Science.gov

Sample records for affects selenium bioavailability

  1. Selenium bioavailability and uptake as affected by four different plants in a loamy clay soil with particular attention to mycorrhizae inoculated ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Munier-Lamy, C; Deneux-Mustin, S; Mustin, C; Merlet, D; Berthelin, J; Leyval, C

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of plant species, especially of their rhizosphere soil, and of inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus on the bioavailability of selenium and its transfer in soil-plant systems. A pot experiment was performed with a loamy clay soil and four plant species: maize, lettuce, radish and ryegrass, the last one being inoculated or not with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant biomass and Se concentration in shoots and roots were estimated at harvest. Se bioavailability in rhizosphere and unplanted soil was evaluated using sequential extractions. Plant biomass and selenium uptake varied with plant species. The quantity of rhizosphere soil also differed between plants and was not proportional to plant biomass. The highest plant biomass, Se concentration in plants, and soil to plant transfer factor were obtained with radish. The lowest Se transfer factors were obtained with ryegrass. For the latter, mycorrhizal inoculation did not significantly affect plant growth, but reduced selenium transfer from soil to plant by 30%. In unplanted soil after 65 days aging, more than 90% of added Se was water-extractable. On the contrary, Se concentration in water extracts of rhizosphere soil represented less than 1% and 20% of added Se for ryegrass and maize, respectively. No correlation was found between the water-extractable fraction and Se concentration in plants. The speciation of selenium in the water extracts indicated that selenate was reduced, may be under organic forms, in the rhizosphere soil. PMID:17544553

  2. Selenium bioavailability with reference to human nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Young, V.R.; Nahapetian, A.; Janghorbani, M.

    1982-05-01

    Various aspects of selenium metabolism and nutrition in relation to the question of selenium bioavailability in foods and the diet of man are reviewed. Few published studies exist on selenium metabolism in human subjects, particularly those representative of healthy individuals in the United States. Animal studies reveal that various factors, including the source and chemical form of selenium in foods and feeds, influence selenium bioavailability. However, the quantitative significance of animal assay data for human nutrition is not known. The limited number of published studies in man suggest that the metabolic fate and physiological function of dietary selenite may differ from that of selenomethionine or of food selenium. However, much additional research will be required to establish an adequate picture of the significance of dietary selenium bioavailability in human nutrition and health. Based on initial human experiments carried out at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, use of stable isotopes of selenium offers promising opportunities for closing the gap of knowledge that now exists concerning the role and significance of factors that determine how the selenium present in foods is used to meet the physiological requirements of the consumer.

  3. Methods of Selenium Supplementation: Bioavailability and Determination of Selenium Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Malgorzata; Szczyglowska, Marzena; Konieczka, Piotr; Namiesnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Selenium, a "dual-surface" element, maintains a very thin line between a level of necessity and harmfulness. Because of this, a deficiency or excess of this element in an organism is dangerous and causes health-related problems, both physically and mentally. The main source of selenium is a balanced diet, with a proper selection of meat and plant products. Meanwhile, the proper assimilation of selenium into these products depends on their bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and/or bioactivity of a given selenium compound. From the time when it was discovered that selenium and its compounds have a significant influence on metabolic processes and in many countries throughout the world, a low quantity of selenium was found in different parts of the environment, pressure was put upon an effective and fast method of supplementing the environment with the help of selenium. This work describes supplementation methods applied with the use of selenium, as well as new ideas for increasing the level of this element in various organisms. Based on the fact that selenium appears in the environment at trace levels, the determination of total amount of selenium or selenium speciation in a given sample demands the selection of appropriate measurement methods. These methods are most often comprised of a sample preparation technique and/or a separation technique as well as a detection system. The work presents information on the subject of analytical methods used for determining selenium and its compounds as well as examples in literature of their application. PMID:24987868

  4. Selenium bioavailability from naturally produced high-selenium peas and oats in selenium-deficient rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined the bioavailability of selenium (Se) from yellow peas and oats harvested from high-Se soil of South Dakota, United States. The Se concentrations of the peas and oats were 13.5 ± 0.2 and 2.5 ± 0.1 mg/kg, respectively. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were depleted of Se by feeding them...

  5. Selenium bioavailability: current knowledge and future research requirements.

    PubMed

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Collings, Rachel; Hurst, Rachel

    2010-05-01

    Information on selenium bioavailability is required to derive dietary recommendations and to evaluate and improve the quality of food products. The need for robust data is particularly important in light of recent suggestions of potential health benefits associated with different intakes of selenium. The issue is not straightforward, however, because of large variations in the selenium content of foods (determined by a combination of geologic/environmental factors and selenium supplementation of fertilizers and animal feedstuffs) and the chemical forms of the element, which are absorbed and metabolized differently. Although most dietary selenium is absorbed efficiently, the retention of organic forms is higher than that of inorganic forms. There are also complications in the assessment and quantification of selenium species within foodstuffs. Often, extraction is only partial, and the process can alter the form or forms present in the food. Efforts to improve, standardize, and make more widely available techniques for species quantification are required. Similarly, reliable and sensitive functional biomarkers of selenium status are required, together with improvements in current biomarker methods. This requirement is particularly important for the assessment of bioavailability, because some functional biomarkers respond differently to the various selenium species. The effect of genotype adds a potential further dimension to the process of deriving bioavailability estimates and underlines the need for further research to facilitate the process of deriving dietary recommendations in the future. PMID:20200264

  6. Selenium bioavailability from naturally produced high-selenium peas and oats in selenium-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Johnson, LuAnn K

    2011-06-01

    This study determined the bioavailability of selenium (Se) from yellow peas and oats harvested from the high-Se soil of South Dakota, United States. The Se concentrations were 13.5 ± 0.2 and 2.5 ± 0.1 mg/kg (dry weight) for peas and oats, respectively. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were depleted of Se by feeding them a 30% Torula yeast-based diet (4.1 μg Se/kg) for 56 days, and then they were replenished with Se for an additional 50 days by feeding them the same diet supplemented with 20, 30, or 40 μg Se/kg from peas or oats, respectively. Selenium bioavailability was determined on the basis of the restoration of Se-dependent enzyme activities and tissue Se concentrations in Se-depleted rats, comparing those responses for yellow peas and oats to those for l-selenomethionine (SeMet; used as a reference) by using a slope-ratio method. Dietary supplementation with peas or oats resulted in linear or log-linear, dose-dependent increases in glutathione peroxidase activities in blood and liver and in thioredoxin reductase activity in liver. Supplementation with peas or oats resulted in linear or log-linear, dose-dependent increases in Se concentrations of plasma, liver, gastrocnemius muscle, and kidneys. The overall bioavailability was approximately 88% for Se from yellow peas and 92% from oats, compared to SeMet. It was concluded that Se from naturally produced high-Se yellow peas or oats is highly bioavailable in this model and that these high-Se foods may be a good dietary source of Se. PMID:21553810

  7. Rumen microorganisms decrease bioavailability of inorganic selenium supplements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the availaility of selenium (Se)-enriched trace mineral supplements, we have observed low Se status in cattle and sheep offered traditional inorganic Se supplements. Reasons for this may include inadequate intake or low bioavailability of inorganic Se sources. The objective of this study w...

  8. Effect of alcohol consumption selenium bioavailability in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    This study was done to determine the effects of alcohol consumption on selenium bioavailability in initially Se-depleted rats. Weanling male rats were fed a Se deficient basal diet for 4 weeks and then for the subsequent 4 weeks were supplemented at 0.031 mg Se/Kg or at 0.085 mg Se/Kg of diet in the form of high Se yeast. During the Se repletion period alcohol replaced medium chain triglycerides in the diet at three levels: 0%, 10% and 20% of calories. Dietary Se level significantly affected urinary Se, fecal Se, Se absorption, Se balance whole blood Se, whole blood glutathione peroxidase activity, liver Se concentration, and total liver Se content. Alcohol consumption significantly increased liver Se concentrations and total liver Se in rats fed the adequate Se diet. In rates fed the low Se diet, this pattern was not shown. There was a significant interaction between alcohol and Se level in terms of liver Se concentration and total liver Se. In the first week of Se repletion, fecal Se. Se absorption and Se balance were significantly higher in the 10% alcohol group fed the low Se repletion diet compared to rats given 0% and 20% alcohol in the same Se group. In the final week Se repletion the parameters of Se balance were not affected by alcohol consumption. Alcohol consumption did not influence whole blood Se and whole blood glutathione peroxidase activity; however alcohol consumption significantly reduced growth rate at both Se levels.

  9. Assessment of selenium bioavailability from naturally produced high-selenium soy foods in selenium-deficient rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed the bioavailability of selenium (Se) from protein isolate and tofu (bean curd) prepared from naturally produced high-Se soybeans in a Se-deficient rat model. The Se content of soybean seeds, protein isolate and tofu was 5.17 ± 0.22, 11.44 ± 0.09 and 7.37 ± 0.12 mg/kg, respectively. Male ...

  10. Selenium bioaccessibility and bioavailability in Se-enriched food supplements.

    PubMed

    Thiry, Celine; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Pussemier, Luc; De Temmerman, Ludwig; Ruttens, Ann

    2013-04-01

    Most European people have selenium (Se) intake inferior to recommended values that are considered necessary to ensure the beneficial action of antioxidant selenoproteins. People could therefore tend to have recourse to Se-enriched food supplements (FS) aiming to increase their Se body level. On the Belgian market, three main types of Se-rich FS are available: Se-enriched yeast, selenate-based FS, and selenite-based FS. In the present work, in vitro tests imitating gastrointestinal digestion and intestinal absorption were used to determine the bioaccessible and bioavailable fractions of Se present in one specimen of each category of FS. The aim of the study was to verify to which extent the difference in Se speciation could influence the efficiency of FS for enhancing the human Se status. Results indicated that differences exist in both bioaccessibility and bioavailability between the three types of FS, and that these differences could be related, at least partially, to the Se species profile. Overall bioavailability of the three FS was low (maximum 14 % of the original Se content). Among the three samples, the selenate-based FS produced the highest fraction of bioavailable Se, followed by Se-yeast, and finally by the selenite-based FS for which Se was almost not available at all. These results confirm the low availability of inorganic Se but were somewhat unexpected regarding the yeast-based FS since Se-rich yeasts are usually reported to contain an important fraction of available Se. PMID:23397356

  11. Rumen Microorganisms Decrease Bioavailability of Inorganic Selenium Supplements.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, M L; Vorachek, W R; Estill, C T; Whanger, P D; Bobe, G; Davis, T Z; Hall, J A

    2016-06-01

    Despite the availability of selenium (Se)-enriched trace mineral supplements, we have observed low Se status in cattle and sheep offered traditional inorganic Se supplements. Reasons for this may include inadequate intake or low bioavailability of inorganic Se sources. The objective of this study was to determine whether rumen microorganisms (RMO) alter the bioavailability of Se sources commonly used in Se supplements. Rumen microorganisms were isolated from ewes (n = 4) and incubated ex vivo with no Se (control), with inorganic Na selenite or Na selenate, or with organic selenomethionine (SeMet). Total Se incorporated into RMO and the amount of elemental Se formed were determined under equivalent conditions. Incorporation of Se from Na selenite, Na selenate, or SeMet into RMO was measured as fold change compared with control (no added Se). Incorporation of Se into microbial mass was greater for SeMet (13.2-fold greater than no-Se control) compared with inorganic Se supplements (P = 0.02); no differences were observed between inorganic Na selenate (3.3-fold greater than no-Se control) and Na selenite (3.5-fold greater than no-Se control; P = 0.97). Formation of non-bioavailable, elemental Se was less for RMO incubated with SeMet compared with inorganic Se sources (P = 0.01); no differences were observed between Na selenate and Na selenite (P = 0.09). The clinical importance of these results is that the oral bioavailability of organic SeMet should be greater compared with inorganic Se sources because of greater RMO incorporation of Se and decreased formation of elemental Se by RMO. PMID:26537117

  12. Influence of estuarine processes on spatiotemporal variation in bioavailable selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Robin; Luoma, Samuel N.; Elrick, Kent A.; Carter, James L.; van der Wegen, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic processes (physical, chemical and biological) challenge our ability to quantify and manage the ecological risk of chemical contaminants in estuarine environments. Selenium (Se) bioavailability (defined by bioaccumulation), stable isotopes and molar carbon-tonitrogen ratios in the benthic clam Potamocorbula amurensis, an important food source for predators, were determined monthly for 17 yr in northern San Francisco Bay. Se concentrations in the clams ranged from a low of 2 to a high of 22 μg g-1 over space and time. Little of that variability was stochastic, however. Statistical analyses and preliminary hydrodynamic modeling showed that a constant mid-estuarine input of Se, which was dispersed up- and down-estuary by tidal currents, explained the general spatial patterns in accumulated Se among stations. Regression of Se bioavailability against river inflows suggested that processes driven by inflows were the primary driver of seasonal variability. River inflow also appeared to explain interannual variability but within the range of Se enrichment established at each station by source inputs. Evaluation of risks from Se contamination in estuaries requires the consideration of spatial and temporal variability on multiple scales and of the processes that drive that variability.

  13. Effect of alcohol consumption on selenium (Se) bioavailability in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H.K.; Snook, J.T.; Yang, F.L.

    1986-03-01

    This study was done to determine the effects of alcohol ingestion on Se bioavailability in initially Se-depleted rats. Weanling male rats were fed a Se deficient (0.012 mg/kg) basal diet for 4 weeks and then for the subsequent 4 weeks were supplemented at 0.031 mg Se/kg or at 0.085 mg Se/kg of diet in the form of high Se yeast. During the Se repletion period alcohol replaced medium chain triglycerides in the diet at 3 levels: 0%, 10%, and 20% of calories. Dietary Se level significantly (P < .0001) affected urinary Se, fecal Se, Se absorption, Se balance, whole blood Se, whole blood glutathione peroxidase activity, and liver Se. In rats fed the higher Se diet total liver Se increased 50% when 20% rather than 0% alcohol was given. In rats fed the lower Se diet total liver Se decreased 12% as dietary alcohol increased from 0 to 20%. There was a significant (P < .0015) interaction between alcohol and Se level. All the other parameters for Se bioavailability were not affected by alcohol consumption. However, alcohol consumption significantly reduced growth rate at both Se levels.

  14. Selenium from Pinto Beans is Bioavailable to Support Bone Structure in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deficiency of selenium (Se), an essential trace mineral for animals and humans, has been shown to induce growth retardation and to impair bone metabolism. The objective of the study was to determine whether Se from pinto beans (SeBean) is as bioavailable as Se from selenomethionine (SeMet) to suppor...

  15. Selenium Bioavailability from Soybeans in Rats Fed a Modified Torula Yeast Diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential nutrient, and soy is a major plant source of dietary protein to humans. The United States produces one third of world’s soybeans, and the Se-rich Northern Plains states produce a large share of the Nation’s soybeans. The present study examined the bioavailability of Se ...

  16. BIOAVAILABILITY OF SELENIUM FROM MEAT AND BROCCOLI AS DETERMINED BY RETENTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF SE75

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meat is the single greatest source of selenium (Se) in the North American diet. Although not naturally enriched in Se, broccoli will accumulate Se when grown on high Se soils. Previous reports have demonstrated that Se from meat is highly bioavailable whereas Se from broccoli has poor bioavailabil...

  17. Protonation of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) results in massive aggregation and reduced oral bioavailability of EGCG-dispersed selenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shanshan; Sun, Kang; Wang, Xin; Wang, Dongxu; Wan, Xiaochun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2013-07-31

    The current results show that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), in the form of phenolic anions at pH 8.0, can effectively disperse selenium nanoparticles. However, at gastric juice pH (1.0), the EGCG-dispersed selenium nanoparticles (referred to as E-Se) extensively aggregated, so that nano features largely disappeared. This demonstrates that deprotonated phenolic anions of EGCG play an important role in maintaining E-Se stability and suggests that E-Se would suffer from reduced oral bioavailability. To validate this conjecture, size-equivalent E-Se and bovine serum albumin (BSA)-dispersed selenium nanoparticles (B-Se), whose physicochemical properties were not altered at pH 1.0, were orally administered to selenium-deficient mice. In comparison to B-Se, the bioavailabilities of E-Se as indicated with hepatic and renal glutathione peroxidase activity and hepatic selenium levels were significantly (p < 0.01) reduced by 39, 32, and 31%, respectively. Therefore, the present study reveals that size-equivalent selenium nanoparticles prepared by different dispersers do not necessarily guarantee equivalent oral bioavailability. PMID:23822637

  18. Selenium Bioavailability from Soy Protein Isolate and Tofu in Rats Fed a Torula Yeast-Based Diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential nutrient, and soy is a major plant source of dietary protein to humans. The United States produces one-third of world’s soybeans, and the Se-rich Northern Plains produce a large share of the nation’s soybeans. The present study used a rat model to determine the bioavail...

  19. Chemical speciation and bioavailability of selenium in the rhizosphere of Symphyotrichum eatonii from reclaimed mine soils.

    PubMed

    Oram, Libbie L; Strawn, Daniel G; Möller, Gregory

    2011-02-01

    Knowledge of rhizosphere influences on Se speciation and bioavailability is required to predict Se bioavailability to plants. In the present study, plant-availability of Se to aster (Symphyotrichum eatonii (A. Gray) G.L. Nesom) was compared in rhizosphere soils and nonrhizosphere (bulk) soils collected from a reclaimed mine site in southeastern Idaho, U.S. X-ray spectroscopy was used to characterize the oxidation state and elemental distribution of Se in aster roots, rhizosphere soils, and bulk soils. Percent extractable Se in aster rhizosphere soil was greater than extractable Se in corresponding bulk soils in all samples (n = 4, p = 0.042, 0.051, and 0.052 for three extractions). Selenium oxidation state mapping of 28 regions within the samples and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra from 26 points within the samples indicated that the rhizosphere and bulk soil Se species was predominantly reduced Se(-II,0), while in the aster roots, high concentrations of Se(VI) were present. Results show that within the rhizosphere, enhanced Se bioavailability is occurring via oxidation of reduced soil Se to more soluble Se(VI) species. PMID:21166454

  20. Mercury and Selenium in a Mining-Affected Watershed of the Rocky Mountain Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langner, H.

    2011-12-01

    The moderating effect of selenium on mercury toxicity is well established, although mechanisms and environmental implications of this interaction are still a field of intensive research. The Upper Clark Fork River Basin in northwestern Montana offers a suitable field site to test some of the emerging models, as a history of intensive metals mining created sub-watersheds with variable combinations of mercury and selenium sources. To address various levels of the food web, we analyzed a preliminary set of sediments, fish tissues and osprey (Pandion haliaetus) blood samples from various locations throughout the watershed. Sediment mercury concentrations vary between 0.02 and over 10 mg/kg, and selenium in sediments ranges from undetectable to 5 mg/kg in the most contaminated reaches. Mercury levels in fish range from 0.03 to 1.5 mg/kg (wet wt) and are highly dependent on the geographic location, in addition to fish species and size. Mercury concentrations in blood of nestling osprey chicks vary between 97 and 730 μg/L, with the majority of the variability explained by geographic location. Total mercury concentration in sediment can explain some of the variability in fish and ospreys; however, mercury accumulation in these organisms is also affected by factors such as the environmental methylation potential and possibly the sequestration of mercury in selenium compounds that are not prone to biomagnification in the food web. This hypothesis is supported by the geographic distribution of selenium and mercury levels in osprey blood: Relatively high selenium concentrations (~2000 μg/L) are associated with the lowest blood mercury levels, despite relatively high mercury levels in the local sediments (~1 mg/kg). In reaches with the lowest selenium concentrations in osprey blood (430 μg/L), the blood mercury levels are relatively high, despite very low sediment mercury levels. Analysis of this data points toward the role of bioavailable selenium in modifying the fate of

  1. Hemicellulose does not affect iron bioavailability in chicks.

    PubMed

    Fly, A D; Czarnecki-Maulden, G L; Fahey, G C; Titgemeyer, E C

    1996-01-01

    Two iron repletion experiments using hemoglobin as a response criterion were conducted to assess effects of hemicelluloses on iron bioavailability to chicks. In Experiment 1, iron bioavailability from intact fiber sources was determined by adding tomato pomace (14.6% hemicelluloses), soybean hulls (20.6% hemicelluloses), beet pulp (21.5% hemicelluloses), orchard grass (24.1% hemicelluloses) and corn fiber (55.2% hemicelluloses) to a casein dextrose basal diet providing 0.4-4.1% hemicelluloses to the diet. Test foods were analyzed for iron, total dietary fiber, neutral detergent residue, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, acid detergent lignin, pectins and uronic acids. Hemicelluloses were determined by the difference of neutral detergent residue minus acid detergent fiber. Iron bioavailability was determined by the standard curve method to be (percent relative to ferrous sulfate using hemoglobin as the response criterion) as follows: tomato pomace, 82.0; soybean hulls, 94.0; beet pulp, 26.5; orchard grass, 68.9; corn fiber, 69.4. Iron bioavailability was not related to hemicellulose content of test foods or diets. In Experiment 2, the effect of psyllium husk (a fiber source that contains predominantly hemicelluloses) on iron bioavailability from ferrous sulfate was assessed. Bioavailability was determined by the slope ratio method where treatments consisted of graded levels of ferrous sulfate in the presence and absence of 5% dietary psyllium. Although iron intrinsic to psyllium was unavailable, bioavailability of ferrous sulfate iron was not affected (P > 0.05) by the presence of psyllium. Thus, there was no clear effect of hemicelluloses on iron bioavailability. However, some feeds that contained high levels of hemicelluloses had low intrinsic iron bioavailabilities, suggesting that other dietary factors are primarily responsible for determining iron bioavailability from these feed components. PMID:8558316

  2. Selenium

    MedlinePlus

    ... depends on the amount of selenium in the soil where they were grown. The amount of selenium ... raised in many different areas, including areas with soil that is rich in selenium. Certain groups of ...

  3. Effects of aging on the fraction distribution and bioavailability of selenium in three different soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Peng, Qin; Liang, Dongli; Liang, Sijie; Chen, Juan; Sun, Huan; Li, Shuqi; Lei, Penghui

    2016-02-01

    Aging refers to the processes by which the mobility and bioavailability of metals in soil decline with time. Although long-term aging is a key process that needs to be considered in risk assessment of metals, few investigations has been attempted to determine whether and how residence time influences the selenium (Se) fractions and bioavailability in soil. In this study, the fractions of Se in soils was evaluated, and bioavailability were assessed by measuring Se concentration in pak choi (Brassica chinensis L.). Results showed that the change of soil available Se in all tested soils divided into two phases: rapid decrease at the initial time (42 d) and slow decline thereafter. The second-order equation could describe the decrease processes of available Se in tested soils during the entire incubation time (R(2) > 0.99), while parabolic diffusion equation had less goodness of fit. Those results indicated that Se aging was controlled not only by diffusion process but also by other processes such as nucleation/precipitation, adsorption/desorption with soil component, occlusion by organic matter and reduction reaction. Soil available Se fractions tended to transform to more stable fractions during aging. The changes of Se concentration in pak choi were consistent with the variation in soil available Se content. In addition, 21 d could be reference for the time of Se aging reaching stabilization in krasnozems and fluvo-aquic soil, and 30 d for black soil. Results could provide theoretical basis to formulate environmental quality criterion and choose the equilibrium time before implementing a pot experiment in Se-spiked soils. PMID:26606190

  4. SELENIUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter addresses the nutritional functions of selenium, including the consequences of nutritional selenium deficiency and the role of selenium in the prevention of cancer. These functions are discussed in terms of the absorption and metabolism of dietary selenium, with special focus on the sel...

  5. Selenium addition alters mercury uptake, bioavailability in the rhizosphere and root anatomy of rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xun; Tam, Nora Fung-Yee; Fu, Shi; Ametkhan, Aray; Ouyang, Yun; Ye, Zhihong

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Mercury (Hg) is an extremely toxic pollutant, especially in the form of methylmercury (MeHg), whereas selenium (Se) is an essential trace element in the human diet. This study aimed to ascertain whether addition of Se can produce rice with enriched Se and lowered Hg content when growing in Hg-contaminated paddy fields and, if so, to determine the possible mechanisms behind these effects. Methods Two cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa, japonica and indica) were grown in either hydroponic solutions or soil rhizobags with different Se and Hg treatments. Concentrations of total Hg, MeHg and Se were determined in the roots, shoots and brown rice, together with Hg uptake kinetics and Hg bioavailability in the soil. Root anatonmy was also studied. Key Results The high Se treatment (5 μg g–1) significantly increased brown rice yield by 48 % and total Se content by 2·8-fold, and decreased total Hg and MeHg by 47 and 55 %, respectively, compared with the control treatments. The high Se treatment also markedly reduced ‘water-soluble’ Hg and MeHg concentrations in the rhizosphere soil, decreased the uptake capacity of Hg by roots and enhanced the development of apoplastic barriers in the root endodermis. Conclusions Addition of Se to Hg-contaminated soil can help produce brown rice that is simultaneously enriched in Se and contains less total Hg and MeHg. The lowered accumulation of total Hg and MeHg appears to be the result of reduced bioavailability of Hg and production of MeHg in the rhizosphere, suppression of uptake of Hg into the root cells and an enhancement of the development of apoplastic barriers in the endodermis of the roots. PMID:24948669

  6. Bioavailable nanoparticles obtained in laser ablation of a selenium target in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, P G; Shafeev, Georgii A; Voronov, Valerii V; Raspopov, R V; Arianova, E A; Trushina, E N; Gmoshinskii, I V; Khotimchenko, S A

    2012-11-30

    The process of producing colloidal solutions of selenium nanoparticles in water using the laser ablation method is described. The prospects of using nanoparticles of elementary selenium as a nutrition source of this microelement are discussed. (nanoparticles)

  7. Chemical forms of selenium affect glutatione peroxidase activity in human Caco-2 cell model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioavailability of selenium (Se) is complicated because there are multiple naturally occurring chemical forms of this element in nature. Assessing the ability of a Se source to restore GPX1 activity in laboratory animals and humans is the most commonly used method. To search for an alternative (...

  8. Pinto beans as a course of bioavailable selenium to support bone structure in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace mineral for animals and humans. The deficiency of Se has been linked to increased oxidative stress with increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress and ROS have been shown to stimulate bone resorption and osteoclast activity. Selenium, a ch...

  9. Thioacetamide-induced cirrhosis in selenium-adequate mice displays rapid and persistent abnormity of hepatic selenoenzymes which are mute to selenium supplementation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jinsong Wang Huali; Yu Hanqing

    2007-10-01

    Selenium reduction in cirrhosis is frequently reported. The known beneficial effect of selenium supplementation on cirrhosis is probably obtained from nutritionally selenium-deficient subjects. Whether selenium supplementation truly improves cirrhosis in general needs additional experimental investigation. Thioacetamide was used to induce cirrhosis in selenium-adequate and -deficient mice. Selenoenzyme activity and selenium content were measured and the influence of selenium supplementation was evaluated. In Se-adequate mice, thioacetamide-mediated rapid onset of hepatic oxidative stress resulted in an increase in thioredoxin reductase activity and a decrease in both glutathione peroxidase activity and selenium content. The inverse activity of selenoenzymes (i.e. TrxR activity goes up and GPx activity goes down) was persistent and mute to selenium supplementation during the progress of cirrhosis; accordingly, cirrhosis was not improved by selenium supplementation in any period. On the other hand, selenium supplementation to selenium-deficient mice always more efficiently increased hepatic glutathione peroxidase activity and selenium content compared with those treated with thioacetamide, indicating that thioacetamide impairs the liver bioavailability of selenium. Although thioacetamide profoundly affects hepatic selenium status in selenium-adequate mice, selenium supplementation does not modify the changes. Selenium supplementation to cirrhotic subjects with a background of nutritional selenium deficiency can improve selenium status but cannot restore hepatic glutathione peroxidase and selenium to normal levels.

  10. SPECIATION OF SELENIUM COMPOUNDS FROM HIGH SELENIUM BROCCOLI IS AFFECTED BY THE EXTRACTING SOLUTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The speciation of selenium compounds from high selenium broccoli (876 ¿g/g) depends on the extraction conditions. Twenty-seven extraction conditions were explored involving nine different buffering systems between pH 1 and pH 9. In non-buffered extractions of broccoli, more than 40% of the spiked ...

  11. Bioavailability, toxicity and biotransformation of selenium in midge (Chironomus dilutus) larvae exposed via water or diet to elemental selenium particles, selenite, or selenized algae.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Gallegos, Mercedes; Doig, Lorne E; Tse, Justin J; Pickering, Ingrid J; Liber, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Elemental selenium (Se) is generally considered to be biologically inert due to its insolubility in water. It is a common form of Se in sediment near uranium mining and milling operations in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Nanosized particles of many materials exhibit different properties compared with their bulk phases, in some cases posing health and ecological risks. Here we investigated the bioavailability and toxicity of Se nanoparticles (SeNPs) using 10-day waterborne and dietary exposures to larvae of Chironomus dilutus, a common benthic invertebrate. For comparison, larvae were also exposed to waterborne dissolved selenite and to dietary selenomethionine as selenized algae. Larval Se accumulation was evaluated using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy or inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy for total Se and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for Se chemical speciation. Exposure to nanoparticulate Se resulted in Se bioaccumulation, at high concentrations, inhibiting larval growth in both waterborne and dietary exposures; larvae predominantly accumulated selenomethionine-like species regardless of uptake route or form of Se tested. Despite the observed Se accumulation, our findings suggest there is little risk of direct SeNP toxicity to benthic invertebrates in Se-contaminated sediments in northern Saskatchewan. Nevertheless, elemental Se in sediments may be biologically available and may contribute directly or indirectly to the risk of Se toxicity to egg-laying vertebrates (fish and piscivorous birds) in Se-contaminated aquatic systems. It thus may be necessary to include elemental Se as a source of potential Se exposure in ecological risk assessments. PMID:23234498

  12. Factors affecting sequestration and bioavailability of phenanthrene in soils

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C.; Kelsey, J.W.; Hatzinger, P.B.; Alexander, M.

    1997-10-01

    A study was conducted to determine factors affecting the sequestration and changes in bioavailability as phenanthrene persists in soils. Phenanthrene became sequestered in seven soils differing appreciably in organic matter and clay content as measured by earthworm uptake, bacterial mineralization, or extractability. Phenanthrene also became sequestered as it aged in soil aggregates of various sizes as measured by decline in availability to a bacterium, a mild extractant, or both. Wetting and drying a soil during aging reduced the amount of phenanthrene recovered by a mild extractant and the rate and extent of bacterial mineralization of the hydrocarbon. After biodegradation of phenanthrene added to the soil, more of the compound remained if it had been aged than if it had not been aged. Wetting and drying the soil during aging further increased the amount of phenanthrene remaining after biodegradation. The rate and extent of bacterial mineralization of phenanthrene were less in leached than in unleached soil. Aging/sequestration is thus markedly affected by soil properties and environmental factors.

  13. Mineralogy affects geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability of zinc

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ramon M.; Schaider, Laurel A.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Shine, James P.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    We correlated mineralogical and particle characteristics of Zn-containing particles with Zn geoavailability, bioaccessibility, and bioavailability following gavage and intranasal (IN) administration in rats. We compared samples of Zn/Pb mine waste and five pulverized pure-phase Zn minerals (<38 μm). Particles were neutron-activated to produce radioactive 65Zn. We assessed geoavailability using sequential extractions and bioaccessibility using in vitro extraction tests simulating various pH and biological conditions. Zn in vivo bioavailability and in vitro bioaccessibility decreased as follows: mine waste > hydrozincite > hemimorphite > zincite ≈ smithsonite ≫ sphalerite. We found significant correlations among geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability. In particular, Zn bioavailability post-gavage and post-IN was significantly correlated with bioaccessibility in simulated phagolysosomal fluid and gastric fluid. These data indicate that solid phase speciation influences biological uptake of Zn and that in vitro tests can be used to predict Zn bioavailability in exposure assessment and effective remediation design. PMID:23933126

  14. Determination of selenium by GFAAS in slurries of fish feces to estimate the bioavailability of this micronutrient in feed used in pisciculture.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fábio A; Neves, Renato C F; Quintero-Pinto, Luis G; Padilha, Cilene C F; Jorge, Sônia M A; Barros, Margarida M; Pezzato, Luiz E; Padilha, Pedro M

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a simple, fast and sensitive method to determine selenium in samples of feces and of fish feed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) through the direct introduction of slurries of the samples into the spectrometer's graphite tube. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) calculated for 20 readings of the blank of the standard slurries (0.50% m/v of feces or feed devoid of selenium) were 0.31 microg l(-1) and 1.03 microg l(-1), respectively, for the standard feces slurries and 0.35 microg l(-1) and 1.16 microg l(-1), respectively, for the standard feed slurries. The proposed method was applied in studies of bioavailability of selenium in different fish feeds and the results proved consistent with that obtained from samples mineralized by acid digestion using the microwave oven. PMID:17448523

  15. Selenium Supplementation Does Not Affect Testicular Selenium Status or Semen Quality in North American Men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although selenium (Se) is essential for sperm function experimental animals, high Se intake in humans has been associated with both improvements and impairments in semen quality. We previously reported a decrease in sperm motility in five men fed high-Se foods in a metabolic research unit, but could...

  16. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake and transport in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability. In the present study, we measured the uptake and transport of various Se compounds in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. We found that two sources...

  17. Determination of selenium bioavailability to a benthic bivalve from particulate and solute pathways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, S.N.; Johns, C.; Fisher, N.S.; Steinberg, N.A.; Oremland, R.S.; Reinfelder, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Particulate organo-Se was assimilated with 86% efficiency by the deposit feeding bivalve Macoma balthica, when the clam was fed 75Se-labeled diatoms. Absorption efficiencies of participate elemental Se were 22%, when the animals were fed 75Se-labeled sediments in which elemental Se was precipitated by microbial dissimilatory reduction. Precipitation of elemental Se did not eliminate biological availability of the element. Selenite was taken up from solution slowly by M. balthica (mean concentration factor was 712). Concentrations of selenite high enough to influence Se bioaccumulation by M. balthica did not occur in the oxidized water column of San Francisco Bay. However, 98-99% of the Se observed in M. balthica could be explained by ingestion of the concentrations of participate Se found in the bay. The potential for adverse biological effects occurred at much lower concentrations of environmental Se when food web transfer was considered than when predictions of effects were based upon bioassays with solute forms of the element. Selenium clearly requires a protective criterion based upon particulate concentrations or food web transfer. ?? 1992 American Chemical Society.

  18. Inoculation of Astragalus racemosus and Astragalus convallarius with selenium-hyperaccumulator rhizosphere fungi affects growth and selenium accumulation.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Stormy Dawn; Fakra, Sirine C; Landon, Jessica; Schulz, Paige; Tracy, Benjamin; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2013-03-01

    Little is known about how fungi affect plant selenium (Se) accumulation. Here we investigate the effects of two fungi on Se accumulation, translocation, and chemical speciation in the hyperaccumulator Astragalus racemosus and the non-accumulator Astragalus convallarius. The fungi, Alternaria astragali (A3) and Fusarium acuminatum (F30), were previously isolated from Astragalus hyperaccumulator rhizosphere. A3-inoculation enhanced growth of A. racemosus yet inhibited growth of A. convallarius. Selenium treatment negated these effects. F30 reduced shoot-to-root Se translocation in A. racemosus. X-ray microprobe analysis showed no differences in Se speciation between inoculation groups. The Astragalus species differed in Se localization and speciation. A. racemosus root-Se was distributed throughout the taproot and lateral root and was 90 % organic in the lateral root. The related element sulfur (S) was present as a mixture of organic and inorganic forms in the hyperaccumulator. Astragalus convallarius root-Se was concentrated in the extreme periphery of the taproot. In the lateral root, Se was exclusively in the vascular core and was only 49 % organic. These findings indicate differences in Se assimilation between the two species and differences between Se and S speciation in the hyperaccumulator. The finding that fungi can affect translocation may have applications in phytoremediation and biofortification. PMID:23117393

  19. Interactions between active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients affecting bioavailability: impact on bioequivalence.

    PubMed

    García-Arieta, Alfredo

    2014-12-18

    The aim of the present paper is to illustrate the impact that excipients may have on the bioavailability of drugs and to review existing US-FDA, WHO and EMA regulatory guidelines on this topic. The first examples illustrate that small amounts of sorbitol (7, 50 or 60mg) affect the bioavailability of risperidone, a class I drug, oral solution, in contrast to what is stated in the US-FDA guidance. Another example suggests, in contrast to what is stated in the US-FDA BCS biowaivers guideline, that a small amount of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) (3.64mg) affects the bioavailability of risperidone tablets, although the reference product also includes SLS in an amount within the normal range for that type of dosage form. These factors are considered sufficient to ensure that excipients do not affect bioavailability according to the WHO guideline. The alternative criterion, defined in the WHO guideline and used in the FIP BCS biowaivers monographs, that asserts that excipients present in generic products of the ICH countries do not affect bioavailability if used in normal amounts, is shown to be incorrect with an example of alendronate (a class III drug) tablets, where 4mg of SLS increases bioavailability more than 5-fold, although a generic product in the USA contains SLS. Finally, another example illustrates that a 2mg difference in SLS may affect bioavailability of a generic product of a class II drug, even if SLS is contained in the comparator product, and in all cases its amount was within the normal range. Therefore, waivers of in vivo bioequivalence studies (e.g., BCS biowaivers, waivers of certain dosage forms in solution at the time of administration and variations in the excipient composition) should be assessed more cautiously. PMID:25236823

  20. Bioavailability of selenium in 'Jose' tall wheatgrass (Thinopyrum ponticum var 'Jose') hay as a substitute for sodium selenite in the diets of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Cun, G S; Robinson, P H; Benes, S E

    2015-06-15

    Due to its potential toxicity to wildlife, selenium (Se) is a highly regulated trace element in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California. Tall wheatgrass (TWG) is a Se-accumulating, salt tolerant forage suitable for cropping systems which re-use agricultural drainage waters. Utilization of TWG hay as an alternative Se supplement for dairy cattle could reduce the importation of 'new' Se into the SJV in the form of sodium selenite (SS) diet supplements. Our study used Se-enriched (4.65 mg/kg DM) TWG hay as a Se source for lactating dairy cows and measured Se accumulation in milk, blood, urine and feces to assess its bioavailability using several indices. Using a 3×3 Latin Square design, three pens of ~310 cows each were fed a similar total mixed ration over 4 week periods, except for Se which was higher in TWG and SS diets (0.53 and 0.65 mg/kg DM) vs. Control diet (0.35 mg/kg DM). Feeding Se-enriched TWG increased blood Se by 6.4% over Control; whereas SS increased it by 4.8%, suggesting higher Se bioavailability for TWG vs. SS. Marginal Se outputs in milk, feces and urine were judged to be better indicators of bioavailability as they estimate Se specifically from supplemental SS or TWG hay. In milk, TWG cows expressed 3.0% of supplemented Se vs. 0.6% for SS cows, supporting higher Se bioavailability for TWG. In contrast, more supplemental Se was retained and not expressed in feces by the SS cows (72.5%) vs. TWG cows (55.1%) which suggested higher Se bioavailability for SS. Based on published guidelines, Se intakes were 'adequate' for cows in all treatment groups, but milk and fat production increased with Se supplementation suggesting that Control cows were Se-deficient to some extent. Collectively, results suggest that the Se in TWG hay had comparable bioavailability to Se in the base diet. PMID:25747375

  1. Pro198Leu polymorphism affects the selenium status and GPx activity in response to Brazil nut intake.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Bárbara R; Busse, Alexandre L; Hare, Dominic J; Cominetti, Cristiane; Horst, Maria A; McColl, Gawain; Magaldi, Regina M; Jacob-Filho, Wilson; Cozzolino, Silvia M F

    2016-02-01

    Selenoproteins play important roles in antioxidant mechanisms, and are thus hypothesised to have some involvement in the pathology of certain types of dementia. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are both thought to involve impaired biological activity of certain selenoproteins. Previously, supplementation with a selenium-rich Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) has shown potential in reducing cognitive decline in MCI patients, and could prove to be a safe and effective nutritional approach early in the disease process to slow decline. Here, we have conducted a pilot study that examined the effects of a range of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the selenoproteins glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) and selenoprotein P (SEPP) in response to selenium supplementation via dietary Brazil nuts, including selenium status, oxidative stress parameters and GPX1 and SEPP gene expression. Our data suggest that GPX1 Pro198Leu rs1050450 genotypes may differentially affect the selenium status and GPx activity. Moreover, rs7579 and rs3877899 SNPs in SEPP gene, as well as GPX1 rs1050450 genotypes can influence the expression of GPX1 and SEPP mRNA in response to Brazil nuts intake. This small study gives cause for larger investigations into the role of these SNPs in both the selenium status and response to selenium dietary intake, especially in chronic degenerative conditions like MCI and AD. PMID:26661784

  2. A dietary assessment of selenium risk to aquatic birds on a coal mine affected stream in Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Wayland, M.; Casey, R.; Woodsworth, E.

    2007-07-15

    In this article, we present the results of a dietary-based assessment of the risk that selenium may pose to two aquatic bird species, the American Dipper (Cinclus mexicanus) and the Harlequin Duck (Histrionicus histrionicus), on one of the coal mine-affected streams, the Gregg River. The study consisted of (1) a literature-based toxicity assessment, (2) simulation of selenium exposure in the diets and eggs of the two species, and (3) a risk assessment that coupled information on toxicity and exposure. Diet and egg selenium concentrations associated with a 20% hatch failure rate were 6.4 and 17 {mu} g {center_dot} g{sup -1} dry wt, respectively. Simulated dietary selenium concentrations were about 2.0-2.5 {mu} g {center_dot} g{sup -1} higher on the Gregg River than on reference streams for both species. When simulated dietary concentrations were considered, hatch failure rates on the Gregg River were predicted to average 12% higher in American Dippers and 8% higher in Harlequin Ducks than at reference streams. Corresponding values were only 3% for both species when predicted egg concentrations were used. Elevated levels of selenium in insects in some of the reference streams were unexpected and raised a question as to whether aquatic birds have evolved a higher tolerance level for dietary selenium in these areas.

  3. Transcriptomics and proteomics show that selenium affects inflammation, cytoskeleton, and cancer pathways in human rectal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Méplan, Catherine; Johnson, Ian T; Polley, Abigael C J; Cockell, Simon; Bradburn, David M; Commane, Daniel M; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P; Mulholland, Francis; Zupanic, Anze; Mathers, John C; Hesketh, John

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiologic studies highlight the potential role of dietary selenium (Se) in colorectal cancer prevention. Our goal was to elucidate whether expression of factors crucial for colorectal homoeostasis is affected by physiologic differences in Se status. Using transcriptomics and proteomics followed by pathway analysis, we identified pathways affected by Se status in rectal biopsies from 22 healthy adults, including 11 controls with optimal status (mean plasma Se = 1.43 μM) and 11 subjects with suboptimal status (mean plasma Se = 0.86 μM). We observed that 254 genes and 26 proteins implicated in cancer (80%), immune function and inflammatory response (40%), cell growth and proliferation (70%), cellular movement, and cell death (50%) were differentially expressed between the 2 groups. Expression of 69 genes, including selenoproteins W1 and K, which are genes involved in cytoskeleton remodelling and transcription factor NFκB signaling, correlated significantly with Se status. Integrating proteomics and transcriptomics datasets revealed reduced inflammatory and immune responses and cytoskeleton remodelling in the suboptimal Se status group. This is the first study combining omics technologies to describe the impact of differences in Se status on colorectal expression patterns, revealing that suboptimal Se status could alter inflammatory signaling and cytoskeleton in human rectal mucosa and so influence cancer risk.-Méplan, C., Johnson, I. T., Polley, A. C. J., Cockell, S., Bradburn, D. M., Commane, D. M., Arasaradnam, R. P., Mulholland, F., Zupanic, A., Mathers, J. C., Hesketh, J. Transcriptomics and proteomics show that selenium affects inflammation, cytoskeleton, and cancer pathways in human rectal biopsies. PMID:27103578

  4. Impact of heat treatment on size, structure, and bioactivity of elemental selenium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinsong; Taylor, Ethan W; Wan, Xiaochun; Peng, Dungeng

    2012-01-01

    Background Elemental selenium nanoparticles have emerged as a novel selenium source with the advantage of reduced risk of selenium toxicity. The present work investigated whether heat treatment affects the size, structure, and bioactivity of selenium nanoparticles. Methods and results After a one-hour incubation of solution containing 80 nm selenium particles in a 90°C water bath, the nanoparticles aggregated into larger 110 nm particles and nanorods (290 nm × 70 nm), leading to significantly reduced bioavailability and phase II enzyme induction in selenium-deficient mice. When a solution containing 40 nm selenium nanoparticles was treated under the same conditions, the nanoparticles aggregated into larger 72 nm particles but did not transform into nanorods, demonstrating that the thermostability of selenium nanoparticles is size-dependent, smaller selenium nanoparticles being more resistant than larger selenium nanoparticles to transformation into nanorods during heat treatment. Conclusion The present results suggest that temperature and duration of the heat process, as well as the original nanoparticle size, should be carefully selected when a solution containing selenium nanoparticles is added to functional foods. PMID:22359458

  5. Dietary selenium affects homocysteine metabolism differently in Fisher-344 rats and CD-1 mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our previous work showed that plasma and tissue homocysteine concentrations are decreased by selenium deprivation in rats. The purpose of this study was to follow up and expand on that work by determining the effects of selenium status (deficient, adequate, and supranutritional) on key aspects of ho...

  6. Anatomical, physiological and experimental factors affecting the bioavailability of sc administered large biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Fathallah, Anas M.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2014-01-01

    Subcutaneous route of administration is highly desirable for protein therapeutics. It improves patient compliance and quality of life1,2, while reducing healthcare cost2. Recent evidence also suggests that sc administration of protein therapeutics can increase tolerability to some treatments such as intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (IVIG) by administering it subcutaneously (subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy SCIG), which will reduce fluctuation in plasma drug concentration3. Furthermore, sc administration may reduce the risk of systemic infections associated with iv infusion1,2. This route, however, has its challenges especially for large multi-domain proteins. Poor bioavailability and poor scalability from preclinical models are often cited. This commentary will discuss barriers to sc absorption as well as physiological and experimental factors that could affect pharmacokinetics of subcutaneously administered large protein therapeutics in preclinical models. A mechanistic pharmacokinetic model is proposed as a potential tool to address the issue of scalability of sc pharmacokinetic from preclinical models to humans PMID:25411114

  7. Selenium Supplementation Restores Innate and Humoral Immune Responses in Footrot-Affected Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jean A.; Vorachek, William R.; Stewart, Whitney C.; Gorman, M. Elena; Mosher, Wayne D.; Pirelli, Gene J.; Bobe, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Dietary selenium (Se) alters whole-blood Se concentrations in sheep, dependent upon Se source and dosage administered, but little is known about effects on immune function. We used footrot (FR) as a disease model to test the effects of supranutritional Se supplementation on immune function. To determine the effect of Se-source (organic Se-yeast, inorganic Na-selenite or Na-selenate) and Se-dosage (1, 3, 5 times FDA-permitted level) on FR severity, 120 ewes with and 120 ewes without FR were drenched weekly for 62 weeks with different Se sources and dosages (30 ewes/treatment group). Innate immunity was evaluated after 62 weeks of supplementation by measuring neutrophil bacterial killing ability. Adaptive immune function was evaluated by immunizing sheep with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). The antibody titer and delayed-type hypersensitivity skin test to KLH were used to assess humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity, respectively. At baseline, FR-affected ewes had lower whole-blood and serum-Se concentrations; this difference was not observed after Se supplementation. Se supplementation increased neutrophil bacterial killing percentages in FR-affected sheep to percentages observed in supplemented and non-supplemented healthy sheep. Similarly, Se supplementation increased KLH antibody titers in FR-affected sheep to titers observed in healthy sheep. FR-affected sheep demonstrated suppressed cell-mediated immunity at 24 hours after intradermal KLH challenge, although there was no improvement with Se supplementation. We did not consistently prevent nor improve recovery from FR over the 62 week Se-treatment period. In conclusion, Se supplementation does not prevent FR, but does restore innate and humoral immune functions negatively affected by FR. PMID:24340044

  8. Higher whole-blood selenium is associated with improved immune responses in footrot-affected sheep

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We reported previously that sheep affected with footrot (FR) have lower whole-blood selenium (WB-Se) concentrations and that parenteral Se-supplementation in conjunction with routine control practices accelerates recovery from FR. The purpose of this follow-up study was to investigate the mechanisms by which Se facilitates recovery from FR. Sheep affected with FR (n = 38) were injected monthly for 15 months with either 5 mg Se (FR-Se) or saline (FR-Sal), whereas 19 healthy sheep received no treatment. Adaptive immune function was evaluated after 3 months of Se supplementation by immunizing all sheep with a novel protein, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). The antibody titer and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test to KLH were used to assess humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity, respectively. Innate immunity was evaluated after 3 months of Se supplementation by measuring intradermal responses to histamine 30 min after injection compared to KLH and saline, and after 15 months of Se supplementation by isolating neutrophils and measuring their bacterial killing ability and relative abundance of mRNA for genes associated with neutrophil migration. Compared to healthy sheep, immune responses to a novel protein were suppressed in FR-affected sheep with smaller decreases in FR-affected sheep that received Se or had WB-Se concentrations above 250 ng/mL at the time of the immune assays. Neutrophil function was suppressed in FR-affected sheep, but was not changed by Se supplementation or WB-Se status. Sheep FR is associated with depressed immune responses to a novel protein, which may be partly restored by improving WB-Se status (> 250 ng/mL). PMID:21896161

  9. Factors affecting soluble selenium removal by a selenate-reducing bacterium Bacillus sp. SF-1.

    PubMed

    Kashiwa, M; Nishimoto, S; Takahashi, K; Ike, M; Fujita, M

    2000-01-01

    High concentrations of soluble selenium, selenate and selenite, have acute and chronic toxicity toward living things. With the aim of developing a biological process for selenium removal, the effects of a variety of parameters on the reduction of soluble selenium by a Bacillus sp. strain SF-1, which is capable of reductively transforming selenate into selenite and, subsequently, into nontoxic insoluble elemental selenium, were studied. The bacterial strain could effectively reduce 20 mM of selenate to selenite and 2 mM of selenite to elemental selenium in the presence of an appropriate carbon source and in the absence of oxygen. The reduction rate of selenate to selenite was much higher than that of selenite to elemental selenium, resulting in the transient accumulation of selenite during selenate reduction. The selenate reduction rate increased with increases in the selenate concentration up to 20 mM, while the rate of selenite reduction decreased sharply at selenite concentrations of more than 2 mM. The elemental selenium transformed from selenate via selenite was found both inside and outside the cells. Bacillus sp. SF-1 was able to utilize a variety of organic acids or sugars as a carbon source in selenate reduction. Although the copresence of sulfate did not inhibit selenate reduction, it was completely inhibited by some other oxyanions, including nitrate. A model sequencing batch system using the bacterial strain was developed and exhibited good performance in the treatment of wastewater containing high concentrations of selenate. PMID:16232792

  10. Food web pathway determines how selenium affects aquatic ecosystems: a San Francisco Bay case study.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A Robin; Luoma, Samuel N; Schlekat, Christian E; Doblin, Martina A; Hieb, Kathryn A

    2004-09-01

    Chemical contaminants disrupt ecosystems, but specific effects may be under-appreciated when poorly known processes such as uptake mechanisms, uptake via diet, food preferences, and food web dynamics are influential. Here we show that a combination of food web structure and the physiology of trace element accumulation explain why some species in San Francisco Bay are threatened by a relatively low level of selenium contamination and some are not. Bivalves and crustacean zooplankton form the base of two dominant food webs in estuaries. The dominant bivalve Potamocorbula amurensis has a 10-fold slower rate constant of loss for selenium than do common crustaceans such as copepods and the mysid Neomysis mercedis (rate constant of loss, ke = 0.025, 0.155, and 0.25 d(-1), respectively). The result is much higher selenium concentrations in the bivalve than in the crustaceans. Stable isotope analyses show that this difference is propagated up the respective food webs in San Francisco Bay. Several predators of bivalves have tissue concentrations of selenium that exceed thresholds thought to be associated with teratogenesis or reproductive failure (liver Se >15 microg g(-1) dry weight). Deformities typical of selenium-induced teratogenesis were observed in one of these species. Concentrations of selenium in tissues of predators of zooplankton are less than the thresholds. Basic physiological and ecological processes can drive wide differences in exposure and effects among species, but such processes are rarely considered in traditional evaluations of contaminant impacts. PMID:15461158

  11. Food web pathway determines how selenium affects aquatic ecosystems: A San francisco Bay case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, A.R.; Luoma, S.N.; Schlekat, C.E.; Doblin, M.A.; Hieb, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical contaminants disrupt ecosystems, but specific effects may be under-appreciated when poorly known processes such as uptake mechanisms, uptake via diet, food preferences, and food web dynamics are influential. Here we show that a combination of food web structure and the physiology of trace element accumulation explain why some species in San Francisco Bay are threatened by a relatively low level of selenium contamination and some are not. Bivalves and crustacean Zooplankton form the base of two dominant food webs in estuaries. The dominant bivalve Potamocorbula amurensis has a 10-fold slower rate constant of loss for selenium than do common crustaceans such as copepods and the mysid Neomysis mercedis (rate constant of loss, ke = 0.025, 0.155, and 0.25 d-1, respectively). The result is much higher selenium concentrations in the bivalve than in the crustaceans. Stable isotope analyses show that this difference is propagated up the respective food webs in San Francisco Bay. Several predators of bivalves have tissue concentrations of selenium that exceed thresholds thought to be associated with teratogenesis or reproductive failure (liver Se > 15 ??g g-1 dry weight). Deformities typical of selenium-induced teratogenesis were observed in one of these species. Concentrations of selenium in tissues of predators of Zooplankton are less than the thresholds. Basic physiological and ecological processes can drive wide differences in exposure and effects among species, but such processes are rarely considered in traditional evaluations of contaminant impacts.

  12. In vitro selenium accessibility in pet foods is affected by diet composition and type.

    PubMed

    van Zelst, Mariëlle; Hesta, Myriam; Alexander, Lucille G; Gray, Kerry; Bosch, Guido; Hendriks, Wouter H; Du Laing, Gijs; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Goethals, Klara; Janssens, Geert P J

    2015-06-28

    Se bioavailability in commercial pet foods has been shown to be highly variable. The aim of the present study was to identify dietary factors associated with in vitro accessibility of Se (Se Aiv) in pet foods. Se Aiv is defined as the percentage of Se from the diet that is potentially available for absorption after in vitro digestion. Sixty-two diets (dog, n 52; cat, n 10) were in vitro enzymatically digested: fifty-four of them were commercially available (kibble, n 20; pellet, n 8; canned, n 17; raw meat, n 6; steamed meat, n 3) and eight were unprocessed (kibble, n 4; canned, n 4) from the same batch as the corresponding processed diets. The present investigation examined if Se Aiv was affected by diet type, dietary protein, methionine, cysteine, lysine and Se content, DM, organic matter and crude protein (CP) digestibility. Se Aiv differed significantly among diet types (P< 0·001). Canned and steamed meat diets had a lower Se Aiv than pelleted and raw meat diets. Se Aiv correlated positively with CP digestibility in extruded diets (kibbles, n 19; r 0·540, P =0·017) and negatively in canned diets (n 16; r - 0·611, P =0·012). Moreover, the canning process (n 4) decreased Se Aiv (P =0·001), whereas extrusion (n 4) revealed no effect on Se Aiv (P =0·297). These differences in Se Aiv between diet types warrant quantification of diet type effects on in vivo Se bioavailability. PMID:25994047

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies loci affecting blood copper, selenium and zinc

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David M.; Zhu, Gu; Dy, Veronica; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Golding, Jean; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Steer, Colin; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Smith, George Davey; Whitfield, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation affecting absorption, distribution or excretion of essential trace elements may lead to health effects related to sub-clinical deficiency. We have tested for allelic effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on blood copper, selenium and zinc in a genome-wide association study using two adult cohorts from Australia and the UK. Participants were recruited in Australia from twins and their families and in the UK from pregnant women. We measured erythrocyte Cu, Se and Zn (Australian samples) or whole blood Se (UK samples) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Genotyping was performed with Illumina chips and >2.5 m SNPs were imputed from HapMap data. Genome-wide significant associations were found for each element. For Cu, there were two loci on chromosome 1 (most significant SNPs rs1175550, P = 5.03 × 10−10, and rs2769264, P = 2.63 × 10−20); for Se, a locus on chromosome 5 was significant in both cohorts (combined P = 9.40 × 10−28 at rs921943); and for Zn three loci on chromosomes 8, 15 and X showed significant results (rs1532423, P = 6.40 × 10−12; rs2120019, P = 1.55 × 10−18; and rs4826508, P = 1.40 × 10−12, respectively). The Se locus covers three genes involved in metabolism of sulphur-containing amino acids and potentially of the analogous Se compounds; the chromosome 8 locus for Zn contains multiple genes for the Zn-containing enzyme carbonic anhydrase. Where potentially relevant genes were identified, they relate to metabolism of the element (Se) or to the presence at high concentration of a metal-containing protein (Cu). PMID:23720494

  14. Solubility constraints affecting the migration of selenium through the cementitious backfill of a geological disposal facility.

    PubMed

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Hinchliff, J; Evans, N D M; Read, D

    2016-03-15

    This work presents the study of the solubility of selenium under cementitious conditions and its diffusion, as SeO3(2-), through monolithic cement samples. The solubility studies were carried out under alkaline conditions similar to those anticipated in the near-field of a cement-based repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Experiments were conducted in NaOH solution, 95%-saturated Ca(OH)2, water equilibrated with a potential backfill material (Nirex reference vault backfill, NRVB) and in solutions containing cellulose degradation products, with and without reducing agents. The highest selenium concentrations were found in NaOH solution. In the calcium-containing solutions, analysis of the precipitates suggests that the solubility controlling phase is Ca2SeO3(OH)2·2H2O, which appears as euhedral rhombic crystals. The presence of cellulose degradation products caused an increase in selenium concentration, possibly due to competitive complexation, thereby, limiting the amount of calcium available for precipitation. Iron coupons had a minor effect on selenium solubility in contrast to Na2S2O4, suggesting that effective reduction of Se(IV) occurs only at Eh values below -300mV. Radial through-diffusion experiments on NRVB and in a fly ash cement showed no evidence of selenium breakthrough after one year. However, autoradiography of the exposed surfaces indicated that some migration had occurred and that selenium was more mobile in the higher porosity backfill than in the fly ash cement. PMID:26642443

  15. Streamflow and water-quality conditions including geologic sources and processes affecting selenium loading in the Toll Gate Creek watershed, Aurora, Arapahoe County, Colorado, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paschke, Suzanne S.; Runkel, Robert L.; Walton-Day, Katherine; Kimball, Briant A.; Schaffrath, Keelin R.

    2013-01-01

    Toll Gate Creek is a perennial stream draining a suburban area in Aurora, Colorado, where selenium concentrations have consistently exceeded the State of Colorado aquatic-life standard for selenium of 4.6 micrograms per liter since the early 2000s. In cooperation with the City of Aurora, Colorado, Utilities Department, a synoptic water-quality study was performed along an 18-kilometer reach of Toll Gate Creek extending from downstream from Quincy Reservoir to the confluence with Sand Creek to develop a detailed understanding of streamflow and concentrations and loads of selenium in Toll Gate Creek. Streamflow and surface-water quality were characterized for summer low-flow conditions (July–August 2007) using four spatially overlapping synoptic-sampling subreaches. Mass-balance methods were applied to the synoptic-sampling and tracer-injection results to estimate streamflow and develop spatial profiles of concentration and load for selenium and other chemical constituents in Toll Gate Creek surface water. Concurrent groundwater sampling determined concentrations of selenium and other chemical constituents in groundwater in areas surrounding the Toll Gate Creek study reaches. Multivariate principal-component analysis was used to group samples and to suggest common sources for dissolved selenium and major ions. Hydrogen and oxygen stable-isotope ratios, groundwater-age interpretations, and chemical analysis of water-soluble paste extractions from core samples are presented, and interpretation of the hydrologic and geochemical data support conclusions regarding geologic sources of selenium and the processes affecting selenium loading in the Toll Gate Creek watershed. Streamflow conditions observed and measured during the synoptic water-quality study represent summer base-flow conditions and rainfall conditions for July 2007. The lack of large tributary inflows and the spatial distribution of small tributary inflows, seeps, and springs indicate that diffuse and

  16. Dietary Selenium (Se) and Copper (Cu) Interact to Affect Homocysteine Metabolism in Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our previous studies have shown that selenium (Se) is protective against dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced preneoplastic colon cancer lesions, and protection against DNA damage has been hypothesized to be one mechanism for the anticancer effect of Se. The present study was designed to determine whethe...

  17. Post-weaning selenium and folate supplementation affects gene and protein expression and global DNA methylation in mice fed high-fat diets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Consumption of high-fat diets has negative impacts on health and well-being, some of which may be epigenetically regulated. Selenium and folate are two compounds which influence epigenetic mechanisms. We investigated the hypothesis that post-weaning supplementation with adequate levels of selenium and folate in offspring of female mice fed a high-fat, low selenium and folate diet during gestation and lactation will lead to epigenetic changes of potential importance for long-term health. Methods Female offspring of mothers fed the experimental diet were either maintained on this diet (HF-low-low), or weaned onto a high-fat diet with sufficient levels of selenium and folate (HF-low-suf), for 8 weeks. Gene and protein expression, DNA methylation, and histone modifications were measured in colon and liver of female offspring. Results Adequate levels of selenium and folate post-weaning affected gene expression in colon and liver of offspring, including decreasing Slc2a4 gene expression. Protein expression was only altered in the liver. There was no effect of adequate levels of selenium and folate on global histone modifications in the liver. Global liver DNA methylation was decreased in mice switched to adequate levels of selenium and folate, but there was no effect on methylation of specific CpG sites within the Slc2a4 gene in liver. Conclusions Post-weaning supplementation with adequate levels of selenium and folate in female offspring of mice fed high-fat diets inadequate in selenium and folate during gestation and lactation can alter global DNA methylation in liver. This may be one factor through which the negative effects of a poor diet during early life can be ameliorated. Further research is required to establish what role epigenetic changes play in mediating observed changes in gene and protein expression, and the relevance of these changes to health. PMID:23497688

  18. Do selenium hyperaccumulators affect selenium speciation in neighboring plants and soil? An X-Ray Microprobe Analysis.

    PubMed

    El Mehdawi, Ali F; Lindblom, Stormy D; Cappa, Jennifer J; Fakra, Sirine C; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2015-01-01

    Neighbors of Se hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus were found earlier to have elevated Se levels. Here we investigate whether Se hyperaccumulators affect Se localization and speciation in surrounding soil and neighboring plants. X-ray fluorescence mapping and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy were used to analyze Se localization and speciation in leaves of Artemisia ludoviciana, Symphyotrichum ericoides and Chenopodium album growing next to Se hyperaccumulators or non-accumulators at a seleniferous site. Regardless of neighbors, A. ludoviciana, S. ericoides and C. album accumulated predominantly (73-92%) reduced selenocompounds with XANES spectra similar to the C-Se-C compounds selenomethionine and methyl-selenocysteine. Preliminary data indicate that the largest Se fraction (65-75%), both in soil next to hyperaccumulator S. pinnata and next to nonaccumulator species was reduced Se with spectra similar to C-Se-C standards. These same C-Se-C forms are found in hyperaccumulators. Thus, hyperaccumulator litter may be a source of organic soil Se, but soil microorganisms may also contribute. These findings are relevant for phytoremediation and biofortification since organic Se is more readily accumulated by plants, and more effective for dietary Se supplementation. PMID:26030363

  19. SUPPLEMENTAL DIETARY INULIN AFFECTS BIOAVAILABILITY OF IRON PRESENT IN CORN AND SOYBEAN MEAL TO YOUNG PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron deficiency represents one of the most common global nutritional disorders in humans. Our objective was to determine whether and how supplemental inulin improved bioavailability of iron intrinsically present in a corn-soybean meal based diet to young pigs for hemoglobin synthesis. In Experimen...

  20. Selenium bioaccessibility and speciation in biofortified Pleurotus mushrooms grown on selenium-rich agricultural residues.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Poonam; Aureli, Federica; D'Amato, Marilena; Prakash, Ranjana; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Nagaraja, Tejo Prakash; Cubadda, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Cultivation of saprophytic fungi on selenium-rich substrates can be an effective means to produce selenium-fortified food. Pleurotus florida, an edible species of oyster mushrooms, was grown on wheat straw from the seleniferous belt of Punjab (India) and its potential to mobilize and accumulate selenium from the growth substrate was studied. Selenium concentration in biofortified mushrooms was 800 times higher compared with control samples grown on wheat straw from non selenium-rich areas (141 vs 0.17 μg Se g(-1) dry weight). Seventy-five percent of the selenium was extracted after in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion and investigation of the selenium molecular fractions by size exclusion HPLC-ICP-MS revealed that proteins and any other high molecular weight selenium-containing molecule were hydrolyzed to peptides and low molecular weight selenocompounds. Analysis of the gastrointestinal hydrolysates by anion exchange HPLC-ICP-MS showed that the bioaccessible selenium was mainly present as selenomethionine, a good bioavailable source of selenium, which accounted for 73% of the sum of the detected species. This study demonstrates the feasibility of producing selenium-biofortified edible mushrooms using selenium-rich agricultural by-products as growth substrates. The proposed approach can be used to evaluate whether selenium-contaminated plant waste materials harvested from high-selenium areas may be used to produce selenium-biofortified edible mushrooms based on the concentration, bioaccessibility and speciation of selenium in the mushrooms. PMID:23578637

  1. Determination of selenium bioavailability from wheat mill fractions in rats by using the slope-ratio assay and a modified Torula yeast-based diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential mineral micronutrient for animals, and significant evidence supports an association between supra-nutritional Se intake and a reduction in the incidence of some forms of cancer. Thus, supplemental Se intake may provide an avenue for reducing cancer incidence. However, a...

  2. Investigation of stillbirths, perinatal mortality and weakness in beef calves with low-selenium whole blood concentrations.

    PubMed

    Davis, Anthony J; Myburgh, Jan G

    2016-01-01

    In this on-farm investigation, we report on stillbirths, weakness and perinatal mortality seen in calves on a commercial beef farm in the Roossenekal area, Mpumalanga province, South Africa. Post-mortem examination of these calves and histopathological examination of organ and tissue samples did not indicate an infectious aetiology. Affected calves had marginal to deficient whole blood selenium concentrations. Whole blood samples collected from adult cattle on this farm and five neighbouring farms were deficient in selenium. The potential contributions of other minerals to the symptoms seen are a subject of ongoing investigation, but selenium deficiency was marked in this herd and required urgent correction. Methods to correct the deficiency included the use of injectable products, and an oral selenium supplement chelated to methionine. Selenium availability to plants is primarily determined by the selenium content of the parent bedrock, the presence of other minerals and the pH of the soil. The apparent sudden onset of this problem implicates a soil factor as being responsible for reducing selenium's bioavailability in this area. Selenium deficiency can have a significant impact on human health. HIV and/or AIDS, various forms of cancer and several specific clinical syndromes are associated with selenium deficiency in humans, and the impact on human health in this area also requires further investigation. PMID:27543038

  3. Soil sterilization affects aging-related sequestration and bioavailability of p,p'-DDE and anthracene to earthworms.

    PubMed

    Slizovskiy, Ilya B; Kelsey, Jason W

    2010-10-01

    Laboratory experiments investigated the effects of soil sterilization and compound aging on the bioaccumulation of spiked p,p'-DDE and anthracene by Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris. Declines in bioavailability occurred as pollutant residence time in both sterile and non-sterile soils increased from 3 to 203 d. Accumulation was generally higher in sterile soils during initial periods of aging (from 3-103 d). By 203 d, however, bioavailability of the compounds was unaffected by sterilization. Gamma irradiation and autoclaving may have altered bioavailability by inducing changes in the chemistry of soil organic matter (SOM). The results support a dual-mode partitioning sorption model in which the SOM components associated with short-term sorption (the 'soft' or 'rubbery' phases) are more affected than are the components associated with long-term sorption (the 'glassy' or microcrystalline phases). Risk assessments based on data from experiments in which sterile soil was used could overestimate exposure and bioaccumulation of pollutants. PMID:20708831

  4. Selenium Sulfide

    MedlinePlus

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  5. Influence of domestic processing on the bioaccessibility of selenium from selected food grains and composite meals.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Anjum; Platel, Kalpana

    2016-03-01

    Selenium, an ultra trace element with several health beneficial attributes, should be mainly derived from dietary sources. Since food processing is likely to alter the bioavailability of micronutrients, the influence of such processing such as germination and fermentation on selenium content and bioaccessibility, information on which is lacking, was examined in this study. Bioaccessibility of selenium from four cereal-based composite meals was also studied. Chickpea, green gram and finger millet were employed to study the effect of germination, and for effect of fermentation, batters used in preparation dosa, idli and dhokla were used. Soaking the grains in water as a part of germination and fermentation brought about a decrease in selenium content, while its bioaccessibility was not affected. The information on the loss of selenium during soaking and heat processing of the germinated grains is novel. Fermentation resulted in a further decrease in selenium content, the percent decrease ranging from 26 to 47 in the batters. Similar decreases were seen in the bioaccessible selenium content as a result of soaking and fermentation. Cooking of the fermented batters, however, significantly enhanced the bioaccessibility of selenium from dosa and dhokla by 44 and 71 %, respectively. Selenium content of the four meals ranged from 150 to 228.8 ng/g. Bioaccessible selenium was highest in the finger millet-based meal (32.8 ng/g), followed by sorghum, wheat and rice-based meals. The present investigation thus provides vital and novel information on selenium content and bioaccessibility from foods subjected to processing as is commonly practiced in Indian households. PMID:27570288

  6. Concentration and solubility of flavanones in orange beverages affect their bioavailability in humans.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Fernando; Larrosa, Mar; Escudero, Elisa; Zafrilla, María P; Cerdá, Begoña; Boza, Julio; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Espín, Juan Carlos; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2010-05-26

    Orange juice is a very rich source of dietary flavanones. The effect of flavanone concentration and solubility of orange beverages on their bioavailability has been studied in a crossover study with 10 healthy volunteers. Five different beverages with different flavanone concentrations were evaluated. Commercial orange juices (29.2-70.3 mg of flavanones/100 mL) were compared with experimental orange beverages in which the flavanone concentration was enhanced (110.2 mg/100 mL). Hesperetin and naringenin glucuronides and sulfates were detected and quantified in plasma and urine. The study shows that the solubility of the flavanones, and particularly that of hesperidin, in the juice is a key factor for the bioavailability as flavanone excretion and the C(max) in plasma correlate well with the soluble flavanone concentration in the juice, whereas it has no correlation with the total flavanone intake. In addition, a large interindividual variation was observed, this being consistent for each individual after the intake of the different beverages, suggesting that flavanone bioavailability is also dependent on the occurrence of specific microbiota that is able to remove the rutinosides from the juice glycosides, which results in aglycones that are then absorbed from the gut. PMID:20441150

  7. Form of supplemental selenium fed to cycling cows affects systemic concentrations of progesterone but not those of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Katheryn L; Anderson, Les; Burris, Walter R; Rhoads, Michelle; Matthews, James C; Bridges, Phillip J

    2016-03-15

    In areas where soils are deficient in selenium (Se), dietary supplementation of this trace mineral directly to cattle is recommended. Selenium status affects fertility, and the form of Se supplemented to cows affects tissue-specific gene expression profiles. The objective of this study was to determine whether the form of Se consumed by cows would affect follicular growth and the production of steroids. Thirty-three Angus-cross cows that had ad libitum access of a mineral mix containing 35 ppm of Se in free-choice vitamin-mineral mixes as either inorganic (ISe), organic (OSe), or a 50/50 mix of ISe and OSe (MIX) for 180 days were used. After 170 days of supplementation, all cows were injected with 25-mg PGF2α to induce regression of the CL and then monitored for behavioral estrus (Day 0). From Day 4 to Day 8 after estrus, follicular growth was determined by transrectal ultrasonography. On Day 6, cows were injected with PGF2α (20 then 15 mg, 8-12 hours apart) to induce regression of the developing CL and differentiation of the dominant follicle of the first follicular wave into a preovulatory follicle. On Day 8, 36 hours after PGF2α (20 mg), the contents of the preovulatory follicle were aspirated by ultrasound-guided follicular puncture. Blood collected on Days 6 and 8 and follicular fluid collected on Day 8 was analyzed for concentrations of progesterone and estradiol. Form of Se supplemented to cows affected (P = 0.04) the systemic concentration of progesterone on Day 6, but not on Day 8. Form of Se did not affect the systemic concentration of estradiol on Day 6 or Day 8. Form of Se tended to affect (P = 0.07) the concentration of progesterone, but not that of estradiol, in the follicular fluid. Form of Se did not affect diameter of the dominant ovarian follicle on Days 4 to 6, but tended to affect (P = 0.08) the diameter of the preovulatory follicle on Day 8. Our results suggest that form of Se fed to cows affects the production of progesterone

  8. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Petra A.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Anderson, Christine B.; Seifried, Harold E.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Howard, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake. PMID:26258789

  9. The poor bioavailability of elemental iron in corn masa flour is not affected by disodium EDTA.

    PubMed

    Walter, Tomas; Pizarro, Fernando; Boy, Erick; Abrams, Steven A

    2004-02-01

    The most sustainable way to eradicate iron deficiency is through food fortification. Elemental iron powders are commonly utilized as fortificants due to their low cost and few sensory problems. However, their bioavailability is unknown. Our goals were to measure the bioavailability of elemental iron in Mexican style corn masa flour tortillas and to evaluate the effects of Na(2)EDTA. We used a stable isotope of H(2)-reduced iron powder, with and without Na(2)EDTA in tortillas prepared with corn masa flour. Two groups of 5- to 7-y-old children (n = 12/group) were fed tortillas to which was added 3 mg/100 g of H(2)-reduced (58)Fe with a mean particle size of 15 micro m. In one group, Na(2)EDTA was incorporated at a ratio of 1:2 mol/mol. The next day, (57)Fe ascorbate was given as a reference dose. After 14 d, blood samples were analyzed for isotopic enrichment. When normalized to 40% absorption of the reference dose, the geometric mean (+/-range 1 SD) bioavailability of reduced iron in tortilla was 3.8% (2.7-5.3). The addition of Na(2)EDTA, tended to increase it (P = 0.18) to 5.1% (2.8-9.2). This observed low absorption was compounded by the use of iron isotopes with smaller particle size (mean diameter 15 micro m) than typical of commercial elemental iron powder (<45 micro m). We conclude that H(2)-reduced iron powder is an ineffective fortificant in corn tortillas. PMID:14747675

  10. GPX1 Pro198Leu polymorphism and GSTM1 deletion do not affect selenium and mercury status in mildly exposed Amazonian women in an urban population.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ariana V; Rita Cardoso, Bárbara; Zavarize, Bruna; Almondes, Kaluce; Bordon, Isabella; Hare, Dominic J; Teixeira Favaro, Déborah Inês; Franciscato Cozzolino, Silvia Maria

    2016-11-15

    Mercury is potent toxicant element, but its toxicity can be reduced by forming a complex with selenium for safe excretion. Considering the impact of mercury exposure in the Amazon region and the possible interaction between these two elements, we aimed to assess the effects of Pro198Leu polymorphism to GPX1 and GSTM1 deletion, on mercury levels in a population from Porto Velho, an urban locality in the Brazilian Amazon region. Two hundred women from the capital city of Rondônia state were recruited for this study with 149 deemed suitable to participate. We assessed dietary intake using 24-hour recall. Selenium levels in plasma and erythrocytes were measured using hydride generation quartz tube atomic absorption spectroscopy and total hair mercury using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Oxidative stress parameters (GPx activity, oxygen radical absorbency capacity [ORAC] and malondialdehyde [MDA]) were also analyzed. All participants were genotyped for Pro198Leu polymorphism and GSTM1 deletion. We observed that this population presented high prevalence of selenium deficiency, and also low levels of mercury, likely due to food habits that did not include selenium-rich food sources or significant consumption of fish (mercury biomagnifiers) regularly. Univariate statistical analysis showed that Pro198Leu and GSTM1 genotypes did not affect selenium and mercury levels in this population. Pro198Leu polymorphism and GSTM1 deletion had no effect on mercury levels in mildly exposed people, suggesting these genetic variants impact mercury levels only in highly exposed populations. PMID:27450956

  11. Analysis of bioavailable Ge in agricultural and mining-affected-soils in Freiberg area (Saxony, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiche, Oliver; Székely, Balázs; Kummer, Nicolai-Alexeji; Heinemann, Ute; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2014-05-01

    Germanium (Ge) concentrations in different soil fraction were investigated using a sequential selective dissolution analysis and a rhizosphere-based single-step extraction method for the identification of Ge-bearing soil fractions and prediction of bioavailability of Ge in soil to plants. About 50 soil samples were collected from various soil depths (horizons A and B) and study sites with different types of land use (dry and moist grassland, arable land, mine dumps) in Freiberg area (Saxony, Germany). Ge has been extracted in six soil fractions: mobile fraction, organic matter and sulfides, Mn- and Fe-oxides (amorphous and crystalline), and kaolinite and phytoliths, and residual fraction. The rhizosphere-based method included a 7-day-long extraction sequence with various organic acids like citric acid, malic acid and acetic acid. For the residue the aforementioned sequential extraction has been applied. The Ge-content of the samples have been measured with ICP-MS using rhodium internal standard and two different soil standards. Total Ge concentrations were found to be in the range of 1.6 to 5.5 ppm with highest concentrations on the tailing site in the mining area of Altenberg. The mean Ge concentration in agriculturally used soils was 2.6 ± 0.67 ppm, whereas the maximum values reach 2.9 ± 0.64 ppm and 3.2 ± 0.67 ppm in Himmelsfürst and in a grassland by the Mulde river, respectively. With respect to the fractions, the vast majority of Ge is contained in the last three fractions, indicating that the bioavailable Ge is typically low in the samples. On the other hand at the soil horizons A at the aforementioned two sites characterised by high total Ge, together with that of Reiche Zeche mine dump have also the highest concentrations of Ge in the first three fractions, reaching levels of 1.74 and 0.98 ppm which account for approximately 40% of the total Ge content. Ge concentrations of soil samples extracted with 0.01 or 0.1 M citric acid and malic acid were

  12. Factors Affecting Mercury and Selenium Levels-in New Jersey Flatfish: Low Risk to Human Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Shukla, Sheila; Gochfeld, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Some fish contain high levels of mercury (Hg), which could pose a risk to fish eaters themselves or their children. In making decisions about fish consumption, people must decide whether to eat fish, how much to eat, what species to eat, and what size fish to eat, as well as suitable (or unsuitable) locations, among other factors. Yet to make sound decisions, people need to know the levels of Hg in fish as a function of species, size, and location of capture. Levels of Hg and selenium (Se) were examined in three species of flatfish (fluke or summer flounder [Paralichthys dentatus], winter flounder [Pseudopleuronectes americanus], and windowpane [Scophthalmus aquosus]) from New Jersey as a function of species, fish size, season, and location. Flatfish were postulated to have low levels of Hg because they are low on the food chain and are bottom feeders, and data were generated to provide individuals with information on a species that might be safe to eat regularly. Although there were interspecific differences in Hg levels in the 3 species, total Hg levels averaged 0.18, 0.14, and 0.06 ppm (μg/g, wet weigh) in windowpane, fluke, and winter flounder, and selenium levels averaged 0.36, 0.35, and 0.25 ppm, respectively. For windowpane, 15% had Hg levels above 0.3 ppm, but no individual fish had Hg levels over 0.5 ppm. There were no significant seasonal differences in Hg levels, although Se was significantly higher in fluke in summer compared to spring. There were few geographical differences among New Jersey locations. Correlations between Hg and Se levels were low. Data, based on 464 fish samples, indicate that Hg levels are below various advisory levels and pose little risk to typical New Jersey fish consumers. A 70-kg person eating 1 meal (8 oz or 227 g) per week would not exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reference dose of 0.1 μg/kg body weight/d of methylmercury (MeHg). However, high-end fish eaters consuming several such meals per week may exceed

  13. Have the bioavailabilities of trace metals to a suite of biomonitors changed over three decades in SW England estuaries historically affected by mining?

    PubMed

    Rainbow, P S; Kriefman, S; Smith, B D; Luoma, S N

    2011-03-15

    Many estuaries of southwest England were heavily contaminated with toxic metals associated with the mining of copper and other metals, particularly between 1850 and 1900. The question remains whether the passage of time has brought remediation to these estuaries. In 2003 and 2006 we revisited sites in 5 metal-contaminated estuaries sampled in the 1970s and 1980s - Restronguet Creek, Gannel, West Looe, East Looe and Tavy. We evaluate changes in metal contamination in sediments and in metal bioavailabilities in sediments and water to local organisms employed as biomonitors. We find that the decline in contamination in these estuaries is complex. Differences in bioavailable contamination in the water column were detectable, as were significant detectable changes in at least some estuaries in bioavailable metal contamination originating from sediments. However, in the 100 years since mining activities declined, bioavailable contamination has not declined to the regional baseline in any estuary affected by the mine wastes. The greatest decline in contamination occurred in the one instance (East Looe) where a previous industrial source of (Ag) contamination was considered. We used the macroalgae Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum as biomonitors of dissolved metal bioavailabilities and the deposit feeders Nereis diversicolor and Scrobicularia plana as biomonitors of bioavailable metal in sediments. We found no systematic decrease in the atypically high Ag, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations in the estuarine sediments over a 26 year period. Accumulated metal (Ag, As, Cu, Pb, and Zn) concentrations in the deposit feeders are similarly still atypically high in at least one estuary for each metal, and there is no consistent evidence for general decreases in sediment metal bioavailabilities over time. We conclude that the legacy of mining in sheltered estuaries of southwest England is the ongoing presence of sediments rich in metals bioavailable to deposit feeders, while

  14. Soy protein isolate does not affect ellagitannin bioavailability and urolithin formation when mixed with pomegranate juice in humans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jieping; Lee, Rupo; Henning, Susanne M; Thames, Gail; Hsu, Mark; ManLam, Hei; Heber, David; Li, Zhaoping

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the effect of mixing soy protein isolate and pomegranate juice (PJ) on the bioavailability and metabolism of ellagitannins (ETs) in healthy volunteers. Eighteen healthy volunteers consumed PJ alone or PJ premixed with soy protein isolate (PJSP). The concentration of plasma ellagic acid (EA) and urine urolithins was measured. There was no significant difference in plasma EA over a 6-h period between the two interventions. While the maximum concentration of plasma EA after PJSP consumption was slightly but significantly lower than after PJ consumption, EA remained in the plasma longer with an elimination half-life t1/2E at 1.36±0.59 versus 1.06±0.47h for PJSP and PJ consumption, respectively. Urinary urolithin A, B and C was not significantly different between the two interventions. In conclusion, premixing soy protein isolate and PJ did not affect the bioavailability or the metabolism of pomegranate ETs in healthy volunteers. PMID:26471685

  15. Soil Redox Chemistry Limitation of Selenium Concentration in Carex Species Sedges

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J. Mincher; John Mionczynski; Patrick A. Hnilicka

    2007-09-01

    The trace element selenium (Se) is required in the production of enzymes that protect mammalian cells from oxidative damage due to the byproducts of aerobic respiration. Its deficiency in livestock results in the nutritional muscular dystrophy called white muscle disease. This especially affects juveniles in the preweaning period. Symptoms have also been reported in wild herbivores on low-Se forage, and their appearance may be episodic, suggesting temporal variations in Se uptake by plants. Here, we report variations in selenium concentrations in Carex spp. sedges used as forage by bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) on summer range in the Wyoming, Wind River Mountains, and correlate those variations with soil conditions that affect the bioavailability of selenium. Variations in available Se are explained based upon the known oxidation/reduction chemistry of the element. It is concluded that water-saturated, alpine soils provide conditions suitable for the reduction of Se to the unavailable, elemental form, limiting its concentration in forage plants.

  16. Cooking enhances but the degree of ripeness does not affect provitamin A carotenoid bioavailability from bananas in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Bresnahan, Kara A; Arscott, Sara A; Khanna, Harjeet; Arinaitwe, Geofrey; Dale, James; Tushemereirwe, Wilberforce; Mondloch, Stephanie; Tanumihardjo, Jacob P; De Moura, Fabiana F; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2012-12-01

    Banana is a staple crop in many regions where vitamin A deficiency is prevalent, making it a target for provitamin A biofortification. However, matrix effects may limit provitamin A bioavailability from bananas. The retinol bioefficacies of unripe and ripe bananas (study 1A), unripe high-provitamin A bananas (study 1B), and raw and cooked bananas (study 2) were determined in retinol-depleted Mongolian gerbils (n = 97/study) using positive and negative controls. After feeding a retinol-deficient diet for 6 and 4 wk in studies 1 and 2, respectively, customized diets containing 60, 30, or 15% banana were fed for 17 and 13 d, respectively. In study 1A, the hepatic retinol of the 60% ripe Cavendish group (0.52 ± 0.13 μmol retinol/liver) differed from baseline (0.65 ± 0.15 μmol retinol/liver) and was higher than the negative control group (0.39 ± 0.16 μmol retinol/liver; P < 0.0065). In study 1B, no groups differed from baseline (0.65 ± 0.15 μmol retinol/liver; P = 0.20). In study 2, the 60% raw Butobe group (0.68 ± 0.17 μmol retinol/liver) differed from the 60% cooked Butobe group (0.87 ± 0.24 μmol retinol/liver); neither group differed from baseline (0.80 ± 0.27 μmol retinol/liver; P < 0.0001). Total liver retinol was higher in the groups fed cooked bananas than in those fed raw (P = 0.0027). Body weights did not differ even though gerbils ate more green, ripe, and raw bananas than cooked, suggesting a greater indigestible component. In conclusion, thermal processing, but not ripening, improves the retinol bioefficacy of bananas. Food matrix modification affects carotenoid bioavailability from provitamin A biofortification targets. PMID:23096010

  17. Effects of selenium biofortification on crop nutritional quality

    PubMed Central

    Malagoli, Mario; Schiavon, Michela; dall’Acqua, Stefano; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) at very low doses has crucial functions in humans and animals. Since plants represent the main dietary source of this element, Se-containing crops may be used as a means to deliver Se to consumers (biofortification). Several strategies have been exploited to increase plant Se content. Selenium assimilation in plants affects both sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) metabolic pathways, which is why recent research has also focused on the effect of Se fertilization on the production of S- and N- secondary metabolites with putative health benefits. In this review we discuss the function of Se in plant and human nutrition and the progress in the genetic engineering of Se metabolism to increase the levels and bioavailability of this element in food crops. Particular attention is paid to Se biofortification and the synthesis of compounds with beneficial effects on health. PMID:25954299

  18. Acute toxicity of the cationic surfactant C12-benzalkonium in different bioassays: how test design affects bioavailability and effect concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Geurts, Marc; Sjollema, Sascha B; Kramer, Nynke I; Hermens, Joop L M; Droge, Steven T J

    2014-03-01

    Using an ion-exchange-based solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method, the freely dissolved concentrations of C12-benzalkonium were measured in different toxicity assays, including 1) immobilization of Daphnia magna in the presence or absence of dissolved humic acid; 2) mortality of Lumbriculus variegatus in the presence or absence of a suspension of Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) sediment; 3) photosystem II inhibition of green algae Chlorella vulgaris; and 4) viability of in vitro rainbow trout gill cell line (RTgill-W1) in the presence or absence of serum proteins. Furthermore, the loss from chemical adsorption to the different test vessels used in these tests was also determined. The C12-benzalkonium sorption isotherms to the different sorbent phases were established as well. Our results show that the freely dissolved concentration is a better indicator of the actual exposure concentration than the nominal or total concentration in most test assays. Daphnia was the most sensitive species to C12-benzalkonium. The acute Daphnia and Lumbriculus tests both showed no enhanced toxicity from possible ingestion of sorbed C12-benzalkonium in comparison with water-only exposure, which is in accordance with the equilibrium partitioning theory. Moreover, the present study demonstrates that commonly used sorbent phases can strongly affect bioavailability and observed effect concentrations for C12-benzalkonium. Even stronger effects of decreased actual exposure concentrations resulting from sorption to test vessels, cells, and sorbent phases can be expected for more hydrophobic cationic surfactants. PMID:24273010

  19. Selenium in the environment and human health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although selenium was shown to affect biological systems over 80 years ago and was recognized as an essential micronutrient in the mid-20th century, the "flowering" of the selenium field has taken place in the 21st century. The biological function of selenium through selenoproteins has been firmly e...

  20. Selenium transformation in coal mine spoils

    SciTech Connect

    Atalay, A.; Koll, K.J.

    1990-09-01

    The objective of this part of the study is to investigate the oxidation-reduction (redox) environment that favor the release of selenium from coal mine spoils. It is anticipated that the study will help answer critical questions as to the form, solubility, and mobility of selenium from the spoil site to the surrounding environment. This investigation will evaluate the conditions which favor the speciation of selenium from coal mine spoils as affected by changes in the oxidation states of selenium.

  1. Selenium status affects selenoprotein expression, reproduction, and F₁ generation locomotor activity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Penglase, Sam; Hamre, Kristin; Rasinger, Josef D; Ellingsen, Staale

    2014-06-14

    Se is an essential trace element, and is incorporated into selenoproteins which play important roles in human health. Mammalian selenoprotein-coding genes are often present as paralogues in teleost fish, and it is unclear whether the expression patterns or functions of these fish paralogues reflect their mammalian orthologues. Using the model species zebrafish (Danio rerio; ZF), we aimed to assess how dietary Se affects key parameters in Se metabolism and utilisation including glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity, the mRNA expression of key Se-dependent proteins (gpx1a, gpx1b, sepp1a and sepp1b), oxidative status, reproductive success and F1 generation locomotor activity. From 27 d until 254 d post-fertilisation, ZF were fed diets with graded levels of Se ranging from deficient ( < 0·10 mg/kg) to toxic (30 mg/kg). The mRNA expression of gpx1a and gpx1b and GPX activity responded in a similar manner to changes in Se status. GPX activity and mRNA levels were lowest when dietary Se levels (0·3 mg/kg) resulted in the maximum growth of ZF, and a proposed bimodal mechanism in response to Se status below and above this dietary Se level was identified. The expression of the sepp1 paralogues differed, with only sepp1a responding to Se status. High dietary Se supplementation (30 mg/kg) decreased reproductive success, while the offspring of ZF fed above 0·3 mg Se/kg diet had lower locomotor activity than the other groups. Overall, the novel finding of low selenoprotein expression and activity coinciding with maximum body growth suggests that even small Se-induced variations in redox status may influence cellular growth rates. PMID:24666596

  2. Selenium Sulfide

    MedlinePlus

    Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium sulfide usually is used twice a week for the first ... it is irritating. Rinse off all of the lotion.Do not use this medication on children younger ...

  3. Heavy metal bioavailability in a soil affected by mineral sulphides contamination following the mine spillage at Aznalcóllar (Spain).

    PubMed

    Clemente, Rafael; Walker, David J; Roig, Asunción; Bernal, M Pilar

    2003-06-01

    A field experiment, lasting 14 months, was carried out in order to assess the effect of organic amendment and lime addition on the bioavailability of heavy metals in contaminated soils. The experiment took place in a soil affected by acid, highly toxic pyritic waste from the Aznalcóllar mine (Seville, Spain) in April 1998. The following treatments were applied (3 plots per treatment): cow manure, a mature compost, lime (to plots having pH < 4), and control without amendment. During the study two crops of Brassica juncea were grown, with two additions of each organic amendment. Throughout the study, the evolution of soil pH, total and available (DTPA-extractable) heavy metals content (Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Pb and Cd), electrical conductivity (EC), soluble sulphates and plant growth and heavy metal uptake were followed. The study indicates that: (1) soil acidification, due to the oxidation of metallic sulphides in the soil, increased heavy metal bioavailability; (2) liming succeeded in controlling the soil acidification; and (3) the organic materials generally promoted fixation of heavy metals in non-available soil fractions, with Cu bioavailability being particularly affected by the organic treatments. PMID:12889610

  4. Bioanalytical effect-balance model to determine the bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediments affected by black and natural carbon.

    PubMed

    Bräunig, Jennifer; Tang, Janet Y M; Warne, Michael St J; Escher, Beate I

    2016-08-01

    In sediments several binding phases dictate the fate and bioavailability of organic contaminants. Black carbon (BC) has a high sorptive capacity for organic contaminants and can limit their bioavailability, while the fraction bound to organic carbon (OC) is considered to be readily desorbable and bioavailable. We investigated the bioavailability and mixture toxicity of sediment-associated contaminants by combining different extraction techniques with in vitro bioanalytical tools. Sediments from a harbour with high fraction of BC, and sediments from remote, agricultural and urban areas with lower BC were treated with exhaustive solvent extraction, Tenax extraction and passive sampling to estimate total, bioaccessible and bioavailable fractions, respectively. The extracts were characterized with cell-based bioassays that measure dioxin-like activity (AhR-CAFLUX) and the adaptive stress response to oxidative stress (AREc32). Resulting bioanalytical equivalents, which are effect-scaled concentrations, were applied in an effect-balance model, consistent with a mass balance-partitioning model for single chemicals. Sediments containing BC had most of the bioactivity associated to the BC fraction, while the OC fraction played a role for sediments with lower BC. As effect-based sediment-water distribution ratios demonstrated, most of the bioactivity in the AhR-CAFLUX was attributable to hydrophobic chemicals while more hydrophilic chemicals activated AREc32, even though bioanalytical equivalents in the aqueous phase remained negligible. This approach can be used to understand the fate and effects of mixtures of diverse organic contaminants in sediments that would not be possible if single chemicals were targeted by chemical analysis; and make informed risk-based decisions concerning the management of contaminated sediments. PMID:27176940

  5. Selenium elimination in pigs after an outbreak of selenium toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Davidson-York, D; Galey, F D; Blanchard, P; Gardner, I A

    1999-07-01

    In May 1996, 150 grower pigs in 5 California counties were exposed to selenium-contaminated feed distributed by a single feed company. Feed samples from 20 herds had a mean selenium concentration of 121.7 ppm dry weight (range, 22.1-531 ppm). In San Luis Obispo County, 52 pigs in 24 herds were exposed to the feed, and 8 pigs died with signs of paralysis. Bilateral symmetrical poliomyelomalacia involving the ventral horns of the cervical and lumbar intumescence was evident on histologic examination of spinal cord from affected pigs. Of 44 surviving exposed pigs, 33 (75%) exhibited signs of selenosis, including anorexia, alopecia, and hoof lesions. Thirty-nine of 44 pigs (88.6%) had elevated (>1 ppm) blood selenium concentrations. Surviving exposed pigs were changed to a standard commercial ration containing approximately 0.5 ppm (dry weight) selenium. Blood selenium concentrations were determined weekly for 46 days following removal of the contaminated feed and were compared with values of 20 control pigs fed a standard commercial ration. Mean (+/-SD) blood selenium concentrations of exposed pigs were 3.2 +/- 2.6 ppm at the initial sampling and 0.4 +/- 0.1 ppm after 46 days. Mean blood selenium concentrations of < or = 0.3 ppm for control pigs at all samplings were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than concentrations for exposed pigs. Muscle and liver samples of 22 of the 44 exposed pigs were collected at slaughter approximately 72 days after withdrawal of the selenium-contaminated feed. Muscle samples had a mean selenium concentration of 0.36 ppm (wet weight). Liver samples had a mean selenium concentration of 1.26 ppm (wet weight). One liver sample had a selenium value in the toxic range for pigs (3.3 ppm wet weight; reference range, 0.4-1.2 ppm). A 1-compartment pharmacokinetic model of selenium elimination in exposed pigs was generated, and the geometric mean blood selenium elimination half-life was estimated to be 12 days. The 60-day withdrawal time recommended

  6. Variations in the accumulation, localization and rate of metabolization of selenium in mature Zea mays plants supplied with selenite or selenate.

    PubMed

    Longchamp, Mélanie; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse; Biron, Philippe; Bariac, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Quantification of selenium bioavailability from foods is a key challenge following the discovery of the antioxidant role of this micronutrient in human health. This study presents the uptake, accumulation and rate of metabolization in mature Zea mays plants grown in hydroponic solution supplemented with selenate or selenite. Selenium content was lower in plants supplemented with selenate and accumulated mainly in the leaves compared with selenite-treated plants where the selenium was retained in the roots. Selenite-treated grains accumulated more selenium. Selenate was metabolized less than selenite in whole plants, but in grains selenium was present exclusively as organic selenium compounds. For humans, the bioavailability of organic selenium was evaluated at 90% compared with only 50% for inorganic forms. Our results show that the potential for selenium bioavailability is increased with selenite treatment. PMID:25842318

  7. Selenium and trace element mobility affected by periodic displacement of stratification in the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beisner, K.; Naftz, D.L.; Johnson, W.P.; Diaz, X.

    2009-01-01

    The Great Salt Lake (GSL) is a unique ecosystem in which trace element activity cannot be characterized by standard geochemical parameters due to the high salinity. Movement of selenium and other trace elements present in the lake bed sediments of GSL may occur due to periodic stratification displacement events or lake bed exposure. The water column of GSL is complicated by the presence of a chemocline persistent over annual to decadal time scales. The water below the chemocline is referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), has a high salinity (16.5 to 22.9%) and is anoxic. The upper brine layer (UBL) resides above the chemocline, has lower salinity (12.6 to 14.7%) and is oxic. Displacement of the DBL may involve trace element movement within the water column due to changes in redox potential. Evidence of stratification displacement in the water column has been observed at two fixed stations on the lake by monitoring vertical water temperature profiles with horizontal and vertical velocity profiles. Stratification displacement events occur over periods of 12 to 24 h and are associated with strong wind events that can produce seiches within the water column. In addition to displacement events, the DBL shrinks and expands in response to changes in the lake surface area over a period of months. Laboratory tests simulating the observed sediment re-suspension were conducted over daily, weekly and monthly time scales to understand the effect of placing anoxic bottom sediments in contact with oxic water, and the associated effect of trace element desorption and (or) dissolution. Results from the laboratory simulations indicate that a small percentage (1%) of selenium associated with anoxic bottom sediments is periodically solubilized into the UBL where it potentially can be incorporated into the biota utilizing the oxic part of GSL.

  8. Tolerance of the preruminant calf for selenium in milk replacer

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, K.J.; Hidiroglou, M.

    1986-07-01

    Calves were fed skim milk powder-based milk replacer containing either .2, 1, 3, 5, or 10 ppm selenium (added as sodium selenate) in the dry matter from 3 to 45 d of age to estimate the lowest amount of dietary selenium that would reduce calf performance and feed utilization. Only at the highest selenium (10 ppm) did calves show reduced average daily gain and feed efficiency and lower blood packed cell volume. Apparent digestibility of dry matter, nitrogen, and lipid, and plasma creatine phosphokinase activity were not affected by any of the selenium intakes. In general, selenium in blood, bile, duodenal mucosa, liver, kidney, and muscle reflected selenium intakes with liver and kidney reaching the highest selenium concentrations. Postmortem examinations of calves revealed no gross abnormalities for any of the selenium treatments. The preruminant calf is very tolerant of high inorganic selenium concentrations in skim milk powder-based milk replacer.

  9. Selenium sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenium sulfide ; CASRN 7446 - 34 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  10. Hepatic oxidative stress and metal subcellular partitioning are affected by selenium exposure in wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    PubMed

    Ponton, Dominic E; Caron, Antoine; Hare, Landis; Campbell, Peter G C

    2016-07-01

    Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) collected from 11 lakes in the Canadian mining regions of Sudbury (Ontario) and Rouyn-Noranda (Quebec) display wide ranges in the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), and thallium (Tl) in their livers. To determine if these trace elements, as well as copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn), are causing oxidative stress in these fish, we measured three biochemical indicators (glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS)) in their livers. We observed that 44% of the yellow perch that we collected were at risk of cellular oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. Considering all fish from all lakes, higher liver Se concentrations were coincident with both lower proportions of GSSG compared to GSH and lower concentrations of TBARS, suggesting that the essential trace-element Se acts as an antioxidant. Furthermore, fish suffering oxidative stress had higher proportions of Cd, Cu and Zn in potentially sensitive subcellular fractions (organelles and heat-denatured proteins) than did fish not suffering from stress. This result suggests that reactive oxygen species may oxidize metal-binding proteins and thereby reduce the capacity of fish to safely bind trace metals. High Cd concentrations in metal-sensitive subcellular fractions likely further exacerbate the negative effects of lower Se exposure. PMID:27131821

  11. Nutritional aspects of selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, M.

    1987-01-01

    The overall objective of this project was to investigate the effect of protein and/or dietary fiber supplementation on selenium absorption and metabolism. These relationships might be of importance in determining either minimum selenium nutritional requirements or levels of intake at which this mineral becomes toxic. Three studies compose the project. The first study involved the controlled feeding of fifteen young adults mice. Subjects were fed a laboratory-controlled diet with and without supplements of selenium or selenium plus guar gum. Selenium supplementation resulted in increased selenium excretion in urine and feces. Supplementation of guar gum, as a dietary fiber, tended to increase fecal selenium excretion and to decrease selenium balance and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity regardless of dietary selenium levels. In study II, seventy two weanling mice were fed varied levels of dietary selenium and protein. Numerically, urinary selenium excretion increased and fecal selenium excretion and selenium balance decreased with increased dietary protein level within the same level of dietary selenium; however, selenium absorption rate tended to decrease with increased dietary protein level. Whole blood and brain tissue glutathione peroxidase activities were higher in animals fed moderate protein level than those fed the other two protein levels. In study III, a survey was conducted to investigate the correlation between dietary fiber or protein intake and urinary selenium excretion. There was a negative correlation between dietary fiber and urinary selenium excretion levels while dietary protein and urinary selenium excretion were positively correlated.

  12. Selenium transformation in coal mine spoils. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Atalay, A.; Koll, K.J.

    1990-09-01

    The objective of this part of the study is to investigate the oxidation-reduction (redox) environment that favor the release of selenium from coal mine spoils. It is anticipated that the study will help answer critical questions as to the form, solubility, and mobility of selenium from the spoil site to the surrounding environment. This investigation will evaluate the conditions which favor the speciation of selenium from coal mine spoils as affected by changes in the oxidation states of selenium.

  13. Charge properties of peptides derived from casein affect their bioavailability and cytoprotection against H2O2-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Xie, Ningning; Li, Bo

    2016-04-01

    The effects of charge properties of casein peptides on absorption stability, antioxidant activity, and cytoprotection were evaluated. Alcalase hydrolysates of casein were separated into 4 fractions by cation-exchange chromatography according to charge properties. After simulated digestion and Caco-2 cell transmembrane transport, we determined the total antioxidant capacity (Trolox equivalent antioxidative capacity and oxygen radical antioxidant activity) and nitrogen content of peptide fractions to estimate available antioxidant efficacy and bioavailability (BA) of peptides. Results showed that negatively charged peptide fractions had greater BA and antioxidant activities after digestion and absorption. The peptide permeates were used to test the cytoprotective effect against H2O2-induced oxidative damage in HepG-2 cells. All peptide permeates increased cell viability, elevated catalase activity, and decreased superoxide dismutase activity. However, negatively charged peptide fractions preserved cell viability to a greater degree. Therefore, the negatively charged peptides from casein may be potential antioxidants and could be used as ingredients in functional foods and dietary supplements. PMID:26851854

  14. Bioavailable concentrations of germanium and rare earth elements in soil as affected by low molecular weight organic acids and root exudates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiche, Oliver; Székely, Balázs; Kummer, Nicolai-Alexeji; Heinemann, Ute; Tesch, Silke; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2014-05-01

    , lanthan, neodymium, gadolinium and erbium in the rhizosphere and therefore the enhancement of bioavailability of the mentioned elements to plants. Based on the suction cup experiment we conclude that in vertical soil profile the bioavailable germanium is heavily affected by the activity of exudates, as the complexation processes of germanium take place at the root zone and below affected by the interplay of the infiltration of citric acid solutions and the actually produced exudates. These studies have been carried out in the framework of the PhytoGerm project, financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Germany. BS contributed as an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow. The authors are grateful to students and laboratory assistants contributing in the field work and sample preparation.

  15. The Freundlich adsorption isotherm constants and prediction of phosphorus bioavailability as affected by different phosphorus sources in two Kansas soils.

    PubMed

    Shafqat, Mustafa N; Pierzynski, Gary M

    2014-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) adsorption onto soil constituents influences P bioavailability from both agronomic and environmental perspectives. In this study, the P availability from different P sources along with utility of Freundlich adsorption coefficients on the predictability of various crop growth parameters were assessed. Two soils were amended with 150mgPkg(-1) each from six different P sources comprised of manures from two types of ruminants animals, three types of monogastric animals, and inorganic P fertilizer. Corn (Zea mays) was grown and harvested seven times under greenhouse conditions to remove P from the P amended treatments. The application of all P sources reduced the value of Freundlich K and increased the value of Freundlich 1/n and equilibrium P concentration (EPC0) in both soils compared to the un-amended control before cropping. The swine (Sus scrofa) manure (HM) resulted in significant smaller values of Freundlich K and larger values of 1/n in the P deficient Eram-Lebo soil compared to other P sources while, the opposite was true for the turkey (Meleagris gallopava) litter (TL) in the Ulysses soil. The corn biomass, tissue P concentration and P uptake were significantly influenced by all P sources during the first harvest and the total P uptake during seven harvests in both soils compared to the control treatment. Both Freundlich coefficients had strong relationships with the aforementioned corn parameters in the P deficient Eram-Lebo soil while, strength of the association was weak or missing in the Ulysses soil which had optimum levels of antecedent P. PMID:24238913

  16. Selenium accumulation and selenium-salt co-tolerance in five grass species. [Festuca arundinaceae; Agropyron deserorum; Buchloe dactyloides; Agrostis stolonifera; Cynodon dactylon

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Huang, Z.; Burau, R.G.

    1987-04-01

    Five grass species including Tall fescue (Festuca arundinaceae Schred), Crested wheatgrass (Agropyron deserorum Fisch), Buffalo grass (Buchlor dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.), Seaside bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) and Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers., Syn.) were examined for selenium and salt tolerance and selenium accumulation under solution culture conditions. Distinct differences in both selenium and salt tolerance were detected among the five species, but no direct association between selenium and salt resistance was found. Tall fescue displayed considerable tolerance under 1 ppm selenium and 100 mM salt treatment. Combined selenium and salt treatment revealed that selenium uptake was increased by the incorporation of salt in the culture solution. However, salt uptake was not significantly affected by the presence of selenium in the culture solution. At moderate toxic levels of selenium, the species with greater tolerance accumulated less selenium than did the less tolerant species.

  17. Interaction between mercury (Hg), arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) affects the activity of glutathione S-transferase in breast milk; possible relationship with fish and sellfish intake.

    PubMed

    Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Labrada-Martagón, Vanessa; Celis de la Rosa, Alfredo de Jesús; Acosta-Vargas, Baudilio; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía Celina; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-01-01

    Breast milk is regarded as an ideal source of nutrients for the growth and development of neonates, but it can also be a potential source of pollutants. Mothers can be exposed to different contaminants as a result of their lifestyle and environmental pollution. Mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) could adversely affect the development of fetal and neonatal nervous system. Some fish and shellfish are rich in selenium (Se), an essential trace element that forms part of several enzymes related to the detoxification process, including glutathione S-transferase (GST). The goal of this study was to determine the interaction between Hg, As and Se and analyze its effect on the activity of GST in breast milk. Milk samples were collected from women between day 7 and 10 postpartum. The GST activity was determined spectrophotometrically; total Hg, As and Se concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. To explain the possible association of Hg, As and Se concentrations with GST activity in breast milk, generalized linear models were constructed. The model explained 44% of the GST activity measured in breast milk. The GLM suggests that GST activity was positively correlated with Hg, As and Se concentrations. The activity of the enzyme was also explained by the frequency of consumption of marine fish and shellfish in the diet of the breastfeeding women. PMID:25208800

  18. Synthesis and stabilization of selenium nanoparticles on cellulose nanocrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon; Blackwood, Jade M.; Bae, In-Tae; Arey, Bruce W.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2007-08-01

    Selenium nanoparticles of 10-20 nm in diameter have been prepared using cellulose nanocrystal (CNXL) as a reducing and structure-directing agent under hydrothermal conditions. Na2SeO3 was reduced to form elemental selenium nanoparticles under hydrothermal conditions. During the hydrothermal process (120-160 oC), CNXL rods were mainly maintained and selenium nanoparticles were interfacially bound to CNXL surface. The reaction temperature affects the sizes of interfacially bound selenium nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were employed to characterize interfacially bound selenium nanoparticles on CNXL surface.

  19. Selenium deficiency and the effects of supplementation on preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Renata Germano B. O. N.; Nogueira, Roberto José N.; Antonio, Maria Ângela R. G. M.; Barros-Filho, Antonio de Azevedo; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to review the literature about blood concentrations of selenium associated with gestational age, feeding, supplementation and related clinical features in preterm infants. Data sources: Systematic review in the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, Google academics, SciELO. org, ScienceDirect (Elsevier) and CINAHL-Plus with Full Text (EBSCO). Articles published up to January 2013 with the keywords "selenium deficiency", "selenium supplementation", "neonates", "infants", "newborn" and "preterm infants" were selected. Data synthesis: The studies reported that low blood selenium levels are associated with increased risk of respiratory diseases. Preterm infants, especially with low birth weight, presented lower selenium levels. Selenium deficiency has also been associated with the use of oral infant formula, enteral and parenteral nutrition (with or without selenium addition). The optimal dose and length of selenium supplementation is not well-established, since they are based only on age group and selenium ingestion by breastfed children. Furthermore, the clinical status of the infant affected by conditions that may increase oxidative stress, and consequently, selenium requirements is not taken into account. Conclusions: Prematurity and low birth weight can contribute to low blood selenium in premature infants. Selenium supplementation seems to minimize or prevent clinical complications caused by prematurity. PMID:24676200

  20. Mapping mine wastes and analyzing areas affected by selenium-rich water runoff in southeast Idaho using AVIRIS imagery and digital elevation data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mars, J.C.; Crowley, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    Remotely sensed hyperspectral and digital elevation data from southeastern Idaho are combined in a new method to assess mine waste contamination. Waste rock from phosphorite mining in the area contains selenium, cadmium, vanadium, and other metals. Toxic concentrations of selenium have been found in plants and soils near some mine waste dumps. Eighteen mine waste dumps and five vegetation cover types in the southeast Idaho phosphate district were mapped by using Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) imagery and field data. The interaction of surface water runoff with mine waste was assessed by registering the AVIRIS results to digital elevation data, enabling determinations of (1) mine dump morphologies, (2) catchment watershed areas above each mine dump, (3) flow directions from the dumps, (4) stream gradients, and (5) the extent of downstream wetlands available for selenium absorption. Watersheds with the most severe selenium contamination, such as the South Maybe Canyon watershed, are associated with mine dumps that have large catchment watershed areas, high stream gradients, a paucity of downstream wetlands, and dump forms that tend to obstruct stream flow. Watersheds associated with low concentrations of dissolved selenium, such as Angus Creek, have mine dumps with small catchment watershed areas, low stream gradients, abundant wetlands vegetation, and less obstructing dump morphologies. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The genotoxicity of selenium.

    PubMed

    Shamberger, R J

    1985-07-01

    Selenium at nutritional levels has been shown to have numerous anticarcinogenic or preventative effects against carcinogen-induced breast, colon, liver and skin cancer in animals. Many of these anticarcinogenic effects have been summarized. In addition, numerous mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of selenium compounds have been reported. Some of the selenium compounds frequently tested for mutagenicity are listed in Table 1. Because of the numerous reported anticarcinogenic and preventative effects of selenium, many individuals are supplementing their diets with amounts of selenium that are greater than the recommended daily requirement. Selenium is also used widely in industrial products such as selenium rectifiers, photoelectric batteries, alloys and paints. Because selenium at higher levels is known to be toxic, there should be a greater understanding about its genotoxic as well as its beneficial effect. The object of this review is to summarize experimental evidence both for the antimutagenic and the mutagenic effect of selenium. PMID:3923345

  2. Microbial Transformations of Selenium Species of Relevance to Bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Eswayah, Abdurrahman S; Smith, Thomas J; Gardiner, Philip H E

    2016-08-15

    Selenium species, particularly the oxyanions selenite (SeO3 (2-)) and selenate (SeO4 (2-)), are significant pollutants in the environment that leach from rocks and are released by anthropogenic activities. Selenium is also an essential micronutrient for organisms across the tree of life, including microorganisms and human beings, particularly because of its presence in the 21st genetically encoded amino acid, selenocysteine. Environmental microorganisms are known to be capable of a range of transformations of selenium species, including reduction, methylation, oxidation, and demethylation. Assimilatory reduction of selenium species is necessary for the synthesis of selenoproteins. Dissimilatory reduction of selenate is known to support the anaerobic respiration of a number of microorganisms, and the dissimilatory reduction of soluble selenate and selenite to nanoparticulate elemental selenium greatly reduces the toxicity and bioavailability of selenium and has a major role in bioremediation and potentially in the production of selenium nanospheres for technological applications. Also, microbial methylation after reduction of Se oxyanions is another potentially effective detoxification process if limitations with low reaction rates and capture of the volatile methylated selenium species can be overcome. This review discusses microbial transformations of different forms of Se in an environmental context, with special emphasis on bioremediation of Se pollution. PMID:27260359

  3. Selenium deficiency, toxicity and biofortification for human health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The melatloid selenium (Se) is ubiquitous in the environment and its concentrations vary from below 0.1 to 10 µg/g or above; although Se concentrations as high as 1200 mg/kg have been reported in some seleniferous regions soil Se concentrations and bioavailability vary with parent material and envir...

  4. Selenium and other trace elements in aquatic insects in coal mine-affected streams in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Wayland, M.; Crosley, R.

    2006-05-15

    We determined levels of Se, As, Cd, Pb, and Zn in aquatic insects at coal mine-impacted and reference sites in streams in the Rocky Mountain foothills of west central Alberta from 2001-2003. Selenium levels were greater at coal mine-impacted sites than at reference sites in caddisflies but not in mayflies or stoneflies. Arsenic levels were greater at coal mine-impacted sites than at reference sites in caddisflies and stoneflies but not in mayflies. Zn levels were higher at coal mine-impacted sites than at reference sites in all three groups of insects. At coal mine-impacted sites, Se levels in mayflies and caddisflies were greater than those in stoneflies while at reference sites mayflies contained greater concentrations of Se than either caddisflies or stoneflies. Arsenic levels in mayflies were greater than those in caddisflies at reference and coal mine-impacted sites and were greater than those in stoneflies at reference sites. At both types of sites Cd differed amongst insect taxa in the order of mayflies < caddisflies < stoneflies. The same was true of Zn at coal mine-affected sites. At reference sites, stoneflies had greater concentrations of Zn than both mayflies and caddisflies. At both types of sites, Pb levels were greater in mayflies and caddisflies than they were in stoneflies. Of the five trace elements considered in this study, only Se was sufficiently elevated in aquatic invertebrates to be of potential concern for consumers such as fish and aquatic birds. Such was the case at both coal mine-impacted and reference sites.

  5. Bioavailability of zinc oxide added to corn tortilla is similar to that of zinc sulfate and is not affected by simultaneous addition of iron

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Jorge L.; Díaz, Margarita; Muñoz, Elsa; Westcott, Jamie L.; González, Karla E.; Krebs, Nancy F.; Caamaño, María C.; Hambidge, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Corn tortilla is the staple food of Mexico and its fortification with zinc, iron, and other micronutrients is intended to reduce micronutrient deficiencies. However, no studies have been performed to determine the relative amount of zinc absorbed from the fortified product and whether zinc absorption is affected by the simultaneous addition of iron. Objective To compare zinc absorption from corn tortilla fortified with zinc oxide versus zinc sulfate and to determine the effect of simultaneous addition of two doses of iron on zinc bioavailability. Methods A randomized, double-blind, crossover design was carried out in two phases. In the first phase, 10 adult women received corn tortillas with either 20 mg/kg of zinc oxide added, 20 mg/kg of zinc sulfate added, or no zinc added. In the second phase, 10 adult women received corn tortilla with 20 mg/kg of zinc oxide added and either with no iron added or with iron added at one of two different levels. Zinc absorption was measured by the stable isotope method. Results The mean (± SEM) fractional zinc absorption from unfortified tortilla, tortilla fortified with zinc oxide, and tortilla fortified with zinc sulfate did not differ among treatments: 0.35 ± 0.07, 0.36 ± 0.05, and 0.37 ± 0.07, respectively. The three treatment groups with 0, 30, and 60 mg/kg of added iron had similar fractional zinc absorption (0.32 ± 0.04, 0.33 ± 0.02, and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively) and similar amounts of zinc absorbed (4.8 ± 0.7, 4.5 ± 0.3, and 4.8 ± 0.7 mg/day, respectively). Conclusions Since zinc oxide is more stable and less expensive and was absorbed equally as well as zinc sulfate, we suggest its use for corn tortilla fortification. Simultaneous addition of zinc and iron to corn tortilla does not modify zinc bioavailability at iron doses of 30 and 60 mg/kg of corn flour. PMID:23424892

  6. Strategic Use of Naturally Selenium (Se)-rich Milling Coproducts to Eliminate Se Deficiency and Create Se-enriched Foods.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium (Se) is essential for sustaining a healthy life. When dietary Se was marginally deficient, populations experienced impaired reproduction and growth rates and increased disease rates. Selenium-rich grains, harvested from regions with seleniferous soils, were natural sources of bioavailable S...

  7. Selenium: Element of Contrasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Robert H.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Reports on recent findings concerning the impact of selenium on human and animal health. In its various oxidation states, different concentrations of selenium may be helpful or detrimental to human health. (CP)

  8. Selenium: Poison and Preventive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmion Howe, Sister

    1978-01-01

    Selenium is an essential nutrient to the human body, but it can reach toxic levels causing a disease called selenosis. This article discusses selenium, its geographical distribution, toxicity, nutritional role, and carcinogenicity. (MA)

  9. Assessing bioavailability levels of metals in effluent-affected rivers: effect of Fe(III) and chelating agents on the distribution of metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuping; Naito, Wataru; Masunaga, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effects of Fe(III) and anthropogenic ligands on the bioavailability of Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb, concentrations of bioavailable metals were measured by the DGT (diffusive gradients in thin films) method in some urban rivers, and were compared with concentrations calculated by a chemical equilibrium model (WHAM 7.0). Assuming that dissolved Fe(III) (<0.45 μm membrane filtered) was in equilibrium with colloidal iron oxide, the WHAM 7.0 model estimated that bioavailable concentrations of Ni, Cu, and Zn were slightly higher than the corresponding values estimated assuming that dissolved Fe(III) was absent. In contrast, lower levels of free Pb were predicted by the WHAM 7.0 model when dissolved Fe(III) was included. Estimates showed that most of the dissolved Pb was present as colloidal iron-Pb complex. Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) concentrations at sampling sites were predicted from the relationship between EDTA and the calculated bioavailable concentration of Zn. When both colloidal iron and predicted EDTA concentrations were included in the WHAM 7.0 calculations, dissolved metals showed a strong tendency to form EDTA complexes, in the order Ni > Cu > Zn > Pb. With the inclusion of EDTA, bioavailable concentrations of Ni, Cu, and Zn predicted by WHAM 7.0 were different from those predicted considering only humic substances and colloidal iron. PMID:27533864

  10. Prebiotics and calcium bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kevin

    2003-03-01

    A prebiotic substance has been defined as a non-digestible food ingredient that beneficially affects the host by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon. Therefore, compared to probiotics, which introduce exogenous bacteria into the colonic microflora, a prebiotic aims at stimulating the growth of one or a limited number of the potentially health-promoting indigenous micro-organisms, thus modulating the composition of the natural ecosystem. In recent years, increasing attention has been focussed on the possible beneficial effects of prebiotics, such as enhanced resistance to invading pathogens, improved bowel function, anti-colon cancer properties, lipid lowering action, improved calcium bioavailability, amongst others. The objective of this review is to critically assess the available data on the effects of prebiotics on calcium bioavailability, and place it in the context of human physiology and, when possible, explain the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. The review will also try to highlight future areas of research that may help in the evaluation of prebiotics as potential ingredients for functional foods aimed at enhancing calcium bioavailability and protecting against osteoporosis. PMID:12691259

  11. Heavy metals in soils from Baia Mare mining impacted area (Romania) and their bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roba, Carmen; Baciu, Calin; Rosu, Cristina; Pistea, Ioana; Ozunu, Alexandru

    2015-04-01

    Keywords: heavy metals, soil contamination, bioavailability, Romania The fate of various metals, including chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, mercury, cadmium, and lead, and metalloids, like arsenic, antimony, and selenium, in the natural environment is of great concern, particularly in the vicinity of former mining sites, dumps, tailings piles, and impoundments, but also in urban areas and industrial centres. Most of the studies focused on the heavy metal pollution in mining areas present only the total amounts of metals in soils. The bioavailable concentration of metals in soil may be a better predictor for environmental impact of historical and current dispersion of metals. Assessment of the metal bioavailability and bioaccessibility is critical in understanding the possible effects on soil biota. The bioavailability of metals in soil and their retention in the solid phase of soil is affected by different parameters like pH, metal amount, cation-exchange capacity, content of organic matter, or soil mineralogy. The main objectives of the present study were to determine the total fraction and the bioavailable fraction of Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn from soil in a well-known mining region in Romania, and to evaluate the influence of soil pH on the metal bioavailability in soil. The heavy metal contents and their bioavailability were monitored in a total of 50 soil samples, collected during June and July 2014 from private gardens of the inhabitants from Baia-Mare area. The main mining activities developed in the area consisted of non-ferrous sulphidic ores extraction and processing, aiming to obtain concentrates of lead, copper, zinc and precious metals. After 2006, the metallurgical industry has considerably reduced its activity by closing or diminishing its production capacity. The analysed soil samples proved to have high levels of Pb (50 - 830 mg/kg), Cu (40 - 600 mg/kg), Zn (100 - 700 mg/kg) and Cd (up to 10 mg/kg). The metal abundance in the total fraction is

  12. Selenium status in food grains of northern districts of India.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sanjiv K; Singh, Ishwar; Sharma, Anita; Singh, Devender

    2008-09-01

    The selenium status in the food grains of the agricultural lands of northern parts of India was estimated by using the HG-AAS technique. The areas where lesser rains were received or less irrigation water was available in northern Indian states viz. Rajasthan and southern parts of the Haryana had higher selenium levels in food grains. Punjab, Himachal Pradesh and northern parts of the Haryana states had normal levels of selenium in their food grains, except for slightly lower selenium levels in a few areas that were affected by floods along the river Yamuna. PMID:17574725

  13. Selenium status in soils of northern districts of India.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sanjiv K; Singh, Ishwar; Singh, Devender; Han, Sang-Do

    2005-04-01

    The HG-AAS technique was used to estimate the soil selenium status of the agricultural lands of northern parts of India. The drier lands where lesser rains were received or where less irrigation water was available in Rajasthan and southern parts of the Haryana states had above normal soil selenium levels. These soils were also found to be alkaline. Punjab, Himachal Pradesh and northern parts of the Haryana states had normal levels of selenium in their soils, except with slightly lower selenium levels in a few areas that were affected by floods along the river Yamuna. The results were also confirmed using the ICP-OES technique. PMID:15763155

  14. Hazard assessment of selenium to endangered razorback suckers (Xyrauchen texanus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.

    2002-01-01

    A hazard assessment was conducted based on information derived from two reproduction studies conducted with endangered razorback suckers (Xyrauchen texanus) at three sites near Grand Junction, CO, USA. Selenium contamination of the upper and lower Colorado River basin has been documented in water, sediment, and biota in studies by US Department of the Interior agencies and academia. Concern has been raised that this selenium contamination may be adversely affecting endangered fish in the upper Colorado River basin. The reproduction studies with razorback suckers revealed that adults readily accumulated selenium in various tissues including eggs, and that 4.6 ??g/g of selenium in food organisms caused increased mortality of larvae. The selenium hazard assessment protocol resulted in a moderate hazard at the Horsethief site and high hazards at the Adobe Creek and North Pond sites. The selenium hazard assessment was considered conservative because an on-site toxicity test with razorback sucker larvae using 4.6 ??g/g selenium in zooplankton caused nearly complete mortality, in spite of the moderate hazard at Horsethief. Using the margin of uncertainty ratio also suggested a high hazard for effects on razorback suckers from selenium exposure. Both assessment approaches suggested that selenium in the upper Colorado River basin adversely affects the reproductive success of razorback suckers. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hazard assessment of selenium to endangered razorback suckers (Xyrauchen texanus).

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven J; Holley, Kathleen M; Buhl, Kevin J

    2002-05-27

    A hazard assessment was conducted based on information derived from two reproduction studies conducted with endangered razorback suckers (Xyrauchen texanus) at three sites near Grand Junction, CO, USA. Selenium contamination of the upper and lower Colorado River basin has been documented in water, sediment, and biota in studies by US Department of the Interior agencies and academia. Concern has been raised that this selenium contamination may be adversely affecting endangered fish in the upper Colorado River basin. The reproduction studies with razorback suckers revealed that adults readily accumulated selenium in various tissues including eggs, and that 4.6 microg/g of selenium in food organisms caused increased mortality of larvae. The selenium hazard assessment protocol resulted in a moderate hazard at the Horsethief site and high hazards at the Adobe Creek and North Pond sites. The selenium hazard assessment was considered conservative because an on-site toxicity test with razorback sucker larvae using 4.6 microg/g selenium in zooplankton caused nearly complete mortality, in spite of the moderate hazard at Horsethief. Using the margin of uncertainty ratio also suggested a high hazard for effects on razorback suckers from selenium exposure. Both assessment approaches suggested that selenium in the upper Colorado River basin adversely affects the reproductive success of razorback suckers. PMID:12150431

  16. Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) as a source of dietary selenium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chapter discusses the nutritional value of lentils, with a focus on factors affecting lentils as a source of dietary selenium. It addresses the chemical nature of lentil-selenium, pointing out that more than 90% is present in organic compounds which are generally well absorbed by humans. The se...

  17. Effects of selenium on mallard duck reproduction and immune function

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, P.L.; Yuill, T.M.; Fairbrother, A.

    1989-11-01

    Selenium from irrigation drain water and coal-fired power stations is a significant environmental contaminant in some regions of the USA. The objectives were to examine whether selenium-exposed waterfowl had altered immune function, disease resistance, or reproduction. Pairs of adult mallards were exposed for 95-99 days on streams with sodium selenite-treated water at 10 and 30 ppb, or on untreated streams. Selenium biomagnified through the food chain to the ducks. Disease resistance was decreased in ducklings hatched on the streams and challenged with duck hepatitis virus 1 (DHV1) when 15-days old. Liver selenium concentrations for these ducklings on the 10 and 30 ppb streams was 3.6 and 7.6 ppm dry weight, respectively. Mortality of ducklings purchased when 7-days old, exposed to selenium for 14 days, and challenged when 22-days old was not affected. However, their selenium exposure was lower (liver selenium 4.1 ppm dry weight for the 30 ppb stream). Five parameters of immune function were measured in adult ducks. Phagocytosis of killed Pasteurella multocida by blood heterophils and monocytes, and blood monocyte concentrations were higher in adult males following 84 days exposure to 30 ppb selenium. Their liver selenium concentrations were 11.1 ppm dry weight after 95-99 days exposure.

  18. Dietary selenium in adjuvant therapy of viral and bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Steinbrenner, Holger; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Dkhil, Mohamed A; Wunderlich, Frank; Sies, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Viral and bacterial infections are often associated with deficiencies in macronutrients and micronutrients, including the essential trace element selenium. In selenium deficiency, benign strains of Coxsackie and influenza viruses can mutate to highly pathogenic strains. Dietary supplementation to provide adequate or supranutritional selenium supply has been proposed to confer health benefits for patients suffering from some viral diseases, most notably with respect to HIV and influenza A virus (IAV) infections. In addition, selenium-containing multimicronutrient supplements improved several clinical and lifestyle variables in patients coinfected with HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Selenium status may affect the function of cells of both adaptive and innate immunity. Supranutritional selenium promotes proliferation and favors differentiation of naive CD4-positive T lymphocytes toward T helper 1 cells, thus supporting the acute cellular immune response, whereas excessive activation of the immune system and ensuing host tissue damage are counteracted through directing macrophages toward the M2 phenotype. This review provides an up-to-date overview on selenium in infectious diseases caused by viruses (e.g., HIV, IAV, hepatitis C virus, poliovirus, West Nile virus) and bacteria (e.g., M. tuberculosis, Helicobacter pylori). Data from epidemiologic studies and intervention trials, with selenium alone or in combination with other micronutrients, and animal experiments are discussed against the background of dietary selenium requirements to alter immune functions. PMID:25593145

  19. [Retention of selenium volatility using lime in coal combustion].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Ren, D; Zhong, Q; Xu, F; Zhang, Y; Yin, J

    2001-05-01

    For understanding the volatility of selenium, the effect of the contents of exchangeable cations of coal on it, and the retention of selenium using CaO in coal combustion, the sequential chemistry extraction, the fixed bed and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) were undertaken. The results showed that the volatility of selenium was more than 97% in coal combustion at 815 degrees C, and the volatility of selenium was affected by the content of exchangeable cations of coal in low-middle temperature. It was identified that lime can restrain the volatility of selenium. In fixed bed combustion of coal, the retention rates of selenium volatility were between 11.6% and 50.7% using lime. In circulating fluidized bed combustion of coal, partitioning of selenium changed very much in ash of different size fraction between without lime and with lime. Comparing with combustion without lime, the content of selenium in ash from chimney was less than fourth times and that in leaching water from chimney decreased by two orders of magnitude using lime. Retention of selenium volatility using lime is so effective in coal combustion, especially in CFB combustion of coal. PMID:11507891

  20. Bioavailability of xenobiotics in the soil environment.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Arata; Bhula, Raj; Burns, G Richard; Carazo, Elizabeth; Felsot, Allan; Hamilton, Denis; Harris, Caroline; Kim, Yong-Hwa; Kleter, Gijs; Koedel, Werner; Linders, Jan; Peijnenburg, J G M Willie; Sabljic, Aleksandar; Stephenson, R Gerald; Racke, D Kenneth; Rubin, Baruch; Tanaka, Keiji; Unsworth, John; Wauchope, R Donald

    2010-01-01

    It is often presumed that all chemicals in soil are available to microorganisms, plant roots, and soil fauna via dermal exposure. Subsequent bioaccumulation through the food chain may then result in exposure to higher organisms. Using the presumption of total availability, national governments reduce environmental threshold levels of regulated chemicals by increasing guideline safety margins. However, evidence shows that chemical residues in the soil environment are not always bioavailable. Hence, actual chemical exposure levels of biota are much less than concentrations present in soil would suggest. Because "bioavailability" conveys meaning that combines implications of chemical sol persistency, efficacy, and toxicity, insights on the magnitude of a chemicals soil bioavailability is valuable. however, soil bioavailability of chemicals is a complex topic, and is affected by chemical properties, soil properties, species exposed, climate, and interaction processes. In this review, the state-of-art scientific basis for bioavailability is addressed. Key points covered include: definition, factors affecting bioavailability, equations governing key transport and distributive kinetics, and primary methods for estimating bioavailability. Primary transport mechanisms in living organisms, critical to an understanding of bioavailability, also presage the review. Transport of lipophilic chemicals occurs mainly by passive diffusion for all microorganisms, plants, and soil fauna. Therefore, the distribution of a chemical between organisms and soil (bioavailable proportion) follows partition equilibrium theory. However, a chemical's bioavailability does not always follow partition equilibrium theory because of other interactions with soil, such as soil sorption, hysteretic desorption, effects of surfactants in pore water, formation of "bound residue", etc. Bioassays for estimating chemical bioavailability have been introduced with several targeted endpoints: microbial

  1. Selenium species bioaccessibility in enriched radish (Raphanus sativus): a potential dietary source of selenium.

    PubMed

    Pedrero, Zoyne; Madrid, Yolanda; Cámara, Carmen

    2006-03-22

    An in vitro gastrointestinal method was employed to predict the potential bioavailability of selenium and its species from radish, belonging to the Brassicaceae family, grown in hydroponics media in the presence of inorganic selenium, such as Na2SeO3 and Na2SeO4. A low transformation of Se into organic forms was observed in radish plants grown in Se(VI)-enriched culture media. On the contrary, in those plants exposed to selenite, >95% of the total selenium was found as selenocystine (SeCys2), selenomethionine (SeMet), and Se-methylselenocysteine (SeMetSeCys). The concentrations of these species in fresh samples remained almost unaltered after a simulated gastrointestinal digestion. Therefore, a high selenium content of Se-methylselenocysteine (65%), previously reported as a cancer chemopreventive species, remained in the potentially bioabsorbable fraction. As these plants usually undergo a short development cycle, these results suggest that radish enriched in selenite could be a good choice as an organoselenium supplement for the human diet and animal feed. PMID:16536627

  2. Animal versus human oral drug bioavailability: Do they correlate?

    PubMed Central

    Musther, Helen; Olivares-Morales, Andrés; Hatley, Oliver J.D.; Liu, Bo; Rostami Hodjegan, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Oral bioavailability is a key consideration in development of drug products, and the use of preclinical species in predicting bioavailability in human has long been debated. In order to clarify whether any correlation between human and animal bioavailability exist, an extensive analysis of the published literature data was conducted. Due to the complex nature of bioavailability calculations inclusion criteria were applied to ensure integrity of the data. A database of 184 compounds was assembled. Linear regression for the reported compounds indicated no strong or predictive correlations to human data for all species, individually and combined. The lack of correlation in this extended dataset highlights that animal bioavailability is not quantitatively predictive of bioavailability in human. Although qualitative (high/low bioavailability) indications might be possible, models taking into account species-specific factors that may affect bioavailability are recommended for developing quantitative prediction. PMID:23988844

  3. Selenium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Selenium is an essential trace mineral. This means your body must get this mineral in the food you eat. Small amounts of ... for your health. Function Selenium is a trace mineral. Your body only needs it in small amounts. ...

  4. Acute selenium toxicosis in polo ponies.

    PubMed

    Desta, Belainesh; Maldonado, Gizela; Reid, Herman; Puschner, Birgit; Maxwell, James; Agasan, Alice; Humphreys, Leigh; Holt, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    Just prior to an international polo event, 21 horses from one team exhibited clinical signs of central nervous system disturbance, hyperexcitability, sweating, ataxia, tachycardia, dyspnea, pyrexia, and rapid death. The suspected cause of this peracute onset of illness and death included intentional contamination of feed or iatrogenic administration of performance-enhancing drugs resulting in a severe adverse reaction. Six horses were submitted to the Bronson Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory for necropsy and toxicological examination. The clinical signs and sudden death, the similarity to earlier work by the lead author of selenium toxicosis in calves, as well as published reports, prompted investigators to focus on selenium testing. Sixty-four hours following receipt, the laboratory detected toxic selenium concentrations in the tissues of these animals. Following further investigation of the case by regulatory officials, it was determined that all affected horses had received an intravenous injection of a compounded "vitamin/mineral" supplement just prior to the onset of signs. The compounded supplement contained toxic levels of selenium. The present report illustrates the in-depth laboratory investigation of the cause of acute death in 6 polo ponies due to selenium toxicosis. In addition to solving this high profile case, the toxic levels of selenium found in livers (6.13 ± 0.31 mg/kg wet weight), kidneys (6.25 ± 0.3 mg/kg wet weight), and sera (1.50 ± 0.11 µg/ml) of these affected animals may provide important diagnostic criteria for future interpretations of selenium concentrations in tissues of horses. PMID:21908304

  5. Bioavailability of Promethazine during Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Wang, Zuwei; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Promethazine (PMZ) is the choice anti-motion sickness medication for treating space motion sickness (SMS) during flight. The side effects associated with PMZ include dizziness, drowsiness, sedation, and impaired psychomotor performance which could impact crew performance and mission operations. Early anecdotal reports from crewmembers indicate that these central nervous system side effects of PMZ are absent or greatly attenuated in microgravity, potentially due to changes in pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics in microgravity. These changes could also affect the therapeutic effectiveness of drugs in general and PMZ, in particular. In this investigation, we examined bioavailability and associated pharmacokinetics of PMZ in astronauts during and after space flight. Methods. Nine astronauts received, per their preference, PMZ (25 or 50 mg as intramuscular injection, oral tablet, or rectal suppository) on flight day one for the treatment of SMS and subsequently collected saliva samples and completed sleepiness scores for 72 h post dose. Thirty days after the astronauts returned to Earth, they repeated the protocol. Bioavailability and PK parameters were calculated and compared between flight and ground. Results. Maximum concentration (Cmax) was lower and time to reach Cmax (tmax) was longer in flight than on the ground. Area under the curve (AUC), a measure of bioavailability, was lower and biological half-life (t1/2) was longer in flight than on the ground. Conclusion. Results indicate that bioavailability of PMZ is reduced during spaceflight. Number of samples, sampling method, and sampling schedule significantly affected PK parameter estimates.

  6. Dietary selenium and selenoprotein function

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Benjamin S.; Hanna, Mirna S.; Cooperstein, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Summary Selenium is a trace mineral and an essential nutrient in the human diet. Selenium is found in soil and water and consequently enters the food chain through the root ways of plants and aquatic organisms. Some areas of the world are low in soil selenium resulting in a selenium deficient population and the appearance of an associated heart disease and bone disorders that can be corrected with dietary selenium. Indeed the requirement for dietary selenium was established by these observations and while selenium deficiency is rare in the West, patients requiring long-term intravenous feedings have also show heart disease associated with a deficiency of selenium in the feeding fluids. Subsequently, it has been established that dietary selenium can improve a wide range of human health conditions even in areas with soil replete in selenium. PMID:22847213

  7. Increased calcium bioavailability in mice fed genetically engineered plants lacking calcium oxalate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioavailable calcium affects bone formation and calcification. Here we investigate how a single gene mutation altering calcium partitioning in the model forage crop Medicago truncatula affects calcium bioavailability. Previously, the cod5 M. truncatula mutant was identified which contains identical ...

  8. Mercury and selenium levels, and selenium:mercury molar ratios of brain, muscle and other tissues in bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) from New Jersey, USA

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn; Gochfeld, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A number of contaminants affect fish health, including mercury and selenium, and the selenium: mercury molar ratio. Recently the protective effects of selenium on methylmercury toxicity have been publicized, particularly for consumption of saltwater fish. Yet the relative ameliorating effects of selenium on toxicity within fish have not been examined, nor has the molar ratio in different tissues, (i.e. brain). We examined mercury and selenium levels in brain, kidney, liver, red and white muscle, and skin and scales in bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) from New Jersey to determine whether there were toxic levels of either metal, and we computed the selenium: mercury molar ratios by tissues. Total mercury averaged 0.32 ± 0.02 ppm wet weight in edible muscle and 0.09 ± 0.01 ppm in brain. Selenium concentration averaged 0.37 ± 0.03 in muscle and 0.36 ± 0.03 ppm in brain. There were significant differences in levels of mercury, selenium, and selenium: mercury molar ratios, among tissues. Mercury and selenium levels were correlated in kidney and skin/scales. Mercury levels were highest in kidney, intermediate in muscle and liver, and lowest in brain and skin/scales; selenium levels were also highest in kidney, intermediate in liver, and were an order of magnitude lower in the white muscle and brain. Mercury levels in muscle, kidney and skin/scales were positively correlated with fish size (length). Selenium levels in muscle, kidney and liver were positively correlated with fish length, but in brain; selenium levels were negatively correlated with fish length. The selenium: mercury molar ratio was negatively correlated with fish length for white muscle, liver, kidney, and brain, particularly for fish over 50 cm in length, suggesting that older fish experience less protective advantages of selenium against mercury toxicity than smaller fish, and that consumers of bluefish similarly receive less advantage from eating larger fish. PMID:23202378

  9. Mineral Commodity Profiles: Selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterman, W.C.; Brown, R.D., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Selenium, which is one of the chalcogen elements in group 16 (or 6A) of the periodic table, is a semiconductor that is chemically similar to sulfur for which it substitutes in many minerals and synthetic compounds. It is a byproduct of copper refining and, to a much lesser extent, lead refining. It is used in many applications, the major ones being a decolorizer for glass, a metallurgical additive to free-machining varieties of ferrous and nonferrous alloys, a constituent in cadmium sulfoselenide pigments, a photoreceptor in xerographic copiers, and a semiconductor in electrical rectifiers and photocells. Refined selenium amounting to more than 1,800 metric tons (t) was produced by 14 countries in 2000. Japan, Canada, the United States, and Belgium, which were the four largest producers, accounted for nearly 85 percent of world production. An estimated 250 t of the world total is secondary selenium, which is recovered from scrapped xerographic copier drums and selenium rectifiers; the selenium in nearly all other uses is dissipated (not recoverable as waste or scrap). The present selenium reserve bases for the United States and the world (including the United States), which are associated with copper deposits, are expected to be able to satisfy demand for selenium for several decades without difficulty.

  10. Why Nature Chose Selenium.

    PubMed

    Reich, Hans J; Hondal, Robert J

    2016-04-15

    The authors were asked by the Editors of ACS Chemical Biology to write an article titled "Why Nature Chose Selenium" for the occasion of the upcoming bicentennial of the discovery of selenium by the Swedish chemist Jöns Jacob Berzelius in 1817 and styled after the famous work of Frank Westheimer on the biological chemistry of phosphate [Westheimer, F. H. (1987) Why Nature Chose Phosphates, Science 235, 1173-1178]. This work gives a history of the important discoveries of the biological processes that selenium participates in, and a point-by-point comparison of the chemistry of selenium with the atom it replaces in biology, sulfur. This analysis shows that redox chemistry is the largest chemical difference between the two chalcogens. This difference is very large for both one-electron and two-electron redox reactions. Much of this difference is due to the inability of selenium to form π bonds of all types. The outer valence electrons of selenium are also more loosely held than those of sulfur. As a result, selenium is a better nucleophile and will react with reactive oxygen species faster than sulfur, but the resulting lack of π-bond character in the Se-O bond means that the Se-oxide can be much more readily reduced in comparison to S-oxides. The combination of these properties means that replacement of sulfur with selenium in nature results in a selenium-containing biomolecule that resists permanent oxidation. Multiple examples of this gain of function behavior from the literature are discussed. PMID:26949981

  11. Bioavailability of metals in soils and sedimentes affected by old mining actitvities. The study case of the Portman bay (SE, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Agudo, Ines; Banegas, Ascension; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Gonzalez-Ciudad, Eva; Perez-Espinosa, Victor; Martinez-Lopez, Salvadora; Martinez, Lucia; Perz-Sirvent, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    A study on metal (Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu and As) mobilization and analysis of the health risk represented by ingestion from contaminated sediments in Portman Bay (SE Spain) was carried out. This zone has suffered a great impact from mining activity, since million tons of mine tailings were dumped into the bay for a long period, giving as a result the filling of the bay with them. The long-term deposition of metals in soils and sediments can lead to their accumulation and transport, while their toxicity depends on the mobility and bioavailability of a significant fraction of the metals. The ingestion of contaminated soil particles by grazing animals or young children may well represent a special exposure pathway for Pb, Cd and other hazardous metals. The aim of this study was to determine the bioaccessibility of Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu and As ,and the extent to which bioaccessibility is influenced by mineralogy in materials from this mining site as an indicator of the potential risk that metals pose to both environmental and human health. General analytical determinations (pH, particle size, organic matter, equivalent calcium carbonate content and mineralogical composition) were carried out to characterize the samples. The mineralogical composition was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), using a Philips PW3040 diffractometer with Cu-Kα. To determine the total metal content, the samples were digested in a Milestone ETHOS PLUS microwave, Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd contents were determined by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry, while As was analysed by HG- AFS using an automated continuous flow hydride generation spectrometer. To assess bioaccessibility, the gastric solution was prepared according to the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) developed by the Solubility/Bioavailability Research Consortium (SBRC). The mineralogical composition, corresponds to materials which have suffered a supergenic oxidation process which has been influenced by the presence of sea water

  12. Speciation of selenium in stream insects using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruwandi Andrahennadi; Mark Wayland; Ingrid J. Pickering

    2007-11-15

    Selenium contamination in the environment is a widespread problem affecting insects and other wildlife. Insects occupy a critical middle link and aid in trophic transfer of selenium in many terrestrial and freshwater food chains, but the mechanisms of selenium uptake through the food chain are poorly understood. In particular, biotransformation of selenium by insects into different chemical forms will greatly influence how toxic or benign the selenium is to that organism or to its predators. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical form of selenium in insects inhabiting selenium contaminated streams near Hinton, Alberta (Canada). Selenium K near-edge spectra indicate a variability of selenium speciation among the insects that included mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), caddisflies (Trichoptera), and craneflies (Diptera). Higher percentages of inorganic selenium were observed in primary consumers, detritivores, and filter feeders than in predatory insects. Among the organic forms of selenium, organic selenides constituted a major fraction in most organisms. A species modeled as trimethylselenonium was observed during the pupal stage of caddisflies. These results provide insights into how the insects cope with their toxic cargo, including how the selenium is biotransformed into less toxic forms and how it can be eliminated from the insects. More broadly, this study demonstrates the strengths of XAS to probe the effects of heavy elements at trace levels in insects from the field.

  13. Speciation of Selenium in Stream Insects Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrahennadi, R.; Wayland, M.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-05-28

    Selenium contamination in the environment is a widespread problem affecting insects and other wildlife. Insects occupy a critical middle link and aid in trophic transfer of selenium in many terrestrial and freshwater food chains, but the mechanisms of selenium uptake through the food chain are poorly understood. In particular, biotransformation of selenium by insects into different chemical forms will greatly influence how toxic or benign the selenium is to that organism or to its predators. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical form of selenium in insects inhabiting selenium contaminated streams near Hinton, Alberta (Canada). Selenium K near-edge spectra indicate a variability of selenium speciation among the insects that included mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), caddisflies (Trichoptera), and craneflies (Diptera). Higher percentages of inorganic selenium were observed in primary consumers, detritivores, and filter feeders than in predatory insects. Among the organic forms of selenium, organic selenides constituted a major fraction in most organisms. A species modeled as trimethylselenonium was observed during the pupal stage of caddisflies. These results provide insights into how the insects cope with their toxic cargo, including how the selenium is biotransformed into less toxic forms and how it can be eliminated from the insects. More broadly, this study demonstrates the strengths of XAS to probe the effects of heavy elements at trace levels in insects from the field.

  14. Bioavailability of heavy metals, germanium and rare earth elements at Davidschacht dump-field in mine affected area of Freiberg (Saxony)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midula, Pavol; Wiche, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Bioavailability research presents an essential tool, in modern phytoremediation and phytomining technologies, allowing the estimation of plant available fractions of elements in soils. However, up to date, sufficient interdisciplinary knowledge on the biogeochemically impacted behavior of specific target elements, in particular Ge and REEs in mining affected soils and their uptake into strategically used plants is lacking. This presented work is focused on a correlation study between the concentrations of selected heavy metals, Ge and REEs in soils formed on the top of the dump-field of Davidschacht and the corresponding their concentrations in 12 vascular plant species. The mine-dump of Davidschacht, situated in the Freiberg (Saxony, Germany) municipality area was chosen as the study area, which has been considered to be a high contaminated enclave, due to the mining history of the region. In total 12 sampling sites with differing composition of plant species were selected. At each sampling site soil samples from a soil depth of 0 - 10 cm and samples of plant material (shoots) were taken. The soil samples were analysed for total concentration of elements, pH (H2O) and consequently analysed by 4-step sequential extraction (SE) to determine fractions of elements that are mobile (fraction 1), acid soluble (pH 5) (fraction 2), bound to organic and oxidizable matter (fraction 3) and bound to amorphic oxides (fraction 4). The plant material was decomposed by hydrofluoric acid in order to extract the elements. Concentrations of elements in soil extracts and digestion solutions were analysed by ICP-MS. For all species bioconcentration factor (BCF) was calculated of the total concentration of elements in order to investigate the bioaccumulation potential. Arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were chosen as the representative heavy metals. Within the REEs neodymium (Nd) and cerium (Ce) were selected as representatives for all REEs, since Nd and Ce correlated significant

  15. Bioavailability of heavy metals, germanium and rare earth elements at Davidschacht dump-field in mine affected area of Freiberg (Saxony)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midula, Pavol; Wiche, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Bioavailability research presents an essential tool, in modern phytoremediation and phytomining technologies, allowing the estimation of plant available fractions of elements in soils. However, up to date, sufficient interdisciplinary knowledge on the biogeochemically impacted behavior of specific target elements, in particular Ge and REEs in mining affected soils and their uptake into strategically used plants is lacking. This presented work is focused on a correlation study between the concentrations of selected heavy metals, Ge and REEs in soils formed on the top of the dump-field of Davidschacht and the corresponding their concentrations in 12 vascular plant species. The mine-dump of Davidschacht, situated in the Freiberg (Saxony, Germany) municipality area was chosen as the study area, which has been considered to be a high contaminated enclave, due to the mining history of the region. In total 12 sampling sites with differing composition of plant species were selected. At each sampling site soil samples from a soil depth of 0 - 10 cm and samples of plant material (shoots) were taken. The soil samples were analysed for total concentration of elements, pH (H2O) and consequently analysed by 4-step sequential extraction (SE) to determine fractions of elements that are mobile (fraction 1), acid soluble (pH 5) (fraction 2), bound to organic and oxidizable matter (fraction 3) and bound to amorphic oxides (fraction 4). The plant material was decomposed by hydrofluoric acid in order to extract the elements. Concentrations of elements in soil extracts and digestion solutions were analysed by ICP-MS. For all species bioconcentration factor (BCF) was calculated of the total concentration of elements in order to investigate the bioaccumulation potential. Arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were chosen as the representative heavy metals. Within the REEs neodymium (Nd) and cerium (Ce) were selected as representatives for all REEs, since Nd and Ce correlated significant

  16. Derivation of a chronic site-specific water quality standard for selenium in the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA.

    PubMed

    Brix, Kevin V; DeForest, David K; Cardwell, Rick D; Adams, William J

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a site-specific water quality standard for selenium in the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA. The study examined the bioavailability and toxicity of selenium, as selenate, to biota resident to the Great Salt Lake and the potential for dietary selenium exposure to aquatic dependent birds that might consume resident biota. Because of its high salinity, the lake has limited biological diversity with bacteria, algae, diatoms, brine shrimp, and brine flies being the only organisms present in the main (hypersaline) portions of the lake. To evaluate their sensitivity to selenium, a series of acute and chronic toxicity studies were conducted on brine shrimp (Artemia franiciscana), brine fly (Ephydra cinerea), and a hypersaline alga (Dunaliella viridis). The resulting acute and chronic toxicity data indicated that resident species are more selenium tolerant than many freshwater species. Because sulfate is known to reduce selenate bioavailability, this selenium tolerance is thought to result in part from the lake's high ambient sulfate concentrations (>5,800 mg/L). The acute and chronic test results were compared to selenium concentrations expected to occur in a mining effluent discharge located at the south end of the lake. Based on these comparisons, no appreciable risks to resident aquatic biota were projected. Field and laboratory data collected on selenium bioaccumulation in brine shrimp demonstrated a linear relationship between water and tissue selenium concentrations. Applying a dietary selenium threshold of 5 mg/kg dry weight for aquatic birds to this relationship resulted in an estimate of 27 microg/L Se in water as a safe concentration for this exposure pathway and an appropriate chronic site-specific water quality standard. Consequently, protection of aquatic birds represents the driving factor in determining a site-specific water quality standard for selenium. PMID:15285352

  17. Selenium in Cattle: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Youcef; Dufrasne, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    This review article examines the role of selenium (Se) and the effects of Se supplementation especially in the bovine species. Selenium is an important trace element in cattle. Some of its roles include the participation in the antioxidant defense the cattle farms. The nutritional requirements of Se in cattle are estimated at 100 μg/kg DM (dry matter) for beef cattle and at 300 μg/kg DM for dairy cows. The rations high in fermentable carbohydrates, nitrates, sulfates, calcium or hydrogen cyanide negatively influence the organism's use of the selenium contained in the diet. The Se supplementation may reduce the incidence of metritis and ovarian cysts during the postpartum period. The increase in fertility when adding Se is attributed to the reduction of the embryonic death during the first month of gestation. A use of organic Se in feed would provide a better transfer of Se in calves relative to mineral Se supplementation. The addition of Se yeasts in the foodstuffs of cows significantly increases the Se content and the percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in milk compared to the addition of sodium selenite. The enzyme 5-iodothyronine deiodinase is a seleno-dependent selenoprotein. It is one of the last proteins to be affected in the event of Se deficiency. This delay in response could explain the fact that several studies did not show the effect of Se supplementation on growth and weight gain of calves. Enrichment of Se in the diet did not significantly affect the slaughter weight and carcass yield of bulls. The impact and results of Se supplementation in cattle depend on physiological stage, Se status of animals, type and content of Se and types of Se administration. Further studies in Se supplementation should investigate the speciation of Se in food and yeasts, as well as understanding their metabolism and absorption. This constitute a path to exploit in order to explain certain different effects of Se. PMID:27120589

  18. Selenium: finding the delicate balance

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, J.

    1987-01-01

    A deficiency of selenium can lead to the degeneration of heart muscle in children. Yet, an excess of selenium can produce a garlicky breath, and extreme levels can cause a loss of nails and hair. People get adequate selenium in their diets in North America, but there are areas around the world where the people exist on foods containing little or no selenium. A person is said to be in balance when the daily intake of selenium equals the amount excreted. However, the need for the mineral varies depending on the population, as well as the sex, studied. For example, Chinese men living in a selenium-deficient area need only 10 micrograms a day to maintain their body stores of selenium, whereas US men need 80 micrograms. In addition, there is a difference in how the body treats different forms and sources of selenium. The body absorbs the mineral better from plant sources than from animal sources, in many instances.

  19. Percutaneous absorption of selenium sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, J.; Skelly, E.M.; Weber, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine selenium levels in the urine of Tinea patients before and after overnight application of a 2.5% selenium sulfide lotion. Selenium was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Hydride generation and carbon rod atomization were studied. It was concluded from this study that selenium is absorbed through intact skin. Selenium is then excreted, at least partially, in urine, for at least a week following treatment. The data show that absorption and excretion of selenium vary on an individual basis. Selenium levels in urine following a single application of selenium sulfide lotion do not indicate that toxic amounts of selenium are being absorbed. Repeated treatments with SeS/sub 2/ result in selenium concentrations in urine which are significantly higher than normal. Significant matrix effects are observed in the carbon rod atomization of urine samples for selenium determinations, even in the presence of a matrix modifier such as nickel. The method of standard additions is required to obtain accurate results in the direct determination of selenium in urine by carbon rod AAS.

  20. EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT FORMS OF ORGANIC CARBON ON THE PARTITIONING AND BIOAVAILABILITY OF NONPHENYL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxygenated nonpolar organic contaminants (NOCs) are underrepresented in studies of the partitioning and bioavailability of NOCs, including nonylphenol. In this investigation, we evaluated the toxicity, partitioning, and bioavailability of nonylphenol as affected by different form...

  1. Relative Bioavailability and Bioaccessability and Speciation of Arsenic in Contaminated Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Assessment of soil arsenic (As) bioavailability may profoundly affect the extent of remediation required at contaminated sites by improving human exposure estimates. Because small adjustments in soil As bioavailability estimates can significantly alter risk assessment...

  2. Mineral surfaces and bioavailability of heavy metals: A molecular-scale perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gordon E.; Foster, Andrea L.; Ostergren, John D.

    1999-01-01

    There is a continual influx of heavy metal contaminants and pollutants into the biosphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources. A complex variety of abiotic and biotic processes affects their speciation and distribution, including adsorption onto and desorption from mineral surfaces, incorporation in precipitates or coprecipitates, release through the dissolution of minerals, and interactions with plants and microbes. Some of these processes can effectively isolate heavy metals from the biosphere, whereas others cause their release or transformation to different species that may be more (or less) bioavailable and/or toxic to organisms. Here we focus on abiotic adsorption and precipitation or coprecipitation processes involving the common heavy metal contaminant lead and the metalloids arsenic and selenium in mine tailings and contaminated soils. We have used extremely intense x-rays from synchrotron sources and a structure-sensitive method known as x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy to determine the molecular-level speciation of these elements at concentrations of 50 to several thousand ppm in the contaminated environmental samples as well as in synthetic sorption samples. Our XAFS studies of As and Pb in the mine tailings show that up to 50% of these contaminants in the samples studied may be present as adsorbed species on mineral surfaces, which makes them potentially more bioavailable than when present in sparingly soluble solid phases. Our XAFS studies of Se(VI) sorption on Fe2+-containing sulfates show that this element undergoes redox reactions that transform it into less bioavailable and less toxic species. This type of information on molecular-level speciation of heavy metal and metalloid contaminants in various environmental settings is needed to prioritize remediation efforts and to assess their potential hazard to humans and other organisms. PMID:10097048

  3. Commentary: selenium study on endangered razorback sucker is flawed.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven J

    2005-07-01

    The razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) is listed as federally endangered throughout its range. A massive recovery effort by the Recovery Implementation Program for Endangered Fish Species in the Upper Colorado River Basin has focused its efforts in the upper Colorado River. The upper Colorado River basin also has two locations that have been identified by the National Irrigation Water Quality Program as having substantial selenium contamination. Selenium is toxic to fishes, affecting reproductive success. Thus, there is concern about potential effects of selenium on the endangered razorback sucker. Two sets of studies have investigated the effects of selenium on razorback suckers, but study results are conflicting. This commentary evaluates studies that claim selenium is not a problem for razorback sucker. We find that study bias was so pervasive that purported conclusions were unwarranted. Contaminated control water, older life stages of fish tested, lack of methodology for analysis of selenium in water, diet, or fish, use of rotifer food, low feeding rates, low growth rates of fish, and improper storage of site waters resulted in an apparent erroneous linkage of high selenium in whole-body residues with no adverse effects. PMID:15922797

  4. Commentary: selenium study on endangered razorback sucker is flawed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, Steven J.

    2005-01-01

    The razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) is listed as federally endangered throughout its range. A massive recovery effort by the Recovery Implementation Program for Endangered Fish Species in the Upper Colorado River Basin has focused its efforts in the upper Colorado River. The upper Colorado River basin also has two locations that have been identified by the National Irrigation Water Quality Program as having substantial selenium contamination. Selenium is toxic to fishes, affecting reproductive success. Thus, there is concern about potential effects of selenium on the endangered razorback sucker. Two sets of studies have investigated the effects of selenium on razorback suckers, but study results are conflicting. This commentary evaluates studies that claim selenium is not a problem for razorback sucker. We find that study bias was so pervasive that purported conclusions were unwarranted. Contaminated control water, older life stages of fish tested, lack of methodology for analysis of selenium in water, diet, or fish, use of rotifer food, low feeding rates, low growth rates of fish, and improper storage of site waters resulted in an apparent erroneous linkage of high selenium in whole-body residues with no adverse effects.

  5. Selenium isotope analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, C.L. Jr.; Warren, C.G.

    1981-01-01

    The isotope ratio of selenium-80 to selenium-74 was determined on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Samples of 2 to 4 mg of selenium were fluorinated with CoF/sub 3/ in a small disposable copper bomb. The product, SeF/sub 6/, was purified in a vacuum line by distillation. The /sup 80/Se//sup 74/Se ratio was determined on a double-collector mass spectrometer that was modified to collect either /sup 82/Se-/sup 80/Se or /sup 80/Se-/sup 74/Se ion pairs. The standard deviation of the difference between two individually fluorinated samples was about 1 per mil. Because essentially all the error was associated with the fluorination step, comparisons between a standard of SeF/sub 6/ and individually fluorinated samples can be expected to have a standard deviation of about 0.5 per mil.

  6. JV Task - 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas Ralston; Laura Raymond

    2009-03-30

    Continuing studies under these three funded projects - (JV Task 77 The Health Implications of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, JV Task 96 Investigating the Importance of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, and JV Task 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue) - were performed to determine the effects of different levels of dietary mercury and selenium on the growth and development of test animals, and related tissue analyses, to understand the protective benefits of dietary selenium in reference to low-level exposure to mercury. Maternal exposure to methylmercury from seafood has been found to cause neurodevelopmental harm in children. However, significant nutritional benefits will be lost if fish consumption is needlessly avoided. The results of these studies support the hypothesis that intracellular Se itself is the physiologically important biomolecule and that the harm of mercury toxicity arises when Hg abundance becomes great enough to bind a significant portion of intracellular Se in vulnerable tissues such as the brain. Formation of HgSe limits bioavailability of Se for synthesis of Se-dependent enzymes, particularly in brain tissues. When production of these enzymes is impaired, the loss of their numerous essential functions results in the signs and symptoms of Hg toxicity. The finding that one mole of Se protects against many moles of Hg indicates that its beneficial effect is not due to sequestration of mercury as HgSe but rather due to the biological activity of the Se. Therefore, the selenium content of seafoods must be considered along with their methylmercury contents in evaluating the effect of dietary exposure to mercury.

  7. Selenium Uptake and Volatilization by Marine Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxem, Katja E.; Vriens, Bas; Wagner, Bettina; Behra, Renata; Winkel, Lenny H. E.

    2015-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace nutrient for humans. An estimated one half to one billion people worldwide suffer from Se deficiency, which is due to low concentrations and bioavailability of Se in soils where crops are grown. It has been hypothesized that more than half of the atmospheric Se deposition to soils is derived from the marine system, where microorganisms methylate and volatilize Se. Based on model results from the late 1980s, the atmospheric flux of these biogenic volatile Se compounds is around 9 Gt/year, with two thirds coming from the marine biosphere. Algae, fungi, and bacteria are known to methylate Se. Although algal Se uptake, metabolism, and methylation influence the speciation and bioavailability of Se in the oceans, these processes have not been quantified under environmentally relevant conditions and are likely to differ among organisms. Therefore, we are investigating the uptake and methylation of the two main inorganic Se species (selenate and selenite) by three globally relevant microalgae: Phaeocystis globosa, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi, and the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. Selenium uptake and methylation were quantified in a batch experiment, where parallel gas-tight microcosms in a climate chamber were coupled to a gas-trapping system. For E. huxleyi, selenite uptake was strongly dependent on aqueous phosphate concentrations, which agrees with prior evidence that selenite uptake by phosphate transporters is a significant Se source for marine algae. Selenate uptake was much lower than selenite uptake. The most important volatile Se compounds produced were dimethyl selenide, dimethyl diselenide, and dimethyl selenyl sulfide. Production rates of volatile Se species were larger with increasing intracellular Se concentration and in the decline phase of the alga. Similar experiments are being carried out with P. globosa and T. oceanica. Our results indicate that marine algae are important for the global cycling of Se

  8. Bioavailability of bioactive food compounds: a challenging journey to bioefficacy

    PubMed Central

    Rein, Maarit J.; Renouf, Mathieu; Cruz‐Hernandez, Cristina; Actis‐Goretta, Lucas; Thakkar, Sagar K.; da Silva Pinto, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    Bioavailability is a key step in ensuring bioefficacy of bioactive food compounds or oral drugs. Bioavailability is a complex process involving several different stages: liberation, absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination phases (LADME). Bioactive food compounds, whether derived from various plant or animal sources, need to be bioavailable in order to exert any beneficial effects. Through a better understanding of the digestive fate of bioactive food compounds we can impact the promotion of health and improvement of performance. Many varying factors affect bioavailability, such as bioaccessibility, food matrix effect, transporters, molecular structures and metabolizing enzymes. Bioefficacy may be improved through enhanced bioavailability. Therefore, several technologies have been developed to improve the bioavailability of xenobiotics, including structural modifications, nanotechnology and colloidal systems. Due to the complex nature of food bioactive compounds and also to the different mechanisms of absorption of hydrophilic and lipophilic bioactive compounds, unravelling the bioavailability of food constituents is challenging. Among the food sources discussed during this review, coffee, tea, citrus fruit and fish oil were included as sources of food bioactive compounds (e.g. (poly)phenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs)) since they are examples of important ingredients for the food industry. Although there are many studies reporting on bioavailability and bioefficacy of these bioactive food components, understanding their interactions, metabolism and mechanism of action still requires extensive work. This review focuses on some of the major factors affecting the bioavailability of the aforementioned bioactive food compounds. PMID:22897361

  9. Selenium Treatment Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selenium (Se) is a metalloid that is a dietary requirement in small quantities, but toxic at higher quantities. It also is known to bioaccumulate. In oxic environments, it exists as selenate (+6) and selenite (+4), both of which are soluble. Selenite will sorb more strongly to...

  10. Selenium and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenium and Compounds ; CASRN 7782 - 49 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcin

  11. Biomarkers of selenium status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The essential trace element selenium (Se) has multiple biological activities, which depend on the level of Se intake. Relatively low Se intakes determine the expression of selenoenzymes in which it serves as an essential constituent. Higher intakes have been shown to have anti-tumorigenic potentia...

  12. Selenium and mercury molar ratios in commercial fish from New Jersey and Illinois: Variation within species and relevance to risk communication

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is an emerging consensus that people consuming large amounts of fish with selenium:mercury ratios below 1 may be at higher risk from mercury toxicity. As the relative amount of selenium increases compared to mercury, risk may be lowered, but it is unclear how much excess selenium is required. It would be useful if the selenium:mercury ratio was relatively consistent within a species, but this has not been the case in our studies of wild-caught fish. Since most people in developed countries and urban areas obtain their fish and other seafood commercially, we examined selenium:mercury molar ratios in commercial fish purchased in stores and fish markets in central New Jersey and Chicago. There was substantial interspecific and intraspecific variation in molar ratios. Across species the selenium:mercury molar ratio decreased with increasing mean mercury levels, but selenium variation also contributed to the ratio. Few samples had selenium:mercury molar ratios below 1, but there was a wide range in ratios, complicating the interpretation for use in risk management and communication. Before ratios can be used in risk management, more information is needed on mercury:selenium interactions and mutual bioavailability, and on the relationship between molar ratios and health outcomes. Further, people who are selenium deficient may be more at risk from mercury toxicity than others. PMID:23541437

  13. Selenium and Selenoprotein Deficiencies Induce Widespread Pyogranuloma Formation in Mice, while High Levels of Dietary Selenium Decrease Liver Tumor Size Driven by TGFα

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Nianxin; Ward, Jerrold M.; Perella, Christine M.; Hoffmann, Victoria J.; Rogers, Keith; Combs, Gerald F.; Schweizer, Ulrich; Merlino, Glenn; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in dietary selenium and selenoprotein status may influence both anti- and pro-cancer pathways, making the outcome of interventions different from one study to another. To characterize such outcomes in a defined setting, we undertook a controlled hepatocarcinogenesis study involving varying levels of dietary selenium and altered selenoprotein status using mice carrying a mutant (A37G) selenocysteine tRNA transgene (TrsptG37) and/or a cancer driver TGFα transgene. The use of TrsptG37 altered selenoprotein expression in a selenoprotein and tissue specific manner and, at sufficient dietary selenium levels, separate the effect of diet and selenoprotein status. Mice were maintained on diets deficient in selenium (0.02 ppm selenium) or supplemented with 0.1, 0.4 or 2.25 ppm selenium or 30 ppm triphenylselenonium chloride (TPSC), a non-metabolized selenium compound. TrsptG37 transgenic and TGFα/TrsptG37 bi-transgenic mice subjected to selenium-deficient or TPSC diets developed a neurological phenotype associated with early morbidity and mortality prior to hepatocarcinoma development. Pathology analyses revealed widespread disseminated pyogranulomatous inflammation. Pyogranulomas occurred in liver, lungs, heart, spleen, small and large intestine, and mesenteric lymph nodes in these transgenic and bi-transgenic mice. The incidence of liver tumors was significantly increased in mice carrying the TGFα transgene, while dietary selenium and selenoprotein status did not affect tumor number and multiplicity. However, adenoma and carcinoma size and area were smaller in TGFα transgenic mice that were fed 0.4 and 2.25 versus 0.1 ppm of selenium. Thus, selenium and selenoprotein deficiencies led to widespread pyogranuloma formation, while high selenium levels inhibited the size of TGFα–induced liver tumors. PMID:23460847

  14. Integrating bioavailability approaches into waste rock evaluations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ranville, James F.; Blumenstein, E. P.; Adams, Michael J.; Choate, LaDonna M.; Smith, Kathleen S.; Wildeman, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of toxic metals in soils affected by mining, industry, agriculture and urbanization, presents problems to human health, the establishment and maintenance of plant and animal habitats, and the rehabilitation of affected areas. A key to managing these problems is predicting the fraction of metal in a given soil that will be biologically labile, and potentially harmful ('bioavailable'). The molecular form of metals and metalloids, particularly the uncomplexed (free) form, controls their bioavailability and toxicity in solution. One computational approach for determining bioavailability, the biotic ligand model (BLM), takes into account not only metal complexation by ligands in solution, but also competitive binding of hardness cations (Ca 2+,Mg 2+,) and metal ions to biological receptor sites. The more direct approach to assess bioavailability is to explicitly measure the response of an organism to a contaminant. A number of microbial enzyme tests have been developed to assess the impact of pollution in a rapid and procedurally simple way. These different approaches in making bioavailability predictions may have value in setting landuse priorities, remediation goals, and habitat reclamation strategies.

  15. Acute selenium toxicosis in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Blodgett, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The toxicity, toxicokinetics, and progressive pathological changes produced by sodium selenite in sheep following parenteral administration were evaluated. In the intramuscular study, the LD/sub 50/ for sodium selenite was 0.7 mg selenium/kg body weight. In the continuous intravenous infusion study, a gradient of tissue selenium/kg body weight with a standard error of 0.035 over a 192 hour observation period. The most evident clinical signs were dyspnea and depression . At necropsy, the most consistent lesions were edematous lungs and pale mottled hearts. Highest tissue selenium concentrations in declining order were found in the liver, kidney, and heart. Four sheep injected intravenously with 0.7 mg selenium/kg body weight survived the 192 hour post-injection observation period. Semilogarithmic plots of blood selenium concentration versus time were triphasic. The ..cap alpha.. and ..gamma.. rate constants of sheep administered a single dose of selenium intravenously were significantly greater than those obtained when sheep were injected intramuscularly with 0.7 mg selenium concentrations was attained with 4, 8, and 12 hour infusions at steady state concentrations of 2500, 3000, and 3500 ppb selenium in the blood. The heart was the target organ of acute selenium toxicosis. A dose-response relationship was observed in the heart with degeneration evident in all hearts and necrosis present in the 2 hearts with the highest concentrations of selenium.

  16. Effect of selenium on the lipids of two unicellular marine algae

    SciTech Connect

    Gennity, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The incorporation of selenium into the lipids of two unicellar marine algae has been investigated. Axenic cultures of the green algae Dunaliella primolecta and the red algae Porphyridium cruentum were grown in the presence of sublethal quantities of selenium (10 ppm) as selenite. Both algae were found to contain selenium bound to all purified lipids, except for saturated hydrocarbons. Of the lipids which contain selenium, carotenoid pigments show the greatest selenium concentration (..beta..-carotene: 1.3..mu..gSe/mg lipid; zeaxanthin: 1.1..mu..gSe/mg lipid) in both algae. P. cruentum contains about ten times as much lipid-associated selenium as D. primolecta, even though the lipids of both algae were very similar. This selenium has been shown to be incorporated non-metabolically into the lipid molecule. The lipid-associated selenium is probably non-covalently bound to the lipid molecule and may interact with double bonds. Selenite does not affect the lipid composition of D. primolecta, as compared with algae grown in the absence of added selenium. A selenium-induced 40% decrease in the cell content of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5omega3) and 20% decrease in arachidonic acid (20:4omega6) in polar lipids (glycolipids plus phospholipids) was observed in P. cruentum. A 25% decrease in the chlorophyll a content of this red algae also occurred. The cell content of other fatty acids, phospholipids and glycolipids was unaltered by selenium. These results are consistent with a selenite-induced oxidation of P. cruentum lipids. Selenium is able to increase the antioxidant potential of algal cells. However, no in vivo selenium-induced protection of algal lipids from oxidation was apparent.

  17. Geologic and Anthropogenic Controls on Selenium and Nitrate Loading to Southern California Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbs, B. J.; Ellis, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    concentrations of nitrate in leachate, possibly from accumulation from atmospheric fallout. Leachate from non-weathered Miocene rock generally had low nitrate concentrations and low selenium. Miocene shales are exposed in vast areas of Southern California. We are undertaking regional studies to determine if other Southern California Watersheds are affected by elevated nitrate and selenium concentrations, and where selenium may threaten habitat.

  18. Effect of chemical form of selenium on tissue glutathione peroxidase activity in developing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Strength, Ralph; Johnson, Janet; White, Marguerite T.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that the stage of development of rats may affect the availability of various forms of selenium for the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) in the rat was experimentally investigated. One experiment evaluated the availability of selenium as selenite or selenomethionine for GSPHx activity during three developmental states in rats: fetus and 7-day old and 14-day old nursing pups. In all tissues studied, GSHPx activity was highest in the 14-day-old pups whose dams were in the selenomethionine group. Rat pups given intraperitoneal selenite had higher liver and kidney GSHPx activity than pups given the same amount of selenium as intraperitoneal selenomethionine. In a second experiment, all dams were fed the same basal diet and pups were weaned to diets containing one of two levels of selenium and one of three forms of selenium (selenite, selenomethionine, or selenocystine). The results also supported the hypothesis these dietary forms of selenium are differentially available for GSHPx activity.

  19. Selenium in mainstream and sidestream smoke of cigarettes containing fly ash-grown tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Gutenmann, W.H.; Lisk, D.J.; Shane, B.S.; Hoffmann, D.; Adams, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The quantities of selenium, tar and nicotine present in mainstream (MS) and sidestream (SS) smoke of machine-smoked cigarettes was studied. The cigarettes were prepared from tobacco purposely cultured on fly ash-amended soil so as to increase its selenium concentration. Selenium concentration was found to be the same in the gaseous phase of both MS and SS smoke, but its concentration was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) in the particulate matter of the MS smoke. Tar was higher in MS smoke and nicotine in SS smoke. Factors affecting selenium concentrations in tobacco and its possible environmental significance are discussed.

  20. Selenium in mainstream and sidestream smoke of cigarettes containing fly ash-grown tobacco.

    PubMed

    Gutenmann, W H; Lisk, D J; Shane, B S; Hoffmann, D; Adams, J D

    1987-01-01

    The quantities of selenium, tar and nicotine present in mainstream (MS) and sidestream (SS) smoke of machine-smoked cigarettes was studied. The cigarettes were prepared from tobacco purposely cultured on fly ash-amended soil so as to increase its selenium concentration. Selenium concentration was found to be the same in the gaseous phase of both MS and SS smoke, but its concentration was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) in the particulate matter of the MS smoke. Tar was higher in MS smoke and nicotine in SS smoke. Factors affecting selenium concentrations in tobacco and its possible environmental significance are discussed. PMID:3428180

  1. Human Folate Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Ohrvik, Veronica E.; Witthoft, Cornelia M.

    2011-01-01

    The vitamin folate is recognized as beneficial health-wise in the prevention of neural tube defects, anemia, cardiovascular diseases, poor cognitive performance, and some forms of cancer. However, suboptimal dietary folate intake has been reported in a number of countries. Several national health authorities have therefore introduced mandatory food fortification with synthetic folic acid, which is considered a convenient fortificant, being cost-efficient in production, more stable than natural food folate, and superior in terms of bioavailability and bioefficacy. Other countries have decided against fortification due to the ambiguous role of synthetic folic acid regarding promotion of subclinical cancers and other adverse health effects. This paper reviews recent studies on folate bioavailability after intervention with folate from food. Our conclusions were that limited folate bioavailability data are available for vegetables, fruits, cereal products, and fortified foods, and that it is difficult to evaluate the bioavailability of food folate or whether intervention with food folate improves folate status. We recommend revising the classical approach of using folic acid as a reference dose for estimating the plasma kinetics and relative bioavailability of food folate. PMID:22254106

  2. Selenium: metabolism and endocrines (Minireview).

    PubMed

    Brtkova; Brtko

    1996-09-01

    Selenium occurs both in prokaryocytes and eukaryocytes as a component of selenoenzymes or selenoproteins. Approximately 80 % of selenium in animal or human body occurs in the form of seleno-L-cysteine, an amino acid encoded by one of standard termination codons. Selenium is an integral component of the active site of glutathione peroxidases which plays an important role in the antioxidant system. Iodothyronine 5-deiodinase, type I is also a selenoenzyme consisting of two identical subunits which catalyzes a reductive monodeiodination of iodothyronine residues of the phenolic ring. General characteristics of several selenoproteins and selenium binding proteins are summarized, also certain facts on the effects of selenium deficiency in man and its distribution and toxicity in higher organisms, are reviewed. Selenium status in the population from selected regions in Slovakia is reported and compared with that in other countries. PMID:10979042

  3. Selenium biomineralization for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda V; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-06-01

    Selenium (Se) is not only a strategic element in high-tech electronics and an essential trace element in living organisms, but also a potential toxin with low threshold concentrations. Environmental biotechnological applications using bacterial biomineralization have the potential not only to remove selenium from contaminated waters, but also to sequester it in a reusable form. Selenium biomineralization has been observed in phylogenetically diverse microorganisms isolated from pristine and contaminated environments, yet it is one of the most poorly understood biogeochemical processes. Microbial respiration of selenium is unique because the microbial cells are presented with both soluble (SeO(4)(2-) and SeO(3)(2-)) and insoluble (Se(0)) forms of selenium as terminal electron acceptor. Here, we highlight selenium biomineralization and the potential biotechnological uses for it in bioremediation and wastewater treatment. PMID:25908504

  4. Bioavailability and generic prescribing.

    PubMed

    Mindel, J S

    1976-01-01

    Although oral drug bioinequivalence has been attributed to a number of causes (excipients, dosage form, variation in dissolution time, and aging) less is known about bioavailability problems of topical medications in ophthalmology. Factors that can alter drug absorption from solutions (pH, partition coefficient, container impurities, contact time, etc.) are noted, and cases in which bioavailability problems should be considered as causes of therapeutic failure are discussed. Various attitudes representing pharmaceutical companies, the federal government, pharmacists, consumers and physicians toward the related problems of bioinequivalence and generic prescribing are examined. Techniques for in vivo and in vitro drug testing and for establishing uniform conditions of drug manufacture and storage can contribute to identification and minimization of bioavailability problems. A rational program based on a combination of such techniques could, ultimately, lead to establishment of the terms "generic equivalency" and "therapeutic equivalency" as synonymous. PMID:13505

  5. Effects of commercial selenium products on glutathione peroxidase activity and semen quality in stud boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine how dietary supplementation of inorganic and organic selenium affects selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and sperm of sexually mature stud boars. Twenty-four boars of the Large White, Landrace, Pietrain, and Duroc breeds of opt...

  6. Selenium incorporation using recombinant techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, Helen

    2010-04-01

    An overview of techniques for recombinant incorporation of selenium and subsequent purification and crystallization of the resulting labelled protein. Using selenomethionine to phase macromolecular structures is common practice in structure determination, along with the use of selenocysteine. Selenium is consequently the most commonly used heavy atom for MAD. In addition to the well established recombinant techniques for the incorporation of selenium in prokaryal expression systems, there have been recent advances in selenium labelling in eukaryal expression, which will be discussed. Tips and things to consider for the purification and crystallization of seleno-labelled proteins are also included.

  7. Selenium for preventing cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vinceti, Marco; Dennert, Gabriele; Crespi, Catherine M; Zwahlen, Marcel; Brinkman, Maree; Zeegers, Maurice PA; Horneber, Markus; D'Amico, Roberto; Del Giovane, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Background This review is an update of the first Cochrane publication on selenium for preventing cancer (Dennert 2011). Selenium is a metalloid with both nutritional and toxicological properties. Higher selenium exposure and selenium supplements have been suggested to protect against several types of cancers. Objectives Two research questions were addressed in this review: What is the evidence for: an aetiological relation between selenium exposure and cancer risk in humans? andthe efficacy of selenium supplementation for cancer prevention in humans? Search methods We conducted electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2013, Issue 1), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1966 to February 2013 week 1), EMBASE (1980 to 2013 week 6), CancerLit (February 2004) and CCMed (February 2011). As MEDLINE now includes the journals indexed in CancerLit, no further searches were conducted in this database after 2004. Selection criteria We included prospective observational studies (cohort studies including sub-cohort controlled studies and nested case-control studies) and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with healthy adult participants (18 years of age and older). Data collection and analysis For observational studies, we conducted random effects meta-analyses when five or more studies were retrieved for a specific outcome. For RCTs, we performed random effects meta-analyses when two or more studies were available. The risk of bias in observational studies was assessed using forms adapted from the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale for cohort and case-control studies; the criteria specified in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions were used to evaluate the risk of bias in RCTs. Main results We included 55 prospective observational studies (including more than 1,100,000 participants) and eight RCTs (with a total of 44,743 participants). For the observational studies, we found lower cancer incidence (summary odds ratio (OR) 0

  8. Toxicity, bioavailability and metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, S B; Rao, P V

    1993-11-01

    1. Environmental toxicology emphasizes the difference from traditional toxicology in which pure compounds of interest are added to purified diets, or injected into the test animals. When the objective is to study the fate and effects of trace elements in the environment, knowledge of the speciation of the elements and their physico-chemical forms is important. 2. Cadmium salts such as the sulfides, carbonates or oxides, are practically insoluble in water. However, these can be converted to water-soluble salts in nature under the influence of oxygen and acids. Chronic exposure to Cd is associated with renal toxicity in humans once a critical body burden is reached. 3. The solubility of As(III) oxide in water is fairly low, but high in either acid or alkali. In water, arsenic is usually in the form of the arsenate or arsenite. As(III) is systemically more poisonous than the As(V), and As(V) is reduced to the As(III) form before exerting any toxic effects. Organic arsenicals also exert their toxic effects in vivo in animals by first metabolizing to the trivalent arsenoxide form. Some methyl arsenic compounds, such as di- and trimethylarsines, occur naturally as a consequence of biological activity. The toxic effect of arsenite can be potentiated by dithiols, while As has a protective effect against the toxicity of a variety of forms of Se in several species. 4. Selenium occurs in several oxidation states and many selenium analogues of organic sulfur compounds exist in nature. Selenium in selenate form occurs in alkaline soils, where it is soluble and easily available to plants. Selenite binds tightly to iron and aluminum oxides and thus is quite insoluble in soils. Hydrogen selenide is a very toxic gas at room temperature. The methylated forms of Se are much less toxic for the organism than selenite. However, the methylated Se derivatives have strong synergistic toxicity with other minerals such as arsenic. 5. Aquatic organisms absorb and retain Hg in the tissues, as

  9. Reproduction in eastern screech-owls fed selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Raptors are occasionally exposed to excessive selenium from contaminated prey, but the effects of this exposure on reproduction are unknown. Therefore, we fed captive eastern screech-owls (Otus asio) diets containing 0, 4.4, or 13.2 ppm (wet wt) added selenium in the form of seleno-DL-methionine. Adult mass at sacrifice and reproductive success of birds receiving 13.2 ppm selenium were depressed (P < 0.05) relative to controls. Parents given 4.4 ppm selenium produced no malformed nestlings, but femur lengths of young were shorter (P = 0.015) than those of controls. Liver biochemistries indicative of oxidative stress were affected (P < 0.05) in 5-day-old nestlings from parents fed 4.4 ppm selenium and included a 19% increase in glutathione peroxidase activity, a 43% increase in the ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH), and a 17% increase in lipid peroxidation. Based on reproductive effects relative to dietary exposure, sensitivity of eastern screech-owls to selenium was similar to that of black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) but less than that of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

  10. Reduction of selenite by Azospirillum brasilense with the formation of selenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tugarova, Anna V; Vetchinkina, Elena P; Loshchinina, Ekaterina A; Burov, Andrei M; Nikitina, Valentina E; Kamnev, Alexander A

    2014-10-01

    The ability to reduce selenite (SeO(3)(2-)) ions with the formation of selenium nanoparticles was demonstrated in Azospirillum brasilense for the first time. The influence of selenite ions on the growth of A. brasilense Sp7 and Sp245, two widely studied wild-type strains, was investigated. Growth of cultures on both liquid and solid (2 % agar) media in the presence of SeO(3)(2-) was found to be accompanied by the appearance of the typical red colouration. By means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XFA), intracellular accumulation of elementary selenium in the form of nanoparticles (50 to 400 nm in diameter) was demonstrated for both strains. The proposed mechanism of selenite-to-selenium (0) reduction could involve SeO(3)(2-) in the denitrification process, which has been well studied in azospirilla, rather than a selenite detoxification strategy. The results obtained point to the possibility of using Azospirillum strains as endophytic or rhizospheric bacteria to assist phytoremediation of, and cereal cultivation on, selenium-contaminated soils. The ability of A. brasilense to synthesise selenium nanoparticles may be of interest to nanobiotechnology for "green synthesis" of bioavailable amorphous red selenium nanostructures. PMID:24863127

  11. Arsenic Bioavailability, Bioaccessibility, And Speciation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term bioavailability has many different meanings across various disciplines. Often bioavailability is concerned with human health aspects such as the case of urban children interacting with contaminated soil. The still utilized approach to base risk assessment on total meta...

  12. Interspecific and intraspecific variation in selenium:mercury molar ratios in saltwater fish from the Aleutians: Potential protection on mercury toxicity by selenium

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn

    2014-01-01

    A number of factors affect the consumption risk from mercury in fish, including mercury levels, seasonal patterns of mercury concentrations, human consumption patterns, and sensitive populations (e.g. pregnant women, fetuses, young children, and yet unknown genetic factors). Recently the protective effects of selenium on methylmercury toxicity have been publicized, particularly for saltwater fish. We examine levels of mercury and selenium in several species of fish and seabirds from the Aleutians (Alaska), determine selenium:mercury molar ratios, and examine species-specific and individual variation in the ratios as a means of exploring the use of the ratio in risk assessment and risk management. Variation among species was similar for mercury and selenium. There was significant inter-specific and intraspecific variation in selenium:mercury molar ratios for fish, and for birds. The mean selenium:mercury molar ratios for all fish and bird species were above 1, meaning there was an excess of selenium relative to mercury. It has been suggested that an excess of selenium confers some protective advantage for salt water fish, although the degree of excess necessary is unclear. The selenium:mercury molar ratio was significantly correlated negatively with total length for most fish species, but not for dolly varden. Some individuals of Pacific cod, yellow irish lord, rock greenling, Pacific halibut, dolly varden, and to a lesser extent, flathead sole, had selenium:mercury ratios below 1. No bird muscle had an excess of mercury (ratio below 1), and only glaucous-winged gull and pigeon guillemot had ratios between 1 and 5. There was a great deal of variation in selenium:mercury molar ratios within fish species, and within bird species, making it difficult and impractical to use these ratios in risk assessment or management, for fish advisories, or for consumers, particularly given the difficulty of interpreting the ratios. PMID:22664537

  13. Effect of dietary selenium and omega-3 fatty acids on muscle composition and quality in broilers

    PubMed Central

    Haug, Anna; Eich-Greatorex, Susanne; Bernhoft, Aksel; Wold, Jens P; Hetland, Harald; Christophersen, Olav A; Sogn, Trine

    2007-01-01

    Background Human health may be improved if dietary intakes of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are increased. Consumption of broiler meat is increasing, and the meat content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are affected by the composition of broiler feed. A two-way analyses of variance was used to study the effect of feed containing omega-3 rich plant oils and selenium enriched yeast on broiler meat composition, antioxidation- and sensory parameters. Four different wheat-based dietary treatments supplemented with 5% rapeseed oil or 4% rapeseed oil plus 1% linseed oil, and either 0.50 mg selenium or 0.84 mg selenium (organic form) per kg diet was fed to newly hatched broilers for 22 days. Results The different dietary treatments gave distinct different concentrations of selenium and fatty acids in thigh muscle; one percent linseed oil in the diet increased the concentration of the omega-3 fatty acids 18:3, 20:5 and 22:5, and 0.84 mg selenium per kg diet gave muscle selenium concentration at the same level as is in fish muscle (0.39 mg/kg muscle). The high selenium intake also resulted in increased concentration of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids EPA (20:5), DPA (22:5) and DHA (22:6), thus it may be speculated if high dietary selenium might have a role in increasing the concentration of EPA, DPA and DHA in tissues after intake of plant oils contning omega-3 fatty acids. Conclusion Moderate modifications of broiler feed may give a healthier broiler meat, having increased content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids. High intakes of selenium (organic form) may increase the concentration of very long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in muscle. PMID:17967172

  14. SLUDGE ORGANICS BIOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern over the bioavailability of toxic organics that can occur in municipal sludges threatens routine land application of sludge. vailable data, however, show that concentrations of priority organics in normal sludges are low. ludges applied at agronomic rates yield chemical c...

  15. Dietary Selenium in Adjuvant Therapy of Viral and Bacterial Infections12

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrenner, Holger; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Dkhil, Mohamed A; Wunderlich, Frank; Sies, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Viral and bacterial infections are often associated with deficiencies in macronutrients and micronutrients, including the essential trace element selenium. In selenium deficiency, benign strains of Coxsackie and influenza viruses can mutate to highly pathogenic strains. Dietary supplementation to provide adequate or supranutritional selenium supply has been proposed to confer health benefits for patients suffering from some viral diseases, most notably with respect to HIV and influenza A virus (IAV) infections. In addition, selenium-containing multimicronutrient supplements improved several clinical and lifestyle variables in patients coinfected with HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Selenium status may affect the function of cells of both adaptive and innate immunity. Supranutritional selenium promotes proliferation and favors differentiation of naive CD4-positive T lymphocytes toward T helper 1 cells, thus supporting the acute cellular immune response, whereas excessive activation of the immune system and ensuing host tissue damage are counteracted through directing macrophages toward the M2 phenotype. This review provides an up-to-date overview on selenium in infectious diseases caused by viruses (e.g., HIV, IAV, hepatitis C virus, poliovirus, West Nile virus) and bacteria (e.g., M. tuberculosis, Helicobacter pylori). Data from epidemiologic studies and intervention trials, with selenium alone or in combination with other micronutrients, and animal experiments are discussed against the background of dietary selenium requirements to alter immune functions. PMID:25593145

  16. Selenium accumulation in lettuce germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for animals and humans. Increasing Se content in food crops offers an effective approach to reduce the widespread selenium deficiency problem in many parts of the world. In this study, we evaluated thirty diverse accessions of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) f...

  17. Effects of Dietary Selenium and Vitamin E on Growth Performance, Meat Yield, and Selenium Content and Lipid Oxidation of Breast Meat of Broilers Reared Under Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Habibian, Mahmood; Ghazi, Shahab; Moeini, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted using 360 broiler chickens to evaluate the effects of dietary vitamin E (0, 125, and 250 mg/kg), selenium (0, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg), or their different combinations on performance, meat yield, and selenium content and lipid oxidation of breast meat of broilers raised under either a thermoneutral (TN, 24 °C constant) or heat stress (HS, 24 to 37 °C cycling) condition. There was a reduction (P < 0.05) in body weight and feed intake and an increase (P < 0.05) in feed conversion ratio when broilers exposed to HS. In the overall period of the study (1 to 49 days), growth performance of TN broilers was not affected (P < 0.05) by vitamin E and selenium supplementation. However, under HS condition, broilers receiving 250 mg/kg vitamin E and 0.5 mg/kg selenium consumed more (P < 0.05) feed than that of broilers receiving 250 mg/kg vitamin E alone, but similar (P > 0.05) to that of broilers receiving 250 mg/kg vitamin E and 1 mg/kg selenium. The malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the breast meat was increased (P < 0.05), but its selenium content was decreased (P < 0.05) by exposure to HS. The breast meat selenium content was increased (P < 0.05) by selenium supplementation. The breast meat selenium content was decreased (P < 0.05) by supplementation of 250 mg/kg vitamin E to diet of TN birds. However, the breast meat selenium content was increased (P < 0.05) by supplementation of vitamin E under HS condition. The breast meat MDA content was not affected (P > 0.05) by dietary treatments under TN condition. However, the breast meat MDA content was decreased (P < 0.05) by both vitamin E and selenium supplementation under HS condition, and the lowest MDA content was observed in the breast meat of broilers receiving combination of 125 mg/kg vitamin E and 1 mg/kg selenium. The results showed that supplementation of selenium and vitamin E was capable of increasing the selenium content of the breast meat and could improve the lipid

  18. Relative Bioavailability and Bioaccessibility and Speciation of Arsenic in Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Scheckel, Kirk G.; Nelson, Clay M.; Seales, Paul E.; Lee, Grace E.; Hughes, Michael F.; Miller, Bradley W.; Yeow, Aaron; Gilmore, Thomas; Serda, Sophia M.; Harper, Sharon; Thomas, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Assessment of soil arsenic (As) bioavailability may profoundly affect the extent of remediation required at contaminated sites by improving human exposure estimates. Because small adjustments in soil As bioavailability estimates can significantly alter risk assessments and remediation goals, convenient, rapid, reliable, and inexpensive tools are needed to determine soil As bioavailability. Objectives: We evaluated inexpensive methods for assessing As bioavailability in soil as a means to improve human exposure estimates and potentially reduce remediation costs. Methods: Nine soils from residential sites affected by mining or smelting activity and two National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference materials were evaluated for As bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and speciation. Arsenic bioavailability was determined using an in vivo mouse model, and As bioaccessibility was determined using the Solubility/Bioavailability Research Consortium in vitro assay. Arsenic speciation in soil and selected soil physicochemical properties were also evaluated to determine whether these parameters could be used as predictors of As bioavailability and bioaccessibility. Results: In the mouse assay, we compared bioavailabilities of As in soils with that for sodium arsenate. Relative bioavailabilities (RBAs) of soil As ranged from 11% to 53% (mean, 33%). In vitro soil As bioaccessibility values were strongly correlated with soil As RBAs (R2 = 0.92). Among physicochemical properties, combined concentrations of iron and aluminum accounted for 80% and 62% of the variability in estimates of RBA and bioaccessibility, respectively. Conclusion: The multifaceted approach described here yielded congruent estimates of As bioavailability and evidence of interrelations among physicochemical properties and bioavailability estimates. PMID:21749965

  19. Nanosized Selenium: A Novel Platform Technology to Prevent Bacterial Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi

    As an important category of bacterial infections, healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are considered an increasing threat to the safety and health of patients worldwide. HAIs lead to extended hospital stays, contribute to increased medical costs, and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In the United States, infections encountered in the hospital or a health care facility affect more than 1.7 million patients, cost 35.7 billion to 45 billion, and contribute to 88,000 deaths in hospitals annually. The most conventional and widely accepted method to fight against bacterial infections is using antibiotics. However, because of the widespread and sometimes inappropriate use of antibiotics, many strains of bacteria have rapidly developed antibiotic resistance. Those new, stronger bacteria pose serious, worldwide threats to public health and welfare. In 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported antibiotic resistance as a global serious threat that is no longer a prediction for the future but is now reality. It has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. The most effective strategy to prevent antibiotic resistance is minimizing the use of antibiotics. In recent years, nanomaterials have been investigated as one of the potential substitutes of antibiotics. As a result of their vastly increased ratio of surface area to volume, nanomaterials will likely exert a stronger interaction with bacteria which may affect bacterial growth and propagation. A major concern of most existing antibacterial nanomaterials, like silver nanoparticles, is their potential toxicity. But selenium is a non-metallic material and a required nutrition for the human body, which is recommended by the FDA at a 53 to 60 μg daily intake. Nanosized selenium is considered to be healthier and less toxic compared with many metal-based nanomaterials due to the generation of reactive oxygen species from metals, especially heavy metals. Therefore, the objectives of

  20. Cytotoxicity and therapeutic effect of irinotecan combined with selenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fuping; Yuan, Qing; Gao, Liang; Cai, Pengju; Zhu, Huarui; Liu, Ru; Wang, Yaling; Wei, Yueteng; Huang, Guodong; Liang, Jian; Gao, Xueyun

    2014-10-01

    Although chemotherapeutic drugs are widely applied for clinic tumor treatment, severe toxicity restricts their therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we reported a new form of selenium, selenium nanoparticles (Nano Se) which have significant lower toxicity and acceptable bioavailability. We investigated Nano Se as chemotherapy preventive agent to protect against toxicities of anticancer drug irinotecan and synergistically enhance the anti-tumor treatment effect in vitro and in vivo. The underlying mechanisms were also investigated. The combination of Nano Se and irinotecan showed increased cytotoxic effect with HCT-8 tumor cells likely by p53 mediated apoptosis. Nano Se inhibited growth of HCT-8 tumor cells partially through caspases mediated apoptosis. In vivo experiment showed Nano Se at a dose of 4 mg/kg/day significantly alleviated adverse effects induced by irinotecan (60 mg/kg) treatment. Nano Se alone treatment did not induce any toxic manifestations. The combination of Nano Se and irinotecan dramatically inhibited tumor growth and significantly induced apoptosis of tumor cells in HCT-8 cells xenografted tumor. Tumor inhibition rate was about 17.2%, 48.6% and 62.1% for Nano Se, irinotecan and the combination of Nano Se and irinotecan, respectively. The beneficial effects of Nano Se for tumor therapy were mainly ascribed to selectively regulating Nrf2-ARE (antioxidant responsive elements) pathway in tumor tissues and normal tissues. Our results suggest Nano Se is a promising selenium species with potential application in cancer treatment. PMID:25064805

  1. Arsenic and Selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, J. A.; Kinniburgh, D. G.; Smedley, P. L.; Fordyce, F. M.; Klinck, B. A.

    2003-12-01

    Arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) have become increasingly important in environmental geochemistry because of their significance to human health. Their concentrations vary markedly in the environment, partly in relation to geology and partly as a result of human activity. Some of the contamination evident today probably dates back to the first settled civilizations which used metals.Arsenic is in group 15 of the periodic table (Table 1) and is usually described as a metalloid. It has only one stable isotope, 75As. It can exist in the -III, -I, 0, III, and V oxidation states (Table 2).

  2. The effect of selenium on reproduction of black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) in Shasta County California

    SciTech Connect

    Flueck, W.T.

    1989-01-01

    This study was to determine if nutritional inadequacy of selenium may be responsible for a declining reproductive rate of a migratory herd of black-tailed deer. Selenium is an essential trace mineral for mammalian herbivores. Deficiency affects primarily neonates resulting in increased mortality rates. Shasta County, California is indigenously low in selenium due to soil characteristics. Local livestock enterprises have experienced reproductive problems, which were responsive to selenium treatment. The low recruitment rate in the deer herd suggested a physiological link between low selenium status and reproductive problems, and an experimental trial was initiated. Free ranging adult females were supplemented with selenium rumen pellets and marked with radio transmitters. From 1985 to 1987, the selenium dose was doubled as compared to 1984. It was established that evaluation of selenium status by determining whole blood selenium levels adequately describes the major bioactive form of selenium, glutathione peroxidase. To evaluate the experimental trial, the pre-weaning survival rate of progeny of supplemented females was compared with the rate in the untreated herd.

  3. The Association between Hantavirus Infection and Selenium Deficiency in Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Li-Qun; Goeijenbier, Marco; Zuo, Shu-Qing; Wang, Li-Ping; Liang, Song; Klein, Sabra L.; Li, Xin-Lou; Liu, Kun; Liang, Lu; Gong, Peng; Glass, Gregory E.; van Gorp, Eric; Richardus, Jan H.; Ma, Jia-Qi; Cao, Wu-Chun; de Vlas, Sake J.

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) caused by hantaviruses and transmitted by rodents is a significant public health problem in China, and occurs more frequently in selenium-deficient regions. To study the role of selenium concentration in HFRS incidence we used a multidisciplinary approach combining ecological analysis with preliminary experimental data. The incidence of HFRS in humans was about six times higher in severe selenium-deficient and double in moderate deficient areas compared to non-deficient areas. This association became statistically stronger after correction for other significant environment-related factors (low elevation, few grasslands, or an abundance of forests) and was independent of geographical scale by separate analyses for different climate regions. A case-control study of HFRS patients admitted to the hospital revealed increased activity and plasma levels of selenium binding proteins while selenium supplementation in vitro decreased viral replication in an endothelial cell model after infection with a low multiplicity of infection (MOI). Viral replication with a higher MOI was not affected by selenium supplementation. Our findings indicate that selenium deficiency may contribute to an increased prevalence of hantavirus infections in both humans and rodents. Future studies are needed to further examine the exact mechanism behind this observation before selenium supplementation in deficient areas could be implemented for HFRS prevention. PMID:25609306

  4. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  5. Sludge organics bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Eiceman, G.E.; Bellin, C.A.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Concern over the bioavailability of toxic organics that can occur in municipal sludges threatens routine land application of sludge. Available data, however, show that concentrations of priority organics in normal sludges are low. Sludges applied at agronomic rates yield chemical concentrations in soil-sludge mixtures 50 to 100 fold lower. Plant uptake at these pollutant concentrations (and at much higher concentrations) is minimal. Chemicals are either (1) accumulated at extremely low levels (PCBs), (2) possibly accumulated, but then rapidly metabolized within plants to extremely low levels (DEHP), or (3) likely degraded so rapidly in soil that only minor contamination occurs (PCP and 2,4-DNP).

  6. Bioavailability of zinc, copper, and manganese from infant diets

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    A series of trace element absorption experiments were performed using the Sprague-Dawley suckling rat put and infant rhesis monkey (Macaca mulatta) with extrinsic radiolabeling to assess the bioavailability of Zn, Cu, and Mn from infant diets and to examine specific factors that affect absorption of these essential nutrients. Bioavailability of Cu as assessed by 6 h liver uptake (% of /sup 64/Cu dose) was highest from human milk and cow milk based formula and significantly lower from cow milk and soy based formula. Copper bioavailability from infant cereal products as assessed by whole body uptake (% of /sup 64/Cu dose) in d 20 rats, 9 h postintubation, was low compared to the bioavailability from cow milk or human milk alone. /sup 65/Zn uptake in d 20 rats, 9 h postintubation, was significantly lower from cereals fed alone or in combination with cow or human milk as compared to the uptake from the milks fed alone. Zn bioavailability varied among cereal diets, (lowest from cereals containing phytate and highest from cereal/fruit products). Mn bioavailability from infant diets was assessed using a modified suckling rat pup model. Bioavailability (24 h whole body retention of /sup 54/Mn) was high from all milks and commercial formulas tested.

  7. Plants defective in calcium oxalate crystal formation have more bioavailable calcium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioavailable calcium affects bone formation and calcification. Here we investigate how a single gene mutation altering calcium partitioning in the forage crop Medicago truncatula affects calcium bioavailability. Previously, the cod5 Medicago mutant was identified which contains wild-type amounts o...

  8. Micronutrient bioavailability research priorities.

    PubMed

    Casgrain, Amélie; Collings, Rachel; Harvey, Linda J; Boza, Julio J; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2010-05-01

    A micronutrient bioavailability workshop, which involved international experts and members of the scientific community and the food industry, with interactive breakout sessions based on synectics principles, was organized by the International Life Sciences Institute Europe Addition of Nutrients to Food Task Force and the European Commission Network of Excellence European Micronutrient Recommendations Aligned. After presentations by experts, a series of "challenge statements" was discussed. The aim was to address topical issues, in particular those that linked bioavailability with the derivation of micronutrient requirements and dietary recommendations, to identify gaps in knowledge and to consider research priorities. Several generic research priorities were identified, including improving the quality of dietary surveys/food composition tables, the need for more metabolic studies that use stable isotopes and high-quality longer-term interventions, and the development of multifactorial mathematical models. Among the common recurrent factors identified as important were polymorphisms/genotype, consideration of the whole diet, chemical form of the micronutrient, and the determination of physiologic requirements. The involvement of all participants in the structured discussions ensured a broad overview of current knowledge, state-of-the-art research, and consideration of priorities for future research. PMID:20200267

  9. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.

    1993-01-01

    Methods for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72.

  10. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.

    1993-04-20

    Methods are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72.

  11. The Content and Bioavailability of Mineral Nutrients of Selected Wild and Traditional Edible Plants as Affected by Household Preparation Methods Practiced by Local Community in Benishangul Gumuz Regional State, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Hailu, Andinet Abera; Addis, Getachew

    2016-01-01

    Edible parts of some wild and traditional vegetables used by the Gumuz community, namely, Portulaca quadrifida, Dioscorea abyssinica, Abelmoschus esculentus, and Oxytenanthera abyssinica, were evaluated for their minerals composition and bioavailability. Mineral elements, namely, Ca, Fe, Zn, and Cu, were analyzed using Shimadzu atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Effects of household processing practices on the levels of mineral elements were evaluated and the bioavailability was predicted using antinutrient-mineral molar ratios. Fe, Zn, Ca, Cu, P, Na, and K level in raw edible portions ranged in (0.64 ± 0.02-27.0 ± 6.24), (0.46 ± 0.02-0.85 ± 0.02), (24.49 ± 1.2-131.7 ± 8.3), (0.11 ± 0.01-0.46 ± 0.04), (39.13 ± 0.34-57.27 ± 0.94), (7.34 ± 0.42-20.42 ± 1.31), and (184.4 ± 1.31-816.3 ± 11.731) mg/100 g FW, respectively. Although statistically significant losses in minerals as a result of household preparation practices were observed, the amount of nutrients retained could be valuable especially in communities that have limited alternative sources of these micronutrients. The predicted minerals' bioavailability shows adequacy in terms of calcium and zinc but not iron. PMID:26981523

  12. The Content and Bioavailability of Mineral Nutrients of Selected Wild and Traditional Edible Plants as Affected by Household Preparation Methods Practiced by Local Community in Benishangul Gumuz Regional State, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Hailu, Andinet Abera; Addis, Getachew

    2016-01-01

    Edible parts of some wild and traditional vegetables used by the Gumuz community, namely, Portulaca quadrifida, Dioscorea abyssinica, Abelmoschus esculentus, and Oxytenanthera abyssinica, were evaluated for their minerals composition and bioavailability. Mineral elements, namely, Ca, Fe, Zn, and Cu, were analyzed using Shimadzu atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Effects of household processing practices on the levels of mineral elements were evaluated and the bioavailability was predicted using antinutrient-mineral molar ratios. Fe, Zn, Ca, Cu, P, Na, and K level in raw edible portions ranged in (0.64 ± 0.02–27.0 ± 6.24), (0.46 ± 0.02–0.85 ± 0.02), (24.49 ± 1.2–131.7 ± 8.3), (0.11 ± 0.01–0.46 ± 0.04), (39.13 ± 0.34–57.27 ± 0.94), (7.34 ± 0.42–20.42 ± 1.31), and (184.4 ± 1.31–816.3 ± 11.731) mg/100 g FW, respectively. Although statistically significant losses in minerals as a result of household preparation practices were observed, the amount of nutrients retained could be valuable especially in communities that have limited alternative sources of these micronutrients. The predicted minerals' bioavailability shows adequacy in terms of calcium and zinc but not iron. PMID:26981523

  13. Selenium deposition kinetics of different selenium sources in muscle and feathers of broilers.

    PubMed

    Couloigner, Florian; Jlali, Maamer; Briens, Mickael; Rouffineau, Friedrich; Geraert, Pierre-André; Mercier, Yves

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine selenium (Se) deposition kinetics in muscles and feathers of broilers in order to develop a rapid method to compare bioavailability of selenium sources. Different Se sources such as 2-hydroxy-4-methylselenobutanoic acid (HMSeBA, SO), sodium selenite (SS) and seleno-yeast (SY) were compared for their kinetics on Se deposition in muscles and feathers in broiler chicks from 0 to 21 d of age. A total of 576 day-old broilers were divided into four treatments with 8 replicates of 18 birds per pen. The diets used in the experiment were a negative control (NC) not supplemented with Se and 3 diets supplemented with 0.2 mg Se/kg as SS, SY or SO. Total Se content in breast muscle and feathers were assessed on days 0, 7, 14 and 21. At 7 d of age, SO increased muscle Se content compared to D0 (P < 0.05), whereas with the other treatments, muscle Se concentration decreased (P < 0.05). After 21 days, organic Se sources maintained (SY) or increased (SO) (P < 0.05) breast muscle Se concentration compared to hatch value whereas inorganic source (SS) or non-supplemented group (NC) showed a significant decrease in tissue Se concentration (P < 0.05). At D21, Se contents of muscle and feathers were highly correlated (R(2) = 0.927; P < 0.0001). To conclude, these results indicate that efficiency of different Se sources can be discriminated through a 7 d using muscle Se content in broiler chickens. Muscle and feathers Se contents were highly correlated after 21 days. Also feather sampling at 21 days of age represents a reliable and non-invasive procedure for Se bioefficacy comparison. PMID:26500270

  14. Mercury and selenium interaction: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Cuvin-Aralar, M.L.; Furness, R.W. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reviews studies on mercury and selenium interaction. It includes the effects of selenium on mercury toxicity on the organism, organ/tissue, and subcellular levels. The paper also touches on possible mechanisms for the protective action of selenium against mercury toxicity and deals briefly with the synergism between the two elements. 71 references.

  15. 21 CFR 573.920 - Selenium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... section, or as selenium yeast, as provided in paragraph (h) of this section. (c) It is added to feed as... months.” (h) Selenium yeast is a dried, non-viable yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cultivated in a fed-batch fermentation which provides incremental amounts of cane molasses and selenium salts in a...

  16. 21 CFR 573.920 - Selenium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... section, or as selenium yeast, as provided in paragraph (h) of this section. (c) It is added to feed as... months.” (h) Selenium yeast is a dried, non-viable yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cultivated in a fed-batch fermentation which provides incremental amounts of cane molasses and selenium salts in a...

  17. Toxicity of selenium and other elements in food organisms to razorback sucker larvae.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven J; Holley, Kathy M; Buhl, Kevin J; Bullard, Fern A; Weston, L Ken; McDonald, Susan F

    2002-09-24

    Elevated selenium concentrations documented in water, sediment, and biota in irrigation drain water studies by U.S. Department of the Interior agencies and academia have raised concerns that selenium may be adversely affecting endangered fish in the upper Colorado River basin. The objective of the study was to determine the effects on endangered razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) larvae from exposure to selenium and other trace elements in water and zooplankton collected from sites adjacent to the Colorado River near Grand Junction, CO. A 30-day study was initiated with 5-day-old larvae exposed in a 4 x 4 factor experiment with four food and four water treatments, and the biological endpoints measured were survival, growth, development, and whole-body residues of selenium. Mean selenium concentration in reference water (24-Road) was <0.7 microg/l, in reference food (brine shrimp) was 3.2 microg/g, at Horsethief was 1.6 microg/l in water and 6.0 microg/g in zooplankton, at Adobe Creek was 3.4 microg/l in water and 32 microg/g in zooplankton, and at Walter Walker was 13 microg/l in water and 52 microg/g in zooplankton. Although there were differences in concentrations of inorganic elements in water and biota among the three sites, selenium was apparently the only element elevated to concentrations of concern. Effects on survival were more prominent from dietary exposure compared to waterborne exposure. Selenium concentrations of >or=4.6 microg/g in food organisms adversely affected the survival of razorback sucker larvae. The onset of mortality in larvae exposed to food and water from Walter Walker seemed delayed compared to mortality in larvae exposed to food and water from Horsethief, which has been observed in two other studies. Elevated arsenic in one food source seemed to interact with selenium to reduce the toxic effects of selenium. PMID:12127741

  18. Selenium and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kudva, Avinash K; Shay, Ashley E; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2015-07-15

    Dietary intake of the micronutrient selenium is essential for normal immune functions. Selenium is cotranslationally incorporated as the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine, into selenoproteins that function to modulate pathways involved in inflammation. Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse association between selenium levels and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis that can potentially progress to colon cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we summarize the current literature on the pathophysiology of IBD, which is multifactorial in origin with unknown etiology. We have focused on a few selenoproteins that mediate gastrointestinal inflammation and activate the host immune response, wherein macrophages play a pivotal role. Changes in cellular oxidative state coupled with altered expression of selenoproteins in macrophages drive the switch from a proinflammatory phenotype to an anti-inflammatory phenotype to efficiently resolve inflammation in the gut and restore epithelial barrier integrity. Such a phenotypic plasticity is accompanied by changes in cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive metabolites, including eicosanoids that not only mitigate inflammation but also partake in restoring gut homeostasis through diverse pathways involving differential regulation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. The role of the intestinal microbiome in modulating inflammation and aiding in selenium-dependent resolution of gut injury is highlighted to provide novel insights into the beneficial effects of selenium in IBD. PMID:26045617

  19. Microbial reporters of metal bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Magrisso, Sagi; Erel, Yigal; Belkin, Shimshon

    2008-01-01

    Summary When attempting to assess the extent and the implications of environmental pollution, it is often essential to quantify not only the total concentration of the studied contaminant but also its bioavailable fraction: higher bioavailability, often correlated with increased mobility, signifies enhanced risk but may also facilitate bioremediation. Genetically engineered microorganisms, tailored to respond by a quantifiable signal to the presence of the target chemical(s), may serve as powerful tools for bioavailability assessment. This review summarizes the current knowledge on such microbial bioreporters designed to assay metal bioavailability. Numerous bacterial metal‐sensor strains have been developed over the past 15 years, displaying very high detection sensitivities for a broad spectrum of environmentally significant metal targets. These constructs are based on the use of a relatively small number of gene promoters as the sensing elements, and an even smaller selection of molecular reporter systems; they comprise a potentially useful panel of tools for simple and cost‐effective determination of the bioavailability of heavy metals in the environment, and for the quantification of the non‐bioavailable fraction of the pollutant. In spite of their inherent advantages, however, these tools have not yet been put to actual use in the evaluation of metal bioavailability in a real environmental remediation scheme. For this to happen, acceptance by regulatory authorities is essential, as is a standardization of assay conditions. PMID:21261850

  20. GIS-assisted regression analysis to identify sources of selenium in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    See, Randolph B.; Naftz, David L.; Qualls, Charles L.

    1992-01-01

    Using a geographic information system, a regression model has been developed to identify and to assess potential sources of selenium in the Kendrick Reclamation Project Area, Wyoming. A variety of spatially distributed factors was examined to determine which factors are most likely to affect selenium discharge in tributaries to the North Platte River. Areas of Upper Cretaceous Cody Shale and Quaternary alluvial deposits and irrigated land, length of irrigation canals, and boundaries of hydrologic subbasins of the major tributaries to the North Platte River were digitized and stored in a geographic information system. Selenium concentrations in samples of soil, plant material, ground water, and surface water were determined and evaluated. The location of all sampling sites was digitized and stored in the geographic information system, together with the selenium concentrations in samples. A regression model was developed using stepwise multiple regression of median selenium discharges on the physical and chemical characteristics of hydrologic subbasins. Results indicate that the intensity of irrigation in a hydrologic subbasin, as determined by area of irrigated land and length of irrigation delivery canals, accounts for the largest variation in median selenium discharges among subbasins. Tributaries draining hydrologic subbasins with greater intensity of irrigation result in greater selenium discharges to the North Platte River than do tributaries draining subbasins with lesser intensity of irrigation.

  1. [Selenium status in population of Irkutsk region].

    PubMed

    Golubkina, N A; Parfenova, E O; Reshetnik, L A

    1998-01-01

    The human selenium status in 10 locations of Irkutsk region (n = 216) is estimated using serum and hair selenium as biological markers. Extremely low serum selenium was typical for the inhabitants of Angara area (63-84 mcg/l). Hair selenium varied from 504 mcg/kg to 718 mcg/kg, the lowest values being found in Shelehov and Angarsk, the highest--in Karam and Mama. Low selenium concentrations were found also in the main food products: cereals--49-89 mcg/kg, meat--234-489 mcg/kg of dry weight, bread--106-180 mcg/kg of dry weight. PMID:9825469

  2. Potassium Intake, Bioavailability, Hypertension, and Glucose Control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Michael S.; Martyn, Lisa; Weaver, Connie M.

    2016-01-01

    Potassium is an essential nutrient. It is the most abundant cation in intracellular fluid where it plays a key role in maintaining cell function. The gradient of potassium across the cell membrane determines cellular membrane potential, which is maintained in large part by the ubiquitous ion channel the sodium-potassium (Na+-K+) ATPase pump. Approximately 90% of potassium consumed (60–100 mEq) is lost in the urine, with the other 10% excreted in the stool, and a very small amount lost in sweat. Little is known about the bioavailability of potassium, especially from dietary sources. Less is understood on how bioavailability may affect health outcomes. Hypertension (HTN) is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and a major financial burden ($50.6 billion) to the US public health system, and has a significant impact on all-cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. The relationship between increased potassium supplementation and a decrease in HTN is relatively well understood, but the effect of increased potassium intake from dietary sources on blood pressure overall is less clear. In addition, treatment options for hypertensive individuals (e.g., thiazide diuretics) may further compound chronic disease risk via impairments in potassium utilization and glucose control. Understanding potassium bioavailability from various sources may help to reveal how specific compounds and tissues influence potassium movement, and further the understanding of its role in health. PMID:27455317

  3. Potassium Intake, Bioavailability, Hypertension, and Glucose Control.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael S; Martyn, Lisa; Weaver, Connie M

    2016-01-01

    Potassium is an essential nutrient. It is the most abundant cation in intracellular fluid where it plays a key role in maintaining cell function. The gradient of potassium across the cell membrane determines cellular membrane potential, which is maintained in large part by the ubiquitous ion channel the sodium-potassium (Na+-K+) ATPase pump. Approximately 90% of potassium consumed (60-100 mEq) is lost in the urine, with the other 10% excreted in the stool, and a very small amount lost in sweat. Little is known about the bioavailability of potassium, especially from dietary sources. Less is understood on how bioavailability may affect health outcomes. Hypertension (HTN) is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and a major financial burden ($50.6 billion) to the US public health system, and has a significant impact on all-cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. The relationship between increased potassium supplementation and a decrease in HTN is relatively well understood, but the effect of increased potassium intake from dietary sources on blood pressure overall is less clear. In addition, treatment options for hypertensive individuals (e.g., thiazide diuretics) may further compound chronic disease risk via impairments in potassium utilization and glucose control. Understanding potassium bioavailability from various sources may help to reveal how specific compounds and tissues influence potassium movement, and further the understanding of its role in health. PMID:27455317

  4. Selenium uptake by edible oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus sp.) from selenium-hyperaccumulated wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Poonam; Prakash, Ranjana; Prakash, N Tejo

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to produce selenium (Se)-fortifying edible mushrooms, five species of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sp.), were cultivated on Se-rich wheat straw collected from a seleniferous belt of Punjab, India. Total selenium was analyzed in the selenium hyperaccumulated wheat straw and the fruiting bodies. Significantly high levels (p<0.0001) of Se uptake were observed in fruiting bodies of all mushrooms grown on Se-rich wheat straw. To the best of our knowledge, accumulation and quantification of selenium in mushrooms has hitherto not been reported with substrates naturally enriched with selenium. The results demonstrate the potential of selenium-rich agricultural residues as substrates for production of Se-enriched mushrooms and the ability of different species of oyster mushrooms to absorb and fortify selenium. The study envisages potential use of selenium-rich agricultural residues towards cultivation of Se-enriched mushrooms for application in selenium supplementation or neutraceutical preparations. PMID:23535542

  5. Selenium metabolite levels in human urine after dosing selenium in different chemical forms

    SciTech Connect

    Hasunuma, Ryoichi; Tsuda, Morizo; Ogawa, Tadao; Kawanishi, Yasuhiro

    1993-11-01

    It has been well known that selenium in marine fish such as tuna and swordfish protects the toxicity of methylmercury in vivo. The protective potency might depend on the chemical forms of selenium in the meat of marine fish sebastes and sperm whale. Little has been revealed, however, on the chemical forms of selenium in the meat of these animals or the selenium metabolites in urine, because the amount of the element is very scarce. Urine is the major excretory route for selenium. The chemical forms of urinary selenium may reflect the metabolism of the element. We have developed methodology for analysis of selenium-containing components in human urine. Using this method, we have observed the time courses of excretory levels of urinary selenium components after a single dose of selenium as selenious acid, selenomethionine, trimethylselenonium ion or tuna meat. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Selenium speciation in ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Atalay, A.

    1990-07-10

    Selenium toxicity diseases in animals may occur when the intake exceeds 4 mg/kg and selenium deficiency symptoms may occur when dietary intake is less than 0.04 mg/kg. Since the selenium dietary requirement is very close to toxic concentration, it is important to understand the distribution of selenium in the environment. Selenium occurs in four oxidation states (-II, 0, +IV, and +VI) as selenide, elemental selenium, selenite and selenate. Selenate is reported as more soluble and less adsorbed than selenite. Selenate is more easily leached from soils and is the most available form for plants. Increased mobility of Se into the environment via anthropogenic activities, and the potential oxidation-reduction behavior of the element have made it imperative to study the aquatic chemistry of Se. For this purpose, Se species are divided into two different categories: dissolved Se (in material that passes through filters with 0.45 u openings) and particulate Se (in material of particle size > 0.45 mm) typically suspended sediment and other suspended solids. Element and colloidal phase, not truly dissolved, but passing through the filter is deemed to consist of selenium (-2,0). In dissolved state selenium may exist in three of its four oxidation states; Se(-II), Se(+IV), and Se(+VI). Particulate Se may exist in the same oxidation states as dissolved Se and can be found in different phases of the particulate matter. In sediments, Se may be within the organic material, iron and manganese oxides, carbonates or other mineral phases. The actual chemical forms of Se may be adsorbed to or coprecipitated with these phases (primarily selenite, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) and selenate, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Selenide, Se(-II), can be covalently bound in the organic portion of a sediment. In addition, Se may be found in anoxic sediments as insoluble metal selenide precipitates, an insoluble elemental Se or as ferroselite (FeSe{sub 2}) and Se containing pyrite.

  7. Bioavailability: implications for science/cleanup policy

    SciTech Connect

    Denit, Jeffery; Planicka, J. Gregory

    1998-12-01

    This paper examines the role of bioavailability in risk assessment and cleanup decisions. Bioavailability refers to how chemicals ''behave'' and their ''availability'' to interact with living organisms. Bioavailability has significant implications for exposure risks, cleanup goals, and site costs. Risk to human health and the environment is directly tied to the bioavailability of the chemicals of concern.

  8. Selenium Content in Seafood in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yumiko; Yamashita, Michiaki; Iida, Haruka

    2013-01-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans, and seafood is one of the major selenium sources, as well as red meat, grains, eggs, chicken, liver and garlic. A substantial proportion of the total amount of selenium is present as selenium containing imidazole compound, selenoneine, in the muscles of ocean fish. In order to characterize the selenium content in seafood, the total selenium levels were measured in the edible portions of commercially important fish and shellfish species. Among the tested edible portions, alfonsino muscle had the highest selenium levels (concentration of 1.27 mg/kg tissue). High levels of selenium (1.20–1.07 mg/kg) were also found in the salted ovary products of mullet and Pacific herring. In other fish muscles, the selenium levels ranged between 0.12 and 0.77 mg/kg tissue. The selenium levels were closely correlated with the mercury levels in the white and red muscles in alfonsino. The selenium content in spleen, blood, hepatopancreas, heart, red muscle, white muscle, brain, ovary and testis ranged between 1.10 and 24.8 mg/kg tissue in alfonsino. PMID:23434904

  9. Shedding Light on Selenium Biomineralization: Proteins Associated with Bionanominerals ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Markus; Kolvenbach, Boris; Gygax, Benjamin; Moes, Suzette; Corvini, Philippe F. X.

    2011-01-01

    Selenium-reducing microorganisms produce elemental selenium nanoparticles with particular physicochemical properties due to an associated organic fraction. This study identified high-affinity proteins associated with such bionanominerals and with nonbiogenic elemental selenium. Proteins with an anticipated functional role in selenium reduction, such as a metalloid reductase, were found to be associated with nanoparticles formed by one selenium respirer, Sulfurospirillum barnesii. PMID:21602371

  10. Biomarkers of Selenium Status

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    The essential trace element, selenium (Se), has multiple biological activities, which depend on the level of Se intake. Relatively low Se intakes determine the expression of selenoenzymes in which it serves as an essential constituent. Higher intakes have been shown to have anti-tumorigenic potential; and very high Se intakes can produce adverse effects. This hierarchy of biological activities calls for biomarkers informative at different levels of Se exposure. Some Se-biomarkers, such as the selenoproteins and particularly GPX3 and SEPP1, provide information about function directly and are of value in identifying nutritional Se deficiency and tracking responses of deficient individuals to Se-treatment. They are useful under conditions of Se intake within the range of regulated selenoprotein expression, e.g., for humans <55 μg/day and for animals <20 μg/kg diet. Other Se-biomarkers provide information indirectly through inferences based on Se levels of foods, tissues, urine or feces. They can indicate the likelihood of deficiency or adverse effects, but they do not provide direct evidence of either condition. Their value is in providing information about Se status over a wide range of Se intake, particularly from food forms. There is need for additional Se biomarkers particularly for assessing Se status in non-deficient individuals for whom the prospects of cancer risk reduction and adverse effects risk are the primary health considerations. This would include determining whether supranutritional intakes of Se may be required for maximal selenoprotein expression in immune surveillance cells. It would also include developing methods to determine low molecular weight Se-metabolites, i.e., selenoamino acids and methylated Se-metabolites, which to date have not been detectable in biological specimens. Recent analytical advances using tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry suggest prospects for detecting these metabolites. PMID:25835046

  11. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ► Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ► Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ► CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage

  12. Effects of selenium on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary carcinogenesis and DNA adduct formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, C.; Daniel, F.B.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the effects of dietary selenium deficiency or excess on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary neoplasia in rats and to delineate whether selenium-mediated modification of mammary carcinogenesis was associated with changes in carcinogen:DNA adduct formation and activities of liver microsomal enzymes that are involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups from weaning and were maintained on one of three synthetic diets designated as follows: selenium deficient (less than 0.02 ppm); selenium adequate (0.2 ppm); or selenium excess (2.5 ppm). For the DMBA binding and DNA adduct studies, rats were given a dose of (/sup 3/H)DMBA p.o. after 1 month on their respective diets. Results from the liver and the mammary gland indicated that neither selenium deficiency nor excess had any significant effect on the binding levels, which were calculated on the basis of total radioactivity isolated with the purified DNA. Furthermore, it was found that dietary selenium intake did not seem to affect quantitatively or qualitatively the formation of DMBA:DNA adducts in the liver. Similarly, in a parallel group of rats that did not receive DMBA, the activities of aniline hydroxylase, aminopyrine N-demethylase, and cytochrome c reductase were not significantly altered by dietary selenium levels. Concurrent with the above experiments, the effect of dietary selenium intake on carcinogenesis was also monitored. Results of this experiment indicated that selenium deficiency enhanced mammary carcinogenesis only when this nutritional condition was maintained in the postinitiation phase. Likewise, an excess of selenium intake inhibited neoplastic development only when this regimen was continued after DMBA administration.

  13. Detailed study of selenium in soil, water, bottom sediment, and biota in the Sun River Irrigation Project, Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area, and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, west-central Montana, 1990-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimick, D.A.; Lambing, J.H.; Palawski, D.U.; Malloy, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Selenium and other constituents are adversely affecting water quality and creating a potential hazard to wildlife in several areas of the Sun River Irrigation Project, Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area, and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge in west-central Montana. Selenium derived from Cretaceous shale and Tertiary and Quaternary deposits containing shale detritus is transported in the oxic shallow ground-water systems. At Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area, drainage from irrigated glacial deposits is the primary source of selenium; drainage from non-irrigated farmland is a significant source locally. Benton Lake generally receives more selenium from natural runoff from its non-irrigated basin than from the trans-basin diversion of irrigation return flow. Selenium has accumulated in aquatic plants and invertebrates, fish, and water birds, particularly in wetlands that receive the largest selenium loads. Although selenium residues in biological tissue from some wetland units exceeded biological risk levels, water-bird reproduction generally has not been impaired. The highest selenium residues in biota commonly occurred in samples from Priest Butte Lakes, which also had the highest selenium concentration in wetland water. Selenium concentrations in all invertebrate samples from Priest Butte Lakes and the south end of Freezeout Lake exceeded the critical dietary threshold for water birds. Selenium delivered to wetlands accumulates in bottom sediment, predominantly in near-shore areas. Potential impacts to water quality, and presumably biota, may be greatest near the mouths of inflows. Most selenium delivered to wetlands will continue to accumulate in bottom sediment and biota.

  14. Selenium mediated reduction of the toxicity expression of cigarette smoke condensate in Photobacterium phosphoreum

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, I.E.; Chortyk, O.T.; Lanier, J.L.

    1986-02-01

    Recently, attention has focused on the potential protective activity of selenium against heavy metal toxicity, cancer and other health disorders. Currently, cigarette smoke affects the health of more people than any other environmental pollutant. Producing cigarettes fortified with selenium has been proposed as a possible method to develop a safer tobacco product. Consequently, it would be informative to determine if the presence of selenium in cigarette smoke leads to increased or decreased toxicity. Luminescent assays have been developed for a wide variety of applications ranging from measuring enzyme activities to monitoring water purity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of selenium on the toxicity of cigarette smoke condensate using in vivo bacterial bioluminescence assays.

  15. Covalent Incorporation of Selenium into Oligonucleotides for X-ray Crystal Structure Determination via MAD: Proof of Principle

    SciTech Connect

    Teplova, M.; Wilds, C.J.; Wawrzak, Z.; Tereshko, V.; Du, Q.; Carrasco, N.; Huang, Z.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    Selenium was incorporated into an oligodeoxynucleotide in the form of 2'-methylseleno-uridine (U{sub Se}). The X-ray crystal structure of the duplex d(GCGTA)U{sub Se}d(ACGC){sub 2} was determined by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) technique and refined to a resolution of 1.3 {angstrom}, demonstrating that selenium can selectively substitute oxygen in DNA and that the resulting compounds are chemically stable. Since derivatization at the 2'-{alpha}-position with selenium does not affect the preference of the sugar for the C3'-endo conformation, this strategy is suitable for incorporating selenium into RNA. The availability of selenium-containing nucleic acids for crystallographic phasing offers an attractive alternative to the commonly used halogenated pyrimidines.

  16. Distribution and mobilization of dissolved selenium in ground water of the irrigated grand and Uncompahgre Valleys, Western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Winfield G.; Butler, David L.

    1993-01-01

    Distribution of dissolved selenium in ground water of the irrigated Grand and Uncompahgre Valleys is affected by the aqueous geochemical environment of the shallow ground-water system composed of alluvium and shale residuum. Selenium concentrations are as high as 1,300 micrograms per liter in water from shallow wells. The highest concentrations of dissolved selenium were in water from wells completed in alluvium overlying the Mancos Shale of Cretaceous Age, and the lowest concentrations were in water from wells completed in terrace deposits on the western side of the Uncompahgre Valley and in water from wells completed in Mancos Shale residuum. Factors controlling the mobilization of dissolved selenium in the Grand and Uncompahgre Valleys could include oxidation/reduction, adsorption/desorption, and(or) ion exchange. Infiltration of irrigation water provides oxidizing conditions for mobilization of selenium from alluvium and shale residuum and transport to streams and irrigation drains tributary to the Uncompahgre, Gunnison and Colorado Rivers.

  17. Chemical Form of Selenium in Naturally Selenium-Rich Lentils (Lens Culinaris L.) From Saskatchewan

    SciTech Connect

    Thavarajah, D.; Vandenberg, A.; George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-06-04

    Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) are a source of many essential dietary components and trace elements for human health. In this study we show that lentils grown in the Canadian prairies are additionally enriched in selenium, an essential micronutrient needed for general well-being, including a healthy immune system and protection against cancer. Selenium K near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the selenium biochemistry of two lentil cultivars grown in various locations in Saskatchewan, Canada. We observe significant variations in total selenium concentration with geographic location and cultivar; however, almost all the selenium (86--95%) in these field-grown lentils is present as organic selenium modeled as selenomethionine with a small component (5--14%) as selenate. As the toxicities of certain forms of arsenic and selenium are antagonistic, selenium-rich lentils may have a pivotal role to play in alleviating the chronic arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh.

  18. Selenopeptides and elemental selenium in Thunbergia alata after exposure to selenite: quantification method for elemental selenium.

    PubMed

    Aborode, Fatai Adigun; Raab, Andrea; Foster, Simon; Lombi, Enzo; Maher, William; Krupp, Eva M; Feldmann, Joerg

    2015-07-01

    Three month old Thunbergia alata were exposed for 13 days to 10 μM selenite to determine the biotransformation of selenite in their roots. Selenium in formic acid extracts (80 ± 3%) was present as selenopeptides with Se-S bonds and selenium-PC complexes (selenocysteinyl-2-3-dihydroxypropionyl-glutathione, seleno-phytochelatin2, seleno-di-glutathione). An analytical method using HPLC-ICPMS to detect and quantify elemental selenium in roots of T. alata plants using sodium sulfite to quantitatively transform elemental selenium to selenosulfate was also developed. Elemental selenium was determined as 18 ± 4% of the total selenium in the roots which was equivalent to the selenium not extracted using formic acid extraction. The results are in an agreement with the XAS measurements of the exposed roots which showed no occurrence of selenite or selenate but a mixture of selenocysteine and elemental selenium. PMID:25747595

  19. Daily dietary selenium intake and hair selenium content in a high selenium area of Enshi, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium is essential to humans and is widely distributed within the human body. Its content in blood, urine, hair and nails are important indicators to evaluate Se level in the human body. In China (Shadi, Enschi city), human selenosis of residents is reported to occur in high numbers. In this stud...

  20. Selenium nanoparticles inhibit Staphylococcus aureus growth

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phong A; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a key bacterium commonly found in numerous infections. S. aureus infections are difficult to treat due to their biofilm formation and documented antibiotic resistance. While selenium has been used for a wide range of applications including anticancer applications, the effects of selenium nanoparticles on microorganisms remain largely unknown to date. The objective of this in vitro study was thus to examine the growth of S. aureus in the presence of selenium nanoparticles. Results of this study provided the first evidence of strongly inhibited growth of S. aureus in the presence of selenium nanoparticles after 3, 4, and 5 hours at 7.8, 15.5, and 31 μg/mL. The percentage of live bacteria also decreased in the presence of selenium nanoparticles. Therefore, this study suggests that selenium nanoparticles may be used to effectively prevent and treat S. aureus infections and thus should be further studied for such applications. PMID:21845045

  1. Toxicokinetics of selenium in the slider turtle, Trachemys scripta.

    PubMed

    Dyc, Christelle; Far, Johann; Gandar, Frédéric; Poulipoulis, Anastassios; Greco, Anais; Eppe, Gauthier; Das, Krishna

    2016-05-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element that can be harmful for wildlife. However, its toxicity in poikilothermic amniotes, including turtles, remains poorly investigated. The present study aims at identifying selenium toxicokinetics and toxicity in juvenile slider turtles (age: 7 months), Trachemys scripta, dietary exposed to selenium, as selenomethionine SeMet, for eight weeks. Non-destructive tissues (i.e. carapace, scutes, skin and blood) were further tested for their suitability to predict selenium levels in target tissues (i.e. kidney, liver and muscle) for conservation perspective. 130 juvenile yellow-bellied slider turtles were assigned in three groups of 42 individuals each (i.e. control, SeMet1 and SeMet2). These groups were subjected to a feeding trial including an eight-week supplementation period SP 8 and a following 4-week elimination period EP 4 . During the SP8, turtles fed on diet containing 1.1 ± 0.04, 22.1 ± 1.0 and 45.0 ± 2.0 µg g(-1) of selenium (control, SeMet1 and SeMet2, respectively). During the EP4, turtles fed on non-supplemented diet. At different time during the trial, six individuals per group were sacrificed and tissues collected (i.e. carapace, scutes, skin, blood, liver, kidney, muscle) for analyses. During the SP8 (Fig. 1), both SeMet1 and SeMet2 turtles efficiently accumulated selenium from a SeMet dietary source. The more selenium was concentrated in the food, the more it was in the turtle body but the less it was removed from their tissues. Moreover, SeMet was found to be the more abundant selenium species in turtles' tissues. Body condition (i.e. growth in mass and size, feeding behaviour and activity) and survival of the SeMet1 and SeMet2 turtles seemed to be unaffected by the selenium exposure. There were clear evidences that reptilian species are differently affected by and sensitive to selenium exposure but the lack of any adverse effects was quite unexpected. Fig. 1 Design of the feeding trial. T, Time of

  2. Recovering selenium from copper refinery slimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvärinen, Olli; Lindroos, Leo; Yllö, Erkki

    1989-07-01

    The selenium contained within copper refinery slimes may be recovered advantageously by roasting at about 600°C. While roasting in air is inefficient, roasting in a sulfating atmosphere enables practically complete selenium recovery. Based on laboratory tests, a new selenium recovery process was adopted at Outokumpu Copper Refinery. In this process, sulfation is achieved by feeding sulfur dioxide and oxygen into the roasting furnace.

  3. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. PMID:23260366

  4. Selenium status of idiopathic infertile Nigerian males.

    PubMed

    Akinloye, Oluyemi; Arowojolu, A O; Shittu, O B; Adejuwon, C A; Osotimehin, Babatunde

    2005-04-01

    Selenium concentration in the sera and seminal plasma of 60 infertile males (40 oligospermia and 20 azoospermia) and 40 males with proven evidence of fertility (normospermia; control group) were estimated using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results were correlated with spermatogram and hormonal levels in order to determine their relationship and significance in male infertility. The mean serum concentrations of selenium was found to be significantly increased in oligospermic compared to azoospermic subjects and controls (p < 0.01), whereas the seminal plasma level was significantly higher in azoospermic compared to oligospermic subjects and controls (p < 0.001). Thus, the ratio of serum selenium to seminal plasma selenium was 1: 1 in controls, 4: 1 in oligospermia, and 1: 2 in azoospermic subject.A significant inverse correlation was observed between serum selenium level and sperm count (p < 0.01). Similarly, seminal plasma selenium correlated with spermatozoa motility, viability, and morphology. Serum selenium level shows positive correlation with the serum testosterone level (p < 0.01). In conclusion, there appears to be a physiological balance in the distribution of selenium in serum and seminal plasma compartment of control males. A disturbance in this balance has a significant influence on spermatogenesis. Selenium appears to have a positive influence on Leydig cells, thus influencing the secretion of testosterone. PMID:15851828

  5. Selenium levels in breads from Sakarya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gülfen, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an important trace element for human and animal health. It accumulates in wheat and corn, which is consumed mostly as bread. The Turkish population consumes mainly white wheat, whole wheat (brown bread) and corn breads. In this study, samples of these breads were collected from six different bakeries in the city of Sakarya, and their selenium levels were determined by ICP-OES after a chemical digestion. It was found that average selenium levels in white wheat, whole wheat and corn breads were 1149, 1204 and 2023 µg/kg, respectively. The results are compared with daily recommended intake and upper tolerable levels for selenium. PMID:24779690

  6. Selenium. Nutritional, toxicologic, and clinical aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, A. M.; Kizer, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    Despite the recent findings of environmental contamination, selenium toxicosis in humans is exceedingly rare in the United States, with the few known cases resulting from industrial accidents and an episode involving the ingestion of superpotent selenium supplements. Chronic selenosis is essentially unheard of in this country because of the typical diversity of the American diet. Nonetheless, because of the growing public interest in selenium as a dietary supplement and the occurrence of environmental selenium contamination, medical practitioners should be familiar with the nutritional, toxicologic, and clinical aspects of this trace element. PMID:2219873

  7. Removal of selenium from contaminated waters

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, K.J.; Yu, Jianhan; Wright, J.D.

    1995-12-01

    Selenium, an essential nutrient in minute quantities, is known to be toxic and is a suspected carcinogen at higher concentrations. The toxicity and teratogenicity of selenium to waterfowl present difficulties in disposing of selenium contaminated waters. Included in the U.S. EPA`s list of priority pollutants, selenium is presently the primary water treatment challenge for many West Coast petroleum refineries. Depending on the type of crude oil processed, selenium can be found in refinery process waters at levels up to 5 mg/L with flowrates approaching 1000 gallons per minute. Agricultural drainage waters emanating from irrigated farm lands in the seleniferous areas of the western United States are another major source of selenium contaminated waters. Because of the high mobility of some selenium compounds, they are easily leached from these soils by irrigation water. Within central California alone, there is a current need for the treatment of about 2 million gallons per day of selenium contaminated agricultural drainage water in concentrations approaching 0.5 mg/L. This paper will present an improved process for the removal of selenium from contaminated waters.

  8. Low selenium environment and Vitamin E in human serum relative to the Kaschin-Beck's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, S.; Zhu, Z.

    1982-04-30

    In China, endemic regions of Kaschin-Beck's disease, Keshan disease, and animal white muscle disease basically overlap, mainly the transitional area between the moist Southeast and the arid Northwest. Tests conducted by the authors reveal that the selenium content of major soils of the regions affected by the diseases is 0.088 to 0.360 ppM, that of the grains below 20 to 30 ppB. Of the inhabitants, 94 percent have serum selenium content below 0.031 ..mu..g/l and the selenium content of the hair of inhabitants is 100 to 200 ppB. From July 1979 to June 1980, the authors treated 41 cases of Kaschin-Beck's disease with sodium selenite-V/sub E/ and 36 of them recovered from the disease. Based upon these data, the authors believe that environmental selenium deficiency of these regions is perhaps the cause of the low level selenium nutrition of the inhabitants. The low level selenium nutrition in turn leads to a reduction of certain enzymic activity to cause the Kaschin-Beck's disease, as well as the Keshan disease and the animal white muscle disease.

  9. Interplay between selenium levels, selenoprotein expression, and replicative senescence in WI-38 human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yona, Legrain; Zahia, Touat-Hamici; Laurent, Chavatte

    2014-10-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element, which is incorporated as selenocysteine into at least 25 selenoproteins using a unique translational UGA-recoding mechanism. Selenoproteins are important enzymes involved in antioxidant defense, redox homeostasis, and redox signaling pathways. Selenium levels decline during aging, and its deficiency is associated with a marked increase in mortality for people over 60 years of age. Here, we investigate the relationship between selenium levels in the culture medium, selenoprotein expression, and replicative life span of human embryonic lung fibroblast WI-38 cells. Selenium levels regulate the entry into replicative senescence and modify the cellular markers characteristic for senescent cells. Whereas selenium supplementation extends the number of population doublings, its deficiency impairs the proliferative capacity of WI-38 cells. We observe that the expression of several selenoproteins involved in antioxidant defense is specifically affected in response to cellular senescence. Their expression is selectively controlled by the modulation of mRNA levels and translational recoding efficiencies. Our data provide novel mechanistic insights into how selenium impacts the replicative life span of mammalian cells by identifying several selenoproteins as new targets of senescence. PMID:26461317

  10. Potential enrichment of medicinal mushrooms with selenium to obtain new dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Milovanovic, Ivan; Brceski, Ilija; Stajic, Mirjana; Knezevic, Aleksandar; Vukojevic, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to resolve the question of whether various selenium concentrations affect the ability of eight species, members of five genera, to produce mycelium biomass and absorb this trace element during submerged cultivation in Na2SeO3-enriched medium. The obtained results demonstrated the ability of mycelia of all of the tested species to absorb selenium at analyzed concentrations. Thus, selenium content ranged from 1.4 µg g-1 (Pleurotus eryngii) to 20.3 µg g-1 (Pleurotus ostreatus). The potential of mycelia to absorb selenium was significant, ranging from 8.1% (Lenzites betulinus) to 62.5% (P ostreatus) of its content in the medium. It may be concluded that all tested mushroom species could be used as satisfactory selenium sources due to the fact that the absorbed concentrations ranged from 15.8% (P. eryngii) to 36.9% (P. ostreatus) of the dietary selenium amount (55 µg d-1) recommended by the European Scientific Committee on Food. PMID:24266370

  11. How to use the world's scarce selenium resources efficiently to increase the selenium concentration in food.

    PubMed

    Haug, Anna; Graham, Robin D; Christophersen, Olav A; Lyons, Graham H

    2007-12-01

    The world's rare selenium resources need to be managed carefully. Selenium is extracted as a by-product of copper mining and there are no deposits that can be mined for selenium alone. Selenium has unique properties as a semi-conductor, making it of special value to industry, but it is also an essential nutrient for humans and animals and may promote plant growth and quality. Selenium deficiency is regarded as a major health problem for 0.5 to 1 billion people worldwide, while an even larger number may consume less selenium than required for optimal protection against cancer, cardiovascular diseases and severe infectious diseases including HIV disease. Efficient recycling of selenium is difficult. Selenium is added in some commercial fertilizers, but only a small proportion is taken up by plants and much of the remainder is lost for future utilization. Large biofortification programmes with selenium added to commercial fertilizers may therefore be a fortification method that is too wasteful to be applied to large areas of our planet. Direct addition of selenium compounds to food (process fortification) can be undertaken by the food industry. If selenomethionine is added directly to food, however, oxidation due to heat processing needs to be avoided. New ways to biofortify food products are needed, and it is generally observed that there is less wastage if selenium is added late in the production chain rather than early. On these bases we have proposed adding selenium-enriched, sprouted cereal grain during food processing as an efficient way to introduce this nutrient into deficient diets. Selenium is a non-renewable resource. There is now an enormous wastage of selenium associated with large-scale mining and industrial processing. We recommend that this must be changed and that much of the selenium that is extracted should be stockpiled for use as a nutrient by future generations. PMID:18833333

  12. How to use the world's scarce selenium resources efficiently to increase the selenium concentration in food

    PubMed Central

    Haug, Anna; Graham, Robin D.; Christophersen, Olav A.; Lyons, Graham H.

    2007-01-01

    The world's rare selenium resources need to be managed carefully. Selenium is extracted as a by-product of copper mining and there are no deposits that can be mined for selenium alone. Selenium has unique properties as a semi-conductor, making it of special value to industry, but it is also an essential nutrient for humans and animals and may promote plant growth and quality. Selenium deficiency is regarded as a major health problem for 0.5 to 1 billion people worldwide, while an even larger number may consume less selenium than required for optimal protection against cancer, cardiovascular diseases and severe infectious diseases including HIV disease. Efficient recycling of selenium is difficult. Selenium is added in some commercial fertilizers, but only a small proportion is taken up by plants and much of the remainder is lost for future utilization. Large biofortification programmes with selenium added to commercial fertilizers may therefore be a fortification method that is too wasteful to be applied to large areas of our planet. Direct addition of selenium compounds to food (process fortification) can be undertaken by the food industry. If selenomethionine is added directly to food, however, oxidation due to heat processing needs to be avoided. New ways to biofortify food products are needed, and it is generally observed that there is less wastage if selenium is added late in the production chain rather than early. On these bases we have proposed adding selenium-enriched, sprouted cereal grain during food processing as an efficient way to introduce this nutrient into deficient diets. Selenium is a non-renewable resource. There is now an enormous wastage of selenium associated with large-scale mining and industrial processing. We recommend that this must be changed and that much of the selenium that is extracted should be stockpiled for use as a nutrient by future generations. PMID:18833333

  13. Rapid persulfate oxidation predicts PAH bioavailability in soils and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Cuypers, C.; Grotenhuis, T.; Joziasse, J.; Rulkens, W.

    2000-05-15

    Persulfate oxidation was validated as a method to predict polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bioavailability in soils and sediments. It was demonstrated for 14 field contaminated soils and sediments that residual PAH concentrations after a short (3 h) persulfate oxidation correspond well to residual PAH concentrations after 21 days of biodegradation. Persulfate oxidation of samples that had first been subjected to biodegradation yielded only limited additional PAH oxidation. This implies that oxidation and biodegradation removed approximately the same PAH fraction. Persulfate oxidation thus provides a good and rapid method for the prediction of PAH bioavailability. Thermogravimetric analysis of oxidized and untreated samples showed that persulfate oxidation primarily affected expanded organic matter. The results indicate that this expanded organic matter contained mainly readily bioavailable PAHs.

  14. Chemical form of selenium differentially influences DNA repair pathways following exposure to lead nitrate.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Shauna M; Horgan, Karina A; Murphy, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Lead, an environmental toxin is known to induce a broad range of physiological and biochemical dysfunctions in humans through a number of mechanisms including the deactivation of antioxidants thus leading to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent DNA damage. Selenium on the other hand has been proven to play an important role in the protection of cells from free radical damage and oxidative stress, though its effects are thought to be form and dose dependent. As the liver is the primary organ required for metabolite detoxification, HepG2 cells were chosen to assess the protective effects of various selenium compounds following exposure to the genotoxic agent lead nitrate. Initially DNA damage was quantified using a comet assay, gene expression patterns associated with DNA damage and signalling were also examined using PCR arrays and the biological pathways which were most significantly affected by selenium were identified. Interestingly, the organic type selenium compounds (selenium yeast and selenomethionine) conferred protection against lead induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells; this is evident by reduction in the quantity of DNA present in the comet tail of cells cultured in their presence with lead. This trend also followed through the gene expression changes noted in DNA damage pathways analysed. These results were in contrast with those of inorganic sodium selenite which promoted lead induced DNA damage evident in both the comet assay results and the gene expression analysis. Over all this study provided valuable insights into the effects which various selenium compounds had on the DNA damage and signalling pathway indicating the potential for using organic forms of selenium such as selenium enriched yeast to protect against DNA damaging agents. PMID:25023848

  15. Exploring the structural basis for selenium/mercury antagonism in Allium fistulosum

    SciTech Connect

    McNear, Jr., David H.; Afton, Scott E.; Caruso, Joseph A.

    2012-12-10

    While continuing efforts are devoted to studying the mutually protective effect of mercury and selenium in mammals, few studies have investigated the mercury-selenium antagonism in plants. In this study, we report the metabolic fate of mercury and selenium in Allium fistulosum (green onion) after supplementation with sodium selenite and mercuric chloride. Analysis of homogenized root extracts via capillary reversed phase chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (capRPLC-ICP-MS) suggests the formation of a mercury-selenium containing compound. Micro-focused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping of freshly excised roots show Hg sequestered on the root surface and outlining individual root cells, while Se is more evenly distributed throughout the root. There are also discrete Hg-only, Se-only regions and an overall strong correlation between Hg and Se throughout the root. Analysis of the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra show a 'background' of methylselenocysteine within the root with discrete spots of SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, Se{sup 0} and solid HgSe on the root surface. Mercury outlining individual root cells is possibly binding to sulfhydryl groups or plasma membrane or cell wall proteins, and in some places reacting with reduced selenium in the rhizosphere to form a mercury(II) selenide species. Together with the formation of the root-bound mercury(II) selenide species, we also report on the formation of cinnabar (HgS) and Hg{sup 0} in the rhizosphere. The results presented herein shed light on the intricate chemical and biological processes occurring within the rhizosphere that influence Hg and Se bioavailability and will be instrumental in predicting the fate and assisting in the remediation of these metals in the environment and informing whether or not fruit and vegetable food selection from aerial plant compartments or roots from plants grown in Hg contaminated soils, are safe for consumption.

  16. BIOSURFACES AND BIOAVAILABILITY: A NANOSCALE OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmentally, contaminant bioavailability is a key parameter in determining exposure assessment and ultimately risk assessment/risk management. Defining bioavailability requires knowledge of the contaminant spatial/temporal disposition and transportability and the thermodyna...

  17. From conceptual model to remediation: bioavailability, a key to clean up heavy metal contaminated soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruzzelli, Gianniantonio; Pedron, Francesca; Pezzarossa, Beatrice

    2013-04-01

    Processes of metal bioavailability in the soil To know the bioavailability processes at site specific levels is essential to understand in detail the risks associated with pollution, and to support the decision-making process, i.e. description of the conceptual model and choice of clean up technologies. It is particularly important to assess how chemical, physical and biological processes in the soil affect the reactions leading to adsorption, precipitation or release of contaminants. The measurement of bioavailability One of the main difficulties in the practical application of the bioavailability concept in soil remediation is the lack of consensus on the method to be used to measure bioavailability. The best strategy is to apply a series of tests to assess bioavailability, since no applicable method is universally valid under all conditions. As an example, bioavailability tests for phytotechnology application should consider two distinct aspects: a physico-chemical driven solubilization process and a physiologically driven uptake process. Soil and plant characteristics strongly influence bioavailability. Bioavailability as a tool in remediation strategies Bioavailability can be used at all stages in remediation strategies: development of the conceptual model, evaluation of risk assessment, and selection of the best technology, considering different scenarios and including different environmental objectives. Two different strategies can be followed: the reduction and the increase of bioavailability. Procedures that reduce bioavailability aim to prevent the movement of pollutants from the soil to the living organisms, essentially by: i) removal of the labile phase of the contaminant, i.e. the fraction which is intrinsic to the processes of bioavailability (phytostabilization); ii) conversion of the labile fraction into a stable fraction (precipitation or adsorption); iii) increase of the resistance to mass transfer of the contaminants (inertization). Procedures

  18. Selenium Distribution and Fractionation in a Managed Urban Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papelis, C.; Boettcher, T. M.; Harris-Burr, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    Metals, and metalloids, are common contaminants of concern in arid and semi-arid watersheds in the Southwestern U.S. Because of the dramatic population growth in this part of the U.S., the potential for contamination of urban watersheds has also increased over the last few decades. Streams in urban watersheds receive storm water, urban runoff, shallow groundwater, and treated wastewater. In addition, urban watersheds are often heavily managed to mitigate flood events and sediment-related impacts. Clearly, sediment transport can have a profound effect on the water quality of affected bodies of water, not only by affecting water clarity, but also by facilitating the transport of chemical constituents, as well as microbiological components. The Las Vegas Wash (Wash) is the lowest point in the Las Vegas Valley Watershed and receives storm water, urban runoff, and treated wastewater from the entire Las Vegas Valley. To minimize erosion, caused by the dramatic wastewater flow increase during the last few decades, several erosion control structures are being built. In addition, wetlands being constructed in the Wash area receive most of the water from the Wash. The construction of these ponds has the potential to alter the distribution of metals and metalloids in bodies of water used by wildlife. An element of particular concern is selenium, a metalloid commonly found at elevated concentrations in soils of the U.S. Southwest. To assess the potential adverse impact on water quality, sediment samples were collected along the Wash, upstream and downstream of erosion control structures, and around current and future constructed wetlands. The sediments were characterized by particle size distribution, specific surface area, mineralogical composition, organic carbon content, and scanning electron microscopy. The total selenium, as well as the percentages associated with exchangeable, organic, carbonate, and oxide sediment fractions were determined. The distribution of selenium

  19. [Bioavailability and metabolism of flavonoids].

    PubMed

    Makarova, M N

    2011-01-01

    In the review the modern data about bioavailability and a metabolism of flavonoids is considered. The data about absorption flavonoids in a digestive path, participation of microorganisms in their hydrolysis, pharmacokinetic the data on the basic classes flavonoids: flavanes (flavan-3-ols), anthocyanes, flavones, flavonols and flavanones is cited. PMID:21842747

  20. [Bioavailability and metabolism of flavonoids].

    PubMed

    Makarova, N M

    2011-01-01

    Published data about bioavailability and metabolism of flavonoids are reviewed. Information concerning the absorption of flavonoids in a digestive path and the participation of microorganisms in their hydrolysis is summarized. Parameters of pharmacokinetics are presented for the main classes of flavonoids, including flavanes (flavan-3-ols), anthocyans, flavones, flavonols, and flavanones. PMID:21870774

  1. Drug Bioavailability Data: (Un)Available.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capomacchia, Anthony C.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The obtainability of drug bioavailability data from both brand-name and generic-drug manufacturers was studied to document the relative change in availability to pharmacy students of drug bioavailability data between 1978 and 1976 for drugs exhibiting bioavailability problems. The results indicate no major change. (JMD)

  2. The role of selenium in cancer prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This elucidation of the role of selenium in health occurred over the last six decades. This involved selenium first being found to be a toxicant, followed only later by its recognition as an essential nutrient. This pathway of discovery led to fundamental discoveries in metabolic biochemistry, vir...

  3. 21 CFR 573.920 - Selenium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selenium. 573.920 Section 573.920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.920 Selenium. (a) Public Law...

  4. 21 CFR 573.920 - Selenium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Selenium. 573.920 Section 573.920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.920 Selenium. (a) Public Law...

  5. 21 CFR 573.920 - Selenium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Selenium. 573.920 Section 573.920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.920 Selenium. (a) Public Law...

  6. Changing selenium nutritional status of Chinese residents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    China has been designated as one of 40 countries deficient in selenium (Se) according to the World Health Organization. Selenium concentrations in hair are commonly used to evaluate the Se level of the human body. Moreover, hair Se concentrations are significantly correlated with Se concentrations ...

  7. Selenium compounds activate early barriers of tumorigenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium chemoprevention by apoptosis has been well studied, but it is not clear whether selenium can activate early barriers of tumorigenesis, namely senescence and DNA damage response. To address this issue, we treated normal and cancerous cells with a gradient concentration of sodium selenite, me...

  8. Surface functionalized selenium nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Savita; Umar, Ahmad; Mehta, S K

    2014-10-01

    Selenium nanoparticles present an enhanced genetic actions and possess superior adsorptive capacity due to the interaction between the nanoparticles and NH, C=O, COO- and C-N groups of proteins. This review is focused on the biomedical applications of surafce funtionalized selenium nanoparticles. The engineering of exterior surface of the selenium nanoparticles has further emphasizing on the recent progresses in regulating monolayer structures for competent delivery of drugs and biomolecules. Crucial queries of transport, uptake, and clearance are discussed and illustrated through the prospects of selenium nanoparticles. The work presents an insight of how biomedical research can evolve with selenium nanoparticles and where we see the field is heading in the near future. PMID:25992427

  9. Selenium species in the roots and shoots of chickpea plants treated with different concentrations of sodium selenite.

    PubMed

    Lyubenova, Lyudmila; Sabodash, Xenia; Schröder, Peter; Michalke, Bernhard

    2015-11-01

    The trace element selenium has an essential role for human health. It is involved in redox center functions, and it is related to the immune system response. Legumes are among the main suppliers of selenium into the human food chain. Not only Se concentration as such but also more the chemical species of Se is of higher importance for successful Se supply to the human diet and its bioavailability. The current study was focused on the investigation of the Se species present in chickpea plants exposed to 0, 10, 25, 50, and 100 μM selenite in short- and long-term treatment studies. The linear increase of total Se concentration could be linked to the increased concentrations of Se exposure. The selenium species (SeMet, SeCys, selenite, selenate, GPx) detected in varying concentrations in shoots and roots depend on the exposure's concentration and duration. The investigation showed that chickpea can accumulate Se in favorable concentrations and its transformation to bioavailable Se species may have positive impacts on human health and aid to implement Se into the diet. PMID:26122563

  10. Bioavailability of the polyphenols: status and controversies.

    PubMed

    D'Archivio, Massimo; Filesi, Carmelina; Varì, Rosaria; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Masella, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    The current interest in polyphenols has been driven primarily by epidemiological studies. However, to establish conclusive evidence for the effectiveness of dietary polyphenols in disease prevention, it is useful to better define the bioavailability of the polyphenols, so that their biological activity can be evaluated. The bioavailability appears to differ greatly among the various phenolic compounds, and the most abundant ones in our diet are not necessarily those that have the best bioavailability profile. In the present review, we focus on the factors influencing the bioavailability of the polyphenols. Moreover, a critical overview on the difficulties and the controversies of the studies on the bioavailability is discussed. PMID:20480022

  11. Bioavailability of the Polyphenols: Status and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    D’Archivio, Massimo; Filesi, Carmelina; Varì, Rosaria; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Masella, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    The current interest in polyphenols has been driven primarily by epidemiological studies. However, to establish conclusive evidence for the effectiveness of dietary polyphenols in disease prevention, it is useful to better define the bioavailability of the polyphenols, so that their biological activity can be evaluated. The bioavailability appears to differ greatly among the various phenolic compounds, and the most abundant ones in our diet are not necessarily those that have the best bioavailability profile. In the present review, we focus on the factors influencing the bioavailability of the polyphenols. Moreover, a critical overview on the difficulties and the controversies of the studies on the bioavailability is discussed. PMID:20480022

  12. Selenium-Enriched Foods Are More Effective at Increasing Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) Activity Compared with Selenomethionine: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, Emma N.; Hesketh, John E.; Sinclair, Bruce R.; Koolaard, John P.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2014-01-01

    Selenium may play a beneficial role in multi-factorial illnesses with genetic and environmental linkages via epigenetic regulation in part via glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. A meta-analysis was undertaken to quantify the effects of dietary selenium supplementation on the activity of overall GPx activity in different tissues and animal species and to compare the effectiveness of different forms of dietary selenium. GPx activity response was affected by both the dose and form of selenium (p < 0.001). There were differences between tissues on the effects of selenium supplementation on GPx activity (p < 0.001); however, there was no evidence in the data of differences between animal species (p = 0.95). The interactions between dose and tissue, animal species and form were significant (p < 0.001). Tissues particularly sensitive to changes in selenium supply include red blood cells, kidney and muscle. The meta-analysis identified that for animal species selenium-enriched foods were more effective than selenomethionine at increasing GPx activity. PMID:25268836

  13. Selenium reduces mobile phone (900 MHz)-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial function, and apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kahya, Mehmet Cemal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Çiğ, Bilal

    2014-08-01

    Exposure to mobile phone-induced electromagnetic radiation (EMR) may affect biological systems by increasing free oxygen radicals, apoptosis, and mitochondrial depolarization levels although selenium may modulate the values in cancer. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of 900 MHz radiation on the antioxidant redox system, apoptosis, and mitochondrial depolarization levels in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Cultures of the cancer cells were divided into four main groups as controls, selenium, EMR, and EMR + selenium. In EMR groups, the cells were exposed to 900 MHz EMR for 1 h (SAR value of the EMR was 0.36 ± 0.02 W/kg). In selenium groups, the cells were also incubated with sodium selenite for 1 h before EMR exposure. Then, the following values were analyzed: (a) cell viability, (b) intracellular ROS production, (c) mitochondrial membrane depolarization, (d) cell apoptosis, and (e) caspase-3 and caspase-9 values. Selenium suppressed EMR-induced oxidative cell damage and cell viability (MTT) through a reduction of oxidative stress and restoring mitochondrial membrane potential. Additionally, selenium indicated anti-apoptotic effects, as demonstrated by plate reader analyses of apoptosis levels and caspase-3 and caspase-9 values. In conclusion, 900 MHz EMR appears to induce apoptosis effects through oxidative stress and mitochondrial depolarization although incubation of selenium seems to counteract the effects on apoptosis and oxidative stress. PMID:24965080

  14. Areas Susceptible to Irrigation-Induced Selenium Contamination of Water and Biota in the Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, Ralph L.; Skorupa, Joseph P.; Peltz, Lorri A.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) studied contamination induced by irrigation drainage in 26 areas of the Western United States during 1986-95. Comprehensive compilation, synthesis, and evaluation of the data resulting from these studies were initiated by DOI in 1992. Soils and ground water in irrigated areas of the West can contain high concentrations of selenium because of (1) residual selenium from the soil's parent rock beneath irrigated land; (2) selenium derived from rocks in mountains upland from irrigated land by erosion and transport along local drainages, and (3) selenium brought into the area in surface water imported for irrigation. Application of irrigation water to seleniferous soils can dissolve and mobilize selenium and create hydraulic gradients that cause the discharge of seleniferous ground water into irrigation drains. Given a source of selenium, the magnitude of selenium contamination in drainage-affected aquatic ecosystems is strongly related to the aridity of the area and the presence of terminal lakes and ponds. Marine sedimentary rocks and deposits of Late Cretaceous or Tertiary age are generally seleniferous in the Western United States. Depending on their origin and history, some Tertiary continental sedimentary deposits also are seleniferous. Irrigation of areas associated with these rocks and deposits can result in concentrations of selenium in water that exceed criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. Geologic and climatic data for the Western United States were evaluated and incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) to produce a map identifying areas susceptible to irrigation-induced selenium contamination. Land is considered susceptible where a geologic source of selenium is in or near the area and where the evaporation rate is more than 2.5 times the precipitation rate. In the Western United States, about 160,000 square miles of land, which includes about 4,100 square miles (2.6 million acres) of

  15. Distribution of selenium in zebrafish larvae after exposure to organic and inorganic selenium forms.

    PubMed

    Dolgova, N V; Hackett, M J; MacDonald, T C; Nehzati, S; James, A K; Krone, P H; George, G N; Pickering, I J

    2016-03-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient for many organisms, and in vertebrates has a variety of roles associated with protection from reactive oxygen species. Over the past two decades there have been conflicting reports upon human health benefits and detriments arising from consumption of selenium dietary supplements. Thus, early studies report a decrease in the incidence of certain types of cancer, whereas subsequent studies did not observe any anti-cancer effect, and adverse effects such as increased risks for type 2 diabetes have been reported. A possible contributing factor may be that different chemical forms of selenium were used in different studies. Using larval stage zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model organism, we report a comparison of the toxicities and tissue selenium distributions of four different chemical forms of selenium. We find that the organic forms of selenium tested (Se-methyl-l-selenocysteine and l-selenomethionine) show considerably more toxicity than inorganic forms (selenite and selenate), and that this appears to be correlated with the level of bioaccumulation. Despite differences in concentrations, the tissue specific pattern of selenium accumulation was similar for the chemical forms tested; selenium was found to be highly concentrated in pigment (melanin) containing tissues especially for the organic selenium treatments, with lower concentrations in eye lens, yolk sac and heart. These results suggest that pigmented tissues might serve as a storage reservoir for selenium. PMID:26781816

  16. Blood selenium levels and contribution of food groups to selenium intake in adolescent girls in Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsdottir, Edda Y.; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg; Thorlacius, Arngrimur; Reykdal, Olafur; Gunnlaugsdottir, Helga; Thorsdottir, Inga; Steingrimsdottir, Laufey

    2012-01-01

    Background/objectives Significant changes have been reported in dietary habits and food availability in Iceland that would be expected to compromise selenium intake and status, especially among young people. These include substantial decreases in the consumption of fish and milk, as well as the selenium content of imported wheat. The aim of this study was to assess selenium in the diet and whole blood of adolescent girls, as well as define the most important foods contributing to intake and blood concentrations of selenium. Design The subjects were 96 randomly selected girls, aged 16–20, who answered a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for dietary assessment. Selenium intake from each food group was calculated in µg/day. Blood samples were collected for measurement of whole blood selenium. Results Mean dietary selenium was 51±25 µg/day. Milk/dairy products, including cheese, contributed 36±14% of total dietary selenium; fish 18±12%; and bread/cereal products 13±6%. Mean whole blood selenium was 117±12 µg/l (range 90–208); nearly 90% of subjects were above the optimal level of 100 µg/l. Fish and bread/cereal products were the only foods significantly correlated with selenium in blood (r=0.32; P=0.002 and r=0.22; P=0.04, respectively) while no correlation was found with milk and dairy products in spite of their greater contribution to total selenium intake. Conclusion In this population of Icelandic adolescent girls, selenium intake and status seem acceptable. Judging from associations between intake and blood levels, fish and cereals may be the most important contributors to blood selenium. PMID:22952457

  17. Epigenetic effects of selenium and their implications for health

    PubMed Central

    Speckmann, Bodo; Grune, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Alterations of epigenetic marks are linked to normal development and cellular differentiation as well as to the progression of common chronic diseases. The plasticity of these marks provides potential for disease therapies and prevention strategies. Macro- and micro-nutrients have been shown to modulate disease risk in part via effects on the epigenome. The essential micronutrient selenium affects human health outcomes, e.g., cancers, cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases, via selenoproteins and through a range of biologically active dietary selenocompounds and metabolism products thereof. This review provides an assessment of the current literature regarding epigenetic effects of dietary and synthetic selenocompounds, which include the modulation of marks and editors of epigenetic information and interference with one-carbon metabolism, which provides the methyl donor for DNA methylation. The relevance of a selenium-epigenome interaction for human health is discussed, and we also indicate where future studies will be helpful to gain a deeper understanding of epigenetic effects elicited by selenium. PMID:25647085

  18. Production of Chlorella biomass enriched by selenium and its use in animal nutrition: a review.

    PubMed

    Doucha, Jirí; Lívanský, Karel; Kotrbácek, Václav; Zachleder, Vilém

    2009-07-01

    Feedstuffs are routinely supplemented with various selenium sources, where organic forms of Se are more bio-available and less toxic than the inorganic forms (selenites, selenates). When the algae are exposed to environmental Se in the form of selenite, they are able as other microorganisms to incorporate the element to different levels, depending on the algae species. Technology of heterotrophic fed-batch cultivation of the microalga Chlorella enriched by organically bound Se was developed, where the cultivation proceeds in fermentors on aerated and mixed nutrient solution with urea as a nitrogen and glucose as a carbon and energy source. High volumetric productivity and high cell concentrations (about 70-100 g Chlorella dry mass l(-1)) can be attained if nutrients and oxygen are adequately supplied. Addition of a small quantity of a new selenoprotein source-spray-dried Se-Chlorella biomass to the diet of farm animals had better effects on specific physiological and physical parameters of animals than selenite salt and was comparable with Se yeast added to the diet. This review introduces the importance of selenium for humans and animals, methods of Se determination, heterotrophic production of selenium-enriched Chlorella biomass in a fed-batch culture regime on organic carbon, and use of the biomass in animal nutrition. PMID:19533119

  19. Evaluation of flushing of a high-selenium backwater channel in the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.; Weston, L.K.; McDonald, S.F.

    2004-01-01

    Concern has been raised that selenium contamination may be adversely affecting endangered fish in the upper Colorado River basin. The objective of the study was to determine if operation of a water control structure (opened in December 1996) that allowed the Colorado River to flow through a channel area at Walter Walker State Wildlife Area (WWSWA) would reduce selenium and other inorganic elements in water, sediment, aquatic invertebrates, and forage fish. Endangered Colorado pikeminnow were collected and muscle plug samples taken for selenium analysis. Selenium concentrations in filtered water were 21.0 ??g/L in 1995, 23.5 ??g/L in 1996, 2.1 ??g/L in 1997, and 2.1 ??g/L in 1998. Selenium concentrations in sediment cores and sediment traps were 8.5 ??/g in 1995, 8.2 ??g/g in 1996, 4.8 ??g/g in 1997, and 1.1 ??g/g in 1998. Selenium concentrations in aquatic invertebrates were 27.4 ??g/g in 1996, 15.5 ??g/g in 1997, and 4.9 ??g/g in 1998. Selenium concentrations in forage fish were 27.2 ??g/g in 1996, 20.2 ??g/g in 1997, and 8.6 ??g/g in 1998. Selenium concentrations in muscle plugs of Colorado pikeminnow were 9.8 ??g/g in 1995, 9.5 ??g/g in 1996, 9.0 ??g/g in 1997, and 10.3 ??g/g in 1998. Although selenium concentrations in water, sediment, aquatic invertebrates, and forage fish decreased substantially after operation of the water control structure, a corresponding change in Colorado pikeminnow did not seem to occur. Selenium concentrations in muscle plugs decreased with increasing fish total length and weight, did not change between repeat sampling in the same year or recapture in subsequent years, and seemed to be most closely associated with the mean monthly river flow for the March-July period. ?? 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Selenium in oncology: from chemistry to clinics.

    PubMed

    Micke, Oliver; Schomburg, Lutz; Buentzel, Jens; Kisters, Klaus; Muecke, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    The essential trace element selenium, which is a crucial cofactor in the most important endogenous antioxidative systems of the human body, is attracting more and more the attention of both laypersons and expert groups. The interest of oncologists mainly focuses in the following clinical aspects: radioprotection of normal tissues, radiosensitizing in malignant tumors, antiedematous effect, prognostic impact of selenium, and effects in primary and secondary cancer prevention. Selenium is a constituent of the small group of selenocysteine-containing selenoproteins and elicits important structural and enzymatic functions. Selenium deficiency has been linked to increased infection risk and adverse mood states. It has been shown to possess cancer-preventive and cytoprotective activities in both animal models and humans. It is well established that Se has a key role in redox regulation and antioxidant function, and hence in membrane integrity, energy metabolism and protection against DNA damage. Recent clinical trials have shown the importance of selenium in clinical oncology. Our own clinical study involving 48 patients suggest that selenium has a positive effect on radiation-associated secondary lymphedema in patients with limb edemas, as well as in the head and neck region, including endolaryngeal edema. Another randomized phase III study of our group was performed to examine the cytoprotective properties of selenium in radiation oncology. The aim was to evaluate whether sodium selenite is able to compensate a preexisting selenium deficiency and to prevent radiation induced diarrhea in adjuvant radiotherapy for pelvic gynecologic malignancies. Through this study, the significant benefits of sodium selenite supplementation with regards to selenium deficiency and radiotherapy induced diarrhea in patients with cervical and uterine cancer has been shown for the first time in a prospective randomized trial. Survival data imply that supplementation with selenium does not

  1. Hazard assessment of selenium and other trace elements in wild larval razorback sucker from the Green River, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Muth, R.T.; Waddell, B.; May, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    Contaminant investigations of the Green River in northeastern Utah have documented selenium contamination at sites receiving irrigation drainage. The Green River provides critical habitat for four endangered fishes including the largest extant riverine population of endangered razorback sucker. Although 2175 larval razorback suckers were collected from the river between 1992 and 1996, very few juveniles have been captured within recent decades. Selenium concentrations were measured in larval razorback suckers collected from five sites in the Green River (Cliff Creek, Stewart Lake Drain, Sportsman's Drain, Greasewood Corral, and Old Charlie Wash) to assess the potential for adverse effects on recruitment of larvae to the juvenile stage and the adult population. Larvae from all sites contained mean selenium concentrations ranging from 4.3 to 5.8 ??g/g. These values were at or above the proposed toxic threshold of 4 ??g/g for adverse biological effects in fish, which was derived from several laboratory and field studies with a wide range of fish species. At two sites, Cliff Creek and Stewart Lake Drain, selenium concentrations in larvae increased over time as fish grew, whereas selenium concentrations decreased as fish grew at Sportsman's Drain. Evaluation of a 279-larvae composite analyzed for 61 elements demonstrated that selenium and, to a lesser extent, vanadium were elevated to concentrations reported to be toxic to a wide range of fish species. Elevated selenium concentrations in larval razorback suckers from the five sites suggest that selenium contamination may be widespread in the Green River, and that survival and recruitment of larvae to the juvenile stage may be limited due to adverse biological effects. Selenium contamination may be adversely affecting the reproductive success and recruitment of endangered razorback sucker.

  2. Influence of food on the bioavailability of drugs.

    PubMed

    Melander, A

    1978-01-01

    Food intake exerts a complex influence on the bioavailability of drugs. It may interfere not only with tablet disintegration, drug dissolution and drug transit through the gastrointestinal tract, but may also affect the metabolic transformation of drugs in the gastrointestinal wall and in the liver. Different food components can have different effects, and food may interact in opposite ways, even with drugs that are chemically related. Therefore, the net effect of food on drug bioavailability can be predicted only by direct clinical studies of the drug in question. As judged mainly from single meal, single dose studies, food intake enhances the bioavailability of several different drugs, such as propranolol, metoprolol, hydrallazine, hydrochlorothiazide, canrenone (from spironolactone), nitrofurantoin, erythromycin (stearate), dicoumarol, phenytoin and carbamazepine, but reduces that of drugs such as isoniazid, rifampicin, tetracycline, penicillin and ampicillin, while having no consistent effect on the bioavailability of metronidazole, oxazepam, melperone, propylthiouracil, sulphasomidine and sulphonylureas. For some drugs such as digoxin and paracetamol, the rate but not the extent of absorption is reduced. Food may enhance bioavailability even though, or rather because, the rate of gastric emptying is reduced; this is apparently the case with hydrochlorothiazide and nitrofurantoin. The food induced enhancement of bioavailability of propranolol, metoprolol and hydrallazine is probably due to reduced first pass metabolism of these drugs, while food induced improvement of drug dissolution may explain the enhanced bioavailability of carbamazepine, canrenone, dicoumarol and phenytoin. An increased gastrointestinal pH may be in part the cause of the food induced reduction of the bioavailability of drugs such as isoniazid and tetracycline. In addition to single meal effects, repeated intake of protein-rich meals enhance, while carbohydrate-rich meals reduce, the rate

  3. Absolute oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Drusano, G L; Standiford, H C; Plaisance, K; Forrest, A; Leslie, J; Caldwell, J

    1986-09-01

    We evaluated the absolute bioavailability of ciprofloxacin, a new quinoline carboxylic acid, in 12 healthy male volunteers. Doses of 200 mg were given to each of the volunteers in a randomized, crossover manner 1 week apart orally and as a 10-min intravenous infusion. Half-lives (mean +/- standard deviation) for the intravenous and oral administration arms were 4.2 +/- 0.77 and 4.11 +/- 0.74 h, respectively. The serum clearance rate averaged 28.5 +/- 4.7 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous administration arm. The renal clearance rate accounted for approximately 60% of the corresponding serum clearance rate and was 16.9 +/- 3.0 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous arm and 17.0 +/- 2.86 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the oral administration arm. Absorption was rapid, with peak concentrations in serum occurring at 0.71 +/- 0.15 h. Bioavailability, defined as the ratio of the area under the curve from 0 h to infinity for the oral to the intravenous dose, was 69 +/- 7%. We conclude that ciprofloxacin is rapidly absorbed and reliably bioavailable in these healthy volunteers. Further studies with ciprofloxacin should be undertaken in target patient populations under actual clinical circumstances. PMID:3777908

  4. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of selenium in foods and diets.

    PubMed

    Kumpulainen, J; Raittila, A M; Lehto, J; Koivistoinen, P

    1983-09-01

    The validity of 2 electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric methods for determination of selenium in foods and diets was tested. By using 0.5% Ni(II) as a matrix modifier to prevent selenium losses during the ashing step, it was shown that selenium can be determined in samples containing greater than or equal to 1 microgram Se/g dry wt without organic extraction. The mean recovery tested, using NBS Bovine Liver, was 98%; recovery of added inorganic selenium in Bovine Liver matrix was 100%. In addition, this method gave values closest to the median value of all participating laboratories using hydride generation AAS or the spectrofluorometric method in a collaborative study on high selenium wheat, flour, and toast samples. For samples with concentrations less than 1 microgram Se/g dry wt, separation of selenium from interfering Fe and P ions by organic extraction was necessary. Using inorganic 75Se in meat and human milk matrixes, an ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-methyl isobutyl ketone-extraction system with added Cu(II) as a matrix modifier yielded the best extraction recoveries, 97 and 98%, respectively. Accuracy and precision of the method were tested using several official and unofficial biological standard materials. The mean accuracy was within 4% of the certified or best values of the standard materials and the day-to-day variation was 9%. The Se/Fe or Se/P interference limits proved to be low enough not to affect selenium determinations in practically all foods or diets. The practical detection limit of the method was 3 ng Se/g dry wt for 1.0 g dry wt samples.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6630125

  5. Selenium in aquatic biota inhabiting agricultural drains in the Salton Sea Basin, California.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Michael K; Martin, Barbara A; May, Thomas W

    2012-09-01

    Resource managers are concerned that water conservation practices in irrigated farmlands along the southern border of the Salton Sea, Imperial County, California, could increase selenium concentrations in agricultural drainwater and harm the desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), a federally protected endangered species. As part of a broader attempt to address this concern, we conducted a 3-year investigation to collect baseline information on selenium concentrations in seven agricultural drains inhabited by pupfish. We collected water, sediment, selected aquatic food-chain taxa (particulate organic detritus, filamentous algae, net plankton, and midge [Chironomidae] larvae), and two poeciliid fishes (western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis and sailfin molly Poecilia latipinna) for selenium determinations. The two fish species served as ecological surrogates for pupfish, which we were not permitted to sacrifice. Dissolved selenium ranged from 0.70 to 32.8 μg/L, with selenate as the major constituent. Total selenium concentrations in other environmental matrices varied widely among drains, with one drain (Trifolium 18) exhibiting especially high concentrations in detritus, 5.98-58.0 μg Se/g; midge larvae, 12.7-50.6 μg Se/g; mosquitofish, 13.2-20.2 μg Se/g; and mollies, 12.8-30.4 μg Se/g (all tissue concentrations are based on dry weights). Although toxic thresholds for selenium in fishes from the Salton Sea are still poorly understood, available evidence suggests that ambient concentrations of this element may not be sufficiently elevated to adversely affect reproductive success and survival in selenium-tolerant poeciliids and pupfish. PMID:21915593

  6. Selenium uptake by sulfur-accumulating bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Douglas C.; Casey, William H.; Sison, Jennette D.; Mack, E. Erin; Ahmad, Azeem; Pollack, Jeffrey S.

    1996-09-01

    Selenium is a trace metal in many rock-forming minerals but is a major environmental contaminant worldwide. Uptake of selenium by S-accumulating bacteria was examined in both pure cultures of Chromatium vinosum and in co-culture with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. We used dual cultures including these bacteria to concentrate selenium into intracellular globules. The bacterium D. desulfuricans reduces sulfate [SO 42- (aq)] to sulfide [H 2S(aq)] and also reduces selenate [SeO 42- (aq)] to selenide [H 2Se (aq)]. Once reduced, sulfide is enzymatically oxidized and formed into intracellular globules by C. vinosum. We found that the selenium also forms an intercellular solid but the reaction is thermodynamically driven and proceeds by reducing S° (s) with H 2Se(aq). Relative to the initial molar ratio of selenate and sulfate in the medium, selenium is concentrated 4.5 to 32-fold in the globules. Because solid selenium is so much more stable than sulfur at growth conditions, other S-depositing bacteria, such as Beggiatoa and Chlorobium, should also concentrate selenium via this reaction, providing a strategy for eliminating contamination or for concentrating low natural levels into a usable form.

  7. Decreased selenium levels in acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, F.J.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.M.; de Bruijn, A.M.; Kruyssen, D.H.C.M.; de Bruin, M.; Valkenburg, H.A. )

    1989-02-24

    To study the association between selenium status and the risk of myocardial infarction, the authors compared plasma, erythrocyte, and toenail selenium levels and the activity of erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase among 84 patients with acute myocardial infarction and 84 population controls. Mean concentrations of all selenium measurements were lower in cases than controls. The differences were statistically significant, except for the plasma selenium level. A positive trend in the risk of acute myocardial infarction from high to low toenail selenium levels was observed, which persisted after adjustment for other risk factors for myocardial infarction. In contrast, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly higher in cases than controls. Because toenail selenium level reflects blood levels up to one year before sampling, these findings suggest that a low selenium status was present before the infarction and, thus, may be of etiologic relevance. The higher glutathione peroxidase activity in the cases may be interpreted as a defense against increased oxidant stress either preceding or following the acute event.

  8. Bioavailability of particle-associated Se to the bivalve Potamocorbula amurensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlekat, C.E.; Dowdle, P.R.; Lee, B.-G.; Luoma, S.N.; Oremland, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Elemental selenium, Se(0), is a prevalent chemical form in sediments, but little is known about its bioavailability. We evaluated the bioavailability of two forms of Se(0) by generating radioisotopic 75Se(0) through bacterial dissimilatory reduction of 75SeO32- by pure bacterial cultures (SES) and by an anaerobic sediment microbial consortium (SED). A third form was generated by reducing 75SeO32- with ascorbic acid (AA). Speciation determinations showed that AA and SES were >90% Se(0), but SED showed a mixture of Se(0), selenoanions, and a residual fraction. Pulse-chase techniques were used to measure assimilation efficiencies (AE) of these particulate Se forms by the bivalve Potamocorbula amurensis. Mean AE values were 3 ?? 2% for AA, 7 ?? 1% for SES, and 28 ?? 15% for SED, showing that the bioavailability of reduced, particle-associated Se is dependent upon its origin. To determine if oxidative microbial processes increased Se transfer, SES 75Se(0) was incubated with an aerobic sediment microbial consortium. After 113 d of incubation, 36% of SES Se(0) was oxidized to SeO32-. Assimilation of total particulate Se was unaffected however (mean AE = 5.5%). The mean AE from the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was 58 ?? 8%, verifying the importance of Se associated with biogenic particles. Speciation and AE results from SED suggest that selenoanion reduction in wetlands and estuaries produces biologically available reduced selenium.Elemental selenium, Se(0), is a prevalent chemical form in sediments, but little is known about its bioavailability. We evaluated the bioavailability of two forms of Se(0) by generating radioisotopic 75Se(0) through bacterial dissimilatory reduction of 75SeO32- by pure bacterial cultures (SES) and by an anaerobic sediment microbial consortium (SED). A third form was generated by reducing 75SeO32 with ascorbic acid (AA). Speciation determinations showed that AA and SES were > 90% Se(0), but SED showed a mixture of Se(0), selenoanions, and a

  9. Revised reference values for selenium intake.

    PubMed

    Kipp, A P; Strohm, D; Brigelius-Flohé, R; Schomburg, L; Bechthold, A; Leschik-Bonnet, E; Heseker, H

    2015-10-01

    The German, Austrian and Swiss nutrition societies are the joint editors of the 'reference values for nutrient intake'. They have revised the reference values for the intake of selenium and published them in February 2015. The saturation of selenoprotein P (SePP) in plasma is used as a criterion for the derivation of reference values for selenium intake in adults. For persons from selenium-deficient regions (China) SePP saturation was achieved with a daily intake of 49μg of selenium. When using the reference body weights the D-A-CH reference values are based upon, the resulting estimated value for selenium intake is 70μg/day for men and 60μg/day for women. The estimated value for selenium intake for children and adolescents is extrapolated using the estimated value for adults in relation to body weight. For infants aged 0 to under 4 months the estimated value of 10μg/day was derived from the basis of selenium intake via breast milk. For infants aged 4 to under 12 months this estimated value was used and taking into account the differences regarding body weight an estimated value of 15μg/day was derived. For lactating women compared to non-lactating women a higher reference value of 75μg/day is indicated due to the release of selenium with breast milk. The additional selenium requirement for pregnant women is negligible, so that no increased reference value is indicated. PMID:26302929

  10. Distribution and mode of occurrence of selenium in US coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, L.; Bragg, L.J.; Finkelman, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    Selenium excess and deficiency have been established as the cause of various health problems in man and animals. Combustion of fossil fuels, especially coal, may be a major source of the anthropogenic introduction of selenium in the environment. Coal is enriched in selenium relative to selenium's concentration in most other rocks and relative to selenium in the Earth's crust. Data from almost 9,000 coal samples have been used to determine the concentration and distribution of selenium in US coals. The geometric mean concentration of selenium in US coal is 1.7 ppm. The highest mean selenium value (geometric mean 4.7 ppm) is in the Texas Region. Atlantic Coast (Virginia and North Carolina) and Alaska coals have the lowest geometric means (0.2 and 0.42 ppm, respectively). All western coal regions have mean selenium concentrations of less than 2.0 ppm. In contrast, all coal basins east of the Rocky Mountains (except for several small basins in Rhode Island, Virginia, and North Carolina) have mean selenium values of 1.9 or greater. Generally, variations in selenium concentration do not correlate with variations in ash yield, pyritic sulphur, or organic sulphur concentrations. This may be the result of multiple sources of selenium; however, in some non-marine basins with restricted sources of selenium, selenium has positive correlations with other coal quality parameters. Selenium occurs in several forms in coal but appears to be chiefly associated with the organic fraction, probably substituting for organic sulphur. Other important forms of selenium in coal are selenium-bearing pyrite, selenium-bearing galena, and lead selenide (clausthalite). Water-soluble and ion-exchangeable selenium also have been reported. ?? 1993 Copyright Science and Technology Letters.

  11. Selenium content of game meat

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, L.C.; Belden, R.P. Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie )

    1991-03-11

    Selenium (Se) content of elk, deer, bison and beef were measured and compared. Samples were obtained from animals grazed on soil known to contain high, but variable amounts of Se. Beef were feedlot grazed and elk, deer, and bison were from captive or semi-captive herds. Selenium content was determined by graphite furnace after high pressure wet microwave digestion of samples. Deer and bison contained more Se than elk or beef. On a dry weight basis, deer contained more Se than bison. Game species contained more Se than beef. Within samples from male elk and deer and elk and bison of both genders, there were interactions between specie and muscle effects. Muscle and gender did not significantly influence Se content. The animals from which these samples were taken were supplemented with feeds grown on high Se containing soils, which was reflected in all values. Se values were twofold higher than those previously reported for meat. Those consuming large quantities of game from areas with high Se soil may need to monitor Se intake to avoid consuming excessive quantities.

  12. Selenium and Methionine Sulfoxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2014-10-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element because it is present in proteins in the form of selenocysteine residue. Functionally characterized selenoproteins are oxidoreductases. Selenoprotein methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase B1 (MsrB1) is a repair enzyme that reduces ROS-oxidized methionine residues in proteins. Here, we explored a possibility that reversible methionine oxidation is also a mechanism that regulates protein function. We found that MsrB1, together with Mical proteins, regulated mammalian actin assembly via stereospecific methionine oxidation and reduction in a reversible, site-specific manner. Two methionine residues in actin were specifically converted to methionine-R-sulfoxide by Mical1 and Mical2 and reduced back to methionine by MsrB1, supporting actin disassembly and assembly, respectively. Macrophages utilized this redox control during cellular activation by stimulating MsrB1 expression and activity. Thus, we identified the regulatory role of MsrB1 as a Mical antagonist in orchestrating actin dynamics and macrophage function. More generally, our study showed that proteins can be regulated by reversible site-specific methionine-R-sulfoxidation and that selenium is involved in this regulation by being a catalytic component of MsrB1. PMID:26461418

  13. Distribution and mobility of selenium and other trace elements in shallow groundwater of the western San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deverel, S.J.; Milliard, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of shallow groundwater that underlies much of the irrigated area in the western San Joaquin Valley, CA, were analyzed for various major ions and trace elements, including selenium. Concentrations of the major ions generally were similar for groundwater collected in the two primary geologic zones - the alluvial fan and basin trough. Selenium concentrations are significantly (α = 0.05) higher in the groundwater of the alluvial-fan zone than in that of the basin-trough zone. The concentrations of oxyanion trace elements were significantly correlated (α = 0.05) with groundwater salinity, but the correlations between selenium and salinity and between molybdenum and salinity were significantly different (α = 0.05) in the alluvial-fan geologic zone compared with those in the basin-trough geologic zone. The evidence suggests that the main factors affecting selenium concentrations in the shallow groundwater are the degree of groundwater salinity and the geologic source of the alluvial soil material.

  14. Selenium accumulation and loss in mallard eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, G.H. )

    1993-04-01

    Five female mallards (Anas platyhynchos) that had just started egg laying were first fed a diet containing 15 ppm selenium in the form of selenomethionine for 20 d and then an untreated diet for 20 d. Selenium levels in eggs peaked (to about 13-20 ppm) in about two weeks on the treated diet and leveled off at a low level (< 5 ppm) after about 10 d back on the untreated diet. Selenium levels in egg whites responded faster than levels in yolks to the females' consumption of treated and untreated diets.

  15. Renal changes in selenium-exposed fish

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, E.M.; Harlan, C.W.; Bell, J.S.

    1982-06-01

    A group of green sunfish was collected from a selenium-rich lake and compared with a similar group collected from a control lake upstream in the same drainage system in east Texas. Since the level of selenium in kidneys of these fish was relatively high (averaging 11 ppm on a fresh weight basis), histopathological and ultrastructural data were collected. Kidneys from fish from the selenium-rich lake showed proliferative glomerulonephritis and hematuria as well as vacuolation and necrosis of cells of the convoluted tubules.

  16. Simultaneous removal of SO2 and trace SeO2 from flue gas: effect of SO2 on selenium capture and kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhong; Tong, Huiling; Zhuo, Yuqun; Wang, Shujuan; Xu, Xuchang

    2006-12-15

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) and trace elements are all pollutants derived from coal combustion. This study relates to the simultaneous removal of SO2 and trace selenium dioxide (SeO2) from flue gas by calcium oxide (CaO) adsorption in the moderate temperature range, especially the effect of SO2 presence on selenium capture. Experiments performed on a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) can reach the following conclusions. When the CaO conversion is relatively low and the reaction rate is controlled by chemical kinetics, the SO2 presence does not affect the selenium capture. When the CaO conversion is very high and the reaction rate is controlled by product layer diffusion, the SO2 presence and the product layer diffusion resistance jointly reduce the selenium capture. On the basis of the kinetics study, a method to estimate the trace selenium removal efficiency using kinetic parameters and the sulfur removal efficiency is developed. PMID:17256549

  17. Selenium isotope geochemistry: A new approach to characterizing the environmental chemistry of selenium. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, A.M.; Esser, B.K.

    1997-02-05

    High levels of selenium in the environment will be a prominent water quality issue in the western United States for many years. Selenium accumulation is linked to increased rates of death and deformity in migratory birds, blind staggers in livestock, and selenosis in humans. In California, agricultural drain waters and oil refinery effluent contribute to high selenium content in the San Joaquin Valley and the San Francisco Bay. The importance of these industries to California`s economy precludes simple abatement, while the complexity of selenium cycling precludes simple remediation. The purpose of this project is to measure variations in the isotopic composition of selenium in water and soil samples caused by natural processes and to show, for the first time, the value of isotopic measurements in characterizing selenium pollution. The research seeks to identify sources of selenium pollution, determine processes in the selenium cycle, and support selenium remediation studies. The project required the successful integration of three components: (1) appropriate sampling a field setting showing Se enrichment and possibly isotopic fractionation, (2) analytical chemical methods for isolating and purifying the various species of Se in waters and sediment, and (3) mass spectroscopic instrumentation for high precision isotope abundance measurements.

  18. Selenium content in wheat and estimation of the selenium daily intake in different regions of Algeria.

    PubMed

    Beladel, B; Nedjimi, B; Mansouri, A; Tahtat, D; Belamri, M; Tchanchane, A; Khelfaoui, F; Benamar, M E A

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we have measured the selenium content in wheat produced locally in eight different regions of Algeria from east to west, and we have established the annual consumption of selenium for five socio-professional categories. Instrumental neutron activation analysis is used. The selenium levels in wheat samples varied from 21 (Tiaret) to 153 μg/kg (Khroub), with a mean value about 52 μg/kg. The mean of selenium daily consumption from ingestion of wheat per person in the eight regions varied from 32 to 52 μg/day which is close to the minimal FAO recommendation. PMID:23079485

  19. Soil and plant selenium at a reclaimed uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Sharmasarkar, Shankar; Vance, George F

    2002-01-01

    Selenium (Se) associated with reclaimed uranium (U) mine lands may result in increased food chain transfer and water contamination. To assess post-reclamation bioavailability of Se at a U mine site in southeastern Wyoming, we studied soil Se distribution, dissolution, speciation, and sorption characteristics and plant Se accumulation. Phosphate-extractable soil Se exceeded the critical limit of 0.5 mg/kg in all the samples, whereas total soil Se ranged from a low (0.6 mg/kg) to an extremely high (26 mg/kg) value. Selenite was the dominant species in phosphate and ammonium bicarbonate-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (AB-DTPA) extracts, whereas selenate was the major Se species in hot water extracts. Extractable soil Se concentrations were in the order of KH2PO4 > AB-DTPA > hot water > saturated paste. The soils were undersaturated with respect to various Se solid phases, albeit with high levels of extractable Se surpassing the critical limit. Calcium and Mg minerals were the potential primary solids controlling Se dissolution, with dissolved organic carbon in the equilibrium solutions resulting in enhanced Se availability. Adsorption was a significant (r2 = 0.76-0.99 at P < 0.05) mechanism governing Se availability and was best described by the initial mass isotherm model, which predicted a maximum reserve Se pool corresponding to 87% of the phosphate-extractable Se concentrations. Grasses, forbs, and shrubs accumulated 11 to 1800 mg Se/kg dry weight. While elevated levels of bioavailable Se may be potentially toxic, the plants accumulating high Se may be used for phytoremediation, or the palatable forage species may be used as animal feed supplements in Se-deficient areas. PMID:12371169

  20. Encapsulation of selenium in chitosan nanoparticles improves selenium availability and protects cells from selenium-induced DNA damage response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium, an essential mineral, plays important roles in optimizing human health. Chitosan is an effective, naturally oriented material for synthesizing nanoparticles with polyanions and exhibit preferable properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradation and resistance to certain enzymes. We have...

  1. [Antioxidant vitamins and selenium in the prevention of white muscle disease in calves].

    PubMed

    Kravtsiv, R I; Stadnyk, A M; Lychuk, M H

    2004-01-01

    Comparative data on the influence of selenium and cobalt inorganic compounds and their chelate complexes with methionin along with intramuscular injection of the vitamin preparation "Ursovit" on metabolism and treatment of calves with the symptoms of white muscle diseases are given in the paper. The increase of vitamins A, E, B12 and carotene and selenium contents in the blood of affected animals, correction of hemopoiesis, immune and antioxidant systems have been stated. The best therapeutic effect has been noticed when using chelate trace-element along with the preparation "Ursovit". PMID:19621762

  2. Assessment of exposure of larval razorback sucker to selenium in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Beyers, D W; Sodergren, C

    2002-01-01

    This investigation evaluated effects of exposure of larval razorback sucker to waterborne and dietary selenium and other contaminants that occur in nursery habitats. Site waters were collected from three localities on the Colorado River near Grand Junction, CO; a total of five test waters (including control) were studied. Razorback sucker larvae were exposed to site-water contaminants via waterborne and dietary exposure using a laboratory food chain (algae, rotifer, razorback sucker). Fish were exposed for 28 days to site waters and food organisms cultured in site waters. Survival data were analyzed by inspection. Growth data were analyzed using analysis of variance to describe the response of fish in each site water and to describe the relative contribution of waterborne versus dietary exposure to constituents in site waters. Selenium concentrations in test-water treatments ranged from < 1 to 20.3 microg/L in water, < 0.702 to 21.8 microg/g in diet, and 2.34 to 42.0 microg/g in fish. Negative effects from dietary exposure to site-water constituents were detected, but the data suggest that they were caused by cocontaminants in the diet, not selenium exposure. Lack of detection of adverse effects from exposure does not imply that razorback sucker populations are not affected by increased environmental selenium concentrations. There are a variety of factors not included in this investigation that may influence sensitivity of razorback sucker populations to selenium. PMID:11706368

  3. Effect of subcutaneous selenium injection and supplementary selenium source on blood selenium and glutathione peroxidase in feedlot heifers

    PubMed Central

    Chorfi, Younes; Girard, Vincent; Fournier, Alain; Couture, Yvon

    2011-01-01

    This study measured the effect on glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and selenium (Se) in whole blood and plasma associated with subcutaneous Se injections in beef heifers fed organic or inorganic Se. Heifers (n = 120) were randomly divided into 2 groups, 1 of which received subcutaneous Se injections. Both groups were given the same total mixed ration with 3 mg of organic or inorganic Se daily. Until week 2, heifers that had received Se injections showed higher concentrations of plasma Se and GSH-Px and whole blood Se (P < 0.001) than those having had no injections. Concentrations of plasma Se and GSH-Px were higher in the group receiving organic Se than the group receiving inorganic Se. Whole blood GSH-Px concentrations increased significantly (P < 0.001) throughout a 12-week period but were not affected by Se source. Combination of Se injections and supplementation could help maintain normal Se and GSH-Px blood status in beef heifers during the first few weeks in the feedlot. PMID:22467963

  4. Arsenic- and selenium-induced changes in spectral reflectance and morphology of soybean plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, N.M.; Ager, C.M.; Eiswerth, B.A.; Power, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) plants were grown in hydroponic solutions treated with high concentrations of either arsenic or selenium. Spectral reflectance changes in arsenic-dosed plants included a shift to shorter wavelengths in the long-wavelength edge of the chlorophyll absorption band centered at 680 nm (the red edge) and higher reflectance in the 550-650 nm region. These results are consistent with vegetation reflectance anomalies observed in previous greenhouse experiments and in airborne radiometer studies. The selenium-dosed plants contrast, exhibited a shift to longer wavelengths of the red edge and lower reflectance between 550 nm and 650 wh when compared with control plants. Morphological effects of arsenic uptake included lower overall biomass, stunted and discolored roots, and smaller leaves oriented more vertically than leaves of control plants. Selenium-dosed plants also displayed morphological changes, but root and leaf biomass were less affected than were those of arsenic-dosed plants when compared to control plants. ?? 1989.

  5. Selenium: environmental significance, pollution, and biological treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lea Chua; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda V; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element needed for all living organisms. Despite its essentiality, selenium is a potential toxic element to natural ecosystems due to its bioaccumulation potential. Though selenium is found naturally in the earth's crust, especially in carbonate rocks and volcanic and sedimentary soils, about 40% of the selenium emissions to atmospheric and aquatic environments are caused by various industrial activities such as mining-related operations. In recent years, advances in water quality and pollution monitoring have shown that selenium is a contaminant of potential environmental concern. This has practical implications on industry to achieve the stringent selenium regulatory discharge limit of 5μgSeL(-1) for selenium containing wastewaters set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Over the last few decades, various technologies have been developed for the treatment of selenium-containing wastewaters. Biological selenium reduction has emerged as the leading technology for removing selenium from wastewaters since it offers a cheaper alternative compared to physico-chemical treatments and is suitable for treating dilute and variable selenium-laden wastewaters. Moreover, biological treatment has the advantage of forming elemental selenium nanospheres which exhibit unique optical and spectral properties for various industrial applications, i.e. medical, electrical, and manufacturing processes. However, despite the advances in biotechnology employing selenium reduction, there are still several challenges, particularly in achieving stringent discharge limits, the long-term stability of biogenic selenium and predicting the fate of bioreduced selenium in the environment. This review highlights the significance of selenium in the environment, health, and industry and biotechnological advances made in the treatment of selenium contaminated wastewaters. The challenges and future perspectives are overviewed considering recent

  6. Serum selenium concentrations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, J R; Lemley-Gillespie, S; Palmer, W R; Weaver, A L; Moore, G F; Klassen, L W

    1991-01-01

    Selenium is a trace element and an essential part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase, which protects cells from oxidative damage. Selenium has been shown to have antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and immune altering effects. Serum selenium concentrations in 101 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis were found to be significantly lower than those in 29 normal, healthy controls (mean (SD) 148 (42) v 160 (25) micrograms/l) and also lower than those in eight patients with fibrositis (148 (42) v 166 (25) micrograms/l). It is speculated that serum selenium concentrations may modulate the effect of viral or other infections in subjects with the appropriate genetic background and in this way enhance the development or progression of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:2059080

  7. Biofortification and phytoremediation of selenium in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofortification is an agricultural process that increases the uptake and accumulation of specific nutrients, e.g. selenium (Se), in agricultural food products through plant breeding, genetic engineering, and manipulation of agronomic practices. The development and uses of biofortified agricultural ...

  8. Review of selenium and prostate cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Pascal, Mouracade; Wu, Xiao-Hou

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men in the United States. Surgery or radiation are sometimes unsatisfactory treatments because of the complications such as incontinence or erectile dysfunction. Selenium was found to be effective to prevent prostate cancer in the Nutritional Prevention of Cancer Trial (NPC), which motivated two other clinical trials: the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) and a Phase III trial of selenium to prevent prostate cancer in men with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. However, these two trials failed to confirm the results of the NPC trial and indicated that the selenium may not be preventive of prostate cancer. In this article we review the three clinical trials and discuss some different points which might be potential factors underlying variation in results obtained. PMID:23725109

  9. Selenium status in pregnant women of a rural population (Zaire) in relationship to iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ngo, D B; Dikassa, L; Okitolonda, W; Kashala, T D; Gervy, C; Dumont, J; Vanovervelt, N; Contempré, B; Diplock, A T; Peach, S; Vanderpas, J

    1997-06-01

    Endemic myxoedematous cretinism has been associated with combined selenium and iodine deficiency in several areas of Zaire. To determine selenium and iodine status across the country, serum selenium and thyroid function parameters including urinary iodide were determined at prenatal clinics in 30 health centres of rural villages distributed over the whole country. Only in Bas-Zaire was the mean serum selenium level similar to that in non-deficient areas (80-120 ng/ml); in the regions of Bandunda and Kasai levels were marginally decreased (55-80 ng/ml), and in Kivu, Haut-Zaire, Equateur and Shaba they were marginally or moderately decreased (< 55 ng/ml). The frequency of abnormally low urinary iodide (< 5 micrograms/dl) varied from 20% in the region of Bas-Zaire to 50% in Kasai (P < 0.001), and to still higher percentages in the 5 other regions of Zaire (Bandundu, 57%; Kivu, 63%; Equateur, 72%; Shaba, 76%; Haut-Zaire, 84%). With the exception of Bas-Zaire, biochemical maternal hypothyroidism (serum TSH > 5mU/l) was present in every region, with a frequency ranging from 3% in Kivu to 12% in Equateur. Iodine deficiency affects most of the Zairean population and requires public health measures on a larger scale than previously estimated. Combined iodine and selenium deficiency affects Equateur, Haut-Zaire and Kivu, where endemic myxoedematous cretinism occurs, but also Shaba, where it was not previously described. Besides combined iodine and selenium deficiency which is permissive, another factor (thiocyanate?) must be taken into account to explain the peculiarly elevated prevalence of endemic myxoedematous cretinism in Central Africa. PMID:9236825

  10. Selenium deficiency mitigates hypothyroxinemia in iodine-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Vanderpas, J B; Contempré, B; Duale, N L; Deckx, H; Bebe, N; Longombé, A O; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T; Dumont, J E

    1993-02-01

    Studies were performed to assess the role of combined selenium and iodine deficiency in the etiology of endemic myxedematous cretinism in a population in Zaire. One effect of selenium deficiency may be to lower glutathione peroxidase activity in the thyroid gland, thus allowing hydrogen peroxide produced during thyroid hormone synthesis to be cytotoxic. In selenium-and-iodine-deficient humans, selenium supplementation may aggravate hypothyroidism by stimulating thyroxin metabolism by the selenoenzyme type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase. Selenium supplementation is thus not indicated without iodine or thyroid hormone supplementation in cases of combined selenium and iodine deficiencies. PMID:8427203

  11. [Selenium. Its physiologic and clinical importance].

    PubMed

    da Silva, A P

    1993-07-01

    Since its discovery in 1817, Selenium has had great biological importance as a key element of cellular protection and in its absence of pathological symptoms. In this revised work, historical aspects of selenium are considered, its characteristics, properties and source as well as its nutritional value, metabolism, physiopathological and biochemical function in humans and finally its future therapeutical application in humans and animals considering some of the traditional ways of treatment. PMID:8379356

  12. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short.

  13. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short.

  14. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.

    1994-12-06

    Methods and apparatus are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short. 2 figures.

  15. Mercury-selenium interactions in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Saroff, L.; Lipfert, W.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1996-02-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to consider the need to control emissions of trace elements and compounds emitted from coal combustion, including coal-fired power plants. Concern has been expressed about emissions of mercury and arsenic, for example, since health effects may be associated with exposure to some of these compounds. By and large, effects of trace element emissions have been considered individually, without regard for possible interactions. To the extent that the relevant environmental pathways and health endpoints differ, this mode of analysis is appropriate. For example, arsenic is considered a carcinogen and mercury affects the brain. However, there may be compelling reasons to consider emissions of mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) together: (1) Both Se and Hg are emitted from power plants primarily as vapors. (2) Hg and Se are both found in fish, which is the primary pathway for Hg health effects. (3) Se has been shown to suppress Hg methylation in aqueous systems, which is a necessary step for Hg health effects at current environmental concentrations. (4) Se is a trace element that is essential for health but that can also be toxic at high concentrations; it can thus have both beneficial and adverse health effects, depending on the dosage. This paper reviews some of the salient characteristics and interactions of the Hg-Se system, to consider the hypothesis that the effects of emissions of these compounds should be considered jointly.

  16. Selenium and diabetes - evidence from animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Huang, Kaixun; Lei, Xin Gen

    2013-01-01

    Whereas selenium was found to act as an insulin-mimic and to be anti-diabetic in earlier studies, recent animal experiments and human trials have shown unexpected risk of prolonged high Se intake in potentiating insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Elevating dietary Se intakes (0.4 to 3.0 mg/kg of diet) above the nutrient requirements, similar to overproduction of selenoproteins, led to insulin resistance and(or) diabetes-like phenotypes in mice, rats, and pigs. Although its diabetogenic mechanism remains unclear, the high Se intake elevated activity or production of selenoproteins including GPx1, MsrB1, SelS, and SelP. This up-regulation diminished intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and then dys-regulated key regulators of β cells and insulin synthesis and secretion, leading to chronic hyperinsulinaemia. Over-scavenging intracellular H2O2 also attenuated oxidative inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases and suppressed insulin signaling. High Se intake might affect expression and(or) function of key regulators for glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and lipogenesis. Future research is needed to find out if certain forms of Se metabolites in addition to selenoproteins and if mechanisms other than intracellular redox control mediate the diabetogenic effect of high Se intakes. Furthermore, a potential interactive role of high Se intakes in the interphase of carcinogenesis and diabetogenesis should be explored to make the optimal use of Se in human nutrition and health. PMID:23867154

  17. Dissolved organic matter kinetically controls mercury bioavailability to bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chiasson-Gould, Sophie A; Blais, Jules M; Poulain, Alexandre J

    2014-03-18

    Predicting the bioavailability of inorganic mercury (Hg) to bacteria that produce the potent bioaccumulative neurotoxin monomethylmercury remains one of the greatest challenges in predicting the environmental fate and transport of Hg. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) affects mercury methylation due to its influence on cell physiology (as a potential nutrient) and its influence on Hg(II) speciation in solution (as a complexing agent), therefore controlling Hg bioavailability. We assessed the role of DOM on Hg(II) bioavailability to a gram-negative bacterium bioreporter under oxic pseudo- and nonequilibrium conditions, using defined media and field samples spanning a wide range of DOM levels. Our results showed that Hg(II) was considerably more bioavailable under nonequilibrium conditions than when DOM was absent or when Hg(II) and DOM had reached pseudoequilibrium (24 h) prior to cell exposure. Under these enhanced uptake conditions, Hg(II) bioavailability followed a bell shaped curve as DOM concentrations increased, both for defined media and natural water samples, consistent with bioaccumulation results in a companion paper (this issue) observed for amphipods. Experiments also suggest that DOM may not only provide shuttle molecules facilitating Hg uptake, but also alter cell wall properties to facilitate the first steps toward Hg(II) internalization. We propose the existence of a short-lived yet critical time window (<24 h) during which DOM facilitates the entry of newly deposited Hg(II) into aquatic food webs, suggesting that the bulk of mercury incorporation in aquatic food webs would occur within hours following its deposition from the atmosphere. PMID:24524696

  18. Selenium in Gluten-free Products.

    PubMed

    Rybicka, Iga; Krawczyk, Magdalena; Stanisz, Ewa; Gliszczyńska-Świgło, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The nutritional value of gluten-free products is the subject of interest for food technologists and nutritionists, as the only effective treatment for celiac disease is a lifelong gluten-free diet. As selenium deficiencies in celiac disease are observed, the aim of the study was to determine the selenium content in 27 grain gluten-free products available on the European Union (EU) market. Moreover, selenium content in products based on popular gluten-free cereals like corn, rice, and buckwheat and in relatively new or less popular products based on oat, amaranth, teff, and quinoa was compared. Selenium content in the tested products ranged from 0.9 to 24.5 μg/100 g. The average content of selenium in products based on popular gluten-free cereals was 2.8 μg/100 g and in products based on oat, amaranth, teff, and quinoa was 10.8 μg/100 g. It indicates that products based on less popular grains, especially on oat, should be more frequently chosen as a source of selenium by people on gluten-free diet than traditionally consumed gluten-free grains. PMID:25690718

  19. Anticipated soil selenium concentrations at Kesterson Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.M.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Zawislanski, P.

    1992-10-01

    Temporal trends from soil monitoring data collected at Kesterson Reservoir have been reviewed to shed light on anticipated concentrations of total and water-extractable selenium in surface and subsurface soils. Based on these data, a mass balance model for selenium has been developed and employed to evaluate the rate of leaching, remobilization and volatilization that has occurred since the Reservoir was dried out in 1987. Results from a series of calibration runs were then extrapolated 25 years in the future to forecast the evolution and redistribution of selenium within the soil profile. Projected water-extractable selenium concentrations within the 0.15 to 1 m depth interval were then used to drive a food-chain based risk-assessment model described in a separate report (CH2M Hill, 1992). Inventories of water-extractable selenium in the root zone increased in 4 of the 5 scenarios investigated. However, predicted values for the average concentration of water-extractable selenium in the root zone fall within the range of values observed at Kesterson today. Consequences of these projected increases on wildlife residing in and around Kesterson are addressed in CH2M Hill (1992).

  20. Biological activity of selenium: Revisited.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Jagoda K; Power, Ronan; Toborek, Michal

    2016-02-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient that exerts multiple and complex effects on human health. Se is essential for human well-being largely due to its potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral properties. The physiological functions of Se are carried out by selenoproteins, in which Se is specifically incorporated as the amino acid, selenocysteine. Importantly, both beneficial and toxic effects of Se have been reported suggesting that the mode of action of Se is strictly chemical form and concentration dependent. Additionally, there is a relatively narrow window between Se deficiency and toxicity and growing evidence suggests that Se health effects depend greatly on the baseline level of this micronutrient. Thus, Se supplementation is not an easy task and requires an individualized approach. It is essential that we continue to explore and better characterize Se containing compounds and mechanisms of action, which could be crucial for disease prevention and treatment. PMID:26714931

  1. Thin film solar cells by selenization sulfurization using diethyl selenium as a selenium precursor

    DOEpatents

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Kadam, Ankur A.

    2009-12-15

    A method of forming a CIGSS absorber layer includes the steps of providing a metal precursor, and selenizing the metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form a selenized metal precursor layer (CIGSS absorber layer). A high efficiency solar cell includes a CIGSS absorber layer formed by a process including selenizing a metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form the CIGSS absorber layer.

  2. Updates on clinical studies of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To establish guidelines for the selenium supplementation in radiotherapy we assessed the benefits and risks of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy. Clinical studies on the use of selenium in radiotherapy were searched in the PubMed electronic database in January 2013. Sixteen clinical studies were identified among the 167 articles selected in the initial search. Ten articles were observational studies, and the other 6 articles reported studies on the effects of selenium supplementation in patients with cancer who underwent radiotherapy. The studies were conducted worldwide including European, American and Asian countries between 1987 and 2012. Plasma, serum or whole blood selenium levels were common parameters used to assess the effects of radiotherapy and the selenium supplementation status. Selenium supplementation improved the general conditions of the patients, improved their quality of life and reduced the side effects of radiotherapy. At the dose of selenium used in these studies (200–500 μg/day), selenium supplementation did not reduce the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and no toxicities were reported. Selenium supplementation may offer specific benefits for several types of cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy. Because high-dose selenium and long-term supplementation may be unsafe due to selenium toxicity, more evidence-based information and additional research are needed to ensure the therapeutic benefits of selenium supplementation. PMID:24885670

  3. Effect of selenium nanoparticles with different sizes in primary cultured intestinal epithelial cells of crucian carp, Carassius auratus gibelio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanbo; Yan, Xuxia; Fu, Linglin

    2013-01-01

    Nano-selenium (Se), with its high bioavailability and low toxicity, has attracted wide attention for its potential application in the prevention of oxidative damage in animal tissues. However, the effect of nano-Se of different sizes on the intestinal epithelial cells of the crucian carp (Carassius auratus gibelio) is poorly understood. Our study showed that different sizes and doses of nano-Se have varied effects on the cellular protein contents and the enzyme activities of secreted lactate dehydrogenase, intracellular sodium potassium adenosine triphosphatase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase. It was also indicated that nano-Se had a size-dependent effect on the primary intestinal epithelial cells of the crucian carp. Thus, these findings may bring us a step closer to understanding the size effect and the bioavailability of nano-Se on the intestinal tract of the crucian carp. PMID:24204137

  4. Effect of selenium nanoparticles with different sizes in primary cultured intestinal epithelial cells of crucian carp, Carassius auratus gibelio

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanbo; Yan, Xuxia; Fu, Linglin

    2013-01-01

    Nano-selenium (Se), with its high bioavailability and low toxicity, has attracted wide attention for its potential application in the prevention of oxidative damage in animal tissues. However, the effect of nano-Se of different sizes on the intestinal epithelial cells of the crucian carp (Carassius auratus gibelio) is poorly understood. Our study showed that different sizes and doses of nano-Se have varied effects on the cellular protein contents and the enzyme activities of secreted lactate dehydrogenase, intracellular sodium potassium adenosine triphosphatase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase. It was also indicated that nano-Se had a size-dependent effect on the primary intestinal epithelial cells of the crucian carp. Thus, these findings may bring us a step closer to understanding the size effect and the bioavailability of nano-Se on the intestinal tract of the crucian carp. PMID:24204137

  5. Selenium:mercury molar ratios in freshwater fish from Tennessee: individual, species, and geographical variations have implications for management.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, C; Donio, M; Pittfield, T

    2012-06-01

    Vertebrates, including humans, can experience adverse effects from mercury consumed in fish. Humans often prefer large predatory fish that bioaccumulate high mercury levels. Recent attention has focused on the role of selenium countering mercury toxicity, but there is little research on the selenium:mercury molar ratios in freshwater fish. We examine selenium:mercury molar ratios in freshwater fish from Tennessee at Poplar Creek which receives ongoing inputs of mercury from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Y-12 facility. Our objective was to determine variation of the ratios within species that might affect the protectiveness of selenium against mercury toxicity. Within species, the ratio was correlated significantly and positively with fish length only for two species. There was great individual variation in the selenium:mercury molar ratio within each species, except striped bass. The lack of a clear relationship between the selenium:mercury molar ratio and fish length, and the intraspecific variation, suggests that it would be difficult to use the molar ratio in predicting either the risk from mercury toxicity or in devising consumption advisories. PMID:22456727

  6. Selenium:Mercury Molar Ratios in Freshwater Fish from Tennessee: Individual, Species, and Geographical Variations have Implications for Management

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, C.; Donio, M.; Pittfield, T.

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrates, including humans, can experience adverse effects from mercury consumed in fish. Humans often prefer large predatory fish that bioaccumulate high mercury levels. Recent attention has focused on the role of selenium countering mercury toxicity, but there is little research on the selenium:mercury molar ratios in freshwater fish. We examine selenium:mercury molar ratios in freshwater fish from Tennessee at Poplar Creek which receives ongoing inputs of mercury from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Y-12 facility. Our objective was to determine variation of the ratios within species that might affect the protectiveness of selenium against mercury toxicity. Within species, the ratio was correlated significantly and positively with fish length only for two species. There was great individual variation in the selenium:mercury molar ratio within each species, except striped bass. The lack of a clear relationship between the selenium:mercury molar ratio and fish length, and the intraspecific variation, suggests that it would be difficult to use the molar ratio in predicting either the risk from mercury toxicity or in devising consumption advisories. PMID:22456727

  7. Bioavailability and biodistribution of nanodelivered lutein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) to enhance lutein bioavailability. The bioavailability of free lutein and PLGA-NP lutein in rats was assessed by determining plasma pharmacokinetics and deposition in selected tissues. Lutein ...

  8. Electrochemical behavior of chemically synthesized selenium thin film.

    PubMed

    Patil, A M; Kumbhar, V S; Chodankar, N R; Lokhande, A C; Lokhande, C D

    2016-05-01

    The facile and low cost simple chemical bath deposition (CBD) method is employed to synthesize red colored selenium thin films. These selenium films are characterized for structural, morphological, topographical and wettability studies. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed the crystalline nature of selenium thin film with hexagonal crystal structure. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study displays selenium nanoparticles ranging from 20 to 475nm. A specific surface area of 30.5m(2)g(-1) is observed for selenium nanoparticles. The selenium nanoparticles hold mesopores in the range of 1.39nm, taking benefits of the good physicochemical stability and excellent porosity. Subsequently, the electrochemical properties of selenium thin films are deliberated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The selenium thin film shows specific capacitance (Cs) of 21.98Fg(-1) with 91% electrochemical stability. PMID:26896773

  9. Geochemistry of selenium in a coastal salt marsh

    SciTech Connect

    Velinsky, D.J.; Cutter, G.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The cycling of sedimentary selenium was examined over a one-year period in the Great Marsh, Delaware (USA). While total selenium and elemental selenium decrease with depth in the sediments at similar rates, Se(IV + VI) exhibits pronounced seasonality related to the redox conditions of the marsh. Porewater selenium reflects the diagenetic cycling of Se(IV + VI) in the sediments and suggests that a partial remobilization of sedimentary selenium occurs when the upper sediments become oxidizing. Diagenetic and mass-balance models indicate that the major sources of selenium to the marsh are creek waters and atmospheric deposition, while total selenium may be removed from the sediments via the flux of volatile selenium compounds.

  10. The Nutraceutical Bioavailability Classification Scheme: Classifying Nutraceuticals According to Factors Limiting their Oral Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian; Li, Fang; Xiao, Hang

    2015-01-01

    The oral bioavailability of a health-promoting dietary component (nutraceutical) may be limited by various physicochemical and physiological phenomena: liberation from food matrices, solubility in gastrointestinal fluids, interaction with gastrointestinal components, chemical degradation or metabolism, and epithelium cell permeability. Nutraceutical bioavailability can therefore be improved by designing food matrices that control their bioaccessibility (B*), absorption (A*), and transformation (T*) within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). This article reviews the major factors influencing the gastrointestinal fate of nutraceuticals, and then uses this information to develop a new scheme to classify the major factors limiting nutraceutical bioavailability: the nutraceutical bioavailability classification scheme (NuBACS). This new scheme is analogous to the biopharmaceutical classification scheme (BCS) used by the pharmaceutical industry to classify drug bioavailability, but it contains additional factors important for understanding nutraceutical bioavailability in foods. The article also highlights potential strategies for increasing the oral bioavailability of nutraceuticals based on their NuBACS designation (B*A*T*). PMID:25705933

  11. Intestinal transport as a potential determinant of drug bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Nauli, Andromeda M; Nauli, Surya M

    2013-08-01

    Orally administered drugs are generally absorbed by the small intestine and transported either to the lymphatic system or to the hepatic portal system. In general, lipid soluble drugs and vitamins are transported by the small intestine to the lymphatics, and water-soluble drugs are transported to the hepatic portal system. By avoiding the early hepatic first pass effect, the lymphatic transport system may increase drug bioavailability. In addition to its transport systems, the small intestine may affect drug bioavailability through drug uptake, intestinal first pass effect, recruitment of drugs by chylomicrons, formation and secretion of chylomicrons, and enterohepatic circulation. All of these factors should be considered when formulating orally administered lipophilic drugs. Our data also suggest that Caco-2 cells may serve as a valuable in vitro model to study the intestinal transport of orally administered drugs. PMID:23343017

  12. A proteomic analysis of green and white sturgeon larvae exposed to heat stress and selenium

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre, Frédéric; Linares-Casenave, Javier; Doroshov, Serge I.; Kültz, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Temperature and selenium are two environmental parameters that potentially affect reproduction and stock recruitment of sturgeon in the San Francisco Bay / Delta Estuary. To identify proteins whose expression is modified by these environmental stressors, we performed a proteomic analysis on larval green and white sturgeons exposed to 18 or 26°C and micro-injected with Seleno-L-Methionine to reach 8 μg g-1 selenium body burden, with L-Methionine as a control. Selenium and high temperature induced mortalities and abnormal morphologies in both species, with a higher mortality in green sturgeon. Larval proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and differential abundances were detected following spot quantitation and hierarchical cluster analysis. In green sturgeon, 34 of 551 protein spots detected on gels showed a variation in abundance whereas in white sturgeon only 9 of 580 protein spots were differentially expressed (P<0.01). Gel replicates were first grouped according to heat treatment. Fifteen of these spots were identified using MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Proteins involved in protein folding, protein synthesis, protein degradation, ATP supply and structural proteins changed in abundance in response to heat and/or selenium. 40S ribosomal protein SA, FK506-binding protein 10, 65 kDa regulatory subunit A of protein phosphatase 2, protein disulfide isomerase, stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1, suppression of tumorigenicity 13 and collagen type II alpha 1, were differentially expressed in high temperature treatment only. Serine/arginine repetitive matrix protein 1, creatine kinase, serine peptidase inhibitor Kazal type 5 and HSP90 were sensitive to combined temperature and selenium exposure. Valosin-containing protein, a protein involved in aggresome formation and in protein quality control decreased more than 50% in response to selenium treatment. Potential use of such proteins as biomarkers of environmental stressors in larval sturgeons

  13. Effect of intraperitoneal selenium administration on liver glycogen levels in rats subjected to acute forced swimming.

    PubMed

    Akil, Mustafa; Bicer, Mursel; Kilic, Mehmet; Avunduk, Mustafa Cihat; Mogulkoc, Rasim; Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim

    2011-03-01

    There are a few of studies examining how selenium, which is known to reduce oxidative damage in exercise, influences glucose metabolism and exhaustion in physical activity. The present study aims to examine how selenium administration affects liver glycogen levels in rats subjected to acute swimming exercise. The study included 32 Sprague-Dawley type male rats, which were equally allocated to four groups: Group 1, general control; Group 2; selenium-supplemented control (6 mg/kg/day sodium selenite); Group 3, swimming control; Group 4, selenium-supplemented swimming (6 mg/kg/day sodium selenite). Liver tissue samples collected from the animals at the end of the study were fixed in 95% ethyl alcohol. From the tissue samples buried into paraffin, 5-µm cross-sections were obtained using a microtome, put on a microscope slide, and stained with PAS. Stained preparations were assessed using a Nikon Eclipse E400 light microscope. All images obtained with the light microscope were transferred to a PC and evaluated using Clemex PE 3.5 image analysis software. The highest liver glycogen levels were found in groups 1 and 2 (p < 0.05). The levels in group 4 were lower than those in groups 1 and 2 but higher than the levels in group 3 (p < 0.05). The lowest liver glycogen levels were obtained in group 3 (p < 0.05). Results of the study indicate that liver glycogen levels that decrease in acute swimming exercise can be restored by selenium administration. It can be argued that physiological doses of selenium administration can contribute to performance. PMID:20340052

  14. A proteomic analysis of green and white sturgeon larvae exposed to heat stress and selenium.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Frédéric; Linares-Casenave, Javier; Doroshov, Serge I; Kültz, Dietmar

    2010-07-15

    Temperature and selenium are two environmental parameters that potentially affect reproduction and stock recruitment of sturgeon in the San Francisco Bay/Delta Estuary. To identify proteins whose expression is modified by these environmental stressors, we performed a proteomic analysis on larval green and white sturgeons exposed to 18 or 26 degrees C and micro-injected with Seleno-L-Methionine to reach 8microgg(-)(1) selenium body burden, with L-Methionine as a control. Selenium and high temperature induced mortalities and abnormal morphologies in both species, with a higher mortality in green sturgeon. Larval proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and differential abundances were detected following spot quantitation and hierarchical cluster analysis. In green sturgeon, 34 of 551 protein spots detected on gels showed a variation in abundance whereas in white sturgeon only 9 of 580 protein spots were differentially expressed (P<0.01). Gel replicates were first grouped according to heat treatment. Fifteen of these spots were identified using MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Proteins involved in protein folding, protein synthesis, protein degradation, ATP supply and structural proteins changed in abundance in response to heat and/or selenium. 40S ribosomal protein SA, FK506-binding protein 10, 65kDa regulatory subunit A of protein phosphatase 2, protein disulfide isomerase, stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1, suppression of tumorigenicity 13 and collagen type II alpha 1, were differentially expressed in high temperature treatment only. Serine/arginine repetitive matrix protein 1, creatine kinase, serine peptidase inhibitor Kazal type 5 and HSP90 were sensitive to combined temperature and selenium exposure. Valosin-containing protein, a protein involved in aggresome formation and in protein quality control decreased more than 50% in response to selenium treatment. Potential use of such proteins as biomarkers of environmental stressors in larval

  15. Mercury and selenium in fish of Fountain Creek, Colorado (USA): possible sources and implications.

    PubMed

    Nimmo, D R; Herrmann, S J; Carsella, J S; McGarvy, C M; Foutz, H P; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M; Gregorich, J M; Turner, J A; Vanden Heuvel, B D

    2016-01-01

    Fountain Creek in Colorado USA is a major tributary that confluences with the Arkansas River at Pueblo, Colorado, the result being the tributary's influence on Arkansas River water quality affecting down-stream users. In a previous study, we found that bryophytes (aquatic plants) accumulated selenium in Fountain Creek watershed and this finding prompted us to investigate the extent of the metalloid in the whole-body tissues of fish. One hundred 11 fish (six species) were collected and analyzed for Se by inductively-coupled plasma emission mass spectrometry. Analysis of all analytical data also showed mercury in all of the fish whole bodies and selected tissues. There was a general increase in selenium but a decrease in mercury in fish with downstream travel-distance. The highest whole-body selenium was in Pueblo, Colorado (3393 µg/kg, dry weight; 906 µg/kg, wet weight); the highest mercury in fish was in the Monument Creek tributary north of Colorado Springs, Colorado (71 µg/kg, dry weight; 19 µg/kg, wet weight). In four tissues of 11 female fish captured, selenium was highest in the livers at eight sites but highest in the ovaries at three sites. Mercury was highest in the epaxial muscle at all sites. Selenium availability could be due to the watershed lithology and land uses; however, mercury could be carried by atmospheric deposition from coal-fired power plants and historic mining activities. Selenium in fish tissues and water samples were compared to U.S. national water quality criteria. PMID:27104125

  16. Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Glycemic Control and Lipid Profiles in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bahmani, Fereshteh; Kia, Mahsa; Soleimani, Alireza; Asemi, Zatollah; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    To our knowledge, data on the effects of selenium supplementation on glycemic control and lipid concentrations in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) are scarce. The current study was done to determine the effects of selenium supplementation on glycemic control and lipid concentrations in patients with DN. This was a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial in which 60 patients with DN were randomly allocated into two groups to receive either 200 μg of selenium supplements (n = 30) or placebo (n = 30) daily for 12 weeks. Blood sampling was performed for the quantification of glycemic indicators and lipid profiles at the onset of the study and after 12 weeks of intervention. Selenium supplementation for 12 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in serum insulin levels (P = 0.01), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (P = 0.02), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated B cell function (HOMA-B) (P = 0.009) and a significant rise in plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (P = 0.001) compared with the placebo. Taking selenium supplements had no significant effects on fasting plasma glucose (FPG), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and lipid profiles compared with the placebo. Overall, our study demonstrated that selenium supplementation for 12 weeks among patients with DN had beneficial effects on plasma GPx, serum insulin levels, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-B, while it did not affect FPG, QUICKI, and lipid profiles. PMID:26686847

  17. Avoidance of selenium-treated food by mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Sanderson, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    Adult, male mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were given a choice between a control diet and a diet containing 5, 10 or 20 ppm selenium as selenomethionine dissolved in water and mixed into the diet. At 10 and 20 ppm, selenium-treated diets were avoided. Avoidance appeared to be caused by a conditioned response, probably to illness caused by the selenium and not to an aversion to the taste of the selenium.

  18. Escherichia coli genes whose products are involved in selenium metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Leinfelder, W.; Forchhammer, K.; Zinoni, F.; Sawers, G.; Mandrand-Berthelot, M.A.; Boeck, A.

    1988-02-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli were isolated which were affected in the formation of both formate dehydrogenase N (phenazine methosulfate reducing) (FDN/sub N/) and formate dehydrogenase H (benzylviologen reducing) (FDH/sub H/). They were analyzed, together with previously characterized pleiotropic fdh mutants (fdhA, fdhB, and fdhC), for their ability to incorporate selenium into the selenopolypeptide subunits of FDH/sub N/ and FDH/sub H/. Results of this study support the notion that the pleiotropic fdh mutants analyzed possess a lesion in the gene(s) encoding the biosynthesis or the incorporation of selenocysteine. The gene complementing the defect in one of the isolated mutants was cloned from a cosmid library. Subclones were tested for complementation of other pleiotropic fdh mutants. The results revealed that the mutations in the eight isolates fell into two complementation groups, one of them containing the fdhA mutation. fdhB, fdhC, and two of the new fdh isolates do not belong to these complementation groups. A new nomenclature (sel) is proposed for pleiotropic fdh mutations affecting selenium metabolism. Four genes have been identified so far: selA and selB (at the fdhA locus), selC (previously fdhC), and selD (previously fdhB).

  19. Selenium toxicosis in a flock of Katahdin hair sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, B I; Donovan, G A; Rae, D O

    1999-01-01

    Selenium supplementation by injection is a common practice. Acute toxicosis from dosaging errors may occur. In this report, 23 of 56 ewes and all 24 lambs injected with selenium died. Tissue, whole blood, and serum concentrations aided in the diagnosis. Caution should be taken when supplementing selenium by injection. Images Figure 1. PMID:10086221

  20. 21 CFR 520.2100 - Selenium, vitamin E capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Selenium, vitamin E capsules. 520.2100 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2100 Selenium, vitamin... to 1 milligram of selenium) and 56.2 milligrams of vitamin E (68 I.U.) (as d-alpha tocopheryl...

  1. 21 CFR 520.2100 - Selenium, vitamin E capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Selenium, vitamin E capsules. 520.2100 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2100 Selenium, vitamin... to 1 milligram of selenium) and 56.2 milligrams of vitamin E (68 I.U.) (as d-alpha tocopheryl...

  2. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  3. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  4. 21 CFR 520.2100 - Selenium, vitamin E capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selenium, vitamin E capsules. 520.2100 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2100 Selenium, vitamin... to 1 milligram of selenium) and 56.2 milligrams of vitamin E (68 I.U.) (as d-alpha tocopheryl...

  5. 21 CFR 520.2100 - Selenium, vitamin E capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Selenium, vitamin E capsules. 520.2100 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2100 Selenium, vitamin... to 1 milligram of selenium) and 56.2 milligrams of vitamin E (68 I.U.) (as d-alpha tocopheryl...

  6. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  7. 21 CFR 522.2100 - Selenium, vitamin E injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Selenium, vitamin E injection. 522.2100 Section... § 522.2100 Selenium, vitamin E injection. (a)(1) Specifications. The drug is an emulsion containing in each milliliter, 5.48 milligrams sodium selenite (equivalent to 2.5 milligrams selenium), 50...

  8. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  9. 21 CFR 522.2100 - Selenium, vitamin E injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Selenium, vitamin E injection. 522.2100 Section... § 522.2100 Selenium, vitamin E injection. (a)(1) Specifications. The drug is an emulsion containing in each milliliter, 5.48 milligrams sodium selenite (equivalent to 2.5 milligrams selenium), 50...

  10. 21 CFR 520.2100 - Selenium, vitamin E capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Selenium, vitamin E capsules. 520.2100 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2100 Selenium, vitamin... to 1 milligram of selenium) and 56.2 milligrams of vitamin E (68 I.U.) (as d-alpha tocopheryl...

  11. 21 CFR 522.2100 - Selenium, vitamin E injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selenium, vitamin E injection. 522.2100 Section... § 522.2100 Selenium, vitamin E injection. (a)(1) Specifications. The drug is an emulsion containing in each milliliter, 5.48 milligrams sodium selenite (equivalent to 2.5 milligrams selenium), 50...

  12. 21 CFR 522.2100 - Selenium, vitamin E injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Selenium, vitamin E injection. 522.2100 Section... § 522.2100 Selenium, vitamin E injection. (a)(1) Specifications. The drug is an emulsion containing in each milliliter, 5.48 milligrams sodium selenite (equivalent to 2.5 milligrams selenium), 50...

  13. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  14. Dual functional selenium-substituted hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Ma, Jun; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Jin; Liu, Yonghui; Qiu, Zhiye; Zhang, Shengmin

    2012-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) doped with trace elements has attracted much attention recently owing to its excellent biological functions. Herein, we use a facile co-precipitation method to incorporate selenium into HA by adding sodium selenite during synthesis. The obtained selenium-substituted HA products are needle-like nanoparticles which have  size and crystallinity that are similar to those of the pure HA nanoparticles (HANs) when the selenium content is low. HANs are found to have the ability to induce the apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells, and the anti-tumour effects are enhanced after incorporation of selenium. Meanwhile, the nanoparticles can also support the growth of bone marrow stem cells. Furthermore, the flow cytometric results indicate that the apoptosis induction of osteosarcoma cells is caused by the increased reactive oxygen species and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. These results show that the selenium-substituted HANs are potentially promising bone graft materials in osteosarcoma treatment due to their dual functions of supporting normal cell growth and inducing tumour cell apoptosis. PMID:23741613

  15. Selenium in Camel – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Faye, Bernard; Seboussi, Rabiha

    2009-01-01

    Requirements for trace minerals in camels, particularly selenium, are not well-known. Selenium supplementation using a pharmaceutical form or commercial mineral mixture is common practice in camels to address the cardiomyopathy often attributed to selenium deficiency. This supplementation is often empirical and based on estimated needs for cattle. Nowadays the use of selenium in animal foodstuffs is commonplace and further investigation of its metabolism (ingestion, dynamic of storage-destocking, excretion) in camels is warranted. The present review aimed to synthesize all the experimental research (comparative selenium status in cow and camel, response to different levels of supplementation at different physiological stages, excretion maternal transfer, experimental toxicosis) and field observations (deficiency, supplementation practices) undertaken in camels. The results underline the particularity of the unique metabolic profile of the camel and lead to practical recommendations for supplementation in camels, highlighting its relative sensitivity to excess Se intake at lower levels than in cattle. The maximal tolerable dose is 8 mg and the recommended doses range from 2 to 4 mg. PMID:22253966

  16. Selenium and Prostate Cancer Prevention: Insights from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT)

    PubMed Central

    Nicastro, Holly L.; Dunn, Barbara K.

    2013-01-01

    The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) was conducted to assess the efficacy of selenium and vitamin E alone, and in combination, on the incidence of prostate cancer. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design clinical trial found that neither selenium nor vitamin E reduced the incidence of prostate cancer after seven years and that vitamin E was associated with a 17% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to placebo. The null result was surprising given the strong preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting chemopreventive activity of selenium. Potential explanations for the null findings include the agent formulation and dose, the characteristics of the cohort, and the study design. It is likely that only specific subpopulations may benefit from selenium supplementation; therefore, future studies should consider the baseline selenium status of the participants, age of the cohort, and genotype of specific selenoproteins, among other characteristics, in order to determine the activity of selenium in cancer prevention. PMID:23552052

  17. Is hepatic oxidative stress a main driver of dietary selenium toxicity in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus)?

    PubMed

    Zee, Jenna; Patterson, Sarah; Wiseman, Steve; Hecker, Markus

    2016-11-01

    Most species of sturgeon have experienced significant population declines and poor recruitment over the past decades, leading many, including white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), to be listed as endangered. Reasons for these declines are not yet fully understood but benthic lifestyle, longevity, and delayed sexual maturation likely render sturgeon particularly susceptible to factors such as habitat alteration and contaminant exposures. One contaminant of particular concern to white sturgeon is selenium (Se), especially in its more bioavailable form selenomethionine (SeMet), as it is known to efficiently bioaccumulate in prey items of this species. Studies have shown white sturgeon to be among the most sensitive species of fish to dietary SeMet as well as other pollutants such as metals, dioxin-like chemicals and endocrine disrupters. One of the primary hypothesized mechanisms of toxicity of SeMet in fish is oxidative stress; however, little is know about the specific mode by which SeMet affects the health of white sturgeon. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize oxidative stress and associated antioxidant responses as a molecular event of toxicity, and to link it with the pathological effects observed previously. Specifically, three-year-old white sturgeon were exposed for 72 days via their diet to 1.4, 5.6, 22.4 or 104.4µg Se per g feed (dm). Doses were chosen to range over a necessary Se intake level, current environmentally relevant intakes and an intake representing predicted increases of Se release. Lipid hydroperoxides, which are end products of lipid oxidation, were quantified as a marker of oxidative stress. Changes in gene expression of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase, apoptosis inducing factor and caspase 3 were quantified as markers of the response to oxidative stress. Concentrations of lipid hydroperoxides were highly variable within dose groups and no dose response was observed

  18. Comparing responses to different selenium sources and dosages in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Delezie, E; Rovers, M; Van der Aa, A; Ruttens, A; Wittocx, S; Segers, L

    2014-12-01

    Developing new sources of organic Se has potential benefit for animal production and human nutrition via animal-based foods enriched in Se. The objectives of this trial were to compare L-selenomethionine with another organic Se source, Se-enriched yeast (SelPlex 2300), and sodium selenite, an inorganic Se source, against a commercial control diet. The effect of source and the dosage of Se supplementation on Se in eggs and blood variables was investigated. Ten treatments were used with 18 laying hens per group. In addition to the control diet, the control diet was supplemented with L-selenomethionine, Se-enriched yeast, or sodium selenite at 0.1, 0.3, or 0.5 mg/kg of Se. The feeding trial lasted 8 wk. Birds in the different treatment groups all showed good performance. At d 0 and 56, Se and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were analyzed in 10 blood samples per group. After supplementing the diets for 56 d, significantly higher Se levels in serum and egg contents were reached for the Se-supplemented groups compared with the control. Supplementing 0.3 and 0.5 mg/kg of L-selenomethionine or Se-enriched yeast instead of 0.1 mg/kg significantly increased the serum Se levels, whereas no significant increase was found for sodium selenite. No effect of Se source or dosage was observed on serum GPx levels. Selenium in eggs was significantly affected by dosage and source of Se. The Se supplementation level in the feed was reflected in the eggs, with the highest and lowest values for 0.5 and 0.1 mg/kg, respectively, and values in between for the 0.3 mg/kg supplementation level. A dose response was most pronounced for L-selenomethionine, followed by Se-enriched yeast, and was least when Se was added as sodium selenite. It can be concluded that Se from organic sources was more bioavailable than the inorganic Se source as evidenced by blood and egg Se levels. Within the organic Se sources, L-selenomethionine showed higher Se transfer to eggs than Se-enriched yeast. PMID:25352676

  19. Sources and cycling of selenium in the western and equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutter, Gregory A.; Cutter, Lynda S.

    value (0.37 nM) was found in the area of weak equatorial upwelling. In contrast, selenite was quite low in the southern hemisphere (0.06 nM) and had its highest concentrations in the equatorial region and under the Intertropical Convergence Zone (0.11 nM). The higher selenite concentrations corresponded to surface waters, which had elevated aluminum levels due to the input of North African dust. While selenium is not enriched in mineral aerosols themselves, air masses from Europe can be entrained in those leaving North Africa, enriching selenium as a consequence. The estimate of atmospheric deposition of selenium to the equatorial Atlantic is ca. 10×10 6 mol yr -1, while relatively low selenium concentrations in the Amazon River (0.48 nM) only deliver ca. 2×10 6 mol yr -1. Atmospheric selenium inputs dominate fluxes to the equatorial Atlantic, but these and Amazonian inputs profoundly affect the distribution and speciation of selenium in this region.

  20. Potential Moderating Effects of Selenium on Mercury Uptake and Selenium:Mercury Molar Ratios in Fish From Oak Ridge and Savannah River Site - 12086

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Donio, Mark; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn

    2012-07-01

    Mercury contamination is an important remediation issue at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and to a lesser extent at other DOE sites because of the hazard it presents, potential consequences to humans and eco-receptors, and completed pathways, to offsite receptors. Recent work has emphasized that selenium might ameliorate the toxicity of mercury, and we examine the selenium:mercury (Se:Hg) molar ratios in fish from Oak Ridge, and compare them to Se:Hg molar ratios in fish from the Savannah River. Selenium/mercury molar ratios varied considerably among and within fish species. There was considerable variation in the molar ratios for individual fish (as opposed to mean ratios by species) for freshwater fish from both sites. The inter-individual variation in molar ratios indicates that such that the molar ratios of mean Se and Hg concentrations may not be representative. Even for fish species with relatively low mercury levels, some individual fish have molar ratios less than unity, the value sometime thought to be protective. Selenium levels varied narrowly regardless of fish size, consistent with homeostatic regulation of this essential trace element. The data indicate that considerable attention will need to be directed toward variations and variances, as well as the mechanisms of the interaction of selenium and mercury, before risk assessment and risk management policies can use this information to manage mercury pollution and risk. Even so, if there are high levels of selenium in the fish from Poplar Creek on Oak Ridge, then the potential exists for some amelioration of adverse health effects, on the fish themselves, predators that eat them, and people who consume them. This work will aid DOE because it will allow managers and scientists to understand another aspect that affects fate and transport of mercury, as well as the potential effects of methylmercury in fish for human and ecological receptors. The variability within fish

  1. Loss of selenium-binding protein 1 decreases sensitivity to clastogens and intracellular selenium content in HeLa cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1) is not a selenoprotein but structurally binds selenium. Loss of SBP1 during carcinogenesis usually predicts poor prognosis. Because genome instability is a hallmark of cancer, we hypothesized that loss of SBP1 modulates cellular selenium content and the response of ...

  2. Spectrochemical method for the determination of selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waring, C.L.; Worthing, H.W.; Hazel, K.V.

    1958-01-01

    Selenium can be determined in pyrite, chalcocite, and marcasite by a simple and rapid spectrochemical method that requires no complicated arrangement of spectrographic equipment or chemical pretreatment of samples. Advantage is taken of the new short wave length radiation plates (Eastman) and the addition of copper oxide to enhance the selenium lines 2039.85 and 2062.78 A. The possibility exists of determining many other elements on the same exposure of the sample. The method is applicable in the range of 0.0015 to 2% selenium. Tests indicate an average difference from the chemical results of 0.07% in the few per cent range, 0.03% in the 0.1 to 1.0% range, 0.005% in the 0.01 to 0.1% range, and 0.00075% in the 0.001 to 0.01% range. The relative accuracy over the entire range is to about 7% of the concentration.

  3. Synthesis of selenium particles with various morphologies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajeet; Sevonkaev, Igor; Goia, Dan V

    2014-02-15

    Uniform selenium spherical particles were prepared by reducing selenous acid with hydroquinone in the presence of Daxad 11G. The red colored colloidal dispersions displayed a distinct plasmon band at ~612 nm and were stable for extended time due to the negative surface potential of the particles. Structural analyses indicated that the Se spheres were aggregates of nanosize subunits crystallized in the hexagonal system. Selenium wires and rods were obtained by changing the pH and the composition of the precipitated dispersions and incubating them for extended time at moderate temperatures. The addition of a co-solvent played a major role in the re-crystallization of selenium spheres into anisotropic structures. PMID:24370410

  4. Investigation of electrical noise in selenium-immersed thermistor bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarpley, J. L.; Sarmiento, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    The selenium immersed, thermistor bolometer, IR detector failed due to spurious and escalating electrical noise outburst as a function of time at elevated temperatures during routine ground based testing in a space simulated environment. Spectrographic analysis of failed bolometers revealed selenium pure zones in the insulating selenium arsenic (Se-As) glass film which surrounds the active sintered Mn, Ni, Co oxide flake. The selenium pure film was identified as a potentially serious failure mechanism. Significant changes were instituted in the manufacturing techniques along with more stringent process controls which eliminated the selenium pure film and successfully produced 22study bolometers.

  5. Temporal variations in dissolved selenium in Lake Kinneret (Israel)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishri, A.; Brenner, I.B.; Hall, G.E.M.; Taylor, H.E.

    1999-01-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient for the growth of the dinoflagellate Peridinium gatunense that dominates the spring algal bloom in Lake Kinneret (LK). The relationship between the levels of dissolved selenium species and the occurance of algal blooms in this lake was studied. During algal blooms of P. gatunense in spring and of the blue-green Aphanizomenon ovalisporum in fall (in 1994) the concentration of epilimnetic dissolved organic Se (Se(org)) increased whereas that of selenite (SeIV) decreased, to levels below the limit of detection: 5 ng/l. The disappearance of SeIV during these blooms is attributed to algal uptake and it is suggested that the growth of both algae may have depended on Se(org) regeneration. A budget performed for selenate (SeVI) suggests that this species is also consumed by algae but to a lesser extent than SeIV (in 1994 ~40% of the epilimnetic load). During the stratification period the hypolimnion of Lake Kinneret becomes anoxic, with high levels of dissolved sulfide. The affects of this environment on the distribution of Se oxy-anions, selenite (SeIV) and selenate(SeVI), were also studied. At the onset of thermal stratification (March) about 35% of the lake inventory of both Se oxidized species are entrapped in the hypolimnion. During stages of oxygen depletion and H2S accumulation, SeIV is completely and SeVI partially removed from this layer. The removal is attributed to reduction followed by formation of particulate reduced products, such as elemental selenium Se(o). The ratio between SeVI to total dissolved selenium (SE(T)) in water sources to the lake is ~0.84, about twice the corresponding ratio in the lake (~0.44, during holomixis). In the lake about 75% of annual SeVI inflow from external sources undergoes reduction to selenide (Se-II) and Se(o) through epilimnetic algal assimilation and hypolimnetic anoxic reduction, respectively. It is suggested that the latter oxidation of the dissolved organic selenide released from

  6. Towards bioavailability-based soil criteria: past, present and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Ravi; Channey, Rufus; McConnell, Stuart; Johnston, Niall; Semple, Kirk T; McGrath, Steve; Dries, Victor; Nathanail, Paul; Harmsen, Joop; Pruszinski, Andrew; MacMillan, Janet; Palanisami, Thavamani

    2015-06-01

    Bioavailability has been used as a key indicator in chemical risk assessment yet poorly quantified risk factor. Worldwide, the framework used to assess potentially contaminated sites is similar, and the decisions are based on threshold contaminant concentration. The uncertainty in the definition and measurement of bioavailability had limited its application to environment risk assessment and remediation. Last ten years have seen major developments in bioavailability research and acceptance. The use of bioavailability in the decision making process as one of the key variables has led to a gradual shift towards a more sophisticated risk-based approach. Now a days, many decision makers and regulatory organisations 'more readily accept' this concept. Bioavailability should be the underlying basis for risk assessment and setting remediation goals of those contaminated sites that pose risk to environmental and human health. This paper summarises the potential application of contaminant bioavailability and bioaccessibility to the assessment of sites affected by different contaminants, and the potential for this to be the underlying basis for sustainable risk assessment and remediation in Europe, North America and Australia over the coming decade. PMID:23519481

  7. Bioavailability enhancement by addition of surfactant and surfactant-like compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    The bioavailability and microbial degradation of contaminant compounds (e.g., toluene and naphthalene) were enhanced by adding synthetic surfactants, biosurfactants, and nutrients with surfactant like properties. In addition to enhanced contaminant degradation, these surfactant compounds have the potential to change the availability of natural organic matter (NOM), and thus may affect overall site bioremediation. Two bacterial bioreporter strains that are induced by toluene or naphthalene were used to directly measure contaminant bioavailability. A cell-free biosurfactant product, Tween-80, and an oleophilic fertilizer were added to aqueous suspensions and soil slurries containing toluene or naphthalene. The addition of these surfactant compounds at or below the critical micelle concentration (CMC) enhanced bioavailability as measured by increased levels of bioluminescence. Bioluminescence data were coupled with gas chromatographic analyses. The addition of Tween-80 increased not only the bioavailability of the contaminants but also, in a separate assay, the bioavailability of recalcitrant NOM. The enhanced NOM bioavailability was inferred from measurements of biomass by optical density increases and plate counts. Thus, adding surfactant compounds for enhanced contaminant degradation has the potential to introduce additional competition for nutrients and microbial metabolism, a significant area of concern for in situ site remediation.

  8. Encapsulation and micronization effectively improve orange beverage flavanone bioavailability in humans.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Navarro, María; Vallejo, Fernando; Borrego, Francisco; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2014-10-01

    The effect of hesperidin encapsulation and particle size reduction on hesperetin bioavailability was assessed after the intake of orange flavanone beverages. Hesperidin micronization (5.1 μm) increased flavanone's bioavailability 2-fold compared to conventional hesperidin (32.8 μm). Gum Arabic encapsulated hesperidin, with enhanced dispersion in water, also showed increased bioavailability despite having a higher particle size than conventional hesperidin (74.2 μm), showing that flavanone dispersion also enhances its bioavailability. The bioavailability of micronized hesperetin was also evaluated to overcome the need for gut microbiota rhamnosidase hydrolysis. When volunteers were stratified for their flavanone excretion capability, differences among treatments were better observed. The treatments used to increase solubility and decrease particle size to facilitate the interaction with intestinal cells and gut microbiota enhanced bioavailabilty especially in high (9.2 ± 1.5 mg) and medium (5.5 ± 0.3 mg) flavanone excretors. On the contrary, micronized hesperetin bioavailability was particularly high in the case of low excretors (4.3 ± 0.6 mg), showing that the low excretion in these volunteers should be associated with the lack of the appropriate microbiota to release hesperetin from hesperidin. Not all of the low excretors, however, reached the excretion levels of high excretors when hesperetin was supplied, suggesting that differences in intestinal transporters of the volunteers could also affect the flavanone excretion rates observed. PMID:25200135

  9. Selenium speciation in ground water. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Atalay, A.

    1990-07-10

    Selenium toxicity diseases in animals may occur when the intake exceeds 4 mg/kg and selenium deficiency symptoms may occur when dietary intake is less than 0.04 mg/kg. Since the selenium dietary requirement is very close to toxic concentration, it is important to understand the distribution of selenium in the environment. Selenium occurs in four oxidation states (-II, 0, +IV, and +VI) as selenide, elemental selenium, selenite and selenate. Selenate is reported as more soluble and less adsorbed than selenite. Selenate is more easily leached from soils and is the most available form for plants. Increased mobility of Se into the environment via anthropogenic activities, and the potential oxidation-reduction behavior of the element have made it imperative to study the aquatic chemistry of Se. For this purpose, Se species are divided into two different categories: dissolved Se (in material that passes through filters with 0.45 u openings) and particulate Se (in material of particle size > 0.45 mm) typically suspended sediment and other suspended solids. Element and colloidal phase, not truly dissolved, but passing through the filter is deemed to consist of selenium (-2,0). In dissolved state selenium may exist in three of its four oxidation states; Se(-II), Se(+IV), and Se(+VI). Particulate Se may exist in the same oxidation states as dissolved Se and can be found in different phases of the particulate matter. In sediments, Se may be within the organic material, iron and manganese oxides, carbonates or other mineral phases. The actual chemical forms of Se may be adsorbed to or coprecipitated with these phases (primarily selenite, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) and selenate, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Selenide, Se(-II), can be covalently bound in the organic portion of a sediment. In addition, Se may be found in anoxic sediments as insoluble metal selenide precipitates, an insoluble elemental Se or as ferroselite (FeSe{sub 2}) and Se containing pyrite.

  10. Lycopene bioavailability is associated with a combination of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Borel, Patrick; Desmarchelier, Charles; Nowicki, Marion; Bott, Romain

    2015-06-01

    The intake of tomatoes and tomato products, which constitute the main dietary source of the red pigment lycopene (LYC), has been associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease, suggesting a protective role of this carotenoid. However, LYC bioavailability displays high interindividual variability. This variability may lead to varying biological effects following LYC consumption. Based on recent results obtained with two other carotenoids, we assumed that this variability was due, at least in part, to several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in LYC and lipid metabolism. Thus, we aimed at identifying a combination of SNPs significantly associated with the variability in LYC bioavailability. In a postprandial study, 33 healthy male volunteers consumed a test meal containing 100g tomato puree, which provided 9.7 mg all-trans LYC. LYC concentrations were measured in plasma chylomicrons (CM) isolated at regular time intervals over 8 h postprandially. For the study 1885 SNPs in 49 candidate genes, i.e., genes assumed to play a role in LYC bioavailability, were selected. Multivariate statistical analysis (partial least squares regression) was used to identify and validate the combination of SNPs most closely associated with postprandial CM LYC response. The postprandial CM LYC response to the meal was notably variable with a CV of 70%. A significant (P=0.037) and validated partial least squares regression model, which included 28 SNPs in 16 genes, explained 72% of the variance in the postprandial CM LYC response. The postprandial CM LYC response was also positively correlated to fasting plasma LYC concentrations (r=0.37, P<0.05). The ability to respond to LYC is explained, at least partly, by a combination of 28 SNPs in 16 genes. Interindividual variability in bioavailability apparently affects the long-term blood LYC status, which could ultimately modulate the biological response following LYC supplementation. PMID

  11. Bioavailability of atrazine, pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene in European river waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akkanen, J.; Penttinen, S.; Haitzer, M.; Kukkonen, J.V.K.

    2001-01-01

    Thirteen river waters and one humic lake water were characterized. The effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the bioavailability of atrazine, pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) was evaluated. Binding of the chemicals by DOM was analyzed with the equilibrium dialysis technique. For each of the water samples, 24 h bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of the chemicals were measured in Daphnia magna. The relationship between DOM and other water characteristics (including conductivity, water hardness and pH), and bioavailability of the chemicals was studied by performing several statistical analyses, including multiple regression analyses, to determine how much of the variation of BCF values could be explained by the quantity and quality of DOM. The bioavailability of atrazine was not affected by DOM or any other water characteristics. Although equilibrium dialysis showed binding of pyrene to DOM, the bioavailability of pyrene was not significantly affected by DOM. The bioavailability of B[a]P was significantly affected by both the quality and quantity of DOM. Multiple regression analyses, using the quality (ABS270 and HbA%) and quantity of DOM as variables, explainedup to 70% of the variation in BCF of B[a]P in the waters studied. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sewage sludge as a source of environmental selenium.

    PubMed

    Cappon, C J

    1991-03-01

    Information is presented on the impact of land application of municipal sewage sludge on the selenium content and speciation in soil, groundwater and edible vegetation. Sources and typical concentrations of selenium in sludge are documented. A discussion of selenium uptake by agricultural crops from sludge-amended soil includes results from greenhouse and field studies. A comparison is made with crop selenium uptake from fly ash application. The effect of sludge treatment on animal and human dietary selenium intake is quantitatively evaluated and selenium guidelines for sludge application are summarized. The conclusion is made that future widespread use of sludge on agricultural land will result in increased selenium uptake by food crops and human dietary intake. While this may not present an increased human health risk, long-term risks are identified and recommendations are made to minimize them. PMID:2063182

  13. Detailed study of selenium and other constituents in water, bottom sediment, soil, alfalfa, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Uncompahgre Project area and in the Grand Valley, west-central Colorado, 1991-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, D.L.; Wright, W.G.; Stewart, K.C.; Osmundson, B.C.; Krueger, R.P.; Crabtree, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    In 1985, the U.S. Department of the Interior began a program to study the effects of irrigation drainage in the Western United States. These studies were done to determine whether irrigation drainage was causing problems related to human health, water quality, and fish and wildlife resources. Results of a study in 1991-93 of irrigation drainage associated with the Uncompahgre Project area, located in the lower Gunnison River Basin, and of the Grand Valley, located along the Colorado River, are described in this report. The focus of the report is on the sources, distribution, movement, and fate of selenium in the hydrologic and biological systems and the effects on biota. Generally, other trace- constituent concentrations in water and biota were not elevated or were not at levels of concern. Soils in the Uncompahgre Project area that primarily were derived from Mancos Shale contained the highest concentrations of total and watrer-extractable selenium. Only 5 of 128\\x11alfalfa samples had selenium concentrations that exceeded a recommended dietary limit for livestock. Selenium data for soil and alfalfa indicate that irrigation might be mobilizing and redistributing selenium in the Uncompahgre Project area. Distribution of dissolved selenium in ground water is affected by the aqueous geochemical environment of the shallow ground- water system. Selenium concentrations were as high as 1,300\\x11micrograms per liter in water from shallow wells. The highest concentrations of dissolved selenium were in water from wells completed in alluvium overlying the Mancos Shale of Cretaceous age; selenium concentrations were lower in water from wells completed in Mancos Shale residuum. Selenium in the study area could be mobilized by oxidation of reduced selenium, desorption from aquifer sediments, ion exchange, and dissolution. Infiltration of irrigation water and, perhaps nitrate, provide oxidizing conditions for mobilization of selenium from alluvium and shale residuum and for

  14. Characterizing the toxicity of pulsed selenium exposure to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Klaine, Stephen J

    2008-03-01

    The acute toxicity of selenium (Se) to aquatic biota has been studied extensively for decades. However, most studies have used a constant concentration aqueous exposure of Se to an invertebrate species. Since constant concentration exposure of toxicants to invertebrates is unusual in the environment, episodic exposure or pulsed exposures may represent true risk to aquatic biota more accurately. This research was designed to characterize the toxicity effects of pulsed Se exposure to Daphnia magna. Selenium exposure was varied during a 21-d chronic toxicity test to examine the effects of exposure concentration, duration, and recovery on survival, growth, and reproduction of D. magna. While D. magna did not die during exposures, latent mortality was observed. Latent mortality increased with exposure concentration and duration. Hence, standard toxicity test using continuous exposures would underestimate Se toxicity. Risk assessment method using results of continuous exposure would underestimate risk of Se to biota. For double-pulse exposures, cumulative mortality on day 21 was higher when time interval between pulses was shorter. With the same total exposure time, continuous exposure caused higher toxicity than did pulsed exposures due to recovery and tolerance development in D. magna after earlier pulses. Growth and reproduction of surviving D. magna were not affected by pulsed Se exposure due to recovery of D. magna after removal of the pulses. Based on these results, risk assessment for Se should take latent effects and the effect of recovery in to account. PMID:18190947

  15. Influences of fiber, methionine and form of selenium on selenium hindgut targeting and tissue accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased selenium (Se) status has beneficial outcomes, including decreased colorectal cancer risk, yet obesity may interfere with Se metabolism. Commensal bacteria can influence colon carcinogenesis and Se influences the microbiome, including production of volatile fatty acids by these microbes. We...

  16. BIOAVAILABILITY OF HALOACETATES IN HUMAN SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to characterize the absorption, disposition and oral bioavailability of chlorinated and brominated haloacetates in human volunteers after consumption of drinking water containing a natural mixture of these compounds. We hypothesize that accurat...

  17. Extracellular polymeric substances govern the surface charge of biogenic elemental selenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohan; Jordan, Norbert; Weiss, Stephan; Foerstendorf, Harald; Heim, Karsten; Kacker, Rohit; Hübner, René; Kramer, Herman; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Farges, François; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-02-01

    The origin of the organic layer covering colloidal biogenic elemental selenium nanoparticles (BioSeNPs) is not known, particularly in the case when they are synthesized by complex microbial communities. This study investigated the presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on BioSeNPs. The role of EPS in capping the extracellularly available BioSeNPs was also examined. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and colorimetric measurements confirmed the presence of functional groups characteristic of proteins and carbohydrates on the BioSeNPs, suggesting the presence of EPS. Chemical synthesis of elemental selenium nanoparticles in the presence of EPS, extracted from selenite fed anaerobic granular sludge, yielded stable colloidal spherical selenium nanoparticles. Furthermore, extracted EPS, BioSeNPs, and chemically synthesized EPS-capped selenium nanoparticles had similar surface properties, as shown by ζ-potential versus pH profiles and isoelectric point measurements. This study shows that the EPS of anaerobic granular sludge form the organic layer present on the BioSeNPs synthesized by these granules. The EPS also govern the surface charge of these BioSeNPs, thereby contributing to their colloidal properties, hence affecting their fate in the environment and the efficiency of bioremediation technologies. PMID:25536371

  18. Micro-spectroscopic investigation of selenium-bearing minerals from the Western US Phosphate Resource Area

    PubMed Central

    Ryser, Amy L; Strawn, Daniel G; Marcus, Matthew A; Johnson-Maynard, Jodi L; Gunter, Mickey E; Möller, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Mining activities in the US Western Phosphate Resource Area (WPRA) have released Se into the environment. Selenium has several different oxidation states and species, each having varying degrees of solubility, reactivity, and bioavailability. In this study we are investigating the speciation of Se in mine-waste rocks. Selenium speciation was determined using bulk and micro-x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), as well as micro-x-ray fluorescence mapping. Rocks used for bulk-XAS were ground into fine powders. Shale used for micro-XAS was broken along depositional planes to expose unweathered surfaces. The near edge region of the XAS spectra (XANES) for the bulk rock samples revealed multiple oxidation states, with peaks indicative of Se(-II), Se(IV), and Se(+VI) species. Micro-XANES analysis of the shale indicated that three unique Se-bearing species were present. Using the XANES data together with ab initio fitting of the extended x-ray absorption fine structure region of the micro-XAS data (micro-EXAFS) the three Se-bearing species were identified as dzharkenite, a di-selenide carbon compound, and Se-substituted pyrite. Results from this research will allow for a better understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of Se in the WPRA.

  19. Selenium or no selenium--that is the question in tumor patients: a new controversy.

    PubMed

    Muecke, Ralph; Schomburg, Lutz; Buentzel, Jens; Kisters, Klaus; Micke, Oliver

    2010-06-01

    The essential trace element selenium, which is a crucial cofactor in the most important endogenous antioxidative systems of the human body, is attracting more attention from both laypersons and expert groups. The interest of oncologists mainly focuses on the following clinical aspects: protection of normal tissues, sensitizing in malignant tumors, antiedematous effect, prognostic impact of selenium, and effects in primary and secondary cancer prevention. Selenium is a constituent of the small group of selenocysteine-containing selenoproteins and elicits important structural and enzymatic functions. Selenium deficiency has been linked to increased infection risk and adverse mood states. It has been shown to possess cancer-preventive and cytoprotective activities in both animal models and humans. It is well established that it has a key role in redox regulation and antioxidant function, and hence in membrane integrity, energy metabolism, and protection against DNA damage. Recent clinical trials have shown the importance of selenium in clinical oncology. In 2009, a significant benefit of sodium selenite supplementation-with no protection of tumor cells, which is often suspected by oncologists- was shown in a prospective randomized trial in gynecologic cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. More recently, concerns arose from 2 large clinical prevention trials (NPC, SELECT) that selenium may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Despite obvious flaws in both studies and good counterarguments, controversy remains on the possible advantages and risks of selenium in cancer prevention. However, in the light of the recent clinical trials the potential benefits of selenium supplementation in tumor patients are becoming obvious, even though further research is needed. PMID:20462857

  20. High-resolution imaging of selenium in kidneys: a localized selenium pool associated with glutathione peroxidase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Malinouski, M.; Kehr, S.; Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; Carlson, B.A.; Seravalli, J.; Jin, R.; Handy, D.E.; Park, T.J.; Loscalzo, J.; Hatfield, D.L.; Gladyshev, V.N.

    2012-04-17

    Recent advances in quantitative methods and sensitive imaging techniques of trace elements provide opportunities to uncover and explain their biological roles. In particular, the distribution of selenium in tissues and cells under both physiological and pathological conditions remains unknown. In this work, we applied high-resolution synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map selenium distribution in mouse liver and kidney. Liver showed a uniform selenium distribution that was dependent on selenocysteine tRNA{sup [Ser]Sec} and dietary selenium. In contrast, kidney selenium had both uniformly distributed and highly localized components, the latter visualized as thin circular structures surrounding proximal tubules. Other parts of the kidney, such as glomeruli and distal tubules, only manifested the uniformly distributed selenium pattern that co-localized with sulfur. We found that proximal tubule selenium localized to the basement membrane. It was preserved in Selenoprotein P knockout mice, but was completely eliminated in glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) knockout mice, indicating that this selenium represented GPx3. We further imaged kidneys of another model organism, the naked mole rat, which showed a diminished uniformly distributed selenium pool, but preserved the circular proximal tubule signal. We applied XFM to image selenium in mammalian tissues and identified a highly localized pool of this trace element at the basement membrane of kidneys that was associated with GPx3. XFM allowed us to define and explain the tissue topography of selenium in mammalian kidneys at submicron resolution.

  1. The effect of consumption of selenium enriched rye/wheat sourdough bread on the body's selenium status.

    PubMed

    Bryszewska, Malgorzata A; Ambroziak, Wojciech; Langford, Nicola J; Baxter, Malcolm J; Colyer, Alison; Lewis, D John

    2007-09-01

    The potential of selenium-enriched rye/wheat sourdough bread as a route for supplementing dietary selenium intakes is reported. In addition to their normal diets, 24 female volunteers (24 to 25 years old) were fed either selenium-enriched bread or non-enriched bread each day (68.02 and 0.84 microg selenium day(-1) respectively) for 4 weeks. The chemical form of the selenium in the bread had been characterised using HPLC-ICP-MS, which showed that 42% of the extractable selenium was present as selenomethionine. Plasma selenium levels and plasma platelet glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) activity were measured in the volunteers' blood over a 6-week period. A statistically significant difference (p = 0.001) was observed in the mean percentage change data, calculated from the plasma selenium level measurements for the enriched and control group, over the duration of the study. A comparable difference was not observed for the platelet GPx1 activity (p = 0.756), over the same period. Two weeks after cessation of the feeding stage, i.e., at t = 6 weeks, the mean percentage change value for the selenium plasma levels in the enriched group was still significantly elevated, suggesting that the absorbed selenium had been incorporated into the body's selenium reserves, and was then being slowly released back into the volunteers' blood. PMID:17721822

  2. High-Resolution Imaging of Selenium in Kidneys: A Localized Selenium Pool Associated with Glutathione Peroxidase 3

    PubMed Central

    Malinouski, Mikalai; Kehr, Sebastian; Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; Carlson, Bradley A.; Seravalli, Javier; Jin, Richard; Handy, Diane E.; Park, Thomas J.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Recent advances in quantitative methods and sensitive imaging techniques of trace elements provide opportunities to uncover and explain their biological roles. In particular, the distribution of selenium in tissues and cells under both physiological and pathological conditions remains unknown. In this work, we applied high-resolution synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map selenium distribution in mouse liver and kidney. Results: Liver showed a uniform selenium distribution that was dependent on selenocysteine tRNA[Ser]Sec and dietary selenium. In contrast, kidney selenium had both uniformly distributed and highly localized components, the latter visualized as thin circular structures surrounding proximal tubules. Other parts of the kidney, such as glomeruli and distal tubules, only manifested the uniformly distributed selenium pattern that co-localized with sulfur. We found that proximal tubule selenium localized to the basement membrane. It was preserved in Selenoprotein P knockout mice, but was completely eliminated in glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) knockout mice, indicating that this selenium represented GPx3. We further imaged kidneys of another model organism, the naked mole rat, which showed a diminished uniformly distributed selenium pool, but preserved the circular proximal tubule signal. Innovation: We applied XFM to image selenium in mammalian tissues and identified a highly localized pool of this trace element at the basement membrane of kidneys that was associated with GPx3. Conclusion: XFM allowed us to define and explain the tissue topography of selenium in mammalian kidneys at submicron resolution. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 185–192. PMID:21854231

  3. Bioavailability of intramuscularly administered tenoxicam.

    PubMed

    Stebler, T; Guentert, T W

    1993-08-01

    Bioavailability of intramuscularly administered tenoxicam relative to single oral and relative to intravenous doses was determined in two separate randomized crossover studies. Twelve healthy volunteers (12 males, age 20-30 years) received a rapid intravenous injection and a single intramuscular dose and 12 other subjects (11 males, 1 female, age 21-25 years) a single oral and a single intramuscular dose of 20 mg of tenoxicam on two different occasions. The wash-out period between the two consecutive treatments was 4 weeks. Plasma concentrations after dosing were determined by a specific HPLC method. Differences in tenoxicam concentration-time profiles after the different routes of administration were limited to the first 2 h after dosing. Later, plasma concentrations were almost superimposable within and across the two studies. The extent of absorption of intramuscularly administered tenoxicam was complete (mean +/- CV per cent: F(abs) 0.99 +/- 20 per cent) with no difference between the two extravascular administrations (F(rel) 0.95 +/- 10 per cent, intramuscular vs oral). After intramuscular administration tenoxicam was more rapidly absorbed compared to the oral dose (Tmax 0.71 h +/- 80 per cent vs 1.4 h +/- 62 per cent; p > 0.05). Peak concentrations after oral and intramuscular administration (Cmax 2.5 mg l-1 +/- 19 per cent vs 2.7 mg l-1 +/- 14 per cent; p < 0.05) were very similar. PMID:8218966

  4. Selenium exposure results in reduced reproduction in an invasive ant species and altered competitive behavior for a native ant species.

    PubMed

    De La Riva, Deborah G; Trumble, John T

    2016-06-01

    Competitive ability and numerical dominance are important factors contributing to the ability of invasive ant species to establish and expand their ranges in new habitats. However, few studies have investigated the impact of environmental contamination on competitive behavior in ants as a potential factor influencing dynamics between invasive and native ant species. Here we investigated the widespread contaminant selenium to investigate its potential influence on invasion by the exotic Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, through effects on reproduction and competitive behavior. For the fecundity experiment, treatments were provided to Argentine ant colonies via to sugar water solutions containing one of three concentrations of selenium (0, 5 and 10 μg Se mL(-1)) that fall within the range found in soil and plants growing in contaminated areas. Competition experiments included both the Argentine ant and the native Dorymyrmex bicolor to determine the impact of selenium exposure (0 or 15 μg Se mL(-1)) on exploitation- and interference-competition between ant species. The results of the fecundity experiment revealed that selenium negatively impacted queen survival and brood production of Argentine ants. Viability of the developing brood was also affected in that offspring reached adulthood only in colonies that were not given selenium, whereas those in treated colonies died in their larval stages. Selenium exposure did not alter direct competitive behaviors for either species, but selenium exposure contributed to an increased bait discovery time for D. bicolor. Our results suggest that environmental toxins may not only pose problems for native ant species, but may also serve as a potential obstacle for establishment among exotic species. PMID:27038576

  5. Selenium, glutathione peroxidase and other selenoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Selenium, as essential trace element, has long been associated with protein. The essentiality of selenium is partially understood as glutathione peroxidase contains an essential selenocysteine. Glutathione peroxidase has been purified from many tissues including rat liver. An estimated molecular weight of 105,000 was obtained for glutathione peroxidase by comparison to standards. A subunit size of 26,000 was obtained by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Glutathione peroxidase is not the only selenoprotein in the rat. In seven rat tissues examined, there were many different subunit sizes and change groups representing between 9 and 23 selenoproteins. Selenocysteine in glutathione peroxidase accounts for ca. 36% of the selenium in the rat. The mode of synthesis of glutathione peroxidase and the other selenoproteins is not understood. Glutathione peroxidase is strongly and reversibly inhibited by mercaptocarboxylic acids and other mercaptans, including some used as slow-acting drugs for the symtomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism and chemistry of this inhibition is discussed. This inhibition may provide a link between selenium and arthritis.

  6. Status of selenium in cancer prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An abundance of data indicate that selenium (Se) can be antitumorigenic. Those data, mostly from controlled studies using animal tumor models and some from clinical studies in free-living people, indicate that treatment with Se in the absence of nutritional Se-deficiency, can reduce cancer risk. T...

  7. Responses to Selenium Supplementation in Healthy Americans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine dose-response relationships of selenium (Se) intake and markers of Se status in healthy, non-deficient subjects, we conducted a 12 mo. intervention using Se supplements (0, 50, 100 or 200 ug Se [as L-selenomethionine]/d) in a group of 106 men and 155 women. At baseline, this cohort, non...

  8. Selenium as a cancer preventive agent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most epidemiological studies have shown inverse associations of selenium (Se) status and cancer risk. Almost all experimental animal studies have shown that supranutritional exposures of Se can reduce tumor yield. Each of the limited number of clinical intervention trials conducted to date has found...

  9. Genetic Determinants of Responses to Selenium Supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a cohort of healthy adults (106 M, 155 W) in eastern North Dakota, we determined the relationships of five biomarkers of selenium (Se) status (plasma Se, serum selenoprotein P [SePP], plasma glutathione peroxidase [GPX3] activity, buccal cell Se, urine Se) to genotype for four selenoproteins (cyt...

  10. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  11. Mercury and selenium content of Taiwanese seafood.

    PubMed

    Fang, G C; Nam, D H; Basu, N

    2011-01-01

    Fish consumption is avid in Taiwan (and other Asian nations), but little is known about the mercury and selenium content in local seafood. This paper reports on total mercury, methylmercury and selenium levels from 14 commonly consumed seafood items obtained from Taichung, Taiwan. Mean total mercury concentrations varied nearly 100-fold across species. Fifty per cent of the marlins sampled and 35% of the sharks exceeded the 0.3 µg g(-1) US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guideline. Methylmercury comprised a majority of the total mercury in all species. In all species studied there was a molar excess of selenium over mercury. The rank order of mean selenium-mercury molar ratios was red tilapia (166.8) > abura (87.9) > river prawn (82.4) > whiteleg shrimp (64.2) > butterfish (44.6) > milkfish (37.0) > tuna (15.6) > grouper (13.9) > ayu (13.4) > coral hind (13.0) > weever (11.8) > saury (9.0) > shark (7.8) > marlin (4.2). PMID:24786009

  12. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  13. Rapid determination of selenium in grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of selenium (Se)-enriched foods to reduce cancer risk would require servings to provide amounts of Se that, when added to daily Se intakes from other foods, would raise consumers’ plasma Se levels to those associated with reduced cancer risk, e.g., >120 ng/ml (Duffield et al, JNCI 95...

  14. Paternal selenium deficiency but not supplementation during preconception alters mammary gland development and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Guido, Luiza N; Fontelles, Camile C; Rosim, Mariana P; Pires, Vanessa C; Cozzolino, Silvia M F; Castro, Inar A; Bolaños-Jiménez, Francisco; Barbisan, Luis F; Ong, Thomas P

    2016-10-15

    Breast cancer is a global public health problem and accumulating evidence indicates early-life exposures as relevant factors in the disease risk determination. Recent studies have shown that paternal nutrition can influence offspring health including breast cancer risk. Selenium is a micronutrient with essential role in central aspects of embryogenesis, male fertility and cancer and that has been extensively studied as a chemopreventive agent in several breast cancer experimental models. Thus, we designed an animal study to evaluate whether paternal selenium deficiency or supplementation during preconception could affect the female offspring mammary gland development and breast cancer susceptibility. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed AIN93-G diet containing 0.15 ppm (control diet), 0.05 ppm (deficient diet) or 1 ppm (supplemented diet) of selenium for 9 weeks and mated with control female rats. Mammary carcinogenesis was induced with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) in their female offspring. Paternal selenium deficiency increased the number of terminal end buds, epithelial elongation and cell proliferation in the mammary gland of the female rat offspring and these effects were associated with higher susceptibility to DMBA-induced mammary tumors (increased incidence and higher grade tumors). On the other hand, paternal selenium supplementation did not influence any of these parameters. These results highlight the importance of father's nutrition including selenium status as a relevant factor affecting daughter's breast cancer risk and paternal preconception as a potential developmental stage to start disease preventive strategies. PMID:27270969

  15. Skeletal muscle disorders associated with selenium deficiency in humans.

    PubMed

    Chariot, Patrick; Bignani, Olivier

    2003-06-01

    Skeletal muscle disorders manifested by muscle pain, fatigue, proximal weakness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) elevation have been reported in patients with selenium deficiency. The object of this report was to review the conditions in which selenium deficiency is associated with human skeletal muscle disorders and to evaluate the importance of mitochondrial alterations in these disorders. A systematic literature review using the Medline database and Cochrane Library provided 38 relevant articles. The main conditions associated with selenium deficiency fell into three categories: (1) insufficient selenium intake in low soil-selenium areas; (2) parenteral or enteral nutrition, or malabsorption; and (3) chronic conditions associated with oxidative stress, such as chronic alcohol abuse and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In low soil-selenium areas, reversibility of muscle symptoms was similar after selenium supplementation and placebo administration, suggesting a role for other factors in the development of disease. In parenteral or enteral nutrition, or malabsorption, muscle symptoms improved after selenium supplementation in 18 of 19 patients (median delay: 4 weeks). The reason that only a minority of selenium-deficient patients present with skeletal muscle disorders is unclear and is possibly related to cofactors, such as viral infections and drugs. Prospective studies of selenium-deficient myopathies would be useful in critically ill patients, alcohol abusers, and HIV-infected patients. PMID:12766976

  16. Recovery of stream communities from experimental selenium exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, M.C.; Kuklinskal, B.; Ferkull, K.; Allen, K.N.; Hermanutz, R.O.; Roush, T.H.; Hedtke, S.F.

    1994-12-31

    The effects of selenium on stream communities and their recovery from those effects were studied at MERS from 1987--1991. Selenium was dosed into two replicate streams each at concentrations of 30, 10, 2.5 and 0 (control) {mu}g L{sup {minus}1} for 18, 30, and 12 months, respectively. Recovery was monitored for three (30) or two (1 0, 2.5) years following cessation of selenium dosing. Selenium rapidly accumulated in the sediment, plants, macroinvertebrates and fish during dosing. Selenium concentrations in sediment, macroinvertebrates, and plants were as high as 2X--4X, 2X--4X, and 1X--1OX the dosed concentration in the 30, 10, and 2.5 treatments, respectively. Selenium decreased relatively rapidly following cessation of dosing. By two years after dosing ceased, selenium concentrations in plants and macroinvertebrates were little different from the controls; selenium in sediment from the 30 and 10 streams was still higher than in the control streams two years after dosing ceased. The macroinvertebrate community changed little during the dosing and recovery period. Commonly used indices of community structure showed no effect of selenium dosing. The isopod Asellus and oligochaetes in the family Tubificidae decreased rapidly following the onset of selenium dosing; their recovery following cessation of dosing was slow.

  17. Low plasma selenium concentrations in critically ill children: the interaction effect between inflammation and selenium deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low plasma selenium concentrations are frequent in critically ill patients. However, whether this is due to systemic inflammation, a deficient nutritional state or both is still not clear. We aimed to determine the factors associated with low plasma selenium in critically ill children while considering the inflammatory response and nutritional status. Method A prospective study was conducted in 173 children (median age 34 months) with systemic inflammatory response who had plasma selenium concentrations assessed 48 hours after admission and on the 5th day of ICU stay. The normal reference range was 0.58 μmol/L to 1.6 μmol/L. The outcome variable was ‘low plasma selenium’, which was defined as plasma selenium values below the distribution median during this period. The main explanatory variables were age, malnutrition, sepsis, C-reactive protein (CRP), and clinical severity scores. The data were analyzed using a Binomial Generalized Estimating Equations model, which includes the correlation between admission and 5th day responses. Results Malnutrition and CRP were associated with low plasma selenium. The interaction effect between these two variables was significant. When CRP values were less than or equal to 40 mg/L, malnutrition was associated with low plasma selenium levels (odds ratio (OR) = 3.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.39 to 7.63, P = 0.007; OR = 2.98, 95% CI 1.26 to 7.06, P = 0.013; OR = 2.49, 95% CI 1.01 to 6.17, P = 0.049, for CRP = 10, 20 and 40 mg/L, respectively). This effect decreased as CRP concentrations increased and there was loose significance when CRP values were >40 mg/L. Similarly, the effect of CRP on low plasma selenium was significant for well-nourished patients (OR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.22, P <0.001) but not for the malnourished (OR = 1.03; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.08, P = 0.16). Conclusions There is a significant interaction between the magnitude of the inflammatory

  18. Effects of selenium treatment on 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil-induced impairment of long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Bitiktaş, Soner; Tan, Burak; Batakçı, Melek; Kavraal, Şehrazat; Dursun, Nurcan; Süer, Cem

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate whether sodium selenite could afford protection against the effects of hypothyroidism on long-term potentiation (LTP), which is thought to be the cellular basis for learning and memory. Hypothyroidism was induced in young-adult rats by the administration of 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) in tap water for 21 days. Half of these hypothyroid and euthroid rats were given 10ppM selenium with their drinking water. Field potentials were recorded from the dentate gyrus in response to stimulation of the medial perforant pathway in vivo. PTU treatment resulted in a significant reduction in both free T3 and free T4 levels, whereas selenium administration to PTU-treated rats restored only the levels of free T3 to their control values. Thyroid hormone levels were not affected by selenium in euthyroid rats. PTU-treated rats exhibited an attenuation of population spike (PS) - LTP, but a comparable potentiation of excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) was found among these rats. The administration of selenium to PTU-treated rats was partially able to attenuate impairment of LTP, but not of potentiation during the LTP induction protocol in hypothyroid rats. Interestingly, the hypothyroid rats that were supplemented with selenium had a lower EPSP potentiation during induction protocol than the control rats. The present study suggests a possible importance of T3 in Se-induced rescue of impaired PS-LTP in hypothyroidism. PMID:26892488

  19. Role of iodine, selenium and other micronutrients in thyroid function and disorders.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Vincenzo; Tafaro, Emilio; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Sabbà, Carlo; Resta, Francesco; Licchelli, Brunella; Guastamacchia, Edoardo

    2009-09-01

    Micronutrients, mostly iodine and selenium, are required for thyroid hormone synthesis and function. Iodine is an essential component of thyroid hormones and its deficiency is considered as the most common cause of preventable brain damage in the world. Nowadays about 800 million people are affected by iodine deficiency disorders that include goiter, hypothyroidism, mental retardation, and a wide spectrum of other growth and developmental abnormalities. Iodine supplementation, under form of iodized salt and iodized vegetable oil, produced dramatic improvements in many areas, even though iodine deficiency is still a problem not only for developing countries. In fact, certain subpopulations like vegetarians may not reach an adequate iodine intake even in countries considered iodine-sufficient. A reduction in dietary iodine content could also be related to increased adherence to dietary recommendations to reduce salt intake for preventing hypertension. Furthermore, iodine intakes are declining in many countries where, after endemic goiter eradication, the lack of monitoring of iodine nutrition can lead to a reappearance of goiter and other iodine deficiency disorders. Three different selenium-dependent iodothyronine deiodinases (types I, II, and III) can both activate and inactivate thyroid hormones, making selenium an essential micronutrient for normal development, growth, and metabolism. Furthermore, selenium is found as selenocysteine in the catalytic center of enzymes protecting the thyroid from free radicals damage. In this way, selenium deficiency can exacerbate the effects of iodine deficiency and the same is true for vitamin A or iron deficiency. Substances introduced with food, such as thiocyanate and isoflavones or certain herbal preparations, can interfere with micronutrients and influence thyroid function. Aim of this paper is to review the role of micronutrients in thyroid function and diseases. PMID:19594417

  20. Enrichment of selenium in allium vegetables for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ip, C; Lisk, D J

    1994-09-01

    We previously reported that garlic cultivated with selenium fertilization is superior to regular garlic in mammary cancer prevention in the rat 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) model (Nutr. Cancer, 17, 279-286, 1992). A new crop of high-selenium garlic was harvested in 1992 and was used in a dose-response study to confirm the reproducibility of the product and the bioassay. Supplementation of 1 or 2 p.p.m. Se in the diet from the high-selenium garlic produced a 56% or 75% reduction respectively in the total tumor yield. Since both garlic and onion belong to the same allium family of vegetables, we were also interested in finding out whether our experience with garlic could be similarly applied to onion. A high-selenium onion crop was grown in the same season and location and with the same schedule of selenium fertilization. Two distinct differences were noted with the high-selenium onion regarding its capacity to accumulate selenium and its efficacy in cancer prevention. First, the selenium concentration in onion was considerably lower (28 p.p.m. Se dry wt) as compared to that found in garlic (110-150 p.p.m. Se). Second, given the same levels of selenium supplementation, the high-selenium onion was apparently not as powerful as the high-selenium garlic in mammary cancer inhibition. Thus different plants, even those of the same genus, may respond in their unique way to selenium fertilization and the biological benefits of selenium enrichment may vary depending on the species. Additional information from our study indicated that the high-selenium garlic/onion might provide an ideal system for delivering selenium-substituted analogs in a food form for cancer prevention: (i) they expressed a good range of anticancer activity and could be easily adapted for human consumption on a regular basis; (ii) their ingestion did not result in an excessive accumulation of tissue selenium, a concern that is associated with the standard selenium compounds such as selenite and

  1. Quantifying Carbon Bioavailability in Northeast Siberian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslop, J.; Chandra, S.; Sobczak, W. V.; Spektor, V.; Davydova, A.; Holmes, R. M.; Bulygina, E. B.; Schade, J. D.; Frey, K. E.; Bunn, A. G.; Walter Anthony, K.; Zimov, S. A.; Zimov, N.

    2010-12-01

    Soils in Northeast Siberia, particularly carbon-rich yedoma (Pleistocene permafrost) soils, have the potential to release large amounts of carbon dioxide and methane due to permafrost thaw and thermokarst activity. In order to quantify the amount of carbon release potential in these soils, it is important to understand carbon bioavailability for microbial consumption in the permafrost. In this study we measured amounts of bioavailable soil carbon across five locations in the Kolyma River Basin, NE Siberia. At each location, we sampled four horizons (top active layer, bottom active layer, Holocene optimum permafrost, and Pleistocene permafrost) and conducted soil extracts for each sample. Filtered and unfiltered extracts were used in biological oxygen demand experiments to determine the dissolved and particulate bioavailable carbon potential for consumption in the soil. Concentrations of bioavailable carbon were 102-608 mg C/kg dry soil for filtered extracts and 115-703 mg C/kg dry soil for unfiltered extracts. Concentrations of carbon respired per gram of dry soil were roughly equal for both the DOC and POC extracts (P<0.001), suggesting that bioavailable soil carbon is predominately in the dissolved form or the presence of an additional unknown limitation preventing organisms from utilizing carbon in the particulate form. Concentrations of bioavailable carbon were similar across the different sampling locations but differed among horizons. The top active layer (102-703 mg C/kg dry soil), Holocene optimum permafrost (193-481 mg C/kg dry soil), and Pleistocene permafrost (151-589 mg C/kg dry soil) horizons had the highest amounts of bioavailable carbon, and the bottom active layer (115-179 mg C/kg dry soil) horizon had the lowest amounts. For comparison, ice wedges had bioavailable carbon concentrations of 23.0 mg C/L and yedoma runoff from Duvyanni Yar had concentrations of 306 mg C/L. Pleistocene permafrost soils had similar concentrations of bioavailable carbon

  2. Bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kesarwani, Kritika; Gupta, Rajiv; Mukerjee, Alok

    2013-04-01

    Recently, the use of herbal medicines has been increased all over the world due to their therapeutic effects and fewer adverse effects as compared to the modern medicines. However, many herbal drugs and herbal extracts despite of their impressive in-vitro findings demonstrates less or negligible in-vivo activity due to their poor lipid solubility or improper molecular size, resulting in poor absorption and hence poor bioavailability. Nowadays with the advancement in the technology, novel drug delivery systems open the door towards the development of enhancing bioavailability of herbal drug delivery systems. For last one decade many novel carriers such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, transferosomes, ethosomes, lipid based systems etc. have been reported for successful modified delivery of various herbal drugs. Many herbal compounds including quercetin, genistein, naringin, sinomenine, piperine, glycyrrhizin and nitrile glycoside have demonstrated capability to enhance the bioavailability. The objective of this review is to summarize various available novel drug delivery technologies which have been developed for delivery of drugs (herbal), and to achieve better therapeutic response. An attempt has also been made to compile a profile on bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin with the mechanism of action (wherever reported) and studies on improvement in drug bioavailability, exhibited particularly by natural compounds. PMID:23620848

  3. Bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Kesarwani, Kritika; Gupta, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the use of herbal medicines has been increased all over the world due to their therapeutic effects and fewer adverse effects as compared to the modern medicines. However, many herbal drugs and herbal extracts despite of their impressive in-vitro findings demonstrates less or negligible in-vivo activity due to their poor lipid solubility or improper molecular size, resulting in poor absorption and hence poor bioavailability. Nowadays with the advancement in the technology, novel drug delivery systems open the door towards the development of enhancing bioavailability of herbal drug delivery systems. For last one decade many novel carriers such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, transferosomes, ethosomes, lipid based systems etc. have been reported for successful modified delivery of various herbal drugs. Many herbal compounds including quercetin, genistein, naringin, sinomenine, piperine, glycyrrhizin and nitrile glycoside have demonstrated capability to enhance the bioavailability. The objective of this review is to summarize various available novel drug delivery technologies which have been developed for delivery of drugs (herbal), and to achieve better therapeutic response. An attempt has also been made to compile a profile on bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin with the mechanism of action (wherever reported) and studies on improvement in drug bioavailability, exhibited particularly by natural compounds. PMID:23620848

  4. Ecology and Biotechnology of Selenium-Respiring Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In nature, selenium is actively cycled between oxic and anoxic habitats, and this cycle plays an important role in carbon and nitrogen mineralization through bacterial anaerobic respiration. Selenium-respiring bacteria (SeRB) are found in geographically diverse, pristine or contaminated environments and play a pivotal role in the selenium cycle. Unlike its structural analogues oxygen and sulfur, the chalcogen selenium and its microbial cycling have received much less attention by the scientific community. This review focuses on microorganisms that use selenate and selenite as terminal electron acceptors, in parallel to the well-studied sulfate-reducing bacteria. It overviews the significant advancements made in recent years on the role of SeRB in the biological selenium cycle and their ecological role, phylogenetic characterization, and metabolism, as well as selenium biomineralization mechanisms and environmental biotechnological applications. PMID:25631289

  5. Ecology and biotechnology of selenium-respiring bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nancharaiah, Y V; Lens, P N L

    2015-03-01

    In nature, selenium is actively cycled between oxic and anoxic habitats, and this cycle plays an important role in carbon and nitrogen mineralization through bacterial anaerobic respiration. Selenium-respiring bacteria (SeRB) are found in geographically diverse, pristine or contaminated environments and play a pivotal role in the selenium cycle. Unlike its structural analogues oxygen and sulfur, the chalcogen selenium and its microbial cycling have received much less attention by the scientific community. This review focuses on microorganisms that use selenate and selenite as terminal electron acceptors, in parallel to the well-studied sulfate-reducing bacteria. It overviews the significant advancements made in recent years on the role of SeRB in the biological selenium cycle and their ecological role, phylogenetic characterization, and metabolism, as well as selenium biomineralization mechanisms and environmental biotechnological applications. PMID:25631289

  6. Selenium Recycling in the United States in 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Micheal W.; Wagner, Lorie A.

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of selenium consumption in the United States is in dissipative uses, such as alloys, animal feeds, fertilizers, glass decolorizer, and pigments. The nondissipative use as a photoreceptor for xerographic copiers is declining. As a result of a lack of a substantial supply of selenium-containing scrap, there are no longer selenium recycling facilities in the United States. Selenium-containing materials collected for recycling, primarily selenium-containing photocopier drums, are exported for processing in other countries. Of the estimated 350 metric tons (t) of selenium products that went to the U.S. market in 2004, an estimated 300 t went to dissipative uses. An estimated 4 t was recovered from old scrap and exported for recycling.

  7. EFFECTS OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES ON ATTENUATION OF METALS: BIOAVAILABILITY AND MOBILITY IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humic substances play vastly important roles in metal behavior in a wide variety of environments. They can affect the mobility and bioavailability of metals by binding and sequestration thereby decreasing the mobility of a metal. They can also transport metals into solution or ...

  8. BARIUM BIOAVAILABILITY AS THE CHLORIDE, SULFATE, OR CARBONATE SALT IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to determine how the bioavailability of a low concentration of barium (Ba) in drinking water is affected by anion speciation. Male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 250-300 grams were maintained on a diet of less than 1 mg Ba/kg of food for at least 1 month pr...

  9. Oral anticancer drugs: mechanisms of low bioavailability and strategies for improvement.

    PubMed

    Stuurman, Frederik E; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2013-06-01

    The use of oral anticancer drugs has increased during the last decade, because of patient preference, lower costs, proven efficacy, lack of infusion-related inconveniences, and the opportunity to develop chronic treatment regimens. Oral administration of anticancer drugs is, however, often hampered by limited bioavailability of the drug, which is associated with a wide variability. Since most anticancer drugs have a narrow therapeutic window and are dosed at or close to the maximum tolerated dose, a wide variability in the bioavailability can have a negative impact on treatment outcome. This review discusses mechanisms of low bioavailability of oral anticancer drugs and strategies for improvement. The extent of oral bioavailability depends on many factors, including release of the drug from the pharmaceutical dosage form, a drug's stability in the gastrointestinal tract, factors affecting dissolution, the rate of passage through the gut wall, and the pre-systemic metabolism in the gut wall and liver. These factors are divided into pharmaceutical limitations, physiological endogenous limitations, and patient-specific limitations. There are several strategies to reduce or overcome these limitations. First, pharmaceutical adjustment of the formulation or the physicochemical characteristics of the drug can improve the dissolution rate and absorption. Second, pharmacological interventions by combining the drug with inhibitors of transporter proteins and/or pre-systemic metabolizing enzymes can overcome the physiological endogenous limitations. Third, chemical modification of a drug by synthesis of a derivative, salt form, or prodrug could enhance the bioavailability by improving the absorption and bypassing physiological endogenous limitations. Although the bioavailability can be enhanced by various strategies, the development of novel oral products with low solubility or cell membrane permeability remains cumbersome and is often unsuccessful. The main reasons are

  10. Synthesis and characterization of single crystalline selenium nanowire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.Y. . E-mail: apzhxy@polyu.edu.hk; Xu, L.H.; Dai, J.Y.; Cai, Y.; Wang, N.

    2006-09-14

    Ordered selenium nanowire arrays with diameters about 40 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition using anodic porous alumina templates. As determined by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra, electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selenium nanowires have uniform diameters, which are fully controllable. Single crystalline trigonal selenium nanowires have been obtained after postannealing at 180 deg. C. These nanowires are perfect with a c-axis growth orientation. The optical absorption spectra reveal two types of electron transition activity.

  11. 21 CFR 522.2100 - Selenium and vitamin E.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Selenium and vitamin E. 522.2100 Section 522.2100... Selenium and vitamin E. (a)(1) Specifications. Each milliliter of emulsion contains 5.48 milligrams (mg) sodium selenite (equivalent to 2.5 mg selenium) and 50 mg of vitamin E (68 I.U.) (as d-alpha...

  12. Selenium Poisoning of Wildlife and Western Agriculture: Cause and Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, N.E.

    2000-02-01

    This project examined the hypothesis that selenium contamination is not the principal cause of the decline of endemic fish species in the Upper Colorado Basin. Activities employed to test this hypothesis included a reconnaissance of locations altered by recent road construction, a re-interpretation of available literature regarding selenium toxicity, and the interpretation of unpublished data obtained from the Upper Colorado Basin Fish Recovery Program. The project demonstrates that most of the evidence implicating selenium is circumstantial.

  13. Effect of selenium supplementation in hypothyroid subjects of an iodine and selenium deficient area: the possible danger of indiscriminate supplementation of iodine-deficient subjects with selenium.

    PubMed

    Contempre, B; Dumont, J E; Ngo, B; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T; Vanderpas, J

    1991-07-01

    Selenium and seleno dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPX) deficiency has been described in endemias of myxedematous cretinism. In northern Zaire, a selenium supplementation trial has been conducted. Beside correcting the GPX activity, two months of selenium supplementation was shown to modify the serum thyroid hormones parameters in clinically euthyroid subjects and to induce a dramatic fall of the already impaired thyroid function in clinically hypothyroid subjects. These results further support a role of selenium in thyroid hormone metabolism. In an iodine deficient area, this selenium deficiency could lead to opposite clinical consequences: protect the general population and the fetus against iodine deficiency and brain damage; and in turn, favour the degenerative process of the thyroid gland leading to myxoedematous cretinism. PMID:2045471

  14. Immunomodulatory effect of selenosemicarbazides and selenium inorganic compounds, distribution in organs after selenium supplementation.

    PubMed

    Musik, I; Koziol-Montewka, M; Toś-Luty, S; Pasternak, K; Latuszyńska, J; Tokarska, M; Kielczykowska, M

    1999-12-01

    Antioxidant properties of selenium producing a protective barrier against free radicals play an important role in numerous metabolic and immunologic processes associated with oxidation-reduction reactions which take place during intracellular digestion of phagocyted bacteria. The aim of our study was to examine the properties of an organic compound of selenium, 4-(o-tolilo)-selenosemicarbazide of p-chlorobenzoic acid in terms of its retention in organs, effect on erythropoesis and phagocytic abilities of neutrophiles as well as antioxidant properties in neutrophiles tested with NBT test. This compound as well as inorganic sodium selenate was given to Swiss mice at the dose of 10(-3) g Se/kg for the period of 10 days. The concentrations of selenium in livers of mice treated with sodium selenate and selenosemicarbazide were found to be higher than in controls (18.7 micrograms lg-1 and 23.2 micrograms lg-1 vs. 12 micrograms lg-1, respectively). Analysis of blood cells count has shown a significant decrease in neutrophile levels in both groups treated with selenium. The influence of selenium compounds on phagocytosis and especially NBT test has been determined (3.8% of positive cells in the controls vs. 2.2% and 0.9% in the groups treated with sodium selenate and selenosemicarbazide, respectively). Our preliminary investigations suggest that selenosemicarbazides are biologically active compounds and can modify neutrophile functions. PMID:10816738

  15. Main and interactive effects of arsenic and selenium on mallard reproduction and duckling growth and survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, T.R., Jr.; Spann, J.W.; Smith, G.J.; Rosscoe, R.

    1994-01-01

    Arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) occur together in high concentrations in the environment and can accumulate in aquatic plants and invertebrates consumed by waterfowl. Ninety-nine pairs of breeding mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed diets supplemented with As (sodium arsenate) at 0, 25, 100, or 400 ug/g, in combination with Se (seleno-DL-methionine) at 0 or 10 ug/g, in a replicated factorial experiment. Ducklings produced were placed on the same treatment combination as their parents. Arsenic accumulated in adult liver and egg, reduced adult weight gain and liver weight, delayed the onset of egg laying, decreased whole egg weight, and caused eggshell thinning. Arsenic did not affect hatching success and was not teratogenic. In ducklings, As accumulated in the liver and reduced body weight, growth, and liver weight. Arsenic did not increase duckling mortality, but it did decrease overall duckling production. Selenium accumulated in adult liver and egg, was teratogenic, and decreased hatching success. Selenium did not affect adult weight, liver weight, survival, onset of egg laying, egg fertility, egg weight, or eggshell thickness. In ducklings, Se accumulated in the liver and reduced body weight and growth, and increased liver weight. Selenium increased duckling mortality and decreased overall duckling production. Antagonistic interactions between As and Se occurred whereby As reduced Se accumulation in liver and egg, and alleviated the effects of Se on hatching success and embryo deformities. It was demonstrated that As and Se, in the chemical forms and at the dietary levels administered in this study, can adversely affect mallard reproduction and duckling growth and survival, and that As can alleviate toxic effects of Se.

  16. Bioavailability of Polyphenol Liposomes: A Challenge Ahead

    PubMed Central

    Mignet, Nathalie; Seguin, Johanne; Chabot, Guy G.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols, including flavonoids, have long been recognized as a source of important molecules involved in the prevention of several diseases, including cancer. However, because of their poor bioavailability, polyphenols remain difficult to be employed clinically. Over the past few years, a renewed interest has been devoted to the use of liposomes as carriers aimed at increasing the bioavailability and, hence, the therapeutic benefits of polyphenols. In this paper, we review the causes of the poor bioavailability of polyphenols and concentrate on their liposomal formulations, which offer a means of improving their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The problems linked to their development and their potential therapeutic advantages are reviewed. Future directions for liposomal polyphenol development are suggested. PMID:24300518

  17. Conceptual Model for Selenium Cycling in the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. P.; Conover, M. R.; Wurtsbaugh, W. A.; Adams, J.

    2006-12-01

    The conceptual model for Selenium cycling in the Great Salt Lake was developed to guide investigations in support of determining an open water selenium standard for the Great Salt Lake. The motivation to determine this particular selenium standard derives from public concern for a plan to allow disposal of reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate in the GSL, which would contain elevated concentrations of major and trace elements, including selenium. The development of an open water standard for selenium requires a working knowledge of the biological significance of existing selenium concentrations in the Great Salt Lake, as well as a working understanding of the likely changes of these concentrations over time given existing and proposed loads to the system. This working knowledge" is being represented in a conceptual model that accounts for selenium in various stocks" in the system (e.g. water, sediment, biota) and the flow" of selenium between stocks (e.g., precipitation and settling, volatilization, bioconcentration). It illustrates the critical pathway of selenium in the Great Salt Lake from water, to microorganisms, to brine shrimp and brine flies, to birds, and to their eggs. It also addresses the complexity of the GSL system: a) Spatially diverse, being comprised by four distinct bays and two layers, with major differences in salinity among their waters. b) Temporally dynamic, due to seasonal and inter-annual variations in runoff. The conceptual model is presently descriptive, but will serve as the basis for a semi-quantitative model that will be fed by data accumulated during subsequent investigations.

  18. Accumulation and metabolism of selenium by yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Kieliszek, Marek; Błażejak, Stanisław; Gientka, Iwona; Bzducha-Wróbel, Anna

    2015-07-01

    This paper examines the process of selenium bioaccumulation and selenium metabolism in yeast cells. Yeast cells can bind elements in ionic from the environment and permanently integrate them into their cellular structure. Up to now, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida utilis, and Yarrowia lipolytica yeasts have been used primarily in biotechnological studies to evaluate binding of minerals. Yeast cells are able to bind selenium in the form of both organic and inorganic compounds. The process of bioaccumulation of selenium by microorganisms occurs through two mechanisms: extracellular binding by ligands of membrane assembly and intracellular accumulation associated with the transport of ions across the cytoplasmic membrane into the cell interior. During intracellular metabolism of selenium, oxidation, reduction, methylation, and selenoprotein synthesis processes are involved, as exemplified by detoxification processes that allow yeasts to survive under culture conditions involving the elevated selenium concentrations which were observed. Selenium yeasts represent probably the best absorbed form of this element. In turn, in terms of wide application, the inclusion of yeast with accumulated selenium may aid in lessening selenium deficiency in a diet. PMID:26003453

  19. Plasma selenium levels and the risk of colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed

    Russo, M W; Murray, S C; Wurzelmann, J I; Woosley, J T; Sandler, R S

    1997-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that selenium may protect against the development of colorectal neoplasia. We examined the potential chemopreventive properties of selenium against colorectal adenomas while controlling for a number of dietary and life-style factors. We conducted a cross-sectional study among patients referred for colonoscopy to University of North Carolina Hospitals. Cases had one or more pathologically confirmed adenomas, and noncases had none. Plasma selenium levels were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction and platform technique. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders. The mean plasma selenium concentrations for cases (n = 37) and noncases (n = 36) were 107 and 120 micrograms/l, respectively (p = 0.06). Those in the fourth quartile of plasma selenium level had 0.24 times the risk (95% confidence interval = 0.06-1.04) for colorectal adenomas of those in the first quartile. The adjusted odds ratio for colorectal adenomas was 0.58 (95% confidence interval = 0.31-1.08) for a 30 microgram/l increase in plasma selenium level. Lower plasma selenium levels were associated with multiple adenomas but not with adenoma size or location. These data support a protective effect of selenium against colorectal adenomas after adjustment for possible confounders. Selenium might be a potentially useful chemopreventive agent for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:9290116

  20. Volatile Selenium Flux in the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, X.; Johnson, W. P.

    2006-12-01

    Volatilization of selenium has been proven to be the major source of selenium vapor from oceans and estuaries and it may be the major mechanism of permanent selenium removal from the Great Salt Lake (other than brine shrimp harvest). However, the volatilization flux of selenium from the Great Salt Lake has not been previously measured due to challenges of analysis in this hyper-saline environment. This work presents results from recent field studies examining the spatial distribution of volatile selenium (geographical and with depth) in the South Arm (main body) of the Great Salt Lake. The analyses involved collection of volatile selenium in a cryo-focusing trap system via sparging with helium. The cryo-trapped volatile selenium was digested with nitric acid and analyzed by ICP-MS. The results show concentrations of volatile selenium that are much greater than values reported for marine estuaries and oceans. Volatile selenium flux to the atmosphere was determined using mass transport equations corrected to simulate the highly saline environment of the South Arm of the Great Salt Lake.

  1. The leaching characteristics of selenium from coal fly ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Wang, J.; Burken, J.G.; Ban, H.; Ladwig, K.

    2007-11-15

    The leaching characteristics of selenium from several bituminous and subbituminous coal fly ashes under different pH conditions were investigated using batch methods. Results indicated that pH had a significant effect on selenium leaching from bituminous coal ash. The minimum selenium leaching occurred in the pH range between 3 and 4, while the maximum selenium leaching occurred at pH 12. The release of selenium from subbituminous coal ashes was very low for the entire experimental pH range, possibly due to the high content of calcium which can form hydration or precipitation products as a sink for selenium. The adsorption results for different selenium species indicated that Se(VI) was hardly adsorbable on either bituminous coal ashes or subbitumminous coal ashes at any pH. However, Se(I) was highly adsorbed by bituminous coal ashes under acidic pH conditions and was mostly removed by subbitumminous coal ashes across the entire pH range. This result suggests that the majority of selenium released from the tested fly ashes was Se(IV). A speciation-based model was developed to simulate the adsorption of Se(IV) on bituminous coal fly ash, and the pH-independent adsorption constants of HSeO{sup 3-} and SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} were determined. The modeling approach is useful for understanding and predicting the release process of selenium from fly ash.

  2. Microbially induced synthesis of cubic and hexagonal selenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Park, Bitna; Kang, Serku; Moon, Wonjin; Roh, Yul

    2013-03-01

    Nanobiotechnology represents an economic alternative for chemical and physical methods of nanoparticles formation. The objectives of this study were to synthesize selenium nanoparticles by microbial processes using anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria as well as to characterize mineralogical properties of the nanoparticles. The selenium nanoparticles were about 200 nm in size and ball shaped. Microbial processes for elemental selenium synthesis may be useful for recovery of natural selenate in the natural environments and immobilization of selenium isotope in the high level nuclear waste disposal sites. PMID:23755605

  3. Selenium nanomaterials: applications in electronics, catalysis and sensors.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Savita; Mehta, S K

    2014-02-01

    This review provides insights into the synthesis, functionalization, and applications of selenium nanoparticles in electronics, optics, catalysis and sensors. The variation of physicochemical properties such as particle size, surface area, and shape of the selenium nanoparticles and the effect of experimental conditions has also been discussed. An overview has also been provided on the fundamental electrical and optical properties of selenium nanomaterials as well as their utilization in different research fields. The work presents an insight on selenium nanoparticles with interesting properties and their future applications. PMID:24749448

  4. Chemistry, stability and bioavailability of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Francioso, Antonio; Mastromarino, Paola; Masci, Alessandra; d'Erme, Maria; Mosca, Luciana

    2014-05-01

    Resveratrol is a bioactive polyphenol found in many vegetables. It is well known for its multiple pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticancer, neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects. In vitro evidence of resveratrol efficacy is widespread, however, many concerns regarding its effectiveness in vivo arise from its poor stability in vitro and bioavailability following oral ingestion. This review focuses on the in vitro stability, with special focus on the photochemical stability of resveratrol, and on the therapeutic perspectives of this molecule due to its low bioavailability. PMID:24329932

  5. Bioavailability of Plant-Derived Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Abourashed, Ehab A.

    2013-01-01

    Natural products with antioxidant properties have been extensively utilized in the pharmaceutical and food industry and have also been very popular as health-promoting herbal products. This review provides a summary of the literature published around the first decade of the 21st century regarding the oral bioavailability of carotenoids, polyphenols and sulfur compounds as the three major classes of plant-derived antioxidants. The reviewed original research includes more than 40 compounds belonging to the above mentioned classes of natural antioxidants. In addition, related reviews published during the same period have been cited. A brief introduction to general bioavailability-related definitions, procedures and considerations is also included. PMID:26784467

  6. Advances in Computationally Modeling Human Oral Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2015-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in experimental high throughput screening (HTS) of ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) and pharmacokinetic properties, the ADME and Toxicity (ADME-Tox) in silico modeling is still indispensable in drug discovery as it can guide us to wisely select drug candidates prior to expensive ADME screenings and clinical trials. Compared to other ADME-Tox properties, human oral bioavailability (HOBA) is particularly important but extremely difficult to predict. In this paper, the advances in human oral bioavailability modeling will be reviewed. Moreover, our deep insight on how to construct more accurate and reliable HOBA QSAR and classification models will also discussed. PMID:25582307

  7. Advances in computationally modeling human oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2015-06-23

    Although significant progress has been made in experimental high throughput screening (HTS) of ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) and pharmacokinetic properties, the ADME and Toxicity (ADME-Tox) in silico modeling is still indispensable in drug discovery as it can guide us to wisely select drug candidates prior to expensive ADME screenings and clinical trials. Compared to other ADME-Tox properties, human oral bioavailability (HOBA) is particularly important but extremely difficult to predict. In this paper, the advances in human oral bioavailability modeling will be reviewed. Moreover, our deep insight on how to construct more accurate and reliable HOBA QSAR and classification models will also discussed. PMID:25582307

  8. Bioavailability of Metal Ions and Evolutionary Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Hong Enriquez, Rolando P.; Do, Trang N.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of life on earth has been a long process that began nearly 3.5 × 109 years ago. In their initial moments, evolution was mainly influenced by anaerobic environments; with the rise of O2 and the corresponding change in bioavailability of metal ions, new mechanisms of survival were created. Here we review the relationships between ancient atmospheric conditions, metal ion bioavailability and adaptation of metals homeostasis during early evolution. A general picture linking geochemistry, biochemistry and homeostasis is supported by the reviewed literature and is further illustrated in this report using simple database searches. PMID:25371266

  9. Role of entrained droplet oil on the bioavailability of petroleum substances in aqueous exposures.

    PubMed

    Redman, A D

    2015-08-15

    Bioavailability of petroleum substances is a complex issue that is affected by substance composition, the physicochemical properties of the individual constituents, and the exposure preparation system. The present study applies mechanistic fate and effects models to characterize the role of droplet oil on dissolved exposure and predicted effects from both neat and weathered crude oils, and refined fuel oils. The main effect from droplet oil is input of additional dissolved hydrocarbons to the exposure system following preparation of the initial stock solution. Toxicity was characterized using toxic units (TU) and shows that replenishment of bioavailable hydrocarbons by droplets in toxicity tests with low droplet content (e.g., <1mg/L) is negligible, consistent with typical exposure conditions following open ocean oil spills. Further, the use of volumetric exposure metrics (e.g., mg/L) introduces considerable variability and the bioavailability-based metrics (e.g., TUs) provide a more consistent basis for understanding oil toxicity data. PMID:26072047

  10. Bioavailability of iron, vitamin A, zinc, and folic acid when added to condiments and seasonings.

    PubMed

    Degerud, Eirik M; Manger, Mari Skar; Strand, Tor A; Dierkes, Jutta

    2015-11-01

    Seasonings and condiments can be candidate vehicles for micronutrient fortification if consumed consistently and if dietary practices ensure bioavailability of the nutrient. In this review, we identify factors that may affect the bioavailability of iron, vitamin A, zinc, and folic acid when added to seasonings and condiments and evaluate their effects on micronutrient status. We take into consideration the chemical and physical properties of different forms of the micronutrients, the influence of the physical and chemical properties of foods and meals to which fortified seasonings and condiments are typically added, and interactions between micronutrients and the physiological and nutritional status of the target population. Bioavailable fortificants of iron have been developed for use in dry or fluid vehicles. For example, sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA) and ferrous sulfate with citric acid are options for iron fortification of fish and soy sauce. Furthermore, NaFeEDTA, microencapsulated ferrous fumarate, and micronized elemental iron are potential fortificants in curry powder and salt. Dry forms of retinyl acetate or palmitate are bioavailable fortificants of vitamin A in dry candidate vehicles, but there are no published studies of these fortificants in fluid vehicles. Studies of zinc and folic acid bioavailability in seasonings and condiments are also lacking. PMID:26469774

  11. Biogeochemical Controls of Uranium Bioavailability from the Dissolved Phase in Natural Freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Marie-Noële; Fuller, Christopher C; Cain, Daniel J; Campbell, Kate M; Aiken, George

    2016-08-01

    To gain insights into the risks associated with uranium (U) mining and processing, we investigated the biogeochemical controls of U bioavailability in the model freshwater species Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda). Bioavailability of dissolved U(VI) was characterized in controlled laboratory experiments over a range of water hardness, pH, and in the presence of complexing ligands in the form of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM). Results show that dissolved U is bioavailable under all the geochemical conditions tested. Uranium uptake rates follow first order kinetics over a range encompassing most environmental concentrations. Uranium uptake rates in L. stagnalis ultimately demonstrate saturation uptake kinetics when exposure concentrations exceed 100 nM, suggesting uptake via a finite number of carriers or ion channels. The lack of a relationship between U uptake rate constants and Ca uptake rates suggest that U does not exclusively use Ca membrane transporters. In general, U bioavailability decreases with increasing pH, increasing Ca and Mg concentrations, and when DOM is present. Competing ions did not affect U uptake rates. Speciation modeling that includes formation constants for U ternary complexes reveals that the aqueous concentration of dicarbonato U species (UO2(CO3)2(-2)) best predicts U bioavailability to L. stagnalis, challenging the free-ion activity model postulate. PMID:27385165

  12. Preparation of selenium coatings onto beryllium foils

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, E.D.; Tassano, P.L.; Reiss, R.H.; Griggs, G.E.

    1984-09-01

    A technique for preparing selenium films onto 50.8 microns thick beryllium foils is described. The selenium was deposited in vacuum from a resistance heated evaporation source. Profilometry measurements of the coatings indicate deposit thicknesses of 5.5, 12.9, 37.5, 49.8 and 74.5 microns. The control of deposition rate and of coating thickness was facilitated using a commercially available closed-loop programmable thin film controller. The x-ray transmission of the coated substrates was measured using a tritiated zirconium source. The transmissivities of the film/substrate combination are presented for the range of energies from 4 to 20 keV. 15 references, 3 figures.

  13. Analysis of Sulfur And Selenium Assimilation in 'Astragalus' Plants With Varying Capacities to Accumulate Selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Sors, T.G.; Ellis, D.R.; Na, G.Nam.; Lahner, B.; Lee, S.; Leustek, T.; Pickering, I.J.; Salt, D.E.; /Purdue U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Saskatchewan U.

    2007-08-08

    Several Astragalus species have the ability to hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) when growing in their native habitat. Given that the biochemical properties of Se parallel those of sulfur (S), we examined the activity of key S assimilatory enzymes ATP sulfurylase (ATPS), APS reductase (APR), and serine acetyltransferase (SAT), as well as selenocysteine methyltransferase (SMT), in eight Astragalus species with varying abilities to accumulate Se. Se hyperaccumulation was found to positively correlate with shoot accumulation of S-methylcysteine (MeCys) and Se-methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys), in addition to the level of SMT enzymatic activity. However, no correlation was observed between Se hyperaccumulation and ATPS, APR, and SAT activities in shoot tissue. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing both ATPS and APR had a significant enhancement of selenate reduction as a proportion of total Se, whereas SAT overexpression resulted in only a slight increase in selenate reduction to organic forms. In general, total Se accumulation in shoots was lower in the transgenic plants overexpressing ATPS, PaAPR, and SAT. Root growth was adversely affected by selenate treatment in both ATPS and SAT overexpressors and less so in the PaAPR transgenic plants. Such observations support our conclusions that ATPS and APR are major contributors of selenate reduction in planta. However, Se hyperaccumulation in Astragalus is not driven by an overall increase in the capacity of these enzymes, but rather by either an increased Se flux through the S assimilatory pathway, generated by the biosynthesis of the sink metabolites MeCys or MeSeCys, or through an as yet unidentified Se assimilation pathway.

  14. Mouse Assay for Determination of Arsenic Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Accurate assessment of human exposure estimates from arsenic-contaminated soils depends upon estimating arsenic (As) soil bioavailability. Development of bioavailability assays provides data needed for human health risk assessments and supports development and valida...

  15. Biofortification and phytoremediation of selenium in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhilin; Bañuelos, Gary S; Lin, Zhi-Qing; Liu, Ying; Yuan, Linxi; Yin, Xuebin; Li, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element for humans and animals but at high concentrations, Se becomes toxic to organisms due to Se replacing sulfur in proteins. Selenium biofortification is an agricultural process that increases the accumulation of Se in crops, through plant breeding, genetic engineering, or use of Se fertilizers. Selenium phytoremediation is a green biotechnology to clean up Se-contaminated environments, primarily through phytoextraction and phytovolatilization. By integrating Se phytoremediation and biofortification technologies, Se-enriched plant materials harvested from Se phytoremediation can be used as Se-enriched green manures or other supplementary sources of Se for producing Se-biofortified agricultural products. Earlier studies primarily aimed at enhancing efficacy of phytoremediation and biofortification of Se based on natural variation in progenitor or identification of unique plant species. In this review, we discuss promising approaches to improve biofortification and phytoremediation of Se using knowledge acquired from model crops. We also explored the feasibility of applying biotechnologies such as inoculation of microbial strains for improving the efficiency of biofortification and phytoremediation of Se. The key research and practical challenges that remain in improving biofortification and phytoremediation of Se have been highlighted, and the future development and uses of Se-biofortified agricultural products in China has also been discussed. PMID:25852703

  16. Biofortification and phytoremediation of selenium in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhilin; Bañuelos, Gary S.; Lin, Zhi-Qing; Liu, Ying; Yuan, Linxi; Yin, Xuebin; Li, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element for humans and animals but at high concentrations, Se becomes toxic to organisms due to Se replacing sulfur in proteins. Selenium biofortification is an agricultural process that increases the accumulation of Se in crops, through plant breeding, genetic engineering, or use of Se fertilizers. Selenium phytoremediation is a green biotechnology to clean up Se-contaminated environments, primarily through phytoextraction and phytovolatilization. By integrating Se phytoremediation and biofortification technologies, Se-enriched plant materials harvested from Se phytoremediation can be used as Se-enriched green manures or other supplementary sources of Se for producing Se-biofortified agricultural products. Earlier studies primarily aimed at enhancing efficacy of phytoremediation and biofortification of Se based on natural variation in progenitor or identification of unique plant species. In this review, we discuss promising approaches to improve biofortification and phytoremediation of Se using knowledge acquired from model crops. We also explored the feasibility of applying biotechnologies such as inoculation of microbial strains for improving the efficiency of biofortification and phytoremediation of Se. The key research and practical challenges that remain in improving biofortification and phytoremediation of Se have been highlighted, and the future development and uses of Se-biofortified agricultural products in China has also been discussed. PMID:25852703

  17. Selenium Derivatization of Nucleic Acids for Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang,J.; Sheng, J.; Carrasco, N.; Huang, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The high-resolution structure of the DNA (5'-GTGTACA-C-3') with the selenium derivatization at the 2'-position of T2 was determined via MAD and SAD phasing. The selenium-derivatized structure (1.28 {angstrom} resolution) with the 2'-Se modification in the minor groove is isomorphorous to the native structure (2.0 {angstrom}). To directly compare with the conventional bromine derivatization, we incorporated bromine into the 5-postion of T4, determined the bromine-derivatized DNA structure at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, and found that the local backbone torsion angles and solvent hydration patterns were altered in the structure with the Br incorporation in the major groove. Furthermore, while the native and Br-derivatized DNAs needed over a week to form reasonable-size crystals, we observed that the Se-derivatized DNAs grew crystals overnight with high-diffraction quality, suggesting that the Se derivatization facilitated the crystal formation. In addition, the Se-derivatized DNA sequences crystallized under a broader range of buffer conditions, and generally had a faster crystal growth rate. Our experimental results indicate that the selenium derivatization of DNAs may facilitate the determination of nucleic acid X-ray crystal structures in phasing and high-quality crystal growth. In addition, our results suggest that the Se derivatization can be an alternative to the conventional Br derivatization.

  18. Selenium in biology: facts and medical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Köhrl, J; Brigelius-Flohé, R; Böck, A; Gärtner, R; Meyer, O; Flohé, L

    2000-01-01

    Several decades after the discovery of selenium as an essential trace element in vertebrates approximately 20 eukaryotic and more than 15 prokaryotic selenoproteins containing the 21st proteinogenic amino acid, selenocysteine, have been identified, partially characterized or cloned from several species. Many of these proteins are involved in redox reactions with selenocysteine acting as an essential component of the catalytic cycle. Enzyme activities have been assigned to the glutathione peroxidase family, to the thioredoxin reductases, which were recently identified as selenoproteins, to the iodothyronine deiodinases, which metabolize thyroid hormones, and to the selenophosphate synthetase 2, which is involved in selenoprotein biosynthesis. Prokaryotic selenoproteins catalyze redox reactions and formation of selenoethers in (stress-induced) metabolism and energy production of E. coli, of the clostridial cluster XI and of other prokaryotes. Apart from the specific and complex biosynthesis of selenocysteine, selenium also reversibly binds to proteins, is incorporated into selenomethionine in bacteria, yeast and higher plants, or posttranslationally modifies a catalytically essential cysteine residue of CO dehydrogenase. Expression of individual eukaryotic selenoproteins exhibits high tissue specificity, depends on selenium availability, in some cases is regulated by hormones, and if impaired contributes to several pathological conditions. Disturbance of selenoprotein expression or function is associated with deficiency syndromes (Keshan and Kashin-Beck disease), might contribute to tumorigenesis and atherosclerosis, is altered in several bacterial and viral infections, and leads to infertility in male rodents. PMID:11076017

  19. Zinc and selenium nutritional status in vegetarians.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, Maritsa Carla; Cozzolino, Silvia Maria Franciscato

    2009-03-01

    A vegetarian diet may have beneficial effects on human health, however when it is not well-balanced may be deficient in some nutrients, as minerals for example. The aim of the present study was to assess the nutritional status of zinc and selenium in vegetarians in the city of São Paulo. A cross-sectional study was performed, and the inclusion criteria were age > or = 18 years, both gender, no use of food or pharmaceutical supplements. Thirty vegetarian, of both genders, mean age of 27 years and 4.5 years of vegetarianism had performed the study, and their mean BMI was 21.5. Zinc plasma concentration was 71 and 62.5 microg/dL for men and women and erythrocyte concentration was 37 microg/gHb for both genders. Selenium concentration was 73.5 and 77.3 microg/L in plasma and 51.4 and 66.9 microg/L in erythrocytes for men and women, respectively. These biochemical values show that, according to the references, selenium blood levels are adequate and zinc concentration in erythrocytes is deficient in the studied population. For this reason, vegetarians should be constantly assessed and receive nutritional support to reduce the effects of inadequate zinc status. PMID:18953504

  20. The Influence of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Bioavailability and Toxicity to Soil Microbial Communities in Alfalfa Rhizosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may affect bioavailability and toxicity of organic contaminants due to their adsorption properties. Recent studies have observed the influence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other organic contaminants. Greenh...

  1. Bioavailability of Cadmium in Inexpensive Jewelry

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer; Guinn, Daphne; Pearson, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: We evaluated the bioavailability of Cd in 86 components of 57 jewelry items found to contain high levels of Cd (> 10,000 ppm) by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), using extractions that simulate mouthing or swallowing of jewelry items. Methods: We screened jewelry for Cd content by XRF. Bioavailability was measured in two ways. Items were placed in saline solution at 37°C for 6 hr to simulate exposures from mouthing of jewelry items. Items were placed in dilute hydrochloric acid (HCl) at 37°C for 6–96 hr, simulating the worst-case scenario of a child swallowing a jewelry item. Damaged pieces of selected samples were also extracted by both methods to determine the effect of breaching the outer plating on bioavailability. Total Cd content of all items was determined by atomic absorption. Results: The 6-hr saline extraction yielded as much as 2,200 µg Cd, and 24-hr dilute HCl extraction yielded a maximum of > 20,000 µg Cd. Leaching of Cd in dilute HCl increased linearly over 6–96 hr, indicating potential for increasing harm the longer an item remains in the stomach. Damage to jewelry by breaching the outer plating generally, but not always, increased Cd release. Bioavailability did not correlate directly with Cd content. Conclusions: These results indicate the potential for dangerous Cd exposures to children who wear, mouth, or accidentally swallow high-Cd jewelry items. PMID:21377949

  2. Iron bioavailability to phytoplankton: an empirical approach

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Hagar; Shaked, Yeala; Kranzler, Chana; Keren, Nir; Morel, François M M

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton are often limited by iron in aquatic environments. Here we examine Fe bioavailability to phytoplankton by analyzing iron uptake from various Fe substrates by several species of phytoplankton grown under conditions of Fe limitation and comparing the measured uptake rate constants (Fe uptake rate/ substrate concentration). When unchelated iron, Fe′, buffered by an excess of the chelating agent EDTA is used as the Fe substrate, the uptake rate constants of all the eukaryotic phytoplankton species are tightly correlated and proportional to their respective surface areas (S.A.). The same is true when FeDFB is the substrate, but the corresponding uptake constants are one thousand times smaller than for Fe′. The uptake rate constants for the other substrates we examined fall mostly between the values for Fe′ and FeDFB for the same S.A. These two model substrates thus empirically define a bioavailability envelope with Fe′ at the upper and FeDFB at the lower limit of iron bioavailability. This envelope provides a convenient framework to compare the relative bioavailabilities of various Fe substrates to eukaryotic phytoplankton and the Fe uptake abilities of different phytoplankton species. Compared with eukaryotic species, cyanobacteria have similar uptake constants for Fe′ but lower ones for FeDFB. The unique relationship between the uptake rate constants and the S.A. of phytoplankton species suggests that the uptake rate constant of Fe-limited phytoplankton has reached a universal upper limit and provides insight into the underlying uptake mechanism. PMID:25350155

  3. Bioavailability and Bioequivalence in Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Chow, Shein-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Bioavailability is referred to as the extent and rate to which the active drug ingredient or active moiety from the drug product is absorbed and becomes available at the site of drug action. The relative bioavailability in terms of the rate and extent of drug absorption is considered predictive of clinical outcomes. In 1984, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was authorized to approve generic drug products under the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act based on evidence of average bioequivalence in drug absorption through the conduct of bioavailability and bioequivalence studies. This article provides an overview (from an American point of view) of definition of bioavailability and bioequivalence, Fundamental Bioequivalence Assumption, regulatory requirements, and process for bioequivalence assessment of generic drug products. Basic considerations including criteria, study design, power analysis for sample size determination, and the conduct of bioequivalence trial, and statistical methods are provided. Practical issues such as one size-fits-all criterion, drug interchangeability and scaled average criteria for assessment of highly variable drug products are also discussed. PMID:25215170

  4. Enhanced bioavailability of opiates after intratracheal administration

    SciTech Connect

    Findlay, J.W.A.; Jones, E.C.; McNulty, M.J.

    1986-03-01

    Several opiate analgesics have low oral bioavailabilities in the dog because of presystemic metabolism. Intratracheal administration may circumvent this first-pass effect. Three anesthetized beagles received 5-mg/kg doses of codeine phosphate intratracheally (i.t.), orally (p.o.) and intravenously (i.v.) in a crossover study. The following drugs were also studied in similar experiments: ethylmorphine hydrochloride (5 mg/kg), pholcodine bitartrate (10 mg/kg, hydrocodone bitartrate (4 mg/kg) and morphine sulfate (2.5 mg/kg). Plasma drug concentrations over the 24- to 48-hr periods after drug administrations were determined by radioimmunoassays. I.t. bioavailabilities (codeine (84%), ethylmorphine (100%), and morphine (87%)) of drugs with poor oral availabilities were all markedly higher than the corresponding oral values (14, 26, and 23%, respectively). I.t. bioavailabilities of pholcodine (93%) and hydrocodone (92%), which have good oral availabilities (74 and 79%, respectively), were also enhanced. In all cases, peak plasma concentrations occurred more rapidly after i.t. (0.08-0.17 hr) than after oral (0.5-2 hr) dosing and i.t. disposition often resembled i.v. kinetics. I.t. administration may be a valuable alternative dosing route, providing rapid onset of pharmacological activity for potent drugs with poor oral bioavailability.

  5. BIOAVAILABILITY OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN AQUATIC SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Before a chemical can elicit toxicity, the animal must accumulate a dose at a target tissue of sufficient magnitude to produce a response. Bioavailability refers to the degree to which this accumulation occurs relative to the amount of chemical present in the environment, and is ...

  6. 21 CFR 320.38 - Retention of bioavailability samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE BIOAVAILABILITY AND BIOEQUIVALENCE REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Determining the Bioavailability or Bioequivalence of Drug Products § 320.38 Retention of bioavailability samples... standard used to conduct an in vivo bioequivalence study comparing the test article to the...

  7. 21 CFR 320.38 - Retention of bioavailability samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE BIOAVAILABILITY AND BIOEQUIVALENCE REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Determining the Bioavailability or Bioequivalence of Drug Products § 320.38 Retention of bioavailability samples... standard used to conduct an in vivo bioequivalence study comparing the test article to the...

  8. Sulfur and Selenium in Chondritic Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreibus, G.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.; Wanke, H.

    1993-07-01

    Selenium is the only truly chalcophile element in chondritic meteorites. It has no other host phases except sulfides. Since Se-volatility is similar to S-volatility one may expect constant S/Se ratios. To test this hypothesis chondritic meteorites were analyzed for Se and S. To avoid problems from inhomogeneous distribution of sulfides the same samples that had been analyzed for Se by INAA were analyzed for S (see Table 1) using a Leybold Heraeus Carbon and Sulfur Analyser (CSA 2002). Solar System Abundances of S and Se: The average S-content of CI- meteorites is with 5.41% in agreement with an earlier average of 5.25% for Orgueil [1], but not with higher S-contents for Ivuna, Alais, and Tonk. Inclusion of these data led to an average CI- content of 6.25% in the Anders and Grevesse compilation [2]. The essentially constant average S/Se ratio in all groups of carbonaceous chondrites of 2563 +- 190 suggests that our Orgueil S-content provides a reliable estimate for the average solar system. The new solar S/Se ratio and the CI-value of Se of 21.3 ppm [3] yield an atomic S/Se ratio of 6200 +- 170, 24% below that calculated from [2]. Weathering Effects: Some of the carbonaceous chondrite finds have similar S/Se ratios as falls (see Table 1). However the badly- weathered Arch (CVR) and Colony (CO) and the two C4-chondrites Mulga West and Maralinga have much lower S and somewhat lower Se contents compared to unweathered meteorites. Their S/Se ratios of 1000-230 indicate higher losses of S--probably by oxidation--as of Se. The low Na-contents in Arch and Colony rel. to CV3 and CO3 may also reflect weathering. Low S/Se ratios in the Sahara meteorites are also indicative of weathering processes. The depletion factors for the CV3- chondrite Acfer086 are, relative to average CV, 10 (S), 5 (Se), 6 (Na), and 4 (Ni). Lower absolute depletions, but the same depletion sequence are found for the CO-meteorite Acfer 202. In the CO/CM Acfer 094 only S and Na are depleted. The

  9. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado: Colorado River: III. Larvae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) larvae from adults exposed to selenium at three sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, for 9 months were used in a 30-day waterborne and dietary selenium study. Selenium concentrations in water averaged <1.6 ??g/L from 24-Road, 0.9 ??g/L from Horsethief, 5.5 ??g/L from Adobe Creek, and 10.7 ??g/L from the North Pond. Selenium in dietary items averaged 2.7 ??g/g in brine shrimp, 5.6 ??g/g in zooplankton from Horsethief east wetland, 20 ??g/g in zooplankton from Adobe Creek, and 39 ??g/g in zooplankton from North Pond. The lowest survival occurred in larvae fed zooplankton rather than brine shrimp. Survival of larvae at Adobe Creek and North Pond was lower in site water than in reference water. Survival of brood stock larvae was higher than Horsethief larvae even though they received the same water and dietary treatments. Arsenic concentrations in brine shrimp may have resulted in an antagonistic interaction with selenium and reduced adverse effects in larvae. Deformities in larvae from North Pond were similar to those reported for selenium-induced teratogenic deformities in other fish species. Selenium concentrations of ???4.6 ??g/g in food resulted in rapid mortality of larvae from Horsethief, Adobe Creek, and North Pond, and suggested that selenium toxicity in the Colorado River could limit recovery of this endangered fish.

  10. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado: Colorado River III. Larvae.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven J; Holley, Kathy M; Buhl, Kevin J; Bullard, Fern A

    2005-06-01

    Razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) larvae from adults exposed to selenium at three sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, for 9 months were used in a 30-day waterborne and dietary selenium study. Selenium concentrations in water averaged <1.6 microg/L from 24-Road, 0.9 microg/L from Horsethief, 5.5 microg/L from Adobe Creek, and 10.7 microg/L from the North Pond. Selenium in dietary items averaged 2.7 microg/g in brine shrimp, 5.6 microg/g in zooplankton from Horsethief east wetland, 20 microg/g in zooplankton from Adobe Creek, and 39 microg/g in zooplankton from North Pond. The lowest survival occurred in larvae fed zooplankton rather than brine shrimp. Survival of larvae at Adobe Creek and North Pond was lower in site water than in reference water. Survival of brood stock larvae was higher than Horsethief larvae even though they received the same water and dietary treatments. Arsenic concentrations in brine shrimp may have resulted in an antagonistic interaction with selenium and reduced adverse effects in larvae. Deformities in larvae from North Pond were similar to those reported for selenium-induced teratogenic deformities in other fish species. Selenium concentrations of 4.6 microg/g in food resulted in rapid mortality of larvae from Horsethief, Adobe Creek, and North Pond, and suggested that selenium toxicity in the Colorado River could limit recovery of this endangered fish. PMID:15883090

  11. CANOLA CROP TAKES UP SELENIUM PROVIDES BIOFUEL AND FEED SUPPLEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many of the Brassica plant taxi that are candidates for phytoremediation of selenium also produce products that be used for refining into biodiesel, as well as selenium enriched animal feeds. These include canola (Brassica napus) that is planted in the Westside soils of central California (Oxalis si...

  12. EFFECTS OF SELENIUM ON MALLARD DUCK REPRODUCTION AND IMMUNE FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selenium from irrigation drain water and coal-fired power stations is a significant environmental contaminant in some regions of the USA. Our objectives were to examine whether selenium-exposed waterfowl had altered immune function, disease resistance, or reproduction. Pairs of a...

  13. Iodine and selenium deficiency associated with cretinism in northern Zaire.

    PubMed

    Vanderpas, J B; Contempré, B; Duale, N L; Goossens, W; Bebe, N; Thorpe, R; Ntambue, K; Dumont, J; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T

    1990-12-01

    Selenium status was determined in an endemic-goiter area and in a control area of Zaire. Compared with the reference values of a noniodine-deficient area, serum selenium in subjects living in the core of the northern Zaire endemic-goiter belt (Karawa villages) was seven times lower in 52 school-children and similarly low in 23 cretins; erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (RBC-GPX) was five times lower in schoolchildren and still two times lower in cretins (P = 0.004). In a less severely iodine-deficient city of the same endemia (Businga), selenium status was moderately altered. RBC-GPX activity was linearly associated with serum selenium concentration up to a value of 1140 nmol/L and leveled off at approximately 15 U/g Hb at greater selenium concentration. At Karawa villages, selenium supplementation normalized both the serum selenium and the RBC-GPX. This combined iodine and selenium deficiency could be associated with the elevated frequency of endemic myxedematous cretinism in Central Africa. PMID:2239787

  14. A global perspective of selenium deficiency and toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium is an essential nutrient that has a relatively narrow margin between ingested amounts that cause deficiency and toxicosis. Both selenium deficiency and toxicosis occur in several regions in many countries throughout the world and result in substantial losses to the livestock industry. Sel...

  15. Algal-bacterial treatment facility removes selenium from drainage water

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Lundquist, Tryg J.; Green, F. Bailey; Zarate, Max A.; Oswald, William J.; Leighton, Terrance

    2000-01-25

    A demonstration algal-bacterial selenium removal (ABSR) facility has been treating agricultural drainage water in the Panoche Drainage District on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley since 1997. The project goals are to demonstrate the effectiveness of the ABSR technology for selenium removal, to investigate potential wildlife exposure to selenium at full-scale facilities, and to develop an operational plant configuration that will minimize the life-cycle cost for each pound of selenium removed. The facility consists of a series of ponds designed to promote native microorganisms that remove nitrate and selenium. Previous treatment research efforts sought to reduce selenium concentrations to less than 5 mu g/L, but the ABSR Facility demonstration focuses on providing affordable reduction of the selenium load that is discharged to the San Joaquin River. During 1997 and 1998, the best-performing ABSR plant configuration reduced nitrate by more than 95 percent and reduced total soluble selenium mass by 80 percent. Ongoing investigations focus on optimizing operational parameters and determining operational costs and scale-up engineering requirements. The preliminary total cost estimate for a 10-acre-foot per day ABSR facility is less than $200 per acre-foot of treated drainage water.

  16. Stabilizing Agents for Drug Nanocrystals: Effect on Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Tuomela, Annika; Hirvonen, Jouni; Peltonen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Drug nanocrystals are a versatile option for drug delivery purposes, and while the number of poorly soluble drug materials is all the time increasing, more research in this area is performed. Drug nanocrystals have a simple structure-a solid drug core is surrounded by a layer of stabilizing agent. However, despite the considerably simple structure, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer for a certain drug can be challenging. Mostly, the stabilizer selection is based purely on the requirement of physical stability, e.g., maintaining the nanosized particle size as long as possible after the formation of drug nanocrystals. However, it is also worth taking into account that stabilizer can affect the bioavailability in the final formulation via interactions with cells and cell layers. In addition, formation of nanocrystals is only one process step, and for the final formulation, more excipients are often added to the composition. The role of the stabilizers in the final formulation can be more than only stabilizing the nanocrystal particle size. A good example is the stabilizer's role as cryoprotectant during freeze drying. In this review, the stabilizing effect, role of stabilizers in final nanocrystalline formulations, challenges in reaching in vitro-in vivo correlation with nanocrystalline products, and stabilizers' effect on higher bioavailability are discussed. PMID:27213435

  17. Influence of aging on copper bioavailability in soils.

    PubMed

    Lock, Koen; Janssen, Colin R

    2003-05-01

    Because of long-term chemical processes, metal bioavailability in field soils decreases with time. Metal toxicity may, therefore, be overestimated if toxicity data with freshly spiked soils are used to derive soil quality criteria, a current practice. In the present study, effects of the long-term processes, called aging, on copper partitioning and ecotoxicity are investigated. Twenty-five field soils contaminated by copper runoff from bronze statues and 25 uncontaminated control soils sampled at 5-m distance from these statues were collected in Flanders (Belgium). The soils were selected so that parameters affecting copper bioavailability (pH, cation-exchange capacity, organic matter content, etc.) varied considerably. To assess the effect of aging on copper toxicity, control soils were spiked at total copper concentrations comparable to those of historically contaminated soils. Pore-water copper concentrations and 0.01 M CaCl2-extracted copper concentrations were significantly higher in freshly spiked soils compared to contaminated field soils. However, this could be a pH effect, because pH decreased after spiking. Acute toxicity to Enchytraeus albidus (14 d) as well as chronic toxicity to Folsomia candida (28-d reproduction) and Trifolium pratense (14-d growth) indicated a dose-response relationship between copper toxicity and pore-water copper concentration or the CaCl2-extracted copper fraction. PMID:12729229

  18. Vanadium bioavailability in soils amended with blast furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Maja A; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Cubadda, Francesco; Gustafsson, Jon Petter

    2015-10-15

    Blast furnace (BF) slags are commonly applied as soil amendments and in road fill material. In Sweden they are also naturally high in vanadium. The aim of this study was to assess the vanadium bioavailability in BF slags when applied to soil. Two soils were amended with up to 29% BF slag (containing 800 mg V kg(-1)) and equilibrated outdoors for 10 months before conducting a barley shoot growth assay. Additional soil samples were spiked with dissolved vanadate(V) for which assays were conducted two weeks (freshly spiked) and 10 months (aged) after spiking. The BF slag vanadium was dominated by vanadium(III) as shown by V K-edge XANES spectroscopy. In contrast, results obtained by HPLC-ICP-MS showed that vanadium(V), the most toxic vanadium species, was predominant in the soil solution. Barley shoot growth was not affected by the BF slag additions. This was likely due to limited dissolution of vanadium from the BF slag, preventing an increase of dissolved vanadium above toxic thresholds. The difference in vanadium bioavailability among treatments was explained by the vanadium concentration in the soil solution. It was concluded that the vanadium in BF slag is sparingly available. These findings should be of importance in environmental risk assessment. PMID:25917693

  19. Stabilizing Agents for Drug Nanocrystals: Effect on Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Tuomela, Annika; Hirvonen, Jouni; Peltonen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Drug nanocrystals are a versatile option for drug delivery purposes, and while the number of poorly soluble drug materials is all the time increasing, more research in this area is performed. Drug nanocrystals have a simple structure—a solid drug core is surrounded by a layer of stabilizing agent. However, despite the considerably simple structure, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer for a certain drug can be challenging. Mostly, the stabilizer selection is based purely on the requirement of physical stability, e.g., maintaining the nanosized particle size as long as possible after the formation of drug nanocrystals. However, it is also worth taking into account that stabilizer can affect the bioavailability in the final formulation via interactions with cells and cell layers. In addition, formation of nanocrystals is only one process step, and for the final formulation, more excipients are often added to the composition. The role of the stabilizers in the final formulation can be more than only stabilizing the nanocrystal particle size. A good example is the stabilizer’s role as cryoprotectant during freeze drying. In this review, the stabilizing effect, role of stabilizers in final nanocrystalline formulations, challenges in reaching in vitro–in vivo correlation with nanocrystalline products, and stabilizers’ effect on higher bioavailability are discussed. PMID:27213435

  20. Higher selenium status is associated with adverse blood lipid profile in British adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent findings have raised concern about possible associations of high selenium exposure with diabetes and hyperlipidemia in the US, a population with high selenium status. In the UK, a population with lower selenium status, there is little data on the association of selenium status with cardio-met...

  1. A broccoli COQ5 methyltransferase involved in ubiquinone biosynthesis mediates selenium volatilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological selenium volatilization, which converts selenium into volatile compounds, provides an important means for the cleanup of selenium polluted environments. To identify novel genes whose products are involved in plant selenium volatilization, a broccoli cDNA encoding COQ5 methyltransferase (B...

  2. Bioavailability of calcium and its absorption inhibitors in raw and cooked green leafy vegetables commonly consumed in India--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Amalraj, Augustine; Pius, Anitha

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this research were to assess the bioavailability of calcium using equilibrium dialysis after simulated gastric digestion method in 20 commonly consumed green leafy vegetables (GLVs) from the typical Indian diet, provide data on the content of calcium absorption inhibitors, like oxalate, phytate, tannin and dietary fibres, and evaluate the inhibitory effect of these compounds on calcium bioavailability in raw and cooked GLVs. Cooking did not affect significantly calcium bioavailability in any GLVs. Sesbania grandiflora had a very high content of total oxalates, tannins and dietary fibers, which reduced calcium bioavailability. Calcium content was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy, oxalate by titrimetry, phytate and tannin by colorimetric and dietary fibres by an enzymatic gravimetric method. Chenopodium album, Alternanthera philoxeroides and Centella asiatica, with lower total calcium content, had nearly twice as much bioavailable calcium than other GLVs, because of low fibres, oxalate, phytate and tannin content. PMID:25306367

  3. [Selenium determination in blood plasma samples of high performance athletes].

    PubMed

    Logemann, E; Krützfeldt, B; Rokitzki, L

    1989-01-01

    Cooperating with the department "Sport- und Leistungsmedizin" of the university hospital of Freiburg/Brsg. we investigated the problem whether endurance stress leads to a significant change in the selenium blood concentration of athletes. We took blood samples of 13 test persons (11 men, 2 women) before, immediately after and 2 hours following a marathon course. The analyses of the concentration of selenium in plasma were performed by atomic absorption spectrometry AAS (molybdenum-coated graphite tube technique with L'vov platform as well as matrix modification with nickel nitrate in order to thermally stabilize the selenium). The selenium level of the plasma samples ranged between 41 and 153 micrograms/L. Our experiments have shown that running a marathon course does not lead to significant changes in the standard selenium plasma concentrations of the athletes. PMID:2818554

  4. Ionic liquid-induced synthesis of selenium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Langi, Bhushan; Shah, Chetan; Singh, Krishankant; Chaskar, Atul; Kumar, Manmohan; Bajaj, Parma N.

    2010-06-15

    A simple wet chemical method has been used to synthesize selenium nanoparticles by the reaction of ionic liquid with sodium selenosulphate, a selenium precursor, in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol stabilizer, in aqueous medium. The method is capable of producing spherical selenium nanoparticles in the size range of 76-150 nm under ambient conditions. This is a first report on the production of nano-selenium assisted by an ionic liquid. The synthesized nanoparticles can be separated easily from the aqueous sol by a high-speed centrifuge machine, and can be re-dispersed in an aqueous medium. The synthesized selenium nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy techniques.

  5. SELENIUM CONCENTRATIONS AND GLULATHIONE PEROXIDASE ACTIVITIES IN A POPULATION EXPOSED TO SELENIUM VIA DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selenium concentrations in blood, urine, hair, and tap water were determined in samples obtained from individuals exposed to varying amounts of the element via water from home wells. Glutathione peroxidase activities were also determined on the blood samples. Correlations of bloo...

  6. Daily selenium intake in a moderate selenium deficiency area of Suzhou China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Daily dietary selenium (Se) intake in Suzhou China was investigated to determine whether residents were susceptible to Se deficiency. Food samples were purchased from local supermarkets, including vegetables, fruits, meats and seafood. Hair samples were collected from 285 people ranging from 20 to ...

  7. Selenium fertilization on lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) grain yield, seed selenium concentration, and antioxidant activity.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element for mammals but has not been considered as an essential element for higher plants. Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a cool season food legume rich in protein and a range of micronutrients including minerals (iron and zinc), folates, and carotenoids. The objecti...

  8. Nanoporous selenium as a cathode material for rechargeable lithium-selenium batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Hou, Yuyang; Wu, Xiongwei; Xiao, Shiying; Chang, Zheng; Yang, Yaqiong; Wu, Yuping

    2013-12-21

    Nanoporous selenium was prepared by a simple mechanical method adopting nano-CaCO3 as a template. When used as a cathode, it can exhibit relatively high capacity and good cycling behaviour. These results present great promise for this new cathode material for rechargeable lithium batteries of high energy density. PMID:24175320

  9. Biological production of selenium-biofortified products from natural-occurring sources of selenium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Health problems associated with soil selenium (Se) deficiency and its subsequent low accumulation by plants have become major nutritional issues in many countries. Of the many strategies employed to increase animal and human absorption of Se, biofortification is a recent technique that utilizes a pl...

  10. Selenium and Preeclampsia: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Guo, Dan; Gu, Hao; Zhang, Li; Lv, Shuyan

    2016-06-01

    Conflicting results exist between selenium concentration and preeclampsia. The role of selenium in the development of preeclampsia is unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis to compare the blood selenium level in patients with preeclampsia and healthy pregnant women, and to determine the effectiveness of selenium supplementation in preventing preeclampsia. We searched PubMed, ScienceDirect, the Cochrane Library, and relevant references for English language literature up to November 25, 2014. Mean difference from observational studies and relative risk from randomized controlled trials were meta-analyzed by a random-effect model. Thirteen observational studies with 1515 participants and 3 randomized controlled trials with 439 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Using a random-effect model, a statistically significant difference in blood selenium concentration of -6.47 μg/l (95 % confidence interval (CI) -11.24 to -1.7, p = 0.008) was seen after comparing the mean difference of observational studies. In randomized controlled trials, using a random-effect model, the relative risk for preeclampsia was 0.28 (0.09 to 0.84) for selenium supplementation (p = 0.02). Evidence from observational studies indicates an inverse association of blood selenium level and the risk of preeclampsia. Supplementation with selenium significantly reduces the incidence of preeclampsia. However, more prospective clinical trials are required to assess the association between selenium supplementation and preeclampsia and to determine the dose, beginning time, and duration of selenium supplementation. PMID:26516080

  11. Protective effect of selenium on lung cancer in smelter workers.

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardsson, L; Brune, D; Nordberg, I G; Wester, P O

    1985-01-01

    A possible protective effect of selenium against lung cancer has been indicated in recent studies. Workers in copper smelters are exposed to a combination of airborne selenium and carcinogens. In this study lung tissue concentrations of selenium, antimony, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lanthanum, and lead from 76 dead copper smelter workers were compared with those of 15 controls from a rural area and 10 controls from an urban area. The mean exposure time for the dead workers was 31.2 years, and the mean retirement time after the end of exposure 7.2 years. Lung cancer appeared in the workers with the lowest selenium lung tissue levels (selenium median value 71 micrograms/kg wet weight), as compared with both the controls (rural group, median value 110; urban group, median value 136) and other causes of death among the workers (median value 158). The quotient between the metals and selenium was used for comparison: a high quotient indicating a low protective effect of selenium and vice versa. The median values of the quotients between antimony, arsenic, cadmium, lanthanum, lead, chromium, and cobalt versus selenium were all numerically higher among the cases of lung cancer, the first five significantly higher (p less than 0.05) in 28 of the 35 comparisons between the lung cancer group and all other groups of smelter workers and controls. The different lung metal concentrations for each person were weighted according to their carcinogenic potency (Crx4 + Asx3 + Cdx2 + Sbx1 + Cox1 + Lax1 + Pbx1) against their corresponding selenium concentrations. From these calculations the protective effect of selenium was even more pronounced. PMID:4041390

  12. Cytotoxicity of selenium nanoparticles in rat dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Joseph F; Webster, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a deadly nosocomial infection caused by contaminated endotracheal tubes. It has been shown that polyvinyl chloride (PVC, the endotracheal tube substrate) coated with elemental selenium nanoparticles reduces bacterial adherence and proliferation on PVC by over 99%. However, it is not known if selenium nanoparticles elicit a cytotoxic effect in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic effects of PVC coated with selenium nanoparticles on fibroblasts, which are mammalian cells central to endotracheal tube intubation. Methods: Different concentrations of selenium nanoparticles were precipitated onto the PVC surface by reduction of selenium salts using glutathione. Characterization of PVC coated with selenium nanoparticles was done by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray, and contact angle measurements. For the cytotoxicity experiments, fibroblasts were seeded at a density of 5000 cm2 onto PVC coated with three different concentrations of selenium nanoparticles (high, medium, low) and incubated for 4 hours (adhesion) as well as for 24 hours and 72 hours (proliferation). The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value was determined after 72 hours using an ultrahigh concentration. MTT assays were used to assess cell viability at the indicated time points. Results: The three concentrations of selenium nanoparticles did not elicit a cytotoxic effect after 72 hours (P < 0.01, n = 3). It was found that the IC50value was at the ultrahigh concentration of selenium nanoparticles. The nanoparticulate elemental selenium concentration previously shown to decrease the function of bacteria was shown not to cause a cytotoxic effect on fibroblasts in vitro. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate great selectivity between bacteria and healthy cells, and are a viable option for coating endotracheal tubes in order to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia. PMID:22915842

  13. A Solid-State NMR Study of Selenium Substitution into Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Kolmas, Joanna; Kuras, Marzena; Oledzka, Ewa; Sobczak, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The substitution of selenium oxyanions in the hydroxyapatite structure was examined using multinuclear solid-state resonance spectroscopy (ssNMR). The study was supported by powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD) and wavelength dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF). Samples of pure hydroxyapatite (HA300) and selenate (HA300-1.2SeO4) or selenite (HA300-1.2SeO3) substituted hydroxyapatites were synthesized using the standard wet method and heated at 300 °C to remove loosely bonded water. PXRD data showed that all samples are single-phase, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite. The incorporation of selenite and selenate ions affected the lattice constants. In selenium-containing samples the concentration of Se was very similar and amounted to 9.55% and 9.64%, for HA300-1.2SeO4 and HA300-1.2SeO3, respectively. PXRD and ssNMR data showed that the selenite doping significantly decreases the crystallite size and crystallinity degree. 31P and 1H NMR experiments demonstrated the developed surface hydrated layer in all samples, especially in HA300-1.2SeO3. 1H NMR studies showed the dehydroxylation of HA during the selenium oxyanions substitution and the existence of hydrogen bonding in structural hydroxyl group channels. 1H→77Se cross polarization NMR experiments indicated that selenites and selenates are located in the crystal lattice and on the crystal surface. PMID:25997001

  14. Importance of suspended sediment (SPS) composition and grain size in the bioavailability of SPS-associated pyrene to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinghui; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhou, Dong; Bao, Yimeng; Li, Husheng; Zhai, Yawei

    2016-07-01

    Hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) tend to associate with suspended sediment (SPS) in aquatic environments; the composition and grain size of SPS will affect the bioavailability of SPS-associated HOCs. However, the bioavailability of HOCs sorbed on SPS with different compositions and grain sizes is not well understood. In this work, passive dosing devices were made to control the freely dissolved concentration of pyrene, a typical HOC, in the exposure systems. The effect of pyrene associated with amorphous organic carbon (AOC), black carbon (BC), and minerals of SPS with grain sizes of 0-50 μm and 50-100 μm on the immobilization and enzymatic activities of Daphnia magna was investigated to quantify the bioavailability of pyrene sorbed on SPS with different grain sizes and compositions. The results showed that the contribution of AOC-, BC-, and mineral-associated pyrene to the total bioavailability of SPS-associated pyrene was approximately 50%-60%, 10%-29%, and 20%-30%, respectively. The bioavailable fraction of pyrene sorbed on the three components of SPS was ordered as AOC (22.4%-67.3%) > minerals (20.1%-46.0%) > BC (9.11%-16.8%), and the bioavailable fraction sorbed on SPS of 50-100 μm grain size was higher than those of 0-50 μm grain size. This is because the SPS grain size will affect the ingestion of SPS and the SPS composition will affect the desorption of SPS-associated pyrene in Daphnia magna. According to the results obtained in this study, a model has been developed to calculate the bioavailability of HOCs to aquatic organisms in natural waters considering both SPS grain size and composition. PMID:27112726

  15. Strategic Selenium Management: Natural Biofortification of Grazing Livestock with Selenium to Avert Selenium Deficiency and Enhance the Nutritional Value of Food Products.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Efficient and effective management of Se deficiency is required to sustain profitability of grazing-based livestock operations. Selenium deficiency increases morbidity and mortality rates, reduces reproduction rates, and reduces yield and quality of marketable products. Therefore, producers must p...

  16. A methodology for ecosystem-scale modeling of selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, T.S.; Luoma, S.N.

    2010-01-01

    The main route of exposure for selenium (Se) is dietary, yet regulations lack biologically based protocols for evaluations of risk. We propose here an ecosystem-scale model that conceptualizes and quantifies the variables that determinehow Se is processed from water through diet to predators. This approach uses biogeochemical and physiological factors from laboratory and field studies and considers loading, speciation, transformation to particulate material, bioavailability, bioaccumulation in invertebrates, and trophic transfer to predators. Validation of the model is through data sets from 29 historic and recent field case studies of Se-exposed sites. The model links Se concentrations across media (water, particulate, tissue of different food web species). It can be used to forecast toxicity under different management or regulatory proposals or as a methodology for translating a fish-tissue (or other predator tissue) Se concentration guideline to a dissolved Se concentration. The model illustrates some critical aspects of implementing a tissue criterion: 1) the choice of fish species determines the food web through which Se should be modeled, 2) the choice of food web is critical because the particulate material to prey kinetics of bioaccumulation differs widely among invertebrates, 3) the characterization of the type and phase of particulate material is important to quantifying Se exposure to prey through the base of the food web, and 4) the metric describing partitioning between particulate material and dissolved Se concentrations allows determination of a site-specific dissolved Se concentration that would be responsible for that fish body burden in the specific environment. The linked approach illustrates that environmentally safe dissolved Se concentrations will differ among ecosystems depending on the ecological pathways and biogeochemical conditions in that system. Uncertainties and model sensitivities can be directly illustrated by varying exposure

  17. Effects of Different Amounts of Supplemental Selenium and Vitamin E on the Incidence of Retained Placenta, Selenium, Malondialdehyde, and Thyronines Status in Cows Treated with Prostaglandin F2α for the Induction of Parturition

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Ivan B.; Veličković, Miljan; Vuković, Dragan; Milanović, Svetlana; Valčić, Olivera; Gvozdić, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of retained placenta (RP) in cows increases in cases of parturition induced by prostaglandin F2α. We analyzed the effects of different doses of supplemental selenium and vitamin E on the incidence of RP, blood selenium, plasma thyronines, and malondialdehyde concentration. Thirty-three clinically healthy, multiparous Holstein-Frisian cows were assigned to 3 groups and supplemented with a single intramuscular injection of sodium selenite (SS) and tocopherol acetate (TAc) between days 250 to 255 of gestation: control—unsupplemented; group A—10 mg SS + 400 mg TAc; group B—20 mg SS + 800 mg TAc. Parturition was induced using PGF2α not before day 275 of gestation. The RP incidence was reduced from 66.7% in the control to 38.2 and 30.8% in groups A and B, respectively. Blood selenium and glutathione peroxidase activity in treated groups were significantly higher compared to control, with no significant difference between groups A and B. Plasma malondialdehyde in group B was significantly lower than that in control and group A, while thyronines levels were not affected. Comparison of RP and non-RP cows, independently of supplement treatment, revealed higher blood selenium and glutathione peroxidase activity and lower MDA and thyroxine in non-RP animals, while triiodothyronine level did not differ. PMID:26464914

  18. Effects of dietary selenium source, storage time, and temperature on the quality of quail eggs.

    PubMed

    Baylan, Mikail; Canogullari, Sibel; Ayasan, Tugay; Copur, Gulsen

    2011-11-01

    We report the effects of time of storage, temperature, and supplementation with sodium selenite- and selenium-enriched yeast on the quality of quail eggs. For this study, 90 10-week-old female Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica) with similar body size were caged individually and randomly divided into five groups of 18 quails each. One group was fed a normal diet and served as control. A second group was supplemented with 0.2 mg/kg sodium selenite (In-Se) and three groups supplemented with 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mg/kg of a commercially available selenium-enriched yeast (O-Se1, O-Se2, and O-Se3, respectively). The eggs were collected at third and fourth weeks of the experiment and were stored at 4°C and 20°C for 0, 15, 30, and 45 days. Extension of the storage time to 45 days at 20°C resulted in significant deterioration of egg quality. The albumen Haugh unit (HU), pH, albumen index, yolk index, and egg weight loss were the most important parameters influenced by the nature of the selenium sources, storage time, and temperature. Storage time and temperature were also significant for egg weight loss, HU, and albumen and yolk indexes. The results show that supplementation with selenium yeast significantly affected shell weight, shell thickness, HU, albumen index, yolk index, and pH. The HU decreased with increased storage time and temperature. Higher levels of Se-yeast administration resulted in greater HU compared to the selenite and control groups. PMID:21136198

  19. Impact of selenium and other trace elements on the endangered adult razorback sucker.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven J; Holley, Kathy M; Buhl, Kevin J; Bullard, Fern A; Weston, L Ken; McDonald, Susan F

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted with endangered the razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) to determine if environmental exposure to selenium in flooded bottomland sites affected survival, growth, and egg-hatching success. Adults were stocked at three sites adjacent to the Colorado River near Grand Junction, Colorado, in July 1996: hatchery ponds at Horsethief Canyon State Wildlife Area (referred to here as Horsethief; the reference site), a diked tertiary channel at Adobe Creek, and North Pond at Walter Walker State Wildlife Area (WWSWA). Fish were collected in April 1997 and spawned. After two spawnings adults from the three sites were held at Horsethief for an 86-day selenium depuration period. Selenium concentrations at Horsethief were 1.4-3.0 microg/L in water, 0.8-0.9 microg/g in sediment, 4.5 microg/g in muscle plug, and 6.0 microg/g in eggs; at Adobe Creek, <0.7-4.5 microg/L in water, 1.2-2.5 microg/g in sediment, 16-20 microg/g in zooplankton, 9.6 microg/g in muscle plug, and 40 microg/g in eggs; and at North Pond, 3.2-17 microg/L in water, 16-94 microg/g in sediment, 32-48 microg/g in zooplankton, 14 microg/g in muscle plug, and 55 microg/g in eggs. During the depuration period, when adults from Adobe Creek and North Pond were held at Horsethief, the fish lost 7%-13% of their selenium burden in 59 days and 14%-21% in 86 days. Larvae from North Pond adults had the most deformities, followed by Adobe Creek adults, with the fewest deformities found in the Horsethief adults. PMID:12203951

  20. Bioaccessibility of selenium after human ingestion in relation to its chemical species and compartmentalization in maize.

    PubMed

    Mombo, Stéphane; Schreck, Eva; Dumat, Camille; Laplanche, Christophe; Pierart, Antoine; Longchamp, Mélanie; Besson, Philippe; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse

    2016-06-01

    Selenium is a micronutrient needed by all living organisms including humans, but often present in low concentration in food with possible deficiency. From another side, at higher concentrations in soils as observed in seleniferous regions of the world, and in function of its chemical species, Se can also induce (eco)toxicity. Root Se uptake was therefore studied in function of its initial form for maize (Zea mays L.), a plant widely cultivated for human and animal food over the world. Se phytotoxicity and compartmentalization were studied in different aerial plant tissues. For the first time, Se oral human bioaccessibility after ingestion was assessed for the main Se species (Se(IV) and Se(VI)) with the BARGE ex vivo test in maize seeds (consumed by humans), and in stems and leaves consumed by animals. Corn seedlings were cultivated in hydroponic conditions supplemented with 1 mg L(-1) of selenium (Se(IV), Se(VI), Control) for 4 months. Biomass, Se concentration, and bioaccessibility were measured on harvested plants. A reduction in plant biomass was observed under Se treatments compared to control, suggesting its phytotoxicity. This plant biomass reduction was higher for selenite species than selenate, and seed was the main affected compartment compared to control. Selenium compartmentalization study showed that for selenate species, a preferential accumulation was observed in leaves, whereas selenite translocation was very limited toward maize aerial parts, except in the seeds where selenite concentrations are generally high. Selenium oral bioaccessibility after ingestion fluctuated from 49 to 89 % according to the considered plant tissue and Se species. Whatever the tissue, selenate appeared as the most human bioaccessible form. A potential Se toxicity was highlighted for people living in seleniferous regions, this risk being enhanced by the high Se bioaccessibility. PMID:26387097

  1. Cadmium Selenium Testing for Microbial Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Cadmium selenium Quantum Dots (QDs) are metal nanoparticles that fluoresce in a variety of colors determined by their size. QDs are solid state structures made of semiconductors or metals that confine a countable, small number of electrons into a small space. The confinement of electrons is achieved by the placement of some insulating material(s) around a central, well conducted region. Coupling QDs with antibodies can be used to make spectrally multiplexed immunoassays that test for a number of microbial contaminants using a single test.

  2. Distinct reactivities on segmented selenium nanorods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Han; Chen, Yun-Wen; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Wang, C R Chris

    2015-09-18

    We demonstrate a new approach to synthesize several unique nanostructures by tuning the selective reactivities on individual symmetry-breaking segmented selenium nanorods (SBS-SeNRs). The segment-selective reactions from thiolated silane endowed the formation of float-like SBS-SeNR@SiO2 with a silica coating on the t-Se segment. Several other unique nanostructures were further synthesized by applying other selective reactions, such as Se chemical removal and nanogold deposition. Such a segmented nanomaterial of SBS-SeNRs acts as a new chemical template for preparing various segmented nanocomposites. PMID:26236788

  3. Spectrum of sodiumlike selenium - Se XXIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, C. M.; Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Richardson, M. C.; Behring, W. E.; Cohen, L.

    1986-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of Se XXIV have been obtained with a 3-m grazing-incidence spectrograph. Thin plastic foils coated with selenium were irradiated with four or eight beams of the OMEGA laser in a line-focus configuration. Spectrograms were obtained by viewing the plasma axially. Prominent in the spectra were the 3s-3p and 3p-3d transitions in the 150-240-A region and the transitions nl-(n + 1)l-prime with n = 3, 4 in the 24-80-A region. The energy levels and ionization limit derived from the measured wavelengths are also presented.

  4. Oral bioavailability of curcumin: problems and advancements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weidong; Zhai, Yingjie; Heng, Xueyuan; Che, Feng Yuan; Chen, Wenjun; Sun, Dezhong; Zhai, Guangxi

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin is a natural compound of Curcuma longa L. and has shown many pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant in both preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, curcumin has hepatoprotective, neuroprotective activities and protects against myocardial infarction. Particularly, curcumin has also demonstrated favorite anticancer efficacy. But limiting factors such as its extremely low oral bioavailability hampers its application as therapeutic agent. Therefore, many technologies have been developed and applied to overcome this limitation. This review described the main physicochemical properties of curcumin and summarized the recent studies in the design and development of oral delivery systems for curcumin to enhance the solubility and oral bioavailability, including liposomes, nanoparticles and polymeric micelles, phospholipid complexes, and microemulsions. PMID:26942997

  5. Evaluation of ammonia as diluent for serum sample preparation and determination of selenium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Caraballo, Edwin A.; Burguera, Marcela; Burguera, José L.

    2002-12-01

    A method for the determination of total selenium in serum samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was evaluated. The method involved direct introduction of 1:5 diluted serum samples (1% v/v NH 4OH+0.05% w/v Triton X-100 ®) into transversely heated graphite tubes, and the use of 10 μg Pd+3 μg Mg(NO 3) 2 as chemical modifier. Optimization of the modifier mass and the atomization temperature was conducted by simultaneously varying such parameters and evaluating both the integrated absorbance and the peak height/peak area ratio. The latter allowed the selection of compromise conditions rendering good sensitivity and adequate analyte peak profiles. A characteristic mass of 49 pg and a detection limit (3s) of 6 μg 1 -1 Se, corresponding to 30 μg l -1 Se in the serum sample, were obtained. The analyte addition technique was used for calibration. The accuracy was assessed by the determination of total selenium in Seronorm™ Trace Elements Serum Batch 116 (Nycomed Pharma AS). The method was applied for the determination of total selenium in ten serum samples taken from individuals with no known physical affection. The selenium concentration ranged between 79 and 147 μg l -1, with a mean value of 114±22 μg l -1.

  6. Absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of selenium following oral administration of elemental selenium nanoparticles or selenite in rats.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Hadrup, Niels; Hansen, Marianne; Pereira, Sonia A; Gammelgaard, Bente; Møller, Laura Hyrup; Mortensen, Alicja; Lam, Henrik Rye; Larsen, Erik H

    2014-02-01

    A suspension of nanoparticles of BSA-stabilized red amorphous elemental selenium (Se) or an aqueous solution of sodium selenite was repeatedly administered by oral gavage for 28 days at 0.05 mg kg(-1) bw per day (low dose) or at 0.5 mg kg(-1) bw per day (high dose) as Se to female rats. Prior to administration, the size distribution of the Se nanoparticles was characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, which showed that the particles' mean diameter was 19 nm and ranged in size from 10 to 80 nm. Following administration of the high dose of Se nanoparticles or selenite the concentration of Se was determined by ICP-MS in the liver, kidney, urine, feces, stomach, lungs, and plasma at the μg g(-1) level and in brain and muscle tissue at the sub-μg g(-1) level. In order to test if any elemental Se was present in the liver, kidney or feces, an in situ derivatization selective to elemental Se was performed by treatment with sulfite, which resulted in formation of the selenosulfate anion. This Se species was selectively and quantitatively determined by anion exchange HPLC and ICP-MS detection. The results showed that elemental Se was present in the livers, kidneys and feces of animals exposed to low and high doses of elemental Se nanoparticles or to selenite, and was also detected in the same samples from control animals. The fraction of Se present as elemental Se in livers and kidneys from the high dose animals was significantly larger than the similar fraction in samples from the low dose animals or from the controls. This suggested that the natural metabolic pathways of Se were exhausted when given the high dose of elemental Se or selenite resulting in a non-metabolized pool of elemental Se. Both dosage forms of Se were bioavailable as demonstrated by the blood biomarker selenoprotein P, which was equally up-regulated in the high-dose animals for both dosage forms of Se. Finally, the excretion of Se in urine and its occurrence as Se

  7. Bioavailability of tocotrienols: evidence in human studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    As a minor component of vitamin E, tocotrienols were evident in exhibiting biological activities such as neuroprotection, radio-protection, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and lipid lowering properties which are not shared by tocopherols. However, available data on the therapeutic window of tocotrienols remains controversial. It is important to understand the absorption and bioavailability mechanisms before conducting in-depth investigations into the therapeutic efficacy of tocotrienols in humans. In this review, we updated current evidence on the bioavailability of tocotrienols from human studies. Available data from five studies suggested that tocotrienols may reach its target destination through an alternative pathway despite its low affinity for α-tocopherol transfer protein. This was evident when studies reported considerable amount of tocotrienols detected in HDL particles and adipose tissues after oral consumption. Besides, plasma concentrations of tocotrienols were shown to be higher when administered with food while self-emulsifying preparation of tocotrienols was shown to enhance the absorption of tocotrienols. Nevertheless, mixed results were observed based on the outcome from 24 clinical studies, focusing on the dosages, study populations and formulations used. This may be due to the variation of compositions and dosages of tocotrienols used, suggesting a need to understand the formulation of tocotrienols in the study design. Essentially, implementation of a control diet such as AHA Step 1 diet may influence the study outcomes, especially in hypercholesterolemic subjects when lipid profile might be modified due to synergistic interaction between tocotrienols and control diet. We also found that the bioavailability of tocotrienols were inconsistent in different target populations, from healthy subjects to smokers and diseased patients. In this review, the effect of dosage, composition and formulation of tocotrienols as well as study populations on the

  8. Speciation and microalgal bioavailability of inorganic silver

    SciTech Connect

    Reinfelder, J.R.; Chang, S.I.

    1999-06-01

    Silver accumulation in aquatic organisms is primarily attributed to the bioavailability of the free Ag ion (Ag{sup +}). Some reports suggest that AgCl(aq) is also available for biological uptake, but few studies of Ag bioavailability used the range of chloride concentrations over which AgCl{sup 0}(aq) is the dominant Ag species. None used environmentally realistic, low Ag concentrations. To assess the bioavailability of inorganic Ag species and the importance of the low polarity AgCl(aq) complex to biological uptake, the authors determined the octanol-water partition coefficient of Ag over a range of chloride concentrations representative of fresh to brackish waters and measured short-term Ag uptake rates in the euryhaline marine microalga Thalassiosira weissflogii exposed to a total silver concentration of 50 pM. Overall octanol-water partition coefficients (D{sub ow}) of inorganic silver ranged from 0.02 to 0.06. The K{sub ow} of AgCl(aq) calculated using D{sub ow} values measured at 0.5, 5, and 50 mM Cl{sup {minus}} and the K{sub ow} of Ag{sup +} (0.03, measured in the absence of Cl{sup {minus}}) was 0.09. Silver D{sub ow} and uptake rate constants in phytoplankton were highest at the Cl{sup {minus}} concentration where uncharged AgCl(aq) is the dominant silver species. Their results demonstrate that AgCl(aq) is the principal bioavailable species of inorganic silver in phytoplankton and suggest that direct uptake of AgCl(aq) is important to the overall accumulation of Ag in aquatic invertebrates.

  9. Bioavailability and biodistribution of nanodelivered lutein.

    PubMed

    Kamil, Alison; Smith, Donald E; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Astete, Carlos; Sabliov, Cristina; Oliver Chen, C-Y

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) to enhance lutein bioavailability. The bioavailability of free lutein and PLGA-NP lutein in rats was assessed by determining plasma pharmacokinetics and deposition in selected tissues. Lutein uptake and secretion was also assessed in Caco-2 cells. Compared to free lutein, PLGA-NP increased the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the time-concentration curve in rats by 54.5- and 77.6-fold, respectively, while promoting tissue accumulation in the mesenteric fat and spleen. In comparison with micellized lutein, PLGA-NP lutein improved the Cmax in rat plasma by 15.6-fold and in selected tissues by ⩾ 3.8-fold. In contrast, PLGA-NP lutein had a lower uptake and secretion of lutein in Caco-2 cells by 10.0- and 50.5-fold, respectively, compared to micellized lutein. In conclusion, delivery of lutein with polymeric NP may be an approach to improve the bioavailability of lutein in vivo. PMID:26304429

  10. Relative bioavailability of three cefixime formulations.

    PubMed

    Kees, F; Naber, K G; Sigl, G; Ungethüm, W; Grobecker, H

    1990-03-01

    Three galenic formulations of cefixime (tablet, syrup and dry suspension) containing 200 mg each were compared with respect to their relative bioavailability in twelve healthy volunteers. All three formulations showed reliable absorption. Mean peak plasma concentrations were reached after 3.3-3.5 h, mean terminal half lives were 2.9-3.1 h. 18-24% of the dose administered were recovered unchanged in the urine. Best bioavailability was obtained with the dry suspension (AUC0-infinity = 25.8 +/- 7.0 micrograms/ml h; Cmax = 3.4 +/- 0.9 microgram/ml), followed by the tablet (AUC0-infinity = 20.9 +/- 8.1 micrograms/ml h; Cmax = 3.0 +/- 1.0 micrograms/ml) and the syrup which is based on triglycerides (AUC0-infinity = 17.8 +/- 5.9 micrograms/ml h; Cmax = 2.4 +/- 0.7 micrograms/ml). The statistical analysis resulted in bioinequivalence between dry suspension and syrup. It is concluded that best bioavailability of cefixime after oral administration is guaranteed when taken in an "aqueous medium" either as dry suspension or as tablet with "plenty of liquid". PMID:2346538

  11. Bioavailability of nanoparticulate hematite to Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Marusenko, Yevgeniy; Shipp, Jessie; Hamilton, George A; Morgan, Jennifer L L; Keebaugh, Michael; Hill, Hansina; Dutta, Arnab; Zhuo, Xiaoding; Upadhyay, Nabin; Hutchings, James; Herckes, Pierre; Anbar, Ariel D; Shock, Everett; Hartnett, Hilairy E

    2013-03-01

    The environmental effects and bioavailability of nanoparticulate iron (Fe) to plants are currently unknown. Here, plant bioavailability of synthesized hematite Fe nanoparticles was evaluated using Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) as a model. Over 56-days of growing wild-type A. thaliana, the nanoparticle-Fe and no-Fe treatments had lower plant biomass, lower chlorophyll concentrations, and lower internal Fe concentrations than the Fe-treatment. Results for the no-Fe and nanoparticle-Fe treatments were consistently similar throughout the experiment. These results suggest that nanoparticles (mean diameter 40.9 nm, range 22.3-67.0 nm) were not taken up and therefore not bioavailable to A. thaliana. Over 14-days growing wild-type and transgenic (Type I/II proton pump overexpression) A. thaliana, the Type I plant grew more than the wild-type in the nanoparticle-Fe treatment, suggesting Type I plants cope better with Fe limitation; however, the nanoparticle-Fe and no-Fe treatments had similar growth for all plant types. PMID:23262070

  12. Rapid screening assay for calcium bioavailability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Luhrsen, K.R.; Hudepohl, G.R.; Smith, K.T.

    1986-03-01

    Calcium bioavailability has been studied by numerous techniques. The authors report here the use of the gamma emitting isotope of calcium (/sup 47/Ca) in a whole body retention assay system. In this system, calcium sources are administered by oral gavage and subsequent counts are determined and corrected for isotopic decay. Unlike iron and zinc retention curves, which exhibit a 2-3 day equilibration period, calcium reaches equilibration after 24 hours. Autoradiographic analysis of the femurs indicate that the newly absorbed calcium is rapidly distributed to the skeletal system. Moreover, the isotope is distributed along the entire bone. Comparisons of calcium bioavailability were made using intrinsic/extrinsic labeled milk from two species i.e. rat and goat as well as CaCO/sub 3/. In addition, extrinsic labeled cow milk was examined. In the rat, the extrinsic labeled calcium from milk was better absorbed than the intrinsic calcium. This was not the case in goat milk or the calcium carbonate which exhibited no significant differences. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled milk indicates a difference in distribution of the /sup 47/Ca. From these data, the authors recommend the use of this assay system in calcium bioavailability studies. The labeling studies and comparisons indicate caution should be used, however, in labeling techniques and species milk comparison.

  13. Selenium Nanoparticles for Stress-Resilient Fish and Livestock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Biplab; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Daware, Akshay; Tribedi, Prosun; Krishnani, K. K.; Minhas, P. S.

    2015-09-01

    The fisheries and livestock sectors capture the highest share of protein-rich animal food and demonstrate accelerated growth as an agriculture subsidiary. Environmental pollution, climate change, as well as pathogenic invasions exert increasing stress impacts that lead the productivity momentum at a crossroads. Oxidative stress is the most common form of stress phenomenon responsible for the retardation of productivity in fisheries and livestock. Essential micronutrients play a determinant role in combating oxidative stress. Selenium, one of the essential micronutrients, appears as a potent antioxidant with reduced toxicity in its nanoscale form. In the present review, different methods of synthesis and characterization of nanoscale selenium have been discussed. The functional characterization of nano-selenium in terms of its effect on growth patterns, feed digestibility, and reproductive system has been discussed to elucidate the mechanism of action. Moreover, its anti-carcinogenic and antioxidant potentiality, antimicrobial and immunomodulatory efficacy, and fatty acid reduction in liver have been deciphered as the new phenomena of nano-selenium application. Biologically synthesized nano-selenium raises hope for pharmacologically enriched, naturally stable nanoscale selenium with high ecological viability. Hence, nano-selenium can be administered with commercial feeds for improvising stress resilience and productivity of fish and livestock.

  14. Regulation of hepatic carbohydrate metabolism by Selenium during diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongping; Qiu, Qinqin; Zou, Caiyan; Dou, Lianjun; Liang, Jun

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, we have tried to unravel the role of Selenium supplementation in containing hyperglycemia by regulating enzymes activities involved in carbohydrate metabolism in liver of diabetic animals. Male wistar rats were divided into four groups: normal control, diabetic, Selenium treated control and Selenium treated diabetic group. Diabetes was induced in the animals by injecting alloxan intraperitoneally at a dose level of 150 mg/kg body weight. Selenium in the form of sodium selenite was supplemented to rats at a dose level of 1 PPM in drinking water, ad libitum for two time durations of 2 and 4 weeks. Animals were sacrificed and livers were excised for the analyses of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism as well as the levels of glycogen. In-vitro (14)C-d glucose uptake and its turnover were also assessed in liver slices of all the treatment groups using radiorespirometry. Selenium supplementation to the diabetic rats normalized the enzyme activities of glucose-6-phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase and glycogen phosphorylase as well as restored the glycogen levels to within the normal limits which were altered during diabetes. Interestingly, when Selenium was supplemented to diabetic rats, (14)C-d glucose uptake and its turnover showed a statistically significant increase in their values which however, were decreased in diabetic rats. In conclusion, Selenium mediates insulin-like role during diabetes by tending to normalize the altered activities of glucose metabolizing enzymes and also improves the glucose uptake and its metabolism by the liver. PMID:25779343

  15. Selenium Nanoparticles for Stress-Resilient Fish and Livestock.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Biplab; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Daware, Akshay; Tribedi, Prosun; Krishnani, K K; Minhas, P S

    2015-12-01

    The fisheries and livestock sectors capture the highest share of protein-rich animal food and demonstrate accelerated growth as an agriculture subsidiary. Environmental pollution, climate change, as well as pathogenic invasions exert increasing stress impacts that lead the productivity momentum at a crossroads. Oxidative stress is the most common form of stress phenomenon responsible for the retardation of productivity in fisheries and livestock. Essential micronutrients play a determinant role in combating oxidative stress. Selenium, one of the essential micronutrients, appears as a potent antioxidant with reduced toxicity in its nanoscale form. In the present review, different methods of synthesis and characterization of nanoscale selenium have been discussed. The functional characterization of nano-selenium in terms of its effect on growth patterns, feed digestibility, and reproductive system has been discussed to elucidate the mechanism of action. Moreover, its anti-carcinogenic and antioxidant potentiality, antimicrobial and immunomodulatory efficacy, and fatty acid reduction in liver have been deciphered as the new phenomena of nano-selenium application. Biologically synthesized nano-selenium raises hope for pharmacologically enriched, naturally stable nanoscale selenium with high ecological viability. Hence, nano-selenium can be administered with commercial feeds for improvising stress resilience and productivity of fish and livestock. PMID:26400834

  16. Aquatic selenium pollution is a global environmental safety issue.

    PubMed

    Lemly, A Dennis

    2004-09-01

    Selenium pollution is a worldwide phenomenon and is associated with a broad spectrum of human activities, ranging from the most basic agricultural practices to the most high-tech industrial processes. Consequently, selenium contamination of aquatic habitats can take place in urban, suburban, and rural settings alike--from mountains to plains, from deserts to rainforests, and from the Arctic to the tropics. Human activities that increase waterborne concentrations of selenium are on the rise and the threat of widespread impacts to aquatic life is greater than ever before. Important sources of selenium contamination in aquatic habitats are often overlooked by environmental biologists and ecological risk assessors due to preoccupation with other, higher priority pollutants, yet selenium may pose the most serious long-term risk to aquatic habitats and fishery resources. Failure to include selenium in the list of constituents measured in contaminant screening/monitoring programs is a major mistake, both from the hazard assessment aspect and from the pollution control aspect. Once selenium contamination begins, a cascade of bioaccumulation events is set into motion which makes meaningful intervention nearly impossible. However, this cascade of events need not happen if adequate foresight and planning are exercised. Early evaluation and action are key. Prudent risk management based on environmentally sound hazard assessment and water quality goals can prevent biological impacts. PMID:15261722

  17. Vanadate and selenium inhibit the triiodothyronine induced enzyme activity and mRNA level for both fatty acid synthase and malic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Mirmiran, R.; Goodridge, A.G.; Stapleton, S.R. Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo )

    1991-03-15

    In chick-embryo hepatocytes in culture, triiodothyronine stimulates enzyme activity, mRNA level and transcription rate for both fatty acid synthase (FAS) and malic enzyme (ME). Insulin alone has no effect but amplifies the induction by T3. Recent evidence has demonstrated the insulin-mimicking action of vanadate and selenium on various physiological processes. Little information, however, is available on the affects of vanadate and selenium on the expression of genes that are regulated by insulin. These studies were initiated to test the potential of vanadate and selenium to mimic the amplification affect of insulin on the T3 induction of FAS and ME. In chick-embryo hepatocytes incubated in a chemically defined medium, addition of T3 for 48h causes an increase in the enzyme activity and mRNA level for both FAS and ME. Addition of sodium vanadate or sodium selenate (20 {mu}M) coincident with the T3 almost completely inhibited the stimulation of FAS and ME activity and accumulation of their respective mRNA's. Fifty percent maximal inhibition occurred at about 3-40{mu}M vanadate or 5-10{mu}M selenium. Vanadate and selenium similarity inhibited FAS and ME enzyme activity and mRNA level when the cells were incubated in the presence of insulin and T3. The effect of these metals was selective; isocitrate dehydrogenase activity as well as the level of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate mRNA were not affected by any of the additions made to the cells in culture. This effect by vanadate and selenium also does not appear to be a generalized effect of metals on lipogenic enzymes as molydate under similar experimental conditions has no effect on either the enzyme activity or mRNA level of FAS or ME. Studies are continuing to determine the mechanism of action of these agents on the regulation of lipogenic enzymes.

  18. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  19. Selenium toxicosis in wild aquatic birds.

    PubMed

    Ohlendorf, H M; Kilness, A W; Simmons, J L; Stroud, R K; Hoffman, D J; Moore, J F

    1988-01-01

    Severe gross and microscopic lesions and other changes were found in adult aquatic birds and in embryos from Kesterson Reservoir (a portion of Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge), Merced County, Calif., during 1984. Adult birds from that area were emaciated, had subacute to extensive chronic hepatic lesions, and had excess fluid and fibrin in the peritoneal cavity. Biochemical changes in their livers included elevated glycogen and non-protein-bound sulfhydryl concentrations and glutathione peroxidase activity but lowered protein, total sulfhydryl, and protein-bound sulfhydryl concentrations. Congenital malformations observed grossly in embryos were often multiple and included anophthalmia, microphthalmia, abnormal beaks, amelia, micromelia, ectrodactyly, and hydrocephaly. Mean concentrations of selenium in livers (94.4 ppm, dry weight) and kidneys (96.6 ppm) of birds collected at the Kesterson ponds were about 10 times those found at a nearby control area (8.3 and 12.2 ppm). We conclude that selenium present in the agricultural drainage water supplied to the Kesterson ponds accumulated in the food chain of aquatic birds to toxic concentrations and caused the lesion and other changes observed. PMID:3373565

  20. Histopathological changes in selenium-exposed fish

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, E.M.; Bell, J.S.; Harlan, C.W.

    1983-06-01

    Redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus) were collected from Martin Lake in east Texas. For at least 8 months, 1 year earlier, aqueous selenium-laden effluent from man-made sources was released into this 5,000-acre reservoir (unpublished data). Redear sunfish from a reference lake, 8 km upstream, were collected for comparison to Martin Lake fish. The hepatopancreas (i.e., liver and associated, disseminated exocrine pancrease), mesonephros (i.e., kidney), gonads, heart, spleen, stomach, and gill arches were preserved for histopathological examination using optical and/or transmission electron microscopy. Livers from Martin Lake redear sunfish (which had accumulated approximately 20 ppm selenium in the liver) showed central necrosis, reduced quantities of rough endoplasmic reticulum and glycogen particles, and increased numbers of lysosome-like structures. Kidneys showed proliferative glomerulonephritis, and exocrine pancreas showed marked hypertrophy at the optical level. Ultrastructurally, architectural disorganization, reduced rough endoplasmic reticulum, increased cisternal space, and proliferation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum were evident. The stomach, spleen, gill, heart, and gonads showed no abnormalities.

  1. Selenium Metabolism in Neptunia amplexicaulis1

    PubMed Central

    Burnell, James N.

    1981-01-01

    ATP sulfurylase (EC 2.7.7.4), cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.16), and methionyl-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.10) from Neptunia amplexicaulis have been purified approximately 162-, 140- and 185-fold, respectively. Purified ATP sulfurylase in the presence of purified inorganic pyrophosphatase catalyzed the incorporation of sulfate into adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate; evidence of an analogous reaction with selenate is presented. Crude extracts catalyzed both the sulfate- and the adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate-dependent NADH oxidation in the adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate kinase assay of Burnell and Whatley (1977 Biochim Biophys Acta 481: 266-278), but an analogous reaction with selenate could not be detected. Both purified cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase and methionyl-tRNA synthetase used selenium-containing analogs as substrates in both the ATP-pyrophosphate exchange and the aminoacylation assays. It seems that selenium-containing amino acids are excluded from proteins by a mechanism(s) other than substrate discrimination at the amino acid activation stage of protein synthesis. PMID:16661667

  2. Selenium for the Prevention of Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Pamela B.; Fain, Heidi D.; Cassidy, James P.; Tran, Sally M.; Moos, Philip J.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Gerads, Russell; Florell, Scott R.; Grossman, Douglas; Leachman, Sancy A.

    2013-01-01

    The role of selenium (Se) supplementation in cancer prevention is controversial; effects often depend on the nutritional status of the subject and on the chemical form in which Se is provided. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo models to study two unique therapeutic windows for intervention in the process of cutaneous melanomagenisis, and to examine the utility of two different chemical forms of Se for prevention and treatment of melanoma. We studied the effects of Se in vitro on UV-induced oxidative stress in melanocytes, and on apoptosis and cell cycle progression in melanoma cells. In vivo, we used the HGF transgenic mouse model of UV-induced melanoma to demonstrate that topical treatment with l-selenomethionine results in a significant delay in the time required for UV-induced melanoma development, but also increases the rate of growth of those tumors once they appear. In a second mouse model, we found that oral administration of high dose methylseleninic acid significantly decreases the size of human melanoma xenografts. Our findings suggest that modestly elevation of selenium levels in the skin might risk acceleration of growth of incipient tumors. Additionally, certain Se compounds administered at very high doses could have utility for the treatment of fully-malignant tumors or prevention of recurrence. PMID:23470450

  3. Selenium toxicosis in wild aquatic birds

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlendorf, H.M.; Kilness, A.W.; Simmons, J.L.; Stroud, R.K.; Hoffman, D.J.; Moore, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Severe gross and microscopic lesions and other changes were found in adult aquatic birds and in embryos from Kesterson Reservoir (a portion of Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge), Merced County, Calif., during 1984. Adult birds from that area were emaciated, had subacute to extensive chronic hepatic lesions, and had excess fluid and fibrin in the peritoneal cavity. Biochemical changes in their livers included elevated glycogen and non-protein-bound sulfhydryl concentrations and glutathione peroxidase activity but lowered protein, total sulfhydryl, and protein-bound sulfhydryl concentrations. Congenital malformations observed grossly in embryos were often multiple and included anophthalmia, microphthalmia, abnormal beaks, amelia, micromelia, ectrodactyly, and hydrocephaly. Mean concentrations of selenium in livers (94.4 ppm, dry weight) and kidneys (96.6 ppm) of birds collected at the Kesterson ponds were about 10 times those found at a nearby control area (8.3 and 12.2 ppm). We conclude that selenium present in the agricultural drainage water supplied to the Kesterson ponds accumulated in the food chain of aquatic birds to toxic concentrations and caused the lesion and other changes observed.

  4. Selenium for the prevention of cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Pamela B; Fain, Heidi D; Cassidy, James P; Tran, Sally M; Moos, Philip J; Boucher, Kenneth M; Gerads, Russell; Florell, Scott R; Grossman, Douglas; Leachman, Sancy A

    2013-03-01

    The role of selenium (Se) supplementation in cancer prevention is controversial; effects often depend on the nutritional status of the subject and on the chemical form in which Se is provided. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo models to study two unique therapeutic windows for intervention in the process of cutaneous melanomagenisis, and to examine the utility of two different chemical forms of Se for prevention and treatment of melanoma. We studied the effects of Se in vitro on UV-induced oxidative stress in melanocytes, and on apoptosis and cell cycle progression in melanoma cells. In vivo, we used the HGF transgenic mouse model of UV-induced melanoma to demonstrate that topical treatment with l-selenomethionine results in a significant delay in the time required for UV-induced melanoma development, but also increases the rate of growth of those tumors once they appear. In a second mouse model, we found that oral administration of high dose methylseleninic acid significantly decreases the size of human melanoma xenografts. Our findings suggest that modestly elevation of selenium levels in the skin might risk acceleration of growth of incipient tumors. Additionally, certain Se compounds administered at very high doses could have utility for the treatment of fully-malignant tumors or prevention of recurrence. PMID:23470450

  5. Selenium and tellurium as carbon substitutes

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.

    1980-01-01

    This review has summarized structure-activity studies with /sup 75/Se- and /sup 123m/Te-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in which the selenium or tellurium heteroatom has been inserted between carbon-carbon bonds. The agents that have been investigated in most detail include steroids for adrenal imaging and long-chain fatty acids, and a variety of other unique agents have also been studied. Because of the great versatility of the organic chemistry of selenium and tellurium, there is continuing interest in the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with /sup 75/Se, /sup 73/Se, and /sup 123m/Te. There are two important factors which will determine the extent of future interest in such agents. These include the necessity of a decrease in the cost of highly enriched /sup 122/Te to make the reactor production of /sup 123m/Te cost effective. In addition, the potential preparation of large amounts of /sup 73/Se should stimulate the development of /sup 73/Se-labeled radiopharmaceuticals.

  6. Re-evaluation of selenium toxicity in grazing mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Raisbeck, M.F.; O`Toole, D.; Sanchez, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    The potential uptake and concentration of selenium by vegetation grown on abandoned coal mine lands has been the focus of many restrictions governing the reclamation of such sites. While there is little question that selenium is very toxic, recent research suggests that much of what has been anecdotally attributed to selenium in the past, is, in fact, due to other environmental factors. This presentation will summarize research undertaken by the authors during the last 6 years to more clearly define the effects of selenosis on herbivores in Wyoming.

  7. [Selenium in selected species of mushrooms from Poland].

    PubMed

    Falandysz, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    The selenium was quantified in the caps, stalks or a whole fruiting bodies of king bolete (Boletus edulis), brown birch scaber stalk (Leccinum scabrum), parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera), fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and poison pax (Paxillus involutus) collected at the various regions of Poland in 1998-2001. King bolete, parasol mushroom and fly agaric were a much more abundant in selenium than brown birch scaber stalk or poison pax. Some differences were observed between the selenium content of the particular species collected at different sites as well as depending on anatomical part of the fruiting body. PMID:14755851

  8. Transport pathways for arsenic and selenium: A miniriew

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zijuan

    2009-01-01

    Summary Arsenic and selenium are metalloids found in the environment. Arsenic is considered to pose the most significant potential threat to human health based on frequency of occurrence, toxicity and human exposure. Selenium, on the other hand, ranks only 147th in toxicity but, in contrast to arsenic, is also a required micronutrient. Whether a toxin or micronutrient, their metabolism requires that cells to accumulate these metalloids. In this review we discuss the membrane proteins that transport arsenic and selenium into cells, from bacteria to humans, as well as some the efflux proteins involved in detoxification. PMID:18789529

  9. Quality characteristics and lutein bioavailability from maize and vegetable-based health food.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Arunkumar; Sheshappa, Mamatha Bangera; Baskaran, Vallikannan

    2014-06-01

    Health food (ready-mix) was prepared from maize and vegetables a source of lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) and studied for its quality characteristics (moisture sorption isotherm, sensory, microbiological, chemical composition, and storage stability) on storage at varying temperatures for 3 months and L+Z bioavailability in mice. Results revealed a decrease in the L+Z level (4.70, 9.24, and 13.85%) of ready-mix stored at 4, 27, and 37°C, respectively. Critical relative humidity and critical moisture content of the product was 64% and 12.24%, respectively. The product is well accepted and was not affected adversely during storage. L+Z bioavailability from ready-mix in mice was higher in plasma (29.4%), liver (58.7%), and eye (14.6%) than control (mice received diet with purified L). To conclude, L+Z in the ready-mix is stable and more bioavailable than control. These findings may help in understanding the importance of simple food processing to improve L bioavailability under its deficient condition among an elderly population. PMID:24670117

  10. Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Searcy, K; Richardson, M; Blythe, G; Wallschlaeger, D; Chu, P; Dene, C

    2012-02-29

    This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more

  11. Effect of selenium-enriched probiotics on laying performance, egg quality, egg selenium content, and egg glutathione peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Cuiling; Zhao, Yuxin; Liao, Shengfa F; Chen, Fu; Qin, Shunyi; Wu, Xianshi; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Kehe

    2011-11-01

    A 35-day experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of selenium-enriched probiotics (SP) on laying performance, egg quality, egg selenium (Se) content, and egg glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity. Five hundred 58-week-old Rohman laying hens were randomly allotted to 5 dietary treatments of 100 each. Each treatment had 5 replicates, and each replicate had 5 cages with 4 hens per cage. The SP was supplemented to a corn-soybean-meal basal diet at 3 different levels that supplied total Se at 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg. The basal diet served as a blank control, while the basal diet with supplemental probiotics served as a probiotics control. The results showed that dietary SP supplementation not only increased (p < 0.05) the rate of egg laying, day egg weight, mean egg weight, egg Se content, and egg GPX activity but also decreased (p < 0.05) the feed:egg ratio and egg cholesterol content. The egg Se content was gradually increased (p < 0.05) along with the increasing level of dietary Se. The SP supplementation also slowed down (p < 0.05) the drop of Haugh units (HU) of eggs stored at room temperature. The egg GPX activity had a positive correlation (p < 0.01) with egg Se content and a negative correlation (p < 0.01) with egg HU drop. These results suggested that Se contents, GPX activity, and HU of eggs were affected by the dietary Se level, whereas the egg-laying performance and egg cholesterol content were affected by the dietary probiotics. It was concluded that this SP is an effective feed additive that combines the organic Se benefit for hen and human health with the probiotics benefit for laying hen production performance. It was also suggested that the eggs from hens fed this SP can serve as a nutraceutical food with high Se and low cholesterol contents for both healthy people and patients with hyperlipidemia, fatty liver, or cardiovascular disease. PMID:21942342

  12. Defining the Optimal Selenium Dose for Prostate Cancer Risk Reduction: Insights from the U-Shaped Relationship Between Selenium Status, DNA Damage, and Apoptosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our work in dogs has revealed a U-shaped dose response between selenium status and prostatic DNA damage that remarkably parallels the relationship between dietary selenium and prostate cancer risk in men, suggesting that more selenium is not necessarily better. Herein, we extend this canine work to ...

  13. Evaluation of the toxicity of selenium from hydroponically produced selenium-enriched kale sprout in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Chantiratikul, Anut; Borisuth, Lalita; Chinrasri, Orawan; Saenthaweesuk, Nattanan; Chookhampaeng, Sumalee; Thosaikham, Witphon; Sriart, Noppong; Chantiratikul, Piyanete

    2016-05-01

    Hydroponically produced Se-enriched kale sprouts (HPSeKS) are studied for their use as an alternative dietary Se supplement for poultry. The study experimented with different levels and sources of Se to determine toxicity and how the toxicity may affect productive performance, Se concentration in egg and tissues, and physiological responses of laying hens. One-hundred and twenty hens, 59 weeks of age, were divided into 5 groups. Each group consisted of 4 replicates and each replicate had 6 birds according to a 2×2+1 Augmented Factorial Experiment in a Completely Randomized Design. The experiment was conducted over a 4 week period, and 5 dietary treatments (T) were used: T1 basal diet, T2 and T3 basal diet plus 5 and 10mg Se/kg from sodium selenite (SS), T4 and T5 basal diet plus 5 and 10mg Se/kg from HPSeKS, respectively. The results make clear that Se from HPSeKS, at 5-10mg/kg, did not affect (P>0.05) feed intake and egg production; however, Se bioavailability decreased (P<0.05). Egg, tissue and plasma Se concentrations, and GSH-Px activity in red blood cells increased (P<0.05) compared to those in T1. Final body weight, feed intake, Se bioavailability, concentration of Se in breast muscle and plasma of hens fed Se from SS were lower (P<0.05) than those of hens fed Se from HPSeKS. The findings demonstrate that dietary Se from HPSeKS at 5-10mg/kg is not considered a toxic level for laying hens. The toxicity of Se from HPSeKS was less than the toxicity of Se from SS. PMID:26964695

  14. The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor gene is down-regulated by selenium deficiency in Caco-2 cells and rat colon mucosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To test the hypothesis that selenium affects DNA methylation and hence gene regulation we employed a methylation array (Panomics) in the human colonic epithelial Caco-2 cell model. The array profiles DNA methylation from promoter regions of 82 human genes. After conditioning cells to repeatedly redu...

  15. From Bioavailability Science to Regulation of Organic Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Calvo, Jose-J; Harmsen, Joop; Parsons, John R; Semple, Kirk T; Aitken, Michael D; Ajao, Charmaine; Eadsforth, Charles; Galay-Burgos, Malyka; Naidu, Ravi; Oliver, Robin; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Römbke, Jörg; Streck, Georg; Versonnen, Bram

    2015-09-01

    The bioavailability of organic chemicals in soil and sediment is an important area of scientific investigation for environmental scientists, although this area of study remains only partially recognized by regulators and industries working in the environmental sector. Regulators have recently started to consider bioavailability within retrospective risk assessment frameworks for organic chemicals; by doing so, realistic decision-making with regard to polluted environments can be achieved, rather than relying on the traditional approach of using total-extractable concentrations. However, implementation remains difficult because scientific developments on bioavailability are not always translated into ready-to-use approaches for regulators. Similarly, bioavailability remains largely unexplored within prospective regulatory frameworks that address the approval and regulation of organic chemicals. This article discusses bioavailability concepts and methods, as well as possible pathways for the implementation of bioavailability into risk assessment and regulation; in addition, this article offers a simple, pragmatic and justifiable approach for use within retrospective and prospective risk assessment. PMID:26230485

  16. Understanding and managing oral bioavailability: physiological concepts and patents.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohd A; Al-Jenoobi, Fahad I; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Ali, Raisuddin

    2015-01-01

    Oral delivery of poorly bioavailable therapeuticals is challenging. The challenges are more serious when physiological factors of gut such as cytochrome P450, P-glycoprotein, permeability, pH triggered precipitation and degradation are responsible for poor bioavailability. P-Glycoprotein mediated multidrug resistance is on high agenda for anti-cancer drugs. The present article compiled different methodologies used to curb these challenges of bioavailability. The concepts of poor bioavailability are illustrated along with possible management. Numerous relevant patents for bioavailability enhancement are also highlighted. Though, there is no universal approach for bioavailability enhancement, the drug related challenges are managed by altering its physicochemical characteristics or employing formulation technology, while the effects of physiological factors are minimized by using efflux transport inhibitor or cytochrome P-450 inhibitor or prodrug or through formulation technologies (enteric coating or microenvironment of pH etc.). PMID:25230073

  17. /sup 75/Selenium-labeled sheep plasma: the time course of changes in 75selenium distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, W.B.; McMurray, C.H.

    1988-09-01

    Sheep fed rations containing 0.1 ppm selenium were labeled by intravenous injection of radioactive sodium selenite or selenocystine. Gel filtration of serially collected plasma samples indicated that, with time, there was a transition from mercaptan sensitive to high mol wt mercaptan and protein solubilizer resistant selenoproteins. Radiolabeled plasma samples collected from selenite and selenocystine labeled sheep were dialyzed against buffer containing 2-mercaptoethanol or protein solubilizer. No difference in the stability between selenite- and selenocystine-labeled plasma could be detected.

  18. Deposition of selenium and other constituents in reservoir bottom sediment of the Solomon River Basin, north-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.

    1999-01-01

    The Solomon River drains approximately 6,840 square miles of mainly agricultural land in north-central Kansas. The Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Department of the Interior, has begun a Resource Management Assessment (RMA) of the Solomon River Basin to provide the necessary data for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance before renewal of long-term water-service contracts with irrigation districts in the basin. In May 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected bottom-sediment cores from Kirwin and Webster Reservoirs, which are not affected by Bureau irrigation, and Waconda Lake, which receives water from both Bureau and non-Bureau irrigated lands. The cores were analyzed for selected physical properties, total recoverable metals, nutrients, cesium-137, and total organic carbon. Spearman's rho correlations and Kendall's tau trend tests were done for sediment concentrations in cores from each reservoir. Selenium, arsenic, and strontium were the only constituents that showed an increasing trend in concentrations for core samples from more than one reservoir. Concentrations and trends for these three constituents were compared to information on historical irrigation to determine any causal effect. Increases in selenium, arsenic, and strontium concentrations can not be completely explained by Bureau irrigation. However, mean selenium, arsenic, and strontium concentrations in sediment from all three reservoirs may be related to total irrigated acres (Bureau and non-Bureau irrigation) in the basin. Selenium, arsenic, and strontium loads were calculated for Webster Reservoir to determine if annual loads deposited in the reservoir were increasing along with constituent concentrations. Background selenium, arsenic, and strontium loads in Webster Reservoir are significantly larger than post-background loads.

  19. Kidney function and blood pressure in preschool-aged children exposed to cadmium and arsenic - potential alleviation by selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Skröder, Helena; Hawkesworth, Sophie; Kippler, Maria; El Arifeen, Shams; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Moore, Sophie E.; Vahter, Marie

    2015-07-15

    Background: Early-life exposure to toxic compounds may cause long-lasting health effects, but few studies have investigated effects of childhood exposure to nephrotoxic metals on kidney and cardiovascular function. Objectives: To assess effects of exposure to arsenic and cadmium on kidney function and blood pressure in pre-school-aged children, and potential protection by selenium. Methods: This cross-sectional study was part of the 4.5 years of age (range: 4.4–5.4 years) follow-up of the children from a supplementation trial in pregnancy (MINIMat) in rural Bangladesh, and nested studies on early-life metal exposures. Exposure to arsenic, cadmium and selenium from food and drinking water was assessed by concentrations in children's urine, measured by ICP-MS. Kidney function was assessed by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, n=1106), calculated from serum cystatin C, and by kidney volume, measured by ultrasound (n=375). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was measured (n=1356) after five minutes rest. Results: Multivariable-adjusted regression analyzes showed that exposure to cadmium, but not arsenic, was inversely associated with eGFR, particularly in girls. A 0.5 µg/L increase in urinary cadmium among the girls (above spline knot at 0.12) was associated with a decrease in eGFR of 2.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2}, corresponding to 0.2SD (p=0.022). A slightly weaker inverse association with cadmium was also indicated for kidney volume, but no significant associations were found with blood pressure. Stratifying on children's urinary selenium (below or above median of 12.6 µg/L) showed a three times stronger inverse association of U-Cd with eGFR (all children) in the lower selenium stratum (B=−2.8; 95% CI: −5.5, −0.20; p=0.035), compared to those with higher selenium (B=−0.79; 95% CI: −3.0, 1.4; p=0.49). Conclusions: Childhood cadmium exposure seems to adversely affect kidney function, but not blood pressure, in this population of young children

  20. Quantities of lead producing health effects in humans: sources and bioavailability.

    PubMed Central

    Mahaffey, K R

    1977-01-01

    Levels of lead ingestion and inhalation producing increased body burden of lead and clinical toxicity in adults and children are compared with usual levels of exposure. The magnitude of lead exposure from air, water, and food is estimated. Sources of high level exposure to lead are described; urban street dirt, house dust, and paint are particularly common sources of high concentrations of lead. The bioavailability of different lead compounds is reviewed as well as factors affecting susceptibility to lead. PMID:908307