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Sample records for affinity purification-tagged proteins

  1. A tandem affinity purification tag of TGA2 for isolation of interacting proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Stotz, Henrik U; Findling, Simone; Nukarinen, Ella; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Mueller, Martin J; Berger, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) tagging provides a powerful tool for isolating interacting proteins in vivo. TAP-tag purification offers particular advantages for the identification of stimulus-induced protein interactions. Type II bZIP transcription factors (TGA2, TGA5 and TGA6) play key roles in pathways that control salicylic acid, ethylene, xenobiotic and reactive oxylipin signaling. Although proteins interacting with these transcription factors have been identified through genetic and yeast 2-hybrid screening, others are still elusive. We have therefore generated a C-terminal TAP-tag of TGA2 to isolate additional proteins that interact with this transcription factor. Three lines most highly expressing TAP-tagged TGA2 were functional in that they partially complemented reactive oxylipin-responsive gene expression in a tga2 tga5 tga6 triple mutant. TAP-tagged TGA2 in the most strongly overexpressing line was proteolytically less stable than in the other 2 lines. Only this overexpressing line could be used in a 2-step purification process, resulting in isolation of co-purifying bands of larger molecular weight than TGA2. TAP-tagged TGA2 was used to pull down NPR1, a protein known to interact with this transcription factor. Mass spectrometry was used to identify peptides that co-purified with TAP-tagged TGA2. Having generated this TGA2 TAP-tag line will therefore be an asset to researchers interested in stimulus-induced signal transduction processes. PMID:25482810

  2. Application of a New Dual Localization-Affinity Purification Tag Reveals Novel Aspects of Protein Kinase Biology in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Colin P.; Hashmi, Shahr B.; Osmani, Aysha H.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi occupy critical environmental niches and have numerous beneficial industrial applications but devastating effects as pathogens and agents of food spoilage. As regulators of essentially all biological processes protein kinases have been intensively studied but how they regulate the often unique biology of filamentous fungi is not completely understood. Significant understanding of filamentous fungal biology has come from the study of the model organism Aspergillus nidulans using a combination of molecular genetics, biochemistry, cell biology and genomic approaches. Here we describe dual localization-affinity purification (DLAP) tags enabling endogenous N or C-terminal protein tagging for localization and biochemical studies in A. nidulans. To establish DLAP tag utility we endogenously tagged 17 protein kinases for analysis by live cell imaging and affinity purification. Proteomic analysis of purifications by mass spectrometry confirmed association of the CotA and NimXCdk1 kinases with known binding partners and verified a predicted interaction of the SldABub1/R1 spindle assembly checkpoint kinase with SldBBub3. We demonstrate that the single TOR kinase of A. nidulans locates to vacuoles and vesicles, suggesting that the function of endomembranes as major TOR cellular hubs is conserved in filamentous fungi. Comparative analysis revealed 7 kinases with mitotic specific locations including An-Cdc7 which unexpectedly located to mitotic spindle pole bodies (SPBs), the first such localization described for this family of DNA replication kinases. We show that the SepH septation kinase locates to SPBs specifically in the basal region of apical cells in a biphasic manner during mitosis and again during septation. This results in gradients of SepH between G1 SPBs which shift along hyphae as each septum forms. We propose that SepH regulates the septation initiation network (SIN) specifically at SPBs in the basal region of G1 cells and that localized gradients

  3. Affinity purification of heme-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Asher, Wesley B; Bren, Kara L

    2014-01-01

    Protein affinity purification techniques are widely used for isolating pure target proteins for biochemical and structural characterization. Herein, we describe the protocol for affinity-based purification of proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that uses the coordination of a peptide tag covalently modified with heme c, known as a heme-tag, to an L-histidine immobilized Sepharose resin. This approach provides an affinity purification tag visible to the eye, facilitating tracking of the protein. In addition, we describe methods for specifically detecting heme-tagged proteins in SDS-PAGE gels using a heme-staining procedure and for quantifying the proteins using a pyridine hemochrome assay. PMID:24943311

  4. A Chimeric Affinity Tag for Efficient Expression and Chromatographic Purification of Heterologous Proteins from Plants.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Jutras, Philippe V; Vorster, Juan; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The use of plants as expression hosts for recombinant proteins is an increasingly attractive option for the production of complex and challenging biopharmaceuticals. Tools are needed at present to marry recent developments in high-yielding gene vectors for heterologous expression with routine protein purification techniques. In this study, we designed the Cysta-tag, a new purification tag for immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) of plant-made proteins based on the protein-stabilizing fusion partner SlCYS8. We show that the Cysta-tag may be used to readily purify proteins under native conditions, and then be removed enzymatically to isolate the protein of interest. We also show that commonly used protease recognition sites for linking purification tags are differentially stable in leaves of the commonly used expression host Nicotiana benthamiana, with those linkers susceptible to cysteine proteases being less stable then serine protease-cleavable linkers. As an example, we describe a Cysta-tag experimental scheme for the one-step purification of a clinically useful protein, human α1-antitrypsin, transiently expressed in N. benthamiana. With potential applicability to the variety of chromatography formats commercially available for IMAC-based protein purification, the Cysta-tag provides a convenient means for the efficient and cost-effective purification of recombinant proteins from plant tissues. PMID:26913045

  5. A Chimeric Affinity Tag for Efficient Expression and Chromatographic Purification of Heterologous Proteins from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sainsbury, Frank; Jutras, Philippe V.; Vorster, Juan; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The use of plants as expression hosts for recombinant proteins is an increasingly attractive option for the production of complex and challenging biopharmaceuticals. Tools are needed at present to marry recent developments in high-yielding gene vectors for heterologous expression with routine protein purification techniques. In this study, we designed the Cysta-tag, a new purification tag for immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) of plant-made proteins based on the protein-stabilizing fusion partner SlCYS8. We show that the Cysta-tag may be used to readily purify proteins under native conditions, and then be removed enzymatically to isolate the protein of interest. We also show that commonly used protease recognition sites for linking purification tags are differentially stable in leaves of the commonly used expression host Nicotiana benthamiana, with those linkers susceptible to cysteine proteases being less stable then serine protease-cleavable linkers. As an example, we describe a Cysta-tag experimental scheme for the one-step purification of a clinically useful protein, human α1-antitrypsin, transiently expressed in N. benthamiana. With potential applicability to the variety of chromatography formats commercially available for IMAC-based protein purification, the Cysta-tag provides a convenient means for the efficient and cost-effective purification of recombinant proteins from plant tissues. PMID:26913045

  6. A heme fusion tag for protein affinity purification and quantification

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Wesley B; Bren, Kara L

    2010-01-01

    We report a novel affinity-based purification method for proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that uses the coordination of a heme tag to an l-histidine-immobilized sepharose (HIS) resin. This approach provides an affinity purification tag visible to the eye, facilitating tracking of the protein. We show that azurin and maltose binding protein are readily purified from cell lysate using the heme tag and HIS resin. Mild conditions are used; heme-tagged proteins are bound to the HIS resin in phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, and eluted by adding 200–500 mM imidazole or binding buffer at pH 5 or 8. The HIS resin exhibits a low level of nonspecific binding of untagged cellular proteins for the systems studied here. An additional advantage of the heme tag-HIS method for purification is that the heme tag can be used for protein quantification by using the pyridine hemochrome absorbance method for heme concentration determination. PMID:20665691

  7. Affinity Purification of a Recombinant Protein Expressed as a Fusion with the Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP) Tag

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Gabelli, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of fusion proteins such as MBP fusions can be used as a way to improve the solubility of the expressed protein in E. coli (Fox and Waugh, 2003; Nallamsetty et al., 2005; Nallamsetty and Waugh, 2006) and as a way to introduce an affinity purification tag. The protocol that follows was designed by the authors as a first step in the purification of a recombinant protein fused with MBP, using fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). Cells should have been thawed, resuspended in binding buffer, and lysed by sonication or microfluidization before mixing with the amylose resin or loading on the column. Slight modifications to this protocol may be made to accommodate both the protein of interest and the availability of equipment. PMID:26096500

  8. A cleavable silica-binding affinity tag for rapid and inexpensive protein purification.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Brandon L; Baneyx, François

    2014-10-01

    We describe a new affinity purification tag called Car9 that confers proteins to which it is fused micromolar affinity for unmodified silica. When appended to the C-terminus of GFPmut2 through a flexible linker, Car9 promotes efficient adsorption to silica gel and the fusion protein can be released from the particles by incubation with L-lysine. Using a silica gel column and the lysine elution approach in fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) mode, Car9-tagged versions of GFPmut2, mCherry and maltose binding protein (MBP) can be recovered from clarified lysates with a purity of 80-90%. Capitalizing on silica's ability to handle large pressure drops, we further show that it is possible to go from cell lysates to purified protein in less than 15 min using a fully disposable device. Finally, we demonstrate that the linker-Car9 region is susceptible to proteolysis by E. coli OmpT and take advantage of this observation to excise the C-terminal extension of GFPmut2-Car9 by incubating purified fusion protein with cells that overproduce the outer membrane protease OmpT. The set of strategies described herein, should reduce the cost of affinity purification by at least 10-fold, cut down purification times to minutes, and allow for the production of proteins with native (or nearly native) termini from their C-terminally-tagged versions. PMID:24777569

  9. Characterization of the diatomite binding domain in the ribosomal protein L2 from E. coli and functions as an affinity tag.

    PubMed

    Li, Junhua; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Yanjun

    2013-03-01

    The ribosomal protein L2, a constituent protein of the 50S large ribosomal subunit, can be used as Si-tag using silica particles for the immobilization and purification of recombinant proteins (Ikeda et al. (Protein Expr Purif 71:91-95, 2010); Taniguchi et al. (Biotechnol Bioeng 96:1023-1029, 2007)). We applied a diatomite powder, a sedimentary rock mainly composed with diatoms silica, as an affinity solid phase and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) technology to release a target protein from the solid phase. The L2 (203-273) was the sufficient region for the adsorption of ribosomal protein L2 on diatomite. We comparatively analyzed the different adsorption properties of the two deleted proteins of L2 (L2 (1-60, 203-273) and L2 (203-273)) on diatomite. The time required to reach adsorption equilibrium of L2 (203-273) fusion protein on diatomite was shorter than that of L2 (1-60, 203-273) fusion protein. The maximum adsorption capacity of L2 (203-273) fusion protein was larger than that of L2 (1-60, 203-273) fusion protein. In order to study whether the L2 (203-273) can function as an affinity purification tag, SUMO was introduced as one specific protease cleavage site between the target protein and the purification tags. The L2 (203-273) and SUMO fusion protein purification method was tested using enhanced green fluorescent protein as a model protein; the result shows that the purification performance of this affinity purification method was good. The strong adsorption characteristic of L2 (203-273) on diatomite also provides a potential protein fusion tag for the immobilization of enzyme. PMID:22926644

  10. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Sondek, John

    2004-09-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, and for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:18429272

  11. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  12. Protein Complex Purification by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture has become a powerful technique for consistently purifying endogenous protein complexes, facilitating biochemical and biophysical assays on otherwise inaccessible biological assemblies, and enabling broader interactomic exploration. For this procedure, cells are broken and their contents separated and extracted into a solvent, permitting access to target macromolecular complexes thus released in solution. The complexes are specifically enriched from the extract onto a solid medium coupled with an affinity reagent-usually an antibody-that recognizes the target either directly or through an appended affinity tag, allowing subsequent characterization of the complex. Here, we discuss approaches and considerations for purifying endogenous yeast protein complexes by affinity capture. PMID:27371601

  13. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. PMID:25829303

  14. Optimized Affinity Capture of Yeast Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an affinity isolation protocol. It uses cryomilled yeast cell powder for producing cell extracts and antibody-conjugated paramagnetic beads for affinity capture. Guidelines for determining the optimal extraction solvent composition are provided. Captured proteins are eluted in a denaturing solvent (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis sample buffer) for gel-based proteomic analyses. Although the procedures can be modified to use other sources of cell extract and other forms of affinity media, to date we have consistently obtained the best results with the method presented. PMID:27371596

  15. Use of the myosin motor domain as large-affinity tag for the expression and purification of proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Kollmar, Martin

    2006-08-15

    The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is increasingly be used for the overexpression of proteins. Dictyostelium is amenable to classical and molecular genetic approaches and can easily be grown in large quantities. It contains a variety of chaperones and folding enzymes, and is able to perform all kinds of post-translational protein modifications. Here, new expression vectors are presented that have been designed for the production of proteins in large quantities for biochemical and structural studies. The expression cassettes of the most successful vectors are based on a tandem affinity purification tag consisting of an octahistidine tag followed by the myosin motor domain tag. The myosin motor domain not only strongly enhances the production of fused proteins but is also used for a fast affinity purification step through its ATP-dependent binding to actin. The applicability of the new system has been demonstrated for the expression and purification of subunits of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex from different species. PMID:16516959

  16. Protein affinity map of chemical space.

    PubMed

    Kauvar, L M; Villar, H O; Sportsman, J R; Higgins, D L; Schmidt, D E

    1998-09-11

    Affinity fingerprinting is a quantitative method for mapping chemical space based on binding preferences of compounds for a reference panel of proteins. An effective reference panel of <20 proteins can be empirically selected which shows differential interaction with nearly all compounds. By using this map to iteratively sample the chemical space, identification of active ligands from a library of 30,000 candidate compounds has been accomplished for a wide spectrum of specific protein targets. In each case, <200 compounds were directly assayed against the target. Further, analysis of the fingerprint database suggests a strategy for effective selection of affinity chromatography ligands and scaffolds for combinatorial chemistry. With such a system, the large numbers of potential therapeutic targets emerging from genome research can be categorized according to ligand binding properties, complementing sequence based classification. PMID:9792501

  17. Use of protein-protein interactions in affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Muronetz, V I; Sholukh, M; Korpela, T

    2001-10-30

    Biospecific recognition between proteins is a phenomenon that can be exploited for designing affinity-chromatographic purification systems for proteins. In principle, the approach is straightforward, and there are usually many alternative ways, since a protein can be always found which binds specifically enough to the desired protein. Routine immunoaffinity chromatography utilizes the recognition of antigenic epitopes by antibodies. However, forces involved in protein-protein interactions as well the forces keeping the three-dimensional structures of proteins intact are complicated, and proteins are easily unfolded by various factors with unpredictable results. Because of this and because of the generally high association strength between proteins, the correct adjustment of binding forces between an immobilized protein and the protein to be purified as well as the release of bound proteins in biologically active form from affinity complexes are the main problem. Affinity systems involving interactions like enzyme-enzyme, subunit-oligomer, protein-antibody, protein-chaperone and the specific features involved in each case are presented as examples. This article also aims to sketch prospects for further development of the use of protein-protein interactions for the purification of proteins. PMID:11694271

  18. Affinity purification of proteins binding to GST fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Swaffield, J C; Johnston, S A

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes the use of proteins fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST fusion proteins) to affinity purify other proteins, a technique also known as GST pulldown purification. The describes a strategy in which a GST fusion protein is bound to agarose affinity beads and the complex is then used to assay the binding of a specific test protein that has been labeled with [35S]methionine by in vitro translation. However, this method can be adapted for use with other types of fusion proteins; for example, His6, biotin tags, or maltose-binding protein fusions (MBP), and these may offer particular advantages. A describes preparation of an E. coli extract that is added to the reaction mixture with purified test protein to reduce nonspecific binding. PMID:18265191

  19. Metal-affinity separations: A new dimension in protein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, F.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Rapid growth in the preparative and high-resolution analytical applications of metal-affinity chromatography demonstrate the appeal of metal recognition as a basis for protein separations. Stable, inexpensive chelated metals effectively mimic biospecific interactions, providing selective ligands for protein binding. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of metal-protein recognition that underlie metal-affinity separations. Also discussed are schemes for integrating metal-affinity purifications into the expression and bioprocessing of recombinant proteins. Promising future developments include new metal-affinity processes for analytical and preparative-scale separations and a range of techniques for enhancing the selectivity of metal-affinity separations.

  20. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture.

    PubMed

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M

    2016-04-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off-target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi-automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead-based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read-out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof-of-concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off-target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA-based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead-based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  1. Affinity Monolith-Integrated Microchips for Protein Purification and Concentration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Wang, Huaixin; Qiao, Wei; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a valuable method to purify and concentrate minute amount of proteins. Monoliths with epoxy groups for affinity immobilization were prepared by direct in-situ photopolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in porogenic solvents consisting of 1-dodecanol and cyclohexanol. By integrating affinity monoliths onto a microfluidic system, targeted biomolecules can be captured and retained on affinity column, while other biomolecules having no specific interactions toward the immobilized ligands flow through the microchannel. Therefore, proteins which remain on the affinity column are purified and concentrated, and then eluted by appropriate solutions and finally, separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis. This integrated microfluidic device has been applied to the purification and separation of specific proteins (FITC-labeled human serum albumin and IgG) in a mixture. PMID:27473483

  2. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein’s affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states. PMID:26162682

  3. Aptamer-modified magnetic beads in affinity separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guohong; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers are valuable alternative ligands for affinity separations. Here, we describe the aptamer-based affinity separation of His-tagged proteins using an aptamer directed against the His-tag. The immobilization of the aptamer to magnetic beads is described as well as the aptamer-based purification and proper methods for the characterization of the process. Moreover, indications for the transfer of the process to other aptamers are given. PMID:25749947

  4. Flexible Linker Modulates Glycosaminoglycan Affinity of Decorin Binding Protein A.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ashli; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Feng, Wei; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Wang, Xu

    2015-08-18

    Decorin binding protein A (DBPA) is a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin found on the surface of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi), the causative agent of Lyme disease. DBPA facilitates bacterial adherence to extracellular matrices of human tissues and is crucial during the early stage of the infection process. Interestingly, DBPA from different strains (B31, N40, and PBr) show significant differences in GAG affinities, but the structural basis for the differences is not clear. In this study, we show that GAG affinity of N40 DBPA is modulated in part by flexible segments that control access to the GAG binding site, such that shortening of the linker leads to higher GAG affinity when analyzed using ELISA, gel mobility shift assay, solution NMR, and isothermal titration calorimetry. Our observation that GAG affinity differences among different B. burgdorferi strains can be attributed to a flexible linker domain regulating access to the GAG-binding domain is novel. It also provides a rare example of how neutral amino acids and dynamic segments in GAG binding proteins can have a large influence on GAG affinity and provides insights into why the number of basic amino acids in the GAG-binding site may not be the only factor determining GAG affinity of proteins. PMID:26223367

  5. Specific capture of uranyl protein targets by metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Basset, Christian; Dedieu, Alain; Guérin, Philippe; Quéméneur, Eric; Meyer, Daniel; Vidaud, Claude

    2008-03-28

    To improve general understanding of biochemical mechanisms in the field of uranium toxicology, the identification of protein targets needs to be intensified. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been widely developed as a powerful tool for capturing metal binding proteins from biological extracts. However uranyl cations (UO2(2+)) have particular physico-chemical characteristics which prevent them from being immobilized on classical metal chelating supports. We report here on the first development of an immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography method, based on the cation-exchange properties of aminophosphonate groups for uranyl binding. The cation distribution coefficient and loading capacity on the support were determined. Then the stability of the uranyl-bonded phase under our chromatographic conditions was optimized to promote affinity mechanisms. The successful enrichment of uranyl binding proteins from human serum was then proven using proteomic and mass spectral analysis. PMID:18308325

  6. Self-affine analysis of protein energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueirêdo, P. H.; Moret, M. A.; Pascutti, P. G.; Nogueira, E.; Coutinho, S.

    2010-07-01

    We study the time series of the total energy of polypeptides and proteins. These time series were generated by molecular dynamics methods and analyzed by applying detrended fluctuation analysis to estimate the long-range power-law correlation, i.e. to measure scaling exponents α. Such exponents were calculated for all systems and their values follow environment conditions, i.e., they are temperature dependent and also, in a continuum medium approach, vary according to the dielectric constants (we simulated ɛ=2 and ɛ=80). The procedure was applied to investigate polyalanines, and other realistic models of proteins (Insect Defensin A and Hemoglobin). The present findings exhibit results that are consistent with previous ones obtained by other methodologies.

  7. Crystal structures of fusion proteins with large-affinity tags.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Douglas R; Mrozkiewicz, Marek K; McGrath, William J; Listwan, Pawel; Kobe, Bostjan

    2003-07-01

    The fusion of a protein of interest to a large-affinity tag, such as the maltose-binding protein (MBP), thioredoxin (TRX), or glutathione-S-transferase (GST), can be advantageous in terms of increased expression, enhanced solubility, protection from proteolysis, improved folding, and protein purification via affinity chromatography. Unfortunately, crystal growth is hindered by the conformational heterogeneity induced by the fusion tag, requiring that the tag is removed by a potentially problematic cleavage step. The first three crystal structures of fusion proteins with large-affinity tags have been reported recently. All three structures used a novel strategy to rigidly fuse the protein of interest to MBP via a short three- to five-amino acid spacer. This strategy has the potential to aid structure determination of proteins that present particular experimental challenges and are not conducive to more conventional crystallization strategies (e.g., membrane proteins). Structural genomics initiatives may also benefit from this approach as a way to crystallize problematic proteins of significant interest. PMID:12824478

  8. Affitins for protein purification by affinity magnetic fishing.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Dos Santos, Raquel; Ottengy, Stella; Viecinski, Aline Canani; Béhar, Ghislaine; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric; Roque, A Cecília A

    2016-07-29

    Currently most economical and technological bottlenecks in protein production are placed in the downstream processes. With the aim of increasing the efficiency and reducing the associated costs, various affinity ligands have been developed. Affitins are small, yet robust and easy to produce, proteins derived from the archaeal extremophilic "7kDa DNA-binding" protein family. By means of combinatorial protein engineering and ribosome display selection techniques, Affitins have shown to bind a diversity of targets. In this work, two previously developed Affitins (anti-lysozyme and anti-IgG) were immobilized onto magnetic particles to assess their potential for protein purification by magnetic fishing. The optimal lysozyme and human IgG binding conditions yielded 58mg lysozyme/g support and 165mgIgG/g support, respectively. The recovery of proteins was possible in high yield (≥95%) and with high purity, namely ≥95% and 81%, when recovering lysozyme from Escherichia coli supernatant and IgG from human plasma, respectively. Static binding studies indicated affinity constants of 5.0×10(4)M(-1) and 9.3×10(5)M(-1) for the anti-lysozyme and anti-IgG magnetic supports. This work demonstrated that Affitins, which can be virtually evolved for any protein of interest, can be coupled onto magnetic particles creating novel affinity adsorbents for purification by magnetic fishing. PMID:27342136

  9. Native Elution of Yeast Protein Complexes Obtained by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes two options for the native (nondenaturing) elution of protein complexes obtained by affinity capture. The first approach involves the elution of complexes purified through a tag that includes a human rhinovirus 3C protease (PreScission protease) cleavage site sequence between the protein of interest and the tag. Incubation with the protease cleaves immobilized complexes from the affinity medium. The second approach involves the release of protein A-tagged protein complexes using a competitive elution reagent called PEGylOx. The degree of purity of the native assemblies eluted is sample dependent and strongly influenced by the affinity capture. It should be noted that the efficiency of native elution is commonly lower than that of elution by a denaturing agent (e.g., SDS) and the release of the complex will be limited by the activity of the protease or the inhibition constant (Ki) of the competitive release agent. However, an advantage of native release is that some nonspecifically bound materials tend to stay adsorbed to the affinity medium, providing an eluted fraction of higher purity. Finally, keep in mind that the presence of the protease or elution peptide could potentially affect downstream applications; thus, their removal should be considered. PMID:27371597

  10. Protein-protein binding affinities by pulse proteolysis: application to TEM-1/BLIP protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Melinda S; Ratcliff, Kathleen; Marqusee, Susan; Handel, Tracy M

    2010-10-01

    Efficient methods for quantifying dissociation constants have become increasingly important for high-throughput mutagenesis studies in the postgenomic era. However, experimentally determining binding affinity is often laborious, requires large amounts of purified protein, and utilizes specialized equipment. Recently, pulse proteolysis has been shown to be a robust and simple method to determine the dissociation constants for a protein-ligand pair based on the increase in thermodynamic stability upon ligand binding. Here, we extend this technique to determine binding affinities for a protein-protein complex involving the β-lactamase TEM-1 and various β-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP) mutants. Interaction with BLIP results in an increase in the denaturation curve midpoint, C(m), of TEM-1, which correlates with the rank order of binding affinities for several BLIP mutants. Hence, pulse proteolysis is a simple, effective method to assay for mutations that modulate binding affinity in protein-protein complexes. From a small set (n = 4) of TEM-1/BLIP mutant complexes, a linear relationship between energy of stabilization (dissociation constant) and ΔC(m) was observed. From this "calibration curve," accurate dissociation constants for two additional BLIP mutants were calculated directly from proteolysis-derived ΔC(m) values. Therefore, in addition to qualitative information, armed with knowledge of the dissociation constants from the WT protein and a limited number of mutants, accurate quantitation of binding affinities can be determined for additional mutants from pulse proteolysis. Minimal sample requirements and the suitability of impure protein preparations are important advantages that make pulse proteolysis a powerful tool for high-throughput mutagenesis binding studies. PMID:20669180

  11. Search for Amyloid-Binding Proteins by Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Miguel; Rostagno, Agueda; Ghiso, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    ‘Amyloid binging proteins’ is a generic term used to designate proteins that interact with different forms of amyloidogenic peptides or proteins and that, as a result, may modulate their physiological and pathological functions by altering solubility, transport, clearance, degradation, and fibril formation. We describe a simple affinity chromatography protocol to isolate and characterize amyloid-binding proteins based on the use of sequential elution steps that may provide further information on the type of binding interaction. As an example, we depict the application of this protocol to the study of Alzheimer’s amyloid β (Aβ) peptide-binding proteins derived from human plasma. Biochemical analysis of the proteins eluted under different conditions identified serum amyloid P component (SAP) and apolipoprotein J (clusterin) as the main plasma Aβ-binding proteins while various apolipoproteins (apoA-IV, apoE, and apoA-I), as well as albumin (HSA) and fibulin were identified as minor contributors. PMID:22528093

  12. Expression and affinity purification of recombinant proteins from plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Urvee A.; Sur, Gargi; Daunert, Sylvia; Babbitt, Ruth; Li, Qingshun

    2002-01-01

    With recent advances in plant biotechnology, transgenic plants have been targeted as an inexpensive means for the mass production of proteins for biopharmaceutical and industrial uses. However, the current plant purification techniques lack a generally applicable, economic, large-scale strategy. In this study, we demonstrate the purification of a model protein, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), by employing the protein calmodulin (CaM) as an affinity tag. In the proposed system, CaM is fused to GUS. In the presence of calcium, the calmodulin fusion protein binds specifically to a phenothiazine-modified surface of an affinity column. When calcium is removed with a complexing agent, e.g., EDTA, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change allowing the dissociation of the calmodulin-phenothiazine complex and, therefore, permitting the elution of the GUS-CaM fusion protein. The advantages of this approach are the fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the target protein under mild elution conditions, thus preserving the activity of the target protein. Two types of transformation methods were used in this study, namely, the Agrobacterium-mediated system and the viral-vector-mediated transformation system. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  13. Affinity-Driven Immobilization of Proteins to Hematite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zare-Eelanjegh, Elaheh; Bora, Debajeet K; Rupper, Patrick; Schrantz, Krisztina; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Richter, Michael; Faccio, Greta

    2016-08-10

    Functional nanoparticles are valuable materials for energy production, bioelectronics, and diagnostic devices. The combination of biomolecules with nanosized material produces a new hybrid material with properties that can exceed the ones of the single components. Hematite is a widely available material that has found application in various sectors such as in sensing and solar energy production. We report a single-step immobilization process based on affinity and achieved by genetically engineering the protein of interest to carry a hematite-binding peptide. Fabricated hematite nanoparticles were then investigated for the immobilization of the two biomolecules C-phycocyanin (CPC) and laccase from Bacillus pumilus (LACC) under mild conditions. Genetic engineering of biomolecules with a hematite-affinity peptide led to a higher extent of protein immobilization and enhanced the catalytic activity of the enzyme. PMID:27429157

  14. Desired Alteration of Protein Affinities: Competitive Selection of Protein Variants Using Yeast Signal Transduction Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Kaishima, Misato; Fukuda, Nobuo; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Molecules that can control protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have recently drawn attention as new drug pipeline compounds. Here, we report a technique to screen desirable affinity-altered (affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated) protein variants. We previously constructed a screening system based on a target protein fused to a mutated G-protein γ subunit (Gγcyto) lacking membrane localization ability. This ability, required for signal transmission, is restored by recruiting Gγcyto into the membrane only when the target protein interacts with an artificially membrane-anchored candidate protein, thereby allowing interacting partners (Gγ recruitment system) to be searched and identified. In the present study, the Gγ recruitment system was altered by integrating the cytosolic expression of a third protein as a competitor to set a desirable affinity threshold. This enabled the reliable selection of both affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated protein variants. The presented approach may facilitate the development of therapeutic proteins that allow the control of PPIs. PMID:25244640

  15. Affinity of cefoperazone for penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, N; Minami, S; Matsuhashi, M; Takaoka, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1980-01-01

    Cefoperazone (T-1551, CFP) a new semisynthetic cephalosporin, has a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. We investigated the affinity of CFP to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and the inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis by CFP. CFP had high affinities for Escherichia coli PBP-3, -1Bs, -2, and -1A, in descending order, and low affinities for PBP-4, -5, and -6. Similarly, CFP showed high affinity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP-3, -1A, -1B, -2, and -4, in descending order. It is known that E. coli PBP-3 and P. aeruginosa PBP-3 participate in cell division. These results are in good agreement with the formation of filamentous cells of E. coli and P. aeruginosa treated with CFP. CFP had lower inhibitory activities on D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA and IB of E. coli than that of penicillin G, but its inhibitory activities on the cross-link formation in peptidoglycan synthesis were the same as those of penicillin G and higher than those of ampicillin. Images PMID:6448021

  16. Kinetic analysis of drug-protein interactions by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cong; Beeram, Sandya; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2015-10-01

    Information on the kinetics of drug-protein interactions is of crucial importance in drug discovery and development. Several methods based on affinity chromatography have been developed in recent years to examine the association and dissociation rates of these processes. These techniques include band-broadening measurements, the peak decay method, peak fitting methods, the split-peak method, and free fraction analysis. This review will examine the general principles and applications of these approaches and discuss their use in the characterization, screening and analysis of drug-protein interactions in the body. PMID:26724332

  17. Structure-based protocol for identifying mutations that enhance protein-protein binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Sammond, Deanne W; Eletr, Ziad M; Purbeck, Carrie; Kimple, Randall J; Siderovski, David P; Kuhlman, Brian

    2007-08-31

    The ability to manipulate protein binding affinities is important for the development of proteins as biosensors, industrial reagents, and therapeutics. We have developed a structure-based method to rationally predict single mutations at protein-protein interfaces that enhance binding affinities. The protocol is based on the premise that increasing buried hydrophobic surface area and/or reducing buried hydrophilic surface area will generally lead to enhanced affinity if large steric clashes are not introduced and buried polar groups are not left without a hydrogen bond partner. The procedure selects affinity enhancing point mutations at the protein-protein interface using three criteria: (1) the mutation must be from a polar amino acid to a non-polar amino acid or from a non-polar amino acid to a larger non-polar amino acid, (2) the free energy of binding as calculated with the Rosetta protein modeling program should be more favorable than the free energy of binding calculated for the wild-type complex and (3) the mutation should not be predicted to significantly destabilize the monomers. The performance of the computational protocol was experimentally tested on two separate protein complexes; Galpha(i1) from the heterotrimeric G-protein system bound to the RGS14 GoLoco motif, and the E2, UbcH7, bound to the E3, E6AP from the ubiquitin pathway. Twelve single-site mutations that were predicted to be stabilizing were synthesized and characterized in the laboratory. Nine of the 12 mutations successfully increased binding affinity with five of these increasing binding by over 1.0 kcal/mol. To further assess our approach we searched the literature for point mutations that pass our criteria and have experimentally determined binding affinities. Of the eight mutations identified, five were accurately predicted to increase binding affinity, further validating the method as a useful tool to increase protein-protein binding affinities. PMID:17603074

  18. Engineered affinity proteins for tumour-targeting applications.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Ståhl, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Targeting of tumour-associated antigens is an expanding treatment modality in clinical oncology as an alternative to, or in combination with, conventional treatments, such as chemotherapy, external-radiation therapy and surgery. Targeting of antigens that are unique or more highly expressed in tumours than in normal tissues can be used to increase the specificity and reduce the cytotoxic effect on normal tissues. Several targeting agents have been studied for clinical use, where monoclonal antibodies have been the ones most widely used. More than 20 monoclonal antibodies are approved for therapy today and the largest field is oncology. Advances in genetic engineering and in vitro selection technology has enabled the feasible high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies, antibody derivatives [e.g. scFvs, Fab molecules, dAbs (single-domain antibodies), diabodies and minibodies] and more recently also non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins. Several of these affinity proteins have been investigated for both in vivo diagnostics and therapy. Affinity proteins in tumour-targeted therapy can affect tumour progression by altering signal transduction or by delivering a payload of toxin, drug or radionuclide. The ErbB receptor family has been extensively studied as biomarkers in tumour targeting, primarily for therapy using monoclonal antibodies. Two receptors in the ErbB family, EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and HER2 (epidermal growth factor receptor 2), are overexpressed in various malignancies and associated with poor patient prognosis and are therefore interesting targets for solid tumours. In the present review, strategies are described for tumour targeting of solid tumours using affinity proteins to deliver radionuclides, either for molecular imaging or radiotherapy. Antibodies, antibody derivatives and non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins are discussed with a certain focus on the affibody (Affibody) molecule. PMID:19341363

  19. Protein purification by aminosquarylium cyanine dye-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Graça, Vânia C; Sousa, Fani; Santos, Paulo F; Almeida, Paulo S

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography (AC) is one of the most important techniques for the separation and purification of biomolecules, being probably the most selective technique for protein purification. It is based on unique specific reversible interactions between the target molecule and a ligand. In this affinity interaction, the choice of the ligand is extremely important for the success of the purification protocol. The growing interest in AC has motivated an intense research effort toward the development of materials able to overcome the disadvantages of conventional natural ligands, namely their high cost and chemical and biological lability. In this context, synthetic dyes have emerged, in recent decades, as a promising alternative to biological ligands. Herein, detailed protocols for the assembling of a new chromatographic dye-ligand affinity support bearing an immobilized aminosquarylium cyanine dye on an agarose-based matrix (Sepharose CL-6B) and for the separation of a mixture o f three standard proteins: lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin, and trypsin are provided. PMID:25749942

  20. High-throughput analysis of protein-DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Franco-Zorrilla, José M; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions mediate most regulatory processes underlying gene expression, such as transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) or chromatin organization. Current knowledge about DNA-binding specificities of TFs is based mostly on low- to medium-throughput methodologies that are time-consuming and often fail to identify DNA motifs recognized by a TF with lower affinity but retaining biological relevance. The use of protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) offers a high-throughput alternative for the identification of protein-DNA specificities. PBM consists in an array of pseudorandomized DNA sequences that are optimized to include all the possible 10- or 11-mer DNA sequences, allowing the determination of binding specificities of most eukaryotic TFs. PBMs that can be synthesized by several manufacturing companies as single-stranded DNA are converted into double-stranded in a simple primer extension reaction. The protein of interest fused to an epitope tag is then incubated onto the PBM, and specific DNA-protein complexes are revealed in a series of immunological reactions coupled to a fluorophore. After scanning and quantifying PBMs, specific DNA motifs recognized by the protein are identified with ready-to-use scripts, generating comprehensive but accessible information about the DNA-binding specificity of the protein. This chapter describes detailed procedures for preparation of double-stranded PBMs, incubation with recombinant protein, and detection of protein-DNA complexes. Finally, we outline some cues for evaluating the biological role of DNA motifs obtained in vitro. PMID:24057393

  1. Identification of protein interacting partners using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dalan; Urena, Luis; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2012-01-01

    A critical and often limiting step in understanding the function of host and viral proteins is the identification of interacting cellular or viral protein partners. There are many approaches that allow the identification of interacting partners, including the yeast two hybrid system, as well as pull down assays using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins followed by mass spectrometry identification(1). Recent studies have highlighted the utility of double-affinity tag mediated purification, coupled with two specific elution steps in the identification of interacting proteins. This approach, termed Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP), was initially used in yeast(2,3) but more recently has been adapted to use in mammalian cells(4-8). As proof-of-concept we have established a tandem affinity purification (TAP) method using the well-characterized eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E(9,10).The cellular translation factor eIF4E is a critical component of the cellular eIF4F complex involved in cap-dependent translation initiation(10). The TAP tag used in the current study is composed of two Protein G units and a streptavidin binding peptide separated by a Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease cleavage sequence. The TAP tag used in the current study is composed of two Protein G units and a streptavidin binding peptide separated by a Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease cleavage sequence(8). To forgo the need for the generation of clonal cell lines, we developed a rapid system that relies on the expression of the TAP-tagged bait protein from an episomally maintained plasmid based on pMEP4 (Invitrogen). Expression of tagged murine eIF4E from this plasmid was controlled using the cadmium chloride inducible metallothionein promoter. Lysis of the expressing cells and subsequent affinity purification via binding to rabbit IgG agarose, TEV protease cleavage, binding to streptavidin linked agarose and subsequent biotin elution identified numerous

  2. Displacement affinity chromatography of protein phosphatase one (PP1) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moorhead, Greg BG; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Nimick, Mhairi; De Wever, Veerle; Campbell, David G; Gourlay, Robert; Lam, Yun Wah; Lamond, Angus I

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase one (PP1) is a ubiquitously expressed, highly conserved protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates target protein serine and threonine residues. PP1 is localized to its site of action by interacting with targeting or regulatory proteins, a majority of which contains a primary docking site referred to as the RVXF/W motif. Results We demonstrate that a peptide based on the RVXF/W motif can effectively displace PP1 bound proteins from PP1 retained on the phosphatase affinity matrix microcystin-Sepharose. Subsequent co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that each identified binding protein was either a direct PP1 interactor or was in a complex that contains PP1. Our results have linked PP1 to numerous new nuclear functions and proteins, including Ki-67, Rif-1, topoisomerase IIα, several nuclear helicases, NUP153 and the TRRAP complex. Conclusion This modification of the microcystin-Sepharose technique offers an effective means of purifying novel PP1 regulatory subunits and associated proteins and provides a simple method to uncover a link between PP1 and additional cellular processes. PMID:19000314

  3. Tuning the Protein Corona of Hydrogel Nanoparticles: The Synthesis of Abiotic Protein and Peptide Affinity Reagents.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Shea, Kenneth J

    2016-06-21

    Nanomaterials, when introduced into a complex, protein-rich environment, rapidly acquire a protein corona. The type and amount of proteins that constitute the corona depend significantly on the synthetic identity of the nanomaterial. For example, hydrogel nanoparticles (NPs) such as poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPAm) have little affinity for plasma proteins; in contrast, carboxylated poly(styrene) NPs acquire a dense protein corona. This range of protein adsorption suggests that the protein corona might be "tuned" by controlling the chemical composition of the NP. In this Account, we demonstrate that small libraries of synthetic polymer NPs incorporating a diverse pool of functional monomers can be screened for candidates with high affinity and selectivity to targeted biomacromolecules. Through directed synthetic evolution of NP compositions, one can tailor the protein corona to create synthetic organic hydrogel polymer NPs with high affinity and specificity to peptide toxins, enzymes, and other functional proteins, as well as to specific domains of large proteins. In addition, many NIPAm NPs undergo a change in morphology as a function of temperature. This transformation often correlates with a significant change in NP-biomacromolecule affinity, resulting in a temperature-dependent protein corona. This temperature dependence has been used to develop NP hydrogels with autonomous affinity switching for the protection of proteins from thermal stress and as a method of biomacromolecule purification through a selective thermally induced catch and release. In addition to temperature, changes in pH or buffer can also alter a NP protein corona composition, a property that has been exploited for protein purification. Finally, synthetic polymer nanoparticles with low nanomolar affinity for a peptide toxin were shown to capture and neutralize the toxin in the bloodstream of living mice. While the development of synthetic polymer alternatives to protein affinity reagents is

  4. Challenges and recent advances in affinity purification of tag-free proteins.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dongli; Chen, Zhilei

    2014-07-01

    There is currently no generic, simple, lowcost method for affinity chromatographic purification of proteins in which the purified product is free of appended tags. Existing approaches for the purification of tagless proteins fall into two broad categories: (1) direct affinity-based capture of tag-free proteins that utilize affinity ligands specific to the target protein or class of target protein, and (2) removal of an appended affinity tag following tag-mediated protein capture. This paper reviews current state-of-the-art approaches for tagless protein purification in both categories, including specific examples of affinity ligands used for the capture of different classes of proteins and cleavage systems for affinity tag removal following chromatographic capture. A particular focus of this review is on recent developments in affinity tag removal systems utilizing split inteins. PMID:24658742

  5. Interplay between binding affinity and kinetics in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huaiqing; Huang, Yongqi; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-07-01

    To clarify the interplay between the binding affinity and kinetics of protein-protein interactions, and the possible role of intrinsically disordered proteins in such interactions, molecular simulations were carried out on 20 protein complexes. With bias potential and reweighting techniques, the free energy profiles were obtained under physiological affinities, which showed that the bound-state valley is deep with a barrier height of 12 - 33 RT. From the dependence of the affinity on interface interactions, the entropic contribution to the binding affinity is approximated to be proportional to the interface area. The extracted dissociation rates based on the Arrhenius law correlate reasonably well with the experimental values (Pearson correlation coefficient R = 0.79). For each protein complex, a linear free energy relationship between binding affinity and the dissociation rate was confirmed, but the distribution of the slopes for intrinsically disordered proteins showed no essential difference with that observed for ordered proteins. A comparison with protein folding was also performed. Proteins 2016; 84:920-933. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018856

  6. Cell-Binding Assays for Determining the Affinity of Protein-Protein Interactions: Technologies and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S A; Cochran, J R

    2016-01-01

    Determining the equilibrium-binding affinity (Kd) of two interacting proteins is essential not only for the biochemical study of protein signaling and function but also for the engineering of improved protein and enzyme variants. One common technique for measuring protein-binding affinities uses flow cytometry to analyze ligand binding to proteins presented on the surface of a cell. However, cell-binding assays require specific considerations to accurately quantify the binding affinity of a protein-protein interaction. Here we will cover the basic assumptions in designing a cell-based binding assay, including the relevant equations and theory behind determining binding affinities. Further, two major considerations in measuring binding affinities-time to equilibrium and ligand depletion-will be discussed. As these conditions have the potential to greatly alter the Kd, methods through which to avoid or minimize them will be provided. We then outline detailed protocols for performing direct- and competitive-binding assays against proteins displayed on the surface of yeast or mammalian cells that can be used to derive accurate Kd values. Finally, a comparison of cell-based binding assays to other types of binding assays will be presented. PMID:27586327

  7. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  8. A designed repeat protein as an affinity capture reagent.

    PubMed

    Speltz, Elizabeth B; Brown, Rebecca S H; Hajare, Holly S; Schlieker, Christian; Regan, Lynne

    2015-10-01

    Repeat proteins are an attractive target for protein engineering and design. We have focused our attention on the design and engineering of one particular class: tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins. In previous work, we have shown that the structure and stability of TPR proteins can be manipulated in a rational fashion [Cortajarena (2011) Prot. Sci. 20: , 1042-1047; Main (2003) Structure 11: , 497-508]. Building on those studies, we have designed and characterized a number of different peptide-binding TPR modules and we have also assembled these modules into supramolecular arrays [Cortajarena (2009) ACS Chem. Biol. 5: , 545-552; Cortajarena (2008) ACS Chem. Biol. 3: , 161-166; Jackrel (2009) Prot. Sci. 18: , 762-774; Kajander (2007) Acta Crystallogr. D Biol. Crystallogr. 63: , 800-811]. Here we focus on the development of one such TPR-peptide interaction for a practical application, affinity purification. We illustrate the general utility of our designed protein interaction. Furthermore, this example highlights how basic research on protein-peptide interactions can lead to the development of novel reagents with important practical applications. PMID:26517897

  9. Confirmation of a Protein-Protein Interaction in the Pantothenate Biosynthetic Pathway by Using Sortase-Mediated Labelling.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Philip M; Balmforth, Matthew R; Ness, Samuel W; Williamson, Daniel J; Rugen, Michael D; Turnbull, W Bruce; Webb, Michael E

    2016-04-15

    High-throughput studies have been widely used to identify protein-protein interactions; however, few of these candidate interactions have been confirmed in vitro. We have used a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence anisotropy to screen candidate interactions within the pantothenate biosynthetic pathway. In particular, we observed no interaction between the next enzyme in the pathway, pantothenate synthetase (PS), and aspartate decarboxylase, but did observe an interaction between PS and the putative Nudix hydrolase, YfcD. Confirmation of the interaction by fluorescence anisotropy was dependent upon labelling an adventitiously formed glycine on the protein N-terminal affinity purification tag by using Sortase. Subsequent formation of the protein-protein complex led to apparent restriction of the dynamics of this tag, thus suggesting that this approach could be generally applied to a subset of other protein-protein interaction complexes. PMID:26818742

  10. Profiling of Protein Interaction Networks of Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Kaake, Robyn M.; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important for nearly all biological processes, and it is known that aberrant protein-protein interactions can lead to human disease and cancer. Recent evidence has suggested that protein interaction interfaces describe a new class of attractive targets for drug development. Full characterization of protein interaction networks of protein complexes and their dynamics in response to various cellular cues will provide essential information for us to understand how protein complexes work together in cells to maintain cell viability and normal homeostasis. Affinity purification coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry has become the primary method for studying in vivo protein interactions of protein complexes and whole organism proteomes. Recent developments in sample preparation and affinity purification strategies allow the capture, identification, and quantification of protein interactions of protein complexes that are stable, dynamic, transient, and/or weak. Current efforts have mainly focused on generating reliable, reproducible, and high confidence protein interaction data sets for functional characterization. The availability of increasing amounts of information on protein interactions in eukaryotic systems and new bioinformatics tools allow functional analysis of quantitative protein interaction data to unravel the biological significance of the identified protein interactions. Existing studies in this area have laid a solid foundation toward generating a complete map of in vivo protein interaction networks of protein complexes in cells or tissues. PMID:20445003

  11. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process. PMID:27438863

  12. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  13. Affinity proteomics to study endogenous protein complexes: Pointers, pitfalls, preferences and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Molloy, Kelly R.; Taylor, Martin S.; Domanski, Michal; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting and studying cellular systems requires the ability to specifically isolate distinct proteins along with the co-assembled constituents of their associated complexes. Affinity capture techniques leverage high affinity, high specificity reagents to target and capture proteins of interest along with specifically associated proteins from cell extracts. Affinity capture coupled to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analyses has enabled the isolation and characterization of a wide range of endogenous protein complexes. Here, we outline effective procedures for the affinity capture of protein complexes, highlighting best practices and common pitfalls. PMID:25757543

  14. Predicting direct protein interactions from affinity purification mass spectrometry data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry identification (AP-MS) is an increasingly popular approach to observe protein-protein interactions (PPI) in vivo. One drawback of AP-MS, however, is that it is prone to detecting indirect interactions mixed with direct physical interactions. Therefore, the ability to distinguish direct interactions from indirect ones is of much interest. Results We first propose a simple probabilistic model for the interactions captured by AP-MS experiments, under which the problem of separating direct interactions from indirect ones is formulated. Then, given idealized quantitative AP-MS data, we study the problem of identifying the most likely set of direct interactions that produced the observed data. We address this challenging graph theoretical problem by first characterizing signatures that can identify weakly connected nodes as well as dense regions of the network. The rest of the direct PPI network is then inferred using a genetic algorithm. Our algorithm shows good performance on both simulated and biological networks with very high sensitivity and specificity. Then the algorithm is used to predict direct interactions from a set of AP-MS PPI data from yeast, and its performance is measured against a high-quality interaction dataset. Conclusions As the sensitivity of AP-MS pipeline improves, the fraction of indirect interactions detected will also increase, thereby making the ability to distinguish them even more desirable. Despite the simplicity of our model for indirect interactions, our method provides a good performance on the test networks. PMID:21034440

  15. Ethanol increases affinity of protein kinase C for phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C is a calcium-dependent enzyme that requires phospholipid for its activation. It is present in relatively high concentration in the brain and may be involved in neuronal function. The present experiments test whether the membrane disorder induced by ethanol affects the activity of kinase C by changing its interaction with membrane lipid. Fractions rich in kinase C were purified from rat brain cytosol by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Enzyme activity was assayed by measuring the phosphorylation of histone H1. As expected, phosphatidylserine activated the enzyme, and the stimulation was further increased by the addition of calcium and/or diacylglycerol. At low concentration of free calcium (0.5-1..mu..M), ethanol (800 mM0 enhanced kinase C activity if the presence of phospholipid. similar results were observed in the absence of calcium. Double reciprocal plots of the data showed that ethanol increased the affinity of the enzyme for phosphatidylserine without affecting the V/sub max. The stimulation of kinase C activity by ethanol was not observed at high calcium concentrations. These experiments suggest that ethanol may activated protein kinase C at physiological levels of calcium by facilitating its transfer into the hydrophobic membrane environment.

  16. Predicting the Impact of Missense Mutations on Protein-Protein Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil; Panchenko, Anna R

    2014-04-01

    The crucial prerequisite for proper biological function is the protein's ability to establish highly selective interactions with macromolecular partners. A missense mutation that alters the protein binding affinity may cause significant perturbations or complete abolishment of the function, potentially leading to diseases. The availability of computational methods to evaluate the impact of mutations on protein-protein binding is critical for a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report an efficient computational approach for predicting the effect of single and multiple missense mutations on protein-protein binding affinity. It is based on a well-tested simulation protocol for structure minimization, modified MM-PBSA and statistical scoring energy functions with parameters optimized on experimental sets of several thousands of mutations. Our simulation protocol yields very good agreement between predicted and experimental values with Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.69 and 0.63 and root-mean-square errors of 1.20 and 1.90 kcal mol(-1) for single and multiple mutations, respectively. Compared with other available methods, our approach achieves high speed and prediction accuracy and can be applied to large datasets generated by modern genomics initiatives. In addition, we report a crucial role of water model and the polar solvation energy in estimating the changes in binding affinity. Our analysis also reveals that prediction accuracy and effect of mutations on binding strongly depends on the type of mutation and its location in a protein complex. PMID:24803870

  17. Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography on Co2+-carboxymethylaspartate-agarose Superflow, as demonstrated by one-step purification of lactate dehydrogenase from chicken breast muscle.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G; Hopp, J; Nelson, P

    1999-02-01

    A rapid method for the purification of lactate dehydrogenase from whole chicken muscle extract in one chromatographic step is reported. The purification procedure can be accomplished in less than 1 h. A new type of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography adsorbent is used that can be utilized at linear flow rates higher than 5 cm/min. The final preparation of the enzyme was with purity higher than 95% as ascertained by SDS-PAGE. Three immobilized metal ions (Ni2+, Zn2+ and Co2+) were compared for their binding properties towards the purified enzyme. The binding site of the enzyme for immobilized intermediate metal ions was determined after cleavage with CNBr and binding studies of the derivative peptides on immobilized Co2+. A peptide located on the N-terminus of the enzyme, implicated in the binding, has great potential as a purification tag in fusion proteins. PMID:9889081

  18. Characterizing informative sequence descriptors and predicting binding affinities of heterodimeric protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are involved in various biological processes, and underlying mechanism of the interactions plays a crucial role in therapeutics and protein engineering. Most machine learning approaches have been developed for predicting the binding affinity of protein-protein complexes based on structure and functional information. This work aims to predict the binding affinity of heterodimeric protein complexes from sequences only. Results This work proposes a support vector machine (SVM) based binding affinity classifier, called SVM-BAC, to classify heterodimeric protein complexes based on the prediction of their binding affinity. SVM-BAC identified 14 of 580 sequence descriptors (physicochemical, energetic and conformational properties of the 20 amino acids) to classify 216 heterodimeric protein complexes into low and high binding affinity. SVM-BAC yielded the training accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, AUC and test accuracy of 85.80%, 0.89, 0.83, 0.86 and 83.33%, respectively, better than existing machine learning algorithms. The 14 features and support vector regression were further used to estimate the binding affinities (Pkd) of 200 heterodimeric protein complexes. Prediction performance of a Jackknife test was the correlation coefficient of 0.34 and mean absolute error of 1.4. We further analyze three informative physicochemical properties according to their contribution to prediction performance. Results reveal that the following properties are effective in predicting the binding affinity of heterodimeric protein complexes: apparent partition energy based on buried molar fractions, relations between chemical structure and biological activity in principal component analysis IV, and normalized frequency of beta turn. Conclusions The proposed sequence-based prediction method SVM-BAC uses an optimal feature selection method to identify 14 informative features to classify and predict binding affinity of heterodimeric protein

  19. Development of the affinity materials for phosphorylated proteins/peptides enrichment in phosphoproteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Lv, Nan; Bi, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Ni, Jia-Zuan

    2015-04-29

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a key event in numerous biological processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) is the most powerful analysis tool in modern phosphoproteomics. However, the direct MS analysis of phosphorylated proteins/peptides is still a big challenge because of the low abundance and insufficient ionization of phosphorylated proteins/peptides as well as the suppression effects of nontargets. Enrichment of phosphorylated proteins/peptides by affinity materials from complex biosamples is the most widely used strategy to enhance the MS detection. The demand of efficiently enriching phosphorylated proteins/peptides has spawned diverse affinity materials based on different enrichment principles (e.g., electronic attraction, chelating). In this review, we summarize the recent development of various affinity materials for phosphorylated proteins/peptides enrichment. We will highlight the design and fabrication of these affinity materials, discuss the enrichment mechanisms involved in different affinity materials, and suggest the future challenges and research directions in this field. PMID:25845677

  20. The tandem affinity purification method: an efficient system for protein complex purification and protein interaction identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Song, Yuan; Li, Yuhua; Chang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Hua; An, Lizhe

    2010-08-01

    Isolation and identification of protein partners in multi-protein complexes are important in gaining further insights into the cellular roles of proteins and determining the possible mechanisms by which proteins have an effect in the molecular environment. The tandem affinity purification (TAP) method was originally developed in yeast for the purification of protein complexes and identification of protein-protein interactions. With modifications to this method and many variations in the original tag made over the past few years, the TAP system could be applied in mammalian, plant, bacteria and other systems for protein complex analysis. In this review, we describe the application of the TAP method in various organisms, the modification in the tag, the disadvantages, the developments and the future prospects of the TAP method. PMID:20399864

  1. Tandem Affinity Purification Combined with Mass Spectrometry to Identify Components of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Peter; Meierhofer, David; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Lan

    2011-01-01

    Most biological processes are governed by multiprotein complexes rather than individual proteins. Identification of protein complexes therefore is becoming increasingly important to gain a molecular understanding of cells and organisms. Mass spectrometry–based proteomics combined with affinity-tag-based protein purification is one of the most effective strategies to isolate and identify protein complexes. The development of tandem-affinity purification approaches has revolutionized proteomics experiments. These two-step affinity purification strategies allow rapid, effective purification of protein complexes and, at the same time, minimize background. Identification of even very low-abundant protein complexes with modern sensitive mass spectrometers has become routine. Here, we describe two general strategies for tandem-affinity purification followed by mass spectrometric identification of protein complexes. PMID:18370112

  2. A novel protein complex identification algorithm based on Connected Affinity Clique Extension (CACE).

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; He, Tingting; Hu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Junmin; Shen, Xianjun; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Yan

    2014-06-01

    A novel algorithm based on Connected Affinity Clique Extension (CACE) for mining overlapping functional modules in protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. In this approach, the value of protein connected affinity which is inferred from protein complexes is interpreted as the reliability and possibility of interaction. The protein interaction network is constructed as a weighted graph, and the weight is dependent on the connected affinity coefficient. The experimental results of our CACE in two test data sets show that the CACE can detect the functional modules much more effectively and accurately when compared with other state-of-art algorithms CPM and IPC-MCE. PMID:24803142

  3. Protein-protein interaction studies based on molecular aptamers by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Ching; Cao, Zehui; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Tan, Weihong

    2004-12-01

    Protein-DNA/protein-protein interactions play critical roles in many biological processes. We report here the investigation of protein-protein interactions using molecular aptamers with affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE). A human alpha-thrombin binding aptamer was labeled with 6-carboxyfluorescein and exploited as a selective fluorescent probe for studying thrombin-protein interactions using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence. A 15-mer binding DNA aptamer can be separated into two peaks in CE that correspond to the linear aptamer (L-Apt) and the thrombin-binding G-quadruplex structure in the presence of K(+) or Ba(2+). In a bare capillary, the peak area of G-quadruplex aptamer (G-Apt) was found to decrease with the addition of thrombin while that of L-Apt remained unchanged. Even though the peak of the G-Apt/thrombin binding complex is broad due to a weaker binding affinity between aptamer and thrombin, we were still able to quantify the thrombin and anti-thrombin proteins (human anti-thrombin III, AT III) based on the peak areas of free G-Apt. The detection limits of thrombin and AT III were 9.8 and 2.1 nM, respectively. The aptamer-based competitive ACE assay has also been applied to quantify thrombin-anti-thrombin III interaction and to monitor this reaction in real time. The addition of poly(ethylene glycol) to the sample matrix stabilized the complex of the G-Aptthrombin. This assay can be used to study the interactions between thrombin and proteins that do not disrupt G-Apt binding property at Exosit I site of the thrombin. Our aptamer-based ACE assay can be an effective approach for studying protein-protein interactions and for analyzing binding site and binding constant information in protein-protein and protein-DNA interaction studies. PMID:15571349

  4. Dual-tagging system for the affinity purification of mammalian protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; McDonald, W Hayes; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Huang, Ying; Wu, Jun; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2007-01-01

    Although affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) provides a powerful tool to study protein-protein interactions, this strategy has encountered numerous difficulties when adapted to mammalian cells. Here we describe a Gateway{reg_sign}-compatible dual-tag affinity purification system that integrates regulatable expression, tetracysteine motifs, and various combinations of affinity tags to facilitate the cloning, detection, and purification of bait proteins and their interacting partners. Utilizing the human telomere binding protein TRF2 as a benchmark, we demonstrate bait protein recoveries upwards of approximately 16% from as little as 1-7 x 10{sup 7} cells and successfully identify known TRF2 interacting proteins, suggesting that our dual-tag affinity purification approach is a capable new tool for expanding the capacity to explore mammalian proteomic networks.

  5. Protein-Polyelectrolyte Coacervation: Morphology Diagram, Binding Affinity, and Protein Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, David; Du, Xiaosong; Dubin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    For aqueous mixtures of negatively charged polysaccharide, hyaluronic acid (HA), and globular protein, either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a pH-ionic strength (I) morphology diagram, with regions of homogeneous solution, soluble complex, coacervation, precipitation, and redissolution, was developed by pH titrations performed at fixed I. The systems are models for coacervation, or liquid-liquid phase separation, between flexible and compact solutes of opposite charge. Protein charge here is tuned by pH, and titration keeps the mixtures close to equilibrium. At high I, only homogeneous solution is observed, as true at high and low pH. Diagrams for the proteins differ because HA affinity for BSA is higher than for BLG, traced to BSA's greater charge patchiness and higher net charge; isothermal solution titration calorimetry finds a factor of two difference in binding energy. Dependences of transition pH on protein charge Z and solution I offer additional insights into interactions underlying morphology transitions. At optimal conditions, the affinity disparity is sufficient to achieve highly selective BSA coacervation in a 1:1 protein mixture, suggesting coacervation to separate similar proteins under mild, non-denaturing conditions. Funding: NSF CBET-1133289, NSF (UMass MRSEC).

  6. Mathematical model accurately predicts protein release from an affinity-based delivery system.

    PubMed

    Vulic, Katarina; Pakulska, Malgosia M; Sonthalia, Rohit; Ramachandran, Arun; Shoichet, Molly S

    2015-01-10

    Affinity-based controlled release modulates the delivery of protein or small molecule therapeutics through transient dissociation/association. To understand which parameters can be used to tune release, we used a mathematical model based on simple binding kinetics. A comprehensive asymptotic analysis revealed three characteristic regimes for therapeutic release from affinity-based systems. These regimes can be controlled by diffusion or unbinding kinetics, and can exhibit release over either a single stage or two stages. This analysis fundamentally changes the way we think of controlling release from affinity-based systems and thereby explains some of the discrepancies in the literature on which parameters influence affinity-based release. The rate of protein release from affinity-based systems is determined by the balance of diffusion of the therapeutic agent through the hydrogel and the dissociation kinetics of the affinity pair. Equations for tuning protein release rate by altering the strength (KD) of the affinity interaction, the concentration of binding ligand in the system, the rate of dissociation (koff) of the complex, and the hydrogel size and geometry, are provided. We validated our model by collapsing the model simulations and the experimental data from a recently described affinity release system, to a single master curve. Importantly, this mathematical analysis can be applied to any single species affinity-based system to determine the parameters required for a desired release profile. PMID:25449806

  7. Preparation of λN-GST fusion protein for affinity immobilization of RNA.

    PubMed

    Di Tomasso, Geneviève; Lampron, Philipe; Omichinski, James G; Legault, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Affinity purification of in vitro transcribed RNA is becoming an attractive alternative to purification using standard denaturing gel electrophoresis. Affinity purification is particularly advantageous because it can be performed in a few hours under non-denaturing conditions. However, the performance of affinity purification methods can vary tremendously depending on the RNA immobilization matrix. It was previously shown that RNA immobilization via an optimized λN-GST fusion protein bound to glutathione-Sepharose resin allows affinity purification of RNA with very high purity and yield. This Chapter outlines the experimental procedure employed to prepare the λN-GST fusion protein used for RNA immobilization in successful affinity purifications of RNA. It describes the details of protein expression and purification as well as routine quality control analyses. PMID:23065558

  8. Affinity-based thermoresponsive precipitation of proteins modified with polymer-binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Seigo; Sawada, Toshiki; Ishizone, Takashi; Serizawa, Takeshi

    2016-04-14

    A 12-mer peptide with an affinity for the meso diad sequence of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) was identified through affinity-based peptide screening. A model protein (i.e., human serum albumin (HSA)) chemically modified with the peptide was successfully precipitated with PNIPAM above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAM. PMID:26996430

  9. High affinity immobilization of proteins using biotin- and GST-based coupling strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hutsell, Stephanie Q.; Kimple, Randall J.; Siderovski, David P.; Willard, Francis S.; Kimple, Adam J.

    2011-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a highly sensitive method for the detection of molecular interactions. One interacting partner is immobilized on the sensor chip surface while the other is injected across the sensor surface. This chapter focuses on high affinity immobilization of protein substrates for affinity and kinetic analyses using biotin/streptavidin interaction and GST/anti-GST-antibody interaction. PMID:20217614

  10. High-affinity immobilization of proteins using biotin- and GST-based coupling strategies.

    PubMed

    Hutsell, Stephanie Q; Kimple, Randall J; Siderovski, David P; Willard, Francis S; Kimple, Adam J

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a highly sensitive method for the detection of molecular interactions. One interacting partner is immobilized on the sensor chip surface while the other is injected across the sensor surface. This chapter focuses on high-affinity immobilization of protein substrates for affinity and kinetic analyses using biotin/streptavidin interaction and GST/anti-GST-antibody interaction. PMID:20217614

  11. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  12. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  13. Computational protein design suggests that human PCNA-partner interactions are not optimized for affinity.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Yearit; Gur, Eyal; Fleishman, Sarel J; Aharoni, Amir

    2013-02-01

    Increasing the affinity of binding proteins is invaluable for basic and applied biological research. Currently, directed protein evolution experiments are the main approach for generating such proteins through the construction and screening of large mutant libraries. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential hub protein that interacts with many different partners to tightly regulate DNA replication and repair in all eukaryotes. Here, we used computational design to generate human PCNA mutants with enhanced affinity for several different partners. We identified double mutations in PCNA, outside the main partner binding site, that were predicted to increase PCNA-partner binding affinities compared to the wild-type protein by forming additional hydrophobic interactions with conserved residues in the PCNA partners. Affinity increases were experimentally validated with four different PCNA partners, demonstrating that computational design can reveal unexpected regions where affinity enhancements in natural systems are possible. The designed PCNA mutants can be used as a valuable tool for further examination of the regulation of PCNA-partner interactions during DNA replication and repair both in vitro and in vivo. More broadly, the ability to engineer affinity increases toward several PCNA partners suggests that interaction affinity is not an evolutionarily optimized trait of this system. PMID:23011891

  14. Baculovirus display for discovery of low-affinity extracellular receptor-ligand interactions using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tom, Irene; Estevez, Alberto; Bowman, Krista; Gonzalez, Lino C

    2015-06-15

    When used in conjunction with multivalent protein probes, protein microarrays offer a robust technology for discovery of low-affinity extracellular protein-protein interactions. Probes for receptor-matching screens generally consist of purified extracellular domains fused to affinity tags. Given that approximately two-thirds of extracellular proteins are transmembrane domain-containing proteins, it would be desirable to develop a system to express and display probe receptors in a native-like membrane environment. Toward this end, we evaluated baculovirus display as a platform for generating multivalent probes for protein microarray screens. Virion particles were generated displaying single-transmembrane domain receptors BTLA, CD200, and EFNB2, representing a range of affinities for their interacting partners. Virions directly labeled with Cy5 fluorophore were screened against a microarray containing more than 600 extracellular proteins, and the results were compared with data derived from soluble Fc protein or probe-coated protein A microbeads. An optimized protocol employing a blocking step with a nonrelated probe-expressing control baculovirus allowed identification of the expected interactions with a signal-to-noise ratio similar to or higher than those obtained with the other formats. Our results demonstrate that baculovirus display is suitable for detection of high- and low-affinity extracellular protein-protein interactions on protein microarrays. This platform eliminates the need for protein purification and provides a native-like lipid environment for membrane-associated receptors. PMID:25797350

  15. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for designing-using the software suite Rosetta-proteins that bind a small molecule of choice and engineering, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput yeast surface display, high affinity and ligand selectivity. We illustrated the utility of this approach by performing the design of a selective digoxigenin (DIG)-binding protein that, after affinity maturation, binds DIG with picomolar affinity and high selectivity over structurally related steroids. PMID:27094290

  16. Affitins as robust tailored reagents for affinity chromatography purification of antibodies and non-immunoglobulin proteins.

    PubMed

    Béhar, Ghislaine; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Affinity chromatography is a convenient way of purifying proteins, as a high degree of purity can be reached in one step. The use of tags has greatly contributed to the popularity of this technique. However, the addition of tags may not be desirable or possible for the production of biopharmaceuticals. There is thus a need for tailored artificial affinity ligands. We have developed the use of archaeal extremophilic proteins as scaffolds to generate affinity proteins (Affitins). Here, we explored the potential of Affitins as ligand to design affinity columns. Affitins specific for human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), bacterial PulD protein, and chicken egg lysozyme were immobilized on an agarose matrix. The columns obtained were functional and highly selective for their cognate target, even in the presence of exogenous proteins as found in cell culture media, ascites and bacterial lysates, which result in a high degree of purity (∼95%) and recovery (∼100%) in a single step. Anti-hIgG Affitin columns withstand repetitive cycles of purification and cleaning-in-place treatments with 0.25 M NaOH as well as Protein A does. High levels of Affitin productions in Escherichia coli makes it possible to produce these affinity columns at low cost. Our results validate Affitins as a new class of tailored ligands for the affinity chromatography purification of potentially any proteins of interest including biopharmaceuticals. PMID:26952369

  17. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold. PMID:24862193

  18. Affinity purification and mass spectrometry: an attractive choice to investigate protein-protein interactions in plant immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Affinity purification of protein complexes from biological tissues, followed by liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry (AP-MS/MS), has ballooned in recent years due to sizeable increases in nucleic acid sequence data essential for interpreting mass spectra, improvements in affinity purifica...

  19. ELISA-mimic screen for synthetic polymer nanoparticles with high affinity to target proteins.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Hoshino, Yu; Shea, Kenneth J

    2012-09-10

    Synthetic polymer nanoparticles (NPs) that display high affinity to protein targets have significant potential for medical and biotechnological applications as protein capture agents or functional replacements of antibodies ("plastic antibodies"). In this study, we modified an immunological assay (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: ELISA) into a high-throughput screening method to select nanoparticles with high affinity to target proteins. Histone and fibrinogen were chosen as target proteins to demonstrate this concept. The selection process utilized a biotinylated NP library constructed with combinations of functional monomers. The screen identified NPs with distinctive functional group compositions that exhibited high affinity to either histone or fibrinogen. The variation of protein affinity with changes in the nature and amount of functional groups in the NP provided chemical insight into the principle determinants of protein-NP binding. The NP affinity was semiquantified using the ELISA-mimic assay by varying the NP concentrations. The screening results were found to correlate with solution-based assay results. This screening system utilizing a biotinylated NP is a general approach to optimize functional monomer compositions and can be used to rapidly search for synthetic polymers with high (or low) affinity for target biological macromolecules. PMID:22813352

  20. Optimizing Scoring Function of Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions with Both Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid (protein-DNA and protein-RNA) recognition is fundamental to the regulation of gene expression. Determination of the structures of the protein-nucleic acid recognition and insight into their interactions at molecular level are vital to understanding the regulation function. Recently, quantitative computational approach has been becoming an alternative of experimental technique for predicting the structures and interactions of biomolecular recognition. However, the progress of protein-nucleic acid structure prediction, especially protein-RNA, is far behind that of the protein-ligand and protein-protein structure predictions due to the lack of reliable and accurate scoring function for quantifying the protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this work, we developed an accurate scoring function (named as SPA-PN, SPecificity and Affinity of the Protein-Nucleic acid interactions) for protein-nucleic acid interactions by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. Specificity and affinity are two requirements of highly efficient and specific biomolecular recognition. Previous quantitative descriptions of the biomolecular interactions considered the affinity, but often ignored the specificity owing to the challenge of specificity quantification. We applied our concept of intrinsic specificity to connect the conventional specificity, which circumvents the challenge of specificity quantification. In addition to the affinity optimization, we incorporated the quantified intrinsic specificity into the optimization strategy of SPA-PN. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions validated that SPA-PN performs well on both the prediction of binding affinity and identification of native conformation. In terms of its performance, SPA-PN can be widely used to predict the protein-nucleic acid structures and quantify their interactions. PMID:24098651

  1. Purification of proteins containing zinc finger domains using Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Voráčková, Irena; Suchanová, Šárka; Ulbrich, Pavel; Diehl, William E.; Ruml, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Heterologous proteins are frequently purified by Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography (IMAC) based on their modification with a hexa-histidine affinity tag (His-tag). The terminal His-tag can, however, alter functional properties of the tagged protein. Numerous strategies for the tag removal have been developed including chemical treatment and insertion of protease target sequences in the protein sequence. Instead of using these approaches, we took an advantage of natural interaction of zinc finger domains with metal ions to purify functionally similar retroviral proteins from two different retroviruses. We found that these proteins exhibited significantly different affinities to the immobilized metal ions, despite that both contain the same type of zinc finger motif (i.e. CCHC). While zinc finger proteins may differ in biochemical properties, the multitude of IMAC platforms should allow relatively simple yet specific method for their isolation in native state. PMID:21600288

  2. Consequences of inducing intrinsic disorder in a high-affinity protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Grigorios; Sharma, Amit; Lancaster, Lorna E; Bowen, Rebecca; Kaminska, Renata; Leech, Andrew P; Walker, Daniel; Redfield, Christina; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-04-29

    The kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of intrinsic disorder in protein-protein recognition are controversial. We address this by inducing one partner of the high-affinity colicin E3 rRNase domain-Im3 complex (K(d) ≈ 10(-12) M) to become an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). Through a variety of biophysical measurements, we show that a single alanine mutation at Tyr507 within the hydrophobic core of the isolated colicin E3 rRNase domain causes the enzyme to become an IDP (E3 rRNase(IDP)). E3 rRNase(IDP) binds stoichiometrically to Im3 and forms a structure that is essentially identical to the wild-type complex. However, binding of E3 rRNase(IDP) to Im3 is 4 orders of magnitude weaker than that of the folded rRNase, with thermodynamic parameters reflecting the disorder-to-order transition on forming the complex. Critically, pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the E3 rRNase(IDP)-Im3 complex demonstrates that the decrease in affinity is mostly accounted for by a drop in the electrostatically steered association rate. Our study shows that, notwithstanding the advantages intrinsic disorder brings to biological systems, this can come at severe kinetic and thermodynamic cost. PMID:25856265

  3. Designer protein delivery: From natural to engineered affinity-controlled release systems.

    PubMed

    Pakulska, Malgosia M; Miersch, Shane; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-03-18

    Exploiting binding affinities between molecules is an established practice in many fields, including biochemical separations, diagnostics, and drug development; however, using these affinities to control biomolecule release is a more recent strategy. Affinity-controlled release takes advantage of the reversible nature of noncovalent interactions between a therapeutic protein and a binding partner to slow the diffusive release of the protein from a vehicle. This process, in contrast to degradation-controlled sustained-release formulations such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres, is controlled through the strength of the binding interaction, the binding kinetics, and the concentration of binding partners. In the context of affinity-controlled release--and specifically the discovery or design of binding partners--we review advances in in vitro selection and directed evolution of proteins, peptides, and oligonucleotides (aptamers), aided by computational design. PMID:26989257

  4. The Monitoring and Affinity Purification of Proteins Using Dual-Tags with Tetracysteine Motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2009-01-01

    Identification and characterization of protein-protein interaction networks is essential for the elucidation of biochemical mechanisms and cellular function. Affinity purification in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has emerged as a very powerful tactic for the identification of specific protein-protein interactions. In this chapter we describe a comprehensive methodology that utilizes our recently developed dual-tag affinity purification system for the enrichment and identification of mammalian protein complexes. The protocol covers a series of separate but sequentially related techniques focused on the facile monitoring and purification of a dual-tagged protein of interest and its interacting partners via a system built with tetracysteine motifs and various combinations of affinity tags. Using human telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) as an example, we have demonstrated the power of the system in terms of bait protein recovery after dual-tag affinity purification, detection of bait protein subcellular localization and expression, and successful identification of known and potentially novel TRF2 interacting proteins. Although the protocol described here has been optimized for the identification and characterization of TRF2-associated proteins, it is, in principle, applicable to the study of any other mammalian protein complexes that may be of interest to the research community.

  5. The Monitoring and Affinity Purification of Proteins Using Dual Tags with Tetracysteine Motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannone, Richard J.; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    Identification and characterization of protein-protein interaction networks is essential for the elucidation of biochemical mechanisms and cellular function. Affinity purification in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has emerged as a very powerful tactic for the identification of specific protein-protein interactions. In this chapter, we describe a comprehensive methodology that uses our recently developed dual-tag affinity purification system for the enrichment and identification of mammalian protein complexes. The protocol covers a series of separate but sequentially related techniques focused on the facile monitoring and purification of a dual-tagged protein of interest and its interacting partners via a system built with tetracysteine motifs and various combinations of affinity tags. Using human telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) as an example, we demonstrate the power of the system in terms of bait protein recovery after dual-tag affinity purification, detection of bait protein subcellular localization and expression, and successful identification of known and potentially novel TRF2 interacting proteins. Although the protocol described here has been optimized for the identification and characterization of TRF2-associated proteins, it is, in principle, applicable to the study of any other mammalian protein complexes that may be of interest to the research community.

  6. A robust assay to measure DNA topology-dependent protein binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, Tamara R.; Solà, Maria; Holt, Ian J.; Neuman, Keir C.

    2015-01-01

    DNA structure and topology pervasively influence aspects of DNA metabolism including replication, transcription and segregation. However, the effects of DNA topology on DNA-protein interactions have not been systematically explored due to limitations of standard affinity assays. We developed a method to measure protein binding affinity dependence on the topology (topological linking number) of supercoiled DNA. A defined range of DNA topoisomers at equilibrium with a DNA binding protein is separated into free and protein-bound DNA populations using standard nitrocellulose filter binding techniques. Electrophoretic separation and quantification of bound and free topoisomers combined with a simple normalization procedure provide the relative affinity of the protein for the DNA as a function of linking number. Employing this assay we measured topology-dependent DNA binding of a helicase, a type IB topoisomerase, a type IIA topoisomerase, a non-specific mitochondrial DNA binding protein and a type II restriction endonuclease. Most of the proteins preferentially bind negatively supercoiled DNA but the details of the topology-dependent affinity differ among proteins in ways that expose differences in their interactions with DNA. The topology-dependent binding assay provides a robust and easily implemented method to probe topological influences on DNA-protein interactions for a wide range of DNA binding proteins. PMID:25552413

  7. A sol-gel-integrated protein array system for affinity analysis of aptamer-target protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji-Young; Kim, Eunkyung; Kang, Jeehye; Kim, Soyoun

    2011-06-01

    A sol-gel microarray system was developed for a protein interaction assay with high activity. Comparing to 2-dimensional microarray surfaces, sol-gel can offer a more dynamic and broad range for proteins. In the present study, this sol-gel-integrated protein array was used in binding affinity analysis for aptamers. Six RNA aptamers and their target protein, yeast TBP (TATA-binding protein), were used to evaluate this method. A TBP-containing sol-gel mixture was spotted using a dispensing workstation under high-humidity conditions and each Cy-3-labeled aptamer was incubated. The dissociation constants (K(d)) were calculated by plotting the fluorescent intensity of the bound aptamers as a function of the TBP concentrations. The K(d) value of the control aptamer was found to be 8 nM, which agrees well with the values obtained using the conventional method, electric mobility shift assay. The sol-gel-based binding affinity measurements fit well with conventional binding affinity measurements, suggesting their possible use as an alternative to the conventional method. In addition, aptamer affinity measurements by the sol-gel-integrated protein chip make it possible to develop a simple high-throughput affinity method for screening high-affinity aptamers. PMID:21749295

  8. Gγ recruitment systems specifically select PPI and affinity-enhanced candidate proteins that interact with membrane protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Kaishima, Misato; Ishii, Jun; Fukuda, Nobuo; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are crucial for the vast majority of biological processes. We previously constructed a Gγ recruitment system to screen PPI candidate proteins and desirable affinity-altered (affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated) protein variants. The methods utilized a target protein fused to a mutated G-protein γ subunit (Gγcyto) lacking the ability to localize to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. However, the previous systems were adapted to use only soluble cytosolic proteins as targets. Recently, membrane proteins have been found to form the principal nodes of signaling involved in diseases and have attracted a great deal of interest as primary drug targets. Here, we describe new protocols for the Gγ recruitment systems that are specifically designed to use membrane proteins as targets to overcome previous limitations. These systems represent an attractive approach to exploring novel interacting candidates and affinity-altered protein variants and their interactions with proteins on the inner side of the plasma membrane, with high specificity and selectivity. PMID:26581329

  9. Gγ recruitment systems specifically select PPI and affinity-enhanced candidate proteins that interact with membrane protein targets.

    PubMed

    Kaishima, Misato; Ishii, Jun; Fukuda, Nobuo; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are crucial for the vast majority of biological processes. We previously constructed a Gγ recruitment system to screen PPI candidate proteins and desirable affinity-altered (affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated) protein variants. The methods utilized a target protein fused to a mutated G-protein γ subunit (Gγcyto) lacking the ability to localize to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. However, the previous systems were adapted to use only soluble cytosolic proteins as targets. Recently, membrane proteins have been found to form the principal nodes of signaling involved in diseases and have attracted a great deal of interest as primary drug targets. Here, we describe new protocols for the Gγ recruitment systems that are specifically designed to use membrane proteins as targets to overcome previous limitations. These systems represent an attractive approach to exploring novel interacting candidates and affinity-altered protein variants and their interactions with proteins on the inner side of the plasma membrane, with high specificity and selectivity. PMID:26581329

  10. CSM-lig: a web server for assessing and comparing protein-small molecule affinities.

    PubMed

    Pires, Douglas E V; Ascher, David B

    2016-07-01

    Determining the affinity of a ligand for a given protein is a crucial component of drug development and understanding their biological effects. Predicting binding affinities is a challenging and difficult task, and despite being regarded as poorly predictive, scoring functions play an important role in the analysis of molecular docking results. Here, we present CSM-Lig (http://structure.bioc.cam.ac.uk/csm_lig), a web server tailored to predict the binding affinity of a protein-small molecule complex, encompassing both protein and small-molecule complementarity in terms of shape and chemistry via graph-based structural signatures. CSM-Lig was trained and evaluated on different releases of the PDBbind databases, achieving a correlation of up to 0.86 on 10-fold cross validation and 0.80 in blind tests, performing as well as or better than other widely used methods. The web server allows users to rapidly and automatically predict binding affinities of collections of structures and assess the interactions made. We believe CSM-lig would be an invaluable tool for helping assess docking poses, the effects of multiple mutations, including insertions, deletions and alternative splicing events, in protein-small molecule affinity, unraveling important aspects that drive protein-compound recognition. PMID:27151202

  11. Affinity Enhancement by Ligand Clustering Effect Inspired by Peptide Dendrimers−Shank PDZ Proteins Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiahui; Liu, Miao; Zheng, Bo; Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity binders are desirable tools to probe the function that specific protein−protein interactions play in cell. In the process of seeking a general strategy to design high-affinity binders, we found a clue from the βPIX (p21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor)−Shank PDZ interaction in synaptic assembly: three PDZ-binding sites are clustered by a parallel coiled-coil trimer but bind to Shank PDZ protein with 1:1 stoichiometry (1 trimer/1 PDZ). Inspired by this architecture, we proposed that peptide dendrimer, mimicking the ligand clustering in βPIX, will also show enhanced binding affinity, yet with 1:1 stoichiometry. This postulation has been proven here, as we synthesized a set of monomeric, dimeric and trimeric peptides and measured their binding affinity and stoichiometry with Shank PDZ domains by isothermal titration calorimetry, native mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance. This affinity enhancement, best explained by proximity effect, will be useful to guide the design of high-affinity blockers for protein−protein interactions. PMID:26918521

  12. Design of high-affinity S100-target hybrid proteins.

    PubMed

    Rezvanpour, Atoosa; Phillips, Jeremy M; Shaw, Gary S

    2009-12-01

    S100B and S100A10 are dimeric, EF-hand proteins. S100B undergoes a calcium-dependent conformational change allowing it to interact with a short contiguous sequence from the actin-capping protein CapZ (TRTK12). S100A10 does not bind calcium but is able to recruit the N-terminus of annexin A2 important for membrane fusion events, and to form larger multiprotein complexes such as that with the cation channel proteins TRPV5/6. In this work, we have designed, expressed, purified, and characterized two S100-target peptide hybrid proteins comprised of S100A10 and S100B linked in tandem to annexin A2 (residues 1-15) and CapZ (TRTK12), respectively. Different protease cleavage sites (tobacco etch virus, PreScission) were incorporated into the linkers of the hybrid proteins. In situ proteolytic cleavage monitored by (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra showed the linker did not perturb the structures of the S100A10-annexin A2 or S100B-TRTK12 complexes. Furthermore, the analysis of the chemical shift assignments ((1)H, (15)N, and (13)C) showed that residues T102-S108 of annexin A2 formed a well-defined alpha-helix in the S100A10 hybrid while the TRTK12 region was unstructured at the N-terminus with a single turn of alpha-helix from D108-K111 in the S100B hybrid protein. The two S100 hybrid proteins provide a simple yet extremely efficient method for obtaining high yields of intact S100 target peptides. Since cleavage of the S100 hybrid protein is not necessary for structural characterization, this approach may be useful as a scaffold for larger S100 complexes. PMID:19827097

  13. Updates to the integrated protein-protein interaction benchmarks: Docking benchmark version 5 and affinity benchmark version 2

    PubMed Central

    Vreven, Thom; Moal, Iain H.; Vangone, Anna; Pierce, Brian G.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Torchala, Mieczyslaw; Chaleil, Raphael; Jiménez-García, Brian; Bates, Paul A.; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J.; Weng, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    We present an updated and integrated version of our widely used protein-protein docking and binding affinity benchmarks. The benchmarks consist of non-redundant, high quality structures of protein-protein complexes along with the unbound structures of their components. Fifty-five new complexes were added to the docking benchmark, 35 of which have experimentally-measured binding affinities. These updated docking and affinity benchmarks now contain 230 and 179 entries, respectively. In particular, the number of antibody-antigen complexes has increased significantly, by 67% and 74% in the docking and affinity benchmarks, respectively. We tested previously developed docking and affinity prediction algorithms on the new cases. Considering only the top ten docking predictions per benchmark case, a prediction accuracy of 38% is achieved on all 55 cases, and up to 50% for the 32 rigid-body cases only. Predicted affinity scores are found to correlate with experimental binding energies up to r=0.52 overall, and r=0.72 for the rigid complexes. PMID:26231283

  14. Fluorous-assisted metal chelate affinity extraction technique for analysis of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Tadashi; Kiyokawa, Ena; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Imakyure, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi

    2016-08-15

    We have developed a fluorous affinity-based extraction method for measurement of protein kinase activity. In this method, a fluorescent peptide substrate was phosphorylated by a protein kinase, and the obtained phosphopeptide was selectively captured with Fe(III)-immobilized perfluoroalkyliminodiacetic acid reagent via a metal chelate affinity technique. Next, the captured phosphopeptide was selectively extracted into a fluorous solvent mixture, tetradecafluorohexane and 1H,1H,2H,2H-tridecafluoro-1-n-octanol (3:1, v/v), using the specificity of fluorous affinity (fluorophilicity). In contrast, the remained substrate peptide in the aqueous (non-fluorous) phase was easily measured fluorimetrically. Finally, the enzyme activity could be assayed by measuring the decrease in fluorescence. The feasibility of this method was demonstrated by applying the method for measurement of the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) using its substrate peptide (kemptide) pre-labeled with carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA). PMID:27260427

  15. Affinity chromatographic selection of carbonylated proteins followed by identification of oxidation sites using tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid; Regnier, Fred

    2005-04-15

    It has been shown that oxidatively modified forms of proteins accumulate during oxidative stress, aging, and in some age-related diseases. One of the unique features of a wide variety of routes by which proteins are oxidized is the generation of carbonyl groups. This paper reports a method for the isolation of oxidized proteins, which involves (1) biotinylation of oxidized proteins with biotin hydrazide and (2) affinity enrichment using monomeric avidin affinity chromatography columns. The selectivity of the method was validated by adding in vitro oxidized biotinylated BSA to a yeast lysate and showing that the predominant protein recovered was BSA. This method was applied to the question of whether large doses of 2-nitropropane produce oxidized proteins. A study of rat liver homogenates showed that animals dosed with 2-nitropropane produced 17 times more oxidized protein than controls in 6 h. Tryptic digestion of these oxidized proteins followed by reversed-phase chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry led to the identification of 14 peptides and their parent proteins. Nine of the 14 identified peptides were found to carry 1 or 2 oxidation sites and 5 of the 9 peptides were biotinylated. The significance of this affinity method is that it allows the isolation of oxidized proteins from the rest of the proteome and facilitates their identification. In some cases, it is even possible to identify the site of oxidation. PMID:15828771

  16. Lipodisks integrated with weak affinity chromatography enable fragment screening of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Bergström, Maria; Edwards, Katarina; Eriksson, Jonny; Ohlson, Sten; Ying, Janet To Yiu; Torres, Jaume; Hernández, Víctor Agmo

    2016-02-01

    Membrane proteins constitute the largest class of drug targets but they present many challenges in drug discovery. Importantly, the discovery of potential drug candidates is hampered by the limited availability of efficient methods for screening drug-protein interactions. In this work we present a novel strategy for rapid identification of molecules capable of binding to a selected membrane protein. An integral membrane protein (human aquaporin-1) was incorporated into planar lipid bilayer disks (lipodisks), which were subsequently covalently coupled to porous derivatized silica and packed into HPLC columns. The obtained affinity columns were used in a typical protocol for fragment screening by weak affinity chromatography (WAC), in which one hit was identified out of a 200 compound collection. The lipodisk-based strategy, which ensures a stable and native-like lipid environment for the protein, is expected to work also with other membrane proteins and screening procedures. PMID:26673836

  17. Origins of specificity and affinity in antibody–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hung-Pin; Lee, Kuo Hao; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Yang, An-Suei

    2014-01-01

    Natural antibodies are frequently elicited to recognize diverse protein surfaces, where the sequence features of the epitopes are frequently indistinguishable from those of nonepitope protein surfaces. It is not clearly understood how the paratopes are able to recognize sequence-wise featureless epitopes and how a natural antibody repertoire with limited variants can recognize seemingly unlimited protein antigens foreign to the host immune system. In this work, computational methods were used to predict the functional paratopes with the 3D antibody variable domain structure as input. The predicted functional paratopes were reasonably validated by the hot spot residues known from experimental alanine scanning measurements. The functional paratope (hot spot) predictions on a set of 111 antibody–antigen complex structures indicate that aromatic, mostly tyrosyl, side chains constitute the major part of the predicted functional paratopes, with short-chain hydrophilic residues forming the minor portion of the predicted functional paratopes. These aromatic side chains interact mostly with the epitope main chain atoms and side-chain carbons. The functional paratopes are surrounded by favorable polar atomistic contacts in the structural paratope–epitope interfaces; more that 80% these polar contacts are electrostatically favorable and about 40% of these polar contacts form direct hydrogen bonds across the interfaces. These results indicate that a limited repertoire of antibodies bearing paratopes with diverse structural contours enriched with aromatic side chains among short-chain hydrophilic residues can recognize all sorts of protein surfaces, because the determinants for antibody recognition are common physicochemical features ubiquitously distributed over all protein surfaces. PMID:24938786

  18. The effect of immunological adjuvants on the relative affinity of anti-protein antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Petty, R E; Steward, M W

    1977-01-01

    Inbred mice of a strain (B1OD2 new) known to produce either no detectable antibody or antibody of low affinity to two protein antigens administered in saline, were immunized with human serum transferrin (HST) in one of nine adjuvants. Such immunization increases the level and relative affinity of anti-HST antibody. The adjuvants used varied in the degree to which they augmented these parameters of the antibody response--that is, FCA and FIA were capable of inducing high levels of high affinity antibody, whereas other adjuvants elicited lower levels of high affinity antibody. The possibility is discussed that substances with adjuvant activity may effect antibody production at two stages: (1) at the stage of antigen selection of cells for proliferation and (2) at the stage or proliferation of antibody producing cell precursors. PMID:844888

  19. The derivatization of oxidized polysaccharides for protein immobilization and affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Junowicz, E; Charm, S E

    1976-03-25

    The present report describes the preparation of modified polysaccharides matrices useful for the synthesis of affinity adsorbents and immobilized proteins. Hydrazido-matrices were synthesized by condensing an excess of the bifunctional reagent, adipic acid dihydrazide, with periodate oxidized cellulose paper, Sephadex, or Sepharose matrices. Ribonucleotide dialdehyde cofactors, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and oxidized DNAase B were separately bound to the hydrazido-polymers. Azido-matrices obtained by modification of the hydrazido-derivatives were coupled to specific amino ligands such as amino acids and proteins. Several adsorbents were prepared and used as models for affinity chromatography. PMID:1260016

  20. Determination of protein-ligand binding affinity by NMR: observations from serum albumin model systems.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Lee; Rutherford, Samantha; Fletcher, Dan

    2005-06-01

    The usefulness of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein for testing NMR methods for the study of protein-ligand interactions is discussed. Isothermal titration calorimetry established the binding affinity and stoichiometry of the specific binding site for L-tryptophan, D-tryptophan, naproxen, ibuprofen, salicylic acid and warfarin. The binding affinities of the same ligands determined by NMR methods are universally weaker (larger KD). This is because the NMR methods are susceptible to interference from additional non-specific binding. The L-tryptophan-BSA and naproxen-BSA systems were the best behaved model systems. PMID:15816062

  1. Identification of proteins interacting with ammodytoxins in Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom by immuno-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brgles, Marija; Kurtović, Tihana; Kovačič, Lidija; Križaj, Igor; Barut, Miloš; Lang Balija, Maja; Allmaier, Günter; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Halassy, Beata

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their function, proteins frequently interact with other proteins. Various methods are used to reveal protein interacting partners, and affinity chromatography is one of them. Snake venom is composed mostly of proteins, and various protein complexes in the venom have been found to exhibit higher toxicity levels than respective components separately. Complexes can modulate envenomation activity of a venom and/or potentiate its effect. Our previous data indicate that the most toxic components of the Vipera ammodytes ammodytes (Vaa) venom isolated so far-ammodytoxins (Atxs)-are contributing to the venom's toxicity only moderately; therefore, we aimed to explore whether they have some interacting partner(s) potentiating toxicity. For screening of possible interactions, immuno-affinity chromatography combined with identification by mass spectrometry was used. Various chemistries (epoxy, carbonyldiimidazole, ethylenediamine) as well as protein G functionality were used to immobilize antibodies on monolith support, a Convective Interaction Media disk. Monoliths have been demonstrated to better suit the separation of large biomolecules. Using such approach, several proteins were indicated as potential Atx-binding proteins. Among these, the interaction of Atxs with a Kunitz-type inhibitor was confirmed by far-Western dot-blot and surface plasmon resonance measurement. It can be concluded that affinity chromatography on monolithic columns combined with mass spectrometry identification is a successful approach for screening of protein interactions and it resulted with detection of the interaction of Atx with Kunitz-type inhibitor in Vaa venom for the first time. PMID:24217948

  2. Design of affinity tags for one-step protein purification from immobilized zinc columns

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, R.S.; Shepherd, R.E.; Koepsel, R.R.; Zhao, A.; Ataai, M.M.

    2000-02-01

    Affinity tags are often used to accomplish recombinant protein purification using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Success of the tag depends on the chelated metal used and the elution profile of the host cell proteins. Zn(II)-iminodiacetic acid (Zn(II)-IDA) may prove to e superior to either immobilized copper or nickel as a result of its relatively low binding affinity for cellular proteins. for example, almost all Escherichia coli proteins elute from Zn(II)-IDA columns between pH 7.5 and 7.0 with very little cellular protein emerging at pH values lower than 7.0. Thus, a large portion of the Zn(II)-IDA elution profile may be free of contaminant proteins, which can be exploited for one-step purification of a target protein from raw cell extract. In this paper the authors have identified several fusion tags that can direct the elution of the target protein to the low background region of the Zn(II)-IDA elution profile. These tags allow targeting of proteins to different regions of the elution profile, facilitating purification under mild conditions.

  3. Affinity Chromatography of Native and Recombinant Proteins from Receptors for Insulin and IGF-I to Recombinant Single Chain Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is an efficient method to isolate proteins by taking advantage of their affinities for specific molecules such as substrates, inhibitors, antigens, ligands, antibodies, and other interacting molecules, including subunits. Nowadays, we take the effectiveness and excellence of this technology for granted. This essay will mainly cover the use of affinity chromatography based on my experience. PMID:26579073

  4. Affinity Chromatography of Native and Recombinant Proteins from Receptors for Insulin and IGF-I to Recombinant Single Chain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is an efficient method to isolate proteins by taking advantage of their affinities for specific molecules such as substrates, inhibitors, antigens, ligands, antibodies, and other interacting molecules, including subunits. Nowadays, we take the effectiveness and excellence of this technology for granted. This essay will mainly cover the use of affinity chromatography based on my experience. PMID:26579073

  5. Determinants of affinity and specificity in RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Helder, Stephanie; Blythe, Amanda J; Bond, Charles S; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-06-01

    Emerging data suggest that the mechanisms by which RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) interact with RNA and the rules governing specificity might be substantially more complex than those underlying their DNA-binding counterparts. Even our knowledge of what constitutes the RNA-bound proteome is contentious; recent studies suggest that 10-30% of RBPs contain no known RNA-binding domain. Adding to this situation is a growing disconnect between the avalanche of identified interactions between proteins and long noncoding RNAs and the absence of biophysical data on these interactions. RNA-protein interactions are also at the centre of what might emerge as one of the biggest shifts in thinking about cell and molecular biology this century, following from recent reports of ribonucleoprotein complexes that drive reversible membrane-free phase separation events within the cell. Unexpectedly, low-complexity motifs are important in the formation of these structures. Here we briefly survey recent advances in our understanding of the specificity of RBPs. PMID:27315040

  6. On the binding affinity of macromolecular interactions: daring to ask why proteins interact

    PubMed Central

    Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins are orchestrated in a precise and time-dependent manner, underlying cellular function. The binding affinity, defined as the strength of these interactions, is translated into physico-chemical terms in the dissociation constant (Kd), the latter being an experimental measure that determines whether an interaction will be formed in solution or not. Predicting binding affinity from structural models has been a matter of active research for more than 40 years because of its fundamental role in drug development. However, all available approaches are incapable of predicting the binding affinity of protein–protein complexes from coordinates alone. Here, we examine both theoretical and experimental limitations that complicate the derivation of structure–affinity relationships. Most work so far has concentrated on binary interactions. Systems of increased complexity are far from being understood. The main physico-chemical measure that relates to binding affinity is the buried surface area, but it does not hold for flexible complexes. For the latter, there must be a significant entropic contribution that will have to be approximated in the future. We foresee that any theoretical modelling of these interactions will have to follow an integrative approach considering the biology, chemistry and physics that underlie protein–protein recognition. PMID:23235262

  7. A novel gigaporous GSH affinity medium for high-speed affinity chromatography of GST-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongdong; Zhang, Rongyue; Li, Juan; Li, Qiang; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui

    2014-03-01

    Novel GSH-AP (phenoxyl agarose coated gigaporous polystyrene, Agap-co-PSt) microspheres were successfully prepared by introducing GSH ligand into hydrophilic AP microspheres pre-activated with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether. The gigaporous structure and chromatographic properties of GSH-AP medium were evaluated and compared with commercial GSH Sepharose FF (GSH-FF) medium. The macropores (100-500nm) of gigaporous PSt microspheres were well maintained after coating with agarose and functionalized with GSH ligand. Hydrodynamic experiments showed that GSH-AP column had less backpressure and plate height than those of GSH-FF column at high flow velocity, which was beneficial for its use in high-speed chromatography. The presence of flow-through pores in GSH-AP microspheres also accelerated the mass transfer rate of biomolecules induced by convective flow, leading to high protein resolution and high dynamic binding capacity (DBC) of glutathione S-transferase (GST) at high flow velocity. High purity of GST and GST-tagged recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1RA) were obtained from crude extract with an acceptable recovery yield within 1.5min at a velocity up to 1400cm/h. GSH-AP medium is promising for high-speed affinity chromatography for the purification of GST and GST-tagged proteins. PMID:24269760

  8. Robotic high-throughput purification of affinity-tagged recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, Simone C; Weinzierl, Robert O J

    2015-01-01

    Affinity purification of recombinant proteins has become the method of choice to obtain good quantities and qualities of proteins for a variety of downstream biochemical applications. While manual or FPLC-assisted purification techniques are generally time-consuming and labor-intensive, the advent of high-throughput technologies and liquid handling robotics has simplified and accelerated this process significantly. Additionally, without the human factor as a potential source of error, automated purification protocols allow for the generation of large numbers of proteins simultaneously and under directly comparable conditions. The delivered material is ideal for activity comparisons of different variants of the same protein. Here, we present our strategy for the simultaneous purification of up to 24 affinity-tagged proteins for activity measurements in biochemical assays. The protocol described is suitable for the scale typically required in individual research laboratories. PMID:25749949

  9. Estimating Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity using High-Throughput Screening by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, Matthew D.; Hage, David S.; Harbison, Gerard S.; Powers, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Many of today’s drug discovery programs utilize high-throughput screening methods that rely on quick evaluations of protein activity to rank potential chemical leads. By monitoring biologically relevant protein-ligand interactions, NMR can provide a means to validate these discovery leads and to optimize the drug discovery process. NMR-based screens typically use a change in chemical shift or linewidth to detect a protein-ligand interaction. However, the relatively low throughput of current NMR screens and their high demand on sample requirements generally makes it impractical to collect complete binding curves to measure the affinity for each compound in a large and diverse chemical library. As a result, NMR ligand screens are typically limited to identifying candidates that bind to a protein and do not give any estimate of the binding affinity. To address this issue, a methodology has been developed to rank binding affinities for ligands based on NMR-based screens that use 1D 1H NMR line-broadening experiments. This method was demonstrated by using it to estimate the dissociation equilibrium constants for twelve ligands with the protein human serum albumin (HSA). The results were found to give good agreement with previous affinities that have been reported for these same ligands with HSA. PMID:18831571

  10. Purification of recombinant proteins from mammalian cell culture using a generic double-affinity chromatography scheme.

    PubMed

    Cass, Brian; Pham, Phuong Lan; Kamen, Amine; Durocher, Yves

    2005-03-01

    Transient transfection of mammalian cells has proven to be a useful technique for the rapid production of recombinant proteins because of its ability to produce milligram quantities within 2 weeks following cloning of their corresponding cDNA. This rapid production also requires a fast and efficient purification scheme that can be applied generically, typically through the use of affinity tags such as the polyhistidine-tag for capture by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC) or the Strep-tag II, which binds to the StrepTactin affinity ligand. However, one-step purification using either of these tags has disadvantages in terms of yield, elution conditions, and purity. Here, we show that the addition of both Strep-tag-II and (His)(8) to the C-terminal of r-proteins allows efficient purification by consecutive IMAC and StrepTactin affinity. This approach has been successfully demonstrated using the intracellular protein DsRed, as well as two secreted proteins, secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), all produced by transient transfection of HEK293-EBNA1 cells in medium supplemented with bovine calf serum. All proteins were purified to >99% homogeneity with yields varying from 29 to 81%. PMID:15721774

  11. Multiplexed Affinity-Based Separation of Proteins and Cells Using Inertial Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Aniruddh; Hou, Han Wei; Mahan, Alison. E.; Han, Jongyoon; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of low abundance proteins or rare cells from complex mixtures, such as blood, is required for many diagnostic, therapeutic and research applications. Current affinity-based protein or cell separation methods use binary ‘bind-elute’ separations and are inefficient when applied to the isolation of multiple low-abundance proteins or cell types. We present a method for rapid and multiplexed, yet inexpensive, affinity-based isolation of both proteins and cells, using a size-coded mixture of multiple affinity-capture microbeads and an inertial microfluidic particle sorter device. In a single binding step, different targets–cells or proteins–bind to beads of different sizes, which are then sorted by flowing them through a spiral microfluidic channel. This technique performs continuous-flow, high throughput affinity-separation of milligram-scale protein samples or millions of cells in minutes after binding. We demonstrate the simultaneous isolation of multiple antibodies from serum and multiple cell types from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or whole blood. We use the technique to isolate low abundance antibodies specific to different HIV antigens and rare HIV-specific cells from blood obtained from HIV+ patients. PMID:27026280

  12. Crystallographic structure of Ni-Co coating on the affinity adsorption of histidine-tagged protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yaw-Jen; Chen, Sheng-Zheng; Ho, Ching-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    The principle of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been recently implemented for protein microarrays for the study of protein abundance and function. Ni-Co film fabricated by electrodeposition is a novel microarray surface in an alloy type for immobilizing histidine-tagged proteins based on IMAC. In this paper, the effects of crystallographic structures and surface properties of Ni-Co coatings, with and without the annealing process, on the immobilization of histidine-tagged proteins were systematically investigated. The experimental results reveal that the stronger hcp texture, due to a higher Co content, results in better affinity adsorption for histidine-tagged biotin. Nevertheless, the allotropic phase transformation from hcp to fcc, due to the annealing process, leads to the decrease of affinity adsorption. The wettability property and the surface roughness of Ni-Co coating are, however, not important factors. Obviously, the crystallographic structure of Ni-Co coating is the dominant factor for the specific affinity adsorption of histidine-tagged protein. PMID:25731093

  13. Affinity chromatography of GroEL chaperonin based on denatured proteins: role of electrostatic interactions in regulation of GroEL affinity for protein substrates.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, N Iu; Marchenkov, V V; Kaĭsheva, A L; Kashparov, I A; Kotova, N V; Kaliman, P A; Semisotnov, G V

    2006-12-01

    The chaperonin GroEL of the heat shock protein family from Escherichia coli cells can bind various polypeptides lacking rigid tertiary structure and thus prevent their nonspecific association and provide for acquisition of native conformation. In the present work we studied the interaction of GroEL with six denatured proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, ribonuclease A, egg lysozyme in the presence of dithiothreitol, pepsin, beta-casein, and apocytochrome c) possessing negative or positive total charge at neutral pH values and different in hydrophobicity (affinity for a hydrophobic probe ANS). To prevent the influence of nonspecific association of non-native proteins on their interaction with GroEL and make easier the recording of the complexing, the proteins were covalently attached to BrCN-activated Sepharose. At low ionic strength (lower than 60 mM), tight binding of the negatively charged denatured proteins with GroEL (which is also negatively charged) needed relatively low concentrations (approximately 10 mM) of bivalent cations Mg2+ or Ca2+. At the high ionic strength (approximately 600 mM), a tight complex was produced also in the absence of bivalent cations. In contrast, positively charged denatured proteins tightly interacted with GroEL irrespectively of the presence of bivalent cations and ionic strength of the solution (from 20 to 600 mM). These features of GroEL interaction with positively and negatively charged denatured proteins were confirmed by polarized fluorescence (fluorescence anisotropy). The findings suggest that the affinity of GroEL for denatured proteins can be determined by the balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. PMID:17223789

  14. Basal Plane Affinity of an Insect Antifreeze Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertaya, N.; Gauthier, S. Y.; Davies, P. L.; Braslavsky, I.

    2007-03-01

    sbwAFP is a powerful antifreeze protein (AFP) with high thermal hysteresis activity that protects spruce budworm (sbw) from freezing during harsh winters in the spruce and fir forests of USA and Canada. Different types of antifreeze proteins have been found in many other species and have potential applications in cryomedicine and cryopreservation. When an ice crystal is cooled in the presence of AFP below the non-equilibrium freezing point the crystal will suddenly and rapidly grow in specific directions. Hyperactive antifreezes like sbwAFP expand perpendicular to the c-axis (in the plane of the a-axes), whereas moderately active AFPs, like type III from fish, grow in the direction parallel to the c-axis. It has been proposed that the basis for hyperactivity of certain AFPs is that they bind and accumulate on the basal plane to inhibit c-axial growth. By putting fluorescent tags on these two types of AFPs we have been able to directly visualize the binding of different types of AFPs to ice surfaces. We do indeed find that the insect AFP accumulates on the basal plane of an ice crystal while type III AFP does not. Supported by CIHR and BNTI.

  15. Analyzing protein-protein interactions from affinity purification-mass spectrometry data with SAINT

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyungwon; Liu, Guomin; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Tyers, Mike; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.

    2012-01-01

    Significance Analysis of INTeractome (SAINT) is a software package for scoring protein-protein interactions based on label-free quantitative proteomics data (e.g. spectral count or intensity) in affinity purification – mass spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments. SAINT allows bench scientists to select bona fide interactions and remove non-specific interactions in an unbiased manner. However, there is no `one-size-fits-all' statistical model for every dataset, since the experimental design varies across studies. Key variables include the number of baits, the number of biological replicates per bait, and control purifications. Here we give a detailed account of input data format, control data, selection of high confidence interactions, and visualization of filtered data. We explain additional options for customizing the statistical model for optimal filtering in specific datasets. We also discuss a graphical user interface of SAINT in connection to the LIMS system ProHits which can be installed as a virtual machine on Mac OSX or PC Windows computers. PMID:22948729

  16. A dual protease approach for expression and affinity purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Raran-Kurussi, Sreejith; Waugh, David S

    2016-07-01

    We describe a new method for affinity purification of recombinant proteins using a dual protease protocol. Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP) is employed as an N-terminal tag to increase the yield and solubility of its fusion partners. The MBP moiety is then removed by rhinovirus 3C protease, prior to purification, to yield an N-terminally His6-tagged protein. Proteins that are only temporarily rendered soluble by fusing them to MBP are readily identified at this stage because they will precipitate after the MBP tag is removed by 3C protease. The remaining soluble His6-tagged protein, if any, is subsequently purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). Finally, the N-terminal His6 tag is removed by His6-tagged tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease to yield the native recombinant protein, and the His6-tagged contaminants are removed by adsorption during a second round of IMAC, leaving only the untagged recombinant protein in the column effluent. The generic strategy described here saves time and effort by removing insoluble aggregates at an early stage in the process while also reducing the tendency of MBP to "stick" to its fusion partners during affinity purification. PMID:27105777

  17. Affinity regression predicts the recognition code of nucleic acid binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pelossof, Raphael; Singh, Irtisha; Yang, Julie L.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the affinity profiles of nucleic acid-binding proteins directly from the protein sequence is a major unsolved problem. We present a statistical approach for learning the recognition code of a family of transcription factors (TFs) or RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) from high-throughput binding assays. Our method, called affinity regression, trains on protein binding microarray (PBM) or RNA compete experiments to learn an interaction model between proteins and nucleic acids, using only protein domain and probe sequences as inputs. By training on mouse homeodomain PBM profiles, our model correctly identifies residues that confer DNA-binding specificity and accurately predicts binding motifs for an independent set of divergent homeodomains. Similarly, learning from RNA compete profiles for diverse RBPs, our model can predict the binding affinities of held-out proteins and identify key RNA-binding residues. More broadly, we envision applying our method to model and predict biological interactions in any setting where there is a high-throughput ‘affinity’ readout. PMID:26571099

  18. Photoaffinity labelling of high affinity dopamine binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, G.M.; McCarry, B.E.; Mishra, R.K.

    1986-03-01

    A photoactive analogue of the dopamine agonist 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) has been synthesized and used to photoaffinity label dopamine binding proteins prepared from bovine caudate nucleus. N-(3-)N'-4-azidobenzamidol)-aminopropyl)-aminopropyl)-ADTN (AzB-AP-ADTN) was incubated with caudate membranes and irradiated with UV light. Membranes were then repeatedly washed by centrifugation to remove excess photolabel. A binding assay, using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 (a D/sub 1/ specific antagonist), was then performed to evaluate the loss of receptor density in the photolyzed preparation. AzB-AP-ADTN irreversibly blocked (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding in a dose-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed a decrease in the B/sub max/, with no significant change in the K/sub d/, of (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding. Compounds which compete for D/sub 1/ receptor binding (such as dopamine, SKF 38393 or apomorphine), proteted the SCH 23390 binding site from inactivation. This data would suggest that the novel photoaffinity ligand, AzB-AP-ADTN, can covalently label the D/sub 1/ (adenylate cyclase linked) dopamine receptor.

  19. A Protocol for Phage Display and Affinity Selection Using Recombinant Protein Baits

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Schäfermeyer, Kim R.; Downie, A. Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Using recombinant phage as a scaffold to present various protein portions encoded by a directionally cloned cDNA library to immobilized bait molecules is an efficient means to discover interactions. The technique has largely been used to discover protein-protein interactions but the bait molecule to be challenged need not be restricted to proteins. The protocol presented here has been optimized to allow a modest number of baits to be screened in replicates to maximize the identification of independent clones presenting the same protein. This permits greater confidence that interacting proteins identified are legitimate interactors of the bait molecule. Monitoring the phage titer after each affinity selection round provides information on how the affinity selection is progressing as well as on the efficacy of negative controls. One means of titering the phage, and how and what to prepare in advance to allow this process to progress as efficiently as possible, is presented. Attributes of amplicons retrieved following isolation of independent plaque are highlighted that can be used to ascertain how well the affinity selection has progressed. Trouble shooting techniques to minimize false positives or to bypass persistently recovered phage are explained. Means of reducing viral contamination flare up are discussed. PMID:24637694

  20. A 45-amino acid scaffold mined from the Protein Data Bank for high affinity ligand engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kruziki, Max A.; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Woldring, Daniel R.; Duong, Vandon T.; Hackel, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Small protein ligands can provide superior physiological distribution versus antibodies and improved stability, production, and specific conjugation. Systematic evaluation of the Protein Data Bank identified a scaffold to push the limits of small size and robust evolution of stable, high-affinity ligands: 45-residue T7 phage gene 2 protein (Gp2) contains an α-helix opposite a β-sheet with two adjacent loops amenable to mutation. De novo ligand discovery from 108 mutants and directed evolution towards four targets yielded target-specific binders with affinities as strong as 200 ±100 pM, Tm’s from 65 ±3 °C to 80 ±1 °C, and retained activity after thermal denaturation. For cancer targeting, a Gp2 domain for epidermal growth factor receptor was evolved with 18 ±8 nM affinity, receptor-specific binding, and high thermal stability with refolding. The efficiency of evolving new binding function and the size, affinity, specificity, and stability of evolved domains render Gp2 a uniquely effective ligand scaffold. PMID:26165154

  1. Ether analogues of DPA-714 with subnanomolar affinity for the translocator protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Banister, Samuel D; Beinat, Corinne; Wilkinson, Shane M; Shen, Bin; Bartoli, Cecilia; Selleri, Silvia; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Martini, Claudia; Chin, Frederick T; Kassiou, Michael

    2015-03-26

    Sixteen new phenyl alkyl ether derivatives (12, 14-28) of the 5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-ylacetamide (DPA) class were synthesized and evaluated in a competition binding assay against [(3)H]PK11195 using 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) derived from rat kidney mitochondrial fractions. All analogues showed superior binding affinities for TSPO compared to DPA-713 (5) and DPA-714 (6). Picomolar affinities were observed for this class of TSPO ligands in this assay for the first time, with phenethyl ether 28 showing the greatest affinity (Ki = 0.13 nM). Additionally, all analogues increased pregnenolone biosynthesis (134-331% above baseline) in a rat C6 glioma cell steroidogenesis assay. PMID:25725375

  2. Slight temperature changes affect protein affinity and cellular uptake/toxicity of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A.; Behzadi, Shahed

    2013-03-01

    It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular/organ temperature.It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular

  3. Determination of protein binding affinities within hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers (HydroMIPs).

    PubMed

    EL-Sharif, Hazim F; Hawkins, Daniel M; Stevenson, Derek; Reddy, Subrayal M

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers (HydroMIPs) were prepared for several proteins (haemoglobin, myoglobin and catalase) using a family of acrylamide-based monomers. Protein affinity towards the HydroMIPs was investigated under equilibrium conditions and over a range of concentrations using specific binding with Hill slope saturation profiles. We report HydroMIP binding affinities, in terms of equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) within the micro-molar range (25 ± 4 μM, 44 ± 3 μM, 17 ± 2 μM for haemoglobin, myoglobin and catalase respectively within a polyacrylamide-based MIP). The extent of non-specific binding or cross-selectivity for non-target proteins has also been assessed. It is concluded that both selectivity and affinity for both cognate and non-cognate proteins towards the MIPs were dependent on the concentration and the complementarity of their structures and size. This is tentatively attributed to the formation of protein complexes during both the polymerisation and rebinding stages at high protein concentrations. We have used atomic force spectroscopy to characterize molecular interactions in the MIP cavities using protein-modified AFM tips. Attractive and repulsive force curves were obtained for the MIP and NIP (non-imprinted polymer) surfaces (under protein loaded or unloaded states). Our force data suggest that we have produced selective cavities for the template protein in the MIPs and we have been able to quantify the extent of non-specific protein binding on, for example, a non-imprinted polymer (NIP) control surface. PMID:24950144

  4. The Use of Affinity Tags to Overcome Obstacles in Recombinant Protein Expression and Purification.

    PubMed

    Amarasinghe, Chinthaka; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Research and industrial demands for recombinant proteins continue to increase over time for their broad applications in structural and functional studies and as therapeutic agents. These applications often require large quantities of recombinant protein at desirable purity, which highlights the importance of developing and improving production approaches that provide high level expression and readily achievable purity of recombinant protein. E. coli is the most widely used host for the expression of a diverse range of proteins at low cost. However, there are common pitfalls that can severely limit the expression of exogenous proteins, such as stability, low solubility and toxicity to the host cell. To overcome these obstacles, one strategy that has found to be promising is the use of affinity tags or carrier peptide to aid in the folding of the target protein, increase solubility, lower toxicity and increase the level of expression. In the meantime, the tags and fusion proteins can be designed to facilitate affinity purification. Since the fusion protein may not exhibit the native conformation of the target protein, various strategies have been developed to remove the tag during or after purification to avoid potential complications in structural and functional studies and to obtain native biological activities. Despite extensive research and rapid development along these lines, there are unsolved problems and imperfect applications. This focused review compares and contrasts various strategies that employ affinity tags to improve bacterial expression and to facilitate purification of recombinant proteins. The pros and cons of the approaches are discussed for more effective applications and new directions of future improvement. PMID:26216265

  5. Poly(zwitterionic)protein conjugates offer increased stability without sacrificing binding affinity or bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Andrew J.; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with therapeutic proteins is an attractive approach to targeting a number of challenging diseases. Unfortunately, the native proteins themselves are often unstable in physiological conditions, reducing bioavailability and therefore increasing the dose that is required. Conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is often used to increase stability, but this has a detrimental effect on bioactivity. Here, we introduce conjugation with zwitterionic polymers such as poly(carboxybetaine). We show that poly(carboxybetaine) conjugation improves stability in a manner similar to PEGylation, but that the new conjugates retain or even improve the binding affinity as a result of enhanced protein–substrate hydrophobic interactions. This chemistry opens a new avenue for the development of protein therapeutics by avoiding the need to compromise between stability and affinity. PMID:22169873

  6. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17812.001 PMID:27436096

  7. Affinity chromatography of chaperones based on denatured proteins: Analysis of cell lysates of different origin.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, N Yu; Sikorskaya, E V; Marchenkov, V V; Kashparov, I A; Semisotnov, G V

    2016-03-01

    Molecular chaperones are involved in folding, oligomerization, transport, and degradation of numerous cellular proteins. Most of chaperones are heat-shock proteins (HSPs). A number of diseases of various organisms are accompanied by changes in the structure and functional activity of chaperones, thereby revealing their vital importance. One of the fundamental properties of chaperones is their ability to bind polypeptides lacking a rigid spatial structure. Here, we demonstrate that affinity chromatography using sorbents with covalently attached denatured proteins allows effective purification and quantitative assessment of their bound protein partners. Using pure Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL (Hsp60), the capacity of denatured pepsin or lysozyme-based affinity sorbents was evaluated as 1 mg and 1.4 mg of GroEL per 1 ml of sorbent, respectively. Cell lysates of bacteria (E. coli, Thermus thermophilus, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis), archaea (Halorubrum lacusprofundi) as well as the lysate of rat liver mitochondria were analyzed using affinity carrier with denatured lysozyme. It was found that, apart from Hsp60, other proteins with a molecular weight of about 100, 50, 40, and 20 kDa are able to interact with denatured lysozyme. PMID:26644295

  8. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. PMID:27436096

  9. SnAvi--a new tandem tag for high-affinity protein-complex purification.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, Ursula; Schlosser, Andreas; Müller, Kristian M; Schäfer, Angelika; Katava, Nenad; Baumeister, Ralf; Schulze, Ekkehard

    2010-04-01

    Systematic tandem-affinity-purification (TAP) of protein complexes was tremendously successful in yeast and has changed the general concept of how we understand protein function in eukaryotic cells. The transfer of this method to other model organisms has been difficult and may require specific adaptations. We were especially interested to establish a cell-type-specific TAP system for Caenorhabditis elegans, a model animal well suited to high-throughput analysis, proteomics and systems biology. By combining the high-affinity interaction between in vivo biotinylated target-proteins and streptavidin with the usage of a newly identified epitope of the publicly shared SB1 monoclonal antibody we created a novel in vivo fluorescent tag, the SnAvi-Tag. We show the versatile application of the SnAvi-Tag in Escherichia coli, vertebrate cells and in C. elegans for tandem affinity purification of protein complexes, western blotting and also for the in vivo sub-cellular localization of labelled proteins. PMID:20047968

  10. Affinity purification of recombinant proteins using a novel silica-binding peptide as a fusion tag.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Mohamed A A; Motomura, Kei; Ikeda, Takeshi; Ishida, Takenori; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio

    2014-06-01

    We recently reported that silica is deposited on the coat of Bacillus cereus spores as a layer of nanometer-sized particles (Hirota et al. 2010 J Bacteriol 192: 111-116). Gene disruption analysis revealed that the spore coat protein CotB1 mediates the accumulation of silica (our unpublished results). Here, we report that B. cereus CotB1 (171 amino acids [aa]) and its C-terminal 14-aa region (corresponding to residues 158-171, designated CotB1p) show strong affinity for silica particles, with dissociation constants at pH 8.0 of 2.09 and 1.24 nM, respectively. Using CotB1 and CotB1p as silica-binding tags, we developed a silica-based affinity purification method in which silica particles are used as an adsorbent for CotB1/CotB1p fusion proteins. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) technology was employed to release the target proteins from the adsorbed fusion proteins. SUMO-protease-mediated site-specific cleavage at the C-terminus of the fused SUMO sequence released the tagless target proteins into the liquid phase while leaving the tag region still bound to the solid phase. Using the fluorescent protein mCherry as a model, our purification method achieved 85 % recovery, with a purity of 95 % and yields of 0.60 ± 0.06 and 1.13 ± 0.13 mg per 10-mL bacterial culture for the CotB1-SUMO-mCherry and CotB1p-SUMO-mCherry fusions, respectively. CotB1p, a short 14-aa peptide, which demonstrates high affinity for silica, could be a promising fusion tag for both affinity purification and enzyme immobilization on silica supports. PMID:24756322

  11. Evaluation of Affinity-Tagged Protein Expression Strategies using Local and Global Isotope Ratio Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hervey, IV, William Judson; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Lankford, Patricia K; Owens, Elizabeth T; McKeown, Catherine K; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Foote, Linda J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; McDonald, W Hayes; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B

    2009-01-01

    Protein enrichments of engineered, affinity-tagged (or bait ) fusion proteins with interaction partners are often laden with background, non-specific proteins, due to interactions that occur in vitro as an artifact of the technique. Furthermore, the in vivo expression of the bait protein may itself affect physiology or metabolism. In this study, intrinsic affinity purification challenges were investigated in a model protein complex, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), encompassing chromosome- and plasmid-encoding strategies for bait proteins in two different microbial species: Escherichia coli and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Isotope ratio measurements of bait protein expression strains relative to native, wild-type strains were performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to assess bait protein expression strategies in each species. Authentic interacting proteins of RNAP were successfully discerned from artifactual co-isolating proteins by the isotopic differentiation of interactions as random or targeted (I-DIRT) method (A. J. Tackett et al. J. Proteome Res. 2005, 4 (5), 1752-1756). To investigate broader effects of bait protein production in the bacteria, we compared proteomes from strains harboring a plasmid that encodes an affinity-tagged subunit (RpoA) of the RNAP complex with the corresponding wild-type strains using stable isotope metabolic labeling. The ratio of RpoA abundance in plasmid strains versus wild type was 0.8 for R. palustris and 1.7 for E. coli. While most other proteins showed no appreciable difference, proteins significantly increased in abundance in plasmid-encoded bait-expressing strains of both species included the plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance protein, GenR and proteins involved in amino acid biosynthesis. Together, these local, complex-specific and more global, whole proteome isotopic abundance ratio measurements provided a tool for evaluating both in vivo and in vitro effects of plasmid

  12. Towards understanding of Nipah virus attachment protein assembly and the role of protein affinity and crowding for membrane curvature events.

    SciTech Connect

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Hayden, Carl C.; Negrete, Oscar A.; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio

    2013-10-01

    Pathogenic viruses are a primary threat to our national security and to the health and economy of our world. Effective defense strategies to combat viral infection and spread require the development of understanding of the mechanisms that these pathogens use to invade the host cell. We present in this report results of our research into viral particle recognition and fusion to cell membranes and the role that protein affinity and confinement in lipid domains plays in membrane curvature in cellular fusion and fission events. Herein, we describe 1) the assembly of the G attachment protein of Nipah virus using point mutation studies to define its role in viral particle fusion to the cell membrane, 2) how lateral pressure of membrane bound proteins induce curvature in model membrane systems, and 3) the role of membrane curvature in the selective partitioning of molecular receptors and specific affinity of associated proteins.

  13. Cross-linking approach to affinity capture of protein complexes from chaotrope-solubilized cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Alloza, Iraide; Martens, Erik; Hawthorne, Susan; Vandenbroeck, Koen

    2004-01-01

    Affinity capture methods are widely used for isolation and analysis of protein complexes. Short peptide tags fused to the protein of interest normally facilitate straightforward purification and detection of interacting proteins. We investigated the suitability of applying C-terminally hexahistidine-tagged interleukin-12 (IL-12) alpha- and beta-chains as "bait" proteins for cocapturing novel binding partners using heterologous recombinant human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) cell lines. The beta-chain, but not the alpha-chain, extracted from cell lysates was capable of binding to the Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity resin under nondenaturing conditions. Retention of the alpha-chain on this matrix was dependent on treatment of cell lysates with high concentrations of chaotropes such as urea. Since under these conditions any noncovalent protein associations are destroyed, prior cross-linking of proteins interacting with the alpha-chain in intact cells was required. The use of the thiol-cleavable cross-linker 3,3'-dithiobis(succinimidyl proprionate) facilitated dissociation of alpha-chain-binding proteins by means of dithiothreitol following purification. Using this approach we were able to demonstrate a strong interaction between the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone calreticulin (CRT) and the IL-12 alpha-chain that was confirmed in a reciprocal anti-CRT immunoprecipitation assay. The assay presented here provides a simple approach to exposing concealed hexahistidine tags while retaining native noncovalent protein interactions and should be generally applicable in a range of pull-down or affinity capture methods aiming at analysis of protein complexes. PMID:14654056

  14. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

    PubMed

    Paramelle, David; Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of currently

  15. Isolation, identification and characterisation of starch-interacting proteins by 2-D affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Irwin, Jennifer A; Higgins, Jody; Rahman, Sadequr; Morell, Matthew K

    2006-05-01

    A 2-D affinity electrophoretic technique (2-DAE) has been used to isolate proteins that interact with various starch components from total barley endosperm extracts. In the first dimension, proteins are separated by native PAGE. The second-dimensional gel contains polysaccharides such as amylopectin and glycogen. The migration of starch-interacting proteins in this dimension is determined by their affinity towards a particular polysaccharide and these proteins are therefore spatially separated from the bulk of proteins in the crude extract. Four distinct proteins demonstrate significant affinity for amylopectin and have been identified as starch branching enzyme I (SBEI), starch branching enzyme IIa (SBEIIa), SBEIIb and starch phosphorylase using polyclonal antibodies and zymogram activity analysis. In the case of starch phosphorylase, a protein spot was excised from a 2-DAE polyacrylamide gel and analysed using Q-TOF MS/MS, resulting in the alignment of three internal peptide sequences with the known sequence of the wheat plastidic starch phosphorylase isoform. This assignment was confirmed by the determination of the enzyme's function using zymogram analysis. Dissociation constants (Kd) were calculated for the three enzymes at 4 degrees C and values of 0.20, 0.21 and 1.3 g/L were determined for SBEI, SBEIIa and starch phosphorylase, respectively. Starch synthase I could also be resolved from the other proteins in the presence of glycogen and its identity was confirmed using a polyclonal antibody and by activity analysis. The 2-DAE method described here is simple, though powerful, enabling protein separation from crude extracts on the basis of function. PMID:16645949

  16. Binding affinity prediction for protein-ligand complexes based on β contacts and B factor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Li, Jinyan

    2013-11-25

    Accurate determination of protein-ligand binding affinity is a fundamental problem in biochemistry useful for many applications including drug design and protein-ligand docking. A number of scoring functions have been proposed for the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity. However, accurate prediction is still a challenging problem because poor performance is often seen in the evaluation under the leave-one-cluster-out cross-validation (LCOCV). We introduce a new scoring function named B2BScore to improve the prediction performance. B2BScore integrates two physicochemical properties for protein-ligand binding affinity prediction. One is the property of β contacts. A β contact between two atoms requires no other atoms to interrupt the atomic contact and assumes that the two atoms should have enough direct contact area. The other is the property of B factor to capture the atomic mobility in the dynamic protein-ligand binding process. Tested on the PDBBind2009 data set, B2BScore shows superior prediction performance to existing methods on independent test data as well as under the LCOCV evaluation framework. In particular, B2BScore achieves a significant LCOCV improvement across 26 protein clusters-a big increase of the averaged Pearson's correlation coefficients from 0.418 to 0.518 and a significant decrease of standard deviation of the coefficients from 0.352 to 0.196. We also identified several important and intuitive contact descriptors of protein-ligand binding through the random forest learning in B2BScore. Some of these descriptors are closely related to contacts between carbon atoms without covalent-bond oxygen/nitrogen, preferred contacts of metal ions, interfacial backbone atoms from proteins, or π rings. Some others are negative descriptors relating to those contacts with nitrogen atoms without covalent-bond hydrogens or nonpreferred contacts of metal ions. These descriptors can be directly used to guide protein-ligand docking. PMID:24191692

  17. Eosinophil cationic protein high-affinity binding to bacteria-wall lipopolysaccharides and peptidoglycans.

    PubMed

    Torrent, Marc; Navarro, Susanna; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Nogués, M Victòria; Boix, Ester

    2008-03-18

    The eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is an eosinophil-secreted RNase involved in the immune host defense, with a cytotoxic activity against a wide range of pathogens. The protein displays antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains. The protein can destabilize lipid bilayers, although the action at the membrane level can only partially account for its bactericidal activity. We have now shown that ECP can bind with high affinity to the bacteria-wall components. We have analyzed its specific association to lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), its lipid A component, and peptidoglycans (PGNs). ECP high-affinity binding capacity to LPSs and lipid A has been analyzed by a fluorescent displacement assay, and the corresponding dissociation constants were calculated using the protein labeled with a fluorophor. The protein also binds in vivo to bacteria cells. Ultrastructural analysis of cell bacteria wall and morphology have been visualized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy in both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus strains. The protein damages the bacteria surface and induces the cell population aggregation on E. coli cultures. Although both bacteria strain cells retain their shape and no cell lysis is patent, the protein can induce in E. coli the outer membrane detachment. ECP also activates the cytoplasmic membrane depolarization in both strains. Moreover, the depolarization activity on E. coli does not require any pretreatment to overcome the outer membrane barrier. The protein binding to the bacteria-wall surface would represent a first encounter step key in its antimicrobial mechanism of action. PMID:18293932

  18. Novel Ubiquitin-derived High Affinity Binding Proteins with Tumor Targeting Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Lorey, Susan; Fiedler, Erik; Kunert, Anja; Nerkamp, Jörg; Lange, Christian; Fiedler, Markus; Bosse-Doenecke, Eva; Meysing, Maren; Gloser, Manja; Rundfeldt, Chris; Rauchhaus, Una; Hänssgen, Ilka; Göttler, Thomas; Steuernagel, Arnd; Fiedler, Ulrike; Haupts, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Targeting effector molecules to tumor cells is a promising mode of action for cancer therapy and diagnostics. Binding proteins with high affinity and specificity for a tumor target that carry effector molecules such as toxins, cytokines, or radiolabels to their intended site of action are required for these applications. In order to yield high tumor accumulation while maintaining low levels in healthy tissues and blood, the half-life of such conjugates needs to be in an optimal range. Scaffold-based binding molecules are small proteins with high affinity and short systemic circulation. Due to their low molecular complexity, they are well suited for combination with effector molecules as well as half-life extension technologies yielding therapeutics with half-lives adapted to the specific therapy. We have identified ubiquitin as an ideal scaffold protein due to its outstanding biophysical and biochemical properties. Based on a dimeric ubiquitin library, high affinity and specific binding molecules, so-called Affilin® molecules, have been selected against the extradomain B of fibronectin, a target almost exclusively expressed in tumor tissues. Extradomain B-binding molecules feature high thermal and serum stability as well as strong in vitro target binding and in vivo tumor accumulation. Application of several half-life extension technologies results in molecules of largely unaffected affinity but significantly prolonged in vivo half-life and tumor retention. Our results demonstrate the utility of ubiquitin as a scaffold for the generation of high affinity binders in a modular fashion, which can be combined with effector molecules and half-life extension technologies. PMID:24474690

  19. Routes to improve binding capacities of affinity resins demonstrated for Protein A chromatography.

    PubMed

    Müller, Egbert; Vajda, Judith

    2016-05-15

    Protein A chromatography is a well-established platform in downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies. Dynamic binding capacities are continuously increasing with almost every newly launched Protein A resin. Nevertheless, binding capacities of affinity chromatography resins cannot compete with binding capacities obtained with modern ion exchange media. Capacities of affinity resins are roughly 50% lower. High binding capacities of ion exchange media are supported by spacer technologies. In this article, we review existing spacer technologies of affinity chromatography resins. A yet known effective approach to increase the dynamic binding capacity of Protein A resins is oligomerization of the particular Protein A motifs. This resembles the tentacle technology used in ion exchange chromatography. Dynamic binding capacities of a hexameric ligand are roughly twice as high compared to capacities obtained with a tetrameric ligand. Further capacity increases up to 130mg/ml can be realized with the hexamer ligand, if the sodium phosphate buffer concentration is increased from 20 to 100mM. Equilibrium isotherms revealed a BET shape for the hexamer ligand at monoclonal antibody liquid phase concentrations higher than 9mg/ml. The apparent multilayer formation may be due to hydrophobic forces. Other quality attributes such as recovery, aggregate content, and overall purity of the captured monoclonal antibody are not affected. PMID:26830536

  20. PBSA_E: A PBSA-Based Free Energy Estimator for Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2016-05-23

    Improving the accuracy of scoring functions for estimating protein-ligand binding affinity is of significant interest as well as practical utility in drug discovery. In this work, PBSA_E, a new free energy estimator based on the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) descriptors, has been developed. This free energy estimator was optimized using high-quality experimental data from a training set consisting of 145 protein-ligand complexes. The method was validated on two separate test sets containing 121 and 130 complexes. Comparison of the binding affinities predicted using the present method with those obtained using three popular scoring functions, i.e., GlideXP, GlideSP, and SYBYL_F, demonstrated that the PBSA_E method is more accurate. This new energy estimator requires a MM/PBSA calculation of the protein-ligand binding energy for a single complex configuration, which is typically obtained by optimizing the crystal structure. The present study shows that PBSA_E has the potential to become a robust tool for more reliable estimation of protein-ligand binding affinity in structure-based drug design. PMID:27088302

  1. Rational stabilization of the C-LytA affinity tag by protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M; Maestro, Beatriz; Mollá-Morales, Almudena; Sanz, Jesús M

    2008-12-01

    The C-LytA protein constitutes the choline-binding module of the LytA amidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Owing to its affinity for choline and analogs, it is regularly used as an affinity tag for the purification of proteins in a single chromatographic step. In an attempt to build a robust variant against thermal denaturation, we have engineered several salt bridges on the protein surface. All the stabilizing mutations were pooled in a single variant, C-LytAm7, which contained seven changes: Y25K, F27K, M33E, N51K, S52K, T85K and T108K. The mutant displays a 7 degrees C thermal stabilization compared with the wild-type form, together with a complete reversibility upon heating and a higher kinetic stability. Moreover, the accumulation of intermediates in the unfolding of C-LytA is virtually abolished for C-LytAm7. The differences in stability become more evident when the proteins are bound to a DEAE-cellulose affinity column, as most of wild-type C-LytA is denatured at approximately 65 degrees C, whereas C-LytAm7 may stand temperatures up to 90 degrees C. Finally, the change in the isoelectric point of C-LytAm7 enhances its solubility at acidic pHs. Therefore, C-LytAm7 behaves as an improved affinity tag and supports the engineering of surface salt bridges as an effective approach for protein stabilization. PMID:18840883

  2. High affinity binding sites for the Wilms' tumour suppressor protein WT1.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T B; Barilla, K C; Romaniuk, P J

    1995-01-01

    The Wilms' tumour suppressor protein (WT1) is a putative transcriptional regulatory protein with four zinc fingers, the last three of which have extensive sequence homology to the early growth response-1 (EGR-1) protein. Although a peptide encoding the zinc finger domain of WT1[-KTS] can bind to a consensus 9 bp EGR-1 binding site, current knowledge about the mechanisms of zinc finger-DNA interactions would predict a more extended recognition site for WT1. Using a WT1[-KTS] zinc finger peptide (WT1-ZFP) and the template oligonucleotide GCG-TGG-GCG-NNNNN in a binding site selection assay, we have determined that the highest affinity binding sites for WT1[-KTS] consist of a 12 bp sequence GCG-TGG-GCG-(T/G)(G/A/T)(T/G). The binding of WT1-ZFP to a number of the selected sequences was measured by a quantitative nitrocellulose filter binding assay, and the results demonstrated that these sequences have a 4-fold higher affinity for the protein than the nonselected sequence GCG-TGG-GCG-CCC. The full length WT1 protein regulates transcription of reporter genes linked to these high affinity sequences. A peptide lacking the first zinc finger of WT1[-KTS], but containing the three zinc fingers homologous to EGR-1 failed to select any specific sequences downstream of the GCG-TGG-GCG consensus sequence in the binding site selection assay. DNA sequences in the fetal promoter of the insulin-like growth factor II gene that confer WT1 responsiveness in a transient transfection assay bind to the WT1-ZFP with affinities that vary according to the number of consensus bases each sequence possesses in the finger 1 subsite. PMID:7862533

  3. Learning a peptide-protein binding affinity predictor with kernel ridge regression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cellular function of a vast majority of proteins is performed through physical interactions with other biomolecules, which, most of the time, are other proteins. Peptides represent templates of choice for mimicking a secondary structure in order to modulate protein-protein interaction. They are thus an interesting class of therapeutics since they also display strong activity, high selectivity, low toxicity and few drug-drug interactions. Furthermore, predicting peptides that would bind to a specific MHC alleles would be of tremendous benefit to improve vaccine based therapy and possibly generate antibodies with greater affinity. Modern computational methods have the potential to accelerate and lower the cost of drug and vaccine discovery by selecting potential compounds for testing in silico prior to biological validation. Results We propose a specialized string kernel for small bio-molecules, peptides and pseudo-sequences of binding interfaces. The kernel incorporates physico-chemical properties of amino acids and elegantly generalizes eight kernels, comprised of the Oligo, the Weighted Degree, the Blended Spectrum, and the Radial Basis Function. We provide a low complexity dynamic programming algorithm for the exact computation of the kernel and a linear time algorithm for it’s approximation. Combined with kernel ridge regression and SupCK, a novel binding pocket kernel, the proposed kernel yields biologically relevant and good prediction accuracy on the PepX database. For the first time, a machine learning predictor is capable of predicting the binding affinity of any peptide to any protein with reasonable accuracy. The method was also applied to both single-target and pan-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex class II benchmark datasets and three Quantitative Structure Affinity Model benchmark datasets. Conclusion On all benchmarks, our method significantly (p-value ≤ 0.057) outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods at predicting

  4. Development and Validation of an Affinity Chromatography-Protein G Method for IgG Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Paradina Fernández, Lesly; Calvo, Loany; Viña, Lisel

    2014-01-01

    Nimotuzumab, an IgG that recognizes the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) overexpressed in some tumors, is used in the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer. For the quantification of this protein in cell culture supernatants, protein G-HPLC affinity chromatography is used due to its high affinity and specificity for antibodies of this class. The technique relies on the comparison of the area under the curve of the elution peak of the samples to be evaluated versus to a calibration curve of well-known concentrations and was validated by assessment of its robustness, specificity, repeatability, intermediate precision, accuracy, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, and range. According to results of the study all validation parameters fulfilled the preestablished acceptance criteria and demonstrated the feasibility of the assay for the analysis of samples of cell culture supernatant as well as drug product. PMID:27379284

  5. Twin-column CaptureSMB: a novel cyclic process for protein A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Angarita, Monica; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Baur, Daniel; Lievrouw, Roel; Lissens, Geert; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-04-10

    A twin-column counter-current chromatography processes, CaptureSMB, was used for the protein A affinity capture of a monoclonal antibody (mAb). By means of sequential loading, the process improves the utilization of the stationary phase by achieving loadings much closer to the static binding capacity of the resin in comparison to batch chromatography. Using a mAb capture case study with protein A affinity chromatography, the performance and product quality obtained from CaptureSMB and batch processes were compared. The effect of the flow rate, column length and titer concentration on the process performance and product quality were evaluated. CaptureSMB showed superior performance compared to batch chromatography with respect to productivity, capacity utilization, product concentration and buffer consumption. A simplified economic evaluation showed that CaptureSMB could decrease resin costs of 10-30% depending on the manufacturing scenario. PMID:25748537

  6. Purification of CD47-streptavidin fusion protein from bacterial lysate using biotin-agarose affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Nasrin; Peng, Ching-An

    2016-07-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed transmembrane glycoprotein that modulates the activity of a plethora of immune cells via its extracellular domain. Therefore, CD47 plays important roles in the regulation of immune responses and may serve as targets for the development of immunotherapeutic agents. To make sure CD47 functionality is intact under the process of protein conjugation, CD47-streptavidin fusion protein was expressed and purified because it can easily bind to biotin-tagged materials via the unique biotin-streptavidin affinity. In this study, gene sequences of CD47 extracellular domain (CD47ECD) and core streptavidin (coreSA) with a total 834 bp were inserted into pET20b plasmid to construct recombinant plasmid encoding CD47-SA fusion gene. After bacteria transformation, the CD47-SA fusion protein was expressed by isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction. The collected bacteria lysate was loaded on biotinylated agarose to proceed the purification of CD47-SA fusion protein. Due to the unexpected high affinity between biotin and coreSA, standard washing and elution approaches (e.g., varying pH, using biotin, and applying guanidine hydrochloride) reported for biotin-streptavidin affinity chromatography were not able to separate the target fusion protein. Instead, using low concentration of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 followed with alkaline buffer could efficiently weaken the binding between biotin and coreSA, thereby eluting out CD47-SA fusion protein from the biotin agarose column. The purified CD47-SA fusion protein was further characterized by molecular biology methods and its antiphagocytic functionality was confirmed by the phagocytosis assay. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:949-958, 2016. PMID:27110670

  7. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  8. Affinity thermoprecipitatin: Contribution of the efficiency of ligand-protein interaction and access of the ligand.

    PubMed

    Galaev, I Y; Mattiasson, B

    1993-05-01

    Conjugates to two thermoprecipitating polymers, poly(N-vinyl caprolactam) and poly(N-isopropylacrylmide), with soybean trypsin inhibitor, Cibacron Blue 3GA, Cu-iminodiacetic acid, and p-aminobenzamidine were synthesized. The interaction of these conjugates with trypsin and lactate dehydrogenase was studied. Coupling of the ligand to a polymer resulted in a 100-1000-fold decrease in enzyme-affinity. Rough theoretical estimates revealed that a successful affinity precipitation required that the binding of a target protein and a ligand coupled to a polymer have binding constants on the order of 10(-7)-10(-8) M. Such strong affinity of low molecular weight ligands that can provide binding constants of 10(-9)-10(-11) M or alternatively multipoint attachment of the target protein molecule. The ligand in the ligand-polymer conjugate is still accessible to the protein after thermoprecipitation, and the latter can bind with the particle of the dispersion of thermoprecipitated ligand-polymer precipitate may result in stripping of enzyme molecules from the surface of the particles. PMID:18601296

  9. N-terminal processing of affinity-tagged recombinant proteins purified by IMAC procedures.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Jane T; Fredericks, Dale P; Christensen, Thorkild; Bruun Schiødt, Christine; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-07-01

    The ability of a new class of metal binding tags to facilitate the purification of recombinant proteins, exemplified by the tagged glutathione S-transferase and human growth hormone, from Escherichia coli fermentation broths and lysates has been further investigated. These histidine-containing tags exhibit high affinity for borderline metal ions chelated to the immobilised ligand, 1,4,7-triazacyclononane (tacn). The use of this tag-tacn immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) system engenders high selectivity with regard to host cell protein removal and permits facile tag removal from the E. coli-expressed recombinant protein. In particular, these tags were specifically designed to enable their efficient removal by the dipeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 (DAP-1), thus capturing the advantages of high substrate specificity and rates of cleavage. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the cleaved products from the DAP-1 digestion of the recombinant N-terminally tagged proteins confirmed the complete removal of the tag within 4-12 h under mild experimental conditions. Overall, this study demonstrates that the use of tags specifically designed to target tacn-based IMAC resins offers a comprehensive and flexible approach for the purification of E. coli-expressed recombinant proteins, where complete removal of the tag is an essential prerequisite for subsequent application of the purified native proteins in studies aimed at delineating the molecular and cellular basis of specific biological processes. PMID:25727088

  10. Identification of proteins associated with RNA polymerase III using a modified tandem chromatin affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Thuy-Trinh; Saguez, Cyril; Conesa, Christine; Lefebvre, Olivier; Acker, Joël

    2015-02-01

    To identify the proteins associated with the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) machinery in exponentially growing yeast cells, we developed our own tandem chromatin affinity purification procedure (TChAP) after in vivo cross-link, allowing a reproducible and good recovery of the protein bait and its associated partners. In contrast to TFIIIA that could only be purified as a free protein, this protocol allows us to capture free Pol III together with Pol III bound on its target genes. Transcription factors, elongation factors, RNA-associated proteins and proteins involved in Pol III biogenesis were identified by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the presence of all the TFIIIB subunits found associated with Pol III together with the absence of TFIIIC and chromatin factors including histones suggest that DNA-bound Pol III purified using TChAP is mainly engaged in transcription reinitiation. PMID:25086199

  11. The elution of certain protein affinity tags with millimolar concentrations of diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Baliova, Martina; Juhasova, Anna; Jursky, Frantisek

    2015-12-01

    Diclofenac (2-[(2, 6-dichlorophenyl)amino] benzeneacetic acid) is a sparingly soluble, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapeutically acting at low micromolar concentrations. In pH range from 8 to 11, its aqueous solubility can be increased up to 200 times by the presence of counter ions such as sodium. Our protein interaction studies revealed that a millimolar concentration of sodium diclofenac is able to elute glutathione S-transferase (GST), cellulose binding protein (CBD), and maltose binding protein (MBP) but not histidine-tagged or PDZ-tagged proteins from their affinity resins. The elution efficiency of diclofenac is comparable with the eluting agents normally used at similar concentrations. Native gel electrophoresis of sodium diclofenac-treated proteins showed that the interaction is non-covalent and non-denaturing. These results suggest that sodium diclofenac, in addition to its pharmaceutical applications, can also be exploited as a lead for the development of new proteomics reagents. PMID:26551210

  12. Predicting binding affinities of diverse pharmaceutical chemicals to human serum plasma proteins using QSPR modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Basant, N; Gupta, S; Singh, K P

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the plasma protein binding (PPB) affinity of chemicals is of paramount significance in the drug development process. In this study, ensemble machine learning-based QSPR models have been established for a four-category classification and PPB affinity prediction of diverse compounds using a large PPB dataset of 930 compounds and in accordance with the OECD guidelines. The structural diversity of the chemicals was tested by the Tanimoto similarity index. The external predictive power of the developed QSPR models was evaluated through internal and external validations. In the QSPR models, XLogP was the most important descriptor. In the test data, the classification QSPR models rendered an accuracy of >93%, while the regression QSPR models yielded r(2) of >0.920 between the measured and predicted PPB affinities, with the root mean squared error <9.77. Values of statistical coefficients derived for the test data were above their threshold limits, thus put a high confidence in this analysis. The QSPR models in this study performed better than any of the previous studies. The results suggest that the developed QSPR models are reliable for predicting the PPB affinity of structurally diverse chemicals. They can be useful for initial screening of candidate molecules in the drug development process. PMID:26854728

  13. Insights into the conformational equilibria of maltose-binding protein by analysis of high affinity mutants.

    PubMed

    Telmer, Patrick G; Shilton, Brian H

    2003-09-01

    The affinity of maltose-binding protein (MBP) for maltose and related carbohydrates was greatly increased by removal of groups in the interface opposite the ligand binding cleft. The wild-type protein has a KD of 1200 nM for maltose; mutation of residues Met-321 and Gln-325, both to alanine, resulted in a KD for maltose of 70 nM; deletion of 4 residues, Glu-172, Asn-173, Lys-175, and Tyr-176, which are part of a poorly ordered loop, results in a KD for maltose of 110 nM. Combining the mutations yields an increased affinity for maltodextrins and a KD of 6 nM for maltotriose. Comparison of ligand binding by the mutants, using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, indicates that decreases in the off-rate are responsible for the increased affinity. Small-angle x-ray scattering was used to demonstrate that the mutations do not significantly affect the solution conformation of MBP in either the presence or absence of maltose. The crystal structures of selected mutants showed that the mutations do not cause significant structural changes in either the closed or open conformation of MBP. These studies show that interactions in the interface opposite the ligand binding cleft, which we term the "balancing interface," are responsible for modulating the affinity of MBP for its ligand. Our results are consistent with a model in which the ligand-bound protein alternates between the closed and open conformations, and removal of interactions in the balancing interface decreases the stability of the open conformation, without affecting the closed conformation. PMID:12794084

  14. NiCoMnO4: A Bifunctional Affinity Probe for His-Tagged Protein Purification and Phosphorylation Sites Recognition.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoyue; Chen, Long; Zhang, Chaoqun; Xu, Xinyuan; Zhang, Yiding; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2016-07-27

    A bifunctional affinity probe NiCoMnO4 was designed and prepared with controllable morphology and size using facile methods. It was observed that the probe could be applied in His-tagged proteins purification and phosphopeptides enrichment simply through the buffer modulation. NiCoMnO4 particles showed satisfactory cycling performance for His-tagged proteins purification and broad pH-tolerance of loading buffer for phosphopeptides affinity. Therefore, a high-throughput, cost-effective, and efficient protein/peptide purification method was developed within 10 min based on the novel bifunctional affinity probe. PMID:27381638

  15. Influence of Sulfolane on ESI-MS Measurements of Protein-Ligand Affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuyu; Richards, Michele R.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-03-01

    The results of an investigation into the influence of sulfolane, a commonly used supercharging agent, on electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements of protein-ligand affinities are described. Binding measurements carried out on four protein-carbohydrate complexes, lysozyme with β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)- d-GlcNAc, a single chain variable fragment and α- d-Gal-(1→2)-[α- d-Abe-(1→3)]-α- d-Man-OCH3, cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer with β- d-Gal-(1→3)-β- d-GalNAc-(1→4)[α- d-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β- d-Gal-(1→4)-β- d-Glc, and a fragment of galectin 3 and α- l-Fuc-(1→2)-β- d-Gal-(1→3)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→3)-β- d-Gal-(1→4)-β- d-Glc, revealed that sulfolane generally reduces the apparent (as measured by ESI-MS) protein-ligand affinities. To establish the origin of this effect, a detailed study was undertaken using the lysozyme-tetrasaccharide interaction as a model system. Measurements carried out using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies reveal that sulfolane reduces the binding affinity in solution but does not cause any significant change in the higher order structure of lysozyme or to the intermolecular interactions. These observations confirm that changes to the structure of lysozyme in bulk solution are not responsible for the supercharging effect induced by sulfolane. Moreover, the agreement between the ESI-MS and ITC-derived affinities indicates that there is no dissociation of the complex during ESI or in the gas phase (i.e., in-source dissociation). This finding suggests that supercharging of lysozyme by sulfolane is not related to protein unfolding during the ESI process. Binding measurements performed using liquid sample desorption ESI-MS revealed that protein supercharging with sulfolane can be achieved without a reduction in affinity.

  16. Identification of high-affinity calmodulin-binding proteins in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, R.M.; Dedman, J.R.; Shenolikar, S.

    1987-03-01

    The Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent binding of (/sup 125/I) calmodulin (CaM) to hepatic proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was utilized to identify CaM binding or acceptor proteins or CAPs. Two proteins of apparent molecular weight of 60,000 (CAP-60) and 45,000 (CAP-45) comprised > 80% of the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent CaM binding in rat liver cytosol. CAP-60 and CAP-45 were partially purified by a variety of chromatographic steps, including affinity chromatography on CaM Sepharose. CAP-60 possessed a native molecular size of 400,000, indicating it to be the CaM-binding subunit of a larger oligomeric complex. In contrast, CAP-45 was monomeric as judged by gel filtration. Neither CAP-60 nor CAP-45 possessed chromatographic properties consistent with known CaM-dependent enzymes reported in the literature. Two-dimensional peptide mapping provided convincing evidence that CAP-60 and CAP-45 were unrelated to other well-characterized CAPs, namely Ca/sup 2 +/ (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II, calcineurin, or the CaM-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. The relative abundance and high affinity for CaM could suggest that these novel target proteins, CAP-60 and CAP-45, represent a dominant pathway for CaM action in the mammalian liver.

  17. Tetrapyrrole binding affinity of the murine and human p22HBP heme-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Micaelo, Nuno M; Macedo, Anjos L; Goodfellow, Brian J; Félix, Vítor

    2010-11-01

    We present the first systematic molecular modeling study of the binding properties of murine (mHBP) and human (hHBP) p22HBP protein (heme-binding protein) with four tetrapyrrole ring systems belonging to the heme biosynthetic pathway: iron protoporphyrin IX (HEMIN), protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), coproporphyrin III (CPIII), coproporphyrin I (CPI). The relative binding affinities predicted by our computational study were found to be similar to those observed experimentally, providing a first rational structural analysis of the molecular recognition mechanism, by p22HBP, toward a number of different tetrapyrrole ligands. To probe the structure of these p22HBP protein complexes, docking, molecular dynamics and MM-PBSA methodologies supported by experimental NMR ring current shift data have been employed. The tetrapyrroles studied were found to bind murine p22HBP with the following binding affinity order: HEMIN> PPIX> CPIII> CPI, which ranged from -22.2 to -6.1 kcal/mol. In general, the protein-tetrapyrrole complexes are stabilized by non-bonded interactions between the tetrapyrrole propionate groups and basic residues of the protein, and by the preferential solvation of the complex compared to the unbound components. PMID:20800521

  18. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Brian H; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J; Engelke, David R

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant "CelTag" DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies. PMID:26715090

  19. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Brian H.; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J.; Engelke, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant “CelTag” DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies. PMID:26715090

  20. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Korin; Erickson, Brian K; Mueller, Ryan; Singer, Steven; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hwang, Mona; Thelen, Michael P.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  1. Mutations in fd phage major coat protein modulate affinity of the displayed peptide

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmicheva, G.A.; Jayanna, P.K.; Eroshkin, A.M.; Grishina, M.A.; Pereyaslavskaya, E.S.; Potemkin, V.A.; Petrenko, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Multibillion-clone libraries of phages displaying guest peptides fused to the major coat protein pVIII (landscape libraries) are a rich source of probes for proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous targets. As opposed to the pIII-type fusion phages, which display peptides as independent structural domains, the guest peptides in the pVIII-fusion phages can be structurally and functionally influenced by contiguous subunits. To decipher the impact of the locale of a guest peptide on its affinity characteristics, we constructed a library of phages carrying β-galactosidase-binding peptide ADTFAKSMQ at the N-terminus of the pVIII protein surrounded by random amino acids. It was found that mutagenesis of amino acids 12–19 (domain C) has polar effects on target binding affinity of the displayed peptide. The phages with highest affinity are characterized by: (i) a net electrostatic charge around −1 of domain C of the mutated phages at pH 7.0; (ii) a lower radius of cylinder coaxial to α-helix formed by domain C; (iii) a lower higher occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of domain C leading to a decreased formation of hydrogen bonds and (iv) positively charged surface and torsion energy of domain C, which may require a conformational transition of N-terminal peptide ADTFAKSMQ for its binding with β-galactosidase. Influence of the guest peptide on the diversity of mutations in the neighboring landscape area was also observed. PMID:19633313

  2. Remarkably low affinity of CD4/peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Peter; Southcombe, Jennifer H; Santos, Ana Mafalda; Huo, Jiandong; Fernandes, Ricardo A; McColl, James; Lever, Melissa; Evans, Edward J; Hudson, Alexander; Chang, Veronica T; Hanke, Tomáš; Godkin, Andrew; Dunne, Paul D; Horrocks, Mathew H; Palayret, Matthieu; Screaton, Gavin R; Petersen, Jan; Rossjohn, Jamie; Fugger, Lars; Dushek, Omer; Xu, Xiao-Ning; Davis, Simon J; Klenerman, David

    2016-05-17

    The αβ T-cell coreceptor CD4 enhances immune responses more than 1 million-fold in some assays, and yet the affinity of CD4 for its ligand, peptide-major histocompatibility class II (pMHC II) on antigen-presenting cells, is so weak that it was previously unquantifiable. Here, we report that a soluble form of CD4 failed to bind detectably to pMHC II in surface plasmon resonance-based assays, establishing a new upper limit for the solution affinity at 2.5 mM. However, when presented multivalently on magnetic beads, soluble CD4 bound pMHC II-expressing B cells, confirming that it is active and allowing mapping of the native coreceptor binding site on pMHC II. Whereas binding was undetectable in solution, the affinity of the CD4/pMHC II interaction could be measured in 2D using CD4- and adhesion molecule-functionalized, supported lipid bilayers, yielding a 2D Kd of ∼5,000 molecules/μm(2) This value is two to three orders of magnitude higher than previously measured 2D Kd values for interacting leukocyte surface proteins. Calculations indicated, however, that CD4/pMHC II binding would increase rates of T-cell receptor (TCR) complex phosphorylation by threefold via the recruitment of Lck, with only a small, 2-20% increase in the effective affinity of the TCR for pMHC II. The affinity of CD4/pMHC II therefore seems to be set at a value that increases T-cell sensitivity by enhancing phosphorylation, without compromising ligand discrimination. PMID:27114505

  3. Protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding

    PubMed Central

    Groitl, Bastian; Horowitz, Scott; Makepeace, Karl A. T.; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Reichmann, Dana; Bardwell, James C. A.; Jakob, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Stress-specific activation of the chaperone Hsp33 requires the unfolding of a central linker region. This activation mechanism suggests an intriguing functional relationship between the chaperone's own partial unfolding and its ability to bind other partially folded client proteins. However, identifying where Hsp33 binds its clients has remained a major gap in our understanding of Hsp33's working mechanism. By using site-specific Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance experiments guided by in vivo crosslinking studies, we now reveal that the partial unfolding of Hsp33's linker region facilitates client binding to an amphipathic docking surface on Hsp33. Furthermore, our results provide experimental evidence for the direct involvement of conditionally disordered regions in unfolded protein binding. The observed structural similarities between Hsp33's own metastable linker region and client proteins present a possible model for how Hsp33 uses protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding. PMID:26787517

  4. Protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding.

    PubMed

    Groitl, Bastian; Horowitz, Scott; Makepeace, Karl A T; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Borchers, Christoph H; Reichmann, Dana; Bardwell, James C A; Jakob, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Stress-specific activation of the chaperone Hsp33 requires the unfolding of a central linker region. This activation mechanism suggests an intriguing functional relationship between the chaperone's own partial unfolding and its ability to bind other partially folded client proteins. However, identifying where Hsp33 binds its clients has remained a major gap in our understanding of Hsp33's working mechanism. By using site-specific Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance experiments guided by in vivo crosslinking studies, we now reveal that the partial unfolding of Hsp33's linker region facilitates client binding to an amphipathic docking surface on Hsp33. Furthermore, our results provide experimental evidence for the direct involvement of conditionally disordered regions in unfolded protein binding. The observed structural similarities between Hsp33's own metastable linker region and client proteins present a possible model for how Hsp33 uses protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding. PMID:26787517

  5. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  6. Identification of proteins associated with the yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase by tandem affinity purification

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Dmitriy A; Savkina, Maria; Anikin, Michael; Del Campo, Mark; Ecker, Karen; Lambowitz, Alan M; De Gnore, Jon P; McAllister, William T

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of mitochondrial (mt) transcripts varies under different conditions, and is thought to depend upon rates of transcription initiation, transcription termination/attenuation and RNA processing/degradation. The requirement to maintain the balance between RNA synthesis and processing may involve coordination between these processes; however, little is known about factors that regulate the activity of mtRNA polymerase (mtRNAP). Recent attempts to identify mtRNAP–protein interactions in yeast by means of a generalized tandem affinity purification (TAP) protocol were not successful, most likely because they involved a C-terminal mtRNAP–TAP fusion (which is incompatible with mtRNAP function) and because of the use of whole-cell solubilization protocols that did not preserve the integrity of mt protein complexes. Based upon the structure of T7 RNAP (to which mtRNAPs show high sequence similarity), we identified positions in yeast mtRNAP that allow insertion of a small affinity tag, confirmed the mature N-terminus, constructed a functional N-terminal TAP–mtRNAP fusion, pulled down associated proteins, and identified them by LC–MS–MS. Among the proteins found in the pull-down were a DEAD-box protein (Mss116p) and an RNA-binding protein (Pet127p). Previous genetic experiments suggested a role for these proteins in linking transcription and RNA degradation, in that a defect in the mt degradadosome could be suppressed by overexpression of either of these proteins or, independently, by mutations in either mtRNAP or its initiation factor Mtf1p. Further, we found that Mss116p inhibits transcription by mtRNAP in vitro in a steady-state reaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Mss116p and Pet127p are involved in modulation of mtRNAP activity. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:19536766

  7. Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Bind to Protein Z Cooperatively and with Equal Affinity.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Tanusree; Manoj, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Protein Z (PZ) is an anticoagulant that binds with high affinity to Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and accelerates the rate of ZPI-mediated inhibition of factor Xa (fXa) by more than 1000-fold in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipids. PZ promotion of the ZPI-fXa interaction results from the anchoring of the Gla domain of PZ onto phospholipid surfaces and positioning the bound ZPI in close proximity to the Gla-anchored fXa, forming a ternary complex of PZ/ZPI/fXa. Although interaction of PZ with phospholipid membrane appears to be absolutely crucial for its cofactor activity, little is known about the binding of different phospholipids to PZ. The present study was conceived to understand the interaction of different phospholipids with PZ. Experiments with both soluble lipids and model membranes revealed that PZ binds to phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) with equal affinity (Kd~48 μM); further, PS and PE bound to PZ synergistically. Equilibrium dialysis experiments revealed two lipid-binding sites for both PS and PE. PZ binds with weaker affinity to other phospholipids, e.g., phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and binding of these lipids is not synergistic with respect to PS. Both PS and PE -containing membranes supported the formation of a fXa-PZ complex. PZ protection of fXa from antithrombin inhibition were also shown to be comparable in presence of both PS: PC and PE: PC membranes. These findings are particularly important and intriguing since they suggest a special affinity of PZ, in vivo, towards activated platelets, the primary membrane involved in blood coagulation process. PMID:27584039

  8. Metal binding affinity and structural properties of calmodulin-like protein 14 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Rosario; La Verde, Valentina; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Dominici, Paola; Astegno, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-known Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin, plants possess many calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that are predicted to have specific roles in the cell. Herein, we described the biochemical and biophysical characterization of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana CML14. We applied isothermal titration calorimetry to analyze the energetics of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) binding to CML14, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, together with intrinsic and ANS-based fluorescence, to evaluate the structural effects of metal binding and metal-induced conformational changes. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and limited proteolysis were used to characterize protein thermal and local stability. Our data demonstrate that CML14 binds one Ca(2+) ion with micromolar affinity (Kd ∼ 12 µM) and the presence of 10 mM Mg(2+) decreases the Ca(2+) affinity by ∼5-fold. Although binding of Ca(2+) to CML14 increases protein stability, it does not result in a more hydrophobic protein surface and does not induce the large conformational rearrangement typical of Ca(2+) sensors, but causes only localized structural changes in the unique functional EF-hand. Our data, together with a molecular modelling prediction, provide interesting insights into the biochemical properties of Arabidopsis CML14 and may be useful to direct additional studies aimed at understanding its physiological role. PMID:27124620

  9. High-Performance Affinity Chromatography: Applications in Drug-Protein Binding Studies and Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya R; Bi, Cong; Suresh, D; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2016-01-01

    The binding of drugs with proteins and other agents in serum is of interest in personalized medicine because this process can affect the dosage and action of drugs. The extent of this binding may also vary with a given disease state. These interactions may involve serum proteins, such as human serum albumin or α1-acid glycoprotein, or other agents, such as lipoproteins. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is a tool that has received increasing interest as a means for studying these interactions. This review discusses the general principles of HPAC and the various approaches that have been used in this technique to examine drug-protein binding and in work related to personalized medicine. These approaches include frontal analysis and zonal elution, as well as peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, and chromatographic immunoassays. The operation of each method is described and examples of applications for these techniques are provided. The type of information that can be obtained by these methods is also discussed, as related to the analysis of drug-protein binding and the study of clinical or pharmaceutical samples. PMID:26827600

  10. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  11. Affinity chromatography reveals RuBisCO as an ecdysteroid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Kamlar, Marek; Kohout, Ladislav; Jezek, Rudolf; Harmatha, Juraj; Macek, Tomas

    2008-12-22

    The aim of this work was to isolate plant ecdysteroid-binding proteins using affinity chromatography. Ecdysteroids as insect hormones have been investigated thoroughly but their function and the mechanism of action in plants and other organisms is still unknown although ecdysteroids occur in some plants in a relatively large amount. Therefore, 20-hydroxyecdysone was immobilized on a polymeric carrier as a ligand for affinity chromatography in order to isolate plant ecdysteroid-binding proteins from the cytosolic extract of New Zealand spinach (Tetragonia tetragonoides). Non-specifically bound proteins were eluted with a rising gradient of concentration of sodium chloride, and 3% (v/v) acetic acid was used for the elution of the specifically bound proteins. Using this method, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) was isolated. The influence of ecdysteroids on RuBisCO was further studied. Our results show that ecdysteroids are able to increase the yield of RuBisCO-mediated reaction in which CO(2) is fixed into organic matter by more than 10%. PMID:18761365

  12. Structure and Energetic Contributions of a Designed Modular Peptide-Binding Protein with Picomolar Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Simon; Tremmel, Dirk; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Reichen, Christian; Mittl, Peer R E; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-03-16

    Natural armadillo repeat proteins (nArmRP) like importin-α or β-catenin bind their target peptides such that each repeat interacts with a dipeptide unit within the stretched target peptide. However, this modularity is imperfect and also restricted to short peptide stretches of usually four to six consecutive amino acids. Here we report the development and characterization of a regularized and truly modular peptide-specific binding protein, based on designed armadillo repeat proteins (dArmRP), binding to peptides of alternating lysine and arginine residues (KR)n. dArmRP were obtained from nArmRP through cycles of extensive protein engineering, which rendered them more uniform. This regularity is reflected in the consistent binding of dArmRP to (KR)-peptides, where affinities depend on the lengths of target peptides and the number of internal repeats in a very systematic manner, thus confirming the modularity of the interaction. This exponential dependency between affinity and recognition length suggests that each module adds a constant increment of binding energy to sequence-specific recognition. This relationship was confirmed by comprehensive mutagenesis studies that also reveal the importance of individual peptide side chains. The 1.83 Å resolution crystal structure of a dArmRP with five identical internal repeats in complex with the cognate (KR)5 peptide proves a modular binding mode, where each dipeptide is recognized by one internal repeat. The confirmation of this true modularity over longer peptide stretches lays the ground for the design of binders with different specificities and tailored affinities by the assembly of dipeptide-specific modules based on armadillo repeats. PMID:26878586

  13. Tsetse Salivary Gland Proteins 1 and 2 Are High Affinity Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins with Residual Nuclease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Caljon, Guy; Ridder, Karin De; Stijlemans, Benoît; Coosemans, Marc; Magez, Stefan; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Den Abbeele, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the tsetse fly salivary gland EST database revealed the presence of a highly enriched cluster of putative endonuclease genes, including tsal1 and tsal2. Tsal proteins are the major components of tsetse fly (G. morsitans morsitans) saliva where they are present as monomers as well as high molecular weight complexes with other saliva proteins. We demonstrate that the recombinant tsetse salivary gland proteins 1&2 (Tsal1&2) display DNA/RNA non-specific, high affinity nucleic acid binding with KD values in the low nanomolar range and a non-exclusive preference for duplex. These Tsal proteins exert only a residual nuclease activity with a preference for dsDNA in a broad pH range. Knockdown of Tsal expression by in vivo RNA interference in the tsetse fly revealed a partially impaired blood digestion phenotype as evidenced by higher gut nucleic acid, hematin and protein contents. PMID:23110062

  14. Phycobiliprotein fusion proteins: versatile intensely fluorescent constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Cai, Yuping A.; Tooley, Aaron J.

    2004-06-01

    Since 1982, phycobiliproteins have served as fluorescent labels in a wide variety of cell and molecule analyses. The exceptional spectroscopic properties of these labels include very high absorbance coefficients and quantum yields, and large Stokes shifts. The spectroscopic diversity of these reagents is restricted to a subset of naturally occurring phycobiliproteins with stable assembly states in vitro, whose target specificity is generated by chemical conjugation to proteins or small molecules. The latter step generates heterogeneity. These limitations have been overcome by expressing various recombinant phycobiliprotein constructs in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Modular recombinant phycobiliprotein-based labels were constructed with some or all of the following features (a) an affinity purification tag; (b) a stable oligomerization domain (to maintain stable higher order assemblies of the phycobiliprotein monomers at very low protein concentration); (c) a biospecific recognition domain. Such phycobiliprotein constructs are readily purified from crude cell extracts by affinity chromatography and used directly as fluorescent labels. To generate constructs for intracellular in vivo labeling, the entire pathways for the biosynthesis of the His-tagged holo- α (phycocyanobilin-bearing) subunit of phycocyanin (emission max. 641 nm) and of the His-tagged holo-α (phycobiliviolin-bearing) subunit of phycoerythrocyanin (emission max. 582 nm) were reconstituted in Escherichia coli.

  15. Recombinant Passenger Proteins Can Be Conveniently Purified by One-Step Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-zhen; Chu, Zhi-zhan; Chen, Chang-chao; Cao, Ao-cheng; Tong, Xin; Ouyang, Can-bin; Yuan, Qi-hang; Wang, Mi-nan; Wu, Zhong-kun; Wang, Hai-hong; Wang, Sheng-bin

    2015-01-01

    Fusion tag is one of the best available tools to date for enhancement of the solubility or improvement of the expression level of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Typically, two consecutive affinity purification steps are often necessitated for the purification of passenger proteins. As a fusion tag, acyl carrier protein (ACP) could greatly increase the soluble expression level of Glucokinase (GlcK), α-Amylase (Amy) and GFP. When fusion protein ACP-G2-GlcK-Histag and ACP-G2-Amy-Histag, in which a protease TEV recognition site was inserted between the fusion tag and passenger protein, were coexpressed with protease TEV respectively in E. coli, the efficient intracellular processing of fusion proteins was achieved. The resulting passenger protein GlcK-Histag and Amy-Histag accumulated predominantly in a soluble form, and could be conveniently purified by one-step Ni-chelating chromatography. However, the fusion protein ACP-GFP-Histag was processed incompletely by the protease TEV coexpressed in vivo, and a large portion of the resulting target protein GFP-Histag aggregated in insoluble form, indicating that the intracellular processing may affect the solubility of cleaved passenger protein. In this context, the soluble fusion protein ACP-GFP-Histag, contained in the supernatant of E. coli cell lysate, was directly subjected to cleavage in vitro by mixing it with the clarified cell lysate of E. coli overexpressing protease TEV. Consequently, the resulting target protein GFP-Histag could accumulate predominantly in a soluble form, and be purified conveniently by one-step Ni-chelating chromatography. The approaches presented here greatly simplify the purification process of passenger proteins, and eliminate the use of large amounts of pure site-specific proteases. PMID:26641240

  16. Recombinant Passenger Proteins Can Be Conveniently Purified by One-Step Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua-zhen; Chu, Zhi-zhan; Chen, Chang-chao; Cao, Ao-cheng; Tong, Xin; Ouyang, Can-bin; Yuan, Qi-hang; Wang, Mi-nan; Wu, Zhong-kun; Wang, Hai-hong; Wang, Sheng-bin

    2015-01-01

    Fusion tag is one of the best available tools to date for enhancement of the solubility or improvement of the expression level of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Typically, two consecutive affinity purification steps are often necessitated for the purification of passenger proteins. As a fusion tag, acyl carrier protein (ACP) could greatly increase the soluble expression level of Glucokinase (GlcK), α-Amylase (Amy) and GFP. When fusion protein ACP-G2-GlcK-Histag and ACP-G2-Amy-Histag, in which a protease TEV recognition site was inserted between the fusion tag and passenger protein, were coexpressed with protease TEV respectively in E. coli, the efficient intracellular processing of fusion proteins was achieved. The resulting passenger protein GlcK-Histag and Amy-Histag accumulated predominantly in a soluble form, and could be conveniently purified by one-step Ni-chelating chromatography. However, the fusion protein ACP-GFP-Histag was processed incompletely by the protease TEV coexpressed in vivo, and a large portion of the resulting target protein GFP-Histag aggregated in insoluble form, indicating that the intracellular processing may affect the solubility of cleaved passenger protein. In this context, the soluble fusion protein ACP-GFP-Histag, contained in the supernatant of E. coli cell lysate, was directly subjected to cleavage in vitro by mixing it with the clarified cell lysate of E. coli overexpressing protease TEV. Consequently, the resulting target protein GFP-Histag could accumulate predominantly in a soluble form, and be purified conveniently by one-step Ni-chelating chromatography. The approaches presented here greatly simplify the purification process of passenger proteins, and eliminate the use of large amounts of pure site-specific proteases. PMID:26641240

  17. Ligand affinity chromatography, an indispensable method for the purification of soluble cytokine receptors and binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Novick, Daniela; Rubinstein, Menachem

    2012-01-01

    Ligand affinity chromatography separation is based on unique interaction between the target analyte and a ligand, which is coupled covalently to a resin. It is a simple, rapid, selective, and efficient purification procedure of proteins providing tens of thousands fold purification in one step. The biological activity of the isolated proteins is retained in most cases thus function is revealed concomitantly with the isolation. Prior to the completion of the genome project this method facilitated rapid and reliable cloning of the corresponding gene. Upon completion of this project, a partial protein sequence is enough for retrieving its complete mRNA and hence its complete protein sequence. This method is indispensable for the isolation of both expected (e.g. receptors) but mainly unexpected, unpredicted and very much surprising binding proteins. No other approach would yield the latter. This chapter provides examples for both the expected target proteins, isolated from rich sources of human proteins, as well as the unexpected binding proteins, found by serendipity. PMID:22131033

  18. Advance chromatin extraction improves capture performance of protein A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nian, Rui; Zhang, Wei; Tan, Lihan; Lee, Jeremy; Bi, Xeuzhi; Yang, Yuansheng; Gan, Hui Theng; Gagnon, Pete

    2016-01-29

    Practical effects of advance chromatin removal on performance of protein A affinity chromatography were evaluated using a caprylic acid-allantoin-based extraction method. Lacking this treatment, the practice of increasing loading residence time to increase capacity was shown to increase host protein contamination of the eluted IgG. Advance chromatin extraction suspended that compromise. Protein A ligand leakage from columns loaded with chromatin-extracted harvest was half the level observed on protein A columns loaded with non-extracted harvest. Columns loaded with chromatin-extracted harvest were cleaned more effectively by 50-100mM NaOH than columns loaded with non-extracted harvest that were cleaned with 250-500mM NaOH. Two protein A media with IgG capacities in excess of 50g/L were loaded with chromatin-extracted harvest, washed with 2.0M NaCl before elution, and the eluted IgG fraction titrated to pH 5.5 before microfiltration. Host protein contamination in the filtrate was reduced to <1ppm, DNA to <1ppb, protein A leakage to 0.5ppm, and aggregates to 1.0%. Caprylic acid and allantoin were both reduced below 5ppm. Step recovery of IgG was 99.4%. Addition of a single polishing step reduced residual protein A beneath the level of detection and aggregates to <0.1%. Overall process recovery including chromatin extraction was 90%. PMID:26774119

  19. High Affinity Immobilization of Proteins Using the CrAsH/TC Tag.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Zweckel, Janine; Rosi, Federica; Sreenu, Domalapally; Schröder, Hendrik; Niemeyer, Christof M; Triola, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarrays represent important tools for biomedical analysis. We have recently described the use of the biarsenical-tetracysteine (TC) tag for the preparation of protein microarrays. The unique feature of this tag enables the site-specific immobilization of TC-containing proteins on biarsenical-modified surfaces, resulting in a fluorescence enhancement that allows the direct quantification of the immobilized proteins. Moreover, the reversibility of the binding upon incubation with large quantities of thiols permits the detachment of the proteins from the surface, thereby enabling recovery of the substrate to extend the life time of the slide. Herein, we describe our recent results that further extend the applicability of the CrAsH/TC tag to the fabrication of biochips. With this aim, the immobilization of proteins on surfaces has been investigated using two different spacers and two TC tags, the minimal TC sequence (CCPGCC) and an optimized motif (FLNCCPGCCMEP). While the minimal peptide motif enables a rapid recycling of the slide, the optimized TC sequence reveals an increased affinity due to its greater resistance to displacement by thiols. Moreover, the developed methodology was applied to the immobilization of proteins via on-chip ligation of recombinant protein thioesters. PMID:27338319

  20. Understanding the nanoparticle–protein corona using methods to quantify exchange rates and affinities of proteins for nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cedervall, Tommy; Lynch, Iseult; Lindman, Stina; Berggård, Tord; Thulin, Eva; Nilsson, Hanna; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Linse, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanoparticles have distinct properties compared with the bulk form of the same materials. These properties are rapidly revolutionizing many areas of medicine and technology. Despite the remarkable speed of development of nanoscience, relatively little is known about the interaction of nanoscale objects with living systems. In a biological fluid, proteins associate with nanoparticles, and the amount and presentation of the proteins on the surface of the particles leads to an in vivo response. Proteins compete for the nanoparticle “surface,” leading to a protein “corona” that largely defines the biological identity of the particle. Thus, knowledge of rates, affinities, and stoichiometries of protein association with, and dissociation from, nanoparticles is important for understanding the nature of the particle surface seen by the functional machinery of cells. Here we develop approaches to study these parameters and apply them to plasma and simple model systems, albumin and fibrinogen. A series of copolymer nanoparticles are used with variation of size and composition (hydrophobicity). We show that isothermal titration calorimetry is suitable for studying the affinity and stoichiometry of protein binding to nanoparticles. We determine the rates of protein association and dissociation using surface plasmon resonance technology with nanoparticles that are thiol-linked to gold, and through size exclusion chromatography of protein–nanoparticle mixtures. This method is less perturbing than centrifugation, and is developed into a systematic methodology to isolate nanoparticle-associated proteins. The kinetic and equilibrium binding properties depend on protein identity as well as particle surface characteristics and size. PMID:17267609

  1. Ni2+-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Jones, Alun; Lim, Maria L R

    2008-01-01

    A two-step chromatographic sequence is described for the purification of native lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli cells. The first step involves Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of the soluble cytoplasmic extract. This method provides superior speed, resolution and yield than the established phosphocellulose cation-exchange chromatographic procedure. Anion-exchange chromatography is used for further purification to >95% purity. The identity and purity of the lactose repressor protein were demonstrated using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, crystallization, tryptic finger-printing mass spectrometry, and inducer binding assays. The purified lac repressor exhibited inducer sensitivity for operator DNA binding and undergoes a conformational change upon inducer binding. By all these extensive biochemical criteria, the purified protein behaves exactly as that described for the Escherichia coli lactose operon repressor. PMID:18800304

  2. PIPINO: A Software Package to Facilitate the Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions from Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Schildbach, Stefan; Blumert, Conny; Horn, Friedemann; von Bergen, Martin; Labudde, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of most proteins is regulated by protein-protein interactions. Hence, the comprehensive characterization of the interactome is the next milestone on the path to understand the biochemistry of the cell. A powerful method to detect protein-protein interactions is a combination of coimmunoprecipitation or affinity purification with quantitative mass spectrometry. Nevertheless, both methods tend to precipitate a high number of background proteins due to nonspecific interactions. To address this challenge the software Protein-Protein-Interaction-Optimizer (PIPINO) was developed to perform an automated data analysis, to facilitate the selection of bona fide binding partners, and to compare the dynamic of interaction networks. In this study we investigated the STAT1 interaction network and its activation dependent dynamics. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was applied to analyze the STAT1 interactome after streptavidin pull-down of biotagged STAT1 from human embryonic kidney 293T cells with and without activation. Starting from more than 2,000 captured proteins 30 potential STAT1 interaction partners were extracted. Interestingly, more than 50% of these were already reported or predicted to bind STAT1. Furthermore, 16 proteins were found to affect the binding behavior depending on STAT1 phosphorylation such as STAT3 or the importin subunits alpha 1 and alpha 6. PMID:26966684

  3. Yeast 3',5'-bisphosphate nucleotidase: an affinity tag for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ma, Jianhui; Yang, Yilin; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Yanxing; Yang, Ling; Sun, Meihao

    2014-05-01

    Affinity chromatography is one of the most popular methods for protein purification. Each tag method has its advantages and disadvantages, and combination of different tags and developing of new tags had been proposed and performed. Yeast 3',5'-bisphosphate nucleotidase, also known as HAL2, hydrolyzes 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate (PAP) with submicromolar Km, which indicated the tight interactions between HAL2 and PAP. In order to explore the feasibility of HAL2 as a protein purification affinity tag, HAL2 was further characterized with PAP as substrate. Results demonstrated that KmPAP and kcatPAP were ∼0.3μM and ∼11s(-)(1), respectively. Kd for PAP was 0.008μM in the presence of Ca(2+). pH was also found to affect interactions between HAL2 and PAP, with tightest binding (Kd∼8nM) at pH 7.5 and 8. The purification protocol was rationally designed based on nanomolar affinity to PAP agarose in the presence of Ca(2+), which could satisfy the metal requirement for PAP binding, prevent hydrolysis of immobilized PAP and could be chelated by ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) for elution. A series of expression vectors were further constructed and Escherichia coli adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) was prokaryotically expressed, purified and characterized. Ready to use expression vector with eight commonly used restriction enzyme recognition sites in multiple cloning site was subsequently constructed. By comparing with current popular tags, HAL2 was found to be an efficient and economical tag for prokaryotic protein expression and purification. PMID:24613729

  4. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Singh, N S; Indig, F E; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R; Shimmo, R

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized onto immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary, resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC (U87MG) column, and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08±0.49 and 0.0086±0.0006μM, respectively, consistent with previously reported values. Furthermore, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX, and rotenone. In addition, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC (U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  5. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Habicht, K-L.; Singh, N.S.; Indig, F.E.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.; Shimmo, R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized on to Immobilized Artificial Membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC-(U87MG) column and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08 ± 1.49 and 0.0086 ± 0.0006 μM respectively, which was consistent with previously reported values. Further, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX and rotenone. Additionally, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC-(U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  6. Metal-Mediated Affinity and Orientation Specificity in a Computationally Designed Protein Homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Der, Bryan S.; Machius, Mischa; Miley, Michael J.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Computationally designing protein-protein interactions with high affinity and desired orientation is a challenging task. Incorporating metal-binding sites at the target interface may be one approach for increasing affinity and specifying the binding mode, thereby improving robustness of designed interactions for use as tools in basic research as well as in applications from biotechnology to medicine. Here we describe a Rosetta-based approach for the rational design of a protein monomer to form a zinc-mediated, symmetric homodimer. Our metal interface design, named MID1 (NESG target ID OR37), forms a tight dimer in the presence of zinc (MID1-zinc) with a dissociation constant <30 nM. Without zinc the dissociation constant is 4 {micro}M. The crystal structure of MID1-zinc shows good overall agreement with the computational model, but only three out of four designed histidines coordinate zinc. However, a histidine-to-glutamate point mutation resulted in four-coordination of zinc, and the resulting metal binding site and dimer orientation closely matches the computational model (C{alpha} rmsd = 1.4 {angstrom}).

  7. Identification of high affinity folate binding proteins in human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Antony, A C; Kincade, R S; Verma, R S; Krishnan, S R

    1987-09-01

    Mature human erythrocyte membranes contained specific, high affinity (Kd 3.3 X 10(-11) M) folate binding moieties. Folate binding was pH, time- and temperature-dependent, saturable, and was much greater for pteroylmonoglutamate and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate than 5-formyltetrahydrofolate and amethopterin. On detergent solubilization of membranes, two peaks of specific folate binding with Mr greater than or equal to 200,000 and 160,000 were identified on Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration chromatography in Triton X-100, and this corresponded to two similar peaks of immunoprecipitated material when solubilized iodinated membranes were probed with anti-human placental folate receptor antiserum. Age-dependent separation of erythrocytes by Stractan density gradients revealed a sevenfold greater folate binding capacity in membranes purified from younger compared with aged erythrocytes. Since this difference was not reflected in proportionately higher immunoreactive folate binding protein, (as determined by a specific radioimmunoassay for these proteins), or differences in affinity in younger than aged cells, these findings indicate that erythrocyte folate binding proteins become progressively nonfunctional at the onset of red cell aging. PMID:3624486

  8. Large-scale screening for novel low-affinity extracellular protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bushell, K. Mark; Söllner, Christian; Schuster-Boeckler, Benjamin; Bateman, Alex; Wright, Gavin J.

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular protein–protein interactions are essential for both intercellular communication and cohesion within multicellular organisms. Approximately a fifth of human genes encode membrane-tethered or secreted proteins, but they are largely absent from recent large-scale protein interaction datasets, making current interaction networks biased and incomplete. This discrepancy is due to the unsuitability of popular high-throughput methods to detect extracellular interactions because of the biochemical intractability of membrane proteins and their interactions. For example, cell surface proteins contain insoluble hydrophobic transmembrane regions, and their extracellular interactions are often highly transient, having half-lives of less than a second. To detect transient extracellular interactions on a large scale, we developed AVEXIS (avidity-based extracellular interaction screen), a high-throughput assay that overcomes these technical issues and can detect very transient interactions (half-lives ≤ 0.1 sec) with a low false-positive rate. We used it to systematically screen for receptor–ligand pairs within the zebrafish immunoglobulin superfamily and identified novel ligands for both well-known and orphan receptors. Genes encoding receptor–ligand pairs were often clustered phylogenetically and expressed in the same or adjacent tissues, immediately implying their involvement in similar biological processes. Using AVEXIS, we have determined the first systematic low–affinity extracellular protein interaction network, supported by independent biological data. This technique will now allow large-scale extracellular protein interaction mapping in a broad range of experimental contexts. PMID:18296487

  9. Precise, fast, and flexible determination of protein interactions by affinity capillary electrophoresis: part 3: anions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanhong; Redweik, Sabine; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M; Preu, Lutz; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-08-01

    The binding of physiologically anionic species or negatively charged drug molecules to proteins is of great importance in biochemistry and medicine. Since affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) has already proven to be a suitable analytical tool to study the influence of ions on proteins, this technique was applied here for comprehensively studying the influence of various anions on proteins of BSA, β-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin, myoglobin, and lysozyme. The analysis was performed using different selected anions of succinate, glutamate, phosphate, acetate, nitrate, iodide, thiocyanate, and pharmaceuticals (salicylic acid, aspirin, and ibuprofen) that exist in the anionic form at physiological pH 7.4. Due to the excellent repeatability and precision of the ACE measurements, not necessarily strong but significant influences of the anions on the proteins were found in many cases. Different influences in the observed bindings indicated change of charge, mass, or conformational changes of the proteins due to the binding with the studied anions. Combining the mobility-shift and pre-equilibrium ACE modes, rapidity and reversibility of the protein-anion bindings were discussed. Further, circular dichroism has been used as an orthogonal approach to characterize the interactions between the studied proteins and anions to confirm the ACE results. Since phosphate and various anions from amino acids and small organic acids such as succinate or acetate are present in very high concentrations in the cellular environment, even weak influences are certainly relevant as well. PMID:24436007

  10. Immobilized metal-affinity chromatography protein-recovery screening is predictive of crystallographic structure success

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ryan; Kelley, Angela; Leibly, David; Nakazawa Hewitt, Stephen; Napuli, Alberto; Van Voorhis, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    The recombinant expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli continues to be a major bottleneck in structural genomics. The establishment of reliable protocols for the performance of small-scale expression and solubility testing is an essential component of structural genomic pipelines. The SSGCID Protein Production Group at the University of Washington (UW-PPG) has developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) protocol for the measurement of protein recovery from immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC) which predicts successful purification of hexahistidine-tagged proteins. The protocol is based on manual transfer of samples using multichannel pipettors and 96-well plates and does not depend on the use of robotic platforms. This protocol has been applied to evaluate the expression and solubility of more than 4000 proteins expressed in E. coli. The UW-PPG also screens large-scale preparations for recovery from IMAC prior to purification. Analysis of these results show that our low-cost non-automated approach is a reliable method for the HTS demands typical of large structural genomic projects. This paper provides a detailed description of these protocols and statistical analysis of the SSGCID screening results. The results demonstrate that screening for proteins that yield high recovery after IMAC, both after small-scale and large-scale expression, improves the selection of proteins that can be successfully purified and will yield a crystal structure. PMID:21904040

  11. Affinity Labeling of Highly Hydrophobic Integral Membrane Proteins for Proteome-Wide Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goshe, Michael B.; Blonder, Josip; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-03-01

    The ability to identify and quantify integral membrane proteins is an analytical challenge for mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The use of surfactants to solubilize and derivatize these proteins can suppress peptide ionization and interfere with chromatographic separations during microcapillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry. To circumvent the use of surfactants and increase proteome coverage, an affinity labeling method has been developed to target highly hydrophobic integral membrane proteins using organic-assisted extraction and solubilization followed by cysteinyl-specific labeling using biotinylation reagents. As demonstrated on the membrane subproteome of Deinococcus radiodurans, specific and quantitative labeling of integral membrane proteins was achieved using a 60% methanol-aqueous buffer system and (+)-biotinyl-iodoacetamidyl-3,6-dioxaoctanediamine as the cysteinyl-alkylating reagent. From a total of 220 unique Cys-labeled peptides, 89 proteins were identified of which 40 were integral membrane proteins containing from 1 to 9 mapped transmembrane domains with a maximum positive GRAVY of 1.08. The protocol described can be used with other stable isotope labeling reagents (e.g. ICAT) to enable comparative measurements to be made on differentially expressed hydrophobic membrane proteins from various organisms (e.g. pathogenic bacteria) and cell types and provide a viable method for comparative proteome-wide analyses.

  12. Nanoparticles Self-Assembly Driven by High Affinity Repeat Protein Pairing.

    PubMed

    Gurunatha, Kargal L; Fournier, Agathe C; Urvoas, Agathe; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Marchi, Valérie; Minard, Philippe; Dujardin, Erik

    2016-03-22

    Proteins are the most specific yet versatile biological self-assembling agents with a rich chemistry. Nevertheless, the design of new proteins with recognition capacities is still in its infancy and has seldom been exploited for the self-assembly of functional inorganic nanoparticles. Here, we report on the protein-directed assembly of gold nanoparticles using purpose-designed artificial repeat proteins having a rigid but modular 3D architecture. αRep protein pairs are selected for their high mutual affinity from a library of 10(9) variants. Their conjugation onto gold nanoparticles drives the massive colloidal assembly of free-standing, one-particle thick films. When the average number of proteins per nanoparticle is lowered, the extent of self-assembly is limited to oligomeric particle clusters. Finally, we demonstrate that the aggregates are reversibly disassembled by an excess of one free protein. Our approach could be optimized for applications in biosensing, cell targeting, or functional nanomaterials engineering. PMID:26863288

  13. A fullerene C60-based ligand in a stationary phase for affine chromatography of membrane porphyrin-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirshakhi, N.; Alyautdin, R. N.; Orlov, A. P.; Poloznikov, A. A.; Kuznetsov, D. A.

    2008-11-01

    A new affine chromatography technique is suggested for the purification of porphyrin-binding proteins (PBP) from mammal cell membranes. The procedure uses new fullerene-porphyrin ligands immobilized on agarose and bound to the polysaccharide matrix via the epoxycyclohexyl residue. A selective PBP stationary phase was used in a single-column chromatography run for the complete purification of a monomeric protein (17.6 kDa) from mitochondrial membranes of rat myocardium. This protein was characterized by high affinity for porphyrin-related structures. To separate it from other nonspecifically sorbed membrane proteins, synchronous linear pH and ionic strength gradients were used.

  14. Affinity chromatography of Drosophila melanogaster ribosomal proteins to 5S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Stark, B C; Chooi, W Y

    1985-02-20

    The binding of Drosophila melanogaster ribosomal proteins to D. melanogaster 5S rRNA was studied using affinity chromatography of total ribosomal proteins (TP80) on 5S rRNA linked via adipic acid dihydrazide to Sepharose 4B. Ribosomal proteins which bound 5S rRNA at 0.3 M potassium chloride and were eluted at 1 M potassium chloride were identified as proteins 1, L4, 2/3, L14/L16, and S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Using poly A-Sepharose 4B columns as a model of non-specific binding, we found that a subset of TP80 proteins is also bound. This subset, while containing some of the proteins bound by 5S rRNA columns, was distinctly different from the latter subset, indicating that the binding to 5S rRNA was specific for that RNA species. PMID:3923010

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH SERUM PROTEINS BY USING HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Hage, David S.; Anguizola, Jeanethe; Barnaby, Omar; Jackson, Abby; Yoo, Michelle J.; Papastavros, Efthimia; Pfaunmiller, Erika; Sobansky, Matt; Tong, Zenghan

    2011-01-01

    The binding of drugs with serum proteins can affect the activity, distribution, rate of excretion, and toxicity of pharmaceutical agents in the body. One tool that can be used to quickly analyze and characterize these interactions is high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC). This review shows how HPAC can be used to study drug-protein binding and describes the various applications of this approach when examining drug interactions with serum proteins. Methods for determining binding constants, characterizing binding sites, examining drug-drug interactions, and studying drug-protein dissociation rates will be discussed. Applications that illustrate the use of HPAC with serum binding agents such as human serum albumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, and lipoproteins will be presented. Recent developments will also be examined, such as new methods for immobilizing serum proteins in HPAC columns, the utilization of HPAC as a tool in personalized medicine, and HPAC methods for the high-throughput screening and characterization of drug-protein binding. PMID:21395530

  16. Recent improvements to Binding MOAD: a resource for protein-ligand binding affinities and structures.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Smith, Richard D; Clark, Jordan J; Dunbar, James B; Carlson, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    For over 10 years, Binding MOAD (Mother of All Databases; http://www.BindingMOAD.org) has been one of the largest resources for high-quality protein-ligand complexes and associated binding affinity data. Binding MOAD has grown at the rate of 1994 complexes per year, on average. Currently, it contains 23,269 complexes and 8156 binding affinities. Our annual updates curate the data using a semi-automated literature search of the references cited within the PDB file, and we have recently upgraded our website and added new features and functionalities to better serve Binding MOAD users. In order to eliminate the legacy application server of the old platform and to accommodate new changes, the website has been completely rewritten in the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) environment. The improved user interface incorporates current third-party plugins for better visualization of protein and ligand molecules, and it provides features like sorting, filtering and filtered downloads. In addition to the field-based searching, Binding MOAD now can be searched by structural queries based on the ligand. In order to remove redundancy, Binding MOAD records are clustered in different families based on 90% sequence identity. The new Binding MOAD, with the upgraded platform, features and functionalities, is now equipped to better serve its users. PMID:25378330

  17. Experimental characterization of the transport phenomena, adsorption, and elution in a protein A affinity monolithic medium.

    PubMed

    Herigstad, M Omon; Dimartino, Simone; Boi, Cristiana; Sarti, Giulio C

    2015-08-14

    A commercially available convective interaction media (CIM) Protein A monolithic column was fully characterized in view of its application for the affinity capture of IgG in monoclonal antibody production processes. By means of moment analysis, the interstitial porosity and axial dispersion coefficient were determined. The frontal analysis method of characteristic points was employed, for the first time with monolithic media, to determine the dynamic binding capacity. The effects of the flow rate and pH on the total recovery of polyclonal IgG and elution profile were evaluated. A comparison with literature data for Protein A chromatography beads demonstrate the superior bed utilization of monolithic media, which gave better performance at lower residence times. PMID:26143608

  18. Preparation of conophylline affinity nano-beads and identification of a target protein.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Eriko; Ogura, Hideki; Kato, Kuniki; Takei, Izumi; Kabe, Yasuaki; Handa, Hiroshi; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2009-09-01

    Conophylline, a vinca alkaloid extracted from the tropical plant Ervatamia microphylla, has been shown to induce the differentiation of insulin-producing beta-cells in cultured cells and in animals. However, its mechanism of action and the molecular target have remained unclear. Therefore, we prepared a fishing probe with conophylline to identify the target protein by using latex nano-beads, which are newly innovated tools for affinity-purification. With these conophylline-linked nano-beads, we found that conophylline directly interacted with ARL6IP. ARL6IP may thus be involved in the mechanism of cellular differentiation of beta-cells, and this probe should be useful to find other target proteins. PMID:19679484

  19. High-affinity σ1 protein agonist reduces clinical and pathological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Oxombre, B; Lee-Chang, C; Duhamel, A; Toussaint, M; Giroux, M; Donnier-Maréchal, M; Carato, P; Lefranc, D; Zéphir, H; Prin, L; Melnyk, P; Vermersch, P

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Selective agonists of the sigma-1 receptor (σ1 protein) are generally reported to protect against neuronal damage and modulate oligodendrocyte differentiation. Human and rodent lymphocytes possess saturable, high-affinity binding sites for compounds binding to the σ1 protein and potential immunomodulatory properties have been described for σ1 protein ligands. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is recognized as a valuable model of the inflammatory aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we have assessed the role of a σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, in EAE. Experimental Approach EAE was induced in SJL/J female mice by active immunization with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)139–151 peptide. The σ1 protein agonist was injected i.p. at the time of immunization (day 0). Disease severity was assessed clinically and by histopathological evaluation of the CNS. Phenotyping of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells were performed by flow cytometry in spleen and cervical lymph nodes. Key Results Prophylactic treatment of EAE mice with the σ1 protein agonist prevented mononuclear cell accumulation and demyelination in brain and spinal cord and increased T2 B-cells and regulatory T-cells, resulting in an overall reduction in the clinical progression of EAE. Conclusions and Implications This σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, decreased the magnitude of inflammation in EAE. This effect was associated with increased proportions of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells with potential immunoregulatory functions. Targeting of the σ1 protein might thus provide new therapeutic opportunities in MS. PMID:25521311

  20. High-Affinity, Small-Molecule Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of MLL1/WDR5 Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karatas, Hacer; Townsend, Elizabeth C; Cao, Fang; Chen, Yong; Bernard, Denzil; Liu, Liu; Lei, Ming; Dou, Yali; Wang, Shaomeng

    2013-02-12

    Mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase, and targeting the MLL1 enzymatic activity has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. The MLL1/WDR5 protein–protein interaction is essential for MLL1 enzymatic activity. In the present study, we designed a large number of peptidomimetics to target the MLL1/WDR5 interaction based upon -CO-ARA-NH–, the minimum binding motif derived from MLL1. Our study led to the design of high-affinity peptidomimetics, which bind to WDR5 with Ki < 1 nM and function as potent antagonists of MLL1 activity in a fully reconstituted in vitro H3K4 methyltransferase assay. Determination of co-crystal structures of two potent peptidomimetics in complex with WDR5 establishes their structural basis for high-affinity binding to WDR5. Evaluation of one such peptidomimetic, MM-102, in bone marrow cells transduced with MLL1-AF9 fusion construct shows that the compound effectively decreases the expression of HoxA9 and Meis-1, two critical MLL1 target genes in MLL1 fusion protein mediated leukemogenesis. MM-102 also specifically inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in leukemia cells harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. Our study provides the first proof-of-concept for the design of small-molecule inhibitors of the WDR5/MLL1 protein–protein interaction as a novel therapeutic approach for acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins.

  1. Relationship between binding affinities to cellular retinoic acid-binding protein and biological potency of a new series of retinoids.

    PubMed

    Sani, B P; Dawson, M I; Hobbs, P D; Chan, R L; Schiff, L J

    1984-01-01

    Binding affinities of a new and unusual series of retinoic acid analogues to cellular retinoic acid-binding protein, a possible mediator of their biological function in the control of differentiation and tumorigenesis, and to serum albumin, their plasma transport protein, were determined. Also, biological activity of these retinoids in the reversal of keratinization in hamster tracheal organ cultures was assessed and compared with their binding affinities. Analogues that possessed high biological activity showed high binding efficiency to cellular retinoic acid-binding protein. Those that were biologically less active were poor binders to the binding protein. Three retinoids, 4657-57, 3920-59, and 4445-75, which showed 90 to 100% binding efficiency of that of retinoic acid for cellular retinoic acid-binding protein expressed high biological activity detectable in the range of 10(-10) M as against 10(-11) M for retinoic acid. The correlation noticed in these two activities not only enhances the confidence in the two assay procedures but also paves the way for design and development of potential chemopreventive agents. No apparent differences were observed in the binding affinities of the retinoids to binding proteins of a normal tissue or a tumor tissue. No correlation existed between the binding affinities of these retinoids to serum albumin and their biological activity. Structure-activity relationships of the retinoids in relation to their binding affinities and biological activities have been discussed. PMID:6317169

  2. Binding Affinity Effects on Physical Characteristics of a Model Phase-Separated Protein Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Sara; Banani, Salman; Rosen, Michael; Brangwynne, Clifford

    2015-03-01

    Non-membrane bound organelles are associated with a range of biological functions. Several of these structures exhibit liquid-like properties, and may represent droplets of phase-separated RNA and/or proteins. These structures are often enriched in multi-valent molecules, however little is known about the interactions driving the assembly, properties, and function. Here, we address this question using a model multi-valent protein system consisting of repeats of Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) protein and a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM). These proteins undergo phase separation into liquid-like droplets. We combine microrheology and quantitative microscopy to determine affect of binding affinity on the viscosity, density and surface tension of these droplets. We also use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and partitioning experiments to probe the structure and dynamics within these droplets. Our results shed light on how inter-molecular interactions manifests in droplet properties, and lay the groundwork for a comprehensive biophysical picture of intracellular RNA/protein organelles.

  3. Kinetic exclusion assay of monoclonal antibody affinity to the membrane protein Roundabout 1 displayed on baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Kusano-Arai, Osamu; Fukuda, Rie; Kamiya, Wakana; Iwanari, Hiroko; Hamakubo, Takao

    2016-07-01

    The reliable assessment of monoclonal antibody (mAb) affinity against membrane proteins in vivo is a major issue in the development of cancer therapeutics. We describe here a simple and highly sensitive method for the evaluation of mAbs against membrane proteins by means of a kinetic exclusion assay (KinExA) in combination with our previously developed membrane protein display system using budded baculovirus (BV). In our BV display system, the membrane proteins are displayed on the viral surface in their native form. The BVs on which the liver cancer antigen Roundabout 1 (Robo1) was displayed were adsorbed onto magnetic beads without fixative (BV beads). The dissociation constant (Kd, ∼10(-11) M) that was measured on the Robo1 expressed BV beads correlated well with the value from a whole cell assay (the coefficient of determination, R(2) = 0.998) but not with the value for the soluble extracellular domains of Robo1 (R(2) = 0.834). These results suggest that the BV-KinExA method described here provides a suitably accurate Kd evaluation of mAbs against proteins on the cell surface. PMID:27095060

  4. G Protein-Coupled Receptors Directly Bind Filamin A with High Affinity and Promote Filamin Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although interaction of a few G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with Filamin A, a key actin cross-linking and biomechanical signal transducer protein, has been observed, a comprehensive structure–function analysis of this interaction is lacking. Through a systematic sequence-based analysis, we found that a conserved filamin binding motif is present in the cytoplasmic domains of >20% of the 824 GPCRs encoded in the human genome. Direct high-affinity interaction of filamin binding motif peptides of select GPCRs with the Ig domain of Filamin A was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetric experiments. Engagement of the filamin binding motif with the Filamin A Ig domain induced the phosphorylation of filamin by protein kinase A in vitro. In transfected cells, agonist activation as well as constitutive activation of representative GPCRs dramatically elicited recruitment and phosphorylation of cellular Filamin A, a phenomenon long known to be crucial for regulating the structure and dynamics of the cytoskeleton. Our data suggest a molecular mechanism for direct GPCR–cytoskeleton coupling via filamin. Until now, GPCR signaling to the cytoskeleton was predominantly thought to be indirect, through canonical G protein-mediated signaling cascades involving GTPases, adenylyl cyclases, phospholipases, ion channels, and protein kinases. We propose that the GPCR-induced filamin phosphorylation pathway is a conserved, novel biochemical signaling paradigm. PMID:26460884

  5. Identification of a Soluble, High-Affinity Salicylic Acid-Binding Protein in Tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Du, H.; Klessig, D. F.

    1997-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a key component in the signal transduction pathway(s), leading to the activation of certain defense responses in plants after pathogen attack. Previous studies have identified several proteins, including catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, through which the SA signal might act. Here we describe a new SA-binding protein. This soluble protein is present in low abundance in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves and has an apparent molecular weight of approximately 25,000. It reversibly binds SA with an apparent dissociation constant of 90 nM, an affinity that is 150-fold higher than that between SA and catalase. The ability of most analogs of SA to compete with labeled SA for binding to this protein correlated with their ability to induce defense gene expression and enhanced resistance. Strikingly, benzothiadiazole, a recently described chemical activator that induces plant defenses and disease resistance at very low rates of application, was the strongest competitor, being much more effective than unlabeled SA. The possible role of this SA-binding protein in defense signal transduction is discussed. PMID:12223676

  6. A tale of two paralogs: human Transformer2 proteins with differential RNA-binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pritha; Grellscheid, Sushma Nagaraja; Sowdhamini, R

    2016-09-01

    The Transformer2 (Tra2) proteins in humans are homologues of the Drosophila Tra2 protein. One of the two RNA-binding paralogs, Tra2β, has been very well-studied over the past decade, but not much is known about Tra2α. It was very recently shown that the two proteins demonstrate the phenomenon of paralog compensation. Here, we provide a structural basis for this genetic backup circuit, using molecular modelling and dynamics studies. We show that the two proteins display similar binding specificities, but differential affinities to a short GAA-rich RNA stretch. Starting from the 6-nucleotide RNA in the solution structure, close to 4000 virtual mutations were modelled on RNA and the domain-RNA interactions were studied after energy minimisation to convergence. Separately, another known 13-nucleotide stretch was docked and the domain-RNA interactions were observed through a 100-ns dynamics trajectory. We have also demonstrated the 'compensatory' mechanism at the level of domains in one of the domain repeat-containing RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26414300

  7. Engineering a reversible, high-affinity system for efficient protein purification based on the cohesin-dockerin interaction.

    PubMed

    Karpol, Alon; Kantorovich, Lia; Demishtein, Alik; Barak, Yoav; Morag, Ely; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2009-01-01

    Efficient degradation of cellulose by the anaerobic thermophilic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum, is carried out by the multi-enzyme cellulosome complex. The enzymes on the complex are attached in a calcium-dependent manner via their dockerin (Doc) module to a cohesin (Coh) module of the cellulosomal scaffoldin subunit. In this study, we have optimized the Coh-Doc interaction for the purpose of protein affinity purification. A C. thermocellum Coh module was thus fused to a carbohydrate-binding module, and the resultant fusion protein was applied directly onto beaded cellulose, thereby serving as a non-covalent "activation" procedure. A complementary Doc module was then fused to a model protein target: xylanase T-6 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, the binding to the immobilized Coh was only partially reversible upon treatment with EDTA, and only negligible amounts of the target protein were eluted from the affinity column. In order to improve protein elution, a series of truncated Docs were designed in which the calcium-coordinating function was impaired without appreciably affecting high-affinity binding to Coh. A shortened Doc of only 48 residues was sufficient to function as an effective affinity tag, and highly purified target protein was achieved directly from crude cell extracts in a single step with near-quantitative recovery of the target protein. Effective EDTA-mediated elution of the sequestered protein from the column was the key step of the procedure. The affinity column was reusable and maintained very high levels of capacity upon repeated rounds of loading and elution. Reusable Coh-Doc affinity columns thus provide an efficient and attractive approach for purifying proteins in high yield by modifying the calcium-binding loop of the Doc module. PMID:18979459

  8. Characterization of a dockerin-based affinity tag: application for purification of a broad variety of target proteins.

    PubMed

    Demishtein, Alik; Karpol, Alon; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose, a major component of plant matter, is degraded by a cell surface multiprotein complex called the cellulosome produced by several anaerobic bacteria. This complex coordinates the assembly of different glycoside hydrolases, via a high-affinity Ca(2+)-dependent interaction between the enzyme-borne dockerin and the scaffoldin-borne cohesin modules. In this study, we characterized a new protein affinity tag, ΔDoc, a truncated version (48 residues) of the Clostridium thermocellum Cel48S dockerin. The truncated dockerin tag has a binding affinity (K(A)) of 7.7 × 10(8)M(-1), calculated by a competitive enzyme-linked assay system. In order to examine whether the tag can be used for general application in affinity chromatography, it was fused to a range of target proteins, including Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP), C. thermocellum β-glucosidase, Escherichia coli thioesterase/protease I (TEP1), and the antibody-binding ZZ-domain from Staphylococcus aureus protein A. The results of this study significantly extend initial studies performed using the Geobacillus stearothermophilus xylanase T-6 as a model system. In addition, the enzymatic activity of a C. thermocellum β-glucosidase, purified using this approach, was tested and found to be similar to that of a β-glucosidase preparation (without the ΔDoc tag) purified using the standard His-tag. The truncated dockerin derivative functioned as an effective affinity tag through specific interaction with a cognate cohesin, and highly purified target proteins were obtained in a single step directly from crude cell extracts. The relatively inexpensive beaded cellulose-based affinity column was reusable and maintained high capacity after each cycle. This study demonstrates that deletion into the first Ca(2+)-binding loop of the dockerin module results in an efficient and robust affinity tag that can be generally applied for protein purification. PMID:21038354

  9. Affinity Purification and Characterization of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste2p

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byung-Kwon; Jung, Kyung-Sik; Son, Cagdas D; Kim, Heejung; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey Marvin

    2007-01-01

    We present a rare example of a biologically active G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) whose purity and identity were verified by mass spectrometry after being purified to near homogeneity from its native system. An overexpression vector was constructed to encode the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPCR -factor receptor (Ste2p, the STE2 gene product) containing a 9-amino acid sequence of rhodopsin that served as an epitope/affinity tag. In the construct, two glycosylation sites and two cysteine residues were removed to aid future structural and functional studies. The receptor was expressed in yeast cells and was detected as a single band in a western blot indicating the absence of glycosylation. Tests of the epitope-tagged, mutated receptor showed it maintained its full biological activity. For extraction of Ste2p, yeast membranes were solubilized with 0.5 % n-dodecyl maltoside (DM). Approximately 120 g of purified -factor receptor was obtained per liter of culture by single-step affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody to the rhodopsin epitope. The binding affinity (Kd) of the purified -factor receptor in DM micelles was 28 nM as compared to Kd = 12.7 nM for Ste2p in cell membranes, and approximately 40 % of the purified receptor was correctly folded as judged by ligand saturation binding. About 50 % of the receptor sequence was retrieved from MALDITOF and nanospray mass spectrometry after CNBr digestion of the purified receptor. The methods described will enable structural studies of the -factor receptor and may provide an efficient technique to purify other GPCRs that have been functionally expressed in yeast.

  10. A Molecular Mechanics Approach to Modeling Protein-Ligand Interactions: Relative Binding Affinities in Congeneric Series

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Chaya S.; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Schiffmiller, Aviva; Schoenbrun, Esther Leah; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce the “Prime-ligand” method for ranking ligands in congeneric series. The method employs a single scoring function, the OPLS-AA/GBSA molecular mechanics/implicit solvent model, for all stages of sampling and scoring. We evaluate the method using 12 test sets of congeneric series for which experimental binding data is available in the literature, as well as the structure of one member of the series bound to the protein. Ligands are ‘docked’ by superimposing a common stem fragment among the compounds in the series using a crystal complex from the Protein Databank, and sampling the conformational space of the variable region. Our results show good correlation between our predicted rankings and experimental data for cases in which binding affinities differ by at least one order of magnitude. For 11 out of 12 cases, >90% of such ligand pairs could be correctly ranked, while for the remaining case, Factor Xa, 76% of such pairs were correctly ranked. A small number of compounds could not be docked using the current protocol due to the large size of functional groups that could not be accommodated by a rigid receptor. CPU requirements for the method, involving CPU-minutes per ligand, are modest compared with more rigorous methods that use similar force fields, such as free energy perturbation. We also benchmark the scoring function using series of ligand bound to the same protein within the CSAR data set. We demonstrate that energy minimization of ligand in the crystal structures is critical to obtain any correlation with experimentally determined binding affinities. PMID:21780805

  11. Identification of Evening Complex Associated Proteins in Arabidopsis by Affinity Purification and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhouxin; Kay, Steve A.

    2016-01-01

    Many species possess an endogenous circadian clock to synchronize internal physiology with an oscillating external environment. In plants, the circadian clock coordinates growth, metabolism and development over daily and seasonal time scales. Many proteins in the circadian network form oscillating complexes that temporally regulate myriad processes, including signal transduction, transcription, protein degradation and post-translational modification. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a tripartite complex composed of EARLY FLOWERING 4 (ELF4), EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3), and LUX ARRHYTHMO (LUX), named the evening complex, modulates daily rhythms in gene expression and growth through transcriptional regulation. However, little is known about the physical interactions that connect the circadian system to other pathways. We used affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) methods to identify proteins that associate with the evening complex in A. thaliana. New connections within the circadian network as well as to light signaling pathways were identified, including linkages between the evening complex, TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1), TIME FOR COFFEE (TIC), all phytochromes and TANDEM ZINC KNUCKLE/PLUS3 (TZP). Coupling genetic mutation with affinity purifications tested the roles of phytochrome B (phyB), EARLY FLOWERING 4, and EARLY FLOWERING 3 as nodes connecting the evening complex to clock and light signaling pathways. These experiments establish a hierarchical association between pathways and indicate direct and indirect interactions. Specifically, the results suggested that EARLY FLOWERING 3 and phytochrome B act as hubs connecting the clock and red light signaling pathways. Finally, we characterized a clade of associated nuclear kinases that regulate circadian rhythms, growth, and flowering in A. thaliana. Coupling mass spectrometry and genetics is a powerful method to rapidly and directly identify novel components and connections within and between complex signaling

  12. Macromolecular crowding effects on protein-protein binding affinity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young C.; Best, Robert B.; Mittal, Jeetain

    2010-11-01

    Macromolecular crowding in cells is recognized to have a significant impact on biological function, yet quantitative models for its effects are relatively undeveloped. The influence of crowding on protein-protein interactions is of particular interest, since these mediate many processes in the cell, including the self-assembly of larger complexes, recognition, and signaling. We use a residue-level coarse-grained model to investigate the effects of macromolecular crowding on the assembly of protein-protein complexes. Interactions between the proteins are treated using a fully transferable energy function, and interactions of protein residues with the spherical crowders are repulsive. We show that the binding free energy for two protein complexes, ubiquitin/UIM1 and cytochrome c/cytochrome c peroxidase, decreases modestly as the concentration of crowding agents increases. To obtain a quantitative description of the stabilizing effect, we map the aspherical individual proteins and protein complexes onto spheres whose radii are calculated from the crowder-excluded protein volumes. With this correspondence, we find that the change in the binding free energy due to crowding can be quantitatively described by the scaled particle theory model without any fitting parameters. The effects of a mixture of different-size crowders—as would be found in a real cell—are predicted by the same model with an additivity ansatz. We also obtain the remarkable result that crowding increases the fraction of specific complexes at the expense of nonspecific transient encounter complexes in a crowded environment. This result, due to the greater excluded volume of the nonspecific complexes, demonstrates that macromolecular crowding can have subtle functional effects beyond the relative stability of bound and unbound complexes.

  13. Development of Enhanced Capacity Affinity Microcolumns by using a Hybrid of Protein Cross-linking/Modification and Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Podariu, Maria; Bi, Cong; Hage, David S.

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid method was examined for increasing the binding capacity and activity of protein-based affinity columns by using a combination of protein cross-linking/modification and covalent immobilization. Various applications of this approach in the study of drug-protein interactions and in use with affinity microcolumns were considered. Human serum albumin (HSA) was utilized as a model protein for this work. Bismaleimidohexane (BMH, a homobifunctional maleimide) was used to modify and/or cross-link HSA through the single free sulfhydryl group that is present on this protein. Up to a 75-113% increase in protein content was obtained when comparing affinity supports that were prepared with BMH versus reference supports that were made by using only covalent immobilization. Several drugs that are known to bind HSA (e.g., warfarin, verapamil and carbamazepine) were further found to have a significant increase in retention on HSA microcolumns that were treated with BMH (i.e., a 70-100% increase in protein-based retention). These BMH-treated HSA microcolumns were used in chiral separations and in ultrafast affinity extraction to measure free drug fractions in drug/protein mixtures, with the latter method giving association equilibrium constants that had good agreement with literature values. In addition, it was found that the reversible binding of HSA with ethacrynic acid, an agent that can combine irreversibly with the free sulfhydryl group on this protein, could be examined by using the BMH-treated HSA microcolumns. The same hybrid immobilization method could be extended to other proteins or alternative applications that may require protein-based affinity columns with enhanced binding capacities and activities. PMID:25981291

  14. Natural poly-histidine affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins on cobalt(II)-carboxymethylaspartate crosslinked agarose.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G; Bochkariov, D E; Jokhadze, G G; Hopp, J; Nelson, P

    1999-12-24

    A natural 19-amino-acid poly-histidine affinity tag was cloned at the N-terminus of three recombinant proteins. The vectors containing the DNA of the fusion proteins were used for transformation of Escherichia coli DH5alpha cells. Each protein was expressed, extracted and purified in one chromatographic step. The purification procedure for each protein can be accomplished in less than 1 h. A new type of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography adsorbent--Co2+-carboxymethylaspartate agarose Superflow--was utilized at linear flow-rates as high as 5 cm/min. The final preparation of each protein is with purity greater than 95% as ascertained by sodium dodecyl sulfate-electrophoresis. Recovery for each purified protein was higher than 77% of the initial loaded amount as judged by biological activity. The operational capacity of Co2+-carboxymethylaspartate agarose for each protein was determined. PMID:10669292

  15. Integrated bioprocess for the production and purification of recombinant proteins by affinity chromatography in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Beshay, Usama; Miksch, Gerhard; Friehs, Karl; Flaschel, Erwin

    2009-02-01

    In order to improve the effectiveness of the production of recombinant proteins in E. coli, integrated fermentation processes were developed. Therefore, expression vectors were constructed containing a strongly expressed gene for a beta-glucanase fused with a metal-chelating affinity tag and a leader peptide for directing the fusion protein into the periplasmic space. Its export into the medium was achieved by means of co-expression of a bacteriocin-release protein, the Kil protein from pColE1. Bioreactors were modified so that special devices containing metal chelate pentadentate chelator PDC resins were located within the bioreactor. Using the bioreactor with an internal device the Zn2+-PDC had a 4.3-fold higher binding capacity than metal-free PDC (12.3 and 2.6 kU ml(-1) PDC, respectively. Using the bioreactor with charged PDC in an external circuit revealed even higher beta-glucanase concentration (65.6 kU ml(-1)), i.e. 1.5-fold compared to the internal adsorbent system. PMID:18481103

  16. A protein engineered to bind uranyl selectively and with femtomolar affinity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu; Bosscher, Mike; Zhang, Changsheng; Ozçubukçu, Salih; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wen; Li, Charles J; Liu, Jianzhao; Jensen, Mark P; Lai, Luhua; He, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Uranyl (UO2(2+)), the predominant aerobic form of uranium, is present in the ocean at a concentration of ~3.2 parts per 10(9) (13.7 nM); however, the successful enrichment of uranyl from this vast resource has been limited by the high concentrations of metal ions of similar size and charge, which makes it difficult to design a binding motif that is selective for uranyl. Here we report the design and rational development of a uranyl-binding protein using a computational screening process in the initial search for potential uranyl-binding sites. The engineered protein is thermally stable and offers very high affinity and selectivity for uranyl with a Kd of 7.4 femtomolar (fM) and >10,000-fold selectivity over other metal ions. We also demonstrated that the uranyl-binding protein can repeatedly sequester 30-60% of the uranyl in synthetic sea water. The chemical strategy employed here may be applied to engineer other selective metal-binding proteins for biotechnology and remediation applications. PMID:24557139

  17. Identification of novel interacting protein partners of SMN using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Shafey, Dina; Boyer, Justin G; Bhanot, Kunal; Kothary, Rashmi

    2010-04-01

    Mutations in the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene cause spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neuromuscular disease associated with muscle weakness that progresses to paralysis, respiratory distress, and ultimately death. Both neurons and muscle are severely affected in this disease. Tandem affinity purification (TAP) has emerged as a useful tool for studying protein complexes in vitro. We have used this purification system to discover novel SMN interacting partners in C2C12 muscle and PC12 neuronal cells. To do so, we fused a TAP-tag, consisting of a HIS hexamer and FLAG epitope separated by the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease cleavage site, to either the N- or C-terminal region of SMN. Interestingly, the profile of SMN interacting proteins varies depending on the cell type and stage. We have identified a number of novel SMN interacting proteins in both C2C12 and PC12 cells, and from among these we have validated Annexin II and myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC). The discovery of these proteins will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of SMA. PMID:20201562

  18. A protein engineered to bind uranyl selectively and with femtomolar affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lu; Bosscher, Mike; Zhang, Changsheng; Özçubukçu, Salih; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wen; Li, Charles J.; Liu, Jianzhao; Jensen, Mark P.; Lai, Luhua; He, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Uranyl (UO22+), the predominant aerobic form of uranium, is present in the ocean at a concentration of ~3.2 parts per 109 (13.7 nM) however, the successful enrichment of uranyl from this vast resource has been limited by the high concentrations of metal ions of similar size and charge, which makes it difficult to design a binding motif that is selective for uranyl. Here we report the design and rational development of a uranyl-binding protein using a computational screening process in the initial search for potential uranyl-binding sites. The engineered protein is thermally stable and offers very high affinity and selectivity for uranyl with a Kd of 7.4 femtomolar (fM) and >10,000-fold selectivity over other metal ions. We also demonstrated that the uranyl-binding protein can repeatedly sequester 30-60% of the uranyl in synthetic sea water. The chemical strategy employed here may be applied to engineer other selective metal-binding proteins for biotechnology and remediation applications.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF DRUG-PROTEIN INTERACTIONS IN BLOOD USING HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Hage, David S.; Jackson, Abby; Sobansky, Matt; Schiel, John E.; Yoo, Michelle J.; Joseph, K. S.

    2009-01-01

    The binding of drugs with proteins in blood, serum or plasma is an important process in determining the activity, distribution, rate of excretion, and toxicity of drugs in the body. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) has received a great deal of interest as a means for studying these interactions. This review examines the various techniques that have been used in HPAC to examine drug-protein binding and discusses the types of information that can be obtained through this approach. A comparison of these techniques with traditional methods for binding studies (e.g., equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration) will also be presented. The use of HPAC with specific serum proteins and binding agents will then be discussed, including human serum albumin and α1-acid glycoprotein. Several examples from the literature are provided to illustrate the applications of such research. Recent developments in this field are also described, such as the use of improved immobilization techniques, new data analysis methods, techniques for working for directly with complex biological samples, and work with immobilized lipoproteins. The relative advantages and limitations of the methods that are described will be considered and the possible use of these techniques in the high-throughput screening or characterization of drug-protein binding will be discussed. PMID:19278006

  20. Specific high-affinity binding of fatty acids to epidermal cytosolic proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.; Chung, W.L.; Mukhtar, H. )

    1991-08-01

    Cytosol from rat, mouse, and human skin or rat epidermis was incubated with (3H)arachidonic acid, (14C)retinoic acid, (14C)oleic acid, (3H)leukotriene A4, (3H)prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or (3H) 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), and protein-bound ligands were separated using Lipidex-1000 at 4C to assess the binding specificity. The binding of oleic acid and arachidonic acid with rat epidermal cytosol was rapid, saturable, and reversible. Binding of oleic acid was competed out with the simultaneous addition of other ligands and found to be in the following order: arachidonic acid greater than oleic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than lauric acid greater than leukotriene A4 greater than 15-HETE = PGE1 greater than PGE2 = PGF2. Scatchard analysis of the binding with arachidonic acid, oleic acid, and retinoic acid revealed high-affinity binding sites with the dissociation constant in the nM range. SDS-PAGE analysis of the oleic acid-bound epidermal cytosolic protein(s) revealed maximum binding at the 14.5 kDa region. The presence of the fatty acid-binding protein in epidermal cytosol and its binding to fatty acids and retinoic acid may be of significance both in the trafficking and the metabolism of fatty acids and retinoids across the skin.

  1. Inhibitory GTP binding protein G/sub i/ regulates US -adrenoceptor affinity towards US -agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, I.; Levitzki, A.

    1987-05-01

    Treatment of S-49 lymphoma cell membranes with pertussis toxin (PT) causes a three-fold reduction of US -adrenoceptor (US AR) affinity towards isoproterenol. A similar treatment with cholera toxin (CT) does not cause such a modulation. The effects were studied by the detailed analysis of SVI-cyanopindolol (CYP) binding curves in the absence and presence of increasing agonist concentrations. Thus, the authors were able to compare in detail the effects of G/sub s/ and G/sub i/ on the agonist-associated state of the US AR. In contrast to these findings, PT treatment does not have any effect on the displacement of SVI-CYP by (-)isoproterenol. These results demonstrate that the inhibitory GTP protein G/sub i/ modulates the US AR affinity towards US -agonists. This might be due to the association of G/sub i/ with the agonist-bound US AR x G/sub s/ x C complex within the membrane. This hypothesis, as well as others, is under investigation.

  2. ANALYSIS OF DRUG-PROTEIN BINDING BY ULTRAFAST AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY USING IMMOBILIZED HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Rangan; Yoo, Michelle J.; Briscoe, Chad J.; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) was explored for use as a stationary phase and ligand in affinity microcolumns for the ultrafast extraction of free drug fractions and the use of this information for the analysis of drug-protein binding. Warfarin, imipramine, and ibuprofen were used as model analytes in this study. It was found that greater than 95% extraction of all these drugs could be achieved in as little as 250 ms on HSA microcolumns. The retained drug fraction was then eluted from the same column under isocratic conditions, giving elution in less than 40 s when working at 4.5 mL/min. The chromatographic behavior of this system gave a good fit with that predicted by computer simulations based on a reversible, saturable model for the binding of an injected drug with immobilized HSA. The free fractions measured by this method were found to be comparable to those determined by ultrafiltration, and equilibrium constants estimated by this approach gave good agreement with literature values. Advantages of this method include its speed and the relatively low cost of microcolumns that contain HSA. The ability of HSA to bind many types of drugs also creates the possibility of using the same affinity microcolumn to study and measure the free fractions for a variety of pharmaceutical agents. These properties make this technique appealing for use in drug binding studies and in the high-throughput screening of new drug candidates. PMID:20227701

  3. DETECTION OF HETEROGENEOUS DRUG-PROTEIN BINDING BY FRONTAL ANALYSIS AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Joseph, K.S.; Hage, David S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the use of frontal analysis and high-performance affinity chromatography for detecting heterogeneous binding in biomolecular interactions, using the binding of acetohexamide with human serum albumin (HSA) as a model. It was found through the use of this model system and chromatographic theory that double-reciprocal plots could be used more easily than traditional isotherms for the initial detection of binding site heterogeneity. The deviations from linearity that were seen in double-reciprocal plots as a result of heterogeneity were a function of the analyte concentration, the relative affinities of the binding sites in the system and the amount of each type of site that was present. The size of these deviations was determined and compared under various conditions. Plots were also generated to show what experimental conditions would be needed to observe these deviations for general heterogeneous systems or for cases in which some preliminary information was available on the extent of binding heterogeneity. The methods developed in this work for the detection of binding heterogeneity are not limited to drug interactions with HSA but could be applied to other types of drug-protein binding or to additional biological systems with heterogeneous binding. PMID:21612784

  4. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  5. Relative penicillin G resistance in Neisseria meningitidis and reduced affinity of penicillin-binding protein 3.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelman, P M; Campos, J; Chaffin, D O; Serfass, D A; Smith, A L; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1988-01-01

    We examined clinical isolates of Neisseria meningitidis relatively resistant to penicillin G (mean MIC, 0.3 micrograms/ml; range, 0.1 to 0.7 micrograms/ml), which were isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid for resistance mechanisms, by using susceptible isolates (mean MIC, less than or equal to 0.06 micrograms/ml) for comparison. The resistant strains did not produce detectable beta-lactamase activity, otherwise modify penicillin G, or bind less total penicillin. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 3 of the six resistant isolates tested uniformly bound less penicillin G in comparison to the same PBP of four susceptible isolates. Reflecting the reduced binding affinity of PBP 3 of the two resistant strains tested, the amount of 3H-labeled penicillin G required for half-maximal binding was increased in comparison with that of PBP 3 of the two susceptible isolates. We conclude that the mechanism of resistance in these meningococci relatively resistant to penicillin G was decreased affinity of PBP 3. Images PMID:3134848

  6. C-Terminally fused affinity Strep-tag II is removed by proteolysis from recombinant human erythropoietin expressed in transgenic tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Kittur, Farooqahmed S.; Lalgondar, Mallikarjun; Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Sane, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Asialo-erythropoietin (asialo-EPO), a desialylated form of EPO, is a potent tissue-protective agent. Recently, we and others have exploited a low cost plant-based expression system to produce recombinant human asialo-EPO (asialo-rhuEPOP). To facilitate purification from plant extracts, Strep-tag II was engineered at the C-terminus of EPO. Although asialo-rhuEPOP was efficiently expressed in transgenic tobacco plants, affinity purification based on Strep-tag II did not result in the recovery of the protein. In this study, we investigated the stability of Strep-tag II tagged asialo-rhuEPOP expressed in tobacco plants to understand whether this fused tag is cleaved or inaccessible. Sequencing RT-PCR products confirmed that fused DNA sequences encoding Strep-tag II were properly transcribed, and three-dimensional protein structure model revealed that the tag must be fully accessible. However, Western blot analysis of leaf extracts and purified asialo-rhuEPOP revealed that the Strep-tag II was absent on the protein. Additionally, no peptide fragment containing Strep-tag II was identified in the LC-MS/MS analysis of purified protein further supporting that the affinity tag was absent on asialo-rhuEPOP. However, Strep-tag II was detected on asialo-rhuEPOP that was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting that the Strep-tag II is removed during protein secretion or extraction. These findings together with recent reports that C-terminally fused Strep-tag II or IgG Fc domain are also removed from EPO in tobacco plants, suggest that its C-terminus may be highly susceptible to proteolysis in tobacco plants. Therefore, direct fusion of purification tags at the C-terminus of EPO should be avoided while expressing it in tobacco plants. PMID:25504272

  7. An affinity-based strategy for the design of selective displacers for the chromatographic separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Vutukuru, Srinavya; Kate, Sandesh D; McCallum, Scott A; Morrison, Christopher J; Cramer, Steven M; Kane, Ravi S

    2008-06-01

    We describe an affinity-based strategy for designing selective protein displacers for the chromatographic purification of proteins. To design a displacer that is selective for a target protein, we attached a component with affinity for the target protein to a resin-binding component; we then tested the ability of such displacers to selectively retain the target protein on a resin relative to another protein having a similar retention time. In particular, we synthesized displacers based on biotin, which selectively retained avidin as compared to aprotinin on SP Sepharose high performance resin. In addition, we have extended this approach to develop an affinity-peptide-based displacer that discriminates between lysozyme and cytochrome c. Here, a selective displacer was designed from a lysozyme-binding peptide that had been identified and optimized previously using phage-display technology. Our results suggest a general strategy for designing highly selective affinity-based displacers by identifying molecules (e.g., peptides) that bind to a protein of interest and using an appropriate linker to attach these molecules to a moiety that binds to the stationary phase. PMID:18512879

  8. Identification by affinity chromatography of the eukaryotic ribosomal proteins that bind to 5.8 S ribosomal ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, N; Lin, A; Wool, I G

    1979-09-10

    The proteins that bind to rat liver 5.8 S ribosomal ribonucleic acid were identified by affinity chromatography. The nucleic acid was oxidized with periodate and coupled by its 3'-terminus to Sepharose 4B through and adipic acid dihydrazide spacer. The ribosomal proteins that associate with the immobilized 5.8 S rRNA were identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresiss: they were L19, L8, and L6 from the 60 S subunit; and S13 and S9 from the small subparticle. Small amounts of L14, L17', L18, L27/L27', and L35', and of S11, S15, S23/S24, and S26 also were bound to the affinity column, but whether they associate directly and specifically with 5.8 S rRNA is not known. Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins did not bind to the rat liver 5.8 S rRNA affinity column. PMID:468846

  9. SAINTq: Scoring protein-protein interactions in affinity purification - mass spectrometry experiments with fragment or peptide intensity data.

    PubMed

    Teo, Guoci; Koh, Hiromi; Fermin, Damian; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Knight, James D R; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Choi, Hyungwon

    2016-08-01

    SAINT (Significance Analysis of INTeractome) is a probabilistic method for scoring bait-prey interactions against negative controls in affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments. Our published SAINT algorithms use spectral counts or protein intensities as the input for calculating the probability of true interaction, which enables objective selection of high-confidence interactions with false discovery control. With the advent of new protein quantification methods such as Data Independent Acquisition (DIA), we redeveloped the scoring method to utilize the reproducibility information embedded in the peptide or fragment intensity data as a key scoring criterion, bypassing protein intensity summarization required in the previous SAINT workflow. The new software package, SAINTq, addresses key issues in the interaction scoring based on intensity data, including treatment of missing values and selection of peptides and fragments for scoring each prey protein. We applied SAINTq to two independent DIA AP-MS data sets profiling the interactome of MEPCE and EIF4A2 and that of 14-3-3β, and benchmarked the performance in terms of recovering previously reported literature interactions in the iRefIndex database. In both data sets, the SAINTq analysis using the fragment-level intensity data led to the most sensitive detection of literature interactions at the same level of specificity. This analysis outperforms the analysis using protein intensity data summed from fragment intensity data that is equivalent to the model in SAINTexpress. PMID:27119218

  10. Nylon-Based Affinity Membranes: Impacts of Surface Modification on Protein Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Beeskow; Kroner; Anspach

    1997-12-15

    Nylon microfiltration membranes were activated with bisoxirane and formaldehyde at terminal amino groups and amide groups of the nylon polymer, respectively. Dextrans were covalently immobilized on these activated membranes to yield dextran-coated membrane matrices. Both procedures led to a significant reduction of hemoglobin adsorption; however, bisoxirane activation required additional cross-linking of dextran and a second dextran layer to yield comparable quality of dextran-coated membranes than formaldehyde activation. Formaldehyde activation was easiest and cheapest and resulted in membranes with highest dextran density and relatively lowest nonspecific hemoglobin adsorption. Dextrans of &Mmacr;w >/= 40,000 were required for bisoxirane-activated membranes, whereas dextrans of &Mmacr;w = 6000 were sufficient for formaldehyde-activated membranes. Both activation methods resulted in stable coatings at low and high pH; however, formaldehyde-activated membranes were unstable under strongly acidic conditions at pH < 3. Dextran coils were found responsible for the reduction of the hydraulic permeability but also for the high ligand densities obtained after immobilization of Cibacron Blue F3G-A (360 nmol/cm2) and iminodiacetic acid (400 nmol/cm2). The thermodynamics of protein adsorption on dye ligand affinity (DLA) membranes corresponded with chromatographic sorbents and dye ligand conjugates, with the dextran coating demonstrating similar structure than dextrans in solution. Protein adsorption took place in the extended coil structure of dextrans with binding capacities up to 730 µg/cm2 lysozyme on DLA membranes and 470 µg/cm2 concanavalin A on metal chelate affinity membranes. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. PMID:9792753

  11. Immobilized metal ion affinity partitioning, a method combining metal-protein interaction and partitioning of proteins in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, G; Vijayalakshmi, M A; Stigbrand, T; Kopperschläger, G

    1991-02-22

    Immobilized metal ions were used for the affinity extraction of proteins in aqueous two-phase systems composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dextran or PEG and salt. Soluble chelating polymers were prepared by covalent attachment of metal-chelating groups to PEG. The effect on the partitioning of proteins of such chelating PEG derivatives coordinated with different metal ions is demonstrated. The proteins studied were alpha 2-macroglobulin, tissue plasminogen activator, superoxide dismutase and monoclonal antibodies. The results indicate that immobilized metal ion affinity partitioning provides excellent potential for the extraction of proteins. PMID:1710621

  12. Carbohydrate affinity for the glucose-galactose binding protein is regulated by allosteric domain motions.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Gabriel; Castaño, David; Diercks, Tammo; Millet, Oscar

    2012-12-01

    Protein function, structure, and dynamics are intricately correlated, but studies on structure-activity relationships are still only rarely complemented by a detailed analysis of dynamics related to function (functional dynamics). Here, we have applied NMR to investigate the functional dynamics in two homologous periplasmic sugar binding proteins with bidomain composition: Escherichia coli glucose/galactose (GGBP) and ribose (RBP) binding proteins. In contrast to their structural and functional similarity, we observe a remarkable difference in functional dynamics: For RBP, the absence of segmental motions allows only for isolated structural adaptations upon carbohydrate binding in line with an induced fit mechanism; on the other hand, GGBP shows extensive segmental mobility in both apo and holo states, enabling selection of the most favorable conformation upon carbohydrate binding in line with a population shift mechanism. Collective segmental motions are controlled by the hinge composition: by swapping two identified key residues between RBP and GGBP we also interchange their segmental hinge mobility, and the doubly mutated GGBP* no longer experiences changes in conformational entropy upon ligand binding while the complementary RBP* shows the segmental dynamics observed in wild-type GGBP. Most importantly, the segmental interdomain dynamics always increase the apparent substrate affinity and thus, are functional, underscoring the allosteric control that the hinge region exerts on ligand binding. PMID:23148479

  13. MEASUREMENT OF DRUG-PROTEIN DISSOCIATION RATES BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY AND PEAK PROFILING

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Ohnmacht, Corey M.; Hage, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The rate at which a drug or other small solute interacts with a protein is important in understanding the biological and pharmacokinetic behavior of these agents. One approach that has been developed for examining these rates involves the use of high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) and estimates of band-broadening through peak profiling. Previous work with this method has been based on a comparison of the statistical moments for a retained analyte versus non-retained species at a single, high flow rate to obtain information on stationary phase mass transfer. In this study an alternative approach was created that allows a broad range of flow rates to be used for examining solute-protein dissociation rates. Chromatographic theory was employed to derive equations that could be used with this approach on a single column, as well as with multiple columns to evaluate and correct for the impact of stagnant mobile phase mass transfer. The interaction of L-tryptophan with human serum albumin was used as a model system to test this method. A dissociation rate constant of 2.7 (± 0.2) s−1 was obtained by this approach at pH 7.4 and 37°C, which was in good agreement with previous values determined by other methods. The techniques described in this report can be applied to other biomolecular systems and should be valuable for the determination of drug-protein dissociation rates. PMID:19422253

  14. A versatile polypeptide platform for integrated recognition and reporting: affinity arrays for protein-ligand interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Enander, Karin; Dolphin, Gunnar T; Liedberg, Bo; Lundström, Ingemar; Baltzer, Lars

    2004-05-17

    A molecular platform for protein detection and quantification is reported in which recognition has been integrated with direct monitoring of target-protein binding. The platform is based on a versatile 42-residue helix-loop-helix polypeptide that dimerizes to form four-helix bundles and allows site-selective modification with recognition and reporter elements on the side chains of individually addressable lysine residues. The well-characterized interaction between the model target-protein carbonic anhydrase and its inhibitor benzenesulfonamide was used for a proof-of-concept demonstration. An affinity array was designed where benzenesulfonamide derivatives with aliphatic or oligoglycine spacers and a fluorescent dansyl reporter group were introduced into the scaffold. The affinities of the array members for human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII) were determined by titration with the target protein and were found to be highly affected by the properties of the spacers (dissociation constant Kd=0.02-3 microM). The affinity of HCAII for acetazolamide (Kd=4 nM) was determined in a competition experiment with one of the benzenesulfonamide array members to address the possibility of screening substance libraries for new target-protein binders. Also, successful affinity discrimination between different carbonic anhydrase isozymes highlighted the possibility of performing future isoform-expression profiling. Our platform is predicted to become a flexible tool for a variety of biosensor and protein-microarray applications within biochemistry, diagnostics and pharmaceutical chemistry. PMID:15146511

  15. Development of an epitope tag for the gentle purification of proteins by immunoaffinity chromatography: application to epitope-tagged green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Nancy E; Arthur, Terrance M; Burgess, Richard R

    2003-12-15

    Polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are useful tools for the gentle purification of proteins and protein complexes. These are high-affinity mAbs that release the antigen in the presence of a nonchaotropic salt and a low-molecular-weight polyhydroxylated compound (polyol). The epitope for the polyol-responsive mAb NT73, which reacts with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, was located at the C terminus of the beta' subunit. Using recombinant DNA techniques, we have identified the epitope to be within the 13-amino-acid sequence SLAELLNAGLGGS and have developed an epitope tag that can be fused to a protein of interest for use as a purification tag. This epitope tag (designated Softag1) was fused to either the N or the C terminus of the green fluorescent protein. These tagged proteins were expressed in E. coli, and the tagged proteins were purified from the soluble fraction by a single-step immunoaffinity chromatography procedure. This approach extends the powerful technique of gentle-release immunoaffinity chromatography to many expressed proteins. PMID:14656522

  16. A comprehensive platform to investigate protein-metal ion interactions by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; Albishri, Hassan M; Abd El-Hady, Deia; Redweik, Sabine; El Deeb, Sami; Wätzig, Hermann

    2015-03-25

    In this work, the behavior of several metal ions with different globular proteins was investigated by affinity capillary electrophoresis. Screening was conducted by applying a proper rinsing protocol developed by our group. The use of 0.1M EDTA in the rinsing solution successfully desorbs metal ions from the capillary wall. The mobility ratio was used to evaluate the precision of the method. Excellent precision for repeated runs was achieved for different protein metal ion interactions (RSD% of 0.05-1.0%). Run times were less than 6 min for all of the investigated interactions. The method has been successfully applied for the interaction study of Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Al(3+), Ga(3+), La(3+), Pd(2+), Ir(3+), Ru(3+), Rh(3+), Pt(2+), Pt(4+), Os(3+), Au(3+), Au(+), Ag(+), Cu(1+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cr(3+), V(3+), MoO4(2-) and SeO3(2-) with bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, β-lactoglobulin and myoglobin. Different interaction values were obtained for most of the tested metal ions even for that in the same metal group. Results were discussed and compared in view of metal and semimetal group's interaction behavior with the tested proteins. The calculated normalized difference of mobility ratios for each protein-metal ion interaction and its sign (positive and negative) has been successfully used to detect the interaction and estimate further coordination of the bound metal ion, respectively. The comprehensive platform summarizes all the obtained interaction results, and is valuable for any future protein-metal ion investigation. PMID:25638307

  17. Biomarker Candidates of Chlamydophila pneumoniae Proteins and Protein Fragments Identified by Affinity-Proteomics Using FTICR-MS and LC-MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susnea, Iuliana; Bunk, Sebastian; Wendel, Albrecht; Hermann, Corinna; Przybylski, Michael

    2011-04-01

    We report here an affinity-proteomics approach that combines 2D-gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with high performance mass spectrometry to the identification of both full length protein antigens and antigenic fragments of Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae). The present affinity-mass spectrometry approach effectively utilized high resolution FTICR mass spectrometry and LC-tandem-MS for protein identification, and enabled the identification of several new highly antigenic C. pneumoniae proteins that were not hitherto reported or previously detected only in other Chlamydia species, such as Chlamydia trachomatis. Moreover, high resolution affinity-MS provided the identification of several neo-antigenic protein fragments containing N- and C-terminal, and central domains such as fragments of the membrane protein Pmp21 and the secreted chlamydial proteasome-like factor (Cpaf), representing specific biomarker candidates.

  18. A Mixed QM/MM Scoring Function to Predict Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hayik, Seth A; Dunbrack, Roland; Merz, Kenneth M

    2010-09-01

    Computational methods for predicting protein-ligand binding free energy continue to be popular as a potential cost-cutting method in the drug discovery process. However, accurate predictions are often difficult to make as estimates must be made for certain electronic and entropic terms in conventional force field based scoring functions. Mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods allow electronic effects for a small region of the protein to be calculated, treating the remaining atoms as a fixed charge background for the active site. Such a semi-empirical QM/MM scoring function has been implemented in AMBER using DivCon and tested on a set of 23 metalloprotein-ligand complexes, where QM/MM methods provide a particular advantage in the modeling of the metal ion. The binding affinity of this set of proteins can be calculated with an R(2) of 0.64 and a standard deviation of 1.88 kcal/mol without fitting and 0.71 and a standard deviation of 1.69 kcal/mol with fitted weighting of the individual scoring terms. In this study we explore using various methods to calculate terms in the binding free energy equation, including entropy estimates and minimization standards. From these studies we found that using the rotational bond estimate to ligand entropy results in a reasonable R(2) of 0.63 without fitting. We also found that using the ESCF energy of the proteins without minimization resulted in an R(2) of 0.57, when using the rotatable bond entropy estimate. PMID:21221417

  19. Proteomic profiling of tandem affinity purified 14-3-3 protein complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ing-Feng; Curran, Amy; Woolsey, Rebekah; Quilici, David; Cushman, John; Mittler, Ron; Harmon, Alice; Harper, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 14-3-3 dimers regulate hundreds of functionally diverse proteins (clients), typically in phosphorylation-dependent interactions. To uncover new clients, a 14-3-3 omega (At1g78300) from Arabidopsis was engineered with a “tandem affinity purification” (TAP) tag and expressed in transgenic plants. Purified complexes were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Results indicate that 14-3-3 omega can dimerize with at least 10 of the 12 14-3-3 isoforms expressed in Arabidopsis. The identification here of 121 putative clients provides support for in vivo 14-3-3 interactions with a diverse array of proteins, including those involved in: (1) Ion transport, such as a K+ channel (GORK), a Cl− channel (CLCg), Ca2+ channels belonging to the glutamate receptor family (GLRs 1.2, 2.1, 2.9, 3.4, 3.7); (2) hormone signaling, such as ACC synthase (isoforms ACS-6, 7 and 8 involved in ethylene synthesis) and the brassinolide receptors BRI1 and BAK1; (3) transcription, such as 7 WRKY family transcription factors; (4) metabolism, such as phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) carboxylase; and (5) lipid signaling, such as phospholipase D (β, and γ). More than 80% (101) of these putative clients represent previously unidentified 14-3-3 interactors. These results raise the number of putative 14-3-3 clients identified in plants to over 300. PMID:19452453

  20. Control of Protein Affinity of Bioactive Nanocellulose and Passivation Using Engineered Block and Random Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Vuoriluoto, Maija; Orelma, Hannes; Zhu, Baolei; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-03-01

    We passivated TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNF) toward human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) by modification with block and random copolymers of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (POEGMA). The block copolymers reversibly adsorbed on TOCNF and were highly effective in preventing nonspecific interactions with hIgG, especially if short PDMAEMA blocks were used. In such cases, total protein rejection was achieved. This is in contrast to typical blocking agents, which performed poorly. When an anti-human IgG biointerface was installed onto the passivated TOCNF, remarkably high affinity antibody-antigen interactions were observed (0.90 ± 0.09 mg/m(2)). This is in contrast to the nonpassivated biointerface, which resulted in a significant false response. In addition, regeneration of the biointerface was possible by low pH aqueous wash. Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus was also utilized to successfully increase the sensitivity for human IgG recognition (1.28 ± 0.11 mg/m(2)). Overall, the developed system based on TOCNF modified with multifunctional polymers can be easily deployed as bioactive material with minimum fouling and excellent selectivity. PMID:26844956

  1. Phosphorylation of FEZ1 by Microtubule Affinity Regulating Kinases regulates its function in presynaptic protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nikolov, Miroslav; Erck, Christian; Grosche, Jens; Urlaub, Henning; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Klopfenstein, Dieter R.; Chua, John Jia En

    2016-01-01

    Adapters bind motor proteins to cargoes and therefore play essential roles in Kinesin-1 mediated intracellular transport. The regulatory mechanisms governing adapter functions and the spectrum of cargoes recognized by individual adapters remain poorly defined. Here, we show that cargoes transported by the Kinesin-1 adapter FEZ1 are enriched for presynaptic components and identify that specific phosphorylation of FEZ1 at its serine 58 regulatory site is mediated by microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARK/PAR-1). Loss of MARK/PAR-1 impairs axonal transport, with adapter and cargo abnormally co-aggregating in neuronal cell bodies and axons. Presynaptic specializations are markedly reduced and distorted in FEZ1 and MARK/PAR-1 mutants. Strikingly, abnormal co-aggregates of unphosphorylated FEZ1, Kinesin-1 and its putative cargoes are present in brains of transgenic mice modelling aspects of Alzheimer’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder exhibiting impaired axonal transport and altered MARK activity. Our findings suggest that perturbed FEZ1-mediated synaptic delivery of proteins arising from abnormal signalling potentially contributes to the process of neurodegeneration. PMID:27247180

  2. Analysis of Lidocaine Interactions with Serum Proteins Using High-Performance Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Sony; Yoo, Michelle J.; Jang, Yoon Jeong; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    High-performance affinity chromatography was used to study binding by the drug lidocaine to human serum albumin (HSA) and α1–acid glycoprotein (AGP). AGP had strong binding to lidocaine, with an association equilibrium constant (Ka) of 1.1-1.7 × 105 M-1 at 37 °C and pH 7.4. Lidocaine had weak-to-moderate binding to HSA, with a Ka in the range of 103 to 104 M-1. Competitive experiments with site selective probes showed that lidocaine was interacting with Sudlow site II of HSA and the propranolol site of AGP. These results agree with previous observations in the literature and provide a better quantitative understanding of how lidocaine binds to these serum proteins and is transported in the circulation. This study also demonstrates how HPAC can be used to examine the binding of a drug with multiple serum proteins and provide detailed information on the interaction sites and equilibrium constants that are involved in such processes. PMID:20138813

  3. Phosphorylation of FEZ1 by Microtubule Affinity Regulating Kinases regulates its function in presynaptic protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nikolov, Miroslav; Erck, Christian; Grosche, Jens; Urlaub, Henning; Schmidt, Christoph F; Klopfenstein, Dieter R; Chua, John Jia En

    2016-01-01

    Adapters bind motor proteins to cargoes and therefore play essential roles in Kinesin-1 mediated intracellular transport. The regulatory mechanisms governing adapter functions and the spectrum of cargoes recognized by individual adapters remain poorly defined. Here, we show that cargoes transported by the Kinesin-1 adapter FEZ1 are enriched for presynaptic components and identify that specific phosphorylation of FEZ1 at its serine 58 regulatory site is mediated by microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARK/PAR-1). Loss of MARK/PAR-1 impairs axonal transport, with adapter and cargo abnormally co-aggregating in neuronal cell bodies and axons. Presynaptic specializations are markedly reduced and distorted in FEZ1 and MARK/PAR-1 mutants. Strikingly, abnormal co-aggregates of unphosphorylated FEZ1, Kinesin-1 and its putative cargoes are present in brains of transgenic mice modelling aspects of Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder exhibiting impaired axonal transport and altered MARK activity. Our findings suggest that perturbed FEZ1-mediated synaptic delivery of proteins arising from abnormal signalling potentially contributes to the process of neurodegeneration. PMID:27247180

  4. Balancing between affinity and speed in target DNA search by zinc-finger proteins via modulation of dynamic conformational ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Zandarashvili, Levani; Esadze, Alexandre; Vuzman, Dana; Kemme, Catherine A.; Levy, Yaakov; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Although engineering of transcription factors and DNA-modifying enzymes has drawn substantial attention for artificial gene regulation and genome editing, most efforts focus on affinity and specificity of the DNA-binding proteins, typically overlooking the kinetic properties of these proteins. However, a simplistic pursuit of high affinity can lead to kinetically deficient proteins that spend too much time at nonspecific sites before reaching their targets on DNA. We demonstrate that structural dynamic knowledge of the DNA-scanning process allows for kinetically and thermodynamically balanced engineering of DNA-binding proteins. Our current study of the zinc-finger protein Egr-1 (also known as Zif268) and its nuclease derivatives reveals kinetic and thermodynamic roles of the dynamic conformational equilibrium between two modes during the DNA-scanning process: one mode suitable for search and the other for recognition. By mutagenesis, we were able to shift this equilibrium, as confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. Using fluorescence and biochemical assays as well as computational simulations, we analyzed how the shifts of the conformational equilibrium influence binding affinity, target search kinetics, and efficiency in displacing other proteins from the target sites. A shift toward the recognition mode caused an increase in affinity for DNA and a decrease in search efficiency. In contrast, a shift toward the search mode caused a decrease in affinity and an increase in search efficiency. This accelerated site-specific DNA cleavage by the zinc-finger nuclease, without enhancing off-target cleavage. Our study shows that appropriate modulation of the dynamic conformational ensemble can greatly improve zinc-finger technology, which has used Egr-1 (Zif268) as a major scaffold for engineering. PMID:26324943

  5. Balancing between affinity and speed in target DNA search by zinc-finger proteins via modulation of dynamic conformational ensemble.

    PubMed

    Zandarashvili, Levani; Esadze, Alexandre; Vuzman, Dana; Kemme, Catherine A; Levy, Yaakov; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-09-15

    Although engineering of transcription factors and DNA-modifying enzymes has drawn substantial attention for artificial gene regulation and genome editing, most efforts focus on affinity and specificity of the DNA-binding proteins, typically overlooking the kinetic properties of these proteins. However, a simplistic pursuit of high affinity can lead to kinetically deficient proteins that spend too much time at nonspecific sites before reaching their targets on DNA. We demonstrate that structural dynamic knowledge of the DNA-scanning process allows for kinetically and thermodynamically balanced engineering of DNA-binding proteins. Our current study of the zinc-finger protein Egr-1 (also known as Zif268) and its nuclease derivatives reveals kinetic and thermodynamic roles of the dynamic conformational equilibrium between two modes during the DNA-scanning process: one mode suitable for search and the other for recognition. By mutagenesis, we were able to shift this equilibrium, as confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. Using fluorescence and biochemical assays as well as computational simulations, we analyzed how the shifts of the conformational equilibrium influence binding affinity, target search kinetics, and efficiency in displacing other proteins from the target sites. A shift toward the recognition mode caused an increase in affinity for DNA and a decrease in search efficiency. In contrast, a shift toward the search mode caused a decrease in affinity and an increase in search efficiency. This accelerated site-specific DNA cleavage by the zinc-finger nuclease, without enhancing off-target cleavage. Our study shows that appropriate modulation of the dynamic conformational ensemble can greatly improve zinc-finger technology, which has used Egr-1 (Zif268) as a major scaffold for engineering. PMID:26324943

  6. Sperm-egg recognition in the mouse: characterization of sp56, a sperm protein having specific affinity for ZP3

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Recognition between mammalian gametes occurs when the plasma membrane of the sperm head binds to the zona pellucida (ZP), an extracellular coat surrounding eggs. ZP3, one of three glycoproteins in the ZP, is the egg protein recognized by sperm. A mouse sperm surface protein, sp56 (M(r) = 56,000), has been identified on the basis of its specific affinity for ZP3 (Bleil, J. D., and P. M. Wassarman. 1990. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 87:5563-5567). Studies presented here were designed to characterize mouse sperm sp56 and to further test whether or not this protein specifically recognizes ZP3. sp56 was purified by both ZP3 affinity chromatography and by ion exchange chromatography followed by size-exclusion chromatography. The purified native protein eluted from size-exclusion columns as a homomultimer (M(r) approximately 110,000). Each monomer of the protein contains intramolecular disulfide bonds, consistent with its extracellular location. Immunohistochemical and immunoblotting studies, using monoclonal antibodies, demonstrated that sp56 is a peripheral membrane protein located on the outer surface of the sperm head plasma membrane, precisely where sperm bind ZP3. Results of crosslinking experiments demonstrated that the ZP3 oligosaccharide recognized by sperm has specific affinity for sp56. Collectively, these results suggest that sp56 may be the sperm protein responsible for sperm-egg recognition in the mouse. PMID:8188752

  7. DNA Sequence Determinants Controlling Affinity, Stability and Shape of DNA Complexes Bound by the Nucleoid Protein Fis.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Stephen P; Stella, Stefano; Cascio, Duilio; Johnson, Reid C

    2016-01-01

    The abundant Fis nucleoid protein selectively binds poorly related DNA sequences with high affinities to regulate diverse DNA reactions. Fis binds DNA primarily through DNA backbone contacts and selects target sites by reading conformational properties of DNA sequences, most prominently intrinsic minor groove widths. High-affinity binding requires Fis-stabilized DNA conformational changes that vary depending on DNA sequence. In order to better understand the molecular basis for high affinity site recognition, we analyzed the effects of DNA sequence within and flanking the core Fis binding site on binding affinity and DNA structure. X-ray crystal structures of Fis-DNA complexes containing variable sequences in the noncontacted center of the binding site or variations within the major groove interfaces show that the DNA can adapt to the Fis dimer surface asymmetrically. We show that the presence and position of pyrimidine-purine base steps within the major groove interfaces affect both local DNA bending and minor groove compression to modulate affinities and lifetimes of Fis-DNA complexes. Sequences flanking the core binding site also modulate complex affinities, lifetimes, and the degree of local and global Fis-induced DNA bending. In particular, a G immediately upstream of the 15 bp core sequence inhibits binding and bending, and A-tracts within the flanking base pairs increase both complex lifetimes and global DNA curvatures. Taken together, our observations support a revised DNA motif specifying high-affinity Fis binding and highlight the range of conformations that Fis-bound DNA can adopt. The affinities and DNA conformations of individual Fis-DNA complexes are likely to be tailored to their context-specific biological functions. PMID:26959646

  8. DNA Sequence Determinants Controlling Affinity, Stability and Shape of DNA Complexes Bound by the Nucleoid Protein Fis

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Stephen P.; Stella, Stefano; Cascio, Duilio; Johnson, Reid C.

    2016-01-01

    The abundant Fis nucleoid protein selectively binds poorly related DNA sequences with high affinities to regulate diverse DNA reactions. Fis binds DNA primarily through DNA backbone contacts and selects target sites by reading conformational properties of DNA sequences, most prominently intrinsic minor groove widths. High-affinity binding requires Fis-stabilized DNA conformational changes that vary depending on DNA sequence. In order to better understand the molecular basis for high affinity site recognition, we analyzed the effects of DNA sequence within and flanking the core Fis binding site on binding affinity and DNA structure. X-ray crystal structures of Fis-DNA complexes containing variable sequences in the noncontacted center of the binding site or variations within the major groove interfaces show that the DNA can adapt to the Fis dimer surface asymmetrically. We show that the presence and position of pyrimidine-purine base steps within the major groove interfaces affect both local DNA bending and minor groove compression to modulate affinities and lifetimes of Fis-DNA complexes. Sequences flanking the core binding site also modulate complex affinities, lifetimes, and the degree of local and global Fis-induced DNA bending. In particular, a G immediately upstream of the 15 bp core sequence inhibits binding and bending, and A-tracts within the flanking base pairs increase both complex lifetimes and global DNA curvatures. Taken together, our observations support a revised DNA motif specifying high-affinity Fis binding and highlight the range of conformations that Fis-bound DNA can adopt. The affinities and DNA conformations of individual Fis-DNA complexes are likely to be tailored to their context-specific biological functions. PMID:26959646

  9. DNA sequence determinants controlling affinity, stability and shape of DNA complexes bound by the nucleoid protein Fis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hancock, Stephen P.; Stella, Stefano; Cascio, Duilio; Johnson, Reid C.; Leng, Fenfei

    2016-03-09

    The abundant Fis nucleoid protein selectively binds poorly related DNA sequences with high affinities to regulate diverse DNA reactions. Fis binds DNA primarily through DNA backbone contacts and selects target sites by reading conformational properties of DNA sequences, most prominently intrinsic minor groove widths. High-affinity binding requires Fis-stabilized DNA conformational changes that vary depending on DNA sequence. In order to better understand the molecular basis for high affinity site recognition, we analyzed the effects of DNA sequence within and flanking the core Fis binding site on binding affinity and DNA structure. X-ray crystal structures of Fis-DNA complexes containing variable sequencesmore » in the noncontacted center of the binding site or variations within the major groove interfaces show that the DNA can adapt to the Fis dimer surface asymmetrically. We show that the presence and position of pyrimidine-purine base steps within the major groove interfaces affect both local DNA bending and minor groove compression to modulate affinities and lifetimes of Fis-DNA complexes. Sequences flanking the core binding site also modulate complex affinities, lifetimes, and the degree of local and global Fis-induced DNA bending. In particular, a G immediately upstream of the 15 bp core sequence inhibits binding and bending, and A-tracts within the flanking base pairs increase both complex lifetimes and global DNA curvatures. Taken together, our observations support a revised DNA motif specifying high-affinity Fis binding and highlight the range of conformations that Fis-bound DNA can adopt. Lastly, the affinities and DNA conformations of individual Fis-DNA complexes are likely to be tailored to their context-specific biological functions.« less

  10. Exploring the interplay between experimental methods and the performance of predictors of binding affinity change upon mutations in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Geng, Cunliang; Vangone, Anna; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2016-08-01

    Reliable prediction of binding affinity changes (ΔΔG) upon mutations in protein complexes relies not only on the performance of computational methods but also on the availability and quality of experimental data. Binding affinity changes can be measured by various experimental methods with different accuracies and limitations. To understand the impact of these on the prediction of binding affinity change, we present the Database of binding Affinity Change Upon Mutation (DACUM), a database of 1872 binding affinity changes upon single-point mutations, a subset of the SKEMPI database (Moal,I.H. and Fernández-Recio,J. Bioinformatics, 2012;28:2600-2607) extended with information on the experimental methods used for ΔΔG measurements. The ΔΔG data were classified into different data sets based on the experimental method used and the position of the mutation (interface and non-interface). We tested the prediction performance of the original HADDOCK score, a newly trained version of it and mutation Cutoff Scanning Matrix (Pires,D.E.V., Ascher,D.B. and Blundell,T.L. Bioinformatics 2014;30:335-342), one of the best reported ΔΔG predictors so far, on these various data sets. Our results demonstrate a strong impact of the experimental methods on the performance of binding affinity change predictors for protein complexes. This underscores the importance of properly considering and carefully choosing experimental methods in the development of novel binding affinity change predictors. The DACUM database is available online at https://github.com/haddocking/DACUM. PMID:27284087