbon balance.

  16. Water and carbon fluxes from savanna ecosystems of the Volta River watershed, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, Heiko; Ferguson, Paul R.; Dubois, Kristal; Hayford, Ebenezer Kofi; von Vordzogbe, Vincent; Veizer, Ján

    2008-03-01

    The fluxes of water and carbon from terrestrial ecosystems are coupled via the process of photosynthesis. Constraining the annual water cycle therefore allows first order estimates of annual photosynthetic carbon flux, providing that the components of evapotranspiration can be separated. In this study, an isotope mass-balance equation is utilized to constrain annual evaporation flux, which in turn, is used to determine the amount of water transferred to the atmosphere by plant transpiration. The Volta River watershed in West Africa is dominated by woodland and savanna ecosystems with a significant proportion of C 4 vegetation. Annually, the Volta watershed receives ˜ 380 km 3 of rainfall, ˜ 50% of which is returned to the atmosphere via transpiration. An annual photosynthetic carbon flux of ˜ 170 × 10 12 g C yr - 1 or ˜ 428 g C m - 2 was estimated to be associated with this water vapor flux. Independent estimates of heterotrophic soil respiration slightly exceeded the NPP estimate from this study, implying that the exchange of carbon between the Volta River watershed and the atmosphere was close to being in balance or that terrestrial ecosystems were a small annual source of CO 2 to the atmosphere. In addition to terrestrial carbon flux, the balance of photosynthesis and respiration in Volta Lake was also examined. The lake was found to evade carbon dioxide to the atmosphere although the magnitude of the flux was much smaller than that of the terrestrial ecosystems.

  17. Organic and inorganic carbon fluxes in a tropical river system (Tana River, Kenya) during contrasting wet seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geeraert, Naomi; Omengo, Fred O.; Bouillon, Steven; Borges, Alberto V.; Govers, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Tropical river systems are often subjected to strong seasonality; in the Tana River (Kenya), for example, ~60% of the annual discharge takes place during a 4-month period. As different carbon pools are transported by the river, seasonal differences in carbon fluxes will also occur. This can furthermore be enhanced or attenuated due to changes in the intensity of carbon transformation processes, such as microbial respiration and primary production, during the wet season. Besides that, seasonal flooding of flood plains or flooded forest is known to be a major driver of the biogeochemical and ecological functioning of tropical rivers ("flood pulse concept") and has been shown to be one of the major drivers of the CO2 emissions from the Amazon River. We monitored the fluxes of different carbon pools at two sites spaced 385 km apart along the lower Tana River (Kenya), which is characterized by a highly seasonal flow regime. Water samples were taken at daily resolution during three wet seasons. During one of those seasons (May-June 2013), considerable flooding took place between both stations, while the other two wet seasons (Oct-Nov 2012 and April-May 2014) were characterised by several distinct discharge peaks, without leading to substantial overbank flooding. The flux of particulate organic carbon (POC) was observed to decrease in the downstream direction by 8 to 33% during all measurement periods. Fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) also decreased in the downstream direction during the wet seasons without flooding (by 10-38%) but increased drastically (increase of 231%) during the wet season with flooding. The dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) flux increased downstream (by 6% to 62%) during all measurement periods. The total carbon flux (POC+DOC+DIC) increased by 33% in the wet season with flooding (2013), but decreased by 23% and 3%, respectively, during the 2012 and 2014 wet seasons. Flooding thus affected the relative contribution of different C pools to the

  18. Carbon Management In the Post-Cap-and-Trade Carbon Economy: An Economic Model for Limiting Climate Change by Managing Anthropogenic Carbon Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGroff, F. A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss an economic model for comprehensive carbon management that focuses on changes in carbon flux in the biosphere due to anthropogenic activity. The two unique features of the model include: 1. A shift in emphasis from primarily carbon emissions, toward changes in carbon flux, mainly carbon extraction, and 2. A carbon price vector (CPV) to express the value of changes in carbon flux, measured in changes in carbon sequestration, or carbon residence time. The key focus with the economic model is the degree to which carbon flux changes due to anthropogenic activity. The economic model has three steps: 1. The CPV metric is used to value all forms of carbon associated with any anthropogenic activity. In this paper, the CPV used is a logarithmic chronological scale to gauge expected carbon residence (or sequestration) time. In future economic models, the CPV may be expanded to include other factors to value carbon. 2. Whenever carbon changes form (and CPV) due to anthropogenic activity, a carbon toll is assessed as determined by the change in the CPV. The standard monetary unit for carbon tolls are carbon toll units, or CTUs. The CTUs multiplied by the quantity of carbon converted (QCC) provides the total carbon toll, or CT. For example, CT = (CTU /mole carbon) x (QCC moles carbon). 3. Whenever embodied carbon (EC) attributable to a good or service moves via trade to a jurisdiction with a different CPV metric, a carbon toll (CT) is assessed representing the CPV difference between the two jurisdictions. This economic model has three clear advantages. First, the carbon pricing and cost scheme use existing and generally accepted accounting methodologies to ensure the veracity and verifiability of carbon management efforts with minimal effort and expense using standard, existing auditing protocols. Implementing this economic model will not require any new, special, unique, or additional training, tools, or systems for any entity to achieve their minimum

  19. Reevaluating carbon fluxes in subduction zones, what goes down, mostly comes up

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Peter B.; Manning, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fluxes in subduction zones can be better constrained by including new estimates of carbon concentration in subducting mantle peridotites, consideration of carbonate solubility in aqueous fluid along subduction geotherms, and diapirism of carbon-bearing metasediments. Whereas previous studies concluded that about half the subducting carbon is returned to the convecting mantle, we find that relatively little carbon may be recycled. If so, input from subduction zones into the overlying plate is larger than output from arc volcanoes plus diffuse venting, and substantial quantities of carbon are stored in the mantle lithosphere and crust. Also, if the subduction zone carbon cycle is nearly closed on time scales of 5–10 Ma, then the carbon content of the mantle lithosphere + crust + ocean + atmosphere must be increasing. Such an increase is consistent with inferences from noble gas data. Carbon in diamonds, which may have been recycled into the convecting mantle, is a small fraction of the global carbon inventory. PMID:26048906

  20. Reevaluating carbon fluxes in subduction zones, what goes down, mostly comes up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, Peter B.; Manning, Craig E.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon fluxes in subduction zones can be better constrained by including new estimates of carbon concentration in subducting mantle peridotites, consideration of carbonate solubility in aqueous fluid along subduction geotherms, and diapirism of carbon-bearing metasediments. Whereas previous studies concluded that about half the subducting carbon is returned to the convecting mantle, we find that relatively little carbon may be recycled. If so, input from subduction zones into the overlying plate is larger than output from arc volcanoes plus diffuse venting, and substantial quantities of carbon are stored in the mantle lithosphere and crust. Also, if the subduction zone carbon cycle is nearly closed on time scales of 5-10 Ma, then the carbon content of the mantle lithosphere + crust + ocean + atmosphere must be increasing. Such an increase is consistent with inferences from noble gas data. Carbon in diamonds, which may have been recycled into the convecting mantle, is a small fraction of the global carbon inventory.

  1. Reevaluating carbon fluxes in subduction zones, what goes down, mostly comes up.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Peter B; Manning, Craig E

    2015-07-28

    Carbon fluxes in subduction zones can be better constrained by including new estimates of carbon concentration in subducting mantle peridotites, consideration of carbonate solubility in aqueous fluid along subduction geotherms, and diapirism of carbon-bearing metasediments. Whereas previous studies concluded that about half the subducting carbon is returned to the convecting mantle, we find that relatively little carbon may be recycled. If so, input from subduction zones into the overlying plate is larger than output from arc volcanoes plus diffuse venting, and substantial quantities of carbon are stored in the mantle lithosphere and crust. Also, if the subduction zone carbon cycle is nearly closed on time scales of 5-10 Ma, then the carbon content of the mantle lithosphere + crust + ocean + atmosphere must be increasing. Such an increase is consistent with inferences from noble gas data. Carbon in diamonds, which may have been recycled into the convecting mantle, is a small fraction of the global carbon inventory. PMID:26048906

  2. A rheostat mechanism governs the bifurcation of carbon flux in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Murima, Paul; Zimmermann, Michael; Chopra, Tarun; Pojer, Florence; Fonti, Giulia; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Alonso, Sylvie; Sauer, Uwe; Pethe, Kevin; McKinney, John D

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid metabolism is an important feature of the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during infection. Consumption of fatty acids requires regulation of carbon flux bifurcation between the oxidative TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt. In Escherichia coli, flux bifurcation is regulated by phosphorylation-mediated inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICD), a paradigmatic example of post-translational mechanisms governing metabolic fluxes. Here, we demonstrate that, in contrast to E. coli, carbon flux bifurcation in mycobacteria is regulated not by phosphorylation but through metabolic cross-activation of ICD by glyoxylate, which is produced by the glyoxylate shunt enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL). This regulatory circuit maintains stable partitioning of fluxes, thus ensuring a balance between anaplerosis, energy production, and precursor biosynthesis. The rheostat-like mechanism of metabolite-mediated control of flux partitioning demonstrates the importance of allosteric regulation during metabolic steady-state. The sensitivity of this regulatory mechanism to perturbations presents a potentially attractive target for chemotherapy. PMID:27555519

  3. A rheostat mechanism governs the bifurcation of carbon flux in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Murima, Paul; Zimmermann, Michael; Chopra, Tarun; Pojer, Florence; Fonti, Giulia; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Alonso, Sylvie; Sauer, Uwe; Pethe, Kevin; McKinney, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid metabolism is an important feature of the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during infection. Consumption of fatty acids requires regulation of carbon flux bifurcation between the oxidative TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt. In Escherichia coli, flux bifurcation is regulated by phosphorylation-mediated inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICD), a paradigmatic example of post-translational mechanisms governing metabolic fluxes. Here, we demonstrate that, in contrast to E. coli, carbon flux bifurcation in mycobacteria is regulated not by phosphorylation but through metabolic cross-activation of ICD by glyoxylate, which is produced by the glyoxylate shunt enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL). This regulatory circuit maintains stable partitioning of fluxes, thus ensuring a balance between anaplerosis, energy production, and precursor biosynthesis. The rheostat-like mechanism of metabolite-mediated control of flux partitioning demonstrates the importance of allosteric regulation during metabolic steady-state. The sensitivity of this regulatory mechanism to perturbations presents a potentially attractive target for chemotherapy. PMID:27555519

  4. Fluxes of Soot Carbon to South Atlantic Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deep sea sediment samples from the South Atlantic Ocean were analyzed for soot black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), stable carbon isotope ratios (δ 13C), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Soot BC was present at low concentrations (0.04–0.17% dry weight), but ...

  5. Carbon monoxide fluxes from natural, managed, or cultivated savannah grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanhueza, Eugenio; Donoso, Loreto; Scharffe, Dieter; Crutzen, Paul J.

    1994-08-01

    As part of a comprehensive study on tropical land use change and its effect on atmospheric trace gas fluxes, we report the CO fluxes recorded at a natural grassland site and the changes produced when this ecosystem was managed or cultivated. The field site is located in the central part of the savannah climatic region of Venezuela. Fluxes were measured in the dark using the enclosed chamber technique. CO was analyzed with a reduction-gas detector in combination with a molecular sieve 5A columm for CO separation. At all sites, CO fluxes exhibited a strong diurnal variation, with net emission during daytime and consumption or no fluxes during nightime. In unplowed soils no differences were observed between dry and rainy season. A large disparity was observed between unplowed and plowed grassland soils. Plowed soil shows a much smaller emission during daytime and a larger consumption at night. The 24-hour integrated fluxes indicate that the nonperturbed grassland switches from being a net source of CO (3.4×1010 molecules cm-2 s-1) to being a net sink (-1.6×1010 molecules cm-2s-1) after plowing. It is likely that burial of surface litter reduces the production of CO in the top soil and that the diffusion of CO to deeper layers (where CO is consumed by microbiological processes) is promoted in decompacted soils. As the rainy season progressed the plowed soil gradually compacted and CO fluxes changed back, and after 3 months the fluxes from plowed soils and the original unplowed soils were equal. Even though the various cultivated fields (corn, sorghum, and pasture) received differing inorganic fertilization treatments, no significant difference in the CO fluxes resulted. Measurements during the dry season suggest that "degrading dry (dead) vegetation" produces CO under dark conditions.

  6. Carbon monoxide fluxes from natural, managed, or cultivated savannah grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Sanhueza, E.; Donoso, L.; Scharffe, D.; Crutzen, P.J.

    1994-08-20

    As part of a comprehensive study on tropical land use change and its effect on atmospheric trace gas fluxes, we report the CO fluxes recorded at a natural grassland site and the changes produced when this ecosystem was managed or cultivated. The field site is located in the central part of the savannah climatic region of Venezuela. Fluxes were measured in the dark using the enclosed chamber technique. CO was analyzed with a reduction-gas detector in combination with a molecular sieve 5A column for CO separation. At all sites, CO fluxes exhibited a strong diurnal variation, with net emission during daytime and consumption or no fluxes during nighttime. In unplowed soils no differences were observed between dry and rainy season. A large disparity was observed between unplowed and plowed grassland soils. Plowed soil shows a much smaller emission during daytime and a larger consumption at night. The 24-hour integrated fluxes indicate that the nonperturbed grassland switches from being a net source of CO (3.4 x 10{sup 10} molecules cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}) to being a net sink (-1.6 x 10{sup 10} molecules cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}) after plowing. It is likely that burial of surface litter reduces the production of CO in the top soil and that the diffusion of CO to deeper layers (where CO is consumed by microbiological processes) is promoted in decompacted soils. As the rainy season progressed the plowed soil gradually compacted and CO fluxes changed back, and after 3 months the fluxes from plowed soils and the original unplowed soils were equal. Even though the various cultivated fields (corn, sorghum, and pasture) received differing inorganic fertilization treatments, no significant difference in the CO fluxes resulted. Measurements during the dry season suggest that {open_quotes}degrading dry (dead) vegetation{close_quotes} produces CO under dark conditions. 14 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Resource quality affects carbon cycling in deep-sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Daniel J; Thornton, Barry; Hay, Steve; Zuur, Alain F; Nicol, Graeme W; McWilliam, Jenna M; Witte, Ursula F M

    2012-09-01

    Deep-sea sediments cover ~70% of Earth's surface and represent the largest interface between the biological and geological cycles of carbon. Diatoms and zooplankton faecal pellets naturally transport organic material from the upper ocean down to the deep seabed, but how these qualitatively different substrates affect the fate of carbon in this permanently cold environment remains unknown. We added equal quantities of (13)C-labelled diatoms and faecal pellets to a cold water (-0.7 °C) sediment community retrieved from 1080 m in the Faroe-Shetland Channel, Northeast Atlantic, and quantified carbon mineralization and uptake by the resident bacteria and macrofauna over a 6-day period. High-quality, diatom-derived carbon was mineralized >300% faster than that from low-quality faecal pellets, demonstrating that qualitative differences in organic matter drive major changes in the residence time of carbon at the deep seabed. Benthic bacteria dominated biological carbon processing in our experiments, yet showed no evidence of resource quality-limited growth; they displayed lower growth efficiencies when respiring diatoms. These effects were consistent in contrasting months. We contend that respiration and growth in the resident sediment microbial communities were substrate and temperature limited, respectively. Our study has important implications for how future changes in the biochemical makeup of exported organic matter will affect the balance between mineralization and sequestration of organic carbon in the largest ecosystem on Earth. PMID:22378534

  8. Water, energy and carbon flux observations from ARS watersheds and agro-ecosystem experimental sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several ARS watershed locations and long term experimental/monitoring sites have been measuring water, energy and carbon fluxes using the eddy covariance technique. Several sites have been collecting flux data for 5 to 10 years, while other locations have recently started a monitoring program. The...

  9. Faunal Influences on Fracture-Induced Carbon Flux Dynamics in Dryland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, K. F.; Caylor, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    Organismal activity, in addition to its role in ecological feedbacks, ha the potential to serve as instigators or enhancers of atmospheric and hydrologic fluxes via alterations in soil structural regimes. We investigated the effect of faunally-induced crack morphology on soil carbon dynamics in three dryland soil systems in central Kenya: bioturbated soils, biocompacted soils, and undisturbed soils. Carbon fluxes were characterized using a closed-system respiration chamber, with CO2 concentration differences measured using an infrared gas analyzer. Results show that faunal influenes play a divergent biomechanical role in bulk soil cracking morphology and topology: macrofauna-induced bioturbation creates shallow, large, well-connected networks relative to those from megaherbivore-induced biocompaction, with the latter showing a "memory" of past drying events through a crack layering effect. These morphologies may further drive differences in soil carbon flux: under dry conditions, bioturbated and control soils show a persistently high and low mean carbon flux, respectively - biocompacted soils suggest a diurnal trend, with daytime lows and nighttime highs comparable to the control and bioturbated soils, respectively. Overall fluxes under wet conditions are considerably higher, but also more variable, though higher mean carbon fluxes are observed in the biocompacted and bioturbated soils. Our results suggest that fracture morphology induced in biocompacted soils may enhance diffusive fluxes that are typical in undisturbed soils to levels that are as high as those from macrofaunal respiration, but that particular physical conditions in fracture morphology and topology may be necessary as a prerequisite.

  10. Soil surface CO2 fluxes and the carbon budget of a grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, J. M.; Garcia, R.; Verma, S. B.

    1992-11-01

    Measurements of soil surface CO2 fluxes are reported for three sites within the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) area, and simple empirical equations are fit to the data to provide predictions of soil fluxes from environmental observations. A prototype soil chamber, used to make the flux measurements, is described and tested by comparing CO2 flux measurements to a 40-L chamber, a 1-m3 chamber, and eddy correlation. Results suggest that flux measurements with the prototype chamber are consistent with measurements by other methods to within about 20%. A simple empirical equation based on 10-cm soil temperature, 0- to 10-cm soil volumetric water content, and leaf area index predicts the soil surface CO2 flux with a root-mean-square (rms) error of 1.2 μmol m-2 s-1 for all three sites. Further evidence supports using this equation to evaluate soil surface CO2 during the 1987 FIFE experiment. The soil surface CO2 fluxes when averaged over 24 hours are comparable to daily gross canopy photosynthetic rates. For 6 days of data the net daily accumulation of carbon is about 0.6 g CO2 m-2 d-1; this is only a few percent of the daily gross accumulation of carbon by photosynthesis. As the soil became drier in 1989, the net accumulation of carbon by the prairie increased, suggesting that the soil flux is more sensitive to temperature and drought than the photosynthetic fluxes.

  11. Soil surface CO2 fluxes and the carbon budget of a grassland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, J. M.; Garcia, R.; Verma, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of soil surface CO2 fluxes are reported for three sites within the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) area, and simple empirical equations are fit to the data to provide predictions of soil fluxes from environmental observations. A prototype soil chamber, used to make the flux measurements, is described and tested by comparing CO2 flux measurements to a 40-L chamber, a 1-m/cu chamber, and eddy correlation. Results suggest that flux measurements with the prototype chamber are consistent with measurements by other methods to within about 20 percent. A simple empirical equation based on 10-cm soil temperature, 0- to 10-cm soil volumetric water content, and leaf area index predicts the soil surface CO2 flux with a rms error of 1.2 micro-mol sq m/s for all three sites. Further evidence supports using this equation to evaluate soil surface CO2 during the 1987 FIFE experiment. The soil surface CO2 fluxes when averaged over 24 hours are comparable to daily gross canopy photosynthetic rates. For 6 days of data the net daily accumulation of carbon is about 0.6 g CO2 sq m/d; this is only a few percent of the daily gross accumulation of carbon by photosynthesis. As the soil became drier in 1989, the net accumulation of carbon by the prairie increased, suggesting that the soil flux is more sensitive to temperature and drought than the photosynthetic fluxes.

  12. Adaptive data-driven models for estimating carbon fluxes in the Northern Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wylie, B.K.; Fosnight, E.A.; Gilmanov, T.G.; Frank, A.B.; Morgan, J.A.; Haferkamp, Marshall R.; Meyers, T.P.

    2007-01-01

    Rangeland carbon fluxes are highly variable in both space and time. Given the expansive areas of rangelands, how rangelands respond to climatic variation, management, and soil potential is important to understanding carbon dynamics. Rangeland carbon fluxes associated with Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) were measured from multiple year data sets at five flux tower locations in the Northern Great Plains. These flux tower measurements were combined with 1-km2 spatial data sets of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), temperature, precipitation, seasonal NDVI metrics, and soil characteristics. Flux tower measurements were used to train and select variables for a rule-based piece-wise regression model. The accuracy and stability of the model were assessed through random cross-validation and cross-validation by site and year. Estimates of NEE were produced for each 10-day period during each growing season from 1998 to 2001. Growing season carbon flux estimates were combined with winter flux estimates to derive and map annual estimates of NEE. The rule-based piece-wise regression model is a dynamic, adaptive model that captures the relationships of the spatial data to NEE as conditions evolve throughout the growing season. The carbon dynamics in the Northern Great Plains proved to be in near equilibrium, serving as a small carbon sink in 1999 and as a small carbon source in 1998, 2000, and 2001. Patterns of carbon sinks and sources are very complex, with the carbon dynamics tilting toward sources in the drier west and toward sinks in the east and near the mountains in the extreme west. Significant local variability exists, which initial investigations suggest are likely related to local climate variability, soil properties, and management.

  13. Evaluation of the Community Land Model simulated carbon and water fluxes against observations over ChinaFLUX sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Mao, J.; Shi, X.; Ricciuto, D. M.; He, H.; Thornton, P. E.; Yu, G.; Han, S.; Li, Y.; Yan, J.; Hao, Y.; Wang, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) is an advanced process-based land surface model that simulates the complicated carbon, water vapor and energy exchanges between the terrestrial ecosystem and the atmosphere at various spatial-temporal scales. We for the first time use eddy-covariance observations of CO2 and water vapor exchange and soil respiration measurements at five representative Chinese Terrestrial Ecosystem Flux Observational Network (ChinaFLUX) tower sites to systematically evaluate the latest versions of CLM, the CLM4.0 and CLM4.5, and comprehensively examine the similarities and differences between the observational and simulated results. The CLM4.5 underestimates annual carbon sink at three forest sites and one alpine grassland site but overestimates the carbon sink at a semi-arid grassland site. The underestimation in annual carbon sink at a deciduous dominated forest site is resulted from underestimated daytime carbon sequestration in summer and overestimated nighttime carbon emission in spring and autumn. Compared with the CLM4.0, the bias of annual Gross Primary Production (GPP) is reduced by 24% and 28% in CLM4.5 at two subtropical forest sites. However, CLM4.5 still has a large positive bias in annual GPP. The improvement in NEE is limited, although the bias of soil respiration decreases by 16%-43% at three forest sites. The CLM4.5 has lower soil water content in dry season than this simulated by the CLM4.0 at two grassland sites. These lead to the significant drop in leaf area index and GPP, and the increase in respiration for the CLM4.5. The new fire parameterization in CLM4.5 causes incorrect fire estimation at Changbaishan forest site, which results in unexpected underestimation of NEE, vegetation carbon, and soil organic carbon by 46%, 95%, and 87%, respectively. Our study with the ChinaFLUX sites indicates a significant improvement of the CLM4.5 than the CLM4, and suggests further developments on the parameterization of seasonal GPP and

  14. Upscaling carbon fluxes over the Great Plains grasslands: Sinks and sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Li; Wylie, Bruce K.; Ji, Lei; Gilmanov, Tagir G.; Tieszen, Larry L.; Howar, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that the grasslands may be carbon sinks or near equilibrium, and they often shift between carbon sources in drought years and carbon sinks in other years. It is important to understand the responses of net ecosystem production (NEP) to various climatic conditions across the U.S. Great Plains grasslands. Based on 15 grassland flux towers, we developed a piecewise regression model and mapped the grassland NEP at 250 m spatial resolution over the Great Plains from 2000 to 2008. The results showed that the Great Plains was a net sink with an averaged annual NEP of 24 ± 14 g C m−2 yr−1, ranging from a low value of 0.3 g C m−2 yr−1 in 2002 to a high value of 47.7 g C m−2 yr−1 in 2005. The regional averaged NEP for the entire Great Plains grasslands was estimated to be 336 Tg C yr−1 from 2000 to 2008. In the 9 year period including 4 dry years, the annual NEP was very variable in both space and time. It appeared that the carbon gains for the Great Plains were more sensitive to droughts in the west than the east. The droughts in 2000, 2002, 2006, and 2008 resulted in increased carbon losses over drought-affected areas, and the Great Plains grasslands turned into a relatively low sink with NEP values of 15.8, 0.3, 20.1, and 10.2 g C m−2 yr−1 for the 4 years, respectively.

  15. Soil Carbon Pools and CO2 Fluxes in the GISS Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharecha, P. A.; Kiang, N. Y.; Aleinov, I.; Moorcroft, P.; Koster, R.; Rind, D.

    2006-12-01

    Determining whether the terrestrial biosphere will act as a sink or source of carbon in the future is crucial for understanding the feedbacks that will affect future global warming. To this end, a growing number of GCMs now include interactive global carbon cycle models (Friedlingstein et al., J. Clim. 19, 2006). To allow for the prediction of net CO2 fluxes from land in the NASA-GISS GCM, we have added a soil biogeochemistry submodel to the Ent dynamic global vegetation model currently under development for the GISS GCM . This submodel is a modified version of the soil submodel in the CASA biosphere model (Potter et al., Glob. Biogeoch. Cyc. 7, 1993). It is driven by vegetation litterfall from the Ent model and litter quality parameters for the Ent vegetation types (in addition to soil temperature, texture, and volumetric moisture) and calculates soil carbon and nitrogen pools and heterotrophic (microbial) respiration. The latter quantity is then used by the Ent model to calculate net CO2 from the global land surface. Here we describe the results of both offline Ent/soil model runs as well as runs in which the model is coupled to the GISS GCM, using prescribed land cover and seasonal variation, and biophysics from Friend and Kiang (J. Clim. 18, 2005). To spin up the soil submodel offline, we conducted 700-1000 year runs using 1986-1995 climatological datasets from the GSWP-2 multi-model analysis (Intl. GEWEX Project Office, 2002, avail. at http://grads.iges.org/gswp/publications.html). The equilibrium soil pools are compared to soil carbon and nitrogen data from the ISRIC-WISE database (Batjes, 2000, avail. at http://www.daac.ornl.gov). This work has been done in the context of incorporation of a dynamic global carbon cycle into the GISS GCM.

  16. On the role of heat fluxes in the uptake of anthropogenic carbon in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VöLker, Christoph; Wallace, Douglas W. R.; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.

    2002-12-01

    The influence of the overturning circulation on the anthropogenic carbon sink in the North Atlantic is investigated with a simple box model. The net air-sea flux of anthropogenic carbon in the North Atlantic is the result of two opposing fluxes: The first is the uptake caused by the disequilibrium between the rapidly rising atmospheric pCO2 and the dissolved carbon content in the ocean, depending mainly on the water exchange rate between mixed layer and interior North Atlantic ocean. Superimposed is a second flux, related to the northward transport of heat within the Atlantic basin, that is directed out of the ocean, contrary to conventional wisdom. It is caused by a latitudinal gradient in the ratio of seawater alkalinity to total dissolved inorganic carbon that in turn is related to the cooling and freshening of surface water on its way north. This flux depends strongly on the vertical structure of the upper branch of the overturning circulation and on the distribution of undersaturation and supersaturation of CO2 in Atlantic surface waters. A data-based estimate of anthropogenic carbon inventory in the North Atlantic is consistent with a dominance of the disequilibrium flux over the heat-flux-related outgassing at the present time, but, in our model, does not place a strong constraint on the net anthropogenic air-sea flux. Stabilization of the atmospheric pCO2 on a higher level will change the relative role of the two opposing fluxes, making the North Atlantic a source of anthropogenic carbon to the atmosphere. We discuss implications for the interpretation of numerical carbon cycle models.

  17. Relevance of methodological choices for accounting of land use change carbon fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongratz, Julia; Hansis, Eberhard; Davis, Steven

    2015-04-01

    To understand and potentially steer how humans shape land-climate interactions it is important to accurately attribute greenhouse gas fluxes from land use and land cover change (LULCC) in space and time. However, such accounting of carbon fluxes from LULCC generally requires choosing from multiple options of how to attribute the fluxes to regions and to LULCC activities. Applying a newly-developed and spatially-explicit bookkeeping model, BLUE ("bookkeeping of land use emissions"), we quantify LULCC carbon fluxes and attribute them to land-use activities and countries by a range of different accounting methods. We present results with respect to a Kyoto Protocol-like ``commitment'' accounting period, using land use emissions of 2008-12 as example scenario. We assess the effect of accounting methods that vary (1) the temporal evolution of carbon stocks, (2) the state of the carbon stocks at the beginning of the period, (3) the temporal attribution of carbon fluxes during the period, and (4) treatment of LULCC fluxes that occurred prior to the beginning of the period. We show that the methodological choices result in grossly different estimates of carbon fluxes for the different attribution definitions. The global net flux in the accounting period varies between 4.3 Pg(C) uptake and 15.2 Pg(C) emissions, depending on the accounting method. Regional results show different modes of variation. This finding has implications for both political and scientific considerations: Not all methodological choices are currently specified under the UNFCCC treaties on land use, land-use change and forestry. Yet, a consistent accounting scheme is crucial to assure comparability of individual LULCC activities, quantify their relevance for the global annual carbon budget, and assess the effects of LULCC policies.

  18. Calculations of automatic chamber flux measurements of methane and carbon dioxide using short time series of concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirk, N.; Mastepanov, M.; Parmentier, F.-J. W.; Lund, M.; Crill, P.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-09-01

    The closed chamber technique is widely used to measure the exchange of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from terrestrial ecosystems. There is, however, large uncertainty about which model should be used to calculate the gas flux from the measured gas concentrations. Due to experimental uncertainties the robust linear regression model (first order polynomial) is often applied, even though theoretical considerations of the technique suggest the application of other, curvilinear models. High-resolution automatic chamber systems which sample gas concentrations several hundred times per flux measurement make it possible to resolve the curvilinear behavior and study the information imposed by the natural variability of the temporal concentration changes. We used more than 50 000 such flux measurements of CH4 and CO2 from five field sites located in peat forming wetlands to calculate fluxes with different models. The flux differences from independent linear estimates are generally found to be smaller than the local flux variability on the plot scale. The curvilinear behavior of the gas concentrations within the chamber is strongly influenced by wind driven chamber leakage, and less so by changing gas concentration gradients in the soil during chamber closure. Such physical processes affect both gas species equally, which makes it possible to isolate biochemical processes affecting the gases differently, such as photosynthesis limitation by chamber headspace CO2 concentrations under high levels of incoming solar radiation. We assess the possibility to exploit this effect for a partitioning of the net CO2 flux into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration and argue that high-resolution automatic chamber measurements could be used for purposes beyond the estimation of the net gas flux.

  19. Carbon dioxide fluxes from Tifway bermudagrass: early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotten, David L.; Zhang, G.; Leclerc, M. Y.; Raymer, P.; Steketee, C. J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports for the first time preliminary data on carbon uptake of warm-season turfgrass at a well-managed sod farm in south central Georgia. It examines the changes in carbon uptake from one of the most widely used warm-season turfgrass cultivars in the world, Tifway Bermudagrass. It elucidates the role of canopy density and light avalaibility on the net carbon uptake using the eddy-covariance technique. Preliminary evidence suggests that turfgrass is effective at sequestering carbon dioxide during the summer months even when the canopy is being reestablished following a grass harvest.

  20. Carbon Fluxes in a sub-arctic tundra undergoing permafrost degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho, R. G.; Webb, E.; Mauritz, M.; Schuur, E. A. G.

    2014-12-01

    As an effect of climate change, temperatures in high latitude regions are increasing faster than in the rest of the world and future projections indicate it will increase between 7°C and 8°C by the end of the 21st century. Permafrost soils store around 1700 Pg of Carbon (C), which is approximately the amount of C stored in terrestrial vegetation and in the atmosphere combined. Sustained warming induces permafrost thaw, leads to a thicker seasonal active layer, and creates subsided patches in the landscape. Carbon that was previously inaccessible to decomposition is thus exposed, increasing the likelihood of positive feedback of CO2 to the atmosphere. We measured C fluxes (Net ecosystem carbon flux, NEE, and Ecosystem respiration, Re) using the eddy covariance approach in a tundra landscape (Eight Mile Lake Watershed, Alaska) undergoing permafrost degradation from the beginning of the growing season in 2008 and throughout most winters until May 2014. This interval encompassed a range of climatic variability that included a deviation of ± 50% from the long term average in growing season precipitation. Active layer depth (thaw depth at the end of the growing season) and subsidence in the footprint were used as indicators of permafrost degradation. Results indicate that annual NEE ranged from a sink of 0.76 MgC ha-1 yr-1 to a source of 0.55 MgC ha-1 yr-1. NEE during the growing seasons fluctuated from 1.1 to 1.8 MgC ha-1 season-1 in net C uptake. Annual NEE was strongly affected by winter Re, which represented between 33% and 45% of the annual value regardless of of the large drop in both air and soil temperature. Parameters from the light response curve (optimum NEE, NEEopt and quantum yield, α) showed a seasonal and interannual variability and were different between the most and least degraded sites in the footprint, which affected the magnitude of the carbon cycle and may have implications for landscape C balance in sub-arctic tundra.

  1. The "Carbon Data Explorer": Web-Based Space-Time Visualization of Modeled Carbon Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billmire, M.; Endsley, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The visualization of and scientific "sense-making" from large datasets varying in both space and time is a challenge; one that is still being addressed in a number of different fields. The approaches taken thus far are often specific to a given academic field due to the unique questions that arise in different disciplines, however, basic approaches such as geographic maps and time series plots are still widely useful. The proliferation of model estimates of increasing size and resolution further complicates what ought to be a simple workflow: Model some geophysical phenomen(on), obtain results and measure uncertainty, organize and display the data, make comparisons across trials, and share findings. A new tool is in development that is intended to help scientists with the latter parts of that workflow. The tentatively-titled "Carbon Data Explorer" (http://spatial.mtri.org/flux-client/) enables users to access carbon science and related spatio-temporal science datasets over the web. All that is required to access multiple interactive visualizations of carbon science datasets is a compatible web browser and an internet connection. While the application targets atmospheric and climate science datasets, particularly spatio-temporal model estimates of carbon products, the software architecture takes an agnostic approach to the data to be visualized. Any atmospheric, biophysical, or geophysical quanity that varies in space and time, including one or more measures of uncertainty, can be visualized within the application. Within the web application, users have seamless control over a flexible and consistent symbology for map-based visualizations and plots. Where time series data are represented by one or more data "frames" (e.g. a map), users can animate the data. In the "coordinated view," users can make direct comparisons between different frames and different models or model runs, facilitating intermodal comparisons and assessments of spatio-temporal variability. Map

  2. Impact of hydrology on methane flux patterns in a permafrost-affected floodplain in Northeast Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Min Jung; Beulig, Felix; Kuesel, Kirsten; Wildner, Marcus; Heimann, Martin; Zimov, Nikita; Zimov, Sergei; Goeckede, Mathias

    2015-04-01

    A large fraction of organic carbon stored in Arctic permafrost soil is at risk to be decomposed and released to the atmosphere under climate change. Thawing of ice-rich permafrost will re-structure the surface topography, with potentially significant effects on hydrology: water table depth (WTD) of depressed areas will increase, while that of the surrounding area will decrease. Changes in hydrology will trigger modifications in soil and vegetation, e.g. soil temperature, vegetation and microbial community structure. All of these secondary effects will alter carbon cycle processes, with the magnitude and even sign of the net effect yet unknown. The objective of this study is to investigate effects of drainage on methane fluxes in a floodplain of the Kolyma River near Cherskii, Northeast Siberia. The study site is separated into two areas, one that has been drained since 2004, and a nearby reference site. Methane flux was measured for ~16 weeks during summer and early winter of 2013, and summer of 2014. In addition, to separate different methane emission pathways, plant-mediated methane transport (through aerenchyma) as well as the proportion of ebullition were measured in 2014. Vegetation and microbial community structures were investigated and compared. After a decade of drainage history that lowered WTD by about 20cm in the drained area, Eriophorum (cotton grass) that previously dominated have to a large part been replaced by Carex (tussock-forming sedge) and shrub species. While WTD primarily influenced the methane flux rate, this vegetation change indirectly altered the flux as well in a way that sites with Eriophorum emitted more methane. Concerning the microbial community structure, the relative abundance of methanogen and ratio of methanotrophs to methanogens were well correlated with methane flux rates, implying that the methane flux is highly influenced by microorganisms. As a consequence of these changes, in the drained area less amount of methane was

  3. Assessing FPAR Source and Parameter Optimization Scheme in Application of a Diagnostic Carbon Flux Model

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D P; Ritts, W D; Wharton, S; Thomas, C; Monson, R; Black, T A

    2009-02-26

    The combination of satellite remote sensing and carbon cycle models provides an opportunity for regional to global scale monitoring of terrestrial gross primary production, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem production. FPAR (the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the plant canopy) is a critical input to diagnostic models, however little is known about the relative effectiveness of FPAR products from different satellite sensors nor about the sensitivity of flux estimates to different parameterization approaches. In this study, we used multiyear observations of carbon flux at four eddy covariance flux tower sites within the conifer biome to evaluate these factors. FPAR products from the MODIS and SeaWiFS sensors, and the effects of single site vs. cross-site parameter optimization were tested with the CFLUX model. The SeaWiFs FPAR product showed greater dynamic range across sites and resulted in slightly reduced flux estimation errors relative to the MODIS product when using cross-site optimization. With site-specific parameter optimization, the flux model was effective in capturing seasonal and interannual variation in the carbon fluxes at these sites. The cross-site prediction errors were lower when using parameters from a cross-site optimization compared to parameter sets from optimization at single sites. These results support the practice of multisite optimization within a biome for parameterization of diagnostic carbon flux models.

  4. [Research progress on urban carbon fluxes based on eddy covariance technique].

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Fu, Yu-Ling; Yang, Fang

    2014-02-01

    Land use change and fossil fuel consumption due to urbanization have made significant effect on global carbon cycle and climate change. Accurate estimating and understanding of the carbon budget and its characteristics are the premises for studying carbon cycle and its driving mechanisms in urban system. Based on the theory of eddy covariance (EC) technique, the characteristics atmospheric boundary layer and carbon cycle in urban area, this study systematically reviewed the principles of CO2 flux monitoring in urban system with EC technique, and then summarized the problems faced in urban CO2 flux monitoring and the method for data processing and further assessment. The main research processes on urban carbon fluxes with EC technique were also illustrated. The results showed that the urban surface was mostly acting as net carbon source. The CO2 exchange between urban surface and atmosphere showed obvious diurnal, weekly and seasonal variation resulted from the vehicle exhaust, domestic heating and vegetation respiration. However, there still exist great uncertainties in urban flux measurement and its explanation due to high spatial heterogeneity and complex distributions of carbon source/sink in urban environments. In the end, we suggested that further researches on EC technique and data assessment in complex urban area should be strengthened. It was also requisite to develop models of urban carbon cycle on the basis of the system principle, to investigate the influencing mechanism and variability of urban cycle at regional scale with spatial analysis technique. PMID:24830264

  5. Soil carbon dioxide fluxes with time and depth in a bare field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux is an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. The amount of CO2 emitted from soil to the atmosphere has significant effects on the soil-atmosphere system. The objectives of this study are 1) to determine bare soil CO2 fluxes continuously with time and de...

  6. Evaluation of carbon isotope flux partitioning theory under simplified and controlled environmental conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Separation of the photosynthetic (Fp) and respiratory (Fr) fluxes of net CO2 exchange (Fn)remains a necessary step toward understanding the biological and physical controls on carbon cycling between the soil, biomass, and atmosphere. Despite recent advancements in stable carbon isotope partitioning ...

  7. A Satellite Based Modeling Framework for Estimating Seasonal Carbon Fluxes Over Agricultural Lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaru, V.; Houborg, R.; Izaurralde, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Croplands are typically characterized by fine-scale heterogeneity, which makes it difficult to accurately estimate cropland carbon fluxes over large regions given the fairly coarse spatial resolution of high-frequency satellite observations. It is, however, important that we improve our ability to estimate spatially and temporally resolved carbon fluxes because croplands constitute a large land area and have a large impact on global carbon cycle. A Satellite based Dynamic Cropland Carbon (SDCC) modeling framework was developed to estimate spatially resolved crop specific daily carbon fluxes over large regions. This modeling framework uses the REGularized canopy reFLECtance (REGFLEC) model to estimate crop specific leaf area index (LAI) using downscaled MODIS reflectance data, and subsequently LAI estimates are integrated into the Environmental Policy Integrated Model (EPIC) model to determine daily net primary productivity (NPP) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP). Firstly, we evaluate the performance of this modeling framework over three eddy covariance flux tower sites (Bondville, IL; Fermi Agricultural Site, IL; and Rosemount site, MN). Daily NPP and NEP of corn and soybean crops are estimated (based on REGFLEC LAI) for year 2007 and 2008 over the flux tower sites and compared against flux tower observations and model estimates based on in-situ LAI. Secondly, we apply the SDCC framework for estimating regional NPP and NEP for corn, soybean and sorghum crops in Nebraska during year 2007 and 2008. The methods and results will be presented.

  8. A Satellite Based Modeling Framework for Estimating Seasonal Carbon Fluxes Over Agricultural Lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaru, V.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Sahajpal, R.; Houborg, R.; Milla, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Croplands are typically characterized by fine-scale heterogeneity, which makes it difficult to accurately estimate cropland carbon fluxes over large regions given the fairly coarse spatial resolution of high-frequency satellite observations. It is, however, important that we improve our ability to estimate spatially and temporally resolved carbon fluxes because croplands constitute a large land area and have a large impact on global carbon cycle. A Satellite based Dynamic Cropland Carbon (SDCC) modeling framework was developed to estimate spatially resolved crop specific daily carbon fluxes over large regions. This modeling framework uses the REGularized canopy reFLECtance (REGFLEC) model to estimate crop specific leaf area index (LAI) using downscaled MODIS reflectance data, and subsequently LAI estimates are integrated into the Environmental Policy Integrated Model (EPIC) model to determine daily net primary productivity (NPP) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP). Firstly, we evaluate the performance of this modeling framework over three eddy covariance flux tower sites (Bondville, IL; Fermi Agricultural Site, IL; and Rosemount site, MN). Daily NPP and NEP of corn and soybean crops are estimated (based on REGFLEC LAI) for year 2007 and 2008 over the flux tower sites and compared against flux tower observations and model estimates based on in-situ LAI. Secondly, we apply the SDCC framework for estimating regional NPP and NEP for corn, soybean and sorghum crops in Nebraska during year 2007 and 2008. The methods and results will be presented.

  9. Relevance of methodological choices for accounting of land use change carbon fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansis, Eberhard; Davis, Steven J.; Pongratz, Julia

    2015-08-01

    Accounting for carbon fluxes from land use and land cover change (LULCC) generally requires choosing from multiple options of how to attribute the fluxes to regions and to LULCC activities. Applying a newly developed and spatially explicit bookkeeping model BLUE (bookkeeping of land use emissions), we quantify LULCC fluxes and attribute them to land use activities and countries by a range of different accounting methods. We present results with respect to a Kyoto Protocol-like "commitment" accounting period, using land use emissions of 2008-2012 as an example scenario. We assess the effect of accounting methods that vary (1) the temporal evolution of carbon stocks, (2) the state of the carbon stocks at the beginning of the period, (3) the temporal attribution of carbon fluxes during the period, and (4) treatment of LULCC fluxes that occurred prior to the beginning of the period. We show that the methodological choices result in grossly different estimates of carbon fluxes for the different attribution definitions.

  10. CARBON POOL AND FLUX OF GLOBAL FOREST ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forest systems cover more than 4.1 x 10 9 hectares of the Earth's land area. lobally, forest vegetation and soils contain about 1146 petagrams of carbon, with approximately 37 percent of this carbon in low-latitude forests, 14 percent in mid-latitudes, and 49 percent in high lati...

  11. Land-Use Influences Carbon Fluxes in Northern Kazakhstan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of carbon cycling is important to maintain sustainable rangeland ecosystems. Rangelands in the western U.S. are similar to those in Central Asia. We used a combination of meteorological and computer modeling techniques to quantitatively assess carbon loss and gain for four major l...

  12. Hydrologic Carbon Fluxes from the Dryland Grain Producing Region of the Inland Pacific Northwest: Measurements and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan, R. D.; Brooks, E. S.; Johnson-Maynard, J.; Huggins, D.

    2013-12-01

    Mitigation strategies to minimize the loss of soil carbon require a fundamental understanding of the dominant hydrologic flow paths, which drive runoff generation, soil erosion, and ultimately the quantity and quality of carbon exported from a landscape. The variation in climate across the Inland Pacific Northwest has resulted in unique agroecosystems which in turn has affected the long term carbon storage and transport. This study assess the ability of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model to simulate runoff, sediment yield and soil carbon export from two ~10 ha field catchments managed under no-till and conventional tillage practices, respectively. End of winter observed erosion maps and soil carbon measurements are compared to simulated erosion and deposition patterns within the conventionally tilled catchment. The effect of scale and climate on hydrologic carbon fluxes will be compared at three watershed scales (~10 ha, ~5,000 ha and ~900,000 ha) as well as from 9 third order streams in the low moderate and high precipitation zones across the Palouse. Samples were collected on an event basis for water years 2012 and 2013 using automated ISCO samplers at the watershed scale and grab samples were taken at the nine locations during high flows. Samples were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), particulate organic carbon (POC), total nitrogen (TN), and Suspended sediment concentrations (SSC). Preliminary results indicate that (DOC) do not significantly vary with discharge at all sampling locations but there were significant differences in DOC concentrations and POC loads from the conventional and no-till catchments. The mass of inorganic carbon found in the water samples is greater in the drier climates than the eastern wetter climates reflecting the changes in soil type and hydrology across the region. Understanding the variability in hydrology as well as the trends in carbon export is an essential first step in

  13. Calcium carbonate does not affect imatinib pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Tawbi, Hussein; Christner, Susan M.; Lin, Yan; Johnson, Matthew; Mowrey, Emily T.; Cherrin, Craig; Chu, Edward; Lee, James J.; Puhalla, Shannon; Stoller, Ronald; Appleman, Leonard R.; Miller, Brian M.; Beumer, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec®/Glivec®), has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), and there is evidence for an exposure response relationship. Calcium carbonate is increasingly used as a calcium supplement and in the setting of gastric upset associated with imatinib therapy. Calcium carbonate could conceivably elevate gastric pH and complex imatinib, thereby influencing imatinib absorption and exposure. We aimed to evaluate whether use of calcium carbonate has a significant effect on imatinib pharmacokinetics. Methods Eleven healthy subjects were enrolled in a 2-period, open-label, single-institution, randomized cross-over, fixed-schedule study. In one period, each subject received 400 mg of imatinib p.o.. In the other period, 4000 mg calcium carbonate (Tums Ultra®) was administered p.o. 15 min before 400 mg of imatinib. Plasma concentrations of imatinib and its active N-desmethyl metabolite CGP74588 were assayed by LC-MS; data were analyzed non-compartmentally, and compared after log transformation. Results Calcium carbonate administration did not significantly affect the imatinib area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC) (41.2 μg/mL•h alone versus 40.8 μg/mL•h with calcium carbonate, P=0.99), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) (2.35 μg/mL alone versus 2.39 μg/mL with calcium carbonate, P=0.89). Conclusions Our results indicate that the use of calcium carbonate does not significantly affect imatinib pharmacokinetics. PMID:24170263

  14. Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, R.A.

    2001-02-22

    The database documented in this numeric data package, a revision to a database originally published by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) in 1995, consists of annual estimates, from 1850 through 1990, of the net flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere resulting from deliberate changes in land cover and land use, especially forest clearing for agriculture and the harvest of wood for wood products or energy. The data are provided on a year-by-year basis for nine regions (North America, South and Central America, Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, Tropical Africa, the Former Soviet Union, China, South and Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Developed Region) and the globe. Some data begin earlier than 1850 (e.g., for six regions, areas of different ecosystems are provided for the year 1700) or extend beyond 1990 (e.g., fuelwood harvest in South and Southeast Asia, by forest type, is provided through 1995). The global net flux during the period 1850 to 1990 was 124 Pg of carbon (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams). During this period, the greatest regional flux was from South and Southeast Asia (39 Pg of carbon), while the smallest regional flux was from North Africa and the Middle East (3 Pg of carbon). For the year 1990, the global total net flux was estimated to be 2.1 Pg of carbon.

  15. Distribution and air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide on the Chukchi Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipko, I. I.; Pugach, S. P.; Repina, I. A.; Dudarev, O. V.; Charkin, A. N.; Semiletov, I. P.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the results of long-term studies of the dynamics of carbonate parameters and air-sea carbon dioxide fluxes on the Chukchi Sea shelf during the summer. As a result of the interaction of physical and biological factors, the surface waters on the west of Chukchi Sea were undersaturated with carbon dioxide when compared with atmospheric air; the partial pressure of CO2 varied in the range from 134 to 359 μatm. The average value of CO2 flux in the Chukchi Sea per unit area varied in the range from-2.4 to-22.0 mmol /(m2 day), which is significantly higher than the average value of CO2 flux in the World Ocean. It has been estimated that the minimal mass of C absorbed by the surface of Chukchi Sea from the atmosphere during ice-free season is 13 × 1012 g; a great part of this carbon is transported to the deeper layers of sea and isolated from the atmosphere for a long period of time. The studies of the carbonate system of the Chukchi Sea, especially of its western part, will provide some new data on the fluxes of carbon dioxide in the Arctic Ocean and their changes. Our analysis can be used for an interpretation of the satellite assessment of CO2 fluxes and dissolved CO2 distribution in the upper layers of the ocean.

  16. Physiological control of carbon and water fluxes in the Chequamegon National Forest, its variability and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutschick, V. P.; Maxwell, C. J.; Najera, F.; Montes-Helu, M.; Mortenson, E.; Jackson, E.

    2001-12-01

    Stomatal function and photosynthetic capacity in the Chequamegon National Forest display much variability within and between individuals, species, seasons or years, and sites (upland forest, lowland forest, and wetland). Significant partitioning of the variability is between overstory and understory, by species, and by drought (1997). The remaining large variability on any site must be incorporated into flux models for the net carbon storage and site hydrology. Simulations with our observed ranges of Ball-Berry parameters (found to best fit stomatal behavior) and photosynthetic capacity (as Vc,max referred to 25oC) were undertaken in order to estimate (1) which of these parameters (their statistical distributions) are most important to measure accurately and (2) whether integrated fluxes of CO2 and water vapor respond linearly to parameter values and thus can be modelled with single, averaged values of parameters. We find a high flux control coefficient (0.35) for total stomatal conductance, gs, over water flux, and a weaker one near 0.10 for carbon flux, for representative summertime conditions. Stomatal response to humidity and to photosynthetic rate appears to be important, in contrast to simpler stomatal models, but the quantitative importance is seen only in those simulations that resolve distributions of irradiances on leaves rather than single average irradiances. Carbon flux is significantly and nonlinearly sensitive to variations in Ball-Berry slope m alone, but flux becomes highly insensitive when the strong negative correlation of slope with intercept b is accounted. Carbon flux remains sensitive to Vc,max25, but in linear fashion, and water flux appears linearly dependent upon both m and Vc,max25. The latter may be taken as the only two independent parameters, eliminating b. Thus, Vc,max25 seems most important for large-scale simulations with more detailed models such as SiB2. Indirect control of carbon flux by water fluxes that can lead to water stress

  17. Carbon fluxes resulting from land-use changes in the Tamaulipan thornscrub of northeastern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Návar-Chaidez, Jose de Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Information on carbon stock and flux resulting from land-use changes in subtropical, semi-arid ecosystems are important to understand global carbon flux, yet little data is available. In the Tamaulipan thornscrub forests of northeastern Mexico, biomass components of standing vegetation were estimated from 56 quadrats (200 m2 each). Regional land-use changes and present forest cover, as well as estimates of soil organic carbon from chronosequences, were used to predict carbon stocks and fluxes in this ecosystem. For the period of 1980–1996, the Tamaulipan thornscrub is presenting an annual deforestation rate of 2.27% indicating that approximately 600 km2 of this plant community are lost every year and that 60% of the original Mexican Tamaulipan thornscrub vegetation has been lost since the 1950's. On the other hand, intensive agriculture, including introduced grasslands increased (4,000 km2) from 32 to 42% of the total studied area, largely at the expense of the Tamaulipan thornscrub forests. Land-use changes from Tamaulipan thornscrub forest to agriculture contribute 2.2 Tg to current annual carbon emissions and standing biomass averages 0.24 ± 0.06 Tg, root biomass averages 0.17 ± 0.03 Tg, and soil organic carbon averages 1.80 ± 0.27 Tg. Land-use changes from 1950 to 2000 accounted for Carbon emissions of the order of 180.1 Tg. Projected land-use changes will likely contribute to an additional carbon flux of 98.0 Tg by the year 2100. Practices to conserve sequester, and transfer carbon stocks in semi-arid ecosystems are discussed as a means to reduce carbon flux from deforestation practices. PMID:18826617

  18. Impacts of ontogenetically migrating copepods on downward carbon flux in the western subarctic Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobari, Toru; Steinberg, Deborah K.; Ueda, Ai; Tsuda, Atsushi; Silver, Mary W.; Kitamura, Minoru

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the impacts of ontogenetically (seasonally) migrating copepods on carbon transport to the mesopelagic zone, we investigated depth distribution, population structure, and feeding activity of the ontogentic copepod community in the western subarctic Pacific Ocean from day-night pairs of zooplankton samples down to 1000 m during the VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) program. Over the 31 July-16 August 2005 study period, the biomass of Neocalanus cristatus and Neocalanus plumchrus predominated in the near surface waters, while Neocalanus flemingeri was already dormant at depth. We observed a strong diel migration for Metridia pacifica, and a seasonal downward migration for Eucalanus bungii. Based on gut pigment analysis, ingestion rate of the copepod community was 214-375 mg C m -2 day -1, which was equal to 26-37% of the concurrent primary production. However, comparison of grazing estimated from gut pigments to calculated carbon demand of the copepod community indicates that phytoplankton comprised 37-59% of the ingested carbon. Thus, the copepod community appears to have also relied on detritus and microzooplankton for their nutrition, likely because primary production during this time was dominated by picophytoplankton too small to be grazed by these large copepods. Fecal pellet flux by the copepod community was estimated to account for 141-223% of the sedimentary particulate organic carbon (POC) flux at 150 m, suggesting considerable fragmentation and consumption of pellets in the upper layers. Fecal pellets alone were adequate to meet copepod carbon demand in the surface 0-150 m layer. Active carbon flux by diel migration of M. pacifica (respiration, egestion, and mortality) was 4-17 mg C m -2 day -1, equal to 6-44% of sedimentary POC flux at 150 m. Active carbon flux by N. flemingeri ontogenetic migration (i.e., respiration and mortality at depth) contributed 246 mg C m -2 year -1, equal to 9% of sedimentary POC flux at 1000 m. The

  19. The response of ecosystem carbon fluxes to LAI and environmental drivers in a maize crop grown in two contrasting seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Luca; Di Tommasi, Paul; D'Urso, Guido; Magliulo, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    The eddy correlation technique was used to investigate the influence of biophysical variables and crop phenological phases on the behaviour of ecosystem carbon fluxes of a maize crop, in two contrasting growing seasons. In 2009, the reduced water supply during the early growing stage limited leaf area expansion, thus negatively affecting canopy photosynthesis. The variability of gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration ( R eco) was mainly explained by seasonal variation of leaf area index (LAI). The seasonal variation of R eco was positively influenced by soil temperatures ( T soil) in 2008 but not in 2009. In 2008, a contribution of both autotrophic and heterotrophic components to total R eco could be hypothesized, while during 2009, autotrophic respiration is supposed to be the most important component. Crop phenological phases affected the response of ecosystem fluxes to biophysical drivers.

  20. Simulating the effects of fire disturbance and vegetation recovery on boreal ecosystem carbon fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Y.; Kimball, J. S.; Jones, L. A.; Zhao, M.

    2011-12-01

    Fire related disturbance and subsequent vegetation recovery has a major influence on carbon storage and land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes in boreal ecosystems. We applied a synthetic approach combining tower eddy covariance flux measurements, satellite remote sensing and model reanalysis surface meteorology within a terrestrial carbon model framework to estimate fire disturbance and recovery effects on boreal ecosystem carbon fluxes including gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration and net CO2 exchange (NEE). A disturbance index based on MODIS land surface temperature and NDVI was found to coincide with vegetation recovery status inferred from tower chronosequence sites. An empirical algorithm was developed to track ecosystem recovery status based on the disturbance index and used to nudge modeled net primary production (NPP) and surface soil organic carbon stocks from baseline steady-state conditions. The simulations were conducted using a satellite based terrestrial carbon flux model driven by MODIS NDVI and MERRA reanalysis daily surface meteorology inputs. The MODIS (MCD45) burned area product was then applied for mapping recent (post 2000) regional disturbance history, and used with the disturbance index to define vegetation disturbance and recovery status. The model was then applied to estimate regional patterns and temporal changes in terrestrial carbon fluxes across the entire northern boreal forest and tundra domain. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess the relative importance of fire disturbance and recovery on regional carbon fluxes relative to assumed steady-state conditions. The explicit representation of disturbance and recovery effects produces more accurate NEE predictions than the baseline steady-state simulations and reduces uncertainty regarding the purported missing carbon sink in the high latitudes.

  1. Coupling of soil water and dissolved carbon measurements to estimate the carbon flux in forest ecosystems a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, M.; Krause, P.; Gleixner, G.

    2003-04-01

    We used the 250 year old forest of the national park Hainich, Germany, to estimate carbon storage and export to the ground water in old grown forests. The Hainich is one of the largest deciduous forest ecosystems in middle Europe and the protected area is unmanaged for at least 50 years. It is one of the flux sites of the Carboeurop cluster (www.carboeurop.de) equipped with an eddy covariance system to measure net ecosystem exchange (NEE). Surprisingly NEE of this old grown forest is about 5 t carbon/ha*a. This high amount of carbon uptake can not be explained only by biomass or litter increase. Therefore we quantified the amount of carbon lost as dissolved carbon from the upper soil layer. To determine if carbon is washed out and transported by water fluxes in form of dissolved carbon, the measurement campaign was extended by sophisticated hydrometrical instruments, like frequency domain reflectrometry (FDR) probes, high frequency rain measurement equipment and ceramic plates to take soil water samples. The FDR probes characterize the soil hydrology and quantify the amount of water percolating horizontal and vertical through the soil. In the water samples dissolved organic carbon and dissolved inorganic carbon were determined. Both the quantification of the soil hydrology and the chemical characterization of the soil water enable the calculation of the carbon export from the system. The measurement equipment and layout will be presented and results of dissolved carbon contents in the subsurface water fluxes will be presented. Preliminary estimations of the carbon loss by seepages will be presented also.

  2. Variability of carbon and water fluxes following climate extremes over a tropical forest in southwestern Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Zeri, Marcelo; Sá, Leonardo D A; Manzi, Antônio O; Araújo, Alessandro C; Aguiar, Renata G; von Randow, Celso; Sampaio, Gilvan; Cardoso, Fernando L; Nobre, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    The carbon and water cycles for a southwestern Amazonian forest site were investigated using the longest time series of fluxes of CO2 and water vapor ever reported for this site. The period from 2004 to 2010 included two severe droughts (2005 and 2010) and a flooding year (2009). The effects of such climate extremes were detected in annual sums of fluxes as well as in other components of the carbon and water cycles, such as gross primary production and water use efficiency. Gap-filling and flux-partitioning were applied in order to fill gaps due to missing data, and errors analysis made it possible to infer the uncertainty on the carbon balance. Overall, the site was found to have a net carbon uptake of ≈5 t C ha(-1) year(-1), but the effects of the drought of 2005 were still noticed in 2006, when the climate disturbance caused the site to become a net source of carbon to the atmosphere. Different regions of the Amazon forest might respond differently to climate extremes due to differences in dry season length, annual precipitation, species compositions, albedo and soil type. Longer time series of fluxes measured over several locations are required to better characterize the effects of climate anomalies on the carbon and water balances for the whole Amazon region. Such valuable datasets can also be used to calibrate biogeochemical models and infer on future scenarios of the Amazon forest carbon balance under the influence of climate change. PMID:24558378

  3. Variability of Carbon and Water Fluxes Following Climate Extremes over a Tropical Forest in Southwestern Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Zeri, Marcelo; Sá, Leonardo D. A.; Manzi, Antônio O.; Araújo, Alessandro C.; Aguiar, Renata G.; von Randow, Celso; Sampaio, Gilvan; Cardoso, Fernando L.; Nobre, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The carbon and water cycles for a southwestern Amazonian forest site were investigated using the longest time series of fluxes of CO2 and water vapor ever reported for this site. The period from 2004 to 2010 included two severe droughts (2005 and 2010) and a flooding year (2009). The effects of such climate extremes were detected in annual sums of fluxes as well as in other components of the carbon and water cycles, such as gross primary production and water use efficiency. Gap-filling and flux-partitioning were applied in order to fill gaps due to missing data, and errors analysis made it possible to infer the uncertainty on the carbon balance. Overall, the site was found to have a net carbon uptake of ≈5 t C ha−1 year−1, but the effects of the drought of 2005 were still noticed in 2006, when the climate disturbance caused the site to become a net source of carbon to the atmosphere. Different regions of the Amazon forest might respond differently to climate extremes due to differences in dry season length, annual precipitation, species compositions, albedo and soil type. Longer time series of fluxes measured over several locations are required to better characterize the effects of climate anomalies on the carbon and water balances for the whole Amazon region. Such valuable datasets can also be used to calibrate biogeochemical models and infer on future scenarios of the Amazon forest carbon balance under the influence of climate change. PMID:24558378

  4. Impacts of Woody Plant Encroachment and Cultivation on Soil Carbon and Soil Water Flux Across a Precipitation Gradient in Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Jobbágy, E. G.; Jackson, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    Land-use/cover changes affect flux and storages of water and carbon, which are becoming increasingly important in light of the projected climate change and water shortages around the world. Cultivation of food crops and woody-plant encroachment are two such changes that are prevalent in grassland ecosystems. We compared belowground water flux and carbon storage in adjacent stands of natural grasslands and woody- encroached or cultivated plots. Stands were located in 5 sites across a precipitation gradient in the Pampa grasslands of varying soil texture in Argentina. Soil cores were excavated to 9 meters or to groundwater level and analyzed for soil moisture and chloride to estimate groundwater recharge rates using the chloride mass balance and chloride displacement methods. Cores were also analyzed for soil organic and inorganic carbon. Comparison of soil chloride profiles under the land-use/cover change from the natural grasslands suggested reduced recharge and/or higher groundwater use under woody plants and enhanced recharge under cultivation compared to the grasslands. Chloride concentrations differed up to 3-fold between the grassland and the two land-use/cover changes. Soil organic carbon was similar or significantly higher under woody plants and lower under cultivation compared with grasslands. The changes in water yield are discussed in context of the estimated carbon sequestration measured at the sites. Valuation of such changes would help determine the optimum land-use/cover under global environmental changes.

  5. Plant species diversity affects soil-atmosphere fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Niklaus, Pascal A; Le Roux, Xavier; Poly, Franck; Buchmann, Nina; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Weigelt, Alexandra; Barnard, Romain L

    2016-07-01

    Plant diversity effects on ecosystem functioning can potentially interact with global climate by altering fluxes of the radiatively active trace gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4). We studied the effects of grassland species richness (1-16) in combination with application of fertilizer (nitrogen:phosphorus:potassium = 100:43.6:83 kg ha(-1) a(-1)) on N2O and CH4 fluxes in a long-term field experiment. Soil N2O emissions, measured over 2 years using static chambers, decreased with species richness unless fertilizer was added. N2O emissions increased with fertilization and the fraction of legumes in plant communities. Soil CH4 uptake, a process driven by methanotrophic bacteria, decreased with plant species numbers, irrespective of fertilization. Using structural equation models, we related trace gas fluxes to soil moisture, soil inorganic N concentrations, nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activity, and the abundance of ammonia oxidizers, nitrite oxidizers, and denitrifiers (quantified by real-time PCR of gene fragments amplified from microbial DNA in soil). These analyses indicated that plant species richness increased soil moisture, which in turn increased N cycling-related activities. Enhanced N cycling increased N2O emission and soil CH4 uptake, with the latter possibly caused by removal of inhibitory ammonium by nitrification. The moisture-related indirect effects were surpassed by direct, moisture-independent effects opposite in direction. Microbial gene abundances responded positively to fertilizer but not to plant species richness. The response patterns we found were statistically robust and highlight the potential of plant biodiversity to interact with climatic change through mechanisms unrelated to carbon storage and associated carbon dioxide removal. PMID:27038993

  6. Assessing and Synthesizing the Last Decade of Research on the Major Pools and Fluxes of the Carbon Cycle in the US and North America: An Interagency Governmental Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, N.; Shrestha, G.; Stover, D. B.; Zhu, Z.; Ombres, E. H.; Deangelo, B.

    2015-12-01

    The 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2) is focused on US and North American carbon stocks and fluxes in managed and unmanaged systems, including relevant carbon management science perspectives and tools for supporting and informing decisions. SOCCR-2 is inspired by the US Carbon Cycle Science Plan (2011) which emphasizes global scale research on long-lived, carbon-based greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide and methane, and the major pools and fluxes of the global carbon cycle. Accordingly, the questions framing the Plan inform this report's topical roadmap, with a focus on US and North America in the global context: 1) How have natural processes and human actions affected the global carbon cycle on land, in the atmosphere, in the oceans and in the ecosystem interfaces (e.g. coastal, wetlands, urban-rural)? 2) How have socio-economic trends affected the levels of the primary carbon-containing gases, carbon dioxide and methane, in the atmosphere? 3) How have species, ecosystems, natural resources and human systems been impacted by increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, the associated changes in climate, and by carbon management decisions and practices? To address these aspects, SOCCR-2 will encompass the following broad assessment framework: 1) Carbon Cycle at Scales (Global Perspective, North American Perspective, US Perspective, Regional Perspective); 2) Role of carbon in systems (Soils; Water, Oceans, Vegetation; Terrestrial-aquatic Interfaces); 3) Interactions/Disturbance/Impacts from/on the carbon cycle. 4) Carbon Management Science Perspective and Decision Support (measurements, observations and monitoring for research and policy relevant decision-support etc.). In this presentation, the Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group and the U.S. Global Change Research Program's U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office will highlight the scientific context, strategy, structure, team and production process of the report, which is part of the USGCRP's Sustained

  7. SIERRA-Flux: measuring regional surface fluxes of carbon dioxide, methane, and water vapor from an unmanned aircraft system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fladeland, M. M.; Yates, E. L.; Bui, T. P.; Dean-Day, J. M.; Kolyer, R.; Schiro, K.; Berthold, R.; Iraci, L. T.; Loewenstein, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Eddy-Covariance Method for quantifying surface-atmosphere fluxes is a foundational technique for measuring net ecosystem exchange and validating regional-to-global carbon cycle models. While towers or ships are the more frequent platform for measuring surface-atmosphere exchange, experiments using aircraft for flux measurements have yielded contributions to several large-scale studies including BOREAS, SMACEX, RECAB by providing local-to-regional coverage beyond towers. The low-altitude flight requirements make airborne flux measurements particularly dangerous and well suited for unmanned aircraft. In a series of flights in June of 2011, the NASA SIERRA carried a payload consisting of the NASA Ames Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) and a fast response (10Hz) CO2, CH4, and H2O vapor analyzer in order to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring fluxes from unmanned aircraft and to characterize accuracy and precision based upon ground measurements. The flights were conducted in Railroad Valley, NV in order to provide a simple model for understanding biases and uncertainties. This paper describes the system specifications, provides preliminary data compared against coincident ground measurements, and discusses future applications of the system.

  8. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous United States by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data 1961

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the...

  9. Bioturbation and dissolved organic matter enhance contaminant fluxes from sediment treated with powdered and granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kupryianchyk, D; Noori, A; Rakowska, M I; Grotenhuis, J T C; Koelmans, A A

    2013-05-21

    Sediment amendment with activated carbon (AC) is a promising technique for in situ sediment remediation. To date it is not clear whether this technique sufficiently reduces sediment-to-water fluxes of sediment-bound hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in the presence of bioturbators. Here, we report polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) pore water concentrations, fluxes, mass transfer coefficients, and survival data of two benthic species, for four treatments: no AC addition (control), powdered AC addition, granular AC addition and addition and subsequent removal of GAC (sediment stripping). AC addition decreased mass fluxes but increased apparent mass transfer coefficients because of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) facilitated transport across the benthic boundary layer (BBL). In turn, DOC concentrations depended on bioturbator activity which was high for the PAC tolerant species Asellus aquaticus and low for AC sensitive species Lumbriculus variegatus. A dual BBL resistance model combining AC effects on gradients, DOC facilitated transport and biodiffusion was evaluated against the data and showed how the type of resistance differs with treatment and chemical hydrophobicity. Data and simulations illustrate the complex interplay between AC and contaminant toxicity to benthic organisms and how differences in species tolerance affect mass fluxes from sediment to the water column. PMID:23590290

  10. Carbon fluxes in an acid rain impacted boreal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Anne; Hintze, Simone; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; van Geldern, Robert; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon export via inland aquatic systems is a key process in the budget of the global carbon cycle. This includes loss of carbon to the atmosphere via gas evasion from rivers or reservoirs as well as carbon fixation in freshwater sediments. Headwater streams are the first endmembers of the transition of carbon between soils, groundwater and surface waters and the atmosphere. In order to quantify these processes the experimental catchment Uhlirska (1.78 km2) located in the northern Czech Republic was studied. Dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon (DIC, DOC, POC) concentrations and isotopes were analyzed in ground-, soil -and stream waters between 2014 and 2015. In addition, carbon dioxide degassing was quantified via a stable isotope modelling approach. Results show a discharge-weighted total carbon export of 31.99 g C m‑2 yr‑1 of which CO2 degassing accounts 79 %. Carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of DIC, DOC, and POC (in ‰ VPDB) ranged from -26.6 to -12.4 ‰ from -29.4 to -22.7 ‰ and from -30.6 to -26.6 ‰ respectively. The mean values for DIC are -21.8 ±3.8 ‰ -23.6 ±0.9 ‰ and -19.5 ±3.0 ‰ for soil, shallow ground and surface water compartments. For DOC, these compartments have mean values of -27.1 ±0.3 ‰ -27.0 ±0.8 ‰ and -27.4 ±0.7 ‰Ṁean POC value of shallow groundwaters and surface waters are -28.8 ±0.8 ‰ and -29.3 ±0.5 ‰ respectively. These isotope ranges indicate little turnover of organic material and predominant silicate weathering. The degassing of CO2 caused an enrichment of the δ13C-DIC values of up to 6.8 ‰ between a catchment gauge and the catchment outlet over a distance of 866 m. In addition, the Uhlirska catchment has only negligible natural sources of sulphate, yet SO42‑ accounts for 21 % of major stream water ions. This is most likely a remainder from acid rain impacts in the area.

  11. Biogenic carbon fluxes from global agricultural production and consumption: Gridded, annual estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, J.; West, T. O.; le Page, Y.; Thomson, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of biogenic carbon fluxes from agricultural lands is needed to generate globally consistent bottom-up estimates for carbon monitoring and model input. We quantify agricultural carbon fluxes associated with annual (starting in 1961) crop net primary productivity (NPP), harvested biomass, and human and livestock consumption and emissions, with estimates of uncertainty, by applying region- and species-specific carbon parameters to annual crop, livestock, food and trade inventory data, and generate downscaled, gridded (0.05 degree resolution) representations of these fluxes. In 2011, global crop NPP was 5.25 ± 0.46 Pg carbon (excluding root exudates), of which 2.05 ± 0.051 Pg carbon was harvested as primary crops; an additional 0.54 Pg of crop residue carbon was collected for livestock fodder. In 2011, total livestock feed intake was 2.42 ± 0.21 Pg carbon, of which 2.31 ± 0.21 Pg carbon was emitted as carbon dioxide and 0.072 ± 0.005 Pg carbon was emitted as methane. We estimate that livestock grazed 1.18 Pg carbon from non-crop lands in 2011, representing 48.5 % of global total feed intake. In 2009, the latest available data year, we estimate global human food intake (excluding seafood and orchard fruits and nuts) at 0.52 ± 0.03 Pg carbon, with an additional 0.24 ± 0.01 Pg carbon of food supply chain losses. Trends in production and consumption of agricultural carbon between 1961 and recent years, such as increasing dominance of oilcrops and decreasing percent contribution of pasturage to total livestock feed intake, are discussed, and accounting of all agricultural carbon was done for the years 2005 and 2009. Gridded at 0.05 degree resolution, these quantities represent local uptake and release of agricultural biogenic carbon (e.g. biomass production and removal, residue and manure inputs to soils) and may be used with other gridded data to help estimate current and future changes in soil organic carbon.

  12. How life affects the geochemical cycle of carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Developing a quantitative understanding of the biogeochemical cycles of carbon as they have worked throughout Earth history on various time scales, how they have been affected by biological evolution, and how changes in the carbon content of ocean and atmosphere may have affected climate and the evolution of life are the goals of the research. Theoretical simulations were developed that can be tuned to reproduce such data as exist and, once tuned, can be used to predict properties that have not yet been observed. This is an ongoing process, in which models and results are refined as new data and interpretations become available and as understanding of the global system improves. Results of the research are described in several papers which were published or submitted for publication. These papers are summarized. Future research plans are presented.

  13. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), model description - Part 2: Carbon fluxes and vegetation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. B.; Mercado, L. M.; Sitch, S.; Jones, C. D.; Gedney, N.; Best, M. J.; Pryor, M.; Rooney, G. G.; Essery, R. L. H.; Blyth, E.; Boucher, O.; Harding, R. J.; Huntingford, C.; Cox, P. M.

    2011-09-01

    The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is a process-based model that simulates the fluxes of carbon, water, energy and momentum between the land surface and the atmosphere. Many studies have demonstrated the important role of the land surface in the functioning of the Earth System. Different versions of JULES have been employed to quantify the effects on the land carbon sink of climate change, increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, changing atmospheric aerosols and tropospheric ozone, and the response of methane emissions from wetlands to climate change. This paper describes the consolidation of these advances in the modelling of carbon fluxes and stores, in both the vegetation and soil, in version 2.2 of JULES. Features include a multi-layer canopy scheme for light interception, including a sunfleck penetration scheme, a coupled scheme of leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, representation of the effects of ozone on leaf physiology, and a description of methane emissions from wetlands. JULES represents the carbon allocation, growth and population dynamics of five plant functional types. The turnover of carbon from living plant tissues is fed into a 4-pool soil carbon model. The process-based descriptions of key ecological processes and trace gas fluxes in JULES mean that this community model is well-suited for use in carbon cycle, climate change and impacts studies, either in standalone mode or as the land component of a coupled Earth system model.

  14. Multi-decadal increases in dissolved organic carbon and alkalinity flux from the Mackenzie drainage basin to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, Suzanne E.; Striegl, Robert G.; McClelland, James W.; Kokelj, Steven V.

    2016-05-01

    Riverine exports of organic and inorganic carbon (OC, IC) to oceans are intricately linked to processes occurring on land. Across high latitudes, thawing permafrost, alteration of hydrologic flow paths, and changes in vegetation may all affect this flux, with subsequent implications for regional and global carbon (C) budgets. Using a unique, multi-decadal dataset of continuous discharge coupled with water chemistry measurements for the Mackenzie River, we show major increases in dissolved OC (DOC) and IC (as alkalinity) fluxes since the early 1970s, for a watershed that covers 1.8 M km2 of northwestern Canada, and provides substantial inputs of freshwater and biogeochemical constituents to the Arctic Ocean. Over a 39-year period of record, DOC flux at the Mackenzie mouth increased by 39.3% (44.5 ± 22.6 Gmol), while alkalinity flux increased by 12.5% (61.5 ± 60.1 Gmol). Isotopic analyses and substantial increases in sulfate flux indicate that increases in alkalinity are driven by accelerating sulfide oxidation, a process that liberates IC from rock and soils in the absence of CO2 consumption. Seasonal and sub-catchment trends suggest that permafrost thaw plays an important role in the observed increases in DOC and alkalinity: sub-catchment increases for all constituents are confined to northern, permafrost-affected regions, while observed increases in autumn to winter are consistent with documented landscape-scale changes that have resulted from changing thaw dynamics. This increase in DOC and sulfide-derived alkalinity represents a substantial intensification of land-to-ocean C mobilization, at a level that is significant within the regional C budget. The change we observe, for example, is similar to current and projected future rates of CO2 consumption by weathering in the Mackenzie basin.

  15. Hydrologic Treatments Affect Gaseous Carbon Loss From Organic Soils, Twitchell Island, California, October 1995-December 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Robin L.; Hastings, Lauren; Fujii, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Subsidence of organic soils in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, has increased the potential for levee failure and flooding in the region. Because oxidation of the peat soils is a primary cause of subsidence, reversion of affected lands to wetlands has been proposed as a mitigation tool. To test this hypothesis, three 10 x 10 meter enclosures were built on Twitchell Island in the Delta and managed as different wetland habitats. Emissions of carbon dioxide and methane were measured in situ from October 1995 through December 1997, from the systems that developed under the different water-management treatments. Treatments included a seasonal control (SC) under current island management conditions; reverse flooding (RF), where the land is intentionally flooded from early dry season until midsummer; permanent shallow flooding (F); and a more deeply flooded, open-water (OW) treatment. Hydrologic treatments affected microbial processes, plant community and temperature dynamics which, in turn, affected carbon cycling. Water-management treatments with a period of flooding significantly decreased gaseous carbon emissions compared to the seasonal control. Permanent flooding treatments showed significantly higher methane fluxes than treatments with some period of aerobic conditions. Shallow flooding treatments created conditions that support cattail [Typha species (spp.)] marshes, while deep flooding precluded emergent vegetation. Carbon inputs to the permanent shallow flooding treatment tended to be greater than the measured losses. This suggests that permanent shallow flooding has the greatest potential for managing subsidence of these soils by generating organic substrate more rapidly than is lost through decomposition. Carbon input estimates of plant biomass compared to measurements of gaseous carbon losses indicate the potential for mitigation of subsidence through hydrologic management of the organic soils in the area.

  16. Diurnal and seasonal variation of various carbon fluxes from an urban tower platform in Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, G. W.; Werner, N.; Hale, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    We measured carbon fluxes (CO2, CO, VOCs) from a tall lattice tower in Houston between 2007 and 2009, and 2011-2013. We present results from various analyses of (i) anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 fluxes using a quadrant segregation technique, (ii) seasonal and multi-year changes of CO fluxes as related to car traffic and industrial sources, and (iii) the accuracy of, and usefulness of a bulk flux footprint model to quantify pentane emissions form a distant source in comparison to permitted emission levels. Segregated and net anthropogenic CO2 fluxes were dominated by car traffic but industrial sources were identified as well. Emissions sank to minimal levels after hurricane Ike had passed over Houston, causing a traffic shutdown and lower population density. Segregated biogenic fluxes showed a clear seasonal variation with photosynthetic activity between April and November, and large effects of the 2011 Texas drought due to negligible irrigation in the study area. Carbon monoxide fluxes, measured via a flux gradient technique, are even stronger dominated by car traffic than CO2 fluxes and serve as a traffic tracer. Our data show a continued drop in emissions over time, seasonal changes with higher emissions during winter, and local influences due to industrial emissions. Lastly, we present the results of a tracer release study and a single point source quantification to test a bulk footprint model in this complex urban area. Known releases of volatile acetone and MEK were compered to measured fluxes using a REA-GC-FID system, and permit emissions of pentane from a foam plastics manufacturing facility were compared to measured pentane fluxes. Both comparisons reveal a surprisingly accurate performance of the footprint model within a factor of 2.

  17. NITROGEN POOLS AND FLUXES IN GRASSLAND SOILS SEQUESTERING CARBON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon sequestration in agricultural, forest, and grassland soils has been promoted as a means by which substantial amounts of CO2 may be removed from the atmosphere, but few studies have evaluated the associated impacts on changes in soil N or net global warming potential (GWP). The purpose of this...

  18. Estimating carbon fluxes on small rotationally grazed pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Satellite-based Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data have been extensively used for estimating gross primary productivity (GPP) and yield of grazing lands throughout the world. Large-scale estimates of GPP are a necessary component of efforts to monitor the soil carbon balance of grazi...

  19. Maintenance metabolism and carbon fluxes in Bacillus species

    PubMed Central

    Tännler, Simon; Decasper, Seraina; Sauer, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Background Selection of an appropriate host organism is crucial for the economic success of biotechnological processes. A generally important selection criterion is a low maintenance energy metabolism to reduce non-productive consumption of substrate. We here investigated, whether various bacilli that are closely related to Bacillus subtilis are potential riboflavin production hosts with low maintenance metabolism. Results While B. subtilis exhibited indeed the highest maintenance energy coefficient, B. licheniformis and B. amyloliquefaciens exhibited only statistically insignificantly reduced maintenance metabolism. Both B. pumilus and B. subtilis (natto) exhibited irregular growth patterns under glucose limitation such that the maintenance metabolism could not be determined. The sole exception with significantly reduced maintenance energy requirements was the B. licheniformis strain T380B. The frequently used spo0A mutation significantly increased the maintenance metabolism of B. subtilis. At the level of 13C-detected intracellular fluxes, all investigated bacilli exhibited a significant flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, a prerequisite for efficient riboflavin production. Different from all other species, B. subtilis featured high respiratory tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes in batch and chemostat cultures. In particular under glucose-limited conditions, this led to significant excess formation of NADPH of B. subtilis, while anabolic consumption was rather balanced with catabolic NADPH formation in the other bacilli. Conclusion Despite its successful commercial production of riboflavin, B. subtilis does not seem to be the optimal cell factory from a bioenergetic point of view. The best choice of the investigated strains is the sporulation-deficient B. licheniformis T380B strain. Beside a low maintenance energy coefficient, this strain grows robustly under different conditions and exhibits only moderate acetate overflow, hence making it a promising

  20. Carbon Explorer Assessment of Carbon Biomass Variability and Carbon Flux Systematics in the Upper Ocean During SOFEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J. K.; Wood, T. J.; Sherman, J. T.

    2002-12-01

    Three autonomous Carbon Explorers built on SIO's Orbcomm/GPS enhanced Sounding Oceanographic Lagrangian Observer were launched near 55S 172W in the "North" SOFEX experiment area in early January 2002. All Explorers at 55S were programmed to perform profiles from 1000, 300, and 300 m with surfacings, GPS position, and telemetry of profile data initiating at local 0600, 1200, and 1800 hours. The floats were programmed to 'sleep' at 100 m depth between profiles to maximize tracking of the surface layer. Each Explorer carried SeaBird T and S sensors and was additionally fitted with a WETLabs transmissometer based "POC" sensor and a Seapoint scattering meter to assess particulate matter variability. A carbon flux "index" obtained during the 100 m sleep periods was also derived from the POC sensor readings. Explorer 1177 was deployed as a control outside of Fe treated waters on Jan 11 2002 (UTC) and drifted initially to the North East at 10 cm/sec. Explorer 2104, deployed on Jan 19 2002 after the 3rd Fe infusion, advected with the patch to the NE on a course that closely paralleled that of the "control". By Feb 8 2002, the two floats had drifted with the circumpolar current nearly 200 km; Explorer 2104 had recorded a 4-fold build-up of of particles in the upper 60 m whereas records from the nearby control Explorer 1177 showed little change. Ship survey data (Revelle) indicated that Explorer 2104 was near but "in" the trailing edge of the patch. Beginning Feb 14 (several days after the 4th infusion of Fe) and ending on Feb 24 2002, Explorer 2104 data showed isolines of POC concentration beginning to deepen in waters below 60 m and a coincident loss of POC from above; the POC flux index also began to show clearly different and enhanced 'spikes' compared to that recorded by the control. The spikes either reflected temporal variability of particle export from the patch or the intermingled sampling of the "in patch" settling plume of particles and "out-of-patch" background

  1. Carbon amendment and soil depth affect the distribution and abundance of denitrifiers in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M; Khalil, M I; Jahangir, M M R; Lee, C; Cardenas, L M; Collins, G; Richards, K G; O'Flaherty, V

    2016-04-01

    The nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK) and nitrous oxide reductase-encoding (nosZ) genes of denitrifying populations present in an agricultural grassland soil were quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Samples from three separate pedological depths at the chosen site were investigated: horizon A (0-10 cm), horizon B (45-55 cm), and horizon C (120-130 cm). The effect of carbon addition (treatment 1, control; treatment 2, glucose-C; treatment 3, dissolved organic carbon (DOC)) on denitrifier gene abundance and N2O and N2 fluxes was determined. In general, denitrifier abundance correlated well with flux measurements; nirS was positively correlated with N2O, and nosZ was positively correlated with N2 (P < 0.03). Denitrifier gene copy concentrations per gram of soil (GCC) varied in response to carbon type amendment (P < 0.01). Denitrifier GCCs were high (ca. 10(7)) and the bac:nirK, bac:nirS, bac:nir (T) , and bac:nosZ ratios were low (ca. 10(-1)/10) in horizon A in all three respective treatments. Glucose-C amendment favored partial denitrification, resulting in higher nir abundance and higher N2O fluxes compared to the control. DOC amendment, by contrast, resulted in relatively higher nosZ abundance and N2 emissions, thus favoring complete denitrification. We also noted soil depth directly affected bacterial, archaeal, and denitrifier abundance, possibly due to changes in soil carbon availability with depth. PMID:26762934

  2. Warmer Boreal Forest Organic Soil Horizons are Associated with Larger Fluxes of Dissolved Organic Carbon than their Cooler Climate Counterparts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowering, K.; Edwards, K. A.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Boreal forest soils are characterized by large stocks of carbon associated with relatively slow decomposition and deep organic horizons. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loss from organic soil horizons occurs through hydrologically-mediated leaching processes, and contributes to downstream carbon both in deeper mineral soils and also in connected aquatic systems. However, the amount of DOC that leaves organic horizons and the environmental controls on this flux are poorly understood and are likely to be affected by climate changes. We sampled zero-tension lysimeters along 3 forested sites of a boreal climate transect to estimate DOC export from organic soil horizons of mesic boreal podzols (spodosols), and to investigate the climatic drivers of this flux. The sites are part of the Newfoundland and Labrador Boreal Ecosystems Latitudinal Transect (NL-BELT) and span approximately 5°C in mean annual temperature. Lysimeters were sampled over 4 years and DOC flux was calculated for each seasonal period (summer, fall, and winter) of each year. DOC flux was greatest in the warmest site (114 mg C day-1 m-2), with the two cooler sites having lower flux rates (40 and 36 mg C day-1 m-2 in the intermediate and coolest sites respectively). Seasonal variation was most pronounced in the warmest site where more DOC exited the organic soil horizons during fall than during summer or winter. DOC flux was correlated with the volume of soil solution collected in the lysimeters (R2 = .46), however the larger sample volumes collected in the warmest climate do not reflect greater overall precipitation. During the 4-year period of this study, similar amounts of precipitation were recorded in all regions, and the number of days with >10mm precipitation did not differ. The greater DOC flux in the warmer climate site may be due to higher rates of both litterfall and decomposition, contributing to increased labile DOC sources in the warmer climate. Analyses of the carbon quality of these samples

  3. Equilibrium analysis of carbon pools and fluxes of forest biomes in the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Kolchugina, T.P.; Vinson, T.S.

    1993-01-01

    Forests are an important component of the biosphere and sequestration of carbon in boreal forests may represent one of the few realistic alternatives to ameliorate changes in atmospheric chemistry. The former Soviet Union has the greatest expanse of boreal forests in the world; however, the role of these forests in the terrestrial carbon cycle is not fully understood because the carbon budget of the Soviet forest sector has not been established. In recognition of the need to determine the role of these forests in the global carbon cycle, the carbon budget of forest biomes in the former Soviet Union was assessed based on an equilibrium analysis of carbon cycle pools and fluxes. Net primary productivity was used to identify the rate of carbon turnover in the forest biomes.

  4. Carbon Fluxes Between the Atmosphere, Terrestrial, and River Systems Across a Glacier-Dominated Landscape in Southcentral Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulueta, R. C.; Welker, J. M.; Tomco, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    The coastal Gulf of Alaska region is experiencing rapid and accelerating changes due to local and regional warming. Predicted high latitude warming may result in rapid recession of glaciers with subsequent changes in river discharge, nutrient fluxes into the rivers, shifts in landscape vegetation cover, and altered CO2 fluxes affecting the regional carbon balance. As glaciers recede an increase in glacier-dominated river discharge and a change in seasonality of the river discharge are expected. Recently deglaciated landscapes will, over time, be occupied by a succession of vegetation cover that are likely to alter the fluxes of carbon both between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems, and between terrestrial ecosystems and stream and river systems. As the landscape evolves from deglaciated forelands it is expected that there is low to no CO2 fluxes between the atmosphere and the recently deglaciated landscape, as well as dissolved organic and inorganic carbon inputs into rivers and streams. These recently deglaciated landscapes will transition to early successional plant species and on towards mature spruce forests. Each transitional terrestrial ecosystem will have different carbon cycling between the atmosphere, terrestrial, and aquatic systems until the mature spruce forests which is expected to have high carbon uptake and sequestration as well as increased inputs of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon into the rivers and streams. A new research project was initiated in the summer of 2011 focusing on glacier-dominated landscapes within the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve in southcentral Alaska with the objective to quantify how the transition from deglaciated forelands to mature spruce forests (a successional sequence) alters the patterns and magnitudes of CO2 exchange, the dissolved carbon inputs from terrestrial to aquatic systems and the extent to which these are manifested due to changes in glacier coverage. We seek to examine present

  5. Alaska ecosystem carbon fluxes estimated from MODIS satellite data inputs from 2000 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Trends in Alaska ecosystem carbon fluxes were predicted from inputs of monthly MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation index time-series combined with the NASA-CASA (Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) carbon cycle simulation model over the past decade. CASA simulates monthly net ecosystem production (NEP) as the difference in carbon fluxes between net primary production (NPP) and soil microbial respiration (Rh). Results Model results showed that NEP on a unit area basis was estimated to be highest (> +10 g C m-2 yr-1) on average over the period 2000 to 2010 within the Major Land Resource Areas (MRLAs) of the Interior Brooks Range Mountains, the Arctic Foothills, and the Western Brooks Range Mountains. The lowest (as negative land C source fluxes) mean NEP fluxes were predicted for the MLRAs of the Cook Inlet Lowlands, the Ahklun Mountains, and Bristol Bay-Northern Alaska Peninsula Lowlands. High levels of interannual variation in NEP were predicted for most MLRAs of Alaska. Conclusions The relatively warm and wet years of 2004 and 2007 resulted in the highest positive NEP flux totals across MLRAs in the northern and western coastal locations in the state (i.e., the Brooks Range Mountains and Arctic Foothills). The relatively cold and dry years of 2001 and 2006 were predicted with the lowest (negative) NEP flux totals for these MLRAs, and likewise across the Ahklun Mountains and the Yukon-Kuskokwim Highlands. PMID:24261829

  6. Benthic Primary Production in a Saltmarsh Pond: Insights from Fluxes of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolewski, J. S.; Stanley, R. H.; Howard, E. M.; Spivak, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important carbon sinks that exist at continental margins and act as mediators in the exchange of nutrients and carbon between terrestrial and marine environments. Within salt marshes, 10-20% of total surface area is covered by marshtop ponds. The fractional area of marshtop ponds is predicted to increase as sea level rises. Despite their potential importance, the balance between autotrophic and heterotrophic processes within such ponds remain poorly understood. To quantify the balance of metabolic fluxes within salt marsh ponds, chemical fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) were measured in July, 2014 in benthic flux chambers inserted into a salt marsh pond in the Plum Island Estuary Long-Term Ecosystem Research (PIE-LTER) site. Light and dark chambers were used to enable separation of rates of photosynthesis and respiration. Separate chambers were used to enclose sediment covered by primarily benthic microalgae and primarily benthic macroalgae. Net ecosystem metabolism in the microalgae was ~10 and in the macroalgae ~15 mmol C/m2/hour. Respiration rates were ~10 mmol C/m2/ hour for both microalgae and macroalgae. The resulting fluxes of net ecosystem production in the ponds will be compared with overall marsh net ecosystem flux as measured by an eddy flux tower that was located 100 meters from the pond. Additionally, concurrent measurements of DIC and DO allow quantification of the C:O ratio during respiration (i.e. respiratory quotient) in this system.

  7. Inorganic carbon fluxes across the vadose zone of planted and unplanted soil mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaysen, E. M.; Jacques, D.; Jessen, S.; Andersen, C. E.; Laloy, E.; Ambus, P.; Postma, D.; Jakobsen, I.

    2014-03-01

    The efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soils influences atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thereby climate change. The partitioning of inorganic carbon fluxes in the vadose zone between emission to the atmosphere and to the groundwater was investigated. Carbon dioxide partial pressure in the soil gas (pCO2), alkalinity, soil moisture and temperature were measured over depth and time in unplanted and planted (barley) mesocosms. The dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) percolation flux was calculated from the pCO2, alkalinity and the water flux at the mesocosm bottom. Carbon dioxide exchange between the soil surface and the atmosphere was measured at regular intervals. The soil diffusivity was determined from soil radon-222 (222Rn) emanation rates and soil air Rn concentration profiles, and was used in conjunction with measured pCO2 gradients to calculate the soil CO2 production. Carbon dioxide fluxes were modelled using the HP1 module of the Hydrus 1-D software. The average CO2 effluxes to the atmosphere from unplanted and planted mesocosm ecosystems during 78 days of experiment were 0.1 ± 0.07 and 4.9 ± 0.07 μmol carbon (C) m-2 s-1, respectively, and largely exceeded the corresponding DIC percolation fluxes of 0.01 ± 0.004 and 0.06 ± 0.03 μmol C m-2 s-1. Post-harvest soil respiration (Rs) was only 10% of the Rs during plant growth, while the post-harvest DIC percolation flux was more than one third of the flux during growth. The Rs was controlled by production and diffusivity of CO2 in the soil. The DIC percolation flux was largely controlled by the pCO2 and the drainage flux due to low solution pH. Plant biomass and soil pCO2 were high in the mesocosms as compared to a standard field situation. Our results indicate no change of the cropland C balance under elevated atmospheric CO2 in a warmer future climate, in which plant biomass and soil pCO2 are expected to increase.

  8. Aspects of spatial and temporal aggregation in estimating regional carbon dioxide fluxes from temperate forest soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kicklighter, David W.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Peterjohn, William T.; Rastetter, Edward B.; Mcguire, A. David; Steudler, Paul A.; Aber, John D.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the influence of aggregation errors on developing estimates of regional soil-CO2 flux from temperate forests. We find daily soil-CO2 fluxes to be more sensitive to changes in soil temperatures (Q(sub 10) = 3.08) than air temperatures (Q(sub 10) = 1.99). The direct use of mean monthly air temperatures with a daily flux model underestimates regional fluxes by approximately 4%. Temporal aggregation error varies with spatial resolution. Overall, our calibrated modeling approach reduces spatial aggregation error by 9.3% and temporal aggregation error by 15.5%. After minimizing spatial and temporal aggregation errors, mature temperate forest soils are estimated to contribute 12.9 Pg C/yr to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Georeferenced model estimates agree well with annual soil-CO2 fluxes measured during chamber studies in mature temperate forest stands around the globe.

  9. A comparison of six methods for measuring soil-surface carbon dioxide fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, J.M.; Kucharik, C.J.; Gower, S.T.; Baldocchi, D.D.; Crill, P.M.; Rayment, M.; Savage, K.; Striegl, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of soil-surface CO2 fluxes are important for characterizing the carbon budget of boreal forests because these fluxes can be the second largest component of the budget. Several methods for measuring soil-surface CO2 fluxes are available: (1) closed-dynamic-chamber systems, (2) closed-static-chamber systems, (3) open-chamber systems, and (4) eddy covariance systems. This paper presents a field comparison of six individual systems for measuring soil-surface CO2 fluxes with each of the four basic system types represented. A single system is used as a reference and compared to each of the other systems individually in black spruce (Picea mariana), jack pine (Pinus banksiana), or aspen (Populus tremuloides) forests. Fluxes vary from 1 to 10 ??mol CO2 m-2 s-1. Adjustment factors to bring all of the systems into agreement vary from 0.93 to 1.45 with an uncertainty of about 10-15%.

  10. Genetic algorithm based adaptive neural network ensemble and its application in predicting carbon flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xue, Y.; Liu, S.; Hu, Y.; Yang, J.; Chen, Q.

    2007-01-01

    To improve the accuracy in prediction, Genetic Algorithm based Adaptive Neural Network Ensemble (GA-ANNE) is presented. Intersections are allowed between different training sets based on the fuzzy clustering analysis, which ensures the diversity as well as the accuracy of individual Neural Networks (NNs). Moreover, to improve the accuracy of the adaptive weights of individual NNs, GA is used to optimize the cluster centers. Empirical results in predicting carbon flux of Duke Forest reveal that GA-ANNE can predict the carbon flux more accurately than Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN), Bagging NN ensemble, and ANNE. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  11. Effects of Elevated CO2 and Nitrogen Deposition on Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes on the Sanjiang Plain Wetland in Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianbo; Zhu, Tingcheng; Ni, Hongwei; Zhong, Haixiu; Fu, Xiaoling; Wang, Jifeng

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen (N) deposition across the globe may affect ecosystem CO2 exchanges and ecosystem carbon cycles. Additionally, it remains unknown how increased N deposition and N addition will alter the effects of elevated CO2 on wetland ecosystem carbon fluxes. Methodology/Principal Findings Beginning in 2010, a paired, nested manipulative experimental design was used in a temperate wetland of northeastern China. The primary factor was elevated CO2, accomplished using Open Top Chambers, and N supplied as NH4NO3 was the secondary factor. Gross primary productivity (GPP) was higher than ecosystem respiration (ER), leading to net carbon uptake (measured by net ecosystem CO2 exchange, or NEE) in all four treatments over the growing season. However, their magnitude had interannual variations, which coincided with air temperature in the early growing season, with the soil temperature and with the vegetation cover. Elevated CO2 significantly enhanced GPP and ER but overall reduced NEE because the stimulation caused by the elevated CO2 had a greater impact on ER than on GPP. The addition of N stimulated ecosystem C fluxes in both years and ameliorated the negative impact of elevated CO2 on NEE. Conclusion/Significance In this ecosystem, future elevated CO2 may favor carbon sequestration when coupled with increasing nitrogen deposition. PMID:23818943

  12. Estimating Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from Sources and Sinks in the Mid-Continent Intensive using Inventories and Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, T. O.; Bandaru, V.; Brandt, C. C.; Schuh, A. E.; Gurney, K. R.; Heath, L. S.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Liu, S.; Li, Z.; Ogle, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    Estimates of carbon dioxide sources and sinks have been compiled from numerous models and national inventories. Flux estimates include those for cropland, grassland, and forest biomass; cropland and grassland soils; fossil-fuel emissions; emissions from livestock and humans; and movement of carbon into and out of the region. Estimates have been scaled to coincide with entities responsible for respective carbon fluxes and for consistent estimates among flux sources. We will present methods used to scale fluxes using satellite remote sensing data and present comprehensive results of carbon fluxes within a ten-state region surrounding the State of Iowa. Results will be compared to previous carbon flux estimates produced under the Mid-Continent Intensive Interim synthesis. We will discuss significant changes in estimation methods and variability associated with components of the current estimates.

  13. Using Airborne Microwave Remotely Sensed Root-Zone Soil Moisture and Flux Measurements to Improve Regional Predictions of Carbon Fluxes in a Terrestrial Biosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Antonarakis, A. S.; Medvigy, D.; Burgin, M. S.; Crow, W. T.; Milak, S.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Truong-Loi, M.; Moghaddam, M.; Saatchi, S. S.; Cuenca, R. H.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    North American ecosystems are critical components of the global carbon cycle, exchanging large amounts of carbon dioxide and other gases with the atmosphere. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 between atmosphere and ecosystems quantifies these carbon fluxes, but current continental-scale estimates contain high levels of uncertainty. Root-zone soil moisture (RZSM) and its spatial and temporal heterogeneity influences NEE and improved estimates can help reduce uncertainty in NEE estimates. We used the RZSM measurements from the Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS) mission, and the carbon, water and energy fluxes observed by the eddy-covariance flux towers to constrain the Ecosystem Demography Model 2.2 (ED2.2) to improve its predictions of carbon fluxes. The parameters of the ED2.2 model were first optimized at seven flux tower sites in North America, which represent six different biomes, by constraining the model against a suite of flux measurements and forest inventory measurements through a Bayesian Markov-Chain Monte Carlo framework. We further applied the AirMOSS RZSM products to constrain the ED2.2 model to achieve better estimates of regional NEE. Evaluation against flux tower measurements and forest dynamics measurements shows that the constrained ED2.2 model produces improved predictions of monthly to annual carbon fluxes. The remote sensing based RZSM can further help improve the spatial patterns and temporal variations of model NEE. The results demonstrate that model-data fusion can substantially improve model performance and highlight the important role of RZSM in regulating the spatial and temporal heterogeneities of carbon fluxes.

  14. Inorganic carbon fluxes across the vadose zone of planted and unplanted soil mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaysen, E. M.; Jacques, D.; Jessen, S.; Andersen, C. E.; Laloy, E.; Ambus, P.; Postma, D.; Jakobsen, I.

    2014-12-01

    The efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soils influences atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thereby climate change. The partitioning of inorganic carbon (C) fluxes in the vadose zone between emission to the atmosphere and to the groundwater was investigated to reveal controlling underlying mechanisms. Carbon dioxide partial pressure in the soil gas (pCO2), alkalinity, soil moisture and temperature were measured over depth and time in unplanted and planted (barley) mesocosms. The dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) percolation flux was calculated from the pCO2, alkalinity and the water flux at the mesocosm bottom. Carbon dioxide exchange between the soil surface and the atmosphere was measured at regular intervals. The soil diffusivity was determined from soil radon-222 (222Rn) emanation rates and soil air Rn concentration profiles and was used in conjunction with measured pCO2 gradients to calculate the soil CO2 production. Carbon dioxide fluxes were modeled using the HP1 module of the Hydrus 1-D software. The average CO2 effluxes to the atmosphere from unplanted and planted mesocosm ecosystems during 78 days of experiment were 0.1 ± 0.07 and 4.9 ± 0.07 μmol C m-2 s-1, respectively, and grossly exceeded the corresponding DIC percolation fluxes of 0.01 ± 0.004 and 0.06 ± 0.03 μmol C m-2 s-1. Plant biomass was high in the mesocosms as compared to a standard field situation. Post-harvest soil respiration (Rs) was only 10% of the Rs during plant growth, while the post-harvest DIC percolation flux was more than one-third of the flux during growth. The Rs was controlled by production and diffusivity of CO2 in the soil. The DIC percolation flux was largely controlled by the pCO2 and the drainage flux due to low solution pH. Modeling suggested that increasing soil alkalinity during plant growth was due to nutrient buffering during root nitrate uptake.

  15. Annual net community production and the biological carbon flux in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The flux of biologically produced organic matter from the surface ocean (the biological pump), over an annual cycle, is equal to the annual net community production (ANCP). Experimental determinations of ANCP at ocean time series sites using a variety of different metabolite mass balances have made it possible to evaluate the accuracy of sediment trap fluxes and satellite-determined ocean carbon export. ANCP values at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT), the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS), Ocean Station Papa (OSP) are 3 ± 1 mol C m-2 yr-1—much less variable than presently suggested by satellite remote sensing measurements and global circulation models. ANCP determined from mass balances at these locations are 3-4 times particulate organic carbon fluxes measured in sediment traps. When the roles of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) flux, zooplankton migration, and depth-dependent respiration are considered these differences are reconciled at HOT and OSP but not at BATS, where measured particulate fluxes are about 3 times lower than expected. Even in the cases where sediment trap fluxes are accurate, it is not possible to "scale up" these measurements to determine ANCP without independent determinations of geographically variable DOC flux and zooplankton migration. Estimates of ANCP from satellite remote sensing using net primary production determined by the carbon-based productivity model suggests less geographic variability than its predecessor (the vertically generalized productivity model) and brings predictions at HOT and OSP closer to measurements; however, satellite-predicted ANCP at BATS is still 3 times too low.

  16. Carbon flux from plants to soil microbes is highly sensitive to nitrogen addition and biochar amendment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, C.; Solaiman, Z. M.; Kilburn, M. R.; Clode, P. L.; Fuchslueger, L.; Koranda, M.; Murphy, D. V.

    2012-04-01

    The release of carbon through plant roots to the soil has been recognized as a governing factor for soil microbial community composition and decomposition processes, constituting an important control for ecosystem biogeochemical cycles. Moreover, there is increasing awareness that the flux of recently assimilated carbon from plants to the soil may regulate ecosystem response to environmental change, as the rate of the plant-soil carbon transfer will likely be affected by increased plant C assimilation caused by increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. What has received less attention so far is how sensitive the plant-soil C transfer would be to possible regulations coming from belowground, such as soil N addition or microbial community changes resulting from anthropogenic inputs such as biochar amendments. In this study we investigated the size, rate and sensitivity of the transfer of recently assimilated plant C through the root-soil-mycorrhiza-microbial continuum. Wheat plants associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were grown in split-boxes which were filled either with soil or a soil-biochar mixture. Each split-box consisted of two compartments separated by a membrane which was penetrable for mycorrhizal hyphae but not for roots. Wheat plants were only grown in one compartment while the other compartment served as an extended soil volume which was only accessible by mycorrhizal hyphae associated with the plant roots. After plants were grown for four weeks we used a double-labeling approach with 13C and 15N in order to investigate interactions between C and N flows in the plant-soil-microorganism system. Plants were subjected to an enriched 13CO2 atmosphere for 8 hours during which 15NH4 was added to a subset of split-boxes to either the root-containing or the root-free compartment. Both, 13C and 15N fluxes through the plant-soil continuum were monitored over 24 hours by stable isotope methods (13C phospho-lipid fatty acids by GC-IRMS, 15N/13C in bulk plant

  17. Drought impact on forest carbon dynamics and fluxes in Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Christopher E; Metcalfe, D B; Girardin, C A J; Amézquita, F Farfán; Cabrera, D Galiano; Huasco, W Huaraca; Silva-Espejo, J E; Araujo-Murakami, A; da Costa, M C; Rocha, W; Feldpausch, T R; Mendoza, A L M; da Costa, A C L; Meir, P; Phillips, O L; Malhi, Y

    2015-03-01

    In 2005 and 2010 the Amazon basin experienced two strong droughts, driven by shifts in the tropical hydrological regime possibly associated with global climate change, as predicted by some global models. Tree mortality increased after the 2005 drought, and regional atmospheric inversion modelling showed basin-wide decreases in CO2 uptake in 2010 compared with 2011 (ref. 5). But the response of tropical forest carbon cycling to these droughts is not fully understood and there has been no detailed multi-site investigation in situ. Here we use several years of data from a network of thirteen 1-ha forest plots spread throughout South America, where each component of net primary production (NPP), autotrophic respiration and heterotrophic respiration is measured separately, to develop a better mechanistic understanding of the impact of the 2010 drought on the Amazon forest. We find that total NPP remained constant throughout the drought. However, towards the end of the drought, autotrophic respiration, especially in roots and stems, declined significantly compared with measurements in 2009 made in the absence of drought, with extended decreases in autotrophic respiration in the three driest plots. In the year after the drought, total NPP remained constant but the allocation of carbon shifted towards canopy NPP and away from fine-root NPP. Both leaf-level and plot-level measurements indicate that severe drought suppresses photosynthesis. Scaling these measurements to the entire Amazon basin with rainfall data, we estimate that drought suppressed Amazon-wide photosynthesis in 2010 by 0.38 petagrams of carbon (0.23-0.53 petagrams of carbon). Overall, we find that during this drought, instead of reducing total NPP, trees prioritized growth by reducing autotrophic respiration that was unrelated to growth. This suggests that trees decrease investment in tissue maintenance and defence, in line with eco-evolutionary theories that trees are competitively disadvantaged in the

  18. Drought impact on forest carbon dynamics and fluxes in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Christopher E.; Metcalfe, D. B.; Girardin, C. A. J.; Amézquita, F. Farfán; Cabrera, D. Galiano; Huasco, W. Huaraca; Silva-Espejo, J. E.; Araujo-Murakami, A.; da Costa, M. C.; Rocha, W.; Feldpausch, T. R.; Mendoza, A. L. M.; da Costa, A. C. L.; Meir, P.; Phillips, O. L.; Malhi, Y.

    2015-03-01

    In 2005 and 2010 the Amazon basin experienced two strong droughts, driven by shifts in the tropical hydrological regime possibly associated with global climate change, as predicted by some global models. Tree mortality increased after the 2005 drought, and regional atmospheric inversion modelling showed basin-wide decreases in CO2 uptake in 2010 compared with 2011 (ref. 5). But the response of tropical forest carbon cycling to these droughts is not fully understood and there has been no detailed multi-site investigation in situ. Here we use several years of data from a network of thirteen 1-ha forest plots spread throughout South America, where each component of net primary production (NPP), autotrophic respiration and heterotrophic respiration is measured separately, to develop a better mechanistic understanding of the impact of the 2010 drought on the Amazon forest. We find that total NPP remained constant throughout the drought. However, towards the end of the drought, autotrophic respiration, especially in roots and stems, declined significantly compared with measurements in 2009 made in the absence of drought, with extended decreases in autotrophic respiration in the three driest plots. In the year after the drought, total NPP remained constant but the allocation of carbon shifted towards canopy NPP and away from fine-root NPP. Both leaf-level and plot-level measurements indicate that severe drought suppresses photosynthesis. Scaling these measurements to the entire Amazon basin with rainfall data, we estimate that drought suppressed Amazon-wide photosynthesis in 2010 by 0.38 petagrams of carbon (0.23-0.53 petagrams of carbon). Overall, we find that during this drought, instead of reducing total NPP, trees prioritized growth by reducing autotrophic respiration that was unrelated to growth. This suggests that trees decrease investment in tissue maintenance and defence, in line with eco-evolutionary theories that trees are competitively disadvantaged in the

  19. Terrestrial carbon cycle affected by non-uniform climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jianyang; Chen, Jiquan; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Luo, Yiqi; Wan, Shiqiang

    2014-03-01

    Feedbacks between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate change could affect many ecosystem functions and services, such as food production, carbon sequestration and climate regulation. The rate of climate warming varies on diurnal and seasonal timescales. A synthesis of global air temperature data reveals a greater rate of warming in winter than in summer in northern mid and high latitudes, and the inverse pattern in some tropical regions. The data also reveal a decline in the diurnal temperature range over 51% of the global land area and an increase over only 13%, because night-time temperatures in most locations have risen faster than daytime temperatures. Analyses of satellite data, model simulations and in situ observations suggest that the impact of seasonal warming varies between regions. For example, spring warming has largely stimulated ecosystem productivity at latitudes between 30° and 90° N, but suppressed productivity in other regions. Contrasting impacts of day- and night-time warming on plant carbon gain and loss are apparent in many regions. We argue that ascertaining the effects of non-uniform climate warming on terrestrial ecosystems is a key challenge in carbon cycle research.

  20. Effects of management of ecosystem carbon pools and fluxes in grassland ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryals, R.; Silver, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    Grasslands represent a large land-use footprint and have considerable potential to sequester carbon (C) in soil. Climate policies and C markets may provide incentives for land managers to pursue strategies that optimize soil C storage, yet we lack robust understanding of C sequestration in grasslands. Previous research has shown that management approaches such as organic amendments or vertical subsoiling can lead to larger soil C pools. These management approaches can both directly and indirectly affect soil C pools. We used well-replicated field experiments to explore the effects of these management strategies on ecosystem C pools and fluxes in two bioclimatic regions of California (Sierra Foothills Research and Extension Center (SFREC) and Nicasio Ranch). Our treatments included an untreated control, compost amendments, plowed (vertical subsoil), and compost + plow. The experiment was conducted over two years allowing us to compare dry (360 mm) and average (632 mm) rainfall conditions. Carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes were measured weekly using a LI-8100 infrared gas analyzer. Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes were measured monthly using static flux chambers. Aboveground and belowground biomass were measured at the end of the growing season as an index of net primary productivity (NPP) in the annual plant dominated system. Soil moisture and temperature were measured continuously and averaged on hourly and daily timescales. Soil organic C and N concentrations were measured prior to the application of management treatments and at the ends of each growing season. Soils were collected to a 10 cm depth in year one and at four depth increments (0-10, 10-30, 30-50, and 50-100 cm) in year two. Soil C and N concentrations were converted to content using bulk density values for each plot. During both growing seasons, soil respiration rates were higher in the composted plots and lower in the plowed plots relative to controls at both sites. The effects on C loss via

  1. Moss and soil contributions to the annual net carbon flux of a maturing boreal forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, J.W.; O'Neill, K. P.; Trumbore, S.E.; Veldhuis, H.; Stocks, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    We used input and decomposition data from 14C studies of soils to determine rates of vertical accumulation of moss combined with carbon storage inventories on a sequence of burns to model how carbon accumulates in soils and moss after a stand-killing fire. We used soil drainage - moss associations and soil drainage maps of the old black spruce (OBS) site at the BOREAS northern study area (NSA) to areally weight the contributions of each moderately well drained, feathermoss areas; poorly drained sphagnum - feathermoss areas; and very poorly drained brown moss areas to the carbon storage and flux at the OBS NSA site. On this very old (117 years) complex of black spruce, sphagnum bog veneer, and fen systems we conclude that these systems are likely sequestering 0.01-0.03 kg C m-2 yr-' at OBS-NSA today. Soil drainage in boreal forests near Thompson, Manitoba, controls carbon storage and flux by controlling moss input and decomposition rates and by controlling through fire the amount and quality of carbon left after burning. On poorly drained soils rich in sphagnum moss, net accumulation and long-term storage of carbon is higher than on better drained soils colonized by feathermosses. The carbon flux of these contrasting ecosystems is best characterized by soil drainage class and stand age, where stands recently burned are net sources of CO2, and maturing stands become increasingly stronger sinks of atmospheric CO2. This approach to measuring carbon storage and flux presents a method of scaling to larger areas using soil drainage, moss cover, and stand age information.

  2. Carbon, Water Vapor, and Energy Fluxes of Grazed and Ungrazed Tallgrass Prairie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owensby, C. E.; Ham, J. M.; Auen, L. M.

    2004-12-01

    To determine the impact of seasonal steer grazing on annual CO2 fluxes of annually-burned native tallgrass prairie, we used conditional sampling (relaxed eddy accumulation) on adjacent pastures of grazed (GR) and ungrazed (UG) tallgrass prairie from 1998 to 2001 and eddy correlation from 2002 to 2004. Fluxes of CO2 were measured almost continuously (24 hr) from immediately following burning through the burn date the following year (365 d). Aboveground biomass and leaf area were determined by clipping biweekly during the growing season. Carbon lost due to burning was estimated by clipping immediately prior to burning and collecting residual surface carbon after the burn. Soil CO2 flux was measured biweekly at midday each year using portable chambers from 1998 to 2002 and diurnally by large autochambers from 2002 to 2004. Steers were stocked at twice the normal season-long stocking rate (0.81 ha steer-1) for the first half of the grazing season (~May 1 to July 15) and the area left ungrazed the remainder of the year. That system of grazing is termed "intensive early stocking" and is commonly used throughout the Kansas Flint Hills. During the early growing season, grazing reduced net carbon exchange relative to the reduction in green leaf area, but as the growing season progressed on the grazed area, regrowth produced younger leaves that had an apparent higher photosynthetic efficiency. Despite a substantially greater green leaf area on the ungrazed area, greater positive net carbon flux occurred on the grazed area during the late season. Nighttime carbon losses were greater on the ungrazed area in the early season, but were greater on the grazed area late in the season. During the peak growth period, an amount equivalent to ~80% of the carbon fixed on a clear day was lost each day through soil CO2 flux and plant respiration. Soil CO2 flux followed a definite diurnal pattern during the growing season with daytime fluxes twice that of nighttime. During the dormant

  3. Linking water and carbon fluxes in a Mediterranean oak woodland using a combined flux and ?18O partitioning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, M.; Piayda, A.; Costa e Silva, F.; Correia, A.; Pereira, J. S.; Cuntz, M.; Werner, C.

    2013-12-01

    Water is one of the key factors driving ecosystem productivity, especially in water-limited ecosystems, where global climate change is expected to intensify drought and alter precipitation patterns. One such ecosystem is the ';Montado', where two vegetation layers respond differently to drought: oak trees avoid drought due to their access to deeper soil layers and ground water while herbaceous plants, surviving the summer in the form of seeds. We aimed at 1) quantifying the impact of the understory herbaceous vegetation on ecosystem carbon and water fluxes throughout the year, 2) determining the driving environmental factors for evapotranspiration (ET) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and 3) disentangling how ET components of the ecosystem relate to carbon dioxide exchange. We present one year data set comparing modeled and measured stable oxygen isotope signatures (δ18O) of soil evaporation, confirming that the Craig and Gordon equation leads to good agreement with measured δ18O of evaporation (Dubbert et al. 2013). Partitioning ecosystem ET and NEE into its three sources revealed a strong contribution of soil evaporation (E) and herbaceous transpiration (T) to ecosystem ET during spring and fall. In contrast, soil respiration (R) and herbaceous net carbon gain contributed to a lesser amount to ecosystem NEE during spring and fall, leading to consistently smaller water use efficiencies (WUE) of the herbaceous understory compared to the cork-oaks. Here, we demonstrate that the ability to assess ET, NEE and WUE independent of soil evaporation dynamics enables the understanding of the mechanisms of the coupling between water and carbon fluxes and their responses to drought. Dubbert, M., Cuntz, M., Piayda, A., Maguas, C., Werner, C., 2013: Partitioning evapotranspiration - Testing the Craig and Gordon model with field measurements of oxygen isotope ratios of evaporative fluxes. J Hydrol. a) Oxygen isotope signatures of soil evaporation on bare soil plots calculated

  4. Methane and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from Stems, Soils, and Coarse Woody Debris in a Temperate Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, D. L.; Villarreal, S.; McWilliams, K.; Inamdar, S. P.; Vargas, R.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the magnitude and variability of greenhouse gas fluxes from different terrestrial carbon pools is necessary for enhancing understanding of terrestrial carbon cycling. While much more is known about variability CO2 fluxes, we have little information on how CH4 fluxes vary across multiple carbon pools within terrestrial ecosystems. We measured fluxes of CH4 and CO2 from living tree stems, soils, and coarse woody debris within a temperate forested watershed during the growing season (May-November). Fluxes of both CH4 and CO2 were significantly different among carbon pools. Living tree stems were weak sources of both CH4 and CO2 with seasonal means (± 1 SD) of 0.08 ± 0.19 nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 1.16 ± 1.21 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. Soils were sinks of CH4 and sources of CO2 with seasonal means (± 1 SD) of -2.00 ± 1.41 nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 3.07 ± 2.10 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. Fluxes of CH4 and CO2 from coarse woody debris were largely variable relative to the other pools with seasonal means (± 1 SD) of -0.21 ± 0.76 nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 2.61 ± 2.50 μmol CO2m-2 s-1. Gas fluxes varied significantly (p < 0.05) between sampling sites for both living stems and coarse woody debris, but not for soils. For living stems, this variability was explained by differences in tree species, where N. sylvatica had largest seasonal mean flux of CH4 and L. tulipifera had the largest seasonal mean flux of CO2. For woody debris sites, the variability was explained wood density, with dense, fresh wood acting as CH4 sources, and less dense, decayed wood acting as CH4 sinks. Our results show homogeneity in soil CH4 and CO2 fluxes, but a large heterogeneity in fluxes from tree stems and coarse woody debris. These results provide insights on how forest management strategies could influence greenhouse gas emissions from forested watersheds.

  5. A case study of carbon fluxes from land change in the southwest Brazilian Amazon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrett, K.; Rogan, J.; Eastman, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, land change is responsible for one-fifth of anthropogenic carbon emissions. In Brazil, three-quarters of carbon emissions originate from land change. This study represents a municipal-scale study of carbon fluxes from vegetation in Rio Branco, Brazil. Land-cover maps of pasture, forest, and secondary growth from 1993, 1996, 1999, and 2003 were produced using an unsupervised classification method (overall accuracy = 89%). Carbon fluxes from land change over the decade of imagery were estimated from transitions between land-cover categories for each time interval. This article presents new methods for estimating emissions reductions from carbon stored in the vegetation that replaces forests (e.g., pasture) and sequestration by new (>10-15 years) forests, which reduced gross emissions by 16, 15, and 22% for the period of 1993-1996, 1996-1999, and 1999-2003, respectively. The methods used in the analysis are broadly applicable and provide a comprehensive characterization of regional-scale carbon fluxes from land change.

  6. Calculations of automatic chamber flux measurements of methane and carbon dioxide using short time series of concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirk, Norbert; Mastepanov, Mikhail; Parmentier, Frans-Jan W.; Lund, Magnus; Crill, Patrick; Christensen, Torben R.

    2016-02-01

    The closed chamber technique is widely used to measure the exchange of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from terrestrial ecosystems. There is, however, large uncertainty about which model should be used to calculate the gas flux from the measured gas concentrations. Due to experimental uncertainties the simple linear regression model (first-order polynomial) is often applied, even though theoretical considerations of the technique suggest the application of other, curvilinear models. High-resolution automatic chamber systems which sample gas concentrations several hundred times per flux measurement make it possible to resolve the curvilinear behavior and study the information imposed by the natural variability of the temporal concentration changes. We used more than 50 000 such flux measurements of CH4 and CO2 from five field sites located in peat-forming wetlands ranging from 56 to 78° N to quantify the typical differences between flux estimates of different models. In addition, we aimed to assess the curvilinearity of the concentration time series and test the general applicability of curvilinear models. Despite significant episodic differences between the calculated flux estimates, the overall differences are generally found to be smaller than the local flux variability on the plot scale. The curvilinear behavior of the gas concentrations within the chamber is strongly influenced by wind-driven chamber leakage, and less so by changing gas concentration gradients in the soil during chamber closure. Such physical processes affect both gas species equally, which makes it possible to isolate biochemical processes affecting the gases differently, such as photosynthesis limitation by chamber headspace CO2 concentrations under high levels of incoming solar radiation. We assess the possibility to exploit this effect for a partitioning of the net CO2 flux into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration as an example of how high-resolution automatic chamber

  7. Regional carbon dioxide fluxes from mixing ratio data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakwin, P. S.; Davis, K. J.; Yi, C.; Wofsy, S. C.; Munger, J. W.; Haszpra, L.; Barcza, Z.

    2004-09-01

    We examine the atmospheric budget of CO2 at temperate continental sites in the Northern Hemisphere. On a monthly time scale both surface exchange and atmospheric transport are important in determining the rate of change of CO2 mixing ratio at these sites. Vertical differences between the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere over the continent are generally greater than large-scale zonal gradients such as the difference between the free troposphere over the continent and the marine boundary layer. Therefore, as a first approximation we parametrize atmospheric transport as a vertical exchange term related to the vertical gradient of CO2 and the mean vertical velocity from the NCEP Reanalysis model. Horizontal advection is assumed to be negligible in our simple analysis. We then calculate the net surface exchange of CO2 from CO2 mixing ratio measurements at four tower sites. The results provide estimates of the surface exchange that are representative of a regional scale (i.e. ~106 km2). Comparison with direct, local-scale (eddy covariance) measurements of net exchange with the ecosystems around the towers are reasonable after accounting for anthropogenic CO2 emissions within the larger area represented by the mixing ratio data. A network of tower sites and frequent aircraft vertical profiles, separated by several hundred kilometres, where CO2 is accurately measured would provide data to estimate horizontal and vertical advection and hence provide a means to derive net CO2 fluxes on a regional scale. At present CO2 mixing ratios are measured with sufficient accuracy relative to global reference gas standards at only a few continental sites. The results also confirm that flux measurements from carefully sited towers capture seasonal variations representative of large regions, and that the midday CO2 mixing ratios sampled in the atmospheric surface layer

  8. Dissolved and particulate organic carbon fluxes from an agricultural watershed during consecutive tropical storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caverly, Emma; Kaste, James M.; Hancock, Gregory S.; Chambers, Randolph M.

    2013-10-01

    Low-frequency high-magnitude hydrologic events mobilize a disproportionate amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from watersheds, but few studies measure the role of extreme storms in exporting organic carbon from croplands. We use high-resolution measurements of storm runoff to quantify DOC and particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes from an agricultural field during consecutive tropical storms that delivered 41 cm of rainfall to the Virginia Coastal Plain. Over a 2 week period, we measured exports of 22 kg DOC ha-1 and 11.3 kg POC ha-1. Ultraviolet absorbance measurements indicate that the aromatic DOC fraction systematically increased as plant-derived aliphatic carbon was depleted during the initial event. Croplands can have event-scale carbon losses that equal or exceed published estimates of annual export for perennial streams draining forested and mixed land use watersheds. We quantify aromatic DOC fractions approaching 50%, indicating that agricultural stormflow can produce a significant load of relatively photoreactive carbon.

  9. Global patterns of ecosystem carbon flux in forests: A biometric data-based synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bing; Yang, Yuanhe; Li, Pin; Shen, Haihua; Fang, Jingyun

    2014-09-01

    Forest ecosystems function as a significant carbon sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, our understanding of global patterns of forest carbon fluxes remains controversial. Here we examined global patterns and environmental controls of forest carbon balance using biometric measurements derived from 243 sites and synthesized from 81 publications around the world. Our results showed that both production and respiration increased with mean annual temperature and exhibited unimodal patterns along a gradient of precipitation. However, net ecosystem production (NEP) initially increased and subsequently declined along gradients of both temperature and precipitation. Our results also indicated that ecosystem production increased during stand development but eventually leveled off, whereas respiration was significantly higher in mature and old forests than in young forests. The residual variation of carbon flux along climatic and age gradients might be explained by other factors such as atmospheric CO2 elevation and disturbances (e.g., forest fire, storm damage, and selective harvest). Heterotrophic respiration (Rh) was positively associated with net primary production (NPP), but the Rh-NPP relationship differed between natural and planted forests: Rh increased exponentially with NPP in natural forests but tended toward saturation with increased NPP in planted forests. Comparison of biometric measurements with eddy covariance observations revealed that ecosystem carbon balance derived from the latter generated higher overall NEP estimates. These results suggest that the eddy covariance observations may overestimate the strength of carbon sinks, and thus, biometric measurements need to be incorporated into global assessments of the forest carbon balance.

  10. Comparing simulated carbon budget of a Lei bamboo forest with flux tower data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Xuehe; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Jinxun; Sun, Cheng; Wang, Ying; Jin, Jiaxin

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo forest ecosystem is the part of the forest ecosystem. The distribution area of bamboo forest is limited, but in somewhere, like south China, it has been cultivate for a long time with human management. As the climate change has been take great effect on forest carbon budget, many researchers pay attention to the carbon budget in bamboo forest. Moreover cultivative management had a significant impact on the bamboo forest carbon budget. In this study, we modified a terrestrial ecosystem model named Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) according the management of Lei bamboo forest. Some management, like fertilization, shoots harvesting and organic mulching in winter, had been incorporated into model. Then we had compared model results with the observation data from a Lei bamboo flux tower. The simulated and observed results had achieved good consistency. Our simulated Lei bamboo forest yearly net ecosystem productivity (NEP) was 0.41 kgC a-1 of carbon, which is very close to the observation data 0.45 kgC a-1 of carbon. And the monthly simulated results can take the change of carbon budget in each month, similar to the data we got from flux tower. It reflects that the modified IBIS model can characterize the growth of bamboo forest and perform the simulation well. And then two groups of simulations were set to evaluate effects of cultivative managements on Lei bamboo forests carbon budget. And results showed that both fertilization and organic mulching had taken positive effects on Lei bamboo forests carbon sequestration.

  11. Molar tooth carbonates and benthic methane fluxes in Proterozoic oceans.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing; Dong, Lin; Xiao, Shuhai; Lang, Xianguo; Huang, Kangjun; Peng, Yongbo; Zhou, Chuanming; Ke, Shan; Liu, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Molar tooth structures are ptygmatically folded and microspar-filled structures common in early- and mid-Proterozoic (∼2,500-750 million years ago, Ma) subtidal successions, but extremely rare in rocks <750 Ma. Here, on the basis of Mg and S isotopes, we show that molar tooth structures may have formed within sediments where microbial sulphate reduction and methanogenesis converged. The convergence was driven by the abundant production of methyl sulphides (dimethyl sulphide and methanethiol) in euxinic or H2S-rich seawaters that were widespread in Proterozoic continental margins. In this convergence zone, methyl sulphides served as a non-competitive substrate supporting methane generation and methanethiol inhibited anaerobic oxidation of methane, resulting in the buildup of CH4, formation of degassing cracks in sediments and an increase in the benthic methane flux from sediments. Precipitation of crack-filling microspar was driven by methanogenesis-related alkalinity accumulation. Deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation around 750 Ma brought molar tooth structures to an end. PMID:26739600

  12. Molar tooth carbonates and benthic methane fluxes in Proterozoic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing; Dong, Lin; Xiao, Shuhai; Lang, Xianguo; Huang, Kangjun; Peng, Yongbo; Zhou, Chuanming; Ke, Shan; Liu, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Molar tooth structures are ptygmatically folded and microspar-filled structures common in early- and mid-Proterozoic (~2,500-750 million years ago, Ma) subtidal successions, but extremely rare in rocks <750 Ma. Here, on the basis of Mg and S isotopes, we show that molar tooth structures may have formed within sediments where microbial sulphate reduction and methanogenesis converged. The convergence was driven by the abundant production of methyl sulphides (dimethyl sulphide and methanethiol) in euxinic or H2S-rich seawaters that were widespread in Proterozoic continental margins. In this convergence zone, methyl sulphides served as a non-competitive substrate supporting methane generation and methanethiol inhibited anaerobic oxidation of methane, resulting in the buildup of CH4, formation of degassing cracks in sediments and an increase in the benthic methane flux from sediments. Precipitation of crack-filling microspar was driven by methanogenesis-related alkalinity accumulation. Deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation around 750 Ma brought molar tooth structures to an end.

  13. Molar tooth carbonates and benthic methane fluxes in Proterozoic oceans

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bing; Dong, Lin; Xiao, Shuhai; Lang, Xianguo; Huang, Kangjun; Peng, Yongbo; Zhou, Chuanming; Ke, Shan; Liu, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Molar tooth structures are ptygmatically folded and microspar-filled structures common in early- and mid-Proterozoic (∼2,500–750 million years ago, Ma) subtidal successions, but extremely rare in rocks <750 Ma. Here, on the basis of Mg and S isotopes, we show that molar tooth structures may have formed within sediments where microbial sulphate reduction and methanogenesis converged. The convergence was driven by the abundant production of methyl sulphides (dimethyl sulphide and methanethiol) in euxinic or H2S-rich seawaters that were widespread in Proterozoic continental margins. In this convergence zone, methyl sulphides served as a non-competitive substrate supporting methane generation and methanethiol inhibited anaerobic oxidation of methane, resulting in the buildup of CH4, formation of degassing cracks in sediments and an increase in the benthic methane flux from sediments. Precipitation of crack-filling microspar was driven by methanogenesis-related alkalinity accumulation. Deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation around 750 Ma brought molar tooth structures to an end. PMID:26739600

  14. Roles of Climate, Vegetation and Soil in Regulating the Spatial Variations in Ecosystem Carbon Dioxide Fluxes in the Northern Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Guirui; Ge, Jianping; Wang, Qiufeng; Zhu, Xianjin; Xu, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Climate, vegetation, and soil characteristics play important roles in regulating the spatial variation in carbon dioxide fluxes, but their relative influence is still uncertain. In this study, we compiled data from 241 eddy covariance flux sites in the Northern Hemisphere and used Classification and Regression Trees and Redundancy Analysis to assess how climate, vegetation, and soil affect the spatial variations in three carbon dioxide fluxes (annual gross primary production (AGPP), annual ecosystem respiration (ARE), and annual net ecosystem production (ANEP)). Our results showed that the spatial variations in AGPP, ARE, and ANEP were significantly related to the climate and vegetation factors (correlation coefficients, R = 0.22 to 0.69, P < 0.01) while they were not related to the soil factors (R = -0.11 to 0.14, P > 0.05) in the Northern Hemisphere. The climate and vegetation together explained 60 % and 58 % of the spatial variations in AGPP and ARE, respectively. Climate factors (mean annual temperature and precipitation) could account for 45 - 47 % of the spatial variations in AGPP and ARE, but the climate constraint on the vegetation index explained approximately 75 %. Our findings suggest that climate factors affect the spatial variations in AGPP and ARE mainly by regulating vegetation properties, while soil factors exert a minor effect. To more accurately assess global carbon balance and predict ecosystem responses to climate change, these discrepant roles of climate, vegetation, and soil are required to be fully considered in the future land surface models. Moreover, our results showed that climate and vegetation factors failed to capture the spatial variation in ANEP and suggest that to reveal the underlying mechanism for variation in ANEP, taking into account the effects of other factors (such as climate change and disturbances) is necessary. PMID:25928452

  15. SEASONAL SOIL FLUXES OF CARBON MONOXIDE IN BURNED AND UNBURNED BRAZILIAN SAVANNAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil-atmosphere fluxes of carbon monoxide (CO) were measured from September 1999 through November 2000 in savanna areas in central Brazil (Cerrado) under different fire regimes using transparent and opaque static chambers. Studies focused on two vegetation types, cerrado stricto...

  16. Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both natural fire and prescribed burns are disturbances to biogeochemical cycles of grassland ecosystems in the southern Great Plains. This study examined eddy covariance whole ecosystem-atmosphere flux in carbon (C) exchange in response to a prescribed burn. Two, paired 34 ha paddocks in central Ok...

  17. Mapping land-surface fluxes of carbon, water and energy from field to regional scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A framework for routine mapping of land-surface fluxes of carbon, water, and energy at the field to regional scales has been established for drought monitoring, water resource management, yield forecasting and crop-growth monitoring. The framework uses the ALEXI/DisALEXI suite of land-surface model...

  18. Nitrogen, Tillage, and Crop Rotation Effects On Carbon Dioxide and Methane Fluxes from Irrigated Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term effects of tillage intensity, N fertilization, and crop rotation on carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) flux from semiarid irrigated soils are poorly understood. We evaluated effects of: a) tillage intensity [no-till (NT) and moldboard plow tillage (CT)] in a continuous corn rotation; b...

  19. Landscape and environmental controls over leaf and ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes under woody plant expansion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many regions of the globe are experiencing a simultaneous change in the dominant plant functional type and regional climatology. We explored how atmospheric temperature and precipitation input control leaf- and ecosystem scale carbon fluxes within a pair of semiarid shrublands that had undergone woo...

  20. CARBON MONOXIDE FLUXES OF DIFFERENT SOIL LAYERS IN UPLAND CANADIAN BOREAL FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dark or low-light carbon monoxide fluxes at upland Canadian boreal forest sites were measured on-site with static chambers and with a laboratory incubation technique using cores from different depths at the same sites. Three different upland black spruce sites, burned in 1987,199...

  1. Long-term carbon dioxide and water flux database, Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, Arizona, USA 1850

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present the carbon dioxide and water flux data along with associated meteorological data collected by USDA Agricultural Research Service, Southwest Watershed Research Center, on the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) from 1997 through 2006. Measurements were collected from a shrub and gr...

  2. Assessing the nonconservative fluvial fluxes of dissolved organic carbon in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauerwald, Ronny; Hartmann, Jens; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Moosdorf, Nils

    2012-03-01

    Fluvial transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important link in the global carbon cycle. Previous studies largely increased our knowledge of fluvial exports of carbon to the marine system, but considerable uncertainty remains about in-stream/in-river losses of organic carbon. This study presents an empirical method to assess the nonconservative behavior of fluvial DOC at continental scale. An empirical DOC flux model was trained on two different subsets of training catchments, one with catchments smaller than 2,000 km2 (n = 246, avg. 494 km2) and one with catchments larger than 2,000 km2 (n = 207, avg. 26,525 km2). A variety of potential predictors and controlling factors of fluvial DOC fluxes is discussed. The predictors retained for the final DOC flux models are runoff, slope gradient, land cover, and areal proportions of wetlands. According to the spatially explicit extrapolation of the models, in North America south of 60°N, the total fluvial DOC flux from small catchments (25.8 Mt C a-1, std. err.: 12%) is higher than that from large catchments (19.9 Mt C a-1, std. err.: 10%), giving a total DOC loss of 5.9 Mt C a-1 (std. err.: 78%). As DOC losses in headwaters are not represented in this budget, the estimated DOC loss is rather a minimum value for the total DOC loss within the fluvial network.

  3. Investigating Alaskan methane and carbon dioxide fluxes using measurements from the CARVE tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Miller, John B.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Commane, Roisin; Dinardo, Steven; Henderson, John M.; Lindaas, Jacob; Lin, John C.; Luus, Kristina A.; Newberger, Tim; Tans, Pieter; Wofsy, Steven C.; Wolter, Sonja; Miller, Charles E.

    2016-04-01

    Northern high-latitude carbon sources and sinks, including those resulting from degrading permafrost, are thought to be sensitive to the rapidly warming climate. Because the near-surface atmosphere integrates surface fluxes over large ( ˜ 500-1000 km) scales, atmospheric monitoring of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) mole fractions in the daytime mixed layer is a promising method for detecting change in the carbon cycle throughout boreal Alaska. Here we use CO2 and CH4 measurements from a NOAA tower 17 km north of Fairbanks, AK, established as part of NASA's Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE), to investigate regional fluxes of CO2 and CH4 for 2012-2014. CARVE was designed to use aircraft and surface observations to better understand and quantify the sensitivity of Alaskan carbon fluxes to climate variability. We use high-resolution meteorological fields from the Polar Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model (hereafter, WRF-STILT), along with the Polar Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (PolarVPRM), to investigate fluxes of CO2 in boreal Alaska using the tower observations, which are sensitive to large areas of central Alaska. We show that simulated PolarVPRM-WRF-STILT CO2 mole fractions show remarkably good agreement with tower observations, suggesting that the WRF-STILT model represents the meteorology of the region quite well, and that the PolarVPRM flux magnitudes and spatial distribution are generally consistent with CO2 mole fractions observed at the CARVE tower. One exception to this good agreement is that during the fall of all 3 years, PolarVPRM cannot reproduce the observed CO2 respiration. Using the WRF-STILT model, we find that average CH4 fluxes in boreal Alaska are somewhat lower than flux estimates by Chang et al. (2014) over all of Alaska for May-September 2012; we also find that enhancements appear to persist during some wintertime

  4. Steel slag carbonation in a flow-through reactor system: the role of fluid-flux.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Eleanor J; Williams-Jones, Anthony E; Migdisov, Artashes A

    2015-01-01

    Steel production is currently the largest industrial source of atmospheric CO2. As annual steel production continues to grow, the need for effective methods of reducing its carbon footprint increases correspondingly. The carbonation of the calcium-bearing phases in steel slag generated during basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel production, in particular its major constituent, larnite {Ca2SiO4}, which is a structural analogue of olivine {(MgFe)2SiO4}, the main mineral subjected to natural carbonation in peridotites, offers the potential to offset some of these emissions. However, the controls on the nature and efficiency of steel slag carbonation are yet to be completely understood. Experiments were conducted exposing steel slag grains to a CO2-H2O mixture in both batch and flow-through reactors to investigate the impact of temperature, fluid flux, and reaction gradient on the dissolution and carbonation of steel slag. The results of these experiments show that dissolution and carbonation of BOF steel slag are more efficient in a flow-through reactor than in the batch reactors used in most previous studies. Moreover, they show that fluid flux needs to be optimized in addition to grain size, pressure, and temperature, in order to maximize the efficiency of carbonation. Based on these results, a two-stage reactor consisting of a high and a low fluid-flux chamber is proposed for CO2 sequestration by steel slag carbonation, allowing dissolution of the slag and precipitation of calcium carbonate to occur within a single flow-through system. PMID:25597686

  5. Magnitude and Uncertainty of Carbon Pools and Fluxes in the US Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, N.; Saatchi, S. S.; Fore, A.; Yu, Y.; Woodall, C. W.; Ganguly, S.; Nemani, R. R.; Hagen, S.; Birdsey, R.; Brown, S.; Salas, W.; Johnson, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    Sassan Saatchi1,2, Stephan Hagen3, Christopher Woodall4 , Sangram Ganguly,5 Nancy Harris6, Sandra Brown7, Timothy Pearson7, Alexander Fore1, Yifan Yu1, Rama Nemani5, Gong Zhang5, William Salas4, Roger Cooke81 NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA2 Institute of Environment and Sustainability, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA3 Applied Geosolutions, 55 Main Street Suit 125, Newmarket, NH 03857, USA4 USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Saint Paul, MN 55108, USA5 NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA6 Forests Program, World Resources Institute, Washington, DC, 20002, USA7 Winrock International, Ecosystem Services Unit, Arlington, VA 22202, USA8 Risk Analysis Resources for the Future, Washington DC 20036-1400Assessment of the carbon sinks and sources associated with greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes across the US forestlands is a priority of the national climate mitigation policy. However, estimates of fluxes from the land sector are less precise compared to other sectors because of the large sources of uncertainty in quantifying the carbon pools, emissions, and removals associated with anthropogenic (land use) and natural changes in the US forestlands. As part of the NASA's Carbon Monitoring System, we developed a methodology based on a combination of ground inventory and space observations to develop spatially refined carbon pools and fluxes including the gross emissions and sequestration of carbon at each 1-ha land unit across the forestlands in the continental United States (CONUS) for the period of 2006-2010. Here, we provide the magnitude and uncertainty of multiple pools and fluxes of the US forestlands and outline the observational requirements to reduce the uncertainties for developing national climate mitigation policies based on the carbon sequestration capacity of the US forest lands. Keywords: forests, carbon pools, greenhouse gas, land use, attribution

  6. Improving SWAT for simulating water and carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qichun; Zhang, Xuesong

    2016-11-01

    As a widely used watershed model for assessing impacts of anthropogenic and natural disturbances on water quantity and quality, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has not been extensively tested in simulating water and carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems. Here, we examine SWAT simulations of evapotranspiration (ET), net primary productivity (NPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and plant biomass at ten AmeriFlux forest sites across the U.S. We identify unrealistic radiation use efficiency (Bio_E), large leaf to biomass fraction (Bio_LEAF), and missing phosphorus supply from parent material weathering as the primary causes for the inadequate performance of the default SWAT model in simulating forest dynamics. By further revising the relevant parameters and processes, SWAT's performance is substantially improved. Based on the comparison between the improved SWAT simulations and flux tower observations, we discuss future research directions for further enhancing model parameterization and representation of water and carbon cycling for forests. PMID:27401278

  7. Integrating flux, satellite, and proximal optical data for an improved understanding of ecosystem carbon uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamon, J. A.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Garrity, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The different scales and methods of satellite observations and flux measurements present challenges for data integration that can be partly addressed by the addition of scale-appropriate optical sampling. Proximal optical measurement facilitates experimental approaches that can inform upscaling, satellite validation, and lead to better understanding of controls on carbon fluxes and other ecosystem processes. Using the framework of the light-use efficiency model, this presentation will review efforts to explore the controls on ecosystem-atmosphere carbon fluxes using a variety of novel optical sensors and platforms. Topics of appropriate sampling methodology, scaling and data aggregation will also be considered, with examples of how information content and interpretation of optical data can be scale-dependent. Key challenges include informatics solutions that handle large, multi-dimensional data volumes and contextual information, including information about sampling protocols and scale. Key opportunities include the assessment of vegetation functional diversity with optical sensors.

  8. Fear of predation alters soil carbon dioxide flux and nitrogen content.

    PubMed

    Sitvarin, Michael I; Rypstra, Ann L

    2014-06-01

    Predators are known to have both consumptive and non-consumptive effects (NCEs) on their prey that can cascade to affect lower trophic levels. Non-consumptive interactions often drive these effects, though the majority of studies have been conducted in aquatic- or herbivory-based systems. Here, we use a laboratory study to examine how linkages between an above-ground predator and a detritivore influence below-ground properties. We demonstrate that predators can depress soil metabolism (i.e. CO2 flux) and soil nutrient content via both consumptive and non-consumptive interactions with detritivores, and that the strength of isolated NCEs is comparable to changes resulting from predation. Changes in detritivore abundance and activity in response to predators and the fear of predation likely mediate interactions with the soil microbe community. Our results underscore the need to explore these mechanisms at large scales, considering the disproportionate extinction risk faced by predators and the importance of soils in the global carbon cycle. PMID:24966204

  9. Increasing diurnal and seasonal amplitudes in carbon and water fluxes after conversion from arable to grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, S. H.; Auerswald, K.; Bernhofer, C.

    2012-04-01

    Land-use change is a topical scientific and political issue due to its potential to affect atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Conversion of arable land to permanent grassland has been proposed as a strategy to sequester atmospheric CO2 into soil organic matter. In this context, eddy covariance measurements were recorded over grazed grassland at a site in the temperate region of southern Germany (annual precipitation 775 mm, annual temperature 9°C) from 2002 to 2008. The site had been arable farm land for decades but from 2000 it became grassland grazed by cattle (Bos taurus). Over the study period the total ecosystem respiration (TER), gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET) increased during the growing season and, therefore, in annual totals (by about 80%, 85%, and 33%, respectively, during seven-year period). A similar trend could not be found for net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon in the daily to annual sums, but was evident in the separated day and night fluxes of NEE. There was no trend in the meteorological conditions (temperature, precipitation) causing the trends. The main effect of the land use change was not a change in C sequestration but an increase in temperature sensitivity; in grassland the C distribution within the soil is closer to the surface than in arable systems, which causes the daily and yearly variations in C balance to increase.

  10. A coupled carbon and plant hydraulic model to predict ecosystem carbon and water flux responses to disturbance and environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. S.; Ewers, B. E.; Roberts, D. E.; McDowell, N. G.; Pendall, E.; Frank, J. M.; Reed, D. E.; Massman, W. J.; Mitra, B.

    2011-12-01

    Changing climate drivers including temperature, humidity, precipitation, and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations directly control land surface exchanges of CO2 and water. In a profound way these responses are modulated by disturbances that are driven by or exacerbated by climate change. Predicting these changes is challenging given that the feedbacks between environmental controls, disturbances, and fluxes are complex. Flux data in areas of bark beetle outbreaks in the western U.S.A. show differential declines in carbon and water flux in response to the occlusion of xylem by associated fungi. For example, bark beetle infestation at the GLEES AmeriFlux site manifested in a decline in summer water use efficiency to 60% in the year after peak infestation compared to previous years, and no recovery of carbon uptake following a period of high vapor pressure deficit. This points to complex feedbacks between disturbance and differential ecosystem reaction and relaxation responses. Theory based on plant hydraulics and extending to include links to carbon storage and exhaustion has potential for explaining these dynamics with simple, yet rigorous models. In this spirit we developed a coupled model that combines an existing model of canopy water and carbon flow, TREES [e.g., Loranty et al., 2010], with the Sperry et al., [1998] plant hydraulic model. The new model simultaneously solves carbon uptake and losses along with plant hydraulics, and allows for testing specific hypotheses on feedbacks between xylem dysfunction, stomatal and non-stomatal controls on photosynthesis and carbon allocation, and autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. These are constrained through gas exchange, root vulnerability to cavitation, sap flux, and eddy covariance data in a novel model complexity-testing framework. Our analysis focuses on an ecosystem gradient spanning sagebrush to subalpine forests. Our modeling results support hypotheses on feedbacks between hydraulic dysfunction and 1) non