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Sample records for affects surface photometry

  1. How the extinction of extragalactic background light affects surface photometry of galaxies, groups and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zackrisson, E.; Micheva, G.; Östlin, G.

    2009-08-01

    The faint regions of galaxies, groups and clusters hold important clues about how these objects formed, and surface photometry at optical and near-infrared wavelengths represents a powerful tool for studying such structures. Here, we identify a hitherto unrecognized problem with this technique, related to how the night sky flux is typically measured and subtracted from astronomical images. While most of the sky flux comes from regions between the observer and the target object, a small fraction - the extragalactic background light (EBL) - comes from behind. We argue that since this part of the sky flux can be subjected to extinction by dust present in the galaxy/group/cluster studied, standard reduction procedures may lead to a systematic oversubtraction of the EBL. Even very small amounts of extinction can lead to spurious features in radial surface brightness profiles and colour maps of extended objects. We assess the likely impact of this effect on a number of topics in extragalactic astronomy where very deep surface photometry is currently attempted, including studies of stellar haloes, starburst host galaxies, disc truncations and diffuse intragroup/intracluster light. We argue that EBL extinction may provide at least a partial explanation for the anomalously red colours reported for the haloes of disc galaxies and for the hosts of local starburst galaxies. EBL extinction effects also mimic truncations in discs with unusually high dust opacities, but are unlikely to be the cause of such features in general. Failure to account for EBL extinction can also give rise to a non-negligible underestimate of intragroup and intracluster light at the faintest surface brightness levels currently probed. Finally, we discuss how EBL extinction effects may be exploited to provide an independent constraint on the surface brightness of the EBL, using a combination of surface photometry and direct star counts.

  2. Surface photometry of WINGS galaxies with GASPHOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, M.; Bindoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moretti, A.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Varela, J.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We present the B, V, and K band surface photometry catalogs obtained by running the automatic software GASPHOT on galaxies from the WINGS cluster survey with isophotal areas larger than 200 pixels. The catalogs can be downloaded at the Centre de Données Astronomiques de Strasbourg. Methods: The luminosity growth curves of stars and galaxies in a given catalog relative to a given cluster image were obtained simultaneously by slicing the image with a fixed surface brightness step in several SExtractor runs. Then, using a single Sersic law convolved with a space-varying point spread function (PSF), GASPHOT performed a simultaneous χ2 best-fit of the major- and minor-axis luminosity growth curves of galaxies. We outline the GASPHOT performances and compare our surface photometry with that obtained by SExtractor, GALFIT, and GIM2D. This analysis is aimed at providing statistical information about the accuracy that is generally achieved by the softwares for automatic surface photometry of galaxies. Results: The GASPHOT catalogs provide the parameters of the Sersic law that fit the luminosity profiles for each galaxy and for each photometric band. They are the sky coordinates of the galaxy center (RA, Dec), the total magnitude (m), the semi-major axis of the effective isophote (Re), the Sersic index (n), the axis ratio (b/a), and a flag parameter (QFLAG) that generally indicates the fit quality. The WINGS-GASPHOT database includes 41 463 galaxies in the B band, 42 275 in the V band, and 71 687 in the K band. The bright early-type galaxies have higher Sersic indices and larger effective radii, as well as redder colors in their center. In general, the effective radii increase systematically from the K to the V and B band. Conclusions: The GASPHOT photometry agrees well with the surface photometry obtained by GALFIT and GIM2D, and with the aperture photometry provided by SExtractor. In particular, the direct comparison of structural parameters derived by different

  3. Multicolor surface photometry of powerful radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    CCD images of 72 powerful radio galaxies have been obtained with the KPNO 2.1m, 4m and CTIO 4m telescopes utilizing B, V, and R filters to study the colors and other photometric properties of these large systems. The GASP software package was used for the data reduction and detailed 2-d surface photometry. In addition, image modeling techniques were employed to investigate the contributions to galaxy properties by point-like nuclear sources seen in some of these galaxies. It was found that powerful radio galaxies show a much higher frequency than normal bright ellipticals of having optical morphologies which deviate from elliptical symmetry. Approximately 50% of the sample exhibit non-elliptically symmetric isophotes. These prominent distortions are present at surface brightness levels of {le} 25 V mag/(arc sec){sup 2}. In addition, a large fraction ({approximately}50%) of the remaining radio galaxies without the aforementioned morphological peculiarities have large isophotal twists ({Delta}P.A. {ge} 10{degree}) or ellipticity gradients. Significantly {approximately}50% of the galaxies with strong optical emission lines in their spectra display optically peculiar structures very similar to those found by Toomre and Toomre (1972) in their simulations of interacting disk galaxies. The galaxies with weak emission lines in their spectra are less frequently ({approximately}10%) distorted from elliptical shape. Those that are exhibit features like isophote twists, double nuclei and close companion galaxies embedded in the radio galaxy optical isophotes. The (B-V) colors of many of the powerful radio galaxies with strong emission lines are blue relative to normal giant ellipticals at the same redshift.

  4. Automated surface photometry for the Coma Cluster galaxies: The catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Okamura, S.; Tarusawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    A homogeneous photometry catalog is presented for 450 galaxies with B(sub 25.5) less than or equal to 16 mag located in the 9.8 deg x 9.8 deg region centered on the Coma Cluster. The catalog is based on photographic photometry using an automated surface photometry software for data reduction applied to B-band Schmidt plates. The catalog provides accurate positions, isophotal and total magnitudes, major and minor axes, and a few other photometric parameters including rudimentary morphology (early of late type).

  5. The Structure of Galaxies I: Surface Photometry Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schombert, J.; Smith, A. K.

    2012-04-01

    This project uses the 2MASS all-sky image database to study the structure of galaxies over a range of luminosities, sizes and morphological types. This first paper in this series will outline the techniques, reliability and data products to our surface photometry program. Our program will analyze all acceptable galaxies (meeting our criteria for isolation from companions and bright stars) from the Revised Shapley-Ames and Uppsala galaxy catalogs. Resulting photometry and surface brightness profiles are released using a transparent scheme of data storage which includes not only all the processed data but knowledge of the processing steps and calibrating parameters.

  6. Changes on Pluto's Surface Revealed with Long Timebase Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Erin; Buie, M.

    2013-10-01

    We are continuing to monitor the long-term photometric behavior of Pluto in order to constrain volatile surface migration. As Pluto passes near the center of the galaxy, the fields are too crowded for normal aperture photometric techniques. We approached this problem with a combination of point-spread function (PSF) photometry and optimal image subtraction (OIS). Our data are from the 0.8-m robotic telescope at Lowell Observatory, the 1-m robotic telescope at New Mexico State Observatory, and the Faulkes 2-m robotic telescope at Siding Spring, part of Las Cumbres Observatory. Our latest results add photometric data up through 2012 to the data collected since discovery. Our new reduction scheme consists of background catalogs, image subtraction using deep templates, and Pluto photometry extraction. We also use the known photometric properties of Charon determined with HST to remove Charon's contribution from old and new data and compare these results with the HST data where Pluto is measured by itself. Data since 2002 show marked departures from the behavior prior to that time. These results provide clear evidence for time evolution of Pluto's surface albedo. We will present these results along with implications for present-day processes that are altering the surface of Pluto. This work also provides crucial insight into the effort required to provide ground-based support observations for the upcoming New Horizons flyby of Pluto in 2015. Support for this work was provided by NASA Planetary Astronomy Program, grant number NNX09AB43G.

  7. Surface photometry of a sample of elliptical and S0 galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    De carvalho, R.R.; Da costa, L.N.; Djorgovski, S. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1991-08-01

    The results are reported of surface photometry of 38 early-type galaxies, located mainly in the Fornax Cluster. Detailed comparisons with previously published work are given along with internal and external error estimates for all quantities, and some serious systematic discrepancies in the older aperture photometry of some of the galaxies in the present sample are pointed out. 15 refs.

  8. Deep Surface Photometry of M87 with 13 Optical Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Zhou, Xu; Ma, Jun; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yanbin; Li, Jiuli; Chen, Jiansheng

    2005-06-01

    Multicolor surface photometry of M87 was undertaken with the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut photometric system, which contains 13 optical bands covering a range from 3800 to 10000 Å. Radial profiles have been derived for surface brightness, ellipticity, position angle, and the residuals from the fitted ellipses. The results show a good agreement with pure elliptical isophotes for M87, and no obvious substructure or dust is detected out to r=500'', corresponding to 40 kpc from the center. The surface brightness profile at r<190'' is well fitted by the de Vaucouleurs law. Moreover, a cD envelope is detected outside that radius. Given the surface brightness profiles of the 13 bands, the spectral energy distribution (SED) of M87 is obtained as a function of semimajor axis (SMA). By fitting the observed SEDs to synthetic ones derived from the PEGASE model, we explored the star formation history (SFH) of this giant elliptical galaxy. In the hypothesis that the evolution time T of M87 is the same as the mean age of its globular clusters, about 14 Gyr, we find that the characteristic timescale τ of the SFH increases monotonically from 2 to 7 Gyr as a function of SMA, while the luminosity-weighted mean stellar ages range from about 11 to 9 Gyr in a mild decrease, and the mean stellar metallicity Z drops from 0.017 to 0.014 as the SMA increases to r=500''. In the range 40''

  9. Surface Photometry of the Southern Milky Way at 170 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Schlosser, W.; Schmidtobreick, L.; Koczet, P.

    As part of the D2-Space-Shuttle-Mission in 1993, the GAUSS-Camera has obtained photographic images of the Milky Way in various passbands in the Ultraviolet. Each film covers an area of the sky of about 140^\\circ. Six images were obtained at 170 nm, but only three of them could be used. The calibration has been done using the catalogued intensities of stars and transforming them into surface brightnesses. Then the stars on the images have been filtered out and the Shuttle-Glow has been eliminated. The images finally have been transformed into maps of the Milky Way in galactic coordinates l, b. These maps cover the Milky Way between the Galactic Center and Vela (360^\\circ <= l <= 270^\\circ, - -25^\\circ <= b <= 35^\\circ) and include dark clouds, reflection nebulae and bright open clusters. They are a perfect tool to investigate the distribution of these objects and therefore the global structure of the Milky Way. The image of the Milky Way at 170 nm is heavily dominated by interstellar extinction, leading to high intensity gradients all over the galactic plane. The images at 217 nm and 280 nm, also obtained by the GAUSS-Camera, and previous photometries taken in U, B, V and R have been used for comparison.

  10. Photographic surface photometry of the Milky Way. III - Photometry of the central area of the Galaxy in the ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proell, H. J.; Schmidt-Kaler, T.; Schlosser, W.

    1983-01-01

    6 photographic plates, taken at La Silla, Chile, with the spherical mirror super-wide-angle camera of the Astronomisches Institut der Ruhr Universität Bochum (see paper I: Schmidt-Kaler, Th. et al., 1982) were measured to study the surface brightness distribution in the area around the centre of the Milky Way, between galactic longitudes 297° and 27°, and latitudes - 30° to + 30°, with an angular resolution of 0.°3 × 0.°3 (Fig. 5). In section 2 the plate material and details of the reductions are presented, so far as not already given in paper I. During the photometric scanning of the plates all stars brighter than a limiting magnitude mlim were marked by hand, and the corresponding data points were replaced by an average from neighbouring points (section 3). Defined at the level of 50% elimination, mlim ≌ 8.m0 (in U). Figure 4 shows the effect of various methods of eliminating bright stars. The errors of the surface photometry are discussed in section 4. The internal mean error of the intensity of one data point, as determined from the scatter from the 6 plates, is ± 9.4%. This error is split into an additive component ± 8 S10U (S10 = intensity of a star of 10m), mostly due to the contributions of airglow and scattered light, and a multiplicative component of ± 7.5%, mostly due to the uncertainty of the photographic characteristic curve. Possible systematic errors are estimated and upper limits for these are given in table II. Section 5 presents the results of the photometry. For the sake of clear representation in the isophote map (Fig 5) data with intermediate intensities 110 < Igal ≦ 250 S10U were smoothed over 0.°9 × 0.°9, data with Igal ≦ 110 S10U were smoothed over 1.°2 × 1.°2. The mean error of the isophotes is about ± 6%. We then compare our photometry with existing ultraviolet surface photometries. Apart from the area l = 320° to 330°, b = -25° to -20° where our intensities are probably vitiated by some remaining airglow

  11. Surface photometry of galaxies in low density regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennik, J.; Hopp, U.; Kovachev, B.; Kuhn, B.; Elsaesser, H.

    1996-06-01

    We perform detailed surface photometry, based on B- and/or R-band CCD images of 92 faint galaxies. They are a subsample of those galaxies which were studied by Hopp et al. (1994) in the direction of three nearby voids. We derive integral photometric parameters and radial surface brightness profiles and compare them to those of several faint galaxy samples, located in different environments, and of a bright field galaxy sample. According to the obtained photometric characteristics, our sample is a mixture of intrinsically bright and faint galaxies, about 60% of them belonging to the bright subsample (M_B_<-19.0). These bright ones show mean characteristics of typical Freeman's disks and are mainly located in the background of the observed voids. The faint subsample (M_B_>=-19.0) has parameters typical for the low-surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies. There are a few well isolated galaxies both among the bright and faint subsamples. About 40% of studied galaxies reveal ellipticity and position angle variations along of the radius. The (B-R) colour indices of the observed galaxies span over a wide range of 0.5-1.8mag with a median value at 1.11 mag, rather blue. About 30% of the observed galaxies reveal radial colour gradients at a 5σ significance level. These galaxies show typically red centers and are getting bluer towards the periphery. The most isolated galaxies in our sample show relatively blue colours (B_T_-R_T_=~0.8). About 40% of the studied galaxies have surface brightness profiles which can be described by the model of single exponential disk. 38% of our galaxies have more complicated profiles and either can be approximated by two exponentials or show the presence of a small bulge. 20% of the observed galaxies have central light depression and outer irregularities - typical for some dwarf galaxies. These profile type frequencies are similar to those of faint field galaxy sample. The evolutionary history of both the isolated and clustered galaxies obviously

  12. Planetary surface photometry and imaging: progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Goguen, Jay D

    2014-10-01

    Spacecraft have visited and returned many thousands of images and spectra of all of the planets, many of their moons, several asteroids, and a few comet nuclei during the golden age of planetary exploration. The signal in each pixel of each image or spectral channel is a measurement of the radiance of scattered sunlight into a specific direction. The information on the structure and composition of the surface that is contained in variation of the radiance with scattering geometry and wavelength, including polarization state, has only just begun to be exploited and is the topic of this review. The uppermost surfaces of these bodies are mainly composed of particles that are continuously generated by impacts of micrometeoroids and larger impactors. Models of light scattering by distributions of sizes and irregular shapes of particles and by closely packed particles within a surface are challenging. These are active topics of research where considerable progress has recently been made. We focus on the surfaces of bodies lacking atmospheres.These surfaces are diverse and their morphologies give evidence of their evolution by impacts and resurfacing by a variety of processes including down slope movement and electrostatic transport of particles, gravitational accumulation of debris, volatile outgassing and migration, and magnetospheric interactions. Sampling of scattering geometries and spatial resolution is constrained by spacecraft trajectories. However, the large number of archived images and spectra demand more quantitative interpretation. The scattering geometry dependence of the radiance is underutilized and promises constraints on the compositions and structure of the surface for materials that lack diagnostic wavelength dependence. The general problem is considered in terms of the lunar regolith for which samples have been returned to Earth. PMID:25313169

  13. The photometric properties of brightest cluster galaxies. II - SIT and CCD surface photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Surface photometry of the first-ranked galaxy in 108 Abell clusters is presented. Galaxy structure, as parameterized by simple Hubble law models, is found to correlate with galaxy absolute magnitude and cluster structure. All the structure data support the dynamical friction evolution model. Twenty-eight percent of the galaxies have multiple component nuclei; the short lifetimes of such systems provide the best available evidence that ongoing evolution actually occurs. Average magnitude and structure evolution rates are derived from the data.

  14. Voyager photometry of surface features on Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S. W.; Veverka, J.

    1981-01-01

    Photometric properties of selected surface features on Ganymede and Callisto are studied, using Voyager images over phase angles from 10 to 124 deg, taken with a clear filter (effective wavelength of approximately 0.5 microns). Normal reflectances on Ganymede average 0.35 for the cratered terrain, and 0.44 for the grooved terrain; the ubiquitous cratered terrain on Callisto is 0.18. The photometric properties of these regions are described by a simple scattering function, where the function of the phase angle is qualitatively similar to that of the moon, i.e., concave upward. By contrast, bright craters on both satellites have functions of the phase angle which are concave downward. The scattering function is not Lambertian, and may be due to an admixture of a small amount of dark, opaque silicate grains with the frost deposits. The brightest craters on Callisto have reflectances which are 10% lower than the brightest craters on Ganymede, and both have similar scattering laws.

  15. Imaging Surface Spots from Space-Borne Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    A general introduction to the foundations of spot modelling is given. It considers geometric models of the surface brightness distribution in late-type stars as can be derived from their wide-band optical light curves. Spot modelling is becoming more and more important thanks to the high-precision, high duty-cycle photometric time series made available by space-borne telescopes designed to search for planets through the method of transits. I review approaches based on a few spots as well as more sophisticated techniques that assume a continuous distributions of active regions and adopt regularization methods developed to solve ill-posed problems. The use of transit light curves to map spots occulted by a planet as it moves across the disc of its host star is also briefly described. In all the cases, the main emphasis is on the basic principles of the modelling techniques and on their testing rather than on the results obtained from their application.

  16. Studying Titan's surface photometry in the 5 microns atmospheric window with the Cassini/VIMS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, T.; Altobelli, N.; Sotin, C.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Philippe, S.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the influence of methane gas and a thick aerosols haze in the atmosphere, Titan's surface is only visible in 7 spectral atmospheric windows centered at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.7-2.8 and 5 microns with the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The 5 microns atmospheric window constitutes the only one being almost insensitive to the haze scattering and which presents only a reduced atmospheric absorption contribution to the signal recorded by the instrument. Despite these advantages leading to the almost direct view of the surface, the 5 microns window is also the noisiest spectral window of the entire VIMS spectrum (an effect highly dependent on the time exposure used for the observations), and it is not totally free from atmospheric contributions, enough to keep "artefacts" in mosaics of several thousands of cubes due to atmospheric and surface photometric effects amplified by the very heterogeneous viewing conditions between each Titan flyby. At first order, a lambertian surface photometry at 5 microns has been used as an initial parameter in order to estimate atmospheric opacity and surface photometry in all VIMS atmospheric windows and to determine the albedo of the surface, yet unknown, both using radiative transfer codes on single cubes or empirical techniques on global hyperspectral mosaics. Other studies suggested that Titan's surface photometry would not be uniquely lambertian but would also contain anisotropic lunar-like contributions. In the present work, we aim at constraining accurately the surface photometry of Titan and residual atmospheric absorption effects in this 5 microns window using a comprehensive study of relevant sites located at various latitudes. Those include bright and dark (dunes) terrains, 5-microns bright terrains (Hotei Regio and Tui Regio), the Huygens Landing Site and high latitudes polar lakes and seas. The VIMS 2004 to 2014 database, composed of more than 40,000 hyperspectral cubes acquired on

  17. Radiative transfer in the surfaces of atmosphereless bodies. III - Interpretation of lunar photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumme, K.; Irvine, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Narrowband and UBV photoelectric phase curves of the entire lunar disk and surface photometry of some craters have been interpreted using a newly developed generalized radiative transfer theory for planetary regoliths. The data are well fitted by the theory, yielding information on both macroscopic and microscopic lunar properties. Derived values for the integrated disk geometric albedo are considerably higher than quoted previously, because of the present inclusion of an accurately determined opposition effect. The mean surface roughness, defined as the ratio of the height to the radius of a typical irregularity, is found to be 0.9 + or - 0.1, or somewhat less than the mean value of 1.2 obtained for the asteroids. From the phase curves, wavelength-dependent values of the single scattering albedo and the Henyey-Greenstein asymmetry factor for the average surface particle are derived.

  18. Disk Galaxies in the Outer Local Supercluster: Optical CCD Surface Photometry and Distribution of Galaxy Disk Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, N. Y.

    1998-01-01

    We report new B-band CCD surface photometry on a sample of 76 disk galaxies brighter than BT = 14.5 mag in the Uppsala General Catalogue of Galaxies, which are confined within a volume located in the outer part of the Local Supercluster.

  19. Interstellar matter in Shapley-Ames elliptical galaxies. I. Multicolour CCD surface photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, P.; Hansen, L.; Jorgensen, H. E.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; de Jong, T.; van den Hoek, L. B.

    1994-04-01

    We present accurate CCD surface photometry in Johnson B and V and Cousins I for a complete, magnitude-limited sample of 56 elliptical galaxies from the RSA catalog. For each galaxy we have determined radial profiles of surface brightness, B-V and/or B-I colour index, ellipticity, position angle, and the third- and fourth order Fourier coefficients that describe the deviations of the B, V, and I isophotes from perfect ellipses, using a full two-dimensional fitting technique. The present sample contains 13 galaxies for which no previous isophote analysis has been published, and 26 without published colour gradients. The radial profiles of the ellipticity, position angle, and the third- and fourth-order Fourier coefficients are found to show considerable detail. The profiles are mostly similar in all passbands, except in cases where dust lanes or patches are present. In this respect, the higher-order Fourier coefficients turn out to be sensitive diagnostic tools for the presence of dust in elliptical galaxies. Isophotal deviations from ellipses on the level of 0.5-1% are found to be common in elliptical galaxies. As noted before by others, these deviations are due to structures that do not necessarily align with the apparent major or minor axes of the galaxies, advocating the use of both the cosine and sine higher-order terms in correlation studies. We show that fitting outer radial intensity profiles of elliptical galaxies is an excellent tool for determining the sky background for the surface photometry. The sky values determined from a power-law fit to the outer intensity profiles are found to be within 0.1% of the sky values at the corners of present-day large CCDs where the contribution of galaxy light is negligible. The average colour gradients for the sample galaxies in B-V and B-I are 0.06 and 0.14 mag arcsec^-2^ per decade in radius, respectively. This compares well with colour gradients in elliptical galaxies found by others. The small uncertainty introduced

  20. HST observations of globular clusters in M 31. 1: Surface photometry of 13 objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecci, F. Fusi; Battistini, P.; Bendinelli, O.; Bonoli, F.; Cacciari, C.; Djorgovski, S.; Federici, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Parmeggiani, G.; Weir, N.

    1994-01-01

    We present the initial results of a study of globular clusters in M 31, using the Faint Object Camera (FOC) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The sample of objects consists of 13 clusters spanning a range of properties. Three independent image deconvolution techniques were used in order to compensate for the optical problems of the HST, leading to mutually fully consistent results. We present detailed tests and comparisons to determine the reliability and limits of these deconvolution methods, and conclude that high-quality surface photometry of M 31 globulars is possible with the HST data. Surface brightness profiles have been extracted, and core radii, half-light radii, and central surface brightness values have been measured for all of the clusters in the sample. Their comparison with the values from ground-based observations indicates the later to be systematically and strongly biased by the seeing effects, as it may be expected. A comparison of the structural parameters with those of the Galactic globulars shows that the structural properties of the M 31 globulars are very similar to those of their Galactic counterparts. A candidate for a post-core-collapse cluster, Bo 343 = G 105, has been already identified from these data; this is the first such detection in the M 31 globular cluster system.

  1. DEEP K{sub s} -NEAR-INFRARED SURFACE PHOTOMETRY OF 80 DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXIES IN THE LOCAL VOLUME

    SciTech Connect

    Fingerhut, Robin L.; McCall, Marshall L.; Argote, Mauricio; Cluver, Michelle E.; Nishiyama, Shogo; Rekola, Rami T. F.; Richer, Michael G.; Vaduvescu, Ovidiu; Woudt, Patrick A. E-mail: mccall@yorku.c E-mail: mcluver@ipac.caltech.ed E-mail: rareko@utu.f E-mail: ovidiuv@ing.iac.e

    2010-06-10

    We present deep near-infrared (K{sub s}) images and surface photometry for 80 dwarf irregular galaxies (dIs) within {approx}5 Mpc of the Milky Way. The galaxy images were obtained at five different facilities between 2004 and 2006. The image reductions and surface photometry have been performed using methods specifically designed for isolating faint galaxies from the high and varying near-infrared sky level. Fifty-four of the 80 dIs have surface brightness profiles which could be fit to a hyperbolic-secant (sech) function, while the remaining profiles could be fit to the sum of a sech and a Gaussian function. From these fits, we have measured central surface brightnesses, scale lengths, and integrated magnitudes. This survey is part of a larger study of the connection between large-scale structure and the global properties of dIs, the hypothesized building-blocks of more massive galaxies.

  2. UIT: Ultraviolet surface photometry of the spiral galaxy M74 (NGC 628)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, Robert H.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Greason, Michael R.; Offenberg, Joel D.; Angione, Ronald J.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Cheng, K. P.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Smith, Eric P.

    1994-01-01

    Ultraviolet photometry, obtained from Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) images at 1520 A (far-UV; magnitudes m(152)) and 2490 A (near-UV; magnitudes m(249)), of the spiral galaxy M74 (NGC 628) is compared with H-alpha, R, V, and B surface photometry and with models. M74's surface brightness profiles have a central peak with an exponential falloff; the exponential scale lengths of the profiles increase with decreasing wavelength for the broad-band images. The slope of the continuum-subtracted H-alpha profile is intermediate between those of far-UV and near-UV profiles, consistent with the related origins of H-alpha and UV emission in extreme Population I material. M74's color profiles all become bluer with increasing radius. The (m(152) - m(249)) color as measured by UIT averages near 0.0 (the color of an A0 star) over the central 20 sec radius and decreases from approximately -0.2 to approximately -0.4 from 20 sec to 200 sec. The spiral arms are the dominant component of the surface photometry colors; interarm regions are slightly redder. In the UV, M74's nuclear region resembles its disk/spiral arm material in colors and morphology, unlike galaxies such as M81. No UV 'bulge' is apparent. The m(152) - m(249) colors and models of M74's central region clearly demonstrate that there is no significant population of O or B stars present in the central 10 sec. M74's UV morphology and (m(152) - m(249)) color profiles are similar to those of M33, although M74 is approximately 0.5 mag redder. M81 has a smooth UV bulge which is much redder than the nuclear regions of M74 and M33. M74 is approximately 0.4 mag bluer than M81 in its outer disk, although M81 has bright UV sources only in spiral arms more than 5 kpc from its center. We investigate possible explanations for the color profiles of the galaxies and the differences among the galaxies: abundances; reddening due to internal dust; interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) variations, and the history of formation of the

  3. Stellar populations in edge-on galaxies from deep CCD surface photometry, 1: NGC 5907

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Heather L.; Boroson, Todd A.; Harding, Paul

    1994-01-01

    We present extremely deep charge coupled device (CCD) surface photometry of the edge-on Sc galaxy NGC 5907. Our data reach reliably to a surface brightness of R=27 mag/sq arcsec, some two magnitudes fainter than any previous work. We obtained this improvement using a 2048X2048 CCD with a wide (approximately 24 min) field, which made it possible to sky subtract directly from the galaxy frame, and by taking many dark sky flatfields. Our analysis of these data, using a full 2D model fitting procedure with a detailed error model, confirm the thin disk parameters of van der Kruit & Searle (1981). In particular, we confirm that the galaxy's disk has a radial cutoff and a constant scale height with radius. We find evidence for a stellar warp in this system, which has the same orientation as the H I warp. Our deep data also confirm that NGC 5907 has no thick disk. This suggests that theories of thick disk formation from star formation in the early stages of disk collapse, or by secular heating mechanisms, are unlikely to be correct, because they would predict that every galaxy would have a thick disk. Thick disk formation from the accretion of satellite galaxies is more likely.

  4. LROC NAC Photometry as a Tool for Studying Physical and Compositional Properties of the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, R. N.; Jolliff, B. L.; Boyd, A. K.; Stopar, J. D.; Sato, H.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.

    2014-10-01

    LROC NAC photometry has been used to study the effects of rocket exhaust on lunar soil properties, and here we apply the same photometric methods to place compositional constraints on regions of silicic volcanism and pure anorthosite on the Moon.

  5. New Insights on Lunar Surface Properties from the Perspective of LRO NAC Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg-Watkins, R. N.; Jolliff, B. L.

    2016-05-01

    The use of NAC photometry has allowed us to gain new insights into physical changes of regolith at spacecraft landing sites, and to determine correlations between composition and reflectance that can be applied to areas of unusual composition.

  6. THE MID-INFRARED TULLY-FISHER RELATION: SPITZER SURFACE PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Sorce, Jenny G.; Courtois, Helene M.; Tully, R. Brent

    2012-11-01

    The availability of photometric imaging of several thousand galaxies with the Spitzer Space Telescope enables a mid-infrared calibration of the correlation between luminosity and rotation in spiral galaxies. The most important advantage of the new calibration in the 3.6 {mu}m band, IRAC Channel 1, is photometric consistency across the entire sky. Additional advantages are minimal obscuration, observations of flux dominated by old stars, and sensitivity to low surface brightness levels due to favorable backgrounds. Roughly 3000 galaxies have been observed through Spitzer cycle 7 and images of these are available from the Spitzer archive. In cycle 8, a program called Cosmic Flows with Spitzer was initiated, which will increase the available sample of spiral galaxies with inclinations greater than 45 Degree-Sign from face-on that are suitable for distance measurements by 1274. This paper describes procedures, based on the photometry package Archangel, that are being employed to analyze both the archival and new data in a uniform way. We give results for 235 galaxies, our calibrator sample for the Tully-Fisher relation. Galaxy magnitudes are determined with uncertainties held below 0.05 mag for normal spiral systems. A subsequent paper will describe the calibration of the [3.6] luminosity-rotation relation.

  7. Photometric calibration of NGS/POSS and ESO/SRC plates using the NOAO PDS measuring engine. II - Surface photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutri, Roc M.; Low, Frank J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present a method to calibrate surface photometry of faint sources measured from direct photographic plates, such as those of the NGS/POSS and ESO/SRC Sky Survey. This calibration procedure does not require scanning sensitometer spots on the plates, but instead uses measurements of the brightness profiles of many faint stars of known brightness to fit a linearized approximation to the characteristic curve. The approximation is valid for only low- to medium-density emulsions, so this technique is appropriate only for relatively faint emission. Comparison between measurements of representative extended sources on the NGS/POSS and CCD images indicates that surface photometry can be obtained from the Sky Survey plates accurate to 0.1-0.3 mag in the range mu(B) between 23 and 27 and mu(R) between 22 and 26 mag/sq arcsec.

  8. Multicolor surface photometry of a sample of low luminosity radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sheetal Kumar; Pandey, S. K.; Chakradhari, N. K.; Baburao Pandge, Mahadev

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed multiband photometric study of five galaxies, selected from a sample of low luminosity early-type galaxies from B2 sample, which have mpg = 15.7, mV = 16.5, redshifts up to 0.2, radio powers P408 = 1023 - 1026.5 W Hz-1 and between 1022 - 1025 W Hz-1 at 1.4 GHz. We have used observed BVR and Hα images from IGO 2m telescope (Pune, India) and 2m HCT, Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO Hanle, India), and archival multiband data from SDSS (ugriz), 2MASS (JHKs ), WISE, Spitzer (mid-IR), XMM, CHANDRA (X-ray), UV (GALEX) and radio from VLA, IRAM for this study.We used standard technique of surface photometry by fitting ellipses to the isophotes for studying the distribution of light in the galaxies by studying their surface brightness profiles, ellipticity profiles, position angle profiles, variation of center of isophotes along semi-major axis, shapes of isophotes, radial color gradients, twists in isophotes and fine structure variations from smooth light profile. The obtained surface brightness profiles are fitted to the core-Sersic model for decomposing the galaxy light profiles and quantify the radial stellar distributions of the sample galaxies.The multiband color index profiles, e.g. u-g, g-r, r-i, i-z, B-R, B-V, J-Hs , J-Ks , H-Ks , R-Ks , 3.4-4.6 μm, 4.6-12 μm (mid-IR) and FUV-NUV(UV), are obtained and combined with various maps e.g . unsharp-masked images, residual maps, quotient maps, dust extinction maps, Hα emission maps, CO intensity maps, diffuse X-ray emission maps and extinction curves of the galaxies to study the morphology, properties and physical correlations of different phases (e.g cool gas, dust, ionized gas and hot gases) of Inter Stellar Medium and to examine various star formation related processes in the galaxies.

  9. Southern galaxies. VIII - Surface photometry of the SD spiral NGC 7793

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vaucouleurs, G.; Davoust, E.

    1980-08-01

    Detailed surface photometry in blue light of the SA(s)d galaxy NGC 7793, the faintest of the five major members of the Sculptor group, is obtained from photoelectrically calibrated Mount Stromlo and McDonald photographs. The luminosity distribution is dominated by an exponential disk of effective radius αe = 2'.11 = 1.92 kpc contributing 98.6% of the total luminosity BT = 9.51 ± 0.06. The corrected face-on magnitude BT0 = 9.13 corresponds to MT0 = -18.35 at the revised distance Δ = 3.1 Mpc (Appendix C). The spheroidal component visible only in the vicinity of the nucleus can be represented by an r1/4 law of effective radius rIe = 6".0 = 91 pc and total magnitude BTI = 14.13 or 1.4% of the total luminosity of the galaxy. The position angle of the major axis is 97°, the mean axis ratio is q = b/a = 0.61, and the inclination = 53°. The concentration indices C21 = 1.68 and C32 = 1.48 are consistent with the Sd classification. The integrated colors from UBV aperture photometry are essentially constant at = 0.56 ± 0.02, = -0.07 ± 0.02, the corrected face-on colors are (B - V)T0 = 0.46, (U - B)T0 = -0.15 in close agreement with the colors of M33 and the mean values for type Scd. A decomposition of the disk into an underlying old component and a young arm component shows that 65.570 of the total luminosity comes from the old component which has a corrected central luminosity μcα(0) = 21.06 and an effective radius re = 1'.76 = 1.60 kpc. The neutral H I mass MH = 0.67 × 109 Msun corresponds to a hydrogen-luminosity ratio MH/LB = 0.14 which is less than half the average for the morphological type and luminosity class of NGC 7793. The large number of H ii regions and the strength of the Hα emission in the disk suggest that a large fraction of the hydrogen is ionized. The integrated magnitude of the brightest superassociation (Hodge Nr 20) B, = 16.0 ± 0.1 is derived in Appendix A. The effect of resolution on the apparent peak brightness is illustrated in Appendix B

  10. Magnetic activity of six young solar analogues II. Surface Differential Rotation from long-term photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, S.; Guinan, E. F.

    2003-10-01

    The present paper is the second of a series dedicated to the study of the magnetic activity in a selected sample of young solar analogues. The sample includes five single G0-G5V stars with ages between =~ 130 Myr and 700 Myr: EK Dra, pi 1 UMa, HN Peg, k1 Cet and BE Cet. In this study we also include the Pleiades-age ( =~ 130 Myr) K0V star DX Leo. Our analysis is based on high precision photometric observations carried out as part of The Sun in Time project, aimed at a multiwavelength study of stars with solar-like global properties, but with different ages and thus at different stages of evolution. In the first paper of this series we presented the photometric observations and determined the existence of starspot cycles and their correlation with the global stellar properties. In the present paper we investigate the surface differential rotation (SDR). The periodogram analysis of the photometric data time series has allowed us to determine the rotational periods and to derive the following results: i) all the selected stars show variations of the rotational period. Such variations are definitely periodic and in phase with the starspot cycle for BE Cet and DX Leo. They are likely periodic and in phase also for pi 1 UMa, EK Dra and HN Peg, but still need confirmation. By analogy with the solar butterfly diagram, the rotational period variations are interpretable in terms of surface differential rotation, that is, they are attributable to the existence of active latitude belts migrating during the activity cycle on a differentially rotating star; ii) BE Cet, pi 1 UMa and EK Dra show a solar-like pattern of SDR, that is the rotational period steadily decreases along the activity cycle, jumping back to higher values at the beginning of the next cycle; on the contrary, DX Leo, k1 Cet and HN Peg show an antisolar pattern; iii) the amplitude of the rotational period variations shows a power law dependence on the rotational period similar to that found in previous studies

  11. VEGAS: A VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey. I. Presentation, wide-field surface photometry, and substructures in NGC 4472

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioli, Massimo; Spavone, Marilena; Grado, Aniello; Iodice, Enrichetta; Limatola, Luca; Napolitano, Nicola R.; Cantiello, Michele; Paolillo, Maurizio; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Raimondo, Gabriella; Schipani, Pietro

    2015-09-01

    Context. We present the VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey (VEGAS), which is designed to obtain deep multiband photometry in g,r,i, of about one hundred nearby galaxies down to 27.3, 26.8, and 26 mag/arcsec2 respectively, using the ESO facility VST/OmegaCAM. Aims: The goals of the survey are 1) to map the light distribution up to ten effective radii, re; 2) to trace color gradients and surface brightness fluctuation gradients out to a few re for stellar population characterization; and 3) to obtain a full census of the satellite systems (globular clusters and dwarf galaxies) out to 20% of the galaxy virial radius. The external regions of galaxies retain signatures of the formation and evolution mechanisms that shaped them, and the study of nearby objects enables a detailed analysis of their morphology and interaction features. To clarify the complex variety of formation mechanisms of early-type galaxies (ETGs), wide and deep photometry is the primary observational step, which at the moment has been pursued with only a few dedicated programs. The VEGAS survey has been designated to provide these data for a volume-limited sample with exceptional image quality. Methods: In this commissioning photometric paper we illustrate the capabilities of the survey using g- and i-band VST/OmegaCAM images of the nearby galaxy NGC 4472 and of smaller ETGs in the surrounding field. Results: Our surface brightness profiles reach rather faint levels and agree excellently well with previous literature. Genuine new results concern the detection of an intracluster light tail in NGC 4472 and of various substructures at increasing scales. We have also produced extended (g - i) color profiles. Conclusions: The VST/OmegaCAM data that we acquire in the context of the VEGAS survey provide a detailed view of substructures in the optical emission from extended galaxies, which can be as faint as a hundred times below the sky level. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Titan: Preliminary results on surface properties and photometry from VIMS observations of the early flybys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Hicks, M.D.; Clark, R.N.; Mosher, J.A.; McCord, T.B.; Jaumann, R.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.; Momary, T.; Simonelli, D.P.; Sicardy, B.

    2006-01-01

    Cassini observations of the surface of Titan offer unprecedented views of its surface through atmospheric windows in the 1-5 ??m region. Images obtained in windows for which the haze opacity is low can be used to derive quantitative photometric parameters such as albedo and albedo distribution, and physical properties such as roughness and particle characteristics. Images from the early Titan flybys, particularly T0, Ta, and T5 have been analyzed to create albedo maps in the 2.01 and 2.73 ??m windows. We find the average normal reflectance at these two wavelengths to be 0.15??0.02 and 0.035??0.003, respectively. Titan's surface is bifurcated into two albedo regimes, particularly at 2.01 ??m. Analysis of these two regimes to understand the physical character of the surface was accomplished with a macroscopic roughness model. We find that the two types of surface have substantially different roughness, with the low-albedo surface exhibiting mean slope angles of ???18??, and the high-albedo terrain having a much more substantial roughness with a mean slope angle of ???34??. A single-scattering phase function approximated by a one-term Henyey-Greenstein equation was also fit to each unit. Titan's surface is back-scattering (g???0.3-0.4), and does not exhibit substantially different backscattering behavior between the two terrains. Our results suggest that two distinct geophysical domains exist on Titan: a bright region cut by deep drainage channels and a relatively smooth surface. The two terrains are covered by a film or a coating of particles perhaps precipitated from the satellite's haze layer and transported by eolian processes. Our results are preliminary: more accurate values for the surface albedo and physical parameters will be derived as more data is gathered by the Cassini spacecraft and as a more complete radiative transfer model is developed from both Cassini orbiter and Huygens Lander measurements. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Optics on a fractal surface and the photometry of the regoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drossart, P.

    1993-05-01

    The light scattered by a rough surface is calculated in a model where the surface is simulated by a mathematical fractal of dimension (D(H) between 2 and 3) and fractal density in the projected area towards the observer rho(H) (rho(H) between 0 and 1). The reflectance on such a surface is calculated in the special case of a 'hemispherical' fractal, in both the geometric optics approximation and a more general diffraction regime. By using a two-parameter phase function (single scattering albedo omega-sub-0 and asymmetry parameter g-sub-0), and including multiple scattering, this four-parameter model is found to reproduce within a good accuracy the phase function of several classes of atmosphereless bodies in the solar system, in good agreement with previous photometric models. The main effect of the diffraction is to reduce the width of the opposition surge by roughly a factor of 2. Another prediction of the model is that the single-scattering contribution due to the fractal part of the surface can be reduced, for nonzero phase angle, to an arbitrarily small amount, for high enough fractal dimension and density. This effect could give a new interpretation of the strong opposition effect observed on some objects, and also of the very low brightness of many solar system bodies.

  14. Surface photometry of celestial sources from a space vehicle: introduction and observational procedures.

    PubMed

    Roach, F E; Carroll, B; Aller, L H; Smith, L

    1972-03-01

    Diffuse celestial sources of relatively low surface brightness such as the Milky Way, zodiacal light, and gegenschein (or contre lumière) can be studied most reliably from above the earth's atmosphere with equipment flown in artificial satellites. We review the techniques used and some of the difficulties encountered in day-time observations from satellites by the use of a special photometer and polarimeter flown in the orbiting skylab observatory, OSO-6. PMID:16591970

  15. The photometric functions of Phobos and Deimos. II - Surface photometry of Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noland, M.; Veverka, J.

    1977-01-01

    Mariner 9 television pictures of Deimos are used to study the uniformity of a certain photometric scattering parameter over the surface of the satellite. It is shown that the photometric data considered satisfy the reciprocity principle and that the Hapke-Irvine scattering law is adequate for describing the surface. Phase functions for Deimos are obtained from scans along the photometric equator, and the photometric behavior of the brightest and darkest areas on the satellite's disk is examined. The results indicate that the surface of Deimos is covered uniformly by a dark and texturally complex material whose photometric behavior is well-represented by the Hapke-Irvine law, that the intrinsic phase coefficient of this material is about 0.017 mag/deg over the phase-angle range from 20 to 80 deg, and that slightly brighter material is present near some craters. Since enhanced brightening was not observed at the specular point of the photometric equator in any of the pictures studied, it is concluded that large exposures of solid rock are absent from the Mars-facing side of Deimos.

  16. A radiation-transfer analysis of the effects of dust on the surface photometry of a sample of nearby spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastrav, Bogdan Adrian; Rushton, Mark T.; Popescu, Cristina C.; Tuffs, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic scale lengths, inclinations and bulge-to-disk ratios of galaxies are critical inputs for radiation-transfer modelling of the panchromatic (UV/optical-MIR/FIR/submm) broadband spectral energy distribution of spiral galaxies. Although these quantities can be derived from analysis of surface photometry of optical images of targets, the effect of the dust on the measured brightness distributions in the optical must be taken into account if a fully self-consistent analysis incorporating the panchromatic and surface photometry is to be achieved. Here we give results of a careful analysis of surface photometry for a benchmark sample ofwell resolved nearby spiral galaxies. We then show how the results can be used in conjunction with aradiation transfer analysis of the panchromatic output of the same objects and the library of morphological corrections for dust given by Pastrav et al.(2013a,b) to provide self-consistent corrections for the morphological and photometric parameters of the disk and bulge components of the target galaxies.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Surface photometry of GHASP galaxies (Barbosa+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, C. E.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Amram, P.; Ferrari, F.; Russeil, D.; Epinat, B.; Perret, V.; Adami, C.; Marcelin, M.

    2016-04-01

    Our data set is constructed using new Rc-band observations taken at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, supplemented with Sloan Digital Sky Survey archival data, obtained with the purpose of deriving homogeneous photometric profiles and parameters. Our results include Rc-band surface brightness profiles for 170 galaxies and ugriz profiles for 108 of these objects. We catalogue several parameters of general interest for further reference, such as total magnitude, effective radius and isophotal parameters (magnitude, position angle, ellipticity and inclination). We also perform a structural decomposition of the surface brightness profiles using a multi-component method to separate discs from bulges and bars, and to observe the main scaling relations involving luminosities, sizes and maximum velocities. We determine the Rc-band Tully-Fisher relation using maximum velocities derived solely from Hα rotation curves for a sample of 80 galaxies, resulting in a slope of -8.1+/-0.5, zero-point of -3.0+/-1.0 and an estimated intrinsic scatter of 0.28+/-0.07. We note that, unlike the Tully-Fisher relation in the near-infrared derived for the same sample, no change in the slope of the relation is seen at the low-mass end (for galaxies with Vmax<125km/s). We suggest that this different behaviour of the Tully-Fisher relation (with the optical relation being described by a single power law while the near-infrared has two), may be caused by differences in the stellar mass-to-light ratio for galaxies with Vmax<125km/s. (4 data files).

  18. Effect of surface conditions affecting voltage breakdowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flauta, Randolph; Aghazarian, Maro; Caughman, John; Ruzic, David

    2008-11-01

    The maximum power transferred by ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antennas is dependent on the breakdown threshold when operated at high voltages. The voltage that these antennas can withstand is lowered and hence breakdowns occur due to many factors. The Surface Plasma Arcs by Radiofrequency - Control Study or SPARCS facility has a 0-15kV DC power supply to deliver power to flat cathode surface and semi-spherical anode made of Cu and Al under 10-8-10-6 torr vacuum conditions. The effects of different surface conditions on the breakdown threshold were then investigated. Also, as the ICRF antennas used for heating plasmas may come into contact with contaminants from the plasma, Li was also deposited on the cathode surface through in-situ evaporation coating and its effect on the breakdown threshold was investigated. Results on surface roughness showed no significant dependence of the breakdown threshold on macroscopic surface roughness in the cathode arithmetic roughness range of ˜77-1139nm. Microscopic surface features such as grain boundaries, impurities and imperfections may play a more visible role in affecting the vacuum breakdown.

  19. Exoplanetary Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope measured the first photons from exoplanets (Charbonneau et al. 2005, Deming et al. 2005). These secondary eclipses (planet passing behind star) revealed the planet's emitted infrared flux, and under a blackbody assumption provide a brightness temperature in each measured bandpass. Since the initial direct detections, Spitzer has made numerous measurements in the four Infrared Array Camera bandpasses at 3.6, 4.5, 5.7, and 8.0 microns; the Infrared Spectrograph's Blue Peakup Array at 16 microns; and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer's 24-micron array. Initial measurements of orbital variation and further photometric study (Harrington et al. 2006, 2007) revealed the extreme day-night variability of some exoplanets, but full orbital phase curves of different planets (Knutson et al. 2007, 2008) demonstrated that not all planets are so variable. This talk will review progress and prospects in exoplanetary photometry.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Surface Photometry of ESO-Uppsala Galaxies (Lauberts+ 1989)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauberts, A.; Valentijn, E. A.

    2006-04-01

    The 15467 southern galaxies in this catalog were scanned from 407 blue and 407 red original ESO-Schmidt plates using a PDS microdensitometer. The galaxies were selected from the ESO-Uppsala Catalogue (VII/34). The original selection criterion was a minimum visual angular diameter of 1arcmin. The plates were calibrated using a catalog of photo- electric standards of 1700 standard galaxies transformed to a photometric standard system (Cousins) created by the authors. The result is a catalog acquired in a homogeneous fashion for all types of galaxies in various environments. The extracted parameters include radial surface brightness profiles, magnitudes at several isophotal levels, colors, color gradients, effective radius parameters, structural parameters such as axial ratios, position angles, and profile gradients. The full version of the catalog, made of 190 columns, is available as the file "esolv.fit" in FITS table format. The ascii file "esolv1.dat" contains a subset of these columns which includes those parameters listed in the printed book version. Detailed discussion of the catalog creation is given in the published book version (ISBN 3-923524-31-5) (2 data files).

  1. ARCHANGEL: Galaxy Photometry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schombert, James

    2011-07-01

    ARCHANGEL is a Unix-based package for the surface photometry of galaxies. While oriented for large angular size systems (i.e. many pixels), its tools can be applied to any imaging data of any size. The package core contains routines to perform the following critical galaxy photometry functions: sky determinationframe cleaningellipse fittingprofile fittingtotal and isophotal magnitudes The goal of the package is to provide an automated, assembly-line type of reduction system for galaxy photometry of space-based or ground-based imaging data. The procedures outlined in the documentation are flux independent, thus, these routines can be used for non-optical data as well as typical imaging datasets. ARCHANGEL has been tested on several current OS's (RedHat Linux, Ubuntu Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X). A tarball for installation is available at the download page. The main routines are Python and FORTRAN based, therefore, a current installation of Python and a FORTRAN compiler are required. The ARCHANGEL package also contains Python hooks to the PGPLOT package, an XML processor and network tools which automatically link to data archives (i.e. NED, HST, 2MASS, etc) to download images in a non-interactive manner.

  2. RR Lyrae Star Metallicities From Caby Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Scott R.

    1996-11-01

    Ten RR Lyr stars have been observed at different pulsational phases with Caby photoelectric photometry to calibrate the response of this system to RR Lyr metallicity. As has been done for nonvariable stars, the data are displayed in a color-color diagram of hk vs b-y, where hk=(Ca-b)-(b-y). It is found that the system is much more sensitive to metal abundance than the Stromgren m1 index, and that the system retains good sensitivity even at the hottest phases of pulsation. The data produce lines of constant metallicity on the hk/b-y diagram which are single valued with respect to both b-y and hk. Therefore Caby photometry gives a metallicity which is independent of pulsational phase, a distinct advantage over ΔS and other techniques used to find RR Lyr abundances. This phase independence probably arises from the fact that Caby photometry is concerned largely with total absorption from the Ca K and H lines and the b - y continuum, and not the specific shapes of the hydrogen lines, which can be affected by changes in surface gravity as a function of phase in the pulsation and by emission near maximum light. The metallicity of the RRc star V7S3 Cen is determined to be -0.69±0.2 dex using the Caby technique.

  3. How surface damage removal affects fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeelani, S.; Scott, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the removal of work hardened surface layers from specimens of 2024-T4 aluminum alloy and AISI-4130 steel on their fatigue lives has been investigated. Specimens were fatigued at selected stress levels for a given number of cycles, and the surface layer was removed followed by subsequent fatigue cycling. Results confirm that when a material is subjected to fatigue loading, damage accumulates in the surface layers in the form of work hardening. Removal of the surface layer brings the specimen back to its pre-fatigued condition.

  4. The ability of intermediate-band Strömgren photometry to correctly identify dwarf, subgiant, and giant stars and provide stellar metallicities and surface gravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Árnadóttir, A. S.; Feltzing, S.; Lundström, I.

    2010-10-01

    Context. Several large scale photometric and spectroscopic surveys are being undertaken to provide a more detailed picture of the Milky Way. Given the necessity of generalisation in the determination of, e.g., stellar parameters when tens and hundred of thousands of stars are considered it remains important to provide independent, detailed studies to verify the methods used in the surveys. Aims: Our first aim is to critically evaluate available calibrations for deriving [M/H] from Strömgren photometry. Secondly, we develop the standard sequences for dwarf stars to reflect their inherent metallicity dependence. Finally, we test how well metallicities derived from ugriz photometry reproduce metallicities derived from the well-tested system of Strömgren photometry. Methods: We evaluate available metallicity calibrations based on Strömgren uvby photometry for dwarf stars using a catalogue of stars with both uvby photometry and spectroscopically determined iron abundances ([Fe/H]). The catalogue was created for this project. Using this catalogue, we also evaluate available calibrations that determine log g. A larger catalogue, in which metallicity is determined directly from uvby photometry, is used to trace metallicity-dependent standard sequences for dwarf stars. We also perform comparisons, for both dwarf and giant stars, of metallicities derived from ugriz photometry with metallicities derived from Strömgren photometry. Results: We provide a homogenised catalogue of 451 dwarf stars with 0.3 < (b-y)0 < 1.0. All stars in the catalogue have uvby photometry and [Fe/H] determined from spectra with high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). Using this catalogue, we test how well various photometric metallicity calibrations reproduce the spectroscopically determined [Fe/H]. Using the preferred metallicity calibration for dwarf stars, we derive new standard sequences in the c1,0 versus (b-y)0 plane and in the c1,0 versus (v-y)0 plane for dwarf stars with 0

  5. Asteroid Lightcurve Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. W.

    2004-05-01

    With the advent of modestly priced CCD cameras and computer controller and reduction software, amateurs can now do photometry on fainter targets than was possible even from large observatories only a decade or so ago. This has led to an explosion of lightcurve data that in turn has yielded rich results. We now have rotation periods for more than 1500 asteroids, extending down to objects only tens of meters in diameter, and well determined shapes and pole orientations of more than 100 objects. Among smaller asteroids, the dispersion in rotation rates ranges from minutes to months, with the slower ones mostly "tumbling," or in states of non-principal axis rotation. The fastest ones must be monolithic, as centrifugal force exceeds their gravity. But among those larger than a few hundred meters diameter, there is a "rotation barrier" at the rate where gravity and centrifugal force match, suggesting that most asteroids this large or larger are "rubble piles." The broad dispersion in spin rates, almost a bimodal distribution, has long been a mystery, but now appears likely to be due to thermal radiation torques from the randomly asymmetric shapes of small asteroids. This is a major paradigm shift from the past, where mutual collisions were considered to be the dominant (or only) evolutionary process affecting spins. Amateur observations have already contributed a great deal leading to this new view, and much remains to be done, providing abundant opportunities for amateur-professional collaborations.

  6. Andromeda (M31) optical and infrared disk survey. I. Insights in wide-field near-IR surface photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stéphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; McDonald, Michael; De Jong, Roelof; Tully, R. Brent

    2014-05-01

    We present wide-field near-infrared J and K{sub s} images of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) taken with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope as part of the Andromeda Optical and Infrared Disk Survey. This data set allows simultaneous observations of resolved stars and near-infrared (NIR) surface brightness across M31's entire bulge and disk (within R = 22 kpc), permitting a direct test of the stellar composition of near-infrared light in a nearby galaxy. Here we develop NIR observation and reduction methods to recover a uniform surface brightness map across the 3° × 1° disk of M31 with 27 WIRCam fields. Two sky-target nodding strategies are tested, and we find that strictly minimizing sky sampling latency cannot improve background subtraction accuracy to better than 2% of the background level due to spatio-temporal variations in the NIR skyglow. We fully describe our WIRCam reduction pipeline and advocate using flats built from night-sky images over a single night, rather than dome flats that do not capture the WIRCam illumination field. Contamination from scattered light and thermal background in sky flats has a negligible effect on the surface brightness shape compared to the stochastic differences in background shape between sky and galaxy disk fields, which are ∼0.3% of the background level. The most dramatic calibration step is the introduction of scalar sky offsets to each image that optimizes surface brightness continuity. Sky offsets reduce the mean surface brightness difference between observation blocks from 1% to <0.1% of the background level, though the absolute background level remains statistically uncertain to 0.15% of the background level. We present our WIRCam reduction pipeline and performance analysis to give specific recommendations for the improvement of NIR wide-field imaging methods.

  7. Produce Surface Characteristics Affect Product Quality and Safety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface characteristics of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables vary largely among produce types, maturities and processing procedure. Studies have shown that the surface topography of produce significantly affected adherence, attachment, and biofilm formation of bacteria, as well as their removal a...

  8. QDPHOT: Quick & Dirty PHOTometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighell, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    QDPHOT is a fast CCD stellar photometry task which quickly produces CCD stellar photometry from two CCD images of a star field. It was designed to be a data mining tool for finding high-quality stellar observations in the data archives of the National Virtual Observatory. QDPHOT typically takes just a few seconds to analyze two Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 observations of Local Group star clusters. It is also suitable for real-time data-quality analysis of CCD observations; on-the-fly instrumental color-magnitude diagrams can be produced at the telescope console during the few seconds between CCD readouts.

  9. How surface roughness affects chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil surface roughness affects transport processes, e.g., runoff generation, infiltration, sediment detachment, etc., occurring on the surface. Nevertheless, how soil roughness affects chemical transport is less known. In this study, we partitioned roughness elements into mounds which diverge water ...

  10. Activities affecting surface water resources: A general overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In November 1987, P.E.I. signed a federal/provincial work-sharing arrangement on water resource management focusing on groundwater pollution, surface water degradation and estuarine eutrophication. The surface water program was designed to identify current surface water uses and users within 12 major watersheds across the Island containing 26 individual rivers, as well as problems arising due to practices that degrade the quality of surface water and restricts its value to other user groups. This report presents a general overview of the program, covering the general characteristics of the Island; operations in agriculture, fish and wildlife, forestry, recreation, fisheries, and industry; alterations of natural features of waterways; wetlands; additional watershed activities such as hydrometric stations and subdivision development; and activities affecting surface water resources such as sedimentation sources, pollution point sources and instream obstructions.

  11. Time series photometry and starspot properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, Katalin

    2011-08-01

    Systematic efforts of monitoring starspots from the middle of the XXth century, and the results obtained from the datasets, are summarized with special focus on the observations made by automated telescopes. Multicolour photometry shows correlations between colour indices and brightness, indicating spotted regions with different average temperatures originating from spots and faculae. Long-term monitoring of spotted stars reveals variability on different timescales. On the rotational timescale new spot appearances and starspot proper motions are followed from continuous changes of light curves during subsequent rotations. Sudden interchange of the more and less active hemispheres on the stellar surfaces is the so called flip-flop phenomenon. The existence and strength of the differential rotation is seen from the rotational signals of spots being at different stellar latitudes. Long datasets, with only short, annual interruptions, shed light on the nature of stellar activity cycles and multiple cycles. The systematic and/or random changes of the spot cycle lengths are discovered and described using various time-frequency analysis tools. Positions and sizes of spotted regions on stellar surfaces are calculated from photometric data by various softwares. From spot positions derived for decades, active longitudes on the stellar surfaces are found, which, in case of synchronized eclipsing binaries can be well positioned in the orbital frame, with respect to, and affected by, the companion stars.

  12. THE SL2S GALAXY-SCALE LENS SAMPLE. III. LENS MODELS, SURFACE PHOTOMETRY, AND STELLAR MASSES FOR THE FINAL SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Suyu, Sherry H.; Treu, Tommaso; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Marshall, Philip J.

    2013-11-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging data and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) near-infrared ground-based images for the final sample of 56 candidate galaxy-scale lenses uncovered in the CFHT Legacy Survey as part of the Strong Lensing in the Legacy Survey project. The new images are used to perform lens modeling, measure surface photometry, and estimate stellar masses of the deflector early-type galaxies (ETGs). Lens modeling is performed on the HST images (or CFHT when HST is not available) by fitting the spatially extended light distribution of the lensed features assuming a singular isothermal ellipsoid mass profile and by reconstructing the intrinsic source light distribution on a pixelized grid. Based on the analysis of systematic uncertainties and comparison with inference based on different methods, we estimate that our Einstein radii are accurate to ∼3%. HST imaging provides a much higher success rate in confirming gravitational lenses and measuring their Einstein radii than CFHT imaging does. Lens modeling with ground-based images, however, when successful, yields Einstein radius measurements that are competitive with space-based images. Information from the lens models is used together with spectroscopic information from companion Paper IV to classify the systems, resulting in a final sample of 39 confirmed (grade A) lenses and 17 promising candidates (grade B,C). This represents an increase of half an order of magnitude in sample size with respect to the sample of confirmed lenses studied in Papers I and II. The Einstein radii of the confirmed lenses in our sample span the range 5-15 kpc and are typically larger than those of other surveys, probing the mass in regions where the dark matter contribution is more important. Stellar masses are in the range 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} M{sub ☉}, covering the range of massive ETGs. The redshifts of the main deflector span a range 0.3 ≤ z{sub d} ≤ 0.8, which nicely complements low

  13. Introductory remarks: Photometry section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The principal goals of photometry and polarimetry are summarized. These goals include studies of the emission features of gaseous species of comets, the wavelength depenence of albedo, the phase function of scatter distribution, and time variation of rotation. Recent advances in photometric techniques were reviewed and include: use of proper filters, extension to the shortest and longest wavelengths, higher spectral resolving power, and polarizaton techniques.

  14. Third Workshop on Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J. (Editor); Lasher, Lawrence E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The discoveries of extrasolar planets by Wolszczan, Mayor and Queloz, Butler et al., and others have stimulated a widespread effort to obtain a body of data sufficient to understand their occurrence and characteristics. Doppler velocity techniques have found dozens of extrasolar planets with masses similar to that of Jupiter. Approximately ten percent of the stars that show planets with orbital periods of a few days to a week are expected to show transits. With the mass obtained from Doppler velocity measurements and the size from transit photometry, the densities of the planets can be determined. Theoretical models of the structure of "hot Jupiters" (i.e., those planets within a tenth of an astronomical unit (AU) of the parent star) indicate that these planets should be substantially larger in size and lower in density than Jupiter. Thus the combination of transit and Doppler velocity measurements provide a critical test of the theories of planetary structure. Furthermore, because photometry can be done with small-aperture telescopes rather than requiring the use of much larger telescopes, transit photometry should also reduce the cost of discovering extrasolar planets.

  15. Autosomal Mutations Affecting Adhesion between Wing Surfaces in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Prout, M.; Damania, Z.; Soong, J.; Fristrom, D.; Fristrom, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Integrins are evolutionarily conserved transmembrane α,β heterodimeric receptors involved in cell-to-matrix and cell-to-cell adhesions. In Drosophila the position-specific (PS) integrins mediate the formation and maintenance of junctions between muscle and epidermis and between the two epidermal wing surfaces. Besides integrins, other proteins are implicated in integrin-dependent adhesion. In Drosophila, somatic clones of mutations in PS integrin genes disrupt adhesion between wing surfaces to produce wing blisters. To identify other genes whose products function in adhesion between wing surfaces, we conducted a screen for autosomal mutations that produce blisters in somatic wing clones. We isolated 76 independent mutations in 25 complementation groups, 15 of which contain more than one allele. Chromosomal sites were determined by deficiency mapping, and genetic interactions with mutations in the β(PS) integrin gene myospheroid were investigated. Mutations in four known genes (blistered, Delta, dumpy and mastermind) were isolated. Mutations were isolated in three new genes (piopio, rhea and steamer duck) that affect myo-epidermal junctions or muscle function in embryos. Mutations in three other genes (kakapo, kiwi and moa) may also affect cell adhesion or muscle function at hatching. These new mutants provide valuable material for the study of integrin-dependent cell-to-cell adhesion. PMID:9136017

  16. The 2060 Chiron: CCD photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bus, Schelte J.; Bowell, Edward; Harris, Alan W.

    1987-01-01

    R-band CCD photometry of 2060 was carried out on nine nights in Nov. and Dec. 1986. The rotation period is 5.9181 + or - 0.0003 hr and the peak to peak lightcurve amplitude is 0.088 + or - 0.0003 mag. Photometric parameters are H sub R = 6.24 + or - 0.02 mag and G sub R = + or - 0.15, though formal errors may not be realistic. The lightcurve has two pairs of extrema, but its asymmetry, as evidenced by the presence of significant odd Fourier harmonics, suggests macroscopic surface irregularities and/or the presence of some large scale albedo variegation. The observational rms residual is + or - 0.015 mag. On time scales from minutes to days there is no evidence for nonperiodic (cometary) brightness changes at the level of a few millimagnitudes.

  17. BV photometry of UX ARIETIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohin, S.; Raveendran, A. V.

    1989-03-01

    Differential BV photometry of UX Ari obtained on 58 nights during 1984-1985, 1985-1986, 1986-1987, and 1987-1988 observing season is presented. It is found that (B-V) is phase dependent, with the system being reddest at the light maximum. This is interpreted as being due to the variable fractional contribution by the G5 V component to the total light at shorter wavelengths. An analysis of the available data indicates that, at larger amplitudes of the photometric wave, the brightness at maximum increases and that at minimum decreases, and both converge to DeltaV of about 1.0 mag at very low amplitudes. It implies that the low wave amplitudes are essentially due to more homogeneity in the surface distribution of spots rather than to low levels of spot activity. The variation in wave amplitude is found to be near-sinusoidal with a period around 13-14 years.

  18. Nanocontact electrification: patterned surface charges affecting adhesion, transfer, and printing.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jesse J; Barry, Chad R; Knuesel, Robert J; Wang, Xinyu; Jacobs, Heiko O

    2011-06-01

    Contact electrification creates an invisible mark, overlooked and often undetected by conventional surface spectroscopic measurements. It impacts our daily lives macroscopically during electrostatic discharge and is equally relevant on the nanoscale in areas such as soft lithography, transfer, and printing. This report describes a new conceptual approach to studying and utilizing contact electrification beyond prior surface force apparatus and point-contact implementations. Instead of a single point contact, our process studies nanocontact electrification that occurs between multiple nanocontacts of different sizes and shapes that can be formed using flexible materials, in particular, surface-functionalized poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps and other common dielectrics (PMMA, SU-8, PS, PAA, and SiO(2)). Upon the formation of conformal contacts and forced delamination, contacted regions become charged, which is directly observed using Kelvin probe force microscopy revealing images of charge with sub-100-nm lateral resolution. The experiments reveal chemically driven interfacial proton exchange as the dominant charging mechanism for the materials that have been investigated so far. The recorded levels of uncompensated charges approach the theoretical limit that is set by the dielectric breakdown strength of the air gap that forms as the surfaces are delaminated. The macroscopic presence of the charges is recorded using force-distance curve measurements involving a balance and a micromanipulator to control the distance between the delaminated objects. Coulomb attraction between the delaminated surfaces reaches 150 N/m(2). At such a magnitude, the force finds many applications. We demonstrate the utility of printed charges in the fields of (i) nanoxerography and (ii) nanotransfer printing whereby the smallest objects are ∼10 nm in diameter and the largest objects are in the millimeter to centimeter range. The printed charges are also shown to affect the electronic

  19. Interactions between surface roughness and airflow turbulence affecting drying dynamics of rough porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Kirchner, James; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Evaporative drying of porous surfaces interacting with turbulent airflows is common in various industrial and natural applications. The intrinsic relief and roughness of natural porous surfaces are likely to influence the structure of interacting turbulent airflow boundary layers, and thus affect rates and patterns of heat and vapor fluxes from the surface. These links have been formalized in new mechanistic models that consider intermittent and localized turbulence-induced boundary layers, resulting in rich surface evaporation and energy exchange dynamics. The models were evaluated experimentally by systematically varying surface roughness elements in drying experiments of wavy and bluff-body covered sand surfaces in a wind tunnel. Thermal infrared signatures of localized evaporative fluxes as well as mean evaporative mass losses were recorded. The resulting patterns were in good agreement with model predictions for local and surface averaged turbulent exchange rates. Experimental and theoretical results suggest that evaporative water losses from wavy sand surfaces can be either enhanced or suppressed (relative to a flat surface), due to the complex interplay between the local boundary layer thickness and internal limitations on water flow to the evaporating surface. For sand surfaces covered by isolated cylindrical elements (bluff bodies), model predictions and measurements show persistent enhancement of evaporative fluxes from bluff-rough surfaces compared to a flat surface under similar conditions. This enhancement is attributed to the formation of vortices that thin the boundary layer over part of the interacting surface footprint. The implications of this study for interpreting and upscaling evapotranspiration rates from terrestrial surfaces will be discussed.

  20. Exploration mode affects visuohaptic integration of surface orientation.

    PubMed

    Plaisier, Myrthe A; van Dam, Loes C J; Glowania, Catharina; Ernst, Marc O

    2014-01-01

    We experience the world mostly in a multisensory fashion using a combination of all of our senses. Depending on the modality we can select different exploration strategies for extracting perceptual information. For instance, using touch we can enclose an object in our hand to explore parts of the object in parallel. Alternatively, we can trace the object with a single finger to explore its parts in a serial fashion. In this study we investigated whether the exploration mode (parallel vs. serial) affects the way sensory signals are combined. To this end, participants visually and haptically explored surfaces that varied in roll angle and indicated which side of the surface was perceived as higher. In Experiment 1, the exploration mode was the same for both modalities (i.e., both parallel or both serial). In Experiment 2, we introduced a difference in exploration mode between the two modalities (visual exploration was parallel while haptic exploration was serial or vice versa). The results showed that visual and haptic signals were combined in a statistically optimal fashion only when the exploration modes were the same. In case of an asymmetry in the exploration modes across modalities, integration was suboptimal. This indicates that spatial-temporal discrepancies in the acquisition of information in the two senses (i.e., haptic and visual) can lead to the breakdown of sensory integration. PMID:25413627

  1. THE IMPACT OF CONTAMINATED RR LYRAE/GLOBULAR CLUSTER PHOTOMETRY ON THE DISTANCE SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Majaess, D.; Turner, D.; Lane, D.; Gieren, W.

    2012-06-10

    RR Lyrae variables and the stellar constituents of globular clusters are employed to establish the cosmic distance scale and age of the universe. However, photometry for RR Lyrae variables in the globular clusters M3, M15, M54, M92, NGC 2419, and NGC 6441 exhibit a dependence on the clustercentric distance. For example, variables and stars positioned near the crowded high-surface brightness cores of the clusters may suffer from photometric contamination, which invariably affects a suite of inferred parameters (e.g., distance, color excess, absolute magnitude, etc.). The impetus for this study is to mitigate the propagation of systematic uncertainties by increasing awareness of the pernicious impact of contaminated and radial-dependent photometry.

  2. k2photometry: Read, reduce and detrend K2 photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Nowak, Grzegorz; Albrecht, Simon; Palle, Enric; Ribas, Ignasi; Bruntt, Hans; Perger, Manuel; Gandolfi, Davide; Hirano, Teriyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Kiilerich, Amanda; Arranz, Jorge P.; Badenas, Mariona; Dai, Fei; Deeg, Hans J.; Guenther, Eike W.; Montanes-Rodriguez, Pilar; Narita, Norio; Rogers, Leslie A.; Bejar, Victor J. S.; Shrotriya, Tushar S.; Winn, Joshua N.; Sebastian, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    k2photometry reads, reduces and detrends K2 photometry and searches for transiting planets. MAST database pixel files are used as input; the output includes raw lightcurves, detrended lightcurves and a transit search can be performed as well. Stellar variability is not typically well-preserved but parameters can be tweaked to change that. The BLS algorithm used to detect periodic events is a Python implementation by Ruth Angus and Dan Foreman-Mackey (https://github.com/dfm/python-bls).

  3. Photometry and the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, C.; Solano, E.

    2013-05-01

    Building Spectral Energy Distributions combining data from different sources is becoming more important as astronomy takes an increasingly multi-wavelength approach. In order to do this, photometry data must be described in sufficient detail to allow for the conversion to compatible flux density units (including the description of magnitude systems and zero points). Furthermore, comparing observed photometry with the synthetic one for theoretical models allows to infer physical properties from the observed objects. But in order to do that, an even more detailed description of the observed photometric points is needed, including the transmission curves of the filters corresponding to the observed data. In the Virtual Observatory an important effort has been done towards this standardization with the Photometry Data Model. And in the SVO we have developed several services to help in this direction, providing detailed information about filters, synthetic photometry for theoretical models and tools to use all this to analyze observed data and estimate object physical properties.

  4. Photometry from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, M. J.; Bless, R. C.; Percival, J. W.; White, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    A brief description of the High Speed Photometer (HSP) of the Hubble Space Telescope is given, in particular the HSP light path, detectors, entrance apertures, and filters. The status of HSP testing to date is reported, and problems encountered with the bright earth and the telescope pointing system are described. The calibration effort for the HSP is well under way. Results of internal (instrument coordinate) aperture locations good to 0.05 arcsec and external (telescope coordinate) locations good to 0.02 arcsec are shown. The effects of spacecraft pointing and jitter on HSP photometry are detailed, and a preliminary measurement of spacecraft jitter with HSP is shown. The aperture calibration effort is verified by accurate pointing of a star to different HSP 1.0 arcsec entrance apertures, and photometric performance of the instrument is shown to be accurate to the 2 percent photon noise of the observations. Future science verification and guaranteed observing time programs are listed. Suggestions are made for future space-based photometers.

  5. Factors affecting response of surface waters to acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.; Johnson, D.W.; Elwood, J.W.; Van Winkle, W.; Clapp, R.B.; Reuss, J.O.

    1986-04-01

    Knowledge of watershed hydrology and of the biogeochemical reactions and elemental pools and fluxes occurring in watersheds can be used to classify the response of watersheds and surface waters to acidic deposition. A conceptual mosel is presented for classifying watersheds into those for which (1) surface water chemistry will change rapidly with deposition quality (direct response) (2) surface water chemistry will change only slowly over time (delayed response), and (3) surface water chemistry will not change significantly, even with continued acidic deposition (capacity-protected). Techniques and data available for classification of all watersheds in a region into these categories are discussed.

  6. The Aerodynamic Characteristics of Airfoils as Affected by Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HOCKER RAY W

    1933-01-01

    The effect on airfoil characteristics of surface roughness of varying degrees and types at different locations on an airfoil was investigated at high values of the Reynolds number in a variable density wind tunnel. Tests were made on a number of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) 0012 airfoil models on which the nature of the surface was varied from a rough to a very smooth finish. The effect on the airfoil characteristics of varying the location of a rough area in the region of the leading edge was also investigated. Airfoils with surfaces simulating lap joints were also tested. Measurable adverse effects were found to be caused by small irregularities in airfoil surfaces which might ordinarily be overlooked. The flow is sensitive to small irregularities of approximately 0.0002c in depth near the leading edge. The tests made on the surfaces simulating lap joints indicated that such surfaces cause small adverse effects. Additional data from earlier tests of another symmetrical airfoil are also included to indicate the variation of the maximum lift coefficient with the Reynolds number for an airfoil with a polished surface and with a very rough one.

  7. Detection by Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Jenkins, Jon M.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A periodic sequence of planetary transits provides a valid detection of an orbiting planet and provides the relative size of the planet and its orbital period. Ancillary measurements of the stellar spectrum and the variations of the star's radial velocity or position combined with stellar models allow the absolute size of the planet and its mass to be obtained. The results of this approach have already shown that the planet orbiting HD209458 has only 70% of the mass of Jupiter, but is nearly 50% larger in radius. Based on models of planetary structure, these results imply that the planet must have spent most of its lifetime so close to the star that it has not been able to cool and contract as have the giant planets in our Solar System. Thus its density is much less than Jupiter and Saturn and is actually less than that of water; i.e., about 0.4 gr/cu cm. If more sensitive measurements of the light curve of stars with closely orbiting planets can be made that provide the varying amplitude of the light reflected by the planet at various phases in its orbit, then characteristics of the planetary atmosphere can be obtained. Potentially, these data can identify major molecular species present in the atmosphere and tell us if clouds are present and yield the phase function of the aerosols. Although such detail cannot be obtained for Earth-size planets because their signal amplitudes are too small, it is possible to get data critical to the determination of the structure of extrasolar planetary systems. In particular, the size distributions and their orbital distributions can be measured by the transit photometry missions now in development. The COROT mission should be able to find large terrestrial planets in short-period orbits while the more ambitious Kepler and Eddington missions should be able to detect planets even smaller than the Earth and at orbital distances that place them in the habitable zone of their stars.

  8. The RINGS Survey: Optical Broadband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Mitchell, Carl; Spekkens, Kristine; Sellwood, Jerry; Williams, Ted

    2016-01-01

    We have targeted a sample of 19 nearby spiral galaxies, the RSS Imaging and Spectroscopy Nearby Galaxy Survey (RINGS), for detailed study of their mass distributions. We have obtained Fabry-Perot Halpha velocity fields using the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), 21-cm HI observations using the Very Large Array (VLA), and optical broadband BVRI photometry using the CTIO 0.9m and KPNO 2.1m telescopes. We present the results of the photometric component of the survey including multicolor images, surface brightness profiles, and DiskFit structural models.

  9. Pretreatment of amphiphilic comb polymer surfaces dramatically affects protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanping; Ma, Hongwei; Hausner, Douglas B; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Beebe, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    New applications in regenerative biotechnology require the ability to understand and control protein-surface interactions on micrometer and submicrometer length scales. Evidence presented here shows that micropatterned amphiphilic comb polymer films exhibit a pretreatment-dependent behavior with respect to protein adsorption for the proteins fibronectin, laminin, and for serum. A micropatterned surface, consisting of protein-reactive regions, separated by comb polymer, was created and tested for protein adsorption using the surface-sensitive imaging tool TOF-SIMS. Immersion of micropatterned surfaces in solutions of fibronectin or laminin resulted in uniform protein coverage on both the comb polymer and protein-reactive regions. However, preimmersion of similarly patterned surfaces in water for 2 h prior to protein incubation was found to dramatically improve the protein-resistant properties of the comb polymer regions. These results are consistent with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chain reorientation and/or hydration and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) backbone segregation away from the interface region. PMID:16283770

  10. Factors Affecting Peptide Interactions with Surface-Bound Microgels.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Lina; Nordström, Randi; Bramhill, Jane; Saunders, Brian R; Álvarez-Asencio, Rubén; Rutland, Mark W; Malmsten, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Effects of electrostatics and peptide size on peptide interactions with surface-bound microgels were investigated with ellipsometry, confocal microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results show that binding of cationic poly-L-lysine (pLys) to anionic, covalently immobilized, poly(ethyl acrylate-co-methacrylic acid) microgels increased with increasing peptide net charge and microgel charge density. Furthermore, peptide release was facilitated by decreasing either microgel or peptide charge density. Analogously, increasing ionic strength facilitated peptide release for short peptides. As a result of peptide binding, the surface-bound microgels displayed pronounced deswelling and increased mechanical rigidity, the latter quantified by quantitative nanomechanical mapping. While short pLys was found to penetrate the entire microgel network and to result in almost complete charge neutralization, larger peptides were partially excluded from the microgel network, forming an outer peptide layer on the microgels. As a result of this difference, microgel flattening was more influenced by the lower Mw peptide than the higher. Peptide-induced deswelling was found to be lower for higher Mw pLys, the latter effect not observed for the corresponding microgels in the dispersed state. While the effects of electrostatics on peptide loading and release were similar to those observed for dispersed microgels, there were thus considerable effects of the underlying surface on peptide-induced microgel deswelling, which need to be considered in the design of surface-bound microgels as carriers of peptide loads, for example, in drug delivery or in functionalized biomaterials. PMID:26750986

  11. Plant surface wax affects parasitoid's response to host footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostás, Michael; Ruf, Daniel; Zabka, Vanessa; Hildebrandt, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    The plant surface is the substrate upon which herbivorous insects and natural enemies meet and thus represents the stage for interactions between the three trophic levels. Plant surfaces are covered by an epicuticular wax layer which is highly variable depending on species, cultivar or plant part. Differences in wax chemistry may modulate ecological interactions. We explored whether caterpillars of Spodoptera frugiperda, when walking over a plant surface, leave a chemical trail (kairomones) that can be detected by the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris. Chemistry and micromorphology of cuticular waxes of two barley eceriferum wax mutants ( cer-za.126, cer-yp.949) and wild-type cv. Bonus (wt) were assessed. The plants were then used to investigate potential surface effects on the detectability of caterpillar kairomones. Here we provide evidence that C. marginiventris responds to chemical footprints of its host. Parasitoids were able to detect the kairomone on wild-type plants and on both cer mutants but the response to cer-yp.949 (reduced wax, high aldehyde fraction) was less pronounced. Experiments with caterpillar-treated wt and mutant leaves offered simultaneously, confirmed this observation: no difference in wasp response was found when wt was tested against cer-za.126 (reduced wax, wt-like chemical composition) but wt was significantly more attractive than cer-yp.949. This demonstrates for the first time that the wax layer can modulate the detectability of host kairomones.

  12. Second Workshop on Improvements to Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers in these proceedings show that a major effort is under way to improve all aspects of photometry. Astronomical multichannel photometry, photodiodes, analog-to-digital converters, data reduction techniques, interference filters and optical fibers are discussed.

  13. Phosphate Ions Affect the Water Structure at Functionalized Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Aliyah; Imbrogno, Joseph; Belfort, Georges; Petersen, Poul B

    2016-09-01

    Antifouling surfaces improve function, efficiency, and safety in products such as water filtration membranes, marine vehicle coatings, and medical implants by resisting protein and biofilm adhesion. Understanding the role of water structure at these materials in preventing protein adhesion and biofilm formation is critical to designing more effective coatings. Such fouling experiments are typically performed under biological conditions using isotonic aqueous buffers. Previous studies have explored the structure of pure water at a few different antifouling surfaces, but the effect of electrolytes and ionic strength (I) on the water structure at antifouling surfaces is not well studied. Here sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is used to characterize the interfacial water structure at poly(ether sulfone) (PES) and two surface-modified PES films in contact with 0.01 M phosphate buffer with high and low salt (Ionic strength, I= 0.166 and 0.025 M, respectively). Unmodified PES, commonly used as a filtration membrane, and modified PES with a hydrophobic alkane (C18) and with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were used. In the low ionic strength phosphate buffer, water was strongly ordered near the surface of the PEG-modified PES film due to exclusion of phosphate ions and the creation of a surface potential resulting from charge separation between phosphate anions and sodium cations. However, in the high ionic strength phosphate buffer, the sodium and potassium chloride (138 and 3 mM, respectively) in the phosphate buffered saline screened this charge and substantially reduced water ordering. A much smaller water ordering and subsequent reduction upon salt addition was observed for the C18-modified PES, and little water structure change was seen for the unmodified PES. The large difference in water structuring with increasing ionic strength between widely used phosphate buffer and phosphate buffered saline at the PEG interface demonstrates the importance of studying

  14. Surface wind observations affected by agricultural development over Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Songjun; Tang, Qiuhong; Zhang, Xuezhen; Xu, Di; Kou, Lihang

    2016-05-01

    Meteorological stations in Northwest China are surrounded by large proportions of cultivated land. The relations between the change of surface wind speed and the cultivated land fractions (CF) within a 4 km radius at 135 meteorological stations over arid Northwest China are investigated. Stations with larger CF experienced larger declines in surface wind speed from 1960 to 2007. Compared with the wind speed variation in the Tibetan Plateau where agricultural development is negligible, stations with low CF show similar variation, whereas the wind speed at stations with large CF illustrates a sharp decrease in the 1970s–1980s, during which irrigated agriculture developed rapidly. The observed wind speed at the station surrounded by irrigated fields in the Jingtai Irrigation District, shows a rapid wind speed decrease during the same period when the irrigated area expanded. By contrast, rapid wind decrease is not observed at a nearby station with minimal influence of agricultural development.

  15. Free-surface stability criterion as affected by velocity distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng-Lung, Chen

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines how the velocity distribution of flow in open channels affects the kinematic and dynamic wave velocities, from which the various forms of the Vedernikov number V can be formulated. When V >1, disturbances created in open-channel flow will amplify in the form of roll waves; when V <1, some (though not all) disturbances will attenuate. A study of the Vedernikov stability criterion reveals that it can be readily deduced within the framework of the kinematic and dynamic wave theories by comparing the kinematic wave velocity to the corresponding dynamic wave velocity. -from Author

  16. How strain affects the reactivity of surface metal oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Amakawa, Kazuhiko; Sun, Lili; Guo, Chunsheng; Hävecker, Michael; Kube, Pierre; Wachs, Israel E; Lwin, Soe; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Patlolla, Anitha; Hermann, Klaus; Schlögl, Robert; Trunschke, Annette

    2013-12-16

    Highly dispersed molybdenum oxide supported on mesoporous silica SBA-15 has been prepared by anion exchange resulting in a series of catalysts with changing Mo densities (0.2-2.5 Mo atoms nm(-2) ). X-ray absorption, UV/Vis, Raman, and IR spectroscopy indicate that doubly anchored tetrahedral dioxo MoO4 units are the major surface species at all loadings. Higher reducibility at loadings close to the monolayer measured by temperature-programmed reduction and a steep increase in the catalytic activity observed in metathesis of propene and oxidative dehydrogenation of propane at 8 % of Mo loading are attributed to frustration of Mo oxide surface species and lateral interactions. Based on DFT calculations, NEXAFS spectra at the O-K-edge at high Mo loadings are explained by distorted MoO4 complexes. Limited availability of anchor silanol groups at high loadings forces the MoO4 groups to form more strained configurations. The occurrence of strain is linked to the increase in reactivity. PMID:24259425

  17. Quantitative evolution of volcanic surfaces affected by erosional processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahitte, Pierre; Boillot-Airaksinen, Kim; Germa, Aurélie; Lavigne, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Variations through time of erosion dynamics, a key point to investigate correlation between climates and landform evolution, still remains poorly documented. One of the main issue in this type of study is the difficulty in determining for how long the erosion has operated. For this purpose, volcanic contexts are particularly suitable for defining the temporal dynamics governing erosion since the age of volcanic activity also constrains the age of emplacement of the surface today eroded, and thus the erosion duration. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of river profiles offers the opportunity to discriminate, among the wide variety of geological phenomena influencing erosion, their respective influence. Quantification of erosion processes and constrain of their signature on reliefs can be addressed by a morphometric approach of river profiles in volcanic environment through the analysis of digital topography (DEM). Break in slope zones, the so-called knickpoints, are usually related to a retreat of the point between the relict channel, upstream, and the adjusted channel, downstream. They are induced by either a lithological contrast, a change in the base level, uplift or eustatism, or a rejuvenation of the age of the volcanic surface. The stream long-profile and its watershed is also investigated by their concavity and hypsometric indexes to determine for how long the complexity and its heterogeneity along the valley incision remain visible. The present study focusses on the erosion of volcanoes in the Lesser Antilles, Reunion Island and Lombok Island (Indonesia). All located in tropical environments, these volcanoes offer a wide diversity of age (30 - 0 Ma) and lithology for investigating the respective influence of geological processes that have induced a large variety of shapes and volcanic history that we try to correlate to geometry of river profiles.

  18. Factors affecting survival of bacteriophage on tomato leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, F B; Balogh, B; Momol, M T; Smith, L M; Wilson, M; Jones, J B

    2007-03-01

    The ability of bacteriophage to persist in the phyllosphere for extended periods is limited by many factors, including sunlight irradiation, especially in the UV zone, temperature, desiccation, and exposure to copper bactericides. The effects of these factors on persistence of phage and formulated phage (phage mixed with skim milk) were evaluated. In field studies, copper caused significant phage reduction if applied on the day of phage application but not if applied 4 or 7 days in advance. Sunlight UV was evaluated for detrimental effects on phage survival on tomato foliage in the field. Phage was applied in the early morning, midmorning, early afternoon, and late evening, while UVA plus UVB irradiation and phage populations were monitored. The intensity of UV irradiation positively correlated with phage population decline. The protective formulation reduced the UV effect. In order to demonstrate direct effects of UV, phage suspensions were exposed to UV irradiation and assayed for effectiveness against bacterial spot of tomato. UV significantly reduced phage ability to control bacterial spot. Ambient temperature had a pronounced effect on nonformulated phage but not on formulated phages. The effects of desiccation and fluorescent light illumination on phage were investigated. Desiccation caused a significant but only slight reduction in phage populations after 60 days, whereas fluorescent light eliminated phages within 2 weeks. The protective formulation eliminated the reduction caused by both of these factors. Phage persistence was dramatically affected by UV, while the other factors had less pronounced effects. Formulated phage reduced deleterious effects of the studied environmental factors. PMID:17259361

  19. Cell surface lectin array: parameters affecting cell glycan signature.

    PubMed

    Landemarre, Ludovic; Cancellieri, Perrine; Duverger, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Among the "omics", glycomics is one of the most complex fields and needs complementary strategies of analysis to decipher the "glycan dictionary". As an alternative method, which has developed since the beginning of the 21st century, lectin array technology could generate relevant information related to glycan motifs, accessibility and a number of other valuable insights from molecules (purified and non-purified) or cells. Based on a cell line model, this study deals with the key parameters that influence the whole cell surface glycan interaction with lectin arrays and the consequences on the interpretation and reliability of the results. The comparison between the adherent and suspension forms of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, showed respective glycan signatures, which could be inhibited specifically by neoglycoproteins. The modifications of the respective glycan signatures were also revealed according to the detachment modes and cell growth conditions. Finally the power of lectin array technology was highlighted by the possibility of selecting and characterizing a specific clone from the mother cell line, based on the slight difference determination in the respective glycan signatures. PMID:22899543

  20. Photometry Of Pluto At Low Galactic Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Erin; Buie, M.; Bagenal, F.

    2012-10-01

    Our research is part of an ongoing project to continue the long-term photometric monitoring of Pluto in hopes to constrain volatile migration on the surface. As Pluto passes near the center of the galaxy, the fields are too crowded with stars for normal aperture photometry. We approached this problem by using Optimal Image Subtraction (OIS). We took images, both containing and not containing Pluto, using the 0.8m robotic telescope at Lowell Observatory, the 1m robotic telescope at New Mexico State University, and the Faulkes 2m robotic telescope at Siding Spring, part of Las Cumbres Observatory. We are presently gathering data, but our main focus was the data from 2010. We began by taking images of the star fields at the galactic center without Pluto to build catalogs of standard stars. These catalogs were applied to the Pluto images in order to make interpolated images and to cross check our results. We extracted the photometry of Pluto from differenced images where the background stars were subtracted, and we then applied the transformation equation to solve for Pluto’s standard magnitude. We will present the details of our data processing methodology, as well as the 2010 Pluto B, V, and B-V light curves in comparison to those from previous years. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Astronomy Grant NNX09AB43G.

  1. Photometry of compact galaxies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.; Usher, P. D.; Barrett, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Photometric histories of the N galaxies 3C 390.3 and PKS 0521-36. Four other compact galaxies, Markarian 9, I Zw 92, 2 Zw 136, and III Zw 77 showed no evidence of variability. The photometric histories were obtained from an exhaustive study of those plates of the Harvard collection taken with large aperture cameras. The images of all galaxies reported were indistinguishable from stars due to the camera f-ratios and low surface brightness of the outlying nebulosities of the galaxies. Standard techniques for the study of variable stars are therefore applicable.

  2. Far-Ultraviolet Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, E. G.; Carruthers, G. R.

    1993-12-01

    During a shuttle flight in May, 1991, wide field images were obtained for 12 star fields with the NRL far-ultraviolet cameras. These cameras provide sensitivity bands with effective wavelengths of lambda eff = 1367 Angstroms and lambda eff = 1702 Angstroms. The properties of the resulting magnitude system will be described and compared with previous photometry from the OAO2, ANS and TD1 satellites. Results from several fields in the vicinity of the galactic center will be discussed.

  3. Characterisation of the Gaia photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, J. M.; Jordi, C.; Fabricius, C.; Voss, H.; Weiler, M.

    2014-07-01

    Our team at the University of Barcelona has contributed since the early phases of the mission to the definition, evaluation and calibration modelling of the Gaia photometry. To maximise the Gaia scientific exploitation, we have frequently shared many different tools and data with the astronomical community. Among this information we have defined several relationships among colours involving Gaia magnitudes and colours from other commonly used photometric systems (Johnson-Cousins, SDSS, Hipparcos, Tycho and 2MASS) for several types of stars (including white dwarfs). These relationships can be used for planning scientific exploitation of Gaia data, performing simulations of the Gaia-like sky, planning ground-based complementary observations and for building catalogues with auxiliary validation data. During the commissioning phase our team (as part of the Payload Experts group) has been intensively checking the first photometric data to analyse the health and properties of the real instrument. These preliminary analyses allowed us to monitor the throughput variations with time, assess the spectral resolution and re-evaluate the performances of the end-of-mission photometry. The Payload Experts group activities continue beyond the commissioning phase aiming to optimize the operations onboard for maximizing the scientific return. Some example of first spectra and photometry are shown.

  4. Friction, Wear, and Surface Damage of Metals as Affected by Solid Surface Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisson, Edmond E; Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Godfrey, Douglas

    1956-01-01

    As predicted by friction theory, experiments showed that friction and surface damage of metals can be reduced by solid surface films. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding was a very important factor in wear of dry and boundary lubricated surfaces. Films of graphitic carbon on cast irons, nio on nickel alloys, and feo and fe sub 3 o sub 4 on ferrous materials were found to be beneficial. Abrasive films such as fe sub 2 o sub 3 or moo sub 3 were definitely detrimental. It appears that the importance of oxide films to friction and wear processes has not been fully appreciated.

  5. Multicolour Optical Photometry of Active Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, A.; Wade, G.; Bedard, D.

    Although broadband photometry has been used to infer information about artificial satellites since soon after the launch of Sputnik 1, the development of photometric techniques for non-resolved space object identification or characterisation has been hampered by the large number of variables involved. Many individual studies, and some long ongoing experiments, have used costly metre-class telescopes to obtain data despite other experiments demonstrating that much more flexible and affordable small aperture telescopes may be suitable for the task. In addition, due to the highly time consuming and weather dependent nature of obtaining photometric observations, many studies have suffered from data sets of limited size, or relied upon simulations to support their claims. With this in mind, an experiment was conducted with the aim of determining the utility of small aperture telescopes for conducting broadband photometry of satellites for the purpose of non-resolved space object identification and characterisation. A 14 inch Celestron CG-14 telescope was used to gain multiple night-long, high temporal resolution data sets of six active geostationary satellites. The results of the experiment cast doubt on the efficacy of some of the previous approaches to obtaining and analysing photometric data. It was discovered that geostationary satellite lightcurves can vary to a greater degree than has generally been recognised, and colour ratios vary considerably with changes in the illumination/observation geometry, making it difficult to use colour for satellite discrimination. Evidence was also detected of variations in the spectral energy distribution of sunlight reflected off satellite surface materials, which could have implications for surface material characterisation and techniques that aim to separate satellite body and solar panel contributions to the total observed spectra.

  6. UBV photometry of ER Vulpeculae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, R. K.; Padalia, T. D.; Srivastava, J. B.

    1991-08-01

    UBV photometry of the RS CVn-type eclipsing binary system ER Vulpeculae has been presented. The period comes out to be 0.698093d. The average depths of primary and secondary minima are, respectively, 0.21 and 0.12m. The colors at various phases have been given. A dip is seen around phase 0.73P as was seen in the observations of Arevalo et al. (1988). Large scatter is present in the observations as noticed earlier, and may be due to activity of the components.

  7. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. X. ULTRAVIOLET TO INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF 117 MILLION EQUIDISTANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Byler, Nell; Johnson, L. C. E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu E-mail: lcjohnso@astro.washington.edu; and others

    2014-11-01

    We have measured stellar photometry with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys in near ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F475W, F814W), and near infrared (F110W, F160W) bands for 117 million resolved stars in M31. As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey, we measured photometry with simultaneous point-spread function (PSF) fitting across all bands and at all source positions after precise astrometric image alignment (<5-10 mas accuracy). In the outer disk, the photometry reaches a completeness-limited depth of F475W ∼ 28, while in the crowded, high surface brightness bulge, the photometry reaches F475W ∼ 25. We find that simultaneous photometry and optimized measurement parameters significantly increase the detection limit of the lowest-resolution filters (WFC3/IR) providing color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) that are up to 2.5 mag deeper when compared with CMDs from WFC3/IR photometry alone. We present extensive analysis of the data quality including comparisons of luminosity functions and repeat measurements, and we use artificial star tests to quantify photometric completeness, uncertainties and biases. We find that the largest sources of systematic error in the photometry are due to spatial variations in the PSF models and charge transfer efficiency corrections. This stellar catalog is the largest ever produced for equidistant sources, and is publicly available for download by the community.

  8. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. X. Ultraviolet to Infrared Photometry of 117 Million Equidistant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Lang, Dustin; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Bell, Eric F.; Bianchi, Luciana; Byler, Nell; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Girardi, Léo; Gordon, Karl; Gregersen, Dylan; Johnson, L. C.; Kalirai, Jason; Lauer, Tod R.; Monachesi, Antonela; Rosenfield, Philip; Seth, Anil; Skillman, Eva

    2014-11-01

    We have measured stellar photometry with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys in near ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F475W, F814W), and near infrared (F110W, F160W) bands for 117 million resolved stars in M31. As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey, we measured photometry with simultaneous point-spread function (PSF) fitting across all bands and at all source positions after precise astrometric image alignment (<5-10 mas accuracy). In the outer disk, the photometry reaches a completeness-limited depth of F475W ~ 28, while in the crowded, high surface brightness bulge, the photometry reaches F475W ~ 25. We find that simultaneous photometry and optimized measurement parameters significantly increase the detection limit of the lowest-resolution filters (WFC3/IR) providing color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) that are up to 2.5 mag deeper when compared with CMDs from WFC3/IR photometry alone. We present extensive analysis of the data quality including comparisons of luminosity functions and repeat measurements, and we use artificial star tests to quantify photometric completeness, uncertainties and biases. We find that the largest sources of systematic error in the photometry are due to spatial variations in the PSF models and charge transfer efficiency corrections. This stellar catalog is the largest ever produced for equidistant sources, and is publicly available for download by the community.

  9. Nutrient losses in runoff from feedlot surfaces as affected by unconsolidated surface materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle feedlots contain unconsolidated surface materials (USM) (loose manure pack) that accumulate within feedlot pens during a feeding cycle. The effects of varying amounts of USM on feedlot runoff water quality are not well defined. The objectives of this field investigation were to: a) compa...

  10. Photometry of late type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    Broad band filter photometry for 57 bright stars of spectral type A2 discussed with peak instrument responses at 3320, 2980, 2460 and 1910 A. The data include nearly all usable filter observations of G, K and M types. Sampling is nearly complete for A and F giants and supergiants, with the exception of Cepheid variables. The basic results presented are relative digital counting rates obtained with a field-stop aperture of 10 minutes of arc. Characteristics of the four filter-photometer combinations and errors are discussed. Some observations require substantial correction if they are to represent the visually brightest star in the field. These corrections and the effects of interstellar reddening are discussed. The adjusted counts are then used to construct color-color diagrams and are compared to the recent SAO grid of model atmospheres.

  11. TT Arietis: Spectroscopy and Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoan; Li, Zongyun; Ding, Yuerong; Zhang, Zhousheng; Li, Zili

    2002-04-01

    We report the photometry and spectroscopy of TT Arietis around the turn of the millennium, when the nova-like variable is in high state. A positive superhump since 1997 still exists. A more precise orbital period than before, 0.13755040+/-1.7×10-7 days, is established. The intensity of the Balmer emission core is found to modulate at the superhump period rather than the orbital period and 180° out of phase with continuum. The intensity of Balmer absorption wings is approximately proportional to the continuum flux. The correlation between Balmer lines and continuum provides a new clue to the study of sources of continuum and emission lines. The mass ratio of the binary is found to be in the range of 0.19+/-0.04, which lends strong support to the proposition that superhumps arise from the inner Lindblad 3:1 resonance in TT Ari, as in superoutbursts of SU UMa stars.

  12. Characterization of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukugita, Masataka; Yasuda, Naoki; Doi, Mamoru; Gunn, James E.; York, Donald G.

    2011-02-01

    We study the photometric properties of stars in the data archive of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the prime aim being to understand the photometric calibration over the entire data set. It is confirmed that the photometric calibration of point sources is accurately on the system defined by the SDSS standard stars. We have also confirmed that the photometric synthesis of the SDSS spectrophotometric data gives broadband fluxes that agree with the photometry with errors of no more than 0.04 mag and little systematic tilt with wavelength. This verifies that the response functions of the 2.5 m telescope system are well characterized. We locate stars in the SDSS photometric system, so that stars can roughly be classified into spectral classes from the color information. We show how metallicity and surface gravity affect colors, and that stars contained in the SDSS general catalog, plotted in color space, show a distribution that matches well with what is anticipated from the variations of metallicity and surface gravity. The color-color plots are perfectly consistent among the three samples—stars in the SDSS general catalog, SDSS standard stars, and spectrophotometric stars of Gunn & Stryker—especially when some considerations are taken into account of the differences (primarily metallicity) of the samples. We show that the g - r-inverse temperature relation is tight and can be used as a good estimator of the effective temperature of stars over a fairly wide range of effective temperatures. We also confirm that the colors of G2V stars in the SDSS photometric system match well with the Sun.

  13. Theory of wide-angle photometry from standard stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1989-01-01

    Wide angle celestial structures, such as bright comet tails and nearby galaxies and clusters of galaxies, rely on photographic methods for quantified morphology and photometry, primarily because electronic devices with comparable resolution and sky coverage are beyond current technological capability. The problem of the photometry of extended structures and of how this problem may be overcome through calibration by photometric standard stars is examined. The perfect properties of the ideal field of view are stated in the guise of a radiometric paraxial approximation, in the hope that fields of view of actual telescopes will conform. Fundamental radiometric concepts are worked through before the issue of atmospheric attenuation is addressed. The independence of observed atmospheric extinction and surface brightness leads off the quest for formal solutions to the problem of surface photometry. Methods and problems of solution are discussed. The spectre is confronted in the spirit of standard stars and shown to be chimerical in that light, provided certain rituals are adopted. After a brief discussion of Baker-Sampson polynomials and the vexing issue of saturation, a pursuit is made of actual numbers to be expected in real cases. While the numbers crunched are gathered ex nihilo, they demonstrate the feasibility of Newton's method in the solution of this overdetermined, nonlinear, least square, multiparametric, photometric problem.

  14. Interactions of bluff-body obstacles with turbulent airflows affecting evaporative fluxes from porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Or, Dani

    2015-11-01

    Bluff-body obstacles interacting with turbulent airflows are common in many natural and engineering applications (from desert pavement and shrubs over natural surfaces to cylindrical elements in compact heat exchangers). Even with obstacles of simple geometry, their interactions within turbulent airflows result in a complex and unsteady flow field that affects surface drag partitioning and transport of scalars from adjacent evaporating surfaces. Observations of spatio-temporal thermal patterns on evaporating porous surfaces adjacent to bluff-body obstacles depict well-defined and persistent zonation of evaporation rates that were used to construct a simple mechanistic model for surface-turbulence interactions. Results from evaporative drying of sand surfaces with isolated cylindrical elements (bluff bodies) subjected to constant turbulent airflows were in good agreement with model predictions for localized exchange rates. Experimental and theoretical results show persistent enhancement of evaporative fluxes from bluff-rough surfaces relative to smooth flat surfaces under similar conditions. The enhancement is attributed to formation of vortices that induce a thinner boundary layer over part of the interacting surface footprint. For a practical range of air velocities (0.5-4.0 m/s), low-aspect ratio cylindrical bluff elements placed on evaporating sand surfaces enhanced evaporative mass losses (relative to a flat surface) by up to 300% for high density of elements and high wind velocity, similar to observations reported in the literature. Concepts from drag partitioning were used to generalize the model and upscale predictions to evaporation from surfaces with multiple obstacles for potential applications to natural bluff-rough surfaces.

  15. Towards understanding how surface life can affect interior geological processes: a non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, J. G.; Gans, F.; Kleidon, A.

    2011-06-01

    Life has significantly altered the Earth's atmosphere, oceans and crust. To what extent has it also affected interior geological processes? To address this question, three models of geological processes are formulated: mantle convection, continental crust uplift and erosion and oceanic crust recycling. These processes are characterised as non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems. Their states of disequilibrium are maintained by the power generated from the dissipation of energy from the interior of the Earth. Altering the thickness of continental crust via weathering and erosion affects the upper mantle temperature which leads to changes in rates of oceanic crust recycling and consequently rates of outgassing of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Estimates for the power generated by various elements in the Earth system are shown. This includes, inter alia, surface life generation of 264 TW of power, much greater than those of geological processes such as mantle convection at 12 TW. This high power results from life's ability to harvest energy directly from the sun. Life need only utilise a small fraction of the generated free chemical energy for geochemical transformations at the surface, such as affecting rates of weathering and erosion of continental rocks, in order to affect interior, geological processes. Consequently when assessing the effects of life on Earth, and potentially any planet with a significant biosphere, dynamical models may be required that better capture the coupled nature of biologically-mediated surface and interior processes.

  16. Nanoscale topographic changes on sterilized glass surfaces affect cell adhesion and spreading.

    PubMed

    Wittenburg, Gretel; Lauer, Günter; Oswald, Steffen; Labudde, Dirk; Franz, Clemens M

    2014-08-01

    Producing sterile glass surfaces is of great importance for a wide range of laboratory and medical applications, including in vitro cell culture and tissue engineering. However, sterilization may change the surface properties of glass and thereby affect its use for medical applications, for instance as a substrate for culturing cells. To investigate potential effects of sterilization on glass surface topography, borosilicate glass coverslips were left untreated or subjected to several common sterilization procedures, including low-temperature plasma gas, gamma irradiation and steam. Imaging by atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the surface of untreated borosilicate coverslips features a complex landscape of microislands ranging from 1000 to 3000 nm in diameter and 1 to 3 nm in height. Steam treatment completely removes these microislands, producing a nanosmooth glass surface. In contrast, plasma treatment partially degrades the microisland structure, while gamma irradiation has no effect on microisland topography. To test for possible effects of the nanotopographic structures on cell adhesion, human gingival fibroblasts were seeded on untreated or sterilized glass surfaces. Analyzing fibroblast adhesion 3, 6, and 24 h after cell seeding revealed significant differences in cell attachment and spreading depending on the sterilization method applied. Furthermore, single-cell force spectroscopy revealed a connection between the nanotopographic landscape of glass and the formation of cellular adhesion forces, indicating that fibroblasts generally adhere weakly to nanosmooth but strongly to nanorough glass surfaces. Nanotopographic changes induced by different sterilization methods may therefore need to be considered when preparing sterile glass surfaces for cell culture or biomedical applications. PMID:24027204

  17. WFPC2 Stellar Photometry with HSTphot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2000-01-01

    HSTphot, a photometry package designed to handle the undersampled PSFs found in WFPC2 images, is introduced and described, as well as some of the considerations that have to be made in order to obtain accurate PSF-fitting stellar photometry with WFPC2 data. Tests of HSTphot's internal reliability are made using multiple observations of the same field, and tests of external reliability are made by comparing with DoPHOT reductions of the same data. Subject headz'ngs: techniques: photometric

  18. Classification of stars with WBVR photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskiy, S. G.; Mironov, A. V.; Malkov, O. Yu.

    2013-10-01

    We present a method of obtaining the most reliable stellar spectral type based on multi-color photometry. The method also allows us to estimate color excess EB-V and distance to the star. Approbation of the method using bright stars with known spectral classification and W BV R photometry permits to estimate its reliability. Stellar spectra models from Pickles (1998) library and Fluks et al. (1994) interstellar extinction law were used in the application of the method.

  19. Meteor44 Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Meteor44 is a software system developed at MSFC for the calibration and analysis of video meteor data. The dynamic range of the (8bit) video data is extended by approximately 4 magnitudes for both meteors and stellar images using saturation compensation. Camera and lens specific saturation compensation coefficients are derived from artificial variable star laboratory measurements. Saturation compensation significantly increases the number of meteors with measured intensity and improves the estimation of meteoroid mass distribution. Astrometry is automated to determine each image's plate coefficient using appropriate star catalogs. The images are simultaneously intensity calibrated from the contained stars to determine the photon sensitivity and the saturation level referenced above the atmosphere. The camera s spectral response is used to compensate for stellar color index and typical meteor spectra in order to report meteor light curves in traditional visual magnitude units. Recent efforts include improved camera calibration procedures, long focal length 'streak' meteor photometry and two-station track determination. Meteor44 has been used to analyze data from the 2001, 2002 and 2003 MSFC Leonid observational campaigns as well as several lesser showers. The software is interactive and can be demonstrated using data from recent Leonid campaigns.

  20. L' AND M' Photometry Of Ultracool Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, M. S.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; Vrba, F. J.; Henden, A. A.; Luginbuhl, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    We have compiled L' (3.4-4.1 microns) and M' (4.6- 4.8 microns) photometry of 63 single and binary M, L, and T dwarfs obtained at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope using the Mauna Kea Observatory filter set. This compilation includes new L' measurements of eight L dwarfs and 13 T dwarfs and new M' measurements of seven L dwarfs, five T dwarfs, and the M1 dwarf Gl 229A. These new data increase by factors of 0. 6 and 1.6, respectively, the numbers of ultracool dwarfs T (sub eff) photometry, and trigonometric parallaxes are available, and we estimate these quantities for nine other dwarfs whose parallaxes and flux-calibrated spectra have been obtained. BC(SUB K) is a well-behaved function of near-infrared spectral type with a dispersion of approx. 0.1 mag for types M6-T5 it is significantly more scattered for types T5-T9. T (sub eff) declines steeply and monotonically for types M6-L7 and T4-T9, but it is nearly constant at approx. 1450 K for types L7-T4 with assumed ages of approx. 3 Gyr. This constant T(sub eff) is evidenced by nearly unchanging values of L'-M' between types L6 and T3. It also supports recent models that attribute the changing near-infrared luminosities and spectral features across the L-T transition to the rapid migration, disruption, and/or thinning of condensate clouds over a narrow range of T(sub eff). The L' and M' luminosities of early-T dwarfs do not exhibit the pronounced humps or inflections previously noted in l through K bands, but insufficient data exist for types L6-T5 to assert that M(Sub L') and M(sub M') are strictly monotonic within this range of typew. We compare the observed K, L', and M' luminosities of L and T dwarfs in our sample with those predicted by precipitation-cloud-free models for varying surface gravities and sedimentation efficiencies.

  1. BVRI PHOTOMETRY OF 53 UNUSUAL ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Q.-Z.

    2011-02-15

    We present the results of BVRI photometry and classification of 53 unusual asteroids, including 35 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), 6 high eccentricity/inclination asteroids, and 12 recently identified asteroid-pair candidates. Most of these asteroids were not classified prior to this work. For the few asteroids that have been previously studied, the results are generally in agreement. In addition to observing and classifying these objects, we merge the results from severalphotometric/spectroscopic surveys to create the largest-ever sample with 449 spectrally classified NEAs for statistical analysis. We identify a 'transition point' of the relative number of C/X-like and S-like NEAs at H {approx} 18 {r_reversible} D {approx} 1 km with confidence level at {approx}95% or higher. We find that the C/X-like:S-like ratio for 18 {<=} H < 22 is about twice as high as that of H < 18 (0.33 {+-} 0.04 versus 0.17 {+-} 0.02), virtually supporting the hypothesis that smaller NEAs generally have less weathered surfaces (therefore less reddish appearance) due to younger collision ages.

  2. One Percent Strömvil Photometry in M 67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. D.; Boyle, R. P.; Janusz, R.

    2005-05-01

    The Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope on Mt. Graham is being used in a program of CCD photometry of open and globular clusters. We are using the Ströomvil System (Straižys et al. 1996), a combination of the Strömgren and Vilnius Systems. This system allows stars to be classified as to temperature, surface gravity, metallicity and reddening from the photometric measures alone. However, to make accurate estimates of the stellar parameters the photometry should be accurate to 1 or 1.5 percent. In our initial runs on the VATT we did not achieve this accuracy. The problem turned out to be scattered light in the telescope and this has now been reduced so we can do accurate photometry. Boyle has written a routine in IRAF which allows us to correct the flats for any differences. We take rotated frames and also frames which are offset in position by one third of a frame, east-west and north-south. Measures of the offset stars give us the corrections that need to be made to the flat. Robert Janusz has written a program, the CommandLog, which allows us to paste IRAF commands in the correct order to reduce measures made on a given observing run. There is an automatic version where one can test various parameters and get a set of solutions. Now we have a set of Strömvil frames in the open cluster, M 67 and we compare our color-magnitude diagram with those of BATC (Fan et al. 1996) and Vilnius (Boyle et al. 1998). A preliminary report of the M 67 photometry will be found in Laugalys et al. (2004). Here we report on a selected set of stars in the M 67 frames, those with errors 1 percent or less.

  3. Surface shape affects the three-dimensional exploratory movements of nocturnal arboreal snakes.

    PubMed

    Jayne, Bruce C; Olberding, Jeffrey P; Athreya, Dilip; Riley, Michael A

    2012-12-01

    Movement and searching behaviors at diverse spatial scales are important for understanding how animals interact with their environment. Although the shapes of branches and the voids in arboreal habitats seem likely to affect searching behaviors, their influence is poorly understood. To gain insights into how both environmental structure and the attributes of an animal may affect movement and searching, we compared the three-dimensional exploratory movements of snakes in the dark on two simulated arboreal surfaces (disc and horizontal cylinder). Most of the exploratory movements of snakes in the dark were a small fraction of the distances they could reach while bridging gaps in the light. The snakes extended farther away from the edge of the supporting surface at the ends of the cylinder than from the sides of the cylinder or from any direction from the surface of the disc. The exploratory movements were not random, and the surface shape and three-dimensional directions had significant interactive effects on how the movements were structured in time. Thus, the physical capacity for reaching did not limit the area that was explored, but the shape of the supporting surface and the orientation relative to gravity did create biased searching patterns. PMID:23052853

  4. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury Survey: UV-IR Photometry of 117 Million Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Lang, Dustin; Dalcanton, Julianne; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, Lent C.; Byler, Nell; Gregersen, Dylan; Seth, Anil; Girardi, Leo; PHAT Survey Team

    2015-01-01

    We have measured resolved stellar photometry using HST/WFC3 and HST/ACS imaging in near ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F475W, F814W), and near infrared (F110W, F160W) with simultaneous point spread function fitting across all bands at all source positions. All images were aligned to 5-10 milliarcsecond relative accuracy and to 50 milliarcsec global accuracy. In the outer disk, the photometry reaches a completeness-limited depth of F475W~28, while in the crowded, high surface brightness bulge, the photometry reaches F475W~25. We find that simultaneous photometry and optimized measurement parameters significantly increase the detection limit of the lowest resolution filters (WFC3/IR) providing color-magnitude diagrams that are up to 2.5 magnitudes deeper when compared with color-magnitude diagrams from WFC3/IR photometry alone. This stellar catalog is the largest ever produced for equidistant sources, and is publicly available for download by the community. The quality of the photometry catalog, as well as examples of some initial results from model fitting will be discussed. PHAT is supported by HST GO-12055 administered by NASA.

  5. Do Aging and Tactile Noise Stimulation Affect Responses to Support Surface Translations in Healthy Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate neuromuscular responses to support surface perturbations are crucial to prevent falls, but aging-related anatomical and physiological changes affect the appropriateness and efficiency of such responses. Low-level noise application to sensory receptors has shown to be effective for postural improvement in a variety of different balance tasks, but it is unknown whether this intervention may have value for improvement of corrective postural responses. Ten healthy younger and ten healthy older adults were exposed to sudden backward translations of the support surface. Low-level noise (mechanical vibration) to the foot soles was added during random trials and temporal (response latency) and spatial characteristics (maximum center-of-pressure excursion and anterior-posterior path length) of postural responses were assessed. Mixed-model ANOVA was applied for analysis of postural response differences based on age and vibration condition. Age affected postural response characteristics, but older adults were well able to maintain balance when exposed to a postural perturbation. Low-level noise application did not affect any postural outcomes. Healthy aging affects some specific measures of postural stability, and in high-functioning older individuals, a low-level noise intervention may not be valuable. More research is needed to investigate if recurring fallers and neuropathy patients could benefit from the intervention in postural perturbation tasks. PMID:27195007

  6. Development and characterization of integrating sphere for photometry and radiometry measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibawa, Bambang Mukti; Mujahid, Abdul Al; Mindara, Jajat Yuda; Panatarani, Camellia; Joni, I. Made; Siregar, Rustam Efendi

    2013-09-01

    Integrating Sphere (IS) is an instrument formed a cavity sphere with its inner surface act as a Lambertian reflector. IS is needed in many optical measurements which involves a high diffused reflection. In addition, IS very essential in photometry and radiometry measurement system. However, currently, IS is still an imported product which considered very expensive. The material for the sphere and inner surface coating affect the performance of the IS systems. Therefore, the main challenges in designing IS are the material engineering for the sphere and the procedure for the inner surface coating. The inner surface was coated using BaSO4 which has a low absorption and high diffuse reflection. Spectral responses of the IS system was characterized using USB2000+ and calibrated using a standard Spectralon from ocean optic. The obtained IS system used an inner surface coating from a mixed 80% Barium Sulfate (BaSO4) and 20% Nippon Elastex paint which yield a reflection factor ρ = 0.955 and amplification factor M=10.69. The validation was conducted using an emitter with known specification from Luxeon of LXHL-DW01 which produced light flux 40.5 lumen with injection current 350 mA and junction temperature Tj 25°C.

  7. Surface-Driven Collagen Self-Assembly Affects Early Osteogenic Stem Cell Signaling.

    PubMed

    Razafiarison, Tojo; Silván, Unai; Meier, Daniela; Snedeker, Jess G

    2016-06-01

    This study reports how extracellular matrix (ECM) ligand self-assembly on biomaterial surfaces and the resulting nanoscale architecture can drive stem cell behavior. To isolate the biological effects of surface wettability on protein deposition, folding, and ligand activity, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based platform was developed and characterized with the ability to tune wettability of elastomeric substrates with otherwise equivalent topology, ligand loading, and mechanical properties. Using this platform, markedly different assembly of covalently bound type I collagen monomers was observed depending on wettability, with hydrophobic substrates yielding a relatively rough layer of collagen aggregates compared to a smooth collagen layer on more hydrophilic substrates. Cellular and molecular investigations with human bone marrow stromal cells revealed higher osteogenic differentiation and upregulation of focal adhesion-related components on the resulting smooth collagen layer coated substrates. The initial collagen assembly driven by the PDMS surface directly affected α1β1 integrin/discoidin domain receptor 1 signaling, activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen activated protein kinase pathway, and ultimately markers of osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We demonstrate for the first time that surface-driven ligand assembly on material surfaces, even on materials with otherwise identical starting topographies and mechanical properties, can dominate the biomaterial surface-driven cell response. PMID:27125602

  8. Surface chemical functionalities affect the behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xujie; Feng, Qingling; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2013-04-01

    This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) in vitro. Plasma polymerized films rich in amine (sbnd NH2), carboxyl (sbnd COOH) and methyl (sbnd CH3), were generated on hydroxyapatite (HAp) substrates. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The ability of different substrates to absorb proteins was evaluated. The results showed that substrates modified with hydrophilic functional group (sbnd COOH and sbnd NH2) can absorb more proteins than these modified with more hydrophobic functional group (sbnd CH3). The behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) cultured on different substrates was investigated in vitro: cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis was used to characterize cell proliferation, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis was used to characterize cell morphology and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis was used to account for differentiation. The results of this study demonstrated that the sbnd NH2 modified surfaces encourage osteogenic differentiation; the sbnd COOH modified surfaces promote cell adhesion and spreading and the sbnd CH3 modified surfaces have the lowest ability to induce osteogenic differentiation. These findings confirmed that the surface chemical states of biomaterials can affect the behavior of hASCs in vitro.

  9. Connecting the dots - III. Nightside cooling and surface friction affect climates of tidally locked terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carone, L.; Keppens, R.; Decin, L.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate how nightside cooling and surface friction affect surface temperatures and large-scale circulation for tidally locked Earth-like planets. For each scenario, we vary the orbital period between Prot = 1 and 100 d and capture changes in climate states. We find drastic changes in climate states for different surface friction scenarios. For very efficient surface friction (ts,fric = 0.1 d), the simulations for short rotation periods (Prot ≤ 10 d) show predominantly standing extratropical Rossby waves. These waves lead to climate states with two high-latitude westerly jets and unperturbed meridional direct circulation. In most other scenarios, simulations with short rotation periods exhibit instead dominance by standing tropical Rossby waves. Such climate states have a single equatorial westerly jet, which disrupts direct circulation. Experiments with weak surface friction (ts,fric = 10-100 d) show decoupling between surface temperatures and circulation, which leads to strong cooling of the nightside. The experiment with ts,fric = 100 d assumes climate states with easterly flow (retrograde rotation) for medium and slow planetary rotations Prot = 12-100 d. We show that an increase of nightside cooling efficiency by one order of magnitude compared to the nominal model leads to a cooling of the nightside surface temperatures by 80-100 K. The dayside surface temperatures only drop by 25 K at the same time. The increase in thermal forcing suppresses the formation of extratropical Rossby waves on small planets (RP = 1REarth) in the short rotation period regime (Prot ≤ 10 d).

  10. Improving Kepler Pipeline Sensitivity with Pixel Response Function Photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Robert L.; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of our investigation into the feasibility and expected benefits of implementing PRF-fitting photometry in the Kepler Science Processing Pipeline. The Kepler Pixel Response Function (PRF) describes the expected system response to a point source at infinity and includes the effects of the optical point spread function, the CCD detector responsivity function, and spacecraft pointing jitter. Planet detection in the Kepler pipeline is currently based on simple aperture photometry (SAP), which is most effective when applied to uncrowded bright stars. Its effectiveness diminishes rapidly as target brightness decreases relative to the effects of noise sources such as detector electronics, background stars, and image motion. In contrast, PRF photometry is based on fitting an explicit model of image formation to the data and naturally accounts for image motion and contributions of background stars. The key to obtaining high-quality photometry from PRF fitting is a high-quality model of the system's PRF, while the key to efficiently processing the large number of Kepler targets is an accurate catalog and accurate mapping of celestial coordinates onto the focal plane. If the CCD coordinates of stellar centroids are known a priori then the problem of PRF fitting becomes linear. A model of the Kepler PRF was constructed at the time of spacecraft commissioning by fitting piecewise polynomial surfaces to data from dithered full frame images. While this model accurately captured the initial state of the system, the PRF has evolved dynamically since then and has been seen to deviate significantly from the initial (static) model. We construct a dynamic PRF model which is then used to recover photometry for all targets of interest. Both simulation tests and results from Kepler flight data demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science

  11. Eos, Koronis, and Maria Family Asteroids: Infrared (JHK) Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Owensby, Pamela D.; Gradie, Jonathan C.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Tedesco, Edward F.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared photometry at 1.2, 1.6, and 2.2 micrometer (JHK) is reported for 56 asteroids in the Eos, Koronis and, Maria dynamical families. These data are consistent with similar surface composition for all of the asteroids of each family. The infrared colors within each family cluster in the region observed for the S taxonomic class, but Eos asteroids may belong to a separable K class. Asteroid 243 Ida, which was observed by the Galileo spacecraft, is a typical member of the Koronis family. The average infrared colors of the Maria family are slightly redder than those of the Eos and Koronis families.

  12. Detection of Terrestrial Planets Using Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Witteborn, Fred; Jenkins, Jon; Dunham, Edward; Boruci, William; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Transit photometry detection of planets offers many advantages: an ability to detect terrestrial size planets, direct determination of the planet's size, applicability to all main-sequence stars, and a differential brightness change of the periodic signature being independent of stellar distance or planetary orbital semi-major axis. Ground and space based photometry have already been successful in detecting transits of the giant planet HD209458b. However, photometry 100 times better is required to detect terrestrial planets. We present results of laboratory measurements of an end-to-end photometric system incorporating all of the important confounding noise features of both the sky and a space based photometer including spacecraft jitter. In addition to demonstrating an instrumental noise of less than 10 ppm (an Earth transit of a solar-like star is 80 ppm), the brightnesses of individual stars were dimmed to simulate Earth-size transit signals. These 'transits' were reliably detected as part of the tests.

  13. An Improved Method for Differential Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Fernández, Javier; Chou, Dean-Yi; Pan, Yen-Chen; Wang, Li-Hang

    2012-05-01

    We developed a method to improve the conventional differential photometry by using many auxiliary stars to reduce noise in the reference light curve, which is used to calibrate the light curve of the target star. The data used in this study are taken with the Taiwan Automated Telescope network. The light curves of two δ Scuti, HD 163032 and V830 Her, are shown here as examples. The results are compared with four other methods: conventional differential photometry; ensemble photometry; the method of Tamuz, Mazeh, & Zucker; and trend filtering algorithm. The light curve computed with our method is smoother than the other four methods, while preserving the pulsational signals. The mode frequencies determined from the light curve from our method also has a higher S/N and lower error in comparison with other methods.

  14. Dry heat treatment affects wheat bran surface properties and hydration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Pieter J; Hemdane, Sami; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-07-15

    Heat stabilization of wheat bran aims at inactivation of enzymes which may cause rancidity and processability issues. Such treatments may however cause additional unanticipated phenomena which may affect wheat bran technological properties. In this work, the impact of toasting on wheat bran hydration capacity and hydration kinetics was studied. Hydration properties were assessed using the Enslin-Neff and drainage centrifugation water retention capacity methods, thermogravimetric analysis and contact angle goniometry, next to more traditional methods. While equilibrium hydration properties of bran were not affected by the heat treatment, the rate at which the heat treated bran hydrated was, however, very significantly reduced compared to the untreated bran. This phenomenon was found to originate from the formation of a lipid coating during the treatment rendering the bran surface hydrophobic. These insights help to understand and partially account for the modified processability of heat treated bran in food applications. PMID:26948645

  15. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  16. Near-surface physics during convection affecting air-water gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    The gas flux at the water surface is affected by physical processes including turbulence from wind shear, microscale wave breaking, large-scale breaking, and convection due to heat loss at the surface. The main route in the parameterizations of the gas flux has been to use the wind speed as a proxy for the gas flux velocity, indirectly taking into account the dependency of the wind shear and the wave processes. The interest in the contributions from convection processes has increased as the gas flux from inland waters (with typically lower wind and sheltered conditions) now is believed to play a substantial role in the air-water gas flux budget. The gas flux is enhanced by convection through the mixing of the mixed layer as well as by decreasing the diffusive boundary layer thickness. The direct numerical simulations performed in this study are shown to be a valuable tool to enhance the understanding of this flow configuration often present in nature.

  17. Photometry of the old nova HZ Pup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassanelli, Tomas; Abbott, Tim

    2016-01-01

    This study of the old nova HZ Pup involved obtaining image data, removing the instrumental signature, performing photometry on the stellar images present, and generating light curves. Relative photometry between the target star and other stars in the image was used to remove atmospheric effects. A periodogram of this light curve shows the historically known periodicity close to 20 minutes. However, other periodicities are also present and it is not clear from the data which are real and which are artifacts of the sampling. These data will be combined with data from other telescopes collected contemporaneously in order to resolve this ambiguity.

  18. TRIPPy: Python-based Trailed Source Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Wesley C.; Alexandersen, Mike; Schwamb, Megan E.; Marsset, Michael E.; Pike, Rosemary E.; Kavelaars, JJ; Bannister, Michele T.; Benecchi, Susan; Delsanti, Audrey

    2016-05-01

    TRIPPy (TRailed Image Photometry in Python) uses a pill-shaped aperture, a rectangle described by three parameters (trail length, angle, and radius) to improve photometry of moving sources over that done with circular apertures. It can generate accurate model and trailed point-spread functions from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. Appropriate aperture correction provides accurate, unbiased flux measurement. TRIPPy requires numpy, scipy, matplotlib, Astropy (ascl:1304.002), and stsci.numdisplay; emcee (ascl:1303.002) and SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) are optional.

  19. How will surface treatments affect the translucency of porcelain laminate veneers?

    PubMed Central

    Turgut, Sedanur; Ayaz, Elif Aydogan; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Ulusoy, Kıvanç Utku; Bagis, Yildirim Hakan

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether surface treatments affect the translucency of laminate veneers with different shades and thicknesses. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 224 disc-shaped ceramic veneers were prepared from A1, A3, HT (High Translucent) and HO (High Opaque) shades of IPS e.max Press (Ivoclar Vivadent) with 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm thicknesses. The ceramics were divided into four groups for surface treatments. Group C: no surface treatments; Group HF: etched with hydrofluoric acid; Group SB: sandblasted with 50-µm Al2O3; and Group L; irradiated with an Er;YAG laser. A translucent shade of resin cement (Rely X Veneer, 3M ESPE) was chosen for cementation. The color values of the veneers were measured with a colorimeter and translucency parameter (TP) values were calculated. A three-way ANOVA with interactions for TP values was performed and Bonferroni tests were used when appropriate (α=0.05). RESULTS There were significant interactions between the surface treatments, ceramic shades and thicknesses (P=.001). For the 0.5-mm-thick specimens there were significant differences after the SB and L treatments. There was no significant difference between the HF and C treatments for any shades or thicknesses (P>.05). For the 1-mm-thick ceramics, there was only a significant difference between the L and C treatments for the HT shade ceramics (P=.01). There were also significant differences between the SB and C treatments except not for the HO shades (P=.768). CONCLUSION The SB and L treatments caused laminate veneers to become more opaque; however, HF treatment did not affect the TP values. When the laminate veneers were thinner, both the shade of the ceramic and the SB and laser treatments had a greater effect on the TP values. PMID:24605200

  20. Manure Injection Affects the Fate of Pirlimycin in Surface Runoff and Soil.

    PubMed

    Kulesza, Stephanie B; Maguire, Rory O; Xia, Kang; Cushman, Julia; Knowlton, Katharine; Ray, Partha

    2016-03-01

    Antibiotics used in animal agriculture are of increasing environmental concern due to the potential for increased antibiotic resistance after land application of manure. Manure application technology may affect the environmental behavior of these antibiotics. Therefore, rainfall simulations were conducted on plots receiving three manure treatments (surface application, subsurface injection, and no manure control) to determine the fate and transport of pirlimycin, an antibiotic commonly used in dairy production. Rainfall simulations were conducted immediately and 7 d after application of dairy manure spiked with 128 ng g (wet weight) pirlimycin. Soil samples were collected from all plots at two depths (0-5 and 5-20 cm). For injection plots, soil was collected from injection slits and between slits. Pirlimycin concentrations were higher in soil within the injection slits compared with surface application plots at 0 and 7 d. Pirlimycin concentrations in the 0- to 5-cm depth decreased by 30, 55, and 87% in the injection slit, between injection slits, and surface application plots 7 d after application. Pirlimycin concentrations were 106 ng g in sediment and 4.67 ng mL in water from the surface application plots, which were 21 and 32 times that of the injection plots, respectively. After 7 d, pirlimycin levels in runoff sediment and water decreased 80 to 98%. Surface application resulted in six and three times higher pirlimycin concentrations in water and sediment than injection. These results indicate that pirlimycin is most susceptible to loss immediately after manure application. Thus, injection could be considered a best management practice to prevent loss of antibiotics in surface runoff. PMID:27065398

  1. SEM Analysis of MTAD Efficacy for Smear Layer Removal from Periodontally Affected Root Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Houshmand, B.; Ghandi, M.; Nekoofar, MH.; Gholamii, Gh. A.; Tabor, R. K.; Dummer, P. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Biopure® MTAD (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, USA) has been developed as a final irrigant following root canal shaping to remove intracanal smear layer. Many of the unique properties of MTAD potentially transfer to the conditioning process of tooth roots during periodontal therapy. The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the effect of MTAD on the removal of smear layer from root surfaces. Materials and Methods Thirty two longitudinally sectioned specimens from 16 freshly extracted teeth diagnosed with advanced periodontal disease were divided into four groups. In group 1 and 2, the root surfaces were scaled using Gracey curettes. In group 3 and 4, 0.5 mm of the root surface was removed using a fissure bur. The specimens in group 1 and 3 were then irrigated by normal saline. The specimens in groups 2 and 4 were irrigated with Biopure MTAD. All specimens were prepared for SEM and scored according to the presence of smear layer. Results MTAD significantly increased (P=0.001) the smear layer removal in both groups 2 and 4 compared to the associated control groups, in which only saline was used. Conclusion MTAD increased the removal of the smear layer from periodontally affected root surfaces. Use of MTAD as a periodontal conditioner may be suggested. PMID:22509454

  2. Amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules affected by granule surface area.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Kong, B W; Kim, M J; Lee, S H

    2008-11-01

    Initial stage of hydrolysis of native starch granules with various amylolytic enzymes, alpha-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, glucoamylase I (GA-I) and II (GA-II) from Aspergillus niger, and beta-amylase from sweet potato showed that the reaction was apparently affected by a specific surface area of the starch granules. The ratios of the reciprocal of initial velocity of each amylolytic hydrolysis for native potato and maize starch to that for rice with the amylolytic enzymes were nearly equivalent to the ratio of surface area per mass of the 2 starch granules to that of rice, that is, 6.94 and 2.25, respectively. Thus, the reciprocal of initial velocity of each enzymatic hydrolysis as expressed in a Lineweaver-Burk plot was a linear function of the reciprocal of surface area for each starch granule. As a result, it is concluded that amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules is governed by the specific surface area, not by the mass concentration, of each granule. PMID:19021791

  3. Multiband Photometry of the Chromospherically Active & Spotted Binary System IM Peg—the Guide Star for the Gravity Probe B Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert; Guinan, Edward F.; Messina, Sergio; Lanza, Antonino F.; Wasatonic, Richard; McCook, George P.

    2010-06-01

    We report on the starspot properties of IM Pegasi—the guide star of the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite. GP-B's mission is to measure two predicted consequences of general relativity—the frame-dragging and geodetic effects—via its extremely precise onboard gyroscopes. However, IM Peg is a chomospherically active binary system with a luminous K2 III primary star showing rotationally modulated (Prot ≈ 24.5 days) light variations from starspots. The starspots can potentially cause problems as GP-B can erroneously interpret a change in starspot coverage (and corresponding shifts in the light center) as the star's movement. This apparent shift can also be exacerbated by possible changes in the light center (photocenter) of the binary system arising from changes in the light balance with the fainter ~1 Msolar (main-sequence early G-type star) component. Since 2000, we have carried out multiband high-precision photoelectric photometry of IM Peg to determine its activity and starspot coverage. Our photometry uses Strömgren uvby intermediate-band filters, VRI filters, and TiO (720/750 nm) narrowband filter sets. Measurements were made relative to nearby comparison and check stars using 0.8 m and 0.25 m telescopes. Analysis of TiO and multiband continuum photometry constrains the starspot areas, temperatures, and surface distributions. The photometry has been modeled using the maximum entropy and Tikhonov regularizations to determine the properties of starspots and to evaluate the effects of changing starspot areas and distributions on the light center of the binary. Our results indicate that IM Peg's activity should not affect the GP-B mission. We also present a study of IM Peg's long-term starspot cycle, which shows evidence of being 20 yr long. Lastly, we have determined the intrinsic (unspotted) brightness of the star to be V mag = 5.62 ± 0.03.

  4. Seasonal Influences on Ground-Surface Water Interactions in an Arsenic-Affected Aquifer in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, L. A.; Magnone, D.; Van Dongen, B.; Bryant, C.; Boyce, A.; Ballentine, C. J.; Polya, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Millions of people in South and Southeast Asia consume drinking water daily which contains dangerous levels of arsenic exceeding health-based recommendations [1]. A key control on arsenic mobilization in aquifers in these areas has been controversially identified as the interaction of 'labile' organic matter contained in surface waters with groundwaters and sediments at depth [2-4], which may trigger the release of arsenic from the solid- to aqueous-phase via reductive dissolution of iron-(hyr)oxide minerals [5]. In a field site in Kandal Province, Cambodia, which is an arsenic-affected area typical to others in the region, there are strong seasonal patterns in groundwater flow direction, which are closely related to monsoonal rains [6] and may contribute to arsenic release in this aquifer. The aim of this study is to explore the implications of the high susceptibility of this aquifer system to seasonal changes on potential ground-surface water interactions. The main objectives are to (i) identify key zones where there are likely ground-surface water interactions, (ii) assess the seasonal impact of such interactions and (iii) quantify the influence of interactions using geochemical parameters (such as As, Fe, NO3, NH4, 14C, 3T/3He, δ18O, δ2H). Identifying the zones, magnitude and seasonal influence of ground-surface water interactions elucidates new information regarding potential locations/pathways of arsenic mobilization and/or transport in affected aquifers and may be important for water management strategies in affected areas. This research is supported by NERC (NE/J023833/1) to DP, BvD and CJB and a NERC PhD studentship (NE/L501591/1) to DM. References: [1] World Health Organization, 2008. [2] Charlet & Polya (2006), Elements, 2, 91-96. [3] Harvey et al. (2002), Science, 298, 1602-1606. [4] Lawson et al. (2013), Env. Sci. Technol. 47, 7085 - 7094. [5] Islam et al. (2004), Nature, 430, 68-71. [6] Benner et al. (2008) Appl. Geochem. 23(11), 3072 - 3087.

  5. Osteoclasts but not osteoblasts are affected by a calcified surface treated with zoledronic acid in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Schindeler, Aaron . E-mail: AaronS@chw.edu.au; Little, David G.

    2005-12-16

    Bisphosphonates are potent inhibitors of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Recent interest has centered on the effects of bisphosphonates on osteoblasts. Chronic dosing of osteoblasts with solubilized bisphosphonates has been reported to enhance osteogenesis and mineralization in vitro. However, this methodology poorly reflects the in vivo situation, where free bisphosphonate becomes rapidly bound to mineralized bone surfaces. To establish a more clinically relevant cell culture model, we cultured bone cells on calcium phosphate coated quartz discs pre-treated with the potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid (ZA). Binding studies utilizing [{sup 14}C]-labeled ZA confirmed that the bisphosphonate bound in a concentration-dependent manner over the 1-50 {mu}M dose range. When grown on ZA-treated discs, the viability of bone-marrow derived osteoclasts was greatly reduced, while the viability and mineralization of the osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line were largely unaffected. This suggests that only bone resorbing cells are affected by bound bisphosphonate. However, this system does not account for transient exposure to unbound bisphosphonate in the hours following a clinical dosing. To model this event, we transiently treated osteoblasts with ZA in the absence of a calcified surface. Osteoblasts proved highly resistant to all transitory treatment regimes, even when utilizing ZA concentrations that prevented mineralization and/or induced cell death when dosed chronically. This study represents a pharmacologically more relevant approach to modeling bisphosphonate treatment on cultured bone cells and implies that bisphosphonate therapies may not directly affect osteoblasts at bone surfaces.

  6. Inferring planetary obliquity using rotational and orbital photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J. C.; Sekowski, C.; Haggard, H. M.; Pallé, E.; Cowan, N. B.

    2016-03-01

    The obliquity of a terrestrial planet is an important clue about its formation and critical to its climate. Previous studies using simulated photometry of Earth show that continuous observations over most of a planet's orbit can be inverted to infer obliquity. However, few studies of more general planets with arbitrary albedo markings have been made and, in particular, a simple theoretical understanding of why it is possible to extract obliquity from light curves is missing. Reflected light seen by a distant observer is the product of a planet's albedo map, its host star's illumination, and the visibility of different regions. It is useful to treat the product of illumination and visibility as the kernel of a convolution. Time-resolved photometry constrains both the albedo map and the kernel, the latter of which sweeps over the planet due to rotational and orbital motion. The kernel's movement distinguishes prograde from retrograde rotation for planets with non-zero obliquity on inclined orbits. We demonstrate that the kernel's longitudinal width and mean latitude are distinct functions of obliquity and axial orientation. Notably, we find that a planet's spin axis affects the kernel - and hence time-resolved photometry - even if this planet is east-west uniform or spinning rapidly, or if it is north-south uniform. We find that perfect knowledge of the kernel at 2-4 orbital phases is usually sufficient to uniquely determine a planet's spin axis. Surprisingly, we predict that east-west albedo contrast is more useful for constraining obliquity than north-south contrast.

  7. ATel 7543: NIR photometry of SNhunt 275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Noel; Artigau, Etienne

    2015-05-01

    SNhunt 275 (PSN J09093496+3307204) appears to be behaving similarly to SN 2009ip with an eruptive mass-loss event followed by a supernova explosion. We obtained a few epochs of NIR photometry using the Observatoire du Mont Megantic 1.6 m telescope and the CPAPIR instrument (Artigau et al. ...

  8. Photometry of Faint Wide Doubles in Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Thuemen, Chris; Gould, Ross

    2015-11-01

    Images of several double stars in Hydra published on the "Double Star Imaging Project" Yahoo Group page suggest magnitude issues compared with the corresponding WDS catalog data per end of 2014. Taking additional images with V and B filters enabled photometry for these pairs, suggesting significant corrections to the old data in WDS.

  9. Walraven photometry of nearby southern OB associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Geus, E. J.; Lub, J.; Van De Grift, E.

    1990-01-01

    Homogeneous Walraven (VBLUW) photometry is presented for 5260 stars in the regions of five nearby southern OB associations: Scorpio Centaurus (Sco OB2), Orion OB1, Canis Major OB1, Monoceros OB1, and Scutum OB2. Derived V and (B - V) in the Johnson system are included.

  10. Detecting Problematic Observer Offsets in Sparse Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderwood, T.

    2014-06-01

    A heuristic method, based upon histogram analysis, is presented for detecting offsets pervasive enough to be symptoms of problematic observing technique or calibration. This method is illustrated by a study of scatter in AAVSO photoelectric photometry (PEP) for five well-observed variable stars.

  11. Detecting Problematic Observer Offsets in Sparse Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderwood, Tom

    2014-05-01

    A heuristic method, based upon histogram analysis, is presented for detecting offsets pervasive enough to be symptoms of problematic observing technique or calibration. This method is illustrated by a study of scatter in AAVSO photoelectric photometry (PEP) for five well-observed variable stars.

  12. TRIPP: Time Resolved Imaging Photometry Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geckeler, Ralf D.; Schuh, Sonja; Dreizler, Stefan; Deetjen, Jochen; Gleissner, Thomas; Risse, Patrick; Rauch, Thomas; Göhler, Eckart; Hügelmeyer, Simon; Husser, Tim-Oliver; Israel, Holger; Benlloch-Garcia, Sara; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    Written in IDL, TRIPP performs CCD time series reduction and analysis. It provides an on-line check of the incoming frames, performs relative aperture photometry and provides a set of time series tools, such as calculation of periodograms including false alarm probability determination, epoc folding, sinus fitting, and light curve simulations.

  13. Photoelectric photometry era at the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences III. Fast photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaňko, M.; Kollár, V.; Komžík, R.; Koza, J.; Pribulla, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a continuation of the article series describing the photoelectric photometry era at the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences. The paper aims to provide a comprehensive technical description of implementation of the fast photometry at the Stará Lesná Observatory and estimates its photometric precision. Using integration times of 0.1 s and 0.01 s, an estimated photometric precision of the fast photometry is about 0.02 mag and 0.06 mag, respectively. Here, we also show the observation principles of the fast photometry and its use in positive observation of stellar occultation lasting 18.44 s by the asteroid (85) Io.

  14. Bearing surface design changes affect contact patterns in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Jocelyn M; Townsend, Elizabeth; Lipman, Joseph; Sculco, Thomas P; Wright, Timothy M

    2007-11-01

    The impact of design changes intended to improve wear of knee replacements can be assessed from analysis of retrieved implants. We hypothesized changes in bearing surface conformity from the Insall-Burstein II knee to a successor, the Optetrak, intended to improve contact stresses would be apparent in wear patterns observed on retrieved tibial inserts. From 151 Insall-Burstein II and 54 Optetrak retrieved components, 35 pairs (Insall-Burstein II and Optetrak) were matched on length of implantation, body mass index, and age. Digital images of the bearing surfaces were used to identify and measure wear modes, which were then converted to a percentage of the total possible contact area. Burnishing was the most prevalent mode for both designs followed by scratching and then pitting. The percentage of involved area was greater for the Optetrak for 23 pairs. Interestingly, for the nine matched pairs with length of implantation longer than 2 years, six of the Insall-Burstein II inserts had considerably greater scratching and pitting and five exhibited abrasion and creep absent from Optetrak implants. Bearing surface design is a major factor that can affect kinematics and contact patterns. Our observations confirm the considerable impact of small changes in conformity and suggest models predicting contact stresses adequately reflect in vivo performance. PMID:18062045

  15. Biofilm Formation by the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium columnare: Development and Parameters Affecting Surface Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenlong; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium columnare is a bacterial fish pathogen that affects many freshwater species worldwide. The natural reservoir of this pathogen is unknown, but its resilience in closed aquaculture systems posits biofilm as the source of contagion for farmed fish. The objectives of this study were (i) to characterize the dynamics of biofilm formation and morphology under static and flow conditions and (ii) to evaluate the effects of temperature, pH, salinity, hardness, and carbohydrates on biofilm formation. Nineteen F. columnare strains, including representatives of all of the defined genetic groups (genomovars), were compared in this study. The structure of biofilm was characterized by light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. F. columnare was able to attach to and colonize inert surfaces by producing biofilm. Surface colonization started within 6 h postinoculation, and microcolonies were observed within 24 h. Extracellular polysaccharide substances and water channels were observed in mature biofilms (24 to 48 h). A similar time course was observed when F. columnare formed biofilm in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions. The virulence potential of biofilm was confirmed by cutaneous inoculation of channel catfish fingerlings with mature biofilm. Several physicochemical parameters modulate attachment to surfaces, with the largest influence being exerted by hardness, salinity, and the presence of mannose. Maintenance of hardness and salinity values within certain ranges could prevent biofilm formation by F. columnare in aquaculture systems. PMID:23851087

  16. Seismic signatures of carbonate caves affected by near-surface absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ying; Wang, Yanghua

    2015-12-01

    The near-surface absorption within a low-velocity zone generally has an exponential attenuation effect on seismic waves. But how does this absorption affect seismic signatures of karstic caves in deep carbonate reservoirs? Seismic simulation and analysis reveals that, although this near-surface absorption attenuates the wave energy of a continuous reflection, it does not alter the basic kinematic shape of bead-string reflections, a special seismic characteristic associated with carbonate caves in the Tarim Basin, China. Therefore, the bead-strings in seismic profiles can be utilized, with a great certainty, for interpreting the existence of caves within the deep carbonate reservoirs and for evaluating their pore spaces. Nevertheless, the difference between the central frequency and the peak frequency is increased along with the increment in the absorption. While the wave energy of bead-string reflections remains strong, due to the interference of seismic multiples generated by big impedance contrast between the infill materials of a cave and the surrounding carbonate rocks, the central frequency is shifted linearly with respect to the near-surface absorption. These two features can be exploited simultaneously, for a stable attenuation analysis of field seismic data.

  17. Culture surfaces coated with various implant materials affect chondrocyte growth and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hambleton, J; Schwartz, Z; Khare, A; Windeler, S W; Luna, M; Brooks, B P; Dean, D D; Boyan, B D

    1994-07-01

    to culture surface was comparable, differing primarily in magnitude. Cell maturation-dependent effects were evident when enzyme activity in trypsinized and scraped cells was compared. These results indicate that different surface materials affect chondrocyte metabolism and phenotypic expression in vitro and suggest that implant materials may modulate the phenotypic expression of cells in vivo. PMID:7520486

  18. Light-induced heterogeneous reactions of NO2 on indoor surfaces: How they affect the balance of nitrous acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Alvarez, E.; Soergel, M.; Bassil, S.; Zetzsch, C.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important indoor pollutant. The adverse health effects due to the formation of nitrosamines are well known. HONO acts as a nitrosating agent after wall reactions of HONO with nicotine [Sleiman et al., 2010]. Indoor air can be surprisingly rich in HONO (homes with fireplaces, stoves, gas heating and cooking) and also surfaces are abundant. High HONO concentrations have been measured in indoor environments, from the direct emissions and heterogeneous reactions of NO2 in darkness. However, the measured HONO concentrations do not correspond to the HONO levels determined by the models [Carslaw, 2007]. We have tested in a flow tube reactor on-line coupled to a NOx analyzer and a sensitive Long Path Absorption Photometry instrument, the behaviour of various indoor surfaces towards NO2 under simulated solar light irradiation (λ= 300-700 nm). Our study has allowed us to obtain a deeper knowledge on the mechanisms of heterogeneous formation of HONO, quantifying the dependence of HONO formation on behalf of NO2 concentration and relative humidity and the enhancement of HONO formation in the presence of light. Pyrex, acidic detergent, alkaline detergent, paint and lacquer were tested on behalf of their heterogeneous reactivity towards NO2 in the absence and in presence of light. The results obtained demonstrated that indoor surfaces are photo-chemically active under atmospherically relevant conditions. The strongly alkaline surfaces (such as certain types of detergent) show a strong long-term uptake capacity. However, other surfaces such as detergents with a more acidic character released HONO. In some cases such as paint and varnish, a strong HONO release with light was detected, which was significantly higher than that obtained over clean glass surfaces. Certain organics present on their composition could exert a photo-sensitizing effect that may explain their increased reactivity. Unfortunately, the final balance points towards an important net

  19. Precision Multiband Photometry with a DSLR Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Csubry, Z.; Hartman, J. D.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.

    2016-03-01

    Ground-based exoplanet surveys such as SuperWASP, HAT Network of Telescopes (HATNet), and KELT have discovered close to two hundred transiting extrasolar planets in the past several years. The strategy of these surveys is to look at a large field of view and measure the brightnesses of its bright stars to around half a percent per point precision, which is adequate for detecting hot Jupiters. Typically, these surveys use CCD detectors to achieve high precision photometry. These CCDS, however, are expensive relative to other consumer-grade optical imaging devices, such as digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLRs). We look at the possibility of using a DSLR camera for precision photometry. Specifically, we used a Canon EOS 60D camera that records light in three colors simultaneously. The DSLR was integrated into the HATNet survey and collected observations for a month, after which photometry was extracted for 6600 stars in a selected stellar field. We found that the DSLR achieves a best-case median absolute deviation of 4.6 mmag per 180 s exposure when the DSLR color channels are combined, and 1000 stars are measured to better than 10 mmag (1%). Also, we achieve 10 mmag or better photometry in the individual colors. This is good enough to detect transiting hot Jupiters. We performed a candidate search on all stars and found four candidates, one of which is KELT-3b, the only known transiting hot Jupiter in our selected field. We conclude that the Canon 60D is a cheap, lightweight device capable of useful photometry in multiple colors.

  20. Elucidating Sources and Factors Affecting Delivery of Nitrogen to Surface Waters of New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, H. E.; Boyer, E. W.; Burns, D. A.; Elliott, E.; Kendall, C.; Butler, T.

    2005-12-01

    Rapid changes in power generation, transportation, and agriculture have appreciably altered nitrogen (N) cycling at regional scales, increasing N inputs to landscapes and surface waters. Numerous studies have linked this surplus N to a host of concerns, including eutrophication and violations in drinking water standards. Inputs of N nation-wide have increased during recent decades, primarily from the production and use of fertilizers, the planting of N-fixing crops, and the combustion of fossil fuels. The role of atmospheric N sources is of particular concern in New York, as rates of atmospheric N deposition in the northeast are among the highest in the nation. Our work aims to quantify nitrogen sources and fate in watersheds throughout the state. Further, we intend to elucidate factors controlling the retention and release of N to surface waters. We quantify nitrogen inputs through both measurement data (e.g., from wet and dry atmospheric deposition, precipitation, streamflow, water quality, and isotopic tracers) and from synoptic spatial databases (e.g., of terrain, land use, and fertilizer inputs). We present preliminary results from large catchments in contrasting spatial settings across the state (different land use configurations and atmospheric deposition gradients), illustrating the contribution of nitrogen sources to each region and factors affecting delivery to surface waters. Further, we present 30 years of temporal data from a large watershed (Fall Creek) in the Finger Lakes region of the state to demonstrate how hydrological and biogeochemical factors, over seasons and under varying hydrological regimes, combine to control N dynamics in surface waters. Our collective work provides information that is necessary to develop sound strategies for understanding and managing nutrients at regional scales.

  1. Surface coating affects behavior of metallic nanoparticles in a biological environment

    PubMed Central

    Jurašin, Darija Domazet; Ćurlin, Marija; Capjak, Ivona; Crnković, Tea; Lovrić, Marija; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Summary Silver (AgNPs) and maghemite, i.e., superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are promising candidates for new medical applications, which implies the need for strict information regarding their physicochemical characteristics and behavior in a biological environment. The currently developed AgNPs and SPIONs encompass a myriad of sizes and surface coatings, which affect NPs properties and may improve their biocompatibility. This study is aimed to evaluate the effects of surface coating on colloidal stability and behavior of AgNPs and SPIONs in modelled biological environments using dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering techniques, as well as transmission electron microscopy to visualize the behavior of the NP. Three dispersion media were investigated: ultrapure water (UW), biological cell culture medium without addition of protein (BM), and BM supplemented with common serum protein (BMP). The obtained results showed that different coating agents on AgNPs and SPIONs produced different stabilities in the same biological media. The combination of negative charge and high adsorption strength of coating agents proved to be important for achieving good stability of metallic NPs in electrolyte-rich fluids. Most importantly, the presence of proteins provided colloidal stabilization to metallic NPs in biological fluids regardless of their chemical composition, surface structure and surface charge. In addition, an assessment of AgNP and SPION behavior in real biological fluids, rat whole blood (WhBl) and blood plasma (BlPl), revealed that the composition of a biological medium is crucial for the colloidal stability and type of metallic NP transformation. Our results highlight the importance of physicochemical characterization and stability evaluation of metallic NPs in a variety of biological systems including as many NP properties as possible. PMID:26977382

  2. Surface coating affects behavior of metallic nanoparticles in a biological environment.

    PubMed

    Jurašin, Darija Domazet; Ćurlin, Marija; Capjak, Ivona; Crnković, Tea; Lovrić, Marija; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Vinković Vrček, Ivana; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Silver (AgNPs) and maghemite, i.e., superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are promising candidates for new medical applications, which implies the need for strict information regarding their physicochemical characteristics and behavior in a biological environment. The currently developed AgNPs and SPIONs encompass a myriad of sizes and surface coatings, which affect NPs properties and may improve their biocompatibility. This study is aimed to evaluate the effects of surface coating on colloidal stability and behavior of AgNPs and SPIONs in modelled biological environments using dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering techniques, as well as transmission electron microscopy to visualize the behavior of the NP. Three dispersion media were investigated: ultrapure water (UW), biological cell culture medium without addition of protein (BM), and BM supplemented with common serum protein (BMP). The obtained results showed that different coating agents on AgNPs and SPIONs produced different stabilities in the same biological media. The combination of negative charge and high adsorption strength of coating agents proved to be important for achieving good stability of metallic NPs in electrolyte-rich fluids. Most importantly, the presence of proteins provided colloidal stabilization to metallic NPs in biological fluids regardless of their chemical composition, surface structure and surface charge. In addition, an assessment of AgNP and SPION behavior in real biological fluids, rat whole blood (WhBl) and blood plasma (BlPl), revealed that the composition of a biological medium is crucial for the colloidal stability and type of metallic NP transformation. Our results highlight the importance of physicochemical characterization and stability evaluation of metallic NPs in a variety of biological systems including as many NP properties as possible. PMID:26977382

  3. Soil factors affecting mycorrhizal use in surface mine reclamation. Information circular/1993

    SciTech Connect

    Norland, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Surface and subsurface stabilization of mining-related wastes through revegetation depends upon the physical, chemical, and biological condition of the waste following mining. Mining disturbances can significantly alter the soil physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of a site, reducing or eliminating mycorrhizal fungi from the soil. Mycorrhizae are economically and ecologically important because they can alleviate environmental stresses caused by lack of proper soil condition and because they are vital to stabilization of mining waste by increasing plant survival and biomass through increased nutrient and water uptake. The report discusses some of the ecological factors that may affect mycorrhizae-plant associations on mining-related wastes and provides general information on mycorrhizae inoculation technology.

  4. Mendelian and non-mendelian mutations affecting surface antigen expression in Paramecium tetraurelia

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, L.M.; Forney, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    A screening procedure was devised for the isolation of X-ray-induced mutations affecting the expression of the A immobilization antigen (i-antigen) in Paramecium tetraurelia. Two of the mutations isolated by this procedure proved to be in modifier genes. The two genes are unlinked to each other and unlinked to the structural A i-antigen gene. These are the first modifier genes identified in a Paramecium sp. that affect surface antigen expression. Another mutation was found to be a deletion of sequences just downstream from the A i-antigen gene. In cells carrying this mutation, the A i-antigen gene lies in close proximity to the end of a macronuclear chromosome. The expression of the A i-antigen is not affected in these cells, demonstrating that downstream sequences are not important for the regulation and expression of the A i-antigen gene. A stable cell line was also recovered which shows non-Mendelian inheritance of a macronuclear deletion of the A i-antigen gene. This mutant does not contain the gene in its macronucleus, but contains a complete copy of the gene in its micronucleus. In the cytoplasm of wild-type animals, the micronuclear gene is included in the developing macronucleus; in the cytoplasm of the mutant, the incorporation of the A i-antigen gene into the macronucleus is inhibited. This is the first evidence that a mechanism is available in ciliates to control the expression of a gene by regulating its incorporation into developing macronuclei.

  5. CDK5 interacts with Slo and affects its surface expression and kinetics through direct phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jun-Ping; Surguchev, Alexei; Joshi, Powrnima; Gross, Liza

    2012-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are ubiquitous and play an important role in a number of diseases. In hair cells of the ear, they play a critical role in electrical tuning, a mechanism of frequency discrimination. These channels show variable kinetics and expression along the tonotopic axis. Although the molecular underpinnings to its function in hair cells are poorly understood, it is established that BK channels consist of a pore-forming α-subunit (Slo) and a number of accessory subunits. Here we identify CDK5, a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase family, as an interacting partner of Slo. We show CDK5 to be present in hair cells and expressed in high concentrations in the cuticular plate and in the circumferential zone. In human embryonic kidney cells, we show that CDK5 inhibits surface expression of Slo by direct phosphorylation of Slo. Similarly, we note that CDK5 affects Slo voltage activation and deactivation kinetics, by a direct phosphorylation of T847. Taken together with its increasing expression along the tonotopic axis, these data suggest that CDK5 likely plays a critical role in electrical tuning and surface expression of Slo in hair cells. PMID:22094329

  6. Infrared Photometry for Automated Telescopes: Passband Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, Gene; Young, Andrew T.

    2011-03-01

    The high precision that photometry in the near and intermediate infrared region can provide has not been achieved, partly because of technical challenges (including cryogenics, which most IR detectors require), and partly because the filters in common use are not optimized to avoid water-vapor absorptions, which are the principal impediment to precise ground-based IR photometry. We review the IRWG filters that achieve this goal, and the trials that were undertaken to demonstrate their superiority. We focus especially on the near IR set and, for high elevation sites, the passbands in the N window. We also discuss the price to be paid for the improved precision, in the form of lower throughput, and why it should be paid: to achieve not only higher precision (i.e., improved signal-to-noise ratio), but also lower extinction, thus producing higher accuracy in extra-atmospheric magnitudes. The edges of the IRWG passbands are not defined by the edges of the atmospheric windows: therefore, they admit no flux from these (constantly varying) edges. The throughput cost and the lack of a large body of data already obtained in these passbands are principal reasons why the IRWG filters are not in wide use at observatories around the world that currently do IR work. Yet a measure of the signal-to-noise ratio varies inversely with both extinction and with a measure of the Forbes effect. So, the small loss of raw throughput is recouped in signal-to-noise gain. We illustrate these points with passbands of both near and intermediate IR passbands. There is also the matter of cost for small production runs of these filters; reduced costs can be realized through bulk orders with uniform filter specifications. As a consequence, the near-IR IRWG passbands offer the prospect of being able to do photometry in those passbands at both high and low elevation sites that are capable of supporting precise photometry, thereby freeing infrared photometry from the need to access exclusively high and

  7. Parameters Affecting Spore Recovery from Wipes Used in Biological Surface Sampling ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Sandra M.; Filliben, James J.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2011-01-01

    The need for the precise and reliable collection of potential biothreat contaminants has motivated research in developing a better understanding of the variability in biological surface sampling methods. In this context, the objective of this work was to determine parameters affecting the efficiency of extracting Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores from commonly used wipe sampling materials and to describe performance using the interfacial energy concept. In addition, surface thermodynamics was applied to understand and predict surface sampling performance. Wipe materials were directly inoculated with known concentrations of B. anthracis spores and placed into extraction solutions, followed by sonication or vortexing. Experimental factors investigated included wipe material (polyester, cotton, and polyester-rayon), extraction solution (sterile deionized water [H2O], deionized water with 0.04% Tween 80 [H2O-T], phosphate-buffered saline [PBS], and PBS with 0.04% Tween 80 [PBST]), and physical dissociation method (vortexing or sonication). The most efficient extraction from wipes was observed for solutions containing the nonionic surfactant Tween 80. The increase in extraction efficiency due to surfactant addition was attributed to an attractive interfacial energy between Tween 80 and the centrifuge tube wall, which prevented spore adhesion. Extraction solution significantly impacted the extraction efficiency, as determined by statistical analysis (P < 0.05). Moreover, the extraction solution was the most important factor in extraction performance, followed by the wipe material. Polyester-rayon was the most efficient wipe material for releasing spores into solution by rank; however, no statistically significant difference between polyester-rayon and cotton was observed (P > 0.05). Vortexing provided higher spore recovery in H2O and H2O-T than sonication, when all three wipe materials and the reference control were considered (P < 0.05). PMID:21296945

  8. Deep photometry and integral magnitudes of 8 nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Ts. B.

    2016-02-01

    We estimated integral magnitudes of galaxies trying to include the contribution of the brightest part of their halos. We performed surface photometry based on (i) concentric elliptical rims, corresponding to the peripheral ellipticity of the image, (ii) median estimation of the mean value of the rim pixels, (iii) apparent radial brightness profiles, corresponding to the rim medians, and (iv) magnitude curves of growth, derived by numerical integrations of the apparent rim profiles, without preliminary background estimation and removal. Furthermore, we used the magnitude curves of growth to determine the integral magnitudes (limited by size and deepness of our frames) and compared them with the total magnitudes in the data base HyperLeda. Also, we used the rim-profiles to estimate the background level far enough from the galaxy center and we build (here—only for trial) the intrinsic radial profiles (with background removal). We apply this photometry on 8 nearby galaxies, observed with CCD in the system BVRC IC by the 50 cm Schmidt telescope of the Rozhen NAO in 2003-2004. We build radial profiles which occur to be as average 1.8 times (1.2-2.5 times) larger than in data base NED and of integral brightness that occurs to be about 1.4 times (1.2-1.7 times) higher than in data base HyperLeda. The relative brightness additions, found here, correlate with the color index and anti-correlate with the luminosity of the galaxy.

  9. From Spitzer Galaxy photometry to Tully-Fisher distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, J. G.; Tully, R. B.; Courtois, H. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Neill, J. D.; Shaya, E. J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper involves a data release of the observational campaign: Cosmicflows with Spitzer (CFS). Surface photometry of the 1270 galaxies constituting the survey is presented. An additional ˜400 galaxies from various other Spitzer surveys are also analysed. CFS complements the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies, that provides photometry for an additional 2352 galaxies, by extending observations to low galactic latitudes (|b| < 30°). Among these galaxies are calibrators, selected in the K band, of the Tully-Fisher relation. The addition of new calibrators demonstrates the robustness of the previously released calibration. Our estimate of the Hubble constant using supernova host galaxies is unchanged, H0 = 75.2 ± 3.3 km s-1 Mpc-1. Distance-derived radial peculiar velocities, for the 1935 galaxies with all the available parameters, will be incorporated into a new data release of the Cosmicflows project. The size of the previous catalogue will be increased by 20 per cent, including spatial regions close to the Zone of Avoidance.

  10. How Venus surface conditions evolution can be affected by large impacts at long timescales?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmann, Cedric; Golabek, Gregor; Tackley, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Using numerical simulations, we investigate how the evolution of Venus' atmosphere and mantle is modified by large impacts, during Late Veneer and Late Heavy Bombardment. We propose a coupled model of mantle/atmosphere feedback. We also focus on volatile fluxes in and out of the atmosphere: atmospheric escape and degassing. The solid part of the planet is simulated using the StagYY code (Armann and Tackley, 2012) and releases volatiles into the atmosphere through degassing. Physical properties are depth-dependent. The assumed rheology is Newtonian diffusion creep plus plastic yielding. Atmospheric escape modeling involves two different aspects: hydrodynamic escape (0-500 Myr) and non-thermal escape mechanisms (dominant post 4 Ga). Hydrodynamic escape is the massive outflow of volatiles occurring when the solar energy input is strong. Post 4 Ga escape from non-thermal processes is comparatively low. The evolution of surface temperature is calculated from the greenhouse effect dependent on CO2 and water concentrations in the atmosphere, using a one-dimensional gray radiative-convective atmosphere model. It allows us to complete the coupling of the model: feedback of the atmosphere on the mantle is obtained by using surface temperature as a boundary condition for the convection. Large impacts are capable of contributing to (i) atmospheric escape, (ii) volatile replenishment and (iii) energy transfer to the mantle of the solid planet. We test a wide range of impactor parameters (size, velocity, timing) and different assumptions related to impact erosion (Shuvalov, 2010). For energy transfer, 2D distribution of the thermal anomaly created by the impact is used, leading to melting and subjected to transport by the mantle convection. Small (0-50 km) meteorites have a negligible effect on the global scale: they only affect the impact point and do not have lasting consequences on surface conditions. Medium ones (50-150 km) have strong short term influence through volatile

  11. UBV photometry of hot white dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheselka, Mathew; Holberg, J. B.; Watkins, Ron; Collins, James; Tweedy, R. W.

    1993-12-01

    Johnson UBV photometry has been obtained for a set of hot degenerate stars, primarily DA and DO white dwarfs from among those detected in the Palomar-Green survey of UV excess objects. Most of our program stars have estimated effective temperatures (Teff) in the range 22,000 to 80,000 K and have no previous photometry. Some objects selected are also x-ray and extreme ultraviolet sources from the ROSAT all sky survey. The importance of precise photometric measurements in the analysis of x-ray data is discussed. A discrepancy between the observed colors and predicted colors is noted, and possibly accounted for by difficulties in defining the atmospheric cutoff of the U band and a general lack of hot stars used to define the photometric transformation between theoretical and observed colors.

  12. Sorption processes affecting arsenic solubility in oxidized surface sediments from Tulare Lake Bed, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gao, S.; Goldberg, S.; Herbel, M.J.; Chalmers, A.T.; Fujii, R.; Tanji, K.K.

    2006-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in shallow groundwater in Tulare Basin pose an environmental risk because of the carcinogenic properties of As and the potential for its migration to deep aquifers that could serve as a future drinking water source. Adsorption and desorption are hypothesized to be the major processes controlling As solubility in oxidized surface sediments where arsenate [As(V)] is dominant. This study examined the relationship between sorption processes and arsenic solubility in shallow sediments from the dry Tulare Lake bed by determining sorption isotherms, pH effect on solubility, and desorption-readsorption behavior (hysteresis), and by using a surface complexation model to describe sorption. The sediments showed a high capacity to adsorb As(V). Estimates of the maximum adsorption capacity were 92 mg As kg- 1 at pH 7.5 and 70 mg As kg- 1 at pH 8.5 obtained using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Soluble arsenic [> 97% As(V)] did not increase dramatically until above pH 10. In the native pH range (7.5-8.5), soluble As concentrations were close to the lowest, indicating that As was strongly retained on the sediment. A surface complexation model, the constant capacitance model, was able to provide a simultaneous fit to both adsorption isotherms (pH 7.5 and 8.5) and the adsorption envelope (pH effect on soluble As), although the data ranges are one order of magnitude different. A hysteresis phenomenon between As adsorbed on the sediment and As in solution phase was observed in the desorption-readsorption processes and differs from conventional hysteresis observed in adsorption-desorption processes. The cause is most likely due to modification of adsorbent surfaces in sediment samples upon extensive extractions (or desorption). The significance of the hysteresis phenomenon in affecting As solubility and mobility may be better understood by further microscopic studies of As interaction mechanisms with sediments subjected to extensive leaching

  13. WISE Photometry for 400 Million SDSS Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Dustin; Hogg, David W.; Schlegel, David J.

    2016-02-01

    We present photometry of images from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) of over 400 million sources detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use a “forced photometry” technique, using measured SDSS source positions, star-galaxy classification, and galaxy profiles to define the sources whose fluxes are to be measured in the WISE images. We perform photometry with The Tractor image modeling code, working on our “unWISE” coaddds and taking account of the WISE point-spread function and a noise model. The result is a measurement of the flux of each SDSS source in each WISE band. Many sources have little flux in the WISE bands, so often the measurements we report are consistent with zero given our uncertainties. However, for many sources we get 3σ or 4σ measurements; these sources would not be reported by the “official” WISE pipeline and will not appear in the WISE catalog, yet they can be highly informative for some scientific questions. In addition, these small-signal measurements can be used in stacking analyses at the catalog level. The forced photometry approach has the advantage that we measure a consistent set of sources between SDSS and WISE, taking advantage of the resolution and depth of the SDSS images to interpret the WISE images; objects that are resolved in SDSS but blended together in WISE still have accurate measurements in our photometry. Our results, and the code used to produce them, are publicly available at http://unwise.me.

  14. Narrow band photometry of selected asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajamohan, R.; Bhargavi, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    The CCD photometry of selected asteroids was carried out to check for possible cometary activity in them. To distinguish the asteroids with possible cometary activity from those of the main belt, each object of interest was observed in two filters; one centered on the C2 emission band at 5140A (90A bandpass) and the other centered on the nearby continuum at 4845A (65A bandpass). None of the observed asteroids appear to have any C2 emission.

  15. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2016 July-September

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  16. Variable Star Photometry at West Challow Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, D.

    2007-05-01

    This paper describes the facilities and observing programme of a small personal observatory set up in the UK for CCD photometry of variable stars. Its development has been driven by the belief that committed amateurs can make a valuable scientific contribution to the study of variable stars. Observing projects carried out at WCO are described including examples of Pro-Am collaboration and contributions to the observing programmes of the BAAVSS, AAVSO and CBA.

  17. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2016 April-June

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  18. Galileo Photometry of Asteroid 951 Gaspra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.C.; Simonelli, D.P.; Lee, P.; Klaasen, K.; Johnson, T.V.; Breneman, H.; Head, J.W.; Murchie, S.; Fanale, F.; Robinson, M.; Clark, B.; Granahan, J.; Garbeil, H.; McEwen, A.S.; Kirk, R.L.; Davies, M.; Neukum, G.; Mottola, S.; Wagner, R.; Belton, M.; Chapman, C.; Pilcher, C.

    1994-01-01

    Galileo images of Gaspra make it possible for the first time to determine a main-belt asteroid's photometric properties accurately by providing surface-resolved coverage over a wide range of incidence and emission angles and by extending the phase angle coverage to phases not observable from Earth. We combine Earth-based telescopic photometry over phase angles 2?? ??? ?? ??? 25?? with Galileo whole-disk and disk-resolved data at 33?? ??? ?? ??? 51?? to derive average global photometric properties in terms of Hapke's photometric model. The microscopic texture and particle phase-function behavior of Gaspra's surface are remarkably like those of other airless rocky bodies such as the Moon. The macroscopic surface roughness parameter, ??̄ = 29??, is slightly larger than that reported for typical lunar materials. The particle single scattering albedo, ??́0 = 0.36 ?? 0.07, is significantly larger than for lunar materials, and the opposition surge amplitude, B0 = 1.63 ?? 0.07, is correspondingly smaller. We determine a visual geometric albedo pv = 0.22 ?? 0.06 for Gaspra, in close agreement with pv = 0.22 ?? 0.03 estimated from Earth-based observations. Gaspra's phase integral is 0.47, and the bolometric Bond albedo is estimated to be 0.12 ?? 0.03. An albedo map derived by correcting Galileo images with our average global photometric function reveals subdued albedo contrasts of ??10% or less over Gaspra's northern hemisphere. Several independent classification algorithms confirm the subtle spectral heterogeneity reported earlier (S. Mottola, M. DiMartino, M. Gonano-Beurer, H. Hoffman, and G. Neukum, 1993, Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, pp. 421-424; M. J. S. Belton et al., 1992, Science 257, 1647-1652). Whole-disk colors (0.41 ??? ?? ??? 0.99 ??m) vary systematically with longitude by about ??5%, but color differences as large as 30% occur locally. Colors vary continuously between end-member materials whose areal distribution correlates with regional topography. Infrared

  19. Surface Physicochemistry and Ionic Strength Affects eDNA’s Role in Bacterial Adhesion to Abiotic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Regina, Viduthalai R.; Lokanathan, Arcot R.; Modrzyński, Jakub J.; Sutherland, Duncan S.; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an important structural component of biofilms formed by many bacteria, but few reports have focused on its role in initial cell adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of eDNA in bacterial adhesion to abiotic surfaces, and determine to which extent eDNA-mediated adhesion depends on the physicochemical properties of the surface and surrounding liquid. We investigated eDNA alteration of cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potential, and subsequently quantified the effect of eDNA on the adhesion of Staphylococcus xylosus to glass surfaces functionalised with different chemistries resulting in variable hydrophobicity and charge. Cell adhesion experiments were carried out at three different ionic strengths. Removal of eDNA from S. xylosus cells by DNase treatment did not alter the zeta potential, but rendered the cells more hydrophilic. DNase treatment impaired adhesion of cells to glass surfaces, but the adhesive properties of S. xylosus were regained within 30 minutes if DNase was not continuously present, implying a continuous release of eDNA in the culture. Removal of eDNA lowered the adhesion of S. xylosus to all surfaces chemistries tested, but not at all ionic strengths. No effect was seen on glass surfaces and carboxyl-functionalised surfaces at high ionic strength, and a reverse effect occurred on amine-functionalised surfaces at low ionic strength. However, eDNA promoted adhesion of cells to hydrophobic surfaces irrespective of the ionic strength. The adhesive properties of eDNA in mediating initial adhesion of S. xylosus is thus highly versatile, but also dependent on the physicochemical properties of the surface and ionic strength of the surrounding medium. PMID:25122477

  20. Interpretation of integrated-disk photometry of Callisto and Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, K.; Ajello, J. M.; Lumme, K.; Bowell, E.

    1983-01-01

    The Lumme-Bowell (1981) theory has been used to interpret the integrated phase curves of Callisto and Ganymede, and it is noted that while the theory explains the brightness angles of these satellites up to about 80 deg solar phase angle, the observed brightness drops off at larger angles more rapidly than predicted. It is suggested that this discrepancy is due to the fact that single regolith particles must have phase functions which are much more elongated in the forward or backward scattering directions than is allowed for by the Lumme-Bowell theory. The hemispheric asymmetry in Callisto's surface texture can be explained by invoking the formation of an ice film on the trailing side, consistent with Voyager detailed photometry and thermometry of Callisto.

  1. Photometry of AM Herculis - A slow optical pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Krzeminski, W.

    1978-01-01

    Multicolor photometry of the X-ray binary AM Her suggests that the red component of the optical flux is closely related to the source of optical circular polarization in the system. It is concluded from the periodic modulation of flux in the U through R bands, which is particularly well-defined when plotted as color curves, that the primary and secondary minima are neither eclipses by a secondary star nor eclipses by a hot spot. It is suggested that the primary minimum in the visual light curve is the eclipse of a region of intense optical emission in the magnetic field near the surface of a degenerate dwarf by that dwarf itself.

  2. Magnetic activity on V889 Herculis. Combining photometry and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, S. P.; Korhonen, H.; Berdyugina, S. V.; Ilyin, I.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.; Savanov, I.; Tuominen, I.

    2008-09-01

    Aims: In this paper we analyse photometric and spectroscopic observations of the young active dwarf V889 Her. We present new surface temperature maps, and compare them to earlier published Doppler maps, as well as to the results obtained from long-term photometry. Methods: The light curve inversions and surface temperature maps were obtained using the Occamian approach inversion technique. Results: The 12 years of photometric records on V889 Her suggest a possible photometric cycle of approximately 9 years. Variability on this time scale is detected in the maximum, minimum, and mean photometric magnitudes. The spots prefer to concentrate on two active longitudes that are approximately 180° apart. Furthermore, one flip-flop event, i.e., a sudden change of the dominant active longitude by 180°, is detected at the time of the global maximum activity. The wings of the Ca II 8662 Å indicate that the quiet photosphere of the V889 Her is similar to the one of the present Sun supporting earlier determined atmospheric parameters, while the chromosphere of V889 Her shows signs of much stronger activity. The temperature maps reveal that the polar regions are covered by spots, which are about 1500 K cooler than the quiet photosphere. The mean spot latitude varies slightly with time. It appears that the spot latitudes from our Doppler images and the spot migration rates revealed by photometry indicate a weaker differential rotation than reported earlier, but in the same (solar-like) direction. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Table [see full textsee full textsee full text] and Figs. [see full textsee full textsee full text]-[see full textsee full textsee full text] are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Marine organic geochemistry in industrially affected coastal areas in Greece: Hydrocarbons in surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianestis, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbons are abundant components of the organic material in coastal zones. Their sources are mainly anthropogenic, but several natural ones have also been recognized. Among hydrocarbons, the polycyclic aromatic ones (PAHs) have received special attention since they considered as hazardous environmental chemicals and are included in priority pollutant lists. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution, sources and transport pathways of hydrocarbons in marine areas in Greece directly influenced from the operation of major industrial units in the coastal zone by using a molecular marker approach, characteristic compositional patterns and related indices and also to evaluate their potential toxicity. Thirty two surface sediment samples were collected from three marine areas: a) Antikyra bay in Korinthiakos gulf, affected from the operation of an alumina and production plant b) Larymna bay in Noth Evoikos, affected from the operation of a nickel production plant and c) Aliveri bay in South Evoikos Gulf, affected from a cement production plant. In all the studied areas aquaculture and fishing activities have been also developed in the coastal zone. High aliphatic hydrocarbon (AHC) concentrations (~500 μg/g), indicating significant petroleum related inputs, were measured only in Antikyra bay. In all the other samples, AHC values were below 100 μg/g. N-alkanes were the most prominent resolved components (R) with an elevated odd to even carbon number preference, revealing the high importance of terrestrial inputs in the study areas. The unresolved complex mixture (UCM) was the major component of the aliphatic fraction (UCM/R > 4), indicating a chronic oil pollution. A series of hopanes were also identified, with patterns characteristic of oil-derived hydrocarbons, further confirming the presence of pollutant inputs from fossil fuel products. Extremely high PAH concentrations (> 100,000 ng/g) were found in the close vicinity of the alumina production

  4. Quick and Dirty WFPC2 Stellar Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.

    2001-01-01

    The latest release of the IRAF (Image Reduction and Analysis Facility) MXTOOLS package includes the new tasks QDWFPC2 (Quick and Dirty Wide Field and Planetary Camera, which does quick CCD (charge-coupled device) stellar photometry on two Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 (Wide Field and Planetary Camera) observations: WFPC2COLOR, which converts HST WFPC2 instrumental magnitudes to standard colors using the Holtzman et al. color equations, and QDCMD (Quick and Dirty Color Magnitude Diagram), which reads the output of WFPC2COLOR and displays a color-magnitude diagram on a user-chosen graphics device.

  5. Photometry and polarimetry of V 1057 Cygni.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G.; Lee, T.; Coyne, G.

    1972-01-01

    Evaluation of extensive photometric and polarimetric data over a six-month interval for V 1057 Cyg. The polarization appears to be constant and of interstellar origin; the photometry, which extends nearly six octaves from the ultraviolet to 22 microns in the infrared, indicates that the total observed luminosity is decreasing - having now declined about 10% from its earlier level. A model characterized by two circumstellar shells which absorb and reradiate short-wavelength stellar flux from an underlying A1-type star provides the best fit to the observational data. The present variability, however, cannot be due to circumstellar activity, but appears to originate in the star itself.

  6. Scintillation Noise in Exoplanet Transit Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhring, Dóra; Wilson, Richard; Osborn, James; Dhillon, Vik

    2015-04-01

    Transit photometry is a powerful technique for studying exoplanets. Transit observations from the ground of targets of magnitude V= 10 or brighter, however, are limited by scintillation noise due to Earth's atmosphere. Through turbulence profiling using instruments such as the stereo-SCIDAR, we have shown to able to accurately model scintillation noise, which is essential in order to fully account for the error budget of the observation. Through numerical modelling we find that employing scintillation reducing techniques enables an improvement of a factor between 1.36 — 1.6 on the astrophysical parameters.

  7. Charles Nordmann and Multicolour Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequeux, James

    2010-11-01

    Charles Nordmann (1881-1940), an astronomer at the Paris Observatory, was the first to determine the effective temperature of stars with his photometre heterochrome, simultaneously and independently of Rosenberg, Wilsing and Scheiner in Germany. He is also the remote precursor of the multicolour photometry of Johnson and Morgan. In spite of the quality of his temperature determinations, which were as good or better than those made by spectrophotometry, he rapidly fell into oblivion because of some failures in his scientific work. We examine his activity in the international context of the time, and explain why he has been forgotten, to be rediscovered only recently.

  8. V photometry of Titania, Oberon, and Triton

    SciTech Connect

    Goguen, J.D.; Hammel, H.B.; Brown, R.H.

    1989-02-01

    The phase angle and orbital brightness variations of Titania, Oberon, and Triton are presently obtained through analysis of V filter photometry obtained at Mauna Kea in 1982-1983. While Titania and Oberon exhibit magnitude variations with phase angle comparable to those of low-to-moderate albedo asteroids observed within several deg of opposition, Triton's phase variation is distinctly different from these and has a phase coefficient consistent with either a high-albedo regolith or an optically thick nonparticulate scattering layer (perhaps an atmosphere, or an ocean). A low-albedo regolith cannot on the strength of these data be ruled out, however. 39 references.

  9. Time Series Photometry of KZ Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    We present BVRI time series photometry of the high amplitude delta Scuti star KZ Lacertae secured using the 0.9-meter telescope located at the Brigham Young University West Mountain Observatory. In addition to the multicolor light curves that are presented, the V data from the last six years of observations are used to plot an O-C diagram in order to determine the ephemeris and evaluate evidence for period change. We wish to thank the Brigham Young University College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences as well as the Department of Physics and Astronomy for their continued support of the research activities at the West Mountain Observatory.

  10. 13-Color Photometry of 16 Variable Be-Stars - Part One - Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M.; Schuster, W. J.

    1982-07-01

    We present thirteen color photometry of 16 variable Be stars observed at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional in San Pedro Martir in Baja California, Our data cover the years 1977 to 1979, and we include earlier measurements of Johnson and Mitchell from 1965 to 1968 that have been corrected in order to have a homogeneous set of data.

  11. Dynamics between fruit cuticles and surface microflora can affect sanitizing methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilms are communities of microorganisms held together by substances such as polysaccharides which form on surfaces. These communities do not need to be on living tissue but form on any available surface such as rocks in a stream, interior of pipes and on teeth. On surfaces, including fruit, these...

  12. Photometry with Multi-anode Microchannel Arrays (mamas) and Charge Injection Devices (cids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of two kinds of detectors are summarized with emphasis on those aspects that would affect their use in high accuracy astronomical photometry. The first type, the multianode microchannel arrays (MAMA), are a family of pulse counting array detectors. Components and operation principles are reviewed and quantum efficiency, noise characteristics, and dynamic range characteristics are described. The second type, charge injection devices (CID), are discussed in reference to their applicability to photometric detection at optical wavelengths.

  13. Erratum: High-Precision Photometry of Extreme Kbo 2003 EL61" (2008, AJ, 135, 1749)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerda, Pedro; Jewitt, David; Peixinho, Nuno

    2008-10-01

    We report an error in Table 3 of the original paper: the UT and Julian dates, Columns 1 and 2, and the photometry, Column 3, are misaligned below row 153. The corrected version of Table 3 is presented herein. These corrections are only typographical in nature, and none of the results or conclusions of the paper are affected. We acknowledge Daniel C. Fabrycky for detecting this error.

  14. Analysing Thermal Response Test Data Affected by Groundwater Flow and Surface Temperature Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoya, Massimo; Imitazione, Gianmario; Chiozzi, Paolo; Orsi, Marco; Armadillo, Egidio

    2014-05-01

    Tests that record the underground temperature variation due to a constant heat injected into a borehole (or extracted from it) by means of a carrier fluid are routinely performed to infer subsurface thermal conductivity and borehole thermal resistance, which are needed to size geothermal heat pump systems. The most popular model to analyse temperature-time curves obtained from these tests is the infinite line source (ILS). This model gives appropriate estimations of thermal parameters only if particular hydro-geological conditions are fulfilled. Several flaws can however affect data interpretation with ILS, which is based on strong assumptions like those of a purely conductive heat transfer regime in a homogeneous medium, no vertical heat flow and infinite length of the borehole. Other drawbacks can arise from the difficulty in the proper thermal insulation of the test equipment, and consequently with oscillations of the carrier fluid temperature due to surface temperature changes. In this paper, we focused on the treatment of thermal response test data when both advection and periodic changes of surface temperature occur. We used a moving line source model to simulate temperature-time signals under different hypothesis of Darcy velocity and thermal properties. A random noise was added to the signal in order to mimic high frequency disturbances, possibly caused by equipment operating conditions and/or geological variability. The subsurface thermal conductivity, the Darcy velocity and the borehole thermal resistance were inferred by minimising the root mean square error between the synthetic dataset and the theoretical model. The optimisation was carried out with the Nelder-Mead algorithm, and thermal and hydraulic properties were determined by iterative reprocessing according to a trial-and-error procedure. The inferred thermal and hydraulic parameters are well consistent with the 'a priory' values, and the presence of noise in the synthetic data does not produce

  15. Near-infrared photometry of carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitelock, Patricia A.; Feast, Michael W.; Marang, Freddy; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2006-06-01

    Near-infrared, JHKL, photometry of 239 Galactic C-rich variable stars is presented and discussed. From these and published data, the stars were classified as Mira or non-Mira variables, and amplitudes and pulsation periods, ranging from 222 to 948 d for the Miras, were determined for most of them. A comparison of the colour and period relations with those of similar stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud indicates minor differences, which may be the consequence of sample selection effects. Apparent bolometric magnitudes were determined by combining the mean JHKL fluxes with mid-infrared photometry from IRAS and MSX. Then, using the Mira period luminosity relation to set the absolute magnitudes, distances were determined - to greater accuracy than has hitherto been possible for this type of star. Bolometric corrections to the K magnitude were calculated and prescriptions derived for calculating these from various colours. Mass-loss rates were also calculated and compared to values in the literature. Approximately one-third of the C-rich Miras and an unknown fraction of the non-Miras exhibit apparently random obscuration events that are reminiscent of the phenomena exhibited by the hydrogen-deficient R Coronae Borealis stars. The underlying cause of this is unclear, but it may be that mass loss, and consequently dust formation, is very easily triggered from these very extended atmospheres. Based on observations made at the South African Astronomical Observatory. E-mail: paw@saao.ac.za

  16. TRIPPy: Trailed Image Photometry in Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Wesley; Alexandersen, Mike; Schwamb, Megan E.; Marsset, Michaël; Pike, Rosemary E.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Bannister, Michele T.; Benecchi, Susan; Delsanti, Audrey

    2016-06-01

    Photometry of moving sources typically suffers from a reduced signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) or flux measurements biased to incorrect low values through the use of circular apertures. To address this issue, we present the software package, TRIPPy: TRailed Image Photometry in Python. TRIPPy introduces the pill aperture, which is the natural extension of the circular aperture appropriate for linearly trailed sources. The pill shape is a rectangle with two semicircular end-caps and is described by three parameters, the trail length and angle, and the radius. The TRIPPy software package also includes a new technique to generate accurate model point-spread functions (PSFs) and trailed PSFs (TSFs) from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. The TSF is merely the convolution of the model PSF, which consists of a moffat profile, and super-sampled lookup table. From the TSF, accurate pill aperture corrections can be estimated as a function of pill radius with an accuracy of 10 mmag for highly trailed sources. Analogous to the use of small circular apertures and associated aperture corrections, small radius pill apertures can be used to preserve S/Ns of low flux sources, with appropriate aperture correction applied to provide an accurate, unbiased flux measurement at all S/Ns.

  17. JHK photometry of selected Trojan and Hilda asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dale W.; Johnson, Paul E.; Buckingham, William L.; Shorthill, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    No entirely satisfactory match has been established between the present JHK photometry of selected Hilda and Trojan asteroids and photometry for both main belt asteroids and laboratory samples. It is noted that while the leading Trojans and Hildas exhibit similar and homogeneous JHK colors, the trailing Trojans appear to be more heterogeneous. Charcoal and magnetite provide the best match in terms of JHK colors.

  18. Subnanometric Roughness Affects the Deposition and Mobile Adhesion of Escherichia coli on Silanized Glass Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sumedha; Jaimes-Lizcano, Yuly Andrea; McLay, Ryan B; Cirino, Patrick C; Conrad, Jacinta C

    2016-05-31

    We investigate the deposition and transient adhesion of Escherichia coli on alkyl and fluoroalkyl silanized glass surfaces of different carbon chain lengths. The rate at which bacteria deposit onto these surfaces decreases as the shear stress is increased from 3 to 67 mPa, but trends in the deposition rate across all surfaces cannot be predicted from extended DLVO calculations of the interaction potential. As the surface root-mean-square (rms) roughness increases, the deposition rate increases and the percentage of motile tethered cells decreases. Furthermore, on surfaces of root-mean-square roughness of less than 0.2 nm, bacteria exhibit mobile adhesion, for which surface-associated cells linearly translate distances greater than approximately 1.5 times their average body length along the flow direction. E. coli bacteria with and without flagella exhibit mobile adhesion, indicating that this behavior is not driven by these appendages. Cells that express fimbriae do not exhibit mobile adhesion. These results suggest that even subnanoscale roughness can influence the deposition and transient adhesion of bacteria and imply that strategies to reduce frictional interactions by making cells or surfaces smoother may help to control the initial fouling of surfaces by E. coli bacteria. PMID:27158837

  19. Nutrient concentrations of runoff as affected by the diameter of unconsolidated material from feedlot surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle feedlots contain unconsolidated material that accumulates on the feedlot surface during a feeding cycle. This study was conducted to measure the effects of varying diameters of unconsolidated surface material and varying flow rates on nutrient concentrations in runoff. Unconsolidated sur...

  20. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models.

    PubMed

    Holland, Marika M; Landrum, Laura

    2015-07-13

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. PMID:26032318

  1. Nanoscale Roughness and Morphology Affect the IsoElectric Point of Titania Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Francesca; Vyas, Varun; Podestà, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    We report on the systematic investigation of the role of surface nanoscale roughness and morphology on the charging behaviour of nanostructured titania (TiO2) surfaces in aqueous solutions. IsoElectric Points (IEPs) of surfaces have been characterized by direct measurement of the electrostatic double layer interactions between titania surfaces and the micrometer-sized spherical silica probe of an atomic force microscope in NaCl aqueous electrolyte. The use of a colloidal probe provides well-defined interaction geometry and allows effectively probing the overall effect of nanoscale morphology. By using supersonic cluster beam deposition to fabricate nanostructured titania films, we achieved a quantitative control over the surface morphological parameters. We performed a systematical exploration of the electrical double layer properties in different interaction regimes characterized by different ratios of characteristic nanometric lengths of the system: the surface rms roughness Rq, the correlation length ξ and the Debye length λD. We observed a remarkable reduction by several pH units of IEP on rough nanostructured surfaces, with respect to flat crystalline rutile TiO2. In order to explain the observed behavior of IEP, we consider the roughness-induced self-overlap of the electrical double layers as a potential source of deviation from the trend expected for flat surfaces. PMID:23874708

  2. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Marika M.; Landrum, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. PMID:26032318

  3. Photometry of dark atmosphereless planetary bodies: an efficient numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkman, Olli; Muinonen, Karri; Peltoniemi, Jouni

    2015-12-01

    We present a scattering model for regolith-covered Solar System bodies. It can be used to compute the intensity of light scattered by a surface consisting of packed, mutually shadowing particles. Our intention is to provide a model in which other researchers can apply in studies of Solar System photometry. Our model is a Lommel-Seeliger type model, representing a medium composed of individual scatterers with small single-scattering albedo. This means that it is suitable for dark regolith surfaces such as the Moon and many classes of asteroids. Our model adds an additional term which takes into account the mutual shadowing between the scatterers. The scatterers can have an arbitrary phase function. We use a numerical ray-tracing simulation to compute the shadowing contribution. We present the model in a form which makes implementing it in existing software straightforward and fast. The model in practice is implemented as files containing pre-computed values of the surface reflection coefficient, which can be loaded into a user's program and used to compute the scattering in the desired viewing geometries. As the usage requires only a little simple arithmetic and a table look-up, it is as fast to use as common analytical models.

  4. Ten Recent Enhancements To Aperture Photometry Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laher, Russ; Rebull, L. M.; Gorjian, V.

    2013-01-01

    Aperture Photometry Tool is free, multi-platform, easy-to-install software for astronomical research, as well as for learning, visualizing, and refining aperture-photometry analyses. This mature software has been under development for five years, and is a silent workhorse of the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program. Software version 2.1.5 is described by Laher et al., Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Vol. 124, No. 917, pp. 737-763, (July 2012). Four software upgrades have been released since the publication, which include new capabilities, increased speed, more user-friendliness, and some minor bug fixes. Visit www.aperturephotometry.org to download the latest version. The enhancements are as follows: 1) Added new Tools menu option to write selected primary-image data to a comma-separated-value file (for importing into Excel); 2) Added a new display of the color-table levels on a separate panel; 3) Added a new tool to measure the angular separation between positions on the thumbnail image, via mouse-cursor drag and release; 4) Added a new tool to overlay an aperture at user-specified coordinates (in addition to aperture overlay via mouse click); 5) Speeded up the source-list tool with optional multithreading in its automatic mode (allowed thread number is user-specifiable); 6) Added a new “Number” column to the output aperture-photometry-table file in order to track the input source order (multithreading reorders the output); 7) Upgraded the source-list tool to accept input source lists containing positions in sexagesimal equatorial coordinates (in addition to decimal degrees, or, alternatively, pixel coordinates); 8) Added a new decimal/sexagesimal converter; 9) Upgraded the source-list creation tool to compute the detection threshold using robust estimates of the local background and local data dispersion, where the user can select the grid and window sizes for these local calculations; and 10) Modified the batch mode to

  5. Effect of tetracycline HCl on periodontally-affected human root surfaces.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L; Scabbia, A; Zangari, F; Griselli, A; Wikesjö, U M; Calura, G

    1995-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate surface characteristics of periodontitis-exposed instrumented human cementum and dentin surfaces following topical application of tetracycline HCl (TTC). Specimens were randomly assigned to application of sterile saline for 1 minute (control); TTC (10 mg/ml) for 1 minute and 4 minutes, respectively; and TTC (100 mg/ml) for 1 minute and 4 minutes, respectively. Solutions were applied with a cotton pellet using a burnishing technique. Control specimens exhibited an amorphous irregular surface smear layer. TTC treatment of cementum for 1 minute resulted in a relatively debris-free, nonhomogeneous surface. The 4-minute application resulted in a surface exhibiting a densely fibrillar, mat-like texture. Dentin specimens conditioned for 1 minute showed a smooth surface with many tubule openings partially occluded by debris. The 4-minute treatment exposed a 3-dimensional network of intertubular and peritubular collagen fibrils. No consistent morphologic differences were observed between cementum or dentin specimens treated with TTC at concentrations of 10 and 100 mg/ml, respectively. The results suggest that topical application of TTC produces morphologic alterations of periodontitis-exposed cementum and dentin that appear related to application interval rather than concentration of the drug. PMID:7473011

  6. Colloidal mobilization of arsenic from mining-affected soils by surface runoff.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Voegelin, Andreas; Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Bolea, Eduardo; Laborda, Francisco; Garrido, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Scorodite-rich wastes left as a legacy of mining and smelting operations pose a threat to environmental health. Colloids formed by the weathering of processing wastes may control the release of arsenic (As) into surface waters. At a former mine site in Madrid (Spain), we investigated the mobilization of colloidal As by surface runoff from weathered processing wastes and from sediments in the bed of a draining creek and a downstream sedimentation-pond. Colloids mobilized by surface runoff during simulated rain events were characterized for their composition, structure and mode of As uptake using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively plasma mass spectrometry (AF4-ICP-MS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the As and Fe K-edges. Colloidal scorodite mobilized in surface runoff from the waste pile is acting as a mobile As carrier. In surface runoff from the river bed and the sedimentation pond, ferrihydrite was identified as the dominant As-bearing colloidal phase. The results from this study suggest that mobilization of As-bearing colloids by surface runoff may play an important role in the dispersion of As from metallurgical wastes deposited above ground and needs to be considered in risk assessment. PMID:26454721

  7. Changes in droplet surface tension affect the observed hygroscopicity of photochemically aged biomass burning aerosol.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Michael R; Short, Daniel Z; Hosseini, Seyedehsan; Lichtenberg, William; Asa-Awuku, Akua A

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the hygroscopic and surface tension properties as a function of photochemical aging of the aerosol emissions from biomass burning. Experiments were conducted in a chamber setting at the UC-Riverside Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) Atmospheric Processes Lab using two biomass fuel sources, manzanita and chamise. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements and off-line filter sample analysis were conducted. The water-soluble organic carbon content and surface tension of the extracted filter samples were measured. Surface tension information was then examined with Köhler theory analysis to calculate the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Laboratory measurement of biomass burning smoke from two chaparral fuels is shown to depress the surface tension of water by 30% or more at organic matter concentrations relevant at droplet activation. Accounting for surface tension depression can lower the calculated κ by a factor of 2. This work provides evidence for surface tension depression in an important aerosol system and may provide closure for differing sub- and supersaturated κ measurements. PMID:23957441

  8. TERMS PHOTOMETRY OF KNOWN TRANSITING EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Diana; Kane, Stephen R.; Ciardi, David R.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Payne, Alan; Ramirez, Solange V.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Wyatt, Pamela; Pilyavsky, Genady; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wright, Jason T.; Zachary Gazak, J.; Rabus, Markus

    2011-10-15

    The Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey conducts radial velocity and photometric monitoring of known exoplanets in order to refine planetary orbits and predictions of possible transit times. This effort is primarily directed toward planets not known to transit, but a small sample of our targets consists of known transiting systems. Here we present precision photometry for six WASP (Wide Angle Search for Planets) planets acquired during their transit windows. We perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis for each planet and combine these data with previous measurements to redetermine the period and ephemerides for these planets. These observations provide recent mid-transit times which are useful for scheduling future observations. Our results improve the ephemerides of WASP-4b, WASP-5b, and WASP-6b and reduce the uncertainties on the mid-transit time for WASP-29b. We also confirm the orbital, stellar, and planetary parameters of all six systems.

  9. Techniques for Automated Single-Star Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Gregory W.

    2001-01-01

    Tennessee State University operates several automatic photoelectric telescopes (APTs) located at Fairborn Observatory in the Patagonia Mountains of southern Arizona. The APTs are dedicated to photometric monitoring programs that would be expensive and difficult to accomplish without the advantages of automation. I review the operation of two of the telescopes (a 0.75- and 0.80-meter (m) APT) and the quality-control techniques that result in the routine acquisition of single-star differential photometry with a precision of 0.001 mag for single observations and 0.0001 - 0.0002 mag for seasonal means. I also illustrate the capabilities of the APTS with sample results from a program to measure luminosity cycles in sun-like stars and a related program to search for the signatures of extrasolar planets around these stars.

  10. UBVRI photometry of W Ursae Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnell, A. P.

    1985-03-01

    High speed UBVRI photometry of W Ursae Majoris produced 15,930 observations covering one complete cycle on 1984 March 5-6. For this epoch, total phase of primary minimum is flat in all spectral bands, while secondary minimum shows a substantial tilt during annual phases. The tilt correlates with a detectable O'Connell effect, indicates a transverse temperature gradient across the projected disk of the primary component, and is qualitatively consistent with a starspot origin for both effects. Gross characteristics of the color curves are consistent with those expected from the wavelength dependence of limb darkening. The observed greater color change at primary minimum as contrasted with secondary must have a different origin. There is qualitative consistency with a Rucinski hot secondary model. Whether consistency can also be achieved with a Mullan starspot model, or whether decisive discrimination between alterative physical models can be demonstrated must await detailed light synthesis simulation.

  11. Selecting M-giants with WISE photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing

    2015-08-01

    We use M-giants, M-dwarfs and QSOs identified by LAMOST to assess how well WISE & 2MASS colour-cuts can separate these populations through photometry. We find that the WISE bands are very efficient to separate M-giants from M-dwarfs, especially for the early-type stars. We derive a new photometric relation to estimate [Fe/H] for M-giants. We show that previous photometric distance relations may be biased and devise a new empirical distance relation. We detect M-giants in the Sagittarius stream from the ALLWISE Source Archive. Our detection shows good agreement with the bright stream, although the leading tail appears to be misaligned by a couple of degrees. We have measured the metallicity distribution at four locations along the stream, finding a clear metallicity offset between the leading and trailing tails.

  12. Asteroid Maps From Photometry And Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen, Mikko; Marchis, F.; Carry, B.

    2007-10-01

    While disk-integrated photometry is the main source of information on most asteroids, adaptive optics can provide some disk-resolved data on many larger (main-belt) asteroids. Asteroid models from lightcurve inversion agree well with the obtained AO images (Marchis et al. 2006, Icarus 185,39), but even more detailed models can be obtained by combining the two sources in inversion. In addition to giving more detail to existing models, the approach can also be used to obtain models of asteroids for which the photometric data are yet insufficient alone. This also helps to calibrate the inversion and deconvolution processes related to the separate sources; e.g., whether features apparently revealed by AO post-processing are real or artificial. We present some examples and discuss the resolution level of topographic detail in the resulting models. Hundreds of asteroids can be mapped in this way in the near future.

  13. Photoelectric photometry of comet Kohoutek (1973f)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohoutek, L.

    1976-01-01

    Comet Kohoutek was observed with the 50 cm (f/15) reflecting telescope of the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, on fourteen nights between January 16 and 30, when the heliocentric and geocentric distances of the comet were r=0.66 - 1.00 A.U. and delta=0.81 - 0.96 A.U., respectively. The 40 inch and 80 inch diaphragms were used for the photometry of the cometary head in the UBV system and with six interference filters. The atmospheric conditions were good but the accuracy of observations was low due to large extinction and twilight. The mean error of one measurement of log F in all but Na 5893 A filters can be estimated at plus or minus 0.02, whereas the accuracy through the Na filter was substantially lower.

  14. Photometry Transforms Generation with PTGP (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, G.; Menzies, K.; Silvis, G.; Harris, B.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) Historically the development of photometry transformation coefficients required extensive manual effort and the use of large spreadsheets. A new release—version 5.0—of the Photometry Transformations Generation Program (PTGP) achieves the goal of generating transformation coefficients without the use of spreadsheets—saving considerable time and ensuring data accuracy. PTGP version 5.0 works directly with VSP to retrieve the most recent standard star reference magnitudes (currently for M67 and NGC7790). It then processes instrument magnitude file(s) downloaded from vphot or exported from AIP4WIN or MAXIM. Either AUID or “Boulder” star identifications can be used for AIP4WIN and MAXIM. When using VPHOT data or “Boulder” star identifications, PTGP determines the AUID names for each of the reference standard stars. All standard transforms are calculated. Plots of each transform's data can be reviewed, and individual star observations added/deleted. Transform sets can be saved for further use. Transform sets can be compared and selected sets averaged. The averaged sets can be exported in a file format compatible with the AAVSO TA tool. The presentation will provide a brief overview and demonstration of the tool. It will also discuss the implications of using PYTHON for the development—both benefits and potential problems. The program runs on both PCs and Macs. A subsequent presentation will discuss the use of VPHOT and PTGP to generate transforms and the testing of the impacts of varying key VPHOT and PTGP parameters.

  15. Abiotic Factors Affecting the Persistence of Avian Influenza Virus in Surface Waters of Waterfowl Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Melinda S.; Cressler, Alan M.; Berghaus, Roy D.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Avian influenza (AI) virus can remain infectious in water for months, and virus-contaminated surface water is considered to be a source of infection within wild waterfowl populations. Previous work has characterized the effects of pH, salinity, and temperature on viral persistence in water, but most of that work was done with modified distilled water. The objective of this study was to identify the abiotic factors that influence the duration of AI virus persistence in natural surface water. Surface water samples were collected from 38 waterfowl habitats distributed across the United States. Samples were submitted to the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory for chemical analysis and the University of Georgia for viral reduction time analysis. Samples were filtered with 0.22-μm filters, and the durations of persistence of three wild-bird-derived influenza A viruses within each water sample at 10, 17, and 28°C were determined. The effects of the surface water physicochemical factors on the duration of AI viral persistence in laboratory experiments were evaluated by multivariable linear regression with robust standard errors. The duration of AI virus persistence was determined to be longest in filtered surface water with a low temperature (<17°C), a neutral-to-basic pH (7.0 to 8.5), low salinity (<0.5 ppt), and a low ammonia concentration (<0.5 mg/liter). Our results also highlighted potential strain-related variation in the stability of AI virus in surface water. These results bring us closer to being able to predict the duration of AI virus persistence in surface water of waterfowl habitats. PMID:24584247

  16. Learning beyond the Surface: Engaging the Cognitive, Affective and Spiritual Dimensions within the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Michael T.; Hyde, Brendan

    2008-01-01

    In Australia the separation of mind, body and spirit by secular society has had a significant influence on educational trends. An outcomes-based approach to education, with an emphasis on cognitive learning, has meant that the affective and spiritual dimensions of students' lives have often been understated. Classroom programs in religious…

  17. Identification of genes affecting expression of phosphoglycerate kinase on the surface of group B streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Boone, Tyler J; Tyrrell, Gregory J

    2012-04-01

    Group B streptococcal phosphoglycerate kinase (GBS-PGK), a glycolytic enzyme, has previously been identified on the surface of group B streptococcus (GBS). To identify genes involved in surface expression of GBS-PGK, we performed Tn917 mutagenesis followed by quantification of PGK expressed on the GBS surface. Tn917 mutagenesis identified 4 genes (sag0966, sag0979, sag0980, and sag1003) that when disrupted, alter expression of GBS-PGK on the bacterial surface. Three of the identified genes were localized to a region of the GBS genome containing genes (sag0973-sag0977) predicted to be involved in resistance to antimicrobial peptides. One mutant isolate, designated NCS13sag1003::Tn917, was found to have increased sensitivity to the antimicrobial peptides bacitracin and nisin. In addition, all of the mutant strains assayed were found to have decreased β-hemolysis. In conclusion, we have identified genes involved in surface expression of GBS-PGK. These genes also appear to be involved in antimicrobial peptide resistance and regulate expression of the β-hemolysin. PMID:22444251

  18. Surface Chemical Gradient Affects the Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells via ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xujie; Shi, Shengjun; Feng, Qingling; Bachhuka, Akash; He, Wei; Huang, Qianli; Zhang, Ranran; Yang, Xing; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2015-08-26

    To understand the role of surface chemistry on cell behavior and the associated molecular mechanisms, we developed and utilized a surface chemical gradient of amine functional groups by carefully adjusting the gas composition of 1,7-octadiene (OD) and allylamine (AA) of the plasma phase above a moving substrate. The chemical gradient surface used in the present work shows an increasing N/C ratio and wettability from the OD side toward the AA side with no change in surface topography. Under standard culture conditions (with serum), human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) adhesion and spreading area increased toward the AA side of the gradient. However, there were no differences in cell behavior in the absence of serum. These results, supported by the trends in proteins adsorption on the gradient surface, demonstrated that surface chemistry affects the response of hASCs through cell-adhesive serum proteins, rather than interacting directly with the cells. The expression of p-ERK and the osteogenic differentiation increased toward the AA side of the gradient, while adipogenic differentiation decreased in the same direction; however, when the activation of ERK1/2 was blocked by PD98059, the levels of osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation on different regions of the chemical gradient were the same. This indicates that ERK1/2 may be an important downstream signaling pathway of surface chemistry directed stem cell fate. PMID:26237746

  19. Cholesterol level affects surface charge of lipid membranes in saline solution

    PubMed Central

    Magarkar, Aniket; Dhawan, Vivek; Kallinteri, Paraskevi; Viitala, Tapani; Elmowafy, Mohammed; Róg, Tomasz; Bunker, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important component of all biological membranes as well as drug delivery liposomes. We show here that increasing the level of cholesterol in a phospholipid membrane decreases surface charge in the physiological environment. Through molecular dynamics simulation we have shown that increasing the level of cholesterol decreases Na+ ion binding. Complementary experimental ζ – potential measurements have shown a decreased ζ – potential with increasing cholesterol content, indicative of reduced surface charge. Both experiments and simulations have been carried out on both saturated 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and monounsaturated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) membranes. This result is particularly important because membrane surface charge plays an important role in the interactions of biomembranes with peripheral membrane proteins and drug delivery liposomes with the immune system. PMID:24845659

  20. Surface and subsurface geologic risk factors to ground water affecting brownfield redevelopment potential.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Martin M; Murray, Kent S; Rogers, Daniel T

    2003-01-01

    A model is created for assessing the redevelopment potential of brownfields. The model is derived from a space and time conceptual framework that identifies and measures the surface and subsurface risk factors present at brownfield sites. The model then combines these factors with a contamination extent multiplier at each site to create an index of redevelopment potential. Results from the application of the model within an urbanized watershed demonstrate clear differences between the redevelopment potential present within five different near-surface geologic units, with those units containing clay being less vulnerable to subsurface contamination. With and without the extent multiplier, the total risk present at the brownfield sites within all the geologic units is also strongly correlated to the actual costs of remediation. Thus, computing the total surface and subsurface risk within a watershed can help guide the remediation efforts at broad geographic scales, and prioritize the locations for redevelopment. PMID:12708672

  1. How subsurface patterns affect surface energy budget patterns: a sudanian case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, D.; Cohard, J.; Descloitres, M.; Vandervaere, J.; Braud, I.; Vauclin, M.

    2011-12-01

    Fractured bedrock areas are still challenging for hydrological modeling because of their complex underground property distributions. The heterogeneity in soil hydraulic properties, for example, can control the subsurface water fluxes and create surface soil moisture pattern which becomes preferential areas for runoff production or evapotranspiration. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a bedrock topography, including outcropping, on subsurface water fluxes and the induced energy budget patterns at the surface. To deal with these ground water/surface water interactions, we run the Parflow-CLM distributed coupled land surface and groundwater model over the 12km2 Ara watershed (Northern Benin) for different bedrock configurations. The Ara catchment is submitted to a sudanian climate with 1200mm total rainfall per year. It is part of the AMMA-Catch project in which 3 meso sites have been documented along a south to north transect in West Africa. The geology of the Ara catchment is composed of metamorphic rocks. The main orientation of the geological structures (and of the gneiss foliation) is roughly north-south and the dip angle is 20° east. These structure create patterns in effective porosity distribution which is supposed to induce subsurface flow perpendicular to surface slope direction. Controlled Parflow-CLM simulation results are compared with energy budget data, including 3 net radiation measurements, eddy covariance station, scintillometric measurements to estimate evapotranspiration at different scales. The experimental device also include ground measurements like distributed surface soil moisture profile and piezometers. Parflow-CLM simulations are in good agreement with energy budget observations if observed Leaf Area Index time series are take into account. Then different hydraulic property distributions (effective porosity, hydraulic transmissivity, water retention curves) are evaluated through watershed dynamic differences.

  2. Cobalt and chromium exposure affects osteoblast function and impairs the mineralization of prosthesis surfaces in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shah, Karan M; Wilkinson, Jeremy Mark; Gartland, Alison

    2015-11-01

    Cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) ions and nanoparticles equivalent to those released through tribo-corrosion of prosthetic metal-on-metal (MOM) bearings and taper junctions are detrimental to osteoblast activity and function in vitro when examined as individual species. Here we examined the effects of Co(2+):Cr(3+) and Co(2+):Cr(6+) combinations on osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cellular activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization to better reflect clinical exposure conditions in vivo. We also assessed the effect of Co(2+):Cr(3+) combinations and Co:Cr nanoparticles on SaOS-2 cell osteogenic responses on grit-blasted, plasma-sprayed titanium-coated, and hydroxyapatite-coated prosthesis surfaces. Cellular activity and ALP activity were reduced to a greater extent with combination treatments compared to individual ions. Co(2+) and Cr(3+) interacted additively and synergistically to reduce cellular activity and ALP activity, respectively, while the Co(2+) with Cr(6+) combination was dominated by the effect of Cr(6+) alone. Mineralization by osteoblasts was greater on hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces compared to grit-blasted and plasma-sprayed titanium-coated surfaces. Treatments with Co(2+):Cr(3+) ions and Co:Cr nanoparticles reduced the percentage mineralization on all surfaces, with hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces having the least reduction. In conclusion, our data suggests that previous studies investigating individual metal ions underestimate their potential clinical effects on osteoblast activity. Furthermore, the data suggests that hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces may modulate osteoblast responses to metal debris. PMID:25929464

  3. How do slope and surface roughness affect plot-scale overland flow connectivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñuela, Andrés; Javaux, Mathieu; Bielders, Charles L.

    2015-09-01

    Surface micro-topography and slope drive the hydrological response of plots through the gradual filling of depressions as well as the establishment of hydraulic connections between overflowing depressions. Therefore, quantifying and understanding the effects of surface roughness and slope on plot-scale overland flow connectivity is crucial to improve current hydrological modeling and runoff prediction. This study aimed at establishing predictive equations relating structural and functional connectivity indicators in function of slope and roughness. The Relative Surface Connection function (RSCf) was used as a functional connectivity indicator was applied. Three characteristic parameters were defined to characterize the RSCf: the surface initially connected to the outlet, the connectivity threshold and the maximum depression storage (DSmax). Gaussian surface elevation fields (6 m × 6 m) were generated for a range of slopes and roughnesses (sill σ and range R of the variogram). A full factorial of 6 slopes (0-15%), 6 values of R (50-400 mm) and 6 values of σ (2-40 mm) was considered, and the RSCf calculated for 10 realizations of each combination. Results showed that the characteristic parameters of the RSCf are greatly influenced by R, σ and slope. At low slopes and high ratios of σ/2R, the characteristic parameters of the RSCf appear linked to a single component of the surface roughness (R or σ). On the contrary, both R and σ are needed to predict the RSCf at high slopes and low ratios of σ/2R. A simple conceptualization of surface depressions as rectangles, whose shape was determined by R and σ, allowed deriving simple mathematical expressions to estimate the characteristic parameters of the RSCf in function of R, σ and slope. In the case of DSmax, the proposed equation performed better than previous empirical expressions found in the literature which do not account for the horizontal component of the surface roughness. The proposed expressions allow

  4. Investigations on temperature distribution of satellite surfaces affected by solar absorptivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Pan, X. X.; Li, G. H.; Liu, X.; Jiang, L. X.

    2010-09-01

    Based on the Monte Carlo ray-tracing method, the network coefficients of thermal network model describing the radiation heat transfer among satellite surfaces is solved by considering the surface material optical characters. It is superiority to the conventional Gebhart's method in view of the grey body and the diffuse reflection assumptions. The zone leveling method is used to discrete the governing equations and the solar absorpivity is separated and considered to be an important correction parameter. Effects of the solar incidence round angle, the zenith angle and the ratio of absorpivity to emissivity (RAE) on temperature distribution are numerically simulated and discussed in detail. The higher or the lower the RAE may be lead to the alternative heating and cooling tend with a larger heating or cooling velocity of main body surfaces than the solar array surfaces. Furthermore, maximum temperature of main body is almost larger than solar arrays. Under the same RAE, solar incidence angle make a great effect on the uniform character of temperature distribution.

  5. Detoxification of Implant Surfaces Affected by Peri-Implant Disease: An Overview of Surgical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wilson Jr, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Peri-implantitis is one of the major causes of implant failure. The detoxification of the implant surface is necessary to obtain reosseointegration. The aim of this review was to summarize in vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials that have evaluated surgical approaches for detoxification of the implant body surfaces. Materials and Methods. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1966 to 2013. The outcome variables were the ability of the therapeutic method to eliminate the biofilm and endotoxins from the implant surface, the changes in clinical parameters, radiographic bone fill, and histological reosseointegration. Results. From 574 articles found, 76 were analyzed. The findings, advantages, and disadvantages of using mechanical, chemical methods and lasers are discussed. Conclusions. Complete elimination of the biofilms is difficult to achieve. All therapies induce changes of the chemical and physical properties of the implant surface. Partial reosseointegration after detoxification has been reported in animals. Combination protocols for surgical treatment of peri-implantitis in humans have shown some positive clinical and radiographic results, but long-term evaluation to evaluate the validity and reliability of the techniques is needed. PMID:23983691

  6. Surface dynamics of poly(methyl methacrylate) films affected by the concentration of casting solutions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Houkuan; Yang, Yuhui; Ding, Jia; Liu, Wanglong; Zuo, Biao; Yang, Juping; Wang, Xinping

    2014-09-01

    The effect of the concentration of casting solutions on the surface dynamics of the corresponding spin-coated poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film was investigated by measuring the surface reorganization of fluorine tracer-labeled PMMA. The onset temperature of fluorinated PMMA chain end reorganization (T(onsetR)) was identified and is shown to depend on the PMMA concentration in the film-forming solution. It was found that the surface T(onsetR) and relaxation activation energy E(a) of the PMMA films prepared from 4.2 wt% PMMA cyclohexanone solution are 70 °C and 260 kJ mol(-1), respectively, which are higher than those of the PMMA films prepared from 0.8 wt% PMMA cyclohexanone solution (55 °C and 144 kJ mol(-1), respectively). The T(onsetR) and E(a) of PMMA films increased with increasing concentration of casting solutions within the range of 1.8 wt% to 4 wt%. The chain entanglement of PMMA chains is proposed to be the speculative origin for these observed depressed dynamics of poly(methyl methacrylate) chains on the films' surface prepared using casting solutions of various concentrations. PMID:25036734

  7. Surface and ground water quality in a restored urban stream affected by road salts

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2001 research began in Minebank Run, MD to examine the impact of restoration on water quality. Our research area was to determine if road salts in the surface and ground waters are detrimental to the stream channel restoration. The upstream reach (UP), above the Baltimore I-...

  8. Sub-surface soil carbon changes affects biofuel greenhouse gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in direct soil organic carbon (SOC) can have a major impact on overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from biofuels when using life-cycle assessment (LCA). Estimated changes in SOC, when accounted for in an LCA, are typically derived from near-surface soil depths (<30 cm). Changes in subsurf...

  9. Physiological variables affecting surface film formation by native lamellar body-like pulmonary surfactant particles.

    PubMed

    Hobi, Nina; Siber, Gerlinde; Bouzas, Virginia; Ravasio, Andrea; Pérez-Gil, Jesus; Haller, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) is a surface active complex of lipids and proteins that prevents the alveolar structures from collapsing and reduces the work of breathing by lowering the surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface (ALI). Surfactant is synthesized by the alveolar type II (AT II) cells, and it is stored in specialized organelles, the lamellar bodies (LBs), as tightly packed lipid bilayers. Upon secretion into the alveolar lining fluid, a large fraction of these particles retain most of their packed lamellar structure, giving rise to the term lamellar body like-particles (LBPs). Due to their stability in aqueous media, freshly secreted LBPs can be harvested from AT II cell preparations. However, when LBPs get in contact with an ALI, they quickly and spontaneously adsorb into a highly organized surface film. In the present study we investigated the adsorptive capacity of LBPs at an ALI under relevant physiological parameters that characterize the alveolar environment in homeostatic or in pathological conditions. Adsorption of LBPs at an ALI is highly sensitive to pH, temperature and albumin concentration and to a relatively lesser extent to changes in osmolarity or Ca(2+) concentrations in the physiological range. Furthermore, proteolysis of LBPs significantly decreases their adsorptive capacity confirming the important role of surfactant proteins in the formation of surface active films. PMID:24582711

  10. New Insights into Stellar Astrophysics from High-Precision Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The rich harvest of information on the occurrence and nature of planets around solar-type stars is why Kepler was built, but equally profound from this mission are the insights and quantitative physical studies of stars. The Kepler sample is dominated by the ~100,000 stars that are like the Sun, yet the Kepler field includes examples of nearly every stellar type. Kepler's exquisite photometry - continuously over an extended time - has enabled the detection of new phenomena and has provided critical tests of stellar models. In this brief review I will summarize some of the exciting new findings that Kepler has made possible, including: Stellar surface granulation in late-type stars; Evidence for rapid rotation of the cores of some evolved stars; Flares on G, K and M stars; Precise ages for older solar-type stars; Evidence for "mixed" modes in evolved stars that couple p-modes to interior g-modes; Stellar differential rotation; Detection of stellar activity cycles from asteroseismology; Mixing processes in stars; Detailed studies of eclipsing binaries; A comparison of the Sun to similar stars; Pulsating stars; Stellar surface features revealed by planet transits.

  11. The TAOS Project: High-Speed Crowded Field Aperture Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.-W.; Kim, D.-W.; Wang, J.-H.; Lehner, M. J.; Chen, W. P.; Byun, Y.-I.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.; Bianco, F. B.; Coehlo, N. K.; Cook, K. H.; Dave, R.; de Pater, I.; Giammarco, J.; King, S.-K.; Lee, T.; Lin, H.-C.; Marshall, S. L.; Porrata, R.; Protopapas, P.; Rice, J. A.; Schwamb, M. E.; Wang, S.-Y.; Wen, C.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    We have devised an aperture photometry pipeline for data reduction of image data from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS). The photometry pipeline has high computational performance, and is capable of real-time photometric reduction of images containing up to 1000 stars, within the sampling rate of 5 Hz. The pipeline is optimized for both speed and signal-to-noise performance, and in the latter category it performs nearly as well as DAOPHOT. This paper provides a detailed description of the TAOS aperture photometry pipeline.

  12. How does the deposition of gas phase species affect surface pH at frozen salty interfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, D. J.; Wren, S. N.

    2012-12-01

    Chemical processes occurring on snow and ice surfaces play an important role in controlling the oxidative capacity of the overlying atmosphere. However, efforts to gain a better, mechanistic understanding of such processes are impeded by a poor understanding of the chemical nature of the air-ice interface. In consequence, constraining the substrates that are most relevant to these processes (e.g., new sea ice, first-year ice, frost flowers, brine layers, saline snow) as well as understanding how chemistry will be affected as the areal extent of these substrates succumbs to polar environmental change, remains difficult. In this study, we used glancing-angle laser-induced fluorescence and a surface-active fluorescent pH indicator to investigate how the nature of the ice, whether frozen pure water, salt water or seawater, influences pH changes at the surface. We find that deposition of HCl(g) leads to a very different pH response at the frozen pure water surface than at the frozen salt water surface indicating that these two surfaces present different chemical environments. Results indicate that the frozen salt water surface is covered by a brine layer which behaves like a true liquid layer. On the other hand, the disordered interface at the pure ice surface presents a unique chemical environment. Our results also suggest that the sea ice surface is buffered against pH changes arising from the deposition of gas phase species. These results have important implications for understanding pH-sensitive processes occurring at the air-ice boundary, such as bromine activation.

  13. Factors affecting sorption of nitro explosives to biochar: pyrolysis temperature, surface treatment, competition, and dissolved metals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seok-Young; Seo, Yong-Deuk

    2015-05-01

    The application of rice straw-derived biochar for removing nitro explosives, including 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), from contaminated water was investigated through batch experiments. An increase in the pyrolysis temperature from 250 to 900°C in general led to higher pH, surface area, cation exchange capacity (CEC), point of zero charge, and C:O ratio of biochar. The maximum sorption capacity estimated by a mixed sorption-partition model increased when pyrolysis temperatures were elevated from 250 to 900°C, indicating that C content and aromaticity of biochar were strongly related to the sorption of nitro explosives to biochar. Surface treatment with acid or oxidant increased the sorption capacity of biochar for the two strong π-acceptor compounds (DNT and TNT) but not for RDX. However, the enhancement of sorption capacity was not directly related to increased surface area and CEC. Compared with single-sorption systems, coexistence of explosives or cationic metals resulted in decreased sorption of each explosive to biochar, suggesting that sorption of nitro explosives and cationic metals to electron-rich portions in biochar was competitive. Our results suggest that π-π electron donor acceptor interactions are main sorption mechanisms and that changing various conditions can enhance or reduce the sorption of nitro explosives to biochar. PMID:26024263

  14. Retention of potentially mobile radiocesium in forest surface soils affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Koarashi, Jun; Moriya, Koichi; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroki; Nagaoka, Mika

    2012-01-01

    The fate of (137)Cs derived from the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout and associated radiological hazards are largely dependent on its mobility in the surface soils of forest ecosystems. Thus, we quantified microbial and adsorptive retentions of (137)Cs in forest surface (0-3 cm) soils. The K(2)SO(4) extraction process liberated 2.1%-12.8% of the total (137)Cs from the soils. Two soils with a higher content of clay- and silt-sized particles, organic carbon content, and cation exchange capacity showed higher (137)Cs extractability. Microbial biomass was observed in all of the soils. However, the (137)Cs extractability did not increase after destruction of the microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation, providing no evidence for microbial retention of the Fukushima-fallout (137)Cs. The results indicate that uptake of (137)Cs by soil microorganisms is less important for retention of potentially mobile (137)Cs in the forest surface soils compared to ion-exchange adsorption on non-specific sites provided by abiotic components. PMID:23256039

  15. Different Culture Media Affect Proliferation, Surface Epitope Expression, and Differentiation of Ovine MSC.

    PubMed

    Adamzyk, Carina; Emonds, Tanja; Falkenstein, Julia; Tolba, René; Jahnen-Dechent, Wilhelm; Lethaus, Bernd; Neuss, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Orthopedic implants including engineered bone tissue are commonly tested in sheep. To avoid rejection of heterologous or xenogeneic cells, autologous cells are preferably used, that is, ovine mesenchymal stem cells (oMSC). Unlike human MSC, ovine MSC are not well studied regarding isolation, expansion, and characterization. Here we investigated the impact of culture media composition on growth characteristics, differentiation, and surface antigen expression of oMSC. The culture media varied in fetal calf serum (FCS) content and in the addition of supplements and/or additional epidermal growth factor (EGF). We found that FCS strongly influenced oMSC proliferation and that specific combinations of supplemental factors (MCDB-201, ITS-plus, dexamethasone, and L-ascorbic acid) determined the expression of surface epitopes. We compared two published protocols for oMSC differentiation towards the osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic fate and found (i) considerable donor to donor variations, (ii) protocol-dependent variations, and (iii) variations resulting from the preculture medium composition. Our results indicate that the isolation and culture of oMSC in different growth media are highly variable regarding oMSC phenotype and behaviour. Furthermore, variations from donor to donor critically influence growth rate, surface marker expression, and differentiation. PMID:24228035

  16. Retention of potentially mobile radiocesium in forest surface soils affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Koarashi, Jun; Moriya, Koichi; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroki; Nagaoka, Mika

    2012-01-01

    The fate of 137Cs derived from the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout and associated radiological hazards are largely dependent on its mobility in the surface soils of forest ecosystems. Thus, we quantified microbial and adsorptive retentions of 137Cs in forest surface (0–3 cm) soils. The K2SO4 extraction process liberated 2.1%–12.8% of the total 137Cs from the soils. Two soils with a higher content of clay- and silt-sized particles, organic carbon content, and cation exchange capacity showed higher 137Cs extractability. Microbial biomass was observed in all of the soils. However, the 137Cs extractability did not increase after destruction of the microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation, providing no evidence for microbial retention of the Fukushima-fallout 137Cs. The results indicate that uptake of 137Cs by soil microorganisms is less important for retention of potentially mobile 137Cs in the forest surface soils compared to ion-exchange adsorption on non-specific sites provided by abiotic components. PMID:23256039

  17. Polarimetric Retrievals of Surface and Cirrus Clouds Properties in the Region Affected by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottaviani, Matteo; Cairns, Brian; Chowdhary, Jacek; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Rich; Burton, Sharon; Hair, John; Obland, Michael D.; Rogers, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) performed several aerial surveys over the region affected by the oil spill caused by the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon offshore platform. The instrument was deployed on the NASA Langley B200 aircraft together with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), which provides information on the distribution of the aerosol layers beneath the aircraft, including an accurate estimate of aerosol optical depth. This work illustrates the merits of polarization measurements in detecting variations of ocean surface properties linked to the presence of an oil slick. In particular, we make use of the degree of linear polarization in the glint region, which is severely affected by variations in the refractive index but insensitive to the waviness of the water surface. Alterations in the surface optical properties are therefore expected to directly affect the polarization response of the RSP channel at 2264 nm, where both molecular and aerosol scattering are negligible and virtually all of the observed signal is generated via Fresnel reflection at the surface. The glint profile at this wavelength is fitted with a model which can optimally estimate refractive index, wind speed and direction, together with aircraft attitude variations affecting the viewing geometry. The retrieved refractive index markedly increases over oil-contaminated waters, while the apparent wind speed is significantly lower than in adjacent uncontaminated areas, suggesting that the slick dampens high-frequency components of the ocean wave spectrum. The constraint on surface reflectance provided by the short-wave infrared channels is a cornerstone of established procedures to retrieve atmospheric aerosol microphysical parameters based on the inversion of the RSP multispectral measurements. This retrieval, which benefits from the ancillary information provided by the HSRL, was in this specific case hampered by

  18. Surface variations affecting human dental enamel studied using nanomechanical and chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Michelle Emma

    The enamel surface is the interface between the tooth and its ever changing oral environment. Cavity (caries) formation and extrinsic tooth staining are due, respectively, to degradation of the enamel structure under low pH conditions and interactions between salivary pellicle and dietary elements. Both of these occur at the enamel surface and are caused by the local environment changing the chemistry of the surface. The results can be detrimental to the enamel's mechanical integrity and aesthetics. Incipient carious lesions are the precursor to caries and form due to demineralisation of enamel. These carious lesions are a reversible structure where ions (e.g. Ca2+, F -) can diffuse in (remineralisation) to preserve the tooth's structural integrity. This investigation used controlled in vitro demineralisation and remineralisation to study artificial carious lesion formation and repair. The carious lesions were cross-sectioned and characterised using nanoindentation, electron probe micro-analysis and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Mechanical and chemical maps showed the carious lesion had a significantly reduced hardness and elastic modulus, and the calcium and phosphate content was lower than in sound enamel. Fluoride based remineralisation treatments gave a new phase (possibly fluorohydroxyapatite) within the lesion with mechanical properties higher than sound enamel. The acquired salivary pellicle is a protein-rich film formed by the physisorption of organic molecules in saliva onto the enamel surface. Its functions include lubrication during mastication and chemical protection. However, pellicle proteins react with dietary elements such as polyphenols (tannins in tea) causing a brown stain. This study has used in vitro dynamic nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy to examine normal and stained pellicles formed in vivo. The effects of polyphenols on the pellicle's mechanical properties and morphology have been studied. It was found that the

  19. Disk-resolved photometry of Asteroid (2867) Steins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spjuth, S.; Jorda, L.; Lamy, P. L.; Keller, H. U.; Li, J.-Y.

    2012-11-01

    We present a new method to perform disk-resolved photometry in order to investigate the intrinsic photometric properties of the surface of small Solar System bodies. We adopt the standard approach where a shape model is combined with a photometric formalism - in practise the Hapke formalism - to remove the effects of topography and recover the photometric (Hapke) parameters of either the global surface or, in its most elaborated form, the spatial variations of these parameters across the surface. Our method operates in the space of the facets representing the three-dimensional shape of the body, whereas all past analysis have always been performed in the space of the image pixels although they are not intrinsic to the surface of the body. This has the advantage of automatically tracking the same local surface element on a series of images. We first apply our method to images of the nucleus of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 obtained by the High-Resolution Imager (HRI) instrument on board the Deep Impact spacecraft and our derived Hapke parameters are in good agreement with those published by Li et al. (Li, J.-Y. et al. [2007]. Icarus 187, 41-55) within their respective uncertainties. We confirm the presence of an extended region of higher roughness in the southern hemisphere of the nucleus and the higher albedo of the ice-rich regions identified by Sunshine et al. (Sunshine, J.M. et al. [2006]. Science 311, 1453-1455) near the equator. The photometric properties of Asteroid (2867) Steins are then studied from multi-spectral images obtained with the OSIRIS Wide Angle Camera (WAC) on board the Rosetta spacecraft during its flyby on 5 September 2008. Our analysis indicates that the surface is highly porous (∼84%) and that it exhibits both a shadow-hiding opposition effect (SHOE) and probably, a coherent-backscatter opposition effect (CBOE). The single scattering albedo is the highest (SSA = 0.57) ever observed among small bodies visited by spacecrafts. Our modelled roughness

  20. Comparison of Metallicities Adopted for the Synthetic UBV Photometry with Those Evaluated by Means of RGU Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaali, S.; Güngör, S.; Karatas, Y.

    1998-04-01

    Comparison of metallicities adopted for the synthetic UBV photometry with those evaluated by means of RGU photometry for 92 stars is presented. The agreement only for zero metallicity. The discrepancy increases to low metallicities which cover Intermediate population and Population II main-sequence star. U-G and G-R colour indices are transformed from UBV synthetic data and do not include any observational error. Therefore, the disagreement may orginate from a systematic error in the metallicity calibration of relatively metal-poor stars in RGU photometry.

  1. Detection of Extrasolar Planets by Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William; Koch, David; Webster, Larry; Dunham, Edward; Witteborn, Fred; Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Douglas; Showen, Robert; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A knowledge of other planetary systems that includes information on the number, size, mass, and spacing of the planets around a variety of star types is needed to deepen our understanding of planetary system formation and processes that give rise to their final configurations. Recent discoveries show that many planetary systems are quite different from the solar system in that they often possess giant planets in short period orbits. The inferred evolution of these planets and their orbital characteristics imply the absence of Earth-like planets near the habitable zone. Information on the properties of the giant-inner planets is now being obtained by both the Doppler velocity and the transit photometry techniques. The combination of the two techniques provides the mass, size, and density of the planets. For the planet orbiting star HD209458, transit photometry provided the first independent confirmation and measurement of the diameter of an extrasolar planet. The observations indicate a planet 1.27 the diameter of Jupiter with 0.63 of its mass (Charbonneau et al. 1999). The results are in excellent agreement with the theory of planetary atmospheres for a planet of the indicated mass and distance from a solar-like star. The observation of the November 23, 1999 transit of that planet made by the Ames Vulcan photometer at Lick Observatory is presented. In the future, the combination of the two techniques will greatly increase the number of discoveries and the richness of the science yield. Small rocky planets at orbital distances from 0.9 to 1.2 AU are more likely to harbor life than the gas giant planets that are now being discovered. However, new technology is needed to find smaller, Earth-like planets, which are about three hundred times less massive than Jupiter-like planets. The Kepler project is a space craft mission designed to discover hundreds of Earth-size planets in and near the habitable zone around a wide variety of stars. To demonstrate that the

  2. Factors affecting hyporheic and surface transient storage in a western U.S. river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Zachary C.; Warwick, John J.; Schumer, Rina

    2014-03-01

    Hyporheic storage accounts for a significant fraction of solute residence time in small streams and has been shown to have a large effect on the transport of solutes. It is not clear whether this characteristic is preserved in larger streams and rivers, as increased discharge and decreased slope may reduce overall exchange between the channel and subsurface, and the size of surface storage zones may increase. Conservative tracer tests conducted in the Truckee River, a stream with mean annual discharge >0.5 m3 s-1, were simulated with both one (1-SZ) and two-storage zone (2-SZ) transport models to quantify the relative role of surface transient storage (STS) and hyporheic transient storage (HTS) on the physical transport of solutes in a large stream. Tracer injections were conducted at two different discharge levels in two reaches with distinct geomorphic characteristics. STS was the dominant storage mechanism for all reaches and discharge levels and surface storage accounted for a larger fraction of median transport time (FMED200) than hyporheic storage in all but one case. Increased discharge significantly reduced the influence of the HTS (primarily) and STS zones on median transport time at the study site. Comparisons with studies of discharge and geomorphic effects on TS characteristics in other streams indicated differing physical controls on STS and HTS zones. Therefore, measurements such as slope, sinuosity, width, depth, and gross gains and losses of discharge need to be considered along with discharge. This work adds to the growing sentiment that up-scaling and prediction of stream storage characteristics based on discharge and channel properties is far from straightforward. Since biogeochemical processing occurs differently in the HTS and STS, two-zone storage models provide necessary representations of transport in river systems for studies focused on aspects of water quality. Extra parameters are required for model optimization but simple cross

  3. Pilot investigations of surface parts of three closed landfills and factors affecting them.

    PubMed

    Saarela, Jouko

    2003-05-01

    Aftercare of closed sanitary landfills in a major environmental problem. Rehabilitation of the landfill with vegetation and reducing leachate production are two issues that must be dealt. For this reason, Finnish Environment Institute has conducted several projects on closed landfills. This research aims at determining the physical and chemical properties of the soils at three closed landfills in Helsinki, Finland. Research was conducted to understand the impact by studying the following properties: Chemical, nutrient metal, gamma and radon analysis of surface soils of three closed landfills in Helsinki area. PMID:12733818

  4. WIYN Open Cluster Study: UBVRI Photometry of NGC 2158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taverne, Luke T.; Steinhauer, Aaron J.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.

    2015-01-01

    We present WIYN 0.9m HDI UBVRI photometry of NGC 2158, a very rich, intermediate-aged, open cluster located near the galactic anti-center. We report derived values for the cluster age, distance, reddening.

  5. Oxidation rate of iron sulfides as affected by surface area, morphology, oxygen concentration and autotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.

    1984-05-01

    The relationship between surface area and rate of oxidation of Fe sulphides (pyrite and marcasite) separated from Texas lignite was studied. The reaction kinetics with respect to Fe sulphide morphology and particle size were evaluated. The oxygen concentration and the presence of autotrophic Fe and S-oxidizing bacteria (thiobacillus ferro-oxidans) on the rate of oxidation were also evaluated. The formation of sulphate from Fe sulphide was selected to measure the rate of oxidation. Relative reaction rates for different morphological forms of Fe sulphide were: marcasite > framboidal pyrite > massive pyrite. As the surface area of pyrite doubled, reaction rate increased by a factor of 1.5. Sulphate production for the 5 to 2 ..mu..m fraction was twice that of the 50 to 20 ..mu..m fraction. Reaction rate was approximately fivefold greater for non-inoculated treatments at 20% O/sub 2/ compared with 0% O/sub 2/ and was approximately ninefold greater for the same treatment inoculated with T. ferro-oxidans.

  6. Factors Affecting P Loads to Surface Waters: Comparing the Roles of Precipitation and Land Management Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motew, M.; Booth, E.; Carpenter, S. R.; Kucharik, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Surface water quality is a major concern in the Yahara watershed (YW) of southern Wisconsin, home to a thriving dairy industry, the city of Madison, and five highly valued lakes that are eutrophic. Despite management interventions to mitigate runoff, there has been no significant trend in P loading to the lakes since 1975. Increases in manure production and heavy rainfall events over this time period may have offset any effects of management. We developed a comprehensive, integrated modeling framework that can simulate the effects of multiple drivers on ecosystem services, including surface water quality. The framework includes process-based representation of terrestrial ecosystems (Agro-IBIS) and groundwater flow (MODFLOW), hydrologic routing of water and nutrients across the landscape (THMB), and assessment of lake water quality (YWQM). Biogeochemical cycling and hydrologic transport of P have been added to the framework to enable detailed simulation of P dynamics within the watershed, including interactions with climate and management. The P module features in-soil cycling of organic, inorganic, and labile forms of P; manure application, decomposition, and subsequent loss of dissolved P in runoff; loss of particulate-bound P with erosion; and transport of dissolved and particulate P within waterways. Model results will compare the effects of increased heavy rainfall events, increased manure production, and implementation of best management practices on P loads to the Yahara lakes.

  7. N-acetyl-L-cysteine affects growth, extracellular polysaccharide production, and bacterial biofilm formation on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Ann-Cathrin; Hermansson, Malte; Elwing, Hans

    2003-08-01

    N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) is used in medical treatment of patients with chronic bronchitis. The positive effects of NAC treatment have primarily been attributed to the mucus-dissolving properties of NAC, as well as its ability to decrease biofilm formation, which reduces bacterial infections. Our results suggest that NAC also may be an interesting candidate for use as an agent to reduce and prevent biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in environments typical of paper mill plants. Using 10 different bacterial strains isolated from a paper mill, we found that the mode of action of NAC is chemical, as well as biological, in the case of bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces. The initial adhesion of bacteria is dependent on the wettability of the substratum. NAC was shown to bind to stainless steel, increasing the wettability of the surface. Moreover, NAC decreased bacterial adhesion and even detached bacteria that were adhering to stainless steel surfaces. Growth of various bacteria, as monocultures or in a multispecies community, was inhibited at different concentrations of NAC. We also found that there was no detectable degradation of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) by NAC, indicating that NAC reduced the production of EPS, in most bacteria tested, even at concentrations at which growth was not affected. Altogether, the presence of NAC changes the texture of the biofilm formed and makes NAC an interesting candidate for use as a general inhibitor of formation of bacterial biofilms on stainless steel surfaces. PMID:12902275

  8. BINARY STAR SYNTHETIC PHOTOMETRY AND DISTANCE DETERMINATION USING BINSYN

    SciTech Connect

    Linnell, Albert P.; DeStefano, Paul; Hubeny, Ivan E-mail: pdestefa@uw.edu

    2013-09-15

    This paper extends synthetic photometry to components of binary star systems. The paper demonstrates accurate recovery of single star photometric properties for four photometric standards, Vega, Sirius, GD153, and HD209458, ranging over the HR diagram, when their model synthetic spectra are placed in fictitious binary systems and subjected to synthetic photometry processing. Techniques for photometric distance determination have been validated for all four photometric standards.

  9. Color photometry of surface features on Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S. W.; Veverka, J.

    1982-01-01

    Voyager imaging data demonstrate that the scattering properties ('phase curves') of all major terrain types on Ganymede and Callisto are not significantly wavelength dependent between 0.4 and 0.6 micron. The data suggest that the phase curves may be slightly steeper at the shorter wavelengths, consistent with the trend of telescopic observations near opposition. However, the differences are small and entirely within the uncertainties of the analysis. The result indicates that the phase integrals (0.8 for Ganymede and 0.6 for Callisto) derived by S. W. Squyres and J. Veverka (1981) from the abundant Voyager clear filter observations are reliable measures of the radiometric phase integrals. The corresponding values of the Bond albedo turn out to be 0.35 for Ganymede and 0.11 for Callisto.

  10. Voyager photometry of Triton - Haze and surface photometric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager whole-disk observations of Triton at 0.41, 0.48, and 0.56 micron filter wavelengths are analyzed using a model which combines an improved version of Hapke's photometric equation with a thin atmospheric haze layer in the appropriate spherical geometry. The model is shown to describe accurately the phase curves over a range of phase angles and to agree with disk-resolved brightness scans along the photometric equator and mirror meridian. According to the model, the photometric parameters of Triton's regolith are reasonably typical of icy satellites, except for the extremely high (close to unity) single-scattering albedo.

  11. Detailed Surface Photometry of Some Galaxies Integrated Properties - Part Two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal El Din, A. I.; Issa, I. A.; Osman, A. M. I.; Kamal, F. Y.

    1992-04-01

    Results about the standard photometric parameters of four galaxies are given. The equivalent and the integrated parameters defined according to de Vaucouleurs are listed. Effective values of the abovementioned ingredients, the reduced luminosity profiles and the dimensions defined by the quartiles are also given.

  12. Surface photometry of galaxies extended to Z = 0.59

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, K. T.; Florentin-Nielsen, R.; Teuber, J.

    1985-11-01

    The authors report a method for the determination of characteristic radii for distant galaxies. The method has been applied to the most dominant galaxies in the clusters A180 (z = 0.135), A370 (z = 0.373), and PKS 0116+082 (z = 0.59). CCD-observations in good seeing have been used, and an accurate point spread function has been determined. Characteristic radii have been obtained by convolution of elliptical galaxy models with the PSF. The results have been entered in the angular size-redshift diagram.

  13. Surface colour photometry of galaxies with Schmidt telescopes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A method is described which owes its practicality to the capability of Schmidt telescopes to record a number of galaxy images on a single plate and to the existence of high speed computer controlled area-scanning precision microdensitometers such as the Photometric Data Systems model 1010. The method of analysis results in quantitative color-index information which is displayed in a manner that allows any user to effectively study the morphological properties of the distribution of color-index in galaxies.

  14. Surface photometry of radio galaxies. II - Cluster sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Frazer N.; White, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    R-band CCD photometric observations are reported for 52 radio galaxies in clusters for which good radio maps are available. Data obtained with the No. 1 0.9-m telescope at KPNO (following the procedures described by Owen and Laing, 1989) are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. Optical and radio luminosity are found to be well correlated in twin-jet, fat-double, narrow-angle-tail, and small-twin-jet sources, all of which are clearly distinguished from the classical doubles as in the scheme of Fanaroff and Riley (1974). It is also shown that the elliptical parent galaxies of the extended radio sources form a one-parameter family with the optical luminosity as the key parameter.

  15. Changes in soil DOC affect reconstructed history and projected future trends in surface water acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruška, Jakub; Krám, Pavel; Moldan, Filip; Oulehle, Filip; Evans, Christopher D.; Wright, Richard F.; Cosby, Bernard J.

    2013-04-01

    Over the last two decades there has been growing evidence of widespread increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters in several regions in Europe and North America. Two main drivers have been proposed to explain this observation: climate change entailing changed humidity and temperature which alter rates of microbial processes and reductions in acid deposition which lead to decreased concentrations of strong acid anions and alter rates of decomposition and solubility of organic matter in soil. The question of historical DOC concentrations is therefore important for quantifying present-day acidification and possible future recovery of the surface waters. Due to the paucity of historical data, estimates of pre-acidification chemical and biological status usually come from modeling applications. Lack of process-understanding and of consensus upon what has been driving the observed DOC trends makes modeling uncertain and model outcomes are subject to controversy. Here we apply the MAGIC model to the long-term observed soil and streamwater chemistry data from an anthropogenically acidified small Lysina catchment, Czech Republic, to illustrate the importance of choice of source of DOC during recovery from acidification. The annual mean streamwater DOC concentration increased from 15.6-16.9 mg L-1 (1993-1994) to 21.8-24.5 mg L-1 in 2010-2011, an average annual increase of 0.6 mg L-1 year-1 (p<0.001). Even stronger DOC trends were observed for soilwater draining the organic soil horizons. Mean annual DOC increased from 41-42 mg L-1 in 1993-1994 to 67-74 mg L-1 in 2010-2011 below the organic horizon (at 5 cm depth below the surface), an annual increase of 2.7 mg L-1 year-1 (p<0.001). At 15 cm depth below the surface, in the uppermost mineral horizon (E), the DOC concentrations increased from 31-34 mg L-1 to 68-73 mg L-1, an annual increase of 1.9 mg L-1 year-1 (p<0.005) Pre-industrial (1850´s) and future (2060) streamwater chemistry was

  16. Recent Advances in Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Meachem, Terry; Cooke, William J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the most common (and obvious) problems with video meteor data involves the saturation of the output signal produced by bright meteors, resulting in the elimination of such meteors from photometric determinations. It is important to realize that a "bright" meteor recorded by intensified meteor camera is not what would be considered "bright" by a visual observer - indeed, many Generation II or III camera systems are saturated by meteors with a visual magnitude of 3, barely even noticeable to the untrained eye. As the relatively small fields of view (approx.30 ) of the camera systems captures at best modest numbers of meteors, even during storm peaks, the loss of meteors brighter than +3 renders the determination of shower population indices from video observations even more difficult. Considerable effort has been devoted by the authors to the study of the meteor camera systems employed during the Marshall Space Flight Center s Leonid ground-based campaigns, and a calibration scheme has been devised which can extend the useful dynamic range of such systems by approximately 4 magnitudes. The calibration setup involves only simple equipment, available to amateur and professional, and it is hoped that use of this technique will make for better meteor photometry, and move video meteor analysis beyond the realm of simple counts.

  17. BVRI CCD photometry of Omega Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaino, Gonzalo; Liller, William

    1987-12-01

    The authors present the first CCD, BVRI main-sequence photometry for ω Cen, matched to the new BVRI isochrones of VandenBerg and Bell (1985). Their main conclusions are: (1) The main-sequence turnoffs as seen in the several colors are found to be at VTO = 18.3±0.15; the MSTO color indexes are at: B-V = 0.55±0.03, V-I = 0.73±0.03, and B-I = 1.28±0.03. (2) The magnitude difference between the main-sequence turnoff and the horizontal branch is ΔMV = 3.80±0.15, as derived from the color-magnitude diagrams. (3) The authors deduce a consistent age for ω Cen in all three color-magnitude diagrams of 17±1.5 Gyr. (4) The large scatter among the main-sequence stars demonstrates that the chemical inhomogeneity of about |Fe/H| = ≡1 dex persists as well in the unevolved stars, hence suggesting the composition to be primordial.

  18. The HST Milky Way Stellar Photometry Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radburn-Smith, David

    2012-10-01

    The Hubble Legacy Archive has invested a significant effort into automatically generating photometry for point sources in all HST observations regardless of the target. We estimate that this archive contains up to 800,000 Milky Way {MW} stars, distributed across the whole sky, complete to some three magnitudes fainter than SDSS. Approximately half of these stars have color information, which is required for stellar population analysis. This considerable archive is thus in need of collation, analysis, and publication.Here we propose to compile such a catalog for public access and to use it for two science goals: 1} A test of existing MW stellar models, where we will in particular constrain the fainter and more distant stellar populations; and 2} Probe the shape and structure of the MW stellar halo with a deeper star catalog than is currently available. These science cases will be used to fully define the catalog, in particular by assessing the different populations present in the observations, and by assessing the level of noise from contaminants and the completeness of the survey

  19. BVI CCD photometry of 47 Tucanae

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.

    1987-08-01

    CCD BVI main-sequence photometry of 47 Tuc is presented, matched to the recent BVI isochrones of VandenBerg and Bell (1985). The main-sequence turnoffs are found to be at V = 17.60 + or - 0.1, B-V = 0.56 + or - 0.02; V-I = 0.68 + or - 0.02, and B-I = 1.24 + or - 0.02. The magnitude difference between the main-sequence turnoff and the horizontal branch is 3.55 + or - 0.15 for all three color indices. A consistent age for 47 Tuc of 17 Gyr and a consistent distance modulus of (m-M)v = 13.2 are obtained for all three indices, and an absolute magnitude of Mv = 0.85 is determined for the horizontal branch stars. The results also favor the adoption of (Fe/H) near -0.5 as the best abundance value for 47 Tuc. 38 references.

  20. BVRI photometry of DQ Herculis in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrienko, E. S.; Ibragimov, M. A.; Savanov, I. S.; Satovskii, B. L.; Egamberdiev, Sh. A.; Burkhanov, O. A.

    2015-09-01

    The results of BV RI photometry of the nova DQ Her 1934 performed at the Maidanak Observatory of the Astronomical Institute of the Uzbek Academy of Sciences in October 2014 are presented. The system's brightness, the out-of-eclipse color indices, and the shape of the minima in the BV RI light curves, which are due to eclipses of the white dwarf with its accreting disk-like envelope by the red dwarf, correspond to one of the lowest activity levels observed during the system's deepest relaxation after a nova outburst. The orbital-phase variations of the color indices indicate the presence of a considerably non-uniform brightness distribution for light coming from the disk-like envelope and other gaseous structures of DQ Her, which are observed at orbital phases of 0.85-1.15. The results can be qualitatively interpreted in a picture in which the gas flow structure is formed during mass exchange in an intermediate polar. The behavior found for the color indices could be due, for example, to the visibility in this phase interval of the passage of regions of shocks (tidal shocks, a hot line, and/or a detached shock) through the line of sight.

  1. Plasma of Argon Affects the Earliest Biological Response of Different Implant Surfaces: An In Vitro Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Canullo, L; Genova, T; Tallarico, M; Gautier, G; Mussano, F; Botticelli, D

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the early cell response and protein adsorption elicited by the argon plasma treatment of different commercially available titanium surfaces via a chair-side device. Sterile disks made of grade 4 titanium (n= 450, 4-mm diameter) with 3 surface topographies (machined, plasma sprayed, and zirconia blasted and acid etched) were allocated to receive 4 testing treatments (2% and 10% protein adsorption and cell adhesion with MC3T3-E1 and MG-63). Furthermore, the specimens were divided to undergo 1) argon plasma treatment (10 W, 1 bar for 12 min) in a plasma reactor, 2) ultraviolet (UV) light treatment for 2 h (positive control group), or 3) no treatment (control group). Pretreatment surface analyses based on a scanning electron microscope and profilometer images were also performed. Profilometric analysis demonstrated that the evaluated specimens perfectly suit the standard parameters. The use of argon plasma was capable of affecting the quantity of proteins adsorbed on the different surfaces, notwithstanding their roughness or topographic features at a low fetal bovine serum concentration (2%). UV light treatment for 2 h attained similar results. Moreover, both the plasma of argon and the UV light demonstrated a significant increase in the number of osteoblasts adherent at 10 min in all tested surfaces. Within its limitations, this in vitro study highlights the potential biological benefits of treating implant surfaces with plasma of argon or UV, irrespective of the roughness of the titanium surface. However, in vivo experiments are needed to confirm these preliminary data and settle the rationale of a treatment that might be clinically relevant in case of bone-reparative deficiencies. PMID:26848069

  2. Domains of surfactant protein A that affect protein oligomerization, lipid structure and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Palaniyar, N; Ikegami, M; Korfhagen, T; Whitsett, J; McCormack, F X

    2001-05-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an abundant protein found in pulmonary surfactant which has been reported to have multiple functions. In this review, we focus on the structural importance of each domain of SP-A in the functions of protein oligomerization, the structural organization of lipids and the surface-active properties of surfactant, with an emphasis on ultrastructural analyses. The N-terminal domain of SP-A is required for disulfide-dependent protein oligomerization, and for binding and aggregation of phospholipids, but there is no evidence that this domain directly interacts with lipid membranes. The collagen-like domain is important for the stability and oligomerization of SP-A. It also contributes shape and dimension to the molecule, and appears to determine membrane spacing in lipid aggregates such as common myelin and tubular myelin. The neck domain of SP-A is primarily involved in protein trimerization, which is critical for many protein functions, but it does not appear to be directly involved in lipid interactions. The globular C-terminal domain of SP-A clearly plays a central role in lipid binding, and in more complex functions such as the formation and/or stabilization of curved membranes. In recent work, we have determined that the maintenance of low surface tension of surfactant in the presence of serum protein inhibitors requires cooperative interactions between the C-terminal and N-terminal domains of the molecule. This effect of SP-A requires a high degree of oligomeric assembly of the protein, and may be mediated by the activity of the protein to alter the form or physical state of surfactant lipid aggregates. PMID:11369537

  3. Design of peptidyl compounds that affect beta-amyloid aggregation: importance of surface tension and context.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Todd J; Murphy, Regina M

    2005-06-21

    Self-association of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide into cross-beta-sheet fibrils induces cellular toxicity in vitro and is linked with progression of Alzheimer's disease. Previously, we demonstrated that hybrid peptides, containing a recognition domain that binds to Abeta and a disrupting domain consisting of a chain of charged amino acids, inhibited Abeta-associated toxicity in vitro and increased the rate of Abeta aggregation. In this work we examine the design parameter space of the disrupting domain. Using KLVFFKKKKKK as a base case, we tested hybrid compounds with a branched rather than linear lysine oligomer, with l-lysine replaced by d-lysine, and with lysine replaced by diaminopropionic acid. We synthesized a compound with a novel anionic disrupting domain that contained cysteine thiols oxidized to sulfates, as well as other compounds in which alkyl or ether chains were appended to KLVFF. In all cases, the hybrid compound's ability to increase solvent surface tension was the strongest predictor of its effect on Abeta aggregation kinetics. Finally, we investigated the effects of arginine on Abeta aggregation. Arginine is a well-known chaotrope but increases surface tension of water. Arginine modestly decreased Abeta aggregation. In contrast, RRRRRR slightly, and KLVFFRRRRRR greatly, increased Abeta aggregation. Thus, the influence of arginine on Abeta aggregation depends strongly on the context in which it is presented. The effect of arginine, RRRRRR, and KLVFFRRRRRR on Abeta aggregation was examined in detail using laser light scattering, circular dichroism spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thioflavin T fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:15952797

  4. The expected Gaia revolution in asteroid science: Photometry and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellino, A.

    2014-07-01

    Gaia is expected to produce a major revolution in our knowledge of the asteroids. Apart from a huge improvement in the accuracy of the orbital elements of these objects, something which is a ''natural'' consequence of the unprecedented astrometric accuracy of Gaia, we can also expect that the photometric and spectrophotometric performances of the Gaia detectors will be such to substantially move ahead the frontier of the domain of physical characterization of asteroids by means of remote observations. A list of physical properties, that will be derived from the analysis of the detections corresponding to different observed transits of each object in the Gaia focal plane during five years of operational activity, includes masses, sizes, average densities, spin properties, reflectance spectra, albedos, as well as a new taxonomic classification. In this review, the focus will be on Gaia photometry and spectrophotometry. The method of photometric inversion of sparse photometric data developed to reduce Gaia photometric data of asteroids will be described, and its expected performances will be discussed. In particular, the choice of assuming for the objects the shapes of ideal triaxial ellipsoids, fairly simplistic in an era in which much more refined shape models are currently used in photometric inversion methods, will be justified by the need of minimizing the CPU time needed to process data for hundreds of thousands of objects in a reasonable time. The processing of spectrophotometric data will be also described. These data will produce a huge data set of reflectance spectra of asteroids. A particular advantage of these data will be that of including also the blue part of the spectrum, which has been substantially lost since the epoch in which the CCD detectors have replaced the older photomultipliers used for UBVRI photometry. The big data set of new asteroid spectra will be also used to develop a new asteroid taxonomy, used new algorithms developed for this

  5. NEW UBVRI PHOTOMETRY OF 234 M33 STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jun

    2013-04-15

    This is the second paper of our series. In this paper, we present UBVRI photometry for 234 star clusters in the field of M33. For most of these star clusters, there is photometry in only two bands in previous studies. The photometry of these star clusters is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements, and in particular that our photometry is in good agreement with that of Zloczewski and Kaluzny. Combined with star cluster photometry in previous studies, we present some results: none of the M33 youngest clusters ({approx}10{sup 7} yr) have masses approaching 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }, and comparisons with models of simple stellar populations suggest a large range of ages for M33 star clusters and some as old as the Galactic globular clusters.

  6. FIXING THE U-BAND PHOTOMETRY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Krisciunas, Kevin; Bastola, Deepak; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Espinoza, Juan; Gonzalez, David; Gonzalez, Luis; Gonzalez, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Morrell, Nidia; Phillips, Mark M.; Hamuy, Mario E-mail: suntzeff@physics.tamu.edu E-mail: hsiao@lco.cl E-mail: mmp@lco.cl

    2013-01-01

    We present previously unpublished photometry of supernovae 2003gs and 2003hv. Using spectroscopically derived corrections to the U-band photometry, we reconcile U-band light curves made from imagery with the Cerro Tololo 0.9 m, 1.3 m, and Las Campanas 1 m telescopes. Previously, such light curves showed a 0.4 mag spread at one month after maximum light. This gives us hope that a set of corrected ultraviolet light curves of nearby objects can contribute to the full utilization of rest-frame U-band data of supernovae at redshift {approx}0.3-0.8. As pointed out recently by Kessler et al. in the context of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey supernova search, if we take the published U-band photometry of nearby Type Ia supernovae at face value, there is a 0.12 mag U-band anomaly in the distance moduli of higher redshift objects. This anomaly led the Sloan survey to eliminate from their analyses all photometry obtained in the rest-frame U-band. The Supernova Legacy Survey eliminated observer frame U-band photometry, which is to say nearby objects observed in the U-band, but they used photometry of high-redshift objects no matter in which band the photons were emitted.

  7. Water color affects the stratification, surface temperature, heat content, and mean epilimnetic irradiance of small lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of water color on lake stratification, mean epilimnetic irradiance, and lake temperature dynamics were examined in small, north-temperate lakes that differed widely in water color (1.5-19.8 m -1). Among these lakes, colored lakes differed from clear lakes in the following ways: (i) the epilimnia were shallower and colder, and mean epilimnetic irradiance was reduced; (ii) the diel temperature cycles were more pronounced; (iii) whole-lake heat accumulation during stratification was reduced. The depth of the epilimnion ranged from 2.5 m in the clearest lake to 0.75 m in the most colored lake, and 91% of the variation in epilimnetic depth was explained by water color. Summer mean morning epilimnetic temperature was ???2??C cooler in the most colored lake compared with the clearest lake. In clear lakes, the diel temperature range (1.4 ?? 0.7??C) was significantly (p = 0.01) less than that in the most colored lake (2.1 ?? 1.0??C). Change in whole-lake heat content was negatively correlated with water color. Increasing water color decreased light penetration more than thermocline depth, leading to reduced mean epilimnetic irradiance in the colored lakes. Thus, in these small lakes, water color significantly affected temperature, thermocline depth, and light climate. ?? 2006 NRC.

  8. Proliferation of Purple Sulphur Bacteria at the Sediment Surface Affects Intertidal Mat Diversity and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Hubas, Cédric; Jesus, Bruno; Ruivo, Mickael; Meziane, Tarik; Thiney, Najet; Davoult, Dominique; Spilmont, Nicolas; Paterson, David M.; Jeanthon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    There is a relative absence of studies dealing with mats of purple sulphur bacteria in the intertidal zone. These bacteria display an array of metabolic pathways that allow them to disperse and develop under a wide variety of conditions, making these mats important in terms of ecosystem processes and functions. Mass blooms of purple sulphur bacteria develop during summer on sediments in the intertidal zone especially on macroalgal deposits. The microbial composition of different types of mats differentially affected by the development of purple sulphur bacteria was examined, at low tide, using a set of biochemical markers (fatty acids, pigments) and composition was assessed against their influence on ecosystem functions (sediment cohesiveness, CO2 fixation). We demonstrated that proliferation of purple sulphur bacteria has a major impact on intertidal mats diversity and functions. Indeed, assemblages dominated by purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae) were efficient exopolymer producers and their biostabilisation potential was significant. In addition, the massive growth of purple sulphur bacteria resulted in a net CO2 degassing whereas diatom dominated biofilms represented a net CO2 sink. PMID:24340018

  9. APASS Landolt-Sloan BVgri Photometry of RAVE Stars. I. Data, Effective Temperatures, and Reddenings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Henden, A.; Frigo, A.; Zwitter, T.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Kordopatis, G.; Levine, S. E.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Smith, T. C.; Steinmetz, M.; Templeton, M.; Terrell, D.; Welch, D. L.; Williams, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2014-11-01

    We provide AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey (APASS) photometry in the Landolt BV and Sloan g'r'i' bands for all 425,743 stars included in the fourth RAVE Data Release. The internal accuracy of the APASS photometry of RAVE stars, expressed as the error of the mean of data obtained and separately calibrated over a median of four distinct observing epochs and distributed between 2009 and 2013, is 0.013, 0.012, 0.012, 0.014, and 0.021 mag for the B, V, g', r', and i' bands, respectively. The equally high external accuracy of APASS photometry has been verified on secondary Landolt and Sloan photometric standard stars not involved in the APASS calibration process and on a large body of literature data on field and cluster stars, confirming the absence of offsets and trends. Compared with the Carlsberg Meridian Catalog (CMC-15), APASS astrometry of RAVE stars is accurate to a median value of 0.098 arcsec. Brightness distribution functions for the RAVE stars have been derived in all bands. APASS photometry of RAVE stars, augmented by 2MASS JHK infrared data, has been χ2 fitted to a densely populated synthetic photometric library designed to widely explore temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and reddening. Resulting T eff and E B - V , computed over a range of options, are provided and discussed, and will be kept updated in response to future APASS and RAVE data releases. In the process, we find that the reddening caused by a homogeneous slab of dust, extending for 140 pc on either side of the Galactic plane and responsible for EpolesB-V = 0.036 ± 0.002 at the Galactic poles, is a suitable approximation of the actual reddening encountered at Galactic latitudes |b| >= 25°.

  10. APASS Landolt-Sloan BVgri photometry of Rave stars. I. Data, effective temperatures, and reddenings

    SciTech Connect

    Munari, U.; Siviero, A.; Henden, A.; Frigo, A.; Bienaymé, O.; Siebert, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Kordopatis, G.; Helmi, A.; Levine, S. E.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; and others

    2014-11-01

    We provide AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey (APASS) photometry in the Landolt BV and Sloan g'r'i' bands for all 425,743 stars included in the fourth RAVE Data Release. The internal accuracy of the APASS photometry of RAVE stars, expressed as the error of the mean of data obtained and separately calibrated over a median of four distinct observing epochs and distributed between 2009 and 2013, is 0.013, 0.012, 0.012, 0.014, and 0.021 mag for the B, V, g', r', and i' bands, respectively. The equally high external accuracy of APASS photometry has been verified on secondary Landolt and Sloan photometric standard stars not involved in the APASS calibration process and on a large body of literature data on field and cluster stars, confirming the absence of offsets and trends. Compared with the Carlsberg Meridian Catalog (CMC-15), APASS astrometry of RAVE stars is accurate to a median value of 0.098 arcsec. Brightness distribution functions for the RAVE stars have been derived in all bands. APASS photometry of RAVE stars, augmented by 2MASS JHK infrared data, has been χ{sup 2} fitted to a densely populated synthetic photometric library designed to widely explore temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and reddening. Resulting T {sub eff} and E {sub B–V}, computed over a range of options, are provided and discussed, and will be kept updated in response to future APASS and RAVE data releases. In the process, we find that the reddening caused by a homogeneous slab of dust, extending for 140 pc on either side of the Galactic plane and responsible for E{sub B−V}{sup poles} = 0.036 ± 0.002 at the Galactic poles, is a suitable approximation of the actual reddening encountered at Galactic latitudes |b| ≥ 25°.

  11. ASPIN: Research project on near-Earth asteroid photometry in frame of the ISON optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotov, Igor; Inasaridze, Raguli; Elenin, Leonid; Krugly, Yurij; Rumyantsev, Vasilij; Namkhai, Tungalag; Schmalz, Sergei; Tsogt-Ochir, Shijirbayar

    International Scientific Optical Network (ISON) represents one of largest systems specializing in observation of space objects. The main goal of project is observations of space debris. As an additional task the regular photometry of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) is carried out using the network’s telescopes with apertures from 0.4 m up to 2.6 m (ASPIN project - Asteroid Search and Photometry Initiative). The photometry is aimed at getting lightcurves of asteroids for solving different tasks concerning with physical properties of these celestial bodies. The lightcurves have been obtained with a typical photometric accuracy of 0.01-0.03 mag. The main purpose of the observations is to study characteristics of asteroids such as rotation period, size and shape of the body, surface composition and other. It is expected to detect an influence of the YORP effect. Special attention is paid to the detection of binary asteroids. During 2013 the photometric observations have been carried out at 12 observatories during more than 250 nights which have been allowed to obtain the data on 40 NEAs as well as 15 main-belt asteroids. In result the rotation periods have been determined for 8 NEAs in the first time and refined for 10 NEAs. Two binary systems were discovered. Lightcurves of 11 main-belt asteroids with diameters less than 10 km (binary systems or members of small clusters) were obtained. Several of the observed asteroids were radar targets - between them the NEA (367943) Duende (or 2012 DA14), which was approached to the Earth in day of falling the Chelyabinsk meteor on February 23, 2013. The obtained results will be presented and perspectives of NEA photometry with ISON telescopes will be discussed.

  12. How fulvic acid affects heavy metal uptake on the muscovite (001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Fenter, P.; Park, C.; Sturchio, N. C.; Nagy, K.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the molecular-scale reactions at mineral-solution interfaces is crucial for developing predictive models to assess the transport and bioavailability of dissolved heavy metals in the surface environment. We investigated the vertical distribution of divalent heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Sr, Hg, and Pb) adsorbed at the muscovite (001)-solution interface in the absence and presence of fulvic acid (FA) using interface-specific specular X-ray reflectivity combined with element-specific resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity with a sub-angstrom resolution. The experimental solutions were prepared using 1-10 mmol/kg metal nitrates with or without 100 mg/kg Elliott Soil Fulvic Acid II or Suwannee River Fulvic Acid from the International Humic Substances Society at pH 2-5.5. Reflectivity data were measured at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. In the absence of FA, the results show a complex picture in which there are three distinct adsorbed species that coexist at the interface: classical inner- and outer-sphere complexes plus a third OS fraction that is more broadly distributed at heights farther from the surface than the other species. Systematic trends in cation adsorption show that these three species are correlated and that their partitioning can be explained by thermodynamic equilibrium among these three species which is controlled mainly by cation hydration energy. The presence of dissolved FA modifies heavy metal uptake by two different mechanisms: it can form complexes with metal cations in solution and adsorb on muscovite as metal-organic complexes when the metal has a relatively high affinity for organic matter. In this case, the adsorbed metal cation shows a characteristic broad distribution within the entire film, resulting in formation of a more electron-dense and thicker organic film on muscovite compared to that without metals. Metals with lower organophilicity show that the enhanced metal uptake occurs mainly within the outer

  13. Spitzer/IRAC Photometry Of The Four Largest Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Richard; Emery, J.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.

    2012-10-01

    The surfaces of the four largest Uranian satellites are dominated by water ice and a spectrally neutral constituent that is likely carbonaceous in composition. CO2 ice has been detected on Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania, with no detection on the furthest regular Uranian satellite, Oberon (Grundy et al., 2003, 2006). Whether CO2 ice is primordial or is actively produced in the Uranian system is unclear; however, it seems unlikely that primordial CO2 ice would remain exposed on an icy satellite surface over the age of the Solar System. One possible mechanism for producing CO2 ice is bombardment of water ice and carbonaceous material by charged particles caught in Uranus’ magnetic field. Unlike the other large Uranian satellites, Oberon spends part of its orbit outside the confines of Uranus’ magnetic field, which might help explain why CO2 ice has yet to be detected on Oberon. We are using photometric data gathered by the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST), in order to search for the signature of CO2 ice on Oberon, and confirm its presence on Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania at longer wavelengths than previous studies. IRAC collects data in four different channels, which are centered roughly at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 µm. Additionally, we are gathering spectroscopic data using SpeX on IRTF, at similar longitudes to the IRAC observations, in order to characterize the distribution of CO2 ice on these icy satellites over a wide range of near-infrared wavelengths. Our preliminary photometry results for Oberon indicate that there is a steep reduction in reflected solar flux from channel 1 to channel 2, suggesting that surface materials are absorbing photons at wavelengths within the bandpass of channel 2. We will present the results of our photometric analysis of the four largest Uranian moons.

  14. Water chemistry of surface waters affected by the Fourmile Canyon wildfire, Colorado, 2010-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Writer, Jeffrey H.; Murphy, Sheila F.

    2012-01-01

    In September 2010, the Fourmile Canyon fire burned about 23 percent of the Fourmile Creek watershed in Boulder County, Colo. Water-quality sampling of Fourmile Creek began within a month after the wildfire to assess its effects on surface-water chemistry. Water samples were collected from five sites along Fourmile Creek (above, within, and below the burned area) monthly during base flow, twice weekly during snowmelt runoff, and at higher frequencies during storm events. Stream discharge was also monitored. Water-quality samples were collected less frequently from an additional 6 sites on Fourmile Creek, from 11 tributaries or other inputs, and from 3 sites along Boulder Creek. The pH, electrical conductivity, temperature, specific ultraviolet absorbance, total suspended solids, and concentrations (dissolved and total) of major cations (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium), anions (chloride, sulfate, alkalinity, fluoride, and bromide), nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, and phosphorus), trace metals (aluminum, arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, mercury, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, rubidium, antimony, selenium, strontium, vanadium, and zinc), and dissolved organic carbon are here reported for 436 samples collected during 2010 and 2011.

  15. Sea surface temperature fronts affect distribution of Pacific saury (Cololabis saira) in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chen-Te; Sun, Chi-Lu; Belkin, Igor M.; Yeh, Su-Zan; Kuo, Chin-Lau; Liu, Don-Chung

    2014-09-01

    Pacific saury (Cololabis saira) is an important fisheries resource and commercial species of Taiwanese deep-sea saury stick-held dip net fishery in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. In this study, the logbook data of a 3-year (2006-2008) Taiwanese Pacific saury fishery and corresponding satellite-derived MODIS sea surface temperature (SST) data were analyzed to detect SST fronts and examine their influence on the spatio-temporal distribution of Pacific saury. The fronts were identified by the Cayula-Cornillon single-image edge detection algorithm. The results show that low frequency of SST fronts is associated with lower CPUEs during the early fishing season (June-August), while high frequency of SST fronts is associated with higher CPUEs during the peak fishing season. When fishing locations of Pacific saury are close to the SST fronts, higher CPUEs are observed. Results of this study provide a better understanding of how SST fronts influence distribution of Pacific saury and improve the basis of fishing ground forecasting.

  16. Regression analysis in modeling of air surface temperature and factors affecting its value in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jasim Mohammed; Jafri, Mohd. Zubir Mat; Lim, Hwee San; Abdullah, Khiruddin

    2012-10-01

    This study encompasses air surface temperature (AST) modeling in the lower atmosphere. Data of four atmosphere pollutant gases (CO, O3, CH4, and H2O) dataset, retrieved from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), from 2003 to 2008 was employed to develop a model to predict AST value in the Malaysian peninsula using the multiple regression method. For the entire period, the pollutants were highly correlated (R=0.821) with predicted AST. Comparisons among five stations in 2009 showed close agreement between the predicted AST and the observed AST from AIRS, especially in the southwest monsoon (SWM) season, within 1.3 K, and for in situ data, within 1 to 2 K. The validation results of AST with AST from AIRS showed high correlation coefficient (R=0.845 to 0.918), indicating the model's efficiency and accuracy. Statistical analysis in terms of β showed that H2O (0.565 to 1.746) tended to contribute significantly to high AST values during the northeast monsoon season. Generally, these results clearly indicate the advantage of using the satellite AIRS data and a correlation analysis study to investigate the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases on AST over the Malaysian peninsula. A model was developed that is capable of retrieving the Malaysian peninsulan AST in all weather conditions, with total uncertainties ranging between 1 and 2 K.

  17. How does the spaceborne radar blind zone affect derived surface snowfall statistics in polar regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maahn, Maximilian; Burgard, Clara; Crewell, Susanne; Gorodetskaya, Irina V.; Kneifel, Stefan; Lhermitte, Stef; Van Tricht, Kristof; Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Global statistics of snowfall are currently only available from the CloudSat satellite. But CloudSat cannot provide observations of clouds and precipitation within the so-called blind zone, which is caused by ground-clutter contamination of the CloudSat radar and covers the last 1200 m above land/ice surface. In this study, the impact of the blind zone of CloudSat on derived snowfall statistics in polar regions is investigated by analyzing three 12 month data sets recorded by ground-based Micro Rain Radar (MRR) at the Belgian Princess Elisabeth station in East Antarctica and at Ny-Ålesund and Longyearbyen in Svalbard, Norway. MRR radar reflectivity profiles are investigated in respect to vertical variability in the frequency distribution, changes in the number of observed snow events, and impacts on total precipitation. Results show that the blind zone leads to reflectivity being underestimated by up to 1 dB, the number of events being altered by ±5% and the precipitation amount being underestimated by 9 to 11 percentage points. Besides investigating a blind zone of 1200 m, the impacts of a reduced blind zone of 600 m are also analyzed. This analysis will help in assessing future missions with a smaller blind zone. The reduced blind zone leads to improved representation of mean reflectivity but does not improve the bias in event numbers and precipitation amount.

  18. Experiences with Opto-Mechanical Systems that Affect Optical Surfaces at the Sub-Nanometer Level

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L C; Taylor, J S

    2008-04-03

    Projection optical systems built for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) demonstrated the ability to produce, support and position reflective optical surfaces for achieving transmitted wavefront errors of 1 nm or less. Principal challenges included optical interferometry, optical manufacturing processes, multi-layer coating technology and opto mechanics. Our group was responsible for designing, building and aligning two different projection optical systems: a full-field, 0.1 NA, four-mirror system for 70 nm features and a small-field, 0.3 NA, two-mirror system for 30 nm features. Other than physical size and configuration, the two systems were very similar in the way they were designed, built and aligned. A key difference exists in the optic mounts, driven primarily by constraints from the metrology equipment used by different optics manufacturers. As mechanical stability and deterministic position control of optics will continue to play an essential role in future systems, we focus our discussion on opto-mechanics and primarily the optic mounts.

  19. Surface functionality affects the biodistribution and microglia-targeting of intra-amniotically delivered dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Nance, Elizabeth; Zhang, Zhi; Jasty, Venkatasai; Kambhampati, Siva P; Mishra, Manoj K; Burd, Irina; Romero, Roberto; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2016-09-10

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a chronic childhood disorder with limited therapeutic options. Maternal intrauterine inflammation/infection is a major risk factor in the pathogenesis of CP. In pre-clinical models, dendrimer-based therapies are viable in postnatal period, attenuating inflammation and improving motor function in vivo. However, treatment to the mother, in the prenatal period, may provide the possibility of preventing/resolving inflammation at early stages. Towards this goal, we used a maternal intrauterine inflammation-induced rabbit model of CP to study fetal-maternal transport and neuroinflammation targeting of intra-amniotically administrated dendrimers with neutral/anionic surface functionality. Our study suggested both hydroxyl-terminated 'neutral' (D-OH) and carboxyl-terminated 'anionic' (D-COOH) Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were absorbed by fetuses and demonstrated bi-directional transport between fetuses and mother. D-OH was more effective in crossing the fetal blood-brain barrier, and targeting activated microglia. The cell-specific targeting was associated with the extent of microglia activation. This study demonstrated intra-amniotically administered hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimers could be an effective drug delivery vehicle for targeting fetal inflammation and preventing subsequent neurologic injury associated with chorioamnionitis. PMID:27378700

  20. Robust automatic photometry of local galaxies from SDSS. Dissecting the color magnitude relation with color profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, Guido; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Fumagalli, Michele; Dotti, Massimo; Fossati, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    We present an automatic procedure to perform reliable photometry of galaxies on SDSS images. We selected a sample of 5853 galaxies in the Coma and Virgo superclusters. For each galaxy, we derive Petrosian g and i magnitudes, surface brightness and color profiles. Unlike the SDSS pipeline, our procedure is not affected by the well known shredding problem and efficiently extracts Petrosian magnitudes for all galaxies. Hence we derived magnitudes even from the population of galaxies missed by the SDSS which represents ~25% of all local supercluster galaxies and ~95% of galaxies with g < 11 mag. After correcting the g and i magnitudes for Galactic and internal extinction, the blue and red sequences in the color magnitude diagram are well separated, with similar slopes. In addition, we study (i) the color-magnitude diagrams in different galaxy regions, the inner (r ≤ 1 kpc), intermediate (0.2RPet ≤ r ≤ 0.3RPet) and outer, disk-dominated (r ≥ 0.35RPet)) zone; and (ii), we compute template color profiles, discussing the dependences of the templates on the galaxy masses and on their morphological type. The two analyses consistently lead to a picture where elliptical galaxies show no color gradients, irrespective of their masses. Spirals, instead, display a steeper gradient in their color profiles with increasing mass, which is consistent with the growing relevance of a bulge and/or a bar component above 1010 M⊙. Full Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A38

  1. The RSA survey of dwarf galaxies, 1: Optical photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vader, J. Patricia; Chaboyer, Brian

    1994-01-01

    We present detailed surface photometry, based on broad B-band charge coupled device (CCD) images, of about 80 dwarf galaxies. Our sample represents approximately 10% of all dwarf galaxies identified in the vicinity of Revised Shapley-Ames (RSA) galaxies on high resolution blue photographic plates, referred to as the RSA survey of dwarf galaxies. We derive global properties and radial surface brightness profiles, and examine the morphologies. The radial surface brightness profiles of dwarf galaxies, whether early or late type, display the same varieties in shape and complexity as those of classical giant galaxies. Only a few are well described by a pure r(exp 1/4) law. Exponential profiles prevail. Features typical of giant disk galaxies, such as exponential profiles with a central depression, lenses, and even, in one case (IC 2041), a relatively prominent bulge are also found in dwarf galaxies. Our data suggest that the central region evolves from being bulge-like, with an r(exp 1/4) law profile, in bright galaxies to a lens-like structure in dwarf galaxies. We prove detailed surface photometry to be a helpful if not always sufficient tool in investigating the structure of dwarf galaxies. In many cases kinematic information is needed to complete the picture. We find the shapes of the surface brightness profiles to be loosely associated with morphological type. Our sample contains several new galaxies with properties intermediate between those of giant and dwarf ellipticals (but no M32-like objects). This shows that such intermediate galaxies exist so that at least a fraction of early-type dwarf ellipticals is structurally related to early-type giants instead of belonging to a totally unrelated, disjunct family. This supports an origin of early-type dwarf galaxies as originally more massive systems that acquired their current morphology as a result of substantial, presumable supernova-driven, mass loss. On the other hand, several early-type dwarfs in our sample are

  2. The RSA survey of dwarf galaxies, 1: Optical photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vader, J. Patricia; Chaboyer, Brian

    1994-10-01

    We present detailed surface photometry, based on broad B-band charge coupled device (CCD) images, of about 80 dwarf galaxies. Our sample represents approximately 10% of all dwarf galaxies identified in the vicinity of Revised Shapley-Ames (RSA) galaxies on high resolution blue photographic plates, referred to as the RSA survey of dwarf galaxies. We derive global properties and radial surface brightness profiles, and examine the morphologies. The radial surface brightness profiles of dwarf galaxies, whether early or late type, display the same varieties in shape and complexity as those of classical giant galaxies. Only a few are well described by a pure r1/4 law. Exponential profiles prevail. Features typical of giant disk galaxies, such as exponential profiles with a central depression, lenses, and even, in one case (IC 2041), a relatively prominent bulge are also found in dwarf galaxies. Our data suggest that the central region evolves from being bulge-like, with an r1/4 law profile, in bright galaxies to a lens-like structure in dwarf galaxies. We prove detailed surface photometry to be a helpful if not always sufficient tool in investigating the structure of dwarf galaxies. In many cases kinematic information is needed to complete the picture. We find the shapes of the surface brightness profiles to be loosely associated with morphological type. Our sample contains several new galaxies with properties intermediate between those of giant and dwarf ellipticals (but no M32-like objects). This shows that such intermediate galaxies exist so that at least a fraction of early-type dwarf ellipticals is structurally related to early-type giants instead of belonging to a totally unrelated, disjunct family. This supports an origin of early-type dwarf galaxies as originally more massive systems that acquired their current morphology as a result of substantial, presumable supernova-driven, mass loss. On the other hand, several early-type dwarfs in our sample are merger

  3. Leaf surface chemicals fromNicotiana affecting germination ofPeronospora tabacina (adam) sporangia.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, B S; Nielsen, M T; Severson, R F; Sisson, V A; Stephenson, M K; Jackson, D M

    1992-09-01

    A bioassay was used to evaluate the effects of cuticular leaf components, isolated fromN. tabacum, N. glutinosa (accessions 24 and 24a), and 23other Nicotiana species, on germinationof P. tabacina (blue mold). The leaf surface compounds includedα- andβ-4,8,13,-duvatriene-l,3-diols (DVT-diols), (13-E)-labda-13-ene-8α-,15-diol (labdenediol), (12-Z)-labda-12,14-diene-8α-ol (cis-abienol), (13-R)-labda-8,14-diene-13-ol (manool), 2-hydroxymanool, a mixture of (13-R)-labda-14-ene-8α,13-diol (sclareol), and (13-S)-labda-14-ene-8α,13-diol (episclareol), and various glucose and/or sucrose ester isolates. The above in acetone were applied onto leaf disks of the blue moldsusceptibleN. tabacum cv. TI 1406, which was then inoculated with blue mold sporangia. Estimated IC50 values (inhibitory concentration) were 3.0μg/cm(2) forα-DVT-diol, 2.9μ/cm(2) forβ-DVT-diol, 0.4μg/cm(2) for labdenediol and 4.7μg/cm(2) for the sclareol mixture. Manool, 2-hydroxymanool, andcis-abienol at application rates up to 30μg/cm(2) had little or no effect on sporangium germination. Glucose and/or sucrose ester isolates from the cuticular leaf extracts of 23Nicotiana species and three different fractions fromN. bigelovii were also evaluated for antimicrobial activity at a concentration of 30μg/cm(2). Germination was inhibited by >20% when exposed to sugar esters isolated fromN. acuminata, N. benthamiana, N. attenuata, N. clevelandii, andN. miersii, and accessions 10 and 12 ofN. bigelovii. These results imply that a number of compounds may influence resistance to blue mold in tobacco. PMID:24254279

  4. Polarimetric Retrievals of Surface and Aerosol Properties in the Region Affected by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottaviani, M.; Cairns, B.; Chowdhary, J.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R.; Obland, M. D.; Zhai, P.; Hu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    In July 2010, the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) effectuated two flights in two consecutive days over the region affected by the oil spill of the Deepwater Horizon offshore platform. Integrated on the NASA Langley B-200 aircraft, the instrument is deployed together with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), which provides information on the distribution of the aerosol layers beneath the aircraft including an accurate estimate of aerosol optical depth. We present a sensitivity study to illustrate the merits of polarization measurements in detecting variations of ocean surface properties linked to the presence of an oil slick. In particular, the Degree of Linear Polarization (DoLP) in the glint region does not depend on the surface roughness, while is severely affected by variations in the refractive index of the ocean surface. Exploiting the RSP channel at 2250nm, where virtually all the signal is generated by the Fresnel reflection at the surface, the DoLP at any angle well into the glint region can therefore be used to detect alterations in the ocean surface. More specifically, the glint profile at this wavelength is fitted to the Cox-Munk model with a routine which can optimally estimate wind speed and direction, while taking into account aircraft attitude variations in determining the viewing geometry. The surveyed area also presents a complex mix of aerosol types. At least one major urban layer originating in the US Southeast mixes in the central portion of the flight trajectory with smoke caused by controlled burns around the damaged platform. The constrain on surface reflectance provided by the SWIR RSP channel, together with the aerosol optical depth provided by the HSRL, are used in Radiative Transfer computations to model the channels at shorter wavelengths and retrieve aerosol descriptive parameters such as aerosol size distribution and refractive index. Finally, the presence of smoke is ground for a discussion on the possibility to infer

  5. Dithering Strategies and Point-Source Photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan; Kim, Alex G

    2011-02-22

    The accuracy in the photometry of a point source depends on the point-spread function (PSF), detector pixelization, and observing strategy. The PSF and pixel response describe the spatial blurring of the source, the pixel scale describes the spatial sampling of a single exposure, and the observing strategy determines the set of dithered exposures with pointing offsets from which the source flux is inferred. In a wide-field imaging survey, sources of interest are randomly distributed within the field of view and hence are centered randomly within a pixel. A given hardware configuration and observing strategy therefore have a distribution of photometric uncertainty for sources of fixed flux that fall in the field. In this article we explore the ensemble behavior of photometric and position accuracies for different PSFs, pixel scales, and dithering patterns. We find that the average uncertainty in the flux determination depends slightly on dither strategy, whereas the position determination can be strongly dependent on the dithering. For cases with pixels much larger than the PSF, the uncertainty distributions can be non-Gaussian, with rms values that are particularly sensitive to the dither strategy. We also find that for these configurations with large pixels, pointings dithered by a fractional pixel amount do not always give minimal average uncertainties; this is in contrast to image reconstruction for which fractional dithers are optimal. When fractional pixel dithering is favored, a pointing accuracy of better than {approx}0.15 {approx}0.15 pixel width is required to maintain half the advantage over random dithers.

  6. Enteric YaiW Is a Surface-Exposed Outer Membrane Lipoprotein That Affects Sensitivity to an Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Markus F. F.; Caro-Hernandez, Paola; Tan, Karen; Runti, Giulia; Wehmeier, Silvia; Scocchi, Marco; Doerrler, William T.; Ferguson, Gail P.

    2014-01-01

    yaiW is a previously uncharacterized gene found in enteric bacteria that is of particular interest because it is located adjacent to the sbmA gene, whose bacA ortholog is required for Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis and Brucella abortus pathogenesis. We show that yaiW is cotranscribed with sbmA in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Typhimurium strains. We present evidence that the YaiW is a palmitate-modified surface exposed outer membrane lipoprotein. Since BacA function affects the very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) modification of S. meliloti and B. abortus lipid A, we tested whether SbmA function might affect either the fatty acid modification of the YaiW lipoprotein or the fatty acid modification of enteric lipid A but found that it did not. Interestingly, we did observe that E. coli SbmA suppresses deficiencies in the VLCFA modification of the lipopolysaccharide of an S. meliloti bacA mutant despite the absence of VLCFA in E. coli. Finally, we found that both YaiW and SbmA positively affect the uptake of proline-rich Bac7 peptides, suggesting a possible connection between their cellular functions. PMID:24214946

  7. Surface Features Analysis in Salt-Affected Area Using Hyperspectral Data: A Case Study in the Zone of Chotts, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaziz, Moncef; Liesenberg, Veraldo; Bouaziz, Samir; Gloaguen, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions are most affected by Salinity. Chotts regions in southern Tunisia are such an area, where the excessive content of salt in the soil is a hard faced problem. Soil salinity in this area enforces several environmental problems such as limiting plant growth, reducing crop productivity, degrading soil quality and leads to accelerated rates rill and gully erosion . Remote sensing analysis by the mean of spectral analysis, geomorphologic aspect from digital elevation models and distribution of rainfall intensity from satellite data are used in this study to discern features and patterns of areas affected by salt. Correlation between these remote sensing indicators is made in order to assess the contribution of each indicator to identify the salt-affected area. The approach followed in this study was applied on Hyperspectral data from EO-1 Mission. Hyperion data are promoted due to their very high spectral resolution and wide enhanced spatial information. The present study highlighted the high correlation between the flat surfaces and the high content of salt in the soil (from soil salinity indices) on one hand and a low correlation between the high intensity of rainfall distribution and indicators of low salt content in the soil on the other hand.

  8. Mg2+ binds to the surface of thymidylate synthase and affects hydride transfer at the interior active site

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Sapienza, Paul J.; Abeysinghe, Thelma; Luzum, Calvin; Lee, Andrew L.; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.; Kohen, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TSase) produces the sole intracellular de novo source of thymidine (i.e. the DNA base T) and thus is a common target for antibiotic and anticancer drugs. Mg2+ has been reported to affect TSase activity, but the mechanism of this interaction has not been investigated. Here we show that Mg2+ binds to the surface of Escherichia coli TSase and affects the kinetics of hydride transfer at the interior active site (16 Å away). Examination of the crystal structures identifies a Mg2+ near the glutamyl moiety of the folate cofactor, providing the first structural evidence for Mg2+ binding to TSase. The kinetics and NMR relaxation experiments suggest that the weak binding of Mg2+ to the protein surface stabilizes the closed conformation of the ternary enzyme complex and reduces the entropy of activation on the hydride transfer step. Mg2+ accelerates the hydride transfer by ca. 7-fold but does not affect the magnitude or temperature-dependence of the intrinsic kinetic isotope effect. These results suggest that Mg2+ facilitates the protein motions that bring the hydride donor and acceptor together, but it does not change the tunneling ready state of the hydride transfer. These findings highlight how variations in cellular Mg2+ concentration can modulate enzyme activity through long-range interactions in the protein, rather than binding at the active site. The interaction of Mg2+ with the glutamyl-tail of the folate cofactor and nonconserved residues of bacterial TSase may assist in designing antifolates with poly-glutamyl substitutes as species-specific antibiotic drugs. PMID:23611499

  9. Coating thickness affects surface stress measurement of brush electro-plating nickel coating using Rayleigh wave approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Dong, Shiyun; Xu, Binshi; He, Peng

    2012-09-01

    A surface ultrasonic wave approach was presented for measuring surface stress of brush electro-plating nickel coating specimen, and the influence of coating thickness on surface stress measurement was discussed. In this research, two Rayleigh wave transducers with 5MHz frequency were employed to collect Rayleigh wave signals of coating specimen with different static tensile stresses and different coating thickness. The difference in time of flight between two Rayleigh wave signals was determined based on normalized cross correlation function. The influence of stress on propagation velocity of Rayleigh wave and the relationship between the difference in time of flight and tensile stress that corresponded to different coating thickness were discussed. Results indicate that inhomogeneous deformation of coating affects the relationship between the difference in time of flight and tensile stress, velocity of Rayleigh wave propagating in coating specimen increases with coating thickness increasing, and the variation rate reduces of difference in time of flight with tensile stress increasing as coating thickness increases. PMID:22534060

  10. Revised Filter Profiles and Zero Points for Broadband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew W.; von Braun, Kaspar

    2015-02-01

    Estimating accurate bolometric fluxes for stars requires reliable photometry to absolutely flux calibrate the spectra. This is a significant problem for studies of very bright stars, which are generally saturated in modern photometric surveys. Instead we must rely on photometry with less precise calibration. We utilize precisely flux-calibrated spectra to derive improved filter bandpasses and zero points for the most common sources of photometry for bright stars. In total, we test 39 different filters in the General Catalog of Photometric Data as well as those from Tycho-2 and Hipparcos. We show that utilizing inaccurate filter profiles from the literature can create significant color terms resulting in fluxes that deviate by gsim10% from actual values. To remedy this we employ an empirical approach; we iteratively adjust the literature filter profile and zero point, convolve it with catalog spectra, and compare to the corresponding flux from the photometry. We adopt the passband values that produce the best agreement between photometry and spectroscopy and are independent of stellar color. We find that while most zero points change by < 5%, a few systems change by 10-15%. Our final profiles and zero points are similar to recent estimates from the literature. Based on determinations of systematic errors in our selected spectroscopic libraries, we estimate that most of our improved zero points are accurate to 0.5-1%.

  11. Correlating Total Visual Magnitude Estimates and CCD Photometry for Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidger, Mark Richard

    2015-08-01

    A key facet of understanding the activity of comets is coverage of their light curve. For some comets such as 2P/Encke there is good light curve coverage from visual observers extending back over many returns over more than 2 centuries. However, in recent years, CCD photometry by amateur astronomers has become the dominant data source and the number of total visual magnitude estimates has reduced sharply, making comparison of recent and historical photometric data for comets increasingly difficult. The relationship between total visual magnitude estimates - dominated by the emission from the Swan bands of C2 - and CCD aperture photometry - dominated by the dust continuum - has been far from clear.This paper compares CCD aperture photometry and total visual magnitude for several recent well-observed bright comets, including C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) using a consistent and homogeneous database of observations from (mainly) Spanish observers. For comets with a 1/r radial coma profile, good agreement is found between CCD aperture photometry and total visual magnitude estimates for a CCD aperture corresponding to a physical coma diameter of ≈105km.The relationship between the coma radial brightness slope and the equivalent physical aperture for CCD photometry to obtain agreement with total visual magnitude estimates is investigated.

  12. HST photometry of the trapezium cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Stauffer, John R.; Hartmann, Lee; Soderblom, David R.; Jones, Burton F.; Werner, Michael W.; Mccaughrean, Mark J.

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained images of 11 fields in the Trapezium cluster with the Planetary Camera (PC) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in order to extend Herbig & Terndrup's (1986) study of this prototype, dense embedded cluster to fainter magnitudes than is possible from the ground. Using these images, we have identified 319 stars within an area of approximately 12 sq arc min corresponding roughly to a volume of approximately 0.065 cu pc assuming the cluster is approximately spherically symmetric. Our completeness limits for star identification in V-band and I-band images are V approximately = 20 and I(sub c) approximately = 19 respectively, corresponding to a mass limit of approximately 0.15 solar mass if the faintest stars have the same average A(sub v) as that estimated for the brighter stars in the cluster. We have compared the V versus V-I color-magnitude diagram derived from the HST photometry to new theoretical isochrones. Star formation in the Trapezium appears to be remarkably coeval, with greater than or = 80% of the stars having inferred ages less than 1 Myr. Over the somewhat limited mass range of the observations, there is no evidence for 'bimodal' star formation-the high- and low-mass stars appear to have the same ages. The sharp cores of the HST images and the small angular size of the PC pixels has allowed us to identify 35 new visual binaries in the cluster with separations from approximately 0.06 arc sec (approximately 26 AU) to approximately 1.0 arc sec (approximately 440 AU). For the range of binary separations that we are sensitive to, the observed binary frequency for the Trapezium is essentially identical to that estimated for field low-mass stars by Duquennoy & Mayor (1991). The most straightfoward inference from this result is that binaries in this separation are unlikely to be formed by a tidal capture process. We have also identified three stars which have associated compact nebulosity visible in the HST images. One of these star + nebulosity

  13. The Presence of VEGF Receptors on the Luminal Surface of Endothelial Cells Affects VEGF Distribution and VEGF Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Marianne O.; Wu, Florence T. H.; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent cytokine that binds to specific receptors on the endothelial cells lining blood vessels. The signaling cascade triggered eventually leads to the formation of new capillaries, a process called angiogenesis. Distributions of VEGF receptors and VEGF ligands are therefore crucial determinants of angiogenic events and, to our knowledge, no quantification of abluminal vs. luminal receptors has been performed. We formulate a molecular-based compartment model to investigate the VEGF distribution in blood and tissue in humans and show that such quantification would lead to new insights on angiogenesis and VEGF-dependent diseases. Our multiscale model includes two major isoforms of VEGF (VEGF121 and VEGF165), as well as their receptors (VEGFR1 and VEGFR2) and the non-signaling co-receptor neuropilin-1 (NRP1). VEGF can be transported between tissue and blood via transendothelial permeability and the lymphatics. VEGF receptors are located on both the luminal and abluminal sides of the endothelial cells. In this study, we analyze the effects of the VEGF receptor localization on the endothelial cells as well as of the lymphatic transport. We show that the VEGF distribution is affected by the luminal receptor density. We predict that the receptor signaling occurs mostly on the abluminal endothelial surface, assuming that VEGF is secreted by parenchymal cells. However, for a low abluminal but high luminal receptor density, VEGF binds predominantly to VEGFR1 on the abluminal surface and VEGFR2 on the luminal surface. Such findings would be pertinent to pathological conditions and therapies related to VEGF receptor imbalance and overexpression on the endothelial cells and will hopefully encourage experimental receptor quantification for both luminal and abluminal surfaces on endothelial cells. PMID:20041209

  14. Spatio-temporal patterns in land use and management affecting surface runoff response of agricultural catchments—A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiener, P.; Auerswald, K.; Van Oost, K.

    2011-05-01

    Surface runoff and associated erosion processes adversely affect soil and surface water quality. There is increasing evidence that a sound understanding of spatial-temporal dynamics of land use and management are crucial to understanding surface runoff processes and underpinning mitigation strategies. In this review, we synthesise the effects of (1) temporal patterns of land management of individual fields, and (2) spatio-temporal interaction of several fields within catchments by applying semivariance analysis, which allows the extent and range of the different patterns to be compared. Consistent effects of management on the temporal dynamics of surface runoff of individual fields can be identified, some of which have been incorporated into small-scale hydrological models. In contrast, the effects of patchiness, the spatial organisation of patches with different soil hydrological properties, and the effects of linear landscape structures are less well understood and are rarely incorporated in models. The main challenge for quantifying these effects arises from temporal changes within individual patches, where the largest contrasts usually occur in mid-summer and cause a seasonally varying effect of patchiness on the overall catchment response. Some studies indicate that increasing agricultural patchiness, due to decreasing field sizes, reduces the catchment-scale response to rainfall, especially in cases of Hortonian runoff. Linear structures associated with patchiness of fields (e.g. field borders, ditches, and ephemeral gullies) may either increase or decrease the hydraulic connectivity within a catchment. The largest gap in research relates to the effects and temporal variation of patch interaction, the influence of the spatial organisation of patches and the interaction with linear structures. In view of the substantial changes in the structure of agricultural landscapes occurring throughout the world, it is necessary to improve our knowledge of the influence

  15. Division B Commission 25: Astronomical Photometry and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Alistair; Adelman, Saul; Milone, Eugene; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Bastien, Pierre; Chen, Wen Ping; Howell, Steve; Knude, Jens; Kurtz, Donald; Magalhães, Antonio Mario; Menzies, John; Smith, Allyn; Volk, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Commission 25 (C25) deals with the techniques and issues involved with the measurement of optical and infrared radiation intensities and polarization from astronomical sources. As such, in recent years attention has focused on photometric standard stars, atmospheric extinction, photometric passbands, transformation between systems, nomenclature, and observing and reduction techniques. At the start of the trimester C25 changed its name from Stellar Photometry and Polarization to Astronomical Photometry and Polarization so as to explicitly include in its mandate particular issues arising from the measurement of resolved sources, given the importance of photometric redshifts of distant galaxies for many of the large photometric surveys now underway. We begin by summarizing commission activities over the 2012-2014 period, follow with a report on Polarimetry, continue with Photometry topics that have been of interest to C25 members, and conclude with a Vision for the Future.

  16. CCD Photometry of bright stars using objective wire mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiński, Krzysztof; Zgórz, Marika; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, Aleksander

    2014-06-01

    Obtaining accurate photometry of bright stars from the ground remains problematic due to the danger of overexposing the target and/or the lack of suitable nearby comparison stars. The century-old method of using objective wire mesh to produce multiple stellar images seems promising for the precise CCD photometry of such stars. Furthermore, our tests on β Cep and its comparison star, differing by 5 mag, are very encouraging. Using a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope with the objective covered by a plastic wire mesh, in poor weather conditions, we obtained differential photometry with a precision of 4.5 mmag per two minute exposure. Our technique is flexible and may be tuned to cover a range as big as 6-8 mag. We discuss the possibility of installing a wire mesh directly in the filter wheel.

  17. CCD Photometry of Bright Stars Using Objective Wire Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Krzysztof; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, Aleksander; Zgórz, Marika

    2014-06-01

    Obtaining accurate photometry of bright stars from the ground remains problematic due to the danger of overexposing the target and/or the lack of suitable nearby comparison stars. The century-old method of using objective wire mesh to produce multiple stellar images seems promising for the precise CCD photometry of such stars. Furthermore, our tests on β Cep and its comparison star, differing by 5 mag, are very encouraging. Using a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope with the objective covered by a plastic wire mesh, in poor weather conditions, we obtained differential photometry with a precision of 4.5 mmag per two minute exposure. Our technique is flexible and may be tuned to cover a range as big as 6-8 mag. We discuss the possibility of installing a wire mesh directly in the filter wheel.

  18. The Founders of the XXth Century Stellar Photometry in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustylnik, I.; Mironov, A.

    Our contribution is dedicated to two ``godfathers'' of astrophotometry in Russia - Vitold Karlovich Ceraski (1849-1925) and Vladimir Borisovich Nikonov (1905-1987). We discuss their scientific legacy and its impact upon the formation of the school of stellar photometry in Russia and the USSR. The graduate of Moscow University in 1871 V. Ceraski started his scientific career in the University astronomical observatory. Already at the dawn of XXth century he was universally regarded as an indisputable authority in Russian astrophotometry. Ceraski introduced essential improvements into the K.-F. Zöllner's visual polarimetric photometer. With its aid he measured in 1903-1905 the stellar magnitude of the Sun with an accuracy close to its modern value (within a 5 % margin) by carefully comparing the brightness of Venus with that of the speck of the solar light reflected from the convex glass surface (during the day) and by comparing the brightness of Venus with that of the brightest stars (in the night). V. Nikonov, the graduate of Leningrad University, in 1925 embarked upon scientific investigations in the local Astronomical Institute. During these years the 13 inch reflector has been installed by Leningrad astronomers at the mountain Kanobili (Abastumani observatory, Georgia). In 1937 Nikonov constructed the first in the USSR photoelectric photometer. Experiments with it indicated that the attainable precision for 4.5m stars amounted to 0.003m. It was obvious for Nikonov that with such a precision one should exercise extreme care in reduction of stellar magnitudes beyond the earth's upper atmosphere. In 1944 he elaborated a method to account for atmospheric extinction which is now universally known as Nikonov's method. Its underlying idea lies in the observations of all non-variable stars available in the program for different air masses.

  19. Inverse problems of NEO photometry: Imaging the NEO population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen1, Mikko; Durech, Josef

    2007-05-01

    Photometry is the main source of information on NEOs (and other asteroids) en masse. Surveys such as Pan-STARRS and LSST will produce colossal photometric databases that can readily be used for mapping the physical characteristics of the whole asteroid population. These datasets are efficiently enriched by any additional dense photometric or other observations. Due to their quickly changing geometries with respect to the Earth, NEOs are the subpopulation that can be mapped the fastest. I review the state of the art in the construction of physical asteroid models from sparse and/or dense photometric data (that can also be combined with other data modes). The models describe the shapes, spin states, scattering properties and surface structure of the targets, and are the solutions of inverse problems necessarily involving comprehensive mathematical analysis. I sum up what we can and cannot get from photometric data, and how all this is done in practice. I also discuss the new freely available software package for solving photometric inverse problems (soon to be released). The analysis of photometric datasets will very soon become an automated industry, resulting in tens of thousands of asteroid models, a large portion of them NEOs. The computational effort in this is considerable in both computer and human time, which means that a large portion of the targets is likely to be analyzed only once. This, again, means that we have to have a good understanding of the reliability of our models, and this is impossible without a thorough understanding of the mathematical nature of the inverse problem(s) involved. Very important concepts are the uniqueness and stability of the solution, the parameter spaces, the so-called inverse crimes in simulations and error prediction, and the domination of systematic errors over random ones.

  20. BATC 15 Band Photometry of the Open Cluster NGC 188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiaxin; Ma, Jun; Wu, Zhenyu; Wang, Song; Zhou, Xu

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents CCD multicolor photometry for the old open cluster NGC 188. The observations were carried out as part of the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut Multicolor Sky Survey from 1995 February to 2008 March, using 15 intermediate-band filters covering 3000-10000 Å. By fitting the Padova theoretical isochrones to our data, the fundamental parameters of this cluster are derived: an age of t=7.5+/- 0.5 Gyr, a distance modulus of {(m-M)}0=11.17+/- 0.08, and a reddening of E(B-V)=0.036+/- 0.010. The radial surface density profile of NGC 188 is obtained using the star count. By fitting the King model, the structural parameters of NGC 188 are derived: a core radius of {R}c=3\\buildrel{ \\prime}\\over{.} 80, a tidal radius of {R}t=44\\buildrel{ \\prime}\\over{.} 78, and a concentration parameter of {C}0={log}({R}t/{R}c)=1.07. Fitting the mass function (MF) to a power-law function φ (m)\\propto {m}α , the slopes of the MFs for different spatial regions are derived. We find that NGC 188 presents a slope break in the MF. The break mass is {m}{break}=0.885 {M}⊙ . In the mass range above {m}{break}, the slope of the overall region is α =-0.76. The slope of the core region is α =1.09, and the slopes of the external regions are α =-0.86 and α =-2.15, respectively. In the mass range below {m}{break}, these slopes are α =0.12, α =4.91, α =1.33, and α =-1.09, respectively. The mass segregation in NGC 188 is reflected in the obvious variation of the slopes in different spatial regions of this cluster.

  1. The post-translational modification of the Clostridium difficile flagellin affects motility, cell surface properties and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Twine, Susan M; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Strong, Philippa C R; Dell, Anne; Buckley, Anthony M; Douce, Gillian R; Valiente, Esmeralda; Logan, Susan M; Wren, Brendan W

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a prominent nosocomial pathogen, proliferating and causing enteric disease in individuals with a compromised gut microflora. We characterized the post-translational modification of flagellin in C. difficile 630. The structure of the modification was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to contain an N-acetylglucosamine substituted with a phosphorylated N-methyl-l-threonine. A reverse genetics approach investigated the function of the putative four-gene modification locus. All mutants were found to have truncated glycan structures by LC-MS/MS, taking into account bioinformatic analysis, we propose that the open reading frame CD0241 encodes a kinase involved in the transfer of the phosphate to the threonine, the CD0242 protein catalyses the addition of the phosphothreonine to the N-acetylglucosamine moiety and CD0243 transfers the methyl group to the threonine. Some mutations affected motility and caused cells to aggregate to each other and abiotic surfaces. Altering the structure of the flagellin modification impacted on colonization and disease recurrence in a murine model of infection, showing that alterations in the surface architecture of C. difficile vegetative cells can play a significant role in disease. We show that motility is not a requirement for colonization, but that colonization was compromised when the glycan structure was incomplete. PMID:25135277

  2. Cell-surface serglycin promotes adhesion of myeloma cells to collagen type I and affects the expression of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Skliris, Antonis; Labropoulou, Vassiliki T; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Aletras, Alexios; Karamanos, Nikos K; Theocharis, Achilleas D

    2013-05-01

    Serglycin (SG) is mainly expressed by hematopoetic cells as an intracellular proteoglycan. Multiple myeloma cells constitutively secrete SG, which is also localized on the cell surface in some cell lines. In this study, SG isolated from myeloma cells was found to interact with collagen type I (Col I), which is a major bone matrix component. Notably, myeloma cells positive for cell-surface SG (csSG) adhered significantly to Col I, compared to cells lacking csSG. Removal of csSG by treatment of the cells with chondroitinase ABC or blocking of csSG by an SG-specific polyclonal antibody significantly reduced the adhesion of myeloma cells to Col I. Significant up-regulation of expression of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels was observed when culturing csSG-positive myeloma cells on Col I-coated dishes or in the presence of soluble Col I. MMP-9 and MMP-2 were also expressed in increased amounts by myeloma cells in the bone marrow of patients with multiple myeloma. Our data indicate that csSG of myeloma cells affects key functional properties, such as adhesion to Col I and the expression of MMPs, and imply that csSG may serve as a potential prognostic factor and/or target for pharmacological interventions in multiple myeloma. PMID:23387827

  3. A Study of Dust Cloud Parameters by Vilnius Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smriglio, F.; Dasgupta, A. K.; Boyle, R. P.

    Three-dimensional classification of stars based on their seven-color CCD photometry in the Vilnius system has been succesfully applied to study the small scale structure of interstellar dust clouds. In the present paper the statistical equations of Munch are modified and applied to stars located beyond the galactic absorbing layer. This particular use of Munch's statistics and the properties of CCD photometry in the Vilnius system offer a better possibility of probing the small scale structure of interstellar medium outside of the solar vicinity. This new technique and the first results are discussed.

  4. The spotted contact binary SS ARIETIS - Spectroscopy and infrared photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainger, P. P.; Bell, S. A.; Hilditch, R. W.

    1992-02-01

    The first infrared photometry for the W-UMa system SS Ari is presented. An analysis based on medium-resolution spectroscopy presented here shows that SS Ari is a W-type system with a mass ratio of 0.33. It seems certain that the asymmetry in the published light curves and those obtained for this study can be explained by the effect of spots on one or possibly both components of the system. The precise location, size and temperature of these spots require the use of Doppler Imaging techniques in conjunction with high-quality multiband photometry.

  5. A method for determining stellar parameters from multicolor photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskij, S. G.

    2012-09-01

    Amethod for determining the most probable spectral types, color excesses E B- V , and distances of stars from multicolor photometry is described. The main idea of the method is modeling the photometric data using various models for the stellar spectra and the interstellar extinction law, and applying the maximum likelihood method. The reliability of the method is estimated using stars with known spectral types and WBVR photometry, based on the empirical library of stellar spectra of Pickles and the model for the interstellar extinction law developed by Fluks et al.

  6. Infrared space observatory photometry of circumstellar dust in Vega-type systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, S. B.; Stencel, R. E.; Backman, D. E.; Thakur, N.

    1998-01-01

    The ISOPHOT (Infrared Space Observatory Photometry) instrument onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was used to obtain 3.6-90 micron photometry of Vega-type systems. Photometric data were calibrated with the ISOPHOT fine calibration source 1 (FCS1). Linear regression was used to derive transformations to make comparisons to ground-based and IRAS photometry systems possible. These transformations were applied to the photometry of 14 main-sequence stars. Details of these results are reported on.

  7. Photometry of Faint and Wide Doubles in Vulpecula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Thuemen, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Images of several double stars in Vulpecula published on the "Double Star Imaging Project" Yahoo Group page suggest magnitude issues compared with the corresponding WDS catalog data per April 2015. Taking additional images with V-filter enabled photometry for these pairs, providing confirming results.

  8. Photometry of Faint and Wide Doubles in Sagitta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Thuemen, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Images of several double stars in Sagitta published on the "Double Star Imaging Project" Yahoo Group page suggest magnitude issues compared with the corresponding WDS catalog data per April 2015. Taking additional images with V-filter enabled photometry for these pairs, provided confirming results.

  9. Photometry and Measurement of Faint and Wide Doubles in Eridanus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Thuemen, Chris

    2015-07-01

    Images of several double stars in Eridanus published on the "Double Star Imaging Project" Yahoo Group page suggest magnitude issues compared with the corresponding WDS catalog data per 2014.12. Taking additional images with V-filter enabled photometry for these pairs with confirming results.

  10. Multiband photometry of PSNJ14102342-4318437 with OAUNI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, A.; Cori, W.; Ricra, J.; Zevallos, M.; Tello, J.

    2016-01-01

    We report multiband photometry of Type Ib SN PSNJ14102342-4318437 (ATel #8415, ATel #8434, ATel #8437, ATel #8504) on 2016-01-10 (UT) gathered with the OAUNI 51cm telescope (Pereyra et al. 2015; arXiv:1512.03104) at Huancayo Observatory, Peru.

  11. Characterization of Transiting Exoplanets by Way of Differential Photometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Michael; Hughes, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a simple activity for plotting and characterizing the light curve from an exoplanet transit event by way of differential photometry analysis. Using free digital imaging software, participants analyse a series of telescope images with the goal of calculating various exoplanet parameters, including size, orbital radius and…

  12. Photoelectric photometry of J V. [Jupiter satellite Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    UBV photometry of J V (Amalthea) near greatest western elongation shows this satellite to be about one magnitude fainter than previously believed. It is observed to be very red, having a B-V color index near + 1.5 mag. Unlike the Galilean satellites, J V appears to be a low-albedo object.

  13. Research Note - Absolute UBV Photometry at the Zacatecas Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, W. J.; Parrao, L.; Gonazlez-Bedolla, S. F.; Rios-Herrera, M.; Berumen, M. R.

    1985-12-01

    Atmospheric extinction data, color coefficients, errors of observation and a list of standard and comparison stars are given for UB V photometry at the Astronomical Observatory in Zacatecas. Our observing and reduction procedures are discussed briefly, and our extinction coefficients and observing errors compared with previous values. The uses of these results are mentioned.

  14. JCMT COADD: UKT14 continuum and photometry data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David; Oliveira, Firmin J.; Tilanus, Remo P. J.; Jenness, Tim

    2014-11-01

    COADD was used to reduce photometry and continuum data from the UKT14 instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in the 1990s. The software can co-add multiple observations and perform sigma clipping and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical analysis. Additional information on the software is available in the JCMT Spring 1993 newsletter (large PDF).

  15. Iontophoresis and Flame Photometry: A Hybrid Interdisciplinary Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Duncan; Cottam, Linzi; Bradley, Sarah; Brannigan, Jeanie; Davis, James

    2010-01-01

    The combination of reverse iontophoresis and flame photometry provides an engaging analytical experiment that gives first-year undergraduate students a flavor of modern drug delivery and analyte extraction techniques while reinforcing core analytical concepts. The experiment provides a highly visual demonstration of the iontophoresis technique and…

  16. BVRI Photometry of the Supernova Candidate Gaia16ath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, J.; Feher, T.; Gyurita, A.; Redli, M.; Sukolova, D.

    2016-07-01

    We report confirmation and photometry of the recently discovered Gaia Science Alerts transient Gaia16ath. CCD frames were taken with the 60/90 cm Schmidt telescope through Bessell B,V,R,I filters at Konkoly Observatory, Piszkesteto, Hungary on July 11.01 UT. The transient was detected with high significance (S/N > 20) in all bands.

  17. Photoelectric UBV-photometry of triple-star components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosova, Zh. P.; Sudakov, S. V.

    Photoelectric UBV photometry has been obtained for components of 30 bright and nearby (V ⪉ 10m, r ⪉ 100 pc) triple stars for purposes of finding physically linked triple systems, their distances and the subsequent investigation of their dynamical evolution. For every component colour excesses EB-V and EU-B are determined and photometric parallaxes πph are calculated.

  18. Uranium in Surface Waters and Sediments Affected by Historical Mining in the Denver West 1:100,000 Quadrangle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, Robert A.; Otton, James K.; Schumann, R. Randall; Wirt, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical sampling of 82 stream waters and 87 stream sediments within mountainous areas immediately west of Denver, Colorado, was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in October 1994. The primary purpose was to evaluate regionally the effects of geology and past mining on the concentration and distribution of uranium. The study area contains uranium- and thorium-rich bedrock, numerous noneconomic occurrences of uranium minerals, and several uranium deposits of variable size and production history. During the sampling period, local streams had low discharge and were more susceptible to uranium-bearing acid drainage originating from historical mines of base- and precious-metal sulfides. Results indicated that the spatial distribution of Precambrian granites and metamorphic rocks strongly influences the concentration of uranium in stream sediments. Within-stream transport increases the dispersion of uranium- and thorium rich mineral grains derived primarily from granitic source rocks. Dissolved uranium occurs predominantly as uranyl carbonate complexes, and concentrations ranged from less than 1 to 65 micrograms per liter. Most values were less than 5 micrograms per liter, which is less than the current drinking water standard of 30 micrograms per liter and much less than locally applied aquatic-life toxicity standards of several hundred micrograms per liter. In local streams that are affected by uranium-bearing acid mine drainage, dissolved uranium is moderated by dilution and sorptive uptake by stream sediments. Sorbents include mineral alteration products and chemical precipitates of iron- and aluminum-oxyhydroxides, which form where acid drainage enters streams and is neutralized. Suspended uranium is relatively abundant in some stream segments affected by nearby acid drainage, which likely represents mobilization of these chemical precipitates. The 234U/238U activity ratio of acid drainage (0.95-1.0) is distinct from that of local surface waters (more than 1

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BR photometry of galaxies in low density regions (Vennik+, 1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennik, J.; Hopp, U.; Kovachev, B.; Kuhn, B.; Elsaesser, H.

    1996-03-01

    We perform detailed surface photometry, based on B- and/or R-band CCD images of 92 faint galaxies. They are a subsample of those galaxies which were studied by Hopp et al. (1994) in the direction of three nearby voids. We derive integral photometric parameters and radial surface brightness profiles and compare them to those of several faint galaxy samples, located in different environments, and of a bright field galaxy sample. According to the obtained photometric characteristics, our sample is a mixture of intrinsically bright and faint galaxies, about 60% of them belonging to the bright subsample (MB<-19.0). These bright ones show mean characteristics of typical Freeman's disks and are mainly located in the background of the observed voids. The faint subsample (MB>=-19.0) has parameters typical for the low-surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies. There are a few well isolated galaxies both among the bright and faint subsamples. (4 data files).

  20. New Horizons disk-integrated approach photometry of Pluto and Charon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangari, Amanda M.; Buie, Marc W.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Howett, C. J. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Young, Leslie A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    Approach and cruise observations of Pluto and Charon by NASA's New Horizons LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager ("LORRI") allow monitoring of Pluto not only at phase angles beyond Earth's 2 degree limit, but present a near constant sub-observer latitude of 43 degrees. However, the creation of light curves and solar phase curves of the pair prove to be an interesting challenge. Early images of the pair from July 2013 are barely resolved and have low signal, while later images show the pair clearly resolved and at sufficient resolution. Just at the Pluto approaches the signal level and image quality of prior HST images, surface features become resolved, rendering disk integrated photometry increasingly difficult and inaccurate, with the largest discrepancies found at longitudes which show the intersection of features informally named Tombaugh Regio ("the heart") and Cthulhu Macula ("the whale"). Now, post flyby, accurate knowledge of the radius and the shapes of surface features and their patterns of dark and light, allow for the creation of custom PSFs created from flyby maps. Using these maps, we present disk-integrated approach photometry, a solar phase curve and estimate Hapke parameters, taking into account the sub-observer position.This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons Project.

  1. A genome-wide search for quantitative trait loci affecting the cortical surface area and thickness of Heschl's gyrus.

    PubMed

    Cai, D-C; Fonteijn, H; Guadalupe, T; Zwiers, M; Wittfeld, K; Teumer, A; Hoogman, M; Arias-Vásquez, A; Yang, Y; Buitelaar, J; Fernández, G; Brunner, H G; van Bokhoven, H; Franke, B; Hegenscheid, K; Homuth, G; Fisher, S E; Grabe, H J; Francks, C; Hagoort, P

    2014-09-01

    Heschl's gyrus (HG) is a core region of the auditory cortex whose morphology is highly variable across individuals. This variability has been linked to sound perception ability in both speech and music domains. Previous studies show that variations in morphological features of HG, such as cortical surface area and thickness, are heritable. To identify genetic variants that affect HG morphology, we conducted a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) meta-analysis in 3054 healthy individuals using HG surface area and thickness as quantitative traits. None of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showed association P values that would survive correction for multiple testing over the genome. The most significant association was found between right HG area and SNP rs72932726 close to gene DCBLD2 (3q12.1; P=2.77 × 10(-7) ). This SNP was also associated with other regions involved in speech processing. The SNP rs333332 within gene KALRN (3q21.2; P=2.27 × 10(-6) ) and rs143000161 near gene COBLL1 (2q24.3; P=2.40 × 10(-6) ) were associated with the area and thickness of left HG, respectively. Both genes are involved in the development of the nervous system. The SNP rs7062395 close to the X-linked deafness gene POU3F4 was associated with right HG thickness (Xq21.1; P=2.38 × 10(-6) ). This is the first molecular genetic analysis of variability in HG morphology. PMID:25130324

  2. How Does the Gibbs Inequality Condition Affect the Stability and Detachment of Floating Spheres from the Free Surface of Water?

    PubMed

    Feng, Dong-Xia; Nguyen, Anh V

    2016-03-01

    Floating objects on the air-water interfaces are central to a number of everyday activities, from walking on water by insects to flotation separation of valuable minerals using air bubbles. The available theories show that a fine sphere can float if the force of surface tension and buoyancies can support the sphere at the interface with an apical angle subtended by the circle of contact being larger than the contact angle. Here we show that the pinning of the contact line at the sharp edge, known as the Gibbs inequality condition, also plays a significant role in controlling the stability and detachment of floating spheres. Specifically, we truncated the spheres with different angles and used a force sensor device to measure the force of pushing the truncated spheres from the interface into water. We also developed a theoretical modeling to calculate the pushing force that in combination with experimental results shows different effects of the Gibbs inequality condition on the stability and detachment of the spheres from the water surface. For small angles of truncation, the Gibbs inequality condition does not affect the sphere detachment, and hence the classical theories on the floatability of spheres are valid. For large truncated angles, the Gibbs inequality condition determines the tenacity of the particle-meniscus contact and the stability and detachment of floating spheres. In this case, the classical theories on the floatability of spheres are no longer valid. A critical truncated angle for the transition from the classical to the Gibbs inequality regimes of detachment was also established. The outcomes of this research advance our understanding of the behavior of floating objects, in particular, the flotation separation of valuable minerals, which often contain various sharp edges of their crystal faces. PMID:26837262

  3. International Studies of Hazardous Groundwater/Surface Water Exchange in the Volcanic Eruption and Tsunami Affected Areas of Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Y. A.; Gusiakov, V. K.; Izbekov, P. E.; Gordeev, E.; Titov, V. V.; Verstraeten, I. M.; Pinegina, T. K.; Tsadikovsky, E. I.; Heilweil, V. M.; Gingerich, S. B.

    2012-12-01

    During the US-Russia Geohazards Workshop held July 17-19, 2012 in Moscow, Russia the international research effort was asked to identify cooperative actions for disaster risk reduction, focusing on extreme geophysical events. As a part of this recommendation the PIRE project was developed to understand, quantify, forecast and protect the coastal zone aquifers and inland water resources of Kamchatka (Russia) and its ecosystems affected by the November 4, 1952 Kamchatka tsunami (Khalatyrka Beach near Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy) and the January 2, 1996 Karymskiy volcano eruption and the lake tsunami. This project brings together teams from U.S. universities and research institutions located in Russia. The research consortium was briefed on recent technical developments and will utilize samples secured via major international volcanic and tsunami programs for the purpose of advancing the study of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) in the volcanic eruption and tsunami affected coastal areas and inland lakes of Kamchatka. We plan to accomplish this project by developing and applying the next generation of field sampling, remote sensing, laboratory techniques and mathematical tools to study groundwater-surface water interaction processes and SGD. We will develop a field and modeling approach to define SGD environment, key controls, and influence of volcano eruption and tsunami, which will provide a framework for making recommendations to combat contamination. This is valuable for politicians, water resource managers and decision-makers and for the volcano eruption and tsunami affected region water supply and water quality of Kamchatka. Data mining and results of our field work will be compiled for spatial modeling by Geo-Information System (GIS) using 3-D Earth Systems Visualization Lab. The field and model results will be communicated to interested stakeholders via an interactive web site. This will allow computation of SGD spatial patterns. In addition, thanks to the

  4. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover.

    PubMed

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca(2+)-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  5. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover

    PubMed Central

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca2+-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  6. Analysis of the DE CVn Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbin, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    The spottedness of the secondary component of a precataclysmic binary DE CVn has been investigated using the photometric data. A simultaneous analysis of the V and Rc light curves was carried out to map the stellar surface. Two different approaches were used for the starspot mapping. The first one is based on the approximation of the spottedness with circular spots. The idea of the second approach consists in partitioning the stellar surface into a grid of small areas. Over this grid a search for the continuous temperature distribution is carried out by the Tikhonov regularization algorithm.

  7. Lunar Photometry and Composition of Ejecta Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V. V.; Pugacheva, S. G.; Pinet, P.; Chevrel, S.; Daydou, Y.

    One scientific goal of the AMIE experiment to fly onboard the SMART-1 mission is to investigate, at low polar orbit, the South Pole regions of the Moon. The AMIE camera will observe the surface in nadir direction within a large phase angle interval, thus providing photometric investigation of selected regions, in particular the South Pole- Aitken basin. The view is taken here that information retrieved from the local surface photometric behaviour of the Moon could be used for guiding the remote sensing anal- yses of specific geological targets. In a preliminary investigation, we have compared the Lunar Prospector thorium contents for some regions of the lunar near side with surface roughness estimated by means of the local photometric function. The aver- age structure of the lunar surface consists in a porous upper layer with various small fragments. Reflecting properties of this layer gives the uniform shape of photometric function. The average integrated lunar indicatrix was used as a background photomet- ric model. Taken as a reference, it permits to intercompare in a uniform system the shape of the phase function of different areas located at different longitude and lati- tude on the Moon. If the observed surface is represented by significant fields of ejecta materials, with many fragments of rocks, a shadow-hiding mechanism is involved, showing up at low phase angles. Thus, the fast decrease of the brightness in the phase function curve should reveal the presence of fragments on the surface. The Saari and Shorthill catalog data were used as observed phase functions. Both kinds of photo- metric functions were converted to symmetric form. Then, the difference between the modeled and observed phase functions for phase angle about 18 degree was used as a photometric parameter of the surface roughness. In the areas under study, this pa- rameter (which can vary between 0 and 1) varies from 0.05 (smooth mare surface) to 0.25 (crater Tycho and its ejecta

  8. Crowded Field Photometry in the CLASH Clusters: Measuring the Red Sequence of Cluster Galaxies with Robust Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John; Kelson, Daniel; Coe, Dan A.; Postman, Marc; CLASH Team

    2016-01-01

    The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) is an HST multi-cycle treasury program investigating 25 massive clusters of galaxies with X-ray gas Tx > 5 keV, spanning ~5 to ~30 x 10^14 solar masses, and a redshift range of 0.15 < z < 0.9. With 500 orbits of HST time and 16-filter, ultraviolet to infrared photometry of each cluster, this survey offers an unprecedented dataset for cluster galaxy photometry across a span of age and mass, but obtaining robust photometry for the cluster members has been hampered by the crowded field. We have developed a new technique to detect and define objects despite the presence of overlapping light profiles and to measure photometry of galaxies overlapping the extended haloes of massive galaxies. Utilizing spectral energy distribution fitting, we infer the properties of the detected galaxies, including their abundances and the time since their first star formation. Here we will discuss our technique and results, including the role metallicity and age play in shaping the red sequence of cluster galaxies.

  9. Stability of the ACS CCD: geometry, flat fielding, photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido

    2002-07-01

    A moderately crowded stellar field, located 6' West of the centre of the cluster 47 Tuc, is observed repeatedly {every three weeks with the WFC, every other month with the HRC} in various filters, spending 1 orbit per epoch. Different filters will be used every time, so that over the course of the year all filters will have been employed at least twice. The most common filters will be checked more frequently. The same field has been observed in the course of the SMOV phase and the positions and magnitudes of the most prominent stars have been accurately measured. Although the field is neither a proper astrometric nor a proper photometric standard one, the positions and magnitudes of the objects in it can be used to monitor any local and large scale variations in the platescale and sensitivity of the detectors. It should be noted that for the filters which have already been used during the SMOV phase it will be sufficient to take one single image, without CR-SPLIT, since the exposure time is always short {20-30 sec} and there will be so many stars that the few of them which are affected by cosmic rays can be discarded as outliers in the photometry. For narrow and medium band filters not exercised on this target in the SMOV phase, however, a baseline will have to be set. This expenditure of time will apply to the current cycle only. At variance with the approach used in SMOV, there is no need for large telescope slews to place the same objects on opposite sides of the detectors, thence allowing the programme to remain compact and efficient. All exposure level parameters are set to their default values, except for the amplifier gain of the WFC exposures in the F606W band, which will be collected with the gain value of 2 for the WFC for compatibility with the SMOV observations. The exposure time is typically 30 seconds for the WFC, 60 sec for the HRC. No attempt will be made to attain a predefined or the same orientation on the sky amongst different epochs. Typically

  10. Use of single-representative reverse-engineered surface-models for RSA does not affect measurement accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Seehaus, Frank; Schwarze, Michael; Flörkemeier, Thilo; von Lewinski, Gabriela; Kaptein, Bart L; Jakubowitz, Eike; Hurschler, Christof

    2016-05-01

    Implant migration can be accurately quantified by model-based Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA), using an implant surface model to locate the implant relative to the bone. In a clinical situation, a single reverse engineering (RE) model for each implant type and size is used. It is unclear to what extent the accuracy and precision of migration measurement is affected by implant manufacturing variability unaccounted for by a single representative model. Individual RE models were generated for five short-stem hip implants of the same type and size. Two phantom analyses and one clinical analysis were performed: "Accuracy-matched models": one stem was assessed, and the results from the original RE model were compared with randomly selected models. "Accuracy-random model": each of the five stems was assessed and analyzed using one randomly selected RE model. "Precision-clinical setting": implant migration was calculated for eight patients, and all five available RE models were applied to each case. For the two phantom experiments, the 95%CI of the bias ranged from -0.28 mm to 0.30 mm for translation and -2.3° to 2.5° for rotation. In the clinical setting, precision is less than 0.5 mm and 1.2° for translation and rotation, respectively, except for rotations about the proximodistal axis (<4.1°). High accuracy and precision of model-based RSA can be achieved and are not biased by using a single representative RE model. At least for implants similar in shape to the investigated short-stem, individual models are not necessary. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:903-910, 2016. PMID:26553748

  11. HIGH-PRECISION PHOTOMETRY OF EXTREME KBO 2003 EL{sub 61}

    SciTech Connect

    Lacerda, Pedro; Jewitt, David; Peixinho, Nuno

    2008-05-15

    We present high-precision, time-resolved, visible and near-infrared photometry of the large (diameter {approx} 2500 km) Kuiper belt object (136108) 2003 EL{sub 61}. The new data confirm rapid rotation at period P = 3.9155 {+-} 0.0001 h with a peak-to-peak photometric range of {delta}m{sub R} = 0.29 {+-} 0.02 mag and further show subtle but reproducible color variations with rotation. Rotational deformation of 2003 EL{sub 61} alone would give rise to a symmetric light curve free of color variations. The observed photometric deviations from the best-fit equilibrium model show the existence of a large surface region with an albedo and color different from the mean surface of 2003 EL{sub 61}. We explore constraints on the nature of this anomalous region set by the existing data.

  12. Photometry of the post-common-envelope binary PG 0308+096

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, M. W.; Lockley, J. J.; Naylor, T.; Wood, Janet H.

    1996-06-01

    We present R- and H-band photometry of PG 0308+096. We demonstrate that the orbital modulation is consistent with that of a dwarf M star heated by a DA white dwarf within the constraints given by the kinematic parameters. By fitting the photometry with an irradiation model we determine that the radius of the white dwarf is 0.019<=R_wd<=0.026 R_ (90 per cent confidence). In order to derive these limits, we have developed a fitting procedure that takes account of the external constraints derived from the spectroscopic analysis by Saffer et al. We determine that the period of the system is 0.286654+/-0.00000078d, which is one of the cycle count aliases considered by Saffer et al. We show that the Hα emission from the surface of the red star can be modelled as either optically thick or thin, but in the latter case the red dwarf must have intrinsic emission.

  13. CCD photometry of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Gibson, James; Mosher, Joel A.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband V and R CCD observations of the Uranian satellite system have been obtained over the full range of solar phase angles observable from earth. These first visual observations of the phase curves of Miranda, Ariel, and Umbriel show that Ariel and Miranda exhibit the large opposition surges previously seen on the two outer Uranian Satellites. Umbriel, however, lacks an appreciable opposition surge; its surface is either extremely compact or consists of small particles which lack a backscattered component. The tenuous structure of the other satellites is most likely due to the effects of eons of meteoritic gardening.

  14. THE SIZE AND SURFACE COATING OF NANOSILVER DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTS BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY IN BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER (RBEC4) CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linking the physical properties of nanoparticles with differences in their biological activity is critical for understanding their potential toxicity and mode of action. The influence of aggregate size, surface coating, and surface charge on nanosilver's (nanoAg) movement through...

  15. RASNZ Photometry Section, Incorporating the Auckland Photoelectric Observers' Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) This review traces the development of amateur photoelectric and CCD photometry in New Zealand from its beginnings in the late 1960s at Christchurch and Auckland, through the Auckland Photoelectric Observers' Group and the RASNZ Photometry Section to its present place in Variable Stars South. For this period of over forty years the participants have been heavily involved with southern hemisphere variable star astronomy and observatories such as Carter, Mt. John, and Auckland, together with which were sponsored the highly successful photoelectric conferences, PEP 1-5. Samples of various projects are shown and described. The full text can be seen at http://www.variablestarssouth.org/index.php/community/member-publications/posters

  16. J, H, K photometry of 433 Eros and other asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Morrison, D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for IR photometry of nine bright asteroids, including 433 Eros, which was conducted in the J, H, K, and (for Eros) L bands with an InSb photometer on the 1.3-m Kitt Peak telescope. It is found that the J-H and H-K color indices of all nine asteroids are slightly redder than those of the sun and that three C-type objects are somewhat redder in the same color indices than four S-types and an E-type. Eros is shown to have an unusually red J-K index; the shape of its IR spectral reflectance curve is attributed in part to the presence of the weak 2-micron pyroxene absorption band in the spectrum. The results show that JHK photometry is less diagnostic of asteroidal composition than higher-resolution IR spectrophotometry.

  17. Copernicus spectra and infrared photometry of 42 Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.; Snow, T. P., Jr.; Gehrz, R. D.; Hackwell, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The Orion sword star 42 Ori is embedded in a nebula north of and separated from the Orion nebula. The B1 V star is probably normal. Other members of the multiple remain poorly defined, and the nebula may exhibit some peculiarities that may depend on them. Copernicus ultraviolet spectra of the star are described here, especially in the form of tables of wavelength identifications. The properties of the interstellar material in the line of sight are also discussed. Infrared photometry is presented which suggests that the ratio of total to selective extinction ranges from 3 to 3.5 for the interstellar matter in the direction of 42 Ori. The IR photometry provides no evidence for companion stellar or circumstellar components.

  18. An Aperture Photometry Pipeline for K2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzasi, Derek L.; Carboneau, Lindsey; Lezcano, Andy; Vydra, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    As part of an ongoing research program with undergraduate students at Florida Gulf Coast University, we have constructed an aperture photometry pipeline for K2 data. The pipeline performs dynamic automated aperture mask definition for all targets in the K2 fields, followed by aperture photometry and detrending. Our pipeline is currently used to support a number of projects, including studies of stellar rotation and activity, red giant asteroseismology, gyrochronology, and exoplanet searches. In addition, output is used to support an undergraduate class on exoplanets aimed at a student audience of both majors and non-majors. The pipeline is designed for both batch and single-target use, and is easily extensible to data from other missions, and pipeline output is available to the community. This paper will describe our pipeline and its capabilities and illustrate the quality of the results, drawing on all of the applications for which it is currently used.

  19. High-speed multicolour photometry with CMOS cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhvala, S. M.; Zhilyaev, B. E.; Reshetnyk, V. M.

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of testing the commercial digital camera Nikon D90 with a CMOS sensor for high-speed photometry with a small telescope Celestron 11'' at the Peak Terskol Observatory. CMOS sensor allows to perform photometry in 3 filters simultaneously that gives a great advantage compared with monochrome CCD detectors. The Bayer BGR colour system of CMOS sensors is close to the Johnson BVR system. The results of testing show that one can carry out photometric measurements with CMOS cameras for stars with the V-magnitude up to ≃14^{m} with the precision of 0.01^{m}. Stars with the V-magnitude up to ˜10 can be shot at 24 frames per second in the video mode.

  20. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. TFIT: A Photometry Package for Mixed-Resolution Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laidler, V. G.; Grogin, N.; Clubb, K.; Ferguson, H.; Papovich, C.; Dickinson, M.; Idzi, R.; MacDonald, E.; Ouchi, M.; Mobasher, B.

    2006-07-01

    TFIT is a software package for measuring relative galaxy photometry between imaging data sets with different angular resolutions, such as the Hubble ACS and Spitzer IRAC images taken for the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). It combines prior information about spatial position and morphology obtained from high angular resolution images with PSF information about both images to construct object templates, which it then fits to a lower-resolution image of the same field. Simulations demonstrate that this technique improves accuracy in uncrowded fields, with performance holding steady as crowding increases and object separation decreases to 1.5 PSF FWHM: outperforming SExtractor by a factor of two. Photometry is also measured, with < 10% degradation, for objects that SExtractor fails to deblend. On real GOODS data, TFIT produces results that are consistent with a traditional PSF subtraction method. TFIT is implemented in Python and C++.

  2. Astronomical Photometry and the Legacy of Arne Henden (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, M.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) Arne Henden has helped provide a valuable resource to the photometric community with the publication of the 1982 book Astronomical Photometry. I will present a brief review of the topics covered in this handbook and recount some of the many times that it has been useful to myself and my students for answering a wide variety of questions dealing with the acquisition and reduction of photometric observations.

  3. Luminosities and temperatures of M dwarf stars from infrared photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Bolometric magnitudes for a large number of M type dwarf stars, obtained by broadband infrared photometry at 1.65, 2.2, and 3.5 microns, are reviewed. The data obtained indicate that one parameter is sufficient to describe the blanketing in all of the UBVRI bands for all types of M dwarfs. In general, late M dwarfs seem to have lower effective temperatures than are predicted by theoretical models.

  4. UBV photometry of OB and field stars at l = 250

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Photoelectric UBV photometry is presented for 70 stars in the SLS Catalog and 35 field stars in the vicinity of l = 250. Reddenings vary from a minimum of 0.25 up to 0.9. Except for six stars, possibly possessing a common distance and reddening, the distance modulus-color excess diagram of the SLS stars reveals no obvious clusters or associations. SLS stars 989 and 999 may be variable. 23 refs.

  5. Using a Web Cam CCD to do V Band Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temple, Paul

    2009-05-01

    With the plethora of cheap web cam based CCD cameras in the market today, it seemed expedient to find out if they can be used to do photometry. An experiment was planned to determine if it was possible to do this kind of exacting measurement. Arne Henden (AAVSO) believed it would be possible to do V band photometry to 0.05 mag accuracy with a web cam CCD. Using a 6" refractor, the heart of M42 was repeatedly imaged. Theta 2 and SAO 132322 were the comparison stars and V361 Orion was the target variable. Since the 1/4 HAD CCD chip only allows for a field of 10x7 arc minutes using the 6" refractor, the number targets was limited. The RGB on the chip itself provides the filters needed for photometry. The G band pass on the chip ranges from 425-650 nm with a peak band pass at 540, V band pass is 475-645 with a peak at 525. The results indicate that a web cam CCD can be used for V band photometry. With a 10 second calibrated exposure without the Peltier cooling being engaged, the results for the 2 target stars were ± 0.18 mag. The star Theta 2 was 0.18 brighter in V than the actual measurement from the Tycho catalog. SAO 132322 was -0.012 mag dimmer than the listed Tycho measurement. Then using SAO 132322 and Theta 2 as comparison stars, V361 Orion was estimated at 7.786 magnitudes. This is inline with visual estimates received before and after this date. With more estimates of known magnitude comparison stars, a correction factor should be estimated and applied to the variable work that will make it more accurate. This correction factor should bring it close to Arne Henden's estimate of 0.05 mag accuracy.

  6. Transformed photometry of young stars in Cha requested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Peter Abraham (Konkoly Observatory, Budapest, Hungary) requested the assistance of AAVSO observers in monitoring eight young stars in Chamaeleon in support of photometry he and his colleagues will be obtaining with the VLT/ISAAC (infrared) and Herschel Space Observatory (far-infrared) during January-February 2013. The targets are CR Cha, CT Cha, HP Cha (Glass I), VW Cha, VZ Cha, WW CHa, WX Cha, XX Cha. Calibrated, transformed VRI photometry is requested to precisely monitor changes in the optical brightness and colors of these objects. Calibration and transformation of the photometry is crucial - if all of the data are not on the same system and particularly if the colors are not transformed, it will be extremely difficult to correlate the data usefully. Previous observations indicate that the stars are highly variable. Brightness changes can be expected from a few tenths of a magnitude to up to 1-2 magnitudes on a timescale of a few days to a few weeks. Observers are asked to try to obtain one to two sets of VRI images per night. Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  7. Automatic CCD Imaging Systems for Time-series CCD Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, D. B.; Pollock, J. T.; Davis, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    CCDs allow precision photometry to be done with small telescopes and at sites with less than ideal seeing conditions. The addition of an automatic observing mode makes it easy to do time-series CCD photometry of variable stars and AGN/QSOs. At Appalachian State University's Dark Sky Observatory (DSO), we have implemented automatic imaging systems for image acquisition, scripted filter changing, data storage and quick-look online photometry two different telescopes, the 32-inch and 18-inch telescopes. The camera at the 18-inch allows a simple system where the data acquisition PC controls a DFM Engineering filter wheel and Photometrics/Roper camera. The 32-inch system is the more complex, with three computers communicating in order to make good use of its camera's 30-second CCD-read time for filter change. Both telescopes use macros written in the PMIS software (GKR Computer Consulting). Both systems allow automatic data capture with only tended care provided by the observer. Indeed, one observer can easily run both telescopes simultaneously. The efficiency and reliability of these systems also reduces observer errors. The only unresolved problem is an occasional but rare camera-read error (the PC is apparently interrupted). We also sometimes experience a crash of the PMIS software, probably due to its 16-bit code now running in the Windows 2000 32-bit environment. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation through grants number AST-0089248 and AST-9119750, the Dunham Fund for Astrophysical Research, and the ASU Research Council.

  8. Night sky photometry with amateur-grade digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, Tomasz; Gronkiewicz, Dominik; Kolomanski, Sylwester; Steslicki, Marek

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of night sky brightness can give us valuable information on light pollution. The more the measurements we have the better is our knowledge on the spatial distribution of the pollution on local and global scale.High accuracy professional photometry of night sky can be performed with dedicated instruments. The main drawbacks of this method are high price and low mobility. This limits an amount of observers and therefore amount of photometric data that can be collected. In order to overcome the problem of limited amount of data we can involve amateur astronomers in photometry of night sky. However, to achieve this goal we need a method that utilizes equipment which is usually used by amateur astronomers, e.g digital cameras.We propose a method that enables good accuracy photometry of night sky with a use of digital compact or DSLR cameras. In the method reduction of observations and standarization to Johnson UBV system are performed. We tested several cameras and compared results to Sky Quality Meter (SQM) measurements. The overall consistency for results is within 0.2 mag.

  9. M2K Planet Search: Spectroscopic Screening and Transit Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew; Gaidos, E.; Fischer, D.; Lepine, S.

    2010-10-01

    The M2K project is a search for planets orbiting nearby early M and late K dwarf drawn from the SUPERBLINK catalog. M and K dwarfs are highly attractive targets for finding low-mass and habitable planets because (1) close-in planets are more likely to orbit within their habitable zone, (2) planets orbiting them induce a larger Doppler signal and have deeper transits than similar planets around F, G, and early K type stars, (3) planet formation models predict they hold an abundance of super-Earth sized planets, and (4) they represent the vast majority of the stars close enough for direct imaging techniques. In spite of this, only 10% of late K and early M dwarfs are being monitored by current Doppler surveys. As part of the M2K project we have obtained low-resolution spectra for more than 2000 of our sample of 10,000 M and K dwarfs. We vet our sample by screening these stars for high metallicity and low chromospheric activity. We search for transits on targets showing high RMS Doppler signal and photometry candidates provided by SuperWASP project. By using "snapshot” photometry have been able to achieve sub-millimag photometry on numerous transit targets in the same night. With further follow-up observations we will be able to detect planets smaller than 10 Earth masses.

  10. Multi-channel fiber photometry for population neuronal activity recording

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingchun; Zhou, Jingfeng; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Minmin; Fu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Fiber photometry has become increasingly popular among neuroscientists as a convenient tool for the recording of genetically defined neuronal population in behaving animals. Here, we report the development of the multi-channel fiber photometry system to simultaneously monitor neural activities in several brain areas of an animal or in different animals. In this system, a galvano-mirror modulates and cyclically couples the excitation light to individual multimode optical fiber bundles. A single photodetector collects excited light and the configuration of fiber bundle assembly and the scanner determines the total channel number. We demonstrated that the system exhibited negligible crosstalk between channels and optical signals could be sampled simultaneously with a sample rate of at least 100 Hz for each channel, which is sufficient for recording calcium signals. Using this system, we successfully recorded GCaMP6 fluorescent signals from the bilateral barrel cortices of a head-restrained mouse in a dual-channel mode, and the orbitofrontal cortices of multiple freely moving mice in a triple-channel mode. The multi-channel fiber photometry system would be a valuable tool for simultaneous recordings of population activities in different brain areas of a given animal and different interacting individuals. PMID:26504642

  11. Photometry and Other Characteristics of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmude, Richard W., Jr.; Dutton, James

    2001-12-01

    New photoelectric magnitude measurements are reported and these values have been combined with previously reported measurements in the selection of the photometric constants of Venus. The selected normalized magnitudes of Venus are: B(1,0) = -3.42, V(1,0) = -4.25, R(1,0) = -4.87 and I(1,0) = -5.14, while the selected solar phase angle coefficients for the B, V, R and I filters are: 0.0055, 0.0063, 0.0071 and 0.0062. Dichotomy measurements made between 1919 and 2001 have been reviewed and it is concluded that the Schroeter effect is real and that it is primarily due to two factors: 1) twilight scattering and 2) shading near the terminator. We also conclude that there is no correlation between the Schroeter effect and the 11-year solar cycle and that there is no difference in the magnitude of the Schroeter effect between eastern and western apparitions. There does, however, appear to be a ~35 year cycle in the magnitude of the Schroeter effect during most of the Twentieth Century. We also conclude that the cusp extensions of Venus may affect the observed phase of that planet and that irregularities near the terminator suggest large-scale vertical cloud relief of about 2-5 kilometers.

  12. Galileo photometry of Apollo landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.; Head, James W.; Pieters, C.; Pratt, S.; Mustard, J.; Klaasen, K.; Neukum, G.; Hoffmann, H.; Jaumann, R.

    1993-01-01

    As of December 1992, the Galileo spacecraft performed its second and final flyby (EM2), of the Earth-Moon system, during which it acquired Solid State Imaging (SSI) camera images of the lunar surface suitable for photometric analysis using Hapke's, photometric model. These images, together with those from the first flyby (EM1) in December 1989, provide observations of all of the Apollo landing sites over a wide range of photometric geometries and at eight broadband filter wavelengths ranging from 0.41 micron to 0.99 micron. We have completed a preliminary photometric analysis of Apollo landing sites visible in EM1 images and developed a new strategy for a more complete analysis of the combined EM1 and EM2 data sets in conjunction with telescopic observations and spectrogoniometric measurements of returned lunar samples. No existing single data set, whether from spacecraft flyby, telescopic observation, or laboratory analysis of returned samples, describes completely the light scattering behavior of a particular location on the Moon at all angles of incidence (i), emission (e), and phase angles (a). Earthbased telescopic observations of particular lunar sites provide good coverage of incidence nad phase angles, but their range in emission angle is limited to only a few degrees because of the Moon's synchronous rotation. Spacecraft flyby observations from Galileo are now available for specific lunar features at many photometric geometries unobtainable from Earth; however, this data set lacks coverage at very small phase angles (a less than 13 deg) important for distinguishing the well-known 'opposition effect'. Spectrogoniometric measurements from returned lunar samples can provide photometric coverage at almost any geometry; however, mechanical properties of prepared particulate laboratory samples, such as particle compaction and macroscopic roughness, likely differ from those on the lunar surface. In this study, we have developed methods for the simultaneous

  13. Galileo photometry of asteroid 243 Ida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.C.; Simonelli, D.P.; Klaasen, K.; Johnson, T.V.; Fanale, F.; Granahan, J.; McEwen, A.S.; Belton, M.; Chapman, C.

    1996-01-01

    Galileo imaging observations over phase angles 19.5?? to 109.8?? are combined with near-opposition Earth-based data to derive the photometric properties of Ida. To first order these properties are uniform over the surface and well modeled at ?? = 0.55 ??m by Hapke parameters ????0 = 0.22, h = 0.020, B0 = 1.5, g = -0.33, and ?? = 18?? with corresponding geometric albedo p = 0.21??0.030.01 and Bond albedo AB = 0.081??0.0170.008. Ida's photometric properties are more similar to those of "average S-asteroids" (P. Helfenstein and J. Veverka 1989, Asteroids II, Univ. of Arizona Press, Tucson) than are those of 951 Gaspra. Two primary color units are identified on Ida: Terrain A exhibits a spectrum with relatively shallower 1-??m absorption and a relatively steeper red spectral slope than average Ida, while Terrain B has a deeper 1-??m absorption and a less steep red slope. The average photometric properties of Ida and Terrain A are similar while those of Terrain B differ mostly in having a slightly higher value of ????0 (0.22 versus 0.21), suggesting that Terrain B consists of slightly brighter, more transparent regolith particles. Galileo observations of Ida's satellite Dactyl over phase angles 19.5?? to 47.6?? suggest photometric characteristics similar to those of Ida, the major difference being Dactyl's slightly lower albedo (0.20 compared to 0.21). ?? 1990 Academic Press, Inc.

  14. Karl Schwarzschild's investigations of ``out-of-focus photometry'' between 1897-1899 and his contribution to photographic photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habison, Peter

    From 1897 to 1899 Karl Schwarzschild was working at Kuffner Observatory in Vienna. During these years he developed new measuring techniques in the field of photographic photometry, where he particularly studied the quantitative determination of the departure of the reciprocity law during photographic exposures. During that time stellar magnitudes were almost exclusively determined by measuring the size of in-focus stellar disks. Photometry using out-of-focus exposures had been proposed, but had not yet been tried. Schwarzschild's very first paper in this context contains two important results: The intimation that estimating densities on out-of-focus plates could give an accuracy of better than 0.05 mag and the analysis of his photographic data indicated that the reciprocity law (S=Iṡ t), was not obeyed. >From the paper it is not clear how he came to set himself this double task. A series of singly exposed plates date from September 1897, whereas the series of exposures of particular relevance to the question of the time dependence of plate density all date from October 1897. It is remarkable how Schwarzschild succeeded in deriving a better approximation of the characteristic curve's dependence on intensity and time. The talk will focus on Schwarzschild's investigations of ``out-of-focus photometry'' between 1897 and 1899. A few selected original photographic plates will be presented and discussed.

  15. BRITE-Constellation: Nanosatellites for precision photometry of bright stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, W. W.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Koudelka, O. F.; Grant, C. C.; Zee, R. E.; Kuschnig, R.; Mochnacki, St.; Rucinski, S. M.; Matthews, J. M.; Orleański, P.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.; Pigulski, A.; Alves, J.; Guedel, M.; Handler, G.; Wade, G. A.; Scholtz, A. L.; Scholtz

    2014-02-01

    BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, brightness and temperature variations of stars brighter than V ~ 4, with precision and time coverage not possible from the ground. The current mission design consists of three pairs of 7 kg nanosats (hence ``Constellation'') from Austria, Canada and Poland carrying optical telescopes (3 cm aperture) and CCDs. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter; the other, a red filter. The first two nanosats (funded by Austria) are UniBRITE, designed and built by UTIAS-SFL (University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies-Space Flight Laboratory) and its twin, BRITE-Austria, built by the Technical University Graz (TUG) with support of UTIAS-SFL. They were launched on 25 February 2013 by the Indian Space Agency, under contract to the Canadian Space Agency. Each BRITE instrument has a wide field of view (~ 24 degrees), so up to 15 bright stars can be observed simultaneously in 32 × 32 sub-rasters. Photometry (with reduced precision but thorough time sampling) of additional fainter targets will be possible through on-board data processing. A critical technical element of the BRITE mission is the three-axis attitude control system to stabilize a nanosat with very low inertia. The pointing stability is better than 1.5 arcminutes rms, a significant advance by UTIAS-SFL over any previous nanosatellite. BRITE-Constellation will primarily measure p- and g-mode pulsations to probe the interiors and ages of stars through asteroseismology. The BRITE sample of many of the brightest stars in the night sky is dominated by the most intrinsically luminous stars: massive stars seen at all evolutionary stages, and evolved medium-mass stars at the very end of their nuclear burning phases (cool giants and AGB stars). The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for stars brighter than mag V=4 from which the BRITE-Constellation sample

  16. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from feedlot pen surface materials as affected by within pen location, moisture, and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of pen location, moisture, and temperature on emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from surface materials obtained from feedlot pens where beef cattle were fed a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain plus solubles. Surface material...

  17. Factors affecting the wettability of different surface materials with vegetable oil at high temperatures and its relation to cleanability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashokkumar, Saranya; Adler-Nissen, Jens; Møller, Per

    2012-12-01

    The main aim of the work was to investigate the wettability of different surface materials with vegetable oil (olive oil) over the temperature range of 25-200 °C to understand the differences in cleanability of different surfaces exposed to high temperatures in food processes. The different surface materials investigated include stainless steel (reference), PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene), silicone, quasicrystalline (Al, Fe, Cr) and ceramic coatings: zirconium oxide (ZrO2), zirconium nitride (ZrN) and titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN). The ceramic coatings were deposited on stainless steel with two different levels of roughness. The cosine of the contact angle of olive oil on different surface materials rises linearly with increasing temperature. Among the materials analyzed, polymers (PTFE, silicone) gave the lowest cos θ values. Studies of the effect of roughness and surface flaws on wettability revealed that the cos θ values increases with increasing roughness and surface flaws. Correlation analysis indicates that the measured contact angle values gave useful information for grouping easy-clean polymer materials from the other materials; for the latter group, there is no direct relation between contact angle and cleanability. In addition to surface wettability with oil many other factors such as roughness and surface defects play an essential role in determining their cleanability.

  18. CCD photometry of the BL Lacertae object 1400+162 and the associated group of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weistrop, D.; Reitsema, H. J.; Smith, B. A.; Shaffer, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    Surface photometry of the BL Lacertae object 1400+162 and an apparently associated group of galaxies has been obtained using a CCD camera. Observations were made in V, broad bandpasses centered on 0.75 micron and 1.0 micron and with no filter. The colors of all but two of the galaxies suggest they are ellipticals, with the colors of the remaining two considerably bluer. Analysis using a method described by Schechter and Press (1976) suggests the group is a small one. The group may be similar to the one associated with the quasar 3C 273. The spectral index of the BL Lac object is 1.49 + or 0.21. This value allows, but does not require, the presence of an underlying elliptical galaxy. The radio-optical and optical-X-ray indices for 1400+162 are similar to values found for quasars.

  19. Multicolor CCD photometry of six lenticular and spiral galaxies. Stellar population of the galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. S.

    2006-03-01

    The results of multicolor surface photometry of the S0 galaxies NGC 524, NGC 1138, and NGC 7280 and the spiral galaxies NGC 532, NGC 783, and NGC 1589 are analyzed. UBVRI observations were acquired with the 1.5-m telescope of the Maidanak Observatory (Uzbekistan), while JHK data were taken from the 2MASS catalog. The brightness and color distributions in the galaxies are analyzed. Extinction in dust lanes in three spiral galaxies is estimated. The contributions of the radiation of the spherical and disk components in different photometric bands are estimated. Two-color diagrams are used to estimate the composition of the stellar populations in various galaxy components. The variations of the color characteristics in the S0 galaxies is due mostly to radial metallicity gradients.

  20. Multicolor CCD photometry of six lenticular and spiral galaxies. Structure of the galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. S.

    2006-03-01

    The results of multicolor surface photometry of the S0 galaxies NGC 524, NGC 1138, and NGC 7280 and the spiral galaxies NGC 532, NGC 783, and NGC 1589 are reported. U BV RI observations were acquired with the 1.5-m telescope of the Maidanak Observatory (Uzbekistan), while JHK data were taken from the 2MASS catalog. The overall structure of the galaxies is analyzed and the galaxy images decomposed into bulge and disk components. The parameters of the galaxy components—rings, bars, spiral arms, and dust lanes—are determined. The bulge/disk decompositions based on averaged one-dimensional photometric profiles yield incorrect parameters for the bulges of the S0-Sa galaxies with bars and/or rings, whose inner regions are dominated by the radiation of the bulge.

  1. Barred Galaxy Photometry: Comparing results from the Cananea sample with N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.; Gadotti, D. A.; Carrasco, L.; Bosma, A.; de Souza, R. E.; Recillas, E.

    2009-11-01

    We compare the results of the photometrical analysis of barred galaxies with those of a similar analysis from N-body simulations. The photometry is for a sample of nine barred galaxies observed in the J and K[s] bands with the CANICA near infrared (NIR) camera at the 2.1 m telescope of the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro (OAGH) in Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. The comparison includes radial ellipticity profiles and surface brightness (density for the N-body galaxies) profiles along the bar major and minor axes. We find very good agreement, arguing that the exchange of angular momentum within the galaxy plays a determinant role in the evolution of barred galaxies.

  2. Comparison of ozone determinations by ultraviolet photometry and gas-phase titration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Patapoff, M.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of ozone determinations based on ultraviolet absorption photometry and gas-phase titration (GPT) shows good agreement between the two methods. Together with other results, these findings indicate that three candidate reference methods for ozone, UV photometry, IR photometry, and GPT are in substantial agreement. However, the GPT method is not recommended for routine use by air pollution agencies for calibration of ozone monitors because of susceptibility to experimental error.

  3. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISKS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES: ULTRAVIOLET AND H{alpha} PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Skillman, Evan D. E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu

    2011-12-20

    We present an analysis of ultradeep UV and H{alpha} imaging of five nearby spiral galaxies to study the recent star formation in the outer disk. Using azimuthally averaged ellipse photometry as well as aperture photometry of individual young stellar complexes, we measure how star formation rates (SFRs) and UV and H{alpha} colors vary with radius. We detect azimuthally averaged UV flux to {approx}1.2-1.4 R{sub 25} in most galaxies; at the edge of the detected UV disk, the surface brightnesses are 28-29 mag arcsec{sup -2}, corresponding to SFR surface densities of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. Additionally, we detect between 120 and 410 young stellar complexes per galaxy, with a significant number of detections out to {approx}1.5 R{sub 25}. We measure radial FUV-NUV profiles, and find that the dispersion in the UV colors of individual young stellar complexes increases with radius. We investigate how radial variations in the frequency of star formation episodes can create color gradients and increasing dispersion in the UV colors of star-forming regions, like those observed in our study. Specifically, we use recently published, high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of {Sigma}{sub SFR} throughout the disk of M33 to estimate the frequency of star formation episodes throughout the disk of a typical spiral galaxy. We use stellar synthesis models of these star formation histories (SFHs) to measure the variations in UV colors and find that we can replicate large dispersions in UV colors based on episodic SFHs.

  4. FACTORS AFFECTING THE LONG-TERM RESPONSE OF SURFACE WATERS TO ACIDIC DEPOSITION: STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent intensive study of the causes of surface water acidification has led to numerous hypothesized controlling mechanisms. Among these are the salt-effect reduction of alkalinity, the base cation buffering and sulfate adsorption capacities of soils, availability of weatherable ...

  5. Connecting the dots III: Night side cooling and surface friction affect climates of tidally locked terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carone, L.; Keppens, R.; Decin, L.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate how night side cooling and surface friction impact surface temperatures and large scale circulation for tidally locked Earth-like planets. For each scenario, we vary the orbital period between Prot = 1 - 100 days and capture changes in climate states. We find drastic changes in climate states for different surface friction scenarios. For very efficient surface friction (ts, fric = 0.1 days), the simulations for short rotation periods (Prot ≤ 10 days) show predominantly standing extra tropical Rossby waves. These waves lead to climate states with two high latitude westerly jets and unperturbed meridional direct circulation. In most other scenarios, simulations with short rotation periods exhibit instead dominance by standing tropical Rossby waves. Such climate states have a single equatorial westerly jet, which disrupts direct circulation. Experiments with weak surface friction (ts, fric = ~10 - 100 days) show decoupling between surface temperatures and circulation, which leads to strong cooling of the night side. The experiment with ts, fric = ~100 days assumes climate states with easterly flow (retrograde rotation) for medium and slow planetary rotations Prot = 12 - 100 days. We show that an increase of night side cooling efficiency by one order of magnitude compared to the nominal model leads to a cooling of the night side surface temperatures by 80-100 K. The day side surface temperatures only drop by 25 K at the same time. The increase in thermal forcing suppresses the formation of extra tropical Rossby waves on small planets (RP = 1REarth) in the short rotation period regime (Prot ≤ 10 days).

  6. The effect of MTAD, an endodontic irrigant, on fibroblast attachment to periodontally affected root surfaces: A SEM analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghandi, Mostafa; Houshmand, Behzad; Nekoofar, Mohammad H.; Tabor, Rachel K.; Yadeghari, Zahra; Dummer, Paul M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Root surface debridement (RSD) is necessary to create an environment suitable for reattachment of the periodontium. Root surface conditioning may aid the formation of a biocompatible surface suitable for cell reattachment. BioPure™ MTAD (mixture of Doxycycline, citric acid and a detergent) is an endodontic irrigant with antibacterial properties and the ability to remove smear layer. It was hypothesized that MTAD may be useful for root surface conditioning. The efficacy of MTAD as a conditioner was measured by examining fibroblast attachment to root surfaces. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two specimens of human teeth with advanced periodontal disease were used. The surfaces were root planed until smooth. Half of the specimens were treated with 0.9% saline and the other samples with Biopure MTAD. As a negative control group, five further samples were left unscaled with surface calculus. Human gingival fibroblast cells HGF1-PI1 were cultured and poured over the tooth specimens and incubated. After fixation, the samples were sputter-coated with gold and examined with a SEM. The morphology and number of attached, fixed viable cells were examined. The data was analysed using the Mann-Whitney-U statistical test. Results: There was no significant difference between the numbers of attached cells in the experimental group treated with MTAD and the control group treated with saline. Little or no attached cells were seen in the negative control group. Conclusion: RSD created an environment suitable for cell growth and attachment in a laboratory setting. The use of MTAD did not promote the attachment and growth of cells on the surface of human roots following RSD. PMID:23869124

  7. Photometry and spectroscopy in the open cluster alpha Persei, 2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.

    1994-01-01

    Results from a combination of new spectroscopic and photometric observations in the lower main sequence and pre-main sequence of the open cluster alpha Persei are presented. New echelle spectroscopy has provided radial and rotational velocity information for thirteen candidate members, three of which are nonmembers based on radial velocity, absence of a Li 6707 A feature, and absence of H alpha emission. A set of revised rotational velocity estimates for several slowly rotating candidates identified earlier is given, yielding rotational velocities as low as 7 km/s for two apparent cluster members. VI photometry for several pre-main-sequence members is given; the new (V, V-I(sub K) photometry yields a more clearly defined pre-main sequence. A list of approximately 30 new faint candidate members based on the (V, V-I(sub K)), charge coupled device (CCD) photometry is presented in an effort to identify additional cluster members at very low masses. Low-dispersion spectra obtained for several of these candidates provide in some cases supporting evidence for cluster membership. The single brown dwarf candidate in this cluster is for the first time placed in a color-magnitude diagram with other cluster members, providing a better means for establishing its true status. Stars from among the list of new photometric candidates may provide the means for establishing a sequence of cluster members down to very faint magnitudes (V approximately 21) and consequently very low masses. New coordinate determinations for previous candidate members and finding charts for the new photometric candidates are provided in Appendices.

  8. High-precision photometry for K2 Campaign 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. X.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Domsa, I.; de Val-Borro, M.

    2015-12-01

    The two reaction wheel K2 mission promises and has delivered new discoveries in the stellar and exoplanet fields. However, due to the loss of accurate pointing, it also brings new challenges for the data reduction processes. In this paper, we describe a new reduction pipeline for extracting high-precision photometry from the K2 data set, and present public light curves for the K2 Campaign 1 target pixel data set. Key to our reduction is the derivation of global astrometric solutions from the target stamps, from which accurate centroids are passed on for high-precision photometry extraction. We extract target light curves for sources from a combined UCAC4 and EPIC catalogue - this includes not only primary targets of the K2 campaign 1, but also any other stars that happen to fall on the pixel stamps. We provide the raw light curves, and the products of various detrending processes aimed at removing different types of systematics. Our astrometric solutions achieve a median residual of ˜0.127 arcsec. For bright stars, our best 6.5 h precision for raw light curves is ˜20 parts per million (ppm). For our detrended light curves, the best 6.5 h precision achieved is ˜15 ppm. We show that our detrended light curves have fewer systematic effects (or trends, or red-noise) than light curves produced by other groups from the same observations. Example light curves of transiting planets and a Cepheid variable candidate, are also presented. We make all light curves public, including the raw and detrended photometry, at http://k2.hatsurveys.org.

  9. New Release of the BSM Epoch Photometry Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, A.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) The Bright Star Monitor (BSM) Epoch Photometry Database (EPD) is a searchable catalog of all observations made by one of the AAVSO's five BSM systems. The newest release of this database contains some 100 million datasets, from both northern and southern hemispheres, taken over the last six years. These have been calibrated by both nightly visits to Landolt standard fields as well as through the use of the Tycho2 photometric catalog. The paper will describe how the observations were made, how to access the catalog, and the limitations to the photometric accuracy. Some examples of well-studied fields will be shown.

  10. Preliminary results on interstellar reddening as deduced from filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laget, M.

    1972-01-01

    Filter photometry has been used to derive the interstellar reddening law from stars through the study of a single spectral type, B0. The deficiency in the far ultraviolet flux of a supergiant relative to a main sequence star is compared with the difference in the flux distribution due to a change of one spectral class. Individual interstellar reddening curves show the general feature reported by Stecher (1969) and by Bless and Savage (1970). There is a large amount of scatter in the far ultraviolet which may be partially due to a real difference in interstellar extinction and partially due to observational inaccuracy.

  11. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of Nova Del 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, T.; Ilkiewicz, K.; Swierczynski, E.; Belcheva, M.; Dimitrov, D.

    2013-08-01

    We report optical BV photometry and spectroscopy of Nova Del 2013, carried out between August 14.88 UT and August 15.08 UT. Using a 60 cm Cassegrain telescope at the Nicolaus Copernicus University Observatory (Torun, Poland) we estimated the V brightness of the Nova to be 6.31+/-0.02 mag and 6.18+/-0.03 mag on Aug. 14.94 UT and Aug. 15.02 UT respectively. HD 194113 (F2, V=8.00 mag) was used as a comparison star.

  12. EUVE photometry of SS Cygni: Dwarf nova outbursts and oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.

    1995-05-15

    The authors present EUVE Deep Survey photometry and AAVSO optical measurements of the 1993 August and 1994 June/July outbursts of the dwarf nova SS Cygni. The EUV and optical light curves are used to illustrate the different response of the accretion disk to outbursts which begin at the inner edge and propagate outward, and those which begin at the outer edge and propagate inward. Furthermore, the authors describe the properties of the quasi-coherent 7--9 s sinusoidal oscillations in the EUV flux detected during the rise and plateau stages of these outbursts.

  13. CCD Photometry of SW Ursae Majoris during the 1996 Superoutburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, Daisaku; Baba, Hajime; Kato, Taichi; Novak, Rudolf

    1998-04-01

    Differential CCD photometry of the 1996 April superoutburst of SW UMa was performed both at the Nicholas Copernicus Observatory and at the Ouda Station, Kyoto University. Although superhumps with a period of 0.05818 (+/- 0.00002) d and possible small-amplitude quasi periodic oscillations (QPOs) were detected, we failed to find the so-called super-QPOs. SW UMa has been proved to be the fourth SU UMa-type dwarf nova, following AL Com, V1028 Cyg, and HV Vir, in which an analysis of the superhump maxima timings revealed an increase in the superhump period.

  14. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Mason, Keith O.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    CCD time-resolved photometry in V, B, and near-IR for 17 faint cataclysmic variables (CVs) is presented and analyzed. The data are obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, the Perkins reflector, Lowell Observatory, and the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos from April-June 1989. The degree of variability and periodicities for the CVs are examined. It is observed that the variability of most of the stars is consistent with CV class behavior. Orbital periods for five CVs are determined, and three potential eclipsing systems are detected.

  15. A digital imaging photometry system for cometary data acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, K. S.; Benson, C. M.; Gary, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes a digital imaging photometry system developed in the Space Science Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight center. The photometric system used for cometary data acquisition is based on an intensified secondary electron conduction (ISEC) vidicon coupled to a versatile data acquisition system which allows real-time interactive operation. Field tests on the Orion and Rosette nebulas indicate a limiting magnitude of approximately m sub v = 14 over the 40 arcmin field-of-view. Observations were conducted of Comet Giacobini-Zinner in August 1985. The resulting data are discussed in relation to the capabilities of the digital analysis system. The development program concluded on August 31, 1985.

  16. Spectroscopy and photometry for low-mass stars in Praesepe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Scott D.; Stauffer, John R.; Prosser, Charles F.; Herter, Terry

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained spectral types, H alpha equivalent widths, and optical photometry for a small sample of late K and M dwarf candidate members of the Praesepe open cluster. At least for the small sample of stars we have observed, all of the Paesepe members later than M2 have H alpha in emission. The chromospheric activity of the Praesepe satrs is essentially the same as that for Hyades members of the same mass, as expected since the two clusters are thought to be the same age.

  17. LEMON: an (almost) completely automated differential-photometry pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrón, V.; Fernández, M.

    2011-11-01

    We present LEMON, the CCD differential-photometry pipeline, written in Python, developed at the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia (CSIC) and originally designed for its use at the 1.23 m CAHA telescope for automated variable stars detection and analysis. The aim of our tool is to make it possible to completely reduce thousands of images of time series in a matter of hours and with minimal user interaction, if not none at all, automatically detecting variable stars and presenting the results to the astronomer.

  18. uvby photometry in McCormick proper motion fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degewij, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Danish 50 cm telescope at the European Southern Observatory was used to obtain high-precision uvby photometry for 50 F2 to G2 stars, with V values in the 9.4-12.3 mag range, which were selected in the southern galactic polar regions of the McCormick proper motion fields and measured on six different nights. The brighter stars are found to systematically exhibit smaller m(1) indices, of about 0.02 mag, upon comparison with the earlier data of Blaauw et al (1976). Single measurements are given for 98 stars in eight McCormick fields at intermediate southern galactic latitudes.

  19. MYRaf: An Easy Aperture Photometry GUI for IRAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaei, M. S.; KiliÇ, Y.; Özeren, F. F.

    2015-07-01

    We describe the design and development of MYRaf, a GUI (Graphical User Interface) that aims to be completely open-source under General Public License (GPL). MYRaf is an easy to use, reliable, and a fast IRAF aperture photometry GUI tool for those who are conversant with text-based software and command-line procedures in GNU/Linux OSs. MYRaf uses IRAF, PyRAF, matplotlib, ginga, alipy, and SExtractor with the general-purpose and high-level programming language Python, and uses the Qt framework.

  20. Accurate PSF-matched photometry for the J-PAS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Teja, Yolanda; Benitez, Txitxo; Dupke, Renato a.

    2015-08-01

    The Javalambre-PAU Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is expected to map 8,600 squared-degrees of the sky using 54 narrow and 5 broad band filters. Carried out by a Spanish-Brazilian consortium, the main goal of this survey is to measure Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) with photometric redshifts. The expectation is measuring these photometric redshifts with a precision of dz/(1 + z) ~ 0.003 for 100 million galaxies and a few millions of quasars, and reaching an accuracy of dz/(1 + z) ~ 0.01 for other 300 million galaxies. With these numbers, it will be possible to determine w in the Dark Energy (DE) equation of state with an accuracy of < 4%. To achieve such precision and measure the radial BAOs, not only an advanced technical setup but also special data processing tools are required. These tools must be accurate as well as suitable to be implemented in fully automated and computationally efficient algorithms.The factor that most influences the photometric redshift precision is the quality of the photometry. For that reason we have developed a new technique based on the Chebyshev-Fourier bases (CHEFs, Jiménez-Teja & Benítez 2012, ApJ, 745, 150) to obtain a highly precise multicolor photometry without PSF consideration, thus saving a considerable amount of time and circumventing severe problems such as the PSF variability across the images. The CHEFs are a set of mathematical orthonormal bases with different scale and resolution levels, originally designed to fit the surface light distribution of galaxies. They have proved to be able to model any kind of morphology, including spirals, highly elliptical, or irregular galaxies, including isophotal twists and fine substructure. They also fit high signal-to-noise images, lensing arcs and stars with great accuracy. We can calculate optimal, unbiased, total magnitudes directly through these CHEFs models and, thus, colors without needing the PSF.We compare our photometry with widely-used codes such as SExtractor (Bertin

  1. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622^{+91}_{-70} km s-1, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. A u-band (~3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h BATC = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time scales, older stellar ages, and

  2. Multicolor photometry of the merging galaxy cluster A2319: Dynamics and star formation properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu E-mail: yuanqirong@njnu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622{sub −70}{sup +91} km s{sup –1}, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ∼10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ∼ 20 mag. A u-band (∼3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h {sub BATC} = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time

  3. Chronic topical application of all-trans-retinoic acid in man does not affect corneocyte surface area.

    PubMed

    Robinson, S M; Poncet, M; Ferracin, J; Czernielewski, J; Verschoore, M

    1994-01-01

    The potential therapeutic activity of topically applied novel analogues of retinoic acid is currently measured in many different animal models. In most cases, the technique used is invasive and biopsy specimens are required. Furthermore, efficacy in these models is not a guarantee of success in treatment of humans. Therefore, predictive human pharmacology tests are required in order to quantify a retinoid effect on human skin before conducting large clinical trials. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in corneocyte surface area could be used as a predictive measure for the efficacy of topical retinoids in man. Topical applications of all-trans retinoic acid gel (Aberel), salicylic acid gel and the gel vehicle were made once daily for 4 weeks to skin of the lumbar region of healthy human volunteers. Corneocytes were recovered from these three treated zones as well as from one zone of untreated skin, and their surface areas were measured by image analysis using a MOP-Videoplan. The results showed that at no point during the 4 weeks of daily application to healthy human skin was there a statistically significant difference in the surface area of corneocytes recovered from Aberel, salicylic acid-, vehicle-treated or untreated sites. No specific effect of retinoic acid could be detected. However, although no between-treatment differences were found, significant cyclical changes in the mean surface areas with respect to baseline were observed. PMID:8024798

  4. Large-scale stress factors affecting coral reefs: open ocean sea surface temperature and surface seawater aragonite saturation over the next 400 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, K. J.; Lippmann, T.; Sen Gupta, A.

    2012-06-01

    One-third of the world's coral reefs have disappeared over the last 30 years, and a further third is under threat today from various stress factors. The main global stress factors on coral reefs have been identified as changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and changes in surface seawater aragonite saturation (Ωarag). Here, we use a climate model of intermediate complexity, which includes an ocean general circulation model and a fully coupled carbon cycle, in conjunction with present-day observations of inter-annual SST variability to investigate three IPCC representative concentration pathways (RCP 3PD, RCP 4.5, and RCP 8.5), and their impact on the environmental stressors of coral reefs related to open ocean SST and open ocean Ωarag over the next 400 years. Our simulations show that for the RCP 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios, the threshold of 3.3 for zonal and annual mean Ωarag would be crossed in the first half of this century. By year 2030, 66-85% of the reef locations considered in this study would experience severe bleaching events at least once every 10 years. Regardless of the concentration pathway, virtually every reef considered in this study (>97%) would experience severe thermal stress by year 2050. In all our simulations, changes in surface seawater aragonite saturation lead changes in temperatures.

  5. High Precision Photometry for the K2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Soares-Furtado, Melinda; Penev, Kaloyan; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gaspar; Bhatti, Waqas; Domsa, Istvan; de Val-Borro, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    The two reaction wheel K2 mission brings new challenges for the data reduction processes. We developed a reduction pipeline for extracting high precision photometry from the K2 dataset and we use this pipeline to generate light curves for the K2 Campaign 0 super-stamps and K2 Campaign 1 target pixel dataset. Key to our reduction technique is the derivation of global astrometric solutions from the target stamps from which accurate centroids are passed on for high precision photometry extraction. We also implemented the image subtraction method to reduce the K2 Campaign 0 super-stamps containing open clusters M35 and NGC2158. We extract target light curvesfor sources from a combined UCAC4 and EPIC catalogue -- this includes not only primary targets of the K2 Mission, but also other stars that happen to fall on the pixel stamps. Our astrometric solutions achieve a median residual of ~0.127". For bright stars, our best 6.5 hour precision for raw light curves is ~20 parts per million (ppm). For our detrended light curves, the best 6.5 hour precision achieved is ~15 ppm. We show that our detrended light curves have fewer systematic effects (or trends, or red-noise) than light curves produced by other groups from the same observations. We highlight the measurements of rotation curves using the K2 light curves of stars within open cluster M35 and NGC2158.

  6. Spectroscopy and photometry campaign on three bright Wolf Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-06-01

    Dr. Noel Richardson (Universite de Montreal) and colleagues have invited AAVSO observers to participate in an international professional-amateur spectroscopy and photometry campaign on the Wof Rayet stars WR 134, WR 135, and WR 137 (HD 191765, HD 192103, and HD 192641). The campaign has begun and runs through September 17, 2013. The purpose of the campaign is to study clumping aspects of the strong winds and changes present in large structures in the stellar winds in these WR stars. Spectroscopy and UBVRI time-series observations are requested. Supplemental targets to be observed if time permits are V905 Sco (HD 160529) and V4375 Sgr (HD 316285). Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Photometry should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Details of the campaign are given at: http://www.stsci.de/wr134/index.htm. Instructions for sending spectroscopy data to Dr. Richardson are given at http! ://www.stsci.de/wr134/pdf/data_transfer.pdf.

  7. Multicolor photometry of triple system b Per requested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Bob Zavala (U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff) has requested AAVSO assistance in obtaining multicolor photometry of the bright triple system b Per in order to prepare for and detect a possible eclipse of the AB components by the C component predicted for 2013 January 23. Multi-color photometric observations of 4.5V b Per are requested 2013 January 23 through February 04. Based on a revised period of 702.45 ± 0.05 days, the next time of minimum light is predicted for HJD = 2456321.35 ± 0.05 (UT 2013 January 28 20:24UT ± 1.5 hours). The eclipse may last for up to four days, so the coverage requested will provide both a baseline out-of-eclipse light curve and a multi-color eclipse light curve for analysis. Photometry is needed at the level of 0.02-0.03 magnitude or better, as the eclipse may be as deep as 0.1 magnitude. For PEP observers, V coverage, and B if possible, is requested. DSLR observers should use whatever band(s) are available to them. Finder charts may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and links.

  8. A new look at photometry of the Moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goguen, J.D.; Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; Buratti, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    We use ROLO photometry (Kieffer, H.H., Stone, T.C. [2005]. Astron. J. 129, 2887-2901) to characterize the before and after full Moon radiance variation for a typical highlands site and a typical mare site. Focusing on the phase angle range 45??. ) to calculate the scattering matrix and solve the radiative transfer equation for I/. F. The mean single scattering albedo is ??=0.808, the asymmetry parameter is ???cos. ?????=0.77 and the phase function is very strongly peaked in both the forward and backward scattering directions. The fit to the observations for the highland site is excellent and multiply scattered photons contribute 80% of I/. F. We conclude that either model, roughness or multiple scattering, can match the observations, but that the strongly anisotropic phase functions of realistic particles require rigorous calculation of many orders of scattering or spurious photometric roughness estimates are guaranteed. Our multiple scattering calculation is the first to combine: (1) a regolith model matched to the measured particle size distribution and index of refraction of the lunar soil, (2) a rigorous calculation of the particle phase function and solution of the radiative transfer equation, and (3) application to lunar photometry with absolute radiance calibration. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Orion Project: A Photometry and Spectroscopy Project for Small Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Jeffrey L.

    2014-05-01

    Orion, the hunter, is one of the most famous constellations. Its declination is such that it is visible from most of the civilized world. In addition, most of the stars of Orion are very bright and interesting. Originally this Project was called the Betelgeuse Campaign, but four more stars were added so the name was changed to the Orion Project. The Project now includes Betelgeuse, Rigel and the three stars of Orion's belt, Mintaka, Alnilam and Alnitak. Both photometry and spectroscopy provide data for the Project. The Project has several goals. First is to help beginners with photometry and spectroscopy. The second goal is the actual observations and data. Because these stars are very bright, they are seldom observed in detail. Their brightness also posses a problem for most professional observatories. It is hoped that by having observations over a long time, interesting changes can be seen that will warrant closer investigation. The AAVSO has an excellent archive of photometric data, but is still lacking a means of handling spectroscopic data. As a third goal it is hoped that the procedures refined in this Project for spectroscopic data may help promote a similar system for the AAVSO.

  10. Infrared spectroscopy and photometry of Comet Austin 1990 V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, Martha S.; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Brooke, Timothy Y.

    1993-01-01

    3-micron and 10-micron spectra and IR photometry of the dynamically new Comet Austin 1990 V were obtained for March-May 1990. An unusual 9-11 micron emission feature 15-20 percent above the continuum is evident at 0.78 AU postperihelion. The shape, in particular a peak at 11.06 micron, differs from that seen in Halley and several other comets, suggesting a difference in the mineralogy of the silicate grains. The 3.1-7.7 micron spectrum at 0.35 AU shows no obvious feature; feature/continuum contrast of the 3.36 micron emission feature is less than about 5 percent. Based on the IR photometry and a dust model weighted toward small grains, the dust production rate on 6 May at 0.78 AU was about 3 x 10 exp 5 g/s. The corresponding dust/gas mass ratio was about 0.1, classifying Austin as a dust-poor comet. This designation refers only to the relative dust cross section, not to the total mass.

  11. UBV Photometry of the young open cluster Berkely 87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinyemi, Abolaji; Eskridge, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    We obtained UBV imaging of a field in the young open cluster Berkeley 87. From these images, we measured the brightness of ~180 stars in the cluster. Our photometry was calibrated using published photometry (Turner & Forbes 1982 PASP 94, 789) of a subset of stars in our field. The cluster is in a region of the sky with strongly varying extinction. Therefore we made a (U-B)-(B-V) color-color diagram of the field and used this to de-redden the stars on a case by case basis. We de-reddened the stars using the unreddened supergiant and main sequence colors from Astrophysical Quantities (Cox 2000).The color-magnitude diagrams of the de-reddened stars are compared to the Padova isochrones(Marigo et al 2008 A&A 482 883). The isochrones are generated for a range of ages, with solar metalicity and no α enhancement. The best fit for the isochrones was the main sequence de-reddened stars from which the age of the cluster is estimated to be 20 million years. This is older than previous age estimates (1-5 million years) from earlier studies of the cluster. This may indicate age variation in the cluster.We acknowledge the support of the Physics and Astronomy department, and the College of Science and Engineering, Minnesota State University, Mankato.

  12. PHOTOMETRY OF VARIABLE STARS FROM DOME A, ANTARCTICA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lingzhi; Macri, Lucas M.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Wang Lifan; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Luong-Van, Daniel; Storey, John W. V.; Cui Xiangqun; Gong Xuefei; Yuan Xiangyan; Feng Longlong; Yang Ji; Zhu Zhenxi; Liu Qiang; Zhou Xu; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Shang Zhaohui; Yang Huigen; York, Donald G.

    2011-11-15

    Dome A on the Antarctic plateau is likely one of the best observing sites on Earth thanks to the excellent atmospheric conditions present at the site during the long polar winter night. We present high-cadence time-series aperture photometry of 10,000 stars with i < 14.5 mag located in a 23 deg{sup 2} region centered on the south celestial pole. The photometry was obtained with one of the CSTAR telescopes during 128 days of the 2008 Antarctic winter. We used this photometric data set to derive site statistics for Dome A and to search for variable stars. Thanks to the nearly uninterrupted synoptic coverage, we found six times as many variables as previous surveys with similar magnitude limits. We detected 157 variable stars, of which 55% were unclassified, 27% were likely binaries, and 17% were likely pulsating stars. The latter category includes {delta} Scuti, {gamma} Doradus, and RR Lyrae variables. One variable may be a transiting exoplanet.

  13. Stromvil CCD Photometry in Globular Cluster M 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Richard P.; Janusz, R.; Philip, A. G. D.; Straizys, V.; Vrba, F.

    2007-12-01

    We observed the globular cluster M 3 in the 7-band Stromvil system plus Vilnius X-band at the 1.8-m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope with a 2K CCD giving a 6-arcmin field. We observed the open cluster M 67 in the same run. Here from the residuals of many stars fit to quality CCD Vilnius photometry (Laugalys et al., 2004, Baltic Astronomy, 13, 1) we reshape and thus correct the initial flatfields. M 67 with a wide color base gives the color transformations of the run by calibrating from about 12 photoelectric standards in the Stromvil and similar Vilnius systems. In M 3 six photoelectric standards of moderate quality, all red stars of 13th magnitude in the Vilnius system calibrate the zero-point magnitude scale. Point-spread-function fitting to the stars in the crowded M 3 field resolves blends. With relatively short exposures of minutes a limiting magnitude V=15 is obtained with a signal/noise ratio about 100. So from this new photometry we subsequently can classify all types of stars and treat questions of reddening, distances, membership and metallicity at least at the horizontal branch of the cluster.

  14. Differential Photometry of Asteroids 727 Nipponia and 741 Botolphia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, M. A.; Rollins, C.; Wark, T. J.

    2004-11-01

    Differential photometry of the asteroids 727 Nipponia and 741 Botolphia yielded light curves and periods consistent with those available from observers of the Observatoire de Geneve. Data were collected with the SARA 0.9-m telescope at KPNO over the nights of April 27, 2003, May 14, 2004, and June 27-29, 2004, using an Apogee AP7p 511x512 CCD camera, and reduced with Mira 6.0 and IDL routines. This project will help find the rotation period of several primitive asteroids and follow up with spectral analyses to determine where on these asteroids water of hydration may be located. The Nipponia data cover a full rotation period (nominally 5.07h) and the phased light curve resembles those of Behrend et al. at the Ob. Geneve (http://obswww.unige.ch/ behrend/). The Botolphia data cover a quarter of the almost 24-h (provisional) period, and supplement light curves available from the Ob. Geneve groups. Both asteroids are small (about 30 km), mid-belt, of uncertain taxonomy (DT for Nipponia, X for Botolphia), and have slightly high albedo (0.14 to 0.24); whether they are "primitive" is uncertain. Continuing differential photometry at varying phase angles and spectral analyses are planned to examine the spectral heterogeneity of these objects and to search for water of hydration. This research was part of the summer REU program at the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA), made possible by National Science Foundation Grant AST-0097616.

  15. Far-ultraviolet stellar photometry: Fields in Sagittarius and Scorpius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Edward G.; Carruthers, George R.

    1995-02-01

    Far-ultraviolet photometry for 741 objects in a field in Sagittarius centered near M8 and 541 objects in a field centered near sigma Scorpii is presented. These data were extracted from electographic images obtained with two cameras during a shuttle flight in 1991 April/May. The cameras provided band passes with lambdaeff = 1375 A and lambdaeff = 1781 A. Synthetic colors show that these bands are sensitive to effective temperature for hot stars. Our measurements were placed on a quantitative far-ultraviolet magnitude scale by convolving the spectra of stars observed by IUE with our cameras' spectral response functions. Fifty-eight percent of the ultraviolet objects were identified with visible stars using the SIMBAD database while another 40% of the objects are blends of early type stars too close together to separate with our resolution. Our photometry is compared with that from the TD-1, OAO 2, and ANS satellites and the S201 (Apollo 16) far-ultraviolet camera and found to agree at the level of a few tenths of a magnitude. Unlike previous studies, almost half of the identified visual counterparts to the ultraviolet objects are early B stars. A plot of distance modulus against ultraviolet color excess reveals a significant population of stars with strong ultraviolet excess.

  16. The MOST Asteroseismology Mission: Ultraprecise Photometry from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Gordon; Matthews, Jaymie; Kuschnig, Rainer; Johnson, Ron; Rucinski, Slavek; Pazder, John; Burley, Gregory; Walker, Andrew; Skaret, Kristina; Zee, Robert; Grocott, Simon; Carroll, Kieran; Sinclair, Peter; Sturgeon, Don; Harron, John

    2003-09-01

    The Microvariablity and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) mission is a low-cost microsatellite designed to detect low-degree acoustic oscillations (periods of minutes) with micromagnitude precision in solar-type stars and metal-poor subdwarfs. There are also plans to detect light reflected from giant, short-period, extrasolar planets and the oscillations of roAp stars and the turbulent variability in the dense winds of Wolf-Rayet stars. This paper describes the experiment and how we met the challenge of ultraprecise photometry despite severe constraints on the mass, volume, and power available for the instrument. A side-viewing, 150 mm aperture Rumak-Maksutov telescope feeds two frame-transfer CCDs, one for tracking and the other for science. There is a single 300 nm wide filter centered at 525 nm. Microlenses project Fabry images of the brighter (V<=10) target stars onto the science CCD. Fainter target stars will be focused directly elsewhere on the CCD. MOST was launched on 2003 June 30 into a low-Earth, Sun-synchronous, polar orbit allowing stars between -19° and +36° declination to be viewed continuously for up to 60 days. Attitude is controlled by reaction wheels and magnetotorquers. A solar safety shutter over the telescope diagonal is the only other moving part. Accumulated photometry will be used to calibrate response across the target field stop, and data will be compressed and downloaded to three dedicated ground stations.

  17. Near-IR Spectroscopy and Visual Broadband Photometry of Unbound Asteroid Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolters, Stephen D.; Weissman, P.; Duddy, S. R.; Christou, A.; Green, S. F.; Lowry, S. C.; Rozitis, B.

    2012-10-01

    Over 62 pairs of asteroids have been identified with extremely similar orbits (Rozek, Breiter, and Jopek 2011, MNRAS 412, 987). Backwards integration of their orbits show that each pair probably experienced a very low-velocity close encounter, in many cases less than 1 Myr ago (e.g. Vokrouhlický and Nesvorný 2008, AJ 136, 280). Pravec et al. (2010, Nature, 466, 1085) examined 35 pairs and found that the secondary/primary mass ratio is <0.2. Also, as this ratio approaches 0.2, the rotation period of the primary increases. This is consistent with formation of the pairs through rotational fission of a parent rubble-pile asteroid (Scheeres 2007, Icarus 189, 370). However, the pairs were linked through dynamical considerations alone, and mass ratios were determined using catalogued visual magnitudes and the assumption that the albedos and bulk densities of the components are identical. We are undertaking a campaign of characterising the asteroids in these pairs using visual and NIR spectroscopy as well as thermal IR photometry. We present 0.8-2.5 micron spectroscopic observations of using SpeX on NASA-IRTF, and BVRI photometry using the 0.6-m Table Mountain Observatory telescope. Our goals are to assess the similarity of the spectra of the components’ surfaces (e.g. Duddy et al. 2012, A&A, 539, A36) and also to look for evidence of color variation as a function of rotational phase. Since dynamical studies have placed constraints on the formation ages, if the asteroids are completely resurfaced during formation, we can start to explore the timescales involved in space weathering. We report recent progress in our investigations. This work was supported in part by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program and done in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under contract with NASA.

  18. Detoxification of Implant Surfaces Affected by Peri-Implant Disease: An Overview of Non-surgical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Valderrama, Pilar; Blansett, Jonathan A; Gonzalez, Mayra G; Cantu, Myrna G; Wilson, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to summarize the findings of studies that have evaluated non-surgical approaches for detoxification of implant body surfaces in vitro and in vivo, and to evaluate clinical trials on the use of these methodologies for treating peri-implant disease. Materials and methods: A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (Pubmed) from 1966 to 2013. In vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials on non-surgical therapy were evaluated. The outcome variables were the ability of the therapeutic method to eliminate the biofilm and endotoxins from the implant surface, the changes in clinical parameters including probing depth, clinical attachment levels, bleeding on probing; radiographic bone fill and histological re-osseointegration. Results: From 134 articles found 35 were analyzed. The findings, advantages and disadvantages of using lasers as well as mechanical and chemical methods are discussed. Most of the in vivo and human studies used combination therapies which makes determining the efficacy of one specific method difficult. Most human studies are case series with short term longitudinal analysis without survival or failure reports. Conclusion: Complete elimination of the biofilms is difficult to achieve using these approaches. All therapies induce changes of the chemical and physical properties of the implant surface. Re-osseointegration may be difficult to achieve if not impossible without surgical access to ensure thorough debridement of the defect and detoxification of the implant surface. Combination protocols for non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis in humans have shown some positive clinical results but long-term evaluation to evaluate the validity and reliability of the techniques is needed. PMID:24894571

  19. Cationic screening of charged surface groups (carboxylates) affects electron transfer steps in photosystem-II water oxidation and quinone reduction.

    PubMed

    Karge, Oliver; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Dau, Holger

    2014-10-01

    The functional or regulatory role of long-distance interactions between protein surface and interior represents an insufficiently understood aspect of protein function. Cationic screening of surface charges determines the morphology of thylakoid membrane stacks. We show that it also influences directly the light-driven reactions in the interior of photosystem II (PSII). After laser-flash excitation of PSII membrane particles from spinach, time courses of the delayed recombination fluorescence (10μs-10ms) and the variable chlorophyll-fluorescence yield (100μs-1s) were recorded in the presence of chloride salts. At low salt-concentrations, a stimulating effect was observed for the S-state transition efficiency, the time constant of O2-formation at the Mn4Ca-complex of PSII, and the halftime of re-oxidation of the primary quinone acceptor (Qa) by the secondary quinone acceptor (Qb). The cation valence determined the half-effect concentrations of the stimulating salt effect, which were around 6μM, 200μM and 10mM for trivalent (LaCl3), bivalent (MgCl2, CaCl2), and monovalent cations (NaCl, KCl), respectively. A depressing high-salt effect also depended strongly on the cation valence (onset concentrations around 2mM, 50mM, and 500mM). These salt effects are proposed to originate from electrostatic screening of negatively charged carboxylate sidechains, which are found in the form of carboxylate clusters at the solvent-exposed protein surface. We conclude that the influence of electrostatic screening by solvent cations manifests a functionally relevant long-distance interaction between protein surface and electron-transfer reactions in the protein interior. A relation to regulation and adaptation in response to environmental changes is conceivable. PMID:25062950

  20. Occurrence of near-surface ozone depletion in the Arctic spring strongly affected by Northern-Hemispheric climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, J.; Wang, Y.; Jiang, T.; Deng, Y.; Oltmans, S. J.; Solberg, S.

    2013-12-01

    In the Arctic spring, near-surface ozone can decrease to extremely low levels due to chemical removal catalyzed by halogen radicals. These ozone depletion events (ODEs) are usually accompanied by greatly enhanced surface deposition of reactive gaseous mercury. Here we show the effects of regional climate variability on Arctic ODE frequencies by analyzing surface ozone measurements at three monitoring sites (Barrow, Alert, and Zeppelinfjellet) in the past 30 years. Among the various climate variability indices, the Western Pacific (WP) index has the most significant impact. In years with high ODE frequencies at Barrow and Alert in April, the WP teleconnection pattern tends to be in its negative phase with a weakened storm track from the western Pacific to the Arctic and a strengthened subtropical jet across the Pacific, reducing transport of ozone-rich air masses from mid-latitudes to the Arctic. Analysis of the observations at Zeppelinfjellet indicates a much stronger influence of WP pattern in the 2000s than 1990s. Consequently, the WP index may be used as a proxy to assess ODE frequencies and subsequent environmental impacts in future climate projections.

  1. Cell surface localization of importin α1/KPNA2 affects cancer cell proliferation by regulating FGF1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kohji; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Tsujii, Akira; Moriyama, Tetsuji; Ikuno, Yudai; Shiromizu, Takashi; Serada, Satoshi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Oka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Importin α1 is involved in nuclear import as a receptor for proteins with a classical nuclear localization signal (cNLS). Here, we report that importin α1 is localized to the cell surface in several cancer cell lines and detected in their cultured medium. We also found that exogenously added importin α1 is associated with the cell membrane via interaction with heparan sulfate. Furthermore, we revealed that the cell surface importin α1 recognizes cNLS-containing substrates. More particularly, importin α1 bound directly to FGF1 and FGF2, secreted cNLS-containing growth factors, and addition of exogenous importin α1 enhanced the activation of ERK1/2, downstream targets of FGF1 signalling, in FGF1-stimulated cancer cells. Additionally, anti-importin α1 antibody treatment suppressed the importin α1−FGF1 complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, resulting in decreased cell growth. This study provides novel evidence that functional importin α1 is located at the cell surface, where it accelerates the proliferation of cancer cells. PMID:26887791

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CU Vir Stroemgren differential photometry (Pyper+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyper, D. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Adelman, S. J.

    2014-06-01

    Our data are from two sources: Stroemgren differential uvby photometry obtained using the Four College Automated Photometric Telescope (FCAPT) originally on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and later at Fairborn Observatory, Washington Camp, AZ, and photometry from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI). (1 data file).

  3. Constraints on the Bulk Composition of Uranus from Herschel PACS and ISO LWS Photometry, SOFIA FORCAST Photometry and Spectroscopy, and Ground-Based Photometry of its Thermal Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Glenn; Mueller, Thomas; Burgdorf, Martin; Fletcher, Leigh; de Pater, Imke; Atreya, Sushil; Adams, Joseph; Herter, Terry; Keller, Luke; Sidher, Sunil; Sinclair, James; Fujiyoshi, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    We present thermal infrared observations of the disk of Uranus at 17-200 μm to deduce its global thermal structure and bulk composition. We combine 17-200 μm filtered photometric measurements by the Herschel PACS and ISO LWS instruments and 19-35 μm filtered photometry and spectroscopy by the SOFIA FORCAST instrument, supplemented by 17-25 μm ground-based photometric filtered imaging of Uranus. Previous analysis of infrared spectroscopic measurements of the disk of Uranus made by the Spitzer IRS instrument yielded a model for the disk-averaged temperature profile and stratospheric composition (Orton et al. 2014a Icarus 243,494; 2014b Icarus 243, 471) that were consistent with submillimeter spectroscopy by the Herschel SPIRE instrument (Swinyard et al. 2014, MNRAS 440, 3658). Our motivation to observe the 17-35 μm spectrum was to place more stringent constraints on the global para-H2 / ortho-H2 ratio in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere than the ISO SWS results of Fouchet et al. (2003, Icarus 161, 127), who examined H2 quadrupole lines. We will discuss the consistency of these observations with a higher para-H2 fraction than implied by local thermal equilibrium, which would resolve a discrepancy between the Spitzer-based model and observations of HD lines by the Herschel PACS experiment (Feuchtgruber et al. 2013 Astron. & Astrophys. 551, A126). Constraints on the global para-H2 fraction allow for more precise analysis of the far-infrared spectrum, which is sensitive to the He:H2 ratio, a quantity that was not constrained by the Spitzer IRS spectra. The derived model, which assumed the ratio derived by the Voyager-2 IRIS/radio-science occultation experiment (Conrath et al. 1987 J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15003), is inconsistent with 70-200 μm PACS photometry (Mueller et al. 2016 Astron. & Astrophys. submittted) and ISO LWS photometric measurements. However, the model can be made consistent with the observations if the fraction of He relative to H2 were

  4. Seasonal dynamics of the land surface energy balance of a boreal forest-peatland landscape affected by degrading permafrost in the Taiga Plains, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, M.; Wischnewski, K.; Chasmer, L.; Quinton, W. L.; Kljun, N.; Detto, M.; Sonnentag, O.

    2014-12-01

    Northern boreal ecosystems along the southern limit of permafrost comprise a mosaic of forests with permafrost, and permafrost-free peatland and lake ecosystems. The proportion of permafrost-free areas has rapidly increased over the last decades due to increasingly warmer air temperatures. This change in land cover causes changes in vegetation composition and structure affecting land surface characteristics such as albedo and surface roughness with important implications for the land surface energy balance and thus regional climate. For example, a decrease in sensible heat flux potentially cools the atmosphere and thus constitutes a negative feedback to the climate system. Changes in latent heat fluxes alter regional water vapour dynamics and thus may affect precipitation patterns. To better understand the land surface energy balance under the influence of degrading permafrost, we measured sensible and latent heat fluxes with two eddy covariance systems, one at 15 m and one at 2 m above the ground surface, along with net radiation and soil heat flux at Scotty Creek, a watershed in the discontinuous permafrost zone in the southern part of the Northwest Territories, Canada. The flux footprint of the 15 m-eddy covariance system covers an area equally covered by black spruce forests and permafrost-free, treeless peatlands whereas the flux footprint of the adjacent 2 m-eddy covariance system covers a single bog within the footprint of the 15 m system. Peak sensible heat fluxes at the bog were up to 200 W m-2 smaller than the landscape-scale fluxes between April and July 2014. During the snow free period, peak latent heat fluxes at the wet bog were about 50 W m-2 higher than the landscape-scale fluxes. Albedo of the forest was generally smaller compared to the bog except for the immediate post-melt period when the bog was affected by widespread surface flooding. This difference in albedo leads to higher net radiation at the forest site, particularly during the snow cover

  5. Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway affect root waving on tilted agar surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Gallois, P.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow in a wavy pattern upon a slanted surface. A novel mutation in the anthranilate synthase alpha 1 (ASA1) gene, named trp5-2wvc1, and mutations in the tryptophan synthase alpha and beta 1 genes (trp3-1 and trp2-1, respectively) confer a compressed root wave phenotype on tilted agar surfaces. When trp5-2wvc1 seedlings are grown on media supplemented with anthranilate metabolites, their roots wave like wild type. Genetic and pharmacological experiments argue that the compressed root wave phenotypes of trp5-2wvc1, trp2-1 and trp3-1 seedlings are not due to reduced IAA biosynthetic potential, but rather to a deficiency in L-tryptophan (L-Trp), or in a L-Trp derivative. Although the roots of 7-day-old seedlings possess higher concentrations of free L-Trp than the shoot as a whole, trp5-2wvc1 mutants show no detectable alteration in L-Trp levels in either tissue type, suggesting that a very localized shortage of L-Trp, or of a L-Trp-derived compound, is responsible for the observed phenotype.

  6. Application of an environmental decision support system to a water quality trading program affected by surface water diversions.

    PubMed

    Obropta, Christopher C; Niazi, Mehran; Kardos, Josef S

    2008-12-01

    Environmental decision support systems (EDSSs) are an emerging tool used to integrate the evaluation of highly complex and interrelated physicochemical, biological, hydrological, social, and economic aspects of environmental problems. An EDSS approach is developed to address hot-spot concerns for a water quality trading program intended to implement the total maximum daily load (TMDL) for phosphorus in the Non-Tidal Passaic River Basin of New Jersey. Twenty-two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) spread throughout the watershed are considered the major sources of phosphorus loading to the river system. Periodic surface water diversions to a major reservoir from the confluence of two key tributaries alter the natural hydrology of the watershed and must be considered in the development of a trading framework that ensures protection of water quality. An EDSS is applied that enables the selection of a water quality trading framework that protects the watershed from phosphorus-induced hot spots. The EDSS employs Simon's (1960) three stages of the decision-making process: intelligence, design, and choice. The identification of two potential hot spots and three diversion scenarios enables the delineation of three management areas for buying and selling of phosphorus credits among WWTPs. The result shows that the most conservative option entails consideration of two possible diversion scenarios, and trading between management areas is restricted accordingly. The method described here is believed to be the first application of an EDSS to a water quality trading program that explicitly accounts for surface water diversions. PMID:18592303

  7. Application of an Environmental Decision Support System to a Water Quality Trading Program Affected by Surface Water Diversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obropta, Christopher C.; Niazi, Mehran; Kardos, Josef S.

    2008-12-01

    Environmental decision support systems (EDSSs) are an emerging tool used to integrate the evaluation of highly complex and interrelated physicochemical, biological, hydrological, social, and economic aspects of environmental problems. An EDSS approach is developed to address hot-spot concerns for a water quality trading program intended to implement the total maximum daily load (TMDL) for phosphorus in the Non-Tidal Passaic River Basin of New Jersey. Twenty-two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) spread throughout the watershed are considered the major sources of phosphorus loading to the river system. Periodic surface water diversions to a major reservoir from the confluence of two key tributaries alter the natural hydrology of the watershed and must be considered in the development of a trading framework that ensures protection of water quality. An EDSS is applied that enables the selection of a water quality trading framework that protects the watershed from phosphorus-induced hot spots. The EDSS employs Simon’s (1960) three stages of the decision-making process: intelligence, design, and choice. The identification of two potential hot spots and three diversion scenarios enables the delineation of three management areas for buying and selling of phosphorus credits among WWTPs. The result shows that the most conservative option entails consideration of two possible diversion scenarios, and trading between management areas is restricted accordingly. The method described here is believed to be the first application of an EDSS to a water quality trading program that explicitly accounts for surface water diversions.

  8. Feasibility of spectro-photometry in X-rays (SPHINX) from the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Ritabrata; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2010-08-01

    Doing space Astronomy on lunar surface has several advantages. We present here feasibility of an All Sky Monitoring Payload for Spectro-photometry in X-rays (SPHINX) which can be placed on a lander on the moon or in a space craft orbiting around the moon. The Si-PIN photo-diodes and CdTe crystals are used to detect solar flares, bright gamma bursts, soft gamma-ray repeaters from space and also X-ray fluorescence (XRF) from lunar surface. We present the complete Geant4 simulation to study the feasibility of such an instrument in presence of Cosmic Diffused X-Ray Background (CDXRB). We find that the signal to noise ratio is sufficient for moderate to bright GRBs (above 5 keV), for the quiet sun (up to 100 keV), solar flares, soft gamma-ray repeaters, X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) of lunar surface etc. This is a low-cost system which is capable of performing multiple tasks while stationed at the natural satellite of our planet.

  9. Differences in the surface composition of seemingly similar F75 cobalt-chromium micron-sized particulates can affect synovial fibroblast viability.

    PubMed

    Kovacik, M W; Mostardi, R A; Neal, D R; Bear, T F; Askew, M J; Bender, E T; Walker, J I; Ramsier, R D

    2008-09-01

    We present data and analyses concerning the cytotoxicity and bioreactivity associated with the surface composition of fine metal particulates that are similar to those commonly released in the body by prostheses used in total joint replacement surgery. Here we study the bulk and surface compositions of three separately procured cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) micron-sized particulate powders, each identified by their corresponding vendor as being ASTM F75 grade material. We use energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to verify the bulk metallic composition and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to examine the surface metallic composition of each CoCrMo powder. Cultured synovial fibroblasts were then exposed to the particulate powders to see how the metallic surfaces might affect cellular viability. Results indicate that while the bulk metallic composition of each CoCrMo powder was similar, the surface metallic compositions were found to be dramatically different and yielded equally dramatic differences in terms of cytotoxicity and bioreactivity of synovial fibroblast in culture. PMID:18583107

  10. Time series photometry of faint cataclysmic variables with a CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Timothy Mark Cameron

    1992-08-01

    I describe a new hardware and software environment for the practice of time-series stellar photometry with the CCD systems available at McDonald Observatory. This instrument runs suitable CCD's in frame transfer mode and permits windowing on the CCD image to maximize the duty cycle of the photometer. Light curves may be extracted and analyzed in real time at the telescope and image data are stored for later, more thorough analysis. I describe a star tracking algorithm, which is optimized for a timeseries of images of the same stellar field. I explore the extraction of stellar brightness measures from these images using circular software apertures and develop a complete description of the noise properties of this technique. I show that scintillation and pixelization noise have a significant effect on high quality observations. I demonstrate that optimal sampling and profile fitting techniques are unnecessarily complex or detrimental methods of obtaining stellar brightness measures under conditions commonly encountered in timeseries CCD photometry. I compare CCD's and photomultiplier tubes as detectors for timeseries photometry using light curves of a variety of stars obtained simultaneously with both detectors and under equivalent conditions. A CCD can produce useful data under conditions when a photomultiplier tube cannot, and a CCD will often produce more reliable results even under photometric conditions. I prevent studies of the cataclysmic variables (CV's) AL Com, CP Eri, V Per, and DO Leo made using the time series CCD photometer. AL Com is a very faint CV at high Galactic latitude and a bona fide Population II CV. Some of the properties of AL Com are similar to the dwarf nova WZ Sge and others are similar to the intermediate polar EX Hya, but overall AL Com is unlike any other well-studied cataclysmic variable. CP Eri is shown to be the fifth known interacting binary white dwarf. V Per was the first CV found to have an orbital period near the middle of the

  11. Estimating environmental conditions affecting protozoal pathogen removal in surface water wetland systems using a multi-scale, model-based approach.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Miles E; Hogan, Jennifer; Smith, Woutrina A; Oates, Stori C; Miller, Melissa A; Hardin, Dane; Shapiro, Karen; Los Huertos, Marc; Conrad, Patricia A; Dominik, Clare; Watson, Fred G R

    2014-09-15

    Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Toxoplasma gondii are waterborne protozoal pathogens distributed worldwide and empirical evidence suggests that wetlands reduce the concentrations of these pathogens under certain environmental conditions. The goal of this study was to evaluate how protozoal removal in surface water is affected by the water temperature, turbidity, salinity, and vegetation cover of wetlands in the Monterey Bay region of California. To examine how protozoal removal was affected by these environmental factors, we conducted observational experiments at three primary spatial scales: settling columns, recirculating wetland mesocosm tanks, and an experimental research wetland (Molera Wetland). Simultaneously, we developed a protozoal transport model for surface water to simulate the settling columns, the mesocosm tanks, and the Molera Wetland. With a high degree of uncertainty expected in the model predictions and field observations, we developed the model within a Bayesian statistical framework. We found protozoal removal increased when water flowed through vegetation, and with higher levels of turbidity, salinity, and temperature. Protozoal removal in surface water was maximized (~0.1 hour(-1)) when flowing through emergent vegetation at 2% cover, and with a vegetation contact time of ~30 minutes compared to the effects of temperature, salinity, and turbidity. Our studies revealed that an increase in vegetated wetland area, with water moving through vegetation, would likely improve regional water quality through the reduction of fecal protozoal pathogen loads. PMID:25016109

  12. Apatite formation on bioactive calcium-silicate cements for dentistry affects surface topography and human marrow stromal cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Taddei, Paola; Perut, Francesca; Tinti, Anna; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Prati, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The effect of ageing in phosphate-containing solution of bioactive calcium-silicate cements on the chemistry, morphology and topography of the surface, as well as on in vitro human marrow stromal cells viability and proliferation was investigated. A calcium-silicate cement (wTC) mainly based on dicalcium-silicate and tricalcium-silicate was prepared. Alpha-TCP was added to wTC to obtain wTC-TCP. Bismuth oxide was inserted in wTC to prepare a radiopaque cement (wTC-Bi). A commercial calcium-silicate cement (ProRoot MTA) was tested as control. Cement disks were aged in DPBS for 5 h ('fresh samples'), 14 and 28 days, and analyzed by ESEM/EDX, SEM/EDX, ATR-FTIR, micro-Raman techniques and scanning white-light interferometry. Proliferation, LDH release, ALP activity and collagen production of human marrow stromal cells (MSC) seeded for 1-28 days on the cements were evaluated. Fresh samples exposed a surface mainly composed of calcium-silicate hydrates CSH (from the hydration of belite and alite), calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and ettringite. Apatite nano-spherulites rapidly precipitated on cement surfaces within 5 h. On wTC-TCP the Ca-P deposits appeared thicker than on the other cements. Aged cements showed an irregular porous calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) coating, formed by aggregated apatite spherulites with interspersed calcite crystals. All the experimental cements exerted no acute toxicity in the cell assay system and allowed cell growth. Using biochemical results, the scores were: fresh cements>aged cements for cell proliferation and ALP activity (except for wTC-Bi), whereas fresh cements

  13. A dimeric peptide with erythropoiesis-stimulating activity uniquely affects erythropoietin receptor ligation and cell surface expression.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rakesh; Green, Jennifer M; Schatz, Peter J; Wojchowski, Don M

    2016-08-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) that exert long-acting antianemia effects have been developed recently, but their mechanisms are poorly understood. Analyses reveal unique erythropoietin receptor (EPOR)-binding properties for one such ESA, the synthetic EPOR agonist peginesatide. Compared with recombinant human EPO and darbepoietin, peginesatide exhibited a slow on rate, but sustained EPOR residency and resistant displacement. In EPO-dependent human erythroid progenitor UT7epo cells, culture in peginesatide unexpectedly upmodulated endogenous cell surface EPOR levels with parallel increases in full-length EPOR-68K levels. These unique properties are suggested to contribute to the durable activity of this (and perhaps additional) dimeric peptide hematopoietic growth factor receptor agonist. PMID:27174804

  14. Surface-attached and suspended bacterial community structure as affected by C/N ratios: relationship between bacteria and fish production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ermeng; Xie, Jun; Wang, Jinlin; Ako, Harry; Wang, Guangjun; Chen, Zhanghe; Liu, Yongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria play crucial roles in the combined system of substrate addition and C/N control, which has been demonstrated to improve aquaculture production. However, the complexity of surface-attached bacteria on substrates and suspended bacteria in the water column hamper further application of this system. This study firstly applied this combined system into the culture of grass carp, and then explored the relationship between microbial complexes from surface-attached and suspended bacteria in this system and the production of grass carp. In addition, this study investigated bacterial community structures as affected by four C/N ratios using Illumina sequencing technology. The results demonstrated that the weight gain rate and specific growth rate of grass carp in the CN20 group (C/N ratio 20:1) were the highest (P < 0.05), and dietary supplementation of the microbial complex had positive effects on the growth of grass carp (P < 0.05). Sequencing data revealed that, (1) the proportions of Verrucomicrobiae and Rhodobacter (surface-attached), sediminibacterium (suspended), and emticicia (surface-attached and suspended) were much higher in the CN20 group compared with those in the other groups (P < 0.05); (2) Rhodobacter, Flavobacterium, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Planctomyces, and Cloacibacterium might be important for the microbial colonization on substrates; (3) as the C/N ratio increased, proportions of Hydrogenophaga (surface-attached and suspended), Zoogloea, and Flectobacillus (suspended) increased, but proportions of Bacillus, Clavibacter, and Cellvibro (surface-attached and suspended) decreased. In summary, a combined system of substrate addition and C/N control increased the production of grass carp, and Verrucomicrobiae and Rhodobacter in the surface-attached bacterial community were potential probiotic bacteria that contributed to the enhanced growth of grass carp. PMID:27263011

  15. Performance of loblolly, Virginia, and shortleaf pine on a reclaimed surface mine as affected by Pisolithus tinctorius ectomycorrhizae and fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.F.; West, D.C.; McLaughlin, S.B.; Amundsen, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of an induced Pisolithus tinctorius infection and broadcast fertilization were studied on the survival and growth of loblolly (Pinus taeda), Virginia (Pinus virginiana), and shortleaf (Pinus echinata) pine outplanted on a reclaimed east Tennessee coal surface mine site. The study site had been previously regraded and hydroseeded with a mixture of ground cover species. After six years, the survival and growth of loblolly pine with P. tinctorius ectomycorrhizae were signficantly improved in comparison with control loblolly pine infected by other ectomycorrhizal symbionts. The response of the Virginia pine to the infection by P. tinctorius was negligible after five years. Fertilization at outplanting significantly reduced the survival of both loblolly and Virginia pine. Fertilization of the shortleaf pine at the start of the third growing season did not result in the drastic mortality exhibited by the loblolly pine, and to a lesser extent the Virginia pine, in response to fertilization at outplanting, but this treatment was still detrimental to the survival of the shortleaf pine after five years. There was a marginal improvement in the survival and growth of the shortleaf pine in response to the infection by P. tinctorius. The effect of fertilization on the growth of all three species was negligible, and the increase in mortality associated with this treatment appeared to be primarily the result of increased competition with the ground cover species. These results indicate that the magnitude of the response exhibited by pines on harsh sites to an ectomycorrhizal infection by P. tinctorius is species dependent. Also, broadcast fertilization is inefficient on surface-mined sites where a vegetative ground cover has been established. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Network-scale dynamics of sediment mixtures: how do tectonics affect surface bed texture and channel slope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, N. M.; Bras, R. L.; Tucker, G. E.

    2003-04-01

    An alluvial channel's slope and bed texture are intimately linked. Along with fluvial discharge, these variables are the key players in setting alluvial transport rates. We know that both channel slope and mean grain size usually decrease downstream, but how sensitive are these variables to tectonic changes? Are basin concavity and downstream fining drastically disrupted during transitions from one tectonic regime to another? We explore these questions using the CHILD numerical landscape evolution model to generate alluvial networks composed of a sand and gravel mixture. The steady-state and transient patterns of both channel slope and sediment texture are investigated. The steady-state patterns in slope and sediment texture are verified independently by solving the erosion equations under equilibrium conditions, i.e. the case when the erosion rate is equal to the uplift rate across the entire landscape. The inclusion of surface texture as a free parameter (as opposed to just channel slope) leads to some surprising results. In all cases, an increase in uplift rate results in channel beds which are finer at equilibrium (for a given drainage area). Higher uplift rates imply larger equilibrium transport rates; this leads to finer channels that have a smaller critical shear stress to entrain material, and therefore more material can be transported for a given discharge (and channel slope). Changes in equilibrium slopes are less intuitive. An increase in uplift rates can cause channel slopes to increase, remain the same, or decrease, depending on model parameter values. In the surprising case in which equilibrium channel slopes decrease with increasing uplift rates, we suggest that surface texture changes more than compensate for the required increase in transport rates, causing channel slopes to decrease. These results highlight the important role of sediment grain size in determining transport rates and caution us against ignoring this important variable in fluvial

  17. Results from a Program of Full Disk Solar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G.; Cookson, A.; Dobias, J.; Preminger, D.; Walton, S.

    Photometry of the full solar disk has been carried out at the San Fernando Observatory since 1985. A number of quantities are computed from images obtained in the red, blue and K-line. Photometric irradiance deficits due to sunspots and excesses due to faculae and network are highly correlated with variations in the total solar irradiance (TSI) from spacecraft. Multiple correlation coefficients as high as 0.95 to 0.97, depending on spacecraft and interval, have been obtained. Recent work shows that the short-term rotation variation of the TSI is due to the coming and going of active regions whereas the solar cycle variations on the scale of the solar cycle are due to changes in line blanketing associated with faculae and network.

  18. Using Photometry to Probe the Circumstellar Environment of δ Scorpii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Wiegert, P. A.; Tycner, C.; Henry, G. W.; Cyr, R. P.; Halonen, R. J.; Muterspaugh, M. W.

    2013-05-01

    We acquired Johnson BV photometry of the binary Be disk system δ Scorpii during its 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012 observing seasons and used it to probe the innermost regions of the disk. We found that several disk building events have occurred during this time, resulting in an overall brightening in the V band and reddening of the system. In addition to these long-term trends, we found cyclical variability in each observing season on timescales between 60 and 100 days. We were able to reproduce the changes in the magnitude and color of δ Sco using our theoretical models and found that variable mass-loss rates in the range 2.5-7.0 × 10-9 M ⊙ yr-1 over ~35 days can reproduce the observed increase in brightness.

  19. USING PHOTOMETRY TO PROBE THE CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENT OF {delta} SCORPII

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C. E.; Wiegert, P. A.; Cyr, R. P.; Halonen, R. J.; Tycner, C.; Henry, G. W.; Muterspaugh, M. W.

    2013-05-15

    We acquired Johnson BV photometry of the binary Be disk system {delta} Scorpii during its 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012 observing seasons and used it to probe the innermost regions of the disk. We found that several disk building events have occurred during this time, resulting in an overall brightening in the V band and reddening of the system. In addition to these long-term trends, we found cyclical variability in each observing season on timescales between 60 and 100 days. We were able to reproduce the changes in the magnitude and color of {delta} Sco using our theoretical models and found that variable mass-loss rates in the range 2.5-7.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} over {approx}35 days can reproduce the observed increase in brightness.

  20. CCD photometry of globular clusters in NGC 3377

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William E.

    1990-08-01

    New CCD photometry to a limit B = 24.3 is presented for a sample of globular clusters around NGC 337, an intermediate-size elliptical in the Leo group. Assuming that the luminosity function of its globular clusters follows the same log-normal form as in other galaxies, a peak frequency level (turnover magnitude) of B(0) = 23.35 + or - 0.40 is derived for a combined sample of clusters in NGC 3377 and NGC 3379. Matching this to the globular clusters in the Milky Way then gives a distance modulus (m - M)B (Leo) = 30.2, or d = (10.7 + or - 2.2) Mpc, in good agreement with other recent distance-scale methods. The clusters around NGC 3377 follow a highly ellipsoidal space distribution; two different tests show that their distribution is at least as flattened as the E6 shape of the galaxy itself.

  1. CCD photometry of globular clusters in NGC 3377

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W.E. )

    1990-09-01

    New CCD photometry to a limit B = 24.3 is presented for a sample of globular clusters around NGC 337, an intermediate-size elliptical in the Leo group. Assuming that the luminosity function of its globular clusters follows the same log-normal form as in other galaxies, a peak frequency level (turnover magnitude) of B(0) = 23.35 + or - 0.40 is derived for a combined sample of clusters in NGC 3377 and NGC 3379. Matching this to the globular clusters in the Milky Way then gives a distance modulus (m - M)B (Leo) = 30.2, or d = (10.7 + or - 2.2) Mpc, in good agreement with other recent distance-scale methods. The clusters around NGC 3377 follow a highly ellipsoidal space distribution; two different tests show that their distribution is at least as flattened as the E6 shape of the galaxy itself. 31 refs.

  2. Three years of photometry of IM Pegasi = HR 8703

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, J. A.; Hall, D. S.; Henry, G. W.; Lovell, L. P.; Stephan, C. A.; Chambliss, C. R.; Detterline, P. K.; Landis, H. J.; Louth, H.; Renner, T. R.

    1983-01-01

    Differential photometry of this K1 IV-III p RS CVn-type binary in 1978-79, 1979-80, and 1980-81 at eight different observatories shows that the variability, discovered originally by Herbst, is periodic. The mean of three different determinations of the photometric period was 24(d).39 + or 0(d).03, about 1 percent shorter than the orbital period of 24(d).649 determined spectroscopically by Harper. The total range observed during these three years was for V from 5(m).60 to 5(m).85. The light curve was nearly sinusoidal but always noticieably asymmetric, with the sense reversing sometime between 1979-80 and 1980-81.

  3. Spitzer IRAC Photometry for Time Series in Crowded Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calchi Novati, S.; Gould, A.; Yee, J. C.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; Zhu, W.; Spitzer Team; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Group

    2015-12-01

    We develop a new photometry algorithm that is optimized for the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Spitzer time series in crowded fields and that is particularly adapted to faint or heavily blended targets. We apply this to the 170 targets from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign and present the results of three variants of this algorithm in an online catalog. We present detailed accounts of the application of this algorithm to two difficult cases, one very faint and the other very crowded. Several of Spitzer's instrumental characteristics that drive the specific features of this algorithm are shared by Kepler and WFIRST, implying that these features may prove to be a useful starting point for algorithms designed for microlensing campaigns by these other missions.

  4. Towards photometry pipeline of the Indonesian space surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyatikanto, Rhorom; Religia, Bahar; Rachman, Abdul; Dani, Tiar

    2015-09-01

    Optical observation through sub-meter telescope equipped with CCD camera becomes alternative method for increasing orbital debris detection and surveillance. This observational mode is expected to eye medium-sized objects in higher orbits (e.g. MEO, GTO, GSO & GEO), beyond the reach of usual radar system. However, such observation of fast moving objects demands special treatment and analysis technique. In this study, we performed photometric analysis of the satellite track images photographed using rehabilitated Schmidt Bima Sakti telescope in Bosscha Observatory. The Hough transformation was implemented to automatically detect linear streak from the images. From this analysis and comparison to USSPACECOM catalog, two satellites were identified and associated with inactive Thuraya-3 satellite and Satcom-3 debris which are located at geostationary orbit. Further aperture photometry analysis revealed the periodicity of tumbling Satcom-3 debris. In the near future, it is not impossible to apply similar scheme to establish an analysis pipeline for optical space surveillance system hosted in Indonesia.

  5. The symbiosis of photometry and radial-velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    1994-01-01

    The FRESIP mission is optimized to detect the inner planets of a planetary system. According to the current paradigm of planet formation, these planets will probably be small Earth-sized objects. Ground-based radial-velocity programs now have the sensitivity to detect Jovian-mass planets in orbit around bright solar-type stars. We expect the more massive planets to form in the outer regions of a proto-stellar nebula. These two types of measurements will very nicely complement each other, as they have highest detection probability for very different types of planets. The combination of FRESIP photometry and ground-based spectra will provide independent confirmation of the existence of planetary systems in orbit around other stars. Such detection of both terrestrial and Jovian planets in orbit around the same star is essential to test our understanding of planet formation.

  6. Flaring on RS CVn systems: Results from EUVE Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, R. A.; Brown, A.; Ayres, T. R.

    We present broadband EUV photometry for a sample of RS CVn systems observed with the Deep Survey Spectrometer and Right Angle Program (RAP) Scanners on the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE). We have developed robust data analysis and light curve software for the interpretation of these data. Large-scale flaring activity is seen on 15 of the 18 systems studied. These binaries cover a range in orbital period of 0.7 days to 21 days and include a mixture of giant, subgiant, and dwarf luminosity classes. For many systems the photometric coverage extends over several orbital periods and flaring is unambiguously characterized. We present statistics on the distribution of variability in the survey. Correlations of flaring with binary properties are examined.

  7. FRAM telescope - monitoring of atmospheric extinction and variable star photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurysek, J.; Honkova, K.; Masek, M.

    2015-02-01

    The FRAM (F/(Ph)otometric Robotic Atmospheric Monitor) telescope is a part of the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) located near town Malargüe in Argentina. The main task of the FRAM telescope is the continuous night - time monitoring of the atmospheric extinction and its wavelength dependence. The current methodology of the measurement of a atmospheric extinction and for instrumentation properties also allows simultaneous observation of other interesting astronomical targets. The current observations of the FRAM telescope are focused on the photometry of eclipsing binaries, positional refinement of minor bodies of the Solar system and observations of optical counterparts of gamma ray bursts. In this contribution, we briefly describe the main purpose of the FRAM telescope for the PAO and we also present its current astrono mical observing program.

  8. Millisecond optical photometry of the DQ Herculis objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, James N.; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.

    1988-01-01

    The results of millisecond optical photometry of the DQ Herculis stars EX Hya, H2252-035, V1223 Sgr, and AE Aqr obtained at the Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory during the years 1985, 1986, and 1987 are reported. The data for coherent and incoherent features are searched for. Coherent features (other than those previously known) were not detected for frequencies between 0.1 and 250 Hz at 4-sigma upper limits of 0.05-0.4 percent. Evidence is not found for 1-3 s, quasi-coherent features. Such features have been detected in the optical emission of the AM Her objects AN UMa, EF Eri, and E1405-451. Because of the similarities between AM Her and DQ Her objects, it was suggested that such quasi-coherent features might also be found in the DQ Her objects.

  9. Prelude to, and Nature of the Space Photometry Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliland, Ronald L.

    2015-09-01

    It is now less than a decade since CoRoT initiated the space photometry revolution with breakthrough discoveries, and five years since Kepler started a series of similar advances. I'll set the context for this revolution noting the status of asteroseismology and exoplanet discovery as it was 15-25 years ago in order to give perspective on why it is not mere hyperbole to claim CoRoT and Kepler fostered a revolution in our sciences. Primary events setting up the revolution will be recounted. I'll continue with noting the major discoveries in hand, and how asteroseismology and exoplanet studies, and indeed our approach to doing science, have been forever changed thanks to these spectacular missions.

  10. Asteroid models from photometry and complementary data sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2016-05-01

    I discuss inversion methods for asteroid shape and spin reconstruction with photometry (lightcurves) and complementary data sources such as adaptive optics or other images, occultation timings, interferometry, and range-Doppler radar data. These are essentially different sampling modes (generalized projections) of plane-of-sky images. An important concept in this approach is the optimal weighting of the various data modes. The maximum compatibility estimate, a multi-modal generalization of the maximum likelihood estimate, can be used for this purpose. I discuss the fundamental properties of lightcurve inversion by examining the two-dimensional case that, though not usable in our three-dimensional world, is simple to analyze, and it shares essentially the same uniqueness and stability properties as the 3-D case. After this, I review the main aspects of 3-D shape representations, lightcurve inversion, and the inclusion of complementary data.

  11. An interactive modular design for computerized photometry in spectrochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    A general functional description of totally automatic photometry of emission spectra is not available for an operating environment in which the sample compositions and analysis procedures are low-volume and non-routine. The advantages of using an interactive approach to computer control in such an operating environment are demonstrated. This approach includes modular subroutines selected at multiple-option, menu-style decision points. This style of programming is used to trace elemental determinations, including the automated reading of spectrographic plates produced by a 3.4 m Ebert mount spectrograph using a dc-arc in an argon atmosphere. The simplified control logic and modular subroutine approach facilitates innovative research and program development, yet is easily adapted to routine tasks. Operator confidence and control are increased by the built-in options including degree of automation, amount of intermediate data printed out, amount of user prompting, and multidirectional decision points.

  12. Photometry of stars in the Cas OB5 Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanriver, Mehmet; Keskin, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    OB associations are a grouping of very young associations, contain 10-100 very hot massive stars, spectral types O and B. Also, the OB associations contain low and intermediate mass stars, too. Association members are believed to form within the same small volume inside a giant molecular cloud. Once the surrounding dust and gas is blown away, the remaining stars become not tied up and begin to drift separately. It is believed that the majority of all stars in the Milky Way were formed in OB associations. O type stars are short-lived, and will be at an end as supernovae after roundly a million years. OB associations are generally only a few million years in age or less. In this study, the photometry of UU Cas and field star which been Cas OB5 association member was carried out. Light curves and color diagrams are given in the study.

  13. Results of the 2015 Mexican Asteroid Photometry Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sada, Pedro V.; Navarro-Meza, Samuel; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Olguin, Lorenzo L.; Saucedo, Julio C.; Loera-Gonzalez, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    The 2015 Mexican Asteroid Photometry Campaign was organized at the 2nd National Planetary Astrophysics Workshop held in 2015 March at the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León in Monterrey, México. Three asteroids were selected for coordinated observations from several Mexican observatories. We report full lightcurves for the main-belt asteroid 1084 Tamariwa (P = 6.195 ± 0.001 h) and near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 4055 Magellan (P = 7.479 ± 0.001 h). Asteroid 1466 Mundleria was also observed on eight nights but no lightcurve was obtained because of its faintness, a crowded field-of-view, and low amplitude (<0.03 mag).

  14. SIT Vidicon photometry for four old Magellanic Cloud clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. E.; Hesser, J. E.; Atwood, B.

    1983-12-01

    SIT Vidicon photometry in B and V from the CTIO 4-m telescope is presented for NGC 1466, NGC 2203, NGC 2210, and NGC 2257 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The deepest data are for NGC 2257, where the main sequence turnoff is reached at V = 22.4, confirming Stryker's (1983) inference from photographic data that the cluster has an age comparable to those of the Galactic globular clusters. NGC 2203 is found to be an intermediate-age cluster with a C-M diagram similar to that of NGC 7789 in the Galaxy. For NGC 1466 and NGC 2210 the present data are compatible with previous studies that have found these to be genuinely old clusters in the Galactic globular cluster sense.

  15. Steps toward a physical calibration of UBV photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buser, R.; Kurucz, R. L.

    The large data base of photoelectric measurements on the Johnson UBV system has been a primary source of information in many fields of astrophysical interest. The availability of UBV data for virtually all types of stars known to make up the stellar populations in galaxies requires a continued effort toward establishing a fully physical calibration of these data in order to propagate effectively the improving knowledge on stellar evolution and stellar atmospheres (i.e., the HR diagram) through the observations relevant to the structure and evolution of the galaxies. One of the major links in this long chain of scientific progress is provided by the synthesis of stellar photometric properties from theoretical model atmospheres. This paper will briefly address some of the basic problems involved in the synthetic color calculations and discuss the theoretical calibration of UBV photometry as obtained from various grids of model atmospheres covering a large range of stellar types.

  16. Glory revealed in disk-integrated photometry of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Muñoz, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Reflected light from a spatially unresolved planet yields unique insight into the overall optical properties of the planet cover. Glories are optical phenomena caused by light that is backscattered within spherical droplets following a narrow distribution of sizes; they are well known on Earth as localised features above liquid clouds. Aims: Here we report the first evidence for a glory in the disk-integrated photometry of Venus and, in turn, of any planet. Methods: We used previously published phase curves of the planet that were reproduced over the full range of phase angles with model predictions based on a realistic description of the Venus atmosphere. We assumed that the optical properties of the planet as a whole can be described by a uniform and stable cloud cover, an assumption that agrees well with observational evidence. Results: We specifically show that the measured phase curves mimic the scattering properties of the Venus upper-cloud micron-sized aerosols, also at the small phase angles at which the glory occurs, and that the glory contrast is consistent with what is expected after multiple scattering of photons. In the optical, the planet appears to be brighter at phase angles of ~11-13° than at full illumination; it undergoes a maximum dimming of up to ~10% at phases in between. Conclusions: Glories might potentially indicate spherical droplets and, thus, extant liquid clouds in the atmospheres of exoplanets. A prospective detection will require exquisite photometry at the small planet-star separations of the glory phase angles. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Recovering physical properties from narrow-band photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenell, W.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Benítez, N.; Vale Asari, N.

    2013-05-01

    Our aim in this work is to answer, using simulated narrow-band photometry data, the following general question: What can we learn about galaxies from these new generation cosmological surveys? For instance, can we estimate stellar age and metallicity distributions? Can we separate star-forming galaxies from AGN? Can we measure emission lines, nebular abundances and extinction? With what precision? To accomplish this, we selected a sample of about 300k galaxies with good S/N from the SDSS and divided them in two groups: 200k objects and a template library of 100k. We corrected the spectra to z = 0 and converted them to filter fluxes. Using a statistical approach, we calculated a Probability Distribution Function (PDF) for each property of each object and the library. Since we have the properties of all the data from the STARLIGHT-SDSS database, we could compare them with the results obtained from summaries of the PDF (mean, median, etc). Our results shows that we retrieve the weighted average of the log of the galaxy age with a good error margin (σ ≈ 0.1 - 0.2 dex), and similarly for the physical properties such as mass-to-light ratio, mean stellar metallicity, etc. Furthermore, our main result is that we can derive emission line intensities and ratios with similar precision. This makes this method unique in comparison to the other methods on the market to analyze photometry data and shows that, from the point of view of galaxy studies, future photometric surveys will be much more useful than anticipated.

  18. Far-ultraviolet photometry of the globular cluster omega Cen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Jonathan H.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Rood, Robert T.; Dorman, Ben; Landsman, Wayne B.; Cheng, K.-P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Hintzen, Paul M. N.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.

    1994-01-01

    We present far-ultraviolet images of the globular cluster omega Centauri obtained with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) during the 1990 December Astro-1 mission. A total of 1957 sources are detected at 1620 A to a limiting ultraviolet (UV) magnitude of 16.4 in the central 24 min diameter region of the field and a limit of 15.6 over the remainder of the 40 min diameter field. Over 1400 of these sources are matched with stars on a Stroemgren u band charge coupled devices (CCD) frame obtained with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) 0.9 m telescope to produce a (far-UV, u) color-magnitude diagram (CMD). Completeness of the sample and error estimates are determined by photometry of artificial stars added to the images. The horizontal branch (HB) of the CMD is heavily populated hotter than 9000 K. A large number of 'extreme HB' stars are found hotter than a conspicuous break in the HB at T(sub e) approximately 16000 K. There is also a significant population of stars above the HB, the brightest of which is 4 mag brighter than the HB. Most of the hotter of these appear to be 'AGB-manque' or 'Post-Early Asymptotic Giant Branch' stars. We compare the observations to recent theoretical evolutionary tracks for the zero-age HB and subsequent phases. The tracks match the data well, with the exception of the hotter HB stars, many of which fall below the zero-age horizontal branch. It is unclear as yet whether these are a special population or an artifact of errors in the models or photometry. We identify 33 stars with T(sub e) greater than or approximately = 50000 K, which are hotter than zero-age HB stars with envelope masses of 0.003 solar mass.

  19. Exoplanet Photometry and Spectroscopy with HII/L2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, M.

    2000-12-01

    With the recent discovery of extrasolar planets (exoplanets) around nearby stars by indirect methods, one of the next goals of the exoplanet study is to directly detect the giant exoplanets and to make photometry and spectroscopy. The next decade will be the time to move from discovery to characterization of exoplanet systems. This, however, requires all of high sensitivity, high spatial resolution, and high dynamic range observations at infrared wavelengths, which will be difficult to achieve from the ground. In this paper, we describe a coronagraphic camera and spectrometer for the HII/L2 mission for mid- and far-infrared astronomy and show the photometry and spectroscopy of exoplanets to be one of the most important scientific aims for this mission. The proposed HII/L2 coronagraph will cover the wavelength between 4 and 27 micron, optimized at 5 micron. The plate scale is about 0.06 arcsec, covering a field-of-view of about 1 arcmin by 1 arcmin with a 1024x1024 array detector. Occulting masks of diameter greater than 0.72 arcsec will be available, which enables the observations of exoplanets beyond ~2 AU around nearby (d~5 pc) stars. The coronagraph greatly takes advantage of the single (non-segmented) mirror of the HII/L2 telescope design. A high-efficiency Ge or CdTe grism with a resolution of a few hundreds will be installed for the coronagraphic spectroscopy of the exoplanet atmosphere. Rich spectral features at mid-infrared wavelengths enable us to study various atmospheric components and to make a comparative study of the exoplanets and our solar system planets.

  20. Infrared Photometry of Late-M, L, and T Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggett, S. K.; Golimowski, David A.; Fan, Xiaohui; Geballe, T. R.; Knapp, G. R.; Brinkmann, J.; Csabai, István; Gunn, James E.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Henry, Todd J.; Hindsley, Robert; Ivezić, Željko; Lupton, Robert H.; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, J. Allyn; Strauss, Michael A.; Uomoto, Alan; York, D. G.

    2002-01-01

    We present ZJHKL'M' photometry of a sample of 58 late M, L, and T dwarfs, most of which are identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Two Micron All-Sky Survey. Near-infrared spectra and spectral classifications for most of this sample are presented in a companion paper by Geballe et al. We derive the luminosities of 18 dwarfs in the sample with known parallaxes, and the results imply that the effective temperature range for the L dwarfs in our sample is approximately 2200-1300 K and for the T dwarfs 1300-800 K. We obtained new photometric data at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope for: 42 dwarfs at Z, 34 dwarfs at JHK, 21 dwarfs at L', as well as M' data for two L dwarfs and two T dwarfs. The M' data provide the first accurate photometry for L and T dwarfs in this bandpass-for a T2 and a T5 dwarf, we find K-M'=1.2 and 1.6, respectively. These colors are much bluer than predicted by published models, suggesting that CO may be more abundant in these objects than expected, as has been found for the T6 dwarf Gl 229B. We also find that K-L' increases monotonically through most of the M, L, and T subclasses, but it is approximately constant between types L6 and T5, restricting its usefulness as a temperature indicator. The degeneracy is probably due to the onset of CH4 absorption at the blue edge of the L' bandpass. The JHK colors of L dwarfs show significant scatter, suggesting that the fluxes in these bandpasses are sensitive to variations in photospheric dust properties. The H-K colors of the later T dwarfs also show some scatter, which we suggest is due to variations in pressure-induced H2 opacity, which is sensitive to gravity and metallicity.

  1. Spectral properties of near-Earth and Mars-crossing asteroids using Sloan photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carry, B.; Solano, E.; Eggl, S.; DeMeo, F. E.

    2016-04-01

    The nature and origin of the asteroids orbiting in near-Earth space, including those on a potentially hazardous trajectory, is of both scientific interest and practical importance. We aim here at determining the taxonomy of a large sample of near-Earth and Mars-crosser asteroids and analyze the distribution of these classes with orbit. We use this distribution to identify the source regions of near-Earth objects and to study the strength of planetary encounters to refresh asteroid surfaces. We measure the photometry of these asteroids over four filters at visible wavelengths on images taken by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These colors are used to classify the asteroids into a taxonomy consistent with the widely used Bus-DeMeo taxonomy (DeMeo et al. [2009]. Icarus 202, 160-180) based on visible and near-infrared spectroscopy. We report here on the taxonomic classification of 206 near-Earth and 776 Mars-crosser asteroids determined from SDSS photometry, representing an increase of 40% and 663% of known taxonomy classifications in these populations. Using the source region mapper by Greenstreet et al. (Greenstreet, S., Ngo, H., Gladman, B. [2012]. Icarus, 217, 355-366), we compare for the first time the taxonomic distribution among near-Earth and main-belt asteroids of similar diameters. Both distributions agree at the few percent level for the inner part of the main belt and we confirm this region as a main source of near-Earth objects. The effect of planetary encounters on asteroid surfaces are also studied by developing a simple model of forces acting on a surface grain during planetary encounter, which provides the minimum distance at which a close approach should occur to trigger resurfacing events. By integrating numerically the orbit of the 519 S-type and 46 Q-type asteroids in our sample back in time for 500,000 years and monitoring their encounter distance with Venus, Earth, Mars, and Jupiter, we seek to understand the conditions for resurfacing

  2. Time-series Photometry of the Pre-Main Sequence Binary V4046 Sgr: Testing the Accretion Stream Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofflemire, Benjamin M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Ardila, David R.; Ciardi, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Most stars are born in binaries, and the evolution of protostellar disks in pre-main sequence (PMS) binary stars is a current frontier of star formation research. PMS binary stars can have up to three accretion disks: two circumstellar disks and a circumbinary disk separated by a dynamically cleared gap. Theory suggests that mass may periodically flow in an accretion stream from a circumbinary disk across the gap onto circumstellar disks or stellar surfaces. Thus, accretion in PMS binaries is controlled by not only radiation, disk viscosity, and magnetic fields, but also by orbital dynamics.As part of a larger, ongoing effort to characterize mass accretion in young binary systems, we test the predictions of the binary accretion stream theory through continuous, multi-orbit, multi-color optical and near-infrared (NIR) time-series photometry. Observations such as these are capable of detecting and characterizing these modulated accretion streams, if they are generally present. Broad-band blue and ultraviolet photometry trace the accretion luminosity and photospheric temperature while NIR photometry provide a measurement of warm circumstellar material, all as a function of orbital phase. The predicted phase and magnitude of enhanced accretion are highly dependent on the binary orbital parameters and as such, our campaign focuses on 10 PMS binaries of varying periods and eccentricities. Here we present multi-color optical (U, B,V, R), narrowband (Hα), and multi-color NIR (J, H) lightcurves of the PMS binary V4046 Sgr (P=2.42 days) obtained with the SMARTS 1.3m telescope and LCOGT 1m telescope network. These results act to showcase the quality and breadth of data we have, or are currently obtaining, for each of the PMS binaries in our sample. With the full characterization of our sample, these observations will guide an extension of the accretion paradigm from single young stars to multiple systems.

  3. Subtle Change in the Charge Distribution of Surface Residues May Affect the Secondary Functions of Cytochrome c*

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Simanta Sarani; Sil, Pallabi; Haldar, Shubhasis; Mitra, Samaresh; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2015-01-01

    Although the primary function of cytochrome c (cyt c) is electron transfer, the protein caries out an additional secondary function involving its interaction with membrane cardiolipin (CDL), its peroxidase activity, and the initiation of apoptosis. Whereas the primary function of cyt c is essentially conserved, its secondary function varies depending on the source of the protein. We report here a detailed experimental and computational study, which aims to understand, at the molecular level, the difference in the secondary functions of cyt c obtained from horse heart (mammalian) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). The conformational landscape of cyt c has been found to be heterogeneous, consisting of an equilibrium between the compact and extended conformers as well as the oligomeric species. Because the determination of relative populations of these conformers is difficult to obtain by ensemble measurements, we used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a method that offers single-molecule resolution. The population of different species is found to depend on multiple factors, including the protein source, the presence of CDL and urea, and their concentrations. The complex interplay between the conformational distribution and oligomerization plays a crucial role in the variation of the pre-apoptotic regulation of cyt c observed from different sources. Finally, computational studies reveal that the variation in the charge distribution at the surface and the charge reversal sites may be the key determinant of the conformational stability of cyt c. PMID:25873393

  4. Cell surface protein C23 affects EGF-EGFR induced activation of ERK and PI3K-AKT pathways.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shunzeng; Dai, Congxin; Liu, Yuting; Sun, Bowen; Shi, Ranran; Han, Mingzhi; Bian, Ruixiang; Wang, Renzhi

    2015-02-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway has been reported as canonical causes in cancer development. Meanwhile, the involvement of C23 in multiple signaling pathways has been also investigated (Lv et al., 2014). However, the effect of C23 on EGF pathway in glioblastoma is not fully characterized. In the present study, C23 and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of U251 cell line were inhibited by C23 and EGFR antibodies, respectively; and then C23 and EGFR siRNAs were used to knock down endogenous C23 and EGFR, respectively. In addition, soft-agar and MTT assay were also introduced. Compared with control, either C23 or EGFR antibodies efficiently repressed the phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 (p<0.000) and AKT (p<0.000). Similarly, either C23 or EGFR siRNAs indeed resulted in C23 and EGFR knockdown, and further suppressed the expression of p-ERK1/2 and p-AKT. Most importantly, immunoprecipitation revealed C23 interacted with EGFR once U251 was exposed to EGF treatment. In addition, the MTT and soft-agar assay also identified that C23 or EGFR siRNAs could obviously affected cell growth (p=0.004) and invasiveness, as cell viability and colony formation decreased markedly. Our results suggest that C23 plays a crucial role in activation of EGF-induced ERK and PI3K-AKT pathways via interacting with EGFR; furthermore, C23 could be indicative of an important factor in glioblastoma development and a useful target for glioblastoma treatment. PMID:25015231

  5. pH gradients and a micro-pore filter at the luminal surface affect fluxes of propionic acid across guinea pig large intestine.

    PubMed

    Busche, Roger; von Engelhardt, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    A neutral pH microclimate had been shown at the luminal surface of the large intestine. The aim was to estimate to what extent fluxes of propionic acid/propionate are affected by changes of the luminal pH when this microclimate is present, largely reduced or absent. Fluxes of propionic acid/propionate (J(Pr)) across epithelia from the caecum, the proximal and the distal colon of guinea pigs were measured in Ussing chambers with and without a filter at the luminal surface. With bicarbonate and with a neutral or an acid pH of mucosal solutions (pH 7.4 or 6.4), mucosal-to-serosal fluxes (J(ms)(Pr) ) were 1.5 to 1.9-fold higher at the lower pH, in bicarbonate-free solutions and carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibition 2.1 to 2.6-fold. With a filter at the mucosal surface and with bicarbonate containing solutions, J (ms) (Pr) was not or only little elevated at the lower pH. Without bicarbonate J(ms)(Pr) was clearly higher. We conclude that the higher J(ms)(Pr) after luminal acidification is due to vigorous mixing in Ussing chambers resulting in a markedly reduced unstirred layer. Therefore, an effective pH microclimate at the epithelial surface is missing. J(ms)(Pr) is not or is little affected by lowering of pH because in the presence of bicarbonate the filter maintains the pH microclimate. However, in bicarbonate-free solutions J(ms)(Pr) was higher at pH 6.4 because a pH microclimate does not develop. Findings confirm that 30-60% of J(ms)(Pr) results from non-ionic diffusion. PMID:17639416

  6. How do changes to plate thickness, length, and face-connectivity affect femoral cancellous bone's density and surface area? An investigation using regular cellular models.

    PubMed

    Anderson, I A; Carman, J B

    2000-03-01

    Models of regular cellular-solids representing femoral head 'medial group' bone were used to (1) compare thickness data for plate-like and beam-like structures at realistic surface areas and densities; (2) test the validity of a standard formula for trabecular thickness (Tb.Th); and (3) study how systematic changes in cancellous bone thicknesses, spacing, and face-connectivity affect relative density and surface area. Models of different face-connectivities, produced by plate removal from the unit cell, were fitted to bone density and surface area data. The medial group bone was anisotropic: the supero-inferior (SI) direction was the principal direction for bone plate alignment and the plane normal to this had the largest number of bone/void intersections per unit line length (P(I)). A comparison of boundary perimeter per unit area data, in planes normal to SI, with surface area data placed the medial group bone between prismatic structures in which walls are parallel to one principal direction and isotropic structures. Selective removal of plates from a closed-cell model produced a similar result. For the same relative density and surface-area, plate-like models had significantly thinner cross-sections than beam-like models. The formula for Tb.Th produced overestimates of model plate thickness by up to 20% at realistic femoral cancellous densities. Trends in data on surface area to volume ratio and density observed on sampled medial group bone could be simulated by plate thickness changes on models of intermediate face-connectivity (approximately 1.5) or by plate removal from models with relatively thick and short (low aspect-ratio) plates. The latter mechanism is unrealistic for it resulted in beam-like structures at low 'medial group' densities, an architecture unlike the predominantly plate-like bone in the sample. PMID:10673116

  7. Snow cover and ground surface temperature on a talus slope affected by mass movements. Veleta cirque, Sierra Nevada, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanarro, L. M.; Palacios, D.; Gómez-Ortiz, A.; Salvador-Franch, F.

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyses the thermal ground behaviour on an alpine talus slope located at the foot of the north wall of the glacial cirque on the Pico del Veleta (3398 m, 37°03'21''N, 3°21'57''W, MAAT: -0,4°C) in Sierra Nevada, SE Spain. There are frequent mass movements on this talus slope, particularly in its central section, caused by the abundant presence of fine-grained sediment and by the water from snowmelt and/or ice degradation in the ground or permafrost (Gómez et al., 2003). To determine the snowmelt pattern and ocurrence of permafrost, a continuous ground surface temperature was kept by installing 6 mini-loggers (HOBO Pendant) along the descending profile of the central talus, which is 170 m long with altitudes ranging from 3180 m at the higher end to 3085 m at the lower end. A thermal borehole was also installed at a depth of 2 m at the base of the slope on an active rock glacier. The results obtained for the period October 2008 - September 2009 show that, in contrast to alpine talus slopes (Luetschg et. al., 2004; Lambiel and Pieracci, 2008), the upper part of the slope is characterized by mean annual ground surface temperatures (MAGST) lower than at the base of the talus, possibly due to the effect of the shadow of the cirque wall. The MAGST oscillate between 0.592°C at the station near the slope apex (S2) and 1.836°C at the station near the base (S5). In winter-spring, when the talus slope is covered with snow, the GST are stabilized at all stations between mid-October and early November. The minimum GST, which express the BTS conditions, oscillate between 0.232 and 0.01°C, depending on the month, with lowest values recorded during the month of April. Only one station (S3, mid-slope) recorded negative values (max. value : - 0.549°C in December and - 0.211 in April ). In summer, the snow disappears fairly quickly between mid- and late July on the intermediate stretch of the talus slope (S3, S4, S6), where the majority of the flows detected occur

  8. Face shape of unaffected parents with cleft affected offspring: combining three-dimensional surface imaging and geometric morphometrics

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, SM; Naidoo, SD; Bardi, KM; Brandon, CA; Neiswanger, K; Resick, JM; Martin, RA; Marazita, ML

    2009-01-01

    Objective Various lines of evidence suggest that face shape may be a predisposing factor for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P). In the present study, 3D surface imaging and statistical shape analysis were used to evaluate face shape differences between the unaffected (non-cleft) parents of individuals with CL/P and unrelated controls. Methods Sixteen facial landmarks were collected from 3D captures of 80 unaffected parents and 80 matched controls. Prior to analysis, each unaffected parent was assigned to a subgroup on the basis of prior family history (positive or negative). A geometric morphometric approach was utilized to scale and superimpose the landmark coordinate data (Procrustes analysis), test for omnibus group differences in face shape, and uncover specific modes of shape variation capable of discriminating unaffected parents from controls. Results Significant disparity in face shape was observed between unaffected parents and controls (p < 0.01). Notably, these changes were specific to parents with a positive family history of CL/P. Shape changes associated with CL/P predisposition included marked flattening of the facial profile (midface retrusion), reduced upper facial height, increased lower facial height and excess interorbital width. Additionally, a sex-specific pattern of parent-control difference was evident in the transverse dimensions of the nasolabial complex. Conclusions The faces of unaffected parents from multiplex cleft families display meaningful shape differences compared with the general population. Quantitative assessment of the facial phenotype in cleft families may enhance efforts to discover the root causes of CL/P. PMID:19840279

  9. Does river restoration affect diurnal and seasonal changes to surface water quality? A study along the Thur River, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Chittoor Viswanathan, Vidhya; Molson, John; Schirmer, Mario

    2015-11-01

    Changes in river water quality were investigated along the lower reach of the Thur River, Switzerland, following river restoration and a summer storm event. River restoration and hydrological storm events can each cause dramatic changes to water quality by affecting various bio-geochemical processes in the river, but have to date not been well documented, especially in combination. Evaluating the success of river restoration is often restricted in large catchments due to a lack of high frequency water quality data, which are needed for process understanding. These challenges were addressed in this study by measuring water quality parameters including dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), nitrate and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) with a high temporal frequency (15 min-1h) over selected time scales. In addition, the stable isotopes of water (δD and δ(18)O-H2O) as well as those of nitrate (δ(15)N-NO3(-) and δ(18)O-NO3(-)) were measured to follow changes in water quality in response to the hydrological changes in the river. To compare the spatial distribution of pre- and post-restoration water quality, the sampling stations were chosen upstream and downstream of the restored section. The diurnal and seasonal changes were monitored by conducting 24-hour campaigns in three seasons (winter, summer and autumn) in 2012 and 2013. The amplitude of the diurnal changes of the various observed parameters showed significant seasonal and spatial variability. Biological processes--mainly photosynthesis and respiration--were found to be the major drivers of these diurnal cycles. During low flow in autumn, a reduction of nitrate (attributed to assimilation by autotrophs) in the pre-dawn period and a production of DOC during the daytime (attributed to photosynthesis) were observed downstream of the restored site. Further, a summer storm event was found to override the influence of these biological processes that control the diurnal changes. High

  10. DOE-EMSP Final Report: Characterization of Changes in Colloid and DNAPL Affecting Surface Chemistry and Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Susan E. Powers; Stefan J. Grimberg; Miles Denham

    2007-02-07

    The waste disposal to the M-area basin and A-14 outfall at the Savannah River Department of Energy facility in Aiken SC (USA) included a wide variety of inorganic aqueous flows and organic solvents in the form of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). The DNAPL has migrated through the subsurface resulting in widespread groundwater contamination. The goal of this research was to identify and quantify processes that could have affected the migration and remediation of the DNAPL in the subsurface. It was hypothesized that the variety of waste disposed at this site could have altered the mineral, microbial and DNAPL properties at this site relative to other DNAPL sites. The DNAPL was determined to have a very low interfacial tension and is suspected to be distributed in fine grained media, thereby reducing the effectiveness of soil vapor extraction remediation efforts. Although the DNAPL is primarily comprised of tetrachloroethene and trichloroethane, it also contains organic acids and several heavy metals. Experimental results suggest that iron from the aqueous and DNAPL phases undergoes precipitation and dechlorination reactions at the DNAPL-water interface, contributing to the low interfacial tension and acidity of the DNAPL. Biological activity in the contaminated region can also contribute to the low interfacial tension. PCE degrading bacteria produce biosurfactants and adhere to the DNAPL-water interface when stressed by high tetrachloroethene or low dissolved oxygen concentrations. The presence of iron can reduce the interfacial tension by nearly an order of magnitude, while the PCE degraders reduced the interfacial tension by nearly 50%. Abiotic changes in the mineral characteristics were not found to be substantially different between contaminated and background samples. The research completed here begins to shed some insight into the complexities of DNAPL fate and migration at sites where co-disposal of many different waste products occurred. Quantifying

  11. EXTENDED PHOTOMETRY FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: A TESTBED FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J. E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a new catalog that supplements the existing DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey photometric and spectroscopic catalogs with ugriz photometry from two other surveys: the Canada-France-Hawaii Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each catalog is cross-matched by position on the sky in order to assign ugriz photometry to objects in the DEEP2 catalogs. We have recalibrated the CFHTLS photometry where it overlaps DEEP2 in order to provide a more uniform data set. We have also used this improved photometry to predict DEEP2 BRI photometry in regions where only poorer measurements were available previously. In addition, we have included improved astrometry tied to SDSS rather than USNO-A2.0 for all DEEP2 objects. In total this catalog contains {approx}27, 000 objects with full ugriz photometry as well as robust spectroscopic redshift measurements, 64% of which have r > 23. By combining the secure and accurate redshifts of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey with ugriz photometry, we have created a catalog that can be used as an excellent testbed for future photo-z studies, including tests of algorithms for surveys such as LSST and DES.

  12. The rotation period of Epsilon Eri from photometry of its starspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Gary J.; Hall, Douglas S.; Mattingly, Phil; Robb, Steve; Wood, Jim; Zeigler, Kenneth; Grim, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    BV photometry at six observatories in 1988/1989 and 1989/1990 shows variability resulting from five starspots which lived 1 or 2 months each, had rotation periods in the range P between 10.0d and 12.3d, and had amplitudes in the range 0.01 m - 0.03 m. From the range in P it was possible to estimate k greater than 0.20 +/- 0.05 for the differential rotation coefficient. Ca II K-line photometry, polarimetry, and earlier photometry reported in the literature has also shown variability with periodicities in the same 10 d -12 d range.

  13. A Pan-STARRS1-based recalibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Schlafly, E.; Green, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a recalibration of the SDSS DR9 photometry with new flat fields and zero points derived from Pan-STARRS. Using PSF photometry of 60 million stars with 16 < r < 20, we obtain SDSS flat-field and amplifier gain corrections stable to 3 millimagnitudes (mmag) in g,r,i,z bands and 15 mmag in u band. We also identify transient non-photometric periods in SDSS ("contrails") based on photometric deviations co-temporal in SDSS bands. The recalibrated SDSS and PS1 photometry agree with systematics at the 7 mmag level.

  14. The AAVSO Photoelectric Photometry Program in Its Scientific and Socio-Historic Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, I review the work of the AAVSO in the area of photoelectric photometry (PEP). This work was influenced by several trends: in science, in technology, and in the sociology of amateur astronomy. Through the 1980s, the AAVSO photoelectric photometry program competed with other such programs and, in recent years, has been overshadowed by CCD photometry programs. Nevertheless, the AAVSO PEP program has, through careful organization, motivation, and feedback, produced extensive scientific results, and can continue to do so. In the case of my own research, AAVSO PEP observations have also contributed significantly to the education of my students.

  15. Shear Wave Velocity Profiles Determined from Surface Wave Measurements at Sites Affected by the August 15th, 2007 Earthquake in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblad, B. L.; Bay, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    The shear wave velocity (Vs) profile of near-surface soils is a critical parameter for understanding recorded ground motions and predicting local site effects in an earthquake. In structural design, the Vs profile in the top 30 m is used to modify design response spectra to account for local soil effects. In addition, knowledge of the near- surface Vs profile at strong motion stations can be used to account for changes in frequency content and amplification caused by the local site conditions. Following the August 15th, 2007 earthquake in Peru, a field testing program was performed to measure Vs profiles in the top 20 to 30 m at twenty-two locations in the affected region. The measurements were performed primarily at the sites of damaged school buildings but were also performed at several strong motion station sites as well as a few locations where evidence of soil liquefaction was observed. Nineteen of the sites were located in the severely affected cities of Chincha, Ica, Pisco and Tambo de Mora, with the remaining three sites located in, Lima, Palpa and Paracus. The Vs profiles were determined from surface wave velocity measurements performed with an impact source. The objective of this paper is to present and discuss the range of Vs profile conditions encountered in the regions affected by the Pisco-Peru earthquake. In the city of Ica, the profiles generally exhibited gradually increasing velocities with depth, with velocities which rarely exceeded 400 m/s in the top 30 m. In contrast, the profiles measured in Pisco, often exhibited strong, shallow velocity contrasts with Vs increasing from less than 200 m/s at the surface to over 600 m/s at some sites. The profiles measured in Chincha generally fell in between the ranges measured in Ica and Pisco. Lastly, soil liquefaction was evident throughout Tambo de Mora on the coast of Peru. Measurements indicated very low shear wave velocities of 75 to 125 m/s in the top 4 m, which is consistent with the observed

  16. Nanoparticles Affect PCR Primarily via Surface Interactions with PCR Components: Using Amino-Modified Silica-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles as a Main Model.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yalong; Cui, Yan; Paoli, George C; Shi, Chunlei; Wang, Dapeng; Shi, Xianming

    2015-06-24

    Nanomaterials have been widely reported to affect the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, many studies in which these effects were observed were not comprehensive, and many of the proposed mechanisms have been primarily speculative. In this work, we used amino-modified silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (ASMNPs, which can be collected very easily using an external magnetic field) as a model and compared them with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, which have been studied extensively) to reveal the mechanisms by which nanoparticles affect PCR. We found that nanoparticles affect PCR primarily by binding to PCR components: (1) inhibition, (2) specifity, and (3) efficiency and yield of PCR are impacted. (1) Excess nanomaterials inhibit PCR by adsorbing to DNA polymerase, Mg(2+), oligonucleotide primers, or DNA templates. Nanoparticle surface-active groups are particularly important to this effect. (2, a) Nanomaterials do not inhibit nonspecific amplification products caused by false priming as previously surmised. It was shown that relatively low concentrations of nanoparticles inhibited the amplification of long amplicons, and increasing the amount of nanoparticles inhibited the amplification of short amplicons. This concentration phenomenon appears to be the result of the formation of "joints" upon the adsorption of ASMNPs to DNA templates. (b) Nanomaterials are able to inhibit nonspecific amplification products due to incomplete amplification by preferably adsorbing single-stranded incomplete amplification products. (3) Some types of nanomaterials, such as AuNPs, enhance the efficiency and yield of PCR because these types of nanoparticles can adsorb to single-stranded DNA more strongly than to double-stranded DNA. This behavior assists in the rapid and thorough denaturation of double-stranded DNA templates. Therefore, the interaction between the surface of nanoparticles and PCR components is sufficient to explain most of the effects of nanoparticles on PCR. PMID

  17. The role of C:N:P stoichiometry in affecting denitrification in sediments from agricultural surface and tile-water wetlands.

    PubMed

    Grebliunas, Brian D; Perry, William L

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient stoichiometry within a wetland is affected by the surrounding land use, and may play a significant role in the removal of nitrate (NO3-N). Tile-drained, agricultural watersheds experience high seasonal inputs of NO3-N, but low phosphorus (PO4-P) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads relative to surface water dominated systems. This difference may present stoichiometric conditions that limit denitrification within receiving waterways. We investigated how C:N:P ratios affected denitrification rates of sediments from tile-drained mitigation wetlands incubated for: 0, 5, 10, and 20 days. We then tested whether denitrification rates of sediments from surface-water and tile-drained wetlands responded differently to C:N ratios of 2:1 versus 4:1. Ratios of C:N:P (P < 0.05) and incubation length (P < 0.05) had a significant effect on denitrification in tile-drained wetland sediments. Carbon limitation of denitrification became evident at elevated NO3-N concentrations (20 mg L(-1)). Denitrification measured from tile water and surface water wetland sediments increased significantly (P < 0.05) at the 2:1 and 4:1 C:N treatments. The results from both experiments suggest wetland sediments provide a limiting pool of labile DOC to maintain prolonged NO3-N removal. Also, DOC limitation became more evident at elevated NO3-N concentrations (20 mg L(-1)). Irrespective of NO3-N concentrations, P did not limit denitrification rates. In addition to wetting period, residence time, and maintenance of anaerobic conditions, the availability of labile DOC is playing an important limiting role in sediment denitrification within mitigation wetlands. PMID:27064357

  18. On modeling and nanoanalysis of caries-affected dentin surfaces restored with Zn-containing amalgam and in vitro oral function.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; López-López, Modesto T; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the influence of mechanical loading on the ability of Zn-free versus Zn-containing amalgams to promote remineralization at the dentin interface. Sound and caries-affected dentin surfaces (CAD) were restored using Zn-free or Zn-containing dental amalgams. Midcoronal dentin surfaces were studied by (1) atomic force microscopy analysis (including plot and phase imaging, nanoindentation test [modulus of Young (Ei), nanoroughness measurements, and fibril diameter assessment], (2) Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, (3) x-ray diffraction, (4) field emission electron microscope and energy-dispersive analysis, for morphological, mechanical, and physicochemical characterization. Analyses were performed before amalgam placement and after amalgam removal, at 24 h and 3 weeks of load cycling. Zn-free and Zn-containing amalgams restorations promoted an increase in the modulus of Young of CAD surfaces, after 3 weeks of load cycling; at this time, Zn-containing amalgams attained higher Ei than Zn-free restorations. Zn-containing amalgams induced tubular occlusion after load cycling, in both sound and CAD. Zn free-amalgams promoted remineralization of both intertubular and peritubular dentin in CAD substrata. These minerals were identified as calcium-phosphate deposits and crystals as hydroxyl-apatite with augmented crystallographic maturity but with some components of lattice distortion. Crosslinking of collagen diminished and secondary structure of collagen increased in CAD substrate restored with Zn-containing amalgam after 3 weeks of load cycling, indicating an advanced preservation, molecular organization, and orientation of collagen fibrils after load cycling. Plot and phase images permitted to observe the topographical changes which were promoted by the mineral deposits; in general, the indexes related to higher remineralization gave rise to a decrease of nanoroughness and an augmentation of the bandwidth of the collagen fibrils. Zn

  19. A new look at photometry of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Stone, Thomas C.; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.

    2010-08-01

    We use ROLO photometry (Kieffer, H.H., Stone, T.C. [2005]. Astron. J. 129, 2887-2901) to characterize the before and after full Moon radiance variation for a typical highlands site and a typical mare site. Focusing on the phase angle range 45° < α < 50°, we test two different physical models, macroscopic roughness and multiple scattering between regolith particles, for their ability to quantitatively reproduce the measured radiance difference. Our method for estimating the rms slope angle is unique and model-independent in the sense that the measured radiance factor I/ F at small incidence angles (high Sun) is used as an estimate of I/ F for zero roughness regolith. The roughness is determined from the change in I/ F at larger incidence angles. We determine the roughness for 23 wavelengths from 350 to 939 nm. There is no significant wavelength dependence. The average rms slope angle is 22.2° ± 1.3° for the mare site and 34.1° ± 2.6° for the highland site. These large slopes, which are similar to previous "photometric roughness" estimates, require that sub-mm scale "micro-topography" dominates roughness measurements based on photometry, consistent with the conclusions of Helfenstein and Shepard (Helfenstein, P., Shepard, M.K. [1999]. Icarus 141, 107-131). We then tested an alternative and very different model for the before and after full Moon I/ F variation: multiple scattering within a flat layer of realistic regolith particles. This model consists of a log normal size distribution of spheres that match the measured distribution of particles in a typical mature lunar soil 72141,1 (McKay, D.S., Fruland, R.M., Heiken, G.H. [1974]. Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 5, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1 (5), 887-906). The model particles have a complex index of refraction 1.65-0.003 i, where 1.65 is typical of impact-generated lunar glasses. Of the four model parameters, three were fixed at values determined from Apollo lunar soils: the mean radius and width of the log normal

  20. Resolved photometry of extragalactic young massive star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, S. S.; de Mink, S. E.; Eldridge, J. J.; Langer, N.; Bastian, N.; Seth, A.; Smith, L. J.; Brodie, J.; Efremov, Yu. N.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: We present colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of young massive star clusters in several galaxies located well beyond the Local Group. The richness of these clusters allows us to obtain large samples of post-main sequence stars and test how well the observed CMDs are reproduced by canonical stellar isochrones. Methods: We use imaging of seven clusters in the galaxies NGC 1313, NGC 1569, NGC 1705, NGC 5236 and NGC 7793 obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope and carry out PSF-fitting photometry of individual stars in the clusters. The clusters have ages in the range ~(5-50) × 106 years and masses of ~105 M⊙-106 M⊙. Although crowding prevents us from obtaining photometry in the inner regions of the clusters, we are still able to measure up to 30-100 supergiant stars in each of the richest clusters. The resulting CMDs and luminosity functions are compared with photometry of artificially generated clusters, designed to reproduce the photometric errors and completeness as realistically as possible. Results: In agreement with previous studies, our CMDs show no clear gap between the H-burning main sequence and the He-burning supergiant stars, contrary to predictions by common stellar isochrones. In general, the isochrones also fail to match the observed number ratios of red-to-blue supergiant stars, although the difficulty of separating blue supergiants from the main sequence complicates this comparison. In several cases we observe a large spread (1-2 mag) in the luminosities of the supergiant stars that cannot be accounted for by observational errors. We find that this spread can be reproduced by including an age spread of ~(10-30) × 106 years in the models. However, age spreads cannot fully account for the observed morphology of the CMDs and other processes, such as the evolution of interacting binary stars, may also play a role. Conclusions: Colour-magnitude diagrams can be successfully obtained for massive star

  1. V-band Photometry Of By Draconis-type Variables; Probing Long-term Activity Cycles In Three Pleiades Members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milingo, Jackie; Thomson, A. D.; Truong, P. N.; Marschall, L. A.; Backman, D. E.

    2007-05-01

    Through the collaborative efforts of undergraduates and faculty at Gettysburg and Franklin & Marshall Colleges, we present the compilation of 10 years of differential photometry for three K-type stars in the Pleiades. These young stars have rotational light curves with V-band amplitudes of a few percent (10% in the most active) due to BY Draconis-type behavior (modulation due to rotation of a star with non-uniform surface brightness). With 10 years of photometry reduced, measured, and compiled we are now in a position to probe the V-band variations in these stars for indications of the extent of brightness asymmetry in the photosphere, and characteristics of the long-term activity of these stars. These observations were acquired at the National Undergraduate Research Observatory, operated by Lowell Observatory and Northern Arizona University. This work is supported by Gettysburg College, the Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium, Arizona Space Grant, NSF grant AST-0354056, and by the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  2. Synthetic photometry for M and K giants and stellar evolution: hydrostatic dust-free model atmospheres and chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aringer, B.; Girardi, L.; Nowotny, W.; Marigo, P.; Bressan, A.

    2016-04-01

    Based on a grid of hydrostatic spherical COMARCS models for cool stars, we have calculated observable properties of these objects, which will be mainly used in combination with stellar evolution tracks and population synthesis tools. The high-resolution opacity sampling and low-resolution convolved spectra as well as bolometric corrections for a large number of filter systems are made electronically available. We exploit those data to study the effect of mass, C/O ratio and nitrogen abundance on the photometry of K and M giants. Depending on effective temperature, surface gravity and the chosen wavelength ranges, variations of the investigated parameters cause very weak to moderate and, in the case of C/O values close to 1, even strong shifts of the colours. For the usage with stellar evolution calculations, they will be treated as correction factors applied to the results of an interpolation in the main quantities. When we compare the synthetic photometry to observed relations and to data from the Galactic bulge, we find in general a good agreement. Deviations appear for the coolest giants showing pulsations, mass-loss and dust shells, which cannot be described by hydrostatic models.

  3. Optical and near infrared photometry of Butcher-Oemler clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shier, Lisa M.; Rieke, Marcia J.

    1993-01-01

    Rich clusters of galaxies at moderate redshifts (z approx. .3) have a larger proportion of optically blue galaxies than their low redshift counterparts. Spectroscopic examination of the blue galaxies by various authors has shown that the blue galaxies are generally Seyferts, show evidence for recent star formation, or are foreground objects. Unfortunately, spectroscopy is too time consuming to be used on large samples. Thus, we have looked for a way to separate Seyferts, starbursts, ellipticals and nonmembers using photometry alone. Five moderate redshift clusters, Abell numbers 777, 963, 1758, 1961 and 2218, have been observed in the V, R and K bands. We model the spectral energy distributions of various kinds of galaxies found in clusters and derive observed colors. We have modeled the spectral energy distributions (SED) of several kinds of galaxies and compute their colors as a function of redshift. We expect to see ellipticals, spirals, starbursts, post-starburst and Seyfert galaxies. The SED of elliptical and Sbc galaxies was observed by Rieke and Rieke. The SEDs for the starburst galaxies was created by adding a reddened 10(exp 8) year old burst to a spiral galaxy SED. The post-starburst (E+A) galaxy SEDs are composed of a slightly reddened 10(exp 9) year old burst and elliptical galaxy SED. SEDs for the Seyferts were created by adding a v(exp -1.1) power law, and a hot dust thermal spectrum to the Sbc. From the SEDs the colors of galaxies at various redshifts with assorted filters were computed. Lilly & Gunn (1985) have optical and infrared photometry for a sample of galaxies in CL0024+1654 observed spectroscopically by Dressler, Gunn and Schneider (1985). We have used this data to choose the most appropriate SEDs for our starburst and post-starburst models. The most likely explanation for the optically blue colors in most cluster galaxies is star formation. Very few galaxies lie in the Seyfert locus. Abel 1758 has more Seyfert candidates than the other

  4. Infrared photometry and polarimetry of Cygnus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terry Jay; Gehrz, Robert D.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Molnar, Lawrence A.; Howard, Eric M.

    1994-01-01

    We present photometry and linear polarimetry of Cygnus X-3 at K (2.2 micrometers) obtained over a 5 yr period. Photometry and polarimetry at J, H, and K of nearby field stars is also presented. From an analysis of these data we find: (1) Using the x-ray ephemeris of Kitamoto et al. (ApJ, 384, 263 (1992), including the first and second derivatives of the period, the leading edge of the decline to minimum in the quiescent K light curve has not changed in phase since 1974. The duration of the minimum in the light curve has changed significantly between different epochs, becoming much broader in 1993 than it was previously. (2) In addition to an interstellar polarization component, it is likely Cyg X-3 has an intrinsic polarization component that is variable. The variations in the polarization do not show any diagnostic pattern with orbital phase. A crude analysis of the polarization suggests the intrinsic polarization of Cyg X-3 has a mean position angle of approximately 12 deg, nearly the same as the direction of the expanding radio lobes. This is consistent with circumstellar electrons scattering in an equatorial disk that is perpendicular to the lobe axis. (3) The mean position angle for the interstellar polarization in the direction of Cyg X-3 is 150 deg. This is nearly perpendicular to the axis of interstellar radio scattering seen in the extended (Very Long Baseline Inteferometry (VLBI) images. Since the position angle of interstellar polarization is the same as the projected magnetic field direction, this suggests the interstellar (not circumstellar) scattering must be taking place perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field lines. (4) Cyg X-3 was observed at K during a flare on 1992 September 30 with a temporal resolution of 6 s. The flaring had rise and fall times of approximately 50 s with peak intensities up to 80 mJy. The flux between individual flare events never dropped to quiescent levels for the duration of our observations (approximately 2000 s).

  5. Infrared Passbands for Accurate IR Photometry : the IRWG set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, E. F.; Young, A. T.

    2002-12-01

    The well-known past limitations in accuracy and precision of infrared photometry has been shown to be due primarily to atmospheric features within passbands and the use of the edges of the atmospheric windows to define those passbands. The saturation of portions of the passbands high in the atmosphere means, especially for the longer wavelength passbands, a large difference between a linearly extrapolated zero-air mass magnitude and the actual value. The rapid curvature of the extinction curve between 1 and 0 air mass is known as the Forbes effect. Since the strengths of atmospheric features vary with altitude and the circumstances of each site, different observatories have responded to the problem by redefining the Johnson system from J to Q to suit the needs of the site. The result has been a proliferation of systems, with filters having been selected for maximum throughput and so not necessarily placed, shaped, and narrowed to minimize optimally the effects of the absorption bands of the terrestrial atmosphere. Given this situation and in light of the tremendous promise of high precision presented by infrared photometry, and with the support of an important segment of the IR community, the Infrared Astronomy Working Group (IRWG) was created inside IAU Com. 25 to solve the problem. A subgroup of the IRWG consisting of Young, Milone, and Stagg set about examining the properties of existing passbands and in optimizing the placement and width of passbands within the atmospheric windows. Here we review the transformation properties of the recommended Z to Q passbands and of the IR filters produced by Custom Scientific Co. to approximate the near IR passbands of this set, their signal to noise ratios, and results of the standardization testing project at the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory over the past few years. The extinction coefficients determined with the manufactured filters demonstrate the usefulness of these passbands for transformation to the standard

  6. Photometry and Spectroscopy of BD+35 1111 in M38

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Steven P.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Sami, Mona; Beltz-Mohrmann, Gillian

    2014-06-01

    BD+35 1111 is a ~10.5-magnitude star in the field of M38, an open cluster that has been a target of our ongoing study of Hα emission variability in massive stars via narrowband CCD photometry (e.g. Souza, Davis, and Teich 2013, BAAS. 45, PM354.22). BD+35 1111 has no MKK classification in the literature, and is not listed as variable in GCVS, VSX, or NSVS. It is included, with no further characterization, in both the Vatican and Kohoutek catalogs of emission line stars. Using inhomogeneous ensemble photometry (e.g. Bhatti, Richmond, Ford, and Petro 2010, ApJ Supp., 186, 233), we find it to be an irregular variable with a range of ~0.15 mag. To further understand this star we obtained a medium-resolution spectrum using the DIS spectrograph on the ARC 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. We classify BD+35 1111 as B2Ve, the only confirmed Be star in the field of M38. This raises the question of membership, since the age of M38 is likely 250 Ma or greater (Pandey et al. 2007, Publ. Astron. Soc. Japan 59, 547). From published B and V magnitudes we find a nominal distance to BD+35 1111 of 1.6 kpc, but with a range of 1.3 to 2.0 kpc, marginally consistent with distance estimates for M38 ranging from 1.0 to 1.4 kpc. If a member, BD+35 1111 is a candidate blue straggler. If not, it may have escaped from a nearby younger cluster, possibly Kronberger 1 (Kronberger et al. 2006, A&A 447, 921), which has the right heliocentric distance and age. The notion that BD+35 1111 is behind M38 is supported by its reddening of EB-V ~ 0.5, significantly higher than for M38 itself 0.24). We gratefully acknowledge support for student research from NSF grant AST-1005024 to the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium, Williams College, and NASA via an American Astronomical Society Small Research Grant.

  7. THE ARAUCARIA PROJECT. A DISTANCE DETERMINATION TO THE LOCAL GROUP SPIRAL M33 FROM NEAR-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF CEPHEID VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gieren, Wolfgang; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Graczyk, Dariusz E-mail: pietrzyn@hubble.cfm.udec.cl; and others

    2013-08-10

    Motivated by an amazing range of reported distances to the nearby Local Group spiral galaxy M33, we have obtained deep near-infrared photometry for 26 long-period Cepheids in this galaxy with the ESO Very Large Telescope. From the data, we constructed period-luminosity relations in the J and K bands which together with previous optical VI photometry for the Cepheids by Macri et al. were used to determine the true distance modulus of M33, and the mean reddening affecting the Cepheid sample with the multiwavelength fit method developed in the Araucaria Project. We find a true distance modulus of 24.62 for M33, with a total uncertainty of {+-}0.07 mag which is dominated by the uncertainty on the photometric zero points in our photometry. The reddening is determined as E(B - V) = 0.19 {+-} 0.02, in agreement with the value used by the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project of Freedman et al. but in some discrepancy with other recent determinations based on blue supergiant spectroscopy and an O-type eclipsing binary which yielded lower reddening values. Our derived M33 distance modulus is extremely insensitive to the adopted reddening law. We show that the possible effects of metallicity and crowding on our present distance determination are both at the 1%-2% level and therefore minor contributors to the total uncertainty of our distance result for M33.

  8. Comparisons between Ground-Based Photometry and Space-Based Measurements of the Total Solar Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G.; Cookson, A.; Dobias, J.; Walton, S.

    2005-05-01

    We will review the usefulness of ground-based full-disk photometry in conjunction with space-based measurements of the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI). It is known that sunspots and faculae cause changes in the TSI. These features need to be modeled using ground-based photometry and their effects removed in order to search for possible other causes of TSI variation. Work to date has shown that approximately 94% of the variance in TSI can be explained by sunspots and faculae/network. Since ground-based photometry is carried out daily, it can help identify anomalies in space-based TSI measurements. Finally, ground-based photometry can help in tying together TSI measurements from different spacecraft that have different native irradiance scales. This work has been partially supported by grants from NASA and NSF.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WASP-104b and WASP-106b photometry (Smith+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M. S.; Anderson, D. R.; Armstrong, D. J.; Barros, S. C. C.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bouchy, F.; Brown, D. J. A.; Collier, Cameron A.; Delrez, L.; Faedi, F.; Gillon, M.; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Hebrard, G.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Louden, T. M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Montagnier, G.; Neveu-Vanmalle, M.; Osborn, H. P.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Rostron, J. W.; Segransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Turner, O. D.; Udry, S.; Walker, S. R.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2014-09-01

    The stars WASP-104 and WASP-106 were observed by SuperWASP-N from 2008 to 2011, and by WASP-South from 2009 to 2010. This differential survey photometry has been de-reddened and normalised. Further photometry was obtained using the TRAPPIST, Euler, Liverpool and Isaac Newton telescopes in 2013 and 2014. All these data are plotted in Figures 1 and 2. (1 data file).

  10. A Search for Ringed Exoplanets Using Kepler Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heising, Matthew Z.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Schlichting, Hilke E.

    2015-11-01

    Models are developed to simulate light curves of stars dimmed by transiting exoplanets with and without rings. These models are then applied to Kepler photometry to search for planetary rings in a sample of 21 exoplanets, mostly hot Jupiters, chosen to offer the best observational opportunity for discovering potential rings. We also examine what kinds of rings might be expected for these planets, in terms of both size and orientation, based on arguments involving the host planet’s equilibrium temperature, its likely obliquities, and the formation and stability of possible ring systems. Finding no evidence for rings, for each of the 21 studied planets it is determined on an observational basis which potential rings can be rejected out of a representative set of fiducial rings, varying in both size and orientation. For 12 of the 21 planets, we determined that Saturn-like rings could be ruled out for at least certain orientations. Additionally, the detectability of rings is studied, and it is found that ringed planets with small obliquities (roughly 5°-10°) can yield large signals, which is encouraging for future work, since such small obliquities are expected for hot Jupiters.

  11. Extended Stromgren Photometry of M22 Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony-Twarog, B. J.; Craig, J. S.; Twarog, B. A.

    1994-05-01

    M22 is a low-latitude globular cluster with significant reddening (E(B-V) ~ 0.42, Crocker 1988) and evidence for a modest spread in extinction across the cluster field. It is also a cluster with some evidence for chemical inhomogeneity. We have applied extended Stromgren photometry (uvbyCa) to several fields in this cluster, focusing on a sample of ~ 300 giants, many of which have membership information from proper motions (Peterson & Cudworth 1994) and quite a number of which have spectroscopic measurements for Fe, Ca, Na, CN and CH abundances. Our results strengthen and support the findings of Lehnert et al. (1991) and Norris & Freeman (1983). Our photometric calcium index, which correlates well with spectroscopic indicators, shows a spread far larger than could be explained by differential reddening. The calcium metallicity index correlates well with the conventional Stromgren metal index m_1, and both are positively correlated with enhanced CN and CH as evidenced by S3839 and W(G) from Norris & Freeman. Although a significant spread in m_1 exists, the spread in iron it implies is nearly an order of magnitude larger than observed spectroscopically, and it is suggested that variations in CN play the largest role in the dispersion of m_1 indices. M22 appears to be a cluster with an unusual history that, unlike omega Cen, has led to enhancements of alpha --rich species with little variation in iron-peak elements.

  12. Multicolor NTT Photometry of the Anomalous Globular Cluster NGC 288

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaino, Gonzalo; Liller, William; Alvarado, Franklin

    1997-12-01

    We present UBV photometry of 2494 stars in a 38 arcmin square field in the anomalous high latitude globular cluster NGC 288 observed with a CCD camera and the 3.5 m NTT at ESO/La Silla. Our results can be summarized as follows: VTO=18.90±0.l4, and turnoff colors at (B-V)TO=0.46±0.05, (U - B)TO= -0.02±0.05 and independently (U - V)TO=0.45±0.07 (estimated external uncertainties). By fitting the resulting B - V ridge line to the theoretical isochrones of Bergbusch & VandenBerg (1992, ApJS, 81, 163) with [Fe/H]=-1.26, Y=0.2358, and [O/Fe]=+0.55, we derive the following values: the apparent distance modulus, (m - M)V = 14.85±0.10 and the interstellar reddening E(B - V) =0.04±0.02, and an age of 14±2 Gyr. We note the presence of approximately 17 blue stragglers, 4 hot faint BHB stars, and 5 faint possibly variable stars.

  13. Infrared photometry of the black hole candidate Sagittarius A*

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Close, Laird M.; Mccarthy, Donald W. JR.; Melia, Fulvio

    1995-01-01

    An infrared source has been imaged within 0.2 +/- 0.3 arcseconds of the unique Galactic center radio source Sgr A* High angular resolution (averaged value of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) approximately 0.55 arcseconds) was achieved by rapid (approximately 50 Hz) real-time images motion compensation. The source's near-infrared magnitudes (K = 12.1 +/- 0.3, H = 13.7 +/- 0.3, and J = 16.6 +/- 0.4) are consistent with a hot object reddened by the local extinction A(sub v) approximately 27). At the 3 sigma level of confidence, a time series of 80 images limits the source variability to less than 50% on timescales from 3 to 30 minutes. The photometry is consistent with the emission from a simple accretion disk model for a approximately 1 x 10(exp 6) solar mass black hole. However, the fluxes are also consistent with a hot luminous (L approximately 10(exp 3.5) to 10(exp 4-6) solar luminosity) central cluster star positionally coincident with Sgr A*.

  14. macula: Rotational modulations in the photometry of spotted stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, David M.

    2012-09-01

    Photometric rotational modulations due to starspots remain the most common and accessible way to study stellar activity. Modelling rotational modulations allows one to invert the observations into several basic parameters, such as the rotation period, spot coverage, stellar inclination and differential rotation rate. The most widely used analytic model for this inversion comes from Budding (1977) and Dorren (1987), who considered circular, grey starspots for a linearly limb darkened star. That model is extended to be more suitable in the analysis of high precision photometry such as that by Kepler. Macula, a Fortran 90 code, provides several improvements, such as non-linear limb darkening of the star and spot, a single-domain analytic function, partial derivatives for all input parameters, temporal partial derivatives, diluted light compensation, instrumental offset normalisations, differential rotation, starspot evolution and predictions of transit depth variations due to unocculted spots. The inclusion of non-linear limb darkening means macula has a maximum photometric error an order-of-magnitude less than that of Dorren (1987) for Sun-like stars observed in the Kepler-bandpass. The code executes three orders-of-magnitude faster than comparable numerical codes making it well-suited for inference problems.

  15. GASPS Photometry of the Tucana-Horologium Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Donaldson J.; Roberge, Aki

    2010-01-01

    The GASPS Open Time Key Programme on Herschel represents a new opportunity to sensitively probe protoplanetary and debris disks at far-IR wavelengths. We present preliminary PACS 70 and 160 micron photometry of eighteen stars in the 30 Myr-old Tucana-Horologium association. Of these eighteen, eight were detected in the 70 micron band. Four of these eight were also detected in the 160 micron band. We constructed SEDs for these systems using optical data from Hipparcos (B and V), near-IR data from 2MASS (J, H, and K), mid-IR data from IRAS and Spitzer MIPS (12 and 24 microns, respectively), and the new far-IR data from PACS. For the stars showing IR excess emission, we fit simple single-temperature blackbody curves to the IR excess in order to determine the rough dust abundances and temperatures. Dust observations at these wavelengths will also be important for comparison with upcoming Herschel PACS spectra that will search for gas in the disks. Our goal is to determine or limit the ever-allusive gas-to-dust ratio for these disk systems.

  16. RELATIVE PHOTOMETRY OF HAT-P-1b OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Beky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Noyes, Robert W.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Winn, Joshua N.

    2013-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of two occultations of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-1b. By measuring the planet to star flux ratio near opposition, we constrain the geometric albedo of the planet, which is strongly linked to its atmospheric temperature gradient. An advantage of HAT-P-1 as a target is its binary companion ADS 16402 A, which provides an excellent photometric reference, simplifying the usual steps in removing instrumental artifacts from HST time-series photometry. We find that without this reference star, we would need to detrend the lightcurve with the time of the exposures as well as the first three powers of HST orbital phase, and this would introduce a strong bias in the results for the albedo. However, with this reference star, we only need to detrend the data with the time of the exposures to achieve the same per-point scatter, therefore we can avoid most of the bias associated with detrending. Our final result is a 2{sigma} upper limit of 0.64 for the geometric albedo of HAT-P-1b between 577 and 947 nm.

  17. NEOWISE STUDIES OF ASTEROIDS WITH SLOAN PHOTOMETRY: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Hand, E.; Grav, T.; Mo, W.; Tholen, D. J.; McMillan, R. S.; Maleszewski, C.; Wright, E.; Watkins, J.; Spahr, T.; Cutri, R. M.; Walker, R.

    2012-01-20

    We have combined the NEOWISE and Sloan Digital Sky Survey data to study the albedos of 24,353 asteroids with candidate taxonomic classifications derived using Sloan photometry. We find a wide range of moderate to high albedos for candidate S-type asteroids that are analogous to the S complex defined by previous spectrophotometrically based taxonomic systems. The candidate C-type asteroids, while generally very dark, have a tail of higher albedos that overlaps the S types. The albedo distribution for asteroids with a photometrically derived Q classification is extremely similar to those of the S types. Asteroids with similar colors to (4) Vesta have higher albedos than the S types, and most have orbital elements similar to known Vesta family members. Finally, we show that the relative reflectance at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m is higher for D-type asteroids and suggest that their red visible and near-infrared spectral slope extends out to these wavelengths. Understanding the relationship between size, albedo, and taxonomic classification is complicated by the fact that the objects with classifications were selected from the visible/near-infrared Sloan Moving Object Catalog, which is biased against fainter asteroids, including those with lower albedos.

  18. High Precision Photometry of Bright Transiting Exoplanet Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Maurice; Eastman, Jason; Johnson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Within the past two decades, the successful search for exoplanets and the characterization of their physical properties have shown the immense progress that has been made towards finding planets with characteristics similar to Earth. For most exoplanets with a radius about the size of Earth, evaluating their physical properties, such as the mass, radius and equilibrium temperature, cannot be determined with satisfactory precision. The MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) was recently built to obtain spectroscopic and photometric measurements to find, confirm, and characterize Earth-like exoplanets. MINERVA's spectroscopic survey targets the brightest, nearby stars which are well-suited to the array's capabilities, while its primary photometric goal is to search for transits around these bright targets. Typically, it is difficult to find satisfactory comparison stars within a telescope's field of view when the primary target is very bright. This issue is resolved by using one of MINERVA's telescopes to observe the primary bright star while the other telescopes observe a distinct field of view that contains satisfactory bright comparison stars. We describe the code used to identify nearby comparison stars, schedule the four telescopes, produce differential photometry from multiple telescopes, and show the first results from this effort.This work has been funded by the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program, the ERAU Honors Program, the ERAU Undergraduate Research Spark Fund, and the Banneker Institute at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

  19. High-speed ultraviolet photometry of HD 60435

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M.; Nelson, M. J.; Bless, R. C.; Dolan, J. F.; Elliot, J. L.; Percival, J. W.; Robinson, E. L.; Van Citters, G. W.

    1993-01-01

    We present the first high-speed ultraviolet photometry of an oscillating Ap star, HD 60435. After removing known orbital effects related to the Hubble Space Telescope, we confirm the presence of a strong pulsation period at a frequency of 123.70 cycles per day. In addition, we find significant amplitude modulation of this frequency that we suggest could be the result of beating of multiple periodicities. In this context, we suggest evidence for the presence of four additional frequencies at nu = 120.56, 126.55, 149.49, and 221.03 cycles per day. Three of these frequencies correspond well to frequencies detected in optical observations of HD 60435. The fourth, at 149.49 cycles per day, if real, is a potentially new pulsation mode that has not been detected in ground-based observations of this star. The amplitude of the 123 cycles per day pulsation is significantly larger in the ultraviolet than it is in the blue.

  20. SYNMAG PHOTOMETRY: A FAST TOOL FOR CATALOG-LEVEL MATCHED COLORS OF EXTENDED SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, Kevin; Yasuda, Naoki; Hogg, David W.; Higgs, Tim D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Masters, Karen L.; Lang, Dustin; Wake, David A.

    2012-12-01

    Obtaining reliable, matched photometry for galaxies imaged by different observatories represents a key challenge in the era of wide-field surveys spanning more than several hundred square degrees. Methods such as flux fitting, profile fitting, and PSF homogenization followed by matched-aperture photometry are all computationally expensive. We present an alternative solution called 'synthetic aperture photometry' that exploits galaxy profile fits in one band to efficiently model the observed, point-spread-function-convolved light profile in other bands and predict the flux in arbitrarily sized apertures. Because aperture magnitudes are the most widely tabulated flux measurements in survey catalogs, producing synthetic aperture magnitudes (SYNMAGs) enables very fast matched photometry at the catalog level, without reprocessing imaging data. We make our code public and apply it to obtain matched photometry between Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz and UKIDSS YJHK imaging, recovering red-sequence colors and photometric redshifts with a scatter and accuracy as good as if not better than FWHM-homogenized photometry from the GAMA Survey. Finally, we list some specific measurements that upcoming surveys could make available to facilitate and ease the use of SYNMAGs.

  1. Disk-resolved photometry of Vesta and Lutetia and comparison with other asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longobardo, Andrea; Palomba, Ernesto; Ciarniello, Mauro; Tosi, Federico; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Zambon, Francesca; Ammannito, Eleonora; Filacchione, Gianrico; Raymond, Carol A.

    2016-03-01

    Photometry of asteroids gives fundamental information about their spectral and physical properties. The aim of this work is two-fold: (1) to calculate phase functions of Vesta and Lutetia in the visible spectral range; and (2) to compare photometric properties of all the asteroids visited by space missions, as inferred from disk-resolved photometry. The phase functions of Vesta and Lutetia have been retrieved by performing a statistical analysis on data provided by the VIR-Dawn and the VIRTIS-Rosetta imaging spectrometers, respectively. The approach is based on the empirical procedure defined in Longobardo et al. (Longobardo, A. et al. [2014]. Icarus 240, 20-35). The Vesta phase functions have been calculated at two wavelengths, one outside (0.75 μm) and one inside (0.95 μm) the pyroxene absorption band at 0.9 μm. The steepness of the phase function at 0.75 μm decreases from dark to bright regions, due to the increasing role of multiple scattering. Otherwise, the phase function at 0.95 μm results in uniformity across Vesta surface, since darkening agents are spectrally featureless and their influence at wavelengths inside the pyroxene absorption band is negligible. Moreover, it is, on average, steeper than the phase functions at 0.75 μm, due to the more important role of single scattering at 0.95 μm. The Lutetia phase function is instead constant across the surface due to the homogeneous spectral properties of this asteroid. The obtained photometric curves (reflectance versus phase angle) of Vesta and Lutetia have been then compared with those retrieved in previous works on asteroids visited by space missions. Differently from comparisons of disk-integrated phase functions of asteroids performed in previous works at low phase angles (lower than 25°), this work restricts to asteroid observations that are disk-resolved and occur at solar phase angles between 20° and 60°. The S-type asteroids (Gaspra, Ida, Eros and Annefrank) show similar photometric curves

  2. Photometry from voyager 2: initial results from the uranian atmosphere, satellites, and rings.

    PubMed

    Lane, A L; Hord, C W; West, R A; Esposito, L W; Simmons, K E; Nelson, R M; Wallis, B D; Buratti, B J; Horn, L J; Graps, A L; Pryor, W R

    1986-07-01

    The Voyager 2 photopolarimeter successfully completed the Uranus encounter, acquiring new data on the planet's atmosphere, its principal satellites, and its ring system. Spatially resolved photometry of the atmosphere at 0.27 micrometer shows no enhancement in absorption toward the pole, unlike the case for Jupiter and Saturn. Stellar occultation measurements indicate the temperature at the 1-millibar level over the north pole is near 90 kelvins. The geometric albedos of the five large satellites of Uranus were measured at 0.27 and 0.75 micrometer and indicate the presence of low albedo, spetrally flat absorbing material. Titania seems to have a fluffy surface, as indicated by its phase curve. The nine ground-based rings were detected, and their internal structure, optical depths, and positions were determined. The sharp edges of the in ring made it possible to measure its edge thickness (less than 150 meters) and particle sizes (less than 30 meters); little or no dust was detcted. New narrow rings and partial rings (arcs) were measured, and the narrow component of the eta ring was found to be discontinuous. PMID:17812890

  3. Deep Photometry of Galaxies in the VEGAS Survey: The Case of NGC 4472

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spavone, M.

    The VST-VEGAS project is aimed at observing and studying a rich sample of nearby early-type galaxies in order to systematically characterize their properties over a wide baseline of sizes and out to the faint outskirts where data are rather scarce so far. The external regions of galaxies more easily retain signatures about the formation and evolution mechanisms which shaped them, as their relaxation time are longer, and they are more weakly influenced by processes such as mergers, secular evolution, central black hole activity, and supernova feedback on the ISM, which tend to level age and metallicity gradients. The collection of a wide photometric dataset of a large number of galaxies in various environmental conditions, may help to shed light on these questions. To this end VEGAS exploits the potential of the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) which provides high quality images of 1 deg2 field of view in order to satisfy both the requirement of high resolution data and the need of studying nearby, and thus large, objects. We present a detailed study of the surface photometry of the elliptical galaxy NGC4472 and of smaller ETGs in its field, performed by using new g and i bands images to constrain the formation history of this nearby giant galaxy, and to investigate the presence of very faint substructures in its surroundings.

  4. In Azospirillum brasilense, mutations in flmA or flmB genes affect polar flagellum assembly, surface polysaccharides, and attachment to maize roots.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Fernando Ariel; Medeot, Daniela Beatriz; Liaudat, Juan Pablo; Pistorio, Mariano; Jofré, Edgardo

    2016-09-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a soil bacterium capable of promoting plant growth. Several surface components were previously reported to be involved in the attachment of A. brasilense to root plants. Among these components are the exopolysaccharide (EPS), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the polar flagellum. Flagellin from polar flagellum is glycosylated and it was suggested that genes involved in such a posttranslational modification are the same ones involved in the biosynthesis of sugars present in the O-antigen of the LPS. In this work, we report on the characterization of two homologs present in A. brasilense Cd, to the well characterized flagellin modification genes, flmA and flmB, from Aeromonas caviae. We show that mutations in either flmA or flmB genes of A. brasilense resulted in non-motile cells due to alterations in the polar flagellum assembly. Moreover, these mutations also affected the capability of A. brasilense cells to adsorb to maize roots and to produce LPS and EPS. By generating a mutant containing the polar flagellum affected in their rotation, we show the importance of the bacterial motility for the early colonization of maize roots. PMID:27393999

  5. New Horizons approach photometry of Pluto and Charon: light curves and Solar phase curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangari, A. M.; Buie, M. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Verbiscer, A.; Howett, C.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    While the most captivating images of Pluto and Charon were shot by NASA's New Horizons probe on July 14, 2015, the spacecraft also imaged Pluto with its LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager ("LORRI") during its Annual Checkouts and Approach Phases, with campaigns in July 2013, July 2014, January 2015, March 2015, April 2015, May 2015 and June 2015. All but the first campaign provided full coverage of Pluto's 6.4 day rotation. Even though many of these images were taken when surface features on Pluto and Charon were unresolved, these data provide a unique opportunity to study Pluto over a timescale of several months. Earth-based data from an entire apparition must be combined to create a single light curve, as Pluto is never otherwise continuously available for observing due to daylight, weather and scheduling. From the spacecraft, Pluto's sub-observer latitude remained constant to within 0.05 degrees of 43.15 degrees, comparable to a week's worth of change as seen from Earth near opposition. During the July 2013 to June 2015 period, Pluto's solar phase curve increased from 11 degrees to 15 degrees, a small range, but large compared to Earth's 2 degree limit. The slope of the solar phase curve hints at properties such as surface roughness. Using PSF photometry that takes into account the ever-increasing sizes of Pluto and Charon as seen from New Horizons, as well as surface features discovered at closest approach, we present rotational light curves and solar phase curves of Pluto and Charon. We will connect these observations to previous measurements of the system from Earth.

  6. Near-field photometry for organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Harikumar, Krishnan; Isphording, Alexandar; Venkataramanan, Venkat

    2013-03-01

    Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology is rapidly maturing to be ready for next generation of light source for general lighting. The current standard test methods for solid state lighting have evolved for semiconductor sources, with point-like emission characteristics. However, OLED devices are extended surface emitters, where spatial uniformity and angular variation of brightness and colour are important. This necessitates advanced test methods to obtain meaningful data for fundamental understanding, lighting product development and deployment. In this work, a near field imaging goniophotometer was used to characterize lighting-class white OLED devices, where luminance and colour information of the pixels on the light sources were measured at a near field distance for various angles. Analysis was performed to obtain angle dependent luminous intensity, CIE chromaticity coordinates and correlated colour temperature (CCT) in the far field. Furthermore, a complete ray set with chromaticity information was generated, so that illuminance at any distance and angle from the light source can be determined. The generated ray set is needed for optical modeling and design of OLED luminaires. Our results show that luminance non-uniformity could potentially affect the luminaire aesthetics and CCT can vary with angle by more than 2000K. This leads to the same source being perceived as warm or cool depending on the viewing angle. As OLEDs are becoming commercially available, this could be a major challenge for lighting designers. Near field measurement can provide detailed specifications and quantitative comparison between OLED products for performance improvement.

  7. Imaging Spotted Stars with Simultaneous Interferometry, Spectroscopy, and Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettenbacher, Rachael; Monnier, John; Korhonen, Heidi; Harmon, Robert; Henry, Gregory W.; Fekel, Francis C.; Williamson, Michael; Latham, David

    2015-08-01

    Harnessing the sub-milliarcsecond resolving capabilities of the world's largest infrared interferometer, the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) Array, we combine light from all six telescopes with the Michigan Infrared Combiner (MIRC) to directly image the spotted stellar surfaces of the giant primary stars of RS CVn binary systems. In the first study of its kind, we compare these unprecedented interferometric (aperture synthesis) images of stars with simultaneous Doppler and light-curve inversion images to verify the methods and understand their limitations. Using the latitude information we obtain from the Doppler and aperture synthesis images, we investigate degeneracies across hemispheres and the latitude dependence of magnetic field structures. Additionally, we have made the first detections of the systems' faint companions (H-band flux ratios >250:1), detected ellipsoidal variations, and measured gravity darkening. Together these results affect previous analyses of starspot location (e.g. active longitudes), evolution, and differential rotation. Whether or not current solar dynamos can accurately predict the properties of the young, active Sun is unclear; our detailed studies of active, cool giants with rapid rotation and large starspots may help broaden and guide extensions of dynamo theory.

  8. Surface Orientation Affects the Direction of Cone Growth by Leptolyngbya sp. Strain C1, a Likely Architect of Coniform Structures Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park)

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Kristina; Gonzalez, Nicolas I.; Stewart, Joshua; Ospino, Frank; Nguyen, Dickie; Cho, David T.; Ghahremani, Nahal; Spear, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Laminated, microbially produced stromatolites within the rock record provide some of the earliest evidence for life on Earth. The chemical, physical, and biological factors that lead to the initiation of these organosedimentary structures and shape their morphology are unclear. Modern coniform structures with morphological features similar to stromatolites are found on the surface of cyanobacterial/microbial mats. They display a vertical element of growth, can have lamination, can be lithified, and observably grow with time. To begin to understand the microbial processes and interactions required for cone formation, we determined the phylogenetic composition of the microbial community of a coniform structure from a cyanobacterial mat at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, and reconstituted coniform structures in vitro. The 16S rRNA clone library from the coniform structure was dominated by Leptolyngbya sp. Other cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria were present in much lower abundance. The same Leptolyngbya sp. identified in the clone library was also enriched in the laboratory and could produce cones in vitro. When coniform structures were cultivated in the laboratory, the initial incubation conditions were found to influence coniform morphology. In addition, both the angle of illumination and the orientation of the surface affected the angle of cone formation demonstrating how external factors can influence coniform, and likely, stromatolite morphology. PMID:23241986

  9. Campaign Photometry During The 2010 Eclipse Of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Jeff; Stencel, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    Epsilon Aurigae is a long period (27.1 years) eclipsing binary star system with an eclipse that lasts nearly 2 years, but with severe ambiguities about component masses and shape. The current eclipse began on schedule in August of 2009. During the previous, 1982-1984 eclipse, an International Campaign was formed to coordinate a detailed study of the system. While that Campaign was deemed successful, the evolutionary status of the star system remained unclear. Epsilon Aurigae has been observed nearly continuously since the 1982 eclipse. The current Campaign was officially started in 2006. In addition to a Yahoo forum we have a dedicated web site and more than 18 online newsletters reporting photometry, spectroscopy, interferometry and polarimetry data. High quality UBVRIJH band photometric data since before the start of the current eclipse has been submitted. We explore the color differences among the light curves in terms of eclipse phases and archival data. At least one new model of the star system has been proposed since the current Campaign began: a low mass but very high luminosity F star plus a B star surrounded by a debris disk. The current eclipse and in particular the interferometry and spectroscopic data have caused new thoughts on defining eclipsing variable star contact points and phases of an eclipse. Second contact may not be the same point as start of totality and third contact may not be the same point as the start of egress and end of totality. In addition, the much awaited mid-eclipse brightening may or may not have appeared. This paper identifies the current Campaign contributors and the photometric data. This work was supported in part by the bequest of William Herschel Womble in support of astronomy at the University of Denver, by NSF grant 1016678 to the University of Denver.

  10. SECONDARY ECLIPSE PHOTOMETRY OF WASP-4b WITH WARM SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Beerer, Ingrid M.; Knutson, Heather A.; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Deming, Drake; Langton, Jonathan; Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.

    2011-01-20

    We present photometry of the giant extrasolar planet WASP-4b at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m taken with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of Spitzer's extended warm mission. We find secondary eclipse depths of 0.319% {+-} 0.031% and 0.343% {+-} 0.027% for the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands, respectively, and show model emission spectra and pressure-temperature profiles for the planetary atmosphere. These eclipse depths are well fit by model emission spectra with water and other molecules in absorption, similar to those used for TrES-3 and HD 189733b. Depending on our choice of model, these results indicate that this planet has either a weak dayside temperature inversion or no inversion at all. The absence of a strong thermal inversion on this highly irradiated planet is contrary to the idea that highly irradiated planets are expected to have inversions, perhaps due the presence of an unknown absorber in the upper atmosphere. This result might be explained by the modestly enhanced activity level of WASP-4b's G7V host star, which could increase the amount of UV flux received by the planet, therefore reducing the abundance of the unknown stratospheric absorber in the planetary atmosphere as suggested in Knutson et al. We also find no evidence for an offset in the timing of the secondary eclipse and place a 2{sigma} upper limit on |ecos {omega}| of 0.0024, which constrains the range of tidal heating models that could explain this planet's inflated radius.

  11. BVRI photometry of NGC 3231, NGC 7055, and NGC 7127

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Hermansson, L.; Holmström, P.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Open clusters are often used as tracers for the formation and evolution of the Milky Way. But they can also be used to study distinct "local stellar populations" and all kind of stellar groups. All these studies crucially depend on their unambiguous detection and classification separating them from the fore- and background field population. Aims: Still more than one third of the catalogued galactic open clusters are unstudied to date. We have chosen three northern open cluster fields, namely NGC 3231, NGC 7055, and NGC 7127 which have been never studied before to shed more light on their true nature. Methods: We present Johnson-Cousins BVRI photometry down to V ≈ 19 mag. After the transformation to the standard systems, colour-magnitude diagrams were generated. These diagrams were used to fit solar abundant isochrones to determine the distance modulus, reddening and apparent age of the main sequences. Results: As reported before, a significant plate-dependent distortion of the UCAC3 compared to the PPMXL within all three star fields was found. No correlation of this distortion with the apparent magnitude of the objects was detected. From the analysis of the colour-magnitude diagrams and the available proper motions we conclude that NGC 7055 and NGC 7127 are young, real, open clusters with ages of about 10 and 100 Myr, respectively. They are located in a distance of about 3300 as well as 5700 pc from the Sun. NGC 3231, on the other hand, is probably a high galactic latitude open cluster remnant. The complete tables with the photometric measurements are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/542/A68

  12. Precision Photometry to Study the Nature of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Schubnell, Michael

    2011-01-30

    Over the past decade scientists have collected convincing evidence that the expansion of the universe is accelerating, leading to the conclusion that the content of our universe is dominated by a mysterious 'dark energy'. The fact that present theory cannot account for the dark energy has made the determination of the nature of dark energy central to the field of high energy physics. It is expected that nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics is required to fully understand the accelerating universe. Discovering the nature of dark energy is a very difficult task, and requires experiments that employ a combination of different observational techniques, such as type-Ia supernovae, gravitational weak lensing surveys, galaxy and galaxy cluster surveys, and baryon acoustic oscillations. A critical component of any approach to understanding the nature of dark energy is precision photometry. This report addresses just that. Most dark energy missions will require photometric calibration over a wide range of intensities using standardized stars and internal reference sources. All of the techniques proposed for these missions rely on a complete understanding of the linearity of the detectors. The technical report focuses on the investigation and characterization of 'reciprocity failure', a newly discovered count-rate dependent nonlinearity in the NICMOS cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope. In order to quantify reciprocity failure for modern astronomical detectors, we built a dedicated reciprocity test setup that produced a known amount of light on a detector, and to measured its response as a function of light intensity and wavelength.

  13. Uncovering Multiple Populations in Globular Clusters with Washington Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Douglas; Cummings, Jeff; Villanova, Sandro; Carraro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Globular Clusters (GCs), long considered as ideal Simple Stellar Populations, are now known to harbor a wide variety of chemical inhomogeneities. Multiple populations (MP) are being found in a growing number of Galactic globular clusters (GCs) via both photometric and spectroscopic techniques. Indeed, it has been suggested that a GC is an object that possesses MP. A definitive investigation of MP in GCs will undoubtedly provide a profound improvement in our understanding of their formation and evolution.However, most studies employ either high resolution VLT spectroscopy, HST photometry or inefficient filters from the ground. A ground-based photometric system which is both efficient and effective would be especially excellent for uncovering MP. We demonstrate that the Washington system meets these goals. The Washington C filter, in addition to being specifically designed for the purpose of detecting MPs, is both much broader and redder than competing UV filters, making it far more efficient at detecting MPs and much less sensitive to reddening and extinction.Our analysis of the well-studied GC NGC 1851 shows indeed that the C filter is both very efficient and effective at detecting its previously discovered MPs in the RGB and SGB, using relatively little telescope time on only a 1-meter telescope. Remarkably, we have also detected an intrinsically broad MS best characterized by two distinct but heavily overlapping populations that cannot be explained by binaries, field stars, or photometric errors. Detailed analysis shows that the MS distribution is in very good agreement with that seen on the RGB. This is the first time MPs in a MS have been discovered from the ground, and just as strikingly, using only a 1-meter telescope. The Washington system thus proves to be a very powerful tool for investigating MPs, and holds particular promise for extragalactic objects where photons are limited.

  14. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the ANS Ultraviolet Photometry Catalogue of Point Sources (Wesselius et al 1982)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The machine-readable version of the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite ultraviolet photometry catalog is described in detail, with a byte-by-byte format description and characteristics of the data file given. The catalog is a compilation of ultraviolet photometry in five bands, within the wavelength range 155 nm to 330 nm, for 3573 mostly stellar objects. Additional cross reference data (object identification, UBV photometry and MK spectral types) are included in the catalog.

  15. Photometry of supernovae in an image series: methods and application to the SuperNova Legacy Survey (SNLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astier, P.; El Hage, P.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Betoule, M.; Fabbro, S.; Fourmanoit, N.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We present a technique to measure lightcurves of time-variable point sources on a spatially structured background from imaging data. The technique was developed to measure lightcurves of SNLS supernovae in order to infer their distances. This photometry technique performs simultaneous point spread function (PSF) photometry at the same sky position on an image series. Methods: We describe two implementations of the method: one that resamples images before measuring fluxes, and one which does not. In both instances, we sketch the key algorithms involved and present the validation using semi-artificial sources introduced in real images in order to assess the accuracy of the supernova flux measurements relative to that of surrounding stars. We describe the methods required to anchor these PSF fluxes to calibrated aperture catalogs, in order to derive SN magnitudes. Results: We find a marginally significant bias of 2 mmag of the after-resampling method, and no bias at the mmag accuracy for the non-resampling method. Given surrounding star magnitudes, we determine the systematic uncertainty of SN magnitudes to be less than 1.5 mmag, which represents about one third of the current photometric calibration uncertainty affecting SN measurements. The SN photometry delivers several by-products: bright star PSF flux measurements which have a repeatability of about 0.6%, as for aperture measurements; we measure relative astrometric positions with a noise floor of 2.4 mas for a single-image bright star measurement; we show that in all bands of the MegaCam instrument, stars exhibit a profile linearly broadening with flux by about 0.5% over the whole brightness range. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS

  16. Laser flare photometry: a noninvasive, objective, and quantitative method to measure intraocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Herbort, Carl P

    2010-10-01

    Aqueous flare and cells are the two inflammatory parameters of anterior chamber inflammation resulting from disruption of the blood-ocular barriers. When examined with the slit lamp, measurement of intraocular inflammation remains subjective with considerable intra- and interobserver variations. Laser flare cell photometry is an objective quantitative method that enables accurate measurement of these parameters with very high reproducibility. Laser flare photometry allows detection of subclinical alterations in the blood-ocular barriers, identifying subtle pathological changes that could not have been recorded otherwise. With the use of this method, it has been possible to compare the effect of different surgical techniques, surgical adjuncts, and anti-inflammatory medications on intraocular inflammation. Clinical studies of uveitis patients have shown that flare measurements by laser flare photometry allowed precise monitoring of well-defined uveitic entities and prediction of disease relapse. Relationships of laser flare photometry values with complications of uveitis and visual loss further indicate that flare measurement by laser flare photometry should be included in the routine follow-up of patients with uveitis. PMID:19430730

  17. Flight Investigation on a Fighter-type Airplane of Factors which Affect the Loads and Load Distributions on the Vertical Tail Surfaces During Rudder Kicks and Fishtails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boshar, John

    1947-01-01

    Results are presented of a flight investigation conducted on a fighter-type airplane to determine the factors which affect the loads and load distributions on the vertical tail surfaces in maneuvers. An analysis is made of the data obtained in steady flight, rudder kicks, and fishtail maneuvers. For the rudder kicks, the significant loads were the "deflection load" resulting from an abrupt control deflection and the "dynamic load" consisting of a load corresponding to the new static equilibrium condition for the rudder deflected plus a load due to a transient overshoot. The minimum time to reach the maximum control deflection attainable by the pilot in any flight condition was found to be a constant. In the fishtail maneuvers, it was found that the pilot tends to deflect the rudder in phase with the natural frequency of the airplane. The maximum loads measured in fishtails were of the same order of magnitude as those from a rudder kick in which the rudder is returned to zero at the time of maximum sideslip.

  18. The ability of Hepatitis B surface antigen DNA vaccine to elicit cell-mediated immune responses, but not antibody responses, was affected by the deglysosylation of S antigen.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yiping; Huang, Zuhu; Lin, Yan; Li, Jun; Chou, Te-Hui; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2008-09-19

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection remains a major worldwide infectious disease with serious long-term morbidity and mortality. The limited selections of drug treatment are not able to control the progress of disease in people with active and persistent HBV infection. Immunotherapy to control the degree of viral infection is one possible alternative solution to this challenge. HBV DNA vaccines, with their strong ability to induce cell-mediated immune responses, offer an attractive option. HBV surface protein is important in viral immunity. Re-establishing anti-S immunity in chronic HBV infected patients will bring significant benefit to the patients. Previous studies have shown that HBV S DNA vaccines are immunogenic in a number of animal studies. In the current study, we further investigated the effect of glycosylation to the expression and immunogenicity of S DNA vaccines. Our results demonstrate that deglycosylation at the two potential N-linked glycosylation sites in S protein resulted in a significant decrease of S-specific cell-mediated immune responses, but did not affect anti-S antibody responses. This finding provides important direction to the development of S DNA vaccines to elicit the optimal and balanced antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to treat people with HBV chronic infections. PMID:18462847

  19. Homogeneous Photometry. V. The Globular Cluster NGC 4147

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Peter B.; Catelan, M.; Smith, Horace A.

    2005-12-01

    New BVRI broadband photometry and astrometry are presented for the globular cluster NGC 4147, based upon measurements derived from 524 ground-based CCD images mostly either donated by colleagues or retrieved from public archives. We have also reanalyzed five exposures of the cluster obtained with WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope in the F439W and F555W (B and V) filters. We present calibrated color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. Analysis of the color-magnitude diagram reveals morphological properties generally consistent with published metal-abundance estimates for the cluster, and an age typical of other Galactic globular clusters of similar metallicity. We have also redetermined the periods and mean magnitudes for the RR Lyrae variables, including a new c-type variable reported here for the first time. Our data do not show clear evidence for photometric variability in candidate V18, recently reported by Arellano Ferro et al. (2004, Rev. Mex. A&A, 40, 209). These observations also support the nonvariable status of candidates V5, V9, and V15. The union of our light-curve data with those of Newburn (1957, AJ, 62, 197), Mannino (1957, Mem. Soc. Astron. Italiana, 28, 285), and Arellano Ferro et al. (op. cit.) permits the derivation of significantly improved periods. The mean periods and the Bailey period-amplitude diagrams support the classification of the cluster as Oosterhoff I, despite its predominantly blue horizontal branch. The number ratio of c- to ab-type RR Lyrae stars, on the other hand, is unusually high for an Oosterhoff I cluster. The calibrated results have been made available through the first author's Web site. Based in part on archival observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal Observatory under program ID 60.A-9050(A). This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center

  20. High-precision ground-based photometry of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2013-04-01

    High-precision photometry of transiting exoplanet systems has contributed significantly to our understanding of the properties of their atmospheres. The best targets are the bright exoplanet systems, for which the high number of photons allow very high signal-to-noise ratios. Most of the current instruments are not optimised for these high-precision measurements, either they have a large read-out overhead to reduce the readnoise and/or their field-of-view is limited, preventing simultaneous observations of both the target and a reference star. Recently we have proposed a new wide-field imager for the Observatoir de Mont-Megantic optimised for these bright systems (PI: Jayawardhana). The instruments has a dual beam design and a field-of-view of 17' by 17'. The cameras have a read-out time of 2 seconds, significantly reducing read-out overheads. Over the past years we have obtained significant experience with how to reach the high precision required for the characterisation of exoplanet atmospheres. Based on our experience we provide the following advice: Get the best calibrations possible. In the case of bad weather, characterise the instrument (e.g. non-linearity, dome flats, bias level), this is vital for better understanding of the science data. Observe the target for as long as possible, the out-of-transit baseline is as important as the transit/eclipse itself. A short baseline can lead to improperly corrected systematic and mis-estimation of the red-noise. Keep everything (e.g. position on detector, exposure time) as stable as possible. Take care that the defocus is not too strong. For a large defocus, the contribution of the total flux from the sky-background in the aperture could well exceed that of the target, resulting in very strict requirements on the precision at which the background is measured.

  1. Optical Photometry of GRB 021004: The First Month

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Stephen T.; Weidinger, Michael; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Gorosabel, Javier; Hjorth, Jens; Pedersen, Kristian; Méndez Alvarez, Javier; Augusteijn, Thomas; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, Alberto; Dahle, Håkon; Egholm, M. P.; Jakobsson, Páll; Jensen, Brian L.; Levan, Andrew; Møller, Palle; Pedersen, Holger; Pursimo, Tapio; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Thomsen, Bjarne

    2003-05-01

    We present UBVRCIC photometry of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 021004 taken at the Nordic Optical Telescope between approximately 8 hours and 30 days after the burst. These data are combined with an analysis of the 87 ks Chandra X-ray observations of GRB 021004 taken at a mean epoch of 33 hr after the burst to investigate the nature of this GRB. We find an intrinsic spectral slope at optical wavelengths of βUH=0.39+/-0.12 and an X-ray slope of βX=0.94+/-0.03. There is no evidence for color evolution between 8.5 hr and 5.5 days after the burst. The optical decay becomes steeper approximately 5 days after the burst. This appears to be a gradual break due to the onset of sideways expansion in a collimated outflow. Our data suggest that the extragalactic extinction along the line of sight to the burst is between AV~0.3 and 0.5 and has an extinction law similar to that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. The optical and X-ray data are consistent with a relativistic fireball with the shocked electrons being in the slow cooling regime and having an electron index of p=1.9+/-0.1. The burst occurred in an ambient medium that is homogeneous on scales larger than approximately 1018 cm but inhomogeneous on smaller scales. The mean particle density is similar to what is seen for other bursts (0.1 cm-3<~n<~100 cm-3). Our results support the idea that the brightening seen at approximately 0.1 days was due to interaction with a clumpy ambient medium within 1017-1018 cm of the progenitor. The agreement between the predicted optical decay and that observed approximately 10 minutes after the burst suggests that the physical mechanism controlling the observed flux at t~10 minutes is the same as the one operating at t>0.5 days. Based on observations taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of Santa Miguel de la Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de

  2. Absolute parameters for AI Phoenicis using WASP photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby-Kent, J. A.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Serenelli, A. M.; Turner, O. D.; Evans, D. F.; Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.; West, R. G.

    2016-06-01

    Context. AI Phe is a double-lined, detached eclipsing binary, in which a K-type sub-giant star totally eclipses its main-sequence companion every 24.6 days. This configuration makes AI Phe ideal for testing stellar evolutionary models. Difficulties in obtaining a complete lightcurve mean the precision of existing radii measurements could be improved. Aims: Our aim is to improve the precision of the radius measurements for the stars in AI Phe using high-precision photometry from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP), and use these improved radius measurements together with estimates of the masses, temperatures and composition of the stars to place constraints on the mixing length, helium abundance and age of the system. Methods: A best-fit ebop model is used to obtain lightcurve parameters, with their standard errors calculated using a prayer-bead algorithm. These were combined with previously published spectroscopic orbit results, to obtain masses and radii. A Bayesian method is used to estimate the age of the system for model grids with different mixing lengths and helium abundances. Results: The radii are found to be R1 = 1.835 ± 0.014 R⊙, R2 = 2.912 ± 0.014 R⊙ and the masses M1 = 1.1973 ± 0.0037 M⊙, M2 = 1.2473 ± 0.0039 M⊙. From the best-fit stellar models we infer a mixing length of 1.78, a helium abundance of YAI = 0.26 +0.02-0.01 and an age of 4.39 ± 0.32 Gyr. Times of primary minimum show the period of AI Phe is not constant. Currently, there are insufficient data to determine the cause of this variation. Conclusions: Improved precision in the masses and radii have improved the age estimate, and allowed the mixing length and helium abundance to be constrained. The eccentricity is now the largest source of uncertainty in calculating the masses. Further work is needed to characterise the orbit of AI Phe. Obtaining more binaries with parameters measured to a similar level of precision would allow us to test for relationships between helium

  3. Improved mm-wave photometry for kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M.; Roesch, M.; Désert, F.-X.; Monfardini, A.; Benoit, A.; Mauskopf, P.; Ade, P.; Boudou, N.; Bourrion, O.; Camus, P.; Cruciani, A.; Doyle, S.; Hoffmann, C.; Leclercq, S.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Ponthieu, N.; Schuster, K. F.; Tucker, C.; Vescovi, C.

    2013-03-01

    Context. We have developed a dual-band (140 and 220 GHz) mm-wave imaging camera based on superconducting kinetic inductance detector (KID) arrays. Each array contains 132 superconducting resonators whose resonant frequencies are shifted by mm-wave photons absorption. The read out is achieved with a single electronics chain per band, taking advantage of the intrinsic KID frequency-domain multiplexability. The arrays are easily scalable and well adapted for future large format focal plane instruments. NIKA (formerly Néel IRAM KID Array, now New IRAM KID Array) has been specifically designed for the IRAM 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta, and is one of the first instruments using KIDs to have made measurements of astronomical sources. Aims: In this Letter we describe the solutions adopted to improve the calibration accuracy and the sensitivity of the instrument, and we report on the outcome of the 3rd NIKA observing run of October, 2011. Methods: We use a fast electronic modulation of the readout tone for each KID pixel in order to linearize the instrument calibration, which we track with measurements of planets. We also adopt a new design of the KIDs, sensitive to both polarizations, to increase the amount of radiation absorbed and thus the optical efficiency of the system. Results: We measured an average sensitivity on the sky of 21 mJys0.5 per beam at 140 GHz and 140 mJys0.5 at 220 GHz in the best observing conditions (τ220 ≃ 0.2) after atmospheric noise decorrelation. The sensitivity at 220 GHz was limited by the atmospheric attenuation and loading as well as a reduction in the spectral bandwidth due to a misplaced filter. We found the repeatability in the photometry over the entire observing run to be better than 10% in both bands, thus demonstrating a significant improvement over the previous runs. We also find good agreement between NIKA measurements of faint astronomical sources and previous measurements of the same sources.

  4. Results of CCD Transit Photometry Testing for the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Witteborn, F.; Dunham, E.; Jenkins, J.; Borucki, W.; Webster, L.

    1999-12-01

    Transit signals produced by Earth-size planets in orbit around solar-like stars are of the order of 8e-5 and have durations from 4 to 16 hours for planets in or near the habitable zone. A mission to search for habitable planets has been proposed (Koch, et al., 1998). At the heart of the mission is an array of CCDs used to continuously measure the relative brightness variations of 100,000 dwarf stars for transits. A testbed facility has been constructed to determine the effects of various induced noise sources on the capability of a CCD photometer to maintain an instrument relative precision of better than 1e-5. The photometry facility includes: a simulated star field with an approximate solar spectrum, fast optics to simulate the space borne telescope, a thinned back-illuminated CCD similar to those to be used on the spacecraft operating at 1 Mpix/sec read rate, and shutterless operation. The test facility is thermally and mechanically isolated. Each source of noise is introduced in a controlled fashion and evaluated. Pointing noise or changing thermal conditions in the spacecraft can cause star-image motion at the milli-pixel level. These motions are imposed by piezo-electric devices that move the photometer relative to the star field. Transit signals as small as Earth-size transits of solar-like stars are generated and measured. This is accomplished by electrical self-heating and expansion of fine wires placed across many of the star apertures. The small decrease in stellar brightness is used to demonstrate that Earth-size planets can be detected under realistic noise conditions and at the shot-noise-limited level. The effects of imposing several noise sources are shown and the resulting detectability of planets is presented. This work is supported in part by the NASA Discovery program and NASA Ames. Koch, D., Borucki, W., Webster, L., Dunham, E., Jenkins, J., Marriott, J. and Reitsema, H. SPIE Conf. on Space Telescopes and Instruments V, 3356, 599-607 (1998)

  5. Hubble Space Telescope Photometry for the Halo Stars in the Leo Elliptical NGC 3377

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William E.; Harris, Gretchen L. H.; Layden, Andrew C.; Stetson, Peter B.

    2007-07-01

    We have used the ACS camera on HST to obtain (V,I) photometry for 57,000 red giant stars in the halo of the Leo elliptical NGC 3377, an intermediate-luminosity elliptical. We use this sample of stars to derive the metallicity distribution function (MDF) for its halo field stars and comment on its chemical evolution history compared with both larger and smaller E galaxies. Our ACS WFC field spans a radial range extending from 4 to 18 kpc projected distance from the center of NGC 3377 and thus covers a significant portion of this galaxy's halo. We find that the MDF is broad, reaching a peak at log(Z/Zsolar)~=-0.6, but containing virtually no stars more metal-poor than log(Z/Zsolar)=-1.5. It may, in addition, have relatively few stars more metal-rich than log(Z/Zsolar)~=-0.3, although interpretation of the high-metallicity end of the MDF is limited by photometric completeness that affects the detection of the reddest, most metal-rich stars. NGC 3377 appears to have an enrichment history intermediate between those of normal dwarf ellipticals and the much larger giants. As yet, we find no clear evidence that the halo of NGC 3377 contains a significant population of ``young'' (<3 Gyr) stars. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program 9811. Support for this work was provided in part by NASA through grant HST-GO-09811.01-A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  6. Spot activity on HD 89546 (FG UMa) from long-term photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdarcan, O.; Evren, S.; Henry, G. W.

    2012-02-01

    We present the analysis of 20 years of time-series BV photometry of the SB1 RS CVn binary HD 89546. The system's yearly mean V brightness, the B-V color index, the photometric period, and the light curve amplitude all show clear cyclic variability with an ≈9-year time scale. We also find some evidence for brightness variability on a time scale longer than the 20-year time span of our observations, perhaps indicating a longer cycle analogous to the solar Gleissberg cycle. We estimate the unspotted V magnitude of HD 89546 to be 7.154m, which is ≈0.2m brighter than the observed maximum brightness. Spot modelling of the system shows that spot temperature variations affect the observed B-V color as well as the V brightness. Two active longitudes are observed, centered around 180° and 360° longitude on the G9 III primary, each covering a longitude range of 120°. Furthermore, two inactive longitude zones are seen spanning only 60° between the two active longitudes. The longitudinal distribution of the spots exhibits no strong cyclic variability but does show rapid jumps of 120° that look like the flip-flop phenomenon. We estimate the differential rotation coefficient of the star as k=0.086 by considering the range of observed photometric period variations and assumed latitudinal spot variations over 45°. Based on data obtained with the Tennessee State University T3 0.4 m APT at Fairborn Observatory, operated by Tennessee State University, and T30 0.3 m telescope of the Ege University Observatory in Izmir.

  7. Photoelectric photometry of Comet P/Halley from Mauna Kea Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piscitelli, J. R.; Tholen, D. J.; Hammel, H. B.; Lark, N.

    1986-01-01

    A program of photoelectric photometry of comet Halley yielded 60 nights of usable photometry. The uncertainty in the photometry in all filters except OH is better than 2%. Throughout the apparition, the comet is brightest in the filters that isolated the neutral gas emission features of OH, CN, C2, and C3. The fluxes in the filters that isolated the ionic emission features of CO(+) and H2O(+) are comparable to the continuum when centered upon the optocenter, thereby making the ionic emission weak to undetectable above the continuum. The continuum colors do not appear to be a function of phase angle; therefore, the colors are probably indicative of dust grain composition and are not dominated by scattering geometry effects.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IC 2602 VRI photometry (Foster+ 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D. C.; Byrne, P. B.; Hawley, S. L.; Rolleston, W. R. J.

    1997-03-01

    We present the results of VRI photometry of the young open cluster IC 2602. Two 15x15arcmin2 fields were observed in February and May 1991 using the 1-m Swope telescope at Las Campanas. Using theoretical isochrones obtained from D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1994ApJS...90..467D), and allowing for observational and other uncertainties, we identify 78 primary candidate members with 12=50%, as might be expected given its low galactic latitude. We also compare our photometry with that given for the X-ray detected stars of Randich et al. (1995A&A...300..134R) present complimentary narrow band Hα photometry for a subset of the stars. (1 data file).

  9. CCD photometry of late-type stars in the young open cluster IC 2602

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D. C.; Byrne, P. B.; Hawley, S. L.; Rolleston, W. R. J.

    1997-11-01

    We present the results of VRI photometry of the young open cluster IC 2602. Two 15 arcmin times 15 arcmin fields were observed in February and May 1991 using the 1-m Swope telescope at Las Campanas. Using theoretical isochrones obtained from \\cite[D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1994)]{dam94}, and allowing for observational and other uncertainties, we identify 78 primary candidate members with 12= 50%, as might be expected given its low galactic latitude. We also compare our photometry with that given for the X-ray detected stars of \\cite[Randich et al. (1995)]{ran95}. We present complimentary narrow band H alpha photometry for a subset of the stars.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: uvby photometry of 4 CP stars (Adelman, 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, S. J.

    1996-11-01

    Differential Stroemgren uvby photometric observations from the Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope are presented for four magnetic chemically peculiar stars. Comparison with uvby photometry of Pedersen & Thomsen for HD 37776 yields an improved period of 1.538675 days. New periods of 15.0305 days and 18.065 days are found for the sharp-lined stars HR 2258 and HR 6958, respectively, rather than one of their aliases. For HR 6958 each color shows a slightly different time of maximum. Comparison of the four color photometry of 108 Aqr taken during the fall of 1995 which well covers the period shows the presence of a secondary minimum near primary maximum in u, v, and b. Comparison with published photometry indicates indicates that subtle changes in the shapes of the light curves have occurred suggesting that this star might be precessing. (5 data files).

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometry of VVV CL041 cluster (Chene+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chene, A.-N.; Ramirez Alegria, S.; Borissova, J.; O'Leary, E.; Martins, F.; Herve, A.; Kuhn, M.; Kurtev, R.; Consuelo Amigo Fuentes, P.; Bonatto, C.; Minniti, D.

    2015-11-01

    We present the JHKs photometry extracted from the VVV (VISTA variables in the Via Lactea) survey for the cluster VVV CL041. The photometry extraction was performed by employing the VVV-SkZ pipeline's (Mauro et al., 2013RMxAA..49..189M) automated software based on ALLFRAME (Stetson, 1994PASP..106..250S). 2MASS photometry was used for absolute flux calibration in the J, H, and Ks bands, using stars with 12.5

  12. ASTERIA: A CubeSat for Exoplanet Transit and Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Mary; Seager, Sara

    2015-12-01

    We present ASTERIA, a 6U CubeSat demonstrator for exoplanet transit photometry. ASTERIA, currently in development at JPL and due to be launched in mid to late 2016, is a testbed for a two-stage pointing system capable of <10 arcsecond pointing as well as active thermal control. These two features will allow ASTERIA to achieve very high photometric precision (<100 ppm) in a very small and cost effective package. ASTERIA will be used to search for transits of known RV planets as well as perform long duration, high cadence stellar photometry. The stellar photometry data will be used to study flares and stellar activity on a variety of stellar types. This presentation will focus on ASTERIA's science mission.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CCD photometry of 11 dwarf irregular galaxies (Hopp+, 1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, U.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.

    1995-02-01

    We present CCD imaging and photometry in B and Cousins R of the dwarf irregular galaxies UGC 4459 (=DDO 53), UGC 5272 (A=DDO 64 and B), UGC 5340 (=DDO 68), UGC 6456, UGC 7559 (=DDO 126), UGC 8024 (=NGC 4789A=DDO 154), UGC 8091 (= GR 8=DDO 155), UGC 8320 (=DDO 168), UGC 8760 (=DDO 183), and DDO 210. For DDO 210 we also give results in the V filter. Photometry of the resolved stars was carried out on background-subtracted images using DAOPHOT. The tables of measurements include positions, magnitudes, colors, a magnitude error, and a color error. Integrated fluxes and colors are also reported. The single-star photometry is compared to previous results in three of the galaxies (UGC 8024, UGC 8091, DDO 210). (11 data files).

  14. Optical BVRI photometry of common proper motion F/G/K+M wide separation binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ting; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Williams, Patrick; Chavez, Joy; Lépine, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    We present optical (BVRI) photometric measurements of a sample of 76 common proper motion wide separation main-sequence binary pairs. The pairs are composed of a F-, G-, or K-type primary star and an M-type secondary. The sample is selected from the revised NLTT catalog and the LSPM catalog. The photometry is generally precise to 0.03 mag in all bands. We separate our sample into two groups, dwarf candidates and subdwarf candidates, using the reduced proper motion diagram constructed with our improved photometry. The M subdwarf candidates in general have larger V – R colors than the M dwarf candidates at a given V – I color. This is consistent with an average metallicity difference between the two groups, as predicted by the PHOENIX/BT-Settl models. The improved photometry will be used as input into a technique to determine the metallicities of the M-type stars.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: uvby-β photometry of WTTS (Chavarria-K+, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarria-K, C.; Terranegra, L.; Moreno-Corral, M. A.; de, Lara E.

    2000-07-01

    We present uvby-β photometry of 116 X-ray flux-selected active stars in the directions of the Orion (40), Taurus-Auriga (58) and Scorpius OB2-2 (18) star forming regions. Additionally, we give near IR JHK photometry of 20 active stars in the Taurus-Auriga direction. The program stars were selected from the ROSAT All Sky Survey and EINSTEIN X-ray surveys and are spectroscopically confirmed weak-line T Tauri stars and weak-line T Tauri star candidates. The photometry confirms the young nature of the program stars and also indicates that a significant fraction of the sample could be foreground objects. The data given here probably represent the largest homogeneous uvby-β photometric sample of new WTTS and WTTS candidates. Many objects in the sample are observed photometrically for the first time. (4 data files).

  16. Stellar photometry with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide-field/Planetary camera - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Hunter, Deidre; Groth, Edward J.; Light, Robert M.; Faber, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    The prospects for the use of the Wide-Field/Planetary Camera (WFPC) for stellar photometry are described. The large halos of the point-spread function (PSF) resulting from spherical aberration and from spatial, temporal, and color variations of the PSF are the main limitations to accurate photometry. Degradations caused by crowding are exacerbated by the halos of the PSF. An attempt is made to quantify these effects and determine the current accuracy of stellar photometry with the WFPC. In realistic cases, the brighter stars in crowded fields have 0.09 mag errors; fainter stars have larger errors depending on the degree of crowding. It is shown that measuring Cepheids in Virgo Cluster galaxies is not currently possible without inordinate increases in exposure times.

  17. Hypercalibration: A Pan-STARRS1-based Recalibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Schlegel, David J.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Jurić, Mario; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Denneau, Larry; Draper, Peter W.; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Price, Paul A.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Tonry, John L.

    2016-05-01

    We present a recalibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry with new flat fields and zero points derived from Pan-STARRS1. Using point-spread function (PSF) photometry of 60 million stars with 16 < r < 20, we derive a model of amplifier gain and flat-field corrections with per-run rms residuals of 3 millimagnitudes (mmag) in griz bands and 15 mmag in u band. The new photometric zero points are adjusted to leave the median in the Galactic north unchanged for compatibility with previous SDSS work. We also identify transient non-photometric periods in SDSS (“contrails”) based on photometric deviations co-temporal in SDSS bands. The recalibrated stellar PSF photometry of SDSS and PS1 has an rms difference of {9, 7, 7, 8} mmag in griz, respectively, when averaged over 15‧ regions.

  18. Near-infrared photometry of WISE J085510.74-071442.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Lodieu, N.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Martín, E. L.; Ivanov, V. D.; Bayo, A.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Mužić, K.; Minniti, D.; Beamín, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We aim at obtaining near-infrared photometry and deriving the mass, age, temperature, and surface gravity of WISE J085510.74-071442.5 (J0855-0714), which is the coolest object beyond the solar system currently known. Methods: We used publicly available data from the archives of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to determine the emission of this source at 1.153 μm (F110W) and 1.575 μm (CH4-off). J0855-0714 was detected at both wavelengths with a signal-to-noise ratio of ≈10 (F110W) and ≈4 (CH4-off) at the peak of the corresponding point-spread-functions. Results: This is the first detection of J0855-0714 in the H-band wavelengths. We measured 26.31 ± 0.10 and 23.22 ± 0.35 mag in F110W and CH4-off (Vega system). J0855-0714 remains unresolved in the HST images that have a spatial resolution of 0.22''. Companions at separations of 0.5 AU (similar mass and brightness) and at ~1 AU (≈1 mag fainter in the F110W filter) are discarded. By combining the new data with published photometry, including non-detections, we build the spectral energy distribution of J0855-0714 from 0.89 through 22.09 μm, and contrast it against current solar-metallicity models of planetary atmospheres. We determine that the best spectral fit yields a temperature of 225-250 K, a bolometric luminosity of log L/L⊙ = -8.57, and a high surface gravity of log g = 5.0 (cm s-2), which suggests an old age although a gravity this high is not fully compatible with evolutionary models. After comparing our data with the cooling theory for brown dwarfs and planets, we infer a mass in the interval 2-10 MJup for ages of 1-12 Gyr and high atmospheric gravities of log g ⪆ 3.5 (cm s-2). If it had the age of the Sun, J0855-0714 would be a ≈5-MJup free-floating planetary-mass object. Conclusions: J0855-0714 meets the mass values previously determined for free-floating planetary-mass objects discovered in star-forming regions and young stellar clusters. Based on

  19. STAR CLUSTERS IN M33: UPDATED UBVRI PHOTOMETRY, AGES, METALLICITIES, AND MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Zhou; De Grijs, Richard E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The photometric characterization of M33 star clusters is far from complete. In this paper, we present homogeneous UBVRI photometry of 708 star clusters and cluster candidates in M33 based on archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the galaxy's major axis. Our photometry includes 387, 563, 616, 580, and 478 objects in the UBVRI bands, respectively, of which 276, 405, 430, 457, and 363 do not have previously published UBVRI photometry. Our photometry is consistent with previous measurements (where available) in all filters. We adopted Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz photometry for complementary purposes, as well as Two Micron All Sky Survey near-infrared JHK photometry where available. We fitted the spectral-energy distributions of 671 star clusters and candidates to derive their ages, metallicities, and masses based on the updated PARSEC simple stellar populations synthesis models. The results of our χ{sup 2} minimization routines show that only 205 of the 671 clusters (31%) are older than 2 Gyr, which represents a much smaller fraction of the cluster population than that in M31 (56%), suggesting that M33 is dominated by young star clusters (<1 Gyr). We investigate the mass distributions of the star clusters—both open and globular clusters—in M33, M31, the Milky Way, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. Their mean values are log (M {sub cl}/M {sub ☉}) = 4.25, 5.43, 2.72, and 4.18, respectively. The fraction of open to globular clusters is highest in the Milky Way and lowest in M31. Our comparisons of the cluster ages, masses, and metallicities show that our results are basically in agreement with previous studies (where objects in common are available); differences can be traced back to differences in the models adopted, the fitting methods used, and stochastic sampling effects.

  20. Precision of a Low-Cost InGaAs Detector for Near Infrared Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Peter W.; Croll, Bryce; Simcoe, Robert A.

    2013-09-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested an InGaAs near-infrared camera to explore whether low-cost detectors can make small (<= 1 m) telescopes capable of precise (< 1 mmag) infrared photometry of relatively bright targets. The camera is constructed around the 640 × 512 pixel APS640C sensor built by FLIR Electro-Optical Components. We designed custom analog-to-digital electronics for maximum stability and minimum noise. The InGaAs dark current halves with every 7°C of cooling, and we reduce it to 840 e- s-1 pixel-1 (with a pixel-to-pixel variation of ± 200 e- s-1 pixel-1) by cooling the array to -20°C. Beyond this point, glow from the readout dominates. The single-sample read noise of 149 e- is reduced to 54 e- through up-the-ramp sampling. Laboratory testing with a star field generated by a lenslet array shows that two-star differential photometry is possible to a precision of 631 ± 205 ppm (0.68 mmag) hr-1/2 at a flux of 2.4 × 104 e- s-1. Employing three comparison stars and decorrelating reference signals further improves the precision to 483 ± 161 ppm (0.52 mmag) hr-1/2. Photometric observations of HD80606 and HD80607 (J = 7.7 and 7.8) in the Y band shows that differential photometry to a precision of 415 ppm (0.45 mmag) hr-1/2 is achieved with an effective telescope aperture of 0.25 m. Next-generation InGaAs detectors should indeed enable Poisson-limited photometry of brighter dwarfs with particular advantage for late-M and L types. In addition, one might acquire near-infrared photometry simultaneously with optical photometry or radial velocity measurements to maximize the return of exoplanet searches with small telescopes.