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Sample records for affinity agonist dysiherbaine

  1. Enantioselective Synthesis of (-)-Dysiherbaine.

    PubMed

    Do, Ha; Kang, Chang Won; Cho, Joon Hyung; Gilbertson, Scott R

    2015-08-21

    Dysiherbaine, a natural product isolated from the Marine sponge Dysidea herbacea, has been shown to be a selective agonist of non-NMDA type glutamate receptors, kainate receptors. An enantioselective synthesis of dysiherbaine is reported. Metathesis of the diene followed by conversion of the resulting alkene to the amino alcohol and addition of the amino acid provides the natural product. This synthesis differs from previous approaches to the molecule in that the functionality on the tetrahydropyran ring is installed late in the route. PMID:26258884

  2. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  3. Muscarinic receptors in rat nasal mucosa are predominantly of the low affinity agonist type.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues de Miranda, J F; Scheres, H M; Salden, H J; Beld, A J; Klaassen, A B; Kuijpers, W

    1985-07-31

    Specific [3H]l-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to rat nasal mucosa homogenates occurs to a homogeneous class of binding sites with Kd = 60 +/- 2 10(-12) M and Bmax = 8.1 +/- 2 pmol/g tissue. Binding is stereoselectively inhibited by benzetimide enantiomers. Pirenzepine inhibits [3H]l-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding with low affinity (Ki = 5.0 10(-7) M), classifying the binding sites as muscarinic M2-receptors. Methylfurtrethonium and methacholine inhibit [3H]l-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding following an almost sigmoid curve at high concentrations pointing to the presence of mainly low affinity agonist binding sites. PMID:3840092

  4. Inhibitory GTP binding protein G/sub i/ regulates US -adrenoceptor affinity towards US -agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, I.; Levitzki, A.

    1987-05-01

    Treatment of S-49 lymphoma cell membranes with pertussis toxin (PT) causes a three-fold reduction of US -adrenoceptor (US AR) affinity towards isoproterenol. A similar treatment with cholera toxin (CT) does not cause such a modulation. The effects were studied by the detailed analysis of SVI-cyanopindolol (CYP) binding curves in the absence and presence of increasing agonist concentrations. Thus, the authors were able to compare in detail the effects of G/sub s/ and G/sub i/ on the agonist-associated state of the US AR. In contrast to these findings, PT treatment does not have any effect on the displacement of SVI-CYP by (-)isoproterenol. These results demonstrate that the inhibitory GTP protein G/sub i/ modulates the US AR affinity towards US -agonists. This might be due to the association of G/sub i/ with the agonist-bound US AR x G/sub s/ x C complex within the membrane. This hypothesis, as well as others, is under investigation.

  5. High-affinity σ1 protein agonist reduces clinical and pathological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Oxombre, B; Lee-Chang, C; Duhamel, A; Toussaint, M; Giroux, M; Donnier-Maréchal, M; Carato, P; Lefranc, D; Zéphir, H; Prin, L; Melnyk, P; Vermersch, P

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Selective agonists of the sigma-1 receptor (σ1 protein) are generally reported to protect against neuronal damage and modulate oligodendrocyte differentiation. Human and rodent lymphocytes possess saturable, high-affinity binding sites for compounds binding to the σ1 protein and potential immunomodulatory properties have been described for σ1 protein ligands. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is recognized as a valuable model of the inflammatory aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we have assessed the role of a σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, in EAE. Experimental Approach EAE was induced in SJL/J female mice by active immunization with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)139–151 peptide. The σ1 protein agonist was injected i.p. at the time of immunization (day 0). Disease severity was assessed clinically and by histopathological evaluation of the CNS. Phenotyping of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells were performed by flow cytometry in spleen and cervical lymph nodes. Key Results Prophylactic treatment of EAE mice with the σ1 protein agonist prevented mononuclear cell accumulation and demyelination in brain and spinal cord and increased T2 B-cells and regulatory T-cells, resulting in an overall reduction in the clinical progression of EAE. Conclusions and Implications This σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, decreased the magnitude of inflammation in EAE. This effect was associated with increased proportions of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells with potential immunoregulatory functions. Targeting of the σ1 protein might thus provide new therapeutic opportunities in MS. PMID:25521311

  6. Binding characteristics of [3H]14-methoxymetopon, a high affinity mu-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Spetea, Mariana; Tóth, Fanni; Schütz, Johannes; Otvös, Ferenc; Tóth, Géza; Benyhe, Sandor; Borsodi, Anna; Schmidhammer, Helmut

    2003-07-01

    The highly potent micro -opioid receptor agonist 14-methoxymetopon (4,5alpha-epoxy-3-hydroxy-14beta-methoxy-5beta,17-dimethylmorphinan-6-one) was prepared in tritium labelled form by a catalytic dehalogenation method resulting in a specific radioactivity of 15.9 Ci/mmol. Opioid binding characteristics of [3H]14-methoxymetopon were determined using radioligand binding assay in rat brain membranes. [3H]14-Methoxymetopon specifically labelled a single class of opioid sites with affinity in low subnanomolar range (Ki = 0.43 nm) and maximal number of binding sites of 314 fmol/mg protein. Binding of [3H]14-methoxymetopon was inhibited by ligands selective for the micro -opioid receptor with high potency, while selective kappa-opioids and delta-opioids were weaker inhibitors. 14-Methoxymetopon increased guanosine-5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding with an EC50 of 70.9 nm, thus, providing evidence for the agonist character of this ligand. The increase of [35S]GTPgammaS binding was inhibited by naloxone and selective micro -opioid antagonists, indicating a micro -opioid receptor-mediated action. [3H]14-Methoxymetopon is one of the few nonpeptide mu-opioid receptor agonists available in radiolabelled form up to now. Due to its high affinity and selectivity, high stability and extremely low nonspecific binding (<10%), this radioligand would be an important and useful tool in probing mu-opioid receptor mechanisms, as well as to promote a further understanding of the opioid system at the cellular and molecular level. PMID:12887410

  7. Solubilization and reconstitution of the D-1 dopamine receptor: potentiation of the agonist high-affinity state of the receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.

    1988-11-29

    The D-1 dopamine receptor was extracted from rat striatal membranes with sodium cholate and NaCl in the presence of a specific agonist and phospholipids. The soluble receptor then was reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles by further addition of phospholipids prior to detergent removal. Of the total membrane receptors, up to 48% were extracted and 36% were reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. Yields were greatly reduced if the agonist was omitted or replaced with an antagonist. The solubilized and reconstituted D-1 receptors retained the pharmacological properties of the membrane-bound receptors, including the ability to discriminate between active and inactive enantiomers of specific agonists and antagonists. In this regard, the affinity of the reconstituted receptors for the D-1 specific antagonist /sup 125/I SCH 23982 was similar to that of the membrane-bound receptors with a Kd of 1.5 nM. Both the soluble and reconstituted forms of the D-1 receptor exhibited two affinity states for the D-1 specific agonist SKandF R-38393. In contrast to the low proportion of the receptors that had a high affinity for the agonists in striatal membranes (less than 6%), there was a dramatic increase following solubilization (22%) and reconstitution (40%). Similar results were obtained by using dopamine; the proportion of high-affinity sites increased from 4% (membrane-bound) to 48% (reconstituted) of the total receptor population. These high-affinity sites were coupled to G proteins, as guanyl nucleotides completely abolished them. Addition of guanyl nucleotides prior to solubilization or to reconstitution, however, had no effect on the subsequent yield of the reconstituted receptors.

  8. Galpha-subunits differentially alter the conformation and agonist affinity of kappa-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Feng; Mosier, Philip D; Westkaemper, Richard B; Roth, Bryan L

    2008-02-12

    Although ligand-induced conformational changes in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well-documented, there is little direct evidence for G protein-induced changes in GPCR conformation. To investigate this possibility, the effects of overexpressing Galpha-subunits (Galpha16 or Galphai2) with the kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) were examined. The changes in KOR conformation were subequently examined via the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) in transmembrane domains 6 (TM6) and 7 (TM7) and extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Significant conformational changes were observed on TM7, the extracellular portion of TM6, and EL2. Seven SCAM-sensitive residues (S3107.33, F3147.37, and I3167.39 to Y3207.43) on TM7 presented a cluster pattern when the KOR was exposed to baseline amounts of G protein, and additional residues became sensitive upon overexpression of various G proteins. In TM7, S3117.34 and N3267.49 were found to be sensitive in Galpha16-overexpressed cells and Y3137.36, N3227.45, S3237.46, and L3297.52 in Galphai2-overexpressed cells. In addition, the degree of sensitivity for various TM7 residues was augmented, especially in Galphai2-overexpressed cells. A similar phenomenon was also observed for residues in TM6 and EL2. In addition to an enhanced sensitivity of certain residues, our findings also indicated that a slight rotation was predicted to occur in the upper part of TM7 upon G protein overexpression. These relatively modest conformational changes engendered by G protein overexpression had both profound and differential effects on the abilities of agonists to bind to KOR. These data are significant because they demonstrate that Galpha-subunits differentially modulate the conformation and agonist affinity of a prototypical GPCR. PMID:18205395

  9. Different affinity states of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors defined by agonists and antagonists in bovine aorta plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesh, G.; Deth, R.C.

    1987-11-01

    Evidence for a nonlinear relationship between alpha-1 adrenergic receptor occupancy and tissue responses, together with the finding of different affinity states for agonist binding, has raised the possibility of functional heterogeneity of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. We have conducted studies to examine: 1) binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)prazosin, 2) competition of antagonists at these sites and 3) different affinity states of the receptor for agonists and modulation of these states by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p). A plasma membrane-enriched vesicular fraction (F2; 15%/33% sucrose interphase) was prepared from the muscular medial layer of bovine thoracic aorta. (/sup 3/H)Prazosin binding was characterized by a monophasic saturation isotherm (KD = 0.116 nM, Bmax = 112 fmol/mg of protein). Antagonist displacement studies yielded a relative potency order of prazosin greater than or equal to WB4104 much greater than phentolamine greater than corynanthine greater than yohimbine greater than or equal to idazoxan greater than rauwolscine. Competition curves for unlabeled prazosin, WB4101 (2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)-aminomethyl-1,4 benzodioxane) and phentolamine were shallow and were best modeled to two binding sites with picomolar and nanomolar KD values. Gpp(NH)p was without effect on antagonist affinity. Agonist (epinephrine, norepinephrine and phenylephrine) competition with (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding was biphasic with pseudo-Hill slopes less than 1.0. Binding was best described by a two-site model in which the average contribution of high affinity sites was 23% of total binding. KD values for the high affinity site ranged from 2.9 to 18 nM, and 3.9 to 5.0 microM for the low affinity site.

  10. Interactions of dopamine agonists with brain D1 receptors labeled by /sup 3/H-antagonists. Evidence for the presence of high and low affinity agonist-binding states

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.E.; Hamblin, M.W.; Creese, I.

    1985-02-01

    The interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with /sup 3/H-antagonist labeled D1 dopamine receptors of rat striatum have been characterized. (/sup 3/H)Flupentixol has been found to selectively label D1 dopamine receptors when its binding to D2 dopamine receptors is blocked by the inclusion of D2 selective concentrations of unlabeled spiroperidol or domperidone. Antagonist//sup 3/H-antagonist competition curves are of uniformly steep slope (nH . 1.0) suggesting the presence of a single D1 dopamine receptor. Agonist//sup 3/H-antagonist competition curves are extremely shallow (nH less than or equal to 0.5) for agonists of high relative efficacy, suggesting the presence of heterogeneous populations of agonist-binding states of the D1 dopamine receptor. Computer-modeling techniques were used to estimate affinities and relative site densities for these heterogeneous binding states. This analysis indicates that the ratio of agonist affinities for low and high affinity agonist-binding states is correlated with agonist relative efficacies in activating adenylate cyclase in membrane homogenates. Under the assay conditions employed, the addition of saturating concentrations of guanine nucleotides reduced, but did not abolish, the relative density of high affinity agonist-binding sites. These binding data can, at least in part, be explained by postulating two states of the D1 dopamine receptor, inducible by agonists but not by antagonists and modulated by guanine nucleotides.

  11. Reconstitution of high affinity. cap alpha. /sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding by fusion with a pertussis toxin substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.H.; Neubig, R.R.

    1986-03-05

    High affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding is thought to occur via a coupling of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptor with N/sub i/, the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide binding protein. Human platelet membranes pretreated at pH 11.5 exhibit a selective inactivation of agonist binding and N/sub i/. To further study the mechanism of agonist binding, alkali treated membranes (ATM) were mixed with membranes pretreated with 10 ..mu..M phenoxybenzamine to block ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors (POB-M). The combined membrane pellet was incubated in 50% polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote membrane-membrane fusion and assayed for binding to the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 (UK) and the antagonist (/sup 3/H) yohimbine. PEG treatment resulted in a 2-4 fold enhancement of UK binding whereas yohimbine binding was unchanged. No enhancement of UK binding was observed in the absence of PEG treatment. The reconstitution was dependent on the addition of POB-M. They found that a 1:1 ratio of POB-M:ATM was optimal. Reconstituted binding was inhibited by GppNHp. Fusion of rat C6 glioma cell membranes, which do not contain ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors, also enhanced agonist binding to ATM. Fusion of C6 membranes from cells treated with pertussis toxin did not enhance (/sup 3/H) UK binding. These data show that a pertussis toxin sensitive membrane component, possibly N/sub i/, can reconstitute high affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist binding.

  12. Interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with dopaminergic D3 binding sites in rat striatum. Evidence that (/sup 3/H)dopamine can label a high affinity agonist-binding state of the D1 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.E.; Creese, I.

    1985-02-01

    The interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with /sup 3/H-agonist labeled D3 dopaminergic binding sites of rat striatum have been characterized by radioligand-binding techniques. When the binding of (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)apomorphine to D2 dopamine receptors is blocked by the inclusion of D2 selective concentrations of unlabeled spiroperidol or domperidone, these ligands appear to label selectively the previously termed D3 binding site. Antagonist/(/sup 3/H)dopamine competition curves are of uniformly steep slope (nH . 1.0), suggesting the presence of a single D3 binding site. The relative potencies of antagonists to inhibit D3 specific (/sup 3/H)dopamine binding are significantly correlated with their potencies to block D1 dopamine receptors as measured by the inhibition of both dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase and (/sup 3/H)flupentixol-binding activities. The affinities of agonists to inhibit D3 specific (/sup 3/H)dopamine binding are also correlated with estimates of these agonists affinities for the high affinity binding component of agonist/(/sup 3/H)flupentixol competition curves. Both D3 specific (/sup 3/H) dopamine binding and the high affinity agonist-binding component of dopamine/(/sup 3/H)flupentixol competition curves show a similar sensitivity to guanine nucleotides. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the D3 binding site is related to a high affinity agonist-binding state of the D1 dopamine receptor.

  13. Identification of Eupatilin from Artemisia argyi as a Selective PPARα Agonist Using Affinity Selection Ultrafiltration LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yongsoo; Jung, Yujung; Kim, Su-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are key nuclear receptors and therapeutic targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases through the regulation of insulin resistance, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Although a few drugs that target PPARs have been approved, more diverse and novel PPAR ligands are necessary to improve the safety and efficacy of available drugs. To expedite the search for new natural agonists of PPARs, we developed a screening assay based on ultrafiltration liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) that is compatible with complex samples such as dietary foods or botanical extracts. The known PPARα and/or PPARγ ligands resveratrol and rosiglitazone were used as positive controls to validate the developed method. When applied to the screening of an Artemisia argyi extract, eupatilin was identified as a selective PPARα ligand. A PPAR competitive binding assay based on FRET detection also confirmed eupatilin as a selective PPARα agonist exhibiting a binding affinity of 1.18 μM (IC50). Furthermore, eupatilin activation of the transcriptional activity of PPARα was confirmed using a cell-based transactivation assay. Thus, ultrafiltration LC-MS is a suitable assay for the identification of PPAR ligands in complex matrixes such as extracts of dietary foods and botanicals. PMID:26225954

  14. 5-HT1A receptor agonist-antagonist binding affinity difference as a measure of intrinsic activity in recombinant and native tissue systems

    PubMed Central

    Watson, J; Collin, L; Ho, M; Riley, G; Scott, C; Selkirk, J V; Price, G W

    2000-01-01

    It has been reported that radiolabelled agonist : antagonist binding affinity ratios can predict functional efficacy at several different receptors. This study investigates whether this prediction is true for recombinant and native tissue 5-HT1A receptors. Saturation studies using [3H]-8-OH-DPAT and [3H]-MPPF revealed a single, high affinity site (KD∼1 nM) in HEK293 cells expressing human 5-HT1A receptors and rat cortex. In recombinant cells, [3H]-MPPF labelled 3–4 fold more sites than [3H]-8-OH-DPAT suggesting the presence of more than one affinity state of the receptor. [3H]-Spiperone labelled a single, lower affinity site in HEK293 cells expressing h5-HT1A receptors but did not bind to native tissue 5-HT1A receptors. These data suggest that, in transfected HEK293 cells, human 5-HT1A receptors exist in different affinity states but in native rat cortical tissue the majority of receptors appear to exist in the high agonist affinity state. Receptor agonists inhibited [3H]-MPPF binding from recombinant 5-HT1A receptors in a biphasic manner, whereas antagonists and partial agonists gave monophasic inhibition curves. All compounds displaced [3H]-8-OH-DPAT and [3H]-spiperone binding in a monophasic manner. In rat cortex, all compounds displaced [3H]-MPPF and [3H]-8-OH-DPAT in a monophasic manner. Functional evaluation of compounds, using [35S]-GTPγS binding, produced a range of intrinsic activities from full agonism, displayed by 5-HT and 5-CT to inverse agonism displayed by spiperone. [3H]-8-OH-DPAT : [3H]-MPPF pKi difference correlated well with functional intrinsic activity (r=0.86) as did [3H]-8-OH-DPAT : [3H]-spiperone pKi difference with functional intrinsic activity (r=0.96). Thus agonist : antagonist binding affinity differences may be used to predict functional efficacy at human 5-HT1A receptors expressed in HEK293 cells where both high and low agonist affinity states are present but not at native rat cortical 5-HT1A receptors in which

  15. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency

    PubMed Central

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M.; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G.; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G.; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3–4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [3H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [35S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [35S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes. PMID:26124120

  16. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency.

    PubMed

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-07-14

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3-4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [(3)H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [(35)S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [(35)S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes. PMID:26124120

  17. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Novel Enhanced-Affinity Glucocorticoid Agonist Fluticasone Furoate in the Glucocorticoid Receptor−Ligand Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Hassell, Anne M.; Kirk, Barrie E.; McLay, Iain M.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Stewart, Eugene L.

    2008-07-08

    An X-ray crystal structure is reported for the novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid agonist fluticasone furoate (FF) in the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Comparison of this structure with those of dexamethasone and fluticasone propionate shows the 17{alpha} furoate ester to occupy more fully the lipophilic 17{alpha} pocket on the receptor, which may account for the enhanced glucocorticoid receptor binding of FF.

  18. The predicted 3D structure of the human D2 dopamine receptor and the binding site and binding affinities for agonists and antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E.; Trabanino, Rene J.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Floriano, Wely B.; Tak Kam, Victor Wai; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurotransmitter and its receptors play a critical role in the cell signaling process responsible for information transfer in neurons functioning in the nervous system. Development of improved therapeutics for such disorders as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia would be significantly enhanced with the availability of the 3D structure for the dopamine receptors and of the binding site for dopamine and other agonists and antagonists. We report here the 3D structure of the long isoform of the human D2 dopamine receptor, predicted from primary sequence using first-principles theoretical and computational techniques (i.e., we did not use bioinformatic or experimental 3D structural information in predicting structures). The predicted 3D structure is validated by comparison of the predicted binding site and the relative binding affinities of dopamine, three known dopamine agonists (antiparkinsonian), and seven known antagonists (antipsychotic) in the D2 receptor to experimentally determined values. These structures correctly predict the critical residues for binding dopamine and several antagonists, identified by mutation studies, and give relative binding affinities that correlate well with experiments. The predicted binding site for dopamine and agonists is located between transmembrane (TM) helices 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereas the best antagonists bind to a site involving TM helices 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 with minimal contacts to TM helix 5. We identify characteristic differences between the binding sites of agonists and antagonists.

  19. Axonal transport of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat vagus nerve: high and low affinity agonist receptors move in opposite directions and differ in nucleotide sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zarbin, M.A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1982-07-01

    The presence and transport of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites have been detected in the rat vagus nerve. These binding sites accumulate both proximal and distal to ligatures in a time-dependent manner. The results of double ligature and colchicine experiments are compatible with the notion that the anterogradely transported binding sites move by fast transport. Most of the sites accumulating proximal to ligatures bind the agonist carbachol with high affinity, while most of the sites accumulating distally bind carbachol with a low affinity. Also, the receptors transported in the anterograde direction are affected by a guanine nucleotide analogue (GppNHp), while those transported in the retrograde direction are less, or not, affected. The bulk of the sites along the unligated nerve trunk bind carbachol with a low affinity and are less sensitive to GppNHp modulation than the anterogradely transported sites. These results suggest that some receptors in the vagus may undergo axonal transport in association with regulatory proteins and that receptor molecules undergo changes in their binding and regulatory properties during their life cycle. These data also support the notion that the high and low affinity agonist form of the muscarinic receptor represent different modulated forms of a single receptor molecule.

  20. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  1. Further Optimization and Evaluation of Bioavailable, Mixed-Efficacy µ-Opioid Receptor (MOR) Agonists/δ-Opioid Receptor (DOR) Antagonists: Balancing MOR and DOR Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Harland, Aubrie A.; Yeomans, Larisa; Griggs, Nicholas W.; Anand, Jessica P.; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Jutkiewicz, Emily M.; Traynor, John R.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    2016-01-01

    In a previously described peptidomimetic series, we reported the development of bifunctional µ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist and δ-opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist ligands with a lead compound that produced antinociception for 1 h after intraperitoneal administration in mice. In this paper, we expand on our original series by presenting two modifications, both of which were designed with the following objectives: 1) probing bioavailability and improving metabolic stability, 2) balancing affinities between MOR and DOR while reducing affinity and efficacy at the Κ-opioid receptor (KOR), and 3) improving in vivo efficacy. Here we establish that through N-acetylation of our original peptidomimetic series, we are able to improve DOR affinity and increase selectivity relative to KOR while maintaining the desired MOR agonist/DOR antagonist profile. From initial in vivo studies, one compound (14a) was found to produce dose-dependent antinociception after peripheral administration with an improved duration of action of longer than 3 h. PMID:26524472

  2. Further Optimization and Evaluation of Bioavailable, Mixed-Efficacy μ-Opioid Receptor (MOR) Agonists/δ-Opioid Receptor (DOR) Antagonists: Balancing MOR and DOR Affinities.

    PubMed

    Harland, Aubrie A; Yeomans, Larisa; Griggs, Nicholas W; Anand, Jessica P; Pogozheva, Irina D; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Traynor, John R; Mosberg, Henry I

    2015-11-25

    In a previously described peptidomimetic series, we reported the development of bifunctional μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist and δ-opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist ligands with a lead compound that produced antinociception for 1 h after intraperitoneal administration in mice. In this paper, we expand on our original series by presenting two modifications, both of which were designed with the following objectives: (1) probing bioavailability and improving metabolic stability, (2) balancing affinities between MOR and DOR while reducing affinity and efficacy at the κ-opioid receptor (KOR), and (3) improving in vivo efficacy. Here, we establish that, through N-acetylation of our original peptidomimetic series, we are able to improve DOR affinity and increase selectivity relative to KOR while maintaining the desired MOR agonist/DOR antagonist profile. From initial in vivo studies, one compound (14a) was found to produce dose-dependent antinociception after peripheral administration with an improved duration of action of longer than 3 h. PMID:26524472

  3. Pulmonary Administration of GW0742, a High-Affinity Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonist, Repairs Collapsed Alveoli in an Elastase-Induced Mouse Model of Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Chihiro; Horiguchi, Michiko; Akita, Tomomi; Oiso, Yuki; Abe, Kaori; Motomura, Tomoki; Yamashita, Chikamasa

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a disease in which lung alveoli are irreversibly damaged, thus compromising lung function. Our previous study revealed that all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) induces the differentiation of human lung alveolar epithelial type 2 progenitor cells and repairs the alveoli of emphysema model mice. ATRA also reportedly has the ability to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ. A selective PPARβ/δ ligand has been reported to induce the differentiation of human keratinocytes during wound repair. Here, we demonstrate that treatment using a high-affinity PPARβ/δ agonist, GW0742, reverses the lung tissue damage induced by elastase in emphysema-model mice and improves respiratory function. Mice treated with elastase, which collapsed their alveoli, were then treated with either 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in saline (control group) or GW0742 (1.0 mg/kg twice a week) by pulmonary administration. Treatment with GW0742 for 2 weeks increased the in vivo expression of surfactant proteins A and D, which are known alveolar type II epithelial cell markers. GW0742 treatment also shortened the average distance between alveolar walls in the lungs of emphysema model mice, compared with a control group treated with 10% DMSO in saline. Treatment with GW0742 for 3 weeks also improved tissue elastance (cm H2O/mL), as well as the ratio of the forced expiratory volume in the first 0.05 s to the forced vital capacity (FEV 0.05/FVC). In each of these experiments, GW0742 treatment reversed the damage caused by elastase. In conclusion, PPARβ/δ agonists are potential therapeutic agents for pulmonary emphysema. PMID:27150147

  4. (/sup 3/H)dihydroergotamine as a high-affinity, slowly dissociating radioligand for 5-HT1B binding sites in rat brain membranes: evidence for guanine nucleotide regulation of agonist affinity states

    SciTech Connect

    Hamblin, M.W.; Ariani, K.; Adriaenssens, P.I.; Ciaranello, R.D.

    1987-12-01

    (/sup 3/H)Dihydroergotamine (DE) labels a population of binding sites in rat brain membranes with an affinity of approximately 70 pM in both hippocampus (maximal binding at saturation (Bmax) = 340 fmol/mg of protein) and cerebral cortex (Bmax = 250 fmol/mg of protein). Specific binding typically comprises about 97% of total binding at the Kd of the radioligand when nonspecific binding is determined in the presence of 100 nM unlabeled DE. Association kinetics at 37 degrees C are consistent with a uniform association rate constant for all sites labeled. Specific binding is completely reversible with addition of excess unlabeled DE, but dissociation does not proceed with simple first-order kinetics, suggesting the presence of more than one discrete binding site. Competition studies with selective drugs reveal alpha adrenergic, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B components of (/sup 3/H)DE specific binding. When phentolamine (500 nM) is included to block alpha receptors and DPAT (100 nM) or spiroxatrine (500 nM) is included to block 5-HT1A receptors, specific binding is exclusively to sites with drug affinities characteristic of 5-HT1B receptors. Under these 5-HT1B-selective conditions, (/sup 3/H)DE binding is about 90% specific, with a Kd of about 50 to 60 pM and a Bmax of 96 fmol/mg of protein in hippocampus and 77 fmol/mg of protein in cortex. (/sup 3/H)DE binding to 5-HT1B sites is very slowly dissociable, with a T1/2 of greater than 2 h at 37 degrees C. 5-HT1B antagonists and DE itself yield competition curves at (/sup 3/H)DE-labeled 5-HT1B sites that are adequately fit assuming a single site in nonlinear regression analysis. Addition of 100 microM guanylyl 5'-imidodiphosphate appears to convert nearly all 5-HT1B sites to those having low affinity for agonists while having a much smaller effect on the binding of (/sup 3/H)DE.

  5. Open tubular columns containing the immobilized ligand binding domain of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α and γ for dual agonists characterization by frontal affinity chromatography with MS detection

    PubMed Central

    Temporini, C.; Pochetti, G.; Fracchiolla, G.; Piemontese, L.; Montanari, R.; Moaddel, R.; Laghezza, A.; Altieri, F.; Cervoni, L.; Ubiali, D.; Prada, E.; Loiodice, F.; Massolini, G.; Calleri, E.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily. In the last years novel PPARs ligands have been identified and these include PPARα/γ dual agonists. To rapidly identify novel PPARs dual ligands, a robust binding assay amenable to high-throughput screening towards PPAR isoforms would be desirable. In this work we describe a parallel assay based on the principles of Frontal Affinity Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (FAC-MS) that can be used to characterize dual agonists. For this purpose the ligand binding domain of PPARα receptor was immobilized onto the surface of open tubular capillaries to create new PPAR-alpha-OT columns to be used in parallel with PPAR-gamma-OT columns. The two biochromatographic systems were used in both ranking and Kd experiments towards new ureidofibrate-like dual agonists for subtype selectivity ratio determination. In order to validate the system, the Kd values determined by frontal analysis chromatography were compared to the affinity constants obtained by ITC experiments. The results of this study strongly demonstrate the specific nature of the interaction of the ligands with the two immobilized receptor subtypes. PMID:23466198

  6. Benzodiazepine receptor ligands. 8: synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of new pyrazolo[5,1-c] [1,2,4]benzotriazine 5-oxide 3- and 8-disubstituted: high affinity ligands endowed with inverse-agonist pharmacological efficacy.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Gabriella; Costanzo, Annarella; Ciciani, Giovanna; Bruni, Fabrizio; Selleri, Silvia; Costagli, Camilla; Besnard, François; Costa, Barbara; Martini, Claudia; De Siena, Gaetano; Malmberg-Aiello, Petra

    2006-02-01

    The synthesis and the binding study of new 3-arylesters and 3-heteroarylpyrazolo[5,1-c][1,2,4]benzotriazine 5-oxide 8-substituted are reported. The nature of these substituents (in terms of lipophilic and electronic features) seems to influence the binding affinity. High-affinity ligands were studied in mice in vivo for their pharmacological effects, considering six potential benzodiazepine actions: anxiolytic-like effects, muscle relaxant effects, motor coordination, anticonvulsant action, spontaneous motor activity, and ethanol-potentiating action. Compounds 4d and 6d showed an inverse-agonist profile. These compounds were evaluated also for their binding at benzodiazepine site on GABAA receptor complex (GABAA/BzR complex) subtype to evaluate their subtype selectivity. PMID:16214350

  7. Discovery of 4-(phenyl)thio-1H-pyrazole derivatives as agonists of GPR109A, a high affinity niacin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Young; Jadhav, Vithal B; Jeong, Dae Young; Park, Woo Kyu; Song, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Sunkyung; Cho, Heeyeong

    2015-06-01

    Even though nicotinic acid (niacin) appears to have beneficial effects on human lipid profiles, niacin-induced cutaneous vasodilatation called flushing limits its remedy to patient. GPR109A is activated by niacin and mediates the anti-lipolytic effects. Based on the hypothesis that β-arrestin signaling mediates niacin-induced flushing, but not its anti-lipolytic effect, we tried to find GPR109A agonists which selectively elicit Gi-protein-biased signaling devoid of β-arrestin internalization using a β-lactamase assay. We identified a 4-(phenyl)thio-1H-pyrazole as a novel scaffold for GPR109A agonist in a high throughput screen, which has no carboxylic acid moiety known to be important for binding. While 1-nicotinoyl derivatives (5a-g, 6a-e) induced β-arrestin recruitment, 1-(pyrazin-2-oyl) derivatives were found to play as G-protein-biased agonists without GPR109A receptor internalization. The activity of compound 5a (EC50 = 45 nM) was similar to niacin (EC50 = 52 nM) and MK-6892 (EC50 = 74 nM) on calcium mobilization assay, but its activity at 10 μM on β-arrestin recruitment were around two and five times weaker than niacin and MK-6892, respectively. The development of G-protein biased GPR109A ligands over β-arrestin pathway is attainable and might be important in differentiation of pharmacological efficacy. PMID:25599616

  8. High Affinity Agonists of the Neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y4 Receptor Derived from the C-Terminal Pentapeptide of Human Pancreatic Polypeptide (hPP): Synthesis, Stereochemical Discrimination, and Radiolabeling.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Kilian K; Ertl, Thomas; Dukorn, Stefanie; Keller, Max; Bernhardt, Günther; Reiser, Oliver; Buschauer, Armin

    2016-07-14

    The diastereomeric mixture of d/l-2,7-diaminooctanedioyl-bis(YRLRY-NH2) (BVD-74D, 2) was described in the literature as a high affinity Y4 receptor agonist. Here we report on the synthesis and pharmacological characterization of the pure diastereomers (2R,7R)- and (2S,7S)-2 and a series of homo- and heterodimeric analogues in which octanedioic acid was used as an achiral linker. To investigate the role of the Arg residues, one or two arginines were replaced by Ala. Moreover, N(ω)-(6-aminohexylaminocarbonyl)Arg was introduced as an arginine replacement (17). (2R,7R)-2 was superior to (2S,7S)-2 in binding and functional cellular assays and equipotent with 17. [(3)H]Propionylation of one amino group in the linker of (2R,7R)-2 or at the primary amino group in 17 resulted in high affinity Y4R radioligands ([(3)H]-(2R,7R)-10, [(3)H]18) with subnanomolar Kd values. PMID:27223253

  9. Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents selected recent advances in immobilization chemistry which have important connections to affinity chromatography. Discusses ligand immobilization and support modification. Cites 51 references. (CS)

  10. Selectively Promiscuous Opioid Ligands: Discovery of High Affinity/Low Efficacy Opioid Ligands with Substantial Nociceptin Opioid Peptide Receptor Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Emerging clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that a compound displaying high affinity for μ, κ, and δ opioid (MOP, KOP, and DOP) receptors and antagonist activity at each, coupled with moderate affinity and efficacy at nociceptin opioid peptide (NOP) receptors will have utility as a relapse prevention agent for multiple types of drug abuse. Members of the orvinol family of opioid ligands have the desired affinity profile but have typically displayed substantial efficacy at MOP and or KOP receptors. In this study it is shown that a phenyl ring analogue (1d) of buprenorphine displays the desired profile in vitro with high, nonselective affinity for the MOP, KOP, and DOP receptors coupled with moderate affinity for NOP receptors. In vivo, 1d lacked any opioid agonist activity and was an antagonist of both the MOP receptor agonist morphine and the KOP receptor agonist ethylketocyclazocine, confirming the desired opioid receptor profile in vivo. PMID:24761755

  11. Specificity, affinity and efficacy of iota-conotoxin RXIA, an agonist of voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.2, 1.6 and 1.7

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Brian; Zhang, Min-Min; Buczek, Oga; Azam, Layla; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Norton, Raymond S; Olivera, Baldomero M; Yoshikami, Doju

    2009-01-01

    The excitotoxic conopeptide ι-RXIA induces repetitive action potentials in frog motor axons and seizures upon intracranial injection into mice. We recently discovered that ι-RXIA shifts the voltage-dependence of activation of voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.6 to a more hyperpolarized level. Here, we performed voltage-clamp experiments to examine its activity against rodent NaV1.1 through NaV1.7 co-expressed with the β1 subunit in Xenopus oocytes and NaV1.8 in dissociated mouse DRG neurons. The order of sensitivity to ι-RXIA was NaV1.6 > 1.2 > 1.7, and the remaining subtypes were insensitive. The time course of ι-RXIA-activity on NaV1.6 during exposure to different peptide concentrations were well fit by single-exponential curves that provided kobs. The plot of kobs versus [ι-RXIA] was linear, consistent with a bimolecular reaction with a Kd of ~3 μM, close to the steady-state EC50 of ~2 μM. ι-RXIA has an unusual residue, D-Phe, and the analog with an L-Phe instead, ι-RXIA[L-Phe44], had a two-fold lower affinity and two-fold faster off-rate than ι-RXIA on NaV1.6 and furthermore was inactive on NaV1.2. ι-RXIA induced repetitive action potentials in mouse sciatic nerve with conduction velocities of both A- and C-fibers, consistent with the presence of NaV1.6 at nodes of Ranvier as well as in unmyelinated axons. Sixteen peptides homologous to ι-RXIA have been identified from a single species of Conus, so these peptides represent a rich family of novel sodium channel-targeting ligands. PMID:18486102

  12. Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Rodney R.

    1985-01-01

    Supports, affinity ligands, immobilization, elution methods, and a number of applications are among the topics considered in this discussion of affinity chromatography. An outline of the basic principles of affinity chromatography is included. (JN)

  13. Agonist mediated conformational changes of solubilized calf forebrain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, P; Andre, C; de Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G

    1984-10-01

    Muscarinic receptors in calf forebrain membranes can be identified by the specific binding of the radiolabelled antagonist [3H]dexetimide. These receptors (2.8 pM/mg protein) comprise two non-interconvertible subpopulations with respectively high and low agonist affinity but with the same antagonist affinity. For all the agonists tested the low affinity sites represent 85 +/- 5% of the total receptor population. 0.5% Digitonin solubilized extracts contain 0.8 pM muscarinic receptor/mg protein. In contrast with the membranes, these extracts contain only sites with low agonist affinity. The alkylating reagent N-ethylmaleimide causes an increase of the acetylcholine affinity for the low affinity sites in membranes as well as for the solubilized sites. This effect is time dependent until a maximal 3-fold increase in affinity is attained. The rate of N-ethylmaleimide action is enhanced by the concomitant presence of agonists. In contrast, N-ethylmaleimide does not affect antagonist binding. This suggests that agonists mediate a conformational change of both the membrane bound low affinity muscarinic sites and of the solubilized sites, resulting in their increased susceptibility towards NEM alkylation. PMID:6487351

  14. Synthesis and biological activities of indolizine derivatives as alpha-7 nAChR agonists.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yu; Tang, Jingshu; Ma, Xiaozhuo; Li, Qing; Xie, Bingxue; Hao, Yuchen; Jin, Hongwei; Wang, Kewei; Zhang, Guisen; Zhang, Liangren; Zhang, Lihe

    2016-06-10

    Human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of schizophrenia accompanied with cognitive impairment. Herein, we report the synthesis and agonistic activities of a series of indolizine derivatives targeting to α7 nAChR. The results show that all synthesized compounds have affinity to α7 nAChR and some give strong agonistic activity, particularly most active agonists show higher potency than control EVP-6124. The docking and structure-activity relationship studies provide insights to develop more potent novel α7 nAChR agonists. PMID:26994846

  15. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonistic activity of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Britta; Walstab, Jutta; Herberhold, Stephan; Bootz, Friedrich; Tschaikin, Marion; Ramseger, René; Bönisch, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline are both used as nasal mucosa decongesting α-adrenoceptor agonists during a common cold. However, it is largely unknown which of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes are actually present in human nasal mucosa, which are activated by the two alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and to what extent. Therefore, mRNA expression in human nasal mucosa of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied. Furthermore, the affinity and potency of the imidazolines oxymetazoline and xylometazoline at these α-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in transfected HEK293 cells. The rank order of mRNA levels of α-adrenoceptor subtypes in human nasal mucosa was: α(2A) > α(1A) ≥ α(2B) > α(1D) ≥ α(2C) > α(1B) . Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline exhibited in radioligand competition studies higher affinities than the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline at most α-adrenoceptor subtypes. Compared to xylometazoline, oxymetazoline exhibited a significantly higher affinity at α(1A) - but a lower affinity at α(2B) -adrenoceptors. In functional studies in which adrenoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signals were measured, both, oxymetazoline and xylometazoline behaved at α(2B) -adrenoceptors as full agonists but oxymetazoline was significantly more potent than xylometazoline. Furthermore, oxymetazoline was also a partial agonist at α(1A) -adrenoceptors; however, its potency was relatively low and it was much lower than its affinity. The higher potency at α(2B) -adrenoceptors, i.e. at receptors highly expressed at the mRNA level in human nasal mucosa, could eventually explain why in nasal decongestants oxymetazoline can be used in lower concentrations than xylometazoline. PMID:20030735

  16. 2-Triazole-Substituted Adenosines: A New Class of Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists, Partial Agonists, and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Cosyn, Liesbet; Palaniappan, Krishnan K.; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Duong, Heng T.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Van Calenbergh, Serge

    2016-01-01

    “Click chemistry” was explored to synthesize two series of 2-(1,2,3-triazolyl)adenosine derivatives (1–14). Binding affinity at the human A1, A2A, and A3ARs (adenosine receptors) and relative efficacy at the A3AR were determined. Some triazol-1-yl analogues showed A3AR affinity in the low nanomolar range, a high ratio of A3/A2A selectivity, and a moderate-to-high A3/A1 ratio. The 1,2,3-triazol-4-yl regiomers typically showed decreased A3AR affinity. Sterically demanding groups at the adenine C2 position tended to reduce relative A3AR efficacy. Thus, several 5′-OH derivatives appeared to be selective A3AR antagonists, i.e., 10, with 260-fold binding selectivity in comparison to the A1AR and displaying a characteristic docking mode in an A3AR model. The corresponding 5′-ethyluronamide analogues generally showed increased A3AR affinity and behaved as full agonists, i.e., 17, with 910-fold A3/A1 selectivity. Thus, N6-substituted 2-(1,2,3-triazolyl)-adenosine analogues constitute a novel class of highly potent and selective nucleoside-based A3AR antagonists, partial agonists, and agonists. PMID:17149867

  17. Characterization of opiate receptor heterogeneity using affinity ligands and phospholipase A/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Reichman, M.

    1985-01-01

    The primary aim of the dissertation was to study the heterogeneity of opiate receptors by utilizing affinity ligands, and by modification of the receptor lipid-microenvironment with phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/). The affinity ligands, 14-bromacetamidomorphine (BAM) and 14-chloroacetylnaltrexone (CAN), selectively inactivated high affinity dihydromorphine binding sites in an apparently irreversible manner (the inhibition was resistant to extensive washes of treated neural membrane homogenates). The inhibitory effect of PLA/sub 2/ (10 ng/ml) on opiate receptor subtypes was determined using (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine (..mu..-type agonist), (/sup 3/H)-enkephalin (delta agonist) and (/sup 3/H)-naloxone (..mu.. antagonist). PLA/sub 2/ abolished the high affinity antagonist binding site, whereas it inhibited high and low affinity agonist binding sites similarly. The results suggest that high affinity antagonist binding sites are different from high affinity agonist binding sites. Indirect binding assays demonstrated that the selectivities of ..mu..- and delta receptors are not affected significantly by PLA/sub 2/ treatment.

  18. Beta-Adrenergic Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Barisione, Giovanni; Baroffio, Michele; Crimi, Emanuele; Brusasco, Vito

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) agonists are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptoms-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. In this article, we first review the basic mechanisms by which the β2-adrenergic system contributes to the control of airway smooth muscle tone. Then, we go on describing the structural characteristics of β2-AR and the molecular basis of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and mechanisms of its desensitization/ dysfunction. In particular, phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A and β-adrenergic receptor kinase are examined in detail. Finally, we discuss the pivotal role of inhaled β2-AR agonists in the treatment of asthma and the concerns about their safety that have been recently raised.

  19. The selectivity of β-adrenoceptor agonists at human β1-, β2- and β3-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jillian G

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: There are two important properties of receptor–ligand interactions: affinity (the ability of the ligand to bind to the receptor) and efficacy (the ability of the receptor–ligand complex to induce a response). Ligands are classified as agonists or antagonists depending on whether or not they have efficacy. In theory, it is possible to develop selective agonists based on selective affinity, selective intrinsic efficacy or both. This study examined the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of 31 β-adrenoceptor agonists at the three human β-adrenoceptors to determine whether the current agonists are subtype selective because of affinity or intrinsic efficacy. Experimental approach: Stable clonal CHO-K1 cell lines, transfected with either the human β1, β2 or β3-adrenoceptor, were used, and whole-cell [3H]-CGP 12177 radioligand binding and [3H]-cAMP accumulation were measured. Key results: Several agonists were found to be highly subtype selective because of selective affinity (e.g. salmeterol and formoterol, for the β2-adrenoceptor over the β1 or β3), while others (e.g. isoprenaline) had little affinity–selectivity. However, the intrinsic efficacy of salmeterol, formoterol and isoprenaline was similar across all three receptor subtypes. Other ligands (e.g. denopamine for β1; clenbuterol, AZ 40140d, salbutamol for β2) were found to have subtype-selective intrinsic efficacy. Several ligands appeared to activate two agonist conformations of the β1- and β3-adrenoceptors. Conclusions and implications: There are agonists with subtype selectivity based upon both selective affinity and selective intrinsic efficacy. Therefore, there is scope to develop better selective agonists based upon both selective affinity and selective intrinsic efficacy. This article is commented on by Kenakin, pp. 1045–1047 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00764.x PMID:20590599

  20. Principles of agonist recognition in Cys-loop receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lynagh, Timothy; Pless, Stephan A.

    2014-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that are activated by a structurally diverse array of neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine, serotonin, glycine, and GABA. After the term “chemoreceptor” emerged over 100 years ago, there was some wait until affinity labeling, molecular cloning, functional studies, and X-ray crystallography experiments identified the extracellular interface of adjacent subunits as the principal site of agonist binding. The question of how subtle differences at and around agonist-binding sites of different Cys-loop receptors can accommodate transmitters as chemically diverse as glycine and serotonin has been subject to intense research over the last three decades. This review outlines the functional diversity and current structural understanding of agonist-binding sites, including those of invertebrate Cys-loop receptors. Together, this provides a framework to understand the atomic determinants involved in how these valuable therapeutic targets recognize and bind their ligands. PMID:24795655

  1. Positive cooperativity of acetylcholine and other agonists with allosteric ligands on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; El-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1997-07-01

    It is well known that allosteric modulators of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors can both diminish and increase the affinity of receptors for their antagonists. We investigated whether the allosteric modulators can also increase the affinity of receptors for their agonists. Twelve agonists and five allosteric modulators were tested in experiments on membranes of CHO cells that had been stably transfected with genes for the M1-M4 receptor subtypes. Allosterically induced changes in the affinities for agonists were computed from changes in the ability of a fixed concentration of each agonist to compete with [3H]N-methylscopolamine for the binding to the receptors in the absence and the presence of varying concentrations of allosteric modulators. The effects of allosteric modulators varied greatly depending on the agonists and the subtypes of receptors. The affinity for acetylcholine was augmented by (-)-eburnamonine on the M2 and M4 receptors and by brucine on the M1 and M3 receptors. Brucine also enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pilocarpine, 3-(3-pentylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1- methylpyridine (pentylthio-TZTP), oxotremorine-M, and McN-A-343 on the M1, M3, and M4 receptors, for pentylthio-TZTP on the M2 receptors, and for arecoline on the M3 receptors. (-)-Eburnamonine enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pentylthio-TZTP, pilocarpine, oxotremorine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors and for pilocarpine on the M4 receptors. Vincamine, strychnine, and alcuronium displayed fewer positive allosteric interactions with the agonists, but each allosteric modulator displayed positive cooperativity with at least one agonist on at least one muscarinic receptor subtype. The highest degrees of positive cooperativity were observed between (-)-eburnamonine and pilocarpine and (-)-eburnamonine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors (25- and 7-fold increases in

  2. Structure-Activity Relationship and Signaling of New Chimeric CXCR4 Agonists.

    PubMed

    Mona, Christine E; Besserer-Offroy, Élie; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefrançois, Marilou; Boulais, Philip E; Lefebvre, Marie-Reine; Leduc, Richard; Lavigne, Pierre; Heveker, Nikolaus; Marsault, Éric; Escher, Emanuel

    2016-08-25

    The CXCR4 receptor binds with meaningful affinities only CXCL12 and synthetic antagonists/inverse agonists. We recently described high affinity synthetic agonists for this chemokine receptor, obtained by grafting the CXCL12 N-terminus onto the inverse agonist T140. While those chimeric molecules behave as agonists for CXCR4, their binding and activation mode are unknown. The present SAR of those CXCL12-oligopeptide grafts reveals the key determinants involved in CXCR4 activation. Position 3 (Val) controls affinity, whereas position 7 (Tyr) acts as an efficacy switch. Chimeric molecules bearing aromatic residues in position 3 possess high binding affinities for CXCR4 and are Gαi full agonists with robust chemotactic properties. Fine-tuning of electron-poor aromatic rings in position 7 enhances receptor activation. To rationalize these results, a homology model of a receptor-ligand complex was built using the published crystal structures of CXCR4. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal further details accounting for the observed SAR for this series. PMID:27434274

  3. Analysis of the agonist activity of fenoldopam (SKF 82526) at the vascular 5-HT2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Christie, M. I.; Harper, D.; Smith, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    1. The 5-HT2 receptor agonist activity of fenoldopam (SKF 82526) was characterized in the rabbit isolated aorta preparation. 2. Fenoldopam was an agonist at the vascular 5-HT2 receptor with lower affinity and efficacy than the naturally occurring agonist 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Fenoldopam had an affinity (pKA) of 5.84 +/- 0.04 and efficacy (tau) of 0.57 +/- 0.04, whereas 5-HT had a pKA of 6.65 +/- 0.12 and tau of 2.66 +/- 0.41. 3. The constrictor effects of fenoldopam and 5-HT were competitively antagonized by the 5-HT2 antagonist, ketanserin, with pKB values of 8.81 +/- 0.11 and 8.83 +/- 0.10 respectively. 4. Prior incubation with fenoldopam produced a concentration-related rightward shift of a subsequent 5-HT concentration-response curve. This inhibition was specific for 5-HT since constrictor responses to angiotensin II were unaffected. 5. This study indicates that the D1 receptor agonist, fenoldopam, acts as an agonist at the vascular 5-HT2 receptor, but with an affinity and efficacy less than that of the naturally occurring agonist, 5-HT. PMID:1361397

  4. Special Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Indu; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1985-01-01

    Describes the nature of affinity chromatography and its use in purifying enzymes, studying cell interactions, exploring hormone receptors, and other areas. The potential the technique may have in treating disease is also considered. (JN)

  5. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  6. Activation of endplate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by agonists.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Anthony

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of a small molecule made in one cell with a large receptor made in another is the signature event of cell signaling. Understanding the structure and energy changes associated with agonist activation is important for engineering drugs, receptors and synapses. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a ∼300kD ion channel that binds the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists to elicit electrical responses in the central and peripheral nervous systems. This mini-review is in two sections. First, general concepts of skeletal muscle AChR operation are discussed in terms of energy landscapes for conformational change. Second, adult vs. fetal AChRs are compared with regard to interaction energies between ACh and agonist-site side chains, measured by single-channel electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations. The five aromatic residues that form the core of each agonist binding site can be divided into two working groups, a triad (led by αY190) that behaves similarly at all sites and a coupled pair (led by γW55) that has a large influence on affinity only in fetal AChRs. Each endplate AChR has 5 homologous subunits, two of α(1) and one each of β, δ, and either γ (fetal) or ϵ (adult). These nicotinic AChRs have only 2 functional agonist binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αγ or αϵ subunit interfaces. The receptor undergoes a reversible, global isomerization between structures called C and O. The C shape does not conduct ions and has a relatively low affinity for ACh, whereas O conducts cations and has a higher affinity. When both agonist sites are empty (filled only with water) the probability of taking on the O conformation (PO) is low, <10(-6). When ACh molecules occupy the agonist sites the C→O opening rate constant and C↔O gating equilibrium constant increase dramatically. Following a pulse of ACh at the nerve-muscle synapse, the endplate current rises rapidly

  7. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    PubMed

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  8. Proglumide exhibits delta opioid agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, A; Stokes, K B; Rhoads, D L; Way, E L

    1987-01-01

    Recently, it was reported that proglumide, a cholecystokinin (CCK) antagonist, potentiates the analgetic effects of morphine and endogenous opioid peptides and reverses morphine tolerance by antagonizing the CCK system in the central nervous system of the rat. In order to provide additional insight into the mode of action of this agent, we assessed the effect of proglumide in the isolated guinea pig ileum and the mouse, rat and rabbit vas deferens. Furthermore, we studied the in vitro binding affinity of this substance to mouse brain synaptosomes. Our results show that proglumide inhibits, dose dependently, the electrically stimulated twitches in the mouse vas deferens and guinea pig ileum, but not in the rat or rabbit vas deferens. The inhibitory action of proglumide on the mouse vas deferens, but not on the guinea pig ileum, is antagonized by naloxone and by the selective delta-antagonist, ICI 174,864, in a competitive fashion. Other CCK antagonists were found to be devoid of such activity on the mouse vas deferens. In vitro binding studies showed that proglumide displaces D-ala-D-[leucine]5-enkephalin (DADLE), a delta agonist, but not ethylketocyclazocine (EKC), a preferentially selective kappa agonist. The effect of proglumide appeared to be elicited presynaptically since it did not alter the norepinephrine-induced contractions of the mouse vas deferens. Our results suggest that proglumide might exert its opiate-like effects by activation of delta-opioid receptors. PMID:3030338

  9. Classical and atypical agonists activate M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors through common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, Esam E; Jakubík, Jan

    2015-07-01

    We mutated key amino acids of the human variant of the M1 muscarinic receptor that target ligand binding, receptor activation, and receptor-G protein interaction. We compared the effects of these mutations on the action of two atypical M1 functionally preferring agonists (N-desmethylclozapine and xanomeline) and two classical non-selective orthosteric agonists (carbachol and oxotremorine). Mutations of D105 in the orthosteric binding site and mutation of D99 located out of the orthosteric binding site decreased affinity of all tested agonists that was translated as a decrease in potency in accumulation of inositol phosphates and intracellular calcium mobilization. Mutation of D105 decreased the potency of the atypical agonist xanomeline more than that of the classical agonists carbachol and oxotremorine. Mutation of the residues involved in receptor activation (D71) and coupling to G-proteins (R123) completely abolished the functional responses to both classical and atypical agonists. Our data show that both classical and atypical agonists activate hM1 receptors by the same molecular switch that involves D71 in the second transmembrane helix. The principal difference among the studied agonists is rather in the way they interact with D105 in the orthosteric binding site. Furthermore, our data demonstrate a key role of D105 in xanomeline wash-resistant binding and persistent activation of hM1 by wash-resistant xanomeline. PMID:25882246

  10. Possible differences in modes of agonist and antagonist binding at human 5-HT6 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pullagurla, Manik R; Westkaemper, Richard B; Glennon, Richard A

    2004-09-01

    A graphics model of the human 5-HT6 receptor was constructed and automated docking studies were performed. The model suggests that 5-HT6 antagonist arylsulfonyltryptamines might bind differently than that of the agonist serotonin. Furthermore, the model explains many of the empirical results from our previous structure-affinity studies. PMID:15357994

  11. Purification of L-( sup 3 H) Nicotine eliminates low affinity binding

    SciTech Connect

    Romm, E.; Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C. ); Lippiello, P.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Some studies of L-({sup 3}H) nicotine binding to rodent and human brain tissue have detected two binding sites as evidenced by nonlinear Scatchard plots. Evidence presented here indicated that the low affinity binding site is not stereospecific, is not inhibited by low concentrations of cholinergic agonists and is probably due to breakdown products of nicotine since purification of the L-({sup 3}H)nicotine eliminates the low affinity site.

  12. Cariprazine:New dopamine biased agonist for neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    De Deurwaerdère, P

    2016-02-01

    Cariprazine (RGH-188, MP-214, Vraylar[TM]) is a new dopamine receptor ligand developed for the treatment of several neuropsychiatric diseases including schizophrenia and bipolar disorders. Cariprazine displays higher affinity at dopamine D3 receptors and a similar affinity at D2 and 5-HT2B receptors. At variance with some atypical antipsychotics, its affinity at 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and histamine H1 receptors is modest compared with its three main targets. Cariprazine could correspond to a biased agonist at dopamine receptors, displaying either antagonist or partial agonist properties depending on the signaling pathways linked to D2/D3 receptors. The compound crosses the blood-brain barrier, as revealed by positron emission tomography and pharmacokinetic studies in various species. Two main metabolites result mainly from the activity of CYP34A and display properties similar to those of the parent drug. Behavioral data report that cariprazine is efficacious in animal models addressing positive, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia with no extrapyramidal side effects. In September 2015, the FDA approved the use of cariprazine for the treatment of schizophrenia and type I bipolar disorder. The efficacy of cariprazine in other neuropsychiatric diseases is currently being evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies. Side effects have been observed in humans, including extrapyramidal side effects and akathisia of mild to moderate intensity. PMID:27092339

  13. β2-adrenoceptor agonists in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Yuri K.; Cameron, Robert B.; Wills, Lauren P.; Trager, Richard E.; Lindsey, Chris C.; Beeson, Craig C.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2014-01-01

    The stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) via cell surface G-protein coupled receptors is a promising strategy for cell repair and regeneration. Here we report the specificity and chemical rationale of a panel of β2-adrenoceptor agonists with regards to MB. Using primary cultures of renal cells, a diverse panel of β2-adrenoceptor agonists elicited three distinct phenotypes: full MB, partial MB, and non-MB. Full MB compounds had efficacy in the low nanomolar range and represent two chemical scaffolds containing three distinct chemical clusters. Interestingly, the MB phenotype did not correlate with reported receptor affinity or chemical similarity. Chemical clusters were then subjected to pharmacophore modeling creating two models with unique and distinct features, consisting of five conserved amongst full MB compounds were identified. The two discrete pharmacophore models were coalesced into a consensus pharmacophore with four unique features elucidating the spatial and chemical characteristics required to stimulate MB. PMID:23954364

  14. Modulation of agonist binding to human dopamine receptor subtypes by L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide and a peptidomimetic analog.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vaneeta; Mann, Amandeep; Costain, Willard; Pontoriero, Giuseppe; Castellano, Jessica M; Skoblenick, Kevin; Gupta, Suresh K; Pristupa, Zdenek; Niznik, Hyman B; Johnson, Rodney L; Nair, Venugopalan D; Mishra, Ram K

    2005-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of the hypothalamic tripeptide L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG) and its conformationally constrained analog 3(R)-[(2(S)-pyrrolidinylcarbonyl)amino]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide (PAOPA) in modulating agonist binding to human dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably transfected with respective cDNAs. Both PLG and PAOPA enhanced agonist [3H]N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) and [3H]quinpirole binding in a dose-dependent manner to the DA D2L,D2S, and D4 receptors. However, agonist binding to the D1 and D3 receptors and antagonist binding to the D2L receptors by PLG were not significantly affected. Scatchard analysis of [3H]NPA binding to membranes in the presence of PLG revealed a significant increase in affinity of the agonist binding sites for the D2L, D2S, and D4 receptors. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition curves revealed that PLG and PAOPA increased the population and affinity of the high-affinity form of the D2L receptor and attenuated guanosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imido)-triphosphate-induced inhibition of high-affinity agonist binding sites for the DA D2L receptor. Furthermore, direct NPA binding with D2L cell membranes pretreated with suramin, a compound that can uncouple receptor/G protein complexes, and incubated with and without DA showed that both PLG and PAOPA had only increased agonist binding in membranes pretreated with both suramin and DA, suggesting that PLG requires the D2L receptor/G protein complex to increase agonist binding. These results suggest that PLG possibly modulates DA D2S, D2L, and D4 receptors in an allosteric manner and that the coupling of D2 receptors to the G protein is essential for this modulation to occur. PMID:16126839

  15. Agonist-trafficking and hallucinogens.

    PubMed

    González-Maeso, Javier; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2009-01-01

    Seven transmembrane domain receptors, also termed G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), represent the most common molecular target for therapeutic drugs. The generally accepted pharmacological model for GPCR activation is the ternary complex model, in which GPCRs exist in a dynamic equilibrium between the active and inactive conformational states. However, the demonstration that different agonists sometimes elicit a different relative activation of two signaling pathways downstream of the same receptor has led to a revision of the ternary complex model. According to this agonist- trafficking model, agonists stabilize distinct activated receptor conformations that preferentially activate specific signaling pathways. Hallucinogenic drugs and non-hallucinogenic drugs represent an attractive experimental system with which to study agonist-trafficking of receptor signaling. Thus many of the behavioral responses induced by hallucinogenic drugs, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin or mescaline, depend on activation of serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT2ARs). In contrast, this neuropsychological state in humans is not induced by closely related chemicals, such as lisuride or ergotamine, despite their similar in vitro activity at the 5-HT2AR. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, as well as unresolved questions, regarding agonist-trafficking and the mechanism of action of hallucinogenic drugs. PMID:19275609

  16. Local Affinity Release.

    PubMed

    Delplace, Vianney; Obermeyer, Jaclyn; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-07-26

    The use of hydrogels for therapeutic delivery is a burgeoning area of investigation. These water-swollen polymer matrices are ideal platforms for localized drug delivery that can be further combined with specific ligands or nanotechnologies to advance the controlled release of small-molecule drugs and proteins. Due to the advantage of hydrophobic, electrostatic, or specific extracellular matrix interactions, affinity-based strategies can overcome burst release and challenges associated with encapsulation. Future studies will provide innovative binding tools, truly stimuli-responsive systems, and original combinations of emerging technologies to control the release of therapeutics spatially and temporally. Local drug delivery can be achieved by directly injecting a therapeutic to its site of action and is advantageous because off-target effects associated with systemic delivery can be minimized. For prolonged benefit, a vehicle that provides sustained drug release is required. Hydrogels are versatile platforms for localized drug release, owing to the large library of biocompatible building blocks from which they can be formed. Injectable hydrogel formulations that gel quickly in situ and provide sustained release of therapeutics are particularly advantageous to minimize invasiveness. The incorporation of polymers, ligands or nanoparticles that have an affinity for the therapeutic of interest improve control over the release of small-molecule drugs and proteins from hydrogels, enabling spatial and temporal control over the delivery. Such affinity-based strategies can overcome drug burst release and challenges associated with protein instability, allowing more effective therapeutic molecule delivery for a range of applications from therapeutic contact lenses to ischemic tissue regeneration. PMID:27403513

  17. Morphometric affinities of gigantopithecus.

    PubMed

    Gelvin, B R

    1980-11-01

    Multivariate analyses, supplemented by univariate statistical methods, of measurements from mandibular tooth crown dimensions and the mandible of Gigantopithecus blacki, G. bilaspurensis, Plio-Plelstocene hominids, Homo erectus, and seven Neogene ape species from the genera Proconsul, Sivapithecus, Ouranopithecus, and Dryopithecus were used to assess the morphometric affinities of Gigantopithecus. The results show that Gigantopithecus displays affinities to Ouranopithecus and to the hominids, particularly the Plio-Plelstocene hominids, rather than to the apes. Ouranopithecus demonstrated dental resemblances to G. bilaspurensis and the Plio-Pleistocene hominids but mandibular similarities to the apes. Results of analyses of tooth and mandibular shape indices, combined with multivariate distance and temporal relationships, suggest that Ouranopithecus is a more likely candidate for Gigantopithecus ancestry than is Silvapithecus indicus. Shape and allometric differences between G. bilaspurensis and the robust australopithecines weaken the argument for an ancestral-descendant relationship between these groups. The results support the hypothesis that Gigantopithecus is an extinct side branch of the Hominidae. PMID:7468790

  18. Multiple GPCR conformations and signalling pathways: implications for antagonist affinity estimates

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jillian G.; Hill, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Antagonist affinity measurements have traditionally been considered important in characterizing the cell-surface receptors present in a particular cell or tissue. A central assumption has been that antagonist affinity is constant for a given receptor–antagonist interaction, regardless of the agonist used to stimulate that receptor or the downstream response that is measured. As a consequence, changes in antagonist affinity values have been taken as initial evidence for the presence of novel receptor subtypes. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that receptors can possess multiple binding sites and the same receptor can show different antagonist affinity measurements under distinct experimental conditions. Here, we discuss several mechanisms by which antagonists have different affinities for the same receptor as a consequence of allosterism, coupling to different G proteins, multiple (but non-interacting) receptor sites, and signal-pathway-dependent pharmacology (where the pharmacology observed varies depending on the signalling pathway measured). PMID:17629959

  19. Isothiouronium compounds as gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, R. D.; Dickenson, H. W.; Hiern, B. P.; Johnston, G. A.; Kazlauskas, R.

    1986-01-01

    Analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) incorporating an isothiouronium salt as a replacement for a protonated amino functional group have been investigated for activity on: GABA receptors in the guinea-pig ileum; [3H]-GABA and [3H]-diazepam binding to rat brain membranes; and GABA uptake and transamination. For the homologous series of omega-isothiouronium alkanoic acids, maximum GABA-mimetic activity was found at 3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]propanoic acid. Introduction of unsaturation into this compound gave two isomeric conformationally restricted analogues. The trans isomer was inactive at GABA receptors while the cis compound ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid (ZAPA)) was more potent than muscimol and GABA as a GABA agonist with respect to low affinity GABA receptor sites. Both isomers were moderately potent at inhibiting the uptake of [3H]-GABA into rat brain slices. Comparison of possible conformations of the two unsaturated isomers by interactive computer graphics modelling and comparison with muscimol has led to a plausible active conformation of ZAPA, which may be a selective and potent agonist for low affinity GABA binding sites. PMID:3015310

  20. Covalent agonists for studying G protein-coupled receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Weichert, Dietmar; Kruse, Andrew C.; Manglik, Aashish; Hiller, Christine; Zhang, Cheng; Hübner, Harald; Kobilka, Brian K.; Gmeiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Structural studies on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) provide important insights into the architecture and function of these important drug targets. However, the crystallization of GPCRs in active states is particularly challenging, requiring the formation of stable and conformationally homogeneous ligand-receptor complexes. Native hormones, neurotransmitters, and synthetic agonists that bind with low affinity are ineffective at stabilizing an active state for crystallogenesis. To promote structural studies on the pharmacologically highly relevant class of aminergic GPCRs, we here present the development of covalently binding molecular tools activating Gs-, Gi-, and Gq-coupled receptors. The covalent agonists are derived from the monoamine neurotransmitters noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, and histamine, and they were accessed using a general and versatile synthetic strategy. We demonstrate that the tool compounds presented herein display an efficient covalent binding mode and that the respective covalent ligand-receptor complexes activate G proteins comparable to the natural neurotransmitters. A crystal structure of the β2-adrenoreceptor in complex with a covalent noradrenaline analog and a conformationally selective antibody (nanobody) verified that these agonists can be used to facilitate crystallogenesis. PMID:25006259

  1. Potent Adjuvanticity of a Pure TLR7-Agonistic Imidazoquinoline Dendrimer

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Nikunj M.; Salunke, Deepak B.; Balakrishna, Rajalakshmi; Mutz, Cole A.; Malladi, Subbalakshmi S.; David, Sunil A.

    2012-01-01

    Engagement of toll-like receptors (TLRs) serve to link innate immune responses with adaptive immunity and can be exploited as powerful vaccine adjuvants for eliciting both primary and anamnestic immune responses. TLR7 agonists are highly immunostimulatory without inducing dominant proinflammatory cytokine responses. We synthesized a dendrimeric molecule bearing six units of a potent TLR7/TLR8 dual-agonistic imidazoquinoline to explore if multimerization of TLR7/8 would result in altered activity profiles. A complete loss of TLR8-stimulatory activity with selective retention of the TLR7-agonistic activity was observed in the dendrimer. This was reflected by a complete absence of TLR8-driven proinflammatory cytokine and interferon (IFN)-γ induction in human PBMCs, with preservation of TLR7-driven IFN-α induction. The dendrimer was found to be superior to the imidazoquinoline monomer in inducing high titers of high-affinity antibodies to bovine α-lactalbumin. Additionally, epitope mapping experiments showed that the dendrimer induced immunoreactivity to more contiguous peptide epitopes along the amino acid sequence of the model antigen. PMID:22952720

  2. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  3. Quantitative analysis of the agonist and antagonist actions of some ATP analogues at P2X-purinoceptors in the rabbit ear artery.

    PubMed

    Leff, P; Wood, B E; O'Connor, S E; McKechnie, K

    1993-02-01

    1. The agonist and antagonist effects of a series of beta, gamma-methylene dihalo- and 2-methylthio-substituted analogues of ATP at P2x-purinoceptors have been analysed on the rabbit isolated ear artery preparation. Cumulative and sequential dosing experimental protocols were employed in the construction of agonist concentration-effect curves in order to address the possible influence of acute receptor desensitization on subsequent analyses. 2. Using the cumulative curve design the following results were obtained: D-AMP-PCBr2P, 2-methylthio-D-AMP-PCCl2P, L-AMP-PCF2P, L-AMP-PCCl2P and LAMP-PCBr2P each behaved as partial agonists. D-AMP-CPP was used as a reference full agonist and these analogues were analysed by the comparative method of Barlow et al. (1967), to provide estimates of affinity and efficacy. 2-Methylthio-L-AMP-PCBr2P was virtually silent as an agonist and was analysed as a competitive antagonist by Schild analysis. 3. Two agonists, L-AMP-PCCl2P and L-AMP-PCBr2P, were analysed by the sequential curve design, and the antagonist effects of one of the agonists, L-AMP-PCBr2P were also analysed using this protocol. The resulting estimates of affinity and efficacy, while similar to those obtained with the cumulative design, indicated that acute desensitization may affect curve definition and estimation of these quantities. 4. The following structure-activity trends emerged: D-analogues tended to have higher efficacy but lower affinity than L-analogues; efficacy varied markedly and inversely with the atomic weight of the halogen while affinity was only minimally affected; 2-methylthio- substitution also reduced efficacy with minimal effect on affinity. 5. The results of this analysis are discussed in terms of the utility of affinity and efficacy information in the classification of purinoceptors and the design of chemical probes for them. PMID:8448598

  4. Fluorescence characteristics of hydrophobic partial agonist probes of the cholecystokinin receptor.

    PubMed

    Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Pinon, Delia I; Miller, Laurence J

    2006-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopic studies are powerful tools for the evaluation of receptor structure and the dynamic changes associated with receptor activation. Here, we have developed two chemically distinct fluorescent probes of the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor by attaching acrylodan or a nitrobenzoxadiazole moiety to the amino terminus of a partial agonist CCK analogue. These two probes were able to bind to the CCK receptor specifically and with high affinity, and were able to elicit only submaximal intracellular calcium responses typical of partial agonists. The fluorescence characteristics of these probes were compared with those previously reported for structurally-related full agonist and antagonist probes. Like the previous probes, the partial agonist probes exhibited longer fluorescence lifetimes and increased anisotropy when bound to the receptor than when free in solution. The receptor-bound probes were not easily quenched by potassium iodide, suggesting that the fluorophores were protected from the extracellular aqueous milieu. The fluorescence characteristics of the partial agonist probes were quite similar to those of the analogous full agonist probes and quite distinct from the analogous antagonist probes. These data suggest that the partially activated conformational state of this receptor is more closely related to its fully active state than to its inactive state. PMID:16779661

  5. Affinity chromatography: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hage, David S; Matsuda, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is one of the most selective and versatile forms of liquid chromatography for the separation or analysis of chemicals in complex mixtures. This method makes use of a biologically related agent as the stationary phase, which provides an affinity column with the ability to bind selectively and reversibly to a given target in a sample. This review examines the early work in this method and various developments that have lead to the current status of this technique. The general principles of affinity chromatography are briefly described as part of this discussion. Past and recent efforts in the generation of new binding agents, supports, and immobilization methods for this method are considered. Various applications of affinity chromatography are also summarized, as well as the influence this field has played in the creation of other affinity-based separation or analysis methods. PMID:25749941

  6. Neuroprotective effects of high affinity sigma 1 receptor selective compounds

    PubMed Central

    Luedtke, Robert R.; Perez, Evelyn; Yang, Shao-Hua; Liu, Ran; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Tu, Zhude; Mach, Robert H.; Simpkins, James W.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that the antipsychotic drug haloperidol, a multifunctional D2-like dopamine and sigma receptor subtype antagonist, has neuroprotective properties. In this study we further examined the association between neuroprotection and receptor antagonism by evaluating a panel of novel compounds with varying affinity at sigma and D2-like dopamine receptors. These compounds were evaluated using an in vitro cytotoxicity assay that utilizes a hippocampal-derived cell line, HT-22, in the presence or absence of varying concentrations (5 to 20 mM) of glutamate. While haloperidol was found to be a potent neuroprotective agent in this in vitro cell assay, the prototypic sigma 1 receptor agonist (+)-pentazocine was found not to be neuroprotective. Subsequently, the potency for the neuroprotection of HT-22 cells was evaluated for a) three SV series indoles which have nMolar affinity at D2-like receptors but varying affinity at sigma 1 receptor and b) two benzyl phenylacetamides sigma 1 receptor selective compounds which bind with low affinity at D2-like receptors but have nMolar affinity for the sigma 1 receptor. We observed that cytoprotection correlated with the affinity of the compounds for sigma 1 receptors. Based upon results from the HT-22 cell-based in vitro assay, two phenylacetamides, LS-127 and LS-137, were further evaluated in vivo using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (t-MCAO) model of stroke. At a dose of 100 µg/kg, both LS-127 and LS-137 attenuated infarct volume by approximately 50%. These studies provide further evidence that sigma 1 receptor selective compounds can provide neuroprotection in cytotoxic situations. These results also demonstrate that sigma 1 receptor selective benzyl phenylacetamides are candidate pharmacotherapeutic agents that could be used to minimize neuronal death after a stroke or head trauma. PMID:22285434

  7. Recent progress in the development of agonists and antagonists for melatonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Zlotos, D P

    2012-01-01

    The various physiological actions of the neurohormone melatonin are mediated mainly by two G-protein-coupled MT(1) and MT(2) receptors. The melatoninergic drugs on the market, ramelteon and agomelatine, as well as the most advanced drug candidates under clinical evaluation, tasimelteon and PD-6735, are high-affinity nonselective MT(1) and MT(2) agonists. However, exploring the exact physiological role of the MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors requires subtype selective MT(1) and MT(2) ligands. This review covers novel melatoninergic agonists and antagonists published since 2010, focusing on high-affinity and subtype selective agents. Additionally, compounds not mentioned in the previous review articles and ligands selective for the MT(3) binding site are included. PMID:22680635

  8. DEVELOPMENT AND IN VITRO CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL BIFUNCTIONAL MU-AGONIST/DELTA-ANTAGONIST OPIOID TETRAPEPTIDE

    PubMed Central

    Purington, Lauren C.; Sobczyk-Kojiro, Katarzyna; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Traynor, John R.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    2011-01-01

    The development of tolerance to and dependence on opioid analgesics greatly reduces their long-term usefulness. Previous studies have demonstrated that co-administration of a mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonist and delta opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist can decrease MOR agonist induced tolerance and dependence development after chronic exposure. Clinically, a single ligand displaying multiple efficacies (e.g. MOR agonism concurrently with DOR antagonism) would be of increased value over two drugs administered simultaneously. Guided by modeling of receptor-ligand complexes we have developed a series of potent non-selective opioid tetrapeptides that have differing efficacy at MOR and DOR. In particular, our lead peptide (KSK-103) binds with equal affinity to MOR and DOR but acts as a MOR agonist with similar efficacy but greater potency than morphine and a DOR antagonist in cellular assays measuring both G protein stimulation and adenylyl cyclase inhibition. PMID:21958158

  9. Quantitative Measure of Receptor Agonist and Modulator Equi-Response and Equi-Occupancy Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rumin; Kavana, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are an important class of drug targets. Quantitative analysis by global curve fitting of properly designed dose-dependent GPCR agonism and allosterism data permits the determination of all affinity and efficacy parameters based on a general operational model. We report here a quantitative and panoramic measure of receptor agonist and modulator equi-response and equi-occupancy selectivity calculated from these parameters. The selectivity values help to differentiate not only one agonist or modulator from another, but on-target from off-target receptor or functional pathway as well. Furthermore, in conjunction with target site free drug concentrations and endogenous agonist tones, the allosterism parameters and selectivity values may be used to predict in vivo efficacy and safety margins. PMID:27116909

  10. Agonist binding and function at the human alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor: allosteric modulation by amilorides.

    PubMed

    Leppik, R A; Birdsall, N J

    2000-11-01

    It has been found previously that amilorides act via an allosteric site on the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor to strongly inhibit antagonist binding. In this study, allosteric modulation of agonist binding and function at the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor was explored. The dissociation rate of the agonist [(3)H]UK14304 from alpha(2A)-receptors was decreased by the amilorides in a concentration-dependent manner. This contrasts with the increases in (3)H-antagonist dissociation rate found previously. The agonist-amiloride analog interaction data could be fitted to equations derived from the ternary complex allosteric model. The calculated log affinities of the amilorides at the [(3)H]UK14304-occupied receptor increased with the size of the 5-N-alkyl side chain and ranged from 2.4 for amiloride to 4.2 for 5-(N,N-hexamethylene)-amiloride. The calculated negative cooperativities cover a narrow range, in sharp contrast to the broad range found for antagonist-amiloride analog interactions. The effects of the amilorides on the agonist actions of UK14304, epinephrine, and norepinephrine were explored using a [(35)S]GTPgammaS functional assay, and the parameters calculated for the cooperativities and affinities of the UK14304-amiloride analog interactions, using the equation derived from the ternary complex allosteric model, were in good agreement with those derived from the kinetic studies. Therefore both the binding and functional data provide further support for the existence of a well defined allosteric site on the human alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. The binding mode of the amilorides at the agonist-occupied and antagonist-occupied receptor differs markedly but, within each group, the structure of either the agonist or the antagonist examined has only a slight effect on the allosteric interactions. PMID:11040058

  11. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.; Martino, A.M.; Hall, D.P. Jr.; Schwartz, R.D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic sites in rat CNS and peripheral tissues was measured in the presence of cytisin, which occupies nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The muscarinic sites were characterized with regard to binding kinetics, pharmacology, anatomical distribution, and regulation by guanyl nucleotides. These binding sites have characteristics of high-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors with a Kd of approximately 30 nM. Most of the muscarinic agonist and antagonist drugs tested have high affinity for the (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding site, but pirenzepine, an antagonist which is selective for M-1 receptors, has relatively low affinity. The ratio of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites to total muscarinic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate varies from 9 to 90% in different tissues, with the highest ratios in the pons, medulla, and heart atrium. In the presence of guanyl nucleotides, (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine binding is decreased, but the extent of decrease varies from 40 to 90% in different tissues, with the largest decreases being found in the pons, medulla, cerebellum, and heart atrium. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binds to high-affinity M-1 and M-2 muscarinic receptors, and they suggest that most M-2 sites have high affinity for acetylcholine but that only a small fraction of M-1 sites have such high affinity.

  12. γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is not an agonist of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Connelly, William M; Errington, Adam C; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound and a drug used clinically to treat the symptoms of narcolepsy. GHB is known to be an agonist of GABAB receptors with millimolar affinity, but also binds with much higher affinity to another site, known as the GHB receptor. While a body of evidence has shown that GHB does not bind to GABAA receptors widely, recent evidence has suggested that the GHB receptor is in fact on extrasynaptic α4β1δ GABAA receptors, where GHB acts as an agonist with an EC50 of 140 nM. We investigated three neuronal cell types that express a tonic GABAA receptor current mediated by extrasynaptic receptors: ventrobasal (VB) thalamic neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells and striatal medium spiny neurons. Using whole-cell voltage clamp in brain slices, we found no evidence that GHB (10 µM) induced any GABAA receptor mediated current in these cell types, nor that it modulated inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, a high concentration of GHB (3 mM) was able to produce a GABAB receptor mediated current, but did not induce any other currents. These results suggest either that GHB is not a high affinity agonist at native α4β1δ receptors, or that these receptors do not exist in classical areas associated with extrasynaptic currents. PMID:24244421

  13. γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid (GHB) Is Not an Agonist of Extrasynaptic GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, William M.; Errington, Adam C.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound and a drug used clinically to treat the symptoms of narcolepsy. GHB is known to be an agonist of GABAB receptors with millimolar affinity, but also binds with much higher affinity to another site, known as the GHB receptor. While a body of evidence has shown that GHB does not bind to GABAA receptors widely, recent evidence has suggested that the GHB receptor is in fact on extrasynaptic α4β1δ GABAA receptors, where GHB acts as an agonist with an EC50 of 140 nM. We investigated three neuronal cell types that express a tonic GABAA receptor current mediated by extrasynaptic receptors: ventrobasal (VB) thalamic neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells and striatal medium spiny neurons. Using whole-cell voltage clamp in brain slices, we found no evidence that GHB (10 µM) induced any GABAA receptor mediated current in these cell types, nor that it modulated inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, a high concentration of GHB (3 mM) was able to produce a GABAB receptor mediated current, but did not induce any other currents. These results suggest either that GHB is not a high affinity agonist at native α4β1δ receptors, or that these receptors do not exist in classical areas associated with extrasynaptic currents. PMID:24244421

  14. Cell type-dependent agonist/antagonist activities of polybrominated diphenyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, N; Matsubara, K; Sanoh, S; Ohta, S; Uramaru, N; Kitamura, S; Yamaguchi, M; Sugihara, K; Fujimoto, N

    2013-11-25

    There have been many concerns expressed regarding the possible adverse effects of thyroid hormone-disrupting chemicals including polychlorinated biphenyls and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), since thyroid hormones play crucial roles in normal vertebrate development. A vast amount of PBDEs have been used as flame retardants for the last two decades and our environment has been contaminated with them. Some PBDEs, especially hydroxylated PBDEs, reportedly show an affinity to the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) and act as thyroid hormone agonists, but in other studies they were reported to inhibit the actions of thyroid hormones. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the binding affinities of PBDEs and their metabolites to TR and their ability to induce thyroid hormone-responsive transcription using luciferase reporter gene assays in two different cell lines, a pituitary cell line, MtT/E-2, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The binding assay showed that many of the examined PBDEs have significant affinity to TR. Interestingly, some of these PBDEs, such as 4'-OH-BDE-17 and 2'-OH-BDE-28, acted as agonists in the reporter gene assay in MtT/E-2 cells, while they acted as antagonists in CHO cells. Our results demonstrated that whether PBDEs and their metabolites are TR agonists or antagonists depends on the cell type used in the assay, which may suggest that the thyroid hormone-disrupting actions of PBDEs differ among target tissues or species. PMID:24076165

  15. N-terminal galanin-(1-16) fragment is an agonist at the hippocampal galanin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fisone, G.; Berthold, M.; Bedecs, K.; Unden, A.; Bartfai, T.; Bertorelli, R.; Consolo, S.; Crawley, J.; Martin, B.; Nilsson, S.; )

    1989-12-01

    The galanin N-terminal fragment (galanin-(1-16)) has been prepared by solid-phase synthesis and by enzymic cleavage of galanin by endoproteinase Asp-N. This peptide fragment displaced {sup 125}I-labeled galanin in receptor autoradiography experiments on rat forebrain and spinal cord and in equilibrium binding experiments from high-affinity binding sites in the ventral hippocampus with an IC50 of approximately 3 nM. In tissue slices of the same brain area, galanin-(1-16), similarly to galanin, inhibited the muscarinic agonist-stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids. Upon intracerebroventricular administration, galanin-(1-16) (10 micrograms/15 microliters) also inhibited the scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.)-evoked release of acetylcholine, as studied in vivo by microdialysis. Substitution of (L-Trp2) for (D-Trp2) resulted in a 500-fold loss in affinity as compared with galanin-(1-16). It is concluded that, in the ventral hippocampus, the N-terminal galanin fragment (galanin-(1-16)) is recognized by the galanin receptors controlling acetylcholine release and muscarinic agonist-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown as a high-affinity agonist and that amino acid residue (Trp2) plays an important role in the receptor-ligand interactions.

  16. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  17. Use of microdoses for induction of buprenorphine treatment with overlapping full opioid agonist use: the Bernese method

    PubMed Central

    Hämmig, Robert; Kemter, Antje; Strasser, Johannes; von Bardeleben, Ulrich; Gugger, Barbara; Walter, Marc; Dürsteler, Kenneth M; Vogel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine is a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist used for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. Because of the partial agonism and high receptor affinity, it may precipitate withdrawal symptoms during induction in persons on full µ-opioid receptor agonists. Therefore, current guidelines and drug labels recommend leaving a sufficient time period since the last full agonist use, waiting for clear and objective withdrawal symptoms, and reducing pre-existing full agonist therapies before administering buprenorphine. However, even with these precautions, for many patients the induction of buprenorphine is a difficult experience, due to withdrawal symptoms. Furthermore, tapering of the full agonist bears the risk of relapse to illicit opioid use. Cases We present two cases of successful initiation of buprenorphine treatment with the Bernese method, ie, gradual induction overlapping with full agonist use. The first patient began buprenorphine with overlapping street heroin use after repeatedly experiencing relapse, withdrawal, and trauma reactivation symptoms during conventional induction. The second patient was maintained on high doses of diacetylmorphine (ie, pharmaceutical heroin) and methadone during induction. Both patients tolerated the induction procedure well and reported only mild withdrawal symptoms. Discussion Overlapping induction of buprenorphine maintenance treatment with full µ-opioid receptor agonist use is feasible and may be associated with better tolerability and acceptability in some patients compared to the conventional method of induction. PMID:27499655

  18. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na(+) in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na(+)-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na(+) sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na(+) increased cell surface [(3)H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na(+) by Cs(+) or NH4(+) inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na(+) over Cs(+). Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  19. PPARδ agonist attenuates alcohol-induced hepatic insulin resistance and improves liver injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Maoyin; de la Monte, Suzanne M.; Longato, Lisa; Tong, Ming; He, Jiman; Chaudhry, Rajeeve; Duan, Kevin; Ouh, Jiyun; Wands, Jack R.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic ethanol exposure impairs liver regeneration due to inhibition of insulin signaling and oxidative injury. PPAR agonists function as insulin sensitizers and anti-inflammatory agents. We investigated whether treatment with a PPARδ agonist could restore hepatic insulin sensitivity, survival signaling, and regenerative responses vis-a-vis chronic ethanol feeding. Methods Adult rats were fed isocaloric liquid diets containing 0% or 37% ethanol, and administered a PPARδ agonist by i.p. injection. We used liver tissue to examine histopathology, gene expression, oxidative stress, insulin signaling, and regenerative responses to 2/3 hepatectomy. Results Chronic ethanol feeding caused insulin resistance, increased oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage, and hepatocellular injury in liver. These effects were associated with reduced insulin receptor binding and affinity, impaired survival signaling through PI3K/Akt/GSK3β, and reduced expression of insulin responsive genes mediating energy metabolism and tissue remodeling. PPARδ agonist treatment reduced ethanol-mediated hepatic injury, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and insulin resistance, increased signaling through PI3K/Akt/GSK3β, and enhanced the regenerative response to partial hepatectomy. Conclusions PPARδ agonist administration may attenuate the severity of chronic ethanol-induced liver injury and ethanol’s adverse effects on the hepatic repair by restoring insulin responsiveness, even in the context of continued high-level ethanol consumption. PMID:19398227

  20. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na+ in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na+-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na+ sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na+ increased cell surface [3H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na+ by Cs+ or NH4+ inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na+ over Cs+. Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  1. Impact of D2 Receptor Internalization on Binding Affinity of Neuroimaging Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ningning; Guo, Wen; Kralikova, Michaela; Jiang, Man; Schieren, Ira; Narendran, Raj; Slifstein, Mark; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Laruelle, Marc; Javitch, Jonathan A; Rayport, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic dopamine (DA) levels seem to affect the in vivo binding of many D2 receptor radioligands. Thus, release of endogenous DA induced by the administration of amphetamine decreases ligand binding, whereas DA depletion increases binding. This is generally thought to be due to competition between endogenous DA and the radioligands for D2 receptors. However, the temporal discrepancy between amphetamine-induced increases in DA as measured by microdialysis, which last on the order of 2 h, and the prolonged decrease in ligand binding, which lasts up to a day, has suggested that agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization may contribute to the sustained decrease in D2 receptor-binding potential seen following a DA surge. To test this hypothesis, we developed an in vitro system showing robust agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization following treatment with the agonist quinpirole. Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were stably co-transfected with human D2 receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and arrestin 3. Agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and radioligand competition binding. The binding of seven D2 antagonists and four agonists to the surface and internalized receptors was measured in intact cells. All the imaging ligands bound with high affinity to both surface and internalized D2 receptors. Affinity of most of the ligands to internalized receptors was modestly lower, indicating that internalization would reduce the binding potential measured in imaging studies carried out with these ligands. However, between-ligand differences in the magnitude of the internalization-associated affinity shift only partly accounted for the data obtained in neuroimaging experiments, suggesting the involvement of mechanisms beyond competition and internalization. PMID:19956086

  2. The long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist, indacaterol, enhances glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription in human airway epithelial cells in a gene- and agonist-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, T; Johnson, M; Newton, R; Giembycz, M A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Inhaled glucocorticoid (ICS)/long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) combination therapy is a recommended treatment option for patients with moderate/severe asthma in whom adequate control cannot be achieved by an ICS alone. Previously, we discovered that LABAs can augment dexamethasone-inducible gene expression and proposed that this effect may explain how these two drugs interact to deliver superior clinical benefit. Herein, we extended that observation by analysing, pharmacodynamically, the effect of the LABA, indacaterol, on glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene transcription induced by seven ligands with intrinsic activity values that span the spectrum of full agonism to antagonism. Experimental Approach BEAS-2B human airway epithelial cells stably transfected with a 2× glucocorticoid response element luciferase reporter were used to model gene transcription together with an analysis of several glucocorticoid-inducible genes. Key Results Indacaterol augmented glucocorticoid-induced reporter activation in a manner that was positively related to the intrinsic activity of the GR agonist. This effect was demonstrated by an increase in response maxima without a change in GR agonist affinity or efficacy. Indacaterol also enhanced glucocorticoid-inducible gene expression. However, the magnitude of this effect was dependent on both the GR agonist and the gene of interest. Conclusions and Implications These data suggest that indacaterol activates a molecular rheostat, which increases the transcriptional competency of GR in an agonist- and gene-dependent manner without apparently changing the relationship between fractional GR occupancy and response. These findings provide a platform to rationally design ICS/LABA combination therapy that is based on the generation of agonist-dependent gene expression profiles in target and off-target tissues. PMID:25598440

  3. Desensitization of Functional µ-Opioid Receptors Increases Agonist Off-Rate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Desensitization of µ-opioid receptors (MORs) develops over 5–15 minutes after the application of some, but not all, opioid agonists and lasts for tens of minutes after agonist removal. The decrease in function is receptor selective (homologous) and could result from 1) a reduction in receptor number or 2) a decrease in receptor coupling. The present investigation used photolysis of two caged opioid ligands to examine the kinetics of MOR-induced potassium conductance before and after MOR desensitization. Photolysis of a caged antagonist, carboxynitroveratryl-naloxone (caged naloxone), blocked the current induced by a series of agonists, and the time constant of decline was significantly decreased after desensitization. The increase in the rate of current decay was not observed after partial blockade of receptors with the irreversible antagonist, β-chlornaltrexamine (β-CNA). The time constant of current decay after desensitization was never more rapid than 1 second, suggesting an increased agonist off-rate rather than an increase in the rate of channel closure downstream of the receptor. The rate of G protein–coupled K+ channel (GIRK) current activation was examined using photolysis of a caged agonist, carboxynitrobenzyl-tyrosine-[Leu5]-enkephalin. After acute desensitization or partial irreversible block of MORs with β-CNA, there was an increase in the time it took to reach a peak current. The decrease in the rate of agonist-induced GIRK conductance was receptor selective and dependent on receptor number. The results indicate that opioid receptor desensitization reduced the number of functional receptor and that the remaining active receptors have a reduced agonist affinity. PMID:24748657

  4. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D.; Schiffmann, Serge N.; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain. PMID:26100888

  5. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D; Schiffmann, Serge N; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain. PMID:26100888

  6. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of 3,8-diazabicyclo[4.2.0]octane ligands, potent nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Frost, Jennifer M; Bunnelle, William H; Tietje, Karin R; Anderson, David J; Rueter, Lynne E; Curzon, Peter; Surowy, Carol S; Ji, Jianquo; Daanen, Jerome F; Kohlhaas, Kathy L; Buckley, Michael J; Henry, Rodger F; Dyhring, Tino; Ahring, Philip K; Meyer, Michael D

    2006-12-28

    A series of potent neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands based on a 3,8-diazabicyclo[4.2.0]octane core have been synthesized and evaluated for affinity and agonist efficacy at the human high affinity nicotine recognition site (halpha4beta2) and in a rat model of persistent nociceptive pain (formalin model). Numerous analogs in this series exhibit picomolar affinity in radioligand binding assays and nanomolar agonist potency in functional assays, placing them among the most potent nAChR ligands known for the halpha4beta2 receptor. Several of the compounds reported in this study (i.e., 24, 25, 28, 30, 32, and 47) exhibit equivalent or greater affinity for the halpha4beta2 receptor relative to epibatidine, and like epibatidine, many exhibit robust analgesic efficacy in the rat formalin model of persistent pain. PMID:17181167

  7. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  8. Defining Nicotinic Agonist Binding Surfaces through Photoaffinity Labeling†

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Maltby, David; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Zhang, Nanjing; Durkin, Kathleen A.; Presley, Jack; Talley, Todd T.; Taylor, Palmer; Burlingame, Alma L.; Casida, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChR) agonists are potential therapeutic agents for neurological dysfunction. In the present study, the homopentameric mollusk ACh binding protein (AChBP), used as a surrogate for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the nAChR, was specifically derivatized by the highly potent agonist azidoepibatidine (AzEPI) prepared as a photoaffinity probe and radioligand. One EPI-nitrene photoactivated molecule was incorporated in each subunit interface binding site based on analysis of the intact derivatized protein. Tryptic fragments of the modified AChBP were analyzed by collision-induced dissociation and Edman sequencing of radiolabeled peptides. Each specific EPI-nitrene-modified site involved either Tyr195 of loop C on the principal or (+)-face or Met116 of loop E on the complementary or (−)-face. The two derivatization sites were observed in similar frequency, providing evidence of the reactivity of the azido/nitrene probe substituent and close proximity to both residues. [3H]AzEPI binds to the α4β2 nAChR at a single high-affinity site and photoaffinity-labels only the α4 subunit, presumably modifying Tyr225 spatially corresponding to Tyr195 of AChBP. Phe137 of the β2 nAChR subunit, equivalent to Met116 of AChBP, conceivably lacks sufficient reactivity with the nitrene generated from the probe. The present photoaffinity labeling in a physiologically relevant condition combined with the crystal structure of AChBP allows development of precise structural models for the AzEPI interactions with AChBP and α4β2 nAChR. These findings enabled us to use AChBP as a structural surrogate to define the nAChR agonist site. PMID:17614369

  9. Purification of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    André, C; De Backer, J P; Guillet, J C; Vanderheyden, P; Vauquelin, G; Strosberg, A D

    1983-01-01

    Calf forebrain homogenates contain 2.8 pM muscarinic acetylcholine receptors per mg of protein. [3H]Antagonist saturation binding experiments under equilibrium conditions revealed a single class of sites with equilibrium dissociation constants of 0.82 nM for [3H]dexetimide and 0.095 nM for [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate. Displacement binding studies with agonists revealed the presence of low and high affinity sites. Here we describe the solubilization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with digitonin and their purification by affinity chromatography using an affinity gel which consisted of dexetimide coupled to Affi-Gel 10 (i.e., carboxy N-hydroxysuccinimide esters linked via a 1 nm spacer arm to agarose beads). Purified proteins were obtained by specific elution with muscarinic drugs, i.e., the antagonist atropine and the irreversible ligand propylbenzilylcholine mustard. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the radioiodinated purified preparations revealed a major 70-K protein. Images Fig. 3. PMID:6605245

  10. Anti-cancer flavonoids are mouse selective STING agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sujeong; Li, Lingyin; Maliga, Zoltan; Yin, Qian; Wu, Hao; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The flavonoids FAA and DMXAA showed impressive activity against solid tumors in mice, but failed clinical trials. They act on a previously unknown molecular target(s) to trigger cytokine release from leukocytes, which causes tumor-specific vascular damage and other anti-tumor effects. We show that DMXAA is a competitive agonist ligand for mouse STING (stimulator of interferon genes), a receptor for the bacterial PAMP cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and an endogenous second messenger cyclic-GMP-AMP. In our structure-activity relationship studies, STING binding affinity and pathway activation activity of four flavonoids correlated with activity in a mouse tumor model measured previously. We propose that STING agonist activity accounts for the anti-tumor effects of FAA and DMXAA in mice. Importantly, DMXAA does not bind to human STING, which may account for its lack of efficacy or mechanism-related toxicity in man. We propose that STING is a druggable target for a novel innate immune activation mechanism of chemotherapy. PMID:23683494

  11. Beta-agonists and animal welfare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of beta-agonists in animal feed is a high profile topic within the U.S. as consumers and activist groups continue to question its safety. The only beta-agonist currently available for use in swine is ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC). This is available as Paylean™ (Elanco Animal Health – FDA a...

  12. Studies on the synthesis and opioid agonistic activities of mitragynine-related indole alkaloids: discovery of opioid agonists structurally different from other opioid ligands.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Hiromitsu; Ishikawa, Hayato; Kurihara, Mika; Kitajima, Mariko; Aimi, Norio; Ponglux, Dhavadee; Koyama, Fumi; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Moriyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Leonard T; Watanabe, Kazuo; Murayama, Toshihiko; Horie, Syunji

    2002-04-25

    Mitragynine (1) is a major alkaloidal component in the Thai traditional medicinal herb, Mitragyna speciosa, and has been proven to exhibit analgesic activity mediated by opioid receptors. By utilizing this natural product as a lead compound, synthesis of some derivatives, evaluations of the structure-activity relationship, and surveys of the intrinsic activities and potencies on opioid receptors were performed with guinea pig ileum. The affinities of some compounds for mu-, delta-, and kappa-receptors were determined in a receptor binding assay. The essential structural moieties in the Corynanthe type indole alkaloids for inducing the opioid agonistic activity were also clarified. The oxidative derivatives of mitragynine, i.e., mitragynine pseudoindoxyl (2) and 7-hydroxymitragynine (12), were found as opioid agonists with higher potency than morphine in the experiment with guinea pig ileum. In addition, 2 induced an analgesic activity in the tail flick test in mice. PMID:11960505

  13. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  14. Modal affinities of endplate acetylcholine receptors caused by loop C mutations

    PubMed Central

    Vij, Ridhima; Purohit, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    The time course of the endplate current is determined by the rate and equilibrium constants for acetylcholine receptor (AChR) activation. We measured these constants in single-channel currents from AChRs with mutations at the neurotransmitter-binding sites, in loop C. The main findings are: (a) Almost all perturbations of loop C generate heterogeneity in the channel open probability (“modes”). (b) Modes are generated by different affinities for ACh that can be either higher or lower than in the wild-type receptors. (c) The modes are stable, in so far as each receptor maintains its affinity for at least several minutes. (d) Different agonists show different degrees of modal activity. With the loop C mutation αP197A, there are four modes with ACh but only two with partial agonists. (e) The affinity variations arise exclusively from the αδ-binding site. (f) Substituting four γ-subunit residues into the δ subunit (three in loop E and one in the β5–β5′ linker) reduces modal activity. (g) At each neurotransmitter-binding site, affinity is determined by a core of five aromatic residues. Modes are eliminated by an alanine mutation at δW57 but not at the other aromatics. (h) Modes are eliminated by a phenylalanine substitution at all core aromatics except αY93. The results suggest that, at the αδ agonist site, loop C and the complementary subunit surface can each adopt alternative conformations and interact with each other to influence the position of δW57 with respect to the aromatic core and, hence, affinity. PMID:26503719

  15. Rotigotine is a potent agonist at dopamine D1 receptors as well as at dopamine D2 and D3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Martyn; Dubois, Vanessa; Scheller, Dieter; Gillard, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Rotigotine acts as a dopamine receptor agonist with high affinity for the dopamine D2, D3, D4 and D5 receptors but with a low affinity for the dopamine D1 receptor. We have investigated this further in radioligand binding and functional studies and compared the profile of rotigotine with that of other drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Experimental Approach The binding of rotigotine to human dopamine D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 receptors was determined in radioligand binding studies using [3H]rotigotine and compared with that of standard antagonist radioligands. Functional interactions of rotigotine with human dopamine receptors was also determined. Key Results [3H]rotigotine can be used as an agonist radioligand to label all dopamine receptor subtypes and this can be important to derive agonist affinity estimates. Rotigotine maintains this high affinity in functional studies at all dopamine receptors especially D1, D2 and D3 receptors and, to a lesser extent, D4 and D5 receptors. Rotigotine, like apomorphine but unlike ropinirole and pramipexole, was a potent agonist at all dopamine receptors. Conclusions and Implications Rotigotine is a high-potency agonist at human dopamine D1, D2 and D3 receptors with a lower potency at D4 and D5 receptors. These studies differentiate rotigotine from conventional dopamine D2 agonists, used in the treatment of PD, such as ropinirole and pramipexole which lack activity at the D1 and D5 receptors, but resembles that of apomorphine which has greater efficacy in PD than other dopamine agonists but has suboptimal pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:25339241

  16. β2-agonist therapy in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Page, Clive P; Rogliani, Paola; Matera, M Gabriella

    2013-04-01

    β2-Agonists are effective bronchodilators due primarily to their ability to relax airway smooth muscle (ASM). They exert their effects via their binding to the active site of β2-adrenoceptors on ASM, which triggers a signaling cascade that results in a number of events, all of which contribute to relaxation of ASM. There are some differences between β2-agonists. Traditional inhaled short-acting β2-agonists albuterol, fenoterol, and terbutaline provide rapid as-needed symptom relief and short-term prophylactic protection against bronchoconstriction induced by exercise or other stimuli. The twice-daily β2-agonists formoterol and salmeterol represent important advances. Their effective bronchodilating properties and long-term improvement in lung function offer considerable clinical benefits to patients. More recently, a newer β2-agonist (indacaterol) with a longer pharmacodynamic half-life has been discovered, with the hopes of achieving once-daily dosing. In general, β2-agonists have an acceptable safety profile, although there is still controversy as to whether long-acting β2-agonists may increase the risk of asthma mortality. In any case, they can induce adverse effects, such as increased heart rate, palpitations, transient decrease in PaO2, and tremor. Desensitization of β2-adrenoceptors that occurs during the first few days of regular use of β2-agonist treatment may account for the commonly observed resolution of the majority of these adverse events after the first few doses. Nevertheless, it can also induce tolerance to bronchoprotective effects of β2-agonists and has the potential to reduce bronchodilator sensitivity to them. Some novel once-daily β2-agonists (olodaterol, vilanterol, abediterol) are under development, mainly in combination with an inhaled corticosteroid or a long-acting antimuscarinic agent. PMID:23348973

  17. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Sondek, John

    2004-09-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, and for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:18429272

  18. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  19. N-Methyl scan of somatostatin octapeptide agonists produces interesting effects on receptor subtype specificity.

    PubMed

    Rajeswaran, W G; Hocart, S J; Murphy, W A; Taylor, J E; Coy, D H

    2001-04-26

    The search for synthetic analogues of somatostatin which exhibit selective affinities for the five receptor subtypes is of considerable basic and therapeutic interest and has generated a large number of potent agonist analogues with a wide spectrum of binding profiles. In the past, conformational restriction of side chain groups and the peptide backbone has yielded the most interesting results. Under the latter category and as part of the present study, we were interested in the potential effects of N-methylation of peptide bond NH groups on binding affinity since this approach had not been systematically examined with these peptides. This was aided by new chemistries for introducing an N-Me group during regular solid-phase peptide synthesis using Boc protection. A number of interesting effects were noted on relative binding affinities of the two series of agonist sequences chosen, DPhe(5)(or Tyr(5))-c[Cys(6)-Phe(7)-DTrp(8)-Lys(9)-Thr(10)-Cys(11)]Thr(12)-NH(2) (SRIF numbering), at the five known human somatostatin receptors transfected into and stably expressed by CHO cells. N-Methylation of residues 7 (Phe), 10 (Thr), 11 (Cys), and 12 (Thr) largely destroyed affinities for all five receptors. N-Methylation of DTrp in the DPhe series gave an analogue with extraordinarily high affinity for the type 5 receptor for which it was also quite selective. N-Methylation of Lys in both series resulted in retention of type 2 affinity despite this residue constituting the "active center" of somatostatin peptides. N-Methylation of either the N-terminal Tyr residue or of Cys(6) in the Tyr series resulted in analogues with extraordinarily high affinity for the type 3 receptor, also with a degree of specificity. N-Methylation of the peptide bond constrains the conformational space of the amino acid and eliminates the possibility of donor hydrogen bond formation from the amide linkage. The beta-bend conformation of the agonists around DTrp-Lys is stabilized by a transannular

  20. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  1. Quantifying Affinity among Chinese Dialects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chin-Chuan

    A study of the relationships between Chinese dialects based on a quantitative measure of dialect affinity is summarized. First, tone values in all the dialect localities available in the early 1970s were used to calculate the dialectal differences in terms of tone height with respect to the "yin and yang" split. In the late 1970s, calculations of…

  2. Thermostabilisation of an agonist-bound conformation of the human adenosine A(2A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Guillaume; Bennett, Kirstie; Jazayeri, Ali; Tate, Christopher G

    2011-06-10

    The adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that plays a key role in transmembrane signalling mediated by the agonist adenosine. The structure of A(2A)R was determined recently in an antagonist-bound conformation, which was facilitated by the T4 lysozyme fusion in cytoplasmic loop 3 and the considerable stabilisation conferred on the receptor by the bound inverse agonist ZM241385. Unfortunately, the natural agonist adenosine does not sufficiently stabilise the receptor for the formation of diffraction-quality crystals. As a first step towards determining the structure of A(2A)R bound to an agonist, the receptor was thermostabilised by systematic mutagenesis in the presence of the bound agonist [(3)H]5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA). Four thermostabilising mutations were identified that when combined to give mutant A(2A)R-GL26, conferred a greater than 200-fold decrease in its rate of unfolding compared to the wild-type receptor. Pharmacological analysis suggested that A(2A)R-GL26 is stabilised in an agonist-bound conformation because antagonists bind with up to 320-fold decreased affinity. None of the thermostabilising mutations are in the ZM241385 binding pocket, suggesting that the mutations affect ligand binding by altering the conformation of the receptor rather than through direct interactions with ligands. A(2A)R-GL26 shows considerable stability in short-chain detergents, which has allowed its purification and crystallisation. PMID:21501622

  3. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  4. CORRELATION OF THE ANTICHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY OF A SERIES OF ORGANOPHOSPHATES WITH THEIR ABILITY TO COMPETE WITH AGONIST BINDING TO MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some compounds that inhibit acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) activity compete directly with quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) binding, a muscarinic antagonist which binds to all subtypes equally, and with cis-methyldioxolane (CD), an agonist that binds with high affinity to the M2 subtype...

  5. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems. PMID:21117653

  6. Monoterpenoid agonists of TRPV3

    PubMed Central

    Vogt-Eisele, A K; Weber, K; Sherkheli, M A; Vielhaber, G; Panten, J; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transient receptor potential (TRP) V3 is a thermosensitive ion channel expressed predominantly in the skin and neural tissues. It is activated by warmth and the monoterpene camphor and has been hypothesized to be involved in skin sensitization. A selection of monoterpenoid compounds was tested for TRPV3 activation to establish a structure-function relationship. The related channel TRPM8 is activated by cool temperatures and a number of chemicals, among them the monoterpene (-)-menthol. The overlap of the receptor pharmacology between the two channels was investigated. Experimental approach: Transfected HEK293 cells were superfused with the test substances. Evoked currents were measured in whole cell patch clamp measurements. Dose-response curves for the most potent agonists were obtained in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Key results: Six monoterpenes significantly more potent than camphor were identified: 6-tert-butyl-m-cresol, carvacrol, dihydrocarveol, thymol, carveol and (+)-borneol. Their EC50 is up to 16 times lower than that of camphor. All of these compounds carry a ring-located hydroxyl group and neither activates TRPM8 to a major extent. Conclusions and implications: Terpenoids have long been recognized as medically and pharmacologically active compounds, although their molecular targets have only partially been identified. TRPV3 activation may be responsible for several of the described effects of terpenoids. We show here that TRPV3 is activated by a number of monoterpenes and that a secondary hydroxyl-group is a structural requirement. PMID:17420775

  7. Agonistic aptamer to the insulin receptor leads to biased signaling and functional selectivity through allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Yunn, Na-Oh; Koh, Ara; Han, Seungmin; Lim, Jong Hun; Park, Sehoon; Lee, Jiyoun; Kim, Eui; Jang, Sung Key; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-09-18

    Due to their high affinity and specificity, aptamers have been widely used as effective inhibitors in clinical applications. However, the ability to activate protein function through aptamer-protein interaction has not been well-elucidated. To investigate their potential as target-specific agonists, we used SELEX to generate aptamers to the insulin receptor (IR) and identified an agonistic aptamer named IR-A48 that specifically binds to IR, but not to IGF-1 receptor. Despite its capacity to stimulate IR autophosphorylation, similar to insulin, we found that IR-A48 not only binds to an allosteric site distinct from the insulin binding site, but also preferentially induces Y1150 phosphorylation in the IR kinase domain. Moreover, Y1150-biased phosphorylation induced by IR-A48 selectively activates specific signaling pathways downstream of IR. In contrast to insulin-mediated activation of IR, IR-A48 binding has little effect on the MAPK pathway and proliferation of cancer cells. Instead, AKT S473 phosphorylation is highly stimulated by IR-A48, resulting in increased glucose uptake both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we present IR-A48 as a biased agonist able to selectively induce the metabolic activity of IR through allosteric binding. Furthermore, our study also suggests that aptamers can be a promising tool for developing artificial biased agonists to targeted receptors. PMID:26245346

  8. Agonistic aptamer to the insulin receptor leads to biased signaling and functional selectivity through allosteric modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yunn, Na-Oh; Koh, Ara; Han, Seungmin; Lim, Jong Hun; Park, Sehoon; Lee, Jiyoun; Kim, Eui; Jang, Sung Key; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high affinity and specificity, aptamers have been widely used as effective inhibitors in clinical applications. However, the ability to activate protein function through aptamer-protein interaction has not been well-elucidated. To investigate their potential as target-specific agonists, we used SELEX to generate aptamers to the insulin receptor (IR) and identified an agonistic aptamer named IR-A48 that specifically binds to IR, but not to IGF-1 receptor. Despite its capacity to stimulate IR autophosphorylation, similar to insulin, we found that IR-A48 not only binds to an allosteric site distinct from the insulin binding site, but also preferentially induces Y1150 phosphorylation in the IR kinase domain. Moreover, Y1150-biased phosphorylation induced by IR-A48 selectively activates specific signaling pathways downstream of IR. In contrast to insulin-mediated activation of IR, IR-A48 binding has little effect on the MAPK pathway and proliferation of cancer cells. Instead, AKT S473 phosphorylation is highly stimulated by IR-A48, resulting in increased glucose uptake both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we present IR-A48 as a biased agonist able to selectively induce the metabolic activity of IR through allosteric binding. Furthermore, our study also suggests that aptamers can be a promising tool for developing artificial biased agonists to targeted receptors. PMID:26245346

  9. Preclinical evaluation of SMM-189, a cannabinoid receptor 2-specific inverse agonist

    PubMed Central

    Presley, Chaela; Abidi, Ammaar; Suryawanshi, Satyendra; Mustafa, Suni; Meibohm, Bernd; Moore, Bob M

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 agonists and inverse agonists are emerging as new therapeutic options for a spectrum of autoimmune-related disease. Of particular interest, is the ability of CB2 ligands to regulate microglia function in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injury. We have previously reported the receptor affinity of 3′,5′-dichloro-2,6-dihydroxy-biphenyl-4-yl)-phenyl-methanone (SMM-189) and the characterization of the beneficial effects of SMM-189 in the mouse model of mild traumatic brain injury. Herein, we report the further characterization of SMM-189 as a potent and selective CB2 inverse agonist, which acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of CP 55,940. The ability of SMM-189 to regulate microglial activation, in terms of chemokine expression and cell morphology, has been determined. Finally, we have determined that SMM-189 possesses acceptable biopharmaceutical properties indicating that the triaryl class of CB2 inverse agonists are viable compounds for continued preclinical development for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and traumatic brain injury. PMID:26196013

  10. Opioid agonists binding and responses in SH-SY5Y cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, E. M.; Hoffmann, B. B.; Loew, G. H.

    1992-01-01

    SH-SY5Y (human neuroblastoma) cultured cells, known to have mu-opioid receptors, have been used to assess and compare the ability of eight representative mu-selective compounds from diverse opioid families to recognize and activate these receptors. A wide range of receptor affinities spanning a factor of 10,000 was found between the highest affinity fentanyl analogs (Ki = 0.1nM) and the lowest affinity analog, meperidine (Ki = 1 microM). A similar range was found for inhibition of PGE1-stimulated cAMP accumulation with a rank order of activities that closely paralleled binding affinities. Maximum inhibition of cAMP accumulation by each compound was about 80%. Maximum stimulation of GTPase activity (approximately 50%) was also similar for all compounds except the lowest affinity meperidine. Both effects were naloxone reversible. These results provide further evidence that mu-receptors are coupled to inhibition of adenylate cyclase and that the SH-SY5Y cell line is a good system for assessment of mu-agonists functional responses.

  11. Piperidine derivatives as nonprostanoid IP receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ryoji; Sakagami, Hideki; Koiwa, Masakazu; Ito, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Mitsuko; Isogaya, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of a new class of nonprostanoid prostaglandin I2 receptor (IP receptor) agonists is reported. Among them, the unique piperidine derivative 31b (2-((1-(2-(N-(4-tolyl)benzamido)ethyl)piperidin-4-yl)oxy)acetic acid) was a good IP receptor agonist and was 50-fold more selective for the human IP receptor than for other human prostanoid receptors. This compound showed good pharmacokinetic properties in dog. PMID:26996371

  12. Lectin affinity chromatography of glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.V.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Since glycolipids (GLs) are either insoluble or form mixed micelles in water, lectin affinity chromatography in aqueous systems has not been applied to their separation. They have overcome this problem by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the mobile phase during chromatography. Affinity columns prepared with the GalNAc-specific Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and equilibrated in THF specifically bind the (/sup 3/H)oligosaccharide derived from Forssman GL indicating that the immobilized HPA retained its carbohydrate-binding specificity in this solvent. Intact Forssman GL was bound by the HPA-column equilibrated in THF and was specifically eluted with 0.1 mg/ml GalNAc in THF. Purification of the Forssman GL was achieved when a crude lipid extract of sheep erythrocyte membranes was applied to the HPA-column in THF. Non-specifically bound GLs were eluted from the column using a step gradient of aqueous buffer in THF, while the addition of GalNAc was required to elute the specifically bound GLs. Using this procedure the A-active GLs were purified from a crude lipid extract of type A human erythrocytes in a single chromatographic step. The use of solvents that maintain carbohydrate-binding specificity and lipid solubility will permit the application of affinity chromatography on immobilized carbohydrate-binding proteins to intact GLs.

  13. Three-dimensional common-feature hypotheses for octopamine agonist arylethanolamines.

    PubMed

    Hirashim, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Eiji; Eto, Morifusa

    2002-10-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 12 octopamine (OA) agonist arylethanolamines (AEAs). Among the 10 common-featured models generated by program catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond donor (HBD) and a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid (HBA1) features was considered to be important in evaluating the OA activity. OA mapped well onto all the HBD and HBA1 features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, for some inactive compounds, their lack of affinity is primarily due to their inability to achieve an energetically favorable conformation shared by the active compounds. Taken together, structures of a 4-OH-Ph, alpha-OH, and a primary amine are important for OA activities. The present studies on OA agonists demonstrate that an HBD and an HBA1 sites located on the molecule seem to be essential for OA activity. PMID:12398339

  14. Ligand-based virtual screening identifies a family of selective cannabinoid receptor 2 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Gianella-Borradori, Matteo; Christou, Ivy; Bataille, Carole J.R.; Cross, Rebecca L.; Wynne, Graham M.; Greaves, David R.; Russell, Angela J.

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R) has been linked with the regulation of inflammation, and selective receptor activation has been proposed as a target for the treatment of a range of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and arthritis. In order to identify selective CB2R agonists with appropriate physicochemical and ADME properties for future evaluation in vivo, we first performed a ligand-based virtual screen. Subsequent medicinal chemistry optimisation studies led to the identification of a new class of selective CB2R agonists. Several examples showed high levels of activity (EC50 < 200 nM) and binding affinity (Ki < 200 nM) for the CB2R, and no detectable activity at the CB1R. The most promising example, DIAS2, also showed favourable in vitro metabolic stability and absorption properties along with a clean selectivity profile when evaluated against a panel of GPCRs and kinases. PMID:25487422

  15. Structure-Guided Design of Selective Epac1 and Epac2 Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Schwede, Frank; Bertinetti, Daniela; Langerijs, Carianne N.; Hadders, Michael A.; Wienk, Hans; Ellenbroek, Johanne H.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.; Bos, Johannes L.; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Janssen, Richard A. J.; Rehmann, Holger

    2015-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP is known to augment glucose-induced insulin secretion. However, its downstream targets in pancreatic β-cells have not been unequivocally determined. Therefore, we designed cAMP analogues by a structure-guided approach that act as Epac2-selective agonists both in vitro and in vivo. These analogues activate Epac2 about two orders of magnitude more potently than cAMP. The high potency arises from increased affinity as well as increased maximal activation. Crystallographic studies demonstrate that this is due to unique interactions. At least one of the Epac2-specific agonists, Sp-8-BnT-cAMPS (S-220), enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in human pancreatic cells. Selective targeting of Epac2 is thus proven possible and may be an option in diabetes treatment. PMID:25603503

  16. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Unravels Biased Phosphorylation of Serotonin 2A Receptor at Ser280 by Hallucinogenic versus Nonhallucinogenic Agonists*

    PubMed Central

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J.; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2A receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT2A receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT2A receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT2A agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser280) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT2A receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser280 by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT2A receptors at Ser280 in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser280 to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased phosphorylation of

  17. Quantitative phosphoproteomics unravels biased phosphorylation of serotonin 2A receptor at Ser280 by hallucinogenic versus nonhallucinogenic agonists.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-05-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT(2A) receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT(2A) receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser(280)) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT(2A) receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser(280) by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT(2A) receptors at Ser(280) in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser(280) to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased

  18. Constitutive precoupling to G(i) and increased agonist potency in the alpha(2B)-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Ge, Huifang; Scheinin, Mika; Kallio, Jaana

    2003-07-11

    The human alpha(2B)-adrenoceptor (alpha(2B)-AR) was mutated by substituting the D(3.49) aspartate in position 109 with an alanine (alpha(2B)-D109A) in the conserved DRY sequence at the cytoplasmic face of TM3. We studied the effects of the mutation on agonist binding and on receptor activation in CHO cells, including possible inverse agonism monitored by measuring intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)). The mutated receptor had increased binding affinity for agonists, especially dexmedetomidine (3.8-fold). The increased affinity was abolished by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin. The mutation produced constitutive receptor activity evidenced as increased basal [Ca(2+)](i) and increased potency and efficacy of agonists to elicit Ca(2+) responses. The imidazoline derivative RX821002 functioned as an inverse agonist only through the alpha(2B)-D109A, reducing [Ca(2+)](i). The results thus indicate that this mutation causes constitutive receptor-G(i)-protein precoupling, and that the D(3.49) aspartate residue of the DRY motif is involved in controlling coupled and uncoupled conformations of alpha(2B)-AR. PMID:12821136

  19. Selectivity optimization of substituted 1,2,3-triazoles as α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Arunrungvichian, Kuntarat; Fokin, Valery V; Vajragupta, Opa; Taylor, Palmer

    2015-08-19

    Three series of substituted anti-1,2,3-triazoles (IND, PPRD, and QND), synthesized by cycloaddition from azide and alkyne building blocks, were designed to enhance selectivity and potency profiles of a lead α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) agonist, TTIn-1. Designed compounds were synthesized and screened for affinity by a radioligand binding assay. Their functional characterization as agonists and antagonists was performed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay using cell lines expressing transfected cDNAs, α7-nAChRs, α4β2-nAChRs, and 5HT3A receptors, and a fluorescence cell reporter. In the IND series, a tropane ring of TTIn-1, substituted at N1, was replaced by mono- and bicyclic amines to vary length and conformational flexibility of a carbon linker between nitrogen atom and N1 of the triazole. Compounds with a two-carbon atom linker optimized binding with Kd's at the submicromolar level. Further modification at the hydrophobic indole of TTIn-1 was made in PPRD and QND series by fixing the amine center with the highest affinity building blocks in the IND series. Compounds from IND and PPRD series are selective as agonists for the α7-nAChRs over α4β2-nAChRs and 5HT3A receptors. Lead compounds in the three series have EC50's between 28 and 260 nM. Based on the EC50, affinity, and selectivity determined from the binding and cellular responses, two of the leads have been advanced to behavioral studies described in the companion article (DOI: 10.1021/acschemneuro.5b00059). PMID:25932897

  20. Asimadoline, a κ-Opioid Agonist, and Visceral Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Asimadoline is a potent κ-opioid receptor agonist with a diaryl acetamide structure. It has high affinity for the κ receptor, with IC50 of 5.6 nM (guinea pig) and 1.2 nM (human recombinant), and high selectively with κ: μ: δ binding ratios of 1:501:498 in human recombinant receptors. It acts as a complete agonist in in vitro assay. Asimadoline reduced sensation in response to colonic distension at subnoxious pressures in healthy volunteers and in IBS patients without alteration of colonic compliance. Asimadoline reduced satiation and enhanced the postprandial gastric volume (in female volunteers). However, there were no significant effects on gastrointestinal transit, colonic compliance, fasting or postprandial colonic tone. In a clinical trial in 40 patients with functional dyspepsia (Rome II), asimadoline did not significantly alter satiation or symptoms over 8 weeks. However, asimadoline, 0.5 mg, significantly decreased satiation in patients with higher postprandial fullness scores, and daily postprandial fullness severity (over 8 weeks); the asimadoline 1.0 mg group was borderline significant. In a clinical trial in patients with IBS, average pain 2 hours post-on-demand treatment with asimadoline was not significantly reduced. Post-hoc analyses suggest asimadoline was effective in mixed IBS. In a 12-week study in 596 patients, chronic treatment with asimadoline, 0.5 mg and 1.0 mg, was associated with adequate relief of pain and discomfort, improvement in pain score and number of pain free days in patients with IBS-D. The 1.0 mg dose was also efficacious in IBS-alternating. There were also weeks with significant reduction in bowel frequency and urgency. Asimadoline has been well tolerated in human trials to date. PMID:18715494

  1. Interaction of a radiolabeled agonist with cardiac muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Harden, T.K.; Meeker, R.B.; Martin, M.W.

    1983-12-01

    The interaction of a radiolabeled muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonist, (methyl-/sup 3/H)oxotremorine acetate ((/sup 3/H)OXO), with a washed membrane preparation derived from rat heart, has been studied. In binding assays at 4 degrees C, the rate constants for association and dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO were 2 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 and 5 X 10(-3) min-1, respectively, Saturation binding isotherms indicated that binding was to a single population of sites with a Kd of approximately 300 pM. The density of (/sup 3/H)OXO binding sites (90-100 fmol/mg of protein) was approximately 75% of that determined for the radiolabeled receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate. Both muscarinic receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO with high affinity and Hill slopes of approximately one. Guanine nucleotides completely inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO. This effect was on the maximum binding (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)OXO with no change occurring in the Kd; the order of potency for five nucleotides was guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio-triphosphate) greater than 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate greater than GTP greater than or equal to guanosine/diphosphate greater than GMP. The (/sup 3/H)OXO-induced interaction of muscarinic receptors with a guanine nucleotide binding protein was stable to solubilization. That is, membrane receptors that were prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)OXO could be solubilized with digitonin, and the addition of guanine nucleotides to the soluble, (/sup 3/H)OXO-labeled complex resulted in dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO from the receptor. Pretreatment of membranes with relatively low concentrations of N-ethylmaleimide inhibited (/sup 3/H)OXO binding by 85% with no change in the Kd of (/sup 3/H)OXO, and with no effect on (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding.

  2. Comparative pharmacology of bombesin receptor subtype-3, nonpeptide agonist MK-5046, a universal peptide agonist, and peptide antagonist Bantag-1 for human bombesin receptors.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Paola; Mantey, Samuel A; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Reitman, Marc L; González, Nieves; Coy, David H; Jensen, Robert T

    2013-10-01

    Bombesin-receptor-subtype-3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor of the bombesin (Bn) family whose natural ligand is unknown and which does not bind any natural Bn-peptide with high affinity. It is present in the central nervous system, peripheral tissues, and tumors; however, its role in normal physiology/pathophysiology is largely unknown because of the lack of selective ligands. Recently, MK-5046 [(2S)-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-[4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)phenyl]-3-(4-{[1-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]methyl}-1H-imidazol-2-yl)propan-2-ol] and Bantag-1 [Boc-Phe-His-4-amino-5-cyclohexyl-2,4,5-trideoxypentonyl-Leu-(3-dimethylamino) benzylamide N-methylammonium trifluoroacetate], a nonpeptide agonist and a peptide antagonist, respectively, for BRS-3 have been described, but there have been limited studies on their pharmacology. We studied MK-5046 and Bantag-1 interactions with human Bn-receptors-human bombesin receptor subtype-3 (hBRS-3), gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R), and neuromedin B receptor (NMB-R)-and compared them with the nonselective, peptide-agonist [d-Tyr6,βAla11,Phe13,Nle14]Bn-(6-14) (peptide #1). Receptor activation was detected by activation of phospholipase C (PLC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, and Akt. In hBRS-3 cells, the relative affinities were Bantag-1 (1.3 nM) > peptide #1 (2 nM) > MK-5046 (37-160 nM) > GRP, NMB (>10 μM), and the binding-dose-inhibition curves were broad (>4 logs), with Hill coefficients differing significantly from unity. Curve-fitting demonstrated high-affinity (MK-5046, Ki = 0.08 nM) and low-affinity (MK-5046, Ki = 11-29 nM) binding sites. For PLC activation in hBRS-3 cells, the relative potencies were MK-5046 (0.02 nM) > peptide #1 (6 nM) > GRP, NMB, Bantag-1 (>10 μM), and MK-5046 had a biphasic dose response, whereas peptide #1 was monophasic. Bantag-1 was a specific hBRS-3-antagonist. In hBRS-3 cells, MK-5046 was a full agonist for activation of MAPK, FAK, Akt

  3. Comparative Pharmacology of Bombesin Receptor Subtype-3, Nonpeptide Agonist MK-5046, a Universal Peptide Agonist, and Peptide Antagonist Bantag-1 for Human Bombesin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Paola; Mantey, Samuel A.; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Reitman, Marc L.; González, Nieves; Coy, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Bombesin-receptor-subtype-3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor of the bombesin (Bn) family whose natural ligand is unknown and which does not bind any natural Bn-peptide with high affinity. It is present in the central nervous system, peripheral tissues, and tumors; however, its role in normal physiology/pathophysiology is largely unknown because of the lack of selective ligands. Recently, MK-5046 [(2S)-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-[4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)phenyl]-3-(4-{[1-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]methyl}-1H-imidazol-2-yl)propan-2-ol] and Bantag-1 [Boc-Phe-His-4-amino-5-cyclohexyl-2,4,5-trideoxypentonyl-Leu-(3-dimethylamino) benzylamide N-methylammonium trifluoroacetate], a nonpeptide agonist and a peptide antagonist, respectively, for BRS-3 have been described, but there have been limited studies on their pharmacology. We studied MK-5046 and Bantag-1 interactions with human Bn-receptors—human bombesin receptor subtype-3 (hBRS-3), gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R), and neuromedin B receptor (NMB-R)—and compared them with the nonselective, peptide-agonist [d-Tyr6,βAla11,Phe13,Nle14]Bn-(6–14) (peptide #1). Receptor activation was detected by activation of phospholipase C (PLC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, and Akt. In hBRS-3 cells, the relative affinities were Bantag-1 (1.3 nM) > peptide #1 (2 nM) > MK-5046 (37–160 nM) > GRP, NMB (>10 μM), and the binding-dose-inhibition curves were broad (>4 logs), with Hill coefficients differing significantly from unity. Curve-fitting demonstrated high-affinity (MK-5046, Ki = 0.08 nM) and low-affinity (MK-5046, Ki = 11–29 nM) binding sites. For PLC activation in hBRS-3 cells, the relative potencies were MK-5046 (0.02 nM) > peptide #1 (6 nM) > GRP, NMB, Bantag-1 (>10 μM), and MK-5046 had a biphasic dose response, whereas peptide #1 was monophasic. Bantag-1 was a specific hBRS-3-antagonist. In hBRS-3 cells, MK-5046 was a full agonist for activation of MAPK

  4. Discovery of acylurea isosteres of 2-acylaminothiadiazole in the azaxanthene series of glucocorticoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hua; Yang, Michael; Xiao, Zili; Doweyko, Arthur M; Cunningham, Mark; Wang, Jinhong; Habte, Sium; Holloway, Deborah; Burke, Christine; Shuster, David; Gao, Ling; Carman, Julie; Somerville, John E; Nadler, Steven G; Salter-Cid, Luisa; Barrish, Joel C; Weinstein, David S

    2014-08-01

    Acylureas and acyclic imides are found to be excellent isosteres for 2-acylamino-1,3,4-thiadiazole in the azaxanthene-based series of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonists. The results reported herein show that primary acylureas maintain high affinity and selectivity for GR while providing improved CYP450 inhibition and pharmacokinetic profile over 2-acylamino-1,3,4-thiadiazoles. General methods for synthesis of a variety of acylureas and acyclic imides from a carboxylic acid were utilized and are described. PMID:24980053

  5. Analgesic effectiveness of the narcotic agonist-antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Raymond W.

    1979-01-01

    1 Two fundamentally different types of narcotic-antogonists have been found to be very effective analgesics with relatively low dependence-producing potentials. 2 These two drug classes can be distinguished as being either morphine-like or nalorphine-like on the basis of their subjective and objective effects after single doses and on chronic administration, and by the character of their abstinence syndromes on abrupt withdrawal or on precipitation by other antagonists. 3 To explain differences in side effects associated with their analgesic actions, the existence of three types of receptors has been postulated: a μ receptor which is believed to be associated with euphoria and other typical morphine-like effects and a kappa (χ) and a sigma (σ) receptor which are believed to be associated with the sedative and psychotomimetic effects, respectively, of the nalorphine-like drugs. 4 The antagonist-analgesics of the morphine-type have the characteristics of being agonists of low intrinsic activity but with high affinity for the μ receptor. Representative analgesics of this type are profadol, propiram and buprenorphine. 5 The antagonist-analgesics of the nalorphine-type are drugs which are believed to have varying degrees of affinity and intrinsic activity at all three receptors, but characteristically seem to act merely as competitive antagonists with no intrinsic activity at the μ receptor. Representative analgesics of this type are pentazocine, nalbuphine and butorphanol. 6 There are considerable differences among the individual drugs of each type in terms of their analgesic and narcotic-antagonistic potencies. However, clear differences in analgesic efficacy among any of the antagonist-analgesics remain to be proved. All give evidence of being capable of relieving pain in nondependent patients in situations in which doses of morphine (or its surrogates) usually used would be effective. 7 The major advantages of the partial agonists of the morphine-type over the

  6. Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yip, T T; Hutchens, T W

    1992-01-01

    Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) (1,2) is also referred to as metal chelate chromatography, metal ion interaction chromatography, and ligand-exchange chromatography. We view this affinity separation technique as an intermediate between highly specific, high-affinity bioaffinity separation methods, and wider spectrum, low-specificity adsorption methods, such as ion exchange. The IMAC stationary phases are designed to chelate certain metal ions that have selectivity for specific groups (e.g., His residues) in peptides (e.g., 3-7) and on protein surfaces (8-13). The number of stationary phases that can be synthesized for efficient chelation of metal ions is unlimited, but the critical consideration is that there must be enough exposure of the metal ion to interact with the proteins, preferably in a biospecific manner. Several examples are presented in Fig. 1. The challenge to produce new immobilized chelating groups, including protein surface metal-binding domains (14,15) is being explored continuously. Table 1 presents a list of published procedures for the synthesis and use of stationary phases with immobilized chelating groups. This is by no means exhaustive, and is intended only to give an idea of the scope and versatility of IMAC. Fig. 1 Schematic illustration of several types of immobilized metal-chelating groups, including, iminodiacetate (IDA), tris(carboxymethyl) ethylenediamine (TED), and the metal-binding peptides (GHHPH)(n)G (where n = 1,2,3, and 5) (14,15). Table 1 Immobilized Chelating Groups and Metal Ions Used for Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography Chelating group Suitable metal ions Reference Commercial source Immodiacetate Transitional1,2 Pharmacia LKB Pierce Sigma Boehringer Mannheim TosoHaas 2-Hydroxy-3[N-(2- pyrtdylmethyl) glycme]propyl Transitional3 Not available ?-Alky1 mtrilo triacetic acid Transitional4 Not available Carboxymethylated asparhc acid Ca(II)13 Not available Tris (carboxy- methyl) ethylene Diamme

  7. Interaction of nicotinic receptor affinity reagents with central nervous system. cap alpha. -bungarotoxin-binding entities

    SciTech Connect

    Lukas, R.J.; Bennett, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Membrane-bound ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin-binding entities derived from rat brain are found to interact specifically with the affinity reagents maleimidobenzyltrimethylammonium (MBTA) and bromoacetylcholine (BAC), originally designed to label nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from electroplax and skeletal muscle. Following treatment of membranes with dithiothreitol, all specific toxin binding sites are irreversibly blocked by reaction with MBTA or BAC. Affinity reagent labeling of dithiothreitol-reduced membranes is prevented (toxin binding sites are not blocked) by prior alkylaction with N-ethylmaleimide, by prior oxidation with dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), or by incubation with neurotoxin. Reversibly associating cholinergic agonists and antagonists retard the rate of affinity reagent interaction with toxin receptors. The apparent rates of affinity reagent alkylation of toxin receptors, and the influences of other sulfhydryl/disulfide reagents on affinity labeling are comparable to those observed for reaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the periphery. The results provide further evidence that central nervous system ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin receptors share a remarkable number of biochemical properties with nicotinic receptors from the periphery.

  8. MDA7: a novel selective agonist for CB2 receptors that prevents allodynia in rat neuropathic pain models

    PubMed Central

    Naguib, M; Diaz, P; Xu, J J; Astruc-Diaz, F; Craig, S; Vivas-Mejia, P; Brown, D L

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is growing interest in using cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor agonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain. In this report, we describe the pharmacological characteristics of MDA7 (1-[(3-benzyl-3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1-benzofuran-6-yl)carbonyl]piperidine), a novel CB2 receptor agonist. Experimental approach: We characterized the pharmacological profile of MDA7 by using radioligand-binding assays and in vitro functional assays at human cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and CB2 receptors. In vitro functional assays were performed at rat CB1 and CB2 receptors. The effects of MDA7 in reversing neuropathic pain were assessed in spinal nerve ligation and paclitaxel-induced neuropathy models in rats. Key results: MDA7 exhibited selectivity and agonist affinity at human and rat CB2 receptors. MDA7 treatment attenuated tactile allodynia produced by spinal nerve ligation or by paclitaxel in a dose-related manner. These effects were selectively antagonized by a CB2 receptor antagonist but not by CB1 or opioid receptor antagonists. MDA7 did not affect rat locomotor activity. Conclusion and implications: MDA7, a novel selective CB2 agonist, was effective in suppressing neuropathic nociception in two rat models without affecting locomotor behaviour. These results confirm the potential for CB2 agonists in the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:18846037

  9. Indian craniometric variability and affinities.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with "Caucasoid" populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  10. Indian Craniometric Variability and Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with “Caucasoid” populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  11. Functional effects of the muscarinic receptor agonist, xanomeline, at 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Watson, J; Brough, S; Coldwell, M C; Gager, T; Ho, M; Hunter, A J; Jerman, J; Middlemiss, D N; Riley, G J; Brown, A M

    1998-01-01

    Xanomeline [3(3-hexyloxy-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1-methylpyridine] has been reported to act as a functionally selective muscarinic partial agonist with potential use in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. This study examined the functional activity of xanomeline at 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors in native tissue and/or human cloned receptors.Xanomeline had affinity for muscarinic receptors in rat cortical membranes where the ratio of the displacement affinity of [3H]-Quinuclidinyl benzilate vs that of [3H]-Oxotremorine-M was 16, indicative of partial agonist activity. Radioligand binding studies on human cloned receptors confirmed that xanomeline had substantial affinity for M1, M2, M3, M4, M5 receptors and also for 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptor subtypes.Carbachol and xanomeline stimulated basal [35S]-GTPγS binding in rat cortical membranes with micromolar affinity. The response to carbachol was attenuated by himbacine and pirenzepine with pA2 of 8.2, 6.9 respectively consistent with the response being mediated, predominantly, via M2 and M4 receptors. Xanomeline-induced stimulation of [35S]-GTPγS binding was inhibited by himbacine with an apparent pKb of 6.3, was not attenuated by pirenzepine up to 3 μM and was inhibited by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY100635 with an apparent pKb of 9.4. These data suggest the agonist effect of xanomeline in this tissue is, in part, via 5-HT1A receptors. Similar studies on human cloned receptors confirmed that xanomeline is an agonist at human cloned 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors.In studies using the fluorescent cytoplasmic Ca2+ indicator FLUO-3AM, xanomeline induced an increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration in SH-SY5Y cells expressing recombinant human 5-HT2C receptors. Atropine antagonized this response, consistent with mediation via endogenously-expressed muscarinic receptors. In the presence of atropine, xanomeline antagonized 5-HT-induced cytoplasmic changes in Ca2+ concentration in cells expressing h5

  12. beta2-Agonists at the Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Kenneth D

    2006-01-01

    The different approaches that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) had adopted to beta2-agonists and the implications for athletes are reviewed by a former Olympic team physician who later became a member of the Medical Commission of the IOC (IOC-MC). Steadily increasing knowledge of the effects of inhaled beta2-agonists on health, is concerned with the fact that oral beta2-agonists may be anabolic, and rapid increased use of inhaled beta2-agonists by elite athletes has contributed to the changes to the IOC rules. Since 2001, the necessity for athletes to meet IOC criteria (i.e., that they have asthma and/or exercise-induced asthma [EIA]) has resulted in improved management of athletes. The prevalence of beta2-agonist use by athletes mirrors the known prevalence of asthma symptoms in each country, although athletes in endurance events have the highest prevalence. The age-of-onset of asthma/EIA in elite winter athletes may be atypical. Of the 193 athletes at the 2006 Winter Olympics who met th IOC's criteria, only 32.1% had childhood asthma and 48.7% of athletes reported onset at age 20 yr or older. These findings lead to speculation that years of intense endurance training may be a causative factor in bronchial hyperreactivity. The distinction between oral (prohibited in sports) and inhaled salbutamol is possible, but athletes must be warned that excessive use of inhaled salbutamol can lead to urinary concentrations similar to those observed after oral administration. This article provides justification that athletes should provide evidence of asthma or EIA before being permitted to use inhaled beta2-agonists. PMID:17085798

  13. Irreversible blockade of the high and low affinity ( sup 3 H) naloxone binding sites by C-6 derivatives of morphinane-6-ones

    SciTech Connect

    Krizsan, D. ); Varga, E.; Benyhe, S.; Szucs, M.; Borsodi, A. ); Hosztafi, S. )

    1991-01-01

    C-6 derivatives-hydrazones, phenylhydrazones, dinitrophenylhydrazones, oximes and semicarbazones - of morphinane-6-ones were synthesized and their binding characteristics were studied on rat brain membranes. The dihydromorphinone and oxymorphone derivatives compete for the ({sup 3}H)naloxone binding sites with high affinity, while the dihydrocodeinone and oxycodone derivatives are less potent. The affinity of the new compounds is decreased for the delta sites as compared to the parent ligands. The ligands bearing bulky substituents also bind with low affinity to the kappa sites. The modification decreased the Na{sup +}-index of compounds indicating their mixed agonist-antagonist character. The dihydromorphinone derivatives are all capable to block irreversibly the high affinity binding site of ({sup 3}H)naloxone, whereas the dihydrocodeinone derivatives block irreversibly the low affinity site. A possible mechanism for the inhibition is suggested.

  14. Introduction of a single isomer beta agonist.

    PubMed

    Rau, J L

    2000-08-01

    The release of levalbuterol offers the first approved single-isomer beta agonist for oral inhalation. Data from in vitro studies support the concept that S albuterol is not inactive and may have properties antagonistic to bronchodilation. There is some variability in the results of clinical studies with the separate isomers of albuterol, which suggests the need for further study. The introduction of levalbuterol into general clinical use in managing asthma and chronic obstructive disease should begin to offer additional information on the effects of a single isomer beta agonist in comparison to previous racemic mixtures. PMID:10963321

  15. Mapping of the acetylcholine binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: ( sup 3 H)nicotine as an agonist photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, R.E.; Cohen, J.B. )

    1991-07-16

    The agonist ({sup 3}H)nicotine was used as a photoaffinity label for the acetylcholine binding sties on the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). ({sup 3}H)Nicotine binds at equilibrium with K{sub eq} = 0.6 {mu}M to the agonist binding sites. Irradiation with 254-nm light of AChR-rich membranes equilibrated with ({sup 3}H)nicotine resulted in covalent incorporation into the {alpha}- and {gamma}-subunits, which was inhibited by agonists and competitive antagonists but not by noncompetitive antagonists. Inhibition of labeling by d-tubocurarine demonstrated that the {alpha}-subunit was labeled via both agonist sites but the {gamma}-subunit was labeled only via the site that binds d-tubocurarine with high affinity. Chymotryptic digestion of the {alpha}-subunit confirmed that Try-198 was the principal amino acid labeled by ({sup 3}H)nicotine. This confirmation required a novel radiosequencing strategy employing o-phthalaldehyde ({sup 3}H)Nicotine, which is the first photoaffinity agonist used, labels primarily Tyr-198 in contrast to competitive antagonist affinity labels, which label primarily Tyr-190 and Cys-192/Cys-193.

  16. Affine hypersurfaces with parallel difference tensor relative to affine α-connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cece

    2014-12-01

    Li and Zhang (2014) studied affine hypersurfaces of R n + 1 with parallel difference tensor relative to the affine α-connection ∇ (α), and characterized the generalized Cayley hypersurfaces by K n - 1 ≠ 0 and ∇ (α) K = 0 for some nonzero constant α, where the affine α-connection ∇ (α) of information geometry was introduced on affine hypersurface. In this paper, by a slightly different method we continue to study affine hypersurfaces with ∇ (α) K = 0, if α = 0 we further assume that the Pick invariant vanishes and affine metric is of constant sectional curvature. It is proved that they are either hyperquadrics or improper affine hypersphere with flat indefinite affine metric, the latter can be locally given as a graph of a polynomial of at most degree n + 1 with constant Hessian determinant. In particular, if the affine metric is definite, Lorentzian, or its negative index is 2, we complete the classification of such hypersurfaces.

  17. Extrinsic factors regulate partial agonist efficacy of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Farroni, Jeffrey S; McCool, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    Background Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in many adult forebrain regions consist of alpha2 + beta heteromeric channels. This subunit composition is distinct from the alpha1 + beta channels found throughout the adult spinal cord. Unfortunately, the pharmacology of forebrain alpha2beta receptors are poorly defined compared to 'neonatal' alpha2 homomeric channels or 'spinal' alpha1beta heteromers. In addition, the pharmacologic properties of native alpha2beta glycine receptors have been generally distinct from receptors produced by heterologous expression. To identify subtype-specific pharmacologic tools for the forebrain alpha2beta receptors, it is important to identify a heterologous expression system that closely resembles these native glycine-gated chloride channels. Results While exploring pharmacological properties of alpha2beta glycine receptors compared to alpha2-homomers, we found that distinct heterologous expression systems appeared to differentially influence partial agonist pharmacology. The β-amino acid taurine possessed 30–50% efficacy for alpha2-containing receptor isoforms when expressed in HEK 293 cells. However, taurine efficacy was dramatically reduced in L-cell fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained for β-alanine. The efficacy of these partial agonists was also strongly reduced by the beta subunit. There were no significant differences in apparent strychnine affinity values calculated from concentration-response data between expression systems or subunit combinations. Nor did relative levels of expression correlate with partial agonist efficacy when compared within or between several different expression systems. Finally, disruption of the tubulin cytoskeleton reduced the efficacy of partial agonists in a subunit-dependent, but system-independent, fashion. Conclusions Our results suggest that different heterologous expression systems can dramatically influence the agonist pharmacology of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. In

  18. Comparative Molecular Field Analysis of fenoterol derivatives interacting with an agonist-stabilized form of the β2-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Plazinska, Anita; Pajak, Karolina; Rutkowska, Ewelina; Jimenez, Lucita; Kozocas, Joseph; Koolpe, Gary; Tanga, Mary; Toll, Lawrence; Wainer, Irving W.; Jozwiak, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) agonist [3H]-(R,R′)-methoxyfenoterol was employed as the marker ligand in displacement studies measuring the binding affinities (Ki values) of the stereoisomers of a series of 4′-methoxyfenoterol analogs in which the length of the alkyl substituent at α′ position was varied from 0 to 3 carbon atoms. The binding affinities of the compounds were additionally determined using the inverse agonist [3H]-CGP-12177 as the marker ligand and the ability of the compounds to stimulate cAMP accumulation, measured as EC50 values, were determined in HEK293 cells expressing the β2-AR. The data indicate that the highest binding affinities and functional activities were produced by methyl and ethyl substituents at the α′ position. The results also indicate that the Ki values obtained using [3H]-(R,R′)-methoxyfenoterol as the marker ligand modeled the EC50 values obtained from cAMP stimulation better than the data obtained using [3H]-CGP-12177 as the marker ligand. The data from this study was combined with data from previous studies and processed using the Comparative Molecular Field Analysis approach to produce a CoMFA model reflecting the binding to the β2-AR conformation probed by [3H]-(R,R′)-4′-methoxyfenoterol. The CoMFA model of the agonist-stabilized β2-AR suggests that the binding of the fenoterol analogs to an agonist-stabilized conformation of the β2-AR is governed to a greater extend by steric effects than binding to the [3H]-CGP-12177-stabilized conformation(s) in which electrostatic interactions play a more predominate role. PMID:24326276

  19. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  20. 5-Hydroxytryptamine(1F) receptors do not participate in vasoconstriction: lack of vasoconstriction to LY344864, a selective serotonin(1F) receptor agonist in rabbit saphenous vein.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M L; Schenck, K

    1999-09-01

    Recently, several novel approaches to the treatment of migraine have been advanced, including selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (or serotonin) 1B/1D (5-HT(1B/1D)) receptor agonists such as sumatriptan and 5-HT(1F) receptor agonists such as LY344864. Many 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists have been identified based on their ability to produce cerebral vascular contraction, whereas LY344864 was identified as an inhibitor of trigeminal nerve-mediated dural extravasation. In our study, several triptan derivatives were compared with LY344864 for their ability to contract the rabbit saphenous vein, a tissue used in the preclinical identification of sumatriptan-related agonists. Sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, and naratriptan all contracted the rabbit saphenous vein from baseline tone, whereas LY344864 in concentrations up to 10(-4) M did not contract the rabbit saphenous vein. Furthermore, vascular contractions to sumatriptan were markedly augmented in the presence of prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)). However, even in the presence of PGF(2alpha) (3 x 10(-7) M), LY344864 did not contract the rabbit saphenous vein in concentrations well in excess of its 5-HT(1F) receptor affinity (pK(i) = 8.2). Only when concentrations exceeded those likely to activate 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptors (>10(-5) M) did modest contractile responses occur in the presence of PGF(2alpha). Use of these serotonergic agonists revealed a significant correlation between the contractile potency in the rabbit saphenous vein and the affinities of these agonists at 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptors, although contractile agonist potencies were not quantitatively similar to 5-HT(1B) or 5-HT(1D) receptor affinities. In contrast, no significant correlation existed between the contractile potencies of these serotonergic agonists in the rabbit saphenous vein and their affinity at 5-HT(1F) receptors. These data support the contention that activation of 5-HT(1F) receptors will not result in vascular

  1. Berberine is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huarong; Li, Changqing; Yang, Junqing; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    Although berberine has hypolipidemic effects with a high affinity to nuclear proteins, the underlying molecular mechanism for this effect remains unclear. Here, we determine whether berberine is an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), with a lipid-lowering effect. The cell-based reporter gene analysis showed that berberine selectively activates PPARalpha (EC50 =0.58 mM, Emax =102.4). The radioligand binding assay shows that berberine binds directly to the ligand-binding domain of PPARalpha (Ki=0.73 mM) with similar affinity to fenofibrate. The mRNA and protein levels of CPT-Ialpha gene from HepG2 cells and hyperlipidemic rat liver are remarkably up-regulated by berberine, and this effect can be blocked by MK886, a non-competitive antagonist of PPARalpha. A comparison assay in which berberine and fenofibrate were used to treat hyperlipidaemic rats for three months shows that these drugs produce similar lipid-lowering effects, except that berberine increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol more effectively than fenofibrate. These findings provide the first evidence that berberine is a potent agonist of PPARalpha and seems to be superior to fenofibrate for treating hyperlipidemia. PMID:27100490

  2. Engineering of a Novel Simplified Human Insulin-Like Peptide 5 Agonist.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nitin A; Hughes, Richard A; Rosengren, K Johan; Kocan, Martina; Ang, Sheng Yu; Tailhades, Julien; Separovic, Frances; Summers, Roger J; Grosse, Johannes; Wade, John D; Bathgate, Ross A D; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter

    2016-03-10

    Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) has recently been discovered as only the second orexigenic gut hormone after ghrelin. As we have previously reported, INSL5 is extremely difficult to assemble and oxidize into its two-chain three-disulfide structure. The focus of this study was to generate structure-activity relationships (SARs) of INSL5 and use it to develop a potent and simpler INSL5 mimetic with RXFP4 agonist activity. A series of human and mouse INSL5 (hINSL5/mINSL5) analogues were designed and chemically synthesized, resulting in a chimeric INSL5 analogue exhibiting more than 10-fold higher potency (0.35 nM) at human RXFP4 compared with native hINSL5 (4.57 nM). The SAR study also identified a key residue (K(A15)) in the A-chain of mINSL5 that contributes to improved RXFP4 affinity and potency of mINSL5 compared with hINSL5. This knowledge ultimately led us to engineer a minimized hINSL5 mimetic agonist that retains native hINSL5-like RXFP4 affinity and potency at human RXFP4. This minimized analogue was synthesized in 17.5-fold higher yield and in less time compared with hINSL5. PMID:26824523

  3. Reciprocity of agonistic support in ravens

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Orlaith N.; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cooperative behaviour through reciprocation or interchange of valuable services in primates has received considerable attention, especially regarding the timeframe of reciprocation and its ensuing cognitive implications. Much less, however, is known about reciprocity in other animals, particularly birds. We investigated patterns of agonistic support (defined as a third party intervening in an ongoing conflict to attack one of the conflict participants, thus supporting the other) in a group of 13 captive ravens, Corvus corax. We found support for long-term, but not short-term, reciprocation of agonistic support. Ravens were more likely to support individuals who preened them, kin and dominant group members. These results suggest that ravens do not reciprocate on a calculated tit-for-tat basis, but aid individuals from whom reciprocated support would be most useful and those with whom they share a good relationship. Additionally, dyadic levels of agonistic support and consolation (postconflict affiliation from a bystander to the victim) correlated strongly with each other, but we found no evidence to suggest that receiving agonistic support influences the victim’s likelihood of receiving support (consolation) after the conflict ends. Our findings are consistent with an emotionally mediated form of reciprocity in ravens and provide additional support for convergent cognitive evolution in birds and mammals. PMID:22298910

  4. Multiple tyrosine metabolites are GPR35 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Hu, Haibei; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Both kynurenic acid and 2-acyl lysophosphatidic acid have been postulated to be the endogenous agonists of GPR35. However, controversy remains whether alternative endogenous agonists exist. The molecular targets accounted for many nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones are mostly unknown. Here we report the agonist activity of multiple tyrosine metabolites at the GPR35. Tyrosine metabolism intermediates that contain carboxylic acid and/or catechol functional groups were first selected. Whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays enabled by label-free optical biosensor were then used to characterize their agonist activity in native HT-29. Molecular assays including β-arrestin translocation, ERK phosphorylation and receptor internalization confirmed that GPR35 functions as a receptor for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, gentisate, rosmarinate, and 3-nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that multiple tyrosine metabolites are alternative endogenous ligands of GPR35, and GPR35 may represent a druggable target for treating certain diseases associated with abnormality of tyrosine metabolism. PMID:22523636

  5. Small molecule TSHR agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Gershengorn, M C

    2011-04-01

    TSH activates the TSH receptor (TSHR) thereby stimulating the function of thyroid follicular cells (thyrocytes) leading to biosynthesis and secretion of thyroid hormones. Because TSHR is involved in several thyroid pathologies, there is a strong rationale for the design of small molecule "drug-like" ligands. Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH, Thyrogen(®)) has been used in the follow-up of patients with thyroid cancer to increase the sensitivity for detection of recurrence or metastasis. rhTSH is difficult to produce and must be administered by injection. A small molecule TSHR agonist could produce the same beneficial effects as rhTSH but with greater ease of oral administration. We developed a small molecule ligand that is a full agonist at TSHR. Importantly for its clinical potential, this agonist elevated serum thyroxine and stimulated thyroidal radioiodide uptake in mice after its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract following oral administration. Graves' disease (GD) is caused by persistent, unregulated stimulation of thyrocytes by thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSAbs) that activate TSHR. We identified the first small molecule TSHR antagonists that inhibited TSH- and TSAb-stimulated signalling in primary cultures of human thyrocytes. Our results provide proof-of-principle for effectiveness of small molecule agonists and antagonists for TSHR. We suggest that these small molecule ligands are lead compounds for the development of higher potency ligands that can be used as probes of TSHR biology with therapeutic potential. PMID:21511239

  6. Reciprocity of agonistic support in ravens.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Orlaith N; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cooperative behaviour through reciprocation or interchange of valuable services in primates has received considerable attention, especially regarding the timeframe of reciprocation and its ensuing cognitive implications. Much less, however, is known about reciprocity in other animals, particularly birds. We investigated patterns of agonistic support (defined as a third party intervening in an ongoing conflict to attack one of the conflict participants, thus supporting the other) in a group of 13 captive ravens, Corvus corax. We found support for long-term, but not short-term, reciprocation of agonistic support. Ravens were more likely to support individuals who preened them, kin and dominant group members. These results suggest that ravens do not reciprocate on a calculated tit-for-tat basis, but aid individuals from whom reciprocated support would be most useful and those with whom they share a good relationship. Additionally, dyadic levels of agonistic support and consolation (postconflict affiliation from a bystander to the victim) correlated strongly with each other, but we found no evidence to suggest that receiving agonistic support influences the victim's likelihood of receiving support (consolation) after the conflict ends. Our findings are consistent with an emotionally mediated form of reciprocity in ravens and provide additional support for convergent cognitive evolution in birds and mammals. PMID:22298910

  7. Protein Complex Purification by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture has become a powerful technique for consistently purifying endogenous protein complexes, facilitating biochemical and biophysical assays on otherwise inaccessible biological assemblies, and enabling broader interactomic exploration. For this procedure, cells are broken and their contents separated and extracted into a solvent, permitting access to target macromolecular complexes thus released in solution. The complexes are specifically enriched from the extract onto a solid medium coupled with an affinity reagent-usually an antibody-that recognizes the target either directly or through an appended affinity tag, allowing subsequent characterization of the complex. Here, we discuss approaches and considerations for purifying endogenous yeast protein complexes by affinity capture. PMID:27371601

  8. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  9. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  10. Compact noncontraction semigroups of affine operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voynov, A. S.; Protasov, V. Yu

    2015-07-01

    We analyze compact multiplicative semigroups of affine operators acting in a finite-dimensional space. The main result states that every such semigroup is either contracting, that is, contains elements of arbitrarily small operator norm, or all its operators share a common invariant affine subspace on which this semigroup is contracting. The proof uses functional difference equations with contraction of the argument. We look at applications to self-affine partitions of convex sets, the investigation of finite affine semigroups and the proof of a criterion of primitivity for nonnegative matrix families. Bibliography: 32 titles.

  11. Orally Active Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonists with Antinociceptive Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Rittiner, Joseph E.; Randhawa, Amarjit S.; Coleman, Jennifer; Fitzpatrick, Brendan J.; Setola, Vincent; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.; Jin, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists have antinociceptive effects in multiple preclinical models of acute and chronic pain. Although numerous A1AR agonists have been developed, clinical applications of these agents have been hampered by their cardiovascular side effects. Herein we report a series of novel A1AR agonists, some of which are structurally related to adenosine 5′-monophosphate (5′-AMP), a naturally occurring nucleotide that itself activates A1AR. These novel compounds potently activate A1AR in several orthogonal in vitro assays and are subtype selective for A1AR over A2AAR, A2BAR, and A3AR. Among them, UNC32A (3a) is orally active and has dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in wild-type mice. The antinociceptive effects of 3a were completely abolished in A1AR knockout mice, revealing a strict dependence on A1AR for activity. The apparent lack of cardiovascular side effects when administered orally and high affinity (Ki of 36 nM for the human A1AR) make this compound potentially suitable as a therapeutic. PMID:22738238

  12. Novel S1P(1) receptor agonists--part 3: from thiophenes to pyridines.

    PubMed

    Bolli, Martin H; Abele, Stefan; Birker, Magdalena; Bravo, Roberto; Bur, Daniel; de Kanter, Ruben; Kohl, Christopher; Grimont, Julien; Hess, Patrick; Lescop, Cyrille; Mathys, Boris; Müller, Claus; Nayler, Oliver; Rey, Markus; Scherz, Michael; Schmidt, Gunther; Seifert, Jürgen; Steiner, Beat; Velker, Jörg; Weller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In preceding communications we summarized our medicinal chemistry efforts leading to the identification of potent, selective, and orally active S1P1 agonists such as the thiophene derivative 1. As a continuation of these efforts, we replaced the thiophene in 1 by a 2-, 3-, or 4-pyridine and obtained less lipophilic, potent, and selective S1P1 agonists (e.g., 2) efficiently reducing blood lymphocyte count in the rat. Structural features influencing the compounds' receptor affinity profile and pharmacokinetics are discussed. In addition, the ability to penetrate brain tissue has been studied for several compounds. As a typical example for these pyridine based S1P1 agonists, compound 53 showed EC50 values of 0.6 and 352 nM for the S1P1 and S1P3 receptor, respectively, displayed favorable PK properties, and penetrated well into brain tissue. In the rat, compound 53 maximally reduced the blood lymphocyte count for at least 24 h after oral dosing of 3 mg/kg. PMID:24367923

  13. Discovery of a novel small molecule agonist scaffold for the APJ receptor.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sanju; Maitra, Rangan; Deschamps, Jeffery R; Bortoff, Katherine; Thomas, James B; Zhang, Yanyan; Warner, Keith; Vasukuttan, Vineetha; Decker, Ann; Runyon, Scott P

    2016-08-15

    The apelinergic system includes a series of endogenous peptides apelin, ELABELA/TODDLER and their 7-transmembrane G-protein coupled apelin receptor (APJ, AGTRL-1, APLNR). The APJ receptor is an attractive therapeutic target because of its involvement in cardiovascular diseases and potentially other disorders including liver fibrosis, obesity, diabetes, and neuroprotection. To date, pharmacological characterization of the APJ receptor has been limited due to the lack of small molecule functional agonists or antagonists. Through focused screening we identified a drug-like small molecule agonist hit 1 with a functional EC50 value of 21.5±5μM and binding affinity (Ki) of 5.2±0.5μM. Initial structure-activity studies afforded compound 22 having a 27-fold enhancement in potency and the first sub-micromolar full agonist with an EC50 value of 800±0.1nM and Ki of 1.3±0.3μM. Preliminary SAR, synthetic methodology, and in vitro pharmacological characterization indicate this scaffold will serve as a favorable starting point for further refinement of APJ potency and selectivity. PMID:27369451

  14. Purification to homogeneity of an active opioid receptor from rat brain by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Loukas, S; Mercouris, M; Panetsos, F; Zioudrou, C

    1994-05-10

    Active opioid binding proteins were solubilized from rat brain membranes in high yield with sodium deoxycholate in the presence of NaCl. Purification of opioid binding proteins was accomplished by opioid antagonist affinity chromatography. Chromatography using the delta-opioid antagonist N,N-diallyl-Tyr-D-Leu-Gly-Tyr-Leu attached to omega-aminododecyl-agarose (Affi-G) (procedure A) yielded a partially purified protein that binds selectively the delta-opioid agonist [3H]Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr ([3H]DSLET), with a Kd of 19 +/- 3 nM and a Bmax of 5.1 +/- 0.4 nmol/mg of protein. Subsequently, Lens culinaris agglutinin-Sepharose 4B chromatography of the Affi-G eluate resulted in isolation of an electrophoretically homogeneous protein of 58 kDa that binds selectively [3H]DSLET with a Kd of 21 +/- 3 nM and a Bmax of 16.5 +/- 1.0 nmol/mg of protein. Chromatography using the nonselective antagonist 6-aminonaloxone coupled to 6-aminohexanoic acid-Sepharose 4B (Affi-NAL) (procedure B) resulted in isolation of a protein that binds selectively [3H]DSLET with a Kd of 32 +/- 2 nM and a Bmax of 12.4 +/- 0.5 nmol/mg of protein, and NaDodSO4/PAGE revealed a major band of apparent molecular mass 58 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies (Anti-R IgG) raised against the Affi-NAL protein inhibit the specific [3H]DSLET binding to the Affi-NAL eluate and to the solubilized membranes. Moreover, the Anti-R IgG inhibits the specific binding of radiolabeled Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-methyl-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO; mu-agonist), DSLET (delta-agonist), and naloxone to homogenates of rat brain membranes with equal potency. Furthermore, immunoaffinity chromatography of solubilized membranes resulted in the retention of a major protein of apparent molecular mass 58 kDa. In addition, immunoblotting of solubilized membranes and purified proteins from the Affi-G and Affi-NAL matrices revealed that the Anti-R IgG interacts with a protein of 58 kDa. PMID:8183950

  15. Affinity of isoxsuprine for adrenoreceptors in equine digital artery and implications for vasodilatory action.

    PubMed

    Belloli, C; Carcano, R; Arioli, F; Beretta, C

    2000-03-01

    We used isolated equine digital arteries to study the vasodilatory mechanism of isoxsuprine, and fowl caecum preparations to investigate the affinity of the drug for beta-adrenoceptors. Isoxsuprine is a potent vasodilator of arterial smooth muscle that has been precontracted by an alpha-adrenoceptor agonist such as noradrenaline (log EC50 = -6.33 [-5.98; -6.68]). The present study indicates that its effect is due to alpha-adrenoceptor blockade since: (1) after a long lasting exposure to cumulative doses of isoxsuprine the vasoconstricting action of noradrenaline cannot be restored; (2) isoxsuprine does not promote relaxation on preparations precontracted by PGF2alpha; (3) isoxsuprine shifts the dose-response curve of noradrenaline to the right; and (4) its affinity (pK(B) = 6.90 [6.60; 7.20]) in this experiment is comparable to that in noradrenaline-precontracted preparations and is 14 times lower than that of the selective alpha1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin [pK(B) = 8.04 (7.40; 8.68]). The affinity of isoxsuprine for beta-adrenoceptors was 100 times lower than that of isoprenaline when tested on fowl caecum. This preparation has a large beta-adrenoceptor and negligible alpha-adrenoceptor population concerned with the control of smooth muscle motility. Our data suggest that the alpha-mediated effect of isoxsuprine on horse arterial smooth muscle is due to higher affinity of the drug for alpha- than beta-adrenoceptors rather than low concentration or functionality of beta-sites at this site. According to these data, pure beta2-agonists seem to be more profitable tools to determine vasodilation of the arterial bed in horses legs. PMID:10743967

  16. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  17. Effects of temperature and ethanol on agonist and antagonist binding to rat heart muscarinic receptors in the absence and presence of GTP.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M; Robberecht, P; Chatelain, P; De Neef, P; Christophe, J

    1985-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the binding of four agonists and three antagonists to rat heart muscarinic receptors was studied in the absence and presence of GTP. The binding of agonists to two states (or classes) of receptors, in the absence of GTP, led to enthalpy and entropy changes that decreased sharply above 25 degrees C, suggesting that agonists induced 'isomerization' reactions (large conformational changes and/or receptor-effector association). Both temperature increase and ethanol decreased hydrophobic interactions, thereby hindering binding and/or agonist-induced 'isomerization' reactions. Addition of GTP to the incubation medium also appeared to reverse (or prevent) 'isomerization' reactions. For agonist binding to the low-affinity state, in the presence of GTP, and for antagonist binding, the thermodynamic parameters observed could be readily explained by simple receptor-ligand associations; large entropy increases and small enthalpy increases, provoked by hydrophobic and ionic interactions, were partly neutralized by entropy and enthalpy decreases, due to hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The muscarinic antagonists used (atropine, n-methylscopolamine and dexetimide), being more hydrophobic molecules than the agonists tested (carbamylcholine, oxotremorine and pilocarpine), induced larger entropy changes or more negative enthalpy changes. PMID:4062907

  18. Effects of temperature and ethanol on agonist and antagonist binding to rat heart muscarinic receptors in the absence and presence of GTP.

    PubMed

    Waelbroeck, M; Robberecht, P; Chatelain, P; De Neef, P; Christophe, J

    1985-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the binding of four agonists and three antagonists to rat heart muscarinic receptors was studied in the absence and presence of GTP. The binding of agonists to two states (or classes) of receptors, in the absence of GTP, led to enthalpy and entropy changes that decreased sharply above 25 degrees C, suggesting that agonists induced 'isomerization' reactions (large conformational changes and/or receptor-effector association). Both temperature increase and ethanol decreased hydrophobic interactions, thereby hindering binding and/or agonist-induced 'isomerization' reactions. Addition of GTP to the incubation medium also appeared to reverse (or prevent) 'isomerization' reactions. For agonist binding to the low-affinity state, in the presence of GTP, and for antagonist binding, the thermodynamic parameters observed could be readily explained by simple receptor-ligand associations; large entropy increases and small enthalpy increases, provoked by hydrophobic and ionic interactions, were partly neutralized by entropy and enthalpy decreases, due to hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The muscarinic antagonists used (atropine, n-methylscopolamine and dexetimide), being more hydrophobic molecules than the agonists tested (carbamylcholine, oxotremorine and pilocarpine), induced larger entropy changes or more negative enthalpy changes. PMID:4062907

  19. Treatment of cocaine craving with as-needed nalmefene, a partial κ opioid receptor agonist: first clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Grosshans, Martin; Mutschler, Jochen; Kiefer, Falk

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of cocaine dependence is difficult as no approved pharmacotherapy is available as yet. However, in preclinical and clinical trials, a variety of compounds were tested for suitability as inhibitors of craving for and relapse into the use of cocaine, among these antidepressants, antiepileptics, dopamine agonists, disulfiram, and naltrexone. Nalmefene, a structural derivative of naltrexone, shares with its parent compound approval (granted by the European Medical Agency in 2013) as a medication for the treatment of alcohol addiction in the European Union. It differs from naltrexone by a higher affinity for the δ opioid-receptors and a partial agonistic affinity to the κ opioid-receptors. It should be noted that patients addicted to cocaine show a considerable increase in κ receptors in the nucleus accumbens. This report describes the case of an abstinent cocaine-addicted patient regularly afflicted with cravings for cocaine. The patient took as-needed nalmefene for 5 months whenever she developed a craving for cocaine. For most of these interventions, the patient reported an abatement of craving and could avoid relapsing into cocaine consumption. This effect may be accounted for by nalmefene acting, other than naltrexone, as a partial agonist of the κ opioid-receptors. Therefore, nalmefene might be a promising new option in the pharmacological repertoire for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:25647453

  20. Scaling analysis of affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Furtlehner, Cyril; Sebag, Michèle; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-06-01

    We analyze and exploit some scaling properties of the affinity propagation (AP) clustering algorithm proposed by Frey and Dueck [Science 315, 972 (2007)]. Following a divide and conquer strategy we setup an exact renormalization-based approach to address the question of clustering consistency, in particular, how many cluster are present in a given data set. We first observe that the divide and conquer strategy, used on a large data set hierarchically reduces the complexity O(N2) to O(N((h+2)/(h+1))) , for a data set of size N and a depth h of the hierarchical strategy. For a data set embedded in a d -dimensional space, we show that this is obtained without notably damaging the precision except in dimension d=2 . In fact, for d larger than 2 the relative loss in precision scales such as N((2-d)/(h+1)d). Finally, under some conditions we observe that there is a value s* of the penalty coefficient, a free parameter used to fix the number of clusters, which separates a fragmentation phase (for ss*) of the underlying hidden cluster structure. At this precise point holds a self-similarity property which can be exploited by the hierarchical strategy to actually locate its position, as a result of an exact decimation procedure. From this observation, a strategy based on AP can be defined to find out how many clusters are present in a given data set. PMID:20866473

  1. The affinity and activity of compounds related to nicotine on the rectus abdominis muscle of the frog (Rana pipiens)

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, R. B.; Thompson, G. M.

    1969-01-01

    1. Series of pyridylalkyl- and substituted phenylalkyl-trimethylammonium salts, triethylammonium salts, diethylamines and di-n-propylamines have been made. The substituents in the benzene ring were nitro, chloro, bromo, methoxy, hydroxy and amino groups and the alkyl residues had one, two, or three methylene groups separating the aromatic nucleus from the cationic head. 2. Most of the trimethylammonium compounds caused a contracture of the frog rectus muscle, but some were partial agonists and a few were antagonists. The di-n-propylamines were all antagonists, as were most of the diethylamines and triethylammonium compounds, though some of these were partial agonists and a few triethylammonium compounds were agonists. The affinities of the antagonists and partial agonists for the receptors stimulated by β-pyridylmethyltrimethylammonium (and by nicotine) were measured. The equipotent molar ratios of all the agonists were measured relative to β-pyridylmethyltrimethylammonium. 3. The dissociation constants of the pyridylmethyldiethylamines and substituted benzyldiethylamines were measured. The effects of substituents on the pKa of benzyldiethylamine were similar to their effects on the pKa of aniline, though there were differences with some of the o-substituted compounds, which could be attributed to internal hydrogen-bond formation. 4. There is no obvious correlation between the effects of a substituent on the pKa of benzyldiethylamine and its effects on affinity. Although increasing the size of the cationic group usually increased affinity, it did not always do so. The compounds with the highest affinity, p-hydroxybenzyldiethylamine (log K, 5·90) had about half the affinity of (+)-tubocurarine (log K, 6·11), but the triethylammonium analogue (log K, 4·17) had only about one-fiftieth of the affinity of the tertiary base. The binding of the drug to the receptor appears to involve many factors which include the size of the groups as well as their electron

  2. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of aptamers. In particular, sequence optimization using combined in silico sequence recombinations and in vitro functional evaluations is effective for the improvement of binding affinities, however, the binding affinities of aptamers are limited by the low hydrophobicity of nucleic acids. Accordingly, introduction of hydrophobic moieties into aptamers expands the diversity of interactions between aptamers and targets. Moreover, construction of multivalent aptamers by connecting aptamers that recognize distinct epitopes is an attractive approach to substantial increases in binding affinity. In addition, binding affinities can be tuned by optimizing the scaffolds of multivalent constructs. In this review, we summarize the various techniques for improving the binding affinities of aptamers. PMID:27043498

  3. Affine root systems and dual numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyakov, I. V.; Gromov, N. A.; Kuratov, V. V.

    The root systems in Carroll spaces with degenerate metric are defined. It is shown that their Cartan matrices and reflection groups are affine. Due to the geometric consideration the root system structure of affine algebras is determined by a sufficiently simple algorithm.

  4. Loop realizations of quantum affine algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Cautis, Sabin; Licata, Anthony

    2012-12-15

    We give a simplified description of quantum affine algebras in their loop presentation. This description is related to Drinfeld's new realization via halves of vertex operators. We also define an idempotent version of the quantum affine algebra which is suitable for categorification.

  5. Structural correlates of affinity in fetal versus adult endplate nicotinic receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Zheng, Wenjun; Auerbach, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Adult-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) mediate signalling at mature neuromuscular junctions and fetal-type AChRs are necessary for proper synapse development. Each AChR has two neurotransmitter binding sites located at the interface of a principal and a complementary subunit. Although all agonist binding sites have the same core of five aromatic amino acids, the fetal site has ~30-fold higher affinity for the neurotransmitter ACh. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations of adult versus fetal homology models to identify complementary-subunit residues near the core that influence affinity, and use single-channel electrophysiology to corroborate the results. Four residues in combination determine adult versus fetal affinity. Simulations suggest that at lower-affinity sites, one of these unsettles the core directly and the others (in loop E) increase backbone flexibility to unlock a key, complementary tryptophan from the core. Swapping only four amino acids is necessary and sufficient to exchange function between adult and fetal AChRs.

  6. Structural correlates of affinity in fetal versus adult endplate nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Zheng, Wenjun; Auerbach, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Adult-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) mediate signalling at mature neuromuscular junctions and fetal-type AChRs are necessary for proper synapse development. Each AChR has two neurotransmitter binding sites located at the interface of a principal and a complementary subunit. Although all agonist binding sites have the same core of five aromatic amino acids, the fetal site has ∼30-fold higher affinity for the neurotransmitter ACh. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations of adult versus fetal homology models to identify complementary-subunit residues near the core that influence affinity, and use single-channel electrophysiology to corroborate the results. Four residues in combination determine adult versus fetal affinity. Simulations suggest that at lower-affinity sites, one of these unsettles the core directly and the others (in loop E) increase backbone flexibility to unlock a key, complementary tryptophan from the core. Swapping only four amino acids is necessary and sufficient to exchange function between adult and fetal AChRs. PMID:27101778

  7. Structural correlates of affinity in fetal versus adult endplate nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Zheng, Wenjun; Auerbach, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Adult-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) mediate signalling at mature neuromuscular junctions and fetal-type AChRs are necessary for proper synapse development. Each AChR has two neurotransmitter binding sites located at the interface of a principal and a complementary subunit. Although all agonist binding sites have the same core of five aromatic amino acids, the fetal site has ∼30-fold higher affinity for the neurotransmitter ACh. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations of adult versus fetal homology models to identify complementary-subunit residues near the core that influence affinity, and use single-channel electrophysiology to corroborate the results. Four residues in combination determine adult versus fetal affinity. Simulations suggest that at lower-affinity sites, one of these unsettles the core directly and the others (in loop E) increase backbone flexibility to unlock a key, complementary tryptophan from the core. Swapping only four amino acids is necessary and sufficient to exchange function between adult and fetal AChRs. PMID:27101778

  8. Identification of potential dual agonists of FXR and TGR5 using e-pharmacophore based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Thangaraj; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2015-05-01

    Farnesoid X receptor and Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor-5 are well known bile acid receptors and act as promising targets for the drug development and treatment of diabetes. Agonists of both the bile acid receptors increase insulin sensitivity and control glucose, lipids and bile acid homeostasis. The current study deals with the identification of novel dual agonists using ligand and structure-based virtual screening. Initially, an experimentally proven well-known dual agonist of FXR and TGR5, namely INT-767, was docked into the binding sites of FXR and TGR5 to determine the protein residues important for ligand binding. The docked complexes FXRINT-767 and TGR5INT-767 were used to generate e-pharmacophore hypotheses. Ligand-based virtual screening was carried out using the hypothetical e-pharmacophore model against the ChemBridge database. Further, structure-based virtual screening was performed with screened hits to find potential agonists of FXR and TGR5. A total of four best agonists were identified based on their affinity and mode of interactions with the receptors. The binding mode of these compounds with both receptors was analyzed in detail. Furthermore, molecular dynamics, ADME toxicity prediction, density functional theory and binding free energy calculations were carried out to rank the compounds. Based on the above analyses, the most potent compound, ChemBridge_9149693, was selected for further in vitro studies. The results of in vitro assays suggested that ChemBridge_9149693 is a potent and promising drug for the treatment of type II diabetes. Thus, the compound could be used for further drug design and development of dual agonists of FXR and TGR5. PMID:25787676

  9. Both the antioxidant and D3 agonist actions of pramipexole mediate its neuroprotective actions in mesencephalic cultures.

    PubMed

    Ling, Z D; Robie, H C; Tong, C W; Carvey, P M

    1999-04-01

    Pramipexole (PPX) is a full intrinsic activity, direct-acting dopamine (DA) agonist possessing 7-fold higher affinity for D3 than for D2 receptors. It also is a potent antioxidant. PPX was previously shown to be neuroprotective because it dose dependently attenuated the DA neuron loss produced by levodopa in mesencephalic cultures. Several different drugs with properties similar to PPX were studied here to better understand the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for this neuroprotective effect. The D3-preferring agonist 7-hydroxy-diphenylaminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) and the D3 antagonist U99194, respectively, increased and decreased the neuroprotective effects of PPX in a dose-dependent fashion. Addition of the selective D2 agonist U95666 or the D2/D3 antagonists domperidone or raclopride did not affect PPX's neuroprotective effect. Interestingly, 7-OH-DPAT by itself did not attenuate the DA neuron loss produced by levodopa. However, when 7-OH-DPAT was combined with a low dose of the antioxidants U101033E or alpha-tocopherol, the toxic effects of levodopa were attenuated. Similar results were observed when the D3-preferring agonist PD128, 907 was studied. In addition, media conditioned by exposure of mesencephalic cultures incubated with all D3-preferring agonists studied was shown to enhance the growth of DA neurons in freshly harvested recipient cultures implicating a D3-mediated trophic activity in the neuroprotective effect. These data suggest that PPX's neuroprotective actions in the levodopa toxicity model are a consequence of its combined actions as a D3 receptor agonist and an antioxidant. PMID:10087005

  10. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  11. An attempt to study the effects of chemical structure on the affinity and efficacy of compounds related to acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, R. B.; Scott, K. A.; Stephenson, R. P.

    1963-01-01

    Two sets of series of compounds, RN+Me3, RN+Me2Et, RN+MeEt2, RN+Et3, and R'N+Me3, R'N+Me2Et, R'N+MeEt2, R'N+Et3, have been prepared, in which R is a 2-(diphenylacetoxy)ethyl, 2-(benziloyloxy)ethyl, 2-(2,2-diphenylethoxy)ethyl, 3-(diphenylmethoxy)propyl or 3,3-diphenylbutyrylmethyl group, and R' is a 2-acetoxyethyl, 2-ethoxyethyl, 3-methoxypropyl or butyrylmethyl group: compounds of the first set therefore differ from those of the second set in that they contain a diphenylmethyl group (or a benziloyl group) in place of a methyl group. The former compounds are antagonists of acetylcholine whereas most of the latter act like acetylcholine. The affinity constants of the former compounds for the acetylcholine receptors of the guinea-pig ileum have been determined and the equipotent molar ratios relative to acetylcholine have been measured for the latter compounds. The variation of the affinity constant with the constitution of the onium group in the antagonists (the diphenylmethyl compounds) was sufficiently consistent from one series to another for it to seem likely that corresponding changes in affinity with the constitution of the onium group would occur in the agonists. From the relative activity of the agonists and with this knowledge of relative affinity it was possible to assess the effects of their structure on efficacy. Substitution of one methyl in the onium group by an ethyl group in these compounds increased affinity but decreased efficacy. The replacement of a second methyl by a second ethyl group had little effect on affinity but decreased efficacy still further. The replacement of the ester link in acetylcholine by a 4-ether oxygen atom (as in the diphenylmethoxypropyl and methoxypropyl compounds) did not appreciably reduce affinity but markedly reduced efficacy, whereas the replacement of the ester link by a 3-ether oxygen atom (as in the diphenylethoxyethyl and ethoxyethyl compounds) markedly reduced affinity but did not reduce efficacy. The

  12. Antitussive activity of sigma-1 receptor agonists in the guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Claire; Fezoui, Malika; Selig, William M; Schwartz, Carl E; Ellis, James L

    2003-01-01

    Current antitussive medications have limited efficacy and often contain the opiate-like agent dextromethorphan (DEX). The mechanism whereby DEX inhibits cough is ill defined. DEX displays affinity at both NMDA and sigma receptors, suggesting that the antitussive activity may involve central or peripheral activity at either of these receptors. This study examined and compared the antitussive activity of DEX and various putative sigma receptor agonists in the guinea-pig citric-acid cough model. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of DEX (30 mg kg−1) and the sigma-1 agonists SKF-10,047 (1–5 mg kg−1), Pre-084 (5 mg kg−1), and carbetapentane (1–5 mg kg−1) inhibited citric-acid-induced cough in guinea-pigs. Intraperitoneal administration of a sigma-1 antagonist, BD 1047 (1–5 mg kg−1), reversed the inhibition of cough elicited by SKF-10,047. In addition, two structurally dissimilar sigma agonists SKF-10,047 (1 mg ml−1) and Pre-084 (1 mg ml−1) inhibited cough when administered by aerosol. Aerosolized BD 1047 (1 mg ml−1, 30 min) prevented the antitussive action of SKF-10,047 (5 mg kg−1) or DEX (30 mg kg−1) given by i.p. administration and, likewise, i.p. administration of BD 1047 (5 mg kg−1) prevented the antitussive action of SKF-10,047 given by aerosol (1 mg ml−1). These results therefore support the argument that antitussive effects of DEX may be mediated via sigma receptors, since both systemic and aerosol administration of sigma-1 receptor agonists inhibit citric-acid-induced cough in guinea-pigs. While significant systemic exposure is possible with aerosol administration, the very low doses administered (estimated <0.3 mg kg−1) suggest that there may be a peripheral component to the antitussive effect. PMID:14691051

  13. Airway Peroxidases Catalyze Nitration of the β2-Agonist Salbutamol and Decrease Its Pharmacological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sallans, Larry; Macha, Stephen; Brown, Kari; McGraw, Dennis W.; Kovacic, Melinda Butsch; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2011-01-01

    β2-Agonists are the most effective bronchodilators for the rapid relief of asthma symptoms, but for unclear reasons, their effectiveness may be decreased during severe exacerbations. Because peroxidase activity and nitrogen oxides are increased in the asthmatic airway, we examined whether salbutamol, a clinically important β2-agonist, is subject to potentially inactivating nitration. When salbutamol was exposed to myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase or lactoperoxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrite (NO2−), both absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry indicated formation of a new metabolite with features expected for the nitrated drug. The new metabolites showed an absorption maximum at 410 nm and pKa of 6.6 of the phenolic hydroxyl group. In addition to nitrosalbutamol (m/z 285.14), a salbutamol-derived nitrophenol, formed by elimination of the formaldehyde group, was detected (m/z 255.13) by mass spectrometry. It is noteworthy that the latter metabolite was detected in exhaled breath condensates of asthma patients receiving salbutamol but not in unexposed control subjects, indicating the potential for β2-agonist nitration to occur in the inflamed airway in vivo. Salbutamol nitration was inhibited in vitro by ascorbate, thiocyanate, and the pharmacological agents methimazole and dapsone. The efficacy of inhibition depended on the nitrating system, with the lactoperoxidase/H2O2/NO2− being the most affected. Functionally, nitrated salbutamol showed decreased affinity for β2-adrenergic receptors and impaired cAMP synthesis in airway smooth muscle cells compared with the native drug. These results suggest that under inflammatory conditions associated with asthma, phenolic β2-agonists may be subject to peroxidase-catalyzed nitration that could potentially diminish their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20974700

  14. Melatonin and Synthetic Melatoninergic Agonists in Psychiatric and Age-associated Disorders: Successful and Unsuccessful Approaches.

    PubMed

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin and the following approved or investigational synthetic melatoninergic agonists are compared with regard to half-life, receptor affinity, metabolism and additional properties: TIK-301, piromelatine, GG-012, AH-001, AH-017, agomelatine, ramelteon, GR 196429, MA-2, tasimelteon, UCM765, and UCM924. Apart from restrictions from the respective approvals, theoretical limits of treatment are outlined as they result from chronobiological, genetic, epigenetic, degenerative or toxicological considerations. Melatoninergic agonists have been shown to reliably entrain circadian rhythms, if chronobiological phase response rules are followed. This allows the treatment of dysphased rhythms, circadian rhythm sleep disorders, and forms of depression with an etiology of circadian dysfunction, such as bipolar disorder and seasonal affective disorders. Entrainment and induction of sleep onset requires only short actions, with low doses of immediate-release melatonin likely to be sufficient. However, sleep maintenance is poorly supported by any of the agonists, despite statistically demonstrable effects. The combinations of melatoninergic properties with the inhibition of 5-HT2C receptors, as in agomelatine and TIK-30, may result in moderate direct antidepressive actions. Other limits of a successful treatment can arise from genetic or epigenetic silencing of melatonin receptor genes, perhaps also from imbalances between parallel signaling pathways in receptor mutants, and from neurodegeneration, especially in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Variants of circadian clock genes cause rhythm deviations that may be corrected by melatoninergic treatment, provided that the spontaneous oscillation period is not beyond the entrainment range. Caveats concerning melatonin's roles as an immune modulator and in certain pathologies, such as Parkinson's disease, as well as toxicological considerations for agonists and their metabolites are also addressed. PMID:25248806

  15. Guanyl nucleotide interactions with dopaminergic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol in human caudate and putamen: guanyl nucleotides enhance ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation and cause an apparent loss of high affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Andorn, A.C.; Bacon, B.R.; Nguyen-Hunh, A.T.; Parlato, S.J.; Stitts, J.A.

    1988-02-01

    The human caudate and putamen contain two high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Both of these affinity states exhibit dopaminergic selectivity. Ascorbic acid, at 0.1 mM, induces a slow loss of the low affinity component of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding in these tissues. The addition of guanyl nucleotides to the ascorbate produces a more rapid loss of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding which includes a loss of the highest affinity state for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Ascorbate induces lipid peroxidation in human caudate and putamen, an effect that is further enhanced by guanyl and inosine nucleotides. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides have no effect on (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding but do decrease the affinity of dopamine at each affinity state greater than 60-fold. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides apparently decrease agonist affinity at human brain dopamine2-binding sites without causing an interconversion of agonist affinity states.

  16. HERG1 Channel Agonists and Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Sanguinetti, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG1) potassium channels are a key determinant of normal repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Loss of function mutations in hERG1 channels cause inherited long QT syndrome and increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death. Many common medications that block hERG1 channels as an unintended side effect also increase arrhythmic risk. Routine preclinical screening for hERG1 block led to the discovery of agonists that shorten action potential duration and QT interval. Agonists have the potential to be used as pharmacotherapy for long QT syndrome, but can also be proarrhythmic. Recent studies have elucidated multiple mechanisms of action for these compounds and the structural basis for their binding to the pore domain of the hERG1 channel. PMID:24721650

  17. HERG1 channel agonists and cardiac arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG1) potassium channels are a key determinant of normal repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Loss of function mutations in hERG1 channels cause inherited long QT syndrome and increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death. Many common medications that block hERG1 channels as an unintended side effect also increase arrhythmic risk. Routine preclinical screening for hERG1 block led to the discovery of agonists that shorten action potential duration and QT interval. Agonists have the potential to be used as pharmacotherapy for long QT syndrome, but can also be proarrhythmic. Recent studies have elucidated multiple mechanisms of action for these compounds and the structural basis for their binding to the pore domain of the hERG1 channel. PMID:24721650

  18. Potent μ-Opioid Receptor Agonists from Cyclic Peptides Tyr-c[D-Lys-Xxx-Tyr-Gly]: Synthesis, Biological, and Structural Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yangmei; Cazares, Margret; Wu, Jinhua; Houghten, Richard A; Toll, Laurence; Dooley, Colette

    2016-02-11

    To optimize the structure of a μ-opioid receptor ligand, analogs H-Tyr-c[D-Lys-Xxx-Tyr-Gly] were synthesized and their biological activity was tested. The analog containing a Phe(3) was identified as not only exhibiting binding affinity 14-fold higher than the original hit but also producing agonist activity 3-fold more potent than morphine. NMR study suggested that a trans conformation at D-Lys(2)-Xxx(3) is crucial for these cyclic peptides to maintain high affinity, selectivity, and functional activity toward the μ-opioid receptor. PMID:26789491

  19. γ-Aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor subtype inverse agonists as therapeutic agents in cognition.

    PubMed

    Gabriella, Guerrini; Giovanna, Ciciani

    2010-01-01

    The gabaergic system has been identified as a relevant regulator of cognitive and emotional processing. In fact, the discovery that negative allosteric regulators (or inverse agonists) at GABA(A) (γ-aminobutyric acid) α5 subtype receptors improve learning and memory tasks, has further validated this concept. The localization of these extrasynaptic subtype receptors, mainly in the hippocampus, has suggested that they play a key role in the three stages of memory: acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval. The "α5 inverse agonist" binds to an allosteric site at GABA(A) receptor, provoking a reduction of chlorine current, but to elicit this effect, the necessary condition is the binding of agonist neurotransmitter (γ-amino butyric acid) at its orthosteric site. In this case, the GABA(A) receptor is not a "constitutively active receptor" and, however, the presence of spontaneous opening channels for native GABA(A) receptors is rare. Here, we present various classes of nonselective and α5 selective GABA(A) receptor ligands, and the in vitro and in vivo tests to elucidate their affinity and activity. The study of the GABA(A) α5 inverse agonists is one of the important tools, although not the only one, for the development of clinical strategies for treatment of Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment. PMID:21050918

  20. Novel and selective partial agonists of 5-HT3 receptors. 2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of piperazinopyridopyrrolopyrazines, piperazinopyrroloquinoxalines, and piperazinopyridopyrroloquinoxalines.

    PubMed

    Prunier, H; Rault, S; Lancelot, J C; Robba, M; Renard, P; Delagrange, P; Pfeiffer, B; Caignard, D H; Misslin, R; Guardiola-Lemaitre, B; Hamon, M

    1997-06-01

    In continuation of our previous work on piperazinopyrrolothienopyrazine derivatives, three series of piperazinopyridopyrrolopyrazines, piperazinopyrroloquinoxalines, and piperazinopyridopyrroloquinoxalines were prepared and evaluated as 5-HT3 receptor ligands. The chemical modifications performed within these new series led to structure-activity relationships regarding both high affinity and selectivity for the 5-HT3 receptors that are in agreement with those established previously for the pyrrolothienopyrazine series. The best compound (8a) obtained in these new series is in the picomolar range of affinity for 5-HT3 receptors with a selectivity higher than 10(6). Four of the high-affinity 5-HT3 ligands (8a, 15a,b, and 16d) were selected in both the pyridopyrrolopyrazine and the pyrroloquinoxaline series and were characterized in vitro and in vivo as agonists or partial agonists. Compound 8a was also evaluated in the light/dark test where it showed potential anxiolytic-like activity at very low doses per os. PMID:9191957

  1. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits. PMID:26832440

  2. Melanocortin 1 Receptor Agonists Reduce Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Ebefors, Kerstin; Johansson, Martin E.; Stefánsson, Bergur; Granqvist, Anna; Arnadottir, Margret; Berg, Anna-Lena; Nyström, Jenny; Haraldsson, Börje

    2010-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy is one of the most common causes of nephrotic syndrome in adults. Recent reports suggest that treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) reduces proteinuria, but the mechanism of action is unknown. Here, we identified gene expression of the melanocortin receptor MC1R in podocytes, glomerular endothelial cells, mesangial cells, and tubular epithelial cells. Podocytes expressed most MC1R protein, which colocalized with synaptopodin but not with an endothelial-specific lectin. We treated rats with passive Heymann nephritis (PHN) with MS05, a specific MC1R agonist, which significantly reduced proteinuria compared with untreated PHN rats (P < 0.01). Furthermore, treatment with MC1R agonists improved podocyte morphology and reduced oxidative stress. In summary, podocytes express MC1R, and MC1R agonism reduces proteinuria, improves glomerular morphology, and reduces oxidative stress in nephrotic rats with PHN. These data may explain the proteinuria-reducing effects of ACTH observed in patients with membranous nephropathy, and MC1R agonists may provide a new therapeutic option for these patients. PMID:20507942

  3. Synthesis and Structure–Activity Relationships of N-Benzyl Phenethylamines as 5-HT2A/2C Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    N-Benzyl substitution of 5-HT2A receptor agonists of the phenethylamine structural class of psychedelics (such as 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine, often referred to as 2C-B) confer a significant increase in binding affinity as well as functional activity of the receptor. We have prepared a series of 48 compounds with structural variations in both the phenethylamine and N-benzyl part of the molecule to determine the effects on receptor binding affinity and functional activity at 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors. The compounds generally had high affinity for the 5-HT2A receptor with 8b having the highest affinity at 0.29 nM but with several other compounds also exhibiting subnanomolar binding affinities. The functional activity of the compounds was distributed over a wider range with 1b being the most potent at 0.074 nM. Most of the compounds exhibited low to moderate selectivity (1- to 40-fold) for the 5-HT2A receptor in the binding assays, although one compound 6b showed an impressive 100-fold selectivity for the 5-HT2A receptor. In the functional assay, selectivity was generally higher with 1b being more than 400-fold selective for the 5-HT2A receptor. PMID:24397362

  4. 2-Substituted adenosine derivatives: affinity and efficacy at four subtypes of human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Mamedova, Liaman K; Chen, Peiran; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2004-11-15

    The affinity and efficacy at four subtypes (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3)) of human adenosine receptors (ARs) of a wide range of 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were evaluated using radioligand binding assays and a cyclic AMP functional assay in intact CHO cells stably expressing these receptors. Similar to previous studies of the N(6)-position, several 2-substituents were found to be critical structural determinants for the A(3)AR activation. The following adenosine 2-ethers were moderately potent partial agonists (K(i), nM): benzyl (117), 3-chlorobenzyl (72), 2-(3-chlorophenyl)ethyl (41), and 2-(2-naphthyl)ethyl (130). The following adenosine 2-ethers were A(3)AR antagonists: 2,2-diphenylethyl, 2-(2-norbornan)ethyl, R- and S-2-phenylbutyl, and 2-(2-chlorophenyl)ethyl. 2-(S-2-Phenylbutyloxy)adenosine as an A(3)AR antagonist right-shifted the concentration-response curve for the inhibition by NECA of cyclic AMP accumulation with a K(B) value of 212 nM, which is similar to its binding affinity (K(i) = 175 nM). These 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were generally less potent at the A(1)AR in comparison to the A(3)AR, but fully efficacious, with binding K(i) values over 100 nM. The 2-phenylethyl moiety resulted in higher A(3)AR affinity (K(i) in nM) when linked to the 2-position of adenosine through an ether group (54), than when linked through an amine (310) or thioether (1960). 2-[2-(l-Naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (K(i) = 3.8 nM) was found to be the most potent and selective (>50-fold) A(2A) agonist in this series. Mixed A(2A)/A(3)AR agonists have been identified. Interestingly, although most of these compounds were extremely weak at the A(2B)AR, 2-[2-(2-naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (EC(50) = 1.4 microM) and 2-[2-(2-thienyl)-ethyloxy]adenosine (EC(50) = 1.8 microM) were found to be relatively potent A(2B) agonists, although less potent than NECA (EC(50) = 140 nM). PMID:15476669

  5. 2-Substituted adenosine derivatives: affinity and efficacy at four subtypes of human adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Mamedova, Liaman K.; Chen, Peiran; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The affinity and efficacy at four subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B and A3) of human adenosine receptors (ARs) of a wide range of 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were evaluated using radioligand binding assays and a cyclic AMP functional assay in intact CHO cells stably expressing these receptors. Similar to previous studies of the N6-position, several 2-substituents were found to be critical structural determinants for the A3AR activation. The following adenosine 2-ethers were moderately potent partial agonists (Ki, nM): benzyl (117), 3-chlorobenzyl (72), 2-(3-chlorophenyl)ethyl (41), and 2-(2-naphthyl)ethyl (130). The following adenosine 2-ethers were A3AR antagonists: 2,2-diphenylethyl, 2-(2-norbornan)ethyl, R- and S-2-phenylbutyl, and 2-(2-chlorophenyl)ethyl. 2-(S-2-Phenylbutyloxy)a-denosine as an A3AR antagonist right-shifted the concentration–response curve for the inhibition by NECA of cyclic AMP accumulation with a KB value of 212 nM, which is similar to its binding affinity (Ki = 175 nM). These 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were generally less potent at the A1AR in comparison to the A3AR, but fully efficacious, with binding Ki values over 100 nM. The 2-phenylethyl moiety resulted in higher A3AR affinity (Ki in nM) when linked to the 2-position of adenosine through an ether group (54), than when linked through an amine (310) or thioether (1960). 2-[2-(l-Naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (Ki = 3.8 nM) was found to be the most potent and selective (>50-fold) A2A agonist in this series. Mixed A2A/A3AR agonists have been identified. Interestingly, although most of these compounds were extremely weak at the A2BAR, 2-[2-(2-naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (EC50 = 1.4 µM) and 2-[2-(2-thienyl)-ethyloxy]adenosine (EC50 = 1.8 (M) were found to be relatively potent A2B agonists, although less potent than NECA (EC50 = 140 nM). PMID:15476669

  6. Synthesis of mixed opioid affinity cyclic endomorphin-2 analogues with fluorinated phenylalanines.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; Perlikowska, Renata; do-Rego, Jean Claude; do-Rego, Jean-Luc; Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Calo, Girolamo; Kluczyk, Alicja; Łapiński, Krzysztof; Tömböly, Csaba; Janecka, Anna

    2015-05-14

    As part of our continuing studies on the structure-activity relationships of cyclic pentapeptides based on the structure of endomorphin-2 (EM-2), we report here the synthesis and biological activities of a new series of analogues of a general sequence Tyr/Dmt-c[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]NH2 (where Dmt = 2',6'-dimethyltyrosine), incorporating fluorinated amino acids: 4-fluorophenylalanine (4-F-Phe), 2,4-difluorophenylalanine (2,4-F-Phe), or 4-trifluoromethylphenylalanine (4-CF3-Phe) instead of the Phe residue in position 3 or 4. Depending on the fluorinated amino acid residue and its position in the sequence, analogues were mixed, high affinity MOP/KOP receptor agonists, MOP/DOP/KOP agonists, or selective KOP agonists. The in vitro potencies and efficacies of all novel analogues were assessed in calcium mobilization assay. The most potent analogues, Dmt-c[d-Lys-Phe-4-F-Phe-Asp]NH2 and Dmt-c[d-Lys-Phe-2,4-F-Phe-Asp]NH2, were tested in vivo in the mouse hot-plate test. They produced strong antinociceptive effect not only after intracerebroventricular but also after intraperitoneal injection, indicating that they were able to cross the blood-brain barrier. PMID:26005537

  7. Synthesis of Mixed Opioid Affinity Cyclic Endomorphin-2 Analogues with Fluorinated Phenylalanines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As part of our continuing studies on the structure–activity relationships of cyclic pentapeptides based on the structure of endomorphin-2 (EM-2), we report here the synthesis and biological activities of a new series of analogues of a general sequence Tyr/Dmt-c[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]NH2 (where Dmt = 2′,6′-dimethyltyrosine), incorporating fluorinated amino acids: 4-fluorophenylalanine (4-F-Phe), 2,4-difluorophenylalanine (2,4-F-Phe), or 4-trifluoromethylphenylalanine (4-CF3-Phe) instead of the Phe residue in position 3 or 4. Depending on the fluorinated amino acid residue and its position in the sequence, analogues were mixed, high affinity MOP/KOP receptor agonists, MOP/DOP/KOP agonists, or selective KOP agonists. The in vitro potencies and efficacies of all novel analogues were assessed in calcium mobilization assay. The most potent analogues, Dmt-c[d-Lys-Phe-4-F-Phe-Asp]NH2 and Dmt-c[d-Lys-Phe-2,4-F-Phe-Asp]NH2, were tested in vivo in the mouse hot-plate test. They produced strong antinociceptive effect not only after intracerebroventricular but also after intraperitoneal injection, indicating that they were able to cross the blood–brain barrier. PMID:26005537

  8. Qualification of LSP1-2111 as a Brain Penetrant Group III Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Orthosteric Agonist

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    LSP1-2111 is a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist with preference toward the mGlu4 receptor subtype. This compound has been extensively used as a tool to explore the pharmacology of mGlu4 receptor activation in preclinical animal behavioral models. However, the blood–brain barrier penetration of this amino acid derivative has never been studied. We report studies on the central nervous system (CNS) disposition of LSP1-2111 using quantitative microdialysis in rat. Significant unbound concentrations of the drug relative to its in vitro binding affinity and functional potency were established in extracellular fluid (ECF). These findings support the use of LSP1-2111 to study the CNS pharmacology of mGlu4 receptor activation through orthosteric agonist mechanisms. PMID:24900783

  9. Affinity Proteomics in the mountains: Alpbach 2015.

    PubMed

    Taussig, Michael J

    2016-09-25

    The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting. PMID:27118167

  10. Optimized Affinity Capture of Yeast Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an affinity isolation protocol. It uses cryomilled yeast cell powder for producing cell extracts and antibody-conjugated paramagnetic beads for affinity capture. Guidelines for determining the optimal extraction solvent composition are provided. Captured proteins are eluted in a denaturing solvent (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis sample buffer) for gel-based proteomic analyses. Although the procedures can be modified to use other sources of cell extract and other forms of affinity media, to date we have consistently obtained the best results with the method presented. PMID:27371596

  11. Aptamers in Affinity Separations: Stationary Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelet, Corinne; Peyrin, Eric

    The use of DNA or RNA aptamers as tools in analytical chemistry is a very promising field of research because of their capabilities to bind specifically the target molecules with an affinity similar to that of antibodies. Notably, they appear to be of great interest as target-specific ligands for the separation and capture of various analytes in affinity chromatography and related affinity-based methods such as magnetic bead technology. In this chapter, the recent developments of these aptamer-based separation/capture approaches are addressed.

  12. Affinity purification of heme-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Asher, Wesley B; Bren, Kara L

    2014-01-01

    Protein affinity purification techniques are widely used for isolating pure target proteins for biochemical and structural characterization. Herein, we describe the protocol for affinity-based purification of proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that uses the coordination of a peptide tag covalently modified with heme c, known as a heme-tag, to an L-histidine immobilized Sepharose resin. This approach provides an affinity purification tag visible to the eye, facilitating tracking of the protein. In addition, we describe methods for specifically detecting heme-tagged proteins in SDS-PAGE gels using a heme-staining procedure and for quantifying the proteins using a pyridine hemochrome assay. PMID:24943311

  13. Progress toward a high-affinity allosteric enhancer at muscarinic M1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, Sebastian; Popham, Angela; Birdsall, Nigel J M

    2003-01-01

    Loss of forebrain acetylcholine is an early neurochemical lesion in Alzheimer's disease (AD). As muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are involved in memory and cognition, a muscarinic agonist could therefore provide a "replacement therapy" in this disease. However, muscarinic receptors occur throughout the CNS and the periphery. A selective locus of action of a muscarinic agonist is therefore crucial in order to avoid intolerable side effects. The five subtypes of muscarinic receptors, M1-M5, have distinct regional distributions with M2 and M3 receptors mediating most of the peripheral effects. M1 receptors are the major receptor subtype in the cortex and hippocampus-the two brain regions most associated with memory and cognition. This localization has led to a, so far unsuccessful, search for a truly M1-selective muscarinic agonist. However, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as donepezil (Aricept), which potentiate cholinergic neurotransmission, do have a therapeutic role in the management of AD and so the M1 receptor remains a viable therapeutic target. Our approach is to develop muscarinic allosteric enhancers-compounds that bind to the receptor at an "allosteric" site, which is distinct from the "primary" site to which ACh binds, and which enhance ACh affinity (or efficacy). Having discovered that a commercially available compound, WIN 62577, is an allosteric enhancer with micromolar potency at M3 receptors, we report here some results of a chemical synthesis project to develop this hit. Modification of WIN 62577 has led to compounds with over 1000-fold increased affinity but, so far, none of these extremely potent compounds are allosteric enhancers. PMID:14501021

  14. Agonistic TAM-163 antibody targeting tyrosine kinase receptor-B

    PubMed Central

    Vugmeyster, Yulia; Rohde, Cynthia; Perreault, Mylene; Gimeno, Ruth E.; Singh, Pratap

    2013-01-01

    TAM-163, an agonist monoclonal antibody targeting tyrosine receptor kinase-B (TrkB), is currently being investigated as a potential body weight modulatory agent in humans. To support the selection of the dose range for the first-in-human (FIH) trial of TAM-163, we conducted a mechanistic analysis of the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data (e.g., body weight gain) obtained in lean cynomolgus and obese rhesus monkeys following single doses ranging from 0.3 to 60 mg/kg. A target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) model was used to describe the observed nonlinear PK and Emax approach was used to describe the observed dose-dependent PD effect. The TMDD model development was supported by the experimental determination of the binding affinity constant (9.4 nM) and internalization rate of the drug-target complex (2.08 h−1). These mechanistic analyses enabled linking of exposure, target (TrkB) coverage, and pharmacological activity (e.g., PD) in monkeys, and indicated that ≥ 38% target coverage (time-average) was required to achieve significant body weight gain in monkeys. Based on the scaling of the TMDD model from monkeys to humans and assuming similar relationship between the target coverage and pharmacological activity between monkey and humans, subcutaneous (SC) doses of 1 and 15 mg/kg in humans were projected to be the minimally and the fully pharmacologically active doses, respectively. Based on the minimal anticipated biological effect level (MABEL) approach for starting dose selection, the dose of 0.05 mg/kg (3 mg for a 60 kg human) SC was recommended as the starting dose for FIH trials, because at this dose level < 10% target coverage was projected at Cmax (and all other time points). This study illustrates a rational mechanistic approach for the selection of FIH dose range for a therapeutic protein with a complex model of action. PMID:23529133

  15. Metabolic mapping of A3 adenosine receptor agonist MRS5980.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Tosh, Dilip K; Tanaka, Naoki; Wang, Haina; Krausz, Kristopher W; O'Connor, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-09-15

    (1S,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(2-((5-Chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethynyl)-6-(methylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-1-carboxamide (MRS5980) is an A3AR selective agonist containing multiple receptor affinity- and selectivity-enhancing modifications and a therapeutic candidate drug for many inflammatory diseases. Metabolism-related poor pharmacokinetic behavior and toxicities are a major reason for drug R&D failure. Metabolomics with UPLC-MS was employed to profile the metabolism of MRS5980 and MRS5980-induced disruption of endogenous compounds. Recombinant drug-metabolizing enzymes screening experiment were used to determine the enzymes involved in MRS5980 metabolism. Analysis of lipid metabolism-related genes was performed to investigate the reason for MRS5980-induced lipid metabolic disorders. Unsupervised principal components analysis separated the control and MRS5980 treatment groups in feces, urine, and liver samples, but not in bile and serum. The major ions mainly contributing to the separation of feces and urine were oxidized MRS5980, glutathione (GSH) conjugates and cysteine conjugate (degradation product of the GSH conjugates) of MRS5980. The major ions contributing to the group separation of liver samples were phosphatidylcholines. In vitro incubation experiments showed the involvement of CYP3A enzymes in the oxidative metabolism of MRS5980 and direct GSH reactivity of MRS5980. The electrophilic attack by MRS5980 is a minor pathway and did not alter GSH levels in liver or liver histology, and thus may be of minor clinical consequence. Gene expression analysis further showed decreased expression of PC biosynthetic genes choline kinase a and b, which further accelerated conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylcholines through increasing the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3. These data will be useful to guide rational design of drugs targeting A3AR, considering efficacy, metabolic elimination, and

  16. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  17. Minimal information to determine affine shape equivalence.

    PubMed

    Wagemans, J; Van Gool, L; Lamote, C; Foster, D H

    2000-04-01

    Participants judged the affine equivalence of 2 simultaneously presented 4-point patterns. Performance level (d') varied between 1.5 and 2.7, depending on the information available for solving the correspondence problem (insufficient in Experiment 1a, superfluous in Experiment 1b, and minimal in Experiments 1c, 2a, 2b) and on the exposure time (unlimited in Experiments 1 and 2a and 500 ms in Experiment 2b), but it did not vary much with the complexity of the affine transformation (rotation and slant in Experiment 1 and same plus tilt in Experiment 2). Performance in Experiment 3 was lower with 3-point patterns than with 4-point patterns, whereas blocking the trials according to the affine transformation parameters had little effect. Determining affine shape equivalence with minimal-information displays is based on a fast assessment of qualitatively or quasi-invariant properties such as convexity/ concavity, parallelism, and collinearity. PMID:10811156

  18. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. PMID:25829303

  19. Visualizing antibody affinity maturation in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Tas, Jeroen M J; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T; Mano, Yasuko M; Chen, Casie S; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with nonimmunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  20. Two amino acids, located in transmembrane domains VI and VII, determine the selectivity of the peptide agonist SMS 201-995 for the SSTR2 somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Kaupmann, K; Bruns, C; Raulf, F; Weber, H P; Mattes, H; Lübbert, H

    1995-01-01

    Human somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5) bind their natural ligands SRIF-14 and SRIF-28 with high affinity. By contrast, short synthetic SRIF analogues such as SMS 201-995, a peptide agonist used for the treatment of various endocrine and malignant disorders, display sub-nanomolar affinity only for the receptor subtype SSTR2. To understand the molecular nature of selective peptide agonist binding to somatostatin receptors we have now, by site-directed mutagenesis, identified amino acids mediating SMS 201-995 specificity for SSTR2. Sequentially, amino acids in SSTR1, a receptor subtype exhibiting low affinity for SMS 201-995, were exchanged for the corresponding SSTR2 residues. After three consecutive steps, in which eight amino acids were exchanged, a SSTR1 mutant receptor with high affinity for SMS 201-995 was obtained. Receptor mutants with different combinations of these eight amino acids were then constructed. A single Ser305 to Phe mutation in TM VII increased the affinity of SSTR1 for SMS 201-995 nearly 100-fold. When this mutation was combined with an exchange of Gln291 to Asn in TM VI, almost full susceptibility to SMS 201-995 was obtained. Thus, it is concluded that the specificity of SMS 201-995 for SSTR2 is mainly defined by these two amino acids in transmembrane domains VI and VII. Using the conjugate gradient method we have, by analogy to the well established structure of bacteriorhodopsin, built a model for SRIF receptor-ligand interactions that explains the importance of Gln291 and Ser305 for the selectivity of agonists. Images PMID:7882976

  1. A novel aminotetralin-type serotonin (5-HT) 2C receptor-specific agonist and 5-HT2A competitive antagonist/5-HT2B inverse agonist with preclinical efficacy for psychoses.

    PubMed

    Canal, Clinton E; Morgan, Drake; Felsing, Daniel; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Rowland, Neil E; Robertson, Kimberly L; Sakhuja, Rajeev; Booth, Raymond G

    2014-05-01

    Development of 5-HT2C agonists for treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders, including psychoses, substance abuse, and obesity, has been fraught with difficulties, because the vast majority of reported 5-HT2C selective agonists also activate 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT2B receptors, potentially causing hallucinations and/or cardiac valvulopathy. Herein is described a novel, potent, and efficacious human 5-HT2C receptor agonist, (-)-trans-(2S,4R)-4-(3'[meta]-bromophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-amine (-)-MBP), that is a competitive antagonist and inverse agonist at human 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors, respectively. (-)-MBP has efficacy comparable to the prototypical second-generation antipsychotic drug clozapine in three C57Bl/6 mouse models of drug-induced psychoses: the head-twitch response elicited by [2,5]-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine; hyperlocomotion induced by MK-801 [(5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (dizocilpine maleate)]; and hyperlocomotion induced by amphetamine. (-)-MBP, however, does not alter locomotion when administered alone, distinguishing it from clozapine, which suppresses locomotion. Finally, consumption of highly palatable food by mice was not increased by (-)-MBP at a dose that produced at least 50% maximal efficacy in the psychoses models. Compared with (-)-MBP, the enantiomer (+)-MBP was much less active across in vitro affinity and functional assays using mouse and human receptors and also translated in vivo with comparably lower potency and efficacy. Results indicate a 5-HT2C receptor-specific agonist, such as (-)-MBP, may be pharmacotherapeutic for psychoses, without liability for obesity, hallucinations, heart disease, sedation, or motoric disorders. PMID:24563531

  2. A Novel Aminotetralin-Type Serotonin (5-HT) 2C Receptor-Specific Agonist and 5-HT2A Competitive Antagonist/5-HT2B Inverse Agonist with Preclinical Efficacy for Psychoses

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Drake; Felsing, Daniel; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Rowland, Neil E.; Robertson, Kimberly L.; Sakhuja, Rajeev; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-01-01

    Development of 5-HT2C agonists for treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders, including psychoses, substance abuse, and obesity, has been fraught with difficulties, because the vast majority of reported 5-HT2C selective agonists also activate 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT2B receptors, potentially causing hallucinations and/or cardiac valvulopathy. Herein is described a novel, potent, and efficacious human 5-HT2C receptor agonist, (−)-trans-(2S,4R)-4-(3′[meta]-bromophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-amine (−)-MBP), that is a competitive antagonist and inverse agonist at human 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors, respectively. (−)-MBP has efficacy comparable to the prototypical second-generation antipsychotic drug clozapine in three C57Bl/6 mouse models of drug-induced psychoses: the head-twitch response elicited by [2,5]-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine; hyperlocomotion induced by MK-801 [(5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (dizocilpine maleate)]; and hyperlocomotion induced by amphetamine. (−)-MBP, however, does not alter locomotion when administered alone, distinguishing it from clozapine, which suppresses locomotion. Finally, consumption of highly palatable food by mice was not increased by (−)-MBP at a dose that produced at least 50% maximal efficacy in the psychoses models. Compared with (−)-MBP, the enantiomer (+)-MBP was much less active across in vitro affinity and functional assays using mouse and human receptors and also translated in vivo with comparably lower potency and efficacy. Results indicate a 5-HT2C receptor-specific agonist, such as (−)-MBP, may be pharmacotherapeutic for psychoses, without liability for obesity, hallucinations, heart disease, sedation, or motoric disorders. PMID:24563531

  3. Dopamine agonist: pathological gambling and hypersexuality.

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    (1) Pathological gambling and increased sexual activity can occur in patients taking dopaminergic drugs. Detailed case reports and small case series mention serious familial and social consequences. The frequency is poorly documented; (2) Most affected patients are being treated for Parkinson's disease, but cases have been reported among patients prescribed a dopamine agonist for restless legs syndrome or pituitary adenoma; (3) Patients treated with this type of drug, and their relatives, should be informed of these risks so that they can watch for changes in behaviour. If such disorders occur, it may be necessary to reduce the dose or to withdraw the drug or replace it with another medication. PMID:19536937

  4. Electrophysiological studies in cultured mouse CNS neurones of the actions of an agonist and an inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, M. S.; Lambert, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The action of agents which bind with the benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor has been investigated by use of intracellular recordings from dissociated mouse neurones grown in tissue culture. The agents tested were midazolam (an agonist at the BZ receptor) and methyl 6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM-an inverse agonist at the BZ receptor). These were applied to the neurone under study by one of the following methods: iontophoresis; pressure application of known concentrations from blunt pipettes; directly in the perfusing medium. On only very few occasions did midazolam or DMCM have a direct effect on the membrane potential (EM) or conductance (GM) of the impaled neurone. For the neurones where direct effects were present, there was no consistent pattern of response. Neither substance affected the threshold for action potential generation. The effect of midazolam and DMCM on responses evoked by iontophoretic application of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was also investigated. Three parameters were used to quantify GABA responses: the depolarization (VGABA); the increase in GM (gGABA) measured with constant current pulses; using voltage clamp, the GABA current (IGABA). The GABA response should be quantified by a parameter which is linearly related to the number of GABA-operated channels which are conducting at any instant. VGABA does not fulfil this criterion. gGABA is an appropriate parameter, but is difficult to determine for large responses where the membrane is nearly short circuited. IGABA measured during voltage clamp fulfils this criterion. Midazolam (greater than 10(-6) M) reliably potentiated GABA responses with a parallel shift to the left of the dose-response curve. This is in agreement with biochemical studies where BZs increase the affinity of the GABA receptor for its ligand. The effect of DMCM on GABA responses was more variable. In the majority of cases GABA responses were reduced by DMCM. The threshold dose for this depression was

  5. Modulation of Innate Immune Responses via Covalently Linked TLR Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present the synthesis of novel adjuvants for vaccine development using multivalent scaffolds and bioconjugation chemistry to spatially manipulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. TLRs are primary receptors for activation of the innate immune system during vaccination. Vaccines that contain a combination of small and macromolecule TLR agonists elicit more directed immune responses and prolong responses against foreign pathogens. In addition, immune activation is enhanced upon stimulation of two distinct TLRs. Here, we synthesized combinations of TLR agonists as spatially defined tri- and di-agonists to understand how specific TLR agonist combinations contribute to the overall immune response. We covalently conjugated three TLR agonists (TLR4, 7, and 9) to a small molecule core to probe the spatial arrangement of the agonists. Treating immune cells with the linked agonists increased activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and enhanced and directed immune related cytokine production and gene expression beyond cells treated with an unconjugated mixture of the same three agonists. The use of TLR signaling inhibitors and knockout studies confirmed that the tri-agonist molecule activated multiple signaling pathways leading to the observed higher activity. To validate that the TLR4, 7, and 9 agonist combination would activate the immune response to a greater extent, we performed in vivo studies using a vaccinia vaccination model. Mice vaccinated with the linked TLR agonists showed an increase in antibody depth and breadth compared to mice vaccinated with the unconjugated mixture. These studies demonstrate how activation of multiple TLRs through chemically and spatially defined organization assists in guiding immune responses, providing the potential to use chemical tools to design and develop more effective vaccines. PMID:26640818

  6. Mechanisms of agonist action at D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Lin, Hong; Strange, Philip G

    2004-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the biochemical mechanisms of agonist action at the G protein-coupled D2 dopamine receptor expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Stimulation of guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding by full and partial agonists was determined at different concentrations of [35S]GTPgammaS (0.1 and 10 nM) and in the presence of different concentrations of GDP. At both concentrations of [35S]GTPgammaS, increasing GDP decreased the [35S]GTPgammaS binding observed with maximally stimulating concentrations of agonist, with partial agonists exhibiting greater sensitivity to the effects of GDP than full agonists. The relative efficacy of partial agonists was greater at the lower GDP concentrations. Concentration-response experiments were performed for a range of agonists at the two [35S]GTPgammaS concentrations and with different concentrations of GDP. At 0.1 nM [35S]GTPgammaS, the potency of both full and partial agonists was dependent on the GDP concentration in the assays. At 10 nM [35S]GTPgammaS, the potency of full agonists exhibited a greater dependence on the GDP concentration, whereas the potency of partial agonists was virtually independent of GDP. We concluded that at the lower [35S]GTPgammaS concentration, the rate-determining step in G protein activation is the binding of [35S]GTPgammaS to the G protein. At the higher [35S]GTPgammaS concentration, for full agonists, [35S]GTPgammaS binding remains the slowest step, whereas for partial agonists, another (GDP-independent) step, probably ternary complex breakdown, becomes rate-determining. PMID:15340043

  7. Affinity engineering of maltoporin: variants with enhanced affinity for particular ligands.

    PubMed

    Clune, A; Lee, K S; Ferenci, T

    1984-05-31

    Affinity-chromatographic selection on immobilized starch was used to selectively enhance the affinity of the maltodextrin-specific pore protein ( maltoporin , LamB protein, or lambda receptor protein) in the outer membrane of E. coli. Selection strategies were established for rare bacteria in large populations producing maltoporin variants with enhanced affinities for both starch and maltose, for starch but not maltose and for maltose but not starch. Three classes of lamB mutants with up to eight-fold increase in affinity for particular ligands were isolated. These mutants provide a unique range of modifications in the specificity of a transport protein. PMID:6375667

  8. Synthesis and opioid receptor affinity of a series of 2, 4-diaryl-substituted 3,7-diazabicylononanones.

    PubMed

    Siener, T; Cambareri, A; Kuhl, U; Englberger, W; Haurand, M; Kögel, B; Holzgrabe, U

    2000-10-01

    3,7-Diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9-ones having aryl rings in positions 2 and 4 with systematically varied substituents were synthesized using a double Mannich procedure. Radioligand binding assays were performed to measure the affinity of the compounds to the mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptors. The affinity of all 2, 4-diphenyl-substituted 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9-ones to the mu- and delta-receptors was found to be low. In contrast, with exception of the nitro- and cyanophenyl-substituted compounds, most of the diazabicycles showed considerable affinity for the kappa-receptor. In particular, the m-fluoro-, p-methoxy-, and m-hydroxy-substituted compounds have an affinity in the submicromolar range. Due to solubility problems in aqueous media, salts of HZ2 were synthesized. The methiodide shows high kappa-affinity and may, thus, be a promising candidate for development of a peripheral kappa-agonist, e.g. for use in the case of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:11020289

  9. Helix-constrained nociceptin peptides are potent agonists and antagonists of ORL-1 and nociception.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Rink-Jan; Harrison, Rosemary S; Ruiz-Gómez, Gloria; Hoang, Huy N; Shepherd, Nicholas E; Chow, Shiao; Hill, Timothy A; Madala, Praveen K; Fairlie, David P

    2015-01-01

    Nociceptin (orphanin FQ) is a 17-residue neuropeptide hormone with roles in both nociception and analgesia. It is an opioid-like peptide that binds to and activates the G-protein-coupled receptor opioid receptor-like-1 (ORL-1, NOP, orphanin FQ receptor, kappa-type 3 opioid receptor) on central and peripheral nervous tissue, without activating classic delta-, kappa-, or mu-opioid receptors or being inhibited by the classic opioid antagonist naloxone. The three-dimensional structure of ORL-1 was recently published, and the activation mechanism is believed to involve capture by ORL-1 of the high-affinity binding, prohelical C-terminus. This likely anchors the receptor-activating N-terminus of nociception nearby for insertion in the membrane-spanning helices of ORL-1. In search of higher agonist potency, two lysine and two aspartate residues were strategically incorporated into the receptor-binding C-terminus of the nociceptin sequence and two Lys(i)→Asp(i+4) side chain-side chain condensations were used to generate lactam cross-links that constrained nociceptin into a highly stable α-helix in water. A cell-based assay was developed using natively expressed ORL-1 receptors on mouse neuroblastoma cells to measure phosphorylated ERK as a reporter of agonist-induced receptor activation and intracellular signaling. Agonist activity was increased up to 20-fold over native nociceptin using a combination of this helix-inducing strategy and other amino acid modifications. An NMR-derived three-dimensional solution structure is described for a potent ORL-1 agonist derived from nociceptin, along with structure-activity relationships leading to the most potent known α-helical ORL-1 agonist (EC₅₀ 40 pM, pERK, Neuro-2a cells) and antagonist (IC₅₀ 7 nM, pERK, Neuro-2a cells). These α-helix-constrained mimetics of nociceptin(1-17) had enhanced serum stability relative to unconstrained peptide analogues and nociceptin itself, were not cytotoxic, and displayed potent

  10. Computational modeling toward understanding agonist binding on dopamine 3.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaxue; Lu, Xuefeng; Yang, Chao-Yie; Huang, Zhimin; Fu, Wei; Hou, Tingjun; Zhang, Jian

    2010-09-27

    The dopamine 3 (D3) receptor is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of nervous system disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, and current research interests primarily focus on the discovery/design of potent D3 agonists. Herein, a well-designed computational protocol, which combines pharmacophore identification, homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was employed to understand the agonist binding on D3 aiming to provide insights into the development of novel potent D3 agonists. We (1) identified the chemical features required in effective D3 agonists by pharmacophore modeling based upon 18 known diverse D3 agonists; (2) constructed the three-dimensional (3D) structure of D3 based on homology modeling and the pharmacophore hypothesis; (3) identified the binding modes of the agonists to D3 by the correlation between the predicted binding free energies and the experimental values; and (4) investigated the induced fit of D3 upon agonist binding through MD simulations. The pharmacophore models of the D3 agonists and the 3D structure of D3 can be used for either ligand- or receptor-based drug design. Furthermore, the MD simulations further give the insight that the long and flexible EL2 acts as a "door" for agonist binding, and the "ionic lock" at the bottom of TM3 and TM6 is essential to transduce the activation signal. PMID:20695484

  11. In Vitro excitation of purified membrane fragments by cholinergic agonists : I. Pharmalogical properties of the excitable membrane fragments.

    PubMed

    Kasai, M; Changeux, J P

    1971-03-01

    Excitation of membrane fragments by cholinergic agonists is measuredin vitro by a filtration technique. Membrane fragments which contain high levels of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase and presumably originate from the innervated excitable faces of electroplax are first purified from homogenates of electric organ ofElectrophorus electricus by centrifugation in a sucrose gradient. Then the fragments, which make closed vesicles or microsacs, are equilibrated overnight with a medium containing(22)Na(+). After equilibration of the inside of the microsacs with the outside medium, the suspension is diluted into a nonradioactive medium. The(22)Na(+) content of the microsacs as a function of time is then followed by rapid filtration on Millipore filters. In the presence of cholinergic agonists, the time course of(22)Na(+) release changes: the rate of(22)Na(+) release increases. This increase is blocked byd-tubocurarine and is absent with microsacs derived from the non-innervated inexcitable membrane of the electroplax. The response to cholinergic agonists is thus followed on a completely cell-free system, in a well-defined environment. The dose-response curves to cholinergic agents obtainedin vitro agree, quantitatively, with the dose-response curves recordedin vivo by electrophysiological methods. In particular, the dose-response curve to agonists is sigmoid, the antagonism betweend-tubocurarine and carbamylcholine competitive, and the antagonism between tetracaine and carbamylcholine noncompetitive. The effects of two different affinity labeling reagents on the response to agonists and on the catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase are followed in parallel on the same microsac preparation. The effects of dithiothreitol and of gramicidin A on the microsacs are studied and are found to be similar to those observedin vivo with the isolated electroplax. PMID:24173287

  12. p-( sup 125 I)iodoclonidine, a novel radiolabeled agonist for studying central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.M.; Siegel, B.W. )

    1990-09-01

    Unlabeled p-iodoclonidine was efficacious in attenuating forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells. Maximal attenuation was 76 +/- 3%, with an EC50 of 347 +/- 60 nM. Comparable values of epinephrine were 72 +/- 3% and 122 +/- 22 nM. Responses to both agonists were abolished by 10 microM phentolamine. Therefore, p-iodoclonidine is an agonist in a cell culture model system of the neuronal alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. p-(125I)Iodoclonidine binding to membranes were measured using various regions of the rat brain. The agonist labeled a single population of sites present on cerebral cortical membranes, which was saturable (Bmax = 230 fmol/mg of protein) and possessed high affinity for the ligand (Kd = 0.6 nM). Binding was largely specific (93% at 0.6 nM). A variety of alpha 2-adrenergic agonists and antagonists were shown to compete for the binding of the radioligand. The binding of p-(125I)iodoclonidine was much less sensitive to agents that interact with alpha 1-adrenergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic receptors. Approximately 65% of the binding was sensitive to guanine nucleotides. Association kinetics using 0.4 nM radioligand were biphasic (37% associate rapidly, with kobs = 0.96 min-1, with the remainder binding more slowly, with kobs = 0.031 min-1) and reached a plateau by 90 min at 25 degrees. Dissociation kinetics were also biphasic, with 30% of the binding dissociating rapidly (k1 = 0.32 min-1) and the remainder dissociating 50-fold more slowly (k2 = 0.006 min-1). Agonist binding is, therefore, uniquely complex and probably reflects the conformational changes that accompany receptor activation.

  13. The Use of the LanthaScreen TR-FRET CAR Coactivator Assay in the Characterization of Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) Inverse Agonists.

    PubMed

    Carazo, Alejandro; Pávek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a critical nuclear receptor in the gene regulation of xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism. The LanthaScreen(TM) TR-FRET CAR coactivator assay provides a simple and reliable method to analyze the affinity of a ligand to the human CAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) with no need to use cellular models. This in silico assay thus enables the study of direct CAR ligands and the ability to distinguish them from the indirect CAR activators that affect the receptor via the cell signaling-dependent phosphorylation of CAR in cells. For the current paper we characterized the pharmacodynamic interactions of three known CAR inverse agonists/antagonists-PK11195, clotrimazole and androstenol-with the prototype agonist CITCO (6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3] thiazole-5-carbaldehyde-O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime) using the TR-FRET LanthaScreen(TM) assay. We have confirmed that all three compounds are inverse agonists of human CAR, with IC50 0.51, 0.005, and 0.35 μM, respectively. All the compounds also antagonize the CITCO-mediated activation of CAR, but only clotrimazole was capable to completely reverse the effect of CITCO in the tested concentrations. Thus this method allows identifying not only agonists, but also antagonists and inverse agonists for human CAR as well as to investigate the nature of the pharmacodynamic interactions of CAR ligands. PMID:25905697

  14. The Use of the LanthaScreen TR-FRET CAR Coactivator Assay in the Characterization of Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) Inverse Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Carazo, Alejandro; Pávek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a critical nuclear receptor in the gene regulation of xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism. The LanthaScreenTM TR-FRET CAR coactivator assay provides a simple and reliable method to analyze the affinity of a ligand to the human CAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) with no need to use cellular models. This in silico assay thus enables the study of direct CAR ligands and the ability to distinguish them from the indirect CAR activators that affect the receptor via the cell signaling-dependent phosphorylation of CAR in cells. For the current paper we characterized the pharmacodynamic interactions of three known CAR inverse agonists/antagonists—PK11195, clotrimazole and androstenol—with the prototype agonist CITCO (6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde-O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime) using the TR-FRET LanthaScreenTM assay. We have confirmed that all three compounds are inverse agonists of human CAR, with IC50 0.51, 0.005, and 0.35 μM, respectively. All the compounds also antagonize the CITCO-mediated activation of CAR, but only clotrimazole was capable to completely reverse the effect of CITCO in the tested concentrations. Thus this method allows identifying not only agonists, but also antagonists and inverse agonists for human CAR as well as to investigate the nature of the pharmacodynamic interactions of CAR ligands. PMID:25905697

  15. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists: pharmacophores, evolutionary QSAR and 3D-QSAR models.

    PubMed

    Nicolotti, Orazio; Altomare, Cosimo; Pellegrini-Calace, Marialuisa; Carotti, Angelo

    2004-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine ion channel receptors (nAChRs) exist as several subtypes and are involved in a variety of functions and disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The lack of reliable information on the 3D structure of nAChRs prompted us to focus efforts on pharmacophore and structure-affinity relationships (SAFIRs). The use of DISCO (DIStance COmparison) and Catalyst/HipHop led to the formulation of a pharmacophore that is made of three geometrically unrelated features: (i) an ammonium head involved in coulombic and/or H-bond interactions, (ii) a lone pair of a pyridine nitrogen or a carbonyl oxygen, as H-bond acceptor site, and (iii) a hydrophobic molecular region generally constituted by aliphatic cycles. The quantitative SAFIR (QSAFIR) study was carried out on about three hundred nicotinoid agonists, and coherent results were obtained from classical Hansch-type approach, 3D QSAFIRs, based on Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA), and trade-off models generated by Multi-objective Genetic QSAR (MoQSAR), a novel evolutionary software that makes use of Genetic Programming (GP) and multi-objective optimization (MO). Within each congeneric series, Hansch-type equations revealed detrimental steric effects as the major factors modulating the receptor affinity, whereas CoMFA allowed us to merge progressively single-class models in a more global one, whose robustness was supported by crossvalidation, high prediction statistics and satisfactory predictions of the affinity data of a true external ligand set (r(2)(pred) = 0.796). Next, MoQSAR was used to analyze a data set of 58 highly active nicotinoids characterized by 56 descriptors, that are log P, MR and 54 low inter-correlated WHIM (Weighted Holistic Invariant Molecular) indices. Equivalent QSAFIR models, that represent different compromises between structural model complexity, fitting and internal model complexity, were found. Our attention was

  16. Dopamine inhibition of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase is mediated through the high-affinity state of the D/sub 2/ receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Borgundvaag, B.; George, S.R.

    1985-07-29

    The diterpinoid forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity (measured by conversion of (/sup 3/H)-ATP to (/sup 3/H)-cAMP) in anterior pituitary from male and female rats. Inhibition of stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by potent dopaminergic agonists was demonstrable only in female anterior pituitary. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity displayed a typically dopaminergic rank order of agonist potencies and could be completely reversed by a specific dopamine receptor antagonist. The IC/sub 50/ values of dopamine agonist inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity correlated with equal molarity with the dissociation constant of the high-affinity dopamine agonist-detected receptor binding site and with the IC/sub 50/ values for inhibition of prolactin secretion. These findings support the hypothesis that it is the high-affinity form of the D/sub 2/ dopamine receptor in anterior pituitary which is responsible for mediating the dopaminergic function of attenuating adenylate cyclase activity. 12 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  17. Solubilization and characterization of guanine nucleotide-sensitive muscarinic agonist binding sites from rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Berrie, C. P.; Birdsall, N. J.; Hulme, E. C.; Keen, M.; Stockton, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors from rat myocardial membranes may be solubilized by digitonin in good yield at low temperatures in the presence of Mg2+. Under these conditions, up to 60% of the soluble receptors show high affinity binding for the potent agonist [3H]-oxotremorine-M (KA = 10(9)M-1), which is inhibited by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate. The muscarinic binding site labelled with [3H]-oxotremorine-M has a higher sedimentation coefficient (13.4 s) than sites labelled with a 3H antagonist in the presence of guanylylimidodiphosphate (11.6 s) and probably represents a complex between the ligand binding subunit of the receptor and a guanine nucleotide binding protein. PMID:6478115

  18. Dual Alleviation of Acute and Neuropathic Pain by Fused Opioid Agonist-Neurokinin 1 Antagonist Peptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Betti, Cecilia; Starnowska, Joanna; Mika, Joanna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Frankiewicz, Lukasz; Novoa, Alexandre; Bochynska, Marta; Keresztes, Attila; Kosson, Piotr; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Chung, Nga N; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Schiller, Peter W; Janssens, Frans; Ceusters, Marc; Sommen, François; Meert, Theo; Przewlocka, Barbara; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2015-12-10

    Herein, the synthesis and biological evaluation of dual opioid agonists-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists is described. In these multitarget ligands, the two pharmacophores do not overlap, and this allowed maintaining high NK1R affinity and antagonist potency in compounds 12 and 13. Although the fusion of the two ligands resulted in slightly diminished opioid agonism at the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR, respectively), as compared to the opioid parent peptide, balanced MOR/DOR activities were obtained. Compared to morphine, compounds 12 and 13 produced more potent antinociceptive effects in both acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (von Frey and cold plate). Similarly to morphine, analgesic tolerance developed after repetitive administration of these compounds. To our delight, compound 12 did not produce cross-tolerance with morphine and high antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects could be reinstated after chronic administration of each of the two compounds. PMID:26713106

  19. Strategies for designing synthetic immune agonists.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tom Y-H

    2016-08-01

    Enhancing the immune system is a validated strategy to combat infectious disease, cancer and allergy. Nevertheless, the development of immune adjuvants has been hampered by safety concerns. Agents that can stimulate the immune system often bear structural similarities with pathogen-associated molecular patterns found in bacteria or viruses and are recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Activation of these PRRs results in the immediate release of inflammatory cytokines, up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules, and recruitment of innate immune cells. The distribution and duration of these early inflammatory events are crucial in the development of antigen-specific adaptive immunity in the forms of antibody and/or T cells capable of searching for and destroying the infectious pathogens or cancer cells. However, systemic activation of these PRRs is often poorly tolerated. Hence, different strategies have been employed to modify or deliver immune agonists in an attempt to control the early innate receptor activation through temporal or spatial restriction. These approaches include physicochemical manipulation, covalent conjugation, formulation and conditional activation/deactivation. This review will describe recent examples of discovery and optimization of synthetic immune agonists towards clinical application. PMID:27213842

  20. Chimpanzees Extract Social Information from Agonistic Screams

    PubMed Central

    Slocombe, Katie E.; Kaller, Tanja; Call, Josep; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) agonistic screams are graded vocal signals that are produced in a context-specific manner. Screams given by aggressors and victims can be discriminated based on their acoustic structure but the mechanisms of listener comprehension of these calls are currently unknown. In this study, we show that chimpanzees extract social information from these vocal signals that, combined with their more general social knowledge, enables them to understand the nature of out-of-sight social interactions. In playback experiments, we broadcast congruent and incongruent sequences of agonistic calls and monitored the response of bystanders. Congruent sequences were in accordance with existing social dominance relations; incongruent ones violated them. Subjects looked significantly longer at incongruent sequences, despite them being acoustically less salient (fewer call types from fewer individuals) than congruent ones. We concluded that chimpanzees categorised an apparently simple acoustic signal into victim and aggressor screams and used pragmatics to form inferences about third-party interactions they could not see. PMID:20644722

  1. Pharmacological and pharmacokinetic characterization of the cannabinoid receptor 2 agonist, GW405833, utilizing rodent models of acute and chronic pain, anxiety, ataxia and catalepsy.

    PubMed

    Valenzano, Kenneth J; Tafesse, Laykea; Lee, Gary; Harrison, James E; Boulet, Jamie M; Gottshall, Susan L; Mark, Lilly; Pearson, Michelle S; Miller, Wendy; Shan, Shen; Rabadi, Leyana; Rotshteyn, Yakov; Chaffer, Suzanne M; Turchin, Paul I; Elsemore, David A; Toth, Mathew; Koetzner, Lee; Whiteside, Garth T

    2005-04-01

    To date, two cannabinoid receptors have been identified, CB1 and CB2. Activation of these receptors with non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonists reduces pain sensitivity in animals and humans. However, activation of CB1 receptors is also associated with central side effects, including ataxia and catalepsy. More recently, a role for selective CB2 agonists in pain modification has been demonstrated. GW405833, a selective CB2 agonist, was recently reported to partially reverse the inflammation and hyperalgesia in a rat model of acute inflammation. In the current report, we extend the characterization and therapeutic potential of this compound. For the first time, we show that GW405833 selectively binds both rat and human CB2 receptors with high affinity, where it acts as a partial agonist (approximately 50% reduction of forskolin-mediated cAMP production compared to the full cannabinoid agonist, CP55,940). We also report for the first time that intraperitoneal administration of GW405833 (0.3-100 mg/kg) to rats shows linear, dose-dependent increases in plasma levels and substantial penetration into the central nervous system. In addition, GW405833 (up to 30 mg/kg) elicits potent and efficacious antihyperalgesic effects in rodent models of neuropathic, incisional and chronic inflammatory pain, the first description of this compound in these models. In contrast, analgesia, sedation and catalepsy were not observed in this dose range, but were apparent at 100 mg/kg. Additionally, GW405833 was not antihyperalgesic against chronic inflammatory pain in CB2 knockout mice. These data support the tenet that selective CB2 receptor agonists have the potential to treat pain without eliciting the centrally-mediated side effects associated with non-selective cannabinoid agonists, and highlight the utility of GW405833 for the investigation of CB2 physiology. PMID:15814101

  2. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure based modeling methods

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R2=0.55 and CCR=0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R2=0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. PMID:25058446

  3. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  4. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  5. Affinity purification of aprotinin from bovine lung.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Liu, Lanhua; Chen, Beizhan; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun

    2015-05-01

    An affinity protocol for the purification of aprotinin from bovine lung was developed. To simulate the structure of sucrose octasulfate, a natural specific probe for aprotinin, the affinity ligand was composed of an acidic head and a hydrophobic stick, and was then linked with Sepharose. The sorbent was then subjected to adsorption analysis with pure aprotinin. The purification process consisted of one step of affinity chromatography and another step of ultrafiltration. Then purified aprotinin was subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, trypsin inhibitor activity, gel-filtration, and thin-layer chromatography analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax ) of the affinity sorbent was 25,476.0 ± 184.8 kallikrein inactivator unit/g wet gel; the dissociation constant of the complex "immobilized ligand-aprotinin" (Kd ) was 4.6 ± 0.1 kallikrein inactivator unit/mL. After the affinity separation of bovine lung aprotinin, reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and gel-filtration chromatography revealed that the protein was a single polypeptide, and the purities were ∼ 97 and 100%, respectively; the purified peptide was also confirmed with aprotinin standard by gel-filtration chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. After the whole purification process, protein, and bioactivity recoveries were 2.2 and 92.6%, respectively; and the specific activity was up to 15,907.1 ± 10.2 kallikrein inactivator unit/mg. PMID:25677462

  6. Novel Analogues of (R)-5-(Methylamino)-5,6-dihydro-4H-imidazo[4,5,1-ij]quinolin-2(1H)-one (Sumanirole) Provide Clues to Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Agonist Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Zou, Mu-Fa; Keck, Thomas M; Kumar, Vivek; Donthamsetti, Prashant; Michino, Mayako; Burzynski, Caitlin; Schweppe, Catherine; Bonifazi, Alessandro; Free, R Benjamin; Sibley, David R; Janowsky, Aaron; Shi, Lei; Javitch, Jonathan A; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2016-04-14

    Novel 1-, 5-, and 8-substituted analogues of sumanirole (1), a dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2R/D3R) agonist, were synthesized. Binding affinities at both D2R and D3R were higher when determined in competition with the agonist radioligand [(3)H]7-hydroxy-N,N-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) than with the antagonist radioligand [(3)H]N-methylspiperone. Although 1 was confirmed as a D2R-preferential agonist, its selectivity in binding and functional studies was lower than previously reported. All analogues were determined to be D2R/D3R agonists in both GoBRET and mitogenesis functional assays. Loss of efficacy was detected for the N-1-substituted analogues at D3R. In contrast, the N-5-alkyl-substituted analogues, and notably the n-butyl-arylamides (22b and 22c), all showed improved affinity at D2R over 1 with neither a loss of efficacy nor an increase in selectivity. Computational modeling provided a structural basis for the D2R selectivity of 1, illustrating how subtle differences in the highly homologous orthosteric binding site (OBS) differentially affect D2R/D3R affinity and functional efficacy. PMID:27035329

  7. (1R, 3S)-(−)-Trans-PAT: A novel full-efficacy serotonin 5-HT2C receptor agonist with 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptor inverse agonist/antagonist activity

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Raymond G.; Fang, Lijuan; Huang, Yingsu; Wilczynski, Andrzej; Sivendran, Sashikala

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors signal primarily through Gαq to activate phospholipase C (PLC) and formation of inositol phosphates (IP) and diacylglycerol. The human 5-HT2C receptor, expressed exclusively in the central nervous system, is involved in several physiological and psychological processes. Development of 5-HT2C agonists that do not also activate 5-HT2A or 5-HT2B receptors is challenging because transmembrane domain identity is about 75% among 5-HT2 subtypes. This paper reports 5-HT2 receptor affinity and function of (1R,3S)-(−)-trans-1-phenyl-3-dimethylamino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (PAT), a small molecule that produces anorexia and weight-loss after peripheral administration to mice. (−)-Trans-PAT is a stereoselective full-efficacy agonist at human 5-HT2C receptors, plus, it is a 5-HT2A/5-HT2B inverse agonist and competitive antagonist. The Ki of (−)-trans-PAT at 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT2C receptors is 410, 1200, and 37 nM, respectively. Functional studies measured activation of PLC/[3H]-IP formation in clonal cells expressing human 5-HT2 receptors. At 5-HT2C receptors, (−)-trans-PAT is an agonist (EC50 = 20 nM) comparable to serotonin in potency and efficacy. At 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors, (−)-trans-PAT is an inverse agonist (IC50 = 490 and 1,000 nM, respectively) and competitive antagonist (KB = 460 and 1400 nM, respectively) of serotonin. Experimental results are interpreted in light of molecular modeling studies indicating the (−)-trans-PAT protonated amine can form an ionic bond with D3.32 of 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors, but, not with 5-HT2B receptors. In addition to probing 5-HT2 receptor structure and function, (−)-trans-PAT is a novel lead regarding 5-HT2C agonist/5-HT2A inverse agonist drug development for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19397907

  8. Identity, Affinity, Reality: Making the Case for Affinity Groups in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie; Ridley, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Affinity groups are places where students build connections and process "ouch" moments from their classes. Children talk about the isolation they sometimes feel. The relationships students gain through race-based affinity groups enable them to feel less alone with their emotions and help them build a stronger sense of self. At the same time,…

  9. Role of extracellular domain dimerization in agonist-induced activation of natriuretic peptide receptor A.

    PubMed

    Parat, Marie; McNicoll, Normand; Wilkes, Brian; Fournier, Alain; De Léan, André

    2008-02-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR) A is composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) with a ligand binding site, a single transmembrane region, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. The natural agonists atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP) bind and activate NPRA, leading to cyclic GMP production, which is responsible for their role in cardiovascular homeostasis. Previous studies suggested that stabilization of a dimeric form of NPRA by agonist is essential for receptor activation. However, ligand specificity and sequential steps of this dimerization process have not been investigated. We used radioligand binding, fluorescence resonance energy transfer homoquenching, and molecular modeling to characterize the interaction of human NPRA-ECD with ANP, BNP, the superagonist (Arg(10),Leu(12),Ser(17),Leu(18))-rANP-(1-28), the minimized analog mini-ANP and the antagonist (Arg(6),beta-cyclohexyl-Ala(8),d-Tic(16),Arg(17),Cys(18))-rANP-(6-18)-amide (A71915). ANP binds to preformed ECD dimers and spontaneous dimerization is the rate-limiting step of the ligand binding process. All the studied peptides, including A71915 antagonist, induce a dose-dependent fluorescence homoquenching, specific to dimerization, with potencies highly correlated with their binding affinities. A71915 induced more quenching than other peptides, suggesting stabilization by the antagonist of ECD dimer in a distinct inactive conformation. In summary, these results indicate that the ligand-induced dimerization process of NPRA is different from that for cytokine receptor model. Agonists or antagonists bind to preformed dimeric ECD, leading to dimer stabilization in an active or inactive conformation, respectively. Furthermore, the highly sensitive fluorescence assay designed to assess dimerization could serve as a powerful tool for further detailing the kinetic steps involved in natriuretic peptide receptor binding and activation. PMID:17965196

  10. Serum stability of selected decapeptide agonists of KISS1R using pseudopeptides.

    PubMed

    Asami, Taiji; Nishizawa, Naoki; Ishibashi, Yoshihiro; Nishibori, Kimiko; Nakayama, Masaharu; Horikoshi, Yasuko; Matsumoto, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Tarui, Naoki; Ohtaki, Tetsuya; Kitada, Chieko

    2012-10-15

    Metastin/kisspeptin, a 54-amino acid peptide, is the ligand of the G-protein-coupled receptor KISS1R which plays a key role in pathways that regulate reproduction and cell migration in many endocrine and gonadal tissues. The N-terminally truncated decapeptide, metastin(45-54), has 3-10 times higher receptor affinity and intracellular calcium ion-mobilizing activity but is rapidly inactivated in serum. In this study we designed and synthesized stable KISS1R agonistic decapeptide analogs with selected substitutions at positions 47, 50, and 51. Replacement of glycine with azaglycine (azaGly) in which the α-carbon is replaced with a nitrogen atom at position 51 improved the stability of amide bonds between Phe(50)-Gly(51) and Gly(51)-Leu(52) as determined by in vitro mouse serum stability studies. Substitution for tryptophan at position 47 with other amino acids such as serine, threonine, β-(3-pyridyl)alanine, and D-tryptophan (D-Trp), produced analogs that were highly stable in mouse serum. D-Trp(47) analog 13 showed not only high metabolic stability but also excellent KISS1R agonistic activity. Other labile peptides may have increased serum stability using amino acid substitution. PMID:22975302

  11. Novel Retinoic Acid Receptor Alpha Agonists for Treatment of Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Li, Zhengzhe; Chen, Yibang; Evans, Todd; Chuang, Peter; Das, Bhaskar; He, John Cijiang

    2011-01-01

    Development of pharmacologic agents that protect podocytes from injury is a critical strategy for the treatment of kidney glomerular diseases. Retinoic acid reduces proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis in multiple animal models of kidney diseases. However, clinical studies are limited because of significant side effects of retinoic acid. Animal studies suggest that all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) attenuates proteinuria by protecting podocytes from injury. The physiological actions of ATRA are mediated by binding to all three isoforms of the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs): RARα, RARβ, and RARγ. We have previously shown that ATRA exerts its renal protective effects mainly through the agonism of RARα. Here, we designed and synthesized a novel boron-containing derivative of the RARα-specific agonist Am580. This new derivative, BD4, binds to RARα receptor specifically and is predicted to have less toxicity based on its structure. We confirmed experimentally that BD4 binds to RARα with a higher affinity and exhibits less cellular toxicity than Am580 and ATRA. BD4 induces the expression of podocyte differentiation markers (synaptopodin, nephrin, and WT-1) in cultured podocytes. Finally, we confirmed that BD4 reduces proteinuria and improves kidney injury in HIV-1 transgenic mice, a model for HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). Mice treated with BD4 did not develop any obvious toxicity or side effect. Our data suggest that BD4 is a novel RARα agonist, which could be used as a potential therapy for patients with kidney disease such as HIVAN. PMID:22125642

  12. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice.

    PubMed

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  13. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A.; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  14. Procaine rapidly inactivates acetylcholine receptors from Torpedo and competes with agonist for inhibition sites

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Miller, K.W. )

    1989-02-21

    The relationship between the high-affinity procaine channel inhibition site and the agonist self-inhibition site on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) from Torpedo electroplaque was investigated by using rapid {sup 86}Rb{sup +} quenched-flux assays at 4 {degree}C in native AChR-rich vesicles on which 50-60% of ACh activation sites were blocked with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX). In the presence of channel-activating acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations alone, AChR undergoes one phase of inactivation in under a second. Addition of procaine produces two-phase inactivation similar to that seen with self-inhibiting ACh concentrations rapid inactivation complete in 30-75 ms is followed by fast desensitization at the same k{sub d} observed without procaine. The dependence of k{sub r} on (procaine) is consistent with a bimolecular association between procaine and its AChR site. Inhibition of AChR function by mixtures of procaine plus self-inhibiting concentrations of ACh or suberyldicholine was studied by reducing the level of {alpha}-BTX block in vesicles. The data support a mechanism where procaine binds preferentially to the open-channel AChR state, since no procaine-induced inactivation is observed without agonist and k{sub r}'s dependence on (ACh) in channel-activating range closely parallels that of {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux response to ACh.

  15. Preparation, characterization and molecular modeling of PEGylated human growth hormone with agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Khameneh, Bahman; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Hassanzadeh-Khayyat, Mohammad; Varasteh, AbdolReza; Chamani, JamshidKhan; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Mohammadpanah, Hamid; Abnous, Khalil; Saberi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-09-01

    In this study, site-specific PEGylated human growth hormone (hGH) was prepared by microbial transglutaminase, modeled and characterized. To this end, the effects of different reaction parameters including reaction media, PEG:protein ratios, reaction time and pH value were investigated. PEG-hGH was purified by size exclusion chromatography method and analyzed by SDS-PAGE, BCA, peptide mapping, ESI and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectroscopy methods. Biophysical and biological properties of PEG-hGH were evaluated. Molecular simulation was utilized to provide molecular insight into the protein-receptor interaction. The optimum conditions that were obtained for PEGylation were phosphate buffer with pH of 7.4, 48 h of stirring and PEG:protein ratio of 40:1. By this method, mono-PEG-hGH with high reaction yield was obtained and PEGylation site was at Gln-40 residue. The circular dichroism and fluorescence spectrum indicated that PEGylation did not change the secondary structure while tertiary structure was altered. Upon enzymatic PEGylation, agonistic activity of hGH was preserved; however, Somavert(®), which is prepared by chemical PEGylation, is an antagonist form of protein. These data were confirmed by the total energy of affinity obtained by computational protein-receptor interaction. In conclusion, PEGylation of hGH was led to prepare a novel form of hormone with an agonist activity which merits further investigations. PMID:26116386

  16. Neuronal nicotinic receptor agonists: a multi-approach development of the pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Nicolotti, O; Pellegrini-Calace, M; Carrieri, A; Altomare, C; Centeno, N B; Sanz, F; Carotti, A

    2001-09-01

    Based on the results obtained with different automated computational approaches as applied to the study of eleven high-affinity agonists of the neuronal nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), belonging to different chemical classes, new relevant features were detected which complement the existing pharmacophores. Convergent results from DISCO (Distance Comparison), QXP (Quick Explore), Catalyst/HipHop, and MIPSIM (Molecular Interaction Potential Similarity) allowed us to identify and locate, in a well defined spatial arrangement, three geometrically independent key structural features: (i) a positively charged nitrogen atom for ionic or hydrogen bond interactions, (ii) a lone pair of the pyridine nitrogen or a specific lone pair of a carbonyl oxygen, as a hydrogen bond acceptor, and (iii) a centre of a hydrophobic area generally occupied by aliphatic cycles. The pharmacophore presented herein, along with predictive 2D and 3D QSAR models recently developed in our group, could represent valuable computational tools for the design of new nAChR agonists having therapeutical potential. PMID:11776295

  17. Novel sigma (σ) receptor agonists produce antidepressant-like effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiajia; Mack, Aisha L.; Coop, Andrew; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2014-01-01

    Many antidepressant drugs interact with σ receptors and accumulating evidence suggests that these proteins mediate antidepressant-like effects in animals and humans. σ Receptors are localized in brain regions affected in depression, further strengthening the hypothesis that they represent logical drug development targets. In this study, two novel σ receptor agonists (UMB23, UMB82) were evaluated for antidepressant-like activity in mice. First, radioligand binding studies confirmed that the novel compounds had preferential affinity for σ receptors. Second, the forced swim test, a well established animal model for screening potential antidepressant drugs, showed that both compounds dose-dependently reduced immobility time. The σ receptor antagonist BD1047 attenuated the antidepressant-like effects of UMB23 and UMB82. Third, locomotor activity suggested that the effects of UMB23 and UMB82 in the forced swim test were not due to non-specific motor activating effects. Together, the data provide further evidence that σ receptor agonists represent a possible new class of antidepressant medication. PMID:17376658

  18. Discovery of a Novel, Orally Efficacious Liver X Receptor (LXR) β Agonist.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yajun; Zhuang, Linghang; Fan, Kristi Yi; Tice, Colin M; Zhao, Wei; Dong, Chengguo; Lotesta, Stephen D; Leftheris, Katerina; Lindblom, Peter R; Liu, Zhijie; Shimada, Jun; Noto, Paul B; Meng, Shi; Hardy, Andrew; Howard, Lamont; Krosky, Paula; Guo, Joan; Lipinski, Kerri; Kandpal, Geeta; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Zhao, Yi; Lala, Deepak; Van Orden, Rebecca; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Guozhou; Wu, Zhongren; McKeever, Brian M; McGeehan, Gerard M; Gregg, Richard E; Claremon, David A; Singh, Suresh B

    2016-04-14

    This article describes the application of Contour to the design and discovery of a novel, potent, orally efficacious liver X receptor β (LXRβ) agonist (17). Contour technology is a structure-based drug design platform that generates molecules using a context perceptive growth algorithm guided by a contact sensitive scoring function. The growth engine uses binding site perception and programmable growth capability to create drug-like molecules by assembling fragments that naturally complement hydrophilic and hydrophobic features of the protein binding site. Starting with a crystal structure of LXRβ and a docked 2-(methylsulfonyl)benzyl alcohol fragment (6), Contour was used to design agonists containing a piperazine core. Compound 17 binds to LXRβ with high affinity and to LXRα to a lesser extent, and induces the expression of LXR target genes in vitro and in vivo. This molecule served as a starting point for further optimization and generation of a candidate which is currently in human clinical trials for treating atopic dermatitis. PMID:26990539

  19. Assessing the agonist profiles of the prostacyclin analogues treprostinil and naxaprostene, particularly their DP₁ activity.

    PubMed

    Syed, Nawazish-i-Husain; Jones, Robert L

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the inhibitory profiles of the prostacyclin analogues treprostinil and naxaprostene on several isolated smooth muscle preparations have been investigated. Treprostinil was an agonist for prostanoid DP1, EP2 and IP receptors, but not EP4 receptors; its DP1 potency was only 3-4 times less than PGD2 itself. Naxaprostene was much more selective for IP receptors and tended towards partial agonism. Treprostinil is a 13,14-dihydro analogue and the role of conformation around C12-15 in controlling agonist specificity is debated; the synthesis of new analogues is proposed and possible clinical usage discussed. In terms of selective prostanoid antagonists employed, BW-A868C/MK-0524 (DP1), ACA-23 (EP2) and GW-627368 (EP4) were found fit for purpose. However, the IP antagonist RO-1138452 was compromised by α1 and α2-adrenoceptor-mediated contractile activity on rat tail artery and anti-muscarinic activity on mouse trachea. There is a need for IP receptor antagonists with better selectivity and higher affinity. PMID:25542069

  20. Peripherally Selective Cannabinoid 1 Receptor (CB1R) Agonists for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Seltzman, Herbert H; Shiner, Craig; Hirt, Erin E; Gilliam, Anne F; Thomas, Brian F; Maitra, Rangan; Snyder, Rod; Black, Sherry L; Patel, Purvi R; Mulpuri, Yatendra; Spigelman, Igor

    2016-08-25

    Alleviation of neuropathic pain by cannabinoids is limited by their central nervous system (CNS) side effects. Indole and indene compounds were engineered for high hCB1R affinity, peripheral selectivity, metabolic stability, and in vivo efficacy. An epithelial cell line assay identified candidates with <1% blood-brain barrier penetration for testing in a rat neuropathy induced by unilateral sciatic nerve entrapment (SNE). The SNE-induced mechanical allodynia was reversibly suppressed, partially or completely, after intraperitoneal or oral administration of several indenes. At doses that relieve neuropathy symptoms, the indenes completely lacked, while the brain-permeant CB1R agonist HU-210 (1) exhibited strong CNS side effects, in catalepsy, hypothermia, and motor incoordination assays. Pharmacokinetic findings of ∼0.001 cerebrospinal fluid:plasma ratio further supported limited CNS penetration. Pretreatment with selective CB1R or CB2R blockers suggested mainly CB1R contribution to an indene's antiallodynic effects. Therefore, this class of CB1R agonists holds promise as a viable treatment for neuropathic pain. PMID:27482723

  1. On Affine Fusion and the Phase Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Mark A.

    2012-11-01

    A brief review is given of the integrable realization of affine fusion discovered recently by Korff and Stroppel. They showed that the affine fusion of the su(n) Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW) conformal field theories appears in a simple integrable system known as the phase model. The Yang-Baxter equation leads to the construction of commuting operators as Schur polynomials, with noncommuting hopping operators as arguments. The algebraic Bethe ansatz diagonalizes them, revealing a connection to the modular S matrix and fusion of the su(n) WZNW model. The noncommutative Schur polynomials play roles similar to those of the primary field operators in the corresponding WZNW model. In particular, their 3-point functions are the su(n) fusion multiplicities. We show here how the new phase model realization of affine fusion makes obvious the existence of threshold levels, and how it accommodates higher-genus fusion.

  2. New generation dopaminergic agents. 1. Discovery of a novel scaffold which embraces the D2 agonist pharmacophore. Structure-activity relationships of a series of 2-(aminomethyl)chromans.

    PubMed

    Mewshaw, R E; Kavanagh, J; Stack, G; Marquis, K L; Shi, X; Kagan, M Z; Webb, M B; Katz, A H; Park, A; Kang, Y H; Abou-Gharbia, M; Scerni, R; Wasik, T; Cortes-Burgos, L; Spangler, T; Brennan, J A; Piesla, M; Mazandarani, H; Cockett, M I; Ochalski, R; Coupet, J; Andree, T H

    1997-12-19

    A series of 2-(aminomethyl)chromans (2-AMCs) was synthesized and evaluated for their affinity and selectivity for both the high- and low-affinity agonist states (D2High and D2Low, respectively) of the dopamine (DA) D2 receptor. The 7-hydroxy-2-(aminomethyl)chroman moiety was observed to be the primary D2 agonist pharmacophore. The 2-methylchroman moiety was discovered to be an entirely novel scaffold which could be used to access the D2 agonist pharmacophore. Attaching various simple alkyl and arylalkyl side chains to the 7-hydroxy 2-AMC nucleus had significant effects on selectivity for the D2High receptor vs the 5HT1A and alpha 1 receptors. A novel DA partial agonist, (R)-(-)-2-(benzylamino)methyl)chroman-7-ol [R-(-)-35c], was identified as having the highest affinity and best selectivity for the D2High receptor vs the alpha 1 and 5HT1A receptors. Several regions of the 2-AMC nucleus were modified and recognized as potential sites to modulate the level of intrinsic activity. The global minimum conformer of the 7-hydroxy-2-AMC moiety was identified as fulfilling the McDermed model D2 agonist pharmacophoric criteria and was proposed as the D2 receptor-bound conformation. Structure-activity relationships gained from these studies have aided in the synthesis of D2 partial agonists of varying intrinsic activity levels. These agents should be of therapeutic value in treating disorders resulting from hypo- and hyperdopaminergic activity, without the side effects associated with complete D2 agonism or antagonism. PMID:9435894

  3. The dynamics of metric-affine gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Vitagliano, Vincenzo; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Liberati, Stefano

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > The role and the dynamics of the connection in metric-affine theories is explored. > The most general second order action does not lead to a dynamical connection. > Including higher order invariants excites new degrees of freedom in the connection. > f(R) actions are also discussed and shown to be a non- representative class. - Abstract: Metric-affine theories of gravity provide an interesting alternative to general relativity: in such an approach, the metric and the affine (not necessarily symmetric) connection are independent quantities. Furthermore, the action should include covariant derivatives of the matter fields, with the covariant derivative naturally defined using the independent connection. As a result, in metric-affine theories a direct coupling involving matter and connection is also present. The role and the dynamics of the connection in such theories is explored. We employ power counting in order to construct the action and search for the minimal requirements it should satisfy for the connection to be dynamical. We find that for the most general action containing lower order invariants of the curvature and the torsion the independent connection does not carry any dynamics. It actually reduces to the role of an auxiliary field and can be completely eliminated algebraically in favour of the metric and the matter field, introducing extra interactions with respect to general relativity. However, we also show that including higher order terms in the action radically changes this picture and excites new degrees of freedom in the connection, making it (or parts of it) dynamical. Constructing actions that constitute exceptions to this rule requires significant fine tuned and/or extra a priori constraints on the connection. We also consider f(R) actions as a particular example in order to show that they constitute a distinct class of metric-affine theories with special properties, and as such they cannot be used as representative toy theories to

  4. Displacement phenomena in lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonryeon

    2015-10-01

    The work described here examines displacement phenomena that play a role in lectin affinity chromatography and their potential to impact reproducibility. This was achieved using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), a lectin widely used in monitoring cancer. Four small identical LEL columns were coupled in series to form a single affinity chromatography system with the last in the series connected to an absorbance detector. The serial affinity column set (SACS) was then loaded with human plasma proteins. At the completion of loading, the column set was disassembled, the four columns were eluted individually, the captured proteins were trypsin digested, the peptides were deglycosylated with PNGase F, and the parent proteins were identified through mass spectral analyses. Significantly different sets of glycoproteins were selected by each column, some proteins appearing to be exclusively bound to the first column while others were bound further along in the series. Clearly, sample displacement chromatography (SDC) occurs. Glycoproteins were bound at different places in the column train, identifying the presence of glycoforms with different affinity on a single glycoprotein. It is not possible to see these phenomena in the single column mode of chromatography. Moreover, low abundance proteins were enriched, which facilitates detection. The great advantage of this method is that it differentiates between glycoproteins on the basis of their binding affinity. Displacement phenomena are concluded to be a significant component of the separation mechanism in heavily loaded lectin affinity chromatography columns. This further suggests that care must be exercised in sample loading of lectin columns to prevent analyte displacement with nonretained proteins. PMID:26348026

  5. Structure-guided optimization of estrogen receptor binding affinity and antagonist potency of pyrazolopyrimidines with basic side chains.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, H.; Sheng, S.; Compton, D.; Kim, Y.; Joachimiak, A.; Sharma, S.; Carlson, K.; Katzenellenbogen, B.; Nettles, K.; Greene, G.; Katzenellenbogen, J.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Chicago; The Scripps Research Inst.

    2007-01-01

    2,3-Diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines are estrogen receptor (ER) antagonists of modest potency that we have described previously. Guided by the crystal structure of an ER-ligand complex that we have obtained with one of these compounds, we prepared analogs that contain a basic side chain at the 2- or 3-aryl group and quickly found one that, according to the structure-based prediction, shows an increase in binding affinity and antagonist potency and a loss of residual agonist activity.

  6. IN VITRO EFFECTS OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS ANTICHOLINESTERASES AND MUSCARINIC AGONISTS ON RAT BRAIN SYNAPTOSOMAL HIGH AFFINITY CHOLINE UPTAKE. (R825811)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. N-Benzyl-5-methoxytryptamines as Potent Serotonin 5-HT2 Receptor Family Agonists and Comparison with a Series of Phenethylamine Analogues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of N-benzylated-5-methoxytryptamine analogues was prepared and investigated, with special emphasis on substituents in the meta position of the benzyl group. A parallel series of several N-benzylated analogues of 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine (2C-I) also was included for comparison of the two major templates (i.e., tryptamine and phenethylamine). A broad affinity screen at serotonin receptors showed that most of the compounds had the highest affinity at the 5-HT2 family receptors. Substitution at the para position of the benzyl group resulted in reduced affinity, whereas substitution in either the ortho or the meta position enhanced affinity. In general, introduction of a large lipophilic group improved affinity, whereas functional activity often followed the opposite trend. Tests of the compounds for functional activity utilized intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Function was measured at the human 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT2C receptors, as well as at the rat 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors. There was no general correlation between affinity and function. Several of the tryptamine congeners were very potent functionally (EC50 values from 7.6 to 63 nM), but most were partial agonists. Tests in the mouse head twitch assay revealed that many of the compounds induced the head twitch and that there was a significant correlation between this behavior and functional potency at the rat 5-HT2A receptor. PMID:25547199

  8. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  9. New unitary affine-Virasoro constructions

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Kiritsis, E.; Obers, N.A.; Poratti, M. ); Yamron, J.P. )

    1990-06-20

    This paper reports on a quasi-systematic investigation of the Virasoro master equation. The space of all affine-Virasoro constructions is organized by K-conjugation into affine-Virasoro nests, and an estimate of the dimension of the space shows that most solutions await discovery. With consistent ansatze for the master equation, large classes of new unitary nests are constructed, including quadratic deformation nests with continuous conformal weights, and unitary irrational central charge nests, which may dominate unitary rational central charge on compact g.

  10. Adsorption affinity of anions on metal oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of anion (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate, chromate, oxalate, tartrate, and citrate) adsorption affinity anions from geometric characteristics, acid-base properties, and complex forming ability are generalized. It is shown that adsorption depends on the nature of both the anions and the ionic medium and adsorbent. It is established that anions are generally grouped into the following series of adsorption affinity reduction: PO{4/3-}, CO{3/2-} > C2O{4/2-}, C(OH)(CH2)2(COO){3/3-}, (CHOH)2(COO){2/2-} > CrO{4/2-} ≫ SO{4/2-}.

  11. TOXICITY OF AHR AGONISTS TO FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are exceptionally sensitive to the lethal toxicity of chemicals that act as arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Toxicity characterizations based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, generally the most potent AhR agonist, support the toxicity equiva...

  12. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  13. Estrogen receptor beta agonists in neurobehavioral investigations.

    PubMed

    Choleris, Elena; Clipperton, Amy E; Phan, Anna; Kavaliers, Martin

    2008-07-01

    Neurobehavioral investigations into the functions of estrogen receptor (ER)alpha and ERbeta have utilized 'knockout' mice, phytoestrogens and, more recently, ER-specific agonists. Feeding, sexual, aggressive and social behavior, anxiety, depression, drug abuse, pain perception, and learning (and associated synaptic plasticity) are affected by ERalpha and ERbeta in a manner that is dependent upon the specific behavior studied, gender and developmental stage. Overall, ERalpha and ERbeta appear to function together to foster sociosexual behavior while inhibiting behaviors that, if occurring at the time of behavioral estrous, may compete with reproduction (eg, feeding). Recently developed pharmacological tools have limited selectivity and availability to the research community at large, as they are not commercially available. The development of highly selective, commercially available ERbeta-specific antagonists would greatly benefit preclinical and applied research. PMID:18600582

  14. Non-Benzodiazepine Receptor Agonists for Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Becker, Philip M; Somiah, Manya

    2015-03-01

    Because of proven efficacy, reduced side effects, and less concern about addiction, non-benzodiazepine receptor agonists (non-BzRA) have become the most commonly prescribed hypnotic agents to treat onset and maintenance insomnia. First-line treatment is cognitive-behavioral therapy. When pharmacologic treatment is indicated, non-BzRA are first-line agents for the short-term and long-term management of transient and chronic insomnia related to adjustment, psychophysiologic, primary, and secondary causation. In this article, the benefits and risks of non-BzRA are reviewed, and the selection of a hypnotic agent is defined, based on efficacy, pharmacologic profile, and adverse events. PMID:26055674

  15. Antipsychotic-Like Effect of the Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Agonist BuTAC in Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Dencker, Ditte; Werge, Thomas; Bymaster, Frank P.; Felder, Christian C.; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic, muscarinic receptor agonists exhibit functional dopamine antagonism and muscarinic receptors have been suggested as possible future targets for the treatment of schizophrenia and drug abuse. The muscarinic ligand (5R,6R)-6-(3-butylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane (BuTAC) exhibits high affinity for muscarinic receptors with no or substantially less affinity for a large number of other receptors and binding sites, including the dopamine receptors and the dopamine transporter. In the present study, we wanted to examine the possible antipsychotic-like effects of BuTAC in primates. To this end, we investigated the effects of BuTAC on d-amphetamine-induced behaviour in antipsychotic-naive Cebus paella monkeys. Possible adverse events of BuTAC, were evaluated in the same monkeys as well as in monkeys sensitized to antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side effects. The present data suggests that, the muscarinic receptor ligand BuTAC exhibits antipsychotic-like behaviour in primates. The behavioural data of BuTAC as well as the new biochemical data further substantiate the rationale for the use of muscarinic M1/M2/M4-preferring receptor agonists as novel pharmacological tools in the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:25880220

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel m-carborane-containing estrogen receptor partial agonists as SERM candidates.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kiminori; Ogawa, Takumi; Kaise, Asako; Endo, Yasuyuki

    2015-08-15

    We designed and synthesized novel m-carborane-containing selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) candidates using previously reported m-carborane-containing ER partial agonist 1 as the lead compound. Biological activities were evaluated by means of ERα competitive binding assay and MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. Re-positioning the N,N-dimethylaminoethyloxy group at the para position of 1 to the meta position enhanced the ERα-binding affinity, and 4c showed the highest relative binding affinity (RBA: 83 vs 17β-estradiol = 100) among the tested compounds. Compound 4b showed the most potent ER-agonist activity (EC50: 1.4 nM) and the lowest maximal efficacy (Emax: 50%) in MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. Inhibition of 0.1 nM 17β-estradiol-induced MCF-7 cell proliferation by 4b (IC50: 0.4 μM) was at least 10 times more potent than that of the lead compound 1. PMID:26077489

  17. Antipsychotic-like effect of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Croy, Carrie Hughes; Dencker, Ditte; Werge, Thomas; Bymaster, Frank P; Felder, Christian C; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic, muscarinic receptor agonists exhibit functional dopamine antagonism and muscarinic receptors have been suggested as possible future targets for the treatment of schizophrenia and drug abuse. The muscarinic ligand (5R,6R)-6-(3-butylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane (BuTAC) exhibits high affinity for muscarinic receptors with no or substantially less affinity for a large number of other receptors and binding sites, including the dopamine receptors and the dopamine transporter. In the present study, we wanted to examine the possible antipsychotic-like effects of BuTAC in primates. To this end, we investigated the effects of BuTAC on d-amphetamine-induced behaviour in antipsychotic-naive Cebus paella monkeys. Possible adverse events of BuTAC, were evaluated in the same monkeys as well as in monkeys sensitized to antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side effects. The present data suggests that, the muscarinic receptor ligand BuTAC exhibits antipsychotic-like behaviour in primates. The behavioural data of BuTAC as well as the new biochemical data further substantiate the rationale for the use of muscarinic M1/M2/M4-preferring receptor agonists as novel pharmacological tools in the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:25880220

  18. Direct measurement of agonist binding to genetically engineered peptides of the acetylcholine receptor by selective T sub 1 NMR relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, Y.; Navon, G. ); Aronheim, A.; Gershoni, J.M. )

    1990-03-13

    Interactions of four ligands of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with genetically engineered peptides have been studied by NMR. A recombinant cholinergic binding site was prepared as a fusion protein between a truncated form of the bacterial protein trpE and a peptide corresponding to the sequence {alpha}184-200 from the Torpedo californica receptor. This construct binds {alpha}-bungarotoxin while the trpE protein alone does not, and thus serves as a negative control. In this study agonist binding to {alpha}184-200 is demonstrated by monitoring the T{sub 1} relaxation of the ligand's protons in the presence and absence of the recombinant binding site. This binding is specific as it can be competed with {alpha}-bungarotoxin. Quantitative analyses of such competitions yielded the concentration of binding sites, which corresponded to 3.3% and 16.5% of the total protein, for partially purified and affinity-purified {alpha}184-200 constructs, respectively. The K{sub D} values for the binding of acetylcholine, nicotine, d-tubocurarine, and gallamine to the affinity-purified construct were 1.4, 1.4, 0.20, and 0.21 mM, respectively, while K{sub D}'s with the nontoxin binding protein were all above 10 mM. Thus, this is a direct demonstration that the toxin binding domain {alpha}184-200 may comprise a major component of the cholinergic agonist site.

  19. Interactions between cannabinoid receptor agonists and mu opioid receptor agonists in rhesus monkeys discriminating fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) enhance some (antinociceptive) but not other (positive reinforcing) effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, suggesting that cannabinoids might be combined with opioids to treat pain without increasing, and possibly decreasing, abuse. The degree to which cannabinoids enhance antinociceptive effects of opioids varies across drugs insofar as Δ(9)-THC and the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 increase the potency of some mu opioid receptor agonists (e.g., fentanyl) more than others (e.g., nalbuphine). It is not known whether interactions between cannabinoids and opioids vary similarly for other (abuse-related) effects. This study examined whether Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 differentially impact the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine in monkeys (n=4) discriminating 0.01mg/kg of fentanyl (s.c.) from saline. Fentanyl (0.00178-0.0178mg/kg) and nalbuphine (0.01-0.32mg/kg) dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding. Neither Δ(9)-THC (0.032-1.0mg/kg) nor CP55940 (0.0032-0.032mg/kg) enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl or nalbuphine; however, doses of Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 that shifted the nalbuphine dose-effect curve markedly to the right and/or down were less effective or ineffective in shifting the fentanyl dose-effect curve. The mu opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.032mg/kg) attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine similarly. These data indicate that the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine are more sensitive to attenuation by cannabinoids than those of fentanyl. That the discriminative stimulus effects of some opioids are more susceptible to modification by drugs from other classes has implications for developing maximally effective therapeutic drug mixtures with reduced abuse liability. PMID:27184925

  20. An in vitro investigation of the cardiovascular effects of the 5-HT(4) receptor selective agonists, velusetrag and TD-8954.

    PubMed

    Beattie, D T; Higgins, D L; Ero, M P; Amagasu, S M; Vickery, R G; Kersey, K; Hopkins, A; Smith, J A M

    2013-01-01

    The 5-HT(4) receptor agonists, and gastrointestinal (GI) prokinetic agents, cisapride and tegaserod, lack selectivity for the 5-HT(4) receptor. Cisapride is a potent human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel inhibitor while cisapride and tegaserod have significant affinity for 5-HT(1) and 5-HT(2) receptor subtypes. Marketing of both compounds was discontinued due to cardiovascular concerns (cardiac arrhythmias with cisapride and ischemic events with tegaserod). The reported association of tegaserod with ischemia has been postulated to involve coronary artery constriction or augmentation of platelet aggregation. This in vitro study investigated the effects of two of the new generation of highly selective 5-HT(4) receptor agonists, velusetrag and TD-8954, on canine, porcine and human coronary artery tone, human platelet aggregation and hERG potassium channel conductance. No significant off-target actions of velusetrag or TD-8954 were identified in these, and prior, studies. While cisapride inhibited potently the hERG channel currents, tegaserod failed to affect platelet aggregation, and had only a small contractile effect on the canine coronary artery at high concentrations. Tegaserod inhibited the 5-HT-induced contractile response in the porcine coronary artery. New generation 5-HT(4) receptor agonists hold promise for the treatment of patients suffering from GI motility disorders with a reduced cardiovascular risk. PMID:23201772

  1. Conformational Restriction and Enantioseparation Increase Potency and Selectivity of Cyanoguanidine-Type Histamine H4 Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Roland; Nordemann, Uwe; Strasser, Andrea; Wittmann, Hans-Joachim; Buschauer, Armin

    2016-04-14

    2-Cyano-1-[4-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)butyl]-3-[2-(phenylsulfanyl)ethyl]guanidine (UR-PI376, 1) is a potent and selective agonist of the human histamine H4 receptor (hH4R). To gain information on the active conformation, we synthesized analogues of 1 with a cyclopentane-1,3-diyl linker. Affinities and functional activities were determined at recombinant hHxR (x: 1-4) subtypes on Sf9 cell membranes (radioligand binding, [(35)S]GTPγS, or GTPase assays) and in part in luciferase assays on human or mouse H4R (HEK-293 cells). The most potent H4R agonists among 14 racemates were separated by chiral HPLC, yielding eight enantiomerically pure compounds. Configurations were assigned based on X-ray structures of intermediates and a stereocontrolled synthetic pathway. (+)-2-Cyano-1-{[trans-(1S,3S)-3-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)cyclopentyl]methyl}-3-[2-(phenylsulfanyl)ethyl]guanidine ((1S,3S)-UR-RG98, 39a) was the most potent H4R agonist in this series (EC50 11 nM; H4R vs H3R, >100-fold selectivity; H1R, H2R, negligible activities), whereas the optical antipode proved to be an H4R antagonist ([(35)S]GTPγS assay). MD simulations confirmed differential stabilization of the active and inactive H4R state by the enantiomers. PMID:27007611

  2. PKCepsilon regulates behavioral sensitivity, binding and tolerance to the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Melisa J; Newton, Philip M; McMahon, Thomas; Connolly, Jacklyn; Huibers, Anne; Whistler, Jennifer; Messing, Robert O

    2009-06-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1) is one of the most abundant G protein-coupled receptors in the brain, but little is known about the mechanisms that modulate CB1 receptor signaling. Here, we show that inhibition or null mutation of the epsilon isozyme of protein kinase C (PKCepsilon) selectively enhances behavioral responses to the CB1 agonist WIN55,212-2 in mice, but not to the structurally unrelated CB1 agonist CP55,940. Binding affinity for [(3)H] WIN55,212-2 was increased in brain membranes from PKCepsilon(-/-) mice compared with PKCepsilon(+/+) mice. There was no difference in binding of the inverse agonist [(3)H] SR141716A. In addition, repeated administration of WIN55,212-2 produced greater analgesic and thermal tolerance in PKCvarepsilon(-/-) mice compared with PKCepsilon(+/+)mice. These results indicate that PKCvarepsilon selectively regulates behavioral sensitivity, CB1 receptor binding and tolerance to WIN55,212-2. PMID:19158669

  3. Streamlining the Pipeline for Generation of Recombinant Affinity Reagents by Integrating the Affinity Maturation Step.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renhua; Gorman, Kevin T; Vinci, Chris R; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Gräslund, Susanne; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Often when generating recombinant affinity reagents to a target, one singles out an individual binder, constructs a secondary library of variants, and affinity selects a tighter or more specific binder. To enhance the throughput of this general approach, we have developed a more integrated strategy where the "affinity maturation" step is part of the phage-display pipeline, rather than a follow-on process. In our new schema, we perform two rounds of affinity selection, followed by error-prone PCR on the pools of recovered clones, generation of secondary libraries, and three additional rounds of affinity selection, under conditions of off-rate competition. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by generating low nanomolar fibronectin type III (FN3) monobodies to five human proteins: ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 R1 (CDC34), COP9 signalosome complex subunit 5 (COPS5), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MAP2K5), Splicing factor 3A subunit 1 (SF3A1) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 11 (USP11). The affinities of the resulting monobodies are typically in the single-digit nanomolar range. We demonstrate the utility of two binders by pulling down the targets from a spiked lysate of HeLa cells. This integrated approach should be applicable to directed evolution of any phage-displayed affinity reagent scaffold. PMID:26437402

  4. Streamlining the Pipeline for Generation of Recombinant Affinity Reagents by Integrating the Affinity Maturation Step

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renhua; Gorman, Kevin T.; Vinci, Chris R.; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Gräslund, Susanne; Kay, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Often when generating recombinant affinity reagents to a target, one singles out an individual binder, constructs a secondary library of variants, and affinity selects a tighter or more specific binder. To enhance the throughput of this general approach, we have developed a more integrated strategy where the “affinity maturation” step is part of the phage-display pipeline, rather than a follow-on process. In our new schema, we perform two rounds of affinity selection, followed by error-prone PCR on the pools of recovered clones, generation of secondary libraries, and three additional rounds of affinity selection, under conditions of off-rate competition. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by generating low nanomolar fibronectin type III (FN3) monobodies to five human proteins: ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 R1 (CDC34), COP9 signalosome complex subunit 5 (COPS5), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MAP2K5), Splicing factor 3A subunit 1 (SF3A1) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 11 (USP11). The affinities of the resulting monobodies are typically in the single-digit nanomolar range. We demonstrate the utility of two binders by pulling down the targets from a spiked lysate of HeLa cells. This integrated approach should be applicable to directed evolution of any phage-displayed affinity reagent scaffold. PMID:26437402

  5. High affinity binding of [3H]-tyramine in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, A.

    1986-01-01

    Optimum assay conditions for the association of [3H]-para-tyramine [( 3H]-pTA) with rat brain membranes were characterized, and a saturable, reversible, drug-specific, and high affinity binding mechanism for this trace amine was revealed. The binding capacity (Bmax) for [3H]-pTA in the corpus striatum was approximately 30 times higher than that in the cerebellum, with similar dissociation constants (KD). The binding process of [3H]-pTA involved the dopamine system, inasmuch as (a) highest binding capacity was associated with dopamine-rich regions; (b) dopamine and pTA equally displaced specifically bound [3H]-pTA; (c) there was a severe loss in striatal binding capacity for [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, for [3H]-dopamine, following unilateral nigrostriatal lesion; (d) acute in vivo reserpine treatment markedly decreased the density of [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, of [3H]-dopamine binding sites. In competition experiments [3H]-pTA binding sites, though displaying nanomolar affinity for dopamine, revealed micromolar affinities for the dopamine agonists apomorphine and pergolide, and for several dopamine antagonists, while having very high affinity for reserpine, a marker for the catecholamine transporter in synaptic vesicles. The binding process of [3H]-pTA was both energy-dependent (ouabain-sensitive), and ATP-Mg2+-insensitive; furthermore, the potencies of various drugs in competing for [3H]-pTA binding to rat striatal membranes correlated well (r = 0.96) with their reported potencies in inhibiting [3H]-dopamine uptake into striatal synaptosomes. It is concluded that [3H]-pTA binds at a site located on/within synaptic vesicles where it is involved in the transport mechanism of dopamine. PMID:3801770

  6. GABA induces functionally active low-affinity GABA receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Meier, E; Drejer, J; Schousboe, A

    1984-12-01

    The effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its agonists muscimol and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5-4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) on the development of GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was studied by cultivation of the cells in media containing these substances. It was found that the presence of 50 microM GABA in the culture media led to the induction of low-affinity GABA receptors (KD 546 +/- 117 nM) in addition to the high-affinity receptors (KD 7 +/- 0.5 nM) which were present regardless of the presence of GABA in the culture media. The functional activity of the GABA receptors was tested by investigating the ability of GABA to modulate evoked glutamate release from the cells. It was found that GABA could inhibit evoked glutamate release (ED50 10 +/- 3 microM) only when the cells had been cultured in the presence of 50 microM GABA, 50 microM muscimol, or 150 microM THIP, i.e., under conditions where low-affinity GABA receptors were present on the cells. This inhibitory effect of GABA could be blocked by 120 microM bicuculline and mimicked by 50 microM muscimol or 150 microM THIP whereas 150 microM (-)-baclofen had no effect. It is concluded that GABA acting extracellularly induces formation of low-affinity receptors on cerebellar granule cells and that these receptors are necessary for mediating an inhibitory effect of GABA on evoked glutamate release. The pharmacological properties of these GABA receptors indicate that they belong to the so-called GABAA receptors. PMID:6149269

  7. High affinity of lead for fetal haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, C N; Lee, W R

    1980-01-01

    In-vitro experiments using 203Pb were performed to identify lead-binding components in human haemoglobin. Sephadex A-50 ion-exchange chromatography of haemolysate showed that different types of haemoglobin had different affinities for lead. For the haemolysate from adults, lead was present in both Hb A (alpha 2 beta 2) and Hb A2 (alpha 2 delta 2), whereas, in the haemolysate from new-born infants, the haemoglobin of fetal origin, Hb F (alpha 2 gamma 2) showed a much greater affinity for 203Pb than the adult haemoglobin Hb A (alpha 2 beta 2), obtained from maternal blood. Analysis of the 203 Pb-labelled haemoglobin suggested that about 82% of 203Pb was in the globin polypeptide. Further analysis with carboxylmethyl (CM) cellulose chromatography indicated that the gamma globin of fetal origin had a higher affinity for 203Pb than the beta globin, whereas alpha globin appeared to be unimportant in lead binding. The results of the different affinities for lead of different Hb types are discussed with regard to the effect of lead upon haemoglobin synthesis. PMID:6158989

  8. Vygotsky's and Buber's Pedagogical Perspectives: Some Affinities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholo, Roberto; Tunes, Elizabeth; Tacca, Maria Carmen Villela Rosa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the dialogical and creative character of pedagogic work by analyzing the affinities between Martin Buber's "I-Thou relation" and Lev Semenovich Vygotsky's "Zone of Proximal Development". Backed up by empirical studies on the teacher-student relation, we understand that education can only result in students'…

  9. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  10. New bifunctional antioxidant/σ1 agonist ligands: Preliminary chemico-physical and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Arena, Emanuela; Cacciatore, Ivana; Cerasa, Laura S; Turkez, Hasan; Pittalà, Valeria; Pasquinucci, Lorella; Marrazzo, Agostino; Parenti, Carmela; Di Stefano, Antonio; Prezzavento, Orazio

    2016-07-15

    We previously reported bifunctional sigma-1 (σ1) ligands endowed with antioxidant activity (1 and 2). In the present paper, pure enantiomers (R)-1 and (R)-2 along with the corresponding p-methoxy (6, 11), p-fluoro derivatives (7, 12) were synthesized. σ1 and σ2 affinities, antioxidant properties, and chemico-physical profiles were evaluated. Para derivatives, while maintaining strong σ1 affinity, displayed improved σ1 selectivity compared to the parent compounds 1 and 2. In vivo evaluation of compounds 1, 2, (R)-1, 7, and 12 showed σ1 agonist pharmacological profile. Chemico-physical studies revealed that amides 2, 11 and 12 were more stable than corresponding esters 1, 6 and 7 under our experimental conditions. Antioxidant properties were exhibited by fluoro derivatives 7 and 12 being able to increase total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Our results underline that p-substituents have an important role on σ1 selectivity, TAC, chemical and enzymatic stabilities. In particular, our data suggest that new very selective compounds 7 and 12 could be promising tools to investigate the disorders in which σ1 receptor dysfunction and oxidative stress are contemporarily involved. PMID:27262426

  11. CTL Activation Using the Natural Low Affinity Epitope 222-229 from Tyrosinase Related Protein 1 Leads to Tumor Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Pavelko, Kevin D.; Hansen, Michael J.; Pease, Larry R.

    2009-01-01

    Vaccine strategies for cancer immunotherapy have focused on peptide ligands with high affinity for MHC class I. Largely, these vaccines have not been therapeutic. We have examined the peptide specificity of a strongly protective T cell response which eradicates established B16 melanoma and find that the recognized epitope is generated by a low affinity MHC class I ligand from tyrosinase related protein 1 (TRP1). Cytotoxic T cell responses are induced against TRP1222-229 by several vaccination schemes using toll-like receptor agonist, T regulatory cell depletion, or the immune modulator B7-DCXAb to drive immunity. TRP1222 CTL are generated from multiple antigen sources, including antigens expressed by tumors growing in situ, tumor cell lysates, and peptide vaccines. The key finding in this study is that protection from freshly implanted or established B16 tumors is mediated primarily by TRP1222-specific CTL and not by CTL specific for more traditional melanoma antigens such as TRP2 or gp100. This finding challenges the assumption that the optimal peptide antigens for cancer vaccines are high affinity MHC ligands. We propose that when administered appropriately, native low affinity MHC ligands are optimal inducers of immunotherapeutic CTL. PMID:19276379

  12. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation. PMID:22269613

  13. [PPAR receptors and insulin sensitivity: new agonists in development].

    PubMed

    Pégorier, J-P

    2005-04-01

    Thiazolidinediones (or glitazones) are synthetic PPARgamma (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors gamma) ligands with well recognized effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The clinical use of these PPARgamma agonists in type 2 diabetic patients leads to an improved glycemic control and an inhanced insulin sensitivity, and at least in animal models, to a protective effect on pancreatic beta-cell function. However, they can produce adverse effects, generally mild or moderate, but some of them (mainly peripheral edema and weight gain) may conduct to treatment cessation. Several pharmacological classes are currently in pre-clinical or clinical development, with the objective to retain the beneficial metabolic properties of PPARgamma agonists, either alone or in association with the PPARalpha agonists (fibrates) benefit on lipid profile, but devoid of the side-effects on weight gain and fluid retention. These new pharmacological classes: partial PPARgamma agonists, PPARgamma antagonists, dual PPARalpha/PPARgamma agonists, pan PPARalpha/beta(delta)/gamma agonists, RXR receptor agonists (rexinoids), are presented in this review. Main results from in vitro cell experiments and animal model studies are discussed, as well as the few published short-term studies in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:15959400

  14. Risk versus benefit considerations for the beta(2)-agonists.

    PubMed

    Kelly, H William

    2006-09-01

    Short-acting beta(2)-agonists are the mainstay of therapy for acute bronchospasm associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, whereas long-acting beta(2)-agonists are used in maintaining disease control in these respiratory disorders. This review describes and compares the pharmacology of the beta(2)-agonists and explains how these differences translate into differences in efficacy and beta(2)-adrenergic-mediated adverse effects. Questions commonly asked by clinicians regarding the efficacy and safety of short- and long-acting beta(2)-agonists include issues about cardiovascular effects, tolerance to their bronchodilator and bronchoprotective effects, blunting of albuterol response by long-acting beta(2)-agonists, potential masking of worsening asthma control, and the role of long-acting beta(2)-agonists as adjunctive therapy with inhaled corticosteroids in maintaining asthma control. Pharmacogenetics may play a role in determining which patients may be at risk for a reduced response to a beta(2)-agonist. The continued use of racemic albuterol, which contains a mixture of R-albuterol and S-albuterol, has been questioned because of data from preclinical and clinical studies suggesting that S-albuterol causes proinflammatory effects and may increase bronchial hyperreactivity. The preclinical and clinical effects of these two stereoisomers are reviewed. Data describing the efficacy and safety of levalbuterol (R-albuterol) and racemic albuterol are presented. PMID:16945063

  15. In Vivo Phenotypic Screening for Treating Chronic Neuropathic Pain: Modification of C2-Arylethynyl Group of Conformationally Constrained A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    (N)-Methanocarba adenosine 5′-methyluronamides containing 2-arylethynyl groups were synthesized as A3 adenosine receptor (AR) agonists and screened in vivo (po) for reduction of neuropathic pain. A small N6-methyl group maintained binding affinity, with human > mouse A3AR and MW < 500 and other favorable physicochemical properties. Emax (maximal efficacy in a mouse chronic constriction injury pain model) of previously characterized A3AR agonist, 2-(3,4-difluorophenylethynyl)-N6-(3-chlorobenzyl) derivative 6a, MRS5698, was surpassed. More efficacious analogues (in vivo) contained the following C2-arylethynyl groups: pyrazin-2-yl 23 (binding Ki, hA3AR, nM 1.8), fur-2-yl 27 (0.6), thien-2-yl 32 (0.6) and its 5-chloro 33, MRS5980 (0.7) and 5-bromo 34 (0.4) equivalents, and physiologically unstable ferrocene 36, MRS5979 (2.7). 33 and 36 displayed particularly long in vivo duration (>3 h). Selected analogues were docked to an A3AR homology model to explore the environment of receptor-bound C2 and N6 groups. Various analogues bound with μM affinity at off-target biogenic amine (M2, 5HT2A, β3, 5HT2B, 5HT2C, and α2C) or other receptors. Thus, we have expanded the structural range of orally active A3AR agonists for chronic pain treatment. PMID:25422861

  16. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N–H and O–H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  17. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Kržan, Mojca; Vianello, Robert; Maršavelski, Aleksandra; Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N-H and O-H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  18. Dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome: implications for patient care.

    PubMed

    Nirenberg, Melissa J

    2013-08-01

    Dopamine agonists are effective treatments for a variety of indications, including Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, but may have serious side effects, such as orthostatic hypotension, hallucinations, and impulse control disorders (including pathological gambling, compulsive eating, compulsive shopping/buying, and hypersexuality). The most effective way to alleviate these side effects is to taper or discontinue dopamine agonist therapy. A subset of patients who taper a dopamine agonist, however, develop dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome (DAWS), which has been defined as a severe, stereotyped cluster of physical and psychological symptoms that correlate with dopamine agonist withdrawal in a dose-dependent manner, cause clinically significant distress or social/occupational dysfunction, are refractory to levodopa and other dopaminergic medications, and cannot be accounted for by other clinical factors. The symptoms of DAWS include anxiety, panic attacks, dysphoria, depression, agitation, irritability, suicidal ideation, fatigue, orthostatic hypotension, nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, generalized pain, and drug cravings. The severity and prognosis of DAWS is highly variable. While some patients have transient symptoms and make a full recovery, others have a protracted withdrawal syndrome lasting for months to years, and therefore may be unwilling or unable to discontinue DA therapy. Impulse control disorders appear to be a major risk factor for DAWS, and are present in virtually all affected patients. Thus, patients who are unable to discontinue dopamine agonist therapy may experience chronic impulse control disorders. At the current time, there are no known effective treatments for DAWS. For this reason, providers are urged to use dopamine agonists judiciously, warn patients about the risks of DAWS prior to the initiation of dopamine agonist therapy, and follow patients closely for withdrawal symptoms during dopamine agonist taper. PMID:23686524

  19. Molecular interactions of agonist and inverse agonist ligands at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: computational ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies validated by experimental mutagenesis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Liu, Yue; Booth, Raymond G.

    2015-02-01

    To understand molecular determinants for ligand activation of the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a drug target for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders, a 5-HT2C homology model was built according to an adrenergic β2 GPCR (β2AR) structure and validated using a 5-HT2B GPCR crystal structure. The models were equilibrated in a simulated phosphatidyl choline membrane for ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies. Ligands included (2S, 4R)-(-)-trans-4-(3'-bromo- and trifluoro-phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-amine (3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT), a 5-HT2C agonist and inverse agonist, respectively. Distinct interactions of 3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT at the wild-type (WT) 5-HT2C receptor model were observed and experimental 5-HT2C receptor mutagenesis studies were undertaken to validate the modelling results. For example, the inverse agonist 3'-CF3-PAT docked deeper in the WT 5-HT2C binding pocket and altered the orientation of transmembrane helices (TM) 6 in comparison to the agonist 3'-Br-PAT, suggesting that changes in TM orientation that result from ligand binding impact function. For both PATs, mutation of 5-HT2C residues S3.36, T3.37, and F5.47 to alanine resulted in significantly decreased affinity, as predicted from modelling results. It was concluded that upon PAT binding, 5-HT2C residues T3.37 and F5.47 in TMs 3 and 5, respectively, engage in inter-helical interactions with TMs 4 and 6, respectively. The movement of TMs 5 and 6 upon agonist and inverse agonist ligand binding observed in the 5-HT2C receptor modelling studies was similar to movements reported for the activation and deactivation of the β2AR, suggesting common mechanisms among aminergic neurotransmitter GPCRs.

  20. Soluble low affinity adenosine A/sub 2/ binding site from human placenta: reconstitution and characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, K.; Prasad, M.; Fox, I.H.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have developed a vesicle reconstitution technique that allows for rapid vacuum filtration assay, and have characterized the soluble A/sub 2/ site from placental membranes. The overall yield of reconstituted binding is 60%. Competition analysis of membranes and reconstituted vesicles yields identical agonist potency orders and affinities: N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) (Kd-330 nM)>2-chloroadenosine (Kd=1.7 ..mu..M) > L-phenylisopropyladenosine (Kd > 1 mM). Equilibrium binding to membranes and reconstituted vesicles of (/sup 3/H)-NECA, an adenosine agonist, was not reduced by guanine nulceotides. HPLC gel permeation chromatography of extracts from membranes preincubated with 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/ and 100 ..mu..M NECA revealed a peak of binding with kD of 0.07. Extracts prepared with either an antagonist or NECA and 100 ..mu..M guanylyl 5'-imidodiphosphate revealed a peak of binding with a kD of 0.09. These data suggest that the adenosine A/sub 2/ receptor retains its binding properties upon reconstitution and may couple to a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein.

  1. Supra-physiological efficacy at GPCRs: superstition or super agonists?

    PubMed

    Langmead, Christopher J; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2013-05-01

    The concept of 'super agonism' has been described since the discovery of peptide hormone analogues that yielded greater functional responses than the endogenous agonists, in the early 1980s. It has remained an area of debate as to whether such compounds can really display greater efficacy than an endogenous agonist. However, recent pharmacological data, combined with crystal structures of different GPCR conformations and improved analytical methods for quantifying drug action, are starting to shed light on this phenomenon and indicate that super agonists may be more than superstition. PMID:23441648

  2. Affinity purification of metalloprotease from marine bacterium using immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangyong; Wang, Linna; Yang, Juan; Bao, Jing; Liu, Junzhong; Lin, Shengxiang; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an efficient affinity purification protocol for an alkaline metalloprotease from marine bacterium was developed using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. After screening and optimization of the affinity ligands and spacer arm lengths, Cu-iminmodiacetic acid was chosen as the optimal affinity ligand, which was coupled to Sepharose 6B via a 14-atom spacer arm. The absorption analysis of this medium revealed a desorption constant Kd of 21.5 μg/mL and a theoretical maximum absorption Qmax of 24.9 mg/g. Thanks to this affinity medium, the enzyme could be purified by only one affinity purification step with a purity of approximately 95% pure when analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The recovery of the protease activity reached 74.6%, which is much higher than the value obtained by traditional protocols (8.9%). These results contribute to the industrial purifications and contribute a significant reference for the purification of other metalloproteases. PMID:27058973

  3. Exploring pharmacological activities and signaling of morphinans substituted in position 6 as potent agonists interacting with the μ opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Opioid analgesics are the most effective drugs for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. However, they also produce several adverse effects that can complicate pain management. The μ opioid (MOP) receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor, is recognized as the opioid receptor type which primarily mediates the pharmacological actions of clinically used opioid agonists. The morphinan class of analgesics including morphine and oxycodone are of main importance as therapeutically valuable drugs. Though the natural alkaloid morphine contains a C-6-hydroxyl group and the semisynthetic derivative oxycodone has a 6-carbonyl function, chemical approaches have uncovered that functionalizing position 6 gives rise to a range of diverse activities. Hence, position 6 of N-methylmorphinans is one of the most manipulated sites, and is established to play a key role in ligand binding at the MOP receptor, efficacy, signaling, and analgesic potency. We have earlier reported on a chemically innovative modification in oxycodone resulting in novel morphinans with 6-acrylonitrile incorporated substructures. Results This study describes in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activities and signaling of new morphinans substituted in position 6 with acrylonitrile and amido functions as potent agonists and antinociceptive agents interacting with MOP receptors. We show that the presence of a 6-cyano group in N-methylmorphinans has a strong influence on the binding to the opioid receptors and post-receptor signaling. One 6-cyano-N-methylmorphinan of the series was identified as the highest affinity and most selective MOP agonist, and very potent in stimulating G protein coupling and intracellular calcium release through the MOP receptor. In vivo, this MOP agonist showed to be greatly effective against thermal and chemical nociception in mice with marked increased antinociceptive potency than the lead molecule oxycodone. Conclusion Development of such novel chemotypes by targeting

  4. Opioid receptor agonistic characteristics of mitragynine pseudoindoxyl in comparison with mitragynine derived from Thai medicinal plant Mitragyna speciosa.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, L T; Horie, S; Takayama, H; Aimi, N; Sakai, S; Yano, S; Shan, J; Pang, P K; Ponglux, D; Watanabe, K

    1999-07-01

    We have previously elucidated the opiate-like action of mitragynine, an active principle isolated from the Thai medicinal plant Mitragyna speciosa. In the present study, effects of the related compound, mitragynine pseudoindoxyl on electrically stimulated contraction in guinea pig ileum and mouse vas deferens, and on its binding affinity in the guinea pig brain membranes were studied. Mitragynine pseudoindoxyl inhibited the electrically stimulated ileum and mouse vas deferens contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. In the ileum, the effective concentration is in an nM order, being nearly equivalent to reported concentrations of the micro-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2, Met-Phe4, Gly-ol5] enkephalin (DAMGO), and is 100- and 20-fold smaller than those of mitragynine and morphine, respectively. In the vas deferens, it is 35-fold smaller than that of morphine. The inhibitory action of mitragynine pseudoindoxyl in the ileum was antagonized by the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and the micro-receptor antagonist naloxonazine. It was also antagonized by the delta-receptor antagonist naltrindole in the vas deferens. Mitragynine pseudoindoxyl showed a similar binding affinity to DAMGO and naltrindole at micro- and delta-receptors, respectively. However, the affinity at kappa-receptors was negligible. The present study demonstrates that mitragynine pseudoindoxyl, a novel alkaloid structurally different from other opioid agonists, acts on opioid receptors, leading to a potent inhibition of electrically stimulated contraction in the ileum through the micro-receptors and in mouse vas deferens through delta-receptors. PMID:10428019

  5. Valerian extract and valerenic acid are partial agonists of the 5-HT5a receptor in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Birgit M; Mahady, Gail B; Pauli, Guido F; Farnsworth, Norman R

    2005-08-18

    Insomnia is the most frequently encountered sleep complaint worldwide. While many prescription drugs are used to treat insomnia, extracts of valerian (Valeriana officinalis L., Valerianaceae) are also used for the treatment of insomnia and restlessness. To determine novel mechanisms of action, radioligand binding studies were performed with valerian extracts (100% methanol, 50% methanol, dichloromethane [DCM], and petroleum ether [PE]) at the melatonin, glutamate, and GABA(A) receptors, and 8 serotonin receptor subtypes. Both DCM and PE extracts had strong binding affinity to the 5-HT(5a) receptor, but only weak binding affinity to the 5-HT(2b) and the serotonin transporter. Subsequent binding studies focused on the 5-HT(5a) receptor due to the distribution of this receptor in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain, which is implicated in the sleep-wake cycle. The PE extract inhibited [(3)H]lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) binding to the human 5-HT(5a) receptor (86% at 50 microg/ml) and the DCM extract inhibited LSD binding by 51%. Generation of an IC(50) curve for the PE extract produced a biphasic curve, thus GTP shift experiments were also performed. In the absence of GTP, the competition curve was biphasic (two affinity sites) with an IC(50) of 15.7 ng/ml for the high-affinity state and 27.7 microg/ml for the low-affinity state. The addition of GTP (100 microM) resulted in a right-hand shift of the binding curve with an IC(50) of 11.4 microg/ml. Valerenic acid, the active constituent of both extracts, had an IC(50) of 17.2 microM. These results indicate that valerian and valerenic acid are new partial agonists of the 5-HT(5a) receptor. PMID:15921820

  6. Efficacy of inverse agonists in cells overexpressing a constitutively active β2-adrenoceptor and type II adenylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Patricia A; Milligan, Graeme

    1998-01-01

    Maximal stimulant output from the adenylyl cyclase cascade in neuroblastoma × glioma hybrid, NG108-15, cells is limited by the levels of expression of isoforms of adenylyl cyclase. Stable expression in these cells of a constitutively active mutant (CAM) version of the human β2-adrenoceptor resulted in higher basal adenylyl cyclase activity than following expression of the human wild type β2-adrenoceptor. Isoprenaline acted as a full agonist in membranes from both wild type and CAM β2-adrenoceptor expressing clones.Expression of type II adenylyl cyclase resulted in a substantially elevated capacity of isoprenaline to stimulate [3H]-forskolin binding, whereas in CAM β2-adrenoceptor expressing cells the basal high affinity [3H]-forskolin binding represented a markedly greater % of the maximal effect which could be produced by addition of isoprenaline, and the EC50 for isoprenaline was some 10 fold lower than in cells expressing the wild type β2-adrenoceptor.Further transfection of the CAM β2-adrenoceptor expressing cells with type II adenylyl cyclase greatly increased both absolute basal and agonist-stimulated levels of adenylyl cyclase activity.Betaxolol, ICI 118,551, sotalol and timolol acted as inverse agonists with varying degrees of efficacy, whereas propranolol functioned as a neutral antagonist and alprenolol as a partial agonist.Pretreatment of the CAM β2-adrenoceptor and type II adenylyl cyclase expressing clones with the irreversible alkylating agent BAAM (1 μM) did not reduce the efficacy of isoprenaline but eliminated efficacy from all the inverse agonist ligands. This effect was dependent upon the concentration of BAAM employed, with half-maximal effects being produced between 10 nM and 100 nM of the alkylating agent, which is similar to the concentrations required to prevent subsequent ligand access to some 50% of the CAM β2-adrenoceptor population.These data demonstrate that inverse agonist efficacy can be modulated by receptor

  7. Comparing Class A GPCRs to bitter taste receptors: Structural motifs, ligand interactions and agonist-to-antagonist ratios.

    PubMed

    Di Pizio, Antonella; Levit, Anat; Slutzki, Michal; Behrens, Maik; Karaman, Rafik; Niv, Masha Y

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane (TM) proteins that play a key role in human physiology. The GPCR superfamily comprises about 800 members, classified into several classes, with rhodopsin-like Class A being the largest and most studied thus far. A huge component of the human repertoire consists of the chemosensory GPCRs, including ∼400 odorant receptors, 25 bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs), which are thought to guard the organism from consuming poisons, and sweet and umami TAS1R heteromers, which indicate the nutritive value of food. The location of the binding site of TAS2Rs is similar to that of Class A GPCRs. However, most of the known bitter ligands are agonists, with only a few antagonists documented thus far. The agonist-to-antagonist ratios of Class A GPCRs vary, but in general are much lower than for TAS2Rs. For a set of well-studied GPCRs, a gradual change in agonists-to-antagonists ratios is observed when comparing low (10 μM)- and high (10 nM)-affinity ligand sets from ChEMBL and the DrugBank set of drugs. This shift reflects pharmaceutical bias toward the therapeutically desirable pharmacology for each of these GPCRs, while the 10 μM sets possibly represent the native tendency of the receptors toward either agonists or antagonists. Analyzing ligand-GPCR interactions in 56 X-ray structures representative of currently available structural data, we find that the N-terminus, TM1 and TM2 are more involved in binding of antagonists than of agonists. On the other hand, ECL2 tends to be more involved in binding of agonists. This is of interest, since TAS2Rs harbor variations on the typical Class A sequence motifs, including the absence of the ECL2-TM3 disulfide bridge. This suggests an alternative mode of regulation of conformational states for TAS2Rs, with potentially less stabilized inactive state. The comparison of TAS2Rs and Class A GPCRs structural features and the pharmacology of the their ligands highlights the intricacies of

  8. Smooth big bounce from affine quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Hervé; Dapor, Andrea; Gazeau, Jean Pierre; Małkiewicz, Przemysław

    2014-04-01

    We examine the possibility of dealing with gravitational singularities on a quantum level through the use of coherent state or wavelet quantization instead of canonical quantization. We consider the Robertson-Walker metric coupled to a perfect fluid. It is the simplest model of a gravitational collapse, and the results obtained here may serve as a useful starting point for more complex investigations in the future. We follow a quantization procedure based on affine coherent states or wavelets built from the unitary irreducible representation of the affine group of the real line with positive dilation. The main issue of our approach is the appearance of a quantum centrifugal potential allowing for regularization of the singularity, essential self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian, and unambiguous quantum dynamical evolution.

  9. Improved native affinity purification of RNA.

    PubMed

    Batey, Robert T; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2007-08-01

    RNA biochemical or structural studies often require an RNA sample that is chemically pure, and most protocols for its in vitro production use denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to achieve this. Unfortunately, many RNAs do not quantitatively refold into an active conformation after denaturation, creating significant problems for downstream characterization or use. In addition, this traditional purification method is not amenable to studies demanding high-throughput RNA production. Recently, we presented the first general method for producing almost any RNA sequence that employs an affinity tag that is removed during the purification process. Because technical difficulties prevented application of this method to many RNAs, we have developed an improved version that utilizes a different activatable ribozyme and affinity tag that are considerably more robust, rapid, and broadly applicable. PMID:17548432

  10. Protein affinity map of chemical space.

    PubMed

    Kauvar, L M; Villar, H O; Sportsman, J R; Higgins, D L; Schmidt, D E

    1998-09-11

    Affinity fingerprinting is a quantitative method for mapping chemical space based on binding preferences of compounds for a reference panel of proteins. An effective reference panel of <20 proteins can be empirically selected which shows differential interaction with nearly all compounds. By using this map to iteratively sample the chemical space, identification of active ligands from a library of 30,000 candidate compounds has been accomplished for a wide spectrum of specific protein targets. In each case, <200 compounds were directly assayed against the target. Further, analysis of the fingerprint database suggests a strategy for effective selection of affinity chromatography ligands and scaffolds for combinatorial chemistry. With such a system, the large numbers of potential therapeutic targets emerging from genome research can be categorized according to ligand binding properties, complementing sequence based classification. PMID:9792501

  11. Affinity Chromatography in Nonionic Detergent Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Wick, Donald G.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1980-10-01

    Anionic dye affinity chromatography is commonly unproductive in the presence of nonionic detergents used to extract particulate proteins. Using lactate dehydrogenase as a model protein, Cibacron blue F3GA as a model dye, and Triton X-100 as a model detergent, we find that the dye is encapsulated in nonionic detergent micelles, rendering the dye incapable of ligation with the enzyme. However, the dye can be liberated from the micelles without altering the nonionic detergent concentration by addition of an anionic detergent, such as deoxycholate or sodium dodecyl sulfate, forming mixed anionic/nonionic micelles that displace the anionic dye. Encapsulation of the anionic detergents prevents their activity as protein denaturants. These observations have been successfully translated to the dye affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of brain particulate cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  12. Relamorelin: A Novel Gastrocolokinetic Synthetic Ghrelin Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Acosta, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic ghrelin agonists, predominantly small molecules, are being developed as prokinetic agents that may prove useful in the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders. Relamorelin (RM-131) is a pentapeptide synthetic ghrelin analog that activates the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS)-1a (also called the ghrelin) receptor with approximately 6-fold greater potency than natural ghrelin. The ability of relamorelin to stimulate growth hormone (GH) release is comparable to that of native ghrelin. Relamorelin has enhanced efficacy and plasma stability compared to native ghrelin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and potential indications for relamorelin. Relamorelin is administered subcutaneously, dosed daily or twice daily. Relamorelin is being studied for the treatment of patients with gastrointestinal motility disorders. Phase IIA pharmacodynamic studies have demonstrated acceleration of gastric emptying in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 DM (T2DM) and upper gastrointestinal symptoms. In a phase IIA study in patients with diabetic gastroparesis, relamorelin accelerated gastric emptying and significantly improved vomiting frequency compared to placebo and improved other symptoms of gastroparesis in a pre-specified subgroup of patients with vomiting at baseline. In patients with chronic idiopathic constipation with defined transit profile at baseline, relamorelin relieved constipation and accelerated colonic transit compared to placebo. These characteristics suggest that this new ghrelin analog shows great promise to relieve patients with upper or lower gastrointestinal motility disorders. PMID:25545036

  13. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure-based modeling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R{sup 2} = 0.55 and CCR = 0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R{sup 2} = 0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset for ligand binding domain (LBD) of the THRβ. • We report the first QSAR model for antagonists of AF-2 domain of THRβ. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables

  14. A MEMS Dielectric Affinity Glucose Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Li, Dachao; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-06-20

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors based on affinity detection are desirable for long-term and stable glucose management. However, most affinity sensors contain mechanical moving structures and complex design in sensor actuation and signal readout, limiting their reliability in subcutaneously implantable glucose detection. We have previously demonstrated a proof-of-concept dielectric glucose sensor that measured pre-mixed glucose-sensitive polymer solutions at various glucose concentrations. This sensor features simplicity in sensor design, and possesses high specificity and accuracy in glucose detection. However, lack of glucose diffusion passage, this device is unable to fulfill real-time in-vivo monitoring. As a major improvement to this device, we present in this paper a fully implantable MEMS dielectric affinity glucose biosensor that contains a perforated electrode embedded in a suspended diaphragm. This capacitive-based sensor contains no moving parts, and enables glucose diffusion and real-time monitoring. The experimental results indicate that this sensor can detect glucose solutions at physiological concentrations and possesses good reversibility and reliability. This sensor has a time constant to glucose concentration change at approximately 3 min, which is comparable to commercial systems. The sensor has potential applications in fully implantable CGM that require excellent long-term stability and reliability. PMID:24511215

  15. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  16. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture. PMID:26584922

  17. Multiresidue Method for Analysis of β Agonists in Swine Urine by Enzyme Linked Receptor Assay Based on β2 Adrenergic Receptor Expressed in HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; She, Yongxin; Wang, Miao; Jin, Maojun; Li, Yongfei; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    A novel enzyme-linked receptor assay (ELRA) based on β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) has been developed for rapid and high-throughput detection of β-adrenergic agonists (β-agonists) in urine. Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) were introduced as the expression system to enhance the functionality of the recombinant β2-AR, and the attempt to detect β-agonists in swine urine using such approaches was accomplished unprecedentedly. In this article, a recombinant porcine β2-AR was produced in the inner membrane of HEK293 cells and purified from crude membrane protein by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. After activity identification, the recombinant receptor was used in the development of direct competitive ELRA. Several parameters such as blocking buffer and blocking process were optimized and the performance of the system was determined. The IC50 concentrations of clenbuterol, salbutamol, and ractopamine were 34, 53 and 63 μg/L, and the average recovery rates were 68.2%, 60.3% and 65.5%, respectively. ELRA based on β2-AR shows a series of advantages such as safety, easy operation, and high efficiency, making it promising for the rapid screening of β-agonists in animal urine. PMID:26422475

  18. Multiresidue Method for Analysis of β Agonists in Swine Urine by Enzyme Linked Receptor Assay Based on β2 Adrenergic Receptor Expressed in HEK293 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; She, Yongxin; Wang, Miao; Jin, Maojun; Li, Yongfei; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    A novel enzyme-linked receptor assay (ELRA) based on β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) has been developed for rapid and high-throughput detection of β-adrenergic agonists (β-agonists) in urine. Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) were introduced as the expression system to enhance the functionality of the recombinant β2-AR, and the attempt to detect β-agonists in swine urine using such approaches was accomplished unprecedentedly. In this article, a recombinant porcine β2-AR was produced in the inner membrane of HEK293 cells and purified from crude membrane protein by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. After activity identification, the recombinant receptor was used in the development of direct competitive ELRA. Several parameters such as blocking buffer and blocking process were optimized and the performance of the system was determined. The IC50 concentrations of clenbuterol, salbutamol, and ractopamine were 34, 53 and 63 μg/L, and the average recovery rates were 68.2%, 60.3% and 65.5%, respectively. ELRA based on β2-AR shows a series of advantages such as safety, easy operation, and high efficiency, making it promising for the rapid screening of β-agonists in animal urine. PMID:26422475

  19. Highly selective and sensitive detection of β-agonists using a surface plasmon resonance sensor based on an alkanethiol monolayer functionalized on a Au surface.

    PubMed

    Suherman; Morita, Kinichi; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu

    2015-05-15

    Immunosensor surfaces for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been constructed using a functionalized succinimidyl propanethiol monolayer as a linker to immobilize β-agonist protein conjugates on a Au surface. Because β-agonist is a small molecule, an indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay was used for detection. The lowest detection limits for ractopamine and salbutamol were 10 ppt (10 pg mL(-1)) and 5 ppt (5 pg mL(-1)), respectively. The fabricated immunosensor surface can be used again for detection after regeneration in 0.1 M sodium hydroxide. It was found that the same sensor surface could be reused for performing over 100 rapid immunoreactions. Moreover, one immunosensing-regeneration cycle requires only 600 s. The fabricated immunosensor surfaces were characterized using SPR and scanning tunneling microscopy observation. In the kinetic study of the indirect competitive immunosensing inhibition, the affinity constant (K1) of salbutamol antibody was smaller than the K1 of ractopamine antibody. Compared to a previous study of clenbuterol detection, it was concluded that the high K1 was coupled with low sensitivity. In the selectivity study, both immunosensor surfaces provided >90% of confidence level for the specific detection of β-agonist compounds. The fabrication of highly selective and sensitive sensor surfaces for detecting β-agonist compounds was confirmed. PMID:25192871

  20. Redoubling the ring size of an endomorphin-2 analog transforms a centrally acting mu-opioid receptor agonist into a pure peripheral analgesic.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; De Marco, Rossella; Gentilucci, Luca; Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Calo', Girolamo; Tömböly, Csaba; Artali, Roberto; Janecka, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The study reports the synthesis and biological evaluation of two opioid analogs, a monomer and a dimer, obtained as products of the solid-phase, side-chain to side-chain cyclization of the pentapeptide Tyr-d-Lys-Phe-Phe-AspNH2 . The binding affinities to the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors, as well as results obtained in a calcium mobilization functional assay are reported. Tyr-[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]2 -NH2 1 was a potent and selective full agonist of mu with sub-nanomolar affinity, while the dimer (Tyr-[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]2 -NH2 )2 2 showed a significant mixed mu/kappa affinity, acting as an agonist at the mu. Molecular docking computations were utilized to explain the ability of the dimeric cyclopeptide 2 to interact with the receptor. Interestingly, in spite of the increased ring size, the higher flexibility allowed 2 to fold and fit into the mu receptor binding pocket. Both cyclopeptides were shown to elicit strong antinociceptive activity after intraventricular injection but only cyclomonomer 1 was able to cross the blood-brain barrier. However, the cyclodimer 2 displayed a potent peripheral antinociceptive activity in a mouse model of visceral inflammatory pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 309-317, 2016. PMID:27038094

  1. Selecting agonists from single cells infected with combinatorial antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Yea, Kyungmoo; Xie, Jia; Ruiz, Diana; Wilson, Ian A; Lerner, Richard A

    2013-05-23

    We describe a system for direct selection of antibodies that are receptor agonists. Combinatorial antibody libraries in lentiviruses are used to infect eukaryotic cells that contain a fluorescent reporter system coupled to the receptor for which receptor agonist antibodies are sought. In this embodiment of the method, very large numbers of candidate antibodies expressing lentivirus and eukaryotic reporter cells are packaged together in a format where each is capable of replication, thereby forging a direct link between genotype and phenotype. Following infection, cells that fluoresce are sorted and the integrated genes encoding the agonist antibodies recovered. We validated the system by illustrating its ability to generate rapidly potent antibody agonists that are complete thrombopoietin phenocopies. The system should be generalizable to any pathway where its activation can be linked to production of a selectable phenotype. PMID:23706638

  2. Therapeutic Potential of 5-HT6 Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Karila, Delphine; Freret, Thomas; Bouet, Valentine; Boulouard, Michel; Dallemagne, Patrick; Rochais, Christophe

    2015-10-22

    Given its predominant expression in the central nervous system (CNS), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT: serotonin) subtype 6 receptor (5-HT6R) has been considered as a valuable target for the development of CNS drugs with limited side effects. After 2 decades of intense research, numerous selective ligands have been developed to target this receptor; this holds potential interest for the treatment of neuropathological disorders. In fact, some agents (mainly antagonists) are currently undergoing clinical trial. More recently, a series of potent and selective agonists have been developed, and preclinical studies have been conducted that suggest the therapeutic interest of 5-HT6R agonists. This review details the medicinal chemistry of these agonists, highlights their activities, and discusses their potential for treating cognitive issues associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), depression, or obesity. Surprisingly, some studies have shown that both 5-HT6R agonists and antagonists exert similar procognitive activities. This article summarizes the hypotheses that could explain this paradox. PMID:26099069

  3. Partial agonist therapy in schizophrenia: relevance to diminished criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Gavaudan, Gilles; Magalon, David; Cohen, Julien; Lançon, Christophe; Léonetti, Georges; Pélissier-Alicot, Anne-Laure

    2010-11-01

    Pathological gambling (PG), classified in the DSM-IV among impulse control disorders, is defined as inappropriate, persistent gaming for money with serious personal, family, and social consequences. Offenses are frequently committed to obtain money for gambling. Pathological gambling, a planned and structured behavioral disorder, has often been described as a complication of dopamine agonist treatment in patients with Parkinson's disease. It has never been described in patients with schizophrenia receiving dopamine agonists. We present two patients with schizophrenia, previously treated with antipsychotic drugs without any suggestion of PG, who a short time after starting aripiprazole, a dopamine partial agonist, developed PG and criminal behavior, which totally resolved when aripiprazole was discontinued. Based on recent advances in research on PG and adverse drug reactions to dopamine agonists in Parkinson's disease, we postulate a link between aripiprazole and PG in both our patients with schizophrenia and raise the question of criminal responsibility. PMID:20579229

  4. Selective 5-HT2C agonists as potential antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Leysen, D C

    1999-02-01

    The antidepressants currently used need improvement, especially in terms of efficacy, relapse rate and onset of action. In this review the clinical and experimental data which support the rationale for 5-HT2C agonists in the treatment of depression are listed. Next, the results obtained with the non-selective 5-HT2C agonists on the market and in clinical development are described. Finally, the preclinical data on the more selective 5-HT2C agonists are summarized. These recent preclinical results reveal a greater potency and effect size compared to fluoxetine, good tolerability and no evidence of tolerance development. Selective 5-HT2C agonists might become innovative drugs for the treatment of depression, panic, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), some forms of aggression and eating disorders. PMID:16160946

  5. Agonist pharmacology of two Drosophila GABA receptor splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The Drosophila melanogaster gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunits, RDLac and DRC 17-1-2, form functional homo-oligomeric receptors when heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The subunits differ in only 17 amino acids, principally in regions of the N-terminal domain which determine agonist pharmacology in vertebrate ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors. A range of conformationally restricted GABA analogues were tested on the two homo-oligomers and their agonists pharmacology compared with that of insect and vertebrate iontropic GABA receptors. 2. The actions of GABA, isoguvacine and isonipecotic acid on RDLac and DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers were compared, by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp. All three compounds were full agonists of both receptors, but were 4-6 fold less potent agonists of DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers than of RDLac. However, the relative potencies of these agonists on each receptor were very similar. 3. A more complete agonist profile was established for RDLac homo-oligomers. The most potent agonists of these receptors were GABA, muscimol and trans-aminocrotonic acid (TACA), which were approximately equipotent. RDLac homo-oligomers were fully activated by a range of GABA analogues, with the order of potency: GABA > ZAPA ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid) > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid > or = isonipecotic acid > or = cis-aminocrotonic acid (CACA) > beta-alanine. 3-Aminopropane sulphonic acid (3-APS), a partial agonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, was the weakest agonist tested and 100 fold less potent than GABA. 4. SR95531, an antagonist of vertebrate GABAA receptors, competitively inhibited the GABA responses of RDLac homo-oligomers, which have previously been found to insensitive to bicuculline. However, its potency (IC50 500 microM) was much reduced when compared to GABAA receptors. 5. The agonist pharmacology of Drosophila RDLac homo-oligomers exhibits aspects of the characteristic pharmacology of

  6. Localization of Free Field Realizations of Affine Lie Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futorny, Vyacheslav; Grantcharov, Dimitar; Martins, Renato A.

    2015-04-01

    We use localization technique to construct new families of irreducible modules of affine Kac-Moody algebras. In particular, localization is applied to the first free field realization of the affine Lie algebra or, equivalently, to imaginary Verma modules.

  7. Sleep attacks in patients taking dopamine agonists: review

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Carl Nikolaus; Wenzel, Karoline; Suppan, Klaudia; Ivanic, Gerd; Kriechbaum, Norbert; Crevenna, Richard; Ott, Erwin

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To assess the evidence for the existence and prevalence of sleep attacks in patients taking dopamine agonists for Parkinson's disease, the type of drugs implicated, and strategies for prevention and treatment. Design Review of publications between July 1999 and May 2001 in which sleep attacks or narcoleptic-like attacks were discussed in patients with Parkinson's disease. Results 124 patients with sleep events were found in 20 publications. Overall, 6.6% of patients taking dopamine agonists who attended movement disorder centres had sleep events. Men were over-represented. Sleep events occurred at both high and low doses of the drugs, with different durations of treatment (0-20 years), and with or without preceding signs of tiredness. Sleep attacks are a class effect, having been found in patients taking the following dopamine agonists: levodopa (monotherapy in 8 patients), ergot agonists (apomorphine in 2 patients, bromocriptine in 13, cabergoline in 1, lisuride or piribedil in 23, pergolide in 5,) and non-ergot agonists (pramipexole in 32, ropinirole in 38). Reports suggest two distinct types of events: those of sudden onset without warning and those of slow onset with prodrome drowsiness. Conclusion Insufficient data are available to provide effective guidelines for prevention and treatment of sleep events in patients taking dopamine agonists for Parkinson's disease. Prospective population based studies are needed to provide this information. What is already known on this topicCar crashes in patients with Parkinson's disease have been associated with sleep attacks caused by the dopamine agonists pramipexole and ropiniroleWhether sleep attacks exist, their connection with certain agonists, prevention or treatment, and the justification of legal actions are controversialWhat this study addsSleep attacks as a phenomenon distinct from normal somnolence really do existThey are a class effect of all dopamine drugsEffective prevention and treatment

  8. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    DOEpatents

    Pandit, Jayvardhan; Jancarik, Jarmila; Kim, Sung-Hou; Koths, Kirston; Halenbeck, Robert; Fear, Anna Lisa; Taylor, Eric; Yamamoto, Ralph; Bohm, Andrew

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  9. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25326839

  10. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25437461

  11. PPAR dual agonists: are they opening Pandora's Box?

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Rose, Madhankumar; Ganti, Subrahmanya S; Krishan, Pawan; Singh, Manjeet

    2007-08-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the major cause of mortality in patients of diabetes mellitus. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of nuclear hormone receptor superfamily comprising of three subtypes such as PPARalpha, PPARgamma and PPARdelta/beta. Activation of PPARalpha reduces triglycerides and involves in regulation of energy homeostasis. Activation of PPARgamma causes insulin sensitization and enhances glucose metabolism, whereas activation of PPARdelta enhances fatty acid metabolism. Current therapeutic strategies available for the treatment of diabetes do not inhibit the associated secondary cardiovascular complications. Hence, the development of multimodal drugs which can reduce hyperglycemia and concomitantly inhibit the progression of secondary cardiovascular complications may offer valuable therapeutic option. Several basic and clinical studies have exemplified the beneficial effects of PPARalpha and PPARgamma ligands in preventing the cardiovascular risks. The PPARalpha/gamma dual agonists are developed to increase insulin sensitivity and simultaneously prevent diabetic cardiovascular complications. Such compounds are under clinical trials and proposed for treatment of Type II diabetes with secondary cardiovascular complications. However, PPARalpha/gamma dual agonists such as muraglitazar, tesaglitazar and ragaglitazar have been noted to produce several cardiovascular risks and carcinogenicity, which raised number of questions about the clinical applications of dual agonists in diabetes and its associated complications. The ongoing basic studies have elucidated the cardio protective role of PPARdelta. Therefore, further studies are on the track to develop PPARalpha/delta and PPAR gamma/delta dual agonists and PPARalpha/gamma/delta pan agonists for the treatment of diabetic cardiovascular complications. The present review critically analyzes the protective and detrimental effect of PPAR agonists in

  12. Mechanisms of inverse agonist action at D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Strange, Philip G

    2005-05-01

    Mechanisms of inverse agonist action at the D2(short) dopamine receptor have been examined. Discrimination of G-protein-coupled and -uncoupled forms of the receptor by inverse agonists was examined in competition ligand-binding studies versus the agonist [3H]NPA at a concentration labelling both G-protein-coupled and -uncoupled receptors. Competition of inverse agonists versus [3H]NPA gave data that were fitted best by a two-binding site model in the absence of GTP but by a one-binding site model in the presence of GTP. K(i) values were derived from the competition data for binding of the inverse agonists to G-protein-uncoupled and -coupled receptors. K(coupled) and K(uncoupled) were statistically different for the set of compounds tested (ANOVA) but the individual values were different in a post hoc test only for (+)-butaclamol. These observations were supported by simulations of these competition experiments according to the extended ternary complex model. Inverse agonist efficacy of the ligands was assessed from their ability to reduce agonist-independent [35S]GTP gamma S binding to varying degrees in concentration-response curves. Inverse agonism by (+)-butaclamol and spiperone occurred at higher potency when GDP was added to assays, whereas the potency of (-)-sulpiride was unaffected. These data show that some inverse agonists ((+)-butaclamol, spiperone) achieve inverse agonism by stabilising the uncoupled form of the receptor at the expense of the coupled form. For other compounds tested, we were unable to define the mechanism. PMID:15735658

  13. Inverse agonist-like action of cadmium on G-protein-gated inward-rectifier K{sup +} channels

    SciTech Connect

    Inanobe, Atsushi; Matsuura, Takanori; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Kurachi, Yoshihisa

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examined allosteric control of K{sup +} channel gating. {yields} We identified a high-affinity site for Cd{sup 2+} to inhibit Kir3.2 activity. {yields} The 6-coordination geometry supports the binding. {yields} Cd{sup 2+} inhibits Kir3.2 by trapping the conformation in the closed state. -- Abstract: The gate at the pore-forming domain of potassium channels is allosterically controlled by a stimulus-sensing domain. Using Cd{sup 2+} as a probe, we examined the structural elements responsible for gating in an inward-rectifier K{sup +} channel (Kir3.2). One of four endogenous cysteines facing the cytoplasm contributes to a high-affinity site for inhibition by internal Cd{sup 2+}. Crystal structure of its cytoplasmic domain in complex with Cd{sup 2+} reveals that octahedral coordination geometry supports the high-affinity binding. This mode of action causes the tethering of the N-terminus to CD loop in the stimulus-sensing domain, suggesting that their conformational changes participate in gating and Cd{sup 2+} inhibits Kir3.2 by trapping the conformation in the closed state like 'inverse agonist'.

  14. Extensive Rigid Analogue Design Maps the Binding Conformation of Potent N-Benzylphenethylamine 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Agonist Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on the structure of the superpotent 5-HT2A agonist 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine, which consists of a ring-substituted phenethylamine skeleton modified with an N-benzyl group, we designed and synthesized a small library of constrained analogues to identify the optimal arrangement of the pharmacophoric elements of the ligand. Structures consisted of diversely substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines, piperidines, and one benzazepine. Based on the structure of (S,S)-9b, which showed the highest affinity of the series, we propose an optimal binding conformation. (S,S)-9b also displayed 124-fold selectivity for the 5-HT2A over the 5-HT2C receptor, making it the most selective 5-HT2A receptor agonist ligand currently known. PMID:23336049

  15. Dissociation of peripheral T cell responses from thymocyte negative selection by weak agonists supports a spare receptor model of T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Lisa K.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    We have focused on stability of the peptide-MHC complex as a determining factor of ligand potency for thymocytes and peripheral CD4+ T cell responses. MHC variant peptides that have low affinities and fast dissociation rates are different in that they stimulate proliferation and cytolysis of mature T cells (classifying the variant peptides as weak agonists) but do not induce thymocyte negative selection. The MHC variant weak agonists require significant receptor reserve, because decreasing the level of T cell receptor on mature T cells blocks the proliferative response. These results demonstrate that peripheral T cells are more sensitive to MHC variant ligands by virtue of increased T cell receptor expression; in addition, the data support a T cell model of the spare receptor theory. PMID:11904393

  16. Differential effects of AMPK agonists on cell growth and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Emma E.; Coelho, Paula P.; Blagih, Julianna; Griss, Takla; Viollet, Benoit; Jones, Russell G.

    2016-01-01

    As a sensor of cellular energy status, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is believed to act in opposition to the metabolic phenotypes favored by proliferating tumor cells. Consequently, compounds known to activate AMPK have been proposed as cancer therapeutics. However, the extent to which the anti-neoplastic properties of these agonists are mediated by AMPK is unclear. Here we examined the AMPK-dependence of six commonly used AMPK agonists (metformin, phenformin, AICAR, 2DG, salicylate and A-769662) and their influence on cellular processes often deregulated in tumor cells. We demonstrate that the majority of these agonists display AMPK-independent effects on cell proliferation and metabolism with only the synthetic activator, A-769662, exerting AMPK-dependent effects on these processes. We find that A-769662 promotes an AMPK-dependent increase in mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity (SRC). Finally, contrary to the view of AMPK activity being tumor suppressive, we find A-769662 confers a selective proliferative advantage to tumor cells growing under nutrient deprivation. Our results indicate that many of the anti-growth properties of these agonists cannot be attributed to AMPK activity in cells, and thus any observed effects using these agonists should be confirmed using AMPK-deficient cells. Ultimately, our data urge caution, not only regarding the type of AMPK agonist proposed for cancer treatment, but also the context in which they are used. PMID:25241895

  17. Perception of specific trigeminal chemosensory agonists

    PubMed Central

    Frasnelli, J; Albrecht, J; Bryant, B; Lundström, JN

    2011-01-01

    The intranasal trigeminal system is a third chemical sense in addition to olfaction and gustation. As opposed to smell and taste, we still lack knowledge on the relationship between receptor binding and perception for the trigeminal system. We therefore investigated the sensitivity of the intranasal trigeminal system towards agonists of the trigeminal receptors TRPM8 and TRPA1 by assessing subjects’ ability to identify which nostril has been stimulated in a monorhinal stimulation design. We summed the number of correct identifications resulting in a lateralization score. Stimuli were menthol (activating TRPM8 receptors), eucalyptol (TRPM8), mustard oil (TRPA1) and two mixtures thereof (menthol/eucalyptol and menthol/mustard oil). In addition, we examined the relationship between intensity and lateralization scores and investigated whether intensity evaluation and lateralization scores of the mixtures show additive effects. All stimuli were correctly lateralized significantly above chance. Across subjects the lateralization scores for single compounds activating the same receptor showed a stronger correlation than stimuli activating different receptors. Although single compounds were isointense, the mixture of menthol and eucalyptol (activating only TRPM8) was perceived as weaker and was lateralized less accurately than the mixture of menthol and mustard oil (activating both TRPM8 and TRPA1) suggesting suppression effects in the former mixture. In conclusion, sensitivity of different subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons seems to be related, but only to a certain degree. The large coherence in sensitivity between various intranasal trigeminal stimuli suggests that measuring sensitivity to one single trigeminal chemical stimulus may be sufficient to generally assess the trigeminal system’s chemosensitivity. Further, for stimuli activating the same receptor a mixture suppression effect appears to occur similar to that observed in the other chemosensory

  18. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  19. Centrally acting hypotensive agents with affinity for 5-HT1A binding sites inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in calf hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Schoeffter, P.; Hoyer, D.

    1988-01-01

    1. A number of centrally acting hypotensive agents and other ligands with high affinity for 5-hydroxytryptamine1A (5-HT1A) recognition sites have been tested on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in calf hippocampus, a functional model for 5-HT1A-receptors. 2. Concentration-dependent inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was elicited by the reference 5-HT1-receptor agonists (mean EC50 value, nM): 5-HT (22), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, 3.2), 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 8.6), N,N-dipropyl-5-carboxamidotryptamine (DP-5-CT, 2.3), 1-[2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyl]-4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-piperazine (PAPP or LY 165163, 20), 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-1H indole (RU 24969, 20), buspirone (65) and ipsapirone (56). Emax amounted to 18-20% inhibition for all but the latter two agonists (14%). 3. The following hypotensive agents with high affinity for 5-HT1A sites were potent agonists in this system (mean EC50 value, nM): flesinoxan (24), indorenate (99), erythro-1-(1-[2-(1,4-benzodioxan-2-yl)-2-hydroxyethyl]-4-piperidyl )- 2-benzimidazolinone (R 28935, 2.5), urapidil (390) and 5-methyl-urapidil (3.5). The first two agents were full agonists, whereas the latter three acted as partial agonists with 60-80% efficacy. 4. Metergoline and methysergide behaved as full agonists and cyanopindolol as a partial agonist with low efficacy. Spiroxatrine and 2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)aminomethyl- 1,4-benzodioxane (WB 4101) which bind to 5-HT1A sites with nanomolar affinity, were agonists and inhibited potently forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in calf hippocampus, showing mean EC50 values of 23 and 15 nM, respectively. Spiroxatrine and WB 4101 yielded 90% and 50% efficacy, respectively. 5. Spiperone and methiothepin (each 1 microM) caused rightward shifts of the concentration-effect curve to 8-OH-DPAT, without loss of the maximal effect, as did the partial agonist cyanopindolol (0.1 microM) and the

  20. In vitro and in vivo characterization of A-796260: a selective cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonist exhibiting analgesic activity in rodent pain models

    PubMed Central

    Yao, B B; Hsieh, G C; Frost, J M; Fan, Y; Garrison, T R; Daza, A V; Grayson, G K; Zhu, C Z; Pai, M; Chandran, P; Salyers, A K; Wensink, E J; Honore, P; Sullivan, J P; Dart, M J; Meyer, M D

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Selective cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonists have demonstrated analgesic activity across multiple preclinical pain models. AM1241 is an indole derivative that exhibits high affinity and selectivity for the CB2 binding site and broad spectrum analgesic activity in rodent models, but is not an antagonist of CB2 in vitro functional assays. Additionally, its analgesic effects are μ-opioid receptor-dependent. Herein, we describe the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of A-796260, a novel CB2 agonist. Experimental approach: A-796260 was characterized in radioligand binding and in vitro functional assays at rat and human CB1 and CB2 receptors. The behavioural profile of A-796260 was assessed in models of inflammatory, post-operative, neuropathic, and osteoarthritic (OA) pain, as well as its effects on motor activity. The receptor specificity was confirmed using selective CB1, CB2 and μ-opioid receptor antagonists. Key results: A-796260 exhibited high affinity and agonist efficacy at human and rat CB2 receptors, and was selective for the CB2 vs CB1 subtype. Efficacy in models of inflammatory, post-operative, neuropathic and OA pain was demonstrated, and these activities were selectively blocked by CB2, but not CB1 or μ-opioid receptor-selective antagonists. Efficacy was achieved at doses that had no significant effects on motor activity. Conclusions and implications: These results further confirm the therapeutic potential of CB2 receptor-selective agonists for the treatment of pain. In addition, they demonstrate that A-796260 may be a useful new pharmacological compound for further studying CB2 receptor pharmacology and for evaluating its role in the modulation of pain. PMID:17994110

  1. Estrogen Receptor-β Agonist Diarylpropionitrile: Biological Activities of R- and S-Enantiomers on Behavior and Hormonal Response to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Michael J.; Wu, T. John; Handa, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Estrogens have been shown to have positive and negative effects on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, perhaps explained by the existence of two distinct estrogen receptor (ER) systems, ERα and ERβ. The ERβ agonist, diarylpropionitrile (DPN) has been shown to have anxiolytic properties in rats. DPN exists as a racemic mixture of two enantiomers, R-DPN and S-DPN. In this study, we compared R-DPN and S-DPN for their in vitro binding affinity, ability to activate transcription in vitro at an estrogen response element, and in vivo endocrine and behavioral responses. In vitro binding studies using recombinant rat ERβ revealed that S-DPN has a severalfold greater relative binding affinity for ERβ than does R-DPN. Furthermore, cotransfection of N-38 immortalized hypothalamic cells with an estrogen response element-luc reporter and ERβ revealed that S-DPN is a potent activator of transcription in vitro, whereas R-DPN is not. Subsequently, we examined anxiety-like behaviors using the open-field test and elevated plus maze or depressive-like behaviors, using the forced swim test. Ovariectomized young adult female Sprague Dawley rats treated with racemic DPN, S-DPN, and the ERβ agonist, WAY-200070, showed significantly decreased anxiety-like behaviors in both the open-field and elevated plus maze and significantly less depressive-like behaviors in the forced swim test compared with vehicle-, R-DPN-, or propylpyrazoletriol (ERα agonist)-treated animals. In concordance with the relative binding affinity and transcriptional potency, these results demonstrate that the S-enantiomer is the biologically active form of DPN. These studies also indicate that estrogen's positive effects on mood, including its anxiolytic and antidepressive actions, are due to its actions at ERβ. PMID:19074580

  2. Sulfhydryl group(s) in the ligand binding site of the D-1 dopamine receptor: specific protection by agonist and antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.; Kassis, S.; Kebabian, J.; Fishman, P.H.

    1986-10-21

    An iodinated compound, (/sup 125/I)-8-iodo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepin-7-ol, has been recently reported to be a specific ligand for the D-1 dopamine receptor. Due to its high affinity and specific activity, this ligand was chosen for the biochemical characterization of the D-1 receptor. Alkylation of particulate fractions of rat caudate nucleus by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) caused an inactivation of the D-1 receptor, as measured by diminished binding of the radioligand to the receptor. The inactivation of the receptor sites by NEM was rapid and irreversible, resulting in a 70% net loss of binding sites. On the basis of Scatchard analysis of binding to NEM-treated tissue, the loss in binding sites was due to a net decrease in the receptor number with a 2-fold decrease in the affinity of the receptor for the radioligand. Receptor occupancy by either a D-1 specific agonist or antagonist protected the ligand binding sites from NEM-mediated inactivation. NEM treatment of the receptor in the absence or presence of protective compound abolished the agonist high-affinity state of the receptor as well as membrane adenylate cyclase activity. The above-treated striatal membranes were fused with HeLa membranes and assayed for dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. When the sources of D-1 receptors were from agonist-protected membranes, the receptors retained the ability to functionally couple to the HeLa adenylate cyclase. These results suggest that the D-1 dopamine receptor contains NEM-sensitive sulfhydryl group(s) either at or near the vicinity of the ligand binding sites, which are critical for both receptor binding and function.

  3. High-affinity dextromethorphan binding sites in guinea pig brain. II. Competition experiments.

    PubMed

    Craviso, G L; Musacchio, J M

    1983-05-01

    Binding of dextromethorphan (DM) to guinea pig brain is stereoselective, since levomethorphan is 20 times weaker than DM in competing for DM sites. In general, opiate agonists and antagonists as well as their corresponding dextrorotatory isomers are weak competitors for tritiated dextromethorphan ([3H]DM) binding sites and display IC50 values in the micromolar range. In contrast, several non-narcotic, centrally acting antitussives are inhibitory in the nanomolar range (IC50 values for caramiphen, carbetapentane, dimethoxanate, and pipazethate are 25 nM, 9 nM, 41 nM, and 190 nM, respectively). Other antitussives, such as levopropoxyphene, chlophedianol, and fominoben, have poor affinity for DM sites whereas the antitussive noscapine enhances DM binding by increasing the affinity of DM for its central binding sites. Additional competition studies indicate that there is no correlation of DM binding with any of the known or putative neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. DM binding is also not related to tricyclic antidepressant binding sites or biogenic amine uptake sites. However, certain phenothiazine neuroleptics and typical and atypical antidepressants inhibit binding with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Moreover, the anticonvulsant drug diphenylhydantoin enhances DM binding in a manner similar to that of noscapine. Preliminary experiments utilizing acid extracts of brain have not demonstrated the presence of an endogenous ligand for DM sites. The binding characteristics of DM sites studied in rat and mouse brain indicate that the relative potencies of several antitussives to inhibit specific DM binding vary according to species. High-affinity, saturable, and stereoselective [3H]DM binding sites are present in liver homogenates, but several differences have been found for these peripheral binding sites and those described for brain. Although the nature of central DM binding sites is not known, the potent interaction of several classes of centrally

  4. Ring size in cyclic endomorphin-2 analogs modulates receptor binding affinity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; Kluczyk, Alicja; Gentilucci, Luca; Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Calo', Girolamo; Tomböly, Csaba; Łapiński, Krzysztof; Janecki, Tomasz; Janecka, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The study reports the solid-phase synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of new side chain-to-side chain cyclized opioid peptide analogs of the general structure Tyr-[D-Xaa-Phe-Phe-Asp]NH2, where Xaa = Lys (1), Orn (2), Dab (3), or Dap (4) (Dab = 2,4-diaminobutyric acid, Dap = 2,3-diaminopropionic acid), containing 17- to 14-membered rings. The influence of the ring size on binding to the MOP, DOP and KOP opioid receptors was studied. In general, the reduction of the size of the macrocyclic ring increased the selectivity for the MOP receptor. The cyclopeptide incorporating Xaa = Lys displayed subnanomolar MOP affinity but modest selectivity over the KOP receptor, while the analog with the Orn residue showed increased affinity and selectivity for MOP. The analog with Dab was a weak MOP agonist and did not bind to the other two opioid receptors. Finally, the peptide with Xaa = Dap was completely MOP receptor-selective with subnanomolar affinity. Interestingly, the deletion of one Phe residue from 1 led to the 14-membered Tyr-c[D-Lys-Phe-Asp]NH2 (5), a potent and selective MOP receptor ligand. The in vitro potencies of the new analogs were determined in a calcium mobilization assay performed in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing human recombinant opioid receptors and chimeric G proteins. A good correlation between binding and the functional test results was observed. The influence of the ring size, solid support and the N-terminal protecting group on the formation of cyclodimers was studied. PMID:25948019

  5. Affinity, potency and efficacy of tramadol and its metabolites at the cloned human mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Gillen, C; Haurand, M; Kobelt, D J; Wnendt, S

    2000-08-01

    The present study was conducted to characterise the centrally active analgesic drug tramadol hydrochloride [(1RS,2RS)-2-[(dimethyl-amino)-methyl]-1-(3-methoxyphenyl)-cyclohe xanol hydrochloride] and its metabolites M1, M2, M3, M4 and M5 at the cloned human mu-opioid receptor. Membranes from stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were used to determine the four parameters of the ligand-receptor interaction: the affinity of (+/-)-tramadol and its metabolites was determined by competitive inhibition of [3H]naloxone binding under high and low salt conditions. The agonist-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding permits the measurement of potency (EC50), efficacy (Emax = maximal stimulation) and relative intrinsic efficacy (effect as a function of receptor occupation). The metabolite (+)-M1 showed the highest affinity (Ki=3.4 nM) to the human mu-opioid receptor, followed by (+/-)-M5 (Ki=100 nM), (-)-M1 (Ki=240 nM) and (+/-)-tramadol (Ki=2.4 microM). The [35S]GTPgammaS binding assay revealed an agonistic activity for the metabolites (+)-M1, (-)-M1 and (+/-)-M5 with the following rank order of intrinsic efficacy: (+)-M1>(+/-)-M5>(-)-M1. The metabolites (+/-)-M2, (+/-)-M3 and (+/-)-M4 displayed only weak affinity (Ki> 10 microM) and had no stimulatory effect on GTPgammaS binding. These data indicate that the metabolite (+)-M1 is responsible for the mu-opioid-derived analgesic effect. PMID:10961373

  6. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Werner, James H; Temirov, Jamshid

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence mIcroscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots with individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  7. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  8. Metal-affinity separations: A new dimension in protein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, F.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Rapid growth in the preparative and high-resolution analytical applications of metal-affinity chromatography demonstrate the appeal of metal recognition as a basis for protein separations. Stable, inexpensive chelated metals effectively mimic biospecific interactions, providing selective ligands for protein binding. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of metal-protein recognition that underlie metal-affinity separations. Also discussed are schemes for integrating metal-affinity purifications into the expression and bioprocessing of recombinant proteins. Promising future developments include new metal-affinity processes for analytical and preparative-scale separations and a range of techniques for enhancing the selectivity of metal-affinity separations.

  9. Avoiding degenerate coframes in an affine gauge approach to quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, E.W.; McCrea, J.D.; Ne`eman, Y.; Hehl, F.W.

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses the following concepts on quantum gravity: The affine gauge approach; affine gauge transformations versus active differomorphisms; affine gauge approach to quantum gravity with topology change.

  10. Aluminum monocation basicity and affinity scales.

    PubMed

    Gal, Jean-François; Yáñez, Manuel; Mó, Otilia

    2015-01-01

    The experimental aspects of the determination of thermochemical data for the attachment of the aluminum monocation Al(+) to neutral atoms and molecules are reviewed. Literature aluminum cation affinities (enthalpy scale) and basicities (Gibbs energy scale) are tabulated and discussed. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations at the G4 level on 43 adducts provide a consistent picture of the energetics of the adducts and their structures. The Al(+)-ligand bonding is analyzed in terms of natural bond orbital and atom-in molecule analyses. A brief comparison of the Al(+) basicity scales and other gas- phase cation basicities is presented. PMID:26307732

  11. Contractions of affine Kac-Moody algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daboul, J.; Daboul, C.; de Montigny, M.

    2008-08-01

    I review our recent work on contractions of affine Kac-Moody algebras (KMA) and present new results. We study generalized contractions of KMA with respect to their twisted and untwisted KM subalgebras. As a concrete example, we discuss contraction of D(1)4 and D(3)4, based on Z3-grading. We also describe examples of 'level-dependent' contractions, which are based on Z-gradings of KMA. Our work generalizes the Inönü-Wigner contraction of P. Majumdar in several directions. We also give an algorithm for constructing Kac-Moody-like algebras hat g for any Lie algebra g.

  12. The Natural Product Magnolol as a Lead Structure for the Development of Potent Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christa E.

    2013-01-01

    Magnolol (4-allyl-2-(5-allyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)phenol), the main bioactive constituent of the medicinal plant Magnolia officinalis, and its main metabolite tetrahydromagnolol were recently found to activate cannabinoid (CB) receptors. We now investigated the structure-activity relationships of (tetrahydro)magnolol analogs with variations of the alkyl chains and the phenolic groups and could considerably improve potency. Among the most potent compounds were the dual CB1/CB2 full agonist 2-(2-methoxy-5-propyl-phenyl)-4-hexylphenol (61a, Ki CB1∶0.00957 µM; Ki CB2∶0.0238 µM), and the CB2-selective partial agonist 2-(2-hydroxy-5-propylphenyl)-4-pentylphenol (60, Ki CB1∶0.362 µM; Ki CB2∶0.0371 µM), which showed high selectivity versus GPR18 and GPR55. Compound 61b, an isomer of 61a, was the most potent GPR55 antagonist with an IC50 value of 3.25 µM but was non-selective. The relatively simple structures, which possess no stereocenters, are easily accessible in a four- to five-step synthetic procedure from common starting materials. The central reaction step is the well-elaborated Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction, which is suitable for a combinatorial chemistry approach. The scaffold is versatile and may be fine-tuned to obtain a broad range of receptor affinities, selectivities and efficacies. PMID:24204944

  13. Aptamer Affinity Maturation by Resampling and Microarray Selection.

    PubMed

    Kinghorn, Andrew B; Dirkzwager, Roderick M; Liang, Shaolin; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Fraser, Lewis A; Shiu, Simon Chi-Chin; Tang, Marco S L; Tanner, Julian A

    2016-07-19

    Aptamers have significant potential as affinity reagents, but better approaches are critically needed to discover higher affinity nucleic acids to widen the scope for their diagnostic, therapeutic, and proteomic application. Here, we report aptamer affinity maturation, a novel aptamer enhancement technique, which combines bioinformatic resampling of aptamer sequence data and microarray selection to navigate the combinatorial chemistry binding landscape. Aptamer affinity maturation is shown to improve aptamer affinity by an order of magnitude in a single round. The novel aptamers exhibited significant adaptation, the complexity of which precludes discovery by other microarray based methods. Honing aptamer sequences using aptamer affinity maturation could help optimize a next generation of nucleic acid affinity reagents. PMID:27346322

  14. Anti-nociception mediated by a κ opioid receptor agonist is blocked by a δ receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A M W; Roberts, K W; Pradhan, A A; Akbari, H A; Walwyn, W; Lutfy, K; Carroll, F I; Cahill, C M; Evans, C J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The opioid receptor family comprises four structurally homologous but functionally distinct sub-groups, the μ (MOP), δ (DOP), κ (KOP) and nociceptin (NOP) receptors. As most opioid agonists are selective but not specific, a broad spectrum of behaviours due to activation of different opioid receptors is expected. In this study, we examine whether other opioid receptor systems influenced KOP-mediated antinociception. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used a tail withdrawal assay in C57Bl/6 mice to assay the antinociceptive effect of systemically administered opioid agonists with varying selectivity at KOP receptors. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to analyse the interactions of the other opioid receptors in modulating KOP-mediated antinociception. KEY RESULTS Etorphine, a potent agonist at all four opioid receptors, was not anti-nociceptive in MOP knockout (KO) mice, although etorphine is an efficacious KOP receptor agonist and specific KOP receptor agonists remain analgesic in MOP KO mice. As KOP receptor agonists are aversive, we considered KOP-mediated antinociception might be a form of stress-induced analgesia that is blocked by the anxiolytic effects of DOP receptor agonists. In support of this hypothesis, pretreatment with the DOP antagonist, naltrindole (10 mg·kg−1), unmasked etorphine (3 mg·kg−1) antinociception in MOP KO mice. Further, in wild-type mice, KOP-mediated antinociception by systemic U50,488H (10 mg·kg−1) was blocked by pretreatment with the DOP agonist SNC80 (5 mg·kg−1) and diazepam (1 mg·kg−1). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Systemic DOP receptor agonists blocked systemic KOP antinociception, and these results identify DOP receptor agonists as potential agents for reversing stress-driven addictive and depressive behaviours mediated through KOP receptor activation. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles

  15. Dihydrocodeine/Agonists for Alcohol Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, Albrecht; Müller, Markus; Frietsch, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol addiction too often remains insufficiently treated. It shows the same profile as severe chronic diseases, but no comparable, effective basic treatment has been established up to now. Especially patients with repeated relapses, despite all therapeutic approaches, and patients who are not able to attain an essential abstinence to alcohol, need a basic medication. It seems necessary to acknowledge that parts of them need any agonistic substance, for years, possibly lifelong. For >14 years, we have prescribed such substances with own addictive character for these patients. Methods: We present a documented best possible practice, no designed study. Since 1997, we prescribed Dihydrocodeine (DHC) to 102 heavily alcohol addicted patients, later, also Buprenorphine, Clomethiazole (>6 weeks), Baclofen, and in one case Amphetamine, each on individual indication. This paper focuses on the data with DHC, especially. The Clomethiazole-data has been submitted to a German journal. The number of treatments with the other substances is still low. Results: The 102 patients with the DHC treatment had 1367 medically assisted detoxifications and specialized therapies before! The 4 years-retention rate was 26.4%, including 2.8% successfully terminated treatments. In our 12-steps scale on clinical impression, we noticed a significant improvement from mean 3.7 to 8.4 after 2 years. The demand for medically assisted detoxifications in the 2 years remaining patients was reduced by 65.5%. Mean GGT improved from 206.6 U/l at baseline to 66.8 U/l after 2 years. Experiences with the other substances are similar but different in details. Conclusion: Similar to the Italian studies with GHB and Baclofen, we present a new approach, not only with new substances, but also with a new setting and much more trusting attitude. We observe a huge improvement, reaching an almost optimal, stable, long term status in around 1/4 of the patients already. Many further

  16. Agonists and antagonists for P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Costanzi, Stefano; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Besada, Pedro; Shin, Dae Hong; Ko, Hyojin; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Mamedova, Liaman

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has identified nucleotide agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1 receptors. Selective non-nucleotide antagonists have been reported for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y6, P2Y12, P2Y13, P2X2/3/P2X3 and P2X7 receptors. For example, the dinucleotide INS 37217 (Up4dC) potently activates the P2Y2 receptor, and the non-nucleotide antagonist A-317491 is selective for P2X2/3/P2X3 receptors. Nucleotide analogues in which the ribose moiety is substituted by a variety of novel ring systems, including conformation-ally locked moieties, have been synthesized as ligands for P2Y receptors. The focus on conformational factors of the ribose-like moiety allows the inclusion of general modifications that lead to enhanced potency and selectivity. At P2Y1,2,4,11 receptors, there is a preference for the North conformation as indicated with (N)-methanocarba analogues. The P2Y1 antagonist MRS2500 inhibited ADP-induced human platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 0.95 nM. MRS2365, an (N)-methanocarba analogue of 2-MeSADP, displayed potency (EC50) of 0.4 nM at the P2Y1 receptor, with >10 000-fold selectivity in comparison to P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors. At P2Y6 receptors there is a dramatic preference for the South conformation. Three-dimensional structures of P2Y receptors have been deduced from structure activity relationships (SAR), mutagenesis and modelling studies. Detailed three-dimensional structures of P2X receptors have not yet been proposed. PMID:16805423

  17. The Synthesis of 1,3,5-triazine Derivatives and JNJ7777120 Analogues with Histamine H4 Receptor Affinity and Their Interaction with PTEN Promoter.

    PubMed

    Latacz, Gniewomir; Kechagioglou, Petros; Papi, Rigini; Łażewska, Dorota; Więcek, Małgorzata; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Wencel, Przemysław; Karcz, Tadeusz; Schwed, Johannes S; Stark, Holger; Kyriakidis, Dimitrios A; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    The involvement of histamine and H4 receptor (H4 R) in cancer has been investigated recently using the H4 R agonists and antagonists. The scope of the research project was synthesis and exploration of the consequences of a group of compounds with histamine H4 receptor (H4 R) affinity on the promoter of PTEN gene encoding the antitumor PTEN protein. The series of novel compounds based either on H4 R antagonists JNJ7777120 structure or 1,3,5-triazine scaffold were synthesized, evaluated for histamine H4 R affinity and used in this study. Compounds 5 and 7 belonging to the group of JNJ7777120 analogues showed the highest interaction with the promoter of PTEN gene and weak affinity against H4 R with Ki value >100 μm. These compounds showed no significant effect on neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells viability indicating no correlation between PTEN gene promoter affinity and antitumor activity. Compound 6, another JNJ7777120 analogue, showed the highest effect on IMR-32 viability with calculated IC50 = 23.27 μm. The 1,3,5-triazine derivatives exhibited generally low or medium interaction with PTEN gene promoter. However, the 1,3,5-triazine derivative 11 with the para-bromo substituent showed the highest affinity against H4 R with Ki value of 520 nm and may be considered as a new lead structure. PMID:26931395

  18. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  19. Heparin affinity purification of extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Balaj, Leonora; Atai, Nadia A.; Chen, Weilin; Mu, Dakai; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Skog, Johan; Maguire, Casey A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are lipid membrane vesicles released by cells. They carry active biomolecules including DNA, RNA, and protein which can be transferred to recipient cells. Isolation and purification of EVs from culture cell media and biofluids is still a major challenge. The most widely used isolation method is ultracentrifugation (UC) which requires expensive equipment and only partially purifies EVs. Previously we have shown that heparin blocks EV uptake in cells, supporting a direct EV-heparin interaction. Here we show that EVs can be purified from cell culture media and human plasma using ultrafiltration (UF) followed by heparin-affinity beads. UF/heparin-purified EVs from cell culture displayed the EV marker Alix, contained a diverse RNA profile, had lower levels of protein contamination, and were functional at binding to and uptake into cells. RNA yield was similar for EVs isolated by UC. We were able to detect mRNAs in plasma samples with comparable levels to UC samples. In conclusion, we have discovered a simple, scalable, and effective method to purify EVs taking advantage of their heparin affinity. PMID:25988257

  20. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  1. Fatigue damage prognosis using affine arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Kim, Daewon

    2014-02-01

    Among the essential steps to be taken in structural health monitoring systems, damage prognosis would be the field that is least investigated due to the complexity of the uncertainties. This paper presents the possibility of using Affine Arithmetic for uncertainty propagation of crack damage in damage prognosis. The structures examined are thin rectangular plates made of titanium alloys with central mode I cracks and a composite plate with an internal delamination caused by mixed mode I and II fracture modes, under a harmonic uniaxial loading condition. The model-based method for crack growth rates are considered using the Paris Erdogan law model for the isotropic plates and the delamination growth law model proposed by Kardomateas for the composite plate. The parameters for both models are randomly taken and their uncertainties are considered as defined by an interval instead of a probability distribution. A Monte Carlo method is also applied to check whether Affine Arithmetic (AA) leads to tight bounds on the lifetime of the structure.

  2. Exploring Fluorous Affinity by Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Catani, Martina; Guzzinati, Roberta; Marchetti, Nicola; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Terms such as "fluorous affinity" and "fluorophilicity" have been used to describe the unique partition and sorption properties often exhibited by highly fluorinated organic compounds, that is molecules rich in sp(3) carbon-fluorine bonds. In this work, we made use of a highly fluorinated stationary phase and a series of benzene derivatives to study the effect of one single perfluorinated carbon on the chromatographic behavior and adsorption properties of molecules. For this purpose, the adsorption equilibria of α,α,α-trifluorotoluene, toluene, and other alkylbenzenes have been studied by means of nonlinear chromatography in a variety of acetonitrile/water eluents. Our results reveal that one single perfluorinated carbon is already enough to induce a drastic change in the adsorption properties of molecules on the perfluorinated stationary phase. In particular, it has been found that adsorption is monolayer if the perfluoroalkyl carbon is present but that, when this unit is missing, molecules arrange as multilayer stack structures. These findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanisms of fluorous affinity. PMID:26047527

  3. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  4. Cardiac action of the first G protein biased small molecule apelin agonist.

    PubMed

    Read, Cai; Fitzpatrick, Christopher M; Yang, Peiran; Kuc, Rhoda E; Maguire, Janet J; Glen, Robert C; Foster, Richard E; Davenport, Anthony P

    2016-09-15

    Apelin peptide analogues displaying bias towards G protein signalling pathways have beneficial cardiovascular actions compared with the native peptide in humans in vivo. Our aim was to determine whether small molecule agonists could retain G protein bias. We have identified a biased small molecule, CMF-019, and characterised it in vitro and in vivo. In competition radioligand binding experiments in heart homogenates, CMF-019 bound to the human, rat and mouse apelin receptor with high affinity (pKi=8.58±0.04, 8.49±0.04 and 8.71±0.06 respectively). In cell-based functional assays, whereas, CMF-019 showed similar potency for the Gαi pathway to the endogenous agonist [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 (pD2=10.00±0.13 vs 9.34±0.15), in β-arrestin and internalisation assays it was less potent (pD2=6.65±0.15 vs 8.65±0.10 and pD2=6.16±0.21 vs 9.28±0.10 respectively). Analysis of these data demonstrated a bias of ∼400 for the Gαi over the β-arrestin pathway and ∼6000 over receptor internalisation. CMF-019 was tested for in vivo activity using intravenous injections into anaesthetised male Sprague-Dawley rats fitted with a pressure-volume catheter in the left ventricle. CMF-019 caused a significant increase in cardiac contractility of 606±112mmHg/s (p<0.001) at 500nmol. CMF-019 is the first biased small molecule identified at the apelin receptor and increases cardiac contractility in vivo. We have demonstrated that Gαi over β-arrestin/internalisation bias can be retained in a non-peptide analogue and predict that such bias will have the therapeutic benefit following chronic use. CMF-019 is suitable as a tool compound and provides the basis for design of biased agonists with improved pharmacokinetics for treatment of cardiovascular conditions such as pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27475715

  5. In Vivo Effects of Bradykinin B2 Receptor Agonists with Varying Susceptibility to Peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Mélissa; Gera, Lajos; Charest-Morin, Xavier; Marceau, François; Bachelard, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    We reported evidence of bradykinin (BK) regeneration from C-terminal extended BK sequences that behave as peptidase-activated B2 receptor (B2R) agonists. Further to these in vitro studies, we carried out in vivo experiments to verify hemodynamic effects of BK analogs exhibiting variable susceptibility toward vascular and blood plasma peptidases. Rats were anesthetized and instrumented to record blood pressure and heart rate responses to bolus intravenous (i.v.) injection of increasing doses of BK, B-9972 (D-Arg-[Hyp3,Igl5,Oic7,Igl8]-BK), BK-Arg, BK-His-Leu or BK-Ala-Pro, in the absence or presence of specific inhibitors. In some experiments, pulsed Doppler flow probes measured hindquarter Doppler shift in response to i.v. injections of kinins. BK caused rapid, transient and dose-related hypotensive effects. These effects were potentiated ∼15-fold by the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, enalaprilat, but extensively inhibited by icatibant (a B2R antagonist) and not influenced by the Arg-carboxypeptidase (CP) inhibitor (Plummer’s inhibitor). The hypotensive responses elicited by the peptidase-resistant B2R agonist, B-9972, were not affected by enalaprilat, but were inhibited by icatibant. The hypotensive responses to BK-Arg were abolished by pre-treatment with either the Arg-CP inhibitor or icatibant, pharmacologically evidencing BK regeneration. The hypotensive effects of BK-His-Leu and BK-Ala-Pro, previously reported as ACE-activated substrates, were abolished by icatibant, but not by enalaprilat. In vivo regeneration of BK from these two C-terminally extended analogs with no affinity for the B2R must follow alternative cleavage rules involving unidentified carboxypeptidase(s) when ACE is blocked. The transient hypotensive responses to BK and three tested analogs coincided with concomitant vasodilation (increased Doppler shift signal). Together, these results provide in vivo evidence that interesting hypotensive and vasodilator effects can be

  6. Peptide agonists of the thrombopoietin receptor.

    PubMed

    Dower, W J; Cwirla, S E; Balasubramanian, P; Schatz, P J; Baccanari, D P; Barrett, R W

    1998-01-01

    We have screened a variety of L-amino acid peptide libraries against the extracellular domain of the human thrombopoietin (HuTPO) receptor, c-Mpl. A large number of peptide ligands were recovered and categorized into two families. Peptides from each family compete with the binding of HuTPO and with the binding of peptides from the other familiy. Representative peptides were synthesized and found to activate the full-length HuTPO receptor expressed in Ba/F3 cells to promote proliferation. These peptide families show no apparent homology to the primary sequence of TPO. We have focused our optimization efforts on one of the peptides, a linear 14-mer (IEGPTLRQWLAARA) with an IC50 of 2 nM in a competition binding assay and an EC50 of 400 nM in the proliferation assay. In order to enhance the potency of the compound, we constructed dimeric peptides by linking the carboxy-termini of the 14-mers to a lysine branch. These molecules exhibited slightly higher affinity (0.5 nM) and greatly increased potency (0.1 nM). The EC50 of the dimeric peptide was equivalent to that of the 332 aa form of baculovirus-expressed recombinant HuTPO. As previously shown for the erythropoietin-mimetic peptides, the TPO-mimetic peptides probably activate the TPO receptor by binding and inducing receptor dimerization. This supposition is supported by the observation that covalent dimerization of the peptide enhances its potency by 4,000-fold over that of the monomer. The peptide dimer is also active in stimulating in vitro proliferation of progenitors and maturation of megakaryocytes from human bone marrow, and in promoting an increase in platelet count when administered to normal mice. PMID:11012174

  7. Chemical Modification of the M1 Agonist VU0364572 Reveals Molecular Switches in Pharmacology and a Bitopic Binding Mode

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported the discovery of VU0364572 and VU0357017 as M1-selective agonists that appear to activate M1 through actions at an allosteric site. Previous studies have revealed that chemical scaffolds for many allosteric modulators contain molecular switches that allow discovery of allosteric antagonists and allosteric agonists or positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) based on a single chemical scaffold. Based on this, we initiated a series of studies to develop selective M1 allosteric antagonists based on the VU0364572 scaffold. Interestingly, two lead antagonists identified in this series, VU0409774 and VU0409775, inhibited ACh-induced Ca2+ responses at rat M1–5 receptor subtypes, suggesting they are nonselective muscarinic antagonists. VU0409774 and VU0409775 also completely displaced binding of the nonselective radioligand [3H]-NMS at M1 and M3 mAChRs with affinities similar to their functional IC50 values. Finally, Schild analysis revealed that these compounds inhibit M1 responses through a fully competitive interaction at the orthosteric binding site. This surprising finding prompted further studies to determine whether agonist activity of VU0364572 and VU0357017 may also engage in previously unappreciated actions at the orthosteric site on M1. Surprisingly, both VU0364572 and VU0357017 completely displaced [3H]-NMS binding to the orthosteric site of M1–M5 receptors at high concentrations. Furthermore, evaluation of agonist activity in systems with varying levels of receptor reserve and Furchgott analysis using a cell line expressing M1 under control of an inducible promotor was consistent with an action of these compounds as weak orthosteric partial agonists of M1. However, consistent with previous studies suggesting actions at a site that is distinct from the orthosteric binding site, VU0364572 or VU0357017 slowed the rate of [3H]-NMS dissociation from CHO-rM1 membranes. Together, these results suggest that VU0364572 and VU0357017 act as

  8. Honokiol: A non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist from nature☆

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Atanas G.; Wang, Jian N.; Gu, Shi P.; Bu, Jing; Kramer, Matthias P.; Baumgartner, Lisa; Fakhrudin, Nanang; Ladurner, Angela; Malainer, Clemens; Vuorinen, Anna; Noha, Stefan M.; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Schuster, Daniela; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M.; Heiss, Elke H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are clinically used to counteract hyperglycemia. However, so far experienced unwanted side effects, such as weight gain, promote the search for new PPARγ activators. Methods We used a combination of in silico, in vitro, cell-based and in vivo models to identify and validate natural products as promising leads for partial novel PPARγ agonists. Results The natural product honokiol from the traditional Chinese herbal drug Magnolia bark was in silico predicted to bind into the PPARγ ligand binding pocket as dimer. Honokiol indeed directly bound to purified PPARγ ligand-binding domain (LBD) and acted as partial agonist in a PPARγ-mediated luciferase reporter assay. Honokiol was then directly compared to the clinically used full agonist pioglitazone with regard to stimulation of glucose uptake in adipocytes as well as adipogenic differentiation in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. While honokiol stimulated basal glucose uptake to a similar extent as pioglitazone, it did not induce adipogenesis in contrast to pioglitazone. In diabetic KKAy mice oral application of honokiol prevented hyperglycemia and suppressed weight gain. Conclusion We identified honokiol as a partial non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist in vitro which prevented hyperglycemia and weight gain in vivo. General significance This observed activity profile suggests honokiol as promising new pharmaceutical lead or dietary supplement to combat metabolic disease, and provides a molecular explanation for the use of Magnolia in traditional medicine. PMID:23811337

  9. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C.; Konger, Raymond L.; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  10. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Harrison, Kathleen A; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C; Konger, Raymond L; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-04-12

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  11. An amino acid residue in the second extracellular loop determines the agonist-dependent tolerance property of the human D3 dopamine receptor.

    PubMed

    Gil-Mast, Sara; Kortagere, Sandhya; Kota, Kokila; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2013-06-19

    The D3 dopamine receptor is a therapeutic target for treating various nervous system disorders such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, depression, and addictive behaviors. The crystal structure of the D3 receptor bound to an antagonist was recently described; however, the structural features that contribute to agonist-induced conformational changes and signaling properties are not well understood. We have previously described the conformation-dependent tolerance and slow response termination (SRT) signaling properties of the D3 receptor and identified the C147 residue in the second intracellular loop (IL2) of the D3 receptor as important for the tolerance property. Interestingly, while IL2 and the C147 residue, in particular, were important for dopamine- and quinpirole-induced tolerance, this residue did not affect the severe tolerance induced by the high affinity, D3 receptor-selective agonist, PD128907. Here, we used D2/D3 receptor chimeras and site-specific D3 receptor mutants to identify another residue, D187, in the second extracellular loop (EC2) of the human D3 receptor that mediates the tolerance property induced by PD128907, quinpirole, pramipexole, and dopamine. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the distinct conformation adopted by D3 receptor during tolerance and suggested that in the tolerant D3 receptor the D187 residue in EC2 forms a salt bridge with the H354 residue in EC3. Indeed, site-directed mutation of the H354 residue resulted in loss of PD1287907-induced tolerance. The mapping of specific amino acid residues that contribute to agonist-dependent conformation changes and D3 receptor signaling properties refines the agonist-bound D3 receptor pharmacophore model which will help develop novel D3 receptor agonists. PMID:23477444

  12. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach. PMID:27498895

  13. Reduced secondary cytokine induction by BAY 50-4798, a high-affinity receptor-specific interleukin-2 analog.

    PubMed

    Steppan, Sonja; Eckart, Michael R; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Sternberg, Lawrence R; Greve, Jeffrey M; Cassell, Delanie J

    2006-03-01

    Recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) (aldesleukin, Proleukin, Chiron, Emeryville, CA) is approved for treatment of cancer patients and under investigation in HIV-infected individuals. However, treatment with aldesleukin is associated with toxicity, which may be due to its elicitation of inflammatory mediators from cells that express the intermediate-affinity IL-2 receptor. BAY 50-4798, a novel IL-2 analog, is a selective agonist for the high-affinity receptor. It induces the proliferation of activated T cells with a potency similar to that of aldesleukin but has reduced activity on cells expressing the intermediate-affinity receptor. In the current study, we compared cytokine responses elicited in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures stimulated with BAY 50-4798 or aldesleukin. BAY 50-4798 induced approximately 5-fold lower mean levels of endogenous IL-2 than aldesleukin, and at least 50% lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis fctor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6, and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Furthermore, statistically significant reductions in the levels of IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were observed in response to BAY 50-4798. These findings increase our understanding of the biologic action of BAY 50-4798 and suggest a mechanism by which it may exhibit better safety than aldesleukin in humans. PMID:16542139

  14. Inhibition of ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors by antagonists: strategy to estimate the association and the dissociation rate constant of antagonists with very strong affinity to the receptors.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, H; Inoue, Y; Hori, K

    1992-10-01

    Since binding of an agonist to an ionotropic neurotransmitter receptor causes not only channel opening, but also desensitization of the receptor, inhibition of the receptor by the antagonist sometimes becomes very complicated. The transient state kinetics of ligand association and dissociation, and desensitization of the receptor were considered on the basis of the minimal model proposed by Hess' group, and the following possibilities were proposed. 1) When an agonist is simultaneously applied to the receptor with an antagonist whose affinity to the receptor is extremely strong and different from that of the agonist, it is usually impossible to estimate the real inhibition constant exactly from the responses because desensitization of the receptor proceeds before the equilibrium of the ligand binding. Simultaneous addition of the antagonist with strong affinity to the receptor may apparently accelerate inactivation (desensitization) of the receptor. The association rate constant of the antagonist can be estimated by analyses of the rate of the inactivation in the presence and the absence of the antagonist. 2) A preincubated antagonist with a slow dissociation rate constant, i.e., a very effective inhibitor, may cause apparent noncompetitive inhibition of the receptor, since the receptor is desensitized by an agonist as soon as the antagonist dissociates from the receptor and the dissociation of the antagonist from the receptor becomes the rate-determining step. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting mRNA prepared from Electrophorus electricus electroplax and used for the experiments on inhibition by an antagonist.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1337082

  15. Functionalized Ergot-alkaloids as potential dopamine D3 receptor agonists for treatment of schizophrenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between the molecular structure and physical properties of functionalized naturally occurred Ergot-alkaloids as potential dopamine D3 receptor agonists is presented. The molecular modeling of the ergoline-skeleton is based on the comprehensive theoretical study of the binding affinity of the isolated chemicals towards the active sites of the D3 sub-type receptor (D3R) loops. The studied proton accepting ability under physiological conditions allows classifying four types of monocationics, characterizing with the different binding modes to D3R involving selected amino acid residues to the active sites. These results marked the pharmaceutical potential and clinical usage of the reported compounds as antipsychotic drugs for Schizophrenia treatment, since they allowed evaluating the highlights of the different hypothesizes of the biochemical causes the illness. The applied complex approach for theoretical and experimental elucidation, including quantum chemistry method, electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric (MS) methods, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational IR and Raman spectroscopy on the isolated fifteen novel derivatives (1)-(15) and their different protonated forms (1a)-(15a) evidenced a strong dependence of molecular conformation, physical properties and binding affinity. Thus, the semi-synthetic functionalization of the naturally occurred products (NPs), provided significant possibilities to further molecular drugs-design and development of novel derivatives with wanted biological function, using the established profile of selected classes/families of NPs. The work described chiefly the non-linear (NL) approach for the interpretation of the mass chromatograms on the performed hybrid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) tandem MS/MS and MS/MS/MS experiments, discussing the merits and great diversity of instrumentation flexibility, thus achieving fundamental

  16. Are styrene oligomers in coastal sediments of an industrial area aryl hydrocarbon-receptor agonists?

    PubMed

    Hong, Seongjin; Lee, Junghyun; Lee, Changkeun; Yoon, Seo Joon; Jeon, Seungyeon; Kwon, Bong-Oh; Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Giesy, John P; Khim, Jong Seong

    2016-06-01

    Effect-directed analysis (EDA) was performed to identify the major aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists in sediments collected from a highly industrialized area (Lake Shihwa, Korea). Great AhR-mediated potencies were found in fractions containing aromatic compounds with log Kow values of 5-8, and relatively great concentrations of styrene oligomers (SOs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected in those fractions. Until now, there was little information on occurrences and toxic relative potencies (RePs) of SOs in coastal environments. In the present study; i) distributions and compositions, ii) AhR binding affinities, and iii) contributions of SOs to total AhR-mediated potencies were determined in coastal sediments. Elevated concentrations of 10 SOs were detected in sediments of inland creeks ranging from 61 to 740 ng g(-1) dry mass (dm), while lesser concentrations were found in inner (mean = 33 ng g(-1) dm) and outer regions (mean = 25 ng g(-1) dm) of the lake. Concentrations of PAHs in sediments were comparable to those of SOs. 2,4-diphenyl-1-butene (SD3) was the predominant SO analogue in sediments. SOs and PAHs were accumulated in sediments near sources, and could not be transported to remote regions due to their hydrophobicity. RePs of 3 SOs could be derived, which were 1000- to 10,000-fold less than that of one representative potent AhR active PAH, benzo[a]pyrene. Although concentrations of SOs in sediments were comparable to those of PAHs, the collective contribution of SOs to total AhR-mediated potencies were rather small (<1%), primarily due to their smaller RePs. Overall, the present study provides information on distributions and AhR binding affinities for SOs as baseline data for degradation products of polystyrene plastic in the coastal environment. PMID:27043777

  17. Pharmacological properties of novel cyclic pentapeptides with µ-opioid receptor agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Perlikowska, Renata; Piekielna, Justyna; Fichna, Jakub; do-Rego, Jean Claude; Toth, Geza; Janecki, Tomasz; Janecka, Anna

    2014-03-01

    In our previous paper we have reported the synthesis and biological activity of a cyclic analog, Tyr-c(D-Lys- Phe-Phe-Asp)-NH2, based on endomorphin-2 (EM-2) structure. This analog displayed high affinity for the µ-opioid receptor, was much more stable than EM-2 in rat brain homogenate and showed remarkable antinociceptive activity after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection. Even more importantly, the cyclic analog elicited weak analgesia also after peripheral administration, giving evidence that it was able to cross, at least to some extent, the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here we describe further modifications of this analog aimed at enhancing brain delivery by increasing lipophilicity. Two new cyclic pentapeptides, Tyr-c(D-Lys-D-1-Nal-Phe-Asp)-NH2 and Tyr-c(D-Lys-D-2-Nal-Phe-Asp)-NH2 (where 1-Nal=1- naphthyl-3-alanine, 2-Nal=2-naphthyl-3-alanine) were synthesized and evaluated in biological assays. Both analogs showed high µ-opioid receptor affinity and agonist activity and were stable in the rat brain homogenates. Unfortunately, the increase of lipophilicity was achieved at the expense of water solubility. The analog with D-2-Nal residue showed strong analgesic effect when given i.c.v. but could not be tested after intravenous (i.v.) administration where higher concentrations of the compound are required. However, this analog showed inhibitory effect on gastrointestinal (GI) motility in vivo, providing an interesting approach to the development of peripherally restricted agents that could be useful for studying gastrointestinal disorders in animal models. PMID:23628088

  18. Binding of [3H]-muscimol, a potent gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor agonist, to membranes of the bovine retina.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, N. N.

    1980-01-01

    1 The binding of [3H]-muscimol, a potent gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor agonist, to crude membrane preparations of bovine retina was studied, using a filtration method to isolate membrane-bound ligand. 2 Specific binding was found to be saturable and occurred at two binding sites with affinity constants of 4.3 nM and 38.2 nM. 3 Binding was sodium-independent, enhanced by both freezing and Triton X-100 treatment but abolished with sodium laurylsulphate. 4 The binding sites demonstrated a high degree of pharmacological specificity, GABA being a potent displacer of [3H]-muscimol. 5 A higher degree of [3H]-muscimol binding was associated with subcellular fractions enriched with photoreceptor synaptosomes rather than with fractions enriched with conventional synaptosomes. PMID:7470740

  19. Radiolabelled D/sub 2/ agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents: Progress report for period February 1, 1987-January 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.

    1987-11-07

    Three D/sub 2/ agonists, /sup 3/H-DHEC, /sup 3/H-BrCr and /sup 3/H-ADTN, were evaluated with /sup 3/H-DHEC showing the most promise as a potential prolactinoma imaging agent. Concentration vs time plots for all three compounds in normal and in DES-treated pituitary tissue are reported. The exceptional D/sub 2/ receptor affinity of N-0437 has prompted synthetic efforts towards preparation of iodo-N-0437 in spite of a lack of preliminary tissue distribution data. An evaluation of /sup 18/F-FDG uptake in the prolactinoma model and as a muscarinic ligand in control animals were evaluated. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Pharmacological profile of the abeorphine 201-678, a potent orally active and long lasting dopamine agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Jaton, A.L.; Giger, R.K.A.; Vigouret, J.M.; Enz, A.; Frick, W.; Closse, A.; Markstein, R.

    1986-01-13

    The central dopaminergic effects of an abeorphine derivative 201-678 were compared to those of apomorphine and bromocriptine in different model systems. After oral administration, this compound induced contralateral turning in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine induced nigral lesions and exhibited strong anti-akinetic properties in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine induced hypothalamic lesions. It decreased dopamine metabolism in striatum and cortex, but did not modify noradrenaline and serotonin metabolism in the rat brain. 201-678 counteracted the in vivo increase of tyrosine hydroxylase activity induced by ..gamma..-butyrolactone. In vitro it stimulated DA-sensitive adenylate cyclase and inhibited acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices. This compound had high affinity for /sup 3/H-dopamine and /sup 3/H-clonidine binding sites. These results indicate that 201-678 is a potent, orally active dopamine agonist with a long duration of action. Furthermore it appears more selective than other dopaminergic drugs. 29 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  2. Detection of the secondary, low-affinity β1-adrenoceptor site in living cells using the fluorescent CGP 12177 derivative BODIPY-TMR-CGP

    PubMed Central

    Gherbi, K; Briddon, S J; Hill, S J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose CGP 12177 not only inhibits agonist effects mediated through the catecholamine site of the β1-adrenoceptor with high affinity, but also exhibits agonist effects of its own at higher concentrations through a secondary, low-affinity β1-adrenoceptor site or conformation. β-blocker affinities for this ‘CGP 12177’ site of the human β1-adrenoceptor have thus far only been characterized in functional studies. Here, we used the fluorescent CGP 12177 analogue BODIPY-TMR-CGP to directly investigate receptor–ligand interactions at the secondary binding site of the β1-adrenoceptor. Experimental Approach The human β1-adrenoceptor was stably expressed in CHO cells containing a cAMP response element (CRE)-secreted placental alkaline phosphatase (SPAP) reporter gene construct. Functional responses of BODIPY-TMR-CGP were determined in the CRE-SPAP reporter gene assay, and manual and automated confocal microscopy platforms used to investigate the binding properties of BODIPY-TMR-CGP. Key Results BODIPY-TMR-CGP displayed a pharmacological profile similar to that of CGP 12177, retaining agonist activity at the secondary β1-adrenoceptor site. In confocal microscopy studies, specific BODIPY-TMR-CGP binding allowed clear visualization of β1-adrenoceptors in live cells. Using a wider concentration range of labelled ligand in a high-content fluorescence-based binding assay than is possible in radioligand binding assays, two-site inhibition binding curves of β-adrenoceptor antagonists were revealed in CHO cells expressing the human β1-adrenoceptor, but not the β2-adrenoceptor. Conclusions and Implications The fluorescent CGP 12177 analogue allowed the detection of the β1-adrenoceptor secondary site in both functional and binding studies. This suggests that BODIPY-TMR-CGP presents an important and novel fluorescent tool to investigate the nature of the secondary β1-adrenoceptor site. PMID:25052258

  3. Supra-physiological efficacy at GPCRs: superstition or super agonists?

    PubMed Central

    Langmead, Christopher J; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The concept of ‘super agonism’ has been described since the discovery of peptide hormone analogues that yielded greater functional responses than the endogenous agonists, in the early 1980s. It has remained an area of debate as to whether such compounds can really display greater efficacy than an endogenous agonist. However, recent pharmacological data, combined with crystal structures of different GPCR conformations and improved analytical methods for quantifying drug action, are starting to shed light on this phenomenon and indicate that super agonists may be more than superstition. Linked Article This article is a commentary on Schrage et al., pp. 357–370 of this issue. To view this paper visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12003 PMID:23441648

  4. Alpha-2 agonists as pain therapy in horses.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    Alpha-2 agonists, such as xylazine, clonidine, romifidine, detomidine, medetomidine, and dexmedetomidine, are potent analgesic drugs that also induce physiologic and behavioral changes, such as hypertension, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, excessive sedation and ataxia, all of which can potentially limit their systemic use as analgesics in some clinical cases. The use of medetomidine and dexmetomidine has been introduced for equine anesthesia/analgesia, and although not approved in this species, their increased specificity for alpha-2 receptors may offer some potential advantages over the traditional alpha-2 agonists. Similarly, other routes of administration and benefits of alpha-2 agonists are recognized in the human and laboratory animal literature, which may prove useful in the equine patient if validated in the near future. This review presents this relevant information. PMID:21056297

  5. Excitation- and β2-agonist-induced activation of the Na+−K+ pump in rat soleus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard; Clausen, Torben

    2002-01-01

    In rat skeletal muscle, Na+–K+ pump activity increases dramatically in response to excitation (up to 20-fold) or β2-agonists (2-fold), leading to a reduction in intracellular Na+. This study examines the time course of these effects and whether they are due to an increased affinity of the Na+–K+ pump for intracellular Na+. Isolated rat soleus muscles were incubated at 30 oC in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer. The effects of direct electrical stimulation on 86Rb+ uptake rate and intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+]i) were characterized in the subsequent recovery phase. [Na+]i was varied using monensin or buffers with low Na+. In the [Na+]i range 21–69 mm, both the β2-agonist salbutamol and electrical stimulation produced a left shift of the curves relating 86Rb+ uptake rate to [Na+]i. In the first 10 s after 1 or 10 s pulse trains of 60 Hz, [Na+]i showed no increase, but 86Rb+ uptake rate increased by 22 and 86 %, respectively. Muscles excited in Na+-free Li+-substituted buffer and subsequently allowed to rest in standard buffer also showed a significant increase in 86Rb+ uptake rate and decrease in [Na+]i. Na+ loading induced by monensin or electroporation also stimulated 86Rb+ uptake rate but, contrary to excitation, increased [Na+]i. The increase in the rate of 86Rb+ uptake elicited by electrical stimulation was abolished by ouabain, but not by bumetanide. The results indicate that excitation (like salbutamol) induces a rapid increase in the affinity of the Na+–K+ pump for intracellular Na+. This leads to a Na+–K+ pump activation that does not require Na+ influx, but possibly the generation of action potentials. This improves restoration of the Na+–K+ homeostasis during work and optimizes excitability and contractile performance of the working muscle. PMID:12433963

  6. Selective Agonists and Antagonists of Formylpeptide Receptors: Duplex Flow Cytometry and Mixture-Based Positional Scanning Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Pinilla, Clemencia; Edwards, Bruce S.; Appel, Jon R.; Yates-Gibbins, Tina; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Medina-Franco, Jose L.; Young, Susan M.; Santos, Radleigh G.

    2013-01-01

    The formylpeptide receptor (FPR1) and formylpeptide-like 1 receptor (FPR2) are G protein–coupled receptors that are linked to acute inflammatory responses, malignant glioma stem cell metastasis, and chronic inflammation. Although several N-formyl peptides are known to bind to these receptors, more selective small-molecule, high-affinity ligands are needed for a better understanding of the physiologic roles played by these receptors. High-throughput assays using mixture-based combinatorial libraries represent a unique, highly efficient approach for rapid data acquisition and ligand identification. We report the superiority of this approach in the context of the simultaneous screening of a diverse set of mixture-based small-molecule libraries. We used a single cross-reactive peptide ligand for a duplex flow cytometric screen of FPR1 and FPR2 in color-coded cell lines. Screening 37 different mixture-based combinatorial libraries totaling more than five million small molecules (contained in 5,261 mixture samples) resulted in seven libraries that significantly inhibited activity at the receptors. Using positional scanning deconvolution, selective high-affinity (low nM Ki) individual compounds were identified from two separate libraries, namely, pyrrolidine bis-diketopiperazine and polyphenyl urea. The most active individual compounds were characterized for their functional activities as agonists or antagonists with the most potent FPR1 agonist and FPR2 antagonist identified to date with an EC50 of 131 nM (4 nM Ki) and an IC50 of 81 nM (1 nM Ki), respectively, in intracellular Ca2+ response determinations. Comparative analyses of other previous screening approaches clearly illustrate the efficiency of identifying receptor selective, individual compounds from mixture-based combinatorial libraries. PMID:23788657

  7. Toward Selective Drug Development for the Human 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1E Receptor: A Comparison of 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1E and 1F Receptor Structure-Affinity RelationshipsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michael T.; Dukat, Małgorzata; Glennon, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 1E receptor is highly expressed in the human frontal cortex and hippocampus, and this distribution suggests the function of 5-HT1E receptors might be linked to memory. To test this hypothesis, behavioral experiments are needed. Because rats and mice lack a 5-HT1E receptor gene, knockout strategies cannot be used to elucidate this receptor's functions. Thus, selective pharmacological tools must be developed. The tryptamine-related agonist BRL54443 [5-hydroxy-3-(1-methylpiperidin-4-yl)-1H-indole] is one of the few agents that binds 5-HT1E receptors with high affinity and some selectively; unfortunately, it binds equally well to 5-HT1F receptors (Ki ≈ 1 nM). The differences between tryptamine binding requirements of these two receptor populations have never been extensively explored; this must be done to guide the design of analogs with greater selectivity for 5-HT1E receptors versus 5-HT1F receptors. Previously, we determined the receptor binding affinities of a large series of tryptamine analogs at the 5-HT1E receptor; we now examine the affinities of this same series of compounds at 5-HT1F receptors. The affinities of these compounds at 5-HT1E and 5-HT1F receptors were found to be highly correlated (r = 0.81). All high-affinity compounds were full agonists at both receptor populations. We identified 5-N-butyryloxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine as a novel 5-HT1F receptor agonist with >60-fold selectivity versus 5-HT1E receptors. There is significant overlap between 5-HT1E and 5-HT1F receptor orthosteric binding properties; thus, identification of 5-HT1E-selective orthosteric ligands will be difficult. The insights generated from this study will inform future drug development and molecular modeling studies for both 5-HT1E and 5-HT1F receptors. PMID:21422162

  8. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field. PMID:25570332

  9. Effectively nonlocal metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Alexey; Koivisto, Tomi; Sandstad, Marit

    2016-03-01

    In metric-affine theories of gravity such as the C-theories, the spacetime connection is associated to a metric that is nontrivially related to the physical metric. In this article, such theories are rewritten in terms of a single metric, and it is shown that they can be recast as effectively nonlocal gravity. With some assumptions, known ghost-free theories with nonsingular and cosmologically interesting properties may be recovered. Relations between different formulations are analyzed at both perturbative and nonperturbative levels, taking carefully into account subtleties with boundary conditions in the presence of integral operators in the action, and equivalences between theories related by nonlocal redefinitions of the fields are verified at the level of equations of motion. This suggests a possible geometrical interpretation of nonlocal gravity as an emergent property of non-Riemannian spacetime structure.

  10. Affinities of the Swartkrans early Homo mandibles.

    PubMed

    Curnoe, Darren

    2008-01-01

    The southern African early Homo assemblage continues to make important contributions to understanding the systematics, adaptations and evolutionary history of the human genus. However, the taxonomy of this sample is in a state of flux. This study examines the size and shape of the mandibular bodies of Swartkrans SK 15 and SK 45 comparing them with variation in two early Homo taxa (H. habilis sensu lato and H. sapiens erectus). The research aims to clarify their phenetic affinities and systematics through univariate statistics, inferential testing and multivariate analysis employing size (Log-transformed) and shape (Mosimann variables). Neither of them strongly resembles H. habilis sensu lato or H. sapiens erectus, rather, they probably sample a novel species of Homo not seen in East Africa. Moreover, there is considerable morphological variability within the Swartkrans sample and the possibility of more than one novel species being sampled at this site cannot be excluded. PMID:18402959

  11. Wetting on rough self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasantzas, George

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we present a general investigation of the effective potential for complete wetting on self-affine rough surfaces. The roughness effect is investigated by means of the height-height correlation model in Fourier space ~(1+aξ2q2)-1-H. The parameters H and ξ are, respectively, the roughness exponent and the substrate in-plane correlation length. It is observed that the effect of H on the free interface profile is significant for ξ>ξ) regime is characterized by a power-law scaling ~Y-2.

  12. Dye affinity cryogels for plasmid DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Çimen, Duygu; Yılmaz, Fatma; Perçin, Işık; Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare megaporous dye-affinity cryogel discs for the purification of plasmid DNA (pDNA) from bacterial lysate. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [PHEMA] cryogel discs were produced by free radical polymerization initiated by N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED) and ammonium persulfate (APS) redox pair in an ice bath. Cibacron Blue F3GA was used as an affinity ligand (loading amount: 68.9μmol/g polymer). The amount of pDNA adsorbed onto the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs first increased and then reached a plateau value (i.e., 32.5mg/g cryogel) at 3.0mg/mL pDNA concentration. Compared with the PHEMA cryogel (0.11mg/g cryogel), the pDNA adsorption capacity of the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel (32.4mg/g polymer) was improved significantly due to the Cibacron Blue 3GA immobilization onto the polymeric matrix. pDNA adsorption amount decreased from 11.7mg/g to 1.1mg/g with the increasing of NaCl concentration. The maximum pDNA adsorption was achieved at 4°C. The overall recovery of pDNA was calculated as 90%. The PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs could be used five times without decreasing the pDNA adsorption capacity significantly. The results show that the PHEMA-Cibacron Blue F3GA cryogel discs promise high selectivity for pDNA. PMID:26249596

  13. Agonist treatment in opioid use: advances and controversy.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Biju; Chand, Prabhat; Benegal, Vivek; Murthy, Pratima

    2012-06-01

    Opioid dependence is a chronic relapsing condition which requires comprehensive care; pharmacological agents form the mainstay of its long term treatment. The two most popular approaches are the harm reduction method using agonists and the complete abstinence method using antagonists. Currently, particularly from the harm minimization perspective and the low feasibility of an abstinence based approach, there is an increasing trend toward agonist treatment. The use of buprenorphine has gained popularity in view of its safety profile and the availability of the buprenorphine-naloxone combination has made it popular as a take-home treatment. This review outlines the pharmacological advances and controversies in this area. PMID:22813654

  14. Insect Nicotinic Receptor Agonists as Flea Adulticides in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Dai Tan; Hsu, Walter H.; Martin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Fleas are significant ectoparasites of small animals. They can be a severe irritant to animals and serve as a vector for a number of infectious diseases. In this article, we discuss the pharmacological characteristics of four insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists used as fleacides in dogs and cats, which include three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, nitenpyram, and dinotefuran) and spinosad. Insect nAChR agonists are one of the most important new classes of insecticides, which are used to control sucking insects both on plants and on companion animals. These new compounds provide a new approach for practitioners to safely and effectively eliminate fleas. PMID:20646191

  15. Piperidine derivatives as nonprostanoid IP receptor agonists 2.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ryoji; Ito, Hiroaki; Ishigaki, Takeshi; Morita, Yasuhiro; Miyamoto, Mitsuko; Isogaya, Masafumi

    2016-06-15

    We searched for a strong and selective nonprostanoid IP agonist bearing piperidine and benzanilide moieties. Through optimization of substituents on the benzanilide moiety, the crucial part of the agonist, 43 (2-((1-(2-(N-(4-tolyl)benzo[d][1,3]dioxole-5-carboxamido)ethyl)piperidin-4-yl)oxy)acetic acid monohydrate monohydrochloride) was discovered and exhibited strong platelet aggregation inhibition (IC50=21nM) and 100-fold selectivity for IP receptor over other PG receptors. The systemic exposure level and bioavailability after oral administration of 43 were also good in dog. PMID:27133594

  16. Novel fentanyl-based dual μ/δ-opioid agonists for the treatment of acute and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Podolsky, Alexander T.; Sandweiss, Alexander; Hu, Jackie; Bilsky, Edward J; Cain, Jim P; Kumirov, Vlad K.; Lee, Yeon Sun; Hruby, Victor J; Vardanyan, Ruben S.; Vanderah, Todd W.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately one third of the adult U.S. population suffers from some type of on-going, chronic pain annually, and many more will have some type of acute pain associated with trauma or surgery. First-line therapies for moderate to severe pain include prescriptions for common mu opioid receptor agonists such as morphine and its various derivatives. The epidemic use, misuse and diversion of prescription opioids has highlighted just one of the adverse effects of mu opioid analgesics. Alternative approaches include novel opioids that target delta or kappa opioid receptors, or compounds that interact with two or more of the opioid receptors. Aims Here we report the pharmacology of a newly synthesized bifunctional opioid agonist (RV-Jim-C3) derived from combined structures of fentanyl and enkephalin in rodents. RV-Jim-C3 has high affinity binding to both mu and delta opioid receptors. Main Methods Mice and rats were used to test RV-Jim-C3 in a tailflick test with and without opioid selective antagonist for antinociception. RV-Jim-C3 was tested for anti-inflammatory and antihypersensitivity effects in a model of formalin-induced flinching and spinal nerve ligation. To rule out motor impairment, rotarod was tested in rats. Key findings RV-Jim-C3 demonstrates potent-efficacious activity in several in vivo pain models including inflammatory pain, antihyperalgesia and antiallodynic with no significant motor impairment. Significance This is the first report of a fentanyl-based structure with delta and mu opioid receptor activity that exhibits outstanding antinociceptive efficacy in neuropathic pain, reducing the propensity of unwanted side effects driven by current therapies that are unifunctional mu opioid agonists. PMID:24084045

  17. Behavioural evidence of agonist-like effect of isoteoline at 5-HT1B serotonergic receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhelyazkova-Savova, Maria D; Zhelyazkov, Delcho K

    2003-01-01

    Isoteoline is a compound of aporphine structure derived from the alkaloid glaucine. Previous studies with isoteoline have shown antagonistic activity at 5-HT(2C) serotonergic receptors. We have investigated whether isoteoline interacts with 5-HT(1B) receptors. An isolation-induced social behavioural deficit test in mice was used as a model of stimulation of these receptors. The deficit in the behaviour of isolated mice in this experimental procedure was reported to be sensitive to 5-HT(1B)-receptor stimulation, since agonists at these receptors are capable of reversing it. In our study, we used N-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazine (TFMPP) (2 mg kg(-1)) as a reference agonist at these receptor sites. TFMPP completely restored the normal behaviour of the isolated mice. Its effect was prevented by propranolol (4 mg kg(-1)), a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist with a high affinity for 5-HT(1B) receptors, which was inactive by itself. When isoteoline was given before TFMPP, it did not prevent the effect of the latter. Given alone at doses of 0.25, 1, 4 or 8 mg kg(-1), isoteoline showed an effect of its own to normalize the behaviour of isolated mice. The effect of isoteoline (1 mg kg(-1), i.p.) was antagonized by pretreatment with propranolol, indicating that it was mediated through stimulation of 5-HT(1B) receptors. Repeated treatment with isoteoline (1 mg kg(-1), 2 x 3 days, i.p.) produced tolerance to its effect and significantly attenuated the effect of TFMPP, when animals were tested 16 h after the last injection. In conclusion, the results provided functional evidence of agonist-like activity of isoteoline at the 5-HT(1B) receptors. PMID:12625876

  18. Computer-aided de novo ligand design and docking/molecular dynamics study of vitamin D receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiu-Long; Takimoto-Kamimura, Midori; Wei, Jing; Gao, Qing-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    1α,25(OH)(2)D(3), which is directly mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR), exerts a wide variety of biological actions. However, the treatment with 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3) is limited because of its side effects. Many analogs and several nonsteroidal mimics with potent biological activity have been reported so far, and our rationale for designing the VDR agonists was on the basis of computer-aided drug design method by de novo design of A-ring and C/D-ring position of 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3). Pyrimidine-2,4-diamine was selected as A-ring, and naphthalene and benzene were chosen as C/D-ring. By linking different components, a virtue compound library was obtained. To evaluate the contribution to activity of each component, we performed a series of automated molecular docking operations. Results revealed that the 19-dimethyl derivatives (the C-19 position correspond to C-20 in 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3)) show the favorable docking affinity to VDR. Moreover, the docking results are quite robust when further validated by molecular dynamics simulations. In addition, by free energy analysis using molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, the driving force of the binding between VDR and the ligands is proved to be hydrophobic interactions. Thus, a possible strategy to design new series of VDR agonists is proposed. The strategy can be successfully applied to explain the high potential activities of the 19-dimethyl derivatives. It is anticipated that the findings reported here may provide useful information for designing effective VDR agonists as well as the therapeutic treatment of VDR-related diseases. PMID:21523537

  19. Partial agonistic effect of 9-hydroxycorynantheidine on mu-opioid receptor in the guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Ishikawa, Hayato; Aimi, Norio; Ponglux, Dhavadee; Watanabe, Kazuo; Horie, Syunji

    2006-04-01

    Mitragynine is an indole alkaloid isolated from the Thai medicinal plant Mitragyna speciosa that is reported to have opioid agonistic properties. The 9-demethyl analogue of mitragynine, 9-hydroxycorynantheidine, is synthesized from mitragynine. 9-Hydroxycorynantheidine inhibited electrically stimulated guinea-pig ileum contraction, but its maximum inhibition was weaker than that of mitragynine and its effect was antagonized by naloxone, suggesting that 9-hydroxycorynantheidine possesses partial agonist properties on opioid receptors. Receptor binding assays revealed that 9-hydroxycorynantheidine has high affinity for mu-opioid receptors. In an assay of the guinea-pig ileum, naloxone shifted the concentration-response curves for [D-Ala(2), N-MePhe(4), Gly-ol(5)]-enkephalin (DAMGO), (5alpha,7alpha,8beta)-(+)-N-Methyl-N-[7-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]-benzeneacetamide (U69593) and 9-hydroxycorynantheidine to the right in a competitive manner. The pA(2) values of naloxone against 9-hydroxycorynantheidine and DAMGO were very similar, but not that against U69593. As indicated by the two assay systems, the opioid effect of 9-hydroxycorynantheidine is selective for the mu-opioid receptor. 9-Hydroxycorynantheidine shifted the concentration-response curve for DAMGO slightly to the right. Pretreatment with the mu-opioid selective and irreversible antagonist beta-funaltorexamine hydrochloride (beta-FNA) shifted the concentration-response curve for DAMGO to the right without affecting the maximum response. On the other hand, beta-FNA did not affect the curve for 9-hydroxycorynantheidine, but decreased the maximum response because of the lack of spare receptors. These studies suggest that 9-hydroxycorynantheidine has partial agonist properties on mu-opioid receptors in the guinea-pig ileum. PMID:16266723

  20. Yokukansan Increases 5-HT1A Receptors in the Prefrontal Cortex and Enhances 5-HT1A Receptor Agonist-Induced Behavioral Responses in Socially Isolated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Yamaguchi, Takuji; Nishi, Akinori; Ikarashi, Yasushi; Hattori, Tomohisa; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The traditional Japanese medicine yokukansan has an anxiolytic effect, which occurs after repeated administration. In this study, to investigate the underlying mechanisms, we examined the effects of repeated yokukansan administration on serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor density and affinity and its expression at both mRNA and protein levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of socially isolated mice. Moreover, we examined the effects of yokukansan on a 5-HT1A receptor-mediated behavioral response. Male mice were subjected to social isolation stress for 6 weeks and simultaneously treated with yokukansan. Thereafter, the density and affinity of 5-HT1A receptors were analyzed by a receptor-binding assay. Levels of 5-HT1A receptor protein and mRNA were also measured. Furthermore, (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT; a 5-HT1A receptor agonist) was injected intraperitoneally, and rearing behavior was examined. Social isolation stress alone did not affect 5-HT1A receptor density or affinity. However, yokukansan significantly increased receptor density and decreased affinity concomitant with unchanged protein and mRNA levels. Yokukansan also enhanced the 8-OH-DPAT-induced decrease in rearing behavior. These results suggest that yokukansan increases 5-HT1A receptors in the PFC of socially isolated mice and enhances their function, which might underlie its anxiolytic effects. PMID:26681968

  1. Discovery and characterization of GSK256073, a non-flushing hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptor 2 (HCA2) agonist.

    PubMed

    Sprecher, Dennis; Maxwell, Miles; Goodman, Joanne; White, Brian; Tang, Chi-Man; Boullay, Valerie; de Gouville, Anne-Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    Niacin has been used for many years in the treatment of dyslipidemia due to its ability to decrease serum levels of triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and to increase levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, niacin causes severe flushing resulting in poor patient compliance. The discovery of hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptor 2 (HCA2) as a high affinity receptor for niacin has opened avenues to investigate the mechanism of action of niacin, and to potentially discover agonists which maintain the antilipolytic effects of niacin accessed by a decrease in circulating non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and thereby perhaps the lipid/lipoprotein effects, but avoid the flushing effects. Here we describe the strategy we implemented to identify such compounds. This approach resulted in the discovery of GSK256073, a highly potent HCA2 agonist, which produced similar NEFA lowering effects to niacin in preclinical models (rat and guinea pig). A guinea pig model was used to predict flushing, via an increase in ear temperature, and GSK256073 was found to have a minimal effect in this model. These preclinical models appeared to be predictive of human response, since in a first-time-in-human study, GSK256073 displayed long lasting NEFA and triglyceride lowering effects in healthy male subjects, which were not associated with flushing. GSK256073 can be used as a pharmacological tool to better understand the role of HCA2 in lipid metabolism. PMID:25773497

  2. [Dmt1]DALDA analogues with enhanced μ opioid agonist potency and with a mixed μ/κ opioid activity profile

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Longxiang; Li, Ziyuan; Chen, Jiajia; Chung, Nga N.; Wilkes, Brian C.; Li, Tingyou; Schiller, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Analogues of [Dmt1]DALDA (H-Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2; Dmt = 2′,6′-dimethyltyrosine), a potent μ opioid agonist peptide with mitochondria-targeted antioxidant activity, were prepared by replacing Phe3 with various 2′,6′-dialkylated Phe analogues, including 2′,6′-dimethylphenylalanine (Dmp), 2′4′,6′-trimethylphenylalanine (Tmp), 2′-isopropyl-6′-methylphenylalanine (Imp) and 2′-ethyl-6′-methylphenylalanine (Emp), or with the bulky amino acids 3′-(1-naphthyl)alanine (1-Nal), 3′-(2-naphthyl)alanine (2-Nal) or Trp. Several compounds showed significantly increased μ agonist potency, retained μ receptor selectivity and are of interest as drug candidates for neuropathic pain treatment. Surprisingly, the Dmp3-, Imp3-, Emp3- and 1-Nal3-containing analogues showed much increased κ receptor binding affinity and had mixed μ/κ properties. In these cases, molecular dynamics studies indicated conformational preorganization of the unbound peptide ligands due to rotational restriction around the Cβ-Cγ bond of the Xxx3 residue, in correlation with the observed κ receptor binding enhancement. Compounds with a mixed μ/κ opioid activity profile are known to have therapeutic potential for treatment of cocaine abuse. PMID:24602401

  3. High potency olfactory receptor agonists discovered by virtual high-throughput screening: molecular probes for receptor structure and olfactory function

    PubMed Central

    Triballeau, Nicolas; Van Name, Eric; Laslier, Guillaume; Cai, Diana; Paillard, Guillaume; Sorensen, Peter W.; Hoffmann, Rémy; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Ngai, John; Acher, Francine C.

    2008-01-01

    The detection and discrimination of diverse chemical structures by the vertebrate olfactory system is accomplished by the recognition of odorous ligands by their cognate receptors. In the present study we used a computational high-throughput screening strategy to discover novel high affinity agonists of an olfactory G protein-coupled receptor tuned to recognize amino acid ligands. Functional testing of the top candidates validated several agonists with potencies higher than any of the receptor’s known natural ligands. Computational modeling revealed molecular interactions involved in ligand recognition by this receptor, and further highlighted interactions that have been conserved in evolutionarily divergent amino acid receptors. Significantly, the top compounds display robust activities as odorants in vivo, and include a natural product that may be used to signal the presence of bacteria in the aquatic environment. Our virtual screening approach should be applicable to the identification of new bioactive molecules for probing the structure of chemosensory receptors and the function of chemosensory systems in vivo. PMID:19081373

  4. Chemical synthesis, docking studies and biological effects of a pan peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonist and cyclooxygenase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Santin, José Roberto; Uchôa, Flávia D T; Lima, Maria do Carmo A; Rabello, Marcelo M; Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Hernandes, Marcelo Z; Amato, Angelica A; Milton, Flora Aparecida; Webb, Paul; Neves, Francisco de Assis Rocha; Galdino, Suely L; Pitta, Ivan Rocha; Farsky, Sandra H P

    2013-03-12

    The compound (5Z)-5-[(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene]-3-(4-chlorobenzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione (LYSO-7) was synthesised in order to obtain a new type of anti-inflammatory drug, designed with hybrid features to inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX) and also to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR). Results obtained from docking (in silico) studies corroborated with experimental data, showing the potential affinity between the studied ligand and targets. The specificity of LYSO-7 for COX-enzymes was detected by the inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 activities by 30% and 20%, respectively. In transactivation reporter gene assays LYSO-07 showed a pan partial agonist effect on the three PPAR subtypes (PPARγ, PPARα and PPARβ/δ). The agonist action on PPARγ was also observed by a pharmacological approach, as the reduction in the Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) secretion and nitric oxide (NO) production by mouse neutrophils was blocked by GW9962, a specific PPARγ antagonist. Additionally, the in vivo effect was measured by reduced carrageenan-induced neutrophil influx into the subcutaneous tissue of mice. Taken together, these data show that LYSO-7 displays a potent in vivo anti-inflammatory effect during the innate acute response, which is dependent on its associated COX inhibitory activities and PPAR activation. PMID:23305993

  5. In vitro affinity maturation of a natural human antibody overcomes a barrier to in vivo affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Fouts, Ashley E; Stengel, Katharina; Luan, Peng; Dillon, Michael; Liang, Wei-Ching; Feierbach, Becket; Kelley, Robert F; Hötzel, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies isolated from human donors are increasingly being developed for anti-infective therapeutics. These antibodies undergo affinity maturation in vivo, minimizing the need for engineering of therapeutic leads for affinity. However, the affinities required for some therapeutic applications may be higher than the affinities of the leads obtained, requiring further affinity maturation in vitro. To improve the neutralization potency of natural human antibody MSL-109 targeting human cytomegalovirus (CMV), we affinity matured the antibody against the gH/gL glycoprotein complex. A phage display library where most of the six complementary-determining regions (CDRs) were allowed to vary in only one amino acid residue at a time was used to scan for mutations that improve binding affinity. A T55R mutation and multiple mutations in position 53 of the heavy chain were identified that, when present individually or in combination, resulted in higher apparent affinities to gH/gL and improved CMV neutralization potency of Fab fragments expressed in bacterial cells. Three of these mutations in position 53 introduced glycosylation sites in heavy chain CDR 2 (CDR H2) that impaired binding of antibodies expressed in mammalian cells. One high affinity (KD < 10 pM) variant was identified that combined the D53N and T55R mutations while avoiding glycosylation of CDR H2. However, all the amino acid substitutions identified by phage display that improved binding affinity without introducing glycosylation sites required between two and four simultaneous nucleotide mutations to avoid glycosylation. These results indicate that the natural human antibody MSL-109 is close to a local affinity optimum. We show that affinity maturation by phage display can be used to identify and bypass barriers to in vivo affinity maturation of antibodies imposed by glycosylation and codon usage. These constraints may be relatively prevalent in human antibodies due to the codon usage and the amino acid

  6. Prediction of Neutral Salt Elution Profiles for Affinity Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1981-04-01

    Neutral salts exhibit very marked differences as eluants of proteins from affinity columns. We observe: (i) that the relative potencies of neutral salts as eluants are independent of the protein or the affinity ligand in the systems studied, (ii) that the absolute salt concentration necessary to elute any given protein bound to the affinity matrix is proportional to the algebraic sum of a set of elution coefficients defined herein for the separate ions present in the solution, and (iii) that the proportionality between elution potency and elution coefficient is a function of the affinity of the protein for the immobilized ligand. Given the concentration of one neutral salt required for elution of a protein of interest from an affinity column, the elution capability of any neutral salt at any temperature can be quantitatively predicted for that protein. Accordingly, application and elution protocols for affinity chromatography can be designed to optimize the yield and fold purification of proteins.

  7. BU08073 a buprenorphine analogue with partial agonist activity at μ-receptors in vitro but long-lasting opioid antagonist activity in vivo in mice

    PubMed Central

    Khroyan, T V; Wu, J; Polgar, W E; Cami-Kobeci, G; Fotaki, N; Husbands, S M; Toll, L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Buprenorphine is a potent analgesic with high affinity at μ, δ and κ and moderate affinity at nociceptin opioid (NOP) receptors. Nevertheless, NOP receptor activation modulates the in vivo activity of buprenorphine. Structure activity studies were conducted to design buprenorphine analogues with high affinity at each of these receptors and to characterize them in in vitro and in vivo assays. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Compounds were tested for binding affinity and functional activity using [35S]GTPγS binding at each receptor and a whole-cell fluorescent assay at μ receptors. BU08073 was evaluated for antinociceptive agonist and antagonist activity and for its effects on anxiety in mice. KEY RESULTS BU08073 bound with high affinity to all opioid receptors. It had virtually no efficacy at δ, κ and NOP receptors, whereas at μ receptors, BU08073 has similar efficacy as buprenorphine in both functional assays. Alone, BU08073 has anxiogenic activity and produces very little antinociception. However, BU08073 blocks morphine and U50,488-mediated antinociception. This blockade was not evident at 1 h post-treatment, but is present at 6 h and remains for up to 3–6 days. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These studies provide structural requirements for synthesis of ‘universal’ opioid ligands. BU08073 had high affinity for all the opioid receptors, with moderate efficacy at μ receptors and reduced efficacy at NOP receptors, a profile suggesting potential analgesic activity. However, in vivo, BU08073 had long-lasting antagonist activity, indicating that its pharmacokinetics determined both the time course of its effects and what receptor-mediated effects were observed. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24903063

  8. Pyrrolo- and Pyridomorphinans: Non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, V.; Clark, M.J.; Traynor, J.R.; Lewis, J.W.; Husbands, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse. PMID:24973818

  9. Pyrrolo- and pyridomorphinans: non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Clark, M J; Traynor, J R; Lewis, J W; Husbands, S M

    2014-08-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse. PMID:24973818

  10. Three amino acids in the D2 dopamine receptor regulate selective ligand function and affinity

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, David F.; Ericksen, Spencer S.; Schetz, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The D2 dopamine receptor is an important therapeutic target for the treatment of psychotic, agitated, and abnormal behavioral states. To better understand the specific interactions of subtype-selective ligands with dopamine receptor subtypes, seven ligands with high selectivity (>120-fold) for the D4 subtype of dopamine receptor were tested on wild-type and mutant D2 receptors. Five of the selective ligands were observed to have 21-fold to 293-fold increases in D2 receptor affinity when three non-conserved amino acids in TM2 and TM3 were mutated to the corresponding D4 amino acids. The two ligands with the greatest improvement in affinity for the D2 mutant receptor [i.e., 3-{[4-(4-iodophenyl) piperazin-1-yl]methyl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (L-750,667) and 1-[4-iodobenzyl]-4-[N-(3-isopropoxy-2-pyridinyl)-N-methyl]-aminopiperidine (RBI-257)] were investigated in functional assays. Consistent with their higher affinity for the mutant than for the wild-type receptor, concentrations of L-750,667 or RBI-257 that produced large reductions in the potency of quinpirole’s functional response in the mutant did not significantly reduce quinpirole’s functional response in the wild-type D2 receptor. In contrast to RBI-257 which is an antagonist at all receptors, L-750,667 is a partial agonist at the wild-type D2 but an antagonist at both the mutant D2 and wild-type D4 receptors. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the TM2/3 microdomain of the D2 dopamine receptor not only regulates the selective affinity of ligands, but in selected cases can also regulate their function. Utilizing a new docking technique that incorporates receptor backbone flexibility, the three non-conserved amino acids that encompass the TM2/3 microdomain were found to account in large part for the differences in intermolecular steric contacts between the ligands and receptors. Consistent with the experimental data, this model illustrates the interactions between a variety of subtype

  11. Putative M2 muscarinic receptors of rat heart have high affinity for organophosphorus anticholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Silveira, C L; Eldefrawi, A T; Eldefrawi, M E

    1990-05-01

    The M2 subtype of muscarinic receptor is predominant in heart, and such receptors were reported to be located in muscles as well as in presynaptic cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals. Muscarinic receptors of rat heart were identified by the high affinity binding of the agonist (+)-[3H]cis-methyldioxolane ([3H]CD), which has been used to label a high affinity population of M2 receptors. A single population of sites (KD 2.74 nM; Bmax of 82 fmol/mg protein) was detected and [3H]CD binding was sensitive to the M2 antagonist himbacine but much less so to pirenzepine, the M1 antagonist. These cardiac receptors had different sensitivities to NiCl2 and N-ethylmaleimide from brain muscarinic receptors, that were also labeled with [3H]CD and considered to be of the M2 subtype. Up to 70% of the [3H]CD-labeled cardiac receptors had high affinities for several organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterases. [3H]CD binding was inhibited by the nerve agents soman, VX, sarin, and tabun, with K0.5 values of 0.8, 2, 20, and 50 nM, respectively. It was also inhibited by echothiophate and paraoxon with K0.5 values of 100 and 300 nM, respectively. The apparent competitive nature of inhibition of [3H]CD binding by both sarin and paraoxon suggests that the OPs bind to the acetylcholine binding site of the muscarinic receptor. Other OP insecticides had lower potencies, inhibiting less than 50% of 5 nM [3H]CD binding by 1 microM of EPN, coumaphos, dioxathion, dichlorvos, or chlorpyriphos. There was poor correlation between the potencies of the OPs in reversibly inhibiting [3H]CD binding, and their anticholinesterase activities and toxicities. Acetylcholinesterases are the primary targets for these OP compounds because of the irreversible nature of their inhibition, which results in building of acetylcholine concentrations that activate muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and desensitize them, thereby inhibiting respiration. Nevertheless, the high affinities that cardiac muscarinic

  12. Affine Vertex Operator Algebras and Modular Linear Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arike, Yusuke; Kaneko, Masanobu; Nagatomo, Kiyokazu; Sakai, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we list all affine vertex operator algebras of positive integral levels whose dimensions of spaces of characters are at most 5 and show that a basis of the space of characters of each affine vertex operator algebra in the list gives a fundamental system of solutions of a modular linear differential equation. Further, we determine the dimensions of the spaces of characters of affine vertex operator algebras whose numbers of inequivalent simple modules are not exceeding 20.

  13. Agonistic induction of a covalent dimer in a mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A documents a juxtamembrane interaction that accompanies receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Deschênes, J; McNicoll, N; De Léan, A

    2001-03-16

    The natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is composed of an extracellular domain with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane-spanning domain, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. In response to agonists (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide), the kinase homology domain-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, which allows the production of cyclic GMP. Previous work from our laboratory strongly indicated that agonists are exerting their effects through the induction of a juxtamembrane dimeric contact. However, a direct demonstration of this mechanism remains to be provided. As a tool, we are now using the properties of a new mutation, D435C. It introduces a cysteine at a position in NPR-A corresponding to a supplementary cysteine found in NPR-C6, another receptor of this family (a disulfide-linked dimer). Although this D435C mutation only leads to trace levels of NPR-A disulfide-linked dimer at basal state, covalent dimerization can be induced by a treatment with rat ANP or with other agonists. The NPR-A(D435C) mutant has not been subjected to significant structural alterations, since it shares with the wild type receptor a similar dose-response pattern of cellular guanylyl cyclase activation. However, a persistent activation accompanies NPR-A(D435C) dimer formation after the removal of the inducer agonist. On the other hand, a construction where the intracellular domain of NPR-A(D435C) has been truncated (DeltaKC(D435C)) displays a spontaneous and complete covalent dimerization. In addition, the elimination of the intracellular domain in wild type DeltaKC and DeltaKC(D435C) is associated with an increase of agonist binding affinity, this effect being more pronounced with the weak agonist pBNP. Also, a D435C secreted extracellular domain remains unlinked even after incubation with rat ANP. In summary, these results demonstrate, in a dynamic fashion, the agonistic induction of a dimeric contact in the

  14. Towards a high-affinity allosteric enhancer at muscarinic M1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, Sebastian; Popham, Angela; Birdsall, Nigel J M

    2002-01-01

    Loss of forebrain acetylcholine (ACh) is an early neurochemical lesion in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), and muscarinic receptors for ACh are involved in memory and cognition, so a muscarinic agonist could provide 'replacement therapy' in this disease. Muscarinic receptors, which couple to G-proteins, occur throughout the CNS, and in the periphery they mediate the responses of the parasympathetic nervous system, so selectivity is crucial. The five subtypes of muscarinic receptor, M1-M5, have a distinct regional distribution, with M2 and M3 mediating most of the peripheral effects, M2 predominating in hindbrain areas, and M1 predominating in the cortex and hippocampus--the brain regions most associated with memory and cognition, which has lead to a search for a truly M1-selective muscarinic agonist. That search has so far been unsuccessful, but acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil (Aricept), which potentiate cholinergic neurotransmission, have a therapeutic role in the management of AD; so the M1 receptor remains a therapeutic target. Our approach is to develop allosteric enhancers--compounds which bind to the receptor at an 'allosteric' site which is distinct from the 'primary' site to which the endogenous ligand binds, and which enhance the affinity (or efficacy) of the endogenous ligand. We have developed radioligand binding assays and analyses for the detection and quantitatitation of allosteric interactions of a test agent with labelled and unlabelled 'primary' ligands, and we report here some results of the initial phase of a chemical synthesis project to develop potent and selective allosteric enhancers at muscarinic M1 receptors. PMID:12212769

  15. Nonpeptide Small Molecule Agonist and Antagonist Original Leads for Neuropeptide FF1 and FF2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide FF1 and FF2 receptors (NPFF1-R and NPFF2-R), and their endogenous ligand NPFF, are one of only several systems responsible for mediating opioid-induced hyperalgesia, tolerance, and dependence. Currently, no small molecules displaying good affinity or selectivity for either subtype have been reported, to decipher the role of NPFF2-R as it relates to opioid-mediated analgesia, for further exploration of NPFF1-R, or for medication development for either subtype. We report the first nonpeptide small molecule scaffold for NPFF1,2-R, the guanidino-piperidines, and SAR studies resulting in the discovery of a NPFF1 agonist (7b, Ki = 487 ± 117 nM), a NPFF1 antagonist (46, Ki = 81 ± 17 nM), and a NPFF2 partial antagonist (53a, Ki = 30 ± 5 nM), which serve as leads for the development of pharmacological probes and potential therapeutic agents. Testing of 46 alone was without effect in the mouse 48 °C warm-water tail-withdrawal test, but pretreatment with 46 prevented NPFF-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:25268943

  16. Investigation of silent information regulator 1 (Sirt1) agonists from Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Chung; Jian, Yi-Ru; Sun, Mao-Feng; Chang, Tung-Ti; Lee, Cheng-Chun; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2013-01-01

    Silent information regulator 1 (Sirt1), a class III nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dependent histone deacetylases, is important in cardioprotection, neuroprotection, metabolic disease, calorie restriction, and diseases associated with aging. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) compounds from TCM Database@Taiwan ( http://tcm.cmu.edu.tw/ ) were employed for screening potent Sirt1 agonists, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was implemented to simulate ligand optimum docking poses and protein structure under dynamic conditions. TCM compounds such as (S)-tryptophan-betaxanthin, 5-O-feruloylquinic acid, and RosA exhibited good binding affinity across different computational methods, and their drug-like potential were validated by MD simulation. Docking poses indicate that the carboxylic group of the three candidates generated H-bonds with residues in the protein chain from Ser441 to Lys444 and formed H-bond, π-cation interactions, or hydrophobic contacts with Phe297 and key active residue, His363. During MD, stable π-cation interactions with residues Phe273 or Arg274 were formed by (S)-tryptophan-betaxanthin and RosA. All candidates were anchored to His363 by stable π- or H-bonds. Hence, we propose (S)-tryptophan-betaxanthin, 5-O-feruloylquinic acid, and RosA as potential lead compounds that can be further tested in drug development process for diseases associated with aging An animated interactive 3D complement (I3DC) is available in Proteopedia at http://proteopedia.org/w/Journal:JBSD:28. PMID:23075283

  17. Mechanisms of action of the 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Stewart J; Rapoport, Alan M; Sheftell, Fred D

    2002-07-01

    Recent studies of the pathophysiology of migraine provide evidence that the headache phase is associated with multiple physiologic actions. These actions include the release of vasoactive neuropeptides by the trigeminovascular system, vasodilation of intracranial extracerebral vessels, and increased nociceptive neurotransmission within the central trigeminocervical complex. The 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists, collectively known as triptans, are a major advance in the treatment of migraine. The beneficial effects of the triptans in patients with migraine are related to their multiple mechanisms of action at sites implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. These mechanisms are mediated by 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors and include vasoconstriction of painfully dilated cerebral blood vessels, inhibition of the release of vasoactive neuropeptides by trigeminal nerves, and inhibition of nociceptive neurotransmission. The high affinity of the triptans for 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors and their favorable pharmacologic properties contribute to the beneficial effects of these drugs, including rapid onset of action, effective relief of headache and associated symptoms, and low incidence of adverse effects. PMID:12117355

  18. Responses to cholinergic agonists of rats selectively bred for differential sensitivity to ethanol.

    PubMed

    de Fiebre, C M; Romm, E; Collins, J T; Draski, L J; Deitrich, R A; Collins, A C

    1991-03-01

    Alcoholics are almost invariably heavy users of tobacco. Both alcoholism and smoking appear to be influenced by genetic factors but it is not known whether the same or different genes regulate the abuse of ethanol and nicotine. Recent studies have demonstrated that the long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mouse lines, which were selectively bred for differences in ethanol-induced anesthesia ("sleep-time"), also differ in several effects of nicotine and the muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine. In order to determine whether or not these differences are due to chance, the relative sensitivities of rat lines which were selectively bred for differences in ethanol-induced sleep-time were determined. The high alcohol sensitivity (HAS) rat line was more sensitive to the locomotor and body temperature depressant effects of nicotine than was the low alcohol sensitivity (LAS) rat line. The control line (CAS) was intermediate in sensitivity. The rat lines did not differ in sensitivity to oxotremorine's hypothermia-producing effects. The numbers and affinities of two classes of brain nicotinic receptors were measured in eight brain regions. No differences among the rat lines were detected. These results suggest that ethanol elicits some of its depressant actions via an effect on brain nicotinic systems, but the differences in sensitivity to ethanol and nicotine are probably not due to differences in the number of brain nicotinic receptors. Perhaps this interaction explains the high correlation between alcoholism and smoking in humans. PMID:2058804

  19. Fine-tuning somatostatin receptor signalling by agonist-selective phosphorylation and dephosphorylation: IUPHAR Review 5

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Stefan; Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Nagel, Falko

    2014-01-01

    The biological actions of somatostatin are mediated by a family of five GPCRs, named sst1 to sst5. Somatostatin receptors exhibit equally high-binding affinities to their natural ligand somatostatin-14 and largely overlapping distributions. The overexpression of somatostatin receptors in human tumours is the molecular basis for diagnostic and therapeutic application of the stable somatostatin analogues octreotide, lanreotide and pasireotide. The efficiency of somatostatin receptor signalling is tightly regulated and ultimately limited by the coordinated phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of intracellular carboxyl-terminal serine and threonine residues. Here, we review and discuss recent progress in the generation and application of phosphosite-specific antibodies for human sst2 and sst5 receptors. These phosphosite-specific antibodies are unique tools to monitor the spatial and temporal dynamics of receptors phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Using a combined approach of phosphosite-specific antibodies and siRNA knock-down screening, relevant kinases and phosphatases were identified. Emerging evidence suggests distinct mechanisms of agonist-selective fine-tuning for individual somatostatin receptors. The recently uncovered differences in phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of these receptors may hence be of physiological significance in mediating responses to acute, persistent or repeated stimuli in a variety of target tissues. PMID:24328848

  20. Clinical assessment of drug-drug interactions of tasimelteon, a novel dual melatonin receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Brian W; Torres, Rosarelis; Dressman, Marlene A; Kramer, William G; Baroldi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Tasimelteon ([1R-trans]-N-[(2-[2,3-dihydro-4-benzofuranyl] cyclopropyl) methyl] propanamide), a novel dual melatonin receptor agonist that demonstrates specificity and high affinity for melatonin receptor types 1 and 2 (MT1 and MT2 receptors), is the first treatment approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder. Tasimelteon is rapidly absorbed, with a mean absolute bioavailability of approximately 38%, and is extensively metabolized primarily by oxidation at multiple sites, mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 and CYP3A4/5, as initially demonstrated by in vitro studies and confirmed by the results of clinical drug-drug interactions presented here. The effects of strong inhibitors and moderate or strong inducers of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4/5 on the pharmacokinetics of tasimelteon were evaluated in humans. Coadministration with fluvoxamine resulted in an approximately 6.5-fold increase in tasimelteon's area under the curve (AUC), whereas cigarette smoking decreased tasimelteon's exposure by approximately 40%. Coadministration with ketoconazole resulted in an approximately 54% increase in tasimelteon's AUC, whereas rifampin pretreatment resulted in a decrease in tasimelteon's exposure of approximately 89%. PMID:25851638

  1. Structural and agonist properties of XCL2, the other member of the C-chemokine subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jamie C.; Nakayama, Takashi; Tyler, Robert C.; Sander, Tara; Yoshie, Osamu; Volkman, Brian F.

    2014-01-01

    Known for its unusual metamorphic native state structure, XCL1 has been the focus of most efforts to elucidate the structural, functional, and physiological properties of chemokines in the C subfamily. By comparison, its closely related paralog XCL2 remains virtually uncharacterized. Based on the importance of the chemokine N-terminus in receptor activation, it was hypothesized that two amino acid differences in XCL2 would alter its agonist activity relative to XCL1 for their shared receptor XCR1. This present study reveals several properties of XCL2 that were unexamined until now. Structurally, XCL1 and XCL2 are very similar, exchanging between the monomeric chemokine fold and an unrelated dimeric state under physiological NaCl and temperature conditions. Ca2+ flux, chemotaxis, and heparin binding assays showed that the monomer form of XCL2 is responsible for G protein-coupled receptor activation while the dimeric form is important for GAG binding. Despite their high structural similarity, XCL2 displays a slightly higher affinity for heparin than XCL1. Because their in vitro functional profiles are virtually identical, distinct physiological roles for XCL1 and XCL2 are probably encoded at the level of expression. PMID:25497737

  2. Mammalian cell production and purification of progenipoietin, a dual-agonist chimaeric haematopoietic growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wood, David C; Mathis, Karl J; Joy, William D; Minnerly, John C; Pegg, Lyle E; Welply, Joseph K

    2003-02-01

    One member of the progenipoietin (ProGP) family of engineered proteins, ProGP-2, is a chimaeric dual cytokine receptor agonist, expressed in mammalian cells, that stimulates both human fetal liver tyrosine kinase-3 (Flt3) and the granulocyte-colony-stimulating-factor (G-CSF) receptor. The production of ProGP-2 on a small and large scale using either anti-(Flt3 ligand) antibody-affinity chromatography, or a combination of (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic-interaction chromatography and preparative reverse-phase chromatography is described. ProGP-2 was produced in hollow-fibre reactors containing stably transfected NS0 cells. The productivity of ProGP-2 was initially high, but was found to decrease 3-4-fold over time. When the yield of ProGP-2 decreased, the combination of three conventional chromatography steps was required to meet protein purity similar to that achieved by the anti-(Flt3 ligand) chromatography method. In addition, a protease activity was observed in conditioned media from the hollow-fibre reactors that resulted in increased degradation of ProGP-2 that was removed by hydrophobic-interaction chromatography at higher pH. Together the results demonstrated a method for production and purification of ProGP-2 for additional studies on its haematopoietic activity. PMID:12578549

  3. Insights into docking and scoring neuronal alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptor agonists using molecular dynamics simulations and QM/MM calculations.

    PubMed

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Bonaccini, Claudia; Grazioso, Giovanni; Chioccioli, Matteo; Cavalli, Andrea; Gratteri, Paola

    2009-11-30

    A combined quantum mechanical (QM)-polarized docking and molecular dynamics approach to study the binding mode and to predict the binding affinity of ligands acting at the alpha4beta2-nAChR is presented. The results obtained in this study indicate that the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics docking protocol well describes the charge-driven interactions occurring in the binding of nicotinic agonists, and it is able to represent the polarization effects on the ligand exerted by the surrounding atoms of the receptor at the binding site. This makes it possible to properly score agonists of alpha4beta2-nAChR and to reproduce the experimental binding affinity data with good accuracy, within a mean error of 2.2 kcal/mol. Moreover, applying the QM-polarized docking to an ensemble of nAChR conformations obtained from MD simulations enabled us to accurately capture nAChR-ligand induced-fit effects. PMID:19360794

  4. Buspirone and gepirone: partial agonists at the 5HT/sub 1/A receptor linked to adenylate cyclase (AC) in rat and guinea pig hippocampal preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Yocca, F.D.; Hyslop, D.K.; Taylor, D.P.; Maayani, S.

    1986-03-01

    The pharmacologic nature of the 5-HT receptor that is negatively linked to AC in membrane preparations from rat and guinea pig (gp) brain in cell culture and in gp hippocampal homogenates positively linked to AC seem to be indistinguishable from the 5HT/sub 1A/ binding site in similar preparations. Affinity values of chemically unrelated but selective drugs for a binding site are useful for taxonomy of functional receptors. The novel anxiolytic drug buspirone (B) and its analog gepirone (G) exhibit selectivity and affinity for spiperone-sensitive (/sup 3/H)-5-HT and (/sup 3/H)-8-OH-DPAT binding sites in gp and rat hippocampus. In the two species tested, B and G were partial agonists (intrinsic activity approx. = 0.5) compared to 5-HT and its potent analog 5-carboxamideotryptamine (5-COAT) at the 5-HT/sub 1A/ receptor linked to AC. The K/sub B/ value of spiperone determined with B and G was indistinguishable from that determined with 5-HT and 5-COAT (20-30 nM). Since B and G exert unique agonist effects at the functional 5HT/sub 1A/ receptor, their structures may be important for identifying chemical groups necessary for recognition and activation of the 5HT/sub 1A/ receptor.

  5. Synthetic RORγt Agonists Enhance Protective Immunity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mi Ra; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Doebelin, Christelle; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben D; Novick, Scott J; Kuruvilla, Dana S; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Griffin, Patrick R

    2016-04-15

    The T cell specific RORγ isoform RORγt has been shown to be the key lineage-defining transcription factor to initiate the differentiation program of TH17 and TC17 cells, cells that have demonstrated antitumor efficacy. RORγt controls gene networks that enhance immunity including increased IL17 production and decreased immune suppression. Both synthetic and putative endogenous agonists of RORγt have been shown to increase the basal activity of RORγt enhancing TH17 cell proliferation. Here, we show that activation of RORγt using synthetic agonists drives proliferation of TH17 cells while decreasing levels of the immune checkpoint protein PD-1, a mechanism that should enhance antitumor immunity while blunting tumor associated adaptive immune resistance. Interestingly, putative endogenous agonists drive proliferation of TH17 cells but do not repress PD-1. These findings suggest that synthetic agonists of RORγt should activate TC17/TH17 cells (with concomitant reduction in the Tregs population), repress PD-1, and produce IL17 in situ (a factor associated with good prognosis in cancer). Enhanced immunity and blockage of immune checkpoints has transformed cancer treatment; thus such a molecule would provide a unique approach for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26785144

  6. Amphetamine- type reinforcement by dopaminergic agonists in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yokel, R A; Wise, R A

    1978-07-19

    Intravenous self-administration of d-amphetamine (0.25 mg/kg/injection) decreased in a dose-related fashion after injections of the dopaminergic agonists apomorphine and piribedil. The dopaminergic agonists appear to suppress amphetamine intake in the same way as do 'free' amphetamine injections, by extending drug satiation in a given interresponse period. Clonidine, an alpha noradrenergic agonist, did not have similar effects. Apomorphine and piribedil did not increase 14C-amphetamine levels in rat brains, nor did they retard disappearance of 14C-amphetamine; thus their amphetamine-like effects are not due to alterations of amphetamine metabolism. Rats responding for amphetamine continued to respond for apomorphine or peribedil when the latter drugs were substituted for the former. Rats experienced in amphetamine self-administration readily initiated and maintained responding for apomorphine and piribedil. The dopaminergic blocker (+)-butaclamol disrupted responding for apomorphine and piribedil, although it produced no marked increase in responding for the dopaminergic agonists, as it does for amphetamine. These data add to the evidence that actions in the dopaminergic synapse account for amphetamine's reinforcing properties. PMID:98800

  7. Alkaloid delta agonist BW373U86 increases hypoxic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bofetiado, D M; Mayfield, K P; D'Alecy, L G

    1996-06-01

    Activation of delta opioid receptors increases survival time during acute, lethal hypoxia in mice. delta Agonists therefore present a promising avenue for therapeutic application to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with clinical hypoxia in settings such as drowning, head injury apnea, and complicated childbirths. However, most delta agonists now available are peptides, and may have limited clinical utility. In the present study, we evaluate the neuroprotective ability of an alkaloid delta agonist, BW373U86. Alkaloid compounds, due to increased stability and increased systemic distribution, may be more favorable for clinical use. We found that BW373U86, like the peptide delta agonist, DPDPE ([D-Pen2, D-Pen5]-enkephalin), increases survival time of mice during lethal hypoxia. The mechanism of neuroprotection induced by delta receptor activation appears to involve decreasing body temperature. Further, using selective opioid receptor antagonists, it appears that BW373U86 exerts these neuroprotective effects by acting at delta-opioid receptors. PMID:8638797

  8. The Agonistic Approach: Reframing Resistance in Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitus, Kathrine

    2008-01-01

    The agonistic approach--aimed at embracing opposing perspectives as part of a qualitative research process and acknowledging that process as fundamentally political--sheds light on both the construction of and the resistance to research identities. This approach involves reflexively embedding interview situations into the ethnographic context as a…

  9. [Alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Mavropoulos, G; Minguet, G; Brichant, J F

    2014-02-01

    Alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists have long been used in the treatment of arterial hypertension. However, in that indication they have progressively been replaced by antihypertensive drugs with a more interesting therapeutic profile. Nonetheless, pharmacological activation of alpha-2 adrenoreceptors leads to a variety of clinical effects that are of major interest for anaesthesia and intensive care practice. Indeed, the sedative and analgesic properties of alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists allow a reduction of hypnotic and opioid needs during general anaesthesia. In addition, they induce a down-regulation of the level of consciousness comparable to that of natural slow-wave sleep during post-anaesthesia and intensive care unit stay. These drugs may also prevent some deleterious effects of the sympathetic discharge in response to surgical stress. Furthermore, alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists are potent adjuncts for locoregional anaesthesia. In this article, we will summarize the most frequent applications of alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine. We will focus on the clinical data available for the two most representative molecules of this pharmacological class: clonidine and dexmedetomidine. PMID:24683831

  10. The emerging therapeutic roles of κ-opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark R; Kaye, Alan D; Kaye, Aaron J; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The current practice of μ-opioid receptor agonists such as morphine as the primary means of acute and chronic pain relief has several dangerous consequences that limit their effectiveness, including respiratory depression, gastrointestinal motility inhibition, addiction, tolerance, and abuse. Several other opioid receptors, notably the μ-opioid (KOP) receptor, have long been known to play a role in pain relief. Recent discoveries and advancements in laboratory techniques have allowed significant developments of KOP agonists as potential novel therapies for pain relief and other pathological processes. These drugs exhibit none of the classic opioid adverse effects and have displayed pronounced analgesia in several different scenarios. New formulations since 2014 have unveiled increased oral bioavailability, exceptional peripheral versus central selectivity, and a positive safety profile. Continued refinements of established μ-opioid agonist formulations have virtually eliminated the centrally mediated side effects of dysphoria and sedation that limited the applicability of previous KOP agonists. Further research is required to better elucidate the potential of these compounds in pain management, as well as in the mediation or modulation of other complex pathophysiological processes as therapeutic agents. PMID:27194194

  11. Roles of affinity and lipophilicity in the slow kinetics of prostanoid receptor antagonists on isolated smooth muscle preparations

    PubMed Central

    Jones, RL; Woodward, DF; Wang, JW; Clark, RL

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The highly lipophilic acyl-sulphonamides L-798106 and L-826266 showed surprisingly slow antagonism of the prostanoid EP3 receptor system in guinea-pig aorta. Roles of affinity and lipophilicity in the onset kinetics of these and other prostanoid ligands were investigated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Antagonist selectivity was assessed using a panel of human recombinant prostanoid receptor-fluorimetric imaging plate reader assays. Potencies/affinities and onset half-times of agonists and antagonists were obtained on guinea-pig-isolated aorta and vas deferens. n-Octanol-water partition coefficients were predicted. KEY RESULTS L-798106, L-826266 and the less lipophilic congener (DG)-3ap appear to behave as selective, competitive-reversible EP3 antagonists. For ligands of low to moderate lipophilicity, potency increments for EP3 and TP (thromboxane-like) agonism on guinea-pig aorta (above pEC50 of 8.0) were associated with progressively longer onset half-times; similar trends were found for TP and histamine H1 antagonism above a pA2 limit of 8.0. In contrast, L-798106 (EP3), L-826266 (EP3, TP) and the lipophilic H1 antagonists astemizole and terfenadine exhibited very slow onset rates despite their moderate affinities; (DG)-3ap (EP3) had a faster onset. Agonism and antagonism on the vas deferens EP3 system were overall much faster, although trends were similar. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS High affinity and high liphophilicity may contribute to the slow onsets of prostanoid ligands in some isolated smooth muscle preparations. Both relationships are explicable by tissue disposition under the limited diffusion model. EP3 antagonists used as research tools should have moderate lipophilicity. The influence of lipophilicity on the potential clinical use of EP3 antagonists is discussed. PMID:20973775

  12. Characterization of a bombesin receptor on Swiss mouse 3T3 cells by affinity cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnett-Smith, J.; Zachary, I.; Rozengurt, E.

    1988-12-01

    We have previously identified by chemical cross-linking a cell surface protein in Swiss 3T3 cells of apparent Mr 75,000-85,000, which may represent a major component of the receptor for peptides of the bombesin family in these cells. Because bombesin-like peptides may interact with other cell surface molecules, it was important to establish the correlation between receptor binding and functions of this complex and further characterize the Mr 75,000-85,000 cross-linked protein. Detailed time courses carried out at different temperatures demonstrated that the Mr 75,000-85,000 affinity-labelled band was the earliest cross-linked complex detected in Swiss 3T3 cells incubated with 125I-labelled gastrin-releasing peptide (125I-GRP). Furthermore, the ability of various nonradioactive bombesin agonists and antagonists to block the formation of the Mr 75,000-85,000 cross-linked complex correlated extremely well (r = 0.994) with the relative capacity of these peptides to inhibit 125I-GRP specific binding. Pretreatment with unlabelled GRP for up to 6 h caused only a slight decrease in both specific 125I-GRP binding and the affinity labelling of the Mr 75,000-85,000 protein. We also show that the cross-linked complex is a glycoprotein. First, solubilized affinity labelled Mr 75,000-85,000 complex applied to wheat germ lectin-sepharose columns was eluted by addition of 0.3 M N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Second, treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase F reduced the apparent molecular weight of the affinity-labelled band from 75,000-85,000 to 43,000, indicating the presence of N-linked oligosaccharide groups.

  13. Negative cooperativity across β1-adrenoceptor homodimers provides insights into the nature of the secondary low-affinity CGP 12177 β1-adrenoceptor binding conformation.

    PubMed

    Gherbi, Karolina; May, Lauren T; Baker, Jillian G; Briddon, Stephen J; Hill, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    At the β1-adrenoceptor, CGP 12177 potently antagonizes agonist responses at the primary high-affinity catecholamine conformation while also exerting agonist effects of its own through a secondary low-affinity conformation. A recent mutagenesis study identified transmembrane region (TM)4 of the β1-adrenoceptor as key for this low-affinity conformation. Others suggested that TM4 has a role in β1-adrenoceptor oligomerization. Here, assessment of the dissociation rate of a fluorescent analog of CGP 12177 [bordifluoropyrromethane-tetramethylrhodamine-(±)CGP 12177 (BODIPY-TMR-CGP)] at the human β1-adrenoceptor expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells revealed negative cooperative interactions between 2 distinct β1-adrenoceptor conformations. The dissociation rate of 3 nM BODIPY-TMR-CGP was 0.09 ± 0.01 min(-1) in the absence of competitor ligands, and this was enhanced 2.2- and 2.1-fold in the presence of 1 µM CGP 12177 and 1 µM propranolol, respectively. These effects on the BODIPY-TMR-CGP dissociation rate were markedly enhanced in β1-adrenoceptor homodimers constrained by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (9.8- and 9.9-fold for 1 µM CGP 12177 and 1 µM propranolol, respectively) and abolished in β1-adrenoceptors containing TM4 mutations vital for the second conformation pharmacology. This study suggests that negative cooperativity across a β1-adrenoceptor homodimer may be responsible for generating the low-affinity pharmacology of the secondary β1-adrenoceptor conformation. PMID:25837585

  14. Physician perceptions of GLP-1 receptor agonists in the UK.

    PubMed

    Matza, Louis S; Curtis, Sarah E; Jordan, Jessica B; Adetunji, Omolara; Martin, Sherry A; Boye, Kristina S

    2016-05-01

    Objectives Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have been used to treat type 2 diabetes for almost a decade, and new treatments in this class have recently been introduced. The purpose of this study was to examine perceptions of GLP-1 receptor agonists among physicians who treat patients with type 2 diabetes in the UK. Methods A total of 670 physicians (226 diabetes specialists; 444 general practice [GP] physicians) completed a survey in 2014. Results Almost all physicians had prescribed GLP-1 receptor agonists (95.4% total sample; 99.1% specialists; 93.5% GP), most frequently to patients whose glucose levels are not adequately controlled with oral medications (85.9% of physicians) and obese/overweight patients (83.7%). Physicians' most common reasons for prescribing a GLP-1 receptor agonist were: associated with weight loss (65.8%), good efficacy (55.7%), less hypoglycemia risk than insulin (55.2%), not associated with weight gain (34.5%), and better efficacy than oral medications (32.7%). Factors that most commonly cause hesitation when prescribing this class were: not considered first line therapy according to guidelines (56.9%), injectable administration (44.6%), cost (36.7%), gastrointestinal side effects (33.4%), and risk of pancreatitis (26.7%). Almost all specialists (99.1%) believed they had sufficient knowledge to prescribe a GLP-1 receptor agonist, compared with 76.1% of GPs. Conclusions Results highlight the widespread use of GLP-1 receptor agonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes in the UK. However, almost a quarter of GPs reported that they do not have enough knowledge to prescribe GLP-1s, suggesting a need for increased dissemination of information to targeted groups of physicians. Study limitations were that the generalizability of the clinician sample is unknown; survey questions required clinicians to select answers from multiple response options rather than generating the responses themselves; and responses to this survey conducted

  15. Can thermodynamic measurements of receptor binding yield information on drug affinity and efficacy?

    PubMed

    Borea, P A; Dalpiaz, A; Varani, K; Gilli, P; Gilli, G

    2000-12-01

    The present commentary surveys the methods for obtaining the thermodynamic parameters of the drug-receptor binding equilibrium, DeltaG degrees, DeltaH degrees, DeltaS degrees, and DeltaC degrees (p) (standard free energy, enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity, respectively). Moreover, it reviews the available thermodynamic data for the binding of agonists and antagonists to several G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and ligand-gated ion channel receptors (LGICRs). In particular, thermodynamic data for five GPCRs (beta-adrenergic, adenosine A(1), adenosine A(2A), dopamine D(2), and 5-HT(1A)) and four LGICRs (glycine, GABA(A), 5-HT(3), and nicotinic) have been collected and analyzed. Among these receptor systems, seven (three GPCRs and all LGICRs) show "thermodynamic agonist-antagonist discrimination": when the agonist binding to a given receptor is entropy-driven, the binding of its antagonist is enthalpy-driven, or vice versa. A scatter plot of all entropy versus enthalpy values of the database gives a regression line with the equation TDeltaS degrees (kJ mol(-1); T = 298.15 K) = 40.3 (+/- 0.7) + 1.00 (+/-0.01) DeltaH degrees (kJ mol(-1)); N = 184; r = 0.981; P < 0.0001 - which is of the form DeltaH degrees = beta. DeltaS degrees, revealing the presence of the "enthalpy-entropy compensation" phenomenon. This means that any decrease of binding enthalpy is compensated for by a parallel decrease of binding entropy, and vice versa, in such a manner that affinity constant values (K(A)) of drug-receptor equilibrium (DeltaG degrees = -RT ln K(A) = DeltaH degrees - TDeltaS degrees ) cannot be greater than 10(11) M(-1). According to the most recent hypotheses concerning drug-receptor interaction mechanisms, these thermodynamic phenomena appear to be a consequence of the rearrangement of solvent molecules that occurs during the binding. PMID:11077036

  16. Development of Spexin-based Human Galanin Receptor Type II-Specific Agonists with Increased Stability in Serum and Anxiolytic Effect in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Lee, Yoo-Na; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Nam Hoon; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Yun, Seongsik; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Seong, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The novel neuropeptide spexin (SPX) was discovered to activate galanin receptor 2 (GALR2) and 3 (GALR3) but not galanin receptor 1 (GALR1). Although GALR2 is known to display a function, particularly in anxiety, depression, and appetite regulation, the further determination of its function would benefit from a more stable and selective agonist that acts only at GALR2. In the present study, we developed a GALR2-specific agonist with increased stability in serum. As galanin (GAL) showed a low affinity to GALR3, the residues in SPX were replaced with those in GAL, revealing that particular mutations such as Gln5 → Asn, Met7 → Ala, Lys11 → Phe, and Ala13 → Pro significantly decreased potencies toward GALR3 but not toward GALR2. Quadruple (Qu) mutation of these residues still retained potency to GALR2 but totally abolished the potency to both GALR3 and GALR1. The first amino acid modifications or D-Asn1 substitution significantly increased the stability when they are incubated in 100% fetal bovine serum. Intracerebroventricular administration of the mutant peptide with D-Asn1 and quadruple substitution (dN1-Qu) exhibited an anxiolytic effect in mice. Taken together, the GALR2-specific agonist with increased stability can greatly help delineation of GALR2-mediated functions and be very useful for treatments of anxiety disorder. PMID:26907960

  17. Structure-activity studies and analgesic efficacy of N-(3-pyridinyl)-bridged bicyclic diamines, exceptionally potent agonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Bunnelle, William H; Daanen, Jerome F; Ryther, Keith B; Schrimpf, Michael R; Dart, Michael J; Gelain, Arianna; Meyer, Michael D; Frost, Jennifer M; Anderson, David J; Buckley, Michael; Curzon, Peter; Cao, Ying-Jun; Puttfarcken, Pamela; Searle, Xenia; Ji, Jianguo; Putman, C Brent; Surowy, Carol; Toma, Lucio; Barlocco, Daniela

    2007-07-26

    A series of exceptionally potent agonists at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has been investigated. Several N-(3-pyridinyl) derivatives of bridged bicyclic diamines exhibit double-digit-picomolar binding affinities for the alpha 4 beta 2 subtype, placing them with epibatidine among the most potent nAChR ligands described to date. Structure-activity studies have revealed that substitutions, particularly hydrophilic groups in the pyridine 5-position, differentially modulate the agonist activity at ganglionic vs central nAChR subtypes, so that improved subtype selectivity can be demonstrated in vitro. Analgesic efficacy has been achieved across a broad range of pain states, including rodent models of acute thermal nociception, persistent pain, and neuropathic allodynia. Unfortunately, the hydrophilic pyridine substituents that were shown to enhance agonist selectivity for central nAChRs in vitro tend to limit CNS penetration in vivo, so that analgesic efficacy with an improved therapeutic window was not realized with those compounds. PMID:17585748

  18. Agonist-induced changes in RalA activities allows the prediction of the endocytosis of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mei; Zhang, Xiaohan; Guo, Shuohan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Min, Chengchun; Cheon, Seung Hoon; Oak, Min-Ho; Kim, Young Ran; Kim, Kyeong-Man

    2016-01-01

    GTP binding proteins are classified into two families: heterotrimeric large G proteins which are composed of three subunits, and one subunit of small G proteins. Roles of small G proteins in the intracellular trafficking of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) were studied. Among various small G proteins tested, GTP-bound form (G23V) of RalA inhibited the internalization of dopamine D2 receptor independently of the previously reported downstream effectors of RalA, such as Ral-binding protein 1 and PLD. With high affinity for GRK2, active RalA inhibited the GPCR endocytosis by sequestering the GRK2 from receptors. When it was tested for several GPCRs including an endogenous GPCR, lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1, agonist-induced conversion of GTP-bound to GDP-bound RalA, which presumably releases the sequestered GRK2, was observed selectively with the GPCRs which have tendency to undergo endocytosis. Conversion of RalA from active to inactive state occurred by translocation of RGL, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, from the plasma membrane to cytosol as a complex with Gβγ. These results suggest that agonist-induced Gβγ-mediated conversion of RalA from the GTP-bound form to the GDP-bound form could be a mechanism to facilitate agonist-induced internalization of GPCRs. PMID:26477566

  19. In vivo brain dopaminergic receptor site mapping using /sup 75/Se-labeled pergolide analogs: the effects of various dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, A.

    1986-01-01

    Perogolide mesylate is a new synthetic ergoline derivative which is reported to possess agonistic activity at central dopamine receptor sites in the brain. The authors have synthesized a (/sup 75/Se)-radiolabeled pergolide mesylate derivative, (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate, which, after i.v. administration to mature male rats, showed a time course differentiation in the uptake of this radiolabeled compound in isolated peripheral and central (brain) tissues that are known to be rich in dopamine receptor sites. Further studies were conducted in which the animals were preexposed to the dopamine receptor agonist SKF-38393, as well as the dopamine receptor antagonists (+)-butaclamol, (-)-butaclamol, (+/-)-butaclamol and (-)-chloroethylnorapomorphine, to substantiate the specific peripheral and central localization patterns of (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate. Further investigations were also conducted in which the animals received an i.v. administration of N-isopropyl-l-123-p-iodoamphetamine ((/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine). However, (/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine did not demonstrate a specific affinity for any type of receptor site in the brain. These investigations further substantiated the fact that (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate does cross the blood-brain barrier is quickly localized at specific dopamine receptor sites in the intact rat brain and that this localization pattern can be affected by preexposure to different dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists. Therefore, these investigations provided further evidence that (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate and other radiolabeled ergoline analogs might be useful as brain dopamine receptor localization radiopharmaceuticals.

  20. Agonist and antagonist bind differently to 5-HT1A receptors during Alzheimer's disease: A post-mortem study with PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Benjamin; Sebti, Johan; Verdurand, Mathieu; Fieux, Sylvain; Billard, Thierry; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Troakes, Claire; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Zimmer, Luc

    2016-10-01

    PET imaging studies using 5-HT1A receptor radiotracers show a decreased density of this receptor in hippocampi of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) at advanced stages. However, current 5-HT1A receptor radiopharmaceuticals used in neuroimaging are antagonists, thought to bind to 5-HT1A receptors in different functional states (i.e., both the one which displays high affinity for agonists and is thought to mediate receptor activation, as well as the state which has low affinity for agonists). Comparing the PET imaging obtained using an agonist radiotracer, which binds selectively to functional receptors, with the PET imaging obtained using an antagonist radiotracer would therefore provide original information on 5-HT1A receptor impairment during AD. Quantitative autoradiography using [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF, a 5-HT1A agonist and antagonist, respectively, was measured in hippocampi of patients with AD (n = 25, at different Braak stages) and control subjects (n = 9). The neuronal density was measured in the same tissues by NeuN immunohistochemistry. The specific binding of both radiotracers was determined by addition of WAY-100635, a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. The autoradiography distribution of both 5-HT1A PET radiotracers varied across hippocampus regions. The highest binding density was in the pyramidal layer of CA1. Incubation with Gpp(NH)p, a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, reduced significantly [(18)F]F13640 binding in hippocampal regions, confirming its preferential interaction with G-coupled receptors, and slightly increased [(18)F]MPPF binding. In the CA1 subfield, [(18)F]F13640 binding was significantly decreased at Braak stages I/II (-19%), Braak stages III/IV (-23%), and Braak stages V/VI (-36%) versus control. In contrast, [(18)F]MPPF binding was statistically reduced only at the most advanced Braak stages V/VI compared to control (-33%). Since [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF can be used in vivo in humans, this

  1. The pharmacological properties of the imidazobenzodiazepine, FG 8205, a novel partial agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tricklebank, M.D.; Honoré, T.; Iversen, S.D.; Kemp, J.A.; Knight, A.R.; Marshall, G.R.; Rupniak, N.M.J.; Singh, L.; Tye, S.; Watjen, F.; Wong, E.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    1 The pharmacological properties of the benzodiazepine receptor ligand, FG 8205 (7-chloro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-3-(5-isopropyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-4H- imidazol[1,5a][1,4]benzodiazepine) have been examined. 2 FG 8205 potently displaced [3H]-flumazenil binding in rat cortical membranes with a K1 of 3.3 nM, but was inactive at 13 neurotransmitter recognition sites. 3 Consistent with a partial agonist profile, the affinity of FG 8205 for the benzodiazepine recognition site was increased in the presence of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 300μM) by a degree (—log [IC50 in the presence of GABA/IC50 alone] = 0.34) significantly less than found for diazepam (0.46). FG 8205 also potentiated the inhibitory potency of the GABAA-receptor agonist, isoguvacine, on the hippocampal CA1 population spike and, again, the maximum shift (—log dose-ratio = 0.2) was significantly less than that seen with diazepam (0.4). 4 In anticonvulsant studies, the ED50 doses of FG 8205 and diazepam needed to antagonize seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) or by sound in audiogenic seizure prone mice were similar with values of 0.2–0.3 mgkg-1, i.p. However, even high doses of FG 8205 (50 mgkg-1) did not protect against seizures induced by electroshock. 5 FG 8205 released responding suppressed by footshock in a rat operant conditioned emotional response task over the dose range 0.5–50 mgkg-1 (i.p.). Similar doses of FG 8205 had a marked taming effect in cynomolgus monkeys. However, measures of sedation and ataxia (as measured by rotarod in the mouse, climbing behaviour in the rat, and by scoring arousal and co-ordination in primates) were slight and only transiently affected by FG 8205, and FG 8205 significantly antagonized the rotarod performance deficit induced by diazepam in the mouse. 6 While the potentiation by FG 8205 of the response to isoguvacine in the rat hippocampal slice and the anxiolytic-like effects of the compound in both rats and primates were reversed by the

  2. Discovery of Tertiary Amine and Indole Derivatives as Potent RORγt Inverse Agonists.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Liu, Qian; Cheng, Yaobang; Cai, Wei; Ma, Yingli; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Qianqian; Orband-Miller, Lisa A; Zhou, Ling; Xiang, Zhijun; Huxdorf, Melanie; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Xiang, Jia-Ning; Leung, Stewart; Qiu, Yang; Zhong, Zhong; Elliott, John D; Lin, Xichen; Wang, Yonghui

    2014-01-01

    A novel series of tertiary amines as retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma-t (RORγt) inverse agonists was discovered through agonist/inverse agonist conversion. The level of RORγt inhibition can be enhanced by modulating the conformational disruption of H12 in RORγt LBD. Linker exploration and rational design led to the discovery of more potent indole-based RORγt inverse agonists. PMID:24900774

  3. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel indazolyl glucocorticoid receptor partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, John L; Sheppeck, James E; Wang, Jim; Dhar, T G Murali; Cavallaro, Cullen; Doweyko, Arthur M; Mckay, Lorraine; Cunningham, Mark D; Habte, Sium F; Nadler, Steven G; Dodd, John H; Somerville, John E; Barrish, Joel C

    2013-10-01

    SAR was used to further develop an indazole class of non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor agonists aided by a GR LBD (ligand-binding domain)-agonist co-crystal structure described in the accompanying paper. Progress towards discovering a dissociated GR agonist guided by human in vitro assays biased the optimization of this compound series towards partial agonists that possessed excellent selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors. PMID:23916594

  4. Sex differences in opioid antinociception: kappa and 'mixed action' agonists.

    PubMed

    Craft, R M; Bernal, S A

    2001-08-01

    A number of investigators have shown that male animals are more sensitive than females to the antinociceptive effects of mu-opioid agonists. The present study was conducted to examine sex differences in opioid antinociception in the rat using agonists known to differ in selectivity for and efficacy at kappa- versus mu-receptors. Dose- and time-effect curves were obtained for s.c. U69593, U50488, ethylketazocine, (-)-bremazocine, (-)-pentazocine, butorphanol and nalbuphine on the 50 or 54 degrees C hotplate and warm water tail withdrawal assays; spontaneous locomotor activity was measured 32-52 min post-injection in the same rats. On the hotplate assay, only butorphanol (54 degrees C) and nalbuphine (50 degrees C) were significantly more potent in males than females. On the tail withdrawal assay, all agonists were significantly more potent or efficacious in males than females at one or both temperatures. In contrast, no agonist was consistently more potent in one sex or the other in decreasing locomotor activity. Estrous stage in female rats only slightly influenced opioid effects, accounting for an average of 2.6% of the variance in females' antinociceptive and locomotor responses to drug (50 degrees C experiment). These results suggest that (1) sex differences in antinociceptive effects of opioids are not mu-receptor-dependent, as they may occur with opioids known to have significant kappa-receptor-mediated activity; (2) the mechanisms underlying sex differences in kappa-opioid antinociception may be primarily spinal rather than supraspinal; (3) sex differences in antinociceptive effects of opioid agonists are not secondary to sex differences in their sedative effects. PMID:11418226

  5. Purine (N)-Methanocarba Nucleoside Derivatives Lacking an Exocyclic Amine as Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Dilip K; Ciancetta, Antonella; Warnick, Eugene; O'Connor, Robert; Chen, Zhoumou; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Crane, Steven; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Auchampach, John A; Salvemini, Daniela; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2016-04-14

    Purine (N)-methanocarba-5'-N-alkyluronamidoriboside A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) agonists lacking an exocyclic amine resulted from an unexpected reaction during a Sonogashira coupling and subsequent aminolysis. Because the initial C6-Me and C6-styryl derivatives had unexpectedly high A3AR affinity, other rigid nucleoside analogues lacking an exocyclic amine were prepared. Of these, the C6-Me-(2-phenylethynyl) and C2-(5-chlorothienylethynyl) analogues were particularly potent, with human A3AR Ki values of 6 and 42 nM, respectively. Additionally, the C2-(5-chlorothienyl)-6-H analogue was potent and selective at A3AR (MRS7220, Ki 60 nM) and also completely reversed mouse sciatic nerve mechanoallodynia (in vivo, 3 μmol/kg, po). The lack of a C6 H-bond donor while maintaining A3AR affinity and efficacy could be rationalized by homology modeling and docking of these hypermodified nucleosides. The modeling suggests that a suitable combination of stabilizing features can partially compensate for the lack of an exocyclic amine, an otherwise important contributor to recognition in the A3AR binding site. PMID:26890707

  6. A Differential Dielectric Affinity Glucose Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian; Leduc, Charles; Ravussin, Yann; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Song, Bing; Li, Dachao; Xu, Kexin; Accili, Domenico; Wang, Qian; Leibel, Rudolph; Lin, Qiao

    2013-01-01

    A continuous glucose monitor with a differential dielectric sensor implanted within the subcutaneous tissue that determines the glucose in the interstitial fluid is presented. The device, created using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, consists of sensing and reference modules that are identical in design and placed in close proximity. Each module contains a microchamber housing a pair of capacitive electrodes residing on the device substrate and embedded in a suspended, perforated polymer diaphragm. The microchambers, enclosed in semi-permeable membranes, are filled with either a polymer solution that has specific affinity to glucose or a glucose-insensitive reference solution. To accurately determine the glucose concentration, changes in the permittivity of the sensing and the reference solutions induced by changes in glucose concentration are measured differentially. In vitro characterization demonstrated the sensor capable of measuring glucose concentrations from 0 to 500 mg/dL with resolution and accuracy of ∼1.7 μg/dL and ∼1.74 mg/dL, respectively. In addition, device drift was reduced to 1.4% (uncontrolled environment) and 11% (5 °C of temperature variation) of that from non-differential measurements, indicating significant stability improvements. Preliminary animal testing demonstrated that the differential sensor accurately tracks glucose concentration in blood. This sensor can potentially be used clinically as a subcutaneously implanted continuous monitoring device in diabetic patients. PMID:24220675

  7. Affine gravity, Palatini formalism and charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph; Livshits, Gideon I.

    2011-12-01

    Affine gravity and the Palatini formalism contribute both to produce a simple and unique formula for calculating charges at spatial and null infinity for Lovelock type Lagrangians whose variational derivatives do not depend on second-order derivatives of the field components. The method is based on the covariant generalization due to Julia and Silva of the Regge-Teitelboim procedure that was used to define properly the mass in the classical formulation of Einstein's theory of gravity. Numerous applications reproduce standard results obtained by other secure but mostly specialized method like in ADM energy for asymptotically flat spacetimes and in Abbot and Deser for asymptotically de Sitter and anti-de Sitter spacetimes, both at spatial infinity. As a novel application we calculate the Bondi energy loss in five dimensional gravity, based on the asymptotic solution given by Tanabe et al. and obtain, as expected, the same result. We also give the for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and find the superpotential for Lovelock theories of gravity when the number of dimensions tends to infinity with maximally symmetrical boundaries. The paper is written in standard component formalism.

  8. Ligand Affinities Estimated by Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Söderhjelm, Pär; Kongsted, Jacob; Ryde, Ulf

    2010-05-11

    We present quantum chemical estimates of ligand-binding affinities performed, for the first time, at a level of theory for which there is a hope that dispersion and polarization effects are properly accounted for (MP2/cc-pVTZ) and at the same time effects of solvation, entropy, and sampling are included. We have studied the binding of seven biotin analogues to the avidin tetramer. The calculations have been performed by the recently developed PMISP approach (polarizable multipole interactions with supermolecular pairs), which treats electrostatic interactions by multipoles up to quadrupoles, induction by anisotropic polarizabilities, and nonclassical interactions (dispersion, exchange repulsion, etc.) by explicit quantum chemical calculations, using a fragmentation approach, except for long-range interactions that are treated by standard molecular-mechanics Lennard-Jones terms. In order to include effects of sampling, 10 snapshots from a molecular dynamics simulation are studied for each biotin analogue. Solvation energies are estimated by the polarized continuum model (PCM), coupled to the multipole-polarizability model. Entropy effects are estimated from vibrational frequencies, calculated at the molecular mechanics level. We encounter several problems, not previously discussed, illustrating that we are first to apply such a method. For example, the PCM model is, in the present implementation, questionable for large molecules, owing to the use of a surface definition that gives numerous small cavities in a protein. PMID:26615702

  9. Divalent cation affinity sites in Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Fisher, G; Kaneshiro, E S; Peters, P D

    1976-05-01

    Sites with high calcium affinity in Paramecium aurelia were identified by high calcium (5 mM) fixation and electron microscope methods. Electron-opaque deposits were observed on the cytoplasmic side of surface membranes, particularly at the basal regions of cilia and trichocyst-pellicle fusion sites. Deposits were also observed on some smooth cytomembranes, within the axoneme of cilia, and on basal bodies. The divalent cations, Mg2+, Mn2+, Sr2+, Ni2+, Ba2+, and Zn2+, could be substituted for Ca2+ in the procedure. Deposits were larger with 5 mM Sr2+. Ba2+, and Mn2+ at ciliary transverse plates and the terminal plate of basal bodies. Microprobe analysis showed that Ca and C1 were concentrated within deposits. In some analyses, S and P were detected in deposits. Also, microprobe analysis of 5 mM Mn2+-fixed P. aurelia showed that those deposits were enriched in Mn and C1 and sometimes enriched in P. Deposits were seen only when the ciliates were actively swimming at the time of fixation. Locomotory mutants having defective membrane Ca-gating mechanisms and ciliates fixed while exhibiting ciliary reversal showed no obvious differences in deposition pattern and intensity. Possible correlations between electron-opaque deposits and the locations of intramembranous particles seen by freeze-fracture studied, as well as sites where fibrillar material associate with membranes are considered. The possibility that the action sites of calcium and other divalent cations were identified is discussed. PMID:1262398

  10. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture.

    PubMed

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M

    2016-04-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off-target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi-automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead-based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read-out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof-of-concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off-target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA-based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead-based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  11. Affinity of guanosine derivatives for polycytidylate revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Hurley, T. B.; Baird, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence is presented for complexation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with polycytidylate (poly(C)) at pH 8.0 and 23 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl2 and 0.2 M MgCl2 in water. The association of 2-MeImpG with poly(C) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy as well as by monitoring the kinetics of the nucleophilic substitution reaction of the imidazole moiety by amines. The results of both methods are consistent with moderately strong poly(C) 2-MeImpG complexation and the spectrophotometric measurements allowed the construction of a binding isotherm with a concentration of 2-MeImpG equal to 5.55 +/- 0.15 mM at half occupancy. UV spectroscopy was employed to establish the binding of other guanosine derivatives on poly(C). These derivatives are guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'GMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate imidazolide (ImpG), and guanosine 5'-monophosphate morpholidate (morpG). Within experimental error these guanosine derivatives exhibit the same affinity for poly(C) as 2-MeImpG.

  12. Banach frames in the affine synthesis problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhin, Pavel A.

    2009-10-01

    We consider the problem of representing functions f\\in L^p(\\mathbb R^d) by a series in elements of the affine system \\displaystyle \\psi_{j,k}(x)=\\lvert\\det a_j\\rvert^{1/2}\\psi(a_jx-bk), \\qquad j\\in\\mathbb N, \\quad k\\in\\mathbb Z^d. The corresponding representation theorems are established on the basis of the frame inequalities \\displaystyle A\\Vert g\\Vert _q\\le\\Vert\\{(g,\\psi_{j,k})\\}\\Vert _Y\\le B\\Vert g\\Vert _q for the Fourier coefficients \\displaystyle(g,\\psi_{j,k})=\\int_{\\mathbb R^d}g(x)\\psi_{j,k}(x)\\,dx of functions g\\in L^q(\\mathbb R^d), 1/p+1/q=1, where {\\Vert\\cdot\\Vert}_Y is the norm in some Banach space of number families \\{y_{j,k}\\} and 0 are constants. In particular, it is proved that if the integral of a function \\psi\\in L^1\\cap L^p(\\mathbb R^d), 1, is nonzero, so \\displaystyle\\int_{\\mathbb R^d}\\psi(x)\\,dx\

  13. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Affine constellations without mutually unbiased counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigert, Stefan; Durt, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    It has been conjectured that a complete set of mutually unbiased bases in a space of dimension d exists if and only if there is an affine plane of order d. We introduce affine constellations and compare their existence properties with those of mutually unbiased constellations. The observed discrepancies make a deeper relation between the two existence problems unlikely.

  14. Tending to Change: Toward a Situated Model of Affinity Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bommarito, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The concept of affinity spaces, a theoretical construct used to analyze literate activity from a spatial perspective, has gained popularity among scholars of literacy studies and, particularly, video-game studies. This article seeks to expand current notions of affinity spaces by identifying key assumptions that have limited researchers'…

  15. The Study of Affinity-Seeking in an Organizational Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flath, Dominic B.

    This study investigated the relationship between supervisors' use of Bell and Daly's affinity-seeking strategies and their impact on employee satisfaction. Results indicated that 16 of the 25 affinity-seeking strategies were positively correlated with a subordinate's perception of supervisor credibility. Results also indicated that a supervisor's…

  16. A minimax approach to spatial estimation using affinity matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. N.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates made in the plane to improve on noisy unbiased estimates were combined. Only a small fraction of points in a giant grid were used to do this, those that are most like a given point. A component of this process defining an affinity matrix of values, indicating which points are relevant to others. Minimax rules are shown to be based on affinity matrices.

  17. Striving for Empathy: Affinities, Alliances and Peer Sexuality Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Jessica; Copp, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Peer sexuality educators' accounts of their work reveal two approaches to empathy with their students: affinity and alliance. "Affinity-based empathy" rests on the idea that the more commonalities sexuality educators and students share (or perceive they share), the more they will be able to empathise with one another, while…

  18. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein’s affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states. PMID:26162682

  19. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo; Soo, Chopin

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauder’s affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and Yang–Mills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the Yang–Mills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with York’s integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the Chern–Simons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: •Wheeler–DeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauder’s program. •WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. •WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. •Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. •Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  20. Synthesis and SAR of potent LXR agonists containing an indole pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Campobasso, Nino; Smallwood, Angela; Parks, Derek J.; Webb, Christine L.; Frank, Kelly A.; Nord, Melanie; Duraiswami, Chaya; Evans, Christopher; Jaye, Michael; Thompson, Scott K.

    2009-03-27

    A novel series of 1H-indol-1-yl tertiary amine LXR agonists has been designed. Compounds from this series were potent agonists with good rat pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, the crystal structure of an LXR agonist bound to LXR{alpha} will be disclosed.

  1. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists: Beta-Cell Protection or Exhaustion?

    PubMed

    van Raalte, Daniël H; Verchere, C Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists enhance insulin secretion and may improve pancreatic islet cell function. However, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist treatment may have more complex, and sometimes deleterious, effects on beta cells. We discuss the concepts of beta cell protection versus exhaustion for different GLP-1R agonists based on recent data. PMID:27160799

  2. A solid-phase combinatorial approach for indoloquinolizidine-peptides with high affinity at D(1) and D(2) dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Molero, Anabel; Vendrell, Marc; Bonaventura, Jordi; Zachmann, Julian; López, Laura; Pardo, Leonardo; Lluis, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Albericio, Fernando; Casadó, Vicent; Royo, Miriam

    2015-06-01

    Ligands acting at multiple dopamine receptors hold potential as therapeutic agents for a number of neurodegenerative disorders. Specifically, compounds able to bind at D1R and D2R with high affinity could restore the effects of dopamine depletion and enhance motor activation on degenerated nigrostriatal dopaminergic systems. We have directed our research towards the synthesis and characterisation of heterocycle-peptide hybrids based on the indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidine core. This privileged structure is a water-soluble and synthetically accessible scaffold with affinity for diverse GPCRs. Herein we have prepared a solid-phase combinatorial library of 80 indoloquinolizidine-peptides to identify compounds with enhanced binding affinity at D2R, a receptor that is crucial to re-establish activity on dopamine-depleted degenerated GABAergic neurons. We applied computational tools and high-throughput screening assays to identify 9a{1,3,3} as a ligand for dopamine receptors with nanomolar affinity and agonist activity at D2R. Our results validate the application of indoloquinolizidine-peptide combinatorial libraries to fine-tune the pharmacological profiles of multiple ligands at D1 and D2 dopamine receptors. PMID:25969169

  3. Characterization of the binding of a novel nonxanthine adenosine antagonist radioligand, ( sup 3 H)CGS 15943, to multiple affinity states of the adenosine A1 receptor in the rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, M.F.; Williams, M.; Do, U.H.; Sills, M.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The triazoloquinazoline CGS 15943 is the first reported nonxanthine adenosine antagonist that has high affinity for brain adenosine receptors. In the present study, the binding of (3H) CGS 15943 to recognition sites in rat cortical membranes was characterized. Saturation experiments revealed that (3H)CGS 15943 labeled a single class of recognition sites with high affinity and limited capacity. Competition studies revealed that the binding of (3H)CGS 15943 was consistent with the labeling of brain adenosine A1 receptors. Adenosine agonists inhibited 1 nM (3H)CGS 15943 binding with the following order of activity N6-cyclopentyladenosine (IC50 = 15 nM) greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than (R)-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than 5'-N6-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine greater than (S)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than CGS 21680 greater than CV 1808 (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM). The potency order for adenosine antagonists was CGS 15943 (IC50 = 5 nM) greater than 8-phenyltheophylline greater than 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-amino-2-chloro)phenylxanthine greater than 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine greater than theophylline = caffeine (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM). Antagonist inhibition curves were steep and best described by a one-site binding model. In contrast, adenosine A1 agonist competition curves were shallow, as indicated by Hill coefficients less than unity. Computer analysis revealed that these inhibition curves were best described by a two-site binding model. Agonist competition curves generated in the presence of 1 mM GTP resulted in a rightward shift and steepening of the inhibition-concentration curves, whereas antagonist binding was not altered in the presence of GTP. The complex binding interactions found with adenosine agonists indicate that (3H)CGS 15943 labels both high and low affinity components of the adenosine A1 receptor in the rat cortex.

  4. Novel agonists for serotonin 5-HT7 receptors reverse metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression in the hippocampus of wild-type and Fmr1 KO mice, a model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lara; Sardone, Lara M; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Ciranna, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT7 receptors are expressed in the hippocampus and modulate the excitability of hippocampal neurons. We have previously shown that 5-HT7 receptors modulate glutamate-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity. In particular, we have shown that activation of 5-HT7 receptors reversed metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression (mGluR-LTD) in wild-type (wt) and in Fmr1 KO mice, a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome in which mGluR-LTD is abnormally enhanced, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptor agonists might be envisaged as a novel therapeutic strategy for Fragile X Syndrome. In this perspective, we have characterized the basic in vitro pharmacokinetic properties of novel molecules with high binding affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and we have tested their effects on synaptic plasticity using patch clamp on acute hippocampal slices. Here we show that LP-211, a high affinity selective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors, reverses mGluR-LTD in wt and Fmr1 KO mice, correcting a synaptic malfunction in the mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. Among novel putative agonists of 5-HT7 receptors, the compound BA-10 displayed improved affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and improved in vitro pharmacokinetic properties with respect to LP-211. BA-10 significantly reversed mGluR-LTD in the CA3-CA1 synapse in wt and Fmr1KO mice, indicating that BA-10 behaved as a highly effective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors and reduced exaggerated mGluR-LTD in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. On the other side, the compounds RA-7 and PM-20, respectively arising from in vivo metabolism of LP-211 and BA-10, had no effect on mGluR-LTD thus did not behave as agonists of 5-HT7 receptors in our conditions. The present results provide information about the structure-activity relationship of novel 5-HT7 receptor agonists and indicate that LP-211 and BA-10 might be used as novel pharmacological tools for the therapy of Fragile X Syndrome

  5. Optimal T-cell receptor affinity for inducing autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Koehli, Sabrina; Naeher, Dieter; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Zehn, Dietmar; Palmer, Ed

    2014-12-01

    T-cell receptor affinity for self-antigen has an important role in establishing self-tolerance. Three transgenic mouse strains expressing antigens of variable affinity for the OVA transgenic-I T-cell receptor were generated to address how TCR affinity affects the efficiency of negative selection, the ability to prime an autoimmune response, and the elimination of the relevant target cell. Mice expressing antigens with an affinity just above the negative selection threshold exhibited the highest risk of developing experimental autoimmune diabetes. The data demonstrate that close to the affinity threshold for negative selection, sufficient numbers of self-reactive T cells escape deletion and create an increased risk for the development of autoimmunity. PMID:25411315

  6. Affinity Monolith-Integrated Microchips for Protein Purification and Concentration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Wang, Huaixin; Qiao, Wei; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a valuable method to purify and concentrate minute amount of proteins. Monoliths with epoxy groups for affinity immobilization were prepared by direct in-situ photopolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in porogenic solvents consisting of 1-dodecanol and cyclohexanol. By integrating affinity monoliths onto a microfluidic system, targeted biomolecules can be captured and retained on affinity column, while other biomolecules having no specific interactions toward the immobilized ligands flow through the microchannel. Therefore, proteins which remain on the affinity column are purified and concentrated, and then eluted by appropriate solutions and finally, separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis. This integrated microfluidic device has been applied to the purification and separation of specific proteins (FITC-labeled human serum albumin and IgG) in a mixture. PMID:27473483

  7. /sup 125/I-BW-A844U, an antagonist radioligand with high affinity and selectivity for adenosine A1 receptors, and /sup 125/I-azido-BW-A844U, a photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Craig, R.H.; Daluge, S.M.; Linden, J.

    1988-06-01

    3-(4-Amino)phenethyl-1-propyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (BW-A844U) has been synthesized and shown to bind with high affinity to adenosine A1 receptors of bovine brain membranes (KD = 0.23 nM). This compound is highly selective for A1 receptors; the KI for binding to A2 receptors of human platelet membranes is 2.0 microM (A2/A1 ratio = 8700). Radioiodination of the 3-aminophenethyl group resulted in 125I-BW-A844U, a radioligand that retains high affinity for A1 receptors in bovine brain membranes (KD = 0.14 nM) and to 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate-solubilized receptors (KD = 0.34 nM). Specific binding of 125I-BW-A844U represented greater than 90% of the total binding at the KD. From the association constant (K1 = 5.0 X 10(8) M-1min-1) and the dissociation constant (K-1 = 0.064 min-1), the kinetic KD (K-1/K1) in membranes was calculated to be 0.13 nM. NaCl (1 M) had little effect on the binding affinity of 125I-BW-A844U, in contrast to the large effect of salt on the binding affinity of acidic antagonist radioligands. 8-Sulfophenyltheophylline inhibited radioligand binding with a Hill coefficient of 1.0, indicative of a single affinity binding state for the antagonist. By comparison, two distinct agonist affinity states of A1 receptors for the agonist (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine could be resolved, a high affinity state (62%, KH = 74 pM) and a low affinity state (KL = 3.83 nM). The addition of 0.1 mM guanylylimidodiphosphate converted all receptors to the low affinity state. Addition of NaCl (0.5 M) decreased the fraction of receptors in the high affinity state and increased both KH and KL, suggesting that NaCl alters coupling of receptors to G proteins and influences the conformation of the receptor polypeptide, whether or not the receptor is coupled to a G protein.

  8. The Novel, Nicotinic Alpha7 Receptor Partial Agonist, BMS-933043, Improves Cognition and Sensory Processing in Preclinical Models of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Linda J.; Easton, Amy E.; Li, Yu-Wen; Sivarao, Digavalli V.; Lidge, Regina; Jones, Kelli M.; Post-Munson, Debra; Daly, Christopher; Lodge, Nicholas J.; Gallagher, Lizbeth; Molski, Thaddeus; Pieschl, Richard; Chen, Ping; Hendricson, Adam; Westphal, Ryan; Cook, James; Iwuagwu, Christiana; Morgan, Daniel; Benitex, Yulia; King, Dalton; Macor, John E.; Zaczek, Robert; Olson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The development of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists is considered a promising approach for the treatment of cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia patients. In the present studies we characterized the novel agent, (2R)-N-(6-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4-pyrimidinyl)-4'H-spiro[4-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2,5'-[1,3]oxazol]-2'-amine (BMS-933043), in vitro and in rodent models of schizophrenia-like deficits in cognition and sensory processing. BMS-933043 showed potent binding affinity to native rat (Ki = 3.3 nM) and recombinant human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (Ki = 8.1 nM) and agonist activity in a calcium fluorescence assay (EC50 = 23.4 nM) and whole cell voltage clamp electrophysiology (EC50 = 0.14 micromolar (rat) and 0.29 micromolar (human)). BMS-933043 exhibited a partial agonist profile relative to acetylcholine; the relative efficacy for net charge crossing the cell membrane was 67% and 78% at rat and human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors respectively. BMS-933043 showed no agonist or antagonist activity at other nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes and was at least 300 fold weaker at binding to and antagonizing human 5-HT3A receptors (Ki = 2,451 nM; IC50 = 8,066 nM). BMS-933043 treatment i) improved 24 hour novel object recognition memory in mice (0.1–10 mg/kg, sc), ii) reversed MK-801-induced deficits in Y maze performance in mice (1–10 mg/kg, sc) and set shift performance in rats (1–10 mg/kg, po) and iii) reduced the number of trials required to complete the extradimensional shift discrimination in neonatal PCP treated rats performing the intra-dimensional/extradimensional set shifting task (0.1–3 mg/kg, po). BMS-933043 also improved auditory gating (0.56–3 mg/kg, sc) and mismatch negativity (0.03–3 mg/kg, sc) in rats treated with S(+)ketamine or neonatal phencyclidine respectively. Given this favorable preclinical profile BMS-933043 was selected for further development to support clinical evaluation in humans. PMID

  9. The Novel, Nicotinic Alpha7 Receptor Partial Agonist, BMS-933043, Improves Cognition and Sensory Processing in Preclinical Models of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Linda J; Easton, Amy E; Li, Yu-Wen; Sivarao, Digavalli V; Lidge, Regina; Jones, Kelli M; Post-Munson, Debra; Daly, Christopher; Lodge, Nicholas J; Gallagher, Lizbeth; Molski, Thaddeus; Pieschl, Richard; Chen, Ping; Hendricson, Adam; Westphal, Ryan; Cook, James; Iwuagwu, Christiana; Morgan, Daniel; Benitex, Yulia; King, Dalton; Macor, John E; Zaczek, Robert; Olson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The development of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists is considered a promising approach for the treatment of cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia patients. In the present studies we characterized the novel agent, (2R)-N-(6-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4-pyrimidinyl)-4'H-spiro[4-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2,5'-[1,3]oxazol]-2'-amine (BMS-933043), in vitro and in rodent models of schizophrenia-like deficits in cognition and sensory processing. BMS-933043 showed potent binding affinity to native rat (Ki = 3.3 nM) and recombinant human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (Ki = 8.1 nM) and agonist activity in a calcium fluorescence assay (EC50 = 23.4 nM) and whole cell voltage clamp electrophysiology (EC50 = 0.14 micromolar (rat) and 0.29 micromolar (human)). BMS-933043 exhibited a partial agonist profile relative to acetylcholine; the relative efficacy for net charge crossing the cell membrane was 67% and 78% at rat and human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors respectively. BMS-933043 showed no agonist or antagonist activity at other nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes and was at least 300 fold weaker at binding to and antagonizing human 5-HT3A receptors (Ki = 2,451 nM; IC50 = 8,066 nM). BMS-933043 treatment i) improved 24 hour novel object recognition memory in mice (0.1-10 mg/kg, sc), ii) reversed MK-801-induced deficits in Y maze performance in mice (1-10 mg/kg, sc) and set shift performance in rats (1-10 mg/kg, po) and iii) reduced the number of trials required to complete the extradimensional shift discrimination in neonatal PCP treated rats performing the intra-dimensional/extradimensional set shifting task (0.1-3 mg/kg, po). BMS-933043 also improved auditory gating (0.56-3 mg/kg, sc) and mismatch negativity (0.03-3 mg/kg, sc) in rats treated with S(+)ketamine or neonatal phencyclidine respectively. Given this favorable preclinical profile BMS-933043 was selected for further development to support clinical evaluation in humans. PMID:27467081

  10. Chasing polys: Interdisciplinary affinity and its connection to physics identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Tyler D.

    This research is based on two motivations that merge by means of the frameworks of interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. First, a goal of education is to develop interdisciplinary abilities in students' thinking and work. But an often ignored factor is students interests and beliefs about being interdisciplinary. Thus, this work develops and uses a framework called interdisciplinary affinity. It encompasses students interests in making connections across disciplines and their beliefs about their abilities to make those connections. The second motivation of this research is to better understand how to engage more students with physics. Physics identity describes how a student sees themselves in relation to physics. By understanding how physics identity is developed, researchers and educators can identify factors that increase interest and engagement in physics classrooms. Therefore, physics identity was used in conjunction with interdisciplinary affinity. Using a mixed methods approach, this research used quantitative data to identify the relationships interdisciplinary affinity has with physics identity and the physics classroom. These connections were explored in more detail using a case study of three students in a high school physics class. Results showed significant and positive relationships between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity, including the individual interest and recognition components of identity. It also identified characteristics of physics classrooms that had a significant, positive relationship with interdisciplinary affinity. The qualitative case study highlighted the importance of student interest to the relationship between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. It also identified interest and mastery orientation as key to understanding the link between interdisciplinary affinity and the physics classroom. These results are a positive sign that by understanding interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity

  11. Genetic affinities of central China populations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H Y; Wang, H W; Tan, S N; Chen, Y; Wang, W L; Tao, H X; Yin, Z C; Zou, Y H; Ouyang, S M; Ni, B

    2014-01-01

    Hunan locates in the south-central part of China, to the south of the middle reaches of the Yangtze River and south of Lake Dongting. According to the historical records, the peopling of Hunan by modern human ancestors can ascend to 40 thousand years ago. Thus, to trace the ancient maternal components can offer further insight into the origin of south-central China. In this study, we investigated the mitochondrial DNA of 114 individuals from Hunan Province (including 34 Han, 40 Tujia and 40 Miao). Hypervariable regions I and II of the mtDNA control region were sequenced, and the relative diagnostic variations in coding region according to the updated worldwide phylogeny tree were selected and typed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis or direct sequencing. All individuals were classified into specific (sub)haplogroups. By comparison with the surrounding populations, southern China-prevalent haplogroups were detected with relative higher frequency in the Tujia and Miao ethnic populations, such as haplogroup B, with more than 20%, lacking in the Han population, which illustrated its southern origin characters. In addition, we also detected northern of East Asia prevalent haplogroups with a relative higher frequency in Tujia populations than in the Miao and Yao ethnic groups, implying a gene flow from Han populations. However, the language-clustering tendency was supported by our principal component analysis and further genetic estimation results. Han and ethnic groups in central China exhibited specific ancestors related to their closer language affinity, although there was extensively genetic admixture between Han and ethnic groups. PMID:24615027

  12. 2-Methoxymethyl-Salvinorin B Is a Potent κ Opioid Receptor Agonist with Longer Lasting Action in Vivo Than Salvinorin A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yulin; Chen, Yong; Xu, Wei; Lee, David Y.W.; Ma, Zhongze; Rawls, Scott M.; Cowan, Alan; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Salvinorin (Sal) A is a naturally occurring, selective κ opioid receptor (KOPR) agonist with a short duration of action in vivo. Pharmacological properties of a C(2) derivative, 2-methoxy-methyl (MOM)-Sal B, were characterized. MOM-Sal B bound to KOPR with high selectivity and displayed ~3-fold higher affinity than U50,488H [(trans)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate] and Sal A. It acted as a full agonist at KOPR in guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding and was ~5- and ~7-fold more potent than U50,488H and Sal A, respectively. In Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing KOPR, all three κ agonists internalized or down-regulated KOPR to similar extents, with MOM-Sal B being the most potent. In mice, MOM-Sal B (0.05–1 mg/kg s.c.) caused immediate and dose-dependent immobility lasting ~3 h, which was blocked by norbinaltorphimine. In contrast, ambulation in a Y-maze was increased when rats received MOM-Sal B (1–5 mg/kg s.c.). In addition, MOM-Sal B (0.5–5 mg/kg i.p.) produced antinociception (hot-plate test) and hypothermia in a dose-dependent manner in rats. MOM-Sal B was more potent than U50,488H in both tests and more efficacious than U50,488H in the hot-plate test. These latter two in vivo effects were blocked by norbinaltorphimine, indicating KOPR-mediated actions. Sal A at 10 mg/kg elicited neither antinociception nor hypothermia 30 min after administration to rats. In summary, MOM-Sal B is a potent and efficacious KOPR agonist with longer lasting in vivo effects than Sal A. PMID:18089845

  13. A marine analgesic peptide, Contulakin-G, and neurotensin are distinct agonists for neurotensin receptors: uncovering structural determinants of desensitization properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Kyoung; Zhang, Liuyin; Smith, Misty D; Walewska, Aleksandra; Vellore, Nadeem A; Baron, Riccardo; McIntosh, J Michael; White, H Steve; Olivera, Baldomero M; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Neurotensin receptors have been studied as molecular targets for the treatment of pain, schizophrenia, addiction, or cancer. Neurotensin (NT) and Contulakin-G, a glycopeptide isolated from a predatory cone snail Conus geographus, share a sequence similarity at the C-terminus, which is critical for activation of neurotensin receptors. Both peptides are potent analgesics, although affinity and agonist potency of Contulakin-G toward neurotensin receptors are significantly lower, as compared to those for NT. In this work, we show that the weaker agonist properties of Contulakin-G result in inducing significantly less desensitization of neurotensin receptors and preserving their cell-surface density. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies suggested that both glycosylation and charged amino acid residues in Contulakin-G or NT played important roles in desensitizing neurotensin receptors. Computational modeling studies of human neurotensin receptor NTS1 and Contulakin-G confirmed the role of glycosylation in weakening interactions with the receptors. Based on available SAR data, we designed, synthesized, and characterized an analog of Contulakin-G in which the glycosylated amino acid residue, Gal-GalNAc-Thr10, was replaced by memantine-Glu10 residue. This analog exhibited comparable agonist potency and weaker desensitization properties as compared to that of Contulakin-G, while producing analgesia in the animal model of acute pain following systemic administration. We discuss our study in the context of feasibility and safety of developing NT therapeutic agents with improved penetration across the blood-brain barrier. Our work supports engineering peptide-based agonists with diverse abilities to desensitize G-protein coupled receptors and further emphasizes opportunities for conotoxins as novel pharmacological tools and drug candidates. PMID:25713532

  14. A marine analgesic peptide, Contulakin-G, and neurotensin are distinct agonists for neurotensin receptors: uncovering structural determinants of desensitization properties

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee-Kyoung; Zhang, Liuyin; Smith, Misty D.; Walewska, Aleksandra; Vellore, Nadeem A.; Baron, Riccardo; McIntosh, J. Michael; White, H. Steve; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Neurotensin receptors have been studied as molecular targets for the treatment of pain, schizophrenia, addiction, or cancer. Neurotensin (NT) and Contulakin-G, a glycopeptide isolated from a predatory cone snail Conus geographus, share a sequence similarity at the C-terminus, which is critical for activation of neurotensin receptors. Both peptides are potent analgesics, although affinity and agonist potency of Contulakin-G toward neurotensin receptors are significantly lower, as compared to those for NT. In this work, we show that the weaker agonist properties of Contulakin-G result in inducing significantly less desensitization of neurotensin receptors and preserving their cell-surface density. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies suggested that both glycosylation and charged amino acid residues in Contulakin-G or NT played important roles in desensitizing neurotensin receptors. Computational modeling studies of human neurotensin receptor NTS1 and Contulakin-G confirmed the role of glycosylation in weakening interactions with the receptors. Based on available SAR data, we designed, synthesized, and characterized an analog of Contulakin-G in which the glycosylated amino acid residue, Gal-GalNAc-Thr10, was replaced by memantine-Glu10 residue. This analog exhibited comparable agonist potency and weaker desensitization properties as compared to that of Contulakin-G, while producing analgesia in the animal model of acute pain following systemic administration. We discuss our study in the context of feasibility and safety of developing NT therapeutic agents with improved penetration across the blood-brain barrier. Our work supports engineering peptide-based agonists with diverse abilities to desensitize G-protein coupled receptors and further emphasizes opportunities for conotoxins as novel pharmacological tools and drug candidates. PMID:25713532

  15. Molecular mechanism of action of triazolobenzodiazepinone agonists of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor. Possible cooperativity across the receptor homo-dimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Aditya J.; Lam, Polo C.H.; Orry, Andrew; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2016-01-01

    The type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R) has multiple physiologic roles relating to nutrient homeostasis, including mediation of post-cibal satiety. This effect has been central in efforts to develop agonists of this receptor as part of a program to manage and/or prevent obesity. While a number of small molecule CCK1R agonists have been developed, none has yet been approved for clinical use, based on inadequate efficacy, side effects, or the potential for toxicity. Understanding the molecular details of docking and mechanism of action of these ligands can be helpful in the rational refinement and enhancement of small molecule drug candidates. In the current work, we have defined the mechanism of binding and activity of two triazolobenzodiazepinones, CE-326597 and PF-04756956, which are reported to be full agonist ligands. To achieve this, we utilized receptor binding with a series of allosteric and orthosteric radioligands at structurally-related CCK1R and CCK2R, as well as chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs exchanging residues in the allosteric pocket, and assessment of biological activity. These triazolobenzodiazepinones docked within the intramembranous small molecule allosteric ligand pocket, with higher affinity binding to CCK2R than CCK1R, yet with biological activity exclusive to or greatly enhanced at CCK1R. These ligands exhibited cooperativity with benzodiazepine binding across the CCK1R homodimeric complex, resulting in their ability to inhibit only a fraction of the saturable binding of a benzodiazepine radioligand, unlike other small molecule antagonists and agonists of this receptor. This may contribute to the understanding of the unique short duration and reversible gallbladder contraction observed in vivo upon administration of these drugs. PMID:26654202

  16. Pivotal role for aspartate-80 in the regulation of dopamine D2 receptor affinity for drugs and inhibition of adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Neve, K A; Cox, B A; Henningsen, R A; Spanoyannis, A; Neve, R L

    1991-06-01

    An aspartate residue corresponding to aspartate-80 of dopamine D2 receptors is strictly conserved among receptors that couple to guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Mutation of this residue alters the function of several classes of neurotransmitter receptors. Dopamine D2 receptors couple to the guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gi to inhibit adenylyl cyclase (ATP-pyrophosphate-lyase, cyclizing; EC 4.6.1.1). Like other Gi-coupled receptors, the binding of agonists and some antagonists to D2 receptors is sensitive to pH and sodium. In the present report, we demonstrate that substitution of an alanine or glutamate residue for aspartate-80 severely impairs inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by D2 receptors and also abolishes or decreases the regulation of the affinity of D2 receptors for agonists and substituted benzamide antagonists by sodium and pH. Our data support the hypothesis that the conformation of D2 receptors is maintained by interactions of monovalent cations with aspartate-80. The regulation of D2 receptors by this interaction has important consequences for the affinity of D2 receptors for ligands and for signal transduction by D2 receptors. PMID:1828858

  17. Different efficacy of specific agonists at 5-HT3 receptor splice variants: the role of the extra six amino acid segment

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, M-I; Lummis, S C R

    1998-01-01

    Whole cell voltage clamp electrophysiology and radioligand binding were used to examine the agonist characteristics of the two splice variants of the 5-HT3 receptor which have been cloned from neuronal cell lines. Homo-oligomeric 5-HT3 receptors were examined in HEK 293 cells stably transfected with either long (5-HT3-L) or short (5-HT3-S) receptor subunit DNAs. Functional homo-oligomeric receptors were formed from both subunits, and responses to 5-HT3 receptor agonists (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 2-methyl 5-HT and m-chlorophenylbiguanide) were qualitatively similar. Maximum currents (Rmax) elicited by the 5-HT3 receptor agonists m-chlorophenylbiguanide (mCPBG) and 2-methyl-5-HT (2-Me-5-HT), as compared to 5-HT, differed in the two splice variants: Rmax mCPBG/Rmax 5-HT values were 0.68±0.04 and 0.91±0.01 in 5-HT3-L and 5-HT3-S receptors, respectively. Comparable values for 2-Me-5-HT were 0.30±0.02 and 0.23±0.02. Radioligand binding data showed no difference in affinity of agonist or antagonist binding sites; thus the six amino acid deletion appears to cause differences in agonist efficacy. The role of the 6 amino acid insertion was further investigated by use of site-directed mutagenesis to create two mutant receptors, one where serine 286 was replaced with alanine, and the second where all 6 amino acids were replaced with alanines. Examination of the mutant receptors when stably expressed in HEK 293 cells revealed agonist properties resembling long and not short 5-HT3 receptors. Thus specific amino acids in this region are not responsible for the observed differences. The data show intracellular structure can have significant effects on ligand-gated ion channel function, and suggest that minor changes in structure may be responsible for differences in function observed when ligand-gated ion channel proteins are modulated intracellularly. PMID:9517385

  18. Agonist-induced changes in the structure of the acetylcholine receptor M2 regions revealed by photoincorporation of an uncharged nicotinic noncompetitive antagonist.

    PubMed

    White, B H; Cohen, J B

    1992-08-01

    To characterize structural changes induced in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) by agonists, we have mapped the sites of photoincorporation of the cholinergic noncompetitive antagonist 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine (]125I]TID) in the presence and absence of 50 microM carbamylcholine. [125I]TID binds to the AChR with similar affinity under both these conditions, but agonist inhibits photoincorporation into all subunits by greater than 75% (White, B. H., Howard, S., Cohen, S. G., and Cohen, J. B. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 21595-21607). [125I]TID-labeled sites on the beta- and delta-subunits were identified by amino-terminal sequencing of both cyanogen bromide (CNBr) and tryptic fragments purified by Tricine sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. In the absence of agonist, [125I]TID specifically labels homologous aliphatic residues (beta L-257, delta L-265, beta V-261, and delta V-269) in the M2 region of both subunits. In the presence of agonist, labeling of these residues is reduced approximately 90%, and the distribution of labeled residues is broadened to include a homologous set of serine residues at the amino terminus of M2. In the beta-subunit residues beta S-250, beta S-254, beta L-257, and beta V-261 are all labeled in the presence of carbamylcholine. This pattern of labeling supports an alpha-helical model for M2 with the labeled face forming the ion channel lumen. The observed redistribution of label in the resting and desensitized states provides the first direct evidence for an agonist-dependent rearrangement of the M2 helices. The efficient labeling of the resting state channel in a region capable of structural change also suggests a plausible model for AChR gating in which the aliphatic residues labeled by [125I]TID form a permeability barrier to the passage of ions. We also report increased labeling of the M1 region of the delta

  19. G Protein-Coupled Receptors Directly Bind Filamin A with High Affinity and Promote Filamin Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although interaction of a few G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with Filamin A, a key actin cross-linking and biomechanical signal transducer protein, has been observed, a comprehensive structure–function analysis of this interaction is lacking. Through a systematic sequence-based analysis, we found that a conserved filamin binding motif is present in the cytoplasmic domains of >20% of the 824 GPCRs encoded in the human genome. Direct high-affinity interaction of filamin binding motif peptides of select GPCRs with the Ig domain of Filamin A was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetric experiments. Engagement of the filamin binding motif with the Filamin A Ig domain induced the phosphorylation of filamin by protein kinase A in vitro. In transfected cells, agonist activation as well as constitutive activation of representative GPCRs dramatically elicited recruitment and phosphorylation of cellular Filamin A, a phenomenon long known to be crucial for regulating the structure and dynamics of the cytoskeleton. Our data suggest a molecular mechanism for direct GPCR–cytoskeleton coupling via filamin. Until now, GPCR signaling to the cytoskeleton was predominantly thought to be indirect, through canonical G protein-mediated signaling cascades involving GTPases, adenylyl cyclases, phospholipases, ion channels, and protein kinases. We propose that the GPCR-induced filamin phosphorylation pathway is a conserved, novel biochemical signaling paradigm. PMID:26460884

  20. Alterations of cortical pyramidal neurons in mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Yáñez, Inmaculada; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are allosteric membrane proteins involved in multiple cognitive processes, including attention, learning, and memory. The most abundant form of heterooligomeric nAChRs in the brain contains the β2- and α4- subunits and binds nicotinic agonists with high affinity. In the present study, we investigated in the mouse the consequences of the deletion of one of the nAChR components: the β2-subunit (β2−/−) on the microanatomy of cortical pyramidal cells. Using an intracellular injection method, complete basal dendritic arbors of 650 layer III pyramidal neurons were sampled from seven cortical fields, including primary sensory, motor, and associational areas, in both β2−/− and WT animals. We observed that the pyramidal cell phenotype shows significant quantitative differences among different cortical areas in mutant and WT mice. In WT mice, the density of dendritic spines was rather similar in all cortical fields, except in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortex, where it was significantly higher. In the absence of the β2-subunit, the most significant reduction in the density of spines took place in this high-order associational field. Our data suggest that the β2-subunit is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis of pyramidal neurons and, in particular, in the circuits that contribute to the high-order functional connectivity of the cerebral cortex. PMID:20534523

  1. Tetrahydroprotoberberine alkaloids with dopamine and σ receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Gadhiya, Satishkumar; Madapa, Sudharshan; Kurtzman, Thomas; Alberts, Ian L; Ramsey, Steven; Pillarsetty, Nagavara-Kishore; Kalidindi, Teja; Harding, Wayne W

    2016-05-01

    Two series of analogues of the tetrahydroprotoberberine (THPB) alkaloid (±)-stepholidine that (a) contain various alkoxy substituents at the C10 position and, (b) were de-rigidified with respect to (±)-stepholidine, were synthesized and evaluated for affinity at dopamine and σ receptors in order to evaluate effects on D3 and σ2 receptor affinity and selectivity. Small n-alkoxy groups are best tolerated by D3 and σ2 receptors. Among all compounds tested, C10 methoxy and ethoxy analogues (10 and 11 respectively) displayed the highest affinity for σ2 receptors as well as σ2 versus σ1 selectivity and also showed the highest D3 receptor affinity. De-rigidification of stepholidine resulted in decreased affinity at all receptors evaluated; thus the tetracyclic THPB framework is advantageous for affinity at dopamine and σ receptors. Docking of the C10 analogues at the D3 receptor, suggest that an ionic interaction between the protonated nitrogen atom and Asp110, a H-bond interaction between the C2 phenol and Ser192, a H-bond interaction between the C10 phenol and Cys181 as well as hydrophobic interactions of the aryl rings to Phe106 and Phe345, are critical for high affinity of the compounds. PMID:27032890

  2. Analysis of biomolecular interactions using affinity microcolumns: A review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Pfaunmiller, Erika L.; White, Christopher J.; Carter, NaTasha; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity chromatography has become an important tool for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The use of affinity microcolumns, which contain immobilized binding agents and have volumes in the mid-to-low microliter range, has received particular attention in recent years. Potential advantages of affinity microcolumns include the many analysis and detection formats that can be used with these columns, as well as the need for only small amounts of supports and immobilized binding agents. This review examines how affinity microcolumns have been used to examine biomolecular interactions. Both capillary-based microcolumns and short microcolumns are considered. The use of affinity microcolumns with zonal elution and frontal analysis methods are discussed. The techniques of peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, split-peak analysis, and band-broadening studies are also explored. The principles of these methods are examined and various applications are provided to illustrate the use of these methods with affinity microcolumns. It is shown how these techniques can be utilized to provide information on the binding strength and kinetics of an interaction, as well as on the number and types of binding sites. It is further demonstrated how information on competition or displacement effects can be obtained by these methods. PMID:24572459

  3. Analysis of biomolecular interactions using affinity microcolumns: a review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Pfaunmiller, Erika L; White, Christopher J; Carter, NaTasha; Hage, David S

    2014-10-01

    Affinity chromatography has become an important tool for characterizing biomolecular interactions. The use of affinity microcolumns, which contain immobilized binding agents and have volumes in the mid-to-low microliter range, has received particular attention in recent years. Potential advantages of affinity microcolumns include the many analysis and detection formats that can be used with these columns, as well as the need for only small amounts of supports and immobilized binding agents. This review examines how affinity microcolumns have been used to examine biomolecular interactions. Both capillary-based microcolumns and short microcolumns are considered. The use of affinity microcolumns with zonal elution and frontal analysis methods are discussed. The techniques of peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, split-peak analysis, and band-broadening studies are also explored. The principles of these methods are examined and various applications are provided to illustrate the use of these methods with affinity microcolumns. It is shown how these techniques can be utilized to provide information on the binding strength and kinetics of an interaction, as well as on the number and types of binding sites. It is further demonstrated how information on competition or displacement effects can be obtained by these methods. PMID:24572459

  4. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site. PMID:27298318

  5. A Potent and Site-Selective Agonist of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Junichiro; Mio, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Otsuka, Shinya; Mori, Yasuo; Uesugi, Motonari

    2015-12-23

    TRPA1 is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel family that is expressed primarily on sensory neurons. This chemosensor is activated through covalent modification of multiple cysteine residues with a wide range of reactive compounds including allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), a spicy component of wasabi. The present study reports on potent and selective agonists of TRPA1, discovered through screening 1657 electrophilic molecules. In an effort to validate the mode of action of hit molecules, we noted a new TRPA1-selective agonist, JT010 (molecule 1), which opens the TRPA1 channel by covalently and site-selectively binding to Cys621 (EC50 = 0.65 nM). The results suggest that a single modification of Cys621 is sufficient to open the TRPA1 channel. The TRPA1-selective probe described herein might be useful for further mechanistic studies of TRPA1 activation. PMID:26630251

  6. Characterization of high affinity (/sup 3/H)triazolam binding in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, M.; Concas, A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-03-01

    The hypnotic Triazolam (TZ), a triazolo (1,4)-benzodiazepine, displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. Specific binding properties of this recently tritiated TZ were characterized. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the GABA effect on (/sup 3/H)TZ binding. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity at 37/sup 0/C (K/sub d/ = 0.25 +/- 0.01 nM at O/sup 0/C; K/sub d/ = 1.46 +/- 0.03 nM at 37/sup 0/C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1003 +/- 37 fmoles/mg prot. at 0/sup 0/C and 1001 +/- 43 fmoles/mg prot. at 37/sup 0/C). Inhibition studies showed that (/sup 3/H)TZ binding displayed no GABA shift at 0/sup 0/C(K/sub i/ 0.37 +/- 0.03 nM/- GABA and K/sub i/ = 0.55 +/- 0.13 nM/+GABA) but a nearly two-fold shift was apparent at 37/sup 0/C (K/sub i/ = 2.92 +/- 0.2 nM/-GABA; K/sub i/ = 1.37 +/- 0.11 mM/+GABA). These results were also confirmed by saturation studies in the presence or absence of GABA showing a shift to higher affinity in the presence of GABA only at 37/sup 0/C. In Ro 15-1788/(/sup 3/H)TZ competition experiments the presence of GABA did not affect the inhibitory potency of Ro 15-1788 on (/sup 3/H)TZ binding at both temperatures. In conclusion (/sup 3/H)TZ binding showed an extremely high affinity for benzodiazepine receptors. In contrast to reported literature, the findings suggest that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors similar to other benzodiazepine agonists.

  7. Two Affinity Sites of the Cannabinoid Subtype 2 Receptor Identified by a Novel Homogeneous Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Rabal, Obdulia; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Zamarbide, Marta; Navarro, Gemma; Sánchez-Arias, Juan A; de Miguel, Irene; Lanciego, José L; Oyarzabal, Julen; Franco, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    Endocannabinoids act on G protein-coupled receptors that are considered potential targets for a variety of diseases. There are two different cannabinoid receptor types: ligands for cannabinoid type 2 receptors (CB2Rs) show more promise than those for cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1Rs) because they lack psychotropic actions. However, the complex pharmacology of these receptors, coupled with the lipophilic nature of ligands, is delaying the translational success of medications targeting the endocannabinoid system. We here report the discovery and synthesis of a fluorophore-conjugated CB2R-selective compound, CM-157 (3-[[4-[2-tert-butyl-1-(tetrahydropyran-4-ylmethyl)benzimidazol-5-yl]sulfonyl-2-pyridyl]oxy]propan-1-amine), which was useful for pharmacological characterization of CB2R by using a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. This methodology does not require radiolabeled compounds and may be undertaken in homogeneous conditions and in living cells (i.e., without the need to isolate receptor-containing membranes). The affinity of the labeled compound was similar to that of the unlabeled molecule. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays disclosed a previously unreported second affinity site and showed conformational changes in CB2R forming receptor heteromers with G protein-coupled receptor GPR55, a receptor for l-α-lysophosphatidylinositol. The populations displaying subnanomolar and nanomolar affinities were undisclosed in competitive assays using a well known cannabinoid receptor ligand, AM630 (1-[2-(morpholin-4-yl)ethyl]-2-methyl-3-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-6-iodoindole), and TH-chrysenediol, not previously tested on binding to cannabinoid receptors. Variations in binding parameters upon formation of dimers with GPR55 may reflect decreases in binding sites or alterations of the quaternary structure of the macromolecular G protein-coupled receptor complexes. In summary, the homogeneous binding assay described here may

  8. A Human Platelet Calcium Calculator Trained by Pairwise Agonist Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide. PMID:25723389

  9. Octopaminergic agonists for the cockroach neuronal octopamine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Eto, Morifusa

    2003-01-01

    The compounds 1-(2,6-diethylphenyl)imidazolidine-2-thione and 2-(2,6-diethylphenyl)imidazolidine showed the almost same activity as octopamine in stimulating adenylate cyclase of cockroach thoracic nervous system among 70 octopamine agonists, suggesting that only these compounds are full octopamine agonists and other compounds are partial octopamine agonists. The quantitative structure-activity relationship of a set of 22 octopamine agonists against receptor 2 in cockroach nervous tissue, was analyzed using receptor surface modeling. Three-dimensional energetics descriptors were calculated from receptor surface model/ligand interaction and these three-dimensional descriptors were used in quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis. A receptor surface model was generated using some subset of the most active structures and the results provided useful information in the characterization and differentiation of octopaminergic receptor. Abbreviation: AEA arylethanolamine AII 2-(arylimino)imidazolidine AIO 2-(arylimino)oxazolidine AIT 2-(arylimino)thiazolidine APAT 2-(α-phenylethylamino)-2-thiazoline BPAT 2-(β-phenylethylamino)-2-thiazoline CAO 2-(3-chlorobenzylamino)-2-oxazoline DCAO 2-(3,5-dichlorobenzylamino)-2-oxazoline DET5 2-(2,6-diethylphenylimino)-5-methylthiazolidine DET6 2-(2,6-diethylphenylimino)thiazine EGTA ethylene glycol bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid GFA genetic function approximation G/PLS genetic partial least squares IND 2-aminomethyl-2-indanol LAH lithium aluminum hydride MCSG maximum common subgroup MCT6 2-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenylimino)thiazine OA octopamine PLS partial least squares QSAR quantitative structure-activity relationship SBAT 2-(substituted benzylamino)-2-thiazoline SD the sum of squared deviations of the dependent variable values from their mean SPIT 3-(substituted phenyl)imidazolidine-2-thione THI 2-amino-1-(2-thiazoyl)ethanol TMS tetramethyl silane PMID:15841226

  10. A human platelet calcium calculator trained by pairwise agonist scanning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-02-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide. PMID:25723389

  11. Improving the developability profile of pyrrolidine progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Kallander, Lara S.; Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Frazee, James S.; Stoy, Patrick; Johnson, Latisha; Lu, Qing; Hammond, Marlys; Barton, Linda S.; Patterson, Jaclyn R.; Azzarano, Leonard M.; Nagilla, Rakesh; Madauss, Kevin P.; Williams, Shawn P.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Duraiswami, Chaya; Grygielko, Eugene T.; Xu, Xiaoping; Laping, Nicholas J.; Bray, Jeffrey D.; Thompson, Scott K.

    2010-09-17

    The previously reported pyrrolidine class of progesterone receptor partial agonists demonstrated excellent potency but suffered from serious liabilities including hERG blockade and high volume of distribution in the rat. The basic pyrrolidine amine was intentionally converted to a sulfonamide, carbamate, or amide to address these liabilities. The evaluation of the degree of partial agonism for these non-basic pyrrolidine derivatives and demonstration of their efficacy in an in vivo model of endometriosis is disclosed herein.

  12. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  13. Synthesis of fluorinated agonist of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Aliouane, Lucie; Chao, Sovy; Brizuela, Leyre; Pfund, Emmanuel; Cuvillier, Olivier; Jean, Ludovic; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Lequeux, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    The bioactive metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a product of sphingosine kinases (SphKs), mediates diverse biological processes such as cell differentiation, proliferation, survival and angiogenesis. A fluorinated analogue of S1P receptor agonist has been synthesized by utilizing a ring opening reaction of oxacycles by a lithiated difluoromethylphosphonate anion as the key reaction. In vitro activity of this S1P analogue is also reported. PMID:25047939

  14. Newspapers and newspaper ink contain agonists for the ah receptor.

    PubMed

    Bohonowych, Jessica E S; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T; Denison, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [(3)H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  15. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel 2-((2-(4-(substituted)phenylpiperazin-1-yl)ethyl)amino)-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosines as potent and selective agonists of the A2A adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Preti, Delia; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Saponaro, Giulia; Romagnoli, Romeo; Aghazadeh Tabrizi, Mojgan; Baraldi, Stefania; Cosconati, Sandro; Bruno, Agostino; Novellino, Ettore; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Ravani, Annalisa; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2015-04-01

    Stimulation of A2A adenosine receptors (AR) promotes anti-inflammatory responses in animal models of allergic rhinitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and rheumatic diseases. Herein we describe the results of a research program aimed at identifying potent and selective agonists of the A2AAR as potential anti-inflammatory agents. The recent crystallographic analysis of A2AAR agonists and antagonists in complex with the receptor provided key information on the structural determinants leading to receptor activation or blocking. In light of this, we designed a new series of 2-((4-aryl(alkyl)piperazin-1-yl)alkylamino)-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosines with high A2AAR affinity, activation potency and selectivity obtained by merging distinctive structural elements of known agonists and antagonists of the investigated target. Docking-based SAR optimization allowed us to identify compound 42 as one of the most potent and selective A2A agonist discovered so far (Ki hA2AAR = 4.8 nM, EC50 hA2AAR = 4.9 nM, Ki hA1AR > 10 000 nM, Ki hA3AR = 1487 nM, EC50 hA2BAR > 10 000 nM). PMID:25780876

  16. Tweaking Subtype Selectivity and Agonist Efficacy at (S)-2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) Receptors in a Small Series of BnTetAMPA Analogues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang-Yan; Larsen, Younes; Navarrete, Cristina Vara; Jensen, Anders A; Nielsen, Birgitte; Al-Musaed, Ali; Frydenvang, Karla; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Pickering, Darryl S; Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius

    2016-03-10

    A series of analogues of the (S)-2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist BnTetAMPA (5b) were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in radioligand binding assays at native and cloned AMPA receptors and functionally by two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology at the four homomeric AMPA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The analogues 6 and 7 exhibit very different pharmacological profiles with binding affinity preference for the subtypes GluA1 and GluA3, respectively. X-ray crystal structures of three ligands (6, 7, and 8) in complex with the agonist binding domain (ABD) of GluA2 show that they induce full domain closure despite their low agonist efficacies. Trp767 in GluA2 ABD could be an important determinant for partial agonism of this compound series at AMPA receptors, since agonist efficacy also correlated with the location of the Trp767 side chain. PMID:26862980

  17. ODE/IM correspondence and modified affine Toda field equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Katsushi; Locke, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    We study the two-dimensional affine Toda field equations for affine Lie algebra gˆ modified by a conformal transformation and the associated linear equations. In the conformal limit, the associated linear problem reduces to a (pseudo-)differential equation. For classical affine Lie algebra gˆ, we obtain a (pseudo-)differential equation corresponding to the Bethe equations for the Langlands dual of the Lie algebra g, which were found by Dorey et al. in study of the ODE/IM correspondence.

  18. Strategies to guide the antibody affinity maturation process.

    PubMed

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Joyce, M Gordon

    2015-04-01

    Antibodies with protective activity are critical for vaccine efficacy. Affinity maturation increases antibody activity through multiple rounds of somatic hypermutation and selection in the germinal center. Identification of HIV-1 specific and influenza-specific antibody developmental pathways, as well as characterization of B cell and virus co-evolution in patients, has informed our understanding of antibody development. In order to counteract HIV-1 and influenza viral diversity, broadly neutralizing antibodies precisely target specific sites of vulnerability and require high levels of affinity maturation. We present immunization strategies that attempt to recapitulate these natural processes and guide the affinity maturation process. PMID:25913818

  19. Strategies to guide the antibody affinity maturation process

    PubMed Central

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Joyce, M. Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies with protective activity are critical for vaccine efficacy. Affinity maturation increases antibody activity through multiple rounds of somatic hypermutation and selection in the germinal center. Identification of HIV-1 specific and influenza-specific antibody developmental pathways, as well as characterization of B cell and virus co-evolution in patients, has informed our understanding of antibody development. In order to counteract HIV-1 and Influenza viral diversity, broadly neutralizing antibodies precisely target specific sites of vulnerability and require high levels of affinity maturation. We present immunization strategies that attempt to recapitulate these natural processes and guide the affinity maturation process. PMID:25913818

  20. Affinity- and topology-dependent bound on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-08-01

    We provide a proof of a recently conjectured universal bound on current fluctuations in Markovian processes. This bound establishes a link between the fluctuations of an individual observable current, the cycle affinities driving the system into a non-equilibrium steady state, and the topology of the network. The proof is based on a decomposition of the network into independent cycles with both positive affinity and positive stationary cycle current. This formalism allows for a refinement of the bound for systems in equilibrium or with locally vanishing affinities.

  1. Affinity+: Semi-Structured Brainstorming on Large Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, Edwin R.; May, Richard A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; LaMothe, Ryan R.; Endert, Alexander

    2013-04-27

    Affinity diagraming is a powerful method for encouraging and capturing lateral thinking in a group environment. The Affinity+ Concept was designed to improve the collaborative brainstorm process through the use of large display surfaces in conjunction with mobile devices like smart phones and tablets. The system works by capturing the ideas digitally and allowing users to sort and group them on a large touch screen manually. Additionally, Affinity+ incorporates theme detection, topic clustering, and other processing algorithms that help bring structured analytic techniques to the process without requiring explicit leadership roles and other overhead typically involved in these activities.

  2. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes. PMID:24038158

  3. Biased signaling: potential agonist and antagonist of PAR2.

    PubMed

    Kakarala, Kavita Kumari; Jamil, Kaiser

    2016-06-01

    Protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) has emerged as one of the promising therapeutic targets to inhibit rapidly metastasizing breast cancer cells. However, its elusive molecular mechanism of activation and signaling has made it a difficult target for drug development. In this study, in silico methods were used to unfold PAR2 molecular mechanism of signaling based on the concept of GPCR receptor plasticity. Although, there are no conclusive evidences of the presence of specific endogenous ligands for PAR2, the efficacy of synthetic agonist and antagonist in PAR2 signaling has opened up the possibilities of ligand-mediated signaling. Furthermore, it has been proved that ligands specific for one GPCR can induce signaling in GPCRs belonging to other subfamilies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify potential agonists and antagonists from the GPCR ligand library (GLL), which may induce biased signaling in PAR2 using the concept of existence of multiple ligand-stabilized receptor conformations. The results of our in silico study suggest that PAR2 may show biased signaling mainly with agonists of serotonin type 1, β-adrenergic type 1,3 and antagonists of substance K (NK1), serotonin type 2, dopamine type 4, and thromboxane receptors. Further, this study also throws light on the putative ligand-specific conformations of PAR2. Thus, the results of this study provide structural insights to putative conformations of PAR2 and also gives initial clues to medicinal chemists for rational drug design targeting this challenging receptor. PMID:26295578

  4. Emerging strategies for exploiting cannabinoid receptor agonists as medicines.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2009-02-01

    Medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptor are already in the clinic. These are Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) and Sativex (Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol with cannabidiol). The first two of these medicines can be prescribed to reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Marinol can also be prescribed to stimulate appetite, while Sativex is prescribed for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in adults with multiple sclerosis and as an adjunctive analgesic treatment for adult patients with advanced cancer. One challenge now is to identify additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a number of potential clinical applications for such agonists are mentioned in this review. A second challenge is to develop strategies that will improve the efficacy and/or the benefit-to-risk ratio of a cannabinoid receptor agonist. This review focuses on five strategies that have the potential to meet either or both of these objectives. These are strategies that involve: (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier; (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue; (iii) targeting up-regulated cannabinoid receptors; (iv) targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors; or (v) 'multi-targeting'. Preclinical data that justify additional research directed at evaluating the clinical importance of each of these strategies are also discussed. PMID:19226257

  5. Cryptochinones from Cryptocarya chinensis act as farnesoid X receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiang-Ru; Chou, Tsung-Hsien; Huang, Din-Wen; Chen, Ih-Sheng

    2014-09-01

    Cryptochinones A-D are tetrahydroflavanones isolated from the leaves of Cryptocarya chinensis, an evergreen tree whose extracts are believed to have a variety of health benefits. The origin of their possible bioactivity is unclear. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of nuclear receptor superfamily that has been widely targeted for developing treatments for chronic liver disease and for hyperglycemia. We studied whether cryptochinones A-D, which are structurally similar to known FXR ligands, may act at this target. Indeed, in mammalian one-hybrid and transient transfection reporter assays, cryptochinones A-D transactivated FXR to modulate promoter action including GAL4, SHP, CYP7A1, and PLTP promoters in dose-dependent manner, while they exhibited similar agonistic activity as chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), an endogenous FXR agonist. Through molecular modeling docking studies we evaluated their ability to bind to the FXR ligand binding pocket. Our results indicate that cryptochinones A-D can behave as FXR agonists. PMID:25127166

  6. Dopamine-deficient mice are hypersensitive to dopamine receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, D S; Szczypka, M S; Palmiter, R D

    2000-06-15

    Dopamine-deficient (DA-/-) mice were created by targeted inactivation of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene in dopaminergic neurons. The locomotor activity response of these mutants to dopamine D1 or D2 receptor agonists and l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) was 3- to 13-fold greater than the response elicited from wild-type mice. The enhanced sensitivity of DA-/- mice to agonists was independent of changes in steady-state levels of dopamine receptors and the presynaptic dopamine transporter as measured by ligand binding. The acute behavioral response of DA-/- mice to a dopamine D1 receptor agonist was correlated with c-fos induction in the striatum, a brain nucleus that receives dense dopaminergic input. Chronic replacement of dopamine to DA-/- mice by repeated l-DOPA administration over 4 d relieved the hypersensitivity of DA-/- mutants in terms of induction of both locomotion and striatal c-fos expression. The results suggest that the chronic presence of dopaminergic neurotransmission is required to dampen the intracellular signaling response of striatal neurons. PMID:10844009

  7. Emerging strategies for exploiting cannabinoid receptor agonists as medicines

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2009-01-01

    Medicines that activate cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor are already in the clinic. These are Cesamet® (nabilone), Marinol® (dronabinol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol) and Sativex® (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol with cannabidiol). The first two of these medicines can be prescribed to reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Marinol® can also be prescribed to stimulate appetite, while Sativex® is prescribed for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in adults with multiple sclerosis and as an adjunctive analgesic treatment for adult patients with advanced cancer. One challenge now is to identify additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a number of potential clinical applications for such agonists are mentioned in this review. A second challenge is to develop strategies that will improve the efficacy and/or the benefit-to-risk ratio of a cannabinoid receptor agonist. This review focuses on five strategies that have the potential to meet either or both of these objectives. These are strategies that involve: (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier; (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue; (iii) targeting up-regulated cannabinoid receptors; (iv) targeting cannabinoid CB2 receptors; or (v) ‘multi-targeting’. Preclinical data that justify additional research directed at evaluating the clinical importance of each of these strategies are also discussed. PMID:19226257

  8. Highly selective agonists for substance P receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central