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Sample records for affects osteoblast behaviour

  1. Osteoclasts but not osteoblasts are affected by a calcified surface treated with zoledronic acid in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Schindeler, Aaron . E-mail: AaronS@chw.edu.au; Little, David G.

    2005-12-16

    Bisphosphonates are potent inhibitors of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Recent interest has centered on the effects of bisphosphonates on osteoblasts. Chronic dosing of osteoblasts with solubilized bisphosphonates has been reported to enhance osteogenesis and mineralization in vitro. However, this methodology poorly reflects the in vivo situation, where free bisphosphonate becomes rapidly bound to mineralized bone surfaces. To establish a more clinically relevant cell culture model, we cultured bone cells on calcium phosphate coated quartz discs pre-treated with the potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid (ZA). Binding studies utilizing [{sup 14}C]-labeled ZA confirmed that the bisphosphonate bound in a concentration-dependent manner over the 1-50 {mu}M dose range. When grown on ZA-treated discs, the viability of bone-marrow derived osteoclasts was greatly reduced, while the viability and mineralization of the osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line were largely unaffected. This suggests that only bone resorbing cells are affected by bound bisphosphonate. However, this system does not account for transient exposure to unbound bisphosphonate in the hours following a clinical dosing. To model this event, we transiently treated osteoblasts with ZA in the absence of a calcified surface. Osteoblasts proved highly resistant to all transitory treatment regimes, even when utilizing ZA concentrations that prevented mineralization and/or induced cell death when dosed chronically. This study represents a pharmacologically more relevant approach to modeling bisphosphonate treatment on cultured bone cells and implies that bisphosphonate therapies may not directly affect osteoblasts at bone surfaces.

  2. Osteoblasts growth behaviour on bio-based calcium carbonate aragonite nanocrystal.

    PubMed

    Shafiu Kamba, Abdullahi; Zakaria, Zuki Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanocrystals derived from cockle shells emerge to present a good concert in bone tissue engineering because of their potential to mimic the composition, structure, and properties of native bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological response of CaCO3 nanocrystals on hFOB 1.19 and MC3T3 E-1 osteoblast cells in vitro. Cell viability and proliferation were assessed by MTT and BrdU assays, and LDH was measured to determine the effect of CaCO3 nanocrystals on cell membrane integrity. Cellular morphology was examined by SEM and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that CaCO3 nanocrystals had no toxic effects to some extent. Cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and protein synthesis were enhanced by the nanocrystals when compared to the control. Cellular interactions were improved, as indicated by SEM and fluorescent microscopy. The production of VEGF and TGF-1 was also affected by the CaCO3 nanocrystals. Therefore, bio-based CaCO3 nanocrystals were shown to stimulate osteoblast differentiation and improve the osteointegration process. PMID:24734228

  3. Strontium ranelate affects signaling from mechanically-stimulated osteocytes towards osteoclasts and osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Astrid D; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2013-03-01

    Strontium Ranelate (SrRan) is used to decrease the risk of bone fractures. Any factor that alters the release of paracrine signals by osteocytes in response to mechanical stimuli potentially affects bone mass and structure, and thus fracture resistance. We hypothesized that SrRan affects paracrine signaling from mechanically-stimulated osteocytes towards osteoclast-precursors and osteoblasts. MLO-Y4 osteocytes were cultured for 24h with SrRan (0.1-3mM) and either or not mechanically stimulated by pulsating fluid flow (PFF; 0.7 ± 0.3 Pa, 5 Hz) for 60 min. Nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) release, and expression of mechanoresponsive genes were quantified. Conditioned medium (CM) from osteocytes was added to mouse bone marrow cells for 7 days to assess osteoclastogenesis, or MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts for 4-16 days to measure osteogenic gene expression. SrRan (3mM) enhanced NO and PGE(2) release to the same extent in static osteocytes (NO: 1.6-fold; PGE(2): 2.8-fold) and PFF-stimulated osteocytes (NO: 1.3-fold; PGE(2): 2.6-fold). CM from PFF-treated osteocytes without SrRan enhanced Ki67 expression but reduced Runx2 and Ocn expression in osteoblasts. This effect on gene expression was not observed with CM obtained from osteocytes treated with the combination of PFF and 3mM SrRan. CM from PFF-treated osteocytes inhibited osteoclastogenesis by 1.9-fold. The combination of PFF and 3mM SrRan reduced osteocyte-stimulated osteoclastogenesis even more strongly (4.3-fold). In conclusion, SrRan affects paracrine signaling between mechanically-stimulated MLO-Y4 osteocytes and both osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors. The positive effects of SrRan on bone fracture resistance may thus be partly explained by altered paracrine signaling by osteocytes. PMID:23234812

  4. Osteoblast-specific expression of Fra-2/AP-1 controls adiponectin and osteocalcin expression and affects metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bozec, Aline; Bakiri, Latifa; Jimenez, Maria; Rosen, Evan D; Catalá-Lehnen, Philip; Schinke, Thorsten; Schett, Georg; Amling, Michael; Wagner, Erwin F

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have established that the skeleton functions as an endocrine organ affecting metabolism through the osteoblast-derived hormone osteocalcin (Ocn). However, it is not fully understood how many transcription factors expressed in osteoblasts regulate the endocrine function. Here, we show that mice with osteoblast-specific deletion of Fra-2 (Fosl2) have low bone mass but increased body weight. In contrast, transgenic expression of Fra-2 in osteoblasts leads to increased bone mass and decreased body weight accompanied by reduced serum glucose and insulin levels, improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. In addition, mice lacking Fra-2 have reduced levels of circulating Ocn, but high adiponectin (Adipoq), whereas Fra-2 transgenic mice exhibit high Ocn and low Adipoq levels. Moreover, we found that Adipoq was expressed in osteoblasts and that this expression was transcriptionally repressed by Fra-2. These results demonstrate that Fra-2 expression in osteoblasts represents a novel paradigm for a transcription factor controlling the endocrine function of the skeleton. PMID:24046454

  5. Bioactive glass coatings affect the behavior of osteoblast-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Foppiano, Silvia; Marshall, Sally J.; Marshall, Grayson W.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2007-01-01

    Functionally graded coatings (FGCs) of bioactive glass on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) were fabricated by the enameling technique. These innovative coatings may be an alternative to plasma-sprayed, hydroxyapatite-coated implants. Previously we determined that a preconditioning treatment in simulated body fluid (SBF) helped to stabilize FGCs (Foppiano, S., et al., Acta Biomater, 2006; 2(2):133-42). The primary goal of this work was to assess the in vitro cytocompatibility of preconditioned FGCs with MC3T3-E1.4 mouse pre-osteoblastic cells. We evaluated cell adhesion, proliferation and mineralization on FGCs in comparison to uncoated Ti6Al4V and tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). No difference in cell adhesion was identified, whereas proliferation was significantly different on all materials, being highest on FGCs followed by TCPS and Ti6Al4V. Qualitative and quantitative mineralization assays indicated that mineralization occurred on all materials. The amount of inorganic phosphate released by the mineralizing layers was significantly different, being highest on TCPS, followed by FGC and uncoated Ti6Al4V. The secondary objective of this work was to assess the ability of the FGCs to affect gene expression, indirectly, by means of their dissolution products, which was assessed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The FGC dissolution products induced a 2-fold increase in the expression of Runx-2, and a 20% decrease in the expression of collagen type 1 with respect to TCPS extract. These genes are regulators of osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, respectively. The findings of this study indicate that preconditioned FGCs are cytocompatible and suggest that future work may allow composition changes to induce preferred gene expression. PMID:17466608

  6. Symbiont infection affects aphid defensive behaviours.

    PubMed

    Dion, Emilie; Polin, Sarah Erika; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Outreman, Yannick

    2011-10-23

    Aphids harbour both an obligate bacterial symbiont, Buchnera aphidicola, and a wide range of facultative ones. Facultative symbionts can modify morphological, developmental and physiological host traits that favour their spread within aphid populations. We experimentally investigated the idea that symbionts may also modify aphid behavioural traits to enhance their transmission. Aphids exhibit many behavioural defences against enemies. Despite their benefits, these behaviours have some associated costs leading to reduction in aphid reproduction. Some aphid individuals harbour a facultative symbiont Hamiltonella defensa that provides protection against parasitoids. By analysing aphid behaviours in the presence of parasitoids, we showed that aphids infected with H. defensa exhibited reduced aggressiveness and escape reactions compared with uninfected aphids. The aphid and the symbiont have both benefited from these behavioural changes: both partners reduced the fitness decrements associated with the behavioural defences. Such symbiont-induced changes of behavioural defences may have consequences for coevolutionary processes between host organisms and their enemies. PMID:21490007

  7. Mobbing Behaviour: Victims and the Affected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erturk, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the level of mobbing behaviour faced by teachers and managers working in primary schools, their responses to such behaviour and the difference in these responses according to the gender variable. The sample of the research consists of a total of 1,316 teachers and managers including 691 men and 625…

  8. Innovative macroporous granules of nanostructured-hydroxyapatite agglomerates: bioactivity and osteoblast-like cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, M S; Fernandes, M H; Monteiro, F J

    2010-12-01

    To modulate the biological response of implantable granules, two types of bioactive porous granules composed of nanostructured-hydroxyapatite (HA) agglomerates and microstructured-HA, respectively, were prepared using a polyurethane sponge impregnation and burnout method. The resulting granules presented a highly porous structure with interconnected porosity. Both types of granules were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Results showed that nanostructed-HA granules presented higher surface area and porosity than microstructured-HA granules. In vitro testing using MG63 human osteoblast-like cells showed that on both types of surfaces cells were able to adhere, proliferate, and migrate through the macropores, and a higher growth rate was achieved on nanostructured-HA granules than on microstructured-HA granules (76 and 40%, respectively). In addition, these cells maintained similar expression levels of osteoblastic-associated markers namely collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, bone morphogenetic protein-2, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and osteoprotegerin. These innovative nanostructured-HA granules may be considered as promising bioceramic alternative matrixes for bone regeneration and drug release application. PMID:20845490

  9. Cobalt and chromium exposure affects osteoblast function and impairs the mineralization of prosthesis surfaces in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shah, Karan M; Wilkinson, Jeremy Mark; Gartland, Alison

    2015-11-01

    Cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) ions and nanoparticles equivalent to those released through tribo-corrosion of prosthetic metal-on-metal (MOM) bearings and taper junctions are detrimental to osteoblast activity and function in vitro when examined as individual species. Here we examined the effects of Co(2+):Cr(3+) and Co(2+):Cr(6+) combinations on osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cellular activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization to better reflect clinical exposure conditions in vivo. We also assessed the effect of Co(2+):Cr(3+) combinations and Co:Cr nanoparticles on SaOS-2 cell osteogenic responses on grit-blasted, plasma-sprayed titanium-coated, and hydroxyapatite-coated prosthesis surfaces. Cellular activity and ALP activity were reduced to a greater extent with combination treatments compared to individual ions. Co(2+) and Cr(3+) interacted additively and synergistically to reduce cellular activity and ALP activity, respectively, while the Co(2+) with Cr(6+) combination was dominated by the effect of Cr(6+) alone. Mineralization by osteoblasts was greater on hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces compared to grit-blasted and plasma-sprayed titanium-coated surfaces. Treatments with Co(2+):Cr(3+) ions and Co:Cr nanoparticles reduced the percentage mineralization on all surfaces, with hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces having the least reduction. In conclusion, our data suggests that previous studies investigating individual metal ions underestimate their potential clinical effects on osteoblast activity. Furthermore, the data suggests that hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces may modulate osteoblast responses to metal debris. PMID:25929464

  10. Web-based Factors Affecting Online Purchasing Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; Sze Yan, Ng; Zakuan, Norhayati; Zaidi Bahari, Ahamad; Jusoh, Ahmad

    2013-06-01

    The growing use of internet and online purchasing among young consumers in Malaysia provides a huge prospect in e-commerce market, specifically for B2C segment. In this market, if E-marketers know the web-based factors affecting online buyers' behaviour, and the effect of these factors on behaviour of online consumers, then they can develop their marketing strategies to convert potential customers into active one, while retaining existing online customers. Review of previous studies related to the online purchasing behaviour in B2C market has point out that the conceptualization and empirical validation of the online purchasing behaviour of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literate users, or ICT professional, in Malaysia has not been clearly addressed. This paper focuses on (i) web-based factors which online buyers (ICT professional) keep in mind while shopping online; and (ii) the effect of web-based factors on online purchasing behaviour. Based on the extensive literature review, a conceptual framework of 24 items of five factors was constructed to determine web-based factors affecting online purchasing behaviour of ICT professional. Analysis of data was performed based on the 310 questionnaires, which were collected using a stratified random sampling method, from ICT undergraduate students in a public university in Malaysia. The Exploratory factor analysis performed showed that five factors affecting online purchase behaviour are Information Quality, Fulfilment/Reliability/Customer Service, Website Design, Quick and Details, and Privacy/Security. The result of Multiple Regression Analysis indicated that Information Quality, Quick and Details, and Privacy/Security affect positively online purchase behaviour. The results provide a usable model for measuring web-based factors affecting buyers' online purchase behaviour in B2C market, as well as for online shopping companies to focus on the factors that will increase customers' online purchase.

  11. Factors circulating in the blood of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients affect osteoblast maturation – Description of a novel in vitro model

    SciTech Connect

    Ehnert, Sabrina; Freude, Thomas; Ihle, Christoph; Mayer, Larissa; Braun, Bianca; Graeser, Jessica; Flesch, Ingo; and others

    2015-03-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most frequent metabolic disorders in industrialized countries. Among other complications, T2DM patients have an increased fracture risk and delayed fracture healing. We have demonstrated that supraphysiological glucose and insulin levels inhibit primary human osteoblasts' maturation. We aimed at developing a more physiologically relevant in vitro model to analyze T2DM-mediated osteoblast changes. Therefore, SCP-1-immortalized pre-osteoblasts were differentiated with T2DM or control (non-obese and obese) sera. Between both control groups, no significant changes were observed. Proliferation was significantly increased (1.69-fold), while AP activity and matrix mineralization was significantly reduced in the T2DM group. Expression levels of osteogenic marker genes and transcription factors were altered, e.g. down-regulation of RUNX2 and SP-7 or up-regulation of STAT1, in the T2DM group. Active TGF-β levels were significantly increased (1.46-fold) in T2DM patients' sera. SCP-1 cells treated with these sera showed significantly increased TGF-β signaling (2.47-fold). Signaling inhibition effectively restored osteoblast maturation in the T2DM group. Summarizing our data, SCP-1 cells differentiated in the presence of T2DM patients' serum exhibit reduced osteoblast function. Thus, this model has a high physiological impact, as it can identify circulating factors in T2DM patients' blood that may affect bone function, e.g. TGF-β. - Highlights: • We present here a physiologically relevant in vitro model for diabetic osteopathy. • Blood of T2DM patients contains factors that affect osteoblasts' function. • The model developed here can be used to identify these factors, e.g. TGF-β. • Blocking TGF-β signaling partly rescues the osteoblasts' function in the T2DM group. • The model is useful to demonstrate the role of single factors in diabetic osteopathy.

  12. Episodic disorders of behaviour and affect after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Eames, Peter Eames; Wood, Rodger Ll

    2003-01-01

    Psychological disorders that follow traumatic brain injury are possibly more complex and diverse than those associated with other forms of "brain damage". These may include organic aggressive, or organic affective syndromes that are episodic in nature and therefore require a more specific diagnosis, a different classification, and a different approach to treatment. Consequently, it is necessary for clinicians to learn to distinguish between "primary" psychiatric illnesses and those disorders of behavioural control and mood that stem specifically from brain injury. There is relatively little in the clinical literature that explains the relationship between variable states of behaviour, mood or temperament, and clinical disorders that may have long-term implications for patient management. This concept paper therefore addresses abnormalities of mood and behaviour that are episodic in character and are not recognisably included in the DSM and ICD classifications of psychological or psychiatric disorders. PMID:21854336

  13. Slight Changes in the Mechanical Stimulation Affects Osteoblast- and Osteoclast-Like Cells in Co-Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kadow-Romacker, Anke; Duda, Georg N.; Bormann, Nicole; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Wildemann, Britt

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells are responsible for coordinated bone maintenance, illustrated by a balanced formation and resorption. Both parameters appear to be influenced by mechanical constrains acting on each of these cell types individually. We hypothesized that the interactions between both cell types are also influenced by mechanical stimulation. Methods Co-cultures of osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells were stimulated with 1,100 µstrain, 0.1 or 0.3 Hz for 1–5 min/day over 5 days. Two different setups depending on the differentiation of the osteoclast-like cells were used: i) differentiation assay for the fusion of pre-osteoclasts to osteoclasts, ii) resorption assay to determine the activity level of osteoclast-like cells. Results In the differentiation assay (co-culture of osteoblasts with unfused osteoclast precursor cells) the mechanical stimulation resulted in a significant decrease of collagen-1 and osteocalcin produced by osteoblast-like cells. Significantly more TRAP-iso5b was measured after stimulation for 3 min with 0.1 Hz, indicating enhanced osteoclastogenesis. In the resorption assay (co-culture of osteoblasts with fused osteoclasts) the stimulation for 3 min with 0.3 Hz significantly increased the resorption activity of osteoclasts measured by the pit formation and the collagen resorption. The same mechanical stimulation resulted in an increased collagen-1 production by the osteoblast-like cells. The ratio of RANKL/OPG was not different between the groups. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that already small changes in duration or frequency of mechanical stimulation had significant consequences for the behavior of osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells in co-culture, which partially depend on the differentiation status of the osteoclast-like cells. PMID:24474895

  14. Behavioural phenotype affects social interactions in an animal network

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Thomas W; Samanta, Madhumita; Lindström, Jan; Royle, Nick J

    2008-01-01

    Animal social networks can be extremely complex and are characterized by highly non-random interactions between group members. However, very little is known about the underlying factors affecting interaction preferences, and hence network structure. One possibility is that behavioural differences between individuals, such as how bold or shy they are, can affect the frequency and distribution of their interactions within a network. We tested this using individually marked three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), and found that bold individuals had fewer overall interactions than shy fish, but tended to distribute their interactions more evenly across all group members. Shy fish, on the other hand, tended to associate preferentially with a small number of other group members, leading to a highly skewed distribution of interactions. This was mediated by the reduced tendency of shy fish to move to a new location within the tank when they were interacting with another individual; bold fish showed no such tendency and were equally likely to move irrespective of whether they were interacting or not. The results show that animal social network structure can be affected by the behavioural composition of group members and have important implications for understanding the spread of information and disease in social groups. PMID:18647713

  15. Large Gradient High Magnetic Fields Affect Osteoblast Ultrastructure and Function by Disrupting Collagen I or Fibronectin/αβ1 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Ai-Rong; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jing-Bao; Wang, Yang; Di, Sheng-Meng; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The superconducting magnet generates a field and field gradient product that can levitate diamagnetic materials. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. The effects of LG-HMF on the ultrastructure and function of osteoblast-like cells (MG-63 and MC3T3-E1) and the underlying mechanism were investigated by transmission electromicroscopy (TEM), MTT, and cell western (ICW) assays. Under LG-HMF significant morphologic changes in osteoblast-like cells occurred, including expansion of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, an increased number of lysosomes, distorted microvilli, and aggregates of actin filaments. Compared to controls, cell viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) secretion were significantly increased, and collagen I (col I), fibronectin (FN), vinculin, integrin α3, αv, and β1 expression were changed under LG-HMF conditions. In conclusion, LG-HMF affects osteoblast ultrastructure, cell viability, and ALP secretion, and the changes caused by LG-HMF may be related to disrupting col I or FN/αβ1 integrin. PMID:23382804

  16. Can the structure of an explosive caldera affect eruptive behaviour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willcox, C. P.; Branney, M.; Carrasco-Nuñez, G.; Barford, D.

    2010-12-01

    Explosive caldera volcanoes cause catastrophic events at the Earth’s surface, yet we know little about how their internal structures evolve with time, and whether this can affect both differentiation and eruptive behaviour. Distinguishing how structural evolution impacts upon eruption behaviour and periodicity is challenging because the resolution of eruption frequencies can be difficult at ancient exhumed calderas, whereas at young volcanoes, most of the caldera floor faults and associated conduits are hidden. Some exhumed calderas reveal caldera floor faults and conduits; some of these apparently underwent a single collapse event that was piecemeal, i.e. fragmentation into several, variously subsided fault-blocks (e.g. Scafell caldera, UK). In contrast, the present study tests whether some caldera volcanoes may become more intensely fractured with time as a result of successive distinct caldera-collapse eruptions (“multi-cyclic calderas”). It has been proposed that this scenario could lead to an increase in eruption frequency, with smaller eruptions over time. Magma leakage through the increasingly fractured volcano might also lead to less evolved compositions with time due to shorter residence times. We have returned to the volcano where this hypothesis was formulated, the ~ 20 km diameter, hydrothermally active Los Humeros caldera in eastern central México. We aim to see how well the structural evolution of this modern caldera can be reconstructed, and whether changes in structure affected the styles and periodicity of large explosive eruptions. How a caldera evolves structurally could have important implications for predicting future catastrophic eruptions. Detailed structural mapping (e.g. of fault scarps, vent positions, and tilted strata), documentation of draping and cross-cutting field relations, together with logging, optical and SEM petrography, XRF major and trace element geochemistry and new 40Ar-39Ar and radiocarbon dating of the pyroclastic

  17. Effect of hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials on human osteoblast phenotype.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L; Penolazzi, L; Torreggiani, E; Farina, R; Lambertini, E; Vecchiatini, R; Piva, R

    2010-03-01

    The present study evaluated human primary osteoblasts and two different osteoblast-like cell lines behaviour when cultured in presence of different hydroxyapatite-based (HA) biomaterials (SINTlife-FIN-CERAMICA S.p.a., Faenza, Italy; Bio-Oss, Geistlich Biomaterials, Woulhusen, Switzerland; Biostite-GABA Vebas, San Giuliano Milanese, MI, Italy), focusing attention on the effect of HA/Biostite in terms of modulation of osteoblastic differentiation. Analysis were about adhesion, proliferation and mineralization activity. Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERalfa) expression and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) were measured as osteoblastic differentiation markers. Determination of viable cells was done with MTT colorimetric assay. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on biomaterial-treated cells. All hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials didn't affect cells morphology and viability, whereas only presence of HA/Biostite improved cells adhesion, growth and differentiation. Adhesion and spreading of the primary cells on HA/Biostite were the same showed by two different osteoblast-like cell lines. These results have important implications for both tissue-engineered bone grafts and enhancement of HA implants performance, to develop new teeth's supporting structure therapies and replacement. PMID:20357737

  18. Personality affects defensive behaviour of Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Oniscidea)

    PubMed Central

    Tuf, Ivan Hadrián; Drábková, Lucie; Šipoš, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated individual behavioural patterns of isopods expressed as tonic immobility following some intrusive treatments. Common rough woodlice, Porcellio scaber, were kept individually in plastic boxes and tested for tonic immobility repeatedly. Reactivity, sensitivity (number of stimuli needed to respond), and endurance of tonic immobility (TI) according three types of treatments (touch, squeeze, drop) were evaluated. Touch was the weakest treatment and it was necessary to repeat it a number of times to obtain a response; while squeeze and drop induced TI more frequently. Nevertheless, duration of the response persisted for a longer time with the touch treatment. Within each set of the three treatment, the strongest response was the third one, regardless of treatment type. Duration of reaction was affected by the size of the woodlouse, the smallest individuals feigning death for the shortest time. Despite body size, we found a significant individual pattern of endurance of TI among tested woodlice, which was stable across treatments as well as across time (5 repetitions during a 3 week period). Porcellio scaber is one of the first species of terrestrial isopods with documented personality traits. PMID:26261447

  19. Affective and Behavioural Variables: Reforms as Experiments to Produce a Civil Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitz-Gibbon, Carol T.

    2006-01-01

    Affective and behavioural indicators of the effects of schooling, and of other interventions, might be more important than cognitive indicators, particularly in the long run and considering the urgent need for civil societies. Examples are provided of the statistical properties of affective and behavioural indicators, and of their current use in…

  20. Targeted overexpression of the two colony-stimulating factor-1 isoforms in osteoblasts differentially affects bone loss in ovariectomized mice

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Gang-Qing; Wu, Jian-Jun; Ovadia, Shira; Troiano, Nancy; Sun, Ben Hua; Insogna, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF1) is one of two cytokines required for normal osteoclastogenesis. There are two major isoforms of CSF1, the cell-surface or membrane-bound isoform (mCSF1) and soluble CSF1 (sCSF1). Whether these isoforms serve nonredundant functions in bone is unclear. To explore this question, we generated transgenic mice expressing human sCSF1, human mCSF1, or both (s/mCSF1) in osteoblasts using the 2.3-kb rat αI-collagen promoter. Bone density determined by peripheral quantitative computed tomography was significantly reduced in mCSF1, sCSF1, and s/mCSF1 transgenic mice compared with wild-type animals. When analyzed by sex, sCSF1, and s/mCSF1, female animals but not mCSF1 female mice were found to have greater bone loss than their male littermates (−20 vs. −9.2%; P < 0.05 for sCSF1 and −21.6 vs. −11.2% for s/mCSF1; P < 0.01). By breeding CSF1 isoform-selective transgenic mice to an op/op background, mice were generated in which a single CSF1 isoform was the only source of the cytokine (sCSF1op/op and mCSF1op/op). Unlike osteoblast-targeted overexpression of mCSF1, selective transgenic expression of sCSF1 did not completely correct the op/op phenotype in 5-mo-old animals. Interestingly, compared with sham-ovariectomized mice of the same genotype, ovariectomy in sCSF1op/op mice led to a greater loss of spinal bone mineral density (22.1%) than was seen in either mCSF1op/op mice (12.9%) or in wild-type animals (10.9%). Our findings support the conclusion that sCSF1 and mCSF1 serve nonredundant functions in bone and that sCSF1 may play a role in mediating estrogen-deficiency bone loss. PMID:19141689

  1. Dicer ablation in osteoblasts by Runx2 driven cre-loxP recombination affects bone integrity, but not glucocorticoid-induced suppression of bone formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Baumgart, Mario; Groth, Marco; Wittmann, Jürgen; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Platzer, Matthias; Tuckermann, Jan P; Baschant, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) is one of the major side effects of long-term glucocorticoid (GC) therapy mediated mainly via the suppression of bone formation and osteoblast differentiation independently of GC receptor (GR) dimerization. Since microRNAs play a critical role in osteoblast differentiation processes, we investigated the role of Dicer dependent microRNAs in the GC-induced suppression of osteoblast differentiation. MicroRNA sequencing of dexamethasone-treated wild-type and GR dimer-deficient mesenchymal stromal cells revealed GC-controlled miRNA expression in a GR dimer-dependent and GR dimer-independent manner. To determine the functional relevance of mature miRNAs in GC-induced osteoblast suppression, mice with an osteoblast-specific deletion of Dicer (Dicer(Runx2Cre)) were exposed to glucocorticoids. In vitro generated Dicer-deficient osteoblasts were treated with dexamethasone and analyzed for proliferation, differentiation and mineralization capacity. In vivo, abrogation of Dicer-dependent miRNA biogenesis in osteoblasts led to growth retardation and impaired bone formation. However, subjecting these mice to GIO showed that bone formation was similar reduced in Dicer(Runx2Cre) mice and littermate control mice upon GC treatment. In line, differentiation of Dicer deficient osteoblasts was suppressed to the same extent as wild type cells by GC treatment. Therefore, Dicer-dependent small RNA biogenesis in osteoblasts plays only a minor role in the pathogenesis of GC-induced inhibition of bone formation. PMID:27554624

  2. Dicer ablation in osteoblasts by Runx2 driven cre-loxP recombination affects bone integrity, but not glucocorticoid-induced suppression of bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Baumgart, Mario; Groth, Marco; Wittmann, Jürgen; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Platzer, Matthias; Tuckermann, Jan P.; Baschant, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) is one of the major side effects of long-term glucocorticoid (GC) therapy mediated mainly via the suppression of bone formation and osteoblast differentiation independently of GC receptor (GR) dimerization. Since microRNAs play a critical role in osteoblast differentiation processes, we investigated the role of Dicer dependent microRNAs in the GC-induced suppression of osteoblast differentiation. MicroRNA sequencing of dexamethasone-treated wild-type and GR dimer-deficient mesenchymal stromal cells revealed GC-controlled miRNA expression in a GR dimer-dependent and GR dimer-independent manner. To determine the functional relevance of mature miRNAs in GC-induced osteoblast suppression, mice with an osteoblast-specific deletion of Dicer (DicerRunx2Cre) were exposed to glucocorticoids. In vitro generated Dicer-deficient osteoblasts were treated with dexamethasone and analyzed for proliferation, differentiation and mineralization capacity. In vivo, abrogation of Dicer-dependent miRNA biogenesis in osteoblasts led to growth retardation and impaired bone formation. However, subjecting these mice to GIO showed that bone formation was similar reduced in DicerRunx2Cre mice and littermate control mice upon GC treatment. In line, differentiation of Dicer deficient osteoblasts was suppressed to the same extent as wild type cells by GC treatment. Therefore, Dicer-dependent small RNA biogenesis in osteoblasts plays only a minor role in the pathogenesis of GC-induced inhibition of bone formation. PMID:27554624

  3. Factors Affecting Mothers' Healthcare-Seeking Behaviour for Childhood Illnesses in a Rural Nigerian Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdulraheem, I. S.; Parakoyi, D. B.

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate healthcare-seeking behaviour could prevent a significant number of child deaths and complications due to ill health. Improving mothers' care-seeking behaviour could also contribute in reducing a large number of child morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This article aims to determine factors affecting healthcare-seeking…

  4. Penile spines affect copulatory behaviour in a primate (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Dixson, A F

    1991-03-01

    Androgen-dependent, keratinized "spines" occur on the glans penis in many rodents, primates and other mammals. Since penile spines overlie dermal tactile receptors, they may play a role in copulatory behaviour. An experiment was conducted to test this hypothesis. Sixteen sexually experienced adult male marmosets were paired with ovariectomized females before, and after, removal of penile spines (using thioglycollate cream applied to the glans under anaesthesia) or a sham operation. Spine removal resulted in an increased duration of preintromission pelvic thrusting (mean +/- s.e.m. from 6.87 +/- 1.09 to 14.94 +/- 3.32 s, p = 0.05) and of intromitted thrusting (from 1.73 +/- 0.11 to 2.0 +/- 0.11 s, p less than 0.05). Three males exhibited partial intromissions during some postspinectomy tests, an effect which had not been observed prior to the operation. Sham operations had no behavioural effects. Results indicate that penile spines play a significant (but not indispensible) role in sensory feedback during copulation in this primate species. PMID:2062934

  5. Rising CO2 concentrations affect settlement behaviour of larval damselfishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, B. M.; Munday, P. L.; Jones, G. P.

    2012-03-01

    Reef fish larvae actively select preferred benthic habitat, relying on olfactory, visual and acoustic cues to discriminate between microhabitats at settlement. Recent studies show exposure to elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) impairs olfactory cue recognition in larval reef fishes. However, whether this alters the behaviour of settling fish or disrupts habitat selection is unknown. Here, the effect of elevated CO2 on larval behaviour and habitat selection at settlement was tested in three species of damselfishes (family Pomacentridae) that differ in their pattern of habitat use: Pomacentrus amboinensis (a habitat generalist), Pomacentrus chrysurus (a rubble specialist) and Pomacentrus moluccensis (a live coral specialist). Settlement-stage larvae were exposed to current-day CO2 levels or CO2 concentrations that could occur by 2100 (700 and 850 ppm) based on IPCC emission scenarios. First, pair-wise choice tests were performed using a two-channel flume chamber to test olfactory discrimination between hard coral, soft coral and coral rubble habitats. The habitat selected by settling fish was then compared among treatments using a multi-choice settlement experiment conducted overnight. Finally, settlement timing between treatments was compared across two lunar cycles for one of the species, P. chrysurus. Exposure to elevated CO2 disrupted the ability of larvae to discriminate between habitat odours in olfactory trials. However, this had no effect on the habitats selected at settlement when all sensory cues were available. The timing of settlement was dramatically altered by CO2 exposure, with control fish exhibiting peak settlement around the new moon, whereas fish exposed to 850 ppm CO2 displaying highest settlement rates around the full moon. These results suggest larvae can rely on other sensory information, such as visual cues, to compensate for impaired olfactory ability when selecting settlement habitat at small spatial scales. However, rising CO2 could cause larvae

  6. Large-scale climatic anomalies affect marine predator foraging behaviour and demography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bost, Charles A.; Cotté, Cedric; Terray, Pascal; Barbraud, Christophe; Bon, Cécile; Delord, Karine; Gimenez, Olivier; Handrich, Yves; Naito, Yasuhiko; Guinet, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-10-01

    Determining the links between the behavioural and population responses of wild species to environmental variations is critical for understanding the impact of climate variability on ecosystems. Using long-term data sets, we show how large-scale climatic anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere affect the foraging behaviour and population dynamics of a key marine predator, the king penguin. When large-scale subtropical dipole events occur simultaneously in both subtropical Southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, they generate tropical anomalies that shift the foraging zone southward. Consequently the distances that penguins foraged from the colony and their feeding depths increased and the population size decreased. This represents an example of a robust and fast impact of large-scale climatic anomalies affecting a marine predator through changes in its at-sea behaviour and demography, despite lack of information on prey availability. Our results highlight a possible behavioural mechanism through which climate variability may affect population processes.

  7. Large-scale climatic anomalies affect marine predator foraging behaviour and demography

    PubMed Central

    Bost, Charles A.; Cotté, Cedric; Terray, Pascal; Barbraud, Christophe; Bon, Cécile; Delord, Karine; Gimenez, Olivier; Handrich, Yves; Naito, Yasuhiko; Guinet, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Determining the links between the behavioural and population responses of wild species to environmental variations is critical for understanding the impact of climate variability on ecosystems. Using long-term data sets, we show how large-scale climatic anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere affect the foraging behaviour and population dynamics of a key marine predator, the king penguin. When large-scale subtropical dipole events occur simultaneously in both subtropical Southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, they generate tropical anomalies that shift the foraging zone southward. Consequently the distances that penguins foraged from the colony and their feeding depths increased and the population size decreased. This represents an example of a robust and fast impact of large-scale climatic anomalies affecting a marine predator through changes in its at-sea behaviour and demography, despite lack of information on prey availability. Our results highlight a possible behavioural mechanism through which climate variability may affect population processes. PMID:26506134

  8. Large-scale climatic anomalies affect marine predator foraging behaviour and demography.

    PubMed

    Bost, Charles A; Cotté, Cedric; Terray, Pascal; Barbraud, Christophe; Bon, Cécile; Delord, Karine; Gimenez, Olivier; Handrich, Yves; Naito, Yasuhiko; Guinet, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Determining the links between the behavioural and population responses of wild species to environmental variations is critical for understanding the impact of climate variability on ecosystems. Using long-term data sets, we show how large-scale climatic anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere affect the foraging behaviour and population dynamics of a key marine predator, the king penguin. When large-scale subtropical dipole events occur simultaneously in both subtropical Southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, they generate tropical anomalies that shift the foraging zone southward. Consequently the distances that penguins foraged from the colony and their feeding depths increased and the population size decreased. This represents an example of a robust and fast impact of large-scale climatic anomalies affecting a marine predator through changes in its at-sea behaviour and demography, despite lack of information on prey availability. Our results highlight a possible behavioural mechanism through which climate variability may affect population processes. PMID:26506134

  9. Mother-Child Affect and Emotion Socialization Processes across the Late Preschool Period: Predictions of Emerging Behaviour Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newland, Rebecca P.; Crnic, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined concurrent and longitudinal relations between maternal negative affective behaviour and child negative emotional expression in preschool age children with (n=96) or without (n=126) an early developmental risk, as well as the predictions of later behaviour problems. Maternal negative affective behaviour, child…

  10. FGF-2 induces the proliferation of human periodontal ligament cells and modulates their osteoblastic phenotype by affecting Runx2 expression in the presence and absence of osteogenic inducers

    PubMed Central

    AN, SHAOFENG; HUANG, XIANGYA; GAO, YAN; LING, JUNQI; HUANG, YIHUA; XIAO, YIN

    2015-01-01

    The exact phenotype of human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) remains a controversial area. Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) exhibits various functions and its effect on hPDLCs is also controversial. Therefore, the present study examined the effect of FGF-2 on the growth and osteoblastic phenotype of hPDLCs with or without osteogenic inducers (dexamethasone and β-glycerophosphate). FGF-2 was added to defined growth culture medium and osteogenic inductive culture medium. Cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and mineralization were measured. The selected differentiation markers, Runx2, collagen type I, α1 (Col1a1), osteocalcin (OCN) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), were investigated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Runx2 and OCN protein expression was measured by western blotting. FGF-2 significantly increased the proliferation of hPDLCs, but did not affect alkaline phosphatase activity. RT-qPCR analysis revealed enhanced mRNA expression of Runx2, OCN and EGFR, but suppressed Col1a1 gene expression in the absence of osteogenic inducers, whereas all these gene levels had no clear trend in their presence. The Runx2 protein expression was clearly increased, but the OCN protein level showed no evident trend. The mineralization assay demonstrated that FGF-2 inhibited mineralized matrix deposition with osteogenic inducers. These results suggested that FGF-2 induces the growth of immature hPDLCs, which is a competitive inhibitor of epithelial downgrowth, and suppresses their differentiation into mineralized tissue by affecting Runx2 expression. Therefore, this may lead to the acceleration of periodontal regeneration. PMID:26133673

  11. How will climate change affect vine behaviour in different soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibar, Urtzi; Aizpurua, Ana; Morales, Fermin; Pascual, Inmaculada; Unamunzaga, Olatz

    2014-05-01

    and water-deficit had a clear influence on the grape phenological development and composition, whilst soil affected root configuration and anthocyanins concentration. Effects of climate change and water availability on different soil conditions should be considered to take full advantage or mitigate the consequences of the future climate conditions.

  12. Teacher Interpersonal Behaviour and Secondary Students' Cognitive, Affective and Moral Outcomes in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivan, Atara; Chan, Dennis W. K.

    2013-01-01

    This study validated the Chinese version of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) in the Hong Kong context as well as examined the relationship between students' perceptions of interpersonal teacher behaviour and their cognitive, affective and moral learning outcomes. Data were collected with the QTI and four other measures of student…

  13. Comorbid LD and ADHD in Childhood: Socioemotional and Behavioural Adjustment and Parents' Positive and Negative Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Yagon, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined how vulnerability and protective factors at the individual level (child's disabilities; patterns of attachment), and at the family level (fathers'/mothers' affect), help explain differences in socioemotional and behavioural adjustment among children aged 8-12 years with comorbid learning disability (LD) and attention…

  14. Larval traits carry over to affect post-settlement behaviour in a common coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Dingeldein, Andrea L; White, J Wilson

    2016-07-01

    Most reef fishes begin life as planktonic larvae before settling to the reef, metamorphosing and entering the benthic adult population. Different selective forces determine survival in the planktonic and benthic life stages, but traits established in the larval stage may carry over to affect post-settlement performance. We tested the hypothesis that larval traits affect two key post-settlement fish behaviours: social group-joining and foraging. Certain larval traits of reef fishes are permanently recorded in the rings in their otoliths. In the bluehead wrasse (Thalassoma bifasciatum), prior work has shown that key larval traits recorded in otoliths (growth rate, energetic condition at settlement) carry over to affect post-settlement survival on the reef, with higher-larval-condition fish experiencing less post-settlement mortality. We hypothesized that this selective mortality is mediated by carry-over effects on post-settlement antipredator behaviours. We predicted that better-condition fish would forage less and be more likely to join groups, both behaviours that would reduce predation risk. We collected 550 recently settled bluehead wrasse (Thalassoma bifasciatum) from three reef sites off St. Croix (USVI) and performed two analyses. First, we compared each settler's larval traits to the size of its social group to determine whether larval traits influenced group-joining behaviour. Secondly, we observed foraging behaviour in a subset of grouped and solitary fish (n = 14) for 1-4 days post-settlement. We then collected the fish and tested whether larval traits influenced the proportion of time spent foraging. Body length at settlement, but not condition, affected group-joining behaviour; smaller fish were more likely to remain solitary or in smaller groups. However, both greater length and better condition were associated with greater proportions of time spent foraging over four consecutive days post-settlement. Larval traits carry over to affect post

  15. Chronic low dose tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) suppresses early bone accrual in young mice by inhibiting osteoblasts without affecting osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, L C; Chen, H; Lu, X; Nanes, M S

    2013-09-01

    The inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is known to cause bone resorption and inhibit bone formation in arthritis and aging but less is known about TNF effects in the young growing skeleton. While investigating the mechanism of bone loss in TNF transgenic mice, we identified an early TNF-sensitive period marked by suppression of osteoblasts and bone accrual as the sole mechanism of TNF action, without an effect on osteoclasts or bone resorption. TgTNF mice express low concentrations of hTNFα (≤5 pg/ml). Osteoblasts cultured from TgTNF mice express reduced levels of RUNX2, Osx, alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin and have delayed formation of mineralized nodules. Early accrual of bone in TgTNF mice is suppressed until 6 weeks of age, after which the rate of bone accrual normalizes without catch up. Histomorphometry revealed that TgTNF mice fail to generate a transient surge in osteoblast number that is seen in wild type (WT) mice at 4 weeks. Osteoclasts, TRAP staining, erosive surfaces, serum CTx, and OPG/RANKL expression did not differ between young TgTNF and WT mice. Canonical Wnts and signaling through β-catenin were reduced in TgTNF mice at 4 weeks and partially recovered by 12 weeks, associated with reduced cytoplasm to nuclear transfer of β-catenin and Wnt regulated genes. TgTNF mice were crossed with BatGal Wnt reporter mice. Active Wnt signaling in tibial trabecular lining cells was reduced in TgTNF mice at 4 weeks compared to control littermates. Our results demonstrate that a low dose inflammatory stimulus is sufficient to inhibit the early surge in osteoblasts and optimal bone formation of young mice independent of changes in osteoclasts. TNF inhibition of the Wnt pathway contributes to the suppression of osteoblasts. PMID:23756233

  16. Detection of genetic variants affecting cattle behaviour and their impact on milk production: a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Juliane; Brand, Bodo; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Graunke, Katharina L; Langbein, Jan; Knaust, Jacqueline; Kühn, Christa; Schwerin, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    Behaviour traits of cattle have been reported to affect important production traits, such as meat quality and milk performance as well as reproduction and health. Genetic predisposition is, together with environmental stimuli, undoubtedly involved in the development of behaviour phenotypes. Underlying molecular mechanisms affecting behaviour in general and behaviour and productions traits in particular still have to be studied in detail. Therefore, we performed a genome-wide association study in an F2 Charolais × German Holstein cross-breed population to identify genetic variants that affect behaviour-related traits assessed in an open-field and novel-object test and analysed their putative impact on milk performance. Of 37,201 tested single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs), four showed a genome-wide and 37 a chromosome-wide significant association with behaviour traits assessed in both tests. Nine of the SNPs that were associated with behaviour traits likewise showed a nominal significant association with milk performance traits. On chromosomes 14 and 29, six SNPs were identified to be associated with exploratory behaviour and inactivity during the novel-object test as well as with milk yield traits. Least squares means for behaviour and milk performance traits for these SNPs revealed that genotypes associated with higher inactivity and less exploratory behaviour promote higher milk yields. Whether these results are due to molecular mechanisms simultaneously affecting behaviour and milk performance or due to a behaviour predisposition, which causes indirect effects on milk performance by influencing individual reactivity, needs further investigation. PMID:26515756

  17. Under a neighbour's influence: public information affects stress hormones and behaviour of a songbird

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Jamie M.; Breuner, Creagh W.; Hahn, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    Socially acquired information improves the accuracy and efficiency of environmental assessments and can increase fitness. Public information may be especially useful during unpredictable food conditions, or for species that depend on resources made less predictable by human disturbance. However, the physiological mechanisms by which direct foraging assessments and public information are integrated to affect behaviour remain largely unknown. We tested for potential effects of public information on the behavioural and hormonal response to food reduction by manipulating the social environment of captive red crossbills (Loxia curvirostra). Red crossbills are irruptive migrants that are considered sensitive to changes in food availability and use public information in decision making. Here, we show that public information can attenuate or intensify the release of glucocorticoids (i.e. stress hormones) during food shortage in red crossbills. The observed modulation of corticosterone may therefore be a physiological mechanism linking public information, direct environmental assessments and behavioural change. This mechanism would not only allow for public information to affect individual behaviour, but might also facilitate group decision making by bringing group members into more similar physiological states. The results further suggest that stressors affecting entire populations may be magnified in individual physiology through social interactions. PMID:20356895

  18. Protection behaviour: a phenomenon affecting organ and tissue donation in the 21st century?

    PubMed

    Kent, B C

    2004-03-01

    UK statistics show that whilst waiting lists for transplantation surgery continue to increase, donor numbers are static. This paper describes the hermeneutic phase of a mixed method study and puts forward the concept of protection behaviour as one explanation for nurses' reticence to discuss post-mortem donation wishes with patients' relatives. The desire to protect appears to influence attitudes, confidence levels and perceived ability to become involved in donor identification and donation discussion, consequently affecting the availability of transplantable organs and tissue. By understanding more fully why protective behaviours are employed, it increases the likelihood of a solution being found. PMID:14967184

  19. Autonomous motivation is associated with the maintenance stage of behaviour change in people with affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Vancampfort, Davy; Moens, Herman; Madou, Tomas; De Backer, Tanja; Vallons, Veerle; Bruyninx, Peter; Vanheuverzwijn, Sarah; Mota, Cindy Teixeira; Soundy, Andy; Probst, Michel

    2016-06-30

    The present study examined whether in people with affective disorders motives for adopting and maintaining physical activity recommendations (as formulated by the self-determination theory) differed across the stages of behaviour change (identified by the transtheoretical model). A total of 165 (105♀) persons (45.6±14.2years) with affective disorders [major depressive disorder (n=96) or bipolar disorder (n=69)] completed the Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2 and the Patient-centred Assessment and Counselling for Exercise questionnaire. Discriminant and multivariate analyses demonstrated that persons with affective disorders at the early stages of change have less autonomous and more controlled physical activity motives than those at the later stages. Our results suggest that autonomous motivation may have an important role to play in the maintenance of health recommendations in persons with affective disorders. Longitudinal and intervention studies should be designed in people with affective disorders to identify the causal pathways between motives for maintaining health recommendations, effective changes in health behaviour and physical and mental health outcomes. PMID:27131627

  20. Telomerized presenescent osteoblasts prevent bone mass loss in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yudoh, K; Nishioka, K

    2004-06-01

    Previously, we showed that human osteoblasts expressing the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene exhibited specific survival advantages--the result of breaching the replicative senescence barrier and maintaining the phenotypic and functional properties of primary osteoblasts in vitro over the total replicative capacity of primary osteoblasts. We postulated that rejuvenated osteoblasts may have a potential to correct bone loss or osteopenia in age-related osteoporotic diseases. In the present study, we studied whether telomerized presenescent osteoblasts prevent bone mass loss in vivo. After obtaining the informed consent from a patient with osteoarthritis who underwent the arthroplastic knee surgery, osteoblastic cells were isolated from donor bone sample. We transfected the gene encoding hTERT into human osteoblastic cells. Human bone fragments from a donor were incubated with human hTERT-transfected presenescent (in vitro aged) osteoblasts or mock-transfected presenescent osteoblasts in culture medium containing Matrigel. We subcutaneously implanted human bone fragments with telomerized presenescent osteoblasts or primary presenescent osteoblasts as three-dimensional Matrigel xenografts in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice (each group: six mice) and analyzed the grafts at 6 weeks after implantation. We also determined whether telomerized osteoblasts affect the bone-forming capacity in vivo, using a well-established mouse transplantation model in which ceramic hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate particles are used as carrier vehicle. Telomerized presenescent osteoblasts were rejuvenated, and maintained the functional properties of young osteoblasts in vitro. Bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) were measured by ash weight and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, respectively. Whereas BMC and BMD of human bone fragments, which were inoculated with aged osteoblasts in SCID mice, decreased with time, telomerized

  1. Comparison of elicitation methods for moral and affective beliefs in the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Dean, M; Arvola, A; Vassallo, M; Lähteenmäki, L; Raats, M M; Saba, A; Shepherd, R

    2006-09-01

    Although the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) has been applied successfully in the area of food choice, it has been criticized for its pure utilitarian approach to the factors determining behaviour. Despite the increase in predictive power of the model with added components such as affective attitude and moral and ethical concerns, in most studies the elicitation process still only addresses people's utilitarian beliefs about the behaviour with little attention paid to other aspects. This study compares the traditional method of elicitation of advantages and disadvantages with two other methods (word association and open-ended) in the elicitations of beliefs, attitudes and moral concerns in relation to the consumption of organic foods. Results show the traditional method to be best for eliciting cognitive beliefs, open-ended emotion task for eliciting emotional beliefs and open-ended beliefs task best for moral concerns. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed. PMID:16782230

  2. Osteoblast-derived VEGF regulates osteoblast differentiation and bone formation during bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kai; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblast-derived VEGF is important for bone development and postnatal bone homeostasis. Previous studies have demonstrated that VEGF affects bone repair and regeneration; however, the cellular mechanisms by which it works are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the functions of osteoblast-derived VEGF in healing of a bone defect. The results indicate that osteoblast-derived VEGF plays critical roles at several stages in the repair process. Using transgenic mice with osteoblast-specific deletion of Vegfa, we demonstrated that VEGF promoted macrophage recruitment and angiogenic responses in the inflammation phase, and optimal levels of VEGF were required for coupling of angiogenesis and osteogenesis in areas where repair occurs by intramembranous ossification. VEGF likely functions as a paracrine factor in this process because deletion of Vegfr2 in osteoblastic lineage cells enhanced osteoblastic maturation and mineralization. Furthermore, osteoblast- and hypertrophic chondrocyte–derived VEGF stimulated recruitment of blood vessels and osteoclasts and promoted cartilage resorption at the repair site during the periosteal endochondral ossification stage. Finally, osteoblast-derived VEGF stimulated osteoclast formation in the final remodeling phase of the repair process. These findings provide a basis for clinical strategies to improve bone regeneration and treat defects in bone healing. PMID:26731472

  3. Enriching early adult environment affects the copulation behaviour of a tephritid fly.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Fleischer, Francisco; Arredondo, José; Aluja, Martín

    2009-07-01

    Early adult experiences in enriched environments favours animal brain and behavioural development ultimately resulting in an increased fitness. However, measuring the effect of environmental enrichment in animal behaviour in nature is often a complicated task, considering the complexity of the natural environment. We expanded previous studies to evaluate how early experience in an enriched environment affects copulation behaviour when animals are confronted with a complex semi-natural environment. Anastrepha ludens flies are an ideal model system for studying these effects because their natural habitats differ significantly from the cage environments in which these flies are reared for biological control purposes. For example, in the field, males form leks of up to six individuals. Each male defends a territory represented by a tree leaf whereas in rearing cages, territories are completely reduced because of the high population density. In a series of three experiments, we observed that male density represented the most influential stimulus for A. ludens male copulation success. Males that experienced lower densities in early adulthood obtained the highest proportion of copulations. By contrast, female copulation behaviour was not altered by female density. However, exposure to natural or artificial leaves in cages in which flies were kept until tested influenced female copulation behaviour. Females that were exposed to enriched environments exhibited a shorter latency to mate and shorter copulation durations with males than females reared in poor environments. We discuss the influence of early experience on male copulation success and female-mating choosiness. PMID:19525439

  4. Sepsis-Induced Osteoblast Ablation Causes Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Asuka; Okamoto, Kazuo; Nakashima, Tomoki; Akira, Shizuo; Ikuta, Koichi; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-21

    Sepsis is a host inflammatory response to severe infection associated with high mortality that is caused by lymphopenia-associated immunodeficiency. However, it is unknown how lymphopenia persists after the accelerated lymphocyte apoptosis subsides. Here we show that sepsis rapidly ablated osteoblasts, which reduced the number of common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs). Osteoblast ablation or inducible deletion of interleukin-7 (IL-7) in osteoblasts recapitulated the lymphopenic phenotype together with a lower CLP number without affecting hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Pharmacological activation of osteoblasts improved sepsis-induced lymphopenia. This study demonstrates a reciprocal interaction between the immune and bone systems, in which acute inflammation induces a defect in bone cells resulting in lymphopenia-associated immunodeficiency, indicating that bone cells comprise a therapeutic target in certain life-threatening immune reactions. PMID:27317262

  5. Effects of Hypogravity on Osteoblast Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth; Doty, Steven

    1997-01-01

    Weightbearing is essential for normal skeletal function. Without weightbearing, the rate of bone formation by osteoblasts decreases in the growing rat. Defective formation may account for the decrease in the maturation, strength and mass of bone that is caused by spaceflight. These skeletal defects may be mediated by a combination of physiologic changes triggered by spaceflight, including skeletal unloading, fluid shifts, and stress-induced endocrine factors. The fundamental question of whether the defects in osteoblast function due to weightlessness are mediated by localized skeletal unloading or by systemic physiologic adaptations such as fluid shifts has not been answered. Furthermore, bone-forming activity of osteoblasts during unloading may be affected by paracrine signals from vascular, monocytic, and neural cells that also reside in skeletal tissue. Therefore we proposed to examine whether exposure of cultured rat osteoblasts to spaceflight inhibits cellular differentiation and impairs mineralization when isolated from the influence of both systemic factors and other skeletal cells.

  6. Associations of negative affect and eating behaviour in obese women with and without binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Schulz, S; Laessle, R G

    2010-12-01

    The present study was planned to investigate differences in psychopathological features, eating behaviour and eating habits between obese women with and without BED. It also aimed to identify specific relationships between affective symptoms and eating behaviour in obese women with BED. Eighty-four obese women were studied (40 with BED, 44 non-BED). Psychiatric comorbidities were assessed with the structured diagnostic interview for DSM-IV (SCID). Depressive symptoms were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and anxiety with the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI). Eating habits (emotional and restrained eating) were assessed by the Dutch eating behaviour questionnaire (DEBQ). Food diaries were used for assessing naturalistic eating behaviour (food intake) and mood before and after food intake. BED subjects exhibited higher levels of comorbidity (in particular mood disorders, anxiety disorders and substance-related disorders), higher depressive symptoms, trait anxiety, external and emotional eating scores than non-BED subjects. Regression analyses revealed that anxiety and emotional eating were significant predictors for BED status. In the BED group, depressive symptoms were significantly related to emotional eating and food intake and negatively related to restraint. Anxiety was significantly related to emotional eating. In general, food intake significantly enhanced mood. Mood was worse on the days with self-reported binge eating episodes than on nonbinge days. These results are discussed with regard to aetiological models for BED and for BED being a distinct diagnostic category separate from obesity. PMID:21406953

  7. Aerobic Glycolysis in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Emel; Long, Fanxin

    2014-01-01

    Osteoblasts, the chief bone-making cells in the body, are a focus of osteoporosis research. Although teriparatite, a synthetic fragment of the human parathyroid hormone (PTH), has been an effective bone anabolic drug, there remains a clinical need for additional therapeutics that safely stimulates osteoblast number and function. Work in the past several decades has provided unprecedented clarity about the roles of growth factors and transcription factors in regulating osteoblast differentiation and activity, but whether these factors may regulate cellular metabolism to influence cell fate and function has been largely unexplored. The past few years have witnessed a resurgence of interest in the cellular metabolism of osteoblasts, with the hope that elucidation of their metabolic profile may open new avenues for developing bone anabolic agents. Here we review the current understanding about glucose metabolism in osteoblasts. PMID:25200872

  8. Inflorescence architecture affects pollinator behaviour and mating success in Spiranthes sinensis (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Iwata, Tatsunori; Nagasaki, Osamu; Ishii, Hiroshi S; Ushimaru, Atushi

    2012-01-01

    • Despite the wide inflorescence diversity among angiosperms, the effects of inflorescence architecture (three-dimensional flower arrangement) on pollinator behaviour and mating success have not been sufficiently studied in natural plant populations. • Here, we investigated how inflorescence architecture affected inter- and intra-plant pollinator movements and consequent mating success in a field population of Spiranthes sinensis var. amoena (S. sinensis). In this species, the flowers are helically arranged around the stem, and the degree of twisting varies greatly among individuals. The large variation in inflorescence architecture in S. sinensis results from variation in a single structural parameter, the helical angle (the angular distance between neighbour-flower directions). • The numbers of visits per inflorescence and successive probes per visit by leaf-cutting bees decreased with helical angle, indicating that individual flowers of tightly twisted inflorescences received less visitations. As expected from pollinator behaviour, pollinia removal and fruit set of individual flowers decreased with helical angle. Meanwhile, geitonogamy decreased in tightly twisted inflorescences. • Our novel findings demonstrate that natural variation in inflorescence architecture significantly affects pollinator behaviour and reproductive success, suggesting that inflorescence architecture can evolve under pollinator-mediated natural selection in plant populations. We also discuss how diverse inflorescence architectures may have been maintained in S. sinensis populations. PMID:21919912

  9. Thermoregulatory behaviour affects prevalence of chytrid fungal infection in a wild population of Panamanian golden frogs.

    PubMed

    Richards-Zawacki, Corinne L

    2010-02-22

    Predicting how climate change will affect disease dynamics requires an understanding of how the environment affects host-pathogen interactions. For amphibians, global declines and extinctions have been linked to a pathogenic chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Using a combination of body temperature measurements and disease assays conducted before and after the arrival of B. dendrobatidis, this study tested the hypothesis that body temperature affects the prevalence of infection in a wild population of Panamanian golden frogs (Atelopus zeteki). The timing of first detection of the fungus was consistent with that of a wave of epidemic infections spreading south and eastward through Central America. During the epidemic, many golden frogs modified their thermoregulatory behaviour, raising body temperatures above their normal set point. Odds of infection decreased with increasing body temperature, demonstrating that even slight environmental or behavioural changes have the potential to affect an individual's vulnerability to infection. The thermal dependency of the relationship between B. dendrobatidis and its amphibian hosts demonstrates how the progression of an epidemic can be influenced by complex interactions between host and pathogen phenotypes and the environments in which they are found. PMID:19864287

  10. The roles of the amygdala in the affective regulation of body, brain, and behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirolli, Marco; Mannella, Francesco; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2010-09-01

    Despite the great amount of knowledge produced by the neuroscientific literature on affective phenomena, current models tackling non-cognitive aspects of behaviour are often bio-inspired but rarely bio-constrained. This paper presents a theoretical account of affective systems centred on the amygdala (Amg). This account aims to furnish a general framework and specific pathways to implement models that are more closely related to biological evidence. The Amg, which receives input from brain areas encoding internal states, innately relevant stimuli, and innately neutral stimuli, plays a fundamental role in the motivational and emotional processes of organisms. This role is based on the fact that Amg implements the two associative processes at the core of Pavlovian learning (conditioned stimulus (CS)-unconditioned stimulus (US) and CS-unconditioned response (UR) associations), and that it has the capacity of modulating these associations on the basis of internal states. These functionalities allow the Amg to play an important role in the regulation of the three fundamental classes of affective responses (namely, the regulation of body states, the regulation of brain states via neuromodulators, and the triggering of a number of basic behaviours fundamental for adaptation) and in the regulation of three high-level cognitive processes (namely, the affective labelling of memories, the production of goal-directed behaviours, and the performance of planning and complex decision-making). Our analysis is conducted within a methodological approach that stresses the importance of understanding the brain within an evolutionary/adaptive framework and with the aim of isolating general principles that can potentially account for the wider possible empirical evidence in a coherent fashion.

  11. Keeper-Animal Interactions: Differences between the Behaviour of Zoo Animals Affect Stockmanship.

    PubMed

    Ward, Samantha J; Melfi, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    Stockmanship is a term used to describe the management of animals with a good stockperson someone who does this in a in a safe, effective, and low-stress manner for both the stock-keeper and animals involved. Although impacts of unfamiliar zoo visitors on animal behaviour have been extensively studied, the impact of stockmanship i.e familiar zoo keepers is a new area of research; which could reveal significant ramifications for zoo animal behaviour and welfare. It is likely that different relationships are formed dependant on the unique keeper-animal dyad (human-animal interaction, HAI). The aims of this study were to (1) investigate if unique keeper-animal dyads were formed in zoos, (2) determine whether keepers differed in their interactions towards animals regarding their attitude, animal knowledge and experience and (3) explore what factors affect keeper-animal dyads and ultimately influence animal behaviour and welfare. Eight black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis), eleven Chapman's zebra (Equus burchellii), and twelve Sulawesi crested black macaques (Macaca nigra) were studied in 6 zoos across the UK and USA. Subtle cues and commands directed by keepers towards animals were identified. The animals latency to respond and the respective behavioural response (cue-response) was recorded per keeper-animal dyad (n = 93). A questionnaire was constructed following a five-point Likert Scale design to record keeper demographic information and assess the job satisfaction of keepers, their attitude towards the animals and their perceived relationship with them. There was a significant difference in the animals' latency to appropriately respond after cues and commands from different keepers, indicating unique keeper-animal dyads were formed. Stockmanship style was also different between keepers; two main components contributed equally towards this: "attitude towards the animals" and "knowledge and experience of the animals". In this novel study, data demonstrated unique dyads

  12. Keeper-Animal Interactions: Differences between the Behaviour of Zoo Animals Affect Stockmanship

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Samantha J.; Melfi, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    Stockmanship is a term used to describe the management of animals with a good stockperson someone who does this in a in a safe, effective, and low-stress manner for both the stock-keeper and animals involved. Although impacts of unfamiliar zoo visitors on animal behaviour have been extensively studied, the impact of stockmanship i.e familiar zoo keepers is a new area of research; which could reveal significant ramifications for zoo animal behaviour and welfare. It is likely that different relationships are formed dependant on the unique keeper-animal dyad (human-animal interaction, HAI). The aims of this study were to (1) investigate if unique keeper-animal dyads were formed in zoos, (2) determine whether keepers differed in their interactions towards animals regarding their attitude, animal knowledge and experience and (3) explore what factors affect keeper-animal dyads and ultimately influence animal behaviour and welfare. Eight black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis), eleven Chapman’s zebra (Equus burchellii), and twelve Sulawesi crested black macaques (Macaca nigra) were studied in 6 zoos across the UK and USA. Subtle cues and commands directed by keepers towards animals were identified. The animals latency to respond and the respective behavioural response (cue-response) was recorded per keeper-animal dyad (n = 93). A questionnaire was constructed following a five-point Likert Scale design to record keeper demographic information and assess the job satisfaction of keepers, their attitude towards the animals and their perceived relationship with them. There was a significant difference in the animals’ latency to appropriately respond after cues and commands from different keepers, indicating unique keeper-animal dyads were formed. Stockmanship style was also different between keepers; two main components contributed equally towards this: “attitude towards the animals” and “knowledge and experience of the animals”. In this novel study, data demonstrated

  13. Impaired oculo-motor behaviour affects both reading and scene perception in neglect patients.

    PubMed

    Primativo, Silvia; Arduino, Lisa S; Daini, Roberta; De Luca, Maria; Toneatto, Carlo; Martelli, Marialuisa

    2015-04-01

    Unilateral spatial neglect (USN) is a common neuropsychological disorder following a right-sided brain lesion. Although USN is mostly characterized by symptoms involving the left hemispace, other symptoms are not left lateralized. Recently, it was shown that patients with neglect dyslexia, a reading disturbance that affects about 40% of USN patients, manifest a non-lateralized impairment of eye movement behaviour in association with their reading deficit when they read aloud and perform non-verbal saccadic tasks (Primativo et al., 2013). In the present paper, we aimed to demonstrate that the eye movement impairment shown by some USN patients reflects a more general oculo-motor disorder that is not confined to orthographic material, the horizontal axis or constrained saccadic tasks. We conjectured that inaccurate oculo-motor behaviour in USN patients indicates the presence of a reading deficit. With this aim we evaluated 20 patients, i.e., 10 right-sided brain-damaged patients without neglect and 10 patients affected by USN. On the basis of the patients' eye movement patterns during a scene exploration task, we found that 4 out of the 10 USN patients presented an abnormal oculo-motor pattern. These same four patients (but not the others) also failed in performing 5 different saccadic tasks and produced neglect dyslexia reading errors in both single words and texts. First, we show that a large proportion of USN patients have inaccurate eye movement behaviour in non-reading tasks. Second, we demonstrate that this exploratory deficit is predictive of the reading impairment. Thus, we conclude that the eye movement deficit prevents reading and impairs the performance on many other perceptual tests, including scene exploration. The large percentage of patients with impaired eye-movement pattern suggests that particular attention should be paid to eye movement behaviour during the diagnostic phase in order to program the best rehabilitation strategy for each patient. PMID

  14. Do Bells Affect Behaviour and Heart Rate Variability in Grazing Dairy Cows?

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Julia; Patt, Antonia; Hillmann, Edna

    2015-01-01

    In alpine regions cows are often equipped with bells. The present study investigated the impact of wearing a bell on behaviour and heart rate variability in dairy cows. Nineteen non-lactating Brown-Swiss cows with bell experience were assigned to three different treatments. For 3 days each, cows were equipped with no bell (control), with a bell with inactivated clapper (silent bell) or with a functional bell (functional bell). The bells weighed 5.5 kg and had frequencies between 532 Hz and 2.8 kHz and amplitudes between 90 and 113 dB at a distance of 20 cm. Data were collected on either the first and third or on all 3 days of each treatment. Whereas duration of rumination was reduced with a functional bell and a silent bell compared with no bell, feeding duration was reduced with a silent bell and was intermediate with a functional bell. Head movements were reduced when wearing a silent bell compared with no bell and tended to be reduced when wearing a functional compared to no bell. With a functional bell, lying duration was reduced by almost 4 hours on the third day of treatment compared with the first day with a functional bell and compared with no bell or a silent bell. All additional behavioural measures are consistent with the hypothesis of a restriction in the behaviour of the cows wearing bells, although this pattern did not reach significance. There was no treatment effect on heart rate variability, suggesting that the bells did not affect vago-sympathetic balance. An effect of experimental day was found for only 1 out of 10 behavioural parameters, as shown by a decrease in lying with a functional bell on day 3. The results indicate behavioural changes in the cows wearing a bell over 3 days, without indication of habituation to the bell. Altogether, the behavioural changes suggest that the behaviour of the cows was disturbed by wearing a bell. If long-lasting, these effects may have implications for animal welfare. PMID:26110277

  15. The impact of maternal control on children's anxious cognitions, behaviours and affect: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Thirlwall, Kerstin; Creswell, Cathy

    2010-10-01

    Controlling parenting is associated with child anxiety however the direction of effects remains unclear. The present study implemented a Latin-square experimental design to assess the impact of parental control on children's anxious affect, cognitions and behaviour. A non-clinical sample of 24 mothers of children aged 4-5 years were trained to engage in (a) controlling and (b) autonomy-granting behaviours in interaction with their child during the preparation of a speech. When mothers engaged in controlling parenting behaviours, children made more negative predictions about their performance prior to delivering their speech and reported feeling less happy about the task, and this was moderated by child trait anxiety. In addition, children with higher trait anxiety displayed a significant increase in observed child anxiety in the controlling condition. The pattern of results was maintained when differences in mothers' levels of negativity and habitual levels of control were accounted for. These findings are consistent with theories that suggest that controlling parenting is a risk factor in the development of childhood anxiety. PMID:20594546

  16. The geomagnetic environment in which sea turtle eggs incubate affects subsequent magnetic navigation behaviour of hatchlings

    PubMed Central

    Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Davidoff, Kyla R.; Mangiamele, Lisa A.; Lohmann, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings (Caretta caretta) use regional magnetic fields as open-ocean navigational markers during trans-oceanic migrations. Little is known, however, about the ontogeny of this behaviour. As a first step towards investigating whether the magnetic environment in which hatchlings develop affects subsequent magnetic orientation behaviour, eggs deposited by nesting female loggerheads were permitted to develop in situ either in the natural ambient magnetic field or in a magnetic field distorted by magnets placed around the nest. In orientation experiments, hatchlings that developed in the normal ambient field oriented approximately south when exposed to a field that exists near the northern coast of Portugal, a direction consistent with their migratory route in the northeastern Atlantic. By contrast, hatchlings that developed in a distorted magnetic field had orientation indistinguishable from random when tested in the same north Portugal field. No differences existed between the two groups in orientation assays involving responses to orbital movements of waves or sea-finding, neither of which involves magnetic field perception. These findings, to our knowledge, demonstrate for the first time that the magnetic environment present during early development can influence the magnetic orientation behaviour of a neonatal migratory animal. PMID:25100699

  17. Factors affecting farmers' behaviour in pesticide use: Insights from a field study in northern China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Liangxin; Niu, Haipeng; Yang, Xiaomei; Qin, Wei; Bento, Célia P M; Ritsema, Coen J; Geissen, Violette

    2015-12-15

    Quantitative understanding of farmers' behaviour in pesticide use is critical to enhance sustainability of chemical pest control and protect farmers' health and the environment. However, reports on the levels of knowledge and awareness of farmers and the practices of pesticide use are often insufficient. Here, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effects of knowledge and awareness of farmers as well as the influence of the associated stakeholders (i.e. pesticide retailers and the government) on farmers' behaviour in pesticide use by using a detailed survey of 307 agricultural households (79 grain farms, 65 fruit farms, 53 vegetable farms and 110 mixed-crop farms) in the Wei River basin in northern China. Eight protective behaviours (PBs) were exhibited by farmers. Careful and safe storage of pesticides, changing clothes or showering after applying pesticides, and reading instructions of the container labels before application were the most frequent PBs. Vegetable and fruit farmers had higher levels of education and knowledge than grain farmers, but the former were less willing to reduce pesticide use because of fear of low profits and lack of trust in the government and pesticide retailers. The PBs of farmers were strongly affected by the perception of the consequences of their behaviour (standardised path coefficient, SPC=0.42) and the level of farmers' knowledge (SPC=0.33). Pesticide retailers and the government had a moderate and weak influence, respectively, on farmers' PBs, suggesting a large gap of trust among farmers, pesticide retailers, and the government. Training and supervising retailers, educating farmers, and improving information transparency across farmers, pesticide retailers and the staff of the Agricultural Extension and Technology Service are recommended for bridging the gap of trust between farmers and the associated stakeholders as well as for promoting the use of PBs among farmers. PMID:26282770

  18. Myotonic dystrophy CTG expansion affects synaptic vesicle proteins, neurotransmission and mouse behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Sicot, Géraldine; Huguet, Aline; Luilier, Sabrina; Steidl, Esther; Saenger, Stefanie; Marciniak, Elodie; Obriot, Hélène; Chevarin, Caroline; Nicole, Annie; Revillod, Lucile; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Takashi; Matsuura, Tohru; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Swanson, Maurice S.; Trovero, Fabrice; Buisson, Bruno; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Hamon, Michel; Humez, Sandrine; Bassez, Guillaume; Metzger, Friedrich; Buée, Luc; Munnich, Arnold; Sergeant, Nicolas; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is a complex multisystemic inherited disorder, which displays multiple debilitating neurological manifestations. Despite recent progress in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy type 1 in skeletal muscle and heart, the pathways affected in the central nervous system are largely unknown. To address this question, we studied the only transgenic mouse line expressing CTG trinucleotide repeats in the central nervous system. These mice recreate molecular features of RNA toxicity, such as RNA foci accumulation and missplicing. They exhibit relevant behavioural and cognitive phenotypes, deficits in short-term synaptic plasticity, as well as changes in neurochemical levels. In the search for disease intermediates affected by disease mutation, a global proteomics approach revealed RAB3A upregulation and synapsin I hyperphosphorylation in the central nervous system of transgenic mice, transfected cells and post-mortem brains of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. These protein defects were associated with electrophysiological and behavioural deficits in mice and altered spontaneous neurosecretion in cell culture. Taking advantage of a relevant transgenic mouse of a complex human disease, we found a novel connection between physiological phenotypes and synaptic protein dysregulation, indicative of synaptic dysfunction in myotonic dystrophy type 1 brain pathology. PMID:23404338

  19. From Affective Experience to Motivated Action: Tracking Reward-Seeking and Punishment-Avoidant Behaviour in Real-Life

    PubMed Central

    Wichers, Marieke; Kasanova, Zuzana; Bakker, Jindra; Thiery, Evert; Derom, Catherine; Jacobs, Nele; van Os, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Many of the decisions and actions in everyday life result from implicit learning processes. Important to psychopathology are, for example, implicit reward-seeking and punishment-avoidant learning processes. It is known that when specific actions get associated with a rewarding experience, such as positive emotions, that this will increase the likelihood that an organism will engage in similar actions in the future. Similarly, when actions get associated with punishing experiences, such as negative emotions, this may reduce the likelihood that the organism will engage in similar actions in the future. This study examines whether we can observe these implicit processes prospectively in the flow of daily life. If such processes take place then we expect that current behaviour can be predicted by how similar behaviour was experienced (in terms of positive and negative affect) at previous measurement moments. This was examined in a sample of 621 female individuals that had participated in an Experience Sampling data collection. Measures of affect and behaviour were collected at 10 semi-random moments of the day for 5 consecutive days. It was examined whether affective experience that was paired with certain behaviours (physical activity and social context) at previous measurements modified the likelihood to show similar behaviours at next measurement moments. Analyses were performed both at the level of observations (a time scale with units of ± 90 min) and at day level (a time scale with units of 24 h). As expected, we found that affect indeed moderated the extent to which previous behaviour predicted similar behaviour later in time, at both beep- and day-level. This study showed that it is feasible to track reward-seeking and punishment-avoidant behaviour prospectively in humans in the flow of daily life. This opens up a new toolbox to examine processes determining goal-oriented behaviour in relation to psychopathology in humans. PMID:26087323

  20. Routine handling methods affect behaviour of three-spined sticklebacks in a novel test of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ralph R J; Paul, Elizabeth S; Radford, Andrew N; Purser, Julia; Mendl, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Fish are increasingly popular subjects in behavioural and neurobiological research. It is therefore important that they are housed and handled appropriately to ensure good welfare and reliable scientific findings, and that species-appropriate behavioural tests (e.g. of cognitive/affective states) are developed. Routine handling of captive animals may cause physiological stress responses that lead to anxiety-like states (e.g. increased perception of danger). In fish, these may be particularly pronounced when handling during tank-to-tank transfer involves removal from water into air. Here we develop and use a new combined scototaxis (preference for dark over light areas) and novel-tank-diving test, alongside conventional open-field and novel-object tests, to measure the effects of transferring three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) between tanks using a box or net (in and out of water respectively). Preference tests for dark over light areas confirmed the presence of scototaxis in this species. Open-field and novel-object tests failed to detect any significant differences between net and box-handled fish. However, the combined diving and scototaxis detected consistent differences between the treatments. Net-handled fish spent less time on the dark side of the tank, less time in the bottom third, and kept a greater distance from the 'safe' bottom dark area than box-handled fish. Possible explanations for this reduction in anxiety-like behaviour in net-handled fish are discussed. The combined diving and scototaxis test may be a sensitive and taxon-appropriate method for measuring anxiety-like states in fish. PMID:26965568

  1. Attitudinal Factors Affecting Viral Advertising Pass-On Behaviour of Online Consumers in Food Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Salleh, Nurhidayah; Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; Zakuan, Norhayati; Sulaiman, Zuraidah; Zameri Mat Saman, Muhamad

    2016-05-01

    The increase number of active users of social media, especially Facebook, stimulates viral advertising behaviour among them, thus attracting e-marketers to focus on viral advertising in promoting their products. In global market, use of Facebook platform indicated that food services/restaurant of food industry is ranked number 11 with 18.8% users’ response rate within the platform. This development calls for e-marketers in Malaysia to use Facebook as their viral advertising channel. Attitudinal factors affecting the viral advertising pass-on behaviour (VAPB) especially among members of social media is of interest to many researchers. The typical attitudinal factors used were attitude toward social media (ATSM), attitude toward advertising in social media (AASM) and attitude toward advertising in general (AAIG). Attitude toward advertised brand (ATAB) is important in fast food industry because users of social media tend to share their experience about tastes and features of the food. However, ATAB is less emphasized in the conceptual model between attitudinal factors and VAPB. These four factors of consumer attitude served as independent variables in the conceptual model of this study and their effect on viral advertising pass-on behaviour among members of Domino's Pizza Malaysia Facebook page was examined. Online survey using a set of questionnaire which was sent to the members of this group via private message was employed. A total of 254 sets of usable questionnaires were collected from the respondents. All the attitudinal factors, except for AASM, were found to have positive and significant effect on VAPB. AAIG exerted the strongest effect on VAPB. Therefore, e-marketers should emphasize on developing a favourable attitude toward advertising in general among members of a social media to get them involve in viral advertising. In addition, instilling a favourable attitude towards advertised brand is also vital as it influences the members to viral the brand

  2. Routine handling methods affect behaviour of three-spined sticklebacks in a novel test of anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Ralph R.J.; Paul, Elizabeth S.; Radford, Andrew N.; Purser, Julia; Mendl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fish are increasingly popular subjects in behavioural and neurobiological research. It is therefore important that they are housed and handled appropriately to ensure good welfare and reliable scientific findings, and that species-appropriate behavioural tests (e.g. of cognitive/affective states) are developed. Routine handling of captive animals may cause physiological stress responses that lead to anxiety-like states (e.g. increased perception of danger). In fish, these may be particularly pronounced when handling during tank-to-tank transfer involves removal from water into air. Here we develop and use a new combined scototaxis (preference for dark over light areas) and novel-tank-diving test, alongside conventional open-field and novel-object tests, to measure the effects of transferring three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) between tanks using a box or net (in and out of water respectively). Preference tests for dark over light areas confirmed the presence of scototaxis in this species. Open-field and novel-object tests failed to detect any significant differences between net and box-handled fish. However, the combined diving and scototaxis detected consistent differences between the treatments. Net-handled fish spent less time on the dark side of the tank, less time in the bottom third, and kept a greater distance from the ‘safe’ bottom dark area than box-handled fish. Possible explanations for this reduction in anxiety-like behaviour in net-handled fish are discussed. The combined diving and scototaxis test may be a sensitive and taxon-appropriate method for measuring anxiety-like states in fish. PMID:26965568

  3. Flexible responses to visual and olfactory stimuli by foraging Manduca sexta: larval nutrition affects adult behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Goyret, Joaquín; Kelber, Almut; Pfaff, Michael; Raguso, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Here, we show that the consequences of deficient micronutrient (β-carotene) intake during larval stages of Manduca sexta are carried across metamorphosis, affecting adult behaviour. Our manipulation of larval diet allowed us to examine how developmental plasticity impacts the interplay between visual and olfactory inputs on adult foraging behaviour. Larvae of M. sexta were reared on natural (Nicotiana tabacum) and artificial laboratory diets containing different concentrations of β-carotene (standard diet, low β-carotene, high β-carotene and cornmeal). This vitamin-A precursor has been shown to be crucial for photoreception sensitivity in the retina of M. sexta. After completing development, post-metamorphosis, starved adults were presented with artificial feeders that could be either scented or unscented. Regardless of their larval diet, adult moths fed with relatively high probabilities on scented feeders. When feeders were unscented, moths reared on tobacco were more responsive than moths reared on β-carotene-deficient artificial diets. Strikingly, moths reared on artificial diets supplemented with increasing amounts of β-carotene (low β and high β) showed increasing probabilities of response to scentless feeders. We discuss these results in relationship to the use of complex, multi-modal sensory information by foraging animals. PMID:19419987

  4. Ghrelin stimulates milk intake by affecting adult type feeding behaviour in postnatal rats.

    PubMed

    Piao, H; Hosoda, H; Kangawa, K; Murata, T; Narita, K; Higuchi, T

    2008-03-01

    The influence of ghrelin on feeding behaviour during infancy is unknown. To determine whether ghrelin influences milk intake in rat pups, newborn rats received a single i.p. injection of either rat ghrelin (100 microg/kg) or rabbit anti-ghrelin immunoglobulin G (100 microg/kg) every 5 days from postpartum day 5 to day 30 (P5-P30). Milk intake was then assessed by body weight gain following a 2-h suckling period. Ghrelin significantly increased weight gain relative to vehicle-injected controls in P20, P25 and P30 pups, but not in younger animals. Similarly, after 8 h of milk restriction, anti-ghrelin injections significantly decreased weight gain in P25 and P30, but not in younger pups. Interestingly, however, ghrelin did increase independent feeding in P10 and P15 pups using a paradigm in which pups consumed milk from a milk-soaked paper towel. We therefore conclude that ghrelin stimulates milk intake at an early postnatal stage, primarily by affecting adult-type feeding behaviour. PMID:18194428

  5. Brain size affects the behavioural response to predators in female guppies (Poecilia reticulata)

    PubMed Central

    van der Bijl, Wouter; Thyselius, Malin; Kotrschal, Alexander; Kolm, Niclas

    2015-01-01

    Large brains are thought to result from selection for cognitive benefits, but how enhanced cognition leads to increased fitness remains poorly understood. One explanation is that increased cognitive ability results in improved monitoring and assessment of predator threats. Here, we use male and female guppies (Poecilia reticulata), artificially selected for large and small brain size, to provide an experimental evaluation of this hypothesis. We examined their behavioural response as singletons, pairs or shoals of four towards a model predator. Large-brained females, but not males, spent less time performing predator inspections, an inherently risky behaviour. Video analysis revealed that large-brained females were further away from the model predator when in pairs but that they habituated quickly towards the model when in shoals of four. Males stayed further away from the predator model than females but again we found no brain size effect in males. We conclude that differences in brain size affect the female predator response. Large-brained females might be able to assess risk better or need less sensory information to reach an accurate conclusion. Our results provide experimental support for the general idea that predation pressure is likely to be important for the evolution of brain size in prey species. PMID:26203003

  6. Brain size affects the behavioural response to predators in female guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    van der Bijl, Wouter; Thyselius, Malin; Kotrschal, Alexander; Kolm, Niclas

    2015-08-01

    Large brains are thought to result from selection for cognitive benefits, but how enhanced cognition leads to increased fitness remains poorly understood. One explanation is that increased cognitive ability results in improved monitoring and assessment of predator threats. Here, we use male and female guppies (Poecilia reticulata), artificially selected for large and small brain size, to provide an experimental evaluation of this hypothesis. We examined their behavioural response as singletons, pairs or shoals of four towards a model predator. Large-brained females, but not males, spent less time performing predator inspections, an inherently risky behaviour. Video analysis revealed that large-brained females were further away from the model predator when in pairs but that they habituated quickly towards the model when in shoals of four. Males stayed further away from the predator model than females but again we found no brain size effect in males. We conclude that differences in brain size affect the female predator response. Large-brained females might be able to assess risk better or need less sensory information to reach an accurate conclusion. Our results provide experimental support for the general idea that predation pressure is likely to be important for the evolution of brain size in prey species. PMID:26203003

  7. Breathing hypoxic gas affects the physiology as well as the diving behaviour of tufted ducks.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Lewis G; Butler, Patrick J; Woakes, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    We measured the effects of exposure to hypoxia (15% and 11% oxygen) and hypercapnia (up to 4.5% carbon dioxide) on rates of respiratory gas exchange both between and during dives in tufted ducks, Aythya fuligula, to investigate to what extent these may explain changes in diving behaviour. As found in previous studies, the ducks decreased dive duration (t(d)) and increased surface duration when diving from a hypoxic or hypercapnic gas mix. In the hypercapnic conditions, oxygen consumption during the dive cycle was not affected. Oxygen uptake between dives was reduced by only 17% when breathing a hypoxic gas mix of 11% oxygen. However, estimates of the rate of oxygen metabolism during the foraging periods of dives decreased nearly threefold in 11% oxygen. Given that tufted ducks normally dive well within their aerobic dive limits and that they significantly reduced their t(d) during hypoxia, it is not at all clear why they make this physiological adjustment. PMID:15778946

  8. Feeding behaviour of an intertidal snail: Does past environmental stress affect predator choices and prey vulnerability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestoso, Ignacio; Arenas, Francisco; Olabarria, Celia

    2015-03-01

    Predation is one of the most important factors in determining structure and dynamics of communities on intertidal rocky shores. Such regulatory role may be of special relevance in novel communities resulting from biological invasions. Non-indigenous species frequently escape natural predators that limit their distribution and abundance in the native range. However, biological interactions also can limit the establishment and spread of non-native populations. There is a growing concern that climate change might affect predator-prey interactions exacerbating the ecological impacts of non-indigenous species. However, mechanisms underlying such interactions are poorly understood in marine ecosystems. Here, we explored if past environmental stress, i.e., increasing temperature and decreasing pH, could affect the vulnerability of two mussel prey, the native Mytilus galloprovincialis and the non-indigenous Xenostrobus securis, to predation by the native dogwhelk Nucella lapillus. In addition, we evaluated the consequences on the feeding behaviour of N. lapillus. First, we exposed monospecific assemblages of each mussel species to combined experimental conditions of increasing temperature and decreasing pH in mesocosms for 3 weeks. Then assemblages were placed on a rocky shore and were enclosed in cages with dogwhelks where they remained for 3 weeks. Despite the lack of preference, consumption was much greater on the native than on the invasive mussels, which barely were consumed by dogwhelks. However, this trend was diverted when temperature increased. Thus, under a coastal warming scenario shifts in dogwhelks feeding behaviour may help to contain invader's populations, especially in estuarine areas where these predators are abundant.

  9. Food chain transport of nanoparticles affects behaviour and fat metabolism in fish.

    PubMed

    Cedervall, Tommy; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Lard, Mercy; Frohm, Birgitta; Linse, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Nano-sized (10(-9)-10(-7) m) particles offer many technical and biomedical advances over the bulk material. The use of nanoparticles in cosmetics, detergents, food and other commercial products is rapidly increasing despite little knowledge of their effect on organism metabolism. We show here that commercially manufactured polystyrene nanoparticles, transported through an aquatic food chain from algae, through zooplankton to fish, affect lipid metabolism and behaviour of the top consumer. At least three independent metabolic parameters differed between control and test fish: the weight loss, the triglycerides∶cholesterol ratio in blood serum, and the distribution of cholesterol between muscle and liver. Moreover, we demonstrate that nanoparticles bind to apolipoprotein A-I in fish serum in-vitro, thereby restraining them from properly utilising their fat reserves if absorbed through ingestion. In addition to the metabolic effects, we show that consumption of nanoparticle-containing zooplankton affects the feeding behaviour of the fish. The time it took the fish to consume 95% of the food presented to them was more than doubled for nanoparticle-exposed compared to control fish. Since many nano-sized products will, through the sewage system, end up in freshwater and marine habitats, our study provides a potential bioassay for testing new nano-sized material before manufacturing. In conclusion, our study shows that from knowledge of the molecular composition of the protein corona around nanoparticles it is possible to make a testable molecular hypothesis and bioassay of the potential biological risks of a defined nanoparticle at the organism and ecosystem level. PMID:22384193

  10. How do different data logger sizes and attachment positions affect the diving behaviour of little penguins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Knott, Nathan; Chiaradia, André; Kato, Akiko

    2007-02-01

    It is crucial in any bio-logging study to establish the potential effect that attachment of loggers may have on the animal. This ensures that the behaviour monitored by the loggers has a biological relevance, as well as for ethical reasons. Evaluation of the effects of externally attached loggers shows that they increase the drag of swimming animals and increase their energy expenditure. Nevertheless, little research has been done on the effects of size or position of such loggers. In this study, we tested whether the size (i.e. large: 4.9% versus small: 3.4% of the bird's frontal area) or the place of attachment (middle versus lower back) affected the diving behaviour of male and female little penguins ( Eudyptula minor). The positioning of the data logger on the middle or lower section of little penguins' back had little, if no effect, on the diving variables measured in this study. Size of the loggers, however, had strong effects. Birds with large loggers made shorter dives and reached shallower depths than those with small loggers. In addition, birds with large loggers made more dives probably to compensate for the extra cost of carrying a large logger. The measured variables also differed between the sexes, with males diving deeper and longer than females. Logger size had a sex-specific effect on the trip duration and descent speed, with males equipped with large loggers staying longer at sea than those with small loggers, and females with large loggers descending faster than those with small loggers. From our results, it appears that effects of logger position do not exist or are very small in comparison with the effects of logger size. The results of the current study indicate that the effects of size of loggers be evaluated more commonly in bio-logging research into the diving activity of free-ranging birds.

  11. Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Prashant S.; Hu, Hao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Maloney, Victoria J.; Xiao, Hui; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Chung, Jeng-Der; Johnson, Virgil E.; Zhu, Yingying; Peter, Gary F.; Hahn, Michael G.; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2015-01-01

    Cortical microtubules are integral to plant morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, and stomatal behaviour, presumably by governing cellulose microfibril orientation. Genetic manipulation of tubulins often leads to abnormal plant development, making it difficult to probe additional roles of cortical microtubules in cell wall biogenesis. Here, it is shown that expressing post-translational C-terminal modification mimics of α-tubulin altered cell wall characteristics and guard cell dynamics in transgenic Populus tremula x alba that otherwise appear normal. 35S promoter-driven transgene expression was high in leaves but unusually low in xylem, suggesting high levels of tubulin transgene expression were not tolerated in wood-forming tissues during regeneration of transformants. Cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents were unaffected in transgenic wood, but expression of cell wall-modifying enzymes, and extractability of lignin-bound pectin and xylan polysaccharides were increased in developing xylem. The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later. Tubulin perturbation also affected guard cell behaviour, delaying drought-induced stomatal closure as well as light-induced stomatal opening in leaves. Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process. Taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis. PMID:26246616

  12. Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Prashant S; Hu, Hao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Maloney, Victoria J; Xiao, Hui; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Chung, Jeng-Der; Johnson, Virgil E; Zhu, Yingying; Peter, Gary F; Hahn, Michael G; Mansfield, Shawn D; Harding, Scott A; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2015-10-01

    Cortical microtubules are integral to plant morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, and stomatal behaviour, presumably by governing cellulose microfibril orientation. Genetic manipulation of tubulins often leads to abnormal plant development, making it difficult to probe additional roles of cortical microtubules in cell wall biogenesis. Here, it is shown that expressing post-translational C-terminal modification mimics of α-tubulin altered cell wall characteristics and guard cell dynamics in transgenic Populus tremula x alba that otherwise appear normal. 35S promoter-driven transgene expression was high in leaves but unusually low in xylem, suggesting high levels of tubulin transgene expression were not tolerated in wood-forming tissues during regeneration of transformants. Cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents were unaffected in transgenic wood, but expression of cell wall-modifying enzymes, and extractability of lignin-bound pectin and xylan polysaccharides were increased in developing xylem. The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later. Tubulin perturbation also affected guard cell behaviour, delaying drought-induced stomatal closure as well as light-induced stomatal opening in leaves. Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process. Taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis. PMID:26246616

  13. Genotype at the PMEL17 locus affects social and explorative behaviour in chickens.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, A-C; Kerje, S; Andersson, L; Jensen, P

    2010-04-01

    1. We studied behaviour and brain gene expression in homozygous PMEL17 genotypes, using chickens originating from an advanced White Leghorn x red junglefowl intercross. The behavioural studies consisted of three social and one explorative behaviour test. There were significant differences between the genotypes in both social and explorative behaviour. 2. Gene expression studies showed no PMEL17 expression in brain, so the genotype differences must depend on extra-neural gene expression or expression during embryonic development. However, linkage or spurious family effects (genetic drift) can not be excluded. 3. The study strongly suggests a correlated effect between plumage colour and behaviour, and we conclude that PMEL17 may have a pleiotropic effect on social and explorative behaviour in chickens. PMID:20461577

  14. Heterozygosity for Nuclear Factor One X Affects Hippocampal-Dependent Behaviour in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Lachlan; Dixon, Chantelle; Cato, Kathleen; Heng, Yee Hsieh Evelyn; Kurniawan, Nyoman D.; Ullmann, Jeremy F. P.; Janke, Andrew L.; Gronostajski, Richard M.; Richards, Linda J.; Burne, Thomas H. J.; Piper, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the genes that regulate the development and subsequent functioning of the hippocampus is pivotal to understanding the role of this cortical structure in learning and memory. One group of genes that has been shown to be critical for the early development of the hippocampus is the Nuclear factor one (Nfi) family, which encodes four site-specific transcription factors, NFIA, NFIB, NFIC and NFIX. In mice lacking Nfia, Nfib or Nfix, aspects of early hippocampal development, including neurogenesis within the dentate gyrus, are delayed. However, due to the perinatal lethality of these mice, it is not clear whether this hippocampal phenotype persists to adulthood and affects hippocampal-dependent behaviour. To address this we examined the hippocampal phenotype of mice heterozygous for Nfix (Nfix+/−), which survive to adulthood. We found that Nfix+/− mice had reduced expression of NFIX throughout the brain, including the hippocampus, and that early hippocampal development in these mice was disrupted, producing a phenotype intermediate to that of wild-type mice and Nfix−/− mice. The abnormal hippocampal morphology of Nfix+/− mice persisted to adulthood, and these mice displayed a specific performance deficit in the Morris water maze learning and memory task. These findings demonstrate that the level of Nfix expression during development and within the adult is essential for the function of the hippocampus during learning and memory. PMID:23776487

  15. Heterozygosity for nuclear factor one x affects hippocampal-dependent behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lachlan; Dixon, Chantelle; Cato, Kathleen; Heng, Yee Hsieh Evelyn; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Janke, Andrew L; Gronostajski, Richard M; Richards, Linda J; Burne, Thomas H J; Piper, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the genes that regulate the development and subsequent functioning of the hippocampus is pivotal to understanding the role of this cortical structure in learning and memory. One group of genes that has been shown to be critical for the early development of the hippocampus is the Nuclear factor one (Nfi) family, which encodes four site-specific transcription factors, NFIA, NFIB, NFIC and NFIX. In mice lacking Nfia, Nfib or Nfix, aspects of early hippocampal development, including neurogenesis within the dentate gyrus, are delayed. However, due to the perinatal lethality of these mice, it is not clear whether this hippocampal phenotype persists to adulthood and affects hippocampal-dependent behaviour. To address this we examined the hippocampal phenotype of mice heterozygous for Nfix (Nfix (+/-)), which survive to adulthood. We found that Nfix (+/-) mice had reduced expression of NFIX throughout the brain, including the hippocampus, and that early hippocampal development in these mice was disrupted, producing a phenotype intermediate to that of wild-type mice and Nfix(-/-) mice. The abnormal hippocampal morphology of Nfix (+/-) mice persisted to adulthood, and these mice displayed a specific performance deficit in the Morris water maze learning and memory task. These findings demonstrate that the level of Nfix expression during development and within the adult is essential for the function of the hippocampus during learning and memory. PMID:23776487

  16. The osteoblastic niche in the context of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Toscani, Denise; Bolzoni, Marina; Accardi, Fabrizio; Aversa, Franco; Giuliani, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The osteoblastic niche has a critical role in the regulation of hemopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence and self-renewal and in the support of hematopoiesis. Several mechanisms are involved in the crosstalk between stem cells and osteoblasts, including soluble cytokines, adhesion molecules, and signal pathways such as the wingless-Int (Wnt), Notch, and parathyroid hormone pathways. According to the most recent evidence, there is an overlap between osteoblastic and perivascular niches that affects HSC function involving mesenchymal stromal and endothelial cells and a gradient of oxygen regulated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α. Derived from plasma cells, multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematopoietic malignancy characterized by a peculiar dependency on the bone microenvironment. Quiescent MM cells may reside in the osteoblastic niche for protection from apoptotic stimuli; in turn, MM cells suppress osteoblast formation and function, leading to impairment of bone formation and the development of osteolytic lesions. Several recent studies have investigated the mechanisms involved in the relationship between osteoblasts and MM cells and identified potential therapeutic targets in the osteoblastic niche, including the HIF-1α, Runx2, and Wnt (both canonical and noncanonical) signaling pathways. PMID:25424768

  17. Fibronectin is a survival factor for differentiated osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, R. K.; Doty, S. B.; Lull, J. C.; Holmuhamedov, E.; Humphries, M. J.; Damsky, C. H.

    1998-01-01

    The skeletal extracellular matrix produced by osteoblasts contains the glycoprotein fibronectin, which regulates the adhesion, differentiation and function of various adherent cells. Interactions with fibronectin are required for osteoblast differentiation in vitro, since fibronectin antagonists added to cultures of immature fetal calvarial osteoblasts inhibit their progressive differentiation. To determine if fibronectin plays a unique role in fully differentiated osteoblasts, cultures that had already formed mineralized nodules in vitro were treated with fibronectin antagonists. Fibronectin antibodies caused >95% of the cells in the mature cultures to display characteristic features of apoptosis (nuclear condensation, apoptotic body formation, DNA laddering) within 24 hours. Cells appeared to acquire sensitivity to fibronectin antibody-induced apoptosis as a consequence of differentiation, since antibodies failed to kill immature cells and the first cells killed were those associated with mature nodules. Intact plasma fibronectin, as well as fragments corresponding to the amino-terminal, cell-binding, and carboxy-terminal domains of fibronectin, independently induced apoptosis of mature (day-13), but not immature (day-4), osteoblasts. Finally, transforming growth factor-beta1 partially protected cells from the apoptotic effects of fibronectin antagonists. Thus, in the course of maturation cultured osteoblasts switch from depending on fibronectin for differentiation to depending on fibronectin for survival. These data suggest that fibronectin, together with transforming growth factor-beta1, may affect bone formation, in part by regulating the survival of osteoblasts.

  18. Effect of magnesium ion on human osteoblast activity

    PubMed Central

    He, L.Y.; Zhang, X.M.; Liu, B.; Tian, Y.; Ma, W.H.

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium, a promising biodegradable metal, has been reported in several studies to increase bone formation. Although there is some information regarding the concentrations of magnesium ions that affect bone remodeling at a cellular level, little is known about the effect of magnesium ions on cell gap junctions. Therefore, this study aimed to systematically investigate the effects of different concentrations of magnesium on bone cells, and further evaluate its effect on gap junctions of osteoblasts. Cultures of normal human osteoblasts were treated with magnesium ions at concentrations of 1, 2 and 3 mM, for 24, 48 and 72 h. The effects of magnesium ions on viability and function of normal human osteoblasts and on gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in osteoblasts were investigated. Magnesium ions induced significant (P<0.05) increases in cell viability, alkaline phosphate activity and osteocalcin levels of human osteoblasts. These stimulatory actions were positively associated with the concentration of magnesium and the time of exposure. Furthermore, the GJIC of osteoblasts was significantly promoted by magnesium ions. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that magnesium ions induced the activity of osteoblasts by enhancing GJIC between cells, and influenced bone formation. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the influence of magnesium on bone remodeling and to the advance of its application in clinical practice. PMID:27383121

  19. Interpersonal Engagement Mediates the Relation between Maternal Affect and Externalising Behaviour in Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Vivienne; Gonzalez, Andrea; Atkinson, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Mother-child interactions around a shared activity have been shown to play a key role in the development of young children’s capacity to interact cooperatively with others. This evidence is particularly germane to type 1 diabetes (T1D) management in younger children where cooperation with parental treatment efforts is crucial for treatment success and where maternal distress and child behavioural problems are risk factors for treatment management, biomedical and psychological outcomes. In 49 4-to-8 year old children with T1D, we investigated whether the association between maternal affect and child problematic behaviour is mediated by mother-child interactions in the context of a T1D-relevant collaborative problem-solving activity. Mothers completed standardised measures of maternal and child psychological adjustment and interacted with their children in the problem-solving activity, analysed for quality of interpersonal engagement based on evaluations of maternal (sensitivity and cognitive stimulation) and dyadic (joint attention and warmth) behaviours. Mediation analyses confirmed the hypothesis that interpersonal engagement mediates the relation between maternal affective state and child behavioural problems. Specifically, more negative maternal affect is associated with lower levels of interpersonal engagement; these less engaged interactions in turn are associated with more behavioural problems in children. These findings are consistent with research involving typically developing children. The implications of our findings are twofold. First, in the context of psychological adjustment to T1D, maternal affect and mother-child interactions are 2 potential targets for interventions which promote cooperative interactions. Second, understanding and caring for children at biological risk requires attention to developmental psychology theory and method; in particular, research addressing parent-child cooperation carries both conceptual and clinical relevance. PMID

  20. Interpersonal engagement mediates the relation between maternal affect and externalising behaviour in young children with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Vivienne; Gonzalez, Andrea; Atkinson, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Mother-child interactions around a shared activity have been shown to play a key role in the development of young children's capacity to interact cooperatively with others. This evidence is particularly germane to type 1 diabetes (T1D) management in younger children where cooperation with parental treatment efforts is crucial for treatment success and where maternal distress and child behavioural problems are risk factors for treatment management, biomedical and psychological outcomes. In 49 4-to-8 year old children with T1D, we investigated whether the association between maternal affect and child problematic behaviour is mediated by mother-child interactions in the context of a T1D-relevant collaborative problem-solving activity. Mothers completed standardised measures of maternal and child psychological adjustment and interacted with their children in the problem-solving activity, analysed for quality of interpersonal engagement based on evaluations of maternal (sensitivity and cognitive stimulation) and dyadic (joint attention and warmth) behaviours. Mediation analyses confirmed the hypothesis that interpersonal engagement mediates the relation between maternal affective state and child behavioural problems. Specifically, more negative maternal affect is associated with lower levels of interpersonal engagement; these less engaged interactions in turn are associated with more behavioural problems in children. These findings are consistent with research involving typically developing children. The implications of our findings are twofold. First, in the context of psychological adjustment to T1D, maternal affect and mother-child interactions are 2 potential targets for interventions which promote cooperative interactions. Second, understanding and caring for children at biological risk requires attention to developmental psychology theory and method; in particular, research addressing parent-child cooperation carries both conceptual and clinical relevance. PMID

  1. DHEA promotes osteoblast differentiation by regulating the expression of osteoblast-related genes and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xuemin; Gui, Yuyan; Xu, Yingping; Li, Dajin; Wang, Ling

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have reported that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) promotes osteoblast proliferation and inhibits osteoblast apoptosis and that DHEA inhibits osteoclast maturation. However, whether DHEA regulates osteoblast differentiation remains unclear. The present study first examined the effect of DHEA on bone morphology in vivo. DHEA was found to increase bone volume (BV), bone mineral density (BMD), and the number of trabeculae in bone (Th.N) and it was found to decrease trabecular spacing in bone (Th.sp) in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. Next, the effect of DHEA on osteoblast differentiation was examined in vitro and osteoblastogenesis-related marker genes, such as Runx2, Osterix, Collagen1, and Osteocalcin, were also detected. DHEA increased osteoblast production in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in osteoblastogenic medium, and DHEA increased the expression of Runx2 and osterix, thereby increasing the expression of osteocalcin and collagen1. Immune cells and bone interact, so changes in immune cells were detected in vivo. DHEA increased the number of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the spleen but it did not affect CTLA-4 or IL-10. When MSCs were treated with DHEA in the presence of Tregs, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity increased. Osteoblasts and adipocytes are both generated by MSCs. If osteoblast differentiation increases, adipocyte differentiation will decrease, and the reverse also holds true. DHEA was found to increase the number of adipocytes in osteoblastogenic medium but it had no effect on the number of adipocytes and expression of PPARγ mRNA in adipogenic medium. This finding suggests that osteoblasts may be involved in adipocyte production. In conclusion, the current results suggest that DHEA can improve postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) by up-regulating osteoblast differentiation via the up-regulation of the expression of osteoblastogenesis-related genes and via an increase in Foxp3(+) Tregs. PMID:26559023

  2. EFFECTS OF PAMIDRONATE ON HUMAN ALVEOLAR OSTEOBLASTS IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Marolt, Darja; Cozin, Matthew; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Cremers, Serge; Landesberg, Regina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Administration of bisphosphonates has recently been associated with the development of osteonecrotic lesions of the jaw (ONJ). To elucidate the potential contributions of osteogenic cells to the development and regeneration of ONJ, we have isolated primary cells from human alveolar and long/iliac bones, and examined the effects of pamidronate on cell viability, proliferation, osteogenesis and wound healing. Materials and Methods Primary human osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells were isolated from alveolar and iliac/long bone and marrow tissue. Cellular proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, apoptosis (TUNEL, Caspase-3, and DAPI assays) and wound healing in an in vitro scratch assay were assessed after exposure to pamidronate at a range of clinically relevant doses. Results Primary alveolar osteoblasts proliferated at significantly higher rates than long/iliac bone osteoblasts in vitro. Upon exposure of alveolar osteoblasts and long/iliac bone marrow stromal cells to pamidronate for more than 72h, we have observed significantly decreased cell viability, proliferation, osteogenesis and in vitro wound healing at ≥6 × 10−5 M pamidronate, with the induction of apoptosis in ~20% of cell population. Conclusions The remodeling activity of alveolar bone, indicated by higher proliferation of alveolar osteoblasts, could be negatively affected by exposure to high concentrations of pamidronate over extended periods of time. The absence of anabolic effects of pamidronate on alveolar osteoblasts, and induction of apoptosis in osteogenic cells could negatively affect bone balance at this site, and contribute to osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:21856057

  3. Regulation of Osteoblast Survival by the Extracellular Matrix and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus. Ruth K.; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Spaceflight adversely affects the skeleton, posing a substantial risk to astronaut's health during long duration missions. The reduced bone mass observed in growing animals following spaceflight is due at least in part to inadequate bone formation by osteoblasts. Thus, it is of central importance to identify basic cellular mechanisms underlying normal bone formation. The fundamental ideas underlying our research are that interactions between extracellular matrix proteins, integrin adhesion receptors, cytoplasmic signaling and cytoskeletal proteins are key ingredients for the proper functioning of osteoblasts, and that gravity impacts these interactions. As an in vitro model system we used primary fetal rat calvarial cells which faithfully recapitulate osteoblast differentiation characteristically observed in vivo. We showed that specific integrin receptors ((alpha)3(beta)1), ((alpha)5(beta)1), ((alpha)8(betal)1) and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, laminin) were needed for the differentiation of immature osteoblasts. In the course of maturation, cultured osteoblasts switched from depending on fibronectin and laminin for differentiation to depending on these proteins for their very survival. Furthermore, we found that manipulating the gravity vector using ground-based models resulted in activation of key intracellular survival signals generated by integrin/extracellular matrix interactions. We are currently testing the in vivo relevance of some of these observations using targeted transgenic technology. In conclusion, mechanical factors including gravity may participate in regulating survival via cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix. This leads us to speculate that microgravity adversely affects the survival of osteoblasts and contributes to spaceflight-induced osteoporosis.

  4. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  5. Mechanisms regulating osteoblast response to surface microtopography and vitamin D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Bryan Frederick, Jr.

    (OH) 2D3. Silencing of the beta1 integrin in osteoblast-like MG63 cells significantly reduced osteogenic response to surface topography and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. Silencing of the alpha 5 subunit did not alter the response of MG63 cells to changing surface roughness or chemistry, although future work must confirm these results given similar cell surface alpha5 integrin expression observed in control and alpha5-silenced cells. Multifunctional RGD, KRSR, and KSSR coated surfaces show that RGD increased osteoblast proliferation and reduced differentiation, KRSR had no affect on osteoblast phenotype, and KSSR increased osteoblast differentiation. These results suggest that titanium surfaces can be modified to manipulate proliferation and differentiation and that RGD/KSSR functionalized surfaces could be further investigated for use as osteointegrative surfaces. The results using VDR deficient osteoblasts demonstrate that 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 acts via VDR-dependent mechanisms in cells cultured on titanium surfaces that support terminal differentiation. In caveolae deficient osteoblasts, 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 affected cell number, alkaline phosphatase activity, and TGF-beta1 levels, although levels of osteocalcin and PGE2 were not affected. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that VDR is required for the actions of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3, but that caveolae-dependent membrane 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 signaling modulates traditional VDR signaling. The exact mechanisms for this interaction remain to be shown. Overall, these results are important in better understanding the role of beta 1 integrin partners in mediating osteoblast response to implant surfaces and in understanding how integrin signaling can alter osteoblast differentiation and responsiveness to 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 via genomic and non-genomic pathways.

  6. Medial prefrontal serotonin in the rat is involved in goal-directed behaviour when affect guides decision making

    PubMed Central

    La Fors, Sabrina S. B. M.; Meerkerk, Dorie T. J.; Joosten, Ruud N. J. M. A.; Uylings, Harry B. M.; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Across species, serotonin (5-HT) depletion in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been shown to cause impaired performance on tests of cognitive flexibility and the processing of affective information (e.g. information with an ‘emotional’ content). While recent work has explored the specific role of the orbital PFC herein, the role of the medial PFC remains unclear. Objectives The aim of our current experiments was to study the role of medial PFC 5-HT in both the processing of affective information and reversal learning across stimulus modalities. Materials and methods To this end, we selectively destroyed 5-HT terminals in the medial PFC of male Wistar rats by means of local infusion of the toxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine. Both control and lesioned animals were tested in two reversal learning paradigms with either spatial or odour cues and an affective switch from non-preferred to preferred food rewards. Results Our results indicate that a pellet switch during reversal learning impaired performance in control animals but not in lesioned animals, independent of the stimulus modality. Conclusion These results indicate that lesioned animals are not guided in their behaviour by the affective value of the reward like intact animals and thus that medial prefrontal 5-HT is needed for affective processing in goal-directed behaviour. PMID:17874235

  7. The Influence of Authoritative Teaching on Children's School Adjustment: Are Children with Behavioural Problems Differentially Affected?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Jean A.; Clark, Teresa P.; Crowl, Alicia; Carlson, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Children with significant behaviour problems are at risk for poor classroom adjustment and school failure. Given this likelihood for a poor developmental trajectory, there is a need to better understand environmental influences within classrooms that help to effectively socialize children to those settings. The current study evaluated the effects…

  8. DOES FEEDBACK FROM A NEST AFFECT PERIPARTURIENT BEHAVIOUR, HORMONES AND HEART RATE IN GILTS?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the effects of feedback from a farrowing nest on sow welfare, as determined by behaviour, hormones and heart rate, 20 gilts housed in central-nest-farrowing-pens were permitted to build a nest of peat, straw and branches. Ten sows then had their nest removed (NR) 10h after the onset of ...

  9. mTORC1 Signaling Promotes Osteoblast Differentiation from Preosteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianquan; Long, Fanxin

    2015-01-01

    Preosteoblasts are precursor cells that are committed to the osteoblast lineage. Differentiation of these cells to mature osteoblasts is regulated by the extracellular factors and environmental cues. Recent studies have implicated mTOR signaling in the regulation of osteoblast differentiation. However, mTOR exists in two distinct protein complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2), and the specific role of mTORC1 in regulating the progression of preosteoblasts to mature osteoblastis still unclear. In this study, we first deleted Raptor, a unique and essential component of mTORC1, in primary calvarial cells. Deletion of Raptor resulted in loss of mTORC1 but an increase in mTORC2 signaling without overtly affecting autophagy. Under the osteogenic culture condition, Raptor-deficient cells exhibited a decrease in matrix synthesis and mineralization. qPCR analyses revealed that deletion of Raptor reduced the expression of late-stage markers for osteoblast differentiation (Bglap, Ibsp, and Col1a), while slightly increasing early osteoblast markers (Runx2, Sp7, and Alpl). Consistent with the findings in vitro, genetic ablation of Raptor in osterix-expressing cells led to osteopenia in mice. Together, our findings have identified a specific role for mTORC1 in the transition from preosteoblasts to mature osteoblasts. PMID:26090674

  10. The Relations of Parental Affect and Encouragement to Children's Moral Emotions and Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinrad, Tracy L.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Eisenburg, Nancy; Fabes, Richard A.; Shepard, Stephanie A.; Cumberland, Amanda; Guthrie, Ivanna K.; Murphy, Bridget C.

    1999-01-01

    Explores the role of observed parental affect and encouragement in children's empathy-related responding and moral behavior, specifically cheating on a puzzle activity. Finds that (1) parents' affect and encouragement positively related to children's sympathy (not empathy) and (2) boys' cheating on the puzzle correlated to parents' affect and…

  11. Wind speed affects prey-catching behaviour in an orb web spider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Joe; Vollrath, Fritz; Hesselberg, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Wind has previously been shown to influence the location and orientation of spider web sites and also the geometry and material composition of constructed orb webs. We now show that wind also influences components of prey-catching behaviour within the web. A small wind tunnel was used to generate different wind speeds. Araneus diadematus ran more slowly towards entangled Drosophila melanogaster in windy conditions, which took less time to escape the web. This indicates a lower capture probability and a diminished overall predation efficiency for spiders at higher wind speeds. We conclude that spiders' behaviour of taking down their webs as wind speed increases may therefore not be a response only to possible web damage.

  12. Liver irradiation causes distal bystander effects in the rat brain and affects animal behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Muhammad, Arif; Hossain, Shakhawat; Ilnytskyy, Slava; Ghose, Abhijit; Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kolb, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy can not only produce effects on targeted organs, but can also influence shielded bystander organs, such as the brain in targeted liver irradiation. The brain is sensitive to radiation exposure, and irradiation causes significant neuro-cognitive deficits, including deficits in attention, concentration, memory, and executive and visuospatial functions. The mechanisms of their occurrence are not understood, although they may be related to the bystander effects. We analyzed the induction, mechanisms, and behavioural repercussions of bystander effects in the brain upon liver irradiation in a well-established rat model. Here, we show for the first time that bystander effects occur in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus regions upon liver irradiation, where they manifest as altered gene expression and somewhat increased levels of γH2AX. We also report that bystander effects in the brain are associated with neuroanatomical and behavioural changes, and are more pronounced in females than in males. PMID:26678032

  13. Group member prototypicality and intergroup negotiation: how one's standing in the group affects negotiation behaviour.

    PubMed

    Van Kleef, Gerben A; Steinel, Wolfgang; van Knippenberg, Daan; Hogg, Michael A; Svensson, Alicia

    2007-03-01

    How does a representative's position in the group influence behaviour in intergroup negotiation? Applying insights from the social identity approach (specifically self-categorization theory), the effects of group member prototypicality, accountability and group attractiveness on competitiveness in intergroup bargaining were examined. As representatives of their group, participants engaged in a computer-mediated negotiation with a simulated out-group opponent. In Experiment 1 (N=114), representatives with a peripheral status in the group sent more competitive and fewer cooperative messages to the opponent than did prototypical representatives, but only under accountability. Experiment 2 (N=110) replicated this finding, and showed that, under accountability, peripherals also made higher demands than did prototypicals, but only when group membership was perceived as attractive. Results are discussed in relation to impression management and strategic behaviour. PMID:17355722

  14. Inequity Aversion Negatively Affects Tolerance and Contact-Seeking Behaviours towards Partner and Experimenter.

    PubMed

    Brucks, Désirée; Essler, Jennifer L; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Range, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Inequity aversion has been proposed to act as a limiting factor for cooperation, thus preventing subjects from disadvantageous cooperative interactions. While a recent study revealed that also dogs show some sensitivity to inequity, the underlying mechanisms of this behaviour are still unclear. The aim of the current study was threefold: 1) to replicate the study by Range et al. (2009, PNAS, 106, 340-345); 2) to investigate the emotional mechanisms involved in the inequity response by measuring the heart rate and 3) to explore the link between inequity aversion and cooperation in terms of behaviours shown towards the partner dog and towards the experimenter who caused the inequity. Dog tested in dyads were alternately asked to give their paw and were either equally or unequally rewarded by the experimenter. After each social test condition, we conducted food tolerance tests and free interaction tests in which the subjects' social behaviour towards the partner and the experimenter were observed. As in the previous study, subjects refused to continue giving their paw when only the partner was rewarded, but not when both dogs were rewarded with rewards of different quality. Although subjects did not react to this quality inequity during the test, we did find reduced durations of food sharing in the subsequent tolerance test, indicating that dogs perceived the inequity but were not able to react to it in the test context. Moreover, subjects avoided their partner and the experimenter more during the free interaction time following unequal compared to equal treatment. Despite the clear behavioural reactions to inequity, we could not detect any changes in heart rate. Results suggest that inequity aversion might in fact be mediated by simple emotional mechanisms: sharing a negative experience, like inequity, might reduce future cooperation by decreasing the likelihood of proximity being maintained between partners. PMID:27081852

  15. Inequity Aversion Negatively Affects Tolerance and Contact-Seeking Behaviours towards Partner and Experimenter

    PubMed Central

    Brucks, Désirée; Essler, Jennifer L.; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Range, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Inequity aversion has been proposed to act as a limiting factor for cooperation, thus preventing subjects from disadvantageous cooperative interactions. While a recent study revealed that also dogs show some sensitivity to inequity, the underlying mechanisms of this behaviour are still unclear. The aim of the current study was threefold: 1) to replicate the study by Range et al. (2009, PNAS, 106, 340–345); 2) to investigate the emotional mechanisms involved in the inequity response by measuring the heart rate and 3) to explore the link between inequity aversion and cooperation in terms of behaviours shown towards the partner dog and towards the experimenter who caused the inequity. Dog tested in dyads were alternately asked to give their paw and were either equally or unequally rewarded by the experimenter. After each social test condition, we conducted food tolerance tests and free interaction tests in which the subjects’ social behaviour towards the partner and the experimenter were observed. As in the previous study, subjects refused to continue giving their paw when only the partner was rewarded, but not when both dogs were rewarded with rewards of different quality. Although subjects did not react to this quality inequity during the test, we did find reduced durations of food sharing in the subsequent tolerance test, indicating that dogs perceived the inequity but were not able to react to it in the test context. Moreover, subjects avoided their partner and the experimenter more during the free interaction time following unequal compared to equal treatment. Despite the clear behavioural reactions to inequity, we could not detect any changes in heart rate. Results suggest that inequity aversion might in fact be mediated by simple emotional mechanisms: sharing a negative experience, like inequity, might reduce future cooperation by decreasing the likelihood of proximity being maintained between partners. PMID:27081852

  16. From global change to a butterfly flapping: biophysics and behaviour affect tropical climate change impacts

    PubMed Central

    Bonebrake, Timothy C.; Boggs, Carol L.; Stamberger, Jeannie A.; Deutsch, Curtis A.; Ehrlich, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Difficulty in characterizing the relationship between climatic variability and climate change vulnerability arises when we consider the multiple scales at which this variation occurs, be it temporal (from minute to annual) or spatial (from centimetres to kilometres). We studied populations of a single widely distributed butterfly species, Chlosyne lacinia, to examine the physiological, morphological, thermoregulatory and biophysical underpinnings of adaptation to tropical and temperate climates. Microclimatic and morphological data along with a biophysical model documented the importance of solar radiation in predicting butterfly body temperature. We also integrated the biophysics with a physiologically based insect fitness model to quantify the influence of solar radiation, morphology and behaviour on warming impact projections. While warming is projected to have some detrimental impacts on tropical ectotherms, fitness impacts in this study are not as negative as models that assume body and air temperature equivalence would suggest. We additionally show that behavioural thermoregulation can diminish direct warming impacts, though indirect thermoregulatory consequences could further complicate predictions. With these results, at multiple spatial and temporal scales, we show the importance of biophysics and behaviour for studying biodiversity consequences of global climate change, and stress that tropical climate change impacts are likely to be context-dependent. PMID:25165769

  17. From global change to a butterfly flapping: biophysics and behaviour affect tropical climate change impacts.

    PubMed

    Bonebrake, Timothy C; Boggs, Carol L; Stamberger, Jeannie A; Deutsch, Curtis A; Ehrlich, Paul R

    2014-10-22

    Difficulty in characterizing the relationship between climatic variability and climate change vulnerability arises when we consider the multiple scales at which this variation occurs, be it temporal (from minute to annual) or spatial (from centimetres to kilometres). We studied populations of a single widely distributed butterfly species, Chlosyne lacinia, to examine the physiological, morphological, thermoregulatory and biophysical underpinnings of adaptation to tropical and temperate climates. Microclimatic and morphological data along with a biophysical model documented the importance of solar radiation in predicting butterfly body temperature. We also integrated the biophysics with a physiologically based insect fitness model to quantify the influence of solar radiation, morphology and behaviour on warming impact projections. While warming is projected to have some detrimental impacts on tropical ectotherms, fitness impacts in this study are not as negative as models that assume body and air temperature equivalence would suggest. We additionally show that behavioural thermoregulation can diminish direct warming impacts, though indirect thermoregulatory consequences could further complicate predictions. With these results, at multiple spatial and temporal scales, we show the importance of biophysics and behaviour for studying biodiversity consequences of global climate change, and stress that tropical climate change impacts are likely to be context-dependent. PMID:25165769

  18. More support for mothers: a qualitative study on factors affecting immunisation behaviour in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The proportion of Ugandan children who are fully vaccinated has varied over the years. Understanding vaccination behaviour is important for the success of the immunisation programme. This study examined influences on immunisation behaviour using the attitude-social influence-self efficacy model. Methods We conducted nine focus group discussions (FGDs) with mothers and fathers. Eight key informant interviews (KIIs) were held with those in charge of community mobilisation for immunisation, fathers and mothers. Data was analysed using content analysis. Results Influences on the mother's immunisation behaviour ranged from the non-supportive role of male partners sometimes resulting into intimate partner violence, lack of presentable clothing which made mothers vulnerable to bullying, inconvenient schedules and time constraints, to suspicion against immunisation such as vaccines cause physical disability and/or death. Conclusions Immunisation programmes should position themselves to address social contexts. A community programme that empowers women economically and helps men recognise the role of women in decision making for child health is needed. Increasing male involvement and knowledge of immunisation concepts among caretakers could improve immunisation. PMID:21942999

  19. Mild mutations in the pan neural gene prospero affect male-specific behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Grosjean, Yaël; Savy, Mathilde; Soichot, Julien; Everaerts, Claude; Cézilly, Frank; Ferveur, Jean François

    2004-01-30

    The fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most appropriate model organisms to study the genetics of behaviour. Here, we focus on prospero (pros), a key gene for the development of the nervous system which specifies multiple aspects from the early formation of the embryonic central nervous system to the formation of larval and adult sensory organs. We studied the effects on locomotion, courtship and mating behaviour of three mild pros mutations. These newly isolated pros mutations were induced after the incomplete excision of a transposable genomic element that, before excision, caused a lethal phenotype during larval development. Strikingly, these mutant strains, but not the strains with a clean excision, produced a high frequency of heterozygous flies, after more than 50 generations in the lab. We investigated the factors that could decrease the fitness of homozygotes relatively to heterozygous pros mutant flies. Flies of both genotypes had slightly different levels of fertility. More strikingly, homozygous mutant males had a lower sexual activity than heterozygous males and failed to mate in a competitive situation. No similar effect was detected in mutant females. These findings suggest that mild mutations in pros did not alter vital functions during development but drastically changed adult male behaviour and reproductive fitness. PMID:14744542

  20. p38 MAPK Signaling in Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Carballo, Eddie; Gámez, Beatriz; Ventura, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    The skeleton is a highly dynamic tissue whose structure relies on the balance between bone deposition and resorption. This equilibrium, which depends on osteoblast and osteoclast functions, is controlled by multiple factors that can be modulated post-translationally. Some of the modulators are Mitogen-activated kinases (MAPKs), whose role has been studied in vivo and in vitro. p38-MAPK modifies the transactivation ability of some key transcription factors in chondrocytes, osteoblasts and osteoclasts, which affects their differentiation and function. Several commercially available inhibitors have helped to determine p38 action on these processes. Although it is frequently mentioned in the literature, this chemical approach is not always as accurate as it should be. Conditional knockouts are a useful genetic tool that could unravel the role of p38 in shaping the skeleton. In this review, we will summarize the state of the art on p38 activity during osteoblast differentiation and function, and emphasize the triggers of this MAPK. PMID:27200351

  1. ACTIVATION OF NFATC2 IN OSTEOBLASTS CAUSES OSTEOPENIA*

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Stefano; Canalis, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (Nfat)c1 to c4 are transcription factors that play an undisputable role in osteoclastogenesis. However, Nfat function in osteoblastic cells is controversial. Constitutive activation of Nfatc1 and c2 in osteoblasts suppresses cell function, although the study of Nfat in vivo has yielded conflicting results. To establish the consequences of Nfatc2 activation in osteoblasts, we generated transgenic mice where a 3.6 kilobase fragment of the collagen type I α1 promoter directs expression of a constitutively active Nfatc2 mutant (Col3.6-Nfatc2). The skeletal phenotype of Col3.6-Nfatc2 mice of both sexes and of sex-matched littermate controls was investigated by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry. Col3.6-Nfatc2 mice were born at the expected Mendelian ratio and appeared normal. Nfatc2 expression was confirmed in parietal bones from 1 and 3 month old transgenic mice. One month old Col3.6-Nfatc2 female mice exhibited cancellous bone compartment osteopenia secondary to a 30% reduction in bone formation. In contrast, cancellous femoral bone volume and bone formation were not altered in male transgenics, whereas osteoblast number was higher, suggesting incomplete osteoblast maturation. Indices of bone resorption were not affected in either sex. At 3 months of age, the skeletal phenotype evolved; and Col3.6-Nfatc2 male mice exhibited vertebral osteopenia, whereas femoral cancellous bone was not affected in either sex. Nfatc2 activation in osteoblasts had no impact on cortical bone structure. Nfatc2 activation inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation in bone marrow stromal cell cultures. In conclusion, Nfatc2 activation in osteoblasts inhibits bone formation and causes cancellous bone osteopenia. PMID:25573264

  2. Activation of Nfatc2 in osteoblasts causes osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Stefano; Canalis, Ernesto

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (Nfat) c1 to c4 are transcription factors that play an undisputable role in osteoclastogenesis. However, Nfat function in osteoblastic cells is controversial. Constitutive activation of Nfatc1 and c2 in osteoblasts suppresses cell function, although the study of Nfat in vivo has yielded conflicting results. To establish the consequences of Nfatc2 activation in osteoblasts, we generated transgenic mice where a 3.6 kb fragment of the collagen type I α1 promoter directs expression of a constitutively active Nfatc2 mutant (Col3.6-Nfatc2). The skeletal phenotype of Col3.6-Nfatc2 mice of both sexes and of sex-matched littermate controls was investigated by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry. Col3.6- Nfatc2 mice were born at the expected Mendelian ratio and appeared normal. Nfatc2 expression was confirmed in parietal bones from 1 and 3 month old transgenic mice. One month old Col3.6-Nfatc2 female mice exhibited cancellous bone compartment osteopenia secondary to a 30% reduction in bone formation. In contrast, cancellous femoral bone volume and bone formation were not altered in male transgenics, whereas osteoblast number was higher, suggesting incomplete osteoblast maturation. Indices of bone resorption were not affected in either sex. At 3 months of age, the skeletal phenotype evolved; and Col3.6-Nfatc2 male mice exhibited vertebral osteopenia, whereas femoral cancellous bone was not affected in either sex. Nfatc2 activation in osteoblasts had no impact on cortical bone structure. Nfatc2 activation inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation in bone marrow stromal cell cultures. In conclusion, Nfatc2 activation in osteoblasts inhibits bone formation and causes cancellous bone osteopenia. PMID:25573264

  3. Reproductive state affects hiding behaviour under risk of predation but not exploratory activity of female Spanish terrapins.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Alejandro; Marzal, Alfonso; López, Pilar; Martín, José

    2015-02-01

    Female investment during reproduction may reduce survivorship due to increased predation risk. During pregnancy, the locomotor performance of gravid females might be diminished due to the additional weight acquired. In addition, egg production may also increase thermoregulatory, metabolic and physiological costs. Also, pregnant females have greater potential fitness and should take fewer risks. Thus, females should ponder their reproductive state when considering their behavioural responses under risky situations. Here, we examine how reproductive state influence risk-taking behaviour in different contexts in female Spanish terrapins (Mauremys leprosa). We simulated predator attacks of different risk levels and measured the time that the turtles spent hiding entirely inside their own shells (i.e. appearance times). We also assessed the subsequent time after emergence from the shell that the turtles spent immobile monitoring for predators before starting to escape actively (i.e. waiting times). Likewise, we performed a novel-environment test and measured the exploratory activity of turtles. We found no correlations between appearance time, waiting time or exploratory activity, but appearance times were correlated across different risk levels. Only appearance time was affected by the reproductive state, where gravid females reappeared relatively later from their shells after a predator attack than non-gravid ones. Moreover, among gravid females, those carrying greater clutches tended to have longer appearance times. This suggests that only larger clutches could affect hiding behaviour in risky contexts. In contrast, waiting time spent scanning for predators and exploratory activity were not affected by the reproductive state. These differences between gravid and non-gravid females might be explained by the metabolic-physiological costs associated with egg production and embryo maintenance, as well as by the relatively higher potential fitness of gravid females. PMID

  4. Environmental manipulation affects depressive-like behaviours in female Wistar-Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Mileva, Guergana R; Bielajew, Catherine

    2015-10-15

    While the efficacy of pharmacological interventions to treat depression has been well-studied in animal models, much less work has been done to shed light on how changes in the immediate environment can impact behaviour. Furthermore, most studies have focused on male rodents despite the prevalence of mood disorders in women. In this study, 36 Wistar Kyoto (validated animal model of depression) and 36 Wistar (control) female rats were used to examine the effects of environmental manipulation on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviours. Animals were assigned to one of three groups: standard (3 rats/cage), enriched (6 rats/cage plus physical enrichment), and isolation (1 rat/cage) housing. The elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swim test (FST) were conducted prior to, and four weeks after environmental assignment to measure anxiety-like and depressive-like behaviours, respectively. Sucrose preference assessed anhedonia both before and after environmental assignment. Weight was measured every week to monitor weight-gain over time. Post-environment sucrose preference was significantly increased in animals in enriched housing as compared to those in isolated housing in both strains. While there were significant differences between strains in measures of open arm duration in the EPM and immobility in the FST, there appeared to be no differences between environmental groups. The results of this study highlight the importance of environmental factors in the expression of anhedonia. Enrichment appears to reduce anhedonia while isolation increases anhedonia. These effects should be studied further to assess whether longer periods of social and physical enrichment alleviate other symptoms of depression. PMID:26215574

  5. How diabetic patients' ideas of illness course affect non-adherent behaviour: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wen An; Chie, Wei-Chu; Lew-Ting, Chih-Yin

    2007-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is becoming more prevalent and its successful management relies on patients' self-care behaviours. Measures focusing on patients' perceptions can be effective behavioural interventions. Aim To gain insight into the perceptions of patients with diabetes, especially ideas of the illness course and perceived severity, and their impacts on self-care behaviour. Design of study Qualitative approach with in-depth patient interviews (n = 22) and seven focus groups (n = 53). Setting A rural town in Taiwan. Method The interview protocol was mainly derived from Kleinman's explanatory model. Purposive sampling strategies of maximum variation were used. The transcript of the interviews was analysed with editing and immersion/crystallisation styles. Results Diabetes is regarded as an incurable, inevitably deteriorating disorder of sugar metabolism with many chronic complications. Patients thought that renal injury, followed by blindness, leg amputation, and poor peripheral circulation, were the most frequent complications. They also assessed their perceived severity of the disease at specific points in time through different indicators in their daily lives, such as sugar level, presence of complications, and medications used. Patients felt that these aspects progressed concurrently and that the illness course followed a unidimensional process. The ever-increasing doses of medication was considered by these patients to be a side-effect of the drugs taken. Conclusion Physicians should clarify with their patients that the risks of uraemia, blindness, and leg amputation are less prevalent than expected and that patients should pay more attention to cardiovascular complications. Certain oral hypoglycaemic agents may not cause a vicious cycle of ever-increasing doses of medication and the drugs that need to be taken should not be seen as indicators of severity but, rather, measures taken to prevent the diabetes becoming severe in the future. PMID:17394733

  6. Does participation in an HIV vaccine efficacy trial affect risk behaviour in South Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, GE; Metch, B; Churchyard, G; Mlisana, K; Nchabeleng, M; Allen, M; Moodie, Z; Kublin, J; Bekker, L-G

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased sexual risk behaviour in participants enrolled in HIV prevention trials has been a concern. The HVTN 503/Phambili study, a phase 2B study of the Merck Ad-5 multiclade HIV vaccine in South Africa, suspended enrollment and vaccinations following the results of the Step study. Participants were notified of their treatment allocation and continue to be followed. We investigated changes in risk behaviour over time and assessed the impact of study unblinding. Methods 801 participants were enrolled. Risk behaviors were assessed with an interviewer-administered questionnaire at 6-month intervals. We assessed change from enrolment to the first 6-month assessment pre-unblinding and between enrolment and at least 6 months post-unblinding on all participants with comparable data. A one-time unblinding risk perception questionnaire was administered post-unblinding. Results A decrease in participants reporting unprotected sex was observed in both measured time periods for men and women, with no differences by treatment arm. At 6 months (pre-unblinding), 29.6% of men and 35.8% of women reported changing from unprotected to protected sex (p <0.0001 for each).Men (22%) were more likely than women (14%) to report behavior change after unblinding (p=0.009). Post-enrolment, 142 (45%) of 313 previously uncircumcised men underwent medical circumcision. 663 participants completed the unblinding questionnaire. More vaccine (24.6%) as compared to placebo recipients (12.0%) agreed that they were more likely to get HIV than most people (p<0.0001), and attributed this to receiving the vaccine. Conclusion We did not find evidence of risk compensation during this clinical trial. Some risk behaviour reductions including male circumcision were noted irrespective of treatment allocation. PMID:23370155

  7. Putting Up a Big Front: Car Design and Size Affect Road-Crossing Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Wilhelm K; Chesham, Alvin; Lobmaier, Janek S

    2016-01-01

    Previous research suggests that people tend to see faces in car fronts and that they attribute personality characteristics to car faces. In the present study we investigated whether car design influences pedestrian road-crossing behaviour. An immersive virtual reality environment with a zebra crossing scenario was used to determine a) whether the minimum accepted distance for crossing the street is larger for cars with a dominant appearance than for cars with a friendly appearance and b) whether the speed of dominant-looking cars is overestimated as compared to friendly-looking cars. Participants completed both tasks while either standing on the pavement or on the centre island. We found that people started to cross the road later in front of friendly-looking low-power cars compared to dominant-looking high-power cars, but only if the cars were relatively large in size. For small cars we found no effect of power. The speed of smaller cars was estimated to be higher compared to large cars (size-speed bias). Furthermore, there was an effect of starting position: From the centre island, participants entered the road significantly later (i. e. closer to the approaching car) and left the road later than when starting from the pavement. Similarly, the speed of the cars was estimated significantly lower when standing on the centre island compared to the pavement. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that car fronts elicit responses on a behavioural level. PMID:27434187

  8. Putting Up a Big Front: Car Design and Size Affect Road-Crossing Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, Wilhelm K.; Chesham, Alvin; Lobmaier, Janek S.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research suggests that people tend to see faces in car fronts and that they attribute personality characteristics to car faces. In the present study we investigated whether car design influences pedestrian road-crossing behaviour. An immersive virtual reality environment with a zebra crossing scenario was used to determine a) whether the minimum accepted distance for crossing the street is larger for cars with a dominant appearance than for cars with a friendly appearance and b) whether the speed of dominant-looking cars is overestimated as compared to friendly-looking cars. Participants completed both tasks while either standing on the pavement or on the centre island. We found that people started to cross the road later in front of friendly-looking low-power cars compared to dominant-looking high-power cars, but only if the cars were relatively large in size. For small cars we found no effect of power. The speed of smaller cars was estimated to be higher compared to large cars (size-speed bias). Furthermore, there was an effect of starting position: From the centre island, participants entered the road significantly later (i. e. closer to the approaching car) and left the road later than when starting from the pavement. Similarly, the speed of the cars was estimated significantly lower when standing on the centre island compared to the pavement. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that car fronts elicit responses on a behavioural level. PMID:27434187

  9. Chronic exposure to mercuric chloride during gestation affects sensorimotor development and later behaviour in rats.

    PubMed

    Chehimi, Latifa; Roy, Vincent; Jeljeli, Mustapha; Sakly, Mohsen

    2012-09-01

    The current study was performed to assess the effects of inorganic mercury (mercuric chloride - HgCl(2)) on the development of offsprings from intoxicated-mother during pregnancy. In this respect, pregnant rats were chronically treated with HgCl(2) at 50 ppm (Hg50) and 100 ppm (Hg100) in drinking water. After parturition, maternal behaviour was recorded during 30 min at 1st to 6th postnatal day (Pnd). The development of their offspring was studied during the first 17 days after birth. Sensorimotor development of pups was measured by different tests: rooting reflex, vibrissae placing response, righting reflex, negative geotaxis, suspension test and rotating grid. Two month after birth, the anxiety of offspring was tested using the elevated plus maze test. Our results indicate that mercury treatment significantly reduced the nursing and increased the time out the nest or drinking and eating. We also showed that prenatal exposure to HgCl(2) decreased weight gain. Importantly, the rooting reflex, the development of the vibrissae placing response, the righting reflex, the grip strength and the negative geotaxis behaviour were delayed in the offspring of dams treated with Hg50, the delay being more severe with Hg100. We also found a decrease in anxiety in adulthood. Cross-fostering test support the direct toxic effects of mercury. PMID:22705860

  10. Acupuncture Affects Autonomic and Endocrine but Not Behavioural Responses Induced by Startle in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Villas-Boas, Julia Dias; Dias, Daniel Penteado Martins; Trigo, Pablo Ignacio; Almeida, Norma Aparecida dos Santos; de Almeida, Fernando Queiroz; de Medeiros, Magda Alves

    2015-01-01

    Startle is a fast response elicited by sudden acoustic, tactile, or visual stimuli in a variety of animals and in humans. As the magnitude of startle response can be modulated by external and internal variables, it can be a useful tool to study reaction to stress. Our study evaluated whether acupuncture can change cardiac autonomic modulation (heart rate variability); and behavioural (reactivity) and endocrine (cortisol levels) parameters in response to startle. Brazilian Sport horses (n = 6) were subjected to a model of startle in which an umbrella was abruptly opened near the horse. Before startle, the horses were subjected to a 20-minute session of acupuncture in acupoints GV1, HT7, GV20, and BL52 (ACUP) and in nonpoints (NP) or left undisturbed (CTL). For analysis of the heart rate variability, ultrashort-term (64 s) heart rate series were interpolated (4 Hz) and divided into 256-point segments and the spectra integrated into low (LF; 0.01–0.07 Hz; index of sympathetic modulation) and high (HF; 0.07–0.50 Hz; index of parasympathetic modulation) frequency bands. Acupuncture (ACUP) changed the sympathovagal balance with a shift towards parasympathetic modulation, reducing the prompt startle-induced increase in LF/HF and reducing cortisol levels 30 min after startle. However, acupuncture elicited no changes in behavioural parameters. PMID:26413116

  11. Does underwater flash photography affect the behaviour, movement and site persistence of seahorses?

    PubMed

    Harasti, D; Gladstone, W

    2013-11-01

    The effect of flash photography on seahorse species has never been tested. An experiment was established to test the effect of flash photography and the handling of Hippocampus whitei, a medium-sized seahorse species endemic to Australia, on their behavioural responses, movements and site persistence. A total of 24 H. whitei were utilized in the experiment with eight in each of the three treatments (flash photography, handling and control). The effect of underwater flash photography on H. whitei movements was not significant; however, the effect of handling H. whitei to take a photograph had a significant effect on their short-term behavioural responses to the photographer. Kaplan-Meier log-rank test revealed that there was no significant difference in site persistence of H. whitei from each of the three treatments and that flash photography had no long-term effects on their site persistence. It is concluded that the use of flash photography by divers is a safe and viable technique with H. whitei, particularly if photographs can be used for individual identification purposes. PMID:24131331

  12. How does the composition affect the mechanical behaviour of simulated clay-rich fault gouges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Elisenda; Spiers, Christopher J.; Hangx, Suzanne J. T.

    2014-05-01

    CO2 capture and storage (CCS) in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is seen as one of the most promising large-scale CO2-mitigation strategies. Prediction of the effect of fluid-rock interaction on the mechanical integrity and sealing capacity of a reservoir-seal system, on timescales of the order of 1,000 or 10,000 years, is important to ensure the safety and containment of a reservoir in relation to long-term CO2 storage. However, most chemical reactions in rock/CO2/brine systems are slow, which means that long-term effects of fluids on rock composition, microstructure, mechanical properties and transport properties cannot be easily reproduced under laboratory conditions. One way to overcome this problem is to use simulated fault gouges in experiments, investigating a range of possible mineralogical compositions resulting from CO2-exposure. Previous studies have shown that the mechanical and transport properties of clay-rich fault gouges are significantly influenced by the mineralogy, particularly by the presence and relative amount of secondary phases, such as quartz and/or carbonate. In CCS settings, where dissolution and/or precipitation of carbonates may play an important role, the carbonate:clay ratio is expected to influence fault frictional behaviour. This is supported by the different behaviour of phyllosilicates, which generally show stable slip behaviour (aseismic), compared to carbonates, which have shown to become prone to unstable slip (potentially seismic) with increasing temperature. However, little is known about the mechanical and transport properties of carbonate/clay mixtures. We investigated the effect of the carbonate:clay ratio on fault friction, fault reactivation potential and slip stability, i.e. seismic vs. aseismic behaviour, as well as transmissivity evolution during and after fault reactivation. We used two types of starting material, derived from crushed Opalinus Claystone (Mont Terri, Switzerland): i) untreated samples consisting

  13. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:25998381

  14. How the flow affects the phase behaviour and microstructure of polymer nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanou, Pavlos S.

    2015-02-14

    We address the issue of flow effects on the phase behaviour of polymer nanocomposite melts by making use of a recently reported Hamiltonian set of evolution equations developed on principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. To this end, we calculate the spinodal curve, by computing values for the nanoparticle radius as a function of the polymer radius-of-gyration for which the second derivative of the generalized free energy of the system becomes zero. Under equilibrium conditions, we recover the phase diagram predicted by Mackay et al. [Science 311, 1740 (2006)]. Under non-equilibrium conditions, we account for the extra terms in the free energy due to changes in the conformations of polymer chains by the shear flow. Overall, our model predicts that flow enhances miscibility, since the corresponding miscibility window opens up for non-zero shear rate values.

  15. Conditioned water affects pair formation behaviour in the marine polychaete Neanthes (Nereis) acuminata.

    PubMed

    Storey, Ellen J; Reish, Don J; Hardege, Jörg D

    2013-01-01

    Assessing cues from conspecifics is paramount during mate choice decisions. Neanthes acuminata is a marine polychaete with a unique life cycle: pair formation, female death following reproduction, male parental care and male ability to mate again after egg care. Males completing such egg care are 'experienced'. Females have been shown to prefer experienced males over all others, including aggressively dominant males. As the female dies following reproduction, the reproductive success of her offspring depends upon successful parental care by the male. It is therefore vital that the female makes a good mate choice decision. This paper shows that the use of conditioned water from males caring for eggs and newly experienced males caused the female to alter her choice to a previously undesired male. However, conditioned water from males, which had reproduced but were isolated for 2 weeks, did not have the same effect on pairing behaviour. This indicates that the smell of experience is short lived. PMID:22941305

  16. Supplementary feeding affects the breeding behaviour of male European treefrogs (Hyla arborea)

    PubMed Central

    Meuche, Ivonne; Grafe, T Ulmar

    2009-01-01

    Background We investigated the effects of energetic constraints on the breeding behaviour of male European treefrogs Hyla arborea and how calling males allocated additional energy supplied by feeding experiments. Results Presence in the chorus was energetically costly indicated by both fed and unfed males losing weight. Males that were supplied with additional energy did not show longer chorus tenure. Instead, fed males returned sooner to the chorus. Additionally, fed males called more often than control males, a novel response for anurans. A significantly higher calling rate was noted from males even 31 nights after supplementary feeding. Conclusion This strategy of allocating additional energy reserves to increasing calling rate is beneficial given the preference of female hylids for males calling at high rates and a female's ability to detect small incremental increases in calling rate. PMID:19128468

  17. Mother-Toddler Affect Exchanges and Children's Mastery Behaviours during Preschool Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jun; Morgan, George A.; Biringen, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal relations of mother-child affect exchanges at 18?months with children's mastery motivation at 39?months. Observation and questionnaire data were collected from mother-child dyads when children were 18?months; 43 mothers again rated their children's mastery motivation at 39?months. Results suggested…

  18. More than a Signature: How Advisor Choice and Advisor Behaviour Affect Doctoral Student Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Chun-Mei; Golde, Chris M.; McCormick, Alexander C.

    2007-01-01

    A satisfactory relationship between doctoral students and their advisors is an essential component of successful doctoral training. Using responses to a national survey of doctoral students in the US from 27 universities and 11 disciplines, this paper explores factors affecting students' satisfaction with the advising relationship. We find that…

  19. Plasma deposited composite coatings to control biological response of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keremidarska, M.; Radeva, E.; Eleršič, K.; Iglič, A.; Pramatarova, L.; Krasteva, N.

    2014-12-01

    The successful osseointegration of a bone implant is greatly dependent on its ability to support cellular adhesion and functions. Deposition of thin composite coatings onto the implant surface is a promising approach to improve interactions with cells without compromising implant bulk properties. In this work, we have developed composite coatings, based on hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDS) and detonation nanodiamond (DND) particles and have studied adhesion, growth and function of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. PPHMDS/DND composites are of interest for orthopedics because they combine superior mechanical properties and good biocompatibility of DND with high adherence of HMDS to different substrata including glass, metals and plastics. We have used two approaches of the implementation of DND particles into a polymer matrix: pre-mixture of both components followed by plasma polymerization and layer-by-layer deposition of HMDS and DND particles and found that the deposition approach affects significantly the surface properties of the resulting layers and cell behaviour. The composite, prepared by subsequent deposition of monomer and DND particles was hydrophilic, with a rougher surface and MG-63 cells demonstrated better spreading, growth and function compared to the other composite which was hydrophobic with a smooth surface similarly to unmodified polymer. Thus, by varying the deposition approach, different PPHMDS/DND composite coatings, enhancing or inhibiting osteoblast adhesion and functions, can be obtained. In addition, the effect of fibronectin pre-adsorption was studied and was found to increase greatly MG-63 cell spreading.

  20. Social bonds affect anti-predator behaviour in a tolerant species of macaque, Macaca nigra.

    PubMed

    Micheletta, Jérôme; Waller, Bridget M; Panggur, Maria R; Neumann, Christof; Duboscq, Julie; Agil, Muhammad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2012-10-01

    Enduring positive social bonds between individuals are crucial for humans' health and well being. Similar bonds can be found in a wide range of taxa, revealing the evolutionary origins of humans' social bonds. Evidence suggests that these strong social bonds can function to buffer the negative effects of living in groups, but it is not known whether they also function to minimize predation risk. Here, we show that crested macaques (Macaca nigra) react more strongly to playbacks of recruitment alarm calls (i.e. calls signalling the presence of a predator and eliciting cooperative mobbing behaviour) if they were produced by an individual with whom they share a strong social bond. Dominance relationships between caller and listener had no effect on the reaction of the listener. Thus, strong social bonds may improve the coordination and efficiency of cooperative defence against predators, and therefore increase chances of survival. This result broadens our understanding of the evolution and function of social bonds by highlighting their importance in the anti-predator context. PMID:22859593

  1. Oceanographic and behavioural processes affecting invertebrate larval dispersal and supply in the western Iberia upwelling ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroga, Henrique; Cruz, Teresa; dos Santos, Antonina; Dubert, Jesus; González-Gordillo, Juan Ignácio; Paula, José; Peliz, Álvaro; Santos, A. Miguel P.

    2007-08-01

    The present review addresses recent findings made in the western Iberia ecosystem on the behavioural and physical interactions that regulate dispersal, supply to coastal habitats and settlement of invertebrate larvae. These studies used the barnacle Chthamalus spp. and the crab Carcinus maenas as model organisms. The observations made on the Iberian shelf showed extensive diel vertical migrations along the water column by representatives of both groups that have never been reported before. The interaction of the diel vertical migration with the two-layer flow structure of upwelling/downwelling circulation suggests a mechanism that may help to retain larvae in shelf waters during upwelling conditions. Measurements of daily supply of C. maenas megalopae to estuaries separated by 500 km disclosed a semilunar pattern, with highest supply around highest amplitude tides, indicating that supply of megalopae to estuaries is accomplished by selective tidal stream transport. Relaxation of equatorward winds also played a role in supply, by enhancing translocation of megalopae to the nearshore. Concerning Chthamalus larvae, the observations on daily settlement made at rocky shores also separated by 500 km showed unclear patterns between locations and years. The relationship of settlement with water temperature, tidal range and upwelling indices indicated that supply of barnacle cyprids may be controlled by multiple mechanisms, viz. upwelling/downwelling circulation, internal tidal bores and sea breezes.

  2. Studying User Income through Language, Behaviour and Affect in Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Preoţiuc-Pietro, Daniel; Volkova, Svitlana; Lampos, Vasileios; Bachrach, Yoram; Aletras, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Automatically inferring user demographics from social media posts is useful for both social science research and a range of downstream applications in marketing and politics. We present the first extensive study where user behaviour on Twitter is used to build a predictive model of income. We apply non-linear methods for regression, i.e. Gaussian Processes, achieving strong correlation between predicted and actual user income. This allows us to shed light on the factors that characterise income on Twitter and analyse their interplay with user emotions and sentiment, perceived psycho-demographics and language use expressed through the topics of their posts. Our analysis uncovers correlations between different feature categories and income, some of which reflect common belief e.g. higher perceived education and intelligence indicates higher earnings, known differences e.g. gender and age differences, however, others show novel findings e.g. higher income users express more fear and anger, whereas lower income users express more of the time emotion and opinions. PMID:26394145

  3. Studying User Income through Language, Behaviour and Affect in Social Media.

    PubMed

    Preoţiuc-Pietro, Daniel; Volkova, Svitlana; Lampos, Vasileios; Bachrach, Yoram; Aletras, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Automatically inferring user demographics from social media posts is useful for both social science research and a range of downstream applications in marketing and politics. We present the first extensive study where user behaviour on Twitter is used to build a predictive model of income. We apply non-linear methods for regression, i.e. Gaussian Processes, achieving strong correlation between predicted and actual user income. This allows us to shed light on the factors that characterise income on Twitter and analyse their interplay with user emotions and sentiment, perceived psycho-demographics and language use expressed through the topics of their posts. Our analysis uncovers correlations between different feature categories and income, some of which reflect common belief e.g. higher perceived education and intelligence indicates higher earnings, known differences e.g. gender and age differences, however, others show novel findings e.g. higher income users express more fear and anger, whereas lower income users express more of the time emotion and opinions. PMID:26394145

  4. Changes in osteoblastic activity due to simulated weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S. B.; Morey-Holton, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    Using histochemistry and electron microscopy, the reduced bone formation which occurs in the hypokinetic, orthostatically treated adult rat has been studied. The two major changes noted occurred in the osteoblast population, indicated by a reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and reduced numbers of gap junctions between cells. These results were most noticeable in the periosteum and endosteum of the long bones. Changes in osteoblasts lining the surface of trabecular bone were not as evident. These results indicate that the cells lining the surfaces of weight bearing bones are most affected by hypokinesia and this reduction in cellular activity may be a mechanically induced effect.

  5. OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaki Miyasaka; Robyn R. Mercer; Andrea M. Mastro; Ken L. Telschow

    2005-03-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium

  6. Baicalin, a Flavone, Induces the Differentiation of Cultured Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ava J. Y.; Choi, Roy C. Y.; Cheung, Anna W. H.; Chen, Vicky P.; Xu, Sherry L.; Dong, Tina T. X.; Chen, Ji J.; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2011-01-01

    Flavonoids, a group of natural compounds found in a variety of vegetables and herbal medicines, have been intensively reported on regarding their estrogen-like activities and particularly their ability to affect bone metabolism. Here, different subclasses of flavonoids were screened for their osteogenic properties by measuring alkaline phosphatase activity in cultured rat osteoblasts. The flavone baicalin derived mainly from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis showed the strongest induction of alkaline phosphatase activity. In cultured osteoblasts, application of baicalin increased significantly the osteoblastic mineralization and the levels of mRNAs encoding the bone differentiation markers, including osteonectin, osteocalcin, and collagen type 1α1. Interestingly, the osteogenic effect of baicalin was not mediated by its estrogenic activity. In contrast, baicalin promoted osteoblastic differentiation via the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway; the activation resulted in the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and, subsequently, induced the nuclear accumulation of the β-catenin, leading to the transcription activation of Wnt-targeted genes for osteogenesis. The baicalin-induced osteogenic effects were fully abolished by DKK-1, a blocker of Wnt/β-catenin receptor. Moreover, baicalin also enhanced the mRNA expression of osteoprotegerin, which could regulate indirectly the activation of osteoclasts. Taken together, our results suggested that baicalin could act via Wnt/β-catenin signaling to promote osteoblastic differentiation. The osteogenic flavonoids could be very useful in finding potential drugs, or food supplements, for treating post-menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:21652696

  7. IL-6 alters osteocyte signaling toward osteoblasts but not osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Bakker, A D; Kulkarni, R N; Klein-Nulend, J; Lems, W F

    2014-04-01

    Mechanosensitive osteocytes regulate bone mass in adults. Interleukin 6 (IL-6), such as present during orthodontic tooth movement, also strongly affects bone mass, but little is known about the effect of IL-6 on osteocyte function. Therefore we aimed to determine in vitro whether IL-6 affects osteocyte mechanosensitivity, and osteocyte regulation of osteoclastogenesis and osteoblast differentiation. MLO-Y4 osteocytes were incubated with/without IL-6 (1 or 10 pg/mL) for 24 hr. Subsequently, osteocytes were subjected to mechanical loading by pulsating fluid flow (PFF) for 1 hr. Mouse osteoclast precursors were cultured for 7 days on top of IL-6-treated osteocytes. Conditioned medium from osteocytes treated with/without IL-6 was added to MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts for 14 days. Exogenous IL-6 (10 pg/mL) did not alter the osteocyte response to PFF. PFF significantly enhanced IL-6 production by osteocytes. IL-6 enhanced Rankl expression but reduced caspase 3/7 activity by osteocytes, and therefore did not affect osteocyte-stimulated osteoclastogenesis. Conditioned medium from IL-6-treated osteocytes reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and Runx2 expression in osteoblasts, but increased expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 and osteocalcin. Our results suggest that IL-6 is produced by shear-loaded osteocytes and that IL-6 may affect bone mass by modulating osteocyte communication toward osteoblasts. PMID:24492932

  8. Synergistic activity of polarised osteoblasts inside condensations cause their differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Himanshu; Hall, Brian K.; Newby, Chris; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2015-01-01

    Condensation of pre-osteogenic, or pre-chondrogenic, cells is the first of a series of processes that initiate skeletal development. We present a validated, novel, three-dimensional agent-based model of in vitro intramembranous osteogenic condensation. The model, informed by system heterogeneity and relying on an interaction-reliant strategy, is shown to be sensitive to ‘rules’ capturing condensation growth and can be employed to track activity of individual cells to observe their macroscopic impact. It, therefore, makes available previously inaccessible data, offering new insights and providing a new context for exploring the emergence, as well as normal and abnormal development, of osteogenic structures. Of the several stages of condensation we investigate osteoblast ‘burial’ within the osteoid they deposit. The mechanisms underlying entrapment – required for osteoblasts to differentiate into osteocytes – remain a matter of conjecture with several hypotheses claiming to capture this important transition. Computational examination of this transition indicates that osteoblasts neither turn off nor slow down their matrix secreting genes – a widely held view; nor do they secrete matrix randomly. The model further reveals that osteoblasts display polarised behaviour to deposit osteoid. This is both an important addition to our understanding of condensation and an important validation of the model’s utility. PMID:26146365

  9. Mutual enhancement of differentiation of osteoblasts and osteocytes occurs through direct cell-cell contact

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Koji; Xing, Qian; Khosla, Sundeep; Monroe, David G.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that osteocytes regulate multiple aspects of bone remodeling through bi-directional communication with osteoblasts. This is potentially mediated through cell-cell contact via osteocytic dendritic processes, through the activity of secreted factors, or both. To test whether cell-cell contact affects gene expression patterns in osteoblasts and osteocytes, we used a co-culture system where calvarial osteoblasts and IDG-SW3 osteocytes were allowed to touch through a porous membrane, while still being physically separated to allow for phenotypic characterization. Osteoblast/osteocyte cell-contact resulted in up-regulation of osteoblast differentiation genes in the osteoblasts, when compared to wells where no cell contact was allowed. Examination of osteocyte gene expression when in direct contact with osteoblasts also revealed increased expression of osteocyte-specific genes. These data suggest that physical contact mutually enhances both the osteoblastic and osteocytic character of each respective cell type. Interestingly, Gja1 (a gap junction protein) was increased in the osteoblasts only when in direct contact with the osteocytes, suggesting that Gja1 may mediate some of the effects of direct cell contact. To test this hypothesis, we treated the direct contact system with the gap junction inhibitor 18-alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid and found that Bglap expression was significantly inhibited. This suggests that osteocytes may regulate late osteoblast differentiation at least in part through Gja1. Identification of the specific factors involved in the enhancement of differentiation of both osteoblasts and osteocytes when in direct contact will uncover new biology concerning how these bone cells communicate. PMID:25043105

  10. Prawn Shell Chitosan Exhibits Anti-Obesogenic Potential through Alterations to Appetite, Affecting Feeding Behaviour and Satiety Signals In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Egan, Áine M; O'Doherty, John V; Vigors, Stafford; Sweeney, Torres

    2016-01-01

    The crustacean shells-derived polysaccharide chitosan has received much attention for its anti-obesity potential. Dietary supplementation of chitosan has been linked with reductions in feed intake, suggesting a potential link between chitosan and appetite control. Hence the objective of this experiment was to investigate the appetite suppressing potential of prawn shell derived chitosan in a pig model. Pigs (70 ± 0.90 kg, 125 days of age, SD 2.0) were fed either T1) basal diet or T2) basal diet plus 1000 ppm chitosan (n = 20 gilts per group) for 63 days. The parameter categories which were assessed included performance, feeding behaviour, serum leptin concentrations and expression of genes influencing feeding behaviour in the small intestine, hypothalamus and adipose tissue. Pigs offered chitosan visited the feeder less times per day (P<0.001), had lower intake per visit (P<0.001), spent less time eating per day (P<0.001), had a lower eating rate (P<0.01) and had reduced feed intake and final body weight (P< 0.001) compared to animals offered the basal diet. There was a treatment (P<0.05) and time effect (P<0.05) on serum leptin concentrations in animals offered the chitosan diet compared to animals offered the basal diet. Pigs receiving dietary chitosan had an up-regulation in gene expression of growth hormone receptor (P<0.05), Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (P<0.01), neuromedin B (P<0.05), neuropeptide Y receptor 5 (P<0.05) in hypothalamic nuclei and neuropeptide Y (P<0.05) in the jejunum. Animals consuming chitosan had increased leptin expression in adipose tissue compared to pigs offered the basal diet (P<0.05). In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that dietary prawn shell chitosan exhibits anti-obesogenic potential through alterations to appetite, and feeding behaviour affecting satiety signals in vivo. PMID:26901760

  11. Prawn Shell Chitosan Exhibits Anti-Obesogenic Potential through Alterations to Appetite, Affecting Feeding Behaviour and Satiety Signals In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Áine M.; O’Doherty, John V.; Vigors, Stafford; Sweeney, Torres

    2016-01-01

    The crustacean shells-derived polysaccharide chitosan has received much attention for its anti-obesity potential. Dietary supplementation of chitosan has been linked with reductions in feed intake, suggesting a potential link between chitosan and appetite control. Hence the objective of this experiment was to investigate the appetite suppressing potential of prawn shell derived chitosan in a pig model. Pigs (70 ± 0.90 kg, 125 days of age, SD 2.0) were fed either T1) basal diet or T2) basal diet plus 1000 ppm chitosan (n = 20 gilts per group) for 63 days. The parameter categories which were assessed included performance, feeding behaviour, serum leptin concentrations and expression of genes influencing feeding behaviour in the small intestine, hypothalamus and adipose tissue. Pigs offered chitosan visited the feeder less times per day (P<0.001), had lower intake per visit (P<0.001), spent less time eating per day (P<0.001), had a lower eating rate (P<0.01) and had reduced feed intake and final body weight (P< 0.001) compared to animals offered the basal diet. There was a treatment (P<0.05) and time effect (P<0.05) on serum leptin concentrations in animals offered the chitosan diet compared to animals offered the basal diet. Pigs receiving dietary chitosan had an up-regulation in gene expression of growth hormone receptor (P<0.05), Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (P<0.01), neuromedin B (P<0.05), neuropeptide Y receptor 5 (P<0.05) in hypothalamic nuclei and neuropeptide Y (P<0.05) in the jejunum. Animals consuming chitosan had increased leptin expression in adipose tissue compared to pigs offered the basal diet (P<0.05). In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that dietary prawn shell chitosan exhibits anti-obesogenic potential through alterations to appetite, and feeding behaviour affecting satiety signals in vivo. PMID:26901760

  12. Phenotypic and Evolutionary Consequences of Social Behaviours: Interactions among Individuals Affect Direct Genetic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Trubenová, Barbora; Hager, Reinmar

    2012-01-01

    Traditional quantitative genetics assumes that an individual's phenotype is determined by both genetic and environmental factors. For many animals, part of the environment is social and provided by parents and other interacting partners. When expression of genes in social partners affects trait expression in a focal individual, indirect genetic effects occur. In this study, we explore the effects of indirect genetic effects on the magnitude and range of phenotypic values in a focal individual in a multi-member model analyzing three possible classes of interactions between individuals. We show that social interactions may not only cause indirect genetic effects but can also modify direct genetic effects. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both direct and indirect genetic effects substantially alter the range of phenotypic values, particularly when a focal trait can influence its own expression via interactions with traits in other individuals. We derive a function predicting the relative importance of direct versus indirect genetic effects. Our model reveals that both direct and indirect genetic effects can depend to a large extent on both group size and interaction strength, altering group mean phenotype and variance. This may lead to scenarios where between group variation is much higher than within group variation despite similar underlying genetic properties, potentially affecting the level of selection. Our analysis highlights key properties of indirect genetic effects with important consequences for trait evolution, the level of selection and potentially speciation. PMID:23226195

  13. Does influenza A virus infection affect movement behaviour during stopover in its wild reservoir host?

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Daniel; Safi, Kamran; Avril, Alexis; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Wikelski, Martin; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Elmberg, Johan; Tolf, Conny; Olsen, Björn; Waldenström, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen a surge in research on avian influenza A viruses (IAVs), in part fuelled by the emergence, spread and potential zoonotic importance of highly pathogenic virus subtypes. The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) is the most numerous and widespread dabbling duck in the world, and one of the most important natural hosts for studying IAV transmission dynamics. In order to predict the likelihood of IAV transmission between individual ducks and to other hosts, as well as between geographical regions, it is important to understand how IAV infection affects the host. In this study, we analysed the movements of 40 mallards equipped with GPS transmitters and three-dimensional accelerometers, of which 20 were naturally infected with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV), at a major stopover site in the Northwest European flyway. Movements differed substantially between day and night, as well as between mallards returning to the capture site and those feeding in natural habitats. However, movement patterns did not differ between LPAIV infected and uninfected birds. Hence, LPAIV infection probably does not affect mallard movements during stopover, with high possibility of virus spread along the migration route as a consequence. PMID:26998334

  14. Coping behaviours and post-traumatic stress in war-affected eastern Congolese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mels, Cindy; Derluyn, Ilse; Broekaert, Eric; García-Pérez, Coral

    2015-02-01

    This study explores coping strategies used by war-affected eastern Congolese adolescents across age and sex, and the association between post-traumatic stress symptoms and engagement and disengagement coping. Cross-sectional data were collected in 11 secondary schools across four areas in the Ituri province, Democratic Republic of Congo. A total of 952 pupils (45.3% girls, 54.7% boys) aged 13-21 years (M = 15.83, standard deviation = 1.81) participated in self-report assessment, using instruments that were either specifically developed (Adolescent Complex Emergency Exposure Scale, assessing traumatic exposure), validated (Impact of Event Scale Revised, assessing post-traumatic stress symptoms) or reviewed (Kidcope, assessing coping strategies) for the study population. Reported coping strategies varied with age, and boys more frequently reported problem solving and resignation as compared with girls. Disengagement coping was associated with lower symptom scores in younger adolescent girls, as was the interaction effect between engagement and disengagement coping. We conclude that disengagement coping is not necessarily a maladaptive reaction to stressful events in war-affected situations and that future research should aim to better understand the heterogeneous patterns of stress and coping responses, including the role of factors such as the nature and appraisal of stressors, available resources for coping and cultural preferences. PMID:24130163

  15. Osteocytes subjected to pulsating fluid flow regulate osteoblast proliferation and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vezeridis, Peter S.; Chen Qian . E-mail: j.kleinnulend@vumc.nl

    2006-09-29

    Osteocytes are thought to orchestrate bone remodeling, but it is unclear exactly how osteocytes influence neighboring bone cells. Here, we tested whether osteocytes, osteoblasts, and periosteal fibroblasts subjected to pulsating fluid flow (PFF) produce soluble factors that modulate the proliferation and differentiation of cultured osteoblasts and periosteal fibroblasts. We found that osteocyte PFF conditioned medium (CM) inhibited bone cell proliferation, and osteocytes produced the strongest inhibition of proliferation compared to osteoblasts and periosteal fibroblasts. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) attenuated the inhibitory effects of osteocyte PFF CM, suggesting that a change in NO release is at least partially responsible for the inhibitory effects of osteocyte PFF CM. Furthermore, osteocyte PFF CM stimulated osteoblast differentiation measured as increased alkaline phosphatase activity, and L-NAME decreased the stimulatory effects of osteocyte PFF CM on osteoblast differentiation. We conclude that osteocytes subjected to PFF inhibit proliferation but stimulate differentiation of osteoblasts in vitro via soluble factors and that the release of these soluble factors was at least partially dependent on the activation of a NO pathway in osteocytes in response to PFF. Thus, the osteocyte appears to be more responsive to PFF than the osteoblast or periosteal fibroblast with respect to the production of soluble signaling molecules affecting osteoblast proliferation and differentiation.

  16. Evidence that the type of person affects the strength of the perceived behavioural control-intention relationship.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, Paschal; Trafimow, David; Finlay, Krystina A; Norman, Paul

    2002-06-01

    This study examined the role of person type in explaining the relationship between perceived behavioural control and behavioural intentions. Participants (N = 187) completed measures of the theory of planned behaviour (Ajzen, 1991) variables regarding 30 behaviours. Within-participants analyses demonstrated that intentions were more strongly predicted by perceived behavioural control (PBC) than a combination of attitudes and subjective norms among a minority of the sample. When these 'PBC controlled' participants were considered separately, the effects for perceived behavioural control obtained in previous between-participants analyses were augmented. Conversely, when these participants were excluded from the sample, the effects of perceived behavioural control were reduced. PBC control was also modestly associated with dispositional measures of perceived controllability. Overall, the findings indicate that the strength of the perceived behavioural control-intention relationship depends not only on the type of behaviour but also on the type of person. PMID:12133227

  17. Fibronectin regulates calvarial osteoblast differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moursi, A. M.; Damsky, C. H.; Lull, J.; Zimmerman, D.; Doty, S. B.; Aota, S.; Globus, R. K.

    1996-01-01

    The secretion of fibronectin by differentiating osteoblasts and its accumulation at sites of osteogenesis suggest that fibronectin participates in bone formation. To test this directly, we determined whether fibronectin-cell interactions regulate progressive differentiation of cultured fetal rat calvarial osteoblasts. Spatial distributions of alpha 5 integrin subunit, fibronectin, osteopontin (bone sialoprotein I) and osteocalcin (bone Gla-protein) were similar in fetal rat calvaria and mineralized, bone-like nodules formed by cultured osteoblasts. Addition of anti-fibronectin antibodies to cultures at confluence reduced subsequent formation of nodules to less than 10% of control values, showing that fibronectin is required for normal nodule morphogenesis. Anti-fibronectin antibodies selectively inhibited steady-state expression of mRNA for genes associated with osteoblast differentiation; mRNA levels for alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin were suppressed, whereas fibronectin, type I collagen and osteopontin were unaffected. To identify functionally relevant domains of fibronectin, we treated cells with soluble fibronectin fragments and peptides. Cell-binding fibronectin fragments (type III repeats 6-10) containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence blocked both nodule initiation and maturation, whether or not they contained a functional synergy site. In contrast, addition of the RGD-containing peptide GRGDSPK alone did not inhibit nodule initiation, although it did block nodule maturation. Thus, in addition to the RGD sequence, other features of the large cell-binding fragments contribute to the full osteogenic effects of fibronectin. Nodule formation and osteoblast differentiation resumed after anti-fibronectin antibodies or GRGDSPK peptides were omitted from the media, showing that the inhibition was reversible and the treatments were not cytotoxic. Outside the central cell-binding domain, peptides from the IIICS region and antibodies to the N terminus did not

  18. Predicting intentions to purchase organic food: the role of affective and moral attitudes in the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Arvola, A; Vassallo, M; Dean, M; Lampila, P; Saba, A; Lähteenmäki, L; Shepherd, R

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the usefulness of integrating measures of affective and moral attitudes into the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB)-model in predicting purchase intentions of organic foods. Moral attitude was operationalised as positive self-rewarding feelings of doing the right thing. Questionnaire data were gathered in three countries: Italy (N=202), Finland (N=270) and UK (N=200) in March 2004. Questions focussed on intentions to purchase organic apples and organic ready-to-cook pizza instead of their conventional alternatives. Data were analysed using Structural Equation Modelling by simultaneous multi-group analysis of the three countries. Along with attitudes, moral attitude and subjective norms explained considerable shares of variances in intentions. The relative influences of these variables varied between the countries, such that in the UK and Italy moral attitude rather than subjective norms had stronger explanatory power. In Finland it was other way around. Inclusion of moral attitude improved the model fit and predictive ability of the model, although only marginally in Finland. Thus the results partially support the usefulness of incorporating moral measures as well as affective items for attitude into the framework of TPB. PMID:18036702

  19. Does mating behaviour affect connectivity in marine fishes? Comparative population genetics of two protogynous groupers (Family Serranidae).

    PubMed

    Portnoy, D S; Hollenbeck, C M; Renshaw, M A; Cummings, N J; Gold, J R

    2013-01-01

    Pelagic larval duration (PLD) has been hypothesized to be the primary predictor of connectivity in marine fishes; however, few studies have examined the effects that adult reproductive behaviour may have on realized dispersal. We assessed gene flow (connectivity) by documenting variation in microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA sequences in two protogynous species of groupers, the aggregate spawning red hind, Epinephelus guttatus, and the single-male, harem-spawning coney, Cephalopholis fulva, to ask whether reproductive strategy affects connectivity. Samples of both species were obtained from waters off three islands (Puerto Rico, St. Thomas and St. Croix) in the Caribbean Sea. Despite the notion that aggregate spawning of red hind may facilitate larval retention, stronger signals of population structure were detected in the harem-spawning coney. Heterogeneity and/or inferred barriers, based on microsatellites, involved St. Croix (red hind and coney) and the west coast of Puerto Rico (coney). Heterogeneity and/or inferred barriers, based on mitochondrial DNA, involved St. Croix (coney only). Genetic divergence in both species was stronger for microsatellites than for mitochondrial DNA, suggesting sex-biased dispersal in both species. Long-term migration rates, based on microsatellites, indicated asymmetric gene flow for both species in the same direction as mean surface currents in the region. Red hind had higher levels of variation in microsatellites and lower levels of variation in mitochondrial DNA. Long-term effective size and effective number of breeders were greater for red hind; estimates of θ(f) , a proxy for long-term effective female size, were the same in both species. Patterns of gene flow in both species appear to stem in part from shared aspects of larval and adult biology, local bathymetry and surface current patterns. Differences in connectivity and levels of genetic variation between the species, however, likely stem from differences in behaviour

  20. Harmine promotes osteoblast differentiation through bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Takayuki; Lee, Ji-Won; Hibino, Ayaka; Asai, Midori; Hojo, Hironori; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Teruya, Toshiaki; Nagai, Kazuo; Chung, Ung-Il; Yagasaki, Kazumi; and others

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Harmine promotes the activity and mRNA expression of ALP. {yields} Harmine enhances the expressions of osteocalcin mRNA and protein. {yields} Harmine induces osteoblastic mineralization. {yields} Harmine upregulates the mRNA expressions of BMPs, Runx2 and Osterix. {yields} BMP signaling pathways are involved in the actions of harmine. -- Abstract: Bone mass is regulated by osteoblast-mediated bone formation and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. We previously reported that harmine, a {beta}-carboline alkaloid, inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of harmine on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. Harmine promoted alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in MC3T3-E1 cells without affecting their proliferation. Harmine also increased the mRNA expressions of the osteoblast marker genes ALP and Osteocalcin. Furthermore, the mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells was enhanced by treatment with harmine. Harmine also induced osteoblast differentiation in primary calvarial osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2 cells. Structure-activity relationship studies using harmine-related {beta}-carboline alkaloids revealed that the C3-C4 double bond and 7-hydroxy or 7-methoxy group of harmine were important for its osteogenic activity. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist noggin and its receptor kinase inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 attenuated harmine-promoted ALP activity. In addition, harmine increased the mRNA expressions of Bmp-2, Bmp-4, Bmp-6, Bmp-7 and its target gene Id1. Harmine also enhanced the mRNA expressions of Runx2 and Osterix, which are key transcription factors in osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, BMP-responsive and Runx2-responsive reporters were activated by harmine treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that harmine enhances osteoblast differentiation probably by inducing the expressions of

  1. Innate defensive behaviour and panic-like reactions evoked by rodents during aggressive encounters with Brazilian constrictor snakes in a complex labyrinth: behavioural validation of a new model to study affective and agonistic reactions in a prey versus predator paradigm.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Guimarães-Costa, Maria Beatriz; Pippa-Gadioli, Leonardo; Weltson, Alfredo; Ubiali, Walter Adriano; Paschoalin-Maurin, Tatiana; Felippotti, Tatiana Tocchini; Elias-Filho, Daoud Hibrahim; Laure, Carlos Júlio; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2007-09-15

    Defensive behaviour has been extensively studied, and non-invasive methodologies may be interesting approaches to analyzing the limbic system function as a whole. Using experimental models of animals in the state of anxiety has been fundamental in the search for new anxiolytic and antipanic compounds. The aim of this present work is to examine a new model for the study of affective behaviour, using a complex labyrinth consisting of an arena and galleries forming a maze. Furthermore, it aims to compare the defensive behaviour of Wistar rats, Mongolian gerbils and golden hamsters in a complex labyrinth, as well as the defensive behaviour of Meriones unguiculatus in aggressive encounters with either Epicrates cenchria assisi or Boa constrictor amarali in this same model. Among species presently studied, the Mongolian gerbils showed better performance in the exploration of both arena and galleries of the labyrinth, also demonstrating less latency in finding exits of the galleries. This increases the possibility of survival, as well as optimizes the events of encounter with the predator. The duration of alertness and freezing increased during confrontation with living Epicrates, as well as the duration of exploratory behaviour in the labyrinth. There was an increase in the number of freezing and alertness behaviours, as well as in duration of alertness during confrontations involving E.c. assisi, compared with behavioural reactions elicited by jirds in presence of B.c. amarali. Interestingly, the aggressive behaviour of Mongolian gerbils was more prominent against B.c. amarali compared with the other Boidae snake. E.c. assisi elicited more offensive attacks and exhibited a greater time period of body movement than B.c. amarali, which spent more time in the arena and in defensive immobility than the E.c. assisi. Considering that jirds evoked more fear-like reaction in contact with E.c. assisi, a fixed E.c. assisi kept in a hermetically closed acrylic box was used as

  2. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun-Yun; Sun, Lin; Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  3. Allopurinol and oxypurinol promote osteoblast differentiation and increase bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Orriss, Isabel R.; Arnett, Timothy R.; George, Jacob; Witham, Miles D.

    2016-01-01

    Allopurinol and its active metabolite, oxypurinol are widely used in the treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. They inhibit xanthine oxidase (XO) an enzyme in the purine degradation pathway that converts xanthine to uric acid. This investigation examined the effect of allopurinol and oxypurinol on bone formation, cell number and viability, gene expression and enzyme activity in differentiating and mature, bone-forming osteoblasts. Although mRNA expression remained relatively constant, XO activity decreased over time with mature osteoblasts displaying reduced levels of uric acid (20% decrease). Treatment with allopurinol and oxypurinol (0.1–1 µM) reduced XO activity by up to 30%. At these concentrations, allopurinol and oxypurinol increased bone formation by osteoblasts ~4-fold and ~3-fold, respectively. Cell number and viability were unaffected. Both drugs increased tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity up to 65%. Osteocalcin and TNAP mRNA expression was increased, 5-fold and 2-fold, respectively. Expression of NPP1, the enzyme responsible for generating the mineralisation inhibitor, pyrophosphate, was decreased 5-fold. Col1α1 mRNA expression and soluble collagen levels were unchanged. Osteoclast formation and resorptive activity were not affected by treatment with allopurinol or oxypurinol. Our data suggest that inhibition of XO activity promotes osteoblast differentiation, leading to increased bone formation in vitro. PMID:26968635

  4. Leukemogenesis Induced by an Activating β-catenin mutation in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kode, Aruna; Manavalan, John S.; Mosialou, Ioanna; Bhagat, Govind; Rathinam, Chozha V.; Luo, Na; Khiabanian, Hossein; Lee, Albert; Vundavalli, Murty; Friedman, Richard; Brum, Andrea; Park, David; Galili, Naomi; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Raza, Azra; Rabadan, Raul; Berman, Ellin; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cells of the osteoblast lineage affect homing, 1, 2 number of long term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) 3, 4, HSC mobilization and lineage determination and B lymphopoiesis 5-8. More recently osteoblasts were implicated in pre-leukemic conditions in mice 9, 10. Yet, it has not been shown that a single genetic event taking place in osteoblasts can induce leukemogenesis. We show here that in mice, an activating mutation of β-catenin in osteoblasts alters the differentiation potential of myeloid and lymphoid progenitors leading to development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with common chromosomal aberrations and cell autonomous progression. Activated β-catenin stimulates expression of the Notch ligand Jagged-1 in osteoblasts. Subsequent activation of Notch signaling in HSC progenitors induces the malignant changes. Demonstrating the pathogenetic role of the Notch pathway, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Notch signaling ameliorates AML. Nuclear accumulation and increased β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts was also identified in 38% of patients with MDS/AML. These patients showed increased Notch signaling in hematopoietic cells. These findings demonstrate that genetic alterations in osteoblasts can induce AML, identify molecular signals leading to this transformation and suggest a potential novel pharmacotherapeutic approach to AML. PMID:24429522

  5. Contextual Variables Affecting Aggressive Behaviour in Individuals with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities Who Live in a Residential Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Didden, R.; Huitink, C.; Schreuder, N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Aggression is a common type of problem behaviour in clients with mild to borderline intellectual disability who live in a residential facility. We explored contextual events that elicit aggressive behaviour and variables that were associated with such events. Method: Respondents were 87 direct-care staff members of 87 clients with…

  6. Icariin Stimulates Differentiation and Suppresses Adipocytic Transdifferentiation of Primary Osteoblasts Through Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Fong, Chichun; Jia, Zhenbin; Cui, Liao; Yao, Xinsheng; Yang, Mengsu

    2016-08-01

    Icariin, the main constituent of Herba Epimedii, appears to be a promising alternative to classic drugs used to treat osteoporosis. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms of its action and the role of icariin in the cross-talk between osteoblasts and adipocytes remain unclear. The present study was designed to investigate the gene expression profile of primary osteoblasts in the presence of icariin, and the effects of icariin on the differentiation and adipogenic transdifferentiation of osteoblasts. Cellular and molecular markers expressed during osteoblastic differentiation were assessed by cytochemical analysis, real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting, and cDNA microarray analysis. Results indicated that icariin up-regulated the expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2), and collagen type 1 (Col1) genes, and down-regulated the expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (Pparg) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (Cebpb) genes. These effects were blocked by ICI 182,780, suggesting that icariin may be acting via the estrogen receptor (ER). Results also demonstrated that the ratio of osteoprotegerin (Opg)/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (Rankl) expression was up-regulated following treatment with icariin. In total, osteoblastic gene expression profile analysis suggested that 33 genes were affected by icariin; these could be sub-divided into nine functional categories. It appears that icariin could stimulate the differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts, regulate the differentiation of osteoclasts, and inhibit the adipogenic transdifferentiation of osteoblasts, therefore increasing the number of osteoblasts undergoing differentiation to mature osteoblasts, via an ER-mediated pathway. In summary, icariin may exhibit beneficial effects on bone health, especially for patients with osteoporosis and obesity. PMID:27061090

  7. A SYNCHROTRON DIFFRACTION STUDY OF TRANSFORMATION BEHAVIOUR IN 9 CR STEELS USING SIMULATED WELD HEAT-AFFECTED ZONE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Specht, Eliot D; Shingledecker, John P; Abe, Fujio

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron diffraction experiments were conducted to examine the real-time transformation behaviours of an ex-perimental 9Cr-3W-3Co-NbV steel with high B and low N (N130B), and the commercial P92 steel under simulated weld heat-affected zone thermal cycles. When heated to peak temperatures near 1100 C, both steels rapidly trans-formed from ferrite to 100% austenite. During cooling, both transformed to martensite near 400 C. Both steels also retained untransformed austenite: 1.7% in N130B, and 5.8% in P92. The N130B was also heated to about 60 C above its A3 of 847 C. About 56% of the original ferrite never transformed to austenite. During cooling an additional 21% of ferrite and 23% of martensite formed. It retained no austenite. The P92 was heated to just above its A3 of 889 C. About 15% of the original ferrite never transformed to austenite. During cooling an additional 22% of ferrite and 60% of martensite formed. This steel retained about 2.3% austenite. Metallographic examina-tions indicated that the M23C6 in N130B was much more stable than that in P92 for heating to the lower peak tem-peratures. Analysis using equilibrium thermodynamics suggested that the more stable M23C6 in N130B could raise its apparent A3 by sequestering C. This could cause the ferrite-austenite transformation to appear sluggish. Ther-modynamic analysis also indicated that the M23C6 in N130B contained about 3.9 at% B compared to about 0.08 at% B in that of P92. In contrast, the refractory metal element content of the M23C6 was predicted to be higher in P92.

  8. Do health literacy and patient empowerment affect self-care behaviour? A survey study among Turkish patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Eyüboğlu, Ezgi; Schulz, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the impact of health literacy and patient empowerment on diabetes self-care behaviour in patients in metropolitan Turkish diabetes centres. The conceptual background is provided by the psychological health empowerment model, which holds that health literacy without patient empowerment comes down to wasting health resources, while empowerment without health literacy can lead to dangerous or suboptimal health behaviour. Design, setting and participants A cross-sectional study was conducted with 167 patients over the age of 18 from one of two diabetes clinics in a major Turkish City. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to eligible outpatients who had an appointment in one of the clinics. Health literacy was measured by a newly translated Turkish version of the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) and the Chew self-report scale. Patient empowerment was measured by a 12-item scale based on Spreitzer's conceptualisation of psychological empowerment in the workplace. Self-care behaviour was measured by the Self-care behaviours were measured by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Measure (SDSCA). Level of diabetes knowledge was measured by Diabetes Knowledge Test. Results Two subscales of empowerment, impact and self-determination, predicted self-reported frequency of self-care behaviours. Neither health literacy nor diabetes knowledge had an effect on self-care behaviours. Conclusions Health literacy might be more effective in clinical decisions while empowerment might exert a stronger influence on habitual health behaviours. PMID:26975936

  9. Effects of different magnitudes of mechanical strain on Osteoblasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Lin; Lin Zhu; Li Yongming . E-mail: liyongming@fmmu.edu.cn

    2006-05-26

    In addition to systemic and local factors, mechanical strain plays a crucial role in bone remodeling during growth, development, and fracture healing, and especially in orthodontic tooth movement. Although many papers have been published on the effects of mechanical stress on osteoblasts or osteoblastic cells, little is known about the effects of different magnitudes of mechanical strain on such cells. In the present study, we investigated how different magnitudes of cyclic tensile strain affected osteoblasts. MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells were subjected to 0%, 6%, 12% or 18% elongation for 24 h using a Flexercell Strain Unit, and then the mRNA and protein expressions of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) were examined. The results showed that cyclic tensile strain induced a magnitude-dependent increase (0%, 6%, 12%, and 18%) in OPG synthesis and a concomitant decrease in RANKL mRNA expression and sRANKL release from the osteoblasts. Furthermore, the induction of OPG mRNA expression by stretching was inhibited by indomethacin or genistein, and the stretch-induced reduction of RANKL mRNA was inhibited by PD098059. These results indicate that different magnitudes of cyclic tensile strain influence the biological behavior of osteoblasts, which profoundly affects bone remodeling.

  10. Dexamethasone suppresses Smad3 pathway in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Iu, Mei-Fway; Kaji, Hiroshi; Sowa, Hideaki; Naito, Junko; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu; Chihara, Kazuo

    2005-04-01

    Central in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced osteoporosis is the effects of GC on bone formation. However, the mechanism of GC-inhibited bone formation is not well known. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta is most abundant in bone matrix compared with other tissues, and we have recently proposed that Smad3, a TGF-beta signaling molecule, is important for promoting bone formation. However, no reports have been available about the effects of GC on Smad3 in osteoblasts. In the present study, we investigated whether dexamethasone (Dex), an active GC analog, would affect the expression and activity of Smad3 in mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 and rat osteoblastic UMR-106 cells. Dex significantly suppressed Smad3-stimulated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, although it did not affect TGF-beta-inhibited ALP activity in MC3T3-E1 cells. Moreover, pretreatment with Dex suppressed TGF-beta-enhanced expression of type I collagen in MC3T3-E1 and UMR-106 cells. In the luciferase assay using p3TP-Lux with a Smad3-specific response element, Dex significantly suppressed the transcriptional activity induced by TGF-beta as well as Smad3. However, Dex did not affect the expression of Smad3 in these cells at both mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, the present study indicates that Dex inhibits ALP activity and type I collagen expression, presumably by suppressing Smad3-induced transcriptional activity but not by modulating Smad3 expression in osteoblastic cells. PMID:15817834

  11. DBI/ACBP loss-of-function does not affect anxiety-like behaviour but reduces anxiolytic responses to diazepam in mice.

    PubMed

    Budry, Lionel; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Tobin, Stephanie; Rodaros, Demetra; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Mandrup, Susanne; Fulton, Stephanie; Alquier, Thierry

    2016-10-15

    Diazepam is well known for its anxiolytic properties, which are mediated via activation of the GABAA receptor. Diazepam Binding Inhibitor (DBI), also called acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP), is a ubiquitously expressed protein originally identified based on its ability to displace diazepam from its binding site on the GABAA receptor. Central administration of ACBP or its cleaved fragment, commonly referred to as endozepines, induces proconflict and anxiety-like behaviour in rodents. For this reason, ACBP is known as an anxiogenic peptide. However, the role of endogenous ACBP in anxiety-like behaviour and anxiolytic responses to diazepam has not been investigated. To address this question, we assessed anxiety behaviour and anxiolytic responses to diazepam in two complementary loss-of-function mouse models including astrocyte-specific ACBP KO (ACBP(GFAP) KO) and whole-body KO (ACBP KO) mice. Male and female ACBP(GFAP) KO and ACBP KO mice do not show significant changes in anxiety-like behaviour compared to control littermates during elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field (OF) tests. Surprisingly, ACBP(GFAP) KO and ACBP KO mice were unresponsive to the anxiolytic effect of a low dose of diazepam during EPM tests. In conclusion, our experiments using genetic ACBP loss-of-function models suggest that endozepines deficiency does not affect anxiety-like behaviour in mice and impairs the anxiolytic action of diazepam. PMID:27363924

  12. Analysis of the factors that affect dental health behaviour and attendance at scheduled dental check-ups using the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimiko; Oda, Megumi

    2011-04-01

    A questionnaire survey was administered to 317 parents who attended infant health check-ups in City B, Okayama Prefecture between October, 2008 and March, 2009. The questionnaire survey studied 7 factors based on the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model. We analysed factors that affected oral health behaviour and attendance at scheduled dental health check-ups. The survey containing 22 items concerning matters such as 'QOL' and 'health problems' was posted to parents and guardians in advance, and then collected on the day of the medical check-up. The collected data was analysed using the t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient, following which we conducted a covariance structure analysis. The results showed that dental health behaviour was directly affected by reinforcing factors, and indirectly associated with enabling and predisposing factors influenced by reinforcing factors. It was also shown that predisposing factors and oral health behaviour were associated with attendance at scheduled oral health check-ups. The results indicated that strengthening oral health education by sharing knowledge that acts as predisposing factors and introducing adaptations of oral health behaviour that that fit individual lives will lead to improved attendance at scheduled dental health check-ups. PMID:21519364

  13. Osteoblastic Osteosarcoma in a Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Megumi; Kondo, Hirotaka; Onuma, Mamoru; Shibuya, Hisashi; Sato, Tsuneo

    2012-01-01

    An osteosarcoma developed in the tarsal joint region involving the distal tibia of a domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Micrometastases were present in the lungs. Histologically the tumor was composed of ovoid to short-spindle cells with abundant giant cells, producing irregular islands of osteoids. The tumor cells were immunopositive with antiosteocalcin monoclonal antibody, consistent with their derivation from osteoblasts. According to review of 10 published cases, productive osteoblasic osteosarcoma is the most common bone tumor in rabbits, with half of all cases developing in the skull or facial bones. PMID:22546918

  14. Differential Responses of Osteoblast Lineage Cells to Nanotopographically-Modified, Microroughened Titanium-Aluminum-Vanadium Alloy Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gittens, Rolando A.; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; McLachlan, Taylor; Cai, Ye; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Schneider, Jennifer M.; Schwartz, Zvi; Sandhage, Kenneth H.; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2013-01-01

    Surface structural modifications at the micrometer and nanometer scales have driven improved success rates of dental and orthopaedic implants by mimicking the hierarchical structure of bone. However, how initial osteoblast-lineage cells populating an implant surface respond to different hierarchical surface topographical cues remains to be elucidated, with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or immature osteoblasts as possible initial colonizers. Here we show that in the absence of any exogenous soluble factors, osteoblastic maturation of primary human osteoblasts (HOBs) but not osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs is strongly influenced by nanostructures superimposed onto a microrough Ti6Al4V (TiAlV) alloy. The sensitivity of osteoblasts to both surface microroughness and nanostructures led to a synergistic effect on maturation and local factor production. Osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs was sensitive to TiAlV surface microroughness with respect to production of differentiation markers, but no further enhancement was found when cultured on micro/nanostructured surfaces. Superposition of nanostructures to microroughened surfaces affected final MSC numbers and enhanced production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) but the magnitude of the response was lower than for HOB cultures. Our results suggest that the differentiation state of osteoblast-lineage cells determines the recognition of surface nanostructures and subsequent cell response, which has implications for clinical evaluation of new implant surface nanomodifications. PMID:22989383

  15. Interaction of the neuropeptide S receptor gene Asn¹⁰⁷Ile variant and environment: contribution to affective and anxiety disorders, and suicidal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Laas, Kariina; Reif, Andreas; Akkermann, Kirsti; Kiive, Evelyn; Domschke, Katharina; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Veidebaum, Toomas; Harro, Jaanus

    2014-04-01

    Neuropeptide S is involved in anxiety and arousal modulation, and the functional polymorphism Asn107Ile (rs324981, A > T) of the neuropeptide S receptor gene (NPSR1) is associated with panic disorder and anxiety/fear-related traits. NPSR1 also interacts with the environment in shaping personality and impulsivity. We therefore examined whether the NPSR1 A/T polymorphism is associated with affective and anxiety disorders in a population-representative sample. Lifetime psychiatric disorders were assessed by MINI interview (n = 501) in the older cohort of the longitudinal Estonian Children Personality, Behaviour and Health Study (ECPBHS). Anxiety (STAI), self-esteem (RSES), depression (MÅDRS), suicide attempts and environmental factors were self-reported in both the younger (original n = 583) and the older cohort (original n = 593). Most of the NPSR1 effects were sex-specific and depended on environmental factors. Females with the functionally least active NPSR1 AA genotype and exposed to environmental adversity had affective/anxiety disorders more frequently; they also exhibited higher anxiety and depressiveness, and lower self-esteem. Female AA homozygotes also reported suicidal behaviour more frequently, and this was further accentuated by adverse family environment. In the general population, the NPSR1 A/T polymorphism together with environmental factors is associated with anxious, depressive and activity-related traits, increased prevalence of affective/anxiety disorders and a higher likelihood of suicidal behaviour. PMID:24331455

  16. Dietary protein ingested before and during short photoperiods makes an impact on affect-related behaviours and plasma composition of amino acids in mice.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Goda, Ryosei; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Kawai, Misato; Shibata, Satomi; Oka, Yoshiaki; Mizunoya, Wataru; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Yasuo, Shinobu

    2015-11-28

    In mammals, short photoperiod is associated with high depression- and anxiety-like behaviours with low levels of the brain serotonin and its precursor tryptophan (Trp). Because the brain Trp levels are regulated by its ratio to large neutral amino acids (Trp:LNAA) in circulation, this study elucidated whether diets of various protein sources that contain different Trp:LNAA affect depression- and anxiety-like behaviours in C57BL/6J mice under short-day conditions (SD). In the control mice on a casein diet, time spent in the central area in the open field test (OFT) was lower in the mice under SD than in those under long-day conditions (LD), indicating that SD exposure induces anxiety-like behaviour. The SD-induced anxiety-like behaviour was countered by an α-lactalbumin diet given under SD. In the mice that were on a gluten diet before transition to SD, the time spent in the central area in the OFT under SD was higher than that in the SD control mice. Alternatively, mice that ingested soya protein before the transition to SD had lower immobility in the forced swim test, a depression-like behaviour, compared with the SD control. Analysis of Trp:LNAA revealed lower Trp:LNAA in the SD control compared with the LD control, which was counteracted by an α-lactalbumin diet under SD. Furthermore, mice on gluten or soya protein diets before transition to SD exhibited high Trp:LNAA levels in plasma under SD. In conclusion, ingestion of specific proteins at different times relative to photoperiodic transition may modulate anxiety- and/or depression-like behaviours, partially through changes in plasma Trp:LNAA. PMID:26370332

  17. Graphene oxide and titanium: synergistic effects on the biomineralization ability of osteoblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Zancanela, Daniela C; Simão, Ana Maria S; Francisco, Camila G; de Faria, Amanda N; Ramos, Ana Paula; Gonçalves, Rogéria R; Matsubara, Elaine Y; Rosolen, José Maurício; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has attracted remarkable attention in recent years due to properties such as extremely large surface area, biocompatibility, biostability, and easy chemical functionalization. Osteoblasts underlie the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in the bone protein matrix during biomineralization; hydroxyapatite deposition involves extracellular matrix vesicles that are rich in alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Here, we have investigated how GO affects osteoblast viability, ALP activity, and mineralized matrix formation in osteoblast cultures in three different phases of cell growth, in the presence and in the absence of titanium (Ti). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectra, and energy dispersive spectroscopy aided GO characterization. The presence of GO increased the viability of osteoblast cells grown on a plastic surface. However, osteoblast viability on Ti discs was lower in the presence than in the absence of GO. ALP activity emerged at 14 days for the cell culture incubated with GO. The total protein concentration also increased at 21 days on both the Ti discs and plastic surface. Osteoblasts grown on Ti discs had increased mineralized matrix formation in the presence of GO as compared to the cells grown in the absence of GO. SEM images of the cell cultures on plastic surfaces in the presence of GO suggested delayed mineralized matrix formation. In conclusion, applications requiring the presence of Ti, such as prostheses and implants, should benefit from the use of GO, which may increase mineralized nodule formation, stimulate biomineralization, and accelerate bone regeneration. PMID:26886819

  18. FoxO1 expression in osteoblasts regulates glucose homeostasis through regulation of osteocalcin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rached, Marie-Therese; Kode, Aruna; Silva, Barbara C.; Jung, Dae Young; Gray, Susan; Ong, Helena; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Kim, Jason K.; Karsenty, Gerard; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2009-01-01

    Osteoblasts have recently been found to play a role in regulating glucose metabolism through secretion of osteocalcin. It is unknown, however, how this osteoblast function is regulated transcriptionally. As FoxO1 is a forkhead family transcription factor known to regulate several key aspects of glucose homeostasis, we investigated whether its expression in osteoblasts may contribute to its metabolic functions. Here we show that mice lacking Foxo1 only in osteoblasts had increased pancreatic β cell proliferation, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity. The ability of osteoblast-specific FoxO1 deficiency to affect metabolic homeostasis was due to increased osteocalcin expression and decreased expression of Esp, a gene that encodes a protein responsible for decreasing the bioactivity of osteocalcin. These results indicate that FoxO1 expression in osteoblasts contributes to FoxO1 control of glucose homeostasis and identify FoxO1 as a key modulator of the ability of the skeleton to function as an endocrine organ regulating glucose metabolism. PMID:20038793

  19. Glucocorticoid Suppresses Connexin 43 Expression by Inhibiting the Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Kim, Mi Ran; Noh, Jeong Mi; Kim, Su Jin; Ka, Sun-O; Kim, Ji Hye; Park, Byung-Hyun; Park, Ji Hyun

    2016-07-01

    The inhibition of proliferation or functional alteration of osteoblasts by glucocorticoids (GCs) has been recognized as an important etiology of GC-induced osteoporosis (GIO). Connexin 43 (Cx43) is the most abundant connexin isoform in bone cells and plays important roles in bone remodeling. Despite the important role of Cx43 in bone homeostasis and the prevalence of GIO, the direct action of GCs on Cx43 expression in osteoblasts has been poorly described. The aim of the present study was to evaluate how GCs affect Cx43 expression in osteoblasts. Dexamethasone (Dex) treatment decreased expression of Cx43 RNA and protein in MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblastic cells. Reduction of Cx43 expression by Dex was dependent on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), as it was abolished by pretreatment with a GR blocker. Treatment with PTH (1-34), a medication used for GIO management, counteracted the suppression of Cx43 by Dex. Akt or mTOR signaling modulators revealed the involvement of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in Dex-induced reduction of Cx43 expression. Moreover, overexpression of Cx43 significantly attenuated Dex-inhibited cell viability and proliferation, as evidenced by MTT and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay of MC3T3-E1 cells. To account for possible species or cell type differences, human primary osteoblasts were treated with Dex and similar downregulation of Cx43 by Dex was observed. In addition, immunofluorescent staining for Cx43 further demonstrated an apparent decrease in Dex-treated human osteoblasts, while analysis of lucifer yellow propagation revealed reduced gap junction intercellular communication by Dex. Collectively, these findings indicate that GCs suppress Cx43 expression in osteoblasts via GR and the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and overexpression of Cx43 may, at least in part, rescue osteoblasts from GC-induced reductions in proliferation. PMID:26914606

  20. Group housing during gestation affects the behaviour of sows and the physiological indices of offspring piglets at weaning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to compare the behaviour of sows in stalls and group housing systems, and the physiological indices of their offspring, 28 sows were randomly distributed into 2 systems with 16 sows in stalls, and the other 12 sows were divided into 3 groups with 4 sows per pen. The area per sow in stalls a...

  1. A Structural Equation Model of the Factors Affecting Filipino University Students' Shadow Education Satisfaction and Behavioural Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Castro, Belinda V.; de Guzman, Allan B.

    2014-01-01

    The overall intent of this exploratory study is to test a model that considers demographic characteristics, attitudes toward shadow education and shadow education institutions' service attributes as antecedents of satisfaction level and behavioural intentions among a select group of Filipino university students. To test the seven hypotheses…

  2. Does oral administration of the amino acid tyrosine affect oestradiol-17β concentration and sexual behaviour in the bitch?

    PubMed

    Spankowsky, S; Heuwieser, W; Arlt, S P

    2013-02-23

    The oral administration of the amino acid, tyrosine, has been for years recommended in order to improve fertility, especially to improve copulation behaviour in female dogs. However, evidence is comparatively poor. The objective of our study was to determine whether oral administration of tyrosine has an effect on oestradiol-17β concentrations and the oestrous behaviour in the bitch. Fifty bitches were randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups in which each dog received 100mg/kg/day of either tyrosine or milk sugar orally between Day 3 and Day 9 of heat. Every two to three days, a gynaecological examination was performed and blood samples were taken to determine oestradiol-17β and progesterone concentrations. The day of ovulation was estimated by clinical findings, and according to the specifications of the laboratory, once progesterone values exceeded 12.7nmol/l. The observed copulation behaviour was not different between the groups. No differences in volume and visual nature of vaginal discharge were observed. At the day of ovulation, mean oestradiol-17β concentration in the treated group was 163.4pmol/l and 162.2pmol/l in the placebo group, respectively. In conclusion, feeding tyrosine to female dogs between Day 3 and Day 9 of heat did not alter visual signs of heat or copulation behaviour, and did not alter oestradiol-17β concentration. PMID:23315766

  3. Home tank water versus novel water differentially affect alcohol-induced locomotor activity and anxiety related behaviours in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Facciol, Amanda; Gerlai, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The zebrafish may be uniquely well suited for studying alcohol's mechanisms of action in vivo, since alcohol can be administered via immersion in a non-invasive manner. Despite the robust behavioural effects of alcohol administration in mammals, studies reporting the locomotor stimulant and anxiolytic effects of alcohol in zebrafish have been inconsistent. In the current study, we examined whether differences in the type of water used for alcohol exposure and behavioural testing contribute to these inconsistencies. To answer this question, we exposed zebrafish to either home water from their housing tanks or novel water from an isolated reservoir (i.e. water lacking zebrafish chemosensory and olfactory cues) with 0% or 1% v/v alcohol for 30min, a 2×2 between subject experimental designs. Behavioural responses were quantified throughout the 30-minute exposure session via a video tracking system. Although control zebrafish exposed to home water and novel water were virtually indistinguishable in their behavioural responses, alcohol's effect on locomotor activity and anxiety-like behavioural responses were dependent on the type of water used for testing. Alcohol exposure in home tank water produced a mild anxiolytic and locomotor stimulant effect, whereas alcohol exposure in novel water produced an anxiogenic effect without altering locomotor activity. These results represent a dissociation between alcohol's effects on locomotor and anxiety related responses, and also illustrate how environmental factors, in this case familiarity with the water, may interact with such effects. In light of these findings, we urge researchers to explicitly state the type of water used. PMID:26921455

  4. Small Variations in Early-Life Environment Can Affect Coping Behaviour in Response to Foraging Challenge in the Three-Spined Stickleback

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Context An increasing concern in the face of human expansion throughout natural habitats is whether animal populations can respond adaptively when confronted with challenges like environmental change and novelty. Behavioural flexibility is an important factor in estimating the adaptive potential of both individuals and populations, and predicting the degree to which they can cope with change. Study Design This study on the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) is an empiric illustration of the degree of behavioural variation that can emerge between semi-natural systems within only a single generation. Wild-caught adult sticklebacks (P, N = 400) were randomly distributed in equal densities over 20 standardized semi-natural environments (ponds), and one year later offspring (F1, N = 652) were presented with repeated behavioural assays. Individuals were challenged to reach a food source through a novel transparent obstacle, during which exploration, activity, foraging, sociability and wall-biting behaviours were recorded through video observation. We found that coping responses of individuals from the first generation to this unfamiliar foraging challenge were related to even relatively small, naturally diversified variation in developmental environment. All measured behaviours were correlated with each other. Especially exploration, sociability and wall-biting were found to differ significantly between ponds. These differences could not be explained by stickleback density or the turbidity of the water. Findings Our findings show that a) differences in early-life environment appear to affect stickleback feeding behaviour later in life; b) this is the case even when the environmental differences are only small, within natural parameters and diversified gradually; and c) effects are present despite semi-natural conditions that fluctuate during the year. Therefore, in behaviourally plastic animals like the stickleback, the adaptive response to human

  5. Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) suppresses osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-09-01

    The Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases has been shown to play a key role in inflammation and bone destruction. Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been the most widely studied because of its critical role in B cells. Furthermore, recent evidence has demonstrated that blocking Btk signaling is effective in ameliorating lymphoma progression and experimental arthritis. The role of Btk in osteoblastic differentiation has not been well elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated the role of Btk in osteoblastic differentiation and investigated the effects of a Btk inhibitor on osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, primary calvarial osteoblasts, and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. Btk expression was detected in all three cell lines. Btk inhibition stimulated mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers (alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and osterix) and promoted mineralization of the extracellular matrix. In addition, Btk knockdown caused increased mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers. Furthermore, Btk inhibition suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Our results indicate that Btk may regulate osteoblastic differentiation through the MAPK, NFκB, and PKCα signaling pathways. PMID:25230818

  6. Macrophage and osteoblast responses to biphasic calcium phosphate microparticles.

    PubMed

    Fellah, Borhane Hakim; Delorme, Bruno; Sohier, Jérôme; Magne, David; Hardouin, Pierre; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate in vitro the biological events leading to ectopic bone formation in contact with microporous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics. After implantation, microparticles may arise from their degradation and induce an inflammatory response involving macrophages. The secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines may affect the differentiation of osteoblasts. Mouse macrophage-like (J774) and osteoblast-like (MC3T3-E1) cells were cultured in the presence of BCP microparticles of different sizes (<20, 40-80, or 80-200 microm). The smallest microparticles decreased the viability of both cell types as measured with LDH and methyl tetrazolium salt assays, and enhanced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-alpha) by macrophages after 24 h, as revealed by ELISA. Osteoblastic cells were then cultured for 96 h in the presence of these pro-inflammatory cytokines and their differentiation studied by RT-PCR. MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with TNF-alpha showed a decrease in osterix, PTH receptor (PTHR1), and osteocalcin gene expression. On the contrary, IL-6 enhanced the expression of osterix, Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin compared with plastic. In conclusion, this study shows that the inflammatory response initiated by BCP microparticles may have both detrimental and beneficial effects on osteogenesis. PMID:20014296

  7. Interactions between integrin receptors and fibronectin are required for calvarial osteoblast differentiation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moursi, A. M.; Globus, R. K.; Damsky, C. H.

    1997-01-01

    We previously showed that anti-fibronectin antibodies or soluble fibronectin fragments containing the central cell-binding domain inhibit formation of mineralized nodules by fetal calvarial osteoblasts in vitro. These findings suggest a critical role for fibronectin in osteoblast differentiation and morphogenesis. In this study we tested the hypothesis that fibronectin's effects on osteogenesis are mediated via direct interactions with integrin receptors for fibronectin on osteoblasts. Immunocytochemical analysis identified the integrin fibronectin receptor alpha5ss1 in fetal rat calvarial tissue and in cultured osteoblasts at all stages of differentiation. Three other integrins, alpha3ss1, alpha8ss1 and alphavss3, which can bind fibronectin, as well as other matrix components, were also identified in tissue and at all stages of cell culture. Immunoprecipitation data showed that alpha5ss1 levels are constant throughout osteoblast differentiation whereas levels of alpha3ss1 and alpha8ss1 decline in mature mineralized cultures. To determine whether integrin fibronectin receptors are required for osteoblast formation of mineralized nodules, we examined the extent of nodule formation in the presence and absence of function-perturbing anti-integrin antibodies. The antibodies were present continuously in cultures beginning at confluence (day 3), and nodule formation was measured at days 10 and 20. An anti-alpha5 integrin subunit antibody reduced nodule formation to less than 5% of control values at both time points. Inhibition of nodule formation was reversible and did not affect cell attachment and viability. Function-perturbing antibodies against alpha3ss1 and alpha8ss1 also reduced nodule formation, to less than 20% of control values. In contrast, function-perturbing antibodies to alphavss3 and alphavss5 did not affect nodule formation, indicating that the inhibitions noted were indeed specific. To determine the effect of antibody treatment on gene expression, steady

  8. Rebamipide Delivered by Brushite Cement Enhances Osteoblast and Macrophage Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pujari-Palmer, Michael; Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli; Engqvist, Håkan; Karlsson Ott, Marjam

    2015-01-01

    Many of the bioactive agents capable of stimulating osseous regeneration, such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), are limited by rapid degradation, a short bioactive half-life at the target site in vivo, or are prohibitively expensive to obtain in large quantities. Rebamipide, an amino acid modified hydroxylquinoline, can alter the expression of key mediators of bone anabolism, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), BMP-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in diverse cell types such as mucosal and endothelial cells or chondrocytes. The present study investigates whether Rebamipide enhances proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts when delivered from brushite cement. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) quenching ability of Rebampide was tested in macrophages as a measure of bioactivity following drug release incubation times, up to 14 days. Rebamipide release from brushite occurrs via non-fickian diffusion, with a rapid linear release of 9.70% ±0.37% of drug per day for the first 5 days, and an average of 0.5%-1% per day thereafter for 30 days. Rebamipide slows the initial and final cement setting time by up to 3 and 1 minute, respectively, but does not significantly reduce the mechanical strength below 4% (weight percentage). Pre-osteoblast proliferation increases by 24% upon exposure to 0.4uM Rebamipide, and by up to 73% when Rebamipide is delivered via brushite cement. Low doses of Rebamipide do not adversely affect peak alkaline phosphatase activity in differentiating pre-osteoblasts. Rebamipide weakly stimulates proliferation in macrophages at low concentrations (118 ±7.4% at 1uM), and quenches ROS by 40-60%. This is the first investigation of Rebamipide in osteoblasts. PMID:26023912

  9. Effects of broad frequency vibration on cultured osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Shigeo M.; Li, Jiliang; Duncan, Randall L.; Yokota, Hiroki; Burr, David B.; Turner, Charles H.

    2003-01-01

    Bone is subjected in vivo to both high amplitude, low frequency strain, incurred by locomotion, and to low amplitude, broad frequency strain. The biological effects of low amplitude, broad frequency strain are poorly understood. To evaluate the effects of low amplitude strains ranging in frequency from 0 to 50 Hz on osteoblastic function, we seeded MC3T3-E1 cells into collagen gels and applied the following loading protocols for 3 min per day for either 3 or 7 days: (1) sinusoidal strain at 3 Hz, with 0-3000 microstrain peak-to-peak followed by 0.33 s resting time, (2) "broad frequency vibration" of low amplitude strain (standard deviation of 300 microstrain) including frequency components from 0 to 50 Hz, and (3) sinusoidal strain combined with broad frequency vibration (S + V). The cells were harvested on day 4 or 8. We found that the S + V stimulation significantly repressed cell proliferation by day 8. Osteocalcin mRNA was up-regulated 2.6-fold after 7 days of S + V stimulation, and MMP-9 mRNA was elevated 1.3-fold after 3 days of vibration alone. Sinusoidal stimulation alone did not affect the cell responses. No differences due to loading were observed in alkaline phosphatase activity and in mRNA levels of type I collagen, osteopontin, connexin 43, MMPs-1A, -3, -13. These results suggest that osteoblasts are more sensitive to low amplitude, broad frequency strain, and this kind of strain could sensitize osteoblasts to high amplitude, low frequency strain. This suggestion implies a potential contribution of stochastic resonance to the mechanical sensitivity of osteoblasts. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  10. Suicidal behaviour in first-episode non-affective psychosis: Specific risk periods and stage-related factors.

    PubMed

    Ayesa-Arriola, Rosa; Alcaraz, Elisa García; Hernández, Begoña Vicente; Pérez-Iglesias, Rocío; López Moríñigo, Javier David; Duta, Rina; David, Anthony S; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto

    2015-12-01

    Suicide is a major cause of premature death in psychosis. Earlier stages have been associated with higher risk. However, such risk periods have not been specifically determined and risk factors for suicidal behaviour may change over those periods, which may have crucial implications for suicide prevention. The aim of this study was to determine and characterize the highest risk period for suicide in a representative sample of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients. Suicidal behaviour prior to first presentation of psychosis and during a 3-year follow-up was examined in a sample of 397 individuals. Risk factors for suicidal behaviour during specific time periods were investigated and compared. The greatest suicide risk was found during the month before and 2 months after first contact with psychiatric services (i.e., 'early' attempts). Severity of depressive symptoms and cannabis use emerged as predominant risk factors across time. 'Early' attempters were characterized as being male, living in urban areas, having poor premorbid adjustment, requiring hospitalization, scoring higher on anxiety measures and unusual thought content than non-attempters. Greater suspiciousness and more severe depressive symptoms distinguished the 'late' attempters. In conclusion, there is a specific high risk period for suicide in FEP around the time of the first presentation. Early intervention programmes targeting phase-specific risk factors, particularly psychotic symptoms management and secondary depression prevention strategies may be useful for suicide prevention in psychosis. PMID:26475577

  11. Identification of Rorβ targets in cultured osteoblasts and in human bone

    SciTech Connect

    Roforth, Matthew M. Khosla, Sundeep Monroe, David G.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •We examine the gene expression patterns controlled by Rorβ in osteoblasts. •Genes involved in extracellular matrix regulation and proliferation are affected. •Rorβ mRNA levels increase in aged, human bone biopsies. •Rorβ may affect osteoblast activity by modulation of these pathways. -- Abstract: Control of osteoblastic bone formation involves the cumulative action of numerous transcription factors, including both activating and repressive functions that are important during specific stages of differentiation. The nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor β (Rorβ) has been recently shown to suppress the osteogenic phenotype in cultured osteoblasts, and is highly upregulated in bone marrow-derived osteogenic precursors isolated from aged osteoporotic mice, suggesting Rorβ is an important regulator of osteoblast function. However the specific gene expression patterns elicited by Rorβ are unknown. Using microarray analysis, we identified 281 genes regulated by Rorβ in an MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblast cell model (MC3T3-Rorβ-GFP). Pathway analysis revealed alterations in genes involved in MAPK signaling, genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) regulation, and cytokine-receptor interactions. Whereas the identified Rorβ-regulated ECM genes normally decline during osteoblastic differentiation, they were highly upregulated in this non-mineralizing MC3T3-Rorβ-GFP model system, suggesting that Rorβ may exert its anti-osteogenic effects through ECM disruption. Consistent with these in vitro findings, the expression of both RORβ and a subset of RORβ-regulated genes were increased in bone biopsies from postmenopausal women (73 ± 7 years old) compared to premenopausal women (30 ± 5 years old), suggesting a role for RORβ in human age-related bone loss. Collectively, these data demonstrate that Rorβ regulates known osteogenic pathways, and may represent a novel therapeutic target for age-associated bone loss.

  12. Perinatal Exposure to a Diet High in Saturated Fat, Refined Sugar and Cholesterol Affects Behaviour, Growth, and Feed Intake in Weaned Piglets.

    PubMed

    Clouard, Caroline; Gerrits, Walter J J; Kemp, Bas; Val-Laillet, David; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The increased consumption of diets high in saturated fats and refined sugars is a major public health concern in Western human societies. Recent studies suggest that perinatal exposure to dietary fat and/or sugar may affect behavioural development. We thus investigated the effects of perinatal exposure to a high-fat high-sugar diet (HFS) on behavioural development and production performance of piglets. Thirty-two non-obese sows and their piglets were allocated to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial design, with 8-week prenatal (gestation) and 8-week postnatal (lactation and post-weaning) exposure to a HFS diet (12% saturated fat, 18.5% sucrose, 1% cholesterol) or control low-fat low-sugar high-starch diets as factors. From weaning onwards (4 weeks of age), piglets were housed in group of 3 littermates (n = 8 groups/treatment) and fed ad libitum. After the end of the dietary intervention (8 weeks of age), all the piglets were fed a standard commercial diet. Piglet behaviours in the home pens were scored, and skin lesions, growth, feed intake and feed efficiency were measured up to 8 weeks after the end of the dietary treatment, i.e. until 16 weeks of age. At the end of the dietary treatment (8 weeks of age), response to novelty was assessed in a combined open field and novel object test (OFT/NOT). During the weeks following weaning, piglets fed the postnatal HFS diet tended to be less aggressive (p = 0.06), but exhibited more oral manipulation of pen mates (p = 0.05) than controls. Compared to controls, piglets fed the prenatal or postnatal HFS diet walked more in the home pen (p ≤ 0.05), and tended to have fewer skin lesions (p < 0.10). Several behavioural effects of the postnatal HFS diet depended on the prenatal diet, with piglets subjected to a switch of diet at birth being more active, and exploring feeding materials, pen mates, and the environment more than piglets that remained on the same diet. Behaviours during the OFT/NOT were not affected by the

  13. Perinatal Exposure to a Diet High in Saturated Fat, Refined Sugar and Cholesterol Affects Behaviour, Growth, and Feed Intake in Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Gerrits, Walter J. J.; Kemp, Bas; Val-Laillet, David; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The increased consumption of diets high in saturated fats and refined sugars is a major public health concern in Western human societies. Recent studies suggest that perinatal exposure to dietary fat and/or sugar may affect behavioural development. We thus investigated the effects of perinatal exposure to a high-fat high-sugar diet (HFS) on behavioural development and production performance of piglets. Thirty-two non-obese sows and their piglets were allocated to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial design, with 8-week prenatal (gestation) and 8-week postnatal (lactation and post-weaning) exposure to a HFS diet (12% saturated fat, 18.5% sucrose, 1% cholesterol) or control low-fat low-sugar high-starch diets as factors. From weaning onwards (4 weeks of age), piglets were housed in group of 3 littermates (n = 8 groups/treatment) and fed ad libitum. After the end of the dietary intervention (8 weeks of age), all the piglets were fed a standard commercial diet. Piglet behaviours in the home pens were scored, and skin lesions, growth, feed intake and feed efficiency were measured up to 8 weeks after the end of the dietary treatment, i.e. until 16 weeks of age. At the end of the dietary treatment (8 weeks of age), response to novelty was assessed in a combined open field and novel object test (OFT/NOT). During the weeks following weaning, piglets fed the postnatal HFS diet tended to be less aggressive (p = 0.06), but exhibited more oral manipulation of pen mates (p = 0.05) than controls. Compared to controls, piglets fed the prenatal or postnatal HFS diet walked more in the home pen (p ≤ 0.05), and tended to have fewer skin lesions (p < 0.10). Several behavioural effects of the postnatal HFS diet depended on the prenatal diet, with piglets subjected to a switch of diet at birth being more active, and exploring feeding materials, pen mates, and the environment more than piglets that remained on the same diet. Behaviours during the OFT/NOT were not affected by the

  14. Behaviour Recovery. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Bill

    2004-01-01

    This second edition of Behaviour Recovery puts emphasis on teaching behaviour concerning children with emotional and behavioural disorders (EBD). These children have many factors in their lives that affect their behaviour over which schools have limited control. This book acknowledges the challenge and explores the practical realities, options and…

  15. Generation of rodent and human osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sarah E B; Shah, Mittal; Orriss, Isabel R

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the isolation, culture and staining of primary osteoblasts from neonatal rodents and human samples. The calvaria and long-bone assays allow direct measurement of bone matrix deposition and mineralisation, as well as producing osteoblasts at defined stages of differentiation for molecular and histological analysis. Culture of human osteoblasts enables cell function to be investigated in targeted patient groups. The described methods will provide a step-by-step guide of what to expect at each stage of the culture and highlight the varied tissue culture conditions required to successfully grow osteoblasts from different sources. A special focus of this paper is the methods used for analysis of bone mineralisation and how to ensure that nonspecific mineral deposition or staining is not quantified. PMID:25396049

  16. Methylsulfonylmethane enhances BMP‑2‑induced osteoblast differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Don Nam; Joung, Youn Hee; Darvin, Pramod; Kang, Dong Young; Sp, Nipin; Byun, Hyo Joo; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Park, Kyung Do; Lee, Hak Kyo; Yang, Young Mok

    2016-07-01

    As human lifespans have increased, the incidence of osteoporosis has also increased. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) affects the process of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation into osteoblasts via the Janus kinase 2 (Jak2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)5b signaling pathway, and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP‑2) is also known to significantly affect bone health. In addition, the phosphorylation of small mothers against decapentaplegic (Smad)1/5/8 regulates the Runt‑related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) gene, which encodes a transcription factor for osteoblast differentiation markers. In the present study, the differentiation of MSCs treated with MSM, BMP‑2, and their combination were examined. The differentiation of osteoblasts was demonstrated through observation of morphological changes and mineralization, using alizarin red and Von Kossa staining. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that the combination of MSM and BMP-2 increased the phosphorylation of the BMP signaling-associated protein, Smad1/5/8. Combination of MSM and BMP-2 significantly increased osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of the MSCs compared with either MSM or BMP-2 alone. Additionally, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that combination of MSM and BMP-2 increased the expression level of the Runx2 gene and the osteoblast differentiation marker genes, alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin, in MSCs compared with controls. Thus, the combination of MSM and BMP-2 may promote the differentiation of MSCs into osteoblasts. PMID:27175741

  17. Direct effects of caffeine on osteoblastic cells metabolism: the possible causal effect of caffeine on the formation of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsuang, Yang-Hwei; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Chen, Li-Ting; Sun, Samuel Chung-Kai; Chen, San-Chi

    2006-01-01

    Background Caffeine consumption has been reported to decrease bone mineral density (BMD), increase the risk of hip fracture, and negatively influence calcium retention. In this study, we investigated the influence of caffeine on the osteoblasts behaviour. Method Osteoblasts derived from newborn Wistar-rat calvaria was used in this study. The effects of various concentrations of caffeine on bone cell activities were evaluated by using MTT assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining, von Kossa staining and biochemical parameters including ALP, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and total protein were performed at day 1, 3, and 7. DNA degradation analysis under the caffeine influence was also performed. Results and discussion The results showed that the viability of the osteoblasts, the formation of ALP positive staining colonies and mineralization nodules formation in the osteoblasts cultures decreased significantly in the presence of 10 mM caffeine. The intracellular LDH, ALP and PGE2 content decreased significantly, the LDH and PGE2 secreted into the medium increased significantly. The activation of an irreversible commitment to cell death by caffeine was clearly demonstrated by DNA ladder staining. Conclusion In summary, our results suggest that caffeine has potential deleterious effect on the osteoblasts viability, which may enhance the rate of osteoblasts apoptosis. PMID:17150127

  18. Velocity, safety, or both? How do balance and strength of goal conflicts affect drivers' behaviour, feelings and physiological responses?

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Daffy, Martin; Brandenburg, Stefan; Beliavski, Alina

    2013-06-01

    Motivational models of driving behaviour agree that choice of speed is modulated by drivers' goals. Whilst it is accepted that some goals favour fast driving and others favour safe driving, little is known about the interplay of these conflicting goals. In the present study, two aspects of this interplay are investigated: the balance of conflict and the strength of conflict. Thirty-two participants completed several simulated driving runs in which fast driving was rewarded with a monetary gain if the end of the track was reached. However, unpredictably, some runs ended with the appearance of a deer. In these runs, fast driving was punished with a monetary loss. The ratio between the magnitudes of gains and losses varied in order to manipulate the balance of conflict. The absolute magnitudes of both gains and losses altered the strength of conflict. Participants drove slower, reported an increase in anxiety-related feelings, and showed indications of physiological arousal if there was more money at stake. In contrast, only marginal effects of varying the ratio between gains and losses were observed. Results confirm that the strength of a safety-velocity conflict is an important determinant of drivers' behaviour, feelings, and physiological responses. The lack of evidence for the balance of conflict playing a role suggests that in each condition, participants subjectively weighted the loss higher than the gain (loss aversion). It is concluded that the interplay of the subjective values that drivers attribute to objective incentives for fast and safe driving is a promising field for future research. Incorporating this knowledge into motivational theories of driving behaviour might improve their contribution to the design of adequate road safety measures. PMID:23523895

  19. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat) causes bone loss by inhibiting immature osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; McCleary-Wheeler, Angela L.; Secreto, Frank J.; Razidlo, David F.; Zhang, Minzhi; Stensgard, Bridget A.; Li, Xiaodong; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (Hdac) inhibitors are used clinically to treat cancer and epilepsy. Although Hdac inhibition accelerates osteoblast maturation and suppresses osteoclast maturation in vitro, the effects of Hdac inhibitors on the skeleton are not understood. The purpose of this study was to determine how the pan-Hdac inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; a.k.a. vorinostat or Zolinza™) affects bone mass and remodeling in vivo. Male C57BL/6 mice received daily SAHA (100 mg/kg) or vehicle injections for three to four weeks. SAHA decreased trabecular bone volume fraction and trabecular number in the distal femur. Cortical bone at the femoral midshaft was not affected. SAHA reduced serum levels of P1NP, a bone formation marker, and also suppressed tibial mRNA levels of type I collagen, osteocalcin and osteopontin, but did not alter Runx2 or osterix transcripts. SAHA decreased histological measures of osteoblast number but interestingly increased indices of osteoblast activity including mineral apposition rate and bone formation rate. Neither serum (TRAcP 5b) nor histological markers of bone resorption were affected by SAHA. P1NP levels returned to baseline in animals which were allowed to recover for four weeks after four weeks of daily SAHA injections, but bone density remained low. In vitro, SAHA suppressed osteogenic colony formation, decreased osteoblastic gene expression, induced cell cycle arrest, and caused DNA damage in bone marrow-derived adherent cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that bone loss following treatment with SAHA is primarily due to a reduction in osteoblast number. Moreover, these decreases in osteoblast number can be attributed to the deleterious effects of SAHA on immature osteoblasts, even while mature osteoblasts are resistant to the harmful effects and demonstrate increased activity in vivo, indicating that the response of osteoblasts to SAHA is dependent upon their differentiation state. These studies suggest that

  20. On-ground housing in “Mice Drawer System” (MDS) cage affects locomotor behaviour but not anxiety in male mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simone, Luciano; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Palanza, Paola; Parmigiani, Stefano

    2008-03-01

    In the present study adult male mice were housed for 21 days in a housing modules of the Mice Drawer System (MDS). MDS is the facility that will support the research on board the International Space Station (ISS). Our investigation focused on: circadian rhythmicity of wide behavioural categories such as locomotor activity, food intake/drinking and resting; emotionality in the elevated plus maze (EPM); body weight. Housing in the MDS determined a strong up-regulation of activity and feeding behaviour and a concomitant decrease in inactivity. Importantly, housing in the MDS disrupted circadian rhythmicity in mice and also determined a decrease in body weight. Finally, when mice were tested in the EPM a clear hyperactivity (i.e. increased total transitions) was found, while no evidence for altered anxiety was detected. In conclusion, housing adult male mice in the MDS housing modules may affect their behaviour, circadian rhythmicity while having no effect on anxiety. It is suggested that to allow adaptation to the peculiar housing allowed by MDS a longer housing duration is needed.

  1. The Phosphorylation and Distribution of Cortactin Downstream of Integrin α9β1 Affects Cancer Cell Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Høye, Anette M.; Couchman, John R.; Wewer, Ulla M.; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Integrins, a family of heterodimeric adhesion receptors are implicated in cell migration, development and cancer progression. They can adopt conformations that reflect their activation states and thereby impact adhesion strength and migration. Integrins in an intermediate activation state may be optimal for migration and we have shown previously that fully activated integrin α9β1 corresponds with less migratory behaviour in melanoma cells. Here, we aimed to identify components associated with the activation status of α9β1. Using cancer cell lines with naturally occuring high levels of this integrin, activation by α9β1-specific ligands led to upregulation of fibronectin matrix assembly and tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin on tyrosine 470 (Y470). Specifically, cortactin phosphorylated on Y470, but not Y421, redistributed together with α9β1 to focal adhesions where active β1 integrin also localises, upon integrin activation. This was commensurate with reduced migration. The localisation and phosphorylation of cortactin Y470 was regulated by Yes kinase and PTEN phosphatase. Cortactin levels influenced fibronectin matrix assembly and active β1 integrin on the cell surface, being inversely correlated with migratory behaviour. This study underlines the complex interplay between cortactin and α9β1 integrin that regulates cell-extracellular matrix interactions. PMID:27339664

  2. Parental stress affects the emotions and behaviour of children up to adolescence: a Greek prospective, longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Bakoula, Chryssa; Kolaitis, Gerasimos; Veltsista, Alexandra; Gika, Artemis; Chrousos, George P

    2009-11-01

    Systematic research about the continuity of mental health problems from childhood to adolescence is limited, but necessary to design effective prevention and intervention strategies. We used a population-based representative sample of Greek adolescents, followed-up from birth to the age of 18 years, to assess early influences on and the persistence of mental health problems in youth. We examined the role of peripartum, early development and parental characteristics in predicting mental health problems in childhood and adolescence. Results suggest a strong relationship between behavioural problems in childhood and adolescence for both genders, while emotional problems were more likely to persist in boys. Age and sex-specific models revealed significant positive associations between higher scores on the behavioural and emotional problems scales and higher frequency of accidents in preschool years, physical punishment in early childhood, lack of parental interest in child's school and activities, and perceived maternal stress in all children. Perceived paternal stress was associated with higher scores on the Total and Internalizing problems scales in the total population. Our results suggest that early interventions are necessary as mental health problems strongly persist from childhood to late adolescence. The adverse effects of parental stress and poor care-giving practices on child's psychopathology need to be recognised and improved. PMID:19206015

  3. Do ambient electromagnetic fields affect behaviour? A demonstration of the relationship between geomagnetic storm activity and suicide.

    PubMed

    Berk, Michael; Dodd, Seetal; Henry, Margaret

    2006-02-01

    The relationship between ambient electromagnetic fields and human mood and behaviour is of great public health interest. The relationship between Ap indices of geomagnetic storm activity and national suicide statistics for Australia from 1968 to 2002 was studied. Ap index data was normalised so as to be globally uniform and gave a measure of storm activity for each day. A geomagnetic storm event was defined as a day in which the Ap index was equal to or exceeded 100 nT. Suicide data was a national tally of daily male and female death figures where suicide had been documented as the cause of death. A total of 51 845 males and 16 327 females were included. The average number of suicides was greatest in spring for males and females, and lowest in autumn for males and summer for females. Suicide amongst females increased significantly in autumn during concurrent periods of geomagnetic storm activity (P = .01). This pattern was not observed in males (P = .16). This suggests that perturbations in ambient electromagnetic field activity impact behaviour in a clinically meaningful manner. The study furthermore raises issues regarding other sources of stray electromagnetic fields and their effect on mental health. PMID:16304696

  4. The Phosphorylation and Distribution of Cortactin Downstream of Integrin α9β1 Affects Cancer Cell Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Høye, Anette M; Couchman, John R; Wewer, Ulla M; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Integrins, a family of heterodimeric adhesion receptors are implicated in cell migration, development and cancer progression. They can adopt conformations that reflect their activation states and thereby impact adhesion strength and migration. Integrins in an intermediate activation state may be optimal for migration and we have shown previously that fully activated integrin α9β1 corresponds with less migratory behaviour in melanoma cells. Here, we aimed to identify components associated with the activation status of α9β1. Using cancer cell lines with naturally occuring high levels of this integrin, activation by α9β1-specific ligands led to upregulation of fibronectin matrix assembly and tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin on tyrosine 470 (Y470). Specifically, cortactin phosphorylated on Y470, but not Y421, redistributed together with α9β1 to focal adhesions where active β1 integrin also localises, upon integrin activation. This was commensurate with reduced migration. The localisation and phosphorylation of cortactin Y470 was regulated by Yes kinase and PTEN phosphatase. Cortactin levels influenced fibronectin matrix assembly and active β1 integrin on the cell surface, being inversely correlated with migratory behaviour. This study underlines the complex interplay between cortactin and α9β1 integrin that regulates cell-extracellular matrix interactions. PMID:27339664

  5. How Growing Complexity of Consumer Choices and Drivers of Consumption Behaviour Affect Demand for Animal Source Foods.

    PubMed

    Perry, B D; Grace, D C

    2015-12-01

    Many societies are spoiled for choice when they purchase meat and other livestock products, and around the globe food choice has grown dramatically in the last two decades. What is more, besides the cost and obvious health concerns influencing commodity section, an increasing proportion of choices is made to contribute to the achievement of certain ideals, such as natural resource management, climate change mitigation, animal welfare concerns and personal lifestyle. At the same time, human health considerations are becoming more important for consumption choices as richer societies, and increasingly the urban poor in low- and middle-income countries, face an unprecedented epidemic of over-consumption and associated diet-related non-communicable diseases. Animal source foods are considered significant contributors to this trend. This paper reviews this complicated arena, and explores the range of considerations that influence consumers' preferences for meat and other animal source foods. This paper also argues that deeper drivers of consumption behaviour of many foods may act in opposition to the articulated preferences for choices around animal source food consumption. We review how the returns to different causes are being valued, how emerging metrics are helping to manage and influence consumption behaviours, and draw conclusions regarding options which influence food choice. PMID:26682899

  6. Uptake of postprandial lipoproteins into bone in vivo: impact on osteoblast function.

    PubMed

    Niemeier, Andreas; Niedzielska, Dagmara; Secer, Rukiye; Schilling, Arndt; Merkel, Martin; Enrich, Carlos; Rensen, Patrick C N; Heeren, Joerg

    2008-08-01

    Dietary lipids and lipophilic vitamins are transported by postprandial lipoproteins and are required for bone metabolism. Despite that, it remains unknown whether bone cells are involved in the uptake of circulating postprandial lipoproteins in vivo. The current study was performed to investigate a putative participation of bone in the systemic postprandial lipoprotein metabolism in mice, to identify potentially involved cell type populations and to analyze whether lipoprotein uptake affects bone function in vivo. As a model for the postprandial state, chylomicron remnants (CR) were injected intravenously into mice. Next to the liver and compared to other organs, bone appeared to be the second most important organ for the clearance of radiolabeled CR particles from the circulation in vivo. In addition, uptake of radiolabeled CR by primary murine osteoblasts and hepatocytes was quantified to be in a similar range in vitro. A complementary approach with fluorescently labeled CR and immunohistochemical staining for apoE proved that intact CR particles were taken up into bone and liver. Electron microscopy localization studies of bone sections revealed CR uptake into sinusoidal endothelial cells, macrophages and osteoblasts. The relative amount of radiolabeled CR uptake into femoral cortical bone, representing predominantly osteoblasts, and bone marrow, representing predominantly non-osteoblast cells, was within the same range. Most importantly, the injection of vitamin K1-enriched CR resulted in an increase of the degree of osteocalcin carboxylation in vivo while total osteocalcin concentrations remained unaffected, giving functional proof that osteoblasts process CR in vivo. In conclusion, here we demonstrate that bone is involved in the postprandial lipoprotein metabolism in mice. Osteoblasts participate in CR clearance from the circulation, which has a direct impact on the secretory function of osteoblasts. PMID:18538644

  7. The Rho-GEF Kalirin regulates bone mass and the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Su; Eleniste, Pierre P.; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Mandela, Prashant; Eipper, Betty A.; Mains, Richard E.; Allen, Matthew R.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Dysregulation in the activity of the bone cells can lead to osteoporosis, a disease characterized by low bone mass and an increase in bone fragility and risk of fracture. Kalirin is a novel GTP-exchange factor protein that has been shown to play a role in cytoskeletal remodeling and dendritic spine formation in neurons. We examined Kalirin expression in skeletal tissue and found that it was expressed in osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Furthermore, micro-CT analyses of the distal femur of global Kalirin knockout (Kal-KO) mice revealed significantly reduced trabecular and cortical bone parameters in Kal-KO mice, compared to WT mice, with significantly reduced bone mass in 8, 14 and 36 week-old female Kal-KO mice. Male mice also exhibited a decrease in bone parameters but not to the level seen in female mice. Histomorphometric analyses also revealed decreased bone formation rate in 14 week-old female Kal-KO mice, as well as decreased osteoblast number/bone surface and increased osteoclast surface/bone surface. Consistent with our in vivo findings, the bone resorbing activity and differentiation of Kal-KO osteoclasts was increased in vitro. Although alkaline phosphatase activity by Kal-KO osteoblasts was increased in vitro, Kal-KO osteoblasts showed decreased mineralizing activity, as well as decreased secretion of OPG, which was inversely correlated with ERK activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that deletion of Kalirin directly affects osteoclast and osteoblast activity, leading to decreased OPG secretion by osteoblasts which is likely to alter the RANKL/OPG ratio and promote osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, Kalirin may play a role in paracrine and/or endocrine signaling events that control skeletal bone remodeling and the maintenance of bone mass. PMID:24380811

  8. The Rho-GEF Kalirin regulates bone mass and the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Su; Eleniste, Pierre P; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Mandela, Prashant; Eipper, Betty A; Mains, Richard E; Allen, Matthew R; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2014-03-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Dysregulation in the activity of the bone cells can lead to osteoporosis, a disease characterized by low bone mass and an increase in bone fragility and risk of fracture. Kalirin is a novel GTP-exchange factor protein that has been shown to play a role in cytoskeletal remodeling and dendritic spine formation in neurons. We examined Kalirin expression in skeletal tissue and found that it was expressed in osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Furthermore, micro-CT analyses of the distal femur of global Kalirin knockout (Kal-KO) mice revealed significantly reduced trabecular and cortical bone parameters in Kal-KO mice, compared to WT mice, with significantly reduced bone mass in 8, 14 and 36week-old female Kal-KO mice. Male mice also exhibited a decrease in bone parameters but not to the level seen in female mice. Histomorphometric analyses also revealed decreased bone formation rate in 14week-old female Kal-KO mice, as well as decreased osteoblast number/bone surface and increased osteoclast surface/bone surface. Consistent with our in vivo findings, the bone resorbing activity and differentiation of Kal-KO osteoclasts was increased in vitro. Although alkaline phosphatase activity by Kal-KO osteoblasts was increased in vitro, Kal-KO osteoblasts showed decreased mineralizing activity, as well as decreased secretion of OPG, which was inversely correlated with ERK activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that deletion of Kalirin directly affects osteoclast and osteoblast activity, leading to decreased OPG secretion by osteoblasts which is likely to alter the RANKL/OPG ratio and promote osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, Kalirin may play a role in paracrine and/or endocrine signaling events that control skeletal bone remodeling and the maintenance of bone mass. PMID:24380811

  9. Co-localisation of host plant resistance QTLs affecting the performance and feeding behaviour of the aphid Myzus persicae in the peach tree

    PubMed Central

    Sauge, M-H; Lambert, P; Pascal, T

    2012-01-01

    The architecture and action of quantitative trait loci (QTL) contributing to plant resistance mechanisms against aphids, the largest group of phloem-feeding insects, are not well understood. Comparative mapping of several components of resistance to the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) was undertaken in Prunus davidiana, a wild species related to peach. An interspecific F1 population of Prunus persica var. Summergrand × P. davidiana clone P1908 was scored for resistance (aphid colony development and foliar damage) and 17 aphid feeding behaviour traits monitored by means of the electrical penetration graph technique. Seven resistance QTLs were detected, individually explaining 6.1–43.1% of the phenotypic variation. Consistency was shown over several trials. Nine QTLs affecting aphid feeding behaviour were identified. All resistance QTLs except one co-located with QTLs underlying aphid feeding behaviour. A P. davidiana resistance allele at the major QTL was associated with drastic reductions in phloem sap ingestion by aphids, suggesting a phloem-based resistance mechanism. Resistance was also positively correlated with aphid salivation into sieve elements, suggesting an insect response to restore the appropriate conditions for ingestion after phloem occlusion. No significant QTL was found for traits characterising aphid mouthpart activity in plant tissues other than phloem vessels. Two QTLs with effects on aphid feeding behaviour but without effect on resistance were identified. SSR markers linked to the main QTLs involved in resistance are of potential use in marker-assisted selection for aphid resistance. Linking our results with the recent sequencing of the peach genome may help clarify the physiological resistance mechanisms. PMID:21897441

  10. Avenanthramides Prevent Osteoblast and Osteocyte Apoptosis and Induce Osteoclast Apoptosis in Vitro in an Nrf2-Independent Manner.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Gretel G; Morales, Cynthya C; Wallace, Taylor C; Plotkin, Lilian I; Bellido, Teresita

    2016-01-01

    Oats contain unique bioactive compounds known as avenanthramides (AVAs) with antioxidant properties. AVAs might enhance the endogenous antioxidant cellular response by activation of the transcription factor Nrf2. Accumulation of reactive oxygen species plays a critical role in many chronic and degenerative diseases, including osteoporosis. In this disease, there is an imbalance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts, which is accompanied by increased osteoblast/osteocyte apoptosis and decreased osteoclast apoptosis. We investigated the ability of the synthethic AVAs 2c, 2f and 2p, to 1-regulate gene expression in bone cells, 2-affect the viability of osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts, and the generation of osteoclasts from their precursors, and 3-examine the potential involvement of the transcription factor Nrf2 in these actions. All doses of AVA 2c and 1 and 5 µM dose of 2p up-regulated collagen 1A expression. Lower doses of AVAs up-regulated OPG (osteoprotegerin) in OB-6 osteoblastic cells, whereas 100 μM dose of 2f and all concentrations of 2c down-regulated RANKL gene expression in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells. AVAs did not affect apoptosis of OB-6 osteoblastic cells or MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells; however, they prevented apoptosis induced by the DNA topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide, the glucocorticoid dexamethasone, and hydrogen peroxide. AVAs prevented apoptosis of both wild type (WT) and Nrf2 Knockout (KO) osteoblasts, demonstrating that AVAs-induced survival does not require Nrf2 expression. Further, KO osteoclast precursors produced more mature osteoclasts than WT; and KO cultures exhibited less apoptotic osteoclasts than WT cultures. Although AVAs did not affect WT osteoclasts, AVA 2p reversed the low apoptosis of KO osteoclasts. These in vitro results demonstrate that AVAs regulate, in part, the function of osteoblasts and osteocytes and prevent osteoblast/osteocyte apoptosis and increase osteoclast apoptosis; further

  11. Avenanthramides Prevent Osteoblast and Osteocyte Apoptosis and Induce Osteoclast Apoptosis in Vitro in an Nrf2-Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Gretel G.; Morales, Cynthya C.; Wallace, Taylor C.; Plotkin, Lilian I.; Bellido, Teresita

    2016-01-01

    Oats contain unique bioactive compounds known as avenanthramides (AVAs) with antioxidant properties. AVAs might enhance the endogenous antioxidant cellular response by activation of the transcription factor Nrf2. Accumulation of reactive oxygen species plays a critical role in many chronic and degenerative diseases, including osteoporosis. In this disease, there is an imbalance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts, which is accompanied by increased osteoblast/osteocyte apoptosis and decreased osteoclast apoptosis. We investigated the ability of the synthethic AVAs 2c, 2f and 2p, to 1-regulate gene expression in bone cells, 2-affect the viability of osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts, and the generation of osteoclasts from their precursors, and 3-examine the potential involvement of the transcription factor Nrf2 in these actions. All doses of AVA 2c and 1 and 5 µM dose of 2p up-regulated collagen 1A expression. Lower doses of AVAs up-regulated OPG (osteoprotegerin) in OB-6 osteoblastic cells, whereas 100 μM dose of 2f and all concentrations of 2c down-regulated RANKL gene expression in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells. AVAs did not affect apoptosis of OB-6 osteoblastic cells or MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells; however, they prevented apoptosis induced by the DNA topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide, the glucocorticoid dexamethasone, and hydrogen peroxide. AVAs prevented apoptosis of both wild type (WT) and Nrf2 Knockout (KO) osteoblasts, demonstrating that AVAs-induced survival does not require Nrf2 expression. Further, KO osteoclast precursors produced more mature osteoclasts than WT; and KO cultures exhibited less apoptotic osteoclasts than WT cultures. Although AVAs did not affect WT osteoclasts, AVA 2p reversed the low apoptosis of KO osteoclasts. These in vitro results demonstrate that AVAs regulate, in part, the function of osteoblasts and osteocytes and prevent osteoblast/osteocyte apoptosis and increase osteoclast apoptosis; further

  12. Hypoxia Modulates the Phenotype of Osteoblasts Isolated From Knee Osteoarthritis Patients, Leading to Undermineralized Bone Nodule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joan; Jackson, Sonya G; Wardale, John; Jones, Simon W

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of hypoxia in the pathology of osteoarthritic (OA) bone by exploring its effect on the phenotype of isolated primary osteoblasts from patients with knee OA. Methods OA bone samples were collected at the time of elective joint replacement surgery for knee or hip OA. Normal bone samples were collected postmortem from cadaver donors. Primary osteoblasts were isolated from knee OA bone chips and cultured under normoxic or hypoxic (2% O2) conditions. Alkaline phosphatase activity was quantified using an enzymatic assay, and osteopontin and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production was assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Total RNA was extracted from bone and osteoblasts, and gene expression was profiled by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Results Human OA bone tissue sections stained positively for carbonic anhydrase IX, a biomarker of hypoxia, and exhibited differential expression of genes that mediate the vasculature and blood coagulation as compared to those found in normal bone. Culture of primary osteoblasts isolated from knee OA bone under hypoxic conditions profoundly affected the osteoblast phenotype, including the expression of genes that mediate bone matrix, bone remodeling, and bone vasculature. Hypoxia also increased the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 and the production of PGE2 by OA osteoblasts. Osteoblast expression of type II collagen α1 chain, angiopoietin-like 4, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 was shown to be mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α. Chronic hypoxia reduced osteoblast- mineralized bone nodule formation. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that hypoxia can induce pathologic changes in osteoblast functionality consistent with an OA phenotype, providing evidence that hypoxia is a key driver of OA pathology. PMID:24574272

  13. Id4, a new candidate gene for senile osteoporosis, acts as a molecular switch promoting osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Yagi, Ken; Yamashita, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nikaido, Itoshi; Bono, Hidemasa; Ninomiya, Yuichi; Kanesaki-Yatsuka, Yukiko; Akita, Masumi; Motegi, Hiromi; Wakana, Shigeharu; Noda, Tetsuo; Sablitzky, Fred; Arai, Shigeki; Kurokawa, Riki; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu; Schönbach, Christian; Suda, Tatsuo; Mizuno, Yosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2010-07-01

    Excessive accumulation of bone marrow adipocytes observed in senile osteoporosis or age-related osteopenia is caused by the unbalanced differentiation of MSCs into bone marrow adipocytes or osteoblasts. Several transcription factors are known to regulate the balance between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the balance between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation in the bone marrow have yet to be elucidated. To identify candidate genes associated with senile osteoporosis, we performed genome-wide expression analyses of differentiating osteoblasts and adipocytes. Among transcription factors that were enriched in the early phase of differentiation, Id4 was identified as a key molecule affecting the differentiation of both cell types. Experiments using bone marrow-derived stromal cell line ST2 and Id4-deficient mice showed that lack of Id4 drastically reduces osteoblast differentiation and drives differentiation toward adipocytes. On the other hand knockdown of Id4 in adipogenic-induced ST2 cells increased the expression of Ppargamma2, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation. Similar results were observed in bone marrow cells of femur and tibia of Id4-deficient mice. However the effect of Id4 on Ppargamma2 and adipocyte differentiation is unlikely to be of direct nature. The mechanism of Id4 promoting osteoblast differentiation is associated with the Id4-mediated release of Hes1 from Hes1-Hey2 complexes. Hes1 increases the stability and transcriptional activity of Runx2, a key molecule of osteoblast differentiation, which results in an enhanced osteoblast-specific gene expression. The new role of Id4 in promoting osteoblast differentiation renders it a target for preventing the onset of senile osteoporosis. PMID:20628571

  14. Repeated forced swim stress differentially affects formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour and the endocannabinoid system in stress normo-responsive and stress hyper-responsive rat strains.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Elaine M; Okine, Bright N; Olango, Weredeselam M; Roche, Michelle; Finn, David P

    2016-01-01

    Repeated exposure to a homotypic stressor such as forced swimming enhances nociceptive responding in rats. However, the influence of genetic background on this stress-induced hyperalgesia is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of repeated forced swim stress on nociceptive responding in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats versus the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat strain, a genetic background that is susceptible to stress, negative affect and hyperalgesia. Given the well-documented role of the endocannabinoid system in stress and pain, we investigated associated alterations in endocannabinoid signalling in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and amygdala. In SD rats, repeated forced swim stress for 10 days was associated with enhanced late phase formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour, compared with naive, non-stressed SD controls. In contrast, WKY rats exposed to 10 days of swim stress displayed reduced late phase formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour. Swim stress increased levels of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) mRNA in the ipsilateral side of the dorsal spinal cord of SD rats, an effect not observed in WKY rats. In the amygdala, swim stress reduced anandamide (AEA) levels in the contralateral amygdala of SD rats, but not WKY rats. Additional within-strain differences in levels of CB1 receptor and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) mRNA and levels of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) were observed between the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the dorsal horn and/or amygdala. These data indicate that the effects of repeated stress on inflammatory pain-related behaviour are different in two rat strains that differ with respect to stress responsivity and affective state and implicate the endocannabinoid system in the spinal cord and amygdala in these differences. PMID:25988529

  15. Primary Human Osteoblasts in Response to 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3, 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and 24R,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3

    PubMed Central

    van der Meijden, Karen; Lips, Paul; van Driel, Marjolein; Heijboer, Annemieke C.; Schulten, Engelbert A. J. M.; den Heijer, Martin; Bravenboer, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    The most biologically active metabolite 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) has well known direct effects on osteoblast growth and differentiation in vitro. The precursor 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) can affect osteoblast function via conversion to 1,25(OH)2D3, however, it is largely unknown whether 25(OH)D3 can affect primary osteoblast function on its own. Furthermore, 25(OH)D3 is not only converted to 1,25(OH)2D3, but also to 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (24R,25(OH)2D3) which may have bioactivity as well. Therefore we used a primary human osteoblast model to examine whether 25(OH)D3 itself can affect osteoblast function using CYP27B1 silencing and to investigate whether 24R,25(OH)2D3 can affect osteoblast function. We showed that primary human osteoblasts responded to both 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2D3 by reducing their proliferation and enhancing their differentiation by the increase of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and osteopontin expression. Osteoblasts expressed CYP27B1 and CYP24 and synthesized 1,25(OH)2D3 and 24R,25(OH)2D3 dose-dependently. Silencing of CYP27B1 resulted in a decline of 1,25(OH)2D3 synthesis, but we observed no significant differences in mRNA levels of differentiation markers in CYP27B1-silenced cells compared to control cells after treatment with 25(OH)D3. We demonstrated that 24R,25(OH)2D3 increased mRNA levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and osteopontin. In addition, 24R,25(OH)2D3 strongly increased CYP24 mRNA. In conclusion, the vitamin D metabolites 25(OH)D3, 1,25(OH)2D3 and 24R,25(OH)2D3 can affect osteoblast differentiation directly or indirectly. We showed that primary human osteoblasts not only respond to 1,25(OH)2D3, but also to 24R,25(OH)2D3 by enhancing osteoblast differentiation. This suggests that 25(OH)D3 can affect osteoblast differentiation via conversion to the active metabolite 1,25(OH)2D3, but also via conversion to 24R,25(OH)2D3. Whether 25(OH)D3 has direct actions on osteoblast function needs further

  16. EGF Inhibits Wnt/β-Catenin-Induced Osteoblast Differentiation by Promoting β-Catenin Degradation.

    PubMed

    Boonanantanasarn, Kanitsak; Lee, Hye-Lim; Baek, Kyunghwa; Woo, Kyung Mi; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Kim, Gwan-Shik

    2015-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and canonical Wnts are representative developmental signals that enhance osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Previously, we demonstrated that epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits BMP2-induced osteoblast differentiation by inducing Smurf1 expression. However, the regulatory role of EGF in Wnt/β-catenin-induced osteoblast differentiation has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effect of EGF on Wnt/β-catenin signaling-induced osteoblast differentiation using the C2C12 cell line. EGF significantly suppressed the expression of osteoblast marker genes, which were induced by Wnt3a and a GSK-3β inhibitor. EGF increased the expression levels of Smurf1 mRNA and protein. Smurf1 knockdown rescued Wnt/β-catenin-induced osteogenic marker gene expression in the presence of EGF. EGF treatment or Smurf1 overexpression did not affect β-catenin mRNA expression levels, but reduced β-catenin protein levels and TOP-Flash activity. EGF and Smurf1 promoted β-catenin ubiquitination. Co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays showed that Smurf1 associates with β-catenin. These results suggest that EGF/Smurf1 inhibits Wnt/β-catenin-induced osteogenic differentiation and that Smurf1 downregulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling by enhancing proteasomal degradation of β-catenin. PMID:26015066

  17. Approximating bone ECM: Crosslinking directs individual and coupled osteoblast/osteoclast behavior.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mintai P; Subbiah, Ramesh; Kim, In Gul; Lee, Kyung Eun; Park, Jimin; Kim, Sang Heon; Park, Kwideok

    2016-10-01

    Osteoblast and osteoclast communication (i.e. osteocoupling) is an intricate process, in which the biophysical profile of bone ECM is an aggregate product of their activities. While the effect of microenvironmental cues on osteoblast and osteoclast maturation has been resolved into individual variables (e.g. stiffness or topography), a single cue can be limited with regards to reflecting the full biophysical scope of natural bone ECM. Additionally, the natural modulation of bone ECM, which involves collagenous fibril and elastin crosslinking via lysyl oxidase, has yet to be reflected in current synthetic platforms. Here, we move beyond traditional substrates and use cell-derived ECM to examine individual and coupled osteoblast and osteoclast behavior on a physiological platform. Specifically, preosteoblast-derived ECM is crosslinked with genipin, a biocompatible crosslinker, to emulate physiological lysyl oxidase-mediated ECM crosslinking. We demonstrate that different concentrations of genipin yield changes to ECM density, stiffness, and roughness while retaining biocompatibility. By approximating various bone ECM profiles, we examine how individual and coupled osteoblast and osteoclast behavior are affected. Ultimately, we demonstrate an increase in osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation on compact and loose ECM, respectively, and identify ECM crosslinking density as an underlying force in osteocoupling behavior. PMID:27376556

  18. Effects of a hydroxyapatite-based biomaterial on gene expression in osteoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Sibilla, P; Sereni, A; Aguiari, G; Banzi, M; Manzati, E; Mischiati, C; Trombelli, L; del Senno, L

    2006-04-01

    Biostite is a hydroxyapatite-derived biomaterial that is used in periodontal and bone reconstructive procedures due to its osteoconductive properties. Since the molecular effects of this biomaterial on osteoblasts are still unknown, we decided to assess whether it may specifically modulate osteoblast functions in vitro. We found that a brief exposure to Biostite significantly reduced the proliferation of MG-63 and SaOS-2 osteoblast-like cells to approximately 50% of the plateau value. Furthermore, gene array analysis of MG-63 cells showed that Biostite caused a differential expression of 37 genes which are involved in cell proliferation and interaction, and related to osteoblast differentiation and tissue regeneration. Results were confirmed by RT-PCR, Western blot, and by an increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) specific activity. Biostite also increased levels of polycystin-2, a mechano-sensitive Ca(2+) channel, a promising new marker of bone cell differentiation. Biostite, therefore, may directly affect osteoblasts by enhancing chondro/osteogenic gene expression and cytoskeleton-related signaling pathways, which may contribute to its clinical efficacy. PMID:16567558

  19. FoxO1 Protein Cooperates with ATF4 Protein in Osteoblasts to Control Glucose Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Kode, Aruna; Mosialou, Ioanna; Silva, Barbara C.; Joshi, Sneha; Ferron, Mathieu; Rached, Marie Therese; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2012-01-01

    The Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits through its expression in osteoblasts β-cell proliferation, insulin secretion, and sensitivity. At least part of the FoxO1 metabolic functions result from its ability to suppress the activity of osteocalcin, an osteoblast-derived hormone favoring glucose metabolism and energy expenditure. In searching for mechanisms mediating the metabolic actions of FoxO1, we focused on ATF4, because this transcription factor also affects glucose metabolism through its expression in osteoblasts. We show here that FoxO1 co-localizes with ATF4 in the osteoblast nucleus, and physically interacts with and promotes the transcriptional activity of ATF4. Genetic experiments demonstrate that FoxO1 and ATF4 cooperate to increase glucose levels and decrease glucose tolerance. These effects result from a synergistic effect of the two transcription factors to suppress the activity of osteocalcin through up-regulating expression of the phosphatase catalyzing osteocalcin inactivation. As a result, insulin production by β-cells and insulin signaling in the muscle, liver and white adipose tissue are compromised and fat weight increases by the FoxO1/ATF4 interaction. Taken together these observations demonstrate that FoxO1 and ATF4 cooperate in osteoblasts to regulate glucose homeostasis. PMID:22298775

  20. Advanced glycation end products suppress osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Yamaguchi, Toru; Kaji, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Ippei; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2013-08-30

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are involved in bone quality deterioration in diabetes mellitus. We previously showed that AGE2 or AGE3 inhibited osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization of mouse stromal ST2 cells, and also induced apoptosis and decreased cell growth. Although quality management for synthesized proteins in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for the maturation of osteoblasts, the effects of AGEs on ER stress in osteoblast lineage are unknown. We thus examined roles of ER stress in AGE2- or AGE3-induced suppression of osteoblastogenesis of ST2 cells. An ER stress inducer, thapsigargin (TG), induced osteoblastic differentiation of ST2 cells by increasing the levels of Osterix, type 1 collagen (Col1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN) mRNA. AGE2 or AGE3 suppressed the levels of ER stress sensors such as IRE1α, ATF6 and OASIS, while they increased the levels of PERK and its downstream molecules, ATF4. A reduction in PERK level by siRNA did not affect the AGEs-induced suppression of the levels of Osterix, Col1 and OCN mRNA. In conclusion, AGEs inhibited the osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells by suppressing ER stress sensors and accumulating abnormal proteins in the cells. This process might accelerate AGEs-induced suppression of bone formation found in diabetes mellitus. PMID:23933252

  1. Severity and timing: How prenatal stress exposure affects glial developmental, emotional behavioural and plasma neurosteroid responses in guinea pig offspring.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Greer A; Palliser, Hannah K; Walker, David; Hirst, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Prenatal stress has been associated with a variety of developmental changes in offspring, notably those associated with brain development and subsequent risk for neuropathologies later in life. Recently, the importance of the timing and the severity of the stressor during pregnancy has been emphasized with neurosteroids including allopregnanolone implicated in the regulation of stress and also for endogenous neuroprotection in offspring. Prenatal stress was induced using strobe light exposure in pregnant guinea pigs (term 71days) in three defined stress exposure groups (Gestational Age (GA)35-65, GA50-65 and GA60-65). Stress was induced for 2h (9-11am) every 5days via strobe light exposure. A fetal cohort were euthanased at term with fetal brains and plasma collected. Anxiety-like behaviour was evaluated at 18 days of age in a separate cohort of offspring with brains and plasma collected at 21days of age. Markers for mature oligodendrocytes and reactive astrocytes were measured in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and the subcortical white matter. The neurosteroid allopregnanolone was measured by radioimmunoassay in offspring plasma. In the CA1 region of the hippocampus, fetuses from all stress groups showed reduced expression of mature oligodendrocytes and reactive astrocytes. By juvenility, all male stress exposure groups had recovered to levels of unaffected controls with the exception of the GA35-65 stress group. In juvenile females, mature oligodendrocyte marker expression was reduced in all stress groups and reactive astrocyte expression was reduced in the GA35-65 and GA60-65 stress groups by juvenility. Increased reactive astrocyte expression was also apparent in the subcortical white matter in both sexes both at term and at juvenility. Prenatally stressed offspring spent less time exploring in the object exploration test and also entered the inner zone of the open field less than controls at 18days of age. Circulating allopregnanolone concentrations were

  2. Exploring Students' Behavioural Patterns during Online Peer Assessment from the Affective, Cognitive, and Metacognitive Perspectives: A Progressive Sequential Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Kun-Hung; Hou, Huei-Tse

    2015-01-01

    Previous research regarding peer assessment has investigated the relationships between peer feedback and learners' performance. However, few studies investigate in-depth learning processes during technology-assisted peer assessment activities, particularly from affective, cognitive, and metacognitive perspectives. This study conducts a series of…

  3. Osteoblasts of calvaria induce higher numbers of osteoclasts than osteoblasts from long bone.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qilong; Schoenmaker, Ton; Jansen, Ineke D C; Bian, Zhuan; de Vries, Teun J; Everts, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the existence of functional differences between osteoclasts harbored in different bones. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of such a heterogeneity are not yet understood. Since cells of the osteoblast lineage play a critical role in osteoclastogenesis, osteoclast heterogeneity may be due to osteoblasts that differ at the different bone sites. In the present study we evaluated possible differences in the capacity of calvaria and long bone osteoblasts to induce osteoclastogenesis. Osteoblasts were isolated from calvaria and long bone of mice and co-cultured with osteoclast precursors obtained from bone marrow of both types of bone, spleen and peripheral blood. Irrespective of the source of the precursors, a significantly higher number of TRACP-positive multinucleated cells were formed with calvaria osteoblasts. The expression of osteoclastogenesis related genes was analyzed by qPCR. OPG was significantly higher expressed by long bone osteoblasts. The RANKL/OPG ratio and TNF-α gene expression were significantly higher in calvaria osteoblast cultures. OPG added to the culture system inhibited osteoclastogenesis in both groups. Blocking TNF-α had no effect on osteoclastogenesis. Calvaria and long bone osteoblasts were pre-stimulated with VitD3 for 5days. Subsequently, osteoclast precursors were added to these cultures. After a co-culture of 6days, it was shown that VitD3 pre-stimulation of long bone osteoblasts strongly improved their capacity to induce osteoclast formation. This coincided with an increased ratio of RANKL/OPG. Taken together, the data demonstrated differences in the capacity of calvaria and long bone osteoblasts to induce osteoclastogenesis. This appeared to be due to differences in the expression of RANKL and OPG. VitD3 pre-stimulation improved the ability of long bone osteoblasts to induce osteoclast formation. Our findings demonstrate bone-site specific differences in osteoblast-mediated formation of

  4. Experiments with osteoblasts cultured under hypergravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacena, Melissa A.; Todd, Paul; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.; Landis, William J.

    2004-01-01

    To understand further the role of gravity in osteoblast attachment, osteoblasts were subjected to hypergravity conditions in vitro. Scanning electron microscopy of all confluent coverslips from FPA units show that the number of attached osteoblasts was similar among gravitational levels and growth durations (90 cells/microscopic field). Specifically, confluent 1.0 G control cultures contained an average of 91 +/- 8 cells/field, 3.3 G samples had 88 +/- 8 cells/field, and 4.0 G cultures averaged 90 +/- 7 cells/field. The sparsely plated cultures assessed by immunohistochemistry also had similar numbers of cells at each time point (l.0 G was similar to 3.3 and 4.0 G), but cell number changed from one time point to the next as those cells proliferated. Immunohistochemistry of centrifuged samples showed an increase in number (up to 160% increase) and thickness (up to 49% increase) of actin fibers, a decrease in intensity of fibronectin fluorescence (18-23% decrease) and an increase in number of vinculin bulbs (202-374% increase in number of vinculin bulbs/area). While hypergravity exposure did not alter the number of attached osteoblasts, it did result in altered actin, fibronectin, and vinculin elements, changing some aspects of osteoblast- substrate adhesion.

  5. Morphological and proteomic analysis of early stage of osteoblast differentiation in osteoblastic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Dun; Chen, Hai-Xiao; Yu, Hai-Qiang; Liang, Yong; Wang, Carrie; Lian, Qing-Quan; Deng, Hai-Teng; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2010-08-15

    Bone remodeling relies on a dynamic balance between bone formation and resorption, mediated by osteoblasts and osteoclasts, respectively. Under certain stimuli, osteoprogenitor cells may differentiate into premature osteoblasts and further into mature osteoblasts. This process is marked by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation. In this study, we induced osteoblast differentiation in mouse osteoprogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells and divided the process into three stages. In the first stage (day 3), the MC3T3-E1 cell under osteoblast differentiation did not express ALP or deposit a mineralized nodule. In the second stage, the MC3T3-E1 cell expressed ALP but did not form a mineralized nodule. In the third stage, the MC3T3-E1 cell had ALP activity and formed mineralized nodules. In the present study, we focused on morphological and proteomic changes of MC3T3-E1 cells in the early stage of osteoblast differentiation - a period when premature osteoblasts transform into mature osteoblasts. We found that mean cell area and mean stress fiber density were increased in this stage due to enhanced cell spreading and decreased cell proliferation. We further analyzed the proteins in the signaling pathway of regulation of the cytoskeleton using a proteomic approach and found upregulation of IQGAP1, gelsolin, moesin, radixin, and Cfl1. After analyzing the focal adhesion signaling pathway, we found the upregulation of FLNA, LAMA1, LAMA5, COL1A1, COL3A1, COL4A6, and COL5A2 as well as the downregulation of COL4A1, COL4A2, and COL4A4. In conclusion, the signaling pathway of regulation of the cytoskeleton and focal adhesion play critical roles in regulating cell spreading and actin skeleton formation in the early stage of osteoblast differentiation.

  6. Nanostructured niobium oxide coatings influence osteoblast adhesion.

    PubMed

    Eisenbarth, E; Velten, D; Müller, M; Thull, R; Breme, J

    2006-10-01

    The interaction of osteoblasts was correlated to the roughness of nanosized surface structures of Nb(2)O(5) coatings on polished CP titanium grade 2. Nb(2)O(5) sol-gel coatings were selected as a model surface to study the interaction of osteoblasts with nanosized surface structures. The surface roughness was quantified by determination of the average surface finish (Ra number) by means of atomic force microscopy. Surface topographies with Ra = 7, 15, and 40 nm were adjusted by means of the annealing process parameters (time and temperature) within a sol-gel coating procedure. The observed osteoblast migration was fastest on smooth surfaces with Ra = 7 nm. The adhesion strength, spreading area, and collagen-I synthesis showed the best results on an intermediate roughness of Ra = 15 nm. The surface roughness of Ra = 40 nm was rather peaked and reduced the speed of cell reactions belonging to the adhesion process. PMID:16788971

  7. Skeletal Collagen Turnover by the Osteoblast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Nicola C.

    1997-01-01

    Among the most overt negative changes experienced by man and experimental animals under conditions of weightlessness are the loss of skeletal mass and attendant hypercalciuria. These clearly result from some disruption in the balance between bone formation and bone resorption (i.e. remodelling) which appears to be due to a decrease in the functions of the osteoblast. In the studies funded by this project, the clonal osteoblastic cell line, UMR 106-01, has been used to investigate the regulation of collagenase and Tissue Inhibitors of MetalloProteases (TIMPs). This project has shed light on the comprehensive role of the osteoblast in the remodelling process, and, in so doing, provided some insight into how the process might be disrupted under conditions of microgravity.

  8. [The regulation of various organs by osteoblasts].

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Takeda, Shu

    2016-05-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that osteocalcin, which is secreted from osteoblasts, plays a significant role in glucose metabolism, fat metabolism, mail fertility, and brain functions. It has been also revealed that fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which is secreted from osteocytes, has an important role in phosphate metabolism or calcium homeostasis. These findings suggest that bone is not only a target organ of hormones but also involved in regulating other organs as an endocrine organ. Bone forms regulatory network with various organs to maintain the whole body homeostasis. This review introduces the regulation of various organs by osteoblasts. PMID:27117618

  9. Triclosan Blocks Mmp 13 Expression in Hormone-Stimulated Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Virginia Monsul; Xu, Tao; Shimizu, Emi; Jefcoat, Steven; Vasilov, Anatoliy; Qin, Ling; Partridge, Nicola C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (Mmp-13) is an important enzyme for the modulation of bone turnover and gingival recession. Elevated levels of Mmp-13 are associated with alveolar bone resorption, periodontal ligament destruction, and gingival attachment loss, which are the clinical symptoms of periodontal disease. Continued evidence suggests periodontal disease contributes to oral tissue destruction and is linked to numerous systemic conditions. Triclosan is a long standing, proven antibacterial and anti-inflammatory agent found in the only FDA-approved dentifrice for the treatment of plaque and gingivitis. Methods This study examined the inhibitory effects of triclosan on lipopolysaccharide (LPS), parathyroid hormone (PTH) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induced expression of Mmp-13 in UMR 106-01 cells, an osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line. The cells were stimulated with PTH or PGE2 to induce Mmp-13 mRNA expression and Real Time RT-PCR was performed to determine gene expression levels. Western blot analysis assessed the presence or absence of protein degradation or inhibition of protein synthesis. Mmp-13 Promoter Reporter Assay was utilized to explore possible direct effects of triclosan on the Mmp-13 promoter. Results Triclosan significantly reduced PTH or PGE2 elevated expression of Mmp-13 in osteoblastic cells without affecting basal levels of the mRNA. Surprisingly, triclosan enhanced the expression of c-fos and amphiregulin mRNA. A promoter assay indicated triclosan directly inhibits the activation of the PTH-responsive minimal promoter of Mmp-13. Conclusion Our data appear to have identified a nuclear mechanism of action of triclosan which accounts for triclosan’s ability to inhibit PTH or PGE2 induced Mmp-13 expression in osteoblastic cells. PMID:23368947

  10. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Jue Yeon; Lee, Seung Jin; Chung, Chong-Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and

  11. Polonium behaviour in reservoirs potentially affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW of Spain).

    PubMed

    Blasco, M; Gázquez, M J; Pérez-Moreno, S M; Grande, J A; Valente, T; Santisteban, M; de la Torre, M L; Bolívar, J P

    2016-02-01

    The province of Huelva is one of the areas most affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) in the world, which can produce big enhancements and fractionations in the waters affected by AMD. There are very few studies on this issue, and none on polonium-210. Twenty-two water reservoirs were sampled, and the (210)Po was measured in both dissolution and particulate phases. The (210)Po concentrations in the waters were in the same order of magnitude to those ones for unperturbed systems, although the data published to particulate matter are very scarce. A mean value and standard uncertainty for (210)Po of 0.25 ± 0.03 mBq L(-1) in the dissolved matter, and 62 ± 9 mBq g(-1) in the particulate matter can be established as base line for the reservoirs of the Huelva area. The distribution coefficients (kd) range from 10(4) to 10(6) L kg(-1), in agreement to the found ones by other authors for the case of neutral waters, but being the lowest values for the more acidic reservoirs. It has been also found that (210)Po has a high tendency to be associated to the particulate matter for neutral-alkaline waters, however, under extreme acid conditions (pH < 3), increases the Po tendency to be associated to the dissolved phase. Therefore, the main conclusion obtained in this work is that AMD has no a significant influence on the total activity concentration of (210)Po in the waters of reservoirs, but the acidity has a clear influence on its distribution between both dissolved and the particulate phases. PMID:26650826

  12. Effect of therapeutic levels of doxycycline and minocycline in the proliferation and differentiation of human bone marrow osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Fernandes, Maria Helena

    2007-03-01

    Semi-synthetic tetracyclines (TCs) have been reported to reduce pathological bone resorption through several mechanisms, although their effect over bone physiological metabolism is not yet fully understood. The present study aims at evaluate the behaviour of osteoblastic-induced human bone marrow cells regarding proliferation and functional activity, in the presence of representative therapeutic concentrations of doxycycline and minocycline. First passage human osteoblastic bone marrow cells were cultured for 35 days in conditions known to favor osteoblastic differentiation. Doxycycline (1-25 micro g/ml) or minocycline (1-50 micro g/ml) were added continuously, with the culture medium, twice a week with every medium change. Cultures were characterised at several time points for cell proliferation and function. Present data showed that 1 micro g/ml of both tetracyclines, level representative of that attained in plasma and crevicular fluid with the standard therapeutic dosage, increased significantly the proliferation of human bone marrow osteoblastic cells without altering their specific phenotype and functional activity. Long-term exposure to these TCs induced a significant increase in the number of active osteoblastic cells that yielded a proportional amount of a normal mineralised matrix, suggesting a potential application in therapeutic approaches aiming to increase bone formation. The presence of higher levels of these agents led to a dose-dependent deleterious effect over cell culture, delaying cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:17141175

  13. Health Service Utilization for Mental, Behavioural and Emotional Problems among Conflict-Affected Population in Georgia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gotsadze, George; Patel, Vikram; McKee, Martin; Uchaneishvili, Maia; Rukhadze, Natia

    2015-01-01

    Background There is large gap in mental illness treatment globally and potentially especially so in war-affected populations. The study aim was to examine health care utilization patterns for mental, behavioural and emotional problems among the war-affected adult population in the Republic of Georgia. Methods A cross-sectional household survey was conducted among 3600 adults affected by 1990s and 2008 armed conflicts in Georgia. Service use was measured for the last 12 months for any mental, emotional or behavioural problems. TSQ, PHQ-9 and GAD-7 were used to measure current symptoms of PTSD, depression and anxiety. Descriptive and regression analyses were used. Results Respondents were predominantly female (65.0%), 35.8% were unemployed, and 56.0% covered by the government insurance scheme. From the total sample, 30.5% had symptoms of at least one current mental disorder. Among them, 39.0% sought care for mental problems, while 33.1% expressed facing barriers to accessing care and so did not seek care. General practitioners (29%) and neurologists (26%) were consulted by the majority of those with a current mental disorder who accessed services, while use of psychiatric services was far more limited. Pharmacotherapy was the predominant type of care (90%). Female gender (OR 1.50, 95% CI: 1.25, 1.80), middle-age (OR 1.83, 95% CI: 1.48, 2.26) and older-age (OR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.19, 2.21), possession of the state insurance coverage (OR 1.55, 95% CI: 1.30, 1.86), current PTSD symptoms (OR 1.56, 95% CI: 1.29, 1.90) and depression (OR 2.12, 95% CI: 1.70, 2.65) were associated with higher rates of health service utilization, while employed were less likely to use services (OR 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55, 0.89). Conclusions Reducing financial access barriers and increasing awareness and access to local care required to help reduce the burden of mental disorders among conflict-affected persons in Georgia. PMID:25853246

  14. Assessment of the role of flavonoids for inducing osteoblast differentiation in isolated mouse bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Swati; Bankar, Rohini; Roy, Partha

    2013-06-15

    Quercetin and rutin are common flavonoids in fruit and vegetables, and have been reported to affect bone development. However, the effect of flavonoids on osteoblast differentiation remains a matter of controversy. In the present study, mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) were isolated and characterized for their use in osteoblast differentiation using two flavonoids, quercetin and rutin. BMMSCs were cultured in various concentrations of quercetin and rutin during the osteoblast differentiation period of 10 days. Both quercetin and rutin were found to up regulate the osteoblast differentiation in dose dependent manner, albeit to lesser extent in case of former than that of latter. Quercetin and rutin also increased alkaline phosphatase activity by about 150 and 240% and demonstrated mineralization up to 110 and 200% respectively as compared to control (which was considered as 100%). Further, both the flavonoids were also found to increase the expression of some of the prominent markers for differentiation of osteoblast like osteopontin, osterix, RunX2, osteoprotegerin and osteocalcin. The current data suggests that certain classes of flavonoids like rutin and quercetin can be used in the cure and management of osteodegenerative disorders due to their osteoblast specific differentiation activities. PMID:23570998

  15. Influence of increased mechanical loading by hypergravity on the microtubule cytoskeleton and prostaglandin E2 release in primary osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Searby, Nancy D.; Steele, Charles R.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2005-01-01

    Cells respond to a wide range of mechanical stimuli such as fluid shear and strain, although the contribution of gravity to cell structure and function is not understood. We hypothesized that bone-forming osteoblasts are sensitive to increased mechanical loading by hypergravity. A centrifuge suitable for cell culture was developed and validated, and then primary cultures of fetal rat calvarial osteoblasts at various stages of differentiation were mechanically loaded using hypergravity. We measured microtubule network morphology as well as release of the paracrine factor prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In immature osteoblasts, a stimulus of 10x gravity (10 g) for 3 h increased PGE2 2.5-fold and decreased microtubule network height 1.12-fold without affecting cell viability. Hypergravity (3 h) caused dose-dependent (5-50 g) increases in PGE2 (5.3-fold at 50 g) and decreases (1.26-fold at 50 g) in microtubule network height. PGE2 release depended on duration but not orientation of the hypergravity load. As osteoblasts differentiated, sensitivity to hypergravity declined. We conclude that primary osteoblasts demonstrate dose- and duration-dependent sensitivity to gravitational loading, which appears to be blunted in mature osteoblasts.

  16. Prolonged Survival of Transplanted Osteoblastic Cells Does Not Directly Accelerate the Healing of Calvarial Bone Defects.

    PubMed

    Kitami, Megumi; Kaku, Masaru; Rocabado, Juan Marcelo Rosales; Ida, Takako; Akiba, Nami; Uoshima, Katsumi

    2016-09-01

    Considering the increased interest in cell-based bone regeneration, it is necessary to reveal the fate of transplanted cells and their substantive roles in bone regeneration. The aim of this study was to analyze the fate of transplanted cells and the effect of osteogenic cell transplantation on calvarial bone defect healing. An anti-apoptotic protein, heat shock protein (HSP) 27, was overexpressed in osteoblasts. Then, the treated osteoblasts were transplanted to calvarial bone defect and their fate was analyzed to evaluate the significance of transplanted cell survival. Transient overexpression of Hsp27 rescued MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells from H2 O2 -induced apoptosis without affecting osteoblastic differentiation in culture. Transplantation of Hsp27-overexpressing cells, encapsulated in collagen gel, showed higher proliferative activity, and fewer apoptotic cells in comparison with control cells. After 4-week of transplantation, both control cell- and Hsp27 overexpressed cell-transplanted groups showed significantly higher new bone formation in comparison with cell-free gel-transplantation group. Interestingly, the prolonged survival of transplanted osteoblastic cells by Hsp27 did not provide additional effect on bone healing. The transplanted cells in collagen gel survived for up to 4-week but did not differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts. In conclusion, cell-containing collagen gel accelerated calvarial bone defect healing in comparison with cell-free collagen gel. However, prolonged survival of transplanted cells by Hsp27 overexpression did not provide additional effect. These results strongly indicate that cell transplantation-based bone regeneration cannot be explained only by the increment of osteogenic cells. Further studies are needed to elucidate the practical roles of transplanted cells that will potentiate successful bone regeneration. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1974-1982, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26754153

  17. Overexpression of BCLXL in Osteoblasts Inhibits Osteoblast Apoptosis and Increases Bone Volume and Strength.

    PubMed

    Moriishi, Takeshi; Fukuyama, Ryo; Miyazaki, Toshihiro; Furuichi, Tatsuya; Ito, Masako; Komori, Toshihisa

    2016-07-01

    The Bcl2 family proteins, Bcl2 and BclXL, suppress apoptosis by preventing the release of caspase activators from mitochondria through the inhibition of Bax subfamily proteins. We reported that BCL2 overexpression in osteoblasts using the 2.3 kb Col1a1 promoter increased osteoblast proliferation, failed to reduce osteoblast apoptosis, inhibited osteoblast maturation, and reduced the number of osteocyte processes, leading to massive osteocyte death. We generated BCLXL (BCL2L1) transgenic mice using the same promoter to investigate BCLXL functions in bone development and maintenance. Bone mineral density in the trabecular bone of femurs was increased, whereas that in the cortical bone was similar to that in wild-type mice. Osteocyte process formation was unaffected and bone structures were similar to those in wild-type mice. A micro-CT analysis showed that trabecular bone volume in femurs and vertebrae and the cortical thickness of femurs were increased. A dynamic bone histomorphometric analysis revealed that the mineralizing surface was larger in trabecular bone, and the bone-formation rate was increased in cortical bone. Serum osteocalcin but not TRAP5b was increased, BrdU-positive osteoblastic cell numbers were increased, TUNEL-positive osteoblastic cell numbers were reduced, and osteoblast marker gene expression was enhanced in BCLXL transgenic mice. The three-point bending test indicated that femurs were stronger in BCLXL transgenic mice than in wild-type mice. The frequency of TUNEL-positive primary osteoblasts was lower in BCLXL transgenic mice than in wild-type mice during cultivation, and osteoblast differentiation was enhanced but depended on cell density, indicating that enhanced differentiation was mainly owing to reduced apoptosis. Increased trabecular and cortical bone volumes were maintained during aging in male and female mice. These results indicate that BCLXL overexpression in osteoblasts increased the trabecular and cortical bone volumes with

  18. Osteoblastic response to pectin nanocoating on titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna; Svava, Rikke; Yihua, Yu; Haugshøj, Kenneth Brian; Dirscherl, Kai; Levery, Steven B; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Nielsen, Martin W; Jørgensen, Bodil; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    Osseointegration of titanium implants can be improved by organic and inorganic nanocoating of the surface. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of organic nanocoating of titanium surface with unmodified and modified pectin Rhamnogalacturonan-Is (RG-Is) isolated from potato and apple with respect to surface properties and osteogenic response in osteoblastic cells. Nanocoatings on titanium surfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of coated RG-Is on cell adhesion, cell viability, bone matrix formation and mineralization was tested using SaOS-2 cells. Nanocoating with pectin RG-Is affected surface properties and in consequence changed the environment for cellular response. The cells cultured on surfaces coated with RG-Is from potato with high content of linear 1.4-linked galactose produced higher level of mineralized matrix compared with control surfaces and surfaces coated with RG-I with low content of linear 1.4-linked galactose. The study showed that the pectin RG-Is nanocoating not only changed chemical and physical titanium surface properties, but also specific coating with RG-Is containing high amount of galactan increased mineralized matrix formation of osteoblastic cells in vitro. PMID:25175196

  19. Effects of microgravity on osteoblast growth activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Lewis, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    Space flight is an environmental condition where astronauts can lose up to 19% of weight-bearing bone during long duration missions. We used the MC3T3-E1 osteoblast to investigate bone cell growth in microgravity (10(-6) to 10(-9)g). Osteoblasts were launched on the STS-56 shuttle flight in a quiescent state with 0.5% fetal calf serum (FCS) medium and growth activation was initiated by adding fresh medium with 10% FCS during microgravity exposure. Four days after serum activation, the cells were fixed before return to normal Earth gravity. Ground controls were treated in parallel with the flight samples in identical equipment. On landing, cell number, cell cytoskeleton, glucose utilization, and prostaglandin synthesis in flight (n = 4) and ground controls (n = 4) were examined. The flown osteoblasts grew slowly in microgravity with total cell number significantly reduced (55 +/- 6 vs 141 +/- 8 cells per microscopic field). The cytoskeleton of the flight osteoblasts had a reduced number of stress fibers and a unique abnormal morphology. Nuclei in the ground controls were large and round with punctate Hoechst staining of the DNA nucleosomes. The flight nuclei were 30% smaller than the controls (P < 0.0001) and oblong in shape, with fewer punctate areas. Due to their reduced numbers, the cells activated in microgravity used significantly less glucose than ground controls (80.2 +/- 0.7 vs 50.3 +/- 3.7 mg of glucose/dl remaining in the medium) and had reduced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis when compared to controls (57.3 +/- 17 vs 138.3 +/- 41 pmol/ml). Cell viability was normal since, on a per-cell basis, glucose use and prostaglandin synthesis were comparable for flight and ground samples. Taken together, these data suggest that growth activation in microgravity results in reduced growth, causing reduced glucose utilization and reduced prostaglandin synthesis, with significantly altered actin cytoskeleton in osteoblasts.

  20. Effects of farnesyl pyrophosphate accumulation on calvarial osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Weivoda, Megan M; Hohl, Raymond J

    2011-08-01

    Statins, drugs commonly used to lower serum cholesterol, have been shown to stimulate osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Statins inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the first step of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway, leading to the depletion of the isoprenoids farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The effects of statins on bone have previously been attributed to the depletion of GGPP, because the addition of exogenous GGPP prevented statin-stimulated osteoblast differentiation in vitro. However, in a recent report, we demonstrated that the specific depletion of GGPP did not stimulate but, in fact, inhibited osteoblast differentiation. This led us to hypothesize that isoprenoids upstream of GGPP play a role in the regulation of osteoblast differentiation. We demonstrate here that the expression of HMGCR and FPP synthase decreased during primary calvarial osteoblast differentiation, correlating with decreased FPP and GGPP levels during differentiation. Zaragozic acid (ZGA) inhibits the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway enzyme squalene synthase, leading to an accumulation of the squalene synthase substrate FPP. ZGA treatment of calvarial osteoblasts led to a significant increase in intracellular FPP and resulted in inhibition of osteoblast differentiation as measured by osteoblastic gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, and matrix mineralization. Simultaneous HMGCR inhibition prevented the accumulation of FPP and restored osteoblast differentiation. In contrast, specifically inhibiting GGPPS to lower the ZGA-induced increase in GGPP did not restore osteoblast differentiation. The specificity of HMGCR inhibition to restore osteoblast differentiation of ZGA-treated cultures through the reduction in isoprenoid accumulation was confirmed with the addition of exogenous mevalonate. Similar to ZGA treatment, exogenous FPP inhibited the mineralization of primary calvarial osteoblasts

  1. Osteoblast differentiation and migration are regulated by dynamin GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Huang, Su; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Largura, Heather W; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Bone formation is controlled by osteoblasts, but the signaling proteins that control osteoblast differentiation and function are still unclear. We examined if the dynamin GTPase, which is associated with actin remodeling and migration in other cells, plays a role in osteoblast differentiation and migration. Dynamin mRNA was expressed in primary osteoblasts throughout differentiation (0-21 days). However, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a marker of osteoblast differentiation, was decreased in osteoblasts over-expressing dynamin. Conversely, ALP activity was increased following shRNA-mediated knockdown of dynamin and in osteoblasts treated with the dynamin inhibitor, dynasore. Dynasore also reduced c-fos and osterix expression, markers of early osteoblasts, suggesting a role for dynamin in pre-osteoblast to osteoblast differentiation. Since dynamin GTPase activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation, we examined the mechanism of dynamin dephosphorylation in osteoblasts. Dynamin formed a protein complex with the tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST and inhibition of phosphatase activity increased the level of phosphorylated dynamin. Further, PTP-PEST blocked the Src-mediated increase in the phosphorylation and GTPase activity of wild-type dynamin but not the phosphorylation mutant dynY231F/Y597F. Although ALP activity was increased in osteoblasts expressing GTPase-defective dynK44A, and to a lesser extent dynY231F/Y597F, osteoblast migration was significantly inhibited by dynK44A and dynY231F/Y597F. These studies demonstrate a novel role for dynamin GTPase activity and phosphorylation in osteoblast differentiation and migration, which may be important for bone formation. PMID:24387844

  2. Osteoblast differentiation and migration are regulated by Dynamin GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Eleniste, Pierre P.; Huang, Su; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Largura, Heather W.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Bone formation is controlled by osteoblasts but the signaling proteins that control osteoblast differentiation and function are still unclear. We examined if the dynamin GTPase, which is associated with actin remodeling and migration in other cells, plays a role in osteoblast differentiation and migration. Dynamin mRNA was expressed in primary osteoblasts throughout differentiation (0–21 days). However, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a marker of osteoblast differentiation, was decreased in osteoblasts over-expressing dynamin. Conversely, ALP activity was increased following shRNA-mediated knockdown of dynamin and in osteoblasts treated with the dynamin inhibitor, dynasore. Dynasore also reduced c-fos and osterix expression, markers of early osteoblasts, suggesting a role for dynamin in pre-osteoblast to osteoblast differentiation. Since dynamin GTPase activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation, we examined the mechanism of dynamin dephosphorylation in osteoblasts. Dynamin formed a protein complex with the tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST and inhibition of phosphatase activity increased the level of phosphorylated dynamin. Further, PTP-PEST blocked the Src-mediated increase in the phosphorylation and GTPase activity of wild-type dynamin but not the phosphorylation mutant dynY231F/Y597F. Although ALP activity was increased in osteoblasts expressing GTPase-defective dynK44A, and to a lesser extent dynY231F/Y597F, osteoblast migration was significantly inhibited by dynK44A and dynY231F/Y597F. These studies demonstrate a novel role for dynamin GTPase activity and phosphorylation in osteoblast differentiation and migration, which may be important for bone formation. PMID:24387844

  3. Modulation of osteoblast attachment and growth in vitro by inertial forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacena, Melissa Ann

    1999-11-01

    cultures is minimally, if at all, affected by alterations in inertial environments. However, in sparse cultures about half as many cells are found attached initially. The remaining attached cells appear to multiply and function normally. These results suggest that the effects of spaceflight on bone are thus not likely to be caused by direct intrinsic effects of gravity on single osteoblasts that can be simulated in laboratory experiments in vitro experiments.

  4. Three-dimensional culture of rat calvarial osteoblasts in porous biodegradable polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishaug-Riley, S. L.; Crane-Kruger, G. M.; Yaszemski, M. J.; Mikos, A. G.

    1998-01-01

    Neonatal rat calvarial osteoblasts were cultured in 90% porous, 75:25 poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) foam scaffolds for up to 56 days to examine the effects of the cell seeding density, scaffold pore size, and foam thickness on the proliferation and function of the cells in this three-dimensional environment. Osteoblasts were seeded at either 11.1 x 10(5) or 22.1 x 10(5) cells per cm2 onto PLGA scaffolds having pore sizes in the range of 150-300 or 500-710 microm with a thickness of either 1.9 or 3.2 mm. After 1 day in culture, 75.6 and 68.6% of the seeded cells attached and proliferated on the 1.9 mm thick scaffolds of 150-300 microm pore size for the low and high seeding densities, respectively. The number of osteoblasts continued to increase throughout the study and eventually leveled off near 56 days, as indicated by a quantitative DNA assay. Osteoblast/foam constructs with a low cell seeding density achieved comparable DNA content and alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) activity after 14 days, and mineralization results after 56 days to those with a high cell seeding density. A maximum penetration depth of osseous tissue of 220+/-40 microm was reached after 56 days in the osteoblast/foam constructs of 150-300 microm pore size initially seeded with a high cell density. For constructs of 500-710 microm pore size, the penetration depth was 190+/-40 microm under the same conditions. Scaffold pore size and thickness did not significantly affect the proliferation or function of osteoblasts as demonstrated by DNA content, ALPase activity, and mineralized tissue formation. These data show that comparable bone-like tissues can be engineered in vitro over a 56 day period using different rat calvarial osteoblast seeding densities onto biodegradable polymer scaffolds with pore sizes in the range of 150-710 microm. When compared with the results of a previous study where similar polymer scaffolds were seeded and cultured with marrow stromal cells, this study

  5. Development and characterization of a mouse floxed Bmp2 osteoblast cell line that retains osteoblast genotype and phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-an; Feng, Junsheng; Wang, Lynn; Mu, Yan-dong; Baker, Andrew; Donly, Kevin J.; Harris, Stephen E.; MacDougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) is essential for osteoblast differentiation and osteogenesis. Generation of floxed Bmp2 osteoblast cell lines is a valuable tool for studying the effects of Bmp2 on osteoblast differentiation and its signaling pathways during skeletal metabolism. Due to relatively limited sources of primary osteoblasts, we have developed cell lines that serve as good surrogate models for the study of osteoblast cell differentiation and bone mineralization. In this study, we established and characterized immortalized mouse floxed Bmp2 osteoblast cell lines. Primary mouse floxed Bmp2 osteoblasts were transfected with pSV3-neo and clonally selected. These transfected cells were verified by PCR and immunohistochemistry. To determine the genotype and phenotype of the immortalized cells, cell morphology, proliferation, differentiation and mineralization were analyzed. Also, expression of osteoblast-related gene markers including Runx2, Osx, ATF4, Dlx3, bone sialoprotein, dentin matrix protein 1, osteonectin, osteocalcin and osteopontin were examined by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. These results showed that immortalized floxed Bmp2 osteoblasts had a higher proliferation rate but preserved their genotypic and phenotypic characteristics similar to the primary cells. Thus, we, for the first time, describe the development of immortalized mouse floxed Bmp2 osteoblast cell lines and present a useful model to study osteoblast biology mediated by BMP2 and its downstream signaling transduction pathways. PMID:21271257

  6. Resveratrol Increases Osteoblast Differentiation In Vitro Independently of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ornstrup, Marie Juul; Harsløf, Torben; Sørensen, Lotte; Stenkjær, Liselotte; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke

    2016-08-01

    Low-grade inflammation negatively affects bone. Resveratrol is a natural compound proven to possess both anti-inflammatory and bone protective properties. However, it is uncertain if the bone effects are mediated though anti-inflammatory effects. Firstly, we investigated if resveratrol affects proliferation and differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Secondly, we investigated if inflammation negatively affects proliferation and differentiation, and if resveratrol counteracts this through anti-inflammatory effects. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from bone marrow aspiration in 13 healthy individuals and cultured towards the osteoblast cell lineage. The cells were stimulated with resveratrol, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), LPS + resveratrol, or vehicle (control) for 21 days. Compared to control, resveratrol decreased cell number by 35 % (p < 0.05) and induced differentiation (a 3-fold increase in alkaline phosphatase (p < 0.002), while P1NP and OPG showed similar trends). LPS induced inflammation with a 44-fold increase in interleukin-6 (p < 0.05) and an extremely prominent increase in interleukin-8 production (p < 0.05) relative to control. In addition, LPS increased cell count (p < 0.05) and decreased differentiation (a reduction in P1NP production (p < 0.02)). Co-stimulation with LPS + resveratrol did not reduce interleukin-6 or interleukin-8, but nonetheless, cell count was reduced (p < 0.05) and alkaline phosphatase, P1NP, and OPG increased (p < 0.05 for all). Thus, resveratrol stimulates osteoblast differentiation independently of inflammation. PMID:27000750

  7. Beta Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation Suppresses Cell Migration in Association with Cell Cycle Transition in Osteoblasts-Live Imaging Analyses Based on FUCCI System.

    PubMed

    Katsumura, Sakie; Ezura, Yoichi; Izu, Yayoi; Shirakawa, Jumpei; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Harada, Kiyoshi; Noda, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    Osteoporosis affects over 20 million patients in the United States. Among those, disuse osteoporosis is serious as it is induced by bed-ridden conditions in patients suffering from aging-associated diseases including cardiovascular, neurological, and malignant neoplastic diseases. Although the phenomenon that loss of mechanical stress such as bed-ridden condition reduces bone mass is clear, molecular bases for the disuse osteoporosis are still incompletely understood. In disuse osteoporosis model, bone loss is interfered by inhibitors of sympathetic tone and adrenergic receptors that suppress bone formation. However, how beta adrenergic stimulation affects osteoblastic migration and associated proliferation is not known. Here we introduced a live imaging system, fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI), in osteoblast biology and examined isoproterenol regulation of cell cycle transition and cell migration in osteoblasts. Isoproterenol treatment suppresses the levels of first entry peak of quiescent osteoblastic cells into cell cycle phase by shifting from G1 /G0 to S/G2 /M and also suppresses the levels of second major peak population that enters into S/G2 /M. The isoproterenol regulation of osteoblastic cell cycle transition is associated with isoproterenol suppression on the velocity of migration. This isoproterenol regulation of migration velocity is cell cycle phase specific as it suppresses migration velocity of osteoblasts in G1 phase but not in G1 /S nor in G2 /M phase. Finally, these observations on isoproterenol regulation of osteoblastic migration and cell cycle transition are opposite to the PTH actions in osteoblasts. In summary, we discovered that sympathetic tone regulates osteoblastic migration in association with cell cycle transition by using FUCCI system. PMID:26192605

  8. Loss of Osteoblast Runx3 Produces Severe Congenital Osteopenia

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Omri; Sharir, Amnon; Kimura, Ayako; Hantisteanu, Shay; Takeda, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Congenital osteopenia is a bone demineralization condition that is associated with elevated fracture risk in human infants. Here we show that Runx3, like Runx2, is expressed in precommitted embryonic osteoblasts and that Runx3-deficient mice develop severe congenital osteopenia. Runx3-deficient osteoblast-specific (Runx3fl/fl/Col1α1-cre), but not chondrocyte-specific (Runx3fl/fl/Col1α2-cre), mice are osteopenic. This demonstrates that an osteoblastic cell-autonomous function of Runx3 is required for proper osteogenesis. Bone histomorphometry revealed that decreased osteoblast numbers and reduced mineral deposition capacity in Runx3-deficient mice cause this bone formation deficiency. Neonatal bone and cultured primary osteoblast analyses revealed a Runx3-deficiency-associated decrease in the number of active osteoblasts resulting from diminished proliferation and not from enhanced osteoblast apoptosis. These findings are supported by Runx3-null culture transcriptome analyses showing significant decreases in the levels of osteoblastic markers and increases in the levels of Notch signaling components. Thus, while Runx2 is mandatory for the osteoblastic lineage commitment, Runx3 is nonredundantly required for the proliferation of these precommitted cells, to generate adequate numbers of active osteoblasts. Human RUNX3 resides on chromosome 1p36, a region that is associated with osteoporosis. Therefore, RUNX3 might also be involved in human bone mineralization. PMID:25605327

  9. Vitamin D and gene networks in human osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    van de Peppel, Jeroen; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone formation is indirectly influenced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) through the stimulation of calcium uptake in the intestine and re-absorption in the kidneys. Direct effects on osteoblasts and bone formation have also been established. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in osteoblasts and 1,25D3 modifies gene expression of various osteoblast differentiation and mineralization-related genes, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALPL), osteocalcin (BGLAP), and osteopontin (SPP1). 1,25D3 is known to stimulate mineralization of human osteoblasts in vitro, and recently it was shown that 1,25D3 induces mineralization via effects in the period preceding mineralization during the pre-mineralization period. For a full understanding of the action of 1,25D3 in osteoblasts it is important to get an integrated network view of the 1,25D3-regulated genes during osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. The current data will be presented and discussed alluding to future studies to fully delineate the 1,25D3 action in osteoblast. Describing and understanding the vitamin D regulatory networks and identifying the dominant players in these networks may help develop novel (personalized) vitamin D-based treatments. The following topics will be discussed in this overview: (1) Bone metabolism and osteoblasts, (2) Vitamin D, bone metabolism and osteoblast function, (3) Vitamin D induced transcriptional networks in the context of osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. PMID:24782782

  10. Pre-adsorbed type-I collagen structure-dependent changes in osteoblastic phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Hanagata, Nobutaka . E-mail: HANAGATA.Nobutaka@nims.go.jp; Takemura, Taro; Monkawa, Akira; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2006-06-16

    Type-I collagen is the most abundant extracellular matrix in bones and modulates various functions of osteoblasts. We prepared two different structures of type-I collagen on tissue culture grade polystylene (TCPS) surfaces, one is feltwork structure of filamentous molecules from acid solutions (ACs) and the other is network structure of fibrils from neutral solutions (NCs), to examine effects of the structures on the maturation process of osteoblast-like cells. No significant differences of cell proliferation were observed between TCPS and ACs, but NCs delayed the proliferation. In initial cell attachment, the cells on ACs had tense lamellipodia with sharp tips, while those on NCs had loose lamellipodia. No detectable differences in levels of expressed integrin {alpha}{sub 2}- and {alpha}{sub 5}-subunits were observed between the structures. Although the matrix mineralization in NCs was also delayed in comparison with TCPS and ACs, fully mineralized levels in NCs were the same as those of TCPS and ACs. In addition, although we examined the effects of densities of pre-adsorbed collagen molecules on osteoblast maturation, the effects were less serious than those of the structures. This study suggests that the structures of collagen affect proliferation and mineralization of osteoblast-like cells.

  11. Increased Gs Signaling in Osteoblasts Reduces Bone Marrow and Whole-Body Adiposity in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Cain, Corey J; Valencia, Joel T; Ho, Samantha; Jordan, Kate; Mattingly, Aaron; Morales, Blanca M; Hsiao, Edward C

    2016-04-01

    Bone is increasingly recognized as an endocrine organ that can regulate systemic hormones and metabolism through secreted factors. Although bone loss and increased adiposity appear to be linked clinically, whether conditions of increased bone formation can also change systemic metabolism remains unclear. In this study, we examined how increased osteogenesis affects metabolism by using an engineered G protein-coupled receptor, Rs1, to activate Gs signaling in osteoblastic cells in ColI(2.3)(+)/Rs1(+) transgenic mice. We previously showed that these mice have dramatically increased bone formation resembling fibrous dysplasia of the bone. We found that total body fat was significantly reduced starting at 3 weeks of age. Furthermore, ColI(2.3)(+)/Rs1(+) mice showed reduced O2 consumption and respiratory quotient measures without effects on food intake and energy expenditure. The mice had significantly decreased serum triacylglycerides, leptin, and adiponectin. Resting glucose and insulin levels were unchanged; however, glucose and insulin tolerance tests revealed increased sensitivity to insulin. The mice showed resistance to fat accumulation from a high-fat diet. Furthermore, ColI(2.3)(+)/Rs1(+) mouse bones had dramatically reduced mature adipocyte differentiation, increased Wingless/Int-1 (Wnt) signaling, and higher osteoblastic glucose utilization than controls. These findings suggest that osteoblasts can influence both local and peripheral adiposity in conditions of increased bone formation and suggest a role for osteoblasts in the regulation of whole-body adiposity and metabolic homeostasis. PMID:26901092

  12. Titanium With Nanotopography Induces Osteoblast Differentiation by Regulating Endogenous Bone Morphogenetic Protein Expression and Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    M S Castro-Raucci, Larissa; S Francischini, Marcelo; N Teixeira, Lucas; P Ferraz, Emanuela; B Lopes, Helena; T de Oliveira, Paulo; Hassan, Mohammad Q; Losa, Adalberto L; Beloti, Marcio M

    2016-07-01

    We aimed at evaluating the effect of titanium (Ti) with nanotopography (Nano) on the endogenous expression of BMP-2 and BMP-4 and the relevance of this process to the nanotopography-induced osteoblast differentiation. MC3T3-E1 cells were grown on Nano and machined (Machined) Ti surfaces and the endogenous BMP-2/4 expression and the effect of BMP receptor BMPR1A silencing in both osteoblast differentiation and expression of genes related to TGF-β/BMP signaling were evaluated. Nano supported higher BMP-2 gene and protein expression and upregulated the osteoblast differentiation compared with Machined Ti surface. The BMPR1A silencing inhibited the osteogenic potential induced by Nano Ti surface as indicated by reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin and RUNX2 gene expression, RUNX2 protein expression and ALP activity. In addition, the expression of genes related to TGF-β/BMP signaling was deeply affected by BMPR1A-silenced cells grown on Nano Ti surface. In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time that nanotopography induces osteoblast differentiation, at least in part, by upregulating the endogenous production of BMP-2 and modulating BMP signaling pathway. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1718-1726, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26681207

  13. Ethyl-2, 5-dihydroxybenzoate displays dual activity by promoting osteoblast differentiation and inhibiting osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Lee, Mi Hee; Koo, Min-Ah; Kim, Min Sung; Seon, Gyeung Mi; Han, Jae-Jin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2016-03-11

    The interplay between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts is essential for balanced bone remodeling. In this study, we evaluate the ability of ethyl-2, 5-dihyrdoxybenzoate (E-2, 5-DHB) to affect both osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation for bone regeneration. Osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was quantified by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition. To evaluate osteoclast differentiation, we investigated the effect of E-2, 5-DHB on RANKL-activated osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 cells. E-2, 5-DHB enhanced ALP activity and inhibited RAW 264.7 cell osteoclastogenesis in vitro. To assess the in vivo activity of E-2, 5-DHB, hMSCs were delivered subcutaneosuly alone or in combination with E-2, 5-DHB in an alginate gel into the backs of nude-mice. Histological and immunohistochemical evaluation showed significantly higher calcium deposition in the E-2, 5-DHB group. Osteocalcin (OCN) was highly expressed in cells implanted in the gels containing E-2, 5-DHB. Our results suggest that E-2, 5-DHB can effectively enhance osteoblast differentiation and inhibit osteoclast differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Understanding the dual function of E-2, 5-DHB on osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation will aid in future development of E-2, 5-DHB as a material for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26869515

  14. Effect of nanocoating with rhamnogalacturonan-I on surface properties and osteoblasts response.

    PubMed

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna; Svava, Rikke; Syberg, Susanne; Yihua, Yu; Haugshøj, Kenneth Brian; Damager, Iben; Ulvskov, Peter; Christensen, Leif Højslet; Gotfredsen, Klaus; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2012-03-01

    Long-term stability of titanium implants are dependent on a variety of factors. Nanocoating with organic molecules is one of the methods used to improve osseointegration. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the in vitro effect of nanocoating with pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) on surface properties and osteoblasts response. Three different RG-Is from apple and lupin pectins were modified and coated on amino-functionalized tissue culture polystyrene plates (aminated TCPS). Surface properties were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurement, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of nanocoating on proliferation, matrix formation and mineralization, and expression of genes (real-time PCR) related to osteoblast differentiation and activity were tested using human osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells. It was shown that RG-I coatings affected the surface properties. All three RG-I induced bone matrix formation and mineralization, which was also supported by the finding that gene expression levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and collagen type-1 were increased in cells cultured on the RG-I coated surface, indicating a more differentiated osteoblastic phenotype. This makes RG-I coating a promising and novel candidate for nanocoatings of implants. PMID:22213456

  15. How attempts to meet others' unrealistic expectations affect health: health-promoting behaviours as a mediator between perfectionism and physical health.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Fleur; Craddock, Alan E

    2016-01-01

    The traits of perfectionism have been associated with health and longevity. Theoretically and empirically, health behaviours are considered a primary mechanism through which such associations of personality and health occur. However, scant evidence to date indicates behaviours did not mediate between perfectionism and health as anticipated. The aim of the current research was therefore to rigorously examine whether health behaviours mediated associations of perfectionism and physical health-related quality of life (HRQL). A sample of 263 students completed questionnaires measuring subtypes of perfectionism, HRQL, self-efficacy and health-promoting behaviours. Hierarchical regression analyses investigated predictors of physical HRQL and health-promoting behaviours. Non-parametric bootstrapping techniques assessed whether health-promoting behaviours mediated significant associations between perfectionism and physical HRQL. Socially prescribed perfectionism (SPP) significantly predicted poorer physical HRQL, and this association was mediated by health-promoting behaviours, a unique finding. Self-oriented perfectionism did not significantly predict physical HRQL, but was linked with more numerous health-promoting behaviours. In conclusion, results suggest that individuals higher in SPP, who are overly concerned with evaluation by others and with meeting perceived unrealistically high standards of performance, performed fewer health-promoting behaviours, and this mediated the association between SPP and poorer physical HRQL. More broadly, perfectionism predicted physical HRQL and engagement or lack thereof in health-promoting behaviours and should be considered as part of health promotion strategies. PMID:26167729

  16. The shunt from the cyclooxygenase to lipoxygenase pathway in human osteoarthritic subchondral osteoblasts is linked with a variable expression of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Maxis, Kelitha; Delalandre, Aline; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Duval, Nicolas; Lajeunesse, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by articular cartilage degradation and hypertrophic bone changes with osteophyte formation and abnormal bone remodeling. Two groups of OA patients were identified via the production of variable and opposite levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or leukotriene B4 (LTB4) by subchondral osteoblasts, PGE2 levels discriminating between low and high subgroups. We studied whether the expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) or 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP) is responsible for the shunt from prostaglandins to leukotrienes. FLAP mRNA levels varied in low and high OA groups compared with normal, whereas mRNA levels of 5-LO were similar in all osteoblasts. Selective inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) with NS-398-stimulated FLAP expression in the high OA osteoblasts subgroup, whereas it was without effect in the low OA osteoblasts subgroup. The addition of PGE2 to the low OA osteoblasts subgroup decreased FLAP expression but failed to affect it in the high OA osteoblasts subgroup. LTB4 levels in OA osteoblasts were stimulated about twofold by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) plus transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a situation corresponding to their effect on FLAP mRNA levels. Treatments with 1,25(OH)2D3 and TGF-beta also modulated PGE2 production. TGF-beta stimulated PGE2 production in both OA osteoblast groups, whereas 1,25(OH)2D3 alone had a limited effect but decreased the effect of TGF-beta in the low OA osteoblasts subgroup. This modulation of PGE2 production was mirrored by the synthesis of COX-2. IL-18 levels were only slightly increased in a subgroup of OA osteoblasts compared with normal; however, no relationship was observed overall between IL-18 and PGE2 levels in normal and OA osteoblasts. These results suggest that the shunt from the production of PGE2 to LTB4 is through regulation of the expression of FLAP, not 5-LO, in OA osteoblasts. The expression of FLAP in OA osteoblasts is also modulated differently by 1,25(OH

  17. BK Knockout by TALEN-Mediated Gene Targeting in Osteoblasts: KCNMA1 Determines the Proliferation and Differentiation of Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Hongya; Gao, Jianjun; Dong, Jibin; Tao, Jie; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Wang, Hongyu; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels participate in many important physiological functions in excitable tissues such as neurons, cardiac and smooth muscles, whereas the knowledge of BK channels in bone tissues and osteoblasts remains elusive. To investigate the role of BK channels in osteoblasts, we used transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to establish a BK knockout cell line on rat ROS17/2.8 osteoblast, and detected the proliferation and mineralization of the BK-knockout cells. Our study found that the BK-knockout cells significantly decreased the ability of proliferation and mineralization as osteoblasts, compared to the wild type cells. The overall expression of osteoblast differentiation marker genes in the BK-knockout cells was significantly lower than that in wild type osteoblast cells. The BK-knockout osteoblast cell line in our study displays a phenotype decrease in osteoblast function which can mimic the pathological state of osteoblast and thus provide a working cell line as a tool for study of osteoblast function and bone related diseases. PMID:27329042

  18. Human osteoblast response to PTFE surfaces.

    PubMed

    Walsh, W R; Olmedo, M; Kim, H D; Zou, L; Weiss, A P

    1994-01-01

    Recently, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE, Gortex) vascular grafts have been rolled and used for interpositional arthroplasties of the carpus in the wrist. Little data, however, are available on the response of human osteoblasts to ePTFE. In-vitro cell culture is a useful method to determine initial cell-biomaterial interactions. The present study explores the morphological and mitogenic response of human bone cells cultured on vascular grade ePTFE grafts. The present findings suggest that neither the inner nor the outer surface of ePTFE, in its present form, support osteoblast growth. PTFE may be a suitable material to act as a space filler for carpal bone interpositional arthroplasties. PMID:10150168

  19. Effects of microgravity on osteoblast growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Tjandrawinata, R.; Fitzgerald, J.; Gasuad, K.; Gilbertson, V.

    1998-01-01

    Studies from space flights over the past two decades have demonstrated that basic physiological changes occur in humans during space flight. These changes include cephalic fluid shifts, loss of fluid and electrolytes, loss of muscle mass, space motion sickness, anemia, reduced immune response, and loss of calcium and mineralized bone. The cause of most of these manifestations is not known and until recently, the general approach was to investigate general systemic changes, not basic cellular responses to microgravity. Recently analyzed data from the 1973-1974 Skylabs disclose that there is a rise in the systemic hormone, cortisol, which may play a role in bone loss in flight. In two flights where bone growth was measured (Skylabs 3 and 4), the crew members had a significant loss of calcium accompanied by a rise in 24 hour urinary cortisol during the entire flight period. In ground-based work on osteoblasts, we have demonstrated that equivalent amounts of glucocorticoids can inhibit osteoblast cell growth. In addition, this laboratory has recently studied gene growth and activation of mouse osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) during spaceflight. Osteoblast cells were grown on glass coverslips, loaded in the Biorack plunger boxes 18 hours before launch and activated 19 hours after launch in the Biorack incubator under microgravity conditions. The osteoblasts were launched in a serum deprived state, activated and collected in microgravity. Samples were collected at 29 hours after sera activation (0-g, n=4; 1-g, n=4). The osteoblasts were examined for changes in gene expression and cell morphology. Approximately one day after growth activation, remarkable differences were observed in gene expression in 0-g and 1-g flight samples. The 0-g activated cells had increased c-fos mRNA when compared to flight 1-g controls. The message of immediate early growth gene, cox-2 was decreased in the microgravity activated cells when compared to ground or 1-g flight controls. Cox-1 was not

  20. Reduction in 50-kHz call-numbers and suppression of tickling-associated positive affective behaviour after lesioning of the lateral hypothalamic parvafox nucleus in rats.

    PubMed

    Roccaro-Waldmeyer, Diana M; Babalian, Alexandre; Müller, Annelies; Celio, Marco R

    2016-02-01

    The parvafox nucleus is located ventrolaterally in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). Its core and shell are composed of neurons expressing the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) and the transcription factor Foxb1, respectively. Given the known functions of the LHA and that the parvafox nucleus receives afferents from the lateral orbitofrontal cortex and projects to the periaqueductal gray matter, a functional role of this entity in the expression of positive emotions has been postulated. The purpose of the present study was to ascertain whether the deletion of neurons in the parvafox nucleus influenced the tickling-induced 50-kHz calls, which are thought to reflect positive affective states, in rats. To this end, tickling of the animals (heterospecific play) was combined with intracerebral injections of the excitotoxin kainic acid into the parvafox nucleus. The most pronounced surgery-associated reduction in 50-kHz call-numbers was observed in the group of rats in which, on the basis of PV-immunoreactive-cell counts in the parvafox nucleus, bilateral lesions had been successfully produced. Two other parameters that were implemented to quantify positive affective behaviour, namely, an approach towards and a following of the hand of the tickling experimenter, were likewise most markedly suppressed in the group of rats with bilaterally successful lesions. Furthermore, positive correlations were found between each of the investigated parameters. Our data afford evidence that the parvafox nucleus plays a role in the production of 50-kHz calls in rats, and, more generally, in the expression of positive emotions. PMID:26554726

  1. Abdominal Fat and Sarcopenia in Women Significantly Alter Osteoblasts Homeostasis In Vitro by a WNT/β-Catenin Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wannenes, Francesca; Papa, Vincenza; Greco, Emanuela A.; Fornari, Rachele; Marocco, Chiara; Di Luigi, Luigi; Donini, Lorenzo M.; Lenzi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and sarcopenia have been associated with mineral metabolism derangement and low bone mineral density (BMD). We investigated whether imbalance of serum factors in obese or obese sarcopenic patients could affect bone cell activity in vitro. To evaluate and characterize potential cellular and molecular changes of human osteoblasts, cells were exposed to sera of four groups of patients: (1) affected by obesity with normal BMD (O), (2) affected by obesity with low BMD (OO), (3) affected by obesity and sarcopenia (OS), and (4) affected by obesity, sarcopenia, and low BMD (OOS) as compared to subjects with normal body weight and normal BMD (CTL). Patients were previously investigated and characterized for body composition, biochemical and bone turnover markers. Then, sera of different groups of patients were used to incubate human osteoblasts and evaluate potential alterations in cell homeostasis. Exposure to OO, OS, and OOS sera significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and BMP4 expression compared to cells exposed to O and CTL, indicating a detrimental effect on osteoblast differentiation. Interestingly, sera of all groups of patients induced intracellular alteration in Wnt/β-catenin molecular pathway, as demonstrated by the significant alteration of specific target genes expression and by altered β-catenin cellular compartmentalization and GSK3β phosphorylation. In conclusion our results show for the first time that sera of obese subjects with low bone mineral density and sarcopenia significantly alter osteoblasts homeostasis in vitro, indicating potential detrimental effects of trunk fat on bone formation and skeletal homeostasis. PMID:24963291

  2. Staphylococcus aureus vs. Osteoblast: Relationship and Consequences in Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Josse, Jérôme; Velard, Frédéric; Gangloff, Sophie C

    2015-01-01

    Bone cells, namely osteoblasts and osteoclasts work in concert and are responsible for bone extracellular matrix formation and resorption. This homeostasis is, in part, altered during infections by Staphylococcus aureus through the induction of various responses from the osteoblasts. This includes the over-production of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors, thus suggesting a role for these cells in both innate and adaptive immunity. S. aureus decreases the activity and viability of osteoblasts, by induction of apoptosis-dependent and independent mechanisms. The tight relationship between osteoclasts and osteoblasts is also modulated by S. aureus infection. The present review provides a survey of the relevant literature discussing the important aspects of S. aureus and osteoblast interaction as well as the ability for antimicrobial peptides to kill intra-osteoblastic S. aureus, hence emphasizing the necessity for new anti-infectious therapeutics. PMID:26636047

  3. Staphylococcus aureus vs. Osteoblast: Relationship and Consequences in Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Josse, Jérôme; Velard, Frédéric; Gangloff, Sophie C.

    2015-01-01

    Bone cells, namely osteoblasts and osteoclasts work in concert and are responsible for bone extracellular matrix formation and resorption. This homeostasis is, in part, altered during infections by Staphylococcus aureus through the induction of various responses from the osteoblasts. This includes the over-production of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors, thus suggesting a role for these cells in both innate and adaptive immunity. S. aureus decreases the activity and viability of osteoblasts, by induction of apoptosis-dependent and independent mechanisms. The tight relationship between osteoclasts and osteoblasts is also modulated by S. aureus infection. The present review provides a survey of the relevant literature discussing the important aspects of S. aureus and osteoblast interaction as well as the ability for antimicrobial peptides to kill intra-osteoblastic S. aureus, hence emphasizing the necessity for new anti-infectious therapeutics. PMID:26636047

  4. Bone regenerates via dedifferentiation of osteoblasts in the zebrafish fin.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Franziska; Hammond, Christina; Chekuru, Avinash; Kurth, Thomas; Hans, Stefan; Weber, Christopher W; Mahatma, Gina; Fisher, Shannon; Brand, Michael; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Weidinger, Gilbert

    2011-05-17

    While mammals have a limited capacity to repair bone defects, zebrafish can completely regenerate amputated bony structures of their fins. Fin regeneration is dependent on formation of a blastema, a progenitor cell pool accumulating at the amputation plane. It is unclear which cells the blastema is derived from, whether it forms by dedifferentiation of mature cells, and whether blastema cells are multipotent. We show that mature osteoblasts dedifferentiate and form part of the blastema. Osteoblasts downregulate expression of intermediate and late bone differentiation markers and induce genes expressed by bone progenitors. Dedifferentiated osteoblasts proliferate in a FGF-dependent manner and migrate to form part of the blastema. Genetic fate mapping shows that osteoblasts only give rise to osteoblasts in the regenerate, indicating that dedifferentiation is not associated with the attainment of multipotency. Thus, bone can regenerate from mature osteoblasts via dedifferentiation, a finding with potential implications for human bone repair. PMID:21571227

  5. Serotonin regulates osteoblast proliferation and function in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dai, S.Q.; Yu, L.P.; Shi, X.; Wu, H.; Shao, P.; Yin, G.Y.; Wei, Y.Z.

    2014-01-01

    The monoamine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), a well-known neurotransmitter, also has important functions outside the central nervous system. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of 5-HT in the proliferation, differentiation, and function of osteoblasts in vitro. We treated rat primary calvarial osteoblasts with various concentrations of 5-HT (1 nM to 10 µM) and assessed the rate of osteoblast proliferation, expression levels of osteoblast-specific proteins and genes, and the ability to form mineralized nodules. Next, we detected which 5-HT receptor subtypes were expressed in rat osteoblasts at different stages of osteoblast differentiation. We found that 5-HT could inhibit osteoblast proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization at low concentrations, but this inhibitory effect was mitigated at relatively high concentrations. Six of the 5-HT receptor subtypes (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT2C) were found to exist in rat osteoblasts. Of these, 5-HT2A and 5-HT1B receptors had the highest expression levels, at both early and late stages of differentiation. Our results indicated that 5-HT can regulate osteoblast proliferation and function in vitro. PMID:25098615

  6. Osteoblast differentiation is functionally associated with decreased AMP kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Takayuki; Bandow, Kenjiro; Suzuki, Hiraku; Chiba, Norika; Kakimoto, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Tomokazu; Kawamoto, Shin-ichiro; Nagaoka, Eiichi; Matsuguchi, Tetsuya

    2009-12-01

    Osteoblasts, originating from mesenchymal stem cells, play a pivotal role in bone formation and mineralization. Several transcription factors including runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) have been reported to be essential for osteoblast differentiation, whereas the cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways controlling the differentiation process have not been fully elucidated. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine-threonine kinase generally regarded as a key regulator of cellular energy homeostasis, polarity, and division. Recent lines of evidence have indicated that the activity of the catalytic alpha subunit of AMPK is regulated through its phosphorylation by upstream AMPK kinases (AMPKKs) including LKB1. Here, we explored the role of AMPK in osteoblast differentiation using in vitro culture models. Phosphorylation of AMPKalpha was significantly decreased during osteoblastic differentiation in both primary osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1, a mouse osteoblastic cell line. Conversely, the terminal differentiation of primary osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cells, represented by matrix mineralization, was significantly inhibited by glucose restriction and stimulation with metformin, both of which are known activators of AMPK. Matrix mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells was also inhibited by the forced expression of a constitutively active form of AMPKalpha. Metformin significantly inhibited gene expression of Runx2 along with osteoblast differentiation markers including osteocalcin (Ocn), bone sialo protein (Bsp), and osteopontin (Opn). Thus, our present data indicate that differentiation of osteoblasts is functionally associated with decreased AMPK activity. PMID:19725053

  7. Enhanced and suppressed mineralization by acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate in osteoblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Kaneko, Kotaro; Chikazu, Daichi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2016-04-29

    It is known that diabetes aggravates alveolar bone loss associated with periodontitis. While insulin depletion increases the blood concentration of ketone bodies, i.e., acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate, their roles in bone metabolism have not been much studied until today. We investigated the effects of acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate on mineralization of extracellular matrix in cultures of mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and primary mouse osteoblasts in the presence and absence of bone morphogenetic protein-2. Acetoacetate potentiated alkaline phosphatase activity in MC3T3-E1 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, ranging from physiological to pathological concentrations (0.05-5 mmol/L). In contrast, β-hydroxybutyrate lowered it in the same experimental settings. Mineralization in cultures of these cells was also up-regulated by acetoacetate and down-regulated by β-hydroxybutyrate. Similar results were obtained in cultures of mouse primary osteoblasts. Neither alkaline phosphatase mRNA nor its protein expression in MC3T3-E1 cells was affected by acetoacetate or β-hydroxybutyrate, indicating that these ketone bodies control the enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase in osteoblasts and hence their mineralization bi-directionally. Finally, either gene silencing of monocarboxylate transporter-1, a major transmembrate transporter for ketone bodies, nullified the effects of ketone bodies on alkaline phosphatase activity in MC3T3-E1 cells. Collectively, we found that ketone bodies bidirectionally modulates osteoblast functions, which suggests that ketone bodies are important endogenous factors that regulate bone metabolism in both physiological and pathological situations. PMID:27018251

  8. Sex dependent regulation of osteoblast response to implant surface properties by systemic hormones

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Osseointegration depends on the implant surface, bone quality and the local and systemic host environment, which can differ in male and female patients. This study was undertaken in order to determine if male and female cells respond differently to titanium surfaces that have micron-scale roughness and if interactions of calciotropic hormones [1α,25(OH)2D3 and 17β-oestradiol (E2)] and microstructured surfaces on osteoblasts are sex dependent. Methods Osteoblasts from 6-week old Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) or on titanium (Ti) disks with two different surface topographies, a smooth pretreated (PT) surface and a coarse grit-blasted/acid-etched (SLA) surface, and treated with 1α,25(OH)2D3, E2, or E2 conjugated to bovine serum albumin (E2-BSA). Results Male and female cells responded similarly to Ti microstructure with respect to cell number and levels of osteocalcin, transforming growth factor-β1, osteoprotegerin and prostaglandin E2 in their conditioned media, exhibiting a more differentiated phenotype on SLA than on PT or TCPS. E2 and E2-BSA increased differentiation and local factor production, an effect that was microstructure dependent and found only in female osteoblasts. 1α,25(OH)2D3 increased osteoblast differentiation and local factor production in female and male cells, but the effect was more robust in male cells. Conclusions Male and female rat osteoblasts respond similarly to surface microstructure but exhibit sexual dimorphism in substrate-dependent responses to systemic hormones. Oestrogen affected only female cells while 1α,25(OH)2D3 had a greater effect on male cells. These results suggest that successful osseointegration in males and females may depend on the implant surface design and correct levels of calciotropic hormones. PMID:21208469

  9. Modelling the Factors that Affect Individuals' Utilisation of Online Learning Systems: An Empirical Study Combining the Task Technology Fit Model with the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Tai-Kuei; Yu, Tai-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Understanding learners' behaviour, perceptions and influence in terms of learner performance is crucial to predict the use of electronic learning systems. By integrating the task-technology fit (TTF) model and the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this paper investigates the online learning utilisation of Taiwanese students. This paper provides a…

  10. Osteoblast adhesion to orthopaedic implant alloys: Effects of cell adhesion molecules and diamond-like carbon coating

    SciTech Connect

    Kornu, R.; Kelly, M.A.; Smith, R.L.; Maloney, W.J.

    1996-11-01

    In total joint arthroplasty, long-term outcomes depend in part on the biocompatibility of implant alloys. This study analyzed effects of surface finish and diamond-like carbon coating on osteoblast cell adhesion to polished titanium-aluminum-vanadium and polished or grit-blasted cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. Osteoblast binding was tested in the presence and absence of the cell adhesion proteins fibronectin, laminin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin and was quantified by measurement of DNA content. Although adherence occurred in serum-free medium, maximal osteoblast binding required serum and was similar for titanium and cobalt alloys at 2 and 12 hours. With the grit-blasted cobalt alloy, cell binding was reduced 48% (p < 0.05) by 24 hours. Coating the alloys with diamond-like carbon did not alter osteoblast adhesion, whereas fibronectin pretreatment increased cell binding 2.6-fold (p < 0.05). In contrast, fibrinogen, vitronectin, and laminin did not enhance cell adhesion. These results support the hypothesis that cell adhesion proteins can modify cell binding to orthopaedic alloys. Although osteoblast binding was not affected by the presence of diamond-like carbon, this coating substance may influence other longer term processes, such as bone formation, and deserves further study. 40 refs., 4 figs.