These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Ethnic Belonging and Traditional Masculinity Ideology Among African Americans, European Americans, and Latinos  

Microsoft Academic Search

African American, European American, and Latino males (N = 378) completed the Ethnic Belonging scale of the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM; J. S. Phinney, 1992), the Male Role Norms Scale (MRNS; E. H. Thompson & J. H. Pleck, 1986; a traditional masculinity ideology questionnaire), and demographic items including participant age and family income. Ethnic belonging was the best predictor

José M. Abreu; Rodney K. Goodyear; Alvaro Campos; Michael D. Newcomb

2000-01-01

2

An Empirical Examination of Inter-Ethnic Stereotypes: Comparing Asian American and African American Employees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Undergraduates (n=127) read career histories (including photographs) of fictitious employees in a 2x2x2 design depicting job type (engineer/human resources), ethnicity (Asian or African American), and gender, with the same qualifications and performance information. African-American males were rated most negatively on work characteristics;…

Gilbert, Jackie; Carr-Ruffino, Norma; Ivancevich, John M.; Lownes-Jackson, Millicent

2003-01-01

3

Ethnic socialization of African American children: Implications for parenting, identity development, and academic achievement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research explores ethnic socialization among middle-income African American parents and their children who attend predominantly white schools. Descriptive data regarding parents' and children's reports of ethnic socialization practices were obtained. Additionally, the relationship between ethnic socialization, ethnic identity, and academic achievement was assessed through correlational and predictive statistics. Correlation analyses indicated that children's reports of ethnic socialization were significantly

Sheree Marshall

1995-01-01

4

Peer Status in an Ethnic Context: Associations with African American Adolescents' Ethnic Identity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation examined the association between ethnic identity centrality and peer status for African American adolescents who represented a sizable proportion, yet numerical minority within a high school context. Initial analyses indicated that a traditional sociometric nomination procedure did not adequately characterize peer status for…

Rock, Patrick F.; Cole, Daphne J.; Houshyar, Shadi; Lythcott, Mawiyah; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

2011-01-01

5

Ethnic Identity, Religiousness, and Drinking Among African Americans: What's the Connection?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tested a theoretical model explaining how ethnic identity and religiousness might be related to alcohol use among African Americans. One hundred seventy-three African American undergraduates at a large, public, Southeastern historically black university completed the study. Findings indicate that although religiousness accounted for 31% of the relationship between ethnic identity and alcohol use, whether mediation existed depended on

Andrea M. Smith; Clarenda M. Phillips; Tamara L. Brown

2008-01-01

6

The Impact of the Undergraduate Study Abroad Experience on Ethnic Identity Development Among African American Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research study seeks to explore the effects of the undergraduate study abroad experience on ethnic identity development among African American women. The research question is: what, if any, is the impact of an undergraduate study abroad experience on ethnic identity development of African American women. The two sub-questions are: 1) What, if any, are the differences between women who

Allegra Johnson

2007-01-01

7

Ethnic Identity and Psychological Adjustment: A Validity Analysis for European American and African American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research studied the role of ethnic identity as a protective factor among European American (n = 77) and African American (n = 82) adolescents identified either as high risk or successful. Adolescents participated in a multiagent, multimethod assessment of depression, internalizing and externalizing behaviors, competence, and academic…

Yasui, Miwa; Dorham, Carole LaRue; Dishion, Thomas J.

2004-01-01

8

Ethnicity as a social context for the development of African-American adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Does anticipated future racial discrimination undermine African-American adolescents' academic motivation and performance? Do face-to-face experiences with racial discrimination at school undermine African-American adolescents' academic functioning? Does African-American ethnic identity buffer these relations? This paper addresses these questions using two waves of data from a longitudinal study of an economically diverse sample of African-American adolescents living near Washington D.C. The data

Jacquelynne S. Eccles; Carol A. Wong; Stephen C. Peck

2006-01-01

9

Ethnic and American Identity as Predictors of Self-Esteem Among African American, Latino, and White Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to examine ethnic and American identity as predictors of self-esteem among adolescents, we surveyed 669 American-born high school students (372 Latinos, 232 African Americans, and 65 Whites). Participants completed measures of self-esteem, ethnic identity, American identity, attitudes toward other groups, and demographic variables. Multiple regression analyses of self-esteem were carried out separately for each ethnic group, using ethnic

Jean S. Phinney; Cindy Lou Cantu; Dawn A. Kurtz

1997-01-01

10

Effects of Ethnically Diverse Photographic Stimuli on Preference and Discourse Tasks in African American and Caucasian American Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study determined whether using photographic stimuli displaying different ethnicity (African American vs. Caucasian American) influenced preference, word count, and number of content units produced by African American or Caucasian American participants. Six photograph pairs depicting common scenes were developed, differing only by model…

Ramkissoon, Ishara; Dagenais, Paul A.; Evans, Kelli J.; Camp, Travis J.; Ferguson, Neina N.

2013-01-01

11

The Role of Gender in the Racial and Ethnic Socialization of African American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholars in the field of African American family studies recognize the influence of gender on socialization. However, few studies investigate how gender influences the racial and ethnic socialization of African American youth. To examine the role of gender (both caregiver and adolescent) in socialization practices, data were obtained from 218…

Brown, Tiffany L.; Linver, Miriam R.; Evans, Melanie

2010-01-01

12

Ethnic Differences in Family Stress Processes Among African-Americans and Black Caribbeans  

PubMed Central

Several theories of stress exposure, including the stress process and the family stress model for economically disadvantaged families, suggest that family processes work similarly across race/ethnic groups. Much of this research, however, treats African-Americans as a monolithic group and ignores potential differences in family stress processes within race that may emerge across ethnic groups. This study examines whether family stress processes differ intraracially in African-American and Black Caribbean families. Using data from the National Survey of American Life, a national representative data set of African-American and Black Caribbean families, we assess the extent to which parents’ stress appraisals and psychological adjustment are related to their adolescent children’s stress appraisals, psychological adjustment, and depressive symptoms. Our study illustrates that stress processes differ by ethnicity and operate through varying pathways in African-American and Black Caribbean families. The implications of intraracial variations in stress processes are discussed. PMID:23349643

Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard; Bellatorre, Anna; Jackson, James S.

2012-01-01

13

Influences on Adolescent African American Females' Global Self-Esteem: Body Image and Ethnic Identity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study of 105 senior high school Southern African American adolescent females examined the relationship between global self-esteem, appearance evaluation (body image), and ethnic identity. As predicted, the relationship between global self-esteem, appearance evaluation (r = 0.46, p less than 0.001), and ethnic identity (r = 40, p less than…

Turnage, Barbara F.

2004-01-01

14

Examining Relationships between Ethnic Identity, Family Environment, and Psychological Outcomes for African American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ethnic identity has been linked to a number of healthy psychological outcomes for African American adolescents. The levels of conflict and cohesion in the family environment have also been found to be predictive of adolescent mental health. This study examined whether the ethnic identity and levels of conflict and cohesion in the family…

Street, Jalika; Harris-Britt, April; Walker-Barnes, Chanequa

2009-01-01

15

Ethnicity, Cognitive Styles, and Math Achievement: Variability within African-American Post-Secondary Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the relationship between ethnicity and cognitive styles was examined. Past literature (Witkin, 1978) suggested that African Americans and other ethnic groups were field-dependent learners. However, more recent studies (Dunn & Dunn, 1991; Saracho, 1999) have given mixed results regarding processing. This study included a sample of…

Tomes, Yuma I.

2008-01-01

16

Development and Validation of the Adolescent Racial and Ethnic Socialization Scale (ARESS) in African American Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Racial and ethnic socialization are an integral part of African American parenting strategies. Varied conceptualizations and operationalizations of racial and ethnic socialization exist within the literature with limited evidence of the validity of existing measures. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive definition of racial and…

Brown, Tiffany L.; Krishnakumar, Ambika

2007-01-01

17

Ethnic identity and attitudes toward the police among African American juvenile offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there is a knowledge base regarding theoretical and empirical research on attitudes toward the police, this line of research has not fully examined the sources of such attitudes, and in particular the extent to which attitudes toward the police are influenced by ethnic identity. The present study examined the role of ethnic identity in African American adolescent offenders' perceptions

Joanna M. Lee; Laurence Steinberg; Alex R. Piquero

2010-01-01

18

Race and Ethnic Differences in Religious Involvement: African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and Non-Hispanic Whites  

PubMed Central

This study examined differences in religious participation and spirituality among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks (Black Caribbeans) and non-Hispanic Whites. Data are taken from the National Survey of American Life, a nationally representative study of African Americans, Black Caribbeans and non-Hispanic Whites. Selected measures of organizational, nonorganizational and subjective religious participation were examined. African American and Caribbean Blacks were largely similar in their reports of religious involvement; both groups generally indicated higher levels of religious participation than non-Hispanic Whites. African Americans were more likely than Black Caribbeans to be official members of their places of worship, engage in activities (choirs, church clubs) at their place of worship and request prayer from others. Black Caribbeans reported reading religious materials more frequently than African Americans. The discussion notes the importance of examining ethnic differences within the black American population of the United States. PMID:20975850

Chatters, Linda M.; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Bullard, Kai McKeever; Jackson, James S.

2010-01-01

19

Ethnic identity, religiousness, and drinking among African Americans: what's the connection?  

PubMed

This study tested a theoretical model explaining how ethnic identity and religiousness might be related to alcohol use among African Americans. One hundred seventy-three African American undergraduates at a large, public, Southeastern historically black university completed the study. Findings indicate that although religiousness accounted for 31% of the relationship between ethnic identity and alcohol use, whether mediation existed depended on which dimensions of ethnic identity, religiousness, and alcohol use were examined. Daily spiritual experiences (but not forgiveness or private religious activities) mediated the link between ethnic belonging (but not ethnic identity search) and average number of alcoholic beverages consumed in a sitting (but not frequency of use or problems with use). PMID:19064441

Smith, Andrea M; Phillips, Clarenda M; Brown, Tamara L

2008-01-01

20

Emotion Socialization and Ethnicity: An Examination of Practices and Outcomes in African American, Asian American, and Latin American Families  

PubMed Central

The current review paper summarizes the literature on parental emotion socialization in ethnically diverse families in the United States. Models of emotion socialization have been primarily developed using samples of European American parents and children. As such, current categorizations of “adaptive” and “maladaptive” emotion socialization practices may not be applicable to individuals from different ethnic backgrounds. The review examines current models of emotion socialization, with particular attention paid to the demographic breakdown of the studies used to develop these models. Additionally, the review highlights studies examining emotion socialization practices in African American, Asian American, and Latin American families. The review is synthesized with summarizing themes of similarities and differences across ethnic groups, and implications for culturally sensitive research and practice are discussed. PMID:23766738

Morelen, Diana; Thomassin, Kristel

2013-01-01

21

The Roles of Ethnic Identity, Anti-White Attitudes, and Academic Self-Concept in African American Student Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conventional wisdom in much of the educational and psychological literatures states that the ethnic and racial identity of African American students is related to their academic achievement. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ethnic identity and anti-white attitudes predicted the academic achievement of African American students at…

Cokley, Kevin O.; Chapman, Collette

2008-01-01

22

Experimentally Evaluating the Impact of a School-Based African-Centered Emancipatory Intervention on the Ethnic Identity of African American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ethnic identity, the extent to which one defines one's self as a member of a particular ethnic group, has been found to be an important predictor of African American adolescents' psychological and behavioral well-being. This study experimentally examined the effects of a school-based emancipatory intervention on the ethnic identity of African

Lewis, Kelly M.; Andrews, Emily; Gaska, Karie; Sullivan, Cris; Bybee, Deborah; Ellick, Kecia L.

2012-01-01

23

Applying Ethnic Equivalence and Cultural Values Models to African-American Teens' Perceptions of Parents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study evaluated both the parenting styles and family ecologies models with interview responses from African American adolescents. Analyses contrasted each model with a joint model for predicting self esteem, self reliance, work orientation, and ethnic identity. Overall, findings suggest that a joint model that combines elements from both models…

Lamborn, Susie D.; Felbab, Amanda J.

2003-01-01

24

African American Adolescents' Perceptions of Ethnic Socialization and Racial Socialization as Distinct Processes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ethnic socialization and racial socialization were examined as discrete concepts using a semistructured interview to assess message content for each form of socialization. We were interested in whether adolescents distinguished between these forms of socialization. Fifty-five African American 11th- and 12th-grade students were asked separate…

Paasch-Anderson, Julie; Lamborn, Susie D.

2014-01-01

25

Racism-Related Stress and Ethnic Identity as Determinants of African American College Students' Career Aspirations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing primarily on the construct of psychological buffer, the purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which racism-related stress and ethnic identity are determinants of career aspirations. A total of 163 African American college students from a predominately White Midwestern university participated in the study. A moderation…

Tovar-Murray, Darrick; Jenifer, Ericka S.; Andrusyk, Jara; D'Angelo, Ryan; King, Tia

2012-01-01

26

INTEGRATING PERSONALITY AND AFRICAN AMERICAN RACIAL/ETHNIC IDENTITY IN A COMPREHENSIVE MODEL OF PERCEIVED DISCRIMINATION AND WELL-BEING .  

E-print Network

??INTEGRATING PERSONALITY AND AFRICAN AMERICAN RACIAL/ETHNIC IDENTITY IN A COMPREHENSIVE MODEL OF PERCEIVED DISCRIMINATION AND WELL-BEING Abstract By Quaneecia L. Rainey, Ph.D. Washington State University… (more)

Rainey, Quaneecia L.

2011-01-01

27

The University of Texas at Austin -College of Liberal Arts Ethnic Studies (African & African American Studies) Degree Plan  

E-print Network

American Studies) Degree Plan B.A. Plan 1: 2006-2008 Catalog Area A: English and Rhetoric & Writing: RHE & African American Studies): 33 hours (including 18 upper-division): 3 hours specified African & African American Studies: AFR 301 24 hours (including at least 12 upper-division) in African & African American

Texas at Austin, University of

28

Workplace discrimination predicting racial/ethnic socialization across African American, Latino, and Chinese families.  

PubMed

Informed by Kohn and Schooler's (1969) occupational socialization framework, this study examined linkages between racial/ethnic minority mothers' perceptions of racial/ethnic discrimination in the workplace and adolescents' accounts of racial/ethnic socialization in the home. Data were collected from 100 mother-early adolescent dyads who participated in a longitudinal study of urban adolescents' development in the Northeastern United States, including African American, Latino, and Chinese families. Mothers and adolescents completed surveys separately. We found that when mothers reported more frequent institutional discrimination at work, adolescents reported more frequent preparation for bias messages at home, across racial/ethnic groups. Mothers' experiences of interpersonal prejudice at work were associated with more frequent cultural socialization messages among African American and Latino families. Chinese youth reported fewer cultural socialization messages when mothers perceived more frequent interpersonal prejudice at work. Findings are discussed in the context of minority groups' distinct social histories and economic status in the United States. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25133408

Hagelskamp, Carolin; Hughes, Diane L

2014-10-01

29

Facial Expression Recognition and Social Competence among African American Elementary School Children: An Examination of Ethnic Differences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated the potential for cross-ethnic miscommunication of facial expressions, examining elementary students' ability to identify emotion in African American and white facial expressions and noting the relationship to social competence. Student data indicated that ability to read faces differing in ethnicity did not differ by children's…

Glanville, Denise N.; Nowicki, Steve

2002-01-01

30

Sociocultural Factors and School Engagement Among African American Youth: The Roles of Racial Discrimination, Racial Socialization, and Ethnic Identity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the links between racial discrimination and school engagement and the roles of racial socialization and ethnic identity as protective factors in those linkages in a sample of 148, sixth through twelfth grade African American adolescents from working and middle-class two-parent families. In home interviews, youth described their ethnic identity, discrimination experiences at school, and school engagement (school

Aryn M. Dotterer; Susan M. McHale; Ann C. Crouter

2009-01-01

31

Ethnic Identity Gratifications Selection and Avoidance by African Americans: A Group Vitality and Social Identity Gratifications Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores the relatively new idea that individuals engage with media in an effort to meet their social identity needs. Specifically, the study broadens the social identity gratifications (SIG) approach to the domain of ethnicity by examining how African Americansethnic identity gratifications selection and avoidance are related to their perceptions of ingroup vitality. Two mediation models involving level

Jessica R. Abrams; Howard Giles

2007-01-01

32

African American, White and Hispanic child care preferences: A factorial survey analysis of welfare leavers by race and ethnicity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research investigates the child care preferences of poor White, African American and Hispanic parents. Using the factorial survey method, this research examines the impact of race and ethnicity on child care preferences and definitions of child care quality. The findings do not support the conclusion that race and ethnicity are a major source of division in preferences for child

Anne B. Shlay

2010-01-01

33

Racial\\/Ethnic Socialization and Parental Involvement in Education as Predictors of Cognitive Ability and Achievement in African American Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Racial\\/ethnic socialization has not been studied in the context of other parenting behaviors such as parental involvement\\u000a in education and its relationship to children’s cognitive outcomes. The present study tested the impact of racial\\/ethnic socialization\\u000a and parental involvement in education on cognitive ability and achievement in a sample of African American youth. Two dimensions\\u000a of racial\\/ethnic socialization, cultural exposure (i.e.,

Meeta BanerjeeZaje; Zaje A. T. Harrell; Deborah J. Johnson

2011-01-01

34

Ethnic density and depressive symptoms among african americans: threshold and differential effects across social and demographic subgroups.  

PubMed

Objectives. We examined the association between Black ethnic density and depressive symptoms among African Americans. We sought to ascertain whether a threshold exists in the association between Black ethnic density and an important mental health outcome, and to identify differential effects of this association across social, economic, and demographic subpopulations. Methods. We analyzed the African American sample (n?=?3570) from the National Survey of American Life, which we geocoded to the 2000 US Census. We determined the threshold with a multivariable regression spline model. We examined differential effects of ethnic density with random-effects multilevel linear regressions stratified by sociodemographic characteristics. Results. The protective association between Black ethnic density and depressive symptoms changed direction, becoming a detrimental effect, when ethnic density reached 85%. Black ethnic density was protective for lower socioeconomic positions and detrimental for the better-off categories. The masking effects of area deprivation were stronger in the highest levels of Black ethnic density. Conclusions. Addressing racism, racial discrimination, economic deprivation, and poor services-the main drivers differentiating ethnic density from residential segregation-will help to ensure that the racial/ethnic composition of a neighborhood is not a risk factor for poor mental health. PMID:25322307

Bécares, Laia; Nazroo, James; Jackson, James

2014-12-01

35

Perceived Support and Internalizing Symptoms in African American Adolescents: Self-Esteem and Ethnic Identity as Mediators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing research leaves a gap in explaining why African American adolescents do not exhibit more anxiety and depression than\\u000a other youth, at the same time that they experience more contextual risk factors. The current study examined the roles of social\\u000a support as well as possible mediators self-esteem and ethnic identity (sense of belonging to one’s ethnic group) in reducing\\u000a internalizing

Noni K. Gaylord-Harden; Brian L. Ragsdale; Jelani Mandara; Maryse H. Richards; Anne C. Petersen

2007-01-01

36

African American Adolescents' Future Education Orientation: Associations with Self-Efficacy, Ethnic Identity, and Perceived Parental Support  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study, using data from 374 African American students (59.4% female) in grades 7-12 attending a rural, southern county public school, addressed associations of self-efficacy, ethnic identity and parental support with "future education orientation." Both gender and current level of achievement distinguished adolescents with differing…

Kerpelman, Jennifer L.; Eryigit, Suna; Stephens, Carolyn J.

2008-01-01

37

African-American Parents' Racial and Ethnic Socialization and Adolescent Academic Grades: Teasing out the Role of Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship of racial and ethnic socialization and academic achievement in a sample of 218 African American adolescents (grades 9-12; 52% girls) attending a public high school in the northeastern United States. Researchers were particularly interested in whether adolescent gender moderated the relationship between racial…

Brown, Tiffany L.; Linver, Miriam R.; Evans, Melanie; DeGennaro, Donna

2009-01-01

38

Linking Contextual Affordances: Examining Racial-Ethnic Socialization and Parental Career Support among African American College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory investigation examined the link between self-reported racial-ethnic socialization experiences and perceived parental career support among African American undergraduate and graduate students. The results of two separate multivariate multiple regression analyses found that messages about coping with racism positively predicted…

Blackmon, Sha'Kema M.; Thomas, Anita Jones

2014-01-01

39

Racism and Illicit Drug Use Among African American Women: The Protective Effects of Ethnic Identity, Affirmation, and Behavior  

PubMed Central

Though recent evidence indicates that rates of illicit drug use among African American women are now higher than the national average, little is known about the etiology of substance use in this population. In addition, the effects of racism and other cultural factors are understudied and may be unique amongst African American women. This cross-sectional study explores risk and protective factors for drug use among 204 African American women. More specifically, associations between racism experiences and drug use are investigated in the context of potential moderating influences (i.e., psychosocial resources, social safety net variables, and cultural identity and practices). Findings suggest that racism is associated with drug use, but that its effects diminish with age. In addition, results suggest that psychosocial resources, social safety net factors and culturally specific factors like ethnic community membership and engagement in cultural practices afford African American women some protection against the detrimental effects of racism. PMID:24482547

Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Perry, Brea; Harp, Kathi L.; Oser, Carrie B.

2012-01-01

40

Ethnic Differences in the Measurement of Academic Self-Concept in a Sample of African American and European American College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the validity and reliability of scores on the Academic Self-Concept Scale (W. Reynolds and others, 1980) in groups of 291 European American and 396 African American college students. Results suggest important ethnic differences in the structure of academic self-concept regarding beliefs about ability and the relationship between effort…

Cokley, Kevin; Komarraju, Meera; King, Aisha; Cunningham, Dana; Muhammed, Grace

2003-01-01

41

The moderating effects of skin color and ethnic identity affirmation on suicide risk among low-SES African American women  

PubMed Central

This study examined the influence of concurrent racism and sexism experiences (i.e. gendered racism) on African American women’s suicidal ideation and behavior in the context of disadvantaged socioeconomic status. Drawing on a stress process framework, the moderating effects of ethnic identity and skin color were explored using multiple regression analyses. Data were from 204 low-income African American women in the B-WISE (Black Women in a Study of Epidemics) project. Findings suggested that experiencing gendered racism significantly increased these women’s risk for suicidal ideation or behavior, though only among women with medium or dark skin color. Also, having strong ethnic identity buffered the harmful effects of gendered racism. The moderating properties of skin color and ethnic identity affirmation likely operate through psychosocial pathways, blocking internalization of negative stereotypes and reducing the level of distress experienced in response to gendered racism. PMID:23459264

Perry, Brea L.; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Oser, Carrie B.

2012-01-01

42

The moderating effects of skin color and ethnic identity affirmation on suicide risk among low-SES African American women.  

PubMed

This study examined the influence of concurrent racism and sexism experiences (i.e. gendered racism) on African American women's suicidal ideation and behavior in the context of disadvantaged socioeconomic status. Drawing on a stress process framework, the moderating effects of ethnic identity and skin color were explored using multiple regression analyses. Data were from 204 low-income African American women in the B-WISE (Black Women in a Study of Epidemics) project. Findings suggested that experiencing gendered racism significantly increased these women's risk for suicidal ideation or behavior, though only among women with medium or dark skin color. Also, having strong ethnic identity buffered the harmful effects of gendered racism. The moderating properties of skin color and ethnic identity affirmation likely operate through psychosocial pathways, blocking internalization of negative stereotypes and reducing the level of distress experienced in response to gendered racism. PMID:23459264

Perry, Brea L; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Oser, Carrie B

2013-03-01

43

Predictors of Unprotected Sex among Young Sexually Active African American, Hispanic, and White MSM: The Importance of Ethnicity and Culture  

PubMed Central

Despite the recognized need for culturally tailored HIV prevention interventions for gay, bisexual, and questioning youth, few studies have examined if predictors of unprotected sex vary for youth from different ethnic groups. This study reports on a sample of 189 gay, bisexual, and questioning youth (age 15–22) from three racial/ethnic backgrounds (African American, Hispanic, and White) recruited in Chicago, IL and Miami-Dade and Broward Counties, Florida. For African American youth, being in a long-term relationship, having been kicked out of the home for having sex with men, and younger age at initiation of sexual behavior were associated with unprotected sex. For Hispanic youth, higher ethnic identification and older age at initiation of sexual behavior were associated with unprotected sex. For White youth, no predictors were associated with unprotected sex. Our findings point to the importance of understanding the varying predictors of unprotected sex and integrating them into tailored prevention interventions. PMID:17721725

Fernandez, M. Isabel; Harper, Gary W.; Hidalgo, Marco A.; Jamil, Omar B.; Torres, Rodrigo Sebastian

2010-01-01

44

Racial/ethnic socialization and parental involvement in education as predictors of cognitive ability and achievement in African American children.  

PubMed

Racial/ethnic socialization has not been studied in the context of other parenting behaviors such as parental involvement in education and its relationship to children's cognitive outcomes. The present study tested the impact of racial/ethnic socialization and parental involvement in education on cognitive ability and achievement in a sample of African American youth. Two dimensions of racial/ethnic socialization, cultural exposure (i.e., exposure to diverse cultures) and cultural socialization (i.e., in-group pride), were examined in a sample of 92 African American mother-child dyads, of which 50% were female. Maternal reports of involvement during their child's 5th grade year were examined as a moderator in the relationship between racial/ethnic socialization and cognitive ability and achievement. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that mothers' reports of cultural exposure messages measured in 4th grade predicted children's scores on 5th grade assessments of passage comprehension. There was also a significant interaction indicating that greater cultural exposure and more parental involvement in education predicted better reading passage comprehension scores over time. The implications for assessing dimensions relevant to cognitive ability and achievement in African American children are discussed. PMID:20582622

Banerjee, Meeta; Harrell, Zaje A T; Johnson, Deborah J

2011-05-01

45

Differences among African American Jr. High School Students: The Effects of Skin Tone on Ethnic Identity, Self-Esteem and Cross-Cultural Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the results of a study conducted to assess differences among African American adolescents based on skin tone. It was hypothesized that the students would demonstrate differences in self-esteem, ethnic identity, and cross-cultural coping strategies based on their skin tones. One hundred thirteen African American adolescents…

Breland, Alfiee M.; Coleman, Hardin L. K.; Steward, Robbie J.

46

African American Adolescents’ Future Education Orientation: Associations with Self-efficacy, Ethnic Identity, and Perceived Parental Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study, using data from 374 African American students (59.4% female) in grades 7–12 attending a rural, southern\\u000a county public school, addressed associations of self-efficacy, ethnic identity and parental support with “future education\\u000a orientation.” Both gender and current level of achievement distinguished adolescents with differing levels of future education\\u000a orientation. The strongest predictors of future education orientation were self-efficacy,

Jennifer L. Kerpelman; Suna Eryigit; Carolyn J. Stephens

2008-01-01

47

Gene-Based Sequencing Identifies Lipid-Influencing Variants with Ethnicity-Specific Effects in African Americans  

PubMed Central

Although a considerable proportion of serum lipids loci identified in European ancestry individuals (EA) replicate in African Americans (AA), interethnic differences in the distribution of serum lipids suggest that some genetic determinants differ by ethnicity. We conducted a comprehensive evaluation of five lipid candidate genes to identify variants with ethnicity-specific effects. We sequenced ABCA1, LCAT, LPL, PON1, and SERPINE1 in 48 AA individuals with extreme serum lipid concentrations (high HDLC/low TG or low HDLC/high TG). Identified variants were genotyped in the full population-based sample of AA (n?=?1694) and tested for an association with serum lipids. rs328 (LPL) and correlated variants were associated with higher HDLC and lower TG. Interestingly, a stronger effect was observed on a “European” vs. “African” genetic background at this locus. To investigate this effect, we evaluated the region among West Africans (WA). For TG, the effect size among WA was the same in AA with only African local ancestry (2–3% lower TG), while the larger association among AA with local European ancestry matched previous reports in EA (10%). For HDLC, there was no association with rs328 in AA with only African local ancestry or in WA, while the association among AA with European local ancestry was much greater than what has been observed for EA (15 vs. ?5 mg/dl), suggesting an interaction with an environmental or genetic factor that differs by ethnicity. Beyond this ancestry effect, the importance of African ancestry-focused, sequence-based work was also highlighted by serum lipid associations of variants that were in higher frequency (or present only) among those of African ancestry. By beginning our study with the sequence variation present in AA individuals, investigating local ancestry effects, and seeking replication in WA, we were able to comprehensively evaluate the role of a set of candidate genes in serum lipids in AA. PMID:24603370

Bentley, Amy R.; Chen, Guanjie; Shriner, Daniel; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hanxia; Mullikin, James C.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Hansen, Nancy F.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Maskeri, Baishali; Young, Alice C.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N.

2014-01-01

48

Body Dissatisfaction, Ethnic Identity, and Disordered Eating among African American Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Initial research suggested that only European American women developed eating disorders (Garner, 1993), yet recent studies have shown that African American women do experience them (e.g., Lester & Petrie, 1998b; Mulholland & Mintz, 2001) and also may be negatively affected by similar sociocultural variables. In this study, we examined a…

Rogers Wood, Nikel A.; Petrie, Trent A.

2010-01-01

49

The Protective Role of Ethnic and Racial Identity and Aspects of an Africentric Orientation against Drug Use among African American Young Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the authors examined (a) the protective potential of multiple components of ethnic and racial identity and (b) the aspects of an Africentric orientation for moderating psychobehavioral risk and protective factors for drug use among a sample of 333 urban low-income African American young adults. Ethnic and racial identity and…

Brook, Judith S.; Pahl, Kerstin

2005-01-01

50

Racial and Ethnic-Related Stressors as Predictors of Perceived Stress and Academic Performance for African American Students at a Historically Black College and University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether racial and ethnic-related stressors were associated with overall levels of perceived stress and academic performance among African American students at a historically Black college and university (HBCU). Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test racial and ethnic-related stressors…

Greer, Tawanda M.

2008-01-01

51

Development of Logical Reasoning and the School Performance of African American Adolescents in Relation to Socioeconomic Status, Ethnic Identity, an Self-Esteem.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explored the relation of African American adolescents' deductive reasoning and school performance to socioeconomic status (SES), ethnicity, and self-esteem. High SES students outscored low SES students in reasoning performance and school grades. Better reasoning performance related to stronger ethnic identity. Self-esteem and grades were strongly…

Chapell, Mark S.; Overton, Willis F.

2002-01-01

52

Online racial discrimination and the protective function of ethnic identity and self-esteem for African American adolescents.  

PubMed

A growing body of literature has shown that being victimized online is associated with poor mental health. Little is known about the factors that protect youth from the negative outcomes that may result from these victimization experiences, particularly those related to race. Using a risk and resilience framework, this study examined the protective function of ethnic identity and self-esteem among African Americans who experience online racial discrimination. For the sample of 125 adolescents, hierarchical regression results revealed that higher levels of ethnic identity and self-esteem significantly moderated the negative impact of online racial discrimination on anxiety levels. These findings show that ethnic identity and self-esteem can buffer the negative mental health outcomes associated with online racial discrimination, at least with respect to adolescents' anxiety. Findings from the current study have significant implications for adolescent adjustment given the increased time youth spend doing online activities. PMID:22369340

Tynes, Brendesha M; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Rose, Chad A; Lin, Johnny; Anderson, Carolyn J

2012-03-01

53

Examining the relationship between the endorsement of racial/ethnic stereotypes and excess body fat composition in a national sample of African Americans and black Caribbeans.  

PubMed

Using the National Survey of American Life, a nationally representative household survey of non-institutionalized US Blacks, our study examined whether the endorsement of racial/ ethnic stereotypes was associated with excess body fat composition among African Americans (n = 3,265) and Black Caribbeans (n = 1,332) living in the United States. We used ordinary least squares and multinomial logistic regression analyses controlling for potential confounders. Results from the linear regression suggested that the endorsement of racial/ethnic stereotypes was associated with increased body mass index and weight among African American males (b = .57, P < .05) and females (b = .50 P < .05). Further, results from the adjusted multinomial logistic regression suggested that African American males who endorsed racial/ethnic stereotypes were more likely to be obese (odds ratio = 1.33, P < .05), than African American males who did not endorse racial/ethnic stereotypes. Surprising, a positive relationship was not found among Black Caribbeans. Future studies should examine the relationship between internalized discrimination and endorsements of negative racial/ethnic stereotypes and excess fat accumulation among ethnically heterogeneous samples of Blacks. PMID:24392609

Parker, Lauren J; Hunte, Haslyn E R

2013-01-01

54

Skin color shades in advertising to ethnic audiences: The case of African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two experimental studies were conducted to examine African Americans' (AA) perceptions and attitudes toward light-skinned and dark-skinned AA female models in print advertisements. Using convenience student samples from three universities in the southeastern USA, the first study examined the perceptions and attitudes of 299 AA males toward the advertising stimuli, while the second study explored the perceptions and attitudes of

Stevie Watson; Corliss G. Thornton; Brian T. Engelland

2010-01-01

55

Mental Health: African Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... effectiveness of treatment for these communities. Cultural Issues Culture, which is understood to be a combination of common heritage beliefs, values and rituals are an important aspect of racial and ethnic communities. African Americans are a resilient people who have withstood enslavement ...

56

A developmental perspective of the relationship of racial-ethnic identity to self-construct, achievement, and behavior in African American children.  

PubMed

This longitudinal study examines the development of racial-ethnic identity among African American children. Racial preferences were assessed in early elementary school with the Racial Attitudes, Beliefs, and Stereotypes Measure-II, a projective technique using paired comparisons of pictures of African American, Asian, Latino, and Caucasian children. Racial-ethnic identity in 3rd grade was assessed using the Multi-Ethnic Identity Measure Ethnic Belonging subscale. Multilevel models indicated that own-group racial preferences increased with age. Second-grade own-group preferences were positively related to 3rd-grade racial-ethnic identity scores. Third-grade racial-ethnic identity was associated positively with self-esteem variables (scholastic, social, physical appearance, and behavioral) and with academic performance. Identity correlated negatively with parent-rated aggression and externalizing and internalizing behaviors. The findings suggest that children's racial-ethnic identity develops differentially by gender, with girls showing faster growth but lower initial ethnic identity. Racial-ethnic identity was shown to be modestly but statistically significantly associated with various important child outcomes. PMID:19364201

Smith, Chaundrissa Oyeshiku; Levine, Douglas W; Smith, Emilie Phillips; Dumas, Jean; Prinz, Ron J

2009-04-01

57

Ethnicity in American Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is comprised of three articles. (1) Ethnicity in American Life: The Historical Perspective, by John Hope Franklin, recounts the trends in the last three centuries. It is contended that ethnicity has extended and continues to extend beyond race; that at times it meant language, customs, religion, and national origin, but that it has…

Franklin, John Hope; And Others

58

Ethnicity-Specific Pharmacogenetics: The Case of Warfarin In African Americans  

PubMed Central

Using a derivation cohort (N=349), we developed the first warfarin dosing algorithm that includes recently discovered polymorphisms in VKORC1 and CYP2C9 associated with warfarin dose requirement in African Americans (AAs). We tested our novel algorithm in an independent cohort of 129 AAs and compared the dose prediction to the International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium (IWPC) dosing algorithms. Our algorithm explains more of the phenotypic variation (R2 = 0.27) than the IWPC pharmacogenomics (R2 = 0.15) or clinical (R2 = 0.16) algorithms. Among high dose patients, our algorithm predicted a higher proportion of patients within 20% of stable warfarin dose (45% vs. 29% and 2% in the IWPC pharmacogenomics and clinical algorithms respectively). In contrast to our novel algorithm, a significant inverse correlation between predicted dose and percent West African ancestry (WAA) was observed for the IWPC pharmacogenomics algorithm among patients requiring ?60 mg/week (? = ?2.04, p=0.02). PMID:24018621

Hernandez, Wenndy; Gamazon, Eric R.; Aquino-Michaels, Keston; Patel, Shitalben; O'Brien, Travis J.; Harralson, Art F.; Kittles, Rick A.; Barbour, April; Tuck, Matthew; McIntosh, Samantha D.; Douglas, Jacqueline N.; Nicolae, Dan; Cavallari, Larisa H.; Perera, Minoli A.

2014-01-01

59

Obesity and African Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Obesity Obesity and African Americans African American women have the ... ss6104.pdf [PDF | 3.5MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

60

Ethnic awareness, prejudice, and civic commitments in four ethnic groups of American adolescents.  

PubMed

The role of prejudice and ethnic awareness in the civic commitments and beliefs about the American social contract of 1,096 (53% female) adolescents (11-18 year olds, Mean = 15) from African-, Arab-, Latino-, and European-American backgrounds were compared. Ethnic awareness was higher among minority youth and discrimination more often reported by African- and Arab-Americans. Parental admonitions against discrimination were heard by all but African Americans, Latinos and those who reported prejudice heard that it could pose a barrier. Adolescents' beliefs that America is an equal opportunity society were negatively associated with experiences of discrimination and African-Americans were least likely to believe that the government was responsive to the average person. With respect to civic goals, all youth endorsed patriotism but ethnic minorities and ethnically aware youth were more committed to advocating for their ethnic group and European-Americans were less committed than were African Americans to improving race relations. PMID:19636724

Flanagan, Constance A; Syvertsen, Amy K; Gill, Sukhdeep; Gallay, Leslie S; Cumsille, Patricio

2009-04-01

61

Our class will focus on Ethnic representations such as African American,  

E-print Network

the Ethnic experiences of race, whiteness, immigration, gender, nationality, geography, and language in the U of race, whiteness, immigration, gender, nationality, geography, and language in the U.S. *This course MWF 3:00-3:50pm (Bate 1011) In this course, we will explore ethnicity and race in the United States

62

Coccidioidomycosis in African Americans  

PubMed Central

Coccidioidomycosis is caused by Coccidioides species, a fungus endemic to the desert regions of the southwestern United States, and is of particular concern for African Americans. We performed a PubMed search of the English-language medical literature on coccidioidomycosis in African Americans and summarized the pertinent literature. Search terms were coccidioidomycosis, Coccidioides, race, ethnicity, African, black, and Negro. The proceedings of the national and international coccidioidomycosis symposia were searched. All relevant articles and their cited references were reviewed; those with epidemiological, immunologic, clinical, and therapeutic data pertaining to coccidioidomycosis in African Americans were included in the review. Numerous studies documented an increased predilection for severe coccidioidal infections, coccidioidomycosis-related hospitalizations, and extrapulmonary dissemination in persons of African descent; however, most of the published studies are variably problematic. The immunologic mechanism for this predilection is unclear. The clinical features and treatment recommendations are summarized. Medical practitioners need to be alert to the possibility of coccidioidomycosis in persons with recent travel to or residence in an area where the disease is endemic. PMID:21193657

Ruddy, Barbara E.; Mayer, Anita P.; Ko, Marcia G.; Labonte, Helene R.; Borovansky, Jill A.; Boroff, Erika S.; Blair, Janis E.

2011-01-01

63

American Ethnic Groups.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The essays in this volume focus on the historical and social evolution of six American ethnic groups. Thomas Sowell discusses similarities and differences in the experiences of antebellum "free persons of color," emancipated slaves and their descendants, and West Indian immigrants, and examines trends in the socioeconomic status of black…

Sowell, Thomas, Ed.; Collins, Lynn D., Ed.

64

Stability and Change in Private and Public Ethnic Regard among African American, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Chinese American Early Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past 20 years, researchers have demonstrated that ethnic identity in adolescence is multifaceted and dynamic, encompassing a number of aspects of content and self-definition. The present study examines "private regard" (i.e., youths' positive evaluations of their ethnic group) as well as "public regard", which refers to their perceptions…

Hughes, Diane; Way, Niobe; Rivas-Drake, Deborah

2011-01-01

65

African Americans and Smoking  

MedlinePLUS

... though they smoke about the same amount. 2 Smoking Rates Among African Americans In 2008, about 5. ... 8%) middle school students. 11 Other Facts About Smoking Among African Americans Use of menthol cigarettes is ...

66

Bidirectional associations between parenting practices and conduct problems in boys from childhood to adolescence: the moderating effect of age and African-American ethnicity.  

PubMed

This study examined the bidirectional relationship between parent and teacher reported conduct problems in youth and parenting practices using a longitudinal sample of boys assessed from 6 to 16 years of age. Analyses tested whether these bidirectional associations changed across development and whether the nature of these associations varied across African-American and Caucasian families. Overall, the results supported a bidirectional relationship between conduct problems and all parenting practices examined from childhood to adolescence. The influence of conduct problems on changes in parenting behaviors was as strong as the influence of parenting behaviors on changes in conduct problems across development. Changes in the bidirectional relationship across development were found in some, but not all, models. While corporal punishment was more strongly related to changes in teacher-reported conduct problems for African-American boys compared to Caucasian boys, more similarities than differences were found between the ethnic groups in terms of the bidirectional associations examined. PMID:17899362

Pardini, Dustin A; Fite, Paula J; Burke, Jeffrey D

2008-07-01

67

Transcript African Americans and Lung Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Transcript African Americans and Lung Cancer Hello. I’m Dr. Christopher Lathan of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Of all ethnic/racial and gender groups in the United States, African American men are the most likely to develop lung cancer and also to die

68

African American Single Mothers: Understanding Their Lives and Families. Sage Series on Race and Ethnic Relations, Volume 10.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Past research on African American single mothers and their families has been conducted using conventional paradigms based upon models of the dominant culture. This practice has resulted in the creation of stereotypes and misconceptions about "the Black family." In this collection of original work by an interdisciplinary group of scholars, the…

Dickerson, Bette J.

69

Ethnic Awareness, Prejudice, and Civic Commitments in Four Ethnic Groups of American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of prejudice and ethnic awareness in the civic commitments and beliefs about the American social contract of 1,096 (53% female) adolescents (11-18 year olds, Mean = 15) from African-, Arab-, Latino-, and European-American backgrounds were compared. Ethnic awareness was higher among minority youth and discrimination more often reported by…

Flanagan, Constance A.; Syvertsen, Amy K.; Gill, Sukhdeep; Gallay, Leslie S.; Cumsille, Patricio

2009-01-01

70

Combination of racial/ethnic and etiology/disease-specific factors is associated with lower survival following liver transplantation in African Americans: an analysis from UNOS/OPTN database.  

PubMed

Higher rates of hepatitis C virus (HCV) recurrence and lower response to HCV antiviral therapy contribute to the lower post-liver transplantation (LT) survival among African Americans with HCV. The current study aims to evaluate race/ethnicity-specific and etiology-specific factors contributing to lower post-LT survival among African Americans in the USA. The 2002-2012 United Network for Organ Sharing registry was utilized to evaluate race/ethnicity-specific post-LT survival among patients with HCV, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), alcoholic liver disease (ALD), non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. From 2002 to 2012, HCV was the leading indication for LT. While African Americans accounted for 9.5% of all LT during this period, they had the lowest overall and etiology-specific five-yr post-LT survival. On multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, African Americans had significantly lower post-LT survival compared with non-Hispanic whites among patients with HCV (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.19-1.41), HCC (HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.25-1.79), and ALD (HR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.19-1.94). In conclusion, African Americans had the lowest post-LT survival among patients with HCV, HCC, and ALD. Race/ethnicity and the etiology of chronic liver disease were observed to have a combined detrimental effect leading to lower survival following LT in African Americans. PMID:24750171

Wong, Robert J; Ahmed, Aijaz

2014-07-01

71

Ethnicity and Risk for Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Following Intimate Partner Violence: Prevalence and Predictors in European American and African American Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study uses a feminist theoretical framework to explore risk factors for the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms following intimate partner violence, with a community sample of 120 low-income European American and African American women. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to examine demographic, violence, and mental…

Lilly, Michelle M.; Graham-Bermann, Sandra A.

2009-01-01

72

Parent Support and African American Adolescents' Career Self-Efficacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research has shown that African American adolescents are not being prepared to enter the workforce at the same rates as adolescents from other ethnic groups. While educational and career options were unavailable to African Americans in previous eras, today educational and career opportunities abound, yet many young African Americans are not in a…

Alliman-Brissett, Annette E.; Turner, Sherri L.; Skovholt, Thomas M.

2004-01-01

73

The Genetic Structure and History of Africans and African Americans  

PubMed Central

Africa is the source of all modern humans, but characterization of genetic variation and of relationships among populations across the continent has been enigmatic. We studied 121 African populations, four African American populations, and 60 non-African populations for patterns of variation at 1327 nuclear microsatellite and insertion/deletion markers. We identified 14 ancestral population clusters in Africa that correlate with self-described ethnicity and shared cultural and/or linguistic properties. We observed high levels of mixed ancestry in most populations, reflecting historical migration events across the continent. Our data also provide evidence for shared ancestry among geographically diverse hunter-gatherer populations (Khoesan speakers and Pygmies). The ancestry of African Americans is predominantly from Niger-Kordofanian (~71%), European (~13%), and other African (~8%) populations, although admixture levels varied considerably among individuals. This study helps tease apart the complex evolutionary history of Africans and African Americans, aiding both anthropological and genetic epidemiologic studies. PMID:19407144

Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Reed, Floyd A.; Friedlaender, Francoise R.; Ehret, Christopher; Ranciaro, Alessia; Froment, Alain; Hirbo, Jibril B.; Awomoyi, Agnes A.; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Doumbo, Ogobara; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Juma, Abdalla T.; Kotze, Maritha J.; Lema, Godfrey; Moore, Jason H.; Mortensen, Holly; Nyambo, Thomas B.; Omar, Sabah A.; Powell, Kweli; Pretorius, Gideon S.; Smith, Michael W.; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Wambebe, Charles; Weber, James L.; Williams, Scott M.

2010-01-01

74

African American Suicide  

MedlinePLUS

... 2010 Data o Some African Americans express little suicide intent or depressive symptoms during suicidal crises; Develop liaisons with the faith community. Recognize warning signs and help a friend or family member get professional help. For More Information American ...

75

Department of African American and African Studies  

E-print Network

by the Faculty of the Department of African American and African Studies in March 1988 and Amended by the Faculty...................................................................... Procedures for Fourth-Year Review

76

Misconceptions of depression in african americans.  

PubMed

Major depression is a very common disabling disorder. Although the relationship between race and depression is complex, depression affects all races, all ethnic and geographic locations as well as all age groups. The prevalence of depression in African Americans is controversial, due to the paucity of research. The deficit in the knowledge and skills in treating depression in African Americans have not been adequately addressed so far. Inadequate and insufficient data on African Americans contributes to the problems of under diagnoses, misdiagnosis, and under treatment of depression. This article will highlight the existing problem of depression in Afro American with a focus on diagnostic and treatment issues. PMID:24999332

Sohail, Zohaib; Bailey, Rahn Kennedy; Richie, William D

2014-01-01

77

Misconceptions of Depression in African Americans  

PubMed Central

Major depression is a very common disabling disorder. Although the relationship between race and depression is complex, depression affects all races, all ethnic and geographic locations as well as all age groups. The prevalence of depression in African Americans is controversial, due to the paucity of research. The deficit in the knowledge and skills in treating depression in African Americans have not been adequately addressed so far. Inadequate and insufficient data on African Americans contributes to the problems of under diagnoses, misdiagnosis, and under treatment of depression. This article will highlight the existing problem of depression in Afro American with a focus on diagnostic and treatment issues. PMID:24999332

Sohail, Zohaib; Bailey, Rahn Kennedy; Richie, William D.

2014-01-01

78

Autism and the African American community.  

PubMed

It is estimated that autism spectrum disorders (ASD) affect 1 in 500 live births per year. However, due to varying techniques for diagnosis and treatment, the disability remains the subject of debate. African Americans tend to suffer disproportionate rates of disability and disease when compared to other racial and ethnic groups due to access to preventative and curative care. However, evidence demonstrates that although rates of diagnosis for autism occur at the same rates in all racial groups, diagnosis in African American children occurs later than in White children. As a result, African American children may require longer and more intensive intervention. This article examines the etiology of autism, diagnosis, and treatment strategies and its impact on African American families. A case method approach is utilized to describe the impact of autism on an African American family. Implications for future research and professional practice and policy are discussed. Understanding autism is important as it relates to the human genome. PMID:21707353

Gourdine, Ruby M; Baffour, Tiffany D; Teasley, Martell

2011-01-01

79

African American History  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Mississippi State University African American History Archive is a great place to start for pointers to African American history sites, as well as an excellent repository of African American history primary documents. The sites include Adonis Productions' Black Pioneers page (with pages on African American pioneers in all fields), Great Day In Harlem (jazz), Mississippi State's AfriGeneas genealogy mailing list and Web site, Small Towns-Black Lives in New Jersey, African American pioneers in Kentucky law, and the International Museum of the Horse's Buffalo Soldier pages. Full text documents include Dr. Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech, Booker T. Washington's "Up From Slavery", Frederick Douglass' "Autobiography" and "My Escape from Slavery", and Henry David Thoreau's "A Plea for Captain John Brown" and "Slavery in Massachussetts", among others. The site also contains African American bibliographies in the arts, education, history, and science, as well as pointers to other African American sites. http://www.msstate.edu/Archives/History/USA/Afro-Amer/afro.html

1997-01-01

80

HMO employment and African-American physicians.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: To assess the level and determinants of African-American physicians' employment in health maintenance organizations (HMOs), particularly early in their careers. METHODS: We analyzed data from the 1991 and 1996 Young Physicians Surveys to assess racial differences in the likelihood of HMO employment (n = 3,705). Using multinomial logistic regression, we evaluated four explanations for an observed relationship between African-American physicians and HMO employment: human capital stratification among organizations, race-based affinity between physicians and patients, financial constraints due to debt burden, and different organizational hiring practices. Using binomial logistic regression, we also evaluated differences in the odds of being turned down for a prior practice position, of subsequently leaving the current practice organization and of later having career doubts. RESULTS: Without any controls, African-American physicians were 4.52 times more likely to practice in HMOs than Caucasian physicians. After controlling for human capital stratification, racial concordance and financial constraints, African-American physicians remained 2.48 times more likely to practice in HMOs than Caucasian physicians. In addition, 19.2% of African-American physicians in HMOs reported being turned down for another job, far more than any other racial/ethnic group in the HMO setting and any racial/ethnic group, including African-American physicians in the non-HMO setting (including all other practice locations). Five years later, those same African-American physicians from HMOs also reported significantly more turnover (7.50 times more likely than non-HMO African-American physicians to leave their current practice) and doubt about their careers (2.17 times more likely than non-HMO African-American physicians to express serious career doubts). CONCLUSIONS: African-American physicians were disproportionately hired into HMO settings, impacting their subsequent careers. PMID:16916130

Briscoe, Forrest; Konrad, Thomas R.

2006-01-01

81

African American History Month  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

February is African American History Month, and, as the Library of Congress site notes, it's an area of history that should be incorporated into all discussions about American history. The Library of Congress listened to its own advice and created this most useful site to help students, teachers, and others to do just that. Visitors can read about a number of notable African Americans, including historian Carter G. Woodson and Congressman Major Owens. By clicking on the "Exhibits & Collections" area visitors can look through some of the digital collections related to various aspects of African American history. Additionally, the site also has other sections that provide primary materials on African Americans in the performing arts as well as oral histories from the Veterans History Project.

82

Ethnicity and acculturation as moderators of the relationship between media exposure, awareness, and thin-ideal internalization in African American women  

E-print Network

dissatisfaction were examined. European American students and African American participants from both predominantly White and historically Black colleges and universities completed measures of media exposure, awareness of socicultural attitudes towards appearance...

Henry, Keisha Denythia

2006-10-30

83

Diabetes in African Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... Moving towards prevention of Type 2 Diabetes This music CD helps African Americans incorporate more physical activity ... move more. Three songs from the popular Movimiento music CD also are included. This CD also contains ...

84

African Americans and Glaucoma  

MedlinePLUS

African Americans and Glaucoma email Send this article to a friend by filling out the fields below: Your name: Your friend's name: Your ... and eventually, in developing more effective treatments. Does glaucoma treatment differ? Although treatment varies for all individuals, ...

85

Precedents in African American architecture  

E-print Network

As a sub-sets of American culture, African Americans have not been able to offer culturally specific architectural elements to the design process because the history of African American form and space has not been recognized ...

Sass, Lawrence

1994-01-01

86

Exploring the Link between Self-Construal and Distress among African American and Asian American College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors investigated ethnicity, self-construal, and distress among African American and Asian American college students. African American students expressed more salient independent self-construals, whereas Asian American students expressed more salient interdependent self-construals. As hypothesized, among African American participants,…

Christopher, Michael S.; Skillman, Gemma D.

2009-01-01

87

A New Audience Segmentation Tool for African Americans: The Black Identity Classification Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many health communications target African Americans in an attempt to remediate race-based health disparities. Such materials often assume that African Americans are culturally homogeneous; however, research indicates that African Americans are heterogeneous in their attitudes, behaviors, and beliefs. The Black Identity Classification Scale (BICS) was designed as a telephone-administered tool to segment African American audiences into 16 ethnic identity types.

Rachel E. Davis; Gwen Alexander; Josephine Calvi; Cheryl Wiese; Sarah Greene; Mike Nowak; William E. Cross Jr; Ken Resnicow

2010-01-01

88

Symposium: Calcium-Related Chronic Diseases in Ethnic Minorities: Can Dairy Consumption Reduce Health Disparities? Low Calcium Intake Among African Americans: Effects on Bones and Body Weight1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review was performed to summarize and integrate the evidence relating calcium intake to health status in African Americans, with special attention to bone and fat. Despite lower average calcium intakes, African Americans typically have skeletons more massive than those of whites. This is the result of a relative resistance of the bony resorptive apparatus to parathyroid hormone, which forces

Robert P. Heaney

89

The College: Arts & Sciences African & African-American Studies  

E-print Network

Size: 25 Description: Applicable English Cluster: American and African-American Studies. This courseThe College: Arts & Sciences African & African-American Studies Department: African & African-American for the course description. Department: African & African-American Studies Course: AAS 122 Title: History of Jazz

Mahon, Bradford Z.

90

Racial(ized) Identity, Ethnic Identity, and Afrocentric Values: Conceptual and Methodological Challenges in Understanding African American Identity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of the literature reveals that there is conceptual confusion and inconsistent and sometimes inappropriate usage of the terms racial identity, ethnic identity, and Afrocentric values. This study explored the extent to which Black racial(ized) identity attitudes were related to ethnic identity and Afrocentric cultural values. Two hundred…

Cokley, Kevin O.

2005-01-01

91

Racial/Ethnic Socialization and Parental Involvement in Education as Predictors of Cognitive Ability and Achievement in African American Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Racial/ethnic socialization has not been studied in the context of other parenting behaviors such as parental involvement in education and its relationship to children's cognitive outcomes. The present study tested the impact of racial/ethnic socialization and parental involvement in education on cognitive ability and achievement in a sample of…

Banerjee, Meeta; Harrell, Zaje A. T.; Johnson, Deborah J.

2011-01-01

92

African American and Non-African American Patients' and Families' Decision Making About Renal Replacement Therapies  

PubMed Central

We conducted focus group meetings of African American and non-African American patients with end-stage renal disease (six groups) and their family members (six groups), stratified by race/ethnicity and treatment. We elicited differences in participants’ experiences with shared decision making about initiating renal replacement therapy (RRT; that is, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, or a kidney transplant). Patients were often very sick when initiating RRT, and had little, if any, time to make a decision about what type of RRT to initiate. They also lacked sufficient information about alternative treatment options prior to initiation. Family members played supportive roles and shared in decision making when possible. Reports were similar for African American and non-African American participants. Our findings suggest that a greater emphasis on the improved engagement of patients and their families in shared decision making about RRT initiation is needed for both ethnic/racial minorities and nonminorities. PMID:22645225

Sheu, Johanna; Ephraim, Patti L.; Powe, Neil R.; Rabb, Hamid; Senga, Mikiko; Evans, Kira E.; Jaar, Bernard G.; Crews, Deidra C.; Greer, Raquel C.; Boulware, L. Ebony

2014-01-01

93

Substance Abuse in African American Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Limited attention to ethnicity in research on substance abuse and women has resulted in assumptions that may not fit the experience of women of color. This study employed a combined quantitative and qualitative design to investigate substance abuse in African American women ages 21 to 48. Life experiences of women with histories of chemical dependence were compared with women who

Harriet Curtis-Boles; Valata Jenkins-Monroe

2000-01-01

94

Cultural Identification and Academic Achievement among African American Males  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relationship between intercultural perceptions, identity, and academic achievement among African American males. Specifically, this study investigated the relationship of academic achievement, cultural mistrust, oppositional cultural attitudes, ethnic identity development and educational outcome expectations and value,…

Irving, Miles Anthony; Hudley, Cynthia

2008-01-01

95

Exposure to Immunization Media Messages among African American Parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. African Americans have low immunization rates, yet little is known about their immunization knowledge, attitudes, and practices or about the effect of outreach to this audience. In Spring 1997, the California Department of Health Services (CDHS) launched a statewide culturally sensitive and ethnically specific media campaign directed toward African Americans. This campaign was preceded by a major Los Angeles

Nan Lashuay; Tom Tjoa; Maria Luisa Zuniga de Nuncio; MaeRetha Franklin; John Elder; Marcy Jones

2000-01-01

96

Mathematics education: The voice of African American and white adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several studies have provided evidence regarding factors that contribute to the mathematics achievement gap between African American and White students. Byrnes (2003) found that 45%-50% of the difference in White and African American students' performance in mathematics was associated with socioeconomic status, exposure to learning opportunities, and motivational aspects of math while 4.5% was explained by ethnicity. The goal in

Sharondrea R King

2010-01-01

97

African Americans and Agriculture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the opportunities available in the field of agriculture for African American students and notes efforts of the 136 colleges of agriculture to publicize their offerings and recruit students. Profiles six black leaders in agriculture, highlighting their achievements in research and aid to developing countries. A table provides data on annual…

Morgan, Joan

2000-01-01

98

Gifted African American Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes factors affecting the life-span achievement of 15 highly accomplished African-American women. Participants perceived that civil-rights and affirmative-action polices opened doors if they were already qualified. Findings suggest cultural strengths plus high ability enabled simultaneous acknowledgment of discrimination and application of…

Kitano, Margie K.

1998-01-01

99

Health Conditions Common in African American Women  

MedlinePLUS

... Submit Home > Minority Women's Health > African-Americans Minority Women's Health African-Americans Health conditions common in African- ... to top Health conditions common in African-American women Asthma Breast cancer Cancer Cervical cancer Diabetes Glaucoma ...

100

The Prevalence and Context of Sexual Harassment Among African American and White American Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethnic differences in the prevalence, type, and outcome of sexual harassment in various work and social settings were examined in a stratified community sample of 248 African American and White American women. Almost half of the women reported sexual harassment in work and social environments. Significant ethnic differences were found in the prevalence and type of sexual harassment and in

GAIL E. WYATT; MONIKA RIEDERLE

1995-01-01

101

AFRICAN AMERICAN IDENTITY COURSE SYLLABUS  

E-print Network

AFRICAN AMERICAN IDENTITY COURSE SYLLABUS Fall 2009 COURSE INFORMATION a. Course Number: AAS 372- American Culture, New York, BasicCivitas Books, 2002 McWhorter, John, Authentically Black: Essays and illuminate the multifaceted nature and development of African American group and individual identity. Using

Vonessen, Nikolaus

102

Ethnicity, Nativity and the Health of American Blacks  

PubMed Central

Few national studies have empirically examined ethnic differences in health within the American Black population. We utilized logistic regression to examine the relationships among ethnicity, nativity, depressive symptoms, and physical health in the two largest ethnic groups of American Blacks, African Americans and Caribbean Blacks. The data were from the National Survey of American Life, an in-person national household survey representative of the non-institutionalized U.S. Black population. We found that African Americans, U.S.-born Caribbean Blacks, and Caribbean-born Blacks had significantly different self-ratings of their health and self-reports of being diagnosed with a chronic physical health condition. Whether assessed by self-rated health or the presence of at least one physician diagnosed chronic health condition, Caribbean-born Blacks had the best health outcomes and U.S.-born Caribbean Blacks had the worst. This finding remained significant even after considering self-reported depressive symptoms. This study highlights the importance of considering ethnic diversity, nativity and immigration as independent sources of variation in health status within the American Black population. PMID:21317512

Griffith, Derek M.; Johnson, Jonetta; Zhang, Rong; Neighbors, Harold W.; Jackson, James S.

2012-01-01

103

Ethnicity and American Group Life. A Bibliography.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bibliography grew out of a broad scale effort by the American Jewish Committee, especially its National Project on Ethnic America, to focus new attention on the positive aspects of multi-ethnicity in our society, and also to encourage deeper study and programming for solving the problems of polarization, fragmentation, and white ethnic

Weed, Perry L., Comp.

104

Identifying Barriers to Colonoscopy Screening for Nonadherent African American Participants in a Patient Navigation Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

African Americans have a higher rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality than other racial/ethnic groups. This disparity is alarming given that CRC is largely preventable through the use of endoscopy (screening colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy), yet rates of CRC screening among African Americans is suboptimal. Only 48.9% of African Americans are…

Sly, Jamilia R.; Edwards, Tiffany; Shelton, Rachel C.; Jandorf, Lina

2013-01-01

105

African American and European American Children in Diverse Elementary Classrooms: Social Integration, Social Status, and Social Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With a sample of African American and European American 3rd- and 4th-grade children (N = 486, ages 8-11 years), this study examined classroom ethnic composition, peer social status (i.e., social preference and perceived popularity as nominated by same- and cross-ethnicity peers), and patterns of ethnic segregation (i.e., friendship, peer group,…

Wilson, Travis; Rodkin, Philip C.

2011-01-01

106

Obesity and African Americans: Physiologic and Behavioral Pathways  

PubMed Central

Although progress has been made to understand the association between physiological and lifestyle behaviors with regard to obesity, ethnic differences in markers of obesity and pathways towards obesity remain somewhat unexplained. However, obesity remains a serious growing concern. This paper highlights ethnic differences in African Americans and Caucasians that may contribute to the higher prevalence of obesity among African Americans. Understanding ethnic differences in metabolic syndrome criteria, functioning of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis, variations in glucocorticoid sensitivity and insulin resistance, and physical activity and cardiovascular fitness levels may help to inform practical clinical and public health interventions and reduce obesity disparities. PMID:24533220

Abraham, Preetha Anna; Kazman, Josh Ben; Zeno, Stacey Anne; Deuster, Patricia Anne

2013-01-01

107

Sacred gospel and the Soka Gakkai: Correlating Black liberation theology and Buddhist humanism---Implications for religious education and the alleviation of African American ethnic suffering  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores black liberation theology and the Buddhist practice of the Soka Gakkai International. It analyzes how these two divergent religious traditions have appealed to African Americans seeking spiritual, personal and social liberation from suffering. Recognizing the co-extensive balance of both spiritual and humanistic approaches to faith, this study correlates these two traditions in order to present principles that

Zakiya N Muwwakkil

2010-01-01

108

African American Women and Eating Disturbances: A Meta-Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from 18 studies were reviewed to investigate the relationship between ethnicity and eating disturbances, focusing on the relationship between African American and white women. Although white women had more risk of eating disturbances, the effect size was small. White women had slightly more risk for all eating disturbances combined. African

O'Neill, Shannon K.

2003-01-01

109

Prevalence and Causes of Visual Impairment in African-American and Hispanic Preschool Children: the Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose To determine the prevalence and causes of decreased visual acuity (VA) in a population-based study of minority preschool children. Design Population-based cross-sectional study. Participants Children 30 to 72 months of age in 44 census tracts in Los Angeles County. Methods A population-based sample of children underwent comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation including monocular VA testing, cover testing, cycloplegic autorefraction, anterior segment and fundus evaluation, and VA retesting with refractive correction. The prevalence and etiology of decreased VA were determined, for both presenting and best-measured VA, and better eye and worse eye. Main Outcome Measures Prevalence of decreased presenting and best-measured VA with an identifiable ophthalmic etiology. Results Presenting VA was assessed in 3207 children and best-measured VA in 3364 children. While nearly a third of cases of worse-eye decreased presenting VA were without an identifiable ophthalmic etiology, this proportion decreased with increasing age. Decreased presenting VA that resolved with retesting and was associated with uncorrected refractive error was present in the worse eye of 4.3% of African-American children and 5.3% of Hispanic children, and in the better eye of 1.9% of African-American children and 1.7% of Hispanic children. Decreased best-measured VA that was not immediately correctable with spectacles and that was due to ocular disease, unilateral or bilateral amblyopia, or probable bilateral ametropic amblyopia, was seen in the worse eye of 1.5% of African-American children and 1.9% of Hispanic children, and in the better eye of 0.8% of African-American and 0.6% of Hispanic children. Amblyopia related to refractive error was the most common cause. Conclusion Over 5% of African-American and Hispanic preschool children in Los Angeles County have either correctable visual impairment from uncorrected refractive error, or visual impairment from amblyopia related to refractive error. PMID:19592106

2009-01-01

110

Media and cultural influences in african-american girls' eating disorder risk.  

PubMed

Objective. To investigate media and cultural influences in eating disorder development in African-American adolescent females. Method. Fifty-seven participants were recruited through churches and community organizations to complete a questionnaire. Results. Mainstream sociocultural identification was associated with more eating disorder behavior in African-American females; cultural ethnic identification was not significantly associated with eating disorder behavior in African-American females, mainstream sociocultural identification, cultural ethnic identification, and body dissatisfaction significantly predicted eating disorder behavior; and cultural ethnic identification was positively correlated with mainstream sociocultural identification. This study provides support for the importance of eating disorder prevention interventions that focus specifically on African-American girls. PMID:24967141

Jones, Lakaii A; Cook-Cottone, Catherine

2013-01-01

111

HIV\\/AIDS Prevention Education: Developing Culturally Competent Programs for African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

African Americans comprise one of the nation's largest ethnic communities. They also account for the highest number of HIV infection and AIDS cases among children, youth, and young adults across all racial, ethnic, and cultural populations. The purpose of this exploratory theory-based article is to discuss the extent of the HIV\\/AIDS epidemic in the African American community, variables that contribute

Jillian N. Ardley; Thomas W. Sileo

2009-01-01

112

Africans and African Americans: Conflicts, Stereotypes and Grudges  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research focuses critically on the relationship between African immigrants and African Americans in the United States. It examines stereotypes, conflicts and grudges between the two groups and how they impact their co-existence and adaptation to each other. Most African Americans are descendants of enslaved Africans that were transported to the US during the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Since African Americans

Foday Darboe; E. Kofi Agorshah; Faculty Mentor

113

african-american studies 142AC african-american studies 156AC african-american studies 158 african-american stud-ies 173AC african-american studies 27AC african-american studies 28AC american studies 101AC american studies  

E-print Network

african-american studies 142AC · african-american studies 156AC · african-american studies 158 · african-american stud- ies 173AC · african-american studies 27AC · african-american studies 28AC · american studies 101AC · american studies 10AC · american studies 139AC · anthropology 121AC · anthropology

Walker, Matthew P.

114

African-Americans and Alcoholism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To better serve people in a counseling relationship, it is useful to understand them not only culturally, but demographically as well. This paper traces historical, religious, demographic aspects and treatment of alcohol abuse in African Americans. Historically, alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence have varied for African Americans. During the…

Sigmon, Scott B.

115

Bidirectional Associations between Parenting Practices and Conduct Problems in Boys from Childhood to Adolescence: The Moderating Effect of Age and African-American Ethnicity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the bidirectional relationship between parent and teacher reported conduct problems in youth and parenting\\u000a practices using a longitudinal sample of boys assessed from 6 to 16 years of age. Analyses tested whether these bidirectional\\u000a associations changed across development and whether the nature of these associations varied across African-American and Caucasian\\u000a families. Overall, the results supported a bidirectional relationship

Dustin A. Pardini; Paula J. Fite; Jeffrey D. Burke

2008-01-01

116

Do Extenuating Circumstances Influence African American Women's Attitudes toward Suicide?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To see if suicide attitudes might be softened by extenuating circumstances, such as terminal illness, African American and European American women imagined themselves in one of four extenuating circumstances then completed measures of suicide acceptability and religiosity. Both ethnic groups reported a greater likelihood of suicide when imagining…

Marion, Michelle S.; Range, Lillian M.

2003-01-01

117

Sexual concurrency among young African American women.  

PubMed

Young African-American women are disproportionately affected by human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) sexually transmitted infections (STI), and engage in greater sexual concurrency than other race/ethnicities. It is important to evaluate behaviors and characteristics associated with the risk of sexual concurrency, so that interventions can target factors most likely to affect positive change. An emphasis on correlates of concurrency beyond individual-level factors has been suggested. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to identify individual- and partner-level characteristics associated with sexual concurrency among high-risk, young African-American women. Data were collected from 570 African-American adolescent women (aged 15-21) recruited from a STI clinic, a family planning clinic, and a teen clinic located in Atlanta, GA from March 2002 through August 2004. Logistic regression analysis was conducted in 2012 to evaluate correlates of sexual concurrency. Results show that almost one-quarter of participants reported sexually concurrent partnerships and 28.4% suspected male partner concurrency. Logistic regression results indicated the number of lifetime sexual partners and relationship factors were the primary contributors to engaging in concurrency in this sample. These findings suggest relationship factors may be important contributors to the prevalence of sexual concurrency among young African-American women. Interventions targeted toward sexual health among young African-American women may need to specifically address partner/relationship factors. Through these findings, we hope to better understand sexual risk taking and develop strategies that would overcome barriers to existing interventions aimed at improving the sexual health outcomes of young African-American women. PMID:23363034

Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna G; Davis, Teaniese L; Sales, Jessica M; Rose, Eve S; Wingood, Gina M; DiClemente, Ralph J

2013-01-01

118

HIV\\/AIDS Stigma and Religiosity Among African American Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

African American women are disproportionately affected by HIV\\/AIDS compared with other ethnicities, accounting for two-thirds (67%) of all women diagnosed with HIV. Despite their increased risk of HIV infection, few studies have been conducted to understand culture-specific factors leading to their vulnerability. Given the central role of religious organizations in African American communities, this study explored whether and to what

Nancy Muturi; Soontae An

2010-01-01

119

African-American Male Stereotypes  

Microsoft Academic Search

As evidenced by the last presidential campaign, the African-American male continues to be the subject of extensive stereotyping. Such stereotypes are pervasive. Reinforced by media images, the stereotypes of the African-American male as a sex crazed beast with a penchant for violence aimed at the European-American community is an obstacle to social work in a multicultural society. Individual practitioners may

Ronald E. Hall

1992-01-01

120

Asian American ethnic identification by surname  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few data sources include ethnicity-levelclassification for Asian Americans. However, it isoften more informative to study the ethnic groupsseparately than to use an aggregate Asian Americancategory, because of differences in immigrationhistory, socioeconomic status, health, and culture. Many types of records that include surnames of personsoffer the potential for inferential ethnicclassification. This paper describes the developmentof surname lists for six major Asian

Diane S. Lauderdale; Bert Kestenbaum

2000-01-01

121

What Women Need to Know about Breast Cancer - African American  

Cancer.gov

Yet, in 2013, more than 27,000 African American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. The disease is the most common cancer among this group. And although African American women are less likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than white women, those African American women who do develop the disease are more likely to die from it (more than 6,000 were projected to die in 2013) than women of any other racial or ethnic group in the United States.

122

Italian Americans and the New Ethnic Consciousness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Notes that a sizable cluster of volumes dealing with the Italian American experience has appeared in the last decade and reviews four books and one bibliography dealing with this ethnic group. (Author/AM)

Pozzetta, George E.

1976-01-01

123

Discrimination, religious coping, and tobacco use among White, African American, and Mexican American vocational school students.  

PubMed

This study examined whether religious coping moderates the impact of racial/ethnic discrimination on current (past 30 day) cigarette and cigar/cigarillo use among a racially/ethnically diverse sample of 984 technical/vocational school students (47.1% women; mean age = 25 years). Results indicate that discrimination increased the likelihood of current cigarette use among African American students and current cigar/cigarillo use among white and African American students. Positive religious coping decreased the likelihood of cigarette and cigar/cigarillo smoking for white students only. Negative religious coping increased the likelihood of cigarette use for white students and cigar/cigarillo use for white and African American students. Two 2-way interactions indicate that positive and negative religious coping moderate the discrimination-cigarette smoking relationship for African American and Mexican American students, respectively. PMID:21249522

Horton, Karissa D; Loukas, Alexandra

2013-03-01

124

African Perceptions of Americans of African and European Descent  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of the stereotyping of African and European Americans have relied almost exclusively on American samples. This study was a cross-cultural attempt to evaluate the generalizability of findings from this research. Two hundred ninety citizens of six African nations (Botswana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe) reported stereotypes of African Americans and European Americans by responding to pairs of

Francis T. McAndrew; Adebowale Akande

1995-01-01

125

Alzheimer's Disease and African Americans  

E-print Network

medication and diet Managing diabetes with diet, . Memory loss that disrupts daily life 2. Challenges in planning or solving problems 3. Difficulty relate to high blood pressure and diabetes, which are more common in older African Americans than older

126

Elder Abuse Among African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perceptions of extreme, moderate, and mild forms of elder abuse among African-American women (n = 25) and men (n = 10) were examined. African-American respondents emphasized physical abuse when giving examples of extremely abusive behavior. Along with physical abuse, verbal abuse was the most frequently identified form of abuse, and was significantly related to age in complex ways: the older the respondents, the more

Jesse J. Tauriac; Natoschia Scruggs

2006-01-01

127

english 31AC african-amercan studies 17AC history 7B public health 130AC sociology 3AC education 30AC ethnic studies 135AC geography 150AC history 127AC information 142AC psychology 125AC anthropology 2AC american  

E-print Network

english 31AC · african-amercan studies 17AC · history 7B · public health 130AC · sociology 3AC · education 30AC ethnic studies 135AC · geography 150AC · history 127AC · information 142AC · psychology 125AC · asian american studies 128AC · english 31AC · african-amercan studies 17AC · history 7B · public health

Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

128

A mentoring pyramid for African American nursing students.  

PubMed

The purpose of this investigation was to ascertain the African American nursing students' perception of a need for a mentoring program for this population. The percentage of ethnic minorities graduating from baccalaureate nursing programs has continued to decline since 1990 (National League of Nursing, 1995). The March 1996 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses estimated there were 2,559,000 registered nurses in the United States. Only 107,500 of these nurses were African American. Data from the 1996 U.S. Census revealed African Americans to be the largest ethnic minority group in the country (14 percent). Based upon the number of racially and culturally diverse clients seeking healthcare, there is a gross underrepresentation of racially and culturally diverse nurses available to administer that care. The attrition rate for African American nursing students is high. Some of the reasons for this failure to retain and graduate African American students from schools of nursing are associated with the lack of mentoring relationships with persons whom students can relate to, feel comfortable with, learn from, and emulate. This study examined the perceptions of African American nursing students enrolled at a predominantly European-American public university in the Southeast United States. The students identified certain categories of needs they felt could be met in a mentoring relationship with a nurse educator. PMID:10624172

Buchanan, B W

1999-01-01

129

Social Integration between African American and European American Children in Majority Black, Majority White, and Multicultural Elementary Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors use social network analysis and multilevel modeling to examine a central feature of classroom social organization: the ethnic composition of the classroom. They examine classroom ethnic composition as it relates to patterns of social integration between African American and European American children. They asked…

Rodkin, Philip C.; Wilson, Travis; Ahn, Hai-Jeong

2007-01-01

130

Using the Child Behavior Checklist with African American and Caucasian American Adopted Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to examine the cross-ethnic measurement equivalence of the "Child Behavior Checklist" (CBCL) for 6- to 18-year-olds (2001, parent version) using a sample of African American special needs adopted children, along with a comparison group of Caucasian American special needs adopted children. Reliability and multiple…

Tyson, Edgar H.; Teasley, Martell; Ryan, Scott

2011-01-01

131

Physical Discipline Among African American and European American Mothers: Links to Children's Externalizing Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to test whether the relation between physical discipline and child aggression was moderated by ethnic-group status. A sample of 466 European American and 100 African American children from a broad range of socioeconomic levels were followed from kindergarten through 3rd grade. Mothers reported their use of physical discipline in interviews and questionnaires, and mothers,

Kirby Deater-Deckard; Kenneth A. Dodge; John E. Bates; Gregory S. Pettit

1996-01-01

132

THE HEALTH STATUS OF AFRICAN AMERICANS IN ALLEGHENY COUNTY A BLACK PAPER FOR THE URBAN LEAGUE OF PITTSBURGH  

E-print Network

/ethnic disparities in health by 2010. This report examines the health conditions of African Americans in AlleghenyTHE HEALTH STATUS OF AFRICAN AMERICANS IN ALLEGHENY COUNTY A BLACK PAPER FOR THE URBAN LEAGUE serves to benchmark the current health status of African Americans and, by way of comparison, whites

Sibille, Etienne

133

English 221 African-American  

E-print Network

English 221 African-American Literature CRN 19106, 4 credits, MWF 1000-1050 Meets Bac Core Requirements: Literature and the Arts How has literature responded to and participated in struggles for racial justice throughout American history? How can texts help us to under- stand how categories of race, gender

Escher, Christine

134

Eating Disorders in African American Girls: Implications for Counselors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given the recent focus on eating disorders in children, it is imperative that counselors consider eating concerns that affect children of all racial and ethnic groups and hence are effective in working with this population. The author discusses risk factors that potentially contribute to eating disorders in African American girls given their…

Talleyrand, Regine M.

2010-01-01

135

Internalization of the Thin Ideal as a Predictor of Body Dissatisfaction and Disordered Eating in African, African-American, and Afro-Caribbean Female College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study, conducted at a historically Black university, evaluated the impact of awareness and internalization of the Western thin ideal of beauty on body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, and bulimia in African-American, African, and Caribbean women. The relationship between internalization of the thin ideal and disordered eating was moderated by ethnicity, with the relationship significant only for the African-American group.

Stefanie C. Gilbert; Stacey Crump; Serge Madhere; William Schutz

2009-01-01

136

What Young African American Women Want in a Healthcare Provider  

PubMed Central

The Institute of Medicine’s report on racial and ethnic disparities in health care encourages enhancing patient provider relationships by building trust. We explored factors important to 19–24 year old African American women (N=40) in choosing a health care provider. Eight focus groups were held in seven Ohio counties. Discussion was aided by photographs of client-provider interactions: two African American and two White providers (man or woman in each); in similar settings, attire, and pose; with a young African American woman client. Participants commented on what was happening in the photographs, how the woman felt, and their perceptions of each provider. Fongwa’s Quality of Care model guided analysis. Women providers were favored; race was not of primary concern. Provider proximity, perceived interest, and understandability were persistent preferences. Trust, awareness of body language, interest in client, and clearly conveying information clearly are critical for providers caring for young African American women. PMID:20562249

Dale, Helen E.; Polivka, Barbara J.; Chaudry, Rosemary V.; Simmonds, Gwenneth C.

2013-01-01

137

Discrimination, Religious Coping, and Tobacco Use Among White, African American, and Mexican American Vocational School Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined whether religious coping moderates the impact of racial\\/ethnic discrimination on current (past 30 day)\\u000a cigarette and cigar\\/cigarillo use among a racially\\/ethnically diverse sample of 984 technical\\/vocational school students (47.1%\\u000a women; mean age = 25 years). Results indicate that discrimination increased the likelihood of current cigarette use among\\u000a African American students and current cigar\\/cigarillo use among white and African American students. Positive

Karissa D. Horton; Alexandra Loukas

138

AFRICAN AMERICANAFRICAN AMERICANAFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIESSTUDIESSTUDIES  

E-print Network

REL 469: Black Religion in America Electives (select four)** AMST 301: American, the Frontier, and the New West AMST 320: Social Constructions of Race and Citizenship AMST 353: Race and Racism in the Americas COMM 458: Race and Ethnicity in Entertainment and the Arts POSC 424: Political Participation

Krylov, Anna I.

139

Technical Consulting: The African-American Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The qualitative research study explored the organizational characteristics necessary in addressing the low concentration of African American technical consultants employed in the information technology industry. Using research participants' professional experience, participants responded to a developed questionnaire. African American technical…

Whitfield, Tracy N.

2010-01-01

140

Heart Healthy Home Cooking African American Style  

E-print Network

Heart Healthy Home Cooking African American Style With Every Heartbeat Is Life #12;#12;Heart Recipe Substitutions for Heart Healthy Cooking at the heart of African American family life and special celebrations. This recipe book brings together many

Bandettini, Peter A.

141

African American Preschoolers' Language, Emergent Literacy Skills, and Use of African American English: A Complex Relation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study examined the relation between African American preschoolers' use of African American English (AAE) and their language and emergent literacy skills in an effort to better understand the perplexing and persistent difficulties many African American children experience learning to read proficiently. Method: African American

Connor, Carol McDonald; Craig, Holly K.

2006-01-01

142

African American Preschoolers' Language, Emergent Literacy Skills, and Use of African American English: A Complex Relation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This study examined the relation between African American preschoolers' use of African American English (AAE) and their language and emergent literacy skills in an effort to better understand the perplexing and persistent difficulties many African American children experience learning to read proficiently. Method: African American preschoolers' (n = 63) vocabulary skills were assessed in the fall and their language

Carol McDonald Connor; Holly K. Craig

2006-01-01

143

Racial profiling salience affects confession susceptibility: Implications for racial profiling of African-Americans and Arab-Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present research examined the perceptions and reactions that students from differing ethnic backgrounds had toward the issue of racial profiling under stereotype threat. A pilot study showed that Arab-American and African-American students have more negative attitudes, ruminated more, and felt more negatively toward profiling than did Caucasian students. In addition, Arab-American, African-American, and Caucasian students had different reactions to

Nichole M Hickcox

2009-01-01

144

The online obstacle : a study of African-American enterprise on the Internet  

E-print Network

Iconic Web companies based in the US, along the likes of Google, Facebook, and Twitter, have exhibited some racial/ethnic diversity among their founders, yet there appears to be a dearth of African-Americans in the group. ...

Lamb, Allen T. (Allen Terrel)

2010-01-01

145

The Continuing Struggle of African Americans for the Power To Make Real Educational Choices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the struggle of African Americans for more educational options (a battle also faced by other racial and ethnic groups). The debate is about who should have the primary power to determine where low-income, mostly African American students should attend school. The fundamental problem is that parents without the power to make…

Fuller, Howard L.

146

Race Matters: Disparities in African-American Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder  

E-print Network

145 145 Race Matters: Disparities in African-American Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity childhood behavioral disorders. African American children, specifically, have been found to be less likely of literature examines race and ethnicity, individual and institutional racism, as well as negative stereotypes

Omiecinski, Curtis

147

Moving beyond the Margins: An Exploration of Low Performing African American Male College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data have shown that African American male college students are being outperformed. Compared to all other populations by ethnicity and gender, African American males most often fare the worst in terms of persistence, performance, and completion. The impetus of this study was to explore the motivation of those that have low academic performance and…

Jackson, Ronald C.

2011-01-01

148

Methylphenidate Improves Aspects of Executive Function in African American Children with ADHD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The undertreatment of ethnic minority children with ADHD prompted a study on the effects of methylphenidate (MPH) on the executive functions of African American children with ADHD. Method: Nineteen African American children with ADHD are tested on the Tower of Hanoi (TOH) and the Paired Associates Learning Task (PAL) in a double-blind…

Hazel-Fernandez, Leslie Ann; Klorman, Rafael; Wallace, James M.; Cook, Stephen

2006-01-01

149

Increased Fruit and Vegetable Intake May Reduce the Nutrition-Related Health Disparities in African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Racial and ethnic minorities in the United States have higher rates of nutrition-related health problems than whites. African Americans have a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and some cancers. The cause for the disparity in these diseases and conditions is complex and multifaceted, and lifestyle factors are clearly implicated. African Americans have a lower intake of fruit and

Joanne Curran Celentano

2009-01-01

150

The Use of Family Health Histories to Address Health Disparities in an African American Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

African Americans continue to suffer from health disparities. The Center for Minority Health (CMH) within the University of Pittsburgh has the mission to eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities. CMH has designed and implemented the Family Health History (FHH) Initiative. The FHH Initiative places genetic-counseling graduate students in the African American community to provide risk assessments and emphasize the importance

Kristen J. Vogel; Vinaya S. Murthy; Beth Dudley; Robin E. Grubs; Elizabeth Gettig; Angela Ford; Stephen B. Thomas

2007-01-01

151

Chronic Hepatitis C Treatment Patterns in African American Patients: An Update  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are large racial disparities in the incidence of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the United States. The prevalence of HCV, and the prevalence of infection with HCV genotype 1, is higher among African Americans than among other ethnic groups. African Americans also have a higher incidence of complications of HCV infection, including a higher incidence of antibodies

Samuel Daniel

2005-01-01

152

A Village without Borders: Umoja Programs Level the Playing Field for African-American Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) has implemented programs designed to help African-American students overcome the psychological and cultural obstacles to successful participation in formal learning environments. African-American students suffer low achievement rates in higher education compared with all racial or ethnic groups.…

Beebe, Anthony; Burgess, Terrence; Carroll, Constance; Charlens, Erin

2009-01-01

153

Racial Identity Attitudes, Self-Esteem, and Academic Achievement among African American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present study was to explore the extent to which racial identity attitudes and self-esteem could predict academic performance for African American middle school students. A total of 175 African American adolescents in 7th grade attending one of two urban schools participated in the study. The Multi-Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM)…

Bonvillain, Jocelyn Freeman; Honora, Detris

2004-01-01

154

"We Don't Feel Welcome Here": African Americans and Hispanics in Metro Boston  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Racial discrimination is an ongoing reality in the lives of African Americans and Hispanics in Metro Boston. Although the region has experienced significant growth in racial and ethnic diversity over the past several decades, racial minority groups continue to struggle for full acceptance and equal opportunity. African Americans and Hispanics…

Louie, Josephine

2005-01-01

155

Moving Beyond Ethnic Stereotypes: Latino Americans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This excerpt from a presentation at the National Council for Children and Television seminar briefly reviews past commercial television efforts at portraying Latino Americans, discusses the demographic composition of this ethnic group and some prevalent stereotypes of Latinos, and provides recommendations to television programmers on how to…

Gutierrez, Felix

1984-01-01

156

Engaging African Americans in Smoking Cessation Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: African Americans are disproportionately exposed to and targeted by prosmoking advertisements, particularly menthol cigarette ads. Though African Americans begin smoking later than whites, they are less likely to quit smoking than whites. Purpose: This study was designed to explore African American smoking cessation attitudes,…

Wallen, Jacqueline; Randolph, Suzanne; Carter-Pokras, Olivia; Feldman, Robert; Kanamori-Nishimura, Mariano

2014-01-01

157

Freedom Road: Adult Education of African Americans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains six chapters by various authors about the history of African Americans' contributions and participation in adult education. The book reports on how some African American leaders saw the connection between education and the eventual freedom or uplift of the African American people. Following a foreword (Phyllis M. Cunningham) and…

Peterson, Elizabeth A., Ed.

158

African American Girls and the Challenges Ahead  

Microsoft Academic Search

The research on the psychosocial development of African American girls is limited. Information that is available focuses on teen pregnancy and health issues such as nutrition and physical activity. African American girls are facing challenges, including poverty, crime, poor self-esteem, and peer pressure. Despite some of the negative characteristics attributed to African American girls, many are achieving some success. Policy

Judith L. Rozie-Battle

2002-01-01

159

Complex Syntax Production of African American Preschoolers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined changes in the complex syntax production of 85 African American preschoolers and the role of child (gender, age, African American English) and family (home environment) factors. Age, gender, and home environment effects were found for the amount of complex language used. African American English was not related to amount of…

Jackson, Sandra C.; Roberts, Joanne E.

2001-01-01

160

Expressions of anxiety in African Americans: ethnography and the epidemiological catchment area studies.  

PubMed

High levels of anxiety have long been reported for African Americans. Recent analyses of Epidemiological Catchment Area (ECA) data have failed to support this, although contemporary ethnographies have discussed important African American folk idioms of anxiety. This study compares ethnographically reported symptoms of anxiety in African Americans to those reported in the ECA data. A multivariate analysis of female African American and European American differences in comparable ECA and ethnographic symptoms was performed. Significant differences were found not in ethnicity but in education levels. Alternative interpretations are discussed. Methodological problems are discussed highlighting limitations of both household survey research, such as the ECA project, and ethnography. PMID:9352168

Heurtin-Roberts, S; Snowden, L; Miller, L

1997-09-01

161

Experiences and perspectives of African American, Latina/o, Asian American, and European American psychology graduate students: A national study.  

PubMed

A national, Web-based survey of 1,219 African American, Latina/o, Asian American, and European American psychology graduate students revealed both similarities and differences in experiences and perspectives. Mentoring was found to be the strongest predictor of satisfaction across groups. Academic supports and barriers, along with perceptions of diversity within the academic environment, were also important predictors of satisfaction. Students of color perceived less fairness of representation of their ethnic group within psychology than European American students, and a greater linkage between aspects of the graduate school experience and their ethnicity. Limitations of the study and implications for future research and action are discussed. PMID:21341899

Maton, Kenneth I; Wimms, Harriette E; Grant, Sheila K; Wittig, Michele A; Rogers, Margaret R; Vasquez, Melba J T

2011-01-01

162

Wellness among African American Counselors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although there are various definitions of wellness, few conceptual definitions have addressed the contextual dimensions of wellness relative to African American counselors. The authors present an overview of generic models of wellness, discuss factors that both inhibit and promote wellness, offer some culture-specific models of wellness, and…

Day-Vines, Norma L.; Holcomb-McCoy, Cheryl

2007-01-01

163

Classic African American Children's Literature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to assert that there are classic African American children's books and to identify a sampling of them. The author presents multiple definitions of the term classic based on the responses of children's literature experts and relevant scholarship. Next, the manner in which data were collected and analyzed in regard to…

McNair, Jonda C.

2010-01-01

164

Tobacco Use among U.S. Racial/Ethnic Minority Groups--African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics: A Report of the Surgeon General. Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States and certain racial and ethnic minority groups are at higher risk for using tobacco. This is the first Surgeon General's report to focus on tobacco use among these four racial and ethnic minority groups. It provides a single, comprehensive source of data on each group's pattern…

Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (DHHS/CDC), Atlanta, GA.

165

Differences between African American and European American First-Year College Students in the Relationship between Self-Efficacy, Outcome Expectations, and Academic Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

First-year African American and European American college students were surveyed to examine ethnic differences in how their social cognitive beliefs (self-efficacy and outcome expectations) influenced their academic achievement. It was hypothesized that outcome expectations may better explain academic achievement for African Americans due to the…

DeFreitas, Stacie Craft

2012-01-01

166

Subjective, Behavioral, and Physiological Reactivity to Ethnically Matched and Ethnically Mismatched Film Clips  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined whether individuals from 4 major ethnic groups within the United States (African American, Chinese American, European American, and Mexican American) showed greater subjective, behavioral, and physiological responses to emotional film clips (amusement, sadness, and disgust) with actors from their own ethnic group (ethnically matched) compared with actors from the other 3 ethnic groups (ethnically mismatched). Evidence showed

Nicole A. Roberts; Robert W. Levenson

2006-01-01

167

The Black Mafia: African-American organized crime in Chicago 1890-1960  

Microsoft Academic Search

The historical role of African-Americans in organized crime in the United States has been greatly ignored by the academic community. The research that does exist argues that black Americans played a minor role in the ethnic gambling and vice industries that existed in many American cities at the beginning of the Twentieth Century. This view is supported by the alien

ROBERT M. LOMBARDO

2002-01-01

168

Stereotypes and ethnocentrism: diverging interethnic perceptions of African American and white American youth.  

PubMed

Much recent work on stereotyping has dealt with groups that are either artificially created or that do not have an extensive history of conflict. The authors attempted to overcome this limitation by examining issues of perceived variability and ethnocentrism among samples of White American and African American youth. The goals were both to examine theoretical issues in stereotyping and to describe the current state of ethnic interrelations among young people. Four studies are reported. Throughout, the samples of African Americans demonstrate interethnic judgments that are consistent with existing work on stereotyping and ethnocentrism. White American students, however, reported judgements that replicate neither the out-group homogeneity effect nor ethnocentrism. Alternative explanations for this difference are considered, and the discussion focuses on differing views concerning the role of ethnic identity and diversity in our society. PMID:7562391

Judd, C M; Park, B; Ryan, C S; Brauer, M; Kraus, S

1995-09-01

169

HIV/AIDS: impact on the African American community.  

PubMed

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has had a devastating impact on the lives of African Americans. In the United States, it is estimated that almost half of all cases of HIV infection in men occur among black men and almost 70% of the cases in women occur among black women. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), which results from HIV infection, has become a leading cause of death of African Americans between the ages of 25 and 44. Denial regarding how the disease is spread, particularly among heterosexuals, and stigmatization about the disease continue to be barriers to effective prevention campaigns within African American communities. Aggressive cultural and ethnic-specific educational campaigns, focusing on prevention, are needed to curb the current spread of HIV within this population. PMID:11913254

Hodge, C E

2001-07-01

170

Cultural Expressions of the African American Child.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interpretations of the differences between the African American child and the Caucasian child in North America follow two major trends. In one the differences in the African American child are viewed as deviance from the Euro-American norm and therefore inferior or pathological. In the other, the differences are viewed as deviant but adaptive…

Akbar, Na'im

171

An Exploratory Study of the Career Decisions of African American and Hispanic Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a need for culturally diverse teachers. Weiher (2000) studied the relationship between African American and Hispanic student achievement and schools with teachers from diverse ethnic backgrounds. Results indicated the greater the difference between the percentage of ethnically diverse teachers and the percentage of diverse students, the…

Waller, Johnnye

2010-01-01

172

Clinical Practices With African Americans: Juxtaposition of Standard Clinical Practices and Africentricism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapidly changing demographics necessitate increased awareness of the impact of race, ethnicity, and levels of acculturation on treatment efficacy and differential diagnosis of ethnic minorities. Increasingly, psychologists are in a position of providing treatment for clients whose cultural background differs from their own. Because African Americans have historically underutilized mental health services, sensitivity to the cultural variables represented by this

Edward F. Morris

2001-01-01

173

The portrayal of African American women in rap music video  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the portrayal of African American women in African American dominated rap music videos for the presence of African American female sex role stereotypes. The literature review included an historical overview tracing African American female stereotypes in American media utilizing an Africentric Feminist ideology. The review detailed descriptions and origins of stereotypes related to negative characterizations of African

Darnell Anderson

1999-01-01

174

Some African American Males' Perspectives on the Black Woman.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents views of Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. Du Bois, Malcolm X, and James Hal Cone (African-American male leaders) toward African-American women in the United States. Discusses the role of African-American men in addressing and eradicating sexism in African-American churches and the African-American community. (SLD)

Burrow, Rufus, Jr.

1992-01-01

175

AFRICAN AMERICAN AFFINITY GROUP ARTICLES OF THE CONSTITUTION & BYLAWS  

E-print Network

AFRICAN AMERICAN AFFINITY GROUP ARTICLES OF THE CONSTITUTION & BYLAWS Date: May 22, 2012 African-American Affinity Group #12;AFRICAN AMERICAN AFFINITY GROUP ARTICLES OF THE CONSTITUTION - 2 - Revised and accepted is the "African -American Affinity Group" (AAAG). ARTICLE II � MISSION SECTION 1 The African-American Affinity

176

AFRICAN-AMERICAN AND HISPANIC-AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS, HIV INFECTION, AND PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION  

PubMed Central

This paper considers strategies for preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among African-American and Hispanic-American adolescents. We describe culturally sensitive interventions based on social learning theory. The interventions combine elements of cognitive-behavioral skills for problem solving, coping, and interpersonal communication with elements of ethnic pride and HIV facts. The paper discusses the strengths and limitations of skills intervention for AIDS prevention and concludes with directions for research. PMID:2288812

Schinke, Steven P.; Botvin, Gilbert J.; Orlandi, Mario A.; Schilling, Robert F.; Gordon, Adam N.

2010-01-01

177

The African-American house as a vehicle of discovery for an African-American architecture  

E-print Network

The purpose of this research is three-fold: (1) This thesis seeks to uncover evidence of a distinctly African-American architectural form. The primary building type observed will be the house, or the housing of African-Americans ...

Clarke, Charles E. (Charles Edward)

1996-01-01

178

Social support unique to African American mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the study was the identification of the cultural postpartum prevention practices of African American families.\\u000a Using qualitative methods, 30 postpartum African American mothers were assessed for their degree of acculturation into the\\u000a Anglo-American culture. The mothers were interviewed to ascertain their postpartum depression prevention practices. Degree\\u000a of acculturation was ascertained using the Landrine & Klonoff (1995) African

Doris Noel Ugarriza

2006-01-01

179

American Indian College Students' Ethnic Identity and Beliefs about Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sixty-seven American Indian and 96 European-American undergraduate students responded to questions about their educational and ethnic beliefs and their perceptions of their mother's and father's support for education. The American Indian participants completed some additional items regarding their ethnic beliefs and their perceptions of their…

Okagaki, Lynn; Helling, Mary Kay; Bingham, Gary E.

2009-01-01

180

Overlooked role of African-American males' hypermasculinity in the epidemic of unintended pregnancies and HIV/AIDS cases with young African-American women.  

PubMed Central

This article looks at multiple lines of converging evidence relevant to the 72% unintended pregnancy rate, and recently emerged heterosexually-based HIV/AIDS epidemic with young African-American women. Evidence recently reveals a convergence of these epidemics, in a vulnerable subpopulation segment of African-American women. Overlooked, as a unique contributing factor in these epidemics is the hypermasculine behaviors of African-American males. Among the risky behaviors linked with this hypermasculinity are a greater tendency with African-American males to have more multiple sexual partners, and a stronger aversion to condom use than other male ethnic groups. As a contributing factor in these epidemics, African-American males' hypermasculinity has several implications for intervention strategies to reduce the epidemics, which are discussed. PMID:14527052

Wolfe, William A.

2003-01-01

181

Clinicopathological Features of Colon Polyps from African-Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Aims  Among the ethnic groups, the age-standardized incidence rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) is highest among African-Americans.\\u000a The majority of CRC arise from preexisting adenoma. It is shown that 30% of the US adult population has adenomas. The potential\\u000a risk of malignant transformation in adenomas differs by specific pathologic and clinical characteristics that we aimed to\\u000a study in AAs.

Mehdi Nouraie; Fatemeh Hosseinkhah; Hassan Brim; Behrouz Zamanifekri; Duane T. Smoot; Hassan Ashktorab

2010-01-01

182

Religiosity, Meaning in Life, and Clinical Symptomology: A Comparison of African-American and European-American College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined whether religiosity is subsumed under the broader construct of meaning in life as a predictor of psychological symptomology in college students from two ethnic groups. Data from 299 undergraduates indicated that among European-American students, religiosity predicted little variance in psychological symptomology and was subsumed by general meaning in life. Conversely, for African-American students, perceived meaning in life

Jeffrey D. Holmes; Susan I. Hardin

2009-01-01

183

Correlates and Consequences of Spanking and Verbal Punishment for Low-Income White, African American, and Mexican American Toddlers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the prevalence, predictors, and outcomes of spanking and verbal punishment in 2,573 low-income White, African American, and Mexican American toddlers at ages 1, 2, and 3. Both spanking and verbal punishment varied by maternal race/ethnicity. Child fussiness at age 1 predicted spanking and verbal punishment at all 3 ages.…

Berlin, Lisa J.; Ispa, Jean M.; Fine, Mark A.; Malone, Patrick S.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Brady-Smith, Christy; Ayoub, Catherine; Bai, Yu

2009-01-01

184

Parent-School Involvement and School Performance: Mediated Pathways among Socioeconomically Comparable African American and Euro-American Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines children's social and academic competencies as mediators to explain the often positive relation between parent-school involvement and achievement. Ethnic variation was examined. For African Americans, academic skills mediated the relations between school involvement and math performance. For Euro-Americans, social competence mediated the…

Hill, Nancy E.; Craft, Stacie A.

2003-01-01

185

AAS 372: African American Identity Guidelines for Writing Assignments  

E-print Network

African American cultures; identity issues of "mixed-race" people; the effect of media stereotypes aboutAAS 372: African American Identity Guidelines for Writing Assignments General Overview African Americans on their identity; reasons why mos

Vonessen, Nikolaus

186

Cultural aspects of African American eating patterns.  

PubMed

The high mortality from diet-related diseases among African Americans strongly suggests a need to adopt diets lower in total fat, saturated fat and salt and higher in fiber. However, such changes would be contrary to some traditional African American cultural practices. Focus group interviews were used to explore cultural aspects of eating patterns among low- and middle-income African Americans recruited from an urban community in Pennsylvania. In total, 21 males and 32 females, aged 13-65+ years were recruited using a networking technique. Participants identified eating practices commonly attributed to African Americans and felt that these were largely independent of socioeconomic status. They were uncertain about links between African American eating patterns and African origins but clear about influences of slavery and economic disadvantage. The perception that African American food patterns were characteristically adaptive to external conditions, suggest that, for effective dietary change in African American communities, changes in the food availability will need to precede or take place in parallel with changes recommended to individuals. Cultural attitudes about where and with whom food is eaten emerged as being equivalent in importance to attitudes about specific foods. These findings emphasize the importance of continued efforts to identify ways to increase the relevance of cultural context and meanings in dietary counseling so that health and nutrition interventions are anchored in values as perceived, in this case, by African Americans. PMID:9395569

Airhihenbuwa, C O; Kumanyika, S; Agurs, T D; Lowe, A; Saunders, D; Morssink, C B

1996-09-01

187

African American Evaluations of Black English and Standard American English  

Microsoft Academic Search

AfricanAmerican undergraduates evaluated two language guises: BlackEnglish and Standard American English. The speaker in these guises described activities in a weekend (informal) and in a business (formal) setting. Based on their scores on the African Self-Consciousness Scale, 55 respondents were categorized as having either a low or high commitment to an African American identity. Results showed that persons without a

Michael J. White; Beverly J. Vandiver; Maria L. Becker; Belinda G. Overstreet; Linda E. Temple; Kelly L. Hagan; Emily P. Mandelbaum

1998-01-01

188

Health-related Quality of Life of African American Breast Cancer Survivors Compared to Healthy African American Women  

PubMed Central

Background The diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer can result in an array of late cancer-specific side effects and changes in general well-being. Research has focused on Caucasian samples, limiting our understanding of the unique health-related quality of life outcomes of African American breast cancer survivors (BCS). Even when African American BCS have been targeted, research is limited by small samples and failure to include comparisons of peers without a history of breast cancer. Objective The purpose of this study was to compare health-related quality of life of African American women BCS to African American women with no history of breast cancer (control group). Methods A total of 140 women (62 BCS and 78 control), ages 18 years or older and 2–10 years post-diagnosis, was recruited from a breast cancer clinic and cancer support groups. Participants provided informed consent and completed a one-time survey based on Brenner’s (1995) proximal-distal health-related quality of life model. Results After adjusting for age, education, income, and body mass index, African American BCS experienced more fatigue (p=0.001), worse hot flashes (p<0.001) and worse sleep quality (p<0.001), but more social support from their partner (p=0.028) and more positive change (p=0.001) compared to African American women controls. Conclusions Our results suggest that African American women BCS may experience unique health-related outcomes that transcend age, education, socio-economic status and body mass index. Implications for Practice Findings suggest the importance of understanding the survivorship experience for particular racial and ethnic subgroups to proactively assess difficulties and plan interventions. PMID:22228394

Von Ah, Diane M.; Russell, Kathleen M.; Carpenter, Janet; Monahan, Patrick O.; Zhao, Qianqian; Tallman, Eileen; Ziner, Kim Wagler; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Miller, Kathy D.; Giesler, R. Brian; Haase, Joan; Otte, Julie; Champion, Victoria L.

2011-01-01

189

Environmental health and African Americans.  

PubMed Central

As environmental health has taken on immensely increased significance in the prevention of disease, dysfunction, and premature death, its boundaries have been anything but stable. This instability, along with a multitude of demographic, social, and economic currents, have brought into stark relief the increasing demand for scientists who have the skills and knowledge to perform environmental risk assessment and implement effective risk management policies and services. Despite this demand far too few African Americans want, or are prepared, to pursue careers in sciences. This paper describes efforts to address this problem and suggests why such initiatives may not yield the desired results. PMID:1951793

Walker, B

1991-01-01

190

The Twilight of Ethnicity Among American Catholics of European Ancestry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Catholic ethnic groups of European origins are essential to any assessment of ethnicity in the United States. Their ethnicity is believed widely to remain vigorous many decades after their immigration. Indeed, by the measure of some important characteristics, such as rates of college attendance and interethnic marriage, they seem distinct from American core groups, specifically Protestants of British ancestry.

Richard D. Alba

1981-01-01

191

Hmong American Adolescents' Perceptions of Ethnic Socialization Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guided by an ecological framework, this study explored ethnic socialization practices from the perspective of Southeast Asian American adolescents. Defined as a multidimensional construct that is conceptually distinct from racial socialization, ethnic socialization involves parents' communication to children about their ethnic heritage. The…

Moua, MyLou Y.; Lamborn, Susie D.

2010-01-01

192

African Americans in the Early Republic.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses five topics on African Americans that are essential to studying United States History in the years between 1760 and 1830: (1) African Americans in the Revolutionary War ; (2) the rise of free black communities; (3) early abolitionism; (4) the spread of slavery; and (5) black resistance to slavery. (CMK)

Nash, Gary B.

2000-01-01

193

African Americans and the Industrial Revolution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Briefly outlines the ways race and technology shaped: (1) the early enslavement of African Americans; (2) the work of bondsmen and women during the antebellum era; and (3) the increasing urbanization of the African American population during the industrial age. (CMK)

Trotter, Joe William, Jr.

2000-01-01

194

African American Art: A Los Angeles Legacy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum unit focuses on the importance of Los Angeles (California) as a center for African American art and shows how African American artists have developed their own styles and how critics and collectors have encouraged them. The unit consists of four lessons, each of which can stand alone or be used in conjunction with the others. It…

Walker, Harriet

195

Educating African American Males: A Dream Deferred.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents recommendations of the Milwaukee (Wisconsin) African American Male Task Force (MAAMTF), which reviewed from January through April of 1990 current educational efforts and recommended strategies by which schools could better address African American males' needs. The MAAMTF recommendations are to be implemented in two phases.…

Milwaukee Public Schools, WI.

196

African-American Literature for Young People.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the development of African-American literature for young people. Describes the setbacks resulting from cutbacks of federal funds for schools and libraries, as publishers cut back on materials they did not consider marketable. Suggests bibliographic resources for discovering works for children by or about African Americans. (DK)

Drew, Margaret A.

1992-01-01

197

African American Undergraduates and the Academic Library  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the academic library experiences of African American undergraduates attending a research university in the Midwest. Data collection techniques included questionnaires and ethnographic observations. The results indicated that African American undergraduates are using the academic library primarily to read and to study with their…

Whitmire, Ethelene

2006-01-01

198

Depression, Sociocultural Factors, and African American Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors discuss depression in African American women from a sociocultural perspective, including aspects of oppression and racism that affect symptom manifestation. The authors highlight John Henryism as a coping mechanism, the history and continuing role of the African American church as a safe haven, and strategies for culturally competent…

Hunn, Vanessa Lynn; Craig, Carlton David

2009-01-01

199

Perceptions and Performance of African American Male Student-Athletes at a Historically Black University and a Predominantly White University.  

E-print Network

??The current study examined the self-perceptions of African American male student-athletes in regards to academic abilities, athletic role, and ethnicity. More specifically, this investigation explored… (more)

Brown, Jennifer Marie

2004-01-01

200

African Americans and the medical establishment.  

PubMed

The African American community's response to the AIDS epidemic has reflected the profound mistrust of the medical establishment which many African Americans feel. Among African Americans, the belief that the epidemic originated in a genocidal plot is widespread. It is thought that organized medicine has been significantly involved in this plot. If we look at African Americans' historical relationship to the medical establishment from the era of slavery to the recent past, the suspicious attitudes which make such beliefs possible can be seen as an intelligible response to a new disease which disproportionately affects African Americans. Successful medical and public health responses to the epidemic have depended and will continue to depend upon overcoming the historical legacy of suspicion and gaining the trust of the community. PMID:10477485

Smith, C

1999-09-01

201

The Media as a System of RacializationExploring Images of African American Women and the New Racism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historically, the media perpetuate ideas about race and ethnicity that place African American women at a clear disadvantage. Beginning with the welfare queen image during the Reagan administration and moving to the porno chick represented in current videos, society views a daily discourse on race, gender, and class that continues to reproduce dominant and distorted views of African American womanhood

Marci Bounds Littlefield

2008-01-01

202

APPENDIX A FACT SHEETSHIV/AIDS AND SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES—CDC FACT SHEET HIV/AIDS AND AFRICAN AMERICANS  

E-print Network

In the United States, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is a health crisis for African Americans. At all stages of HIV/AIDS—from infection with HIV to death with AIDS—blacks (including African Americans) are disproportionately affected, as compared with members of other races and ethnicities.

unknown authors

203

Do You See What I See? Effects of Group Consciousness on African American Women's Attributions to Prejudice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the effects of three types of group consciousness among African American women ("ethnic," "feminist," and "womanist") on prejudice attributions and appraised personal significance ("centrality") of a negative intergroup event. African American female college students (N = 123) imagined themselves in an audiotaped scenario in…

King, Kimberly R.

2003-01-01

204

DISTURBANCES IN THE SOCIAL BODYDifferences in Body Image and Eating Problems among African American and white Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

An emerging body of research comparing body image disturbance and eating problems among African American and white women suggests that there are major ethnic differences in these areas. African American women appear to be more satisfied with their weight and appearance than are white women, and they are less likely to engage in unhealthy weight control practices, yet they are

MEG LOVEJOY

2001-01-01

205

Knowledge, Beliefs and Behaviours Related to STD Risk, Prevention, and Screening among a Sample of African American Men and Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Current data on sexually transmitted disease (STD) among African Americans show significant racial/ethnic disparities. The purpose of this study was to explore knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours related to STD risk, prevention, and testing among African American adults to help inform the development of a health communication…

Uhrig, Jennifer D.; Friedman, Allison; Poehlman, Jon; Scales, Monica; Forsythe, Ann

2014-01-01

206

Race consciousness and the health of African Americans.  

PubMed

The historical experience of African Americans in our country has been shaped by the institution of slavery, dehumanization of blacks, segregation, pursuit of civil rights, and racism in contemporary American society. Disparities in health care provide compelling evidence that issues of race or skin color for the descendants of slaves and other ethnic minorities persist in the 21st century. Nurses providing care for African Americans must bridge the racial divide and incorporate culturally relevant content in the health history. As an integral aspect of their professional growth as culturally competent health care providers, they must incorporate the idea of "race consciousness" which is described as an awareness of the historical journey of the group, knowledge of disparities in health care for the people, and a self appraisal of one's attitudes and biases toward the group. PMID:12729454

Watts, Rosalyn J

2003-01-01

207

African-Americans and serial homicide  

Microsoft Academic Search

African-Americans are usually over-represented among offenders arrested in “normal” homicide cases, making up a considerably\\u000a larger proportion than would be expected from the Black presence in the population at large. Among serial murderers, however,\\u000a African-Americans are much less in evidence—perhaps one-fifth or less of known American serial killers are Black. It may be\\u000a that African-Americans are in fact less involved

Philip Jenkins

1993-01-01

208

Demographics of African-American vs. European-Heritage Mothers of Newborns with Down Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although important for public health policy, ethnic/racial disparities have rarely been examined among families of young children with Down syndrome. This study compared 144 African-American mothers with 726 European-heritage mothers of newborns with Down syndrome using official birth records in one American state from 1990 through 2002; outcome…

Hodapp, Robert M.; Urbano, Richard C.

2008-01-01

209

Help-Seeking Experiences and Attitudes among African American, Asian American, and European American College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined African American, Asian American, and European American college students' previous direct and indirect experiences of seeking professional psychological services and related attitudes. Survey data were collected from 254 European American, 182 African American and 82 Asian American college students. Results revealed that fewer…

Masuda, Akihiko; Anderson, Page L.; Twohig, Michael P.; Feinstein, Amanda B.; Chou, Ying-Yi; Wendell, Johanna W.; Stormo, Analia R.

2009-01-01

210

Associations between reasons for living and diminished suicide intent among African-American female suicide attempters.  

PubMed

African-American women are at high risk for suicide ideation and suicide attempts and use emergency psychiatric services at disproportionately high rates relative to men and other ethnic groups. However, suicide death rates are low for this population. Cultural variables in the African-American community may promote resilience and prevent fatal suicidal behavior among African-American women. The present study evaluated self-reported reasons for living as a protective factor against suicidal intent and suicide attempt lethality in a sample of African-American female suicide attempters (n = 150). Regression analyses revealed that reasons for living were negatively associated with suicidal intent, even after controlling for spiritual well-being and symptoms of depression. These results indicate that the ability to generate and contemplate reasons for valuing life may serve as a protective characteristic against life-threatening suicidal behavior among African-American women. Implications for research and clinical practice are further discussed. PMID:25010106

Flowers, Kelci C; Walker, Rheeda L; Thompson, Martie P; Kaslow, Nadine J

2014-08-01

211

Mental health and diurnal salivary cortisol patterns among African American and European American female dementia family caregivers.  

PubMed

Using a sociocultural stress and coping model, this pilot study examines the influence of depressive symptoms and stress on diurnal salivary cortisol patterns among African American (N=30) and European American (N=24) female dementia caregivers and noncaregivers (African American, N=48; European American, N=15). Caregiving participants completed the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and Stress-Related Growth Scale (SRGS) as respective measures of depressive symptoms, stress, and stress resilience. Participants also collected five saliva samples daily for two consecutive days. African American caregivers scored significantly higher than European American caregivers on the SRGS, but they did not differ on the PSS and CES-D scales. Regression analyses with age, ethnicity, caregiving status, and depressive symptoms as predictors, and cortisol slope as criterion, showed that only age and ethnicity predicted cortisol slope. African Americans had flatter slopes than the European Americans sampled, regardless of caregiving status. Findings highlight the role of cultural beliefs and of ethnicity in explaining cortisol function. PMID:16861373

McCallum, T J; Sorocco, Kristen H; Fritsch, Thomas

2006-08-01

212

African americans' perceived sociocultural determinants of suicide: afrocentric implications for public health inequalities.  

PubMed

The cultural values of African Americans have not been adequately incorporated as a theoretical base to develop new public health models. The major objectives of this study were to explore, with a purposive sample, via seven focus groups, 40 African American college students, the following: How do (a) ethnic culture and (b) a "minoritized" status influence perceptions of sociocultural determinants in explaining increases in the incidence of suicide among African Americans? Thematic results of focus group discussions including the following: (a) racism, discrimination, and stereotyping; (b) U.S. individualism; (c) integration and cultural assimilation; and, (d) the prison industrial complex. PMID:25350896

Borum, Valerie

2014-11-10

213

African-American elders. Implications for health care providers.  

PubMed

With the demographic projections that are expected in the next century, health care professionals of all disciplines will be caring for a large group of older African Americans. Most will be women with multiple chronic illnesses that are, and will continue to be, influenced by a number of factors, including race, gender, and socioeconomic status. Although the data we have on older African Americans have increased significantly over the past several years, a great need for studies that examine the complexities of race, health risks, and disease course still exists. Health-care providers will begin to avoid stereotypes as they begin to appreciate the diversity of this group, which will become especially important as the characteristics of the current cohort of elders changes in the coming years. It is clear that more and more African Americans are living longer and are in better health. An examination of those determinants of successful aging that might be applied to elders of all racial and ethnic backgrounds must occur. It will be imperative that all facets of the established medical system begin to provide and plan for culturally sensitive health care and services, which will require data, both quantitative and qualitative, that defines the characteristics of older African Americans along with their health-service needs. Health professional schools will have to adapt curricula to include issues of ethnogeriatrics to ensure that all providers are prepared to meet the challenge of providing culturally sensitive health care.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7720018

Brangman, S A

1995-02-01

214

Womanist Therapy with African American Women with Disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

African American women are at increased risk for disabilities. There is very little information available, however, regarding psychological interventions with African American women with disabilities. The purpose of this article is to discuss psychological intervention in working with African American women with acquired disabilities from a womanist perspective. Themes and interventions will be discussed. Recommendations for working with African American

Nina A. Nabors; Melanie F. Pettee

2003-01-01

215

Fatigue Severity among African Americans: Gender and Age Interactions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated the relationship between fatigue, age, and gender among African Americans, Caucasians, and Latinos. Survey results found significant age and gender interactions among African Americans and Caucasians. African American women and older African American men had the highest fatigue rates. There was no significant difference in levels of…

Song, Sharon; Jason, Leonard A.; Taylor, Renee R.; Torres-Harding, Susan R.; Helgerson, Jena; Witter, Elizabeth

2002-01-01

216

African Americans and the Spanish-American War and Philippine Insurrection: Military Participation, Recognition, and Memory, 1898-1904  

E-print Network

African Americans he was challenging racial stereotypes thatAfrican American editors constantly fought against prejudicial stereotypes.stereotypes reinforced many whites’ negative opinions about African Americans,

Russell, Timothy Dale

2013-01-01

217

Symposium: Calcium-Related Chronic Diseases in Ethnic Minorities: Can Dairy Consumption Reduce Health Disparities? Reducing Hypertensive Cardiovascular Disease Risk of African Americans with Diet: Focus on the Facts1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypertension is more common and more severe in African Americans than in other population groups in the United States, placing them at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and end-stage renal disease. Whereas past efforts to reduce blood pressure (BP) via the diet centered on manipulating isolated nutrients, there are now conclusive data demonstrating that it is not single dietary

Molly E. Reusser; David A. McCarrony

218

Discussing cancer: communication with African Americans.  

PubMed

Regular screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) facilitates earlier detection, lowers mortality, and may reduce incidence through detection and removal of pre-cancerous polyps. Optimizing health professional delivery of CRC screening information and recommendations can assist in reducing CRC disparity in the African-American community. This article presents qualitative data on African Americans' attitudes about health professional CRC communications based on the analysis of focus groups (N = 79). Using a social-ecological framework, colorectal cancer and professional communication themes are examined to offer four general and nine cancer-specific theoretically based and culturally appropriate strategies for improving health professional cancer communication with African Americans. PMID:25050658

Caito, Nikki; Hood, Sula; Thompson, Vetta L Sanders

2014-01-01

219

Psychosocial correlates of binge eating in Hispanic, African American, and Caucasian women presenting for bariatric surgery.  

PubMed

Research suggests that that binge eating, stress, and depression are prevalent among individuals seeking bariatric surgery. However, ethnic differences in the prevalence of binge eating and binge eating disorder (BED) in this population remain unclear, as does the impact of depression and stress on any such relationship. Further, no studies to date have examined the prevalence of binge eating in Hispanic women presenting for bariatric surgery. This study sought to (a) compare the prevalence and severity of binge eating symptomatology and BED diagnosis in Hispanic, African American, and Caucasian women presenting for gastric bypass surgery, (b) examine the impact of depressive symptoms and stress on binge eating symptomatology, and (c) investigate whether ethnicity moderated any relationship between depression, stress, and binge eating. Results indicated that Hispanic women exhibited equal rates of binge eating symptomatology, BED, and depressive symptomatology as African American and Caucasian women. However, Caucasian women exhibited greater binge eating symptomatology than African American women, and African American women endorsed greater levels of stress than Caucasian women. Across all ethnic groups, depressive symptomatology, but not stress, significantly predicted binge eating severity. These findings suggest that Hispanic women presenting for bariatric surgery report binge eating rates equivalent to Caucasian and African American women, and that depressive symptoms are an important predictor of binge eating in female bariatric surgery candidates across ethnic groups. PMID:20188290

Azarbad, Leila; Corsica, Joyce; Hall, Brian; Hood, Megan

2010-04-01

220

Prospective links between ethnic socialization, ethnic and American identity, and well-being among Asian-American adolescents.  

PubMed

Ethnic socialization and ethnic identity have been related to positive outcomes, but little research has examined these associations longitudinally. This three-wave study prospectively linked socialization messages at Time 1, ethnic identity and American identity at Time 2, and self-esteem and depressive symptoms at Time 3 in 147 (58% female; 25% first-generation) Asian-American adolescents. The results indicated positive links between cultural socialization messages and ethnic and American identity, though the latter association was significant only for females. Ethnic identity was positively related to self-esteem, and mediated the positive effect of cultural socialization on self-esteem. The promotion of mistrust was positively linked to self-esteem and negatively related to ethnic identity, though this latter association was significant for foreign-born youth only. Our findings highlight the importance of elucidating prospective links in identity development, and examining gender and generational differences within them. PMID:24162183

Gartner, Meaghan; Kiang, Lisa; Supple, Andrew

2014-10-01

221

Seasonal changes in sleep duration in African American and African college students living in Washington, D.C.  

PubMed

Duration of nocturnal melatonin secretion, a marker of "biological night" that relates to sleep duration, is longer in winter than in summer in patients with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), but not in healthy controls. In this study of African and African American college students, we hypothesized that students who met criteria for winter SAD or subsyndromal SAD (S-SAD) would report sleeping longer in winter than in summer. In addition, based on our previous observation that Africans report more "problems" with change in seasons than African Americans, we expected that the seasonal changes in sleep duration would be greater in African students than in African American students. Based on Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ) responses, African American and African college students in Washington, D.C. (N = 575) were grouped into a winter SAD/S-SAD group or a no winter diagnosis group, and winter and summer sleep length were determined. We conducted a 2 (season) x 2 (sex) x 2 (ethnicity) x 2 (winter diagnosis group) ANCOVA on reported sleep duration, controlling for age. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that African and African American students with winter SAD/S-SAD report sleeping longer in the summer than in the winter. No differences in seasonality of sleep were found between African and African American students. Students with winter SAD or S-SAD may need to sacrifice sleep duration in the winter, when their academic functioning/efficiency may be impaired by syndromal or subsyndromal depression, in order to meet seasonally increased academic demands. PMID:17619774

Volkov, Janna; Rohan, Kelly J; Yousufi, Samina M; Nguyen, Minh-Chau; Jackson, Michael A; Thrower, Courtney M; Postolache, Teodor T

2007-01-01

222

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS African-American Career World, http://www.eop.com/mags-AACW.php, is the  

E-print Network

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS African-American Career World, http://www.eop.com/mags-AACW.php, is the recruitment link between students and professionals who are African American trends, and role-model profiles that target the African-American community. Black

Arnold, Jonathan

223

Midlife development and menopause in African American and Caucasian women.  

PubMed

Little is known about factors that enhance midlife women's well-being and even less about whether these factors differ for African Americans and Caucasians. We conducted focus groups with 30 women, grouped by ethnicity and menopausal status. Women identified midlife as a time of opportunity for self-development. Pre/perimenopausal women expressed more fears about severe emotional changes than did their postmenopausal counterparts. These fears were in sharp contrast to the women's descriptions of enhanced self-esteem. Caucasian women were primarily concerned about menopause as a harbinger of physical aging and the ensuing disadvantage of divergence from society's ideal of a youthful appearance, while African American women viewed menopause as a normal, even welcome, part of life. A language of emancipation and awareness of gender bias were prominent in the women's stories regardless of menopausal status or race. Further study should assess the role that feminist insights may play in the well-being of midlife women. PMID:12148913

Sampselle, Carolyn M; Harris, Vanessa; Harlow, Sioban D; Sowers, MaryFran

2002-06-01

224

Measuring African American women's trust in provider during pregnancy.  

PubMed

Significant racial disparities exist in pregnancy outcomes, but few researchers have examined the relationship between trust in providers and pregnancy outcomes. The Trust in Physician Scale (TPS), the most widely used tool, has not been tested in pregnancy. We assessed the psychometric properties of the TPS and identified correlates of trust in 189 pregnant African American women. Evidence supports internal consistency reliability (>.85) and internal structure of the TPS (CFI = .97; RMSEA = .05; ?(2) (42) = 65.93, p = .001), but TPS scores did not predict pregnancy outcomes. African American women reported a high level of trust in obstetric providers. Trust did not differ by provider type (physician or midwife) but was related to the women's history of perceived racism and strength of ethnic identity. PMID:24395526

Peters, Rosalind M; Benkert, Ramona; Templin, Thomas N; Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E

2014-04-01

225

The effects of African-centered education on the achievement motivation of African American students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The education of African American students has been the subject of research and investigation for more than 50 years. As a result of historical practices, African American students have been subdued by academic apathy. Major discrepancies have been noted in academic achievement between African American and Caucasian students. This study compared achievement motivation of African American students who receive an

Jay B Marks

2005-01-01

226

African Americans: Diverse People, Diverse Career Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifies the many subgroups within the African-American population and suggests guidelines for career counseling with different subcultures: rural and urban lower class, middle class, and underclass. (SK)

Kimbrough, Verna D.; Salomone, Paul R.

1993-01-01

227

Statistical Profile of Older African Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... with non-relatives, and 39 percent lived alone. INCOME AND POVERTY Households containing families headed by African Americans age 65 and over reported a median income in 2012 of $40,348. The A Statistical ...

228

Improving Cancer Outcomes for African-Americans  

Cancer.gov

Improving Cancer Outcomes for African-Americans New Hanover Regional Medical Center Coastal Area Health Education Center University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of North Carolina at Wilmington Report given at the Program Steering Committee

229

African American Community Mental Health Fact Sheet  

MedlinePLUS

... 12 percent of the U.S. population. People experiencing homelessness are at a greater risk of developing a mental illness. • Nearly half of all prisoners in the United States are African American. Prison inmates ...

230

Improving Cancer Outcomes for African Americans  

Cancer.gov

Improving Cancer Outcomes for African Americans Update for RTOG in Miami Jan 20, 2006 Patrick D. Maguire, MD New Hanover Regional (NHRMC) Update for NHRMC January 20, 2006 I. Radiotherapy (RT) Clinical Trials II. Publications III. Partnership & Telesynergy IV. Patient

231

Improving Cancer Outcomes for African Americans  

Cancer.gov

Improving Cancer Outcomes for African Americans Update for RTOG in Tampa Feb 2, 2007 Patrick D. Maguire, MD New Hanover Regional (NHRMC) Update for NHRMC Feb 2, 2007 I. Radiotherapy (RT) Clinical Trials II. Publications III. Partnership & Telesynergy IV. Patient

232

Ethnic Differences in Sleep Quality Accompany Ethnic Differences in Night-time Blood Pressure Dipping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: African Americans exhibit a smaller nocturnal decrease in blood pressure (BP) than whites, and there are also reports of poorer sleep quality among African Americans. We examined the contribution of sleep quality to ethnic differences in BP dipping in African American and white male and female college students. We hypothesized that African Americans would exhibit blunted nocturnal BP dipping

Joel W. Hughes; Ihori Kobayashi; Nathan T. Deichert

2007-01-01

233

Experiences and Perspectives of African-American, Latina/o, Asian-American and European-American Psychology Graduate Students: A National Study  

PubMed Central

A national, web-based survey of 1,222 African-American, Latina/o, Asian-American and European-American psychology graduate students revealed both similarities and differences in experiences and perspectives. Mentoring was found to be the strongest predictor of satisfaction across groups. Academic supports and barriers, along with perceptions of diversity were also important predictors of satisfaction. Students of color differed from European-American students in perceptions of fairness of representation of their ethnic group within psychology, and in aspects of the graduate school experience perceived as linked to ethnicity. Limitations of the study and implications for future research and action are discussed. PMID:21341899

Maton, Kenneth I.; Wimms, Harriette E.; Grant, Sheila K.; Wittig, Michele A.; Rogers, Margaret R.; Vasquez, Melba J. T.

2013-01-01

234

African-Americans and HIV Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

African-Americans are significantly overrepresented among individuals with HIV\\/AIDS in the USA. This fact has been well documented\\u000a and publicized.1 It is much less well known that African-Americans are underrepresented in research on HIV\\/AIDS in the USA. A recent search\\u000a of publications listed on Medline revealed over 94,000 articles published between 1996 and July 2008 in the area of HIV-1\\u000a and

Kimberly Smith; William D. King

235

75 FR 6081 - National African American History Month, 2010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...America A Proclamation In the centuries since African Americans first arrived on our shores, they have known the...the hope of progress, and the triumph of the American Dream. African American history is an essential thread of the...

2010-02-05

236

Asian American Studies Department College of Ethnic Studies  

E-print Network

Asian American Studies Department College of Ethnic Studies San Francisco State University Retention, Tenure, and Promotion Reviews Department Evaluation Criteria The following Asian American Studies and by the University Provost, Academic Affairs on April 8, 2011. The Asian American Studies Department expects its

237

African American Women, Hair Care, and Health Barriers  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The objective of this study was to elucidate the prevalence of hair loss among African American women; explore the psychosocial impact of hair grooming difficulties; and examine both perceptions related to physician encounters in this group and the relationship between hair grooming, physical activity, and weight maintenance. Design: An anonymous retrospective and qualitative survey, the Hair Care Assessment Survey, is an 18-question novel survey instrument designed at the Henry Ford Hospital Department of Dermatology Multicultural Dermatology Center. Setting: The Hair Care Assessment Survey was distributed at church-related functions at predominantly African American metropolitan Detroit churches. Participants: Two hundred African American women from metropolitan Detroit, Michigan, aged 21 to 83. Measurements: The Hair Care Assessment Survey collected data relating to hair loss and hair care, psychosocial experiences relating to hair loss, and hair care as it relates to exercise and body weight management. Data was collected on doctor-patient hair-related medical visits and experiences with commercially available ethnic hair care products. Results: More than 50 percent reported excessive hair loss. Twenty-eight percent had visited a physician to discuss hair issues, but only 32 percent felt their physician understood African American hair. Forty-five percent reported avoiding exercise because of hair concerns, and 22 percent felt that their hair impeded maintaining healthy body weight. Conclusion: Hair loss affects a compelling number of African American women, and a significant number express dissatisfaction in hair-related physician encounters. Additionally, hair styling problems present a serious impediment to physical activity and weight management among this already high-risk population. PMID:25276273

Mahan, Meredith Grace

2014-01-01

238

Factors influencing enrollment of African Americans in the Look AHEAD trial  

PubMed Central

Background Many factors have been identified that influence the recruitment of African Americans into clinical trials; however, the influence of eligibility criteria may not be widely appreciated. We used the experience from the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) trial screening process to examine the differential impact eligibility criteria had on the enrollment of African Americans compared to other volunteers. Methods Look AHEAD is a large randomized clinical trial to examine whether assignment to an intensive lifestyle intervention designed to produce and maintain weight loss reduces the long-term risk of major cardiovascular events in adults with type 2 diabetes. Differences in the screening, eligibility, and enrollment rates between African Americans and members of other racial/ethnic groups were examined to identify possible reasons. Results Look AHEAD screened 28,735 individuals for enrollment, including 6226 (21.7%) who were self-identified African Americans. Of these volunteers, 12.9% of the African Americans compared to 19.3% of all other screenees ultimately enrolled (p < 0.001). African Americans no more often than others were lost to follow-up or refused to attend clinic visits to establish eligibility. Furthermore, the enrollment rates of individuals with histories of cardiovascular disease and diabetes therapy did not markedly differ between the ethnic groups. Higher prevalence of adverse levels of blood pressure, heart rate, HbA1c, and serum creatinine among African American screenees accounted for the greater proportions excluded (all p < 0.001). Conclusions Compared to non-African Americans, African American were more often ineligible for the Look AHEAD trial due to comorbid conditions. Monitoring trial eligibility criteria for differential impact, and modifying them when appropriate, may ensure greater enrollment yields. PMID:22064686

Mount, David L; Davis, Cralen; Kennedy, Betty; Raatz, Susan; Dotson, Kathy; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L; Thomas, Sheikilya; Johnson, Karen C; Espeland, Mark A

2013-01-01

239

Ethnic identity and mental health in American Indian youth: examining mediation pathways through self-esteem, and future optimism.  

PubMed

Mental health functioning in American Indian youth is an understudied topic. Given the increased rates of depression and anxiety in this population, further research is needed. Using multiple group structural equation modeling, the current study illuminates the effect of ethnic identity on anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, and externalizing behavior in a group of Lumbee adolescents and a group of Caucasian, African American, and Latino/Hispanic adolescents. This study examined two possible pathways (i.e., future optimism and self-esteem) through which ethnic identity is associated with adolescent mental health. The sample (N = 4,714) is 28.53% American Indian (Lumbee) and 51.38% female. The study findings indicate that self-esteem significantly mediated the relationships between ethnic identity and anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, and externalizing behavior for all racial/ethnic groups (i.e., the total sample). Future optimism significantly mediated the relationship between ethnic identity and externalizing behavior for all racial/ethnic groups and was a significant mediator between ethnic identity and depressive symptoms for American Indian youth only. Fostering ethnic identity in all youth serves to enhance mental health functioning, but is especially important for American Indian youth due to the collective nature of their culture. PMID:23929530

Smokowski, Paul R; Evans, Caroline B R; Cotter, Katie L; Webber, Kristina C

2014-03-01

240

Lactose intolerance and health disparities among African Americans and Hispanic Americans: an updated consensus statement.  

PubMed

Dairy foods contribute nine essential nutrients to the diet including calcium, potassium and vitamin D; nutrients identified by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as being "of public health concern" within the U.S. population. Milk and milk product intake is associated with better diet quality and has been associated with a reduced risk of chronic diseases or conditions including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and osteoporosis. Some research also indicates dairy food intake may be linked to reduced body fat, when accompanied by energy-restriction. On average, both African Americans and Hispanic Americans consume less than the recommended levels of dairy foods, and perceived or actual lactose intolerance can be a primary reason for limiting or avoiding dairy intake. True lactose intolerance prevalence is not known because healthcare providers do not routinely measure for it, and no standardized assessment method exists. Avoiding dairy may lead to shortfalls of essential nutrients and increased susceptibility to chronic disease. This updated Consensus Statement aims to provide the most current information about lactose intolerance and health, with specific relevance to the African American and Hispanic American communities. Topics covered include diagnostic considerations, actual and recommended dairy food intake and levels of consumption of key dairy nutrients among African Americans and Hispanic Americans; prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance among various racial/ethnic groups; the association between dairy food intake, lactose intolerance and chronic disease; and research-based management recommendations for those with lactose intolerance. PMID:24079212

Bailey, Rahn K; Fileti, Cecelia Pozo; Keith, Jeanette; Tropez-Sims, Susanne; Price, Winston; Allison-Ottey, Sharon Denise

2013-01-01

241

African American College Women in the San Francisco Bay Area: Perceptions of Cross's Nigrescence Model and Potential Leadership Style  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although more African American women are pursuing a college education, how are they coping with their double minority status on predominantly White college campuses? As they become more aware of their identity, how does their interaction change with students and groups of a different ethnic background? The possible relationship between ethnic

Picou-Broadnax, Amber

2010-01-01

242

Family Interactions Among African American Prostate Cancer Survivors  

PubMed Central

Prostate cancer affects African Americans at a higher rate than any other ethnic group in the United States. Prostate cancer does not only affect the man with the disease but also affects those individuals who are closest to him, such as his family and friends. Open communication is valuable in coping with stressors that are affiliated with chronic illnesses. This article focuses on family and friend social support of men with prostate cancer. Data analysis revealed that support from family members and friends plays an important role in how men cope with their treatment and recovery from prostate cancer. PMID:18552602

Jones, Randy A.; Taylor, Ann Gill; Bourguignon, Cheryl; Steeves, Richard; Fraser, Gertrude; Lippert, Marguerite; Theodorescu, Dan; Mathews, Holly; Kilbridge, Kerry Laing

2009-01-01

243

Caveats in the neuropsychological assessment of African Americans.  

PubMed Central

This preliminary investigation examined the predictive accuracy of six neuropsychological tests in a population of non-brain-injured African Americans. False positives were unacceptably high on five of the neuropsychological tests administered. These pilot data raise important questions about the utility of neuropsychological test norms with groups dissimilar in sociocultural background to the normative population. These findings are examined in terms of the relative merits of the race-homogenous and race-comparative paradigms and underscore the importance of conducting normative studies that involve ethnic minority populations. PMID:12126285

Campbell, Alfonso L.; Ocampo, Carlota; DeShawn Rorie, Kashemi; Lewis, Sonya; Combs, Shawn; Ford-Booker, Phyllis; Briscoe, Juanita; Lewis-Jack, Ometha; Brown, Andrew; Wood, Don; Dennis, Gary; Weir, Roger; Hastings, Alicia

2002-01-01

244

Black versus BlackThe Relationships among African, African American, and African Caribbean Persons  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is based on a survey examining the relationships among continental African, African American, and African Caribbean persons. Relationships were explored in terms of contact and friendship, travel to countries of the diaspora, cross-cultural communications, thoughts and stereotypes, and education involving knowledge of the diaspora. The outcome of this survey points to the need for more Afrocentric education in

Jennifer V. Jackson; Mary E. Cothran

2003-01-01

245

Acute Coronary Syndrome in African Americans and Hispanic Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among African Americans and Hispanics in the United States, coronary heart disease (CHD) is highly prevalent and is the single\\u000a most frequent cause of myocardial infarction and death in that population [1]. However, multiple factors contribute to overall\\u000a poorer care and worse outcomes among African Americans and Hispanics when compared with whites. These factors include difference\\u000a in disease manifestation, socioeconomic

Tseday Sirak; Simbo Chiadika; Matthew Daka; Claude Simon

246

Research with African Americans: Lessons Learned about Recruiting African American Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors briefly explore literature related to recruiting African American research participants, reflect on their experiences conducting body image research with a sample of African American college women in an earlier study (S. Kashubeck-West et al., 2008), and discuss some methodological and cultural challenges that they encountered during…

Coker, Angela D.; Huang, Hsin-Hsin; Kashubeck-West, Susan

2009-01-01

247

Teaching African American Youth: Learning from the Lives of Three African American Social Studies Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the life histories of three African American social studies teachers, focusing on the evolution and changes in their identities, perspectives, and attitudes related to their profession and instructional practice. In addition, the study addresses the significance of the teachers' racialized experiences as African Americans and…

McBride, Chantee Earl

2010-01-01

248

Prosodic Rhythm and African American English  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prosodic rhythm was measured for a sample of 20 African American and 20 European American speakers from North Carolina using the metric devised by Low, Grabe, and Nolan (2000), which involves comparisons of the durations of vowels in adjacent syllables. In order to gain historical perspective, the same technique was applied to the ex-slave recordings described in Bailey, Maynor, and

Erik R. Thomas; Phillip M. Carter

2006-01-01

249

A comparison of type 2 diabetes risk allele load between African Americans and European Americans.  

PubMed

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is greater in populations of African descent compared to European-descent populations. Genetic risk factors may underlie the disparity in disease prevalence. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >60 common genetic variants that contribute to T2D risk in populations of European, Asian, African and Hispanic descent. These studies have not comprehensively examined population differences in cumulative risk allele load. To investigate the relationship between risk allele load and T2D risk, 46 T2D single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 43 loci from GWAS in European, Asian, and African-derived populations were genotyped in 1,990 African Americans (n = 963 T2D cases, n = 1,027 controls) and 1,644 European Americans (n = 719 T2D cases, n = 925 controls) ascertained and recruited using a common protocol in the southeast United States. A genetic risk score (GRS) was constructed from the cumulative risk alleles for each individual. In African American subjects, risk allele frequencies ranged from 0.024 to 0.964. Risk alleles from 26 SNPs demonstrated directional consistency with previous studies, and 3 SNPs from ADAMTS9, TCF7L2, and ZFAND6 showed nominal evidence of association (p < 0.05). African American individuals carried 38-67 (53.7 ± 4.0, mean ± SD) risk alleles. In European American subjects, risk allele frequencies ranged from 0.084 to 0.996. Risk alleles from 36 SNPs demonstrated directional consistency, and 10 SNPs from BCL11A, PSMD6, ADAMTS9, ZFAND3, ANK1, CDKN2A/B, TCF7L2, PRC1, FTO, and BCAR1 showed evidence of association (p < 0.05). European American individuals carried 38-65 (50.9 ± 4.4) risk alleles. African Americans have a significantly greater burden of 2.8 risk alleles (p = 3.97 × 10(-89)) compared to European Americans. However, GRS modeling showed that cumulative risk allele load was associated with risk of T2D in European Americans, but only marginally in African Americans. This result suggests that there are ethnic-specific differences in genetic architecture underlying T2D, and that these differences complicate our understanding of how risk allele load impacts disease susceptibility. PMID:25273842

Keaton, Jacob M; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N; Palmer, Nicholette D; Freedman, Barry I; Langefeld, Carl D; Ng, Maggie C Y; Bowden, Donald W

2014-12-01

250

The Effects of African American Women's Sexual Revictimization  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a study of African American women's sexual revictimization experiences in the context of historical and sociocultural factors. African American and White American women have been socialized differently about the history of race in America and stereotypes about who meets the societal-criteria's for rape victims today. In order to better understand the cumulative impact of African American women's

Gail Elizabeth Wyatt; Cindy M. Notgrass; Gwen Gordon

1995-01-01

251

Dialect Leveling and /ai/ Monopthongization among African American Detroiters.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents evidence that Detroit African Americans are participating in a recent sound change that is typically associated with some White but not African American varieties in the American South. Reports a leveling pattern in which /ai/ monothongization has expanded to the salient pre-voiceless context in Detroit African American English (AAE).…

Anderson, Bridget L.

2002-01-01

252

The Impact of Perceived Group Support on the Effectiveness of an HIV Prevention Intervention for African American Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The enormous HIV/AIDS disparity among African American women and women in other ethnic groups dictates the need to implement the most effective HIV prevention interventions. This study examined the impact of perceived group support on HIV protective behaviors (i.e., attitudes and behaviors related to condom use, alcohol, and drugs) of African

Belgrave, Faye Z.; Corneille, Maya; Hood, Kristina; Foster-Woodson, Julia; Fitzgerald, Angela

2010-01-01

253

African American Portrayals i A i M i l Th tin American Musical Theatre  

E-print Network

African American Portrayals i A i M i l Th tin American Musical Theatre 1920's-1930's Darlene M Delano History 600 (Macieski) American History in Song #12;African American Portrayals in American RenaissanceEffect of the Harlem Renaissance Progress made to advance the African American experience

New Hampshire, University of

254

Phenotypic Bias and Ethnic Identity in Filipino Americans*  

PubMed Central

Objective Links between phenotypes (skin tone, physical features) and a range of outcomes (income, physical health, psychological distress) were examined. Ethnic identity was examined as a protective moderator of phenotypic bias. Method Data were from a community sample of 2,092 Filipino adults in San Francisco and Honolulu. Results After controlling for age, nativity, marital status, and education, darker skin was associated with lower income and lower physical health for females and males. For females, more ethnic features were associated with lower income. For males, darker skin was related to lower psychological distress. One interaction was found such that females with more ethnic features exhibited lower distress; however, ethnic identity moderated distress levels of those with less ethnic features. Conclusions Phenotypic bias appears prevalent in Filipino Americans though specific effects vary by gender and skin color versus physical features. Discussion centers on the social importance of appearance and potential strengths gained from ethnic identification. PMID:20107617

Kiang, Lisa; Takeuchi, David T.

2009-01-01

255

Substance Abuse in African Americans: In Search of a Culturally Competent Research Agenda  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Healthy People 2010 guidelines identify substance abuse as a major public health problem in need of effective interventions for diverse populations including racial and ethnic minorities. However, the literature with regard to substance abuse in the African American community is rather scant. This article discusses the need for a research…

Sharma, Manoj; Atri, Ashutosh

2006-01-01

256

A Salutogenic Framework to Understand Disparity in Breast Cancer Screening Behavior in African American Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

African American women (AAW) have the highest breast cancer mortality rate than any other racial or ethnic group. Limited access to care reduces mammography screening for AAW. Despite barriers, some AAW engage in breast cancer screening (BCS) behaviors like mammography. The salutogenic theory of health focuses on positive health behaviors and offers a framework to understand personal factors which allow

Regina Conway-Phillips

2011-01-01

257

African-American School Counselors in Majority School Districts: A Qualitative Perspective of Their Lived Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation will focus on the lived experiences of African-American school counselors in majority school districts and the lack of retention among this population. The lack of retention and representation of ethnic minorities in the workforce has been the subject of much discussion throughout the United States (Ingersoll, 2004). The…

Wingate, Crystal Nicole

2011-01-01

258

An Evaluation of Sisters of Nia: A Cultural Program for African American Girls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the authors evaluated the effectiveness of a cultural intervention for increasing cultural values and beliefs. Fifty-nine African American girls in early adolescence participated in a 15-session cultural program or in an activity comparison group. Measures of ethnic identity, gender roles, and relational aggression were administered…

Belgrave, Faye Z.; Reed, Melba C.; Plybon, Laura E.; Butler, Deborah S.; Allison, Kevin W.; Davis, Trina

2004-01-01

259

African-American and Latino Views of Local Chicago TV News  

Microsoft Academic Search

African-Americans and Latinos make up about 60% of Chicago's population. This research looks at how these groups view local TV news coverage of their communities. A random telephone survey of 340 blacks and bilingual Latinos reveals that only 35% think their race or ethnic group is accurately portrayed on local TV news. They rate local news as \\

Cynthia C. Linton; Robert K. LeBailly

260

Physical Activity among African American Women: Change and Ways of Knowing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research has grown in the 21st century regarding the physical activity patterns of racial and ethnic minorities. Although more is now known about some groups, disparities in health have not diminished. The purpose of this paper is to further explore the research about physical activity for African American women and suggest ways that future…

Henderson, Karla A.

2011-01-01

261

Will I Ever Teach? Latino and African American Students’ Perspectives on PRAXIS I  

Microsoft Academic Search

This longitudinal study examined the PRAXIS I experiences of African American and Latino undergraduates seeking admission into teacher education at a Big Ten university. Participants were 44 students selected from a larger sample enrolled in a recruitment and support program aimed at members of underrepresented minority groups. The theoretical framework included ethnic identity development, stereotype threat, cultural continuity\\/discontinuity, and bias

Christine I. Bennett; Lynn M. McWhorter; John A. Kuykendall

2006-01-01

262

African American and Caucasian Preschoolers' Use of Decontextualized Language: Literate Language Features in Oral Narratives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Low-income preschoolers' use of literate language features in oral narratives across three age groups (3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds) and two ethnic groups (Caucasian and African American) was examined. Method: Sixty-seven preschoolers generated a story using a wordless picture book. The literate language features examined were simple and…

Curenton, Stephanie M.; Justice, Laura M.

2004-01-01

263

Influence of Family Perceptions of Acting White on Acculturative Stress in African American College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined family-oriented stressors on acculturative stress in 83 African American college students attending a predominately White university. Results showed that family pressure for participants not to acculturate, pressure to maintain ethnic group language, perception of Acting White, and acculturation level were related to higher…

Thompson, Keisha V.; Lightfoot, Nicole L.; Castillo, Linda G.; Hurst, Morgan L.

2010-01-01

264

Culturally Sensitive AIDS Educational Videos for African American Audiences: Effects of Source, Message, Receiver, and Context  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of using culturally sensitive educational materials in HIV-related interventions with racial and ethnic minority groups is widely recognized. However, little empirical research has been conducted to assess the relative effectiveness of different techniques for creating culturally sensitive AIDS educational videos. Two field experiments with three samples of African American adults (N = 174, 173, and 143) were conducted

Gregory M. Herek; J. Roy Gillis; Eric K. Glunt; Jeffrey Lewis; David Welton; John P. Capitanio

1998-01-01

265

Parental Factors that Influence the Career Development of College-Bound African American High School Seniors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parents have been identified as being the most influential factor upon their children career development. There are various factors that influence the career development of individuals from different ethnic backgrounds. The purpose of the study was to identify parental factors that influence the career development of college-bound African American

Bostic, Shenice S.

2010-01-01

266

Perceived Racism and Career Self-Efficacy in African American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

African American adolescents' perceptions of racism and career self-efficacy relationships are examined. Participants in a southwestern urban high school completed the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure, Racism and Life Experiences Scale-Personal and -Group, and career decision and career task self-efficacy scales. Results indicate that…

Rollins, Vanessa B.; Valdez, Jesse N.

2006-01-01

267

Critical Race Theory as an Analytical Tool: African American Male Success in Doctoral Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While access to higher education for racial and ethnic minorities improved over the last half of the 20th century, the percentage of these populations obtaining terminal degrees does not approach their respective percentage of society at large. By interviewing five African American males who completed a doctoral program at a Majority White…

Ballard, Harlan E.; Cintron, Rosa

2010-01-01

268

Culturally Distinctive and Academic Socialization: Direct and Interactive Relationships with African American Adolescents' Academic Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Theories of ethnic minority development have largely suggested that African American parents engage in a combination of practices that include culturally distinctive socialization as well as behaviors that are characteristic of more universal forms of academic socialization. However, few studies have examined how these socialization dimensions…

Cooper, Shauna M.; Smalls, Ciara

2010-01-01

269

Oppression through the Eyes of a Haitian Americans and African American Male Students Oppression is an issue still facing ethnic minority groups in the United States (Watts, 2002). The present  

E-print Network

is an issue still facing ethnic minority groups in the United States (Watts, 2002). The present study analyzed at Colorado State University as a doctoral student in Applied Developmental Science under the Human and educate the working poor and homeless. #12;

Boone, Randall B.

270

We fall down: the African American experience of coping with the homicide of a loved one.  

PubMed

Rates of homicide among African Americans are much higher than those of other racial or ethnic groups. Research has demonstrated that homicide can be psychologically debilitating for surviving family members. Yet, exploring the experiences of homicide victims’ surviving loved ones has received little attention. This study examined the coping strategies of African American survivors of homicide. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 8 African American family members (ages 18-82) of homicide victims. Survivors were recruited from the Massachusetts Office of Victim Services and from homicide survivor support, school, and community groups throughout the New England area. Interviews were conducted using open-ended questions derived from coping, support network, grief, and bereavement literatures. Results indicate that the primary coping strategies utilized by African American survivors of homicide victims are spiritual coping and meaning making, maintaining a connection to the deceased, collective coping and caring for others, and concealment. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:22073426

Sharpe, Tanya L; Boyas, Javier

2011-01-01

271

Suicide acceptability in African- and white Americans: the role of religion.  

PubMed

Rates of suicidal behavior are lower among African- than white Americans. We analyzed the association of suicide acceptability with religious, sociodemographic, and emotional variables in representative samples of African- and white Americans (1990). Adjusted for ethnic response bias, the former were less accepting of suicide than the latter (odds ratio .60; 95% confidence interval .41, .88). Orthodox religious beliefs and personal devotion predicted rejection of suicide best; this effect was equally strong in both groups. The comparatively low level of suicide acceptability among African-Americans was mostly attributable to their relatively high levels of orthodox religious beliefs and devotion, as opposed to practice and affiliation, although sociodemographic and emotional differences contributed as well. These results are interpreted using the cognitive dissonance model. Given rapid secularization among the young in the United States, these findings may help explain the rising suicide rates among white and, especially, African-American young people. PMID:9457142

Neeleman, J; Wessely, S; Lewis, G

1998-01-01

272

HIV/AIDS stigma and religiosity among African American women.  

PubMed

African American women are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS compared with other ethnicities, accounting for two-thirds (67%) of all women diagnosed with HIV. Despite their increased risk of HIV infection, few studies have been conducted to understand culture-specific factors leading to their vulnerability. Given the central role of religious organizations in African American communities, this study explored whether and to what extent religiosity plays a role in stigma toward HIV/AIDS. Results of hierarchical regression showed that after controlling for key factors, religiosity was a significant factor predicting the level of religious stigma. Those with high religiosity displayed significantly higher stigma, associating HIV/AIDS with a curse or punishment from God. Verbatim responses to an open-ended question also revealed seemingly ingrained prejudice against HIV/AIDS from a religious perspective. The findings point to the important role of faith-based organizations (FBOs) in addressing HIV/AIDS issues within African American communities. PMID:20574877

Muturi, Nancy; An, Soontae

2010-06-01

273

Examining Cultural Socialization Within African American and European American Households  

Microsoft Academic Search

This preliminary study explored the cultural socialization processes of 227 African American and European American parents of elementary schoolchildren. The Cultural Value Socialization Scales (K. M. Tyler, A. W. Boykin, C. M. Boelter, & M. L. Dillihunt, 2005) were used to garner parents' reports of their cultural value socialization activities at home. The scales contained written vignettes depicting persons involved

Kenneth M. Tyler; Monica L. Dillihunt; A. Wade Boykin; Sean T. Coleman; Darla M. Scott; Christina M. B. Tyler; Eric A. Hurley

2008-01-01

274

Are You at Risk for Oral Cancer? What African American Men Need to Know  

MedlinePLUS

... At Risk for Oral Cancer? What African American Men Need to Know Main Content Are African American ... do if you have symptoms? Are African American men at risk for oral cancer? Yes, African American ...

275

Trichomonas vaginalis, HIV, and African-Americans.  

PubMed Central

Trichomonas vaginalis may be emerging as one of the most important cofactors in amplifying HIV transmission, particularly in African-American communities of the United States. In a person co-infected with HIV, the pathology induced by T. vaginalis infection can increase HIV shedding. Trichomonas infection may also act to expand the portal of entry for HIV in an HIV-negative person. Studies from Africa have suggested that T. vaginalis infection may increase the rate of HIV transmission by approximately twofold. Available data indicate that T. vaginalis is highly prevalent among African-Americans in major urban centers of the United States and is often the most common sexually transmitted infection in black women. Even if T. vaginalis increases the risk of HIV transmission by a small amount, this could translate into an important amplifying effect since Trichomonas is so common. Substantial HIV transmission may be attributable to T. vaginalis in African-American communities of the United States. PMID:11747718

Sorvillo, F.; Smith, L.; Kerndt, P.; Ash, L.

2001-01-01

276

Ancestry-informative markers for African Americans based on the Affymetrix Pan-African genotyping array  

PubMed Central

Genetic admixture has been utilized as a tool for identifying loci associated with complex traits and diseases in recently admixed populations such as African Americans. In particular, admixture mapping is an efficient approach to identifying genetic basis for those complex diseases with substantial racial or ethnic disparities. Though current advances in admixture mapping algorithms may utilize the entire panel of SNPs, providing ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) that can differentiate parental populations and estimate ancestry proportions in an admixed population may particularly benefit admixture mapping in studies of limited samples, help identify unsuitable individuals (e.g., through genotyping the most informative ancestry markers) before starting large genome-wide association studies (GWAS), or guide larger scale targeted deep re-sequencing for determining specific disease-causing variants. Defining panels of AIMs based on commercial, high-throughput genotyping platforms will facilitate the utilization of these platforms for simultaneous admixture mapping of complex traits and diseases, in addition to conventional GWAS. Here, we describe AIMs detected based on the Shannon Information Content (SIC) or Fst for African Americans with genome-wide coverage that were selected from ?2.3 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covered by the Affymetrix Axiom Pan-African array, a newly developed genotyping platform optimized for individuals of African ancestry. PMID:25392759

Zhang, Xu; Mu, Wenbo; Liu, Cong

2014-01-01

277

78 FR 34241 - African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2013  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proclamation 8992--African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2013 Presidential...8992 of May 31, 2013 African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2013 By the President...lasting freedom. Through every generation, music has reflected and renewed our...

2013-06-06

278

Addressing the lack of Baseball Consumption amongst African Americans  

E-print Network

target market as a viable consumer base. As such, marketers should understand what factors encourage African Americans to consume sport, and what factors deter African Americans from consuming baseball. Thus, the purpose of my study was to advance...

Brown, Brandon Leigh

2013-08-06

279

A Qualitative Description of African American Women's Breastfeeding Experiences  

E-print Network

The low rates of breastfeeding among African American women in the U.S. is a poorly understood, persistent disparity that contributes to higher incidences of morbidity and mortality for African Americans across the lifespan. Understanding how...

Spencer, Becky

2012-08-31

280

HIV/AIDS Frames in African-American Media.  

E-print Network

??African-Americans are disproportionately affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. HIV/AIDS coverage in one African-American print medium, Essence magazine, was analyzed from August 2000 to August 2010.… (more)

Hawkins, Endira

2012-01-01

281

Promoting positive youth development by examining the career and educational aspirations of African American males: implications for designing educational programs.  

PubMed

African American males experience poor academic performance, high absenteeism at school, and are at increased risk of being involved in violence than other racial groups. Given that the educational outlook for African American males appears bleak, it is important to assess the aspirations of these adolescent males in order to find the gap between aspirations and educational attainment. In order to promote positive development within this population, it is essential that factors that affect African American males be identified. A survey was administered to male students attending elementary, middle, and high schools in a local school district. A cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the career and educational aspirations of African American males. A total of 473 males were surveyed: 45% African American, 22% Caucasian, 13% biracial, and 19% Other (including Asian American, Hispanic, Native American). The results revealed that African American males aspired to attend college at the same rate as other ethnic groups. Also, African American males were more likely to aspire to be professional athletes than males from other ethnic groups. Important factors to consider when designing a program are discussed as well as future research and limitations. PMID:21992020

Lee, Felecia A; Lewis, Rhonda K; Sly, Jamilia R; Carmack, Chakema; Roberts, Shani R; Basore, Polly

2011-10-01

282

Genome-Wide Association of BMI in African Americans  

PubMed Central

Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple novel loci associated with obesity in Europeans but results in other ethnicities are less convincing. Here, we report a two-stage GWAS of BMI in African Americans. The GWAS was performed using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform in 816 nondiabetic and 899 diabetic nephropathy subjects. 746,626 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for association with BMI after adjustment for age, gender, disease status, and population structure. Sixty high scoring SNPs that showed nominal association in both GWAS cohorts were further replicated in 3,274 additional subjects in four replication cohorts and a meta-analysis was computed. Meta-analysis of 4,989 subjects revealed five SNPs (rs6794092, rs268972, rs2033195, rs815611, and rs6088887) at four loci showing consistent associations in both GWAS (P < 0.0001) and replication cohorts (P < 0.05) with combined P values range from 2.4 × 10?6 to 5 × 10?5. These loci are located near PP13439-TMEM212, CDH12, MFAP3-GALNT10, and FER1L4 and had effect sizes between 0.091 and 0.167 s.d. unit (or 0.67–1.24 kg/m2) of BMI for each copy of the effect allele. Our findings suggest the presence of novel loci potentially associated with adiposity in African Americans. Further replication and meta-analysis in African Americans and other populations will shed light on the role of these loci in different ethnic populations. PMID:21701570

Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Hester, Jessica M.; Wing, Maria R.; Li, Jiang; Xu, Jianzhao; Hicks, Pamela J.; Roh, Bong H.; Lu, Lingyi; Divers, Jasmin; Langefeld, Carl D.; Freedman, Barry I.; Palmer, Nichole D.; Bowden, Donald W.

2012-01-01

283

Alcohol Dependence and Health Care Utilization in African Americans  

PubMed Central

Objective Ethnic and cultural differences in patterns of alcohol use disorders must be understood in order to address improvement in prevention of such disorders and accessibility to health care services. The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors that influence the utilization of medical and mental health services among alcohol-dependent and non alcohol–dependent African Americans. Method A cohort of 454 African Americans was evaluated. Alcohol-dependent participants were recruited from various inpatient treatment facilities in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area and through advertisement and word of mouth. Non–alcohol-dependent participants were recruited by advertisements. Each participant was administered the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism to assess alcohol dependency and the Family History Assessment module to access family history of alcoholism. ?2 Test and analysis of variance were used to analyze the data. Results Alcohol dependence was more prevalent among men, those with lower income, those with less education, and they utilized mental health counseling as opposed to medical-based therapy. Increased reports of medical conditions such as migraine (p < .001), loss of consciousness (p = .001), and sexually transmitted diseases (p < .001) were also associated with alcohol dependency. Other factors, including visits to inpatient treatment programs, were directly related to incidence of alcohol dependency regardless of gender status (p < .001). Conclusions This study suggests an association exists among alcohol dependence, medical conditions, health care, and mental care utilization among African Americans. Future research may benefit from investigating if an association exists between alcohol use disorders and health care utilization for other ethnic groups. PMID:23862295

Marshall, Vanessa J.; Kalu, Nnenna; Kwagyan, John; Scott, Denise M.; Cain, Gloria E.; Hill, Karen; Hesselbrock, Victor; Ferguson, Clifford L.; Taylor, Robert E.

2013-01-01

284

Glomerular hyperfiltration in hypertensive African Americans.  

PubMed

The incidence of end-stage renal disease attributable to hypertension is 5-fold greater in African Americans than in whites. To determine whether glomerular hyperfiltration is an antecedent to renal failure, we compared responses of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate to graded infusions of norepinephrine (0. 01, 0.025, and 0.05 microg. kg(-1). min(-1) for 30 minutes each) in 29 African Americans and 33 age-matched French Canadian whites with essential hypertension. Renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate were measured by using a constant-infusion technique of PAH and inulin, respectively. Studies were conducted on an inpatient clinical research center, and antihypertensive medications had been discontinued for at least 1 week. Based on 24-hour blood pressure monitoring, nighttime blood pressures decreased (P<0.01) in the French Canadians but not in the African Americans. Baseline renal blood flow was higher (P<0.05) in the African Americans (1310+/-127 mL. min(-1) per 1.73 m(2)) than in the French Canadians (1024+/-42 mL. min(-1) per 1.73 m(2)); baseline glomerular filtration rate was also higher (P<0.01) in the African Americans (140+/-4 versus 121+/-4 mL. min(-1) per 1.73 m(2)). In response to norepinephrine-induced blood pressure increases, renal blood flow was autoregulated and did not change in either patient group. In the African Americans, glomerular filtration rate increased (P<0.01) to 167 mL. min(-1) per 1.73 m(2) during the first norepinephrine infusion, without subsequent change. In contrast, glomerular filtration rate did not change with norepinephrine-induced increases of blood pressure in the French Canadians. In the African Americans, the elevation of baseline glomerular filtration rate, with a further increase in response to norepinephrine, may be indicative of glomerular hyperfiltration. Glomerular hyperfiltration and lack of nocturnal blood pressure decline may contribute to the higher incidence of end-stage renal disease in hypertensive African Americans. PMID:10720601

Kotchen, T A; Piering, A W; Cowley, A W; Grim, C E; Gaudet, D; Hamet, P; Kaldunski, M L; Kotchen, J M; Roman, R J

2000-03-01

285

Colorectal cancer knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors in African Americans.  

PubMed

Disparities in healthcare among racial and ethnic minorities are associated with poor outcomes. African Americans have the highest incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) among all racial groups. Using a nonrandom sample of 100 African American men and women, 50 years of age and older, the authors explored CRC knowledge, perceptions, and screening behaviors of African American men and women who resided or worked in an urban low-income housing residence. The extent to which screening may be attributed to demographic, sociopsychological, and structural variables was also investigated. Respondents demonstrated inadequate knowledge of CRC, with a significant difference in mean scores between males and females. Self-report of participation in CRC screening was above the national average, with almost half of the sample reporting fecal occult blood home kit use and more than half of the sample reporting completion of sigmoid and colonoscopy exams and double contrast barium enema exam. A majority perceived CRC as a threat. A very high percentage perceived numerous benefits to CRC screening in preventing CRC susceptibility. Perceived barriers of nearly half of the sample included screening may be painful and afraid to find out something is wrong if I have CRC screening, while more than half did not know how to schedule screening. Barriers and threat were correlated with grade school education. Barriers were negatively correlated with secondary education and post-secondary education and moderately correlated with threat. Predictor variables found in the Health Belief Model accounted for a significant amount of the variance in screening behavior, barriers, and threat. Older African American men and women need more information about CRC in order to increase their awareness of CRC and the importance of screening. There is a need to educate healthcare professionals about the causes, prevention, and detection of CRC and the importance of screening. PMID:15238806

Green, Pauline M; Kelly, Beatrice Adderley

2004-01-01

286

Health and Mental Health Policies' Role in Better Understanding and Closing African American-White American Disparities in Treatment Access and Quality of Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since publication of the U.S. Surgeon General's report "Mental Health: Culture, Race and Ethnicity--A Supplement to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General" (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2001), several federal initiatives signal a sustained focus on addressing African American-White American disparities in mental health…

Snowden, Lonnie R.

2012-01-01

287

EXPOSURE OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN YOUTH TO ALCOHOL ADVERTISING  

Microsoft Academic Search

The marketing of alcohol products in African-American communities has, on occasion, stirred national controversy and met with fierce resistance from African Americans and others. Charges of over-concentration of alcohol bill- boards in African-American neighbor- hoods have prompted protests and leg- islative fights in Chicago, Milwaukee, Baltimore, Los Angeles and elsewhere.1 Battles over the heavy marketing to the African-American community of

D. Jernigan; P. Wright; B. Gallegos; A. Tate; J. Streicker; M. Lee; J. F. Mosher

288

Postmodern Perspective on the Economics of African American Fatherhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

The economics of African American fatherhood have not been effectively conveyed to social work practitioners. The prevailing\\u000a assumption of African American fathers by practitioners is that they are absent or dysfunctional. Despite the existence of\\u000a successful African American fathers, bias in the literature and practice reinforce deficit models as African American. To\\u000a eliminate bias, social scientists and human service practitioners

Ronald E. Hall; Jonathan N. Livingston; Valerie V. Henderson; Glenn O. Fisher; Rebekah Hines

2007-01-01

289

Impact of Migration on African American Family Development and Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the short-and long-term influences of African American migration on the development and functioning of African American families and family relationships. Using existing research and the results from an ethnographic study of a large, African American, extended family, this article confirms the findings of previous studies and begins to examine the meaning and definition of contemporary types of

Pearl Stewart

2007-01-01

290

Exposure of African-American Youth to Alcohol Advertising.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The marketing of alcohol products in African-American communities has, on occasion, stirred national controversy and met with fierce resistance from African Americans and others. Despite occasional media and community spotlights on the marketing of alcohol products in the African-American community, there has been no systematic review of the…

2003

291

African American Youth: An Analysis of Political and Electoral Participation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Religion has traditionally been of great importance to the African American community. For as long as there has been religion in the African American community their have been scholarly debates on its role. Scholars have continuously argued the importance of religion in the development of African American consciousness and politics. Scholarship has also been divided on the impact of religion

James Garner II

292

African American Acculturation and Black Racial Identity: A Preliminary Investigation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the relationship between acculturation and racial identity among African Americans. One hundred eighty-seven African American students completed the Black Racial Identity Attitude Scale and the African American Acculturation Scale (AAAS). Acculturation was associated with three of the five AAAS subscales: Dissonance, Immersion, and…

Pope-Davis, Donald B.; Liu, William M.; Ledesma-Jones, Shannon; Nevitt, Jonathan

2000-01-01

293

African American Single Mothers Raising Sons: Implications for Family Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Being raised by a single mother is one factor that has been suggested as contributing to the plight of African American males. Yet few studies have focused specifically on African American single mothers' experiences with raising sons. This qualitative study explored the following questions: (1) What are the experiences of African American single mothers in the raising of their sons?

Ann L. Gantt; Geoffrey L. Greif

2009-01-01

294

Empowerment Groups for Urban African American Girls: A Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the author wanted to read Bemak, Chung, and Siroskey-Sabdo's article in an objective sense, her response to their article is most likely influenced by her own experiences as an African American female and mother of an African American daughter. To her, the paramount issue facing African American females is the double and sometimes triple…

Holcomb-McCoy, Cheryl C.

2005-01-01

295

African American Women's Emotional Responses to Breast Cancer1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is an emotionally challenging disease for women. Little is known about African American women's emotional responses to breast cancer. This exploratory study focuses on the emotional responses of African American women throughout their breast cancer experience. Sixty-six African American women, age 35 to 76, living in the southeastern United States participated in focus group interviews. There were five

Phyllis D. Morgan; Victoria Mock; Joshua Fogel

296

Family and Career Trajectories among African American Female Attorneys  

Microsoft Academic Search

Professional African American women are vastly understudied in sociology. We address that omission by examining how the intersection of race with the structure of elite, male-dominated occupations shapes family and work trajectories for a sample of 203 African American female attorneys. Like the general population of African American women, respondents with partners and with children do not seem to suffer

Mary Blair-Loy; Gretchen Dehart

2003-01-01

297

Barriers to Hospice Use among African Americans: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present review was undertaken to explore recent evidence in the professional literature pertaining to use of hospice services by African Americans. The article addresses the research methods that have been used to study African American hospice use, obstacles to African American participation in hospice that have been identified, and…

Washington, Karla T.; Bickel-Swenson, Denise; Stephens, Nathan

2008-01-01

298

Oral Cancer in African Americans: Addressing Health Disparities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To explore factors underlying African Americans' perceptions of oral cancer and the oral cancer exam. Study findings were used to guide development of oral cancer messages designed to increase oral cancer exams among African Americans. Methods: Focus groups were conducted to understand African Americans' attitudes and expectations…

Dodd, Virginia J.; Watson, Jennifer M.; Choi, Youjin; Tomar, Scott L.; Logan, Henrietta L.

2008-01-01

299

Resistance to Conversion to Islam Among African American Women Inmates  

Microsoft Academic Search

While the tendency to convert to Islam is common among African American male inmates, Islamic conversion among African American female inmates does not commonly occur. Educated estimates and telephone interviews with chaplains of major female correctional institutions in Florida and Alabama, indicate that Islamic conversion among African American female inmates is extremely low. Why is there such a stark contrast

Felecia Dix-Richardson

2002-01-01

300

CHRISTIAN ENCOUNTER WITH ISLAM AMONG AFRICAN AMERICANS IN PRISON  

Microsoft Academic Search

African American prison inmates convert to Islam at a rate faster than any other demographic group in the United States. In this paper, I focus on the Christian encounter with Islam among African Americans in prison. First I examine the wider demographic and historical context influencing the rise of Islam among prisoners. I trace the tendency of African American prisoners

David J. Feddes

301

The Economic Status of the African American Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the economic status of the African American family in Cleveland (Ohio) and in the United states as a whole and describes a model of interactions of social forces and economic factors that have influenced the declining earnings of African American families. The proportion of African American families in poverty in the United…

Reed, Wornie L.

302

Race, Culture, and the Education of African Americans  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this essay, Marvin Lynn explores a range of perspectives on African American education, with particular focus on three works: "Black American Students in an Affluent Suburb: A Study of Academic Disengagement," by social anthropologist John Ogbu; "African-Centered Pedagogy: Developing Schools of Achievement for African American Children," by…

Lynn, Marvin

2006-01-01

303

Going to School: The African-American Experience.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume presents the views of a range of African-American educators on questions related to African-American academic achievement. The concern in this volume is with the persistent, pervasive, and disproportionate underachievement of African-American students. The book is divided into four parts. Part 1, "Problem Identification," comprises the…

Lomotey, Kofi, Ed.

304

Perceptions of Domestic Violence: A Dialogue with African American Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although empirical research has accumulated over the past 20 years regarding African Americans and domestic violence, many questions remain about African American perceptions of domestic violence. This article explores African American women's perceptions about domestic violence through three focus groups held at a New York social services agency.…

Bent-Goodley, Tricia B.

2004-01-01

305

Understanding East Indians' Attitudes Toward African Americans: Do Mainstream Prejudicial Attitudes Transfer to Immigrants?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research—especially in the United States—has largely utilised a Black\\/White focus in studying intergroup attitudes, and has not sufficiently dealt with how racial\\/ethnic minority groups (including newer immigrants) view one another. To address this dearth in the literature, the present study investigates predictors of intergroup attitudes of one minority group (East Indian immigrants and Indian Americans) toward another (African Americans).

Cheri L. Philip; Ram Mahalingam; Robert M. Sellers

2010-01-01

306

An Intersectional Approach for Understanding Perceived Discrimination and Psychological Well-Being Among African American and Caribbean Black Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined whether combinations of ethnicity, gender, and age moderated the association between perceived discrimination and psychological well-being indicators (depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and life satisfaction) in a nationally representative sample of Black youth. The data were from the National Survey of American Life, which includes 810 African American and 360 Caribbean Black adolescents. The results indicated main effects

Eleanor K. Seaton; Cleopatra H. Caldwell; Robert M. Sellers; James S. Jackson

2010-01-01

307

“Brothers Gonna Work It Out:” Understanding the Pedagogic Performance of African American Male Teachers Working with African American Male Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing from ethnographic data, this paper explores how African American male teachers working with African American male\\u000a students performed their pedagogy. This paper highlights how teachers’ understanding of African American males social and\\u000a educational needs shaped their pedagogical performance. Interestingly however, teachers’ performance was contingent on the\\u000a diverse ways they imagined African American males should engage within their social and

Anthony L. Brown

2009-01-01

308

Approaches to Addressing Plagiarism Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies  

E-print Network

Approaches to Addressing Plagiarism Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies The Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies offers the following option for satisfying the English Composition requirement in the College of Arts and Sciences: AAAD-A141-A142 (4-4 cr

Indiana University

309

African American Studies & Research Center's 28th Symposium on African American  

E-print Network

in African American images in post World War II popular culture. Jolivette Anderson-Douoning is a native: Dr. Cornelius Bynum, Purdue University The Colonial Breast: Enlightenment Project and Revolutionary

Ginzel, Matthew

310

Heart rate and blood pressure responses to tobacco smoking among African-American adolescents.  

PubMed Central

Ethnic differences in both physiological response to and health consequences of tobacco smoking-some of which have been attributed to ethnic preferences for menthol cigarettes-have been described in the literature. We compared acute physiological responses to smoking in African-American and European-American adolescent menthol cigarette smokers seeking smoking cessation treatment. One-hundred- twenty-eight adolescents (32% African-American, 71% female; mean age 15.16 +/- 1.32 years, mean Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence (FTND) score 6.73 +/- 1.53, cigarettes per day (CPD) 16.9 +/- 2.64) participated in an experimental session during which they smoked one menthol cigarette of their usual brand. Blood pressure, heart rate, and exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations were measured before and after smoking; mean puff volume (mL), puff duration (sec) and maximal puff velocity (mL/sec) during smoking were also determined. Two sample t-tests were performed to assess ethnic differences in smoking topography; analysis of covariance was used to determine whether heart rate and blood pressure after smoking one menthol cigarette varied by ethnicity, after controlling for baseline physiological measures. No significant ethnic differences were observed in either smoking topography or acute cardiovascular response to smoking. These preliminary findings warrant extension to a broader group of nontreatment-seeking adolescent smokers of both ethnicities. PMID:15233486

Moolchan, Eric T.; Hudson, Darrell L.; Schroeder, Jennifer R.; Sehnert, Shelley S.

2004-01-01

311

N:\\redesign\\people\\African-Americans.doc 1 African-Americans at IIT  

E-print Network

colleges or attended Chicago's black high schools (Wendell Phillips and Dunbar served the African:\\redesign\\people\\African-Americans.doc 2 first black graduate of Armour, but he is shown in group class photos prior to 1901 with at least one other black classmate. Re Kent College and Chicago College of Law: These two schools, both started

Heller, Barbara

312

A Dynamic-Ecological Model of Identity Formation and Conflict among Bisexually-Behaving African-American Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding how ethnic, sexual, and masculine (ESM) identities form and possibly conflict among African-American men may\\u000a be important to consider in explaining bisexual behavior in this population. It is proposed that the bisexual behavior among\\u000a African-American who are primarily sexually attracted to other men may be a function of conflicting ESM identities. Comprehensively\\u000a understanding the formation and conflict of ESM

Patrick A. Wilson

2008-01-01

313

Social and cultural factors are related to perceived colorectal cancer screening benefits and intentions in African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Models that explain preventive behaviors, such as colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, do not account for social and cultural\\u000a factors relevant to African Americans. This exploratory study examined the relationship between socio-cultural factors (e.g.,\\u000a traditional acculturative strategy, group-based medical mistrust, physician ethnicity, and group-level perceptions of susceptibility)\\u000a and perceived benefits, perceived barriers, and CRC screening intentions among African Americans (N = 198; Age:

Jason Q. PurnellMira; Mira L. Katz; Barbara L. Andersen; Oxana Palesh; Colmar Figueroa-Moseley; Pascal Jean-Pierre; Nancy Bennett

2010-01-01

314

African-American Women’s Conceptualizations of Health Disparities: A Community-Based Participatory Research Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health disparities among African-American families represent a significant social problem. Nationally, African-American infants\\u000a have dramatically worse birth outcomes than other racial and ethnic groups. A Community-Based Participatory Research approach\\u000a was utilized to engage community residents. This study examined participants’ definitions of infant mortality, views on the\\u000a community impact of infant mortality, and strengths and vulnerabilities in the health care service

Tiffany D. Baffour; Jill M. Chonody

2009-01-01

315

Prenatal Care and Medical Risk in Low-Income, Primiparous, Mexican-Origin and African American Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purposes of this study are to assess selected prenatal factors that are associated with initiation of prenatal care for Mexican-origin and African American women, and to explore ethnic-specific differences in content of prenatal care at first visit, relationship with medical risk, and perceived medical risk. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 1,544 lowincome African American and Mexicanorigin women in 22

Ruth E. Zambrana; Susan C. M. Scrimshaw; Christine Dunkel-Schetter

1996-01-01

316

"O Brotha Where Art Thou?" Examining the Ideological Discourses of African American Male Teachers Working with African American Male Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the early 1990s, several researchers have found that African American teachers who are successful with African American students hold deep philosophical commitments to the concept of "social justice". While these scholars have convincingly articulated how "social justice" is a central feature of African American teachers' success with…

Brown, Anthony L.

2009-01-01

317

"Brothers Gonna Work It Out:" Understanding the Pedagogic Performance of African American Male Teachers Working with African American Male Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing from ethnographic data, this paper explores how African American male teachers working with African American male students performed their pedagogy. This paper highlights how teachers' understanding of African American males social and educational needs shaped their pedagogical performance. Interestingly however, teachers' performance was…

Brown, Anthony L.

2009-01-01

318

A Call to Action to Raise Achievement for African American Students. Student Achievement Policy Brief #1: African American Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One out of every six public school students in the U.S. is African American. The achievement of African American students as a group will have a significant impact on the nation's economic strength and social well-being. This brief looks at the performance of African American students on state reading and mathematics tests and considers the policy…

Kober, Nancy

2010-01-01

319

The myth of meritocracy and African American health.  

PubMed

Recent theoretical and empirical studies of the social determinants of health inequities have shown that economic deprivation, multiple levels of racism, and neighborhood context limit African American health chances and that African Americans' poor health status is predicated on unequal opportunity to achieve the American Dream. President Obama's election has been touted as a demonstration of American meritocracy-the belief that all may obtain the American Dream-and has instilled hope in African Americans. However, we argue that in the context of racism and other barriers to success, meritocratic ideology may act as a negative health determinant for African Americans. PMID:20724679

Kwate, Naa Oyo A; Meyer, Ilan H

2010-10-01

320

African American College Women's Suicide Buffers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To examine the relationships buffers may have with suicide ideation, 300 African American female college students completed measures of suicide ideation and buffers. Three variables accounted for a significant and unique portion of the variance in suicide ideation: family support, a view that suicide is unacceptable, and a collaborative religious…

Marion, Michelle S.; Range, Lillian M.

2003-01-01

321

Language and the African American Child  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How do children acquire African American English? How do they develop the specific language patterns of their communities? Drawing on spontaneous speech samples and data from structured elicitation tasks, this book explains the developmental trends in the children's language. It examines topics such as the development of tense/aspect marking,…

Green, Lisa J.

2011-01-01

322

Depressive Symptoms in African-American Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms in an African American female college student sample (n=78) using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI2) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). MMPI-2 was a more conservative scale than BDI in identifying depressive symptom levels. Discusses stress inoculation methods to assist…

Reed, Michael K.; And Others

1996-01-01

323

Advocacy on Behalf of African American Clients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oppression of African American people includes racism, sexism, and classism. Oppression is understood as a process that infuses prejudice with power. This power is then used to limit or hinder access to societal rights from those identified as lacking power. Advocacy is a process that defuses prejudice and attempts to redefine power by…

Sanders, Jo-Ann Lipford

324

2000 African American History Month Celebration Luncheon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Early Space Exploration Conference Center at the KSC Visitor Complex, the planning committee for the 2000 African American History Month Celebration Luncheon gather in the lobby. At the far left is Mack McKinney, chief, Programs Resources Management, who was chairperson for the event.

2000-01-01

325

African American Female Superintendents: Resilient School Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Six African American female superintendents who had served as superintendents in at least 2 school districts were interviewed to understand ways in which they responded to barriers and adversity in their roles, with a particular emphasis on issues related to sexism and racism. Study participants shared that they work to engage the community and…

Johnson, Bernadeia H.

2012-01-01

326

Identifying and Supporting Gifted African American Men.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the unique challenges faced by the gifted and talented Black man. Reviews issues of identifying gifted African-American male college students and factors affecting retention. Profiles the Meyerhoff Scholars Program at the University of Maryland. Outlines seven recommendations that address campuswide attitudes and practices impeding the…

Fries-Britt, Sharon

1997-01-01

327

Retaining African American Men Through Mentoring Initiatives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the benefits of mentoring for African-American male students. Profiles six successful mentoring programs, highlighting the success of the Faculty Mentor Program at the University of Louisville. Presents eight recommendations for viable, effective mentoring programs to promote the retention, academic achievement, and leadership…

LaVant, Bruce D.; Anderson, John L.; Tiggs, Joseph W.

1997-01-01

328

Paranoid Ideation among Elderly African American Persons.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A cross sectional study involving 998 independently living elderly African Americans used the Brief Symptom Inventory to measure paranoid ideation and 14 independent variables including demographic characteristics, cognitive deficit, and depression. Paranoid ideation was found in 10% of the sample. Regression analysis revealed 6 of 14 independent…

Bazargan, Mohsen; Bazargan, Shahrzad; King, Lewis

2001-01-01

329

African Americans in Television: An Afrocentric Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Proposes that, historically and contemporarily, African Americans were and are severely underrepresented in the Eurocentric press, portrayed stereotypically, depicted in low-status occupational roles, and denied news or public affairs programs to adequately serve their informational needs. Theories on mass media's impact on society and individuals…

Tait, Alice A.; Perry, Robert L.

1994-01-01

330

The Persistence of African American College Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the family dynamics of persistent African American college men. These students were typical Black males, not those pre-categorized as high-achieving or unprepared for college. The stories of participants revealed their strength, ambition, and intentions to successfully gain a baccalaureate degree. In general Black males are…

Beale, Tyson J.

2010-01-01

331

Growing Up African American in Catholic Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contributors to this volume use their own stories to demonstrate success of one institution, the Catholic school system, in educating many African Americans who have gone on to make important contributions to the community. Their own experiences are the starting points for their reflections on the historical and sociological treatment of the…

Irvine, Jacqueline Jordan, Ed.; Foster, Michele, Ed.

332

African American men constructing computing identity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many young African American males have a passion for video games, but they don't often translate that passion into learning about computing. Part of the problem is that they do not identify with computing as a social norm within their peer group. This disidentification with computing can negatively impact academic performance and limit opportunities for upward mobility. We developed a

Betsy James DiSalvo; Sarita Yardi; Mark Guzdial; Tom McKlin; Charles Meadows; Kenneth Perry; Amy Bruckman

2011-01-01

333

Distinguished African American Political and Governmental Leaders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This comprehensive directory profiles more than 100 African American political and governmental leaders from the mid-19th century to the present. Each entry includes the following information, where applicable: birth date and place; parents' names and history; current status; education; anecdotes; national or local events; awards and honors;…

Haskins, James

334

African American English: A Linguistic Introduction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This introduction to African American English (AAE) looks at the grammar as a whole, describing patterns in sentence structure, sound system, word formation, and word use in AAE. The book uses linguistic description and data from conversation to explain that AAE is not a compilation of random deviations from mainstream English but rather a…

Green, Lisa J.

335

Phonetic Transcription of African American Vernacular English.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article summarizes African American Vernacular English (AAVE) phonological features from the perspective of phonetic transcription. Relevant International Phonetic Alphabet symbols and diacritics are discussed, as well as the importance of transcription detail when differentiating dialect variation from phonological delay or disorder. A chart…

Pollock, Karen E.; Meredith, Linette Hinton

2001-01-01

336

Engaging African American Males in Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By selecting appropriate reading materials, teachers can engage African American adolescent males with text, particularly students who have not mastered the skills, strategies, and knowledge that will lead to positive life outcomes. This approach takes into account students' four literacy needs--academic, cultural, emotional, and social--and…

Tatum, Alfred W.

2006-01-01

337

Karla Holloway to Lead African and African-American Studies at Duke University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The appointment of Karla F. C. Holloway, an African American woman, as director of the Duke University (North Carolina) African American Studies program is representative of an institutional effort to stabilize the program and to recruit African American scholars to the institution, across disciplines. During Holloway's interim directorship,…

Hawkins, B. Denise

1996-01-01

338

Teacher and parent perceptions of behavior problems among a sample of African American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white students.  

PubMed

A multiracial/multiethnic sample of middle school adolescents and their teachers was used to assess whether teacher ratings of student behavior problems varied according to teacher-student racial/ethnic differences and students' perception of teachers' attitudes toward them. No significant mean score differences were found for Hispanic or non-Hispanic white students according to the race/ethnicity of the teachers doing the ratings. However, African American students rated by Hispanic and non-Hispanic white teachers had significantly higher mean total behavior problem scores than African American students rated by African American teachers. Teacher ratings were also compared to those made by parents. The percentage of students rated as cases by teachers but not by parents differed significantly by race/ethnicity of student. Other findings indicated highly significant relationships between student-perceived teacher disparagement and the assignment of high behavior problem scores to students by teachers. PMID:7572829

Zimmerman, R S; Khoury, E L; Vega, W A; Gil, A G; Warheit, G J

1995-04-01

339

Family Support and Colorectal Cancer Screening among Urban African Americans  

PubMed Central

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death among African Americans. Less than 50% of African Americans have had CRC screening. This study examined the relationships between family support and influence, cultural identity, CRC beliefs, and a screening informed decision among 129 urban African Americans. Family support (p < .01) significantly predicted CRC beliefs and CRC beliefs significantly predicted informed decision (p < .01). Based on study results, practitioners should routinely assess family support and CRC beliefs with African Americans patients. This may improve patient-provider shared decision-making satisfaction and CRC screening adherence among African American patients. PMID:23086216

Brittain, Kelly; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y.; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Northouse, Laurel; Caldwell, Cleopatra H.

2011-01-01

340

Family Support and Colorectal Cancer Screening among Urban African Americans.  

PubMed

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death among African Americans. Less than 50% of African Americans have had CRC screening. This study examined the relationships between family support and influence, cultural identity, CRC beliefs, and a screening informed decision among 129 urban African Americans. Family support (p < .01) significantly predicted CRC beliefs and CRC beliefs significantly predicted informed decision (p < .01). Based on study results, practitioners should routinely assess family support and CRC beliefs with African Americans patients. This may improve patient-provider shared decision-making satisfaction and CRC screening adherence among African American patients. PMID:23086216

Brittain, Kelly; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Northouse, Laurel; Caldwell, Cleopatra H

2012-07-01

341

An African-American Family with Dystonia  

PubMed Central

The genetic cause of late-onset focal and segmental dystonia remains unknown in most individuals. Recently, mutations in Thanatos-associated protein domain containing, apoptosis associated protein 1 (THAP1) have been described in DYT6 dystonia and associated with some cases of familial and sporadic late-onset dystonia in Caucasians. We are not aware of any previous descriptions of familial dystonia in African Americans or reports of THAP1 mutations in African Americans. Herein, we characterize an African-American (AA) kindred with late-onset primary dystonia, clinically and genetically. The clinical phenotype included cervical, laryngeal and hand-forearm dystonia. Symptoms were severe and disabling for several family members, whereas others only displayed mild signs. There were no accompanying motor or cognitive signs. In this kindred, age of onset ranged from 45 to 50 years and onset was frequently sudden, with symptoms developing within weeks or months. DYT1 was excluded as the cause of dystonia in this kindred. The entire genomic region of THAP1, including non-coding regions, was sequenced. We identified 13 sequence variants in THAP1, although none co-segregated with dystonia. A novel THAP1 variant (c.-237-3G>T/A) was found in 3/84 AA dystonia patient alleles and 3/212 AA control alleles, but not in 5,870 Caucasian alleles. In summary, although previously unreported, familial primary dystonia does occur in African Americans. Genetic analysis of the entire genomic region of THAP1 revealed a novel variant that was specific for African Americans. Therefore, genetic testing for dystonia and future studies of candidate genes must take genetic background into consideration. PMID:21601506

Puschmann, Andreas; Xiao, Jianfeng; Bastian, Robert W.; Searcy, Jill A.; LeDoux, Mark S.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.

2011-01-01

342

Intergenerational effects of high socioeconomic status on low birthweight and preterm birth in African Americans.  

PubMed Central

As socioeconomic status (SES) increases, the incidence of low birthweight and preterm birth decreases irrespective of social class. However, low birthweight remains twice as high for African-American women as for white women even when SES is controlled. This study examines to what extent second generation high SES African-American women experience improvement in birthweight and gestational age. One hundred eighty-nine former Meharry students were surveyed. Identified were 934 births that are the children and grandchildren of these students who matriculated at Meharry. These infants are compared with a cohort of white mothers from a study in the School of Public Health at Yale University. Low birthweight was reduced in the third generation high SES African-American children (6.9%) from the second generation (11.4%) but remained higher than white children (3.3%). Results showed that African-American third generation children remained at higher risk for low birthweight than were white children (relative risk [RR], 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03, 3.09). Similar results were observed for preterm delivery where the increased risk to third generation African-American children was 3.16 (1.89, 5.27). Persistent strong ethnic differences in birthweight in this high SES cohort (OR = 3.16, 95% CI, 1.89-5.27) support a conclusion that African-American women have birthweight distributions that are somewhat lighter than white women. This may explain a portion of current ethnic differences in birthweight. It is also possible that persistent psychosocial and behavioral factors continue to negatively influence birthweight, even in second generation high SES African-American mothers. This explanation will require identification of powerful risk factors, which are largely unrelated to those presently under investigation. PMID:10881470

Foster, H. W.; Wu, L.; Bracken, M. B.; Semenya, K.; Thomas, J.; Thomas, J.

2000-01-01

343

Emotion regulation strategies and later externalizing behavior among European American and African American children  

PubMed Central

Children’s early emotion regulation strategies (ERS) have been related to externalizing problems; however, most studies have included predominantly European American, middle-class children. The current study explores whether ERS use may have differential outcomes as a function of the mother’s ethnic culture. The study utilizes two diverse samples of low-income male toddlers to examine observed ERS during a delay of gratification task in relation to maternal and teacher reports of children’s externalizing behavior 2 to 6 years later. Although the frequencies of ERS were comparable between ethnic groups in both samples, the use of physical comfort seeking and self-soothing was positively related to African American children’s later externalizing behavior but negatively related to externalizing behavior for European American children in Sample 1. Data from Sample 2 appear to support this pattern for self-soothing in maternal, but not teacher, reportof externalizing behavior. Within group differences by income were examined as a possible explanatory factor accounting for the ethnic differences, but it was not supported. Alternative explanations are discussed to explain the pattern of findings. PMID:19338690

Supplee, Lauren H.; Skuban, Emily Moye; Shaw, Daniel S.; Prout, Joanna

2009-01-01

344

Say "adios" to the American dream? The interplay between ethnic and national identity among Latino and Caucasian Americans.  

PubMed

In three studies, implicit and explicit measures were used to examine the interconnections between ethnic and national identities among Latino Americans and Caucasian Americans. Consistently, Latino Americans as a group were conceived of as being less American than Caucasian Americans (Studies 1-3). This effect was exhibited by both Caucasian and Latino participants. Overall, Caucasian participants displayed a stronger national identification than Latino participants (Studies 2 and 3). In addition, ethnic American associations accounted for the strength of national identification for Caucasian participants, but not for Latino participants (Study 2). Finally, ethnic differences in national identification among individuals who exclude Latino Americans from the national identity emerged when persistent ethnic disparities were primed, but not when increasing equalities were stressed (Study 3). In sum, ethnic American associations account for the merging versus dissociation between ethnic and national identifications and reflect a long-standing ethnic hierarchy in American society. PMID:20099963

Devos, Thierry; Gavin, Kelly; Quintana, Francisco J

2010-01-01

345

Physical activity attitudes, preferences, and practices in African American, Hispanic, and Caucasian girls.  

PubMed

Physical activity levels in girls decline dramatically during adolescence, most profoundly among minorities. To explore ethnic and racial variation in attitudes toward physical activity, semistructured interviews (n = 80) and physical activity checklists (n = 130) are conducted with African American, Hispanic, and Caucasian middle school girls in six locations across the United States. Girls from all groups have similar perceptions of the benefits of physical activity, with staying in shape as the most important. Girls have similar negative perceptions of physical activity, including getting hurt, sweating, aggressive players, and embarrassment. Chores, running or jogging, exercises, and dance are common activities for girls regardless of ethnicity. Basketball, swimming, running, and dance are commonly cited favorite activities, although there are slight differences between ethnic groups. The results suggest that factors other than ethnicity contribute to girls' physical activity preferences and that distinct interventions may not be needed for each ethnic group. PMID:16397158

Grieser, Mira; Vu, Maihan B; Bedimo-Rung, Ariane L; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Moody, Jamie; Young, Deborah Rohm; Moe, Stacey G

2006-02-01

346

Physical Activity Attitudes, Preferences, and Practices in African American, Hispanic, and Caucasian Girls  

PubMed Central

Physical activity levels in girls decline dramatically during adolescence, most profoundlyamong minorities. To explore ethnic and racial variation in attitudes toward physical activity, semistructured interviews (n = 80) and physical activity checklists (n = 130) are conducted with African American, Hispanic, and Caucasian middle school girls in six locations across the United States. Girls from all groups have similar perceptions of the benefits of physical activity, with staying in shape as the most important. Girls have similar negative perceptions of physical activity, including getting hurt, sweating, aggressive players, and embarrassment. Chores, runningor jogging, exercises, and dance are common activities for girls regardless of ethnicity. Basketball, swimming, running, and dance are commonly cited favorite activities, although there are slight differences between ethnic groups. The results suggest that factors other than ethnicity contribute to girls’physical activity preferences and that distinct interventions may not be needed for each ethnic group. PMID:16397158

Grieser, Mira; Vu, Maihan B.; Bedimo-Rung, Ariane L.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Moody, Jamie; Young, Deborah Rohm; Moe, Stacey G.

2008-01-01

347

Ethnic American Groups in Four Specialized Encyclopedic Works: A Comparative and Critical Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the treatment of ethnic groups in the United States in four encyclopedic works: (1) "Harvard Encyclopedia of American Ethnic Groups"; (2) "Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America"; (3) "Encyclopedia of New York City"; and (4) "American Immigrant Culture." (SLD)

Wertsman, Vladimir F.

1999-01-01

348

Koreans in the Hood: Conflict with African Americans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The essays in this collection examine relationships between the Korean American and African American communities in Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York. The contrast between the economic power and lack of political power of Korean Americans and the political power and lack of economic power of African Americans is traced. Essays 2-5 cover Los…

Kim, Kwang Chung, Ed.

349

Testing the Utility of a Modified Organ Donation Model among African American Adults  

PubMed Central

African Americans are overrepresented on the organ transplant waiting list because they are disproportionately impacted by certain health conditions that potentially warrant a life-saving transplant. While the African American need for transplantation is considerably high, organ and tissue donation rates are comparatively low, resulting in African Americans spending more than twice the amount of time on the national transplant waiting list as compared to people of other racial/ethnic backgrounds. There are a multitude of factors that contribute to the reluctance expressed by African Americans with respect to organ donation. This study proposes the use of an adaptation of the Organ Donation Model to explore the ways in which knowledge, trust in the donation/allocation process, and religious beliefs impact African American donation decision making. Bivariate and path analyses demonstrated that alignment with religious beliefs was the greatest driving factor with respect to attitudes towards donation; attitudes were significantly associated with donation intentions; and knowledge is directly associated with intentions to serve as a potential deceased organ donor. The significance of these variables speaks to the importance of their inclusion in a model that focuses on the African American population and offers new direction for more effective donation education efforts. PMID:21698439

Robinson, Dana H. Z.; Perryman, Jennie P.; Thompson, Nancy J.; Amaral, Sandra; Jacob Arriola, Kimberly R.

2011-01-01

350

African American Studies & Research Center and Latin American & Latino Studies  

E-print Network

in Central America and Spanish Jamaica 5. Eclectic Bigotry in South Atlantic Societies: Racism, Hybridity Symposium on African American Culture & Philosophy "Afro"Afro--Latin America:Latin America: Rethinking Stewart Center, 3rd Floor West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 #12;"Afro-Latin America: Rethinking Identity

Pittendrigh, Barry

351

Ethnic Heritage Studies: The American Woman. Experimental Unit.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Providing information and activities designed to dispel sex role socialization, myths, and stereotypes as bases for prejudiced views, this teaching guide focuses on the American woman's image and diverse roles in our society. It is part of the Louisville Area Ethnic Heritage Studies Project described in ED 150 043. The project materials are…

Keepers, Beverly

352

Implicit Race/Ethnic Prejudice in Mexican Americans  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Implicit race/ethnic prejudice was assessed using Spanish- and English-language versions of an Implicit Association Test that used Hispanic/Anglo first names and pleasant/unpleasant words as stimuli. This test was administered to a consecutive sample of Mexican American adults residing in the Rio Grande Valley region of Texas of whom about…

Garza, Christelle Fabiola; Gasquoine, Philip Gerard

2013-01-01

353

Intergroup Attitudes of European American Children Attending Ethnically Homogeneous Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intergroup attitudes were assessed in European American 1st-grade (M=6.99 years, SD=0.32) and 4th-grade (M=10.01 years, SD=0.36) children (N=138) attending ethnically homogeneous schools to test hypotheses about racial biases and interracial friendships. An Ambiguous Situations Task and an Intergroup Contact Assessment were administered to all…

McGlothlin, Heidi; Killen, Melanie

2006-01-01

354

Economic Success and Ethnicity: Mexican-Americans in San Jose.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ethnicity patterns and adaptive strategies of 10 economically successful Mexican Americans were studied over a 1-year period in San Jose, California. Employed by a federally-funded community development project, the 10 held positions from secretary to chief program administrator, with salaries ranging from $6,000 to $20,000 per year. A formal…

Reynolds, Diane A.

355

Development and Validation of a Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Model for African-Americans  

PubMed Central

Because existing risk prediction models for lung cancer were developed in white populations, they may not be appropriate for predicting risk among African-Americans. Therefore, a need exists to construct and validate a risk prediction model for lung cancer that is specific to African-Americans. We analyzed data from 491 African-Americans with lung cancer and 497 matched African-American controls to identify specific risks and incorporate them into a multivariable risk model for lung cancer and estimate the 5-year absolute risk of lung cancer. We performed internal and external validations of the risk model using data on additional cases and controls from the same ongoing multiracial/ethnic lung cancer case-control study from which the model-building data were obtained as well as data from two different lung cancer studies in metropolitan Detroit, respectively. We also compared our African-American model with our previously developed risk prediction model for whites. The final risk model included smoking-related variables [smoking status, pack-years smoked, age at smoking cessation (former smokers), and number of years since smoking cessation (former smokers)], self- reported physician diagnoses of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or hay fever, and exposures to asbestos or wood dusts. Our risk prediction model for African-Americans exhibited good discrimination [75% (95% confidence interval, 0.67?0.82)] for our internal data and moderate discrimination [63% (95% confidence interval, 0.57?0.69)] for the external data group, which is an improvement over the Spitz model for white subjects. Existing lung cancer prediction models may not be appropriate for predicting risk for African-Americans because (a) they were developed using white populations, (b) level of risk is different for risk factors that African-American share with whites, and (c) unique group-specific risk factors exist for African-Americans. This study developed and validated a risk prediction model for lung cancer that is specific to African-Americans and thus more precise in predicting their risks. These findings highlight the importance of conducting further ethnic-specific analyses of disease risk. PMID:19138969

Etzel, Carol J.; Kachroo, Sumesh; Liu, Mei; D'Amelio, Anthony; Dong, Qiong; Cote, Michele L.; Wenzlaff, Angela S.; Hong, Waun Ki; Greisinger, Anthony J.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Spitz, Margaret R.

2009-01-01

356

Empowering African American Exceptional Learners: Vision for the New Millennium.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cultural differences can be barriers for African American students. General educators often turn to special educators for assistance, placing students in at-risk positions that magnify denigrating stereotypes. Many African American students are misidentified, misassessed, and misinstructed. Discusses factors underlying the education of African

Obi, Sunday O.; Obiakor, Festus

2001-01-01

357

Technological politics and the political history of African-Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation is a critical study of technopolitical issues in the history of African American people. Langdon Winner's theory of technopolitics was used to facilitate the analysis of large scale technologies and their compatibility with various political ends. I contextualized the central technopolitical issues within the major epochs of African American political history: the Atlantic slave trade, the African artisans

Bruce Cosby

1995-01-01

358

Teaching Experiences of African American Educators in the Rural South  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A scarcity of research exists regarding the voices of African American teachers who taught in the rural South. In this study, we report the life experiences, perceptions, thoughts, and feelings of three female African American educators as they pertain to their experiences teaching before, during, and after desegregation. Three female African

Polidore, Ellene; Edmonson, Stacey L.; Slate, John R.

2010-01-01

359

Issues in Mathematics Education with African American Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To teach mathematics successfully to African Americans, there must be modification of what math is as a knowledge. Recently, a framework was composed which delineated four disparate dimensions of math as a type of knowledge and how assessment varies as a result of the definitions. Examines implications for African American education, African

Pennington, Harvey J.

2000-01-01

360

African-American Band Music and Recordings  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, a number of African American musicians and bandleaders had garnered the attention of the music-going public, and names such as Eubie Blake and Scott Joplin remain familiar to this very day. This rather fine online collection offered by the Library of Congress's Performing Arts division brings together a number of so-called "stock" arrangements for bands or small orchestras written by African Americans during that period. Visitors to the site should start by reading one of the four informative essays offered here, and then search through the actual music. There are over 206 pieces of music here, including "After the Cake Walk" from 1901 and the 1905 number, "Banana Man". Additionally, visitors can read any number of composer and bandleader biographies.

361

African American parents' attitudes toward HPV vaccination.  

PubMed

This study sought to determine knowledge about human papillomaviruses (HPV), vaccination acceptability and intent to vaccinate, and describe the individual characteristics, and sociocultural attitudes that affect African American parents' intent to vaccinate their daughters. Two hundred African Americans completed self-administered surveys that assessed factors that may influence HPV vaccination behavior, HPV and cervical cancer knowledge and risk perception, cultural attitudes, and preferences for location and timing of vaccination. Eligibility criteria included men and women who had a daughter aged 9 to 17 years, whether the daughter had or had not been told that she had an HPV infection. Approximately two-thirds of the African American parents surveyed were aware of HPV and HPV vaccination. Responders were likely to be female, younger, employed, and to have social resources. They were also knowledgeable about HPV, but knowledge did not necessarily lead to vaccination. Among parents knowledgeable about HPV, vaccination status was significantly affected by whether a pediatrician had recommended the vaccine. There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics or sociocultural attitudes between the parents who had vaccinated their daughters and those who had not, although more of the parents who had vaccinated daughters were worried about STIs. PMID:21942167

Thompson, Vetta L Sanders; Arnold, Lauren D; Notaro, Sheri R

2011-01-01

362

Qualitative study of African-American job satisfaction in a scientific/technical research environment  

SciTech Connect

Many studies have been conducted in the area of job satisfaction. Its necessary attributes sor components have been studied, analyzed, validated, standardized, and normed, onpredominantly white male populations. Few of these studies have focused on people of color, specifically African-Americans, and fewer still on those African-Americans working in a high-tech, scientific and research environments. The researchers have defined what is necessary for the current dominent culture`s population, but are their findings applicable and valid for our nation`s other cultures and ethnic groups? Among the conclusions: the subjects felt that there was no real difference in job satisfiers from their white colleagues; however the subjects had the sense of community (African-American) and the need to give back to it. Frustrations included politics, funding, and lack of control.

Krossa, C.D. [San Francisco Univ. (United States)

1996-09-01

363

Ethnicity and Me: An Experimental Unit.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This secondary social studies unit, part one of a series of four, contains 22 classroom activities that involve students in discovering their ethnicity. Students examine their attitudes toward ethnic groups, particularly African Americans, Irish Americans, Arab Americans, and Mexican Americans. The activities can easily be integrated into U.S.…

Smith, Gary R.

364

Gender and Ethnicity Attributions to a Gender and Ethnicity-Unspecified Individual: Is there a People?=?White Male Bias?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated gender and ethnicity attributions to a gender- and ethnicity-unspecified individual (Chris) presented in one of two scripts (business versus interpersonal) to 192 African American and European American college students. Gender and ethnicity did not predict the likelihood of attributing masculine (77.60%) or feminine (22.40%) gender. Significantly more African American participants engaged in ethnicity attribution and saw Chris as

Rebecca Davis Merritt; Teion Wells Harrison

2006-01-01

365

Eating Disorders of White American, Racial and Ethnic Minority American, and International Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considers eating attitudes and behaviors related to anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and obesity of white American, African-American, Native American, and some international women from the point of view of cultural influences such as sex role, the media, socioeconomic class, and acculturation to Western society. (Author/NB)

Osvold, Lise Leigh; Sodowsky, Gargi Roysircar

1993-01-01

366

77 FR 33595 - African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2012  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...8832 of June 1, 2012 African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2012 By the President...long-cherished piece of American culture, music offers a vibrant soundtrack to the story...tradition, and during African-American Music Appreciation Month, we pay special...

2012-06-07

367

Phonological Awareness Skills in Young African American English Speakers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine African American children's performance on a phonological awareness task that included items reflecting differences between African American English (AAE) and mainstream American English. The relationship between spoken production of AAE forms and performance on phonological awareness, vocabulary, and…

Mitri, Souraya Mansour; Terry, Nicole Patton

2014-01-01

368

Racism as a stressor for African Americans: A biopsychosocial model  

Microsoft Academic Search

iven the historical and contemporary existence of racism in American society, one might suspect there would be an equally substantial literature examining the effects of racism on African Americans. Yet, research exploring the biological, psychological, and social effects of racism among African Americans is virtually nonexistent. The purpose of this article was threefold: (a) to provide a brief overview of

Rodney Clark; Norman B. Anderson; Vernessa R. Clark; David R. Williams

1999-01-01

369

A Grounded Theory of the Course-Choosing Experiences of African American High School Students and Their Families Related to Advanced-Level Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research findings indicate that students' course selections impact the racial and ethnic achievement gap. Exposure to advanced-level courses has been found to lessen this gap and enhances success after high school. Despite this, African American students tend to evidence lower participation in these courses than do other racial and ethnic student…

Jones, Brenda Laverne

2009-01-01

370

Differences in vaginal microbiome in African American women versus women of European ancestry.  

PubMed

Women of European ancestry are more likely to harbour a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiome, whereas African American women are more likely to exhibit a diverse microbial profile. African American women are also twice as likely to be diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis and are twice as likely to experience preterm birth. The objective of this study was to further characterize and contrast the vaginal microbial profiles in African American versus European ancestry women. Through the Vaginal Human Microbiome Project at Virginia Commonwealth University, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was used to compare the microbiomes of vaginal samples from 1268 African American women and 416 women of European ancestry. The results confirmed significant differences in the vaginal microbiomes of the two groups and identified several taxa relevant to these differences. Major community types were dominated by Gardnerella vaginalis and the uncultivated bacterial vaginosis-associated bacterium-1 (BVAB1) that were common among African Americans. Moreover, the prevalence of multiple bacterial taxa that are associated with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and preterm birth, including Mycoplasma, Gardnerella, Prevotella and Sneathia, differed between the two ethnic groups. We investigated the contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including pregnancy, body mass index, diet, smoking and alcohol use, number of sexual partners, and household income, to vaginal community composition. Ethnicity, pregnancy and alcohol use correlated significantly with the relative abundance of bacterial vaginosis-associated species. Trends between microbial profiles and smoking and number of sexual partners were observed; however, these associations were not statistically significant. These results support and extend previous findings that there are significant differences in the vaginal microbiome related to ethnicity and demonstrate that these differences are pronounced even in healthy women. PMID:25073854

Fettweis, Jennifer M; Brooks, J Paul; Serrano, Myrna G; Sheth, Nihar U; Girerd, Philippe H; Edwards, David J; Strauss, Jerome F; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Buck, Gregory A

2014-10-01

371

Frequent Buyer Club Participation Patterns for African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on (a) racial prejudice, (b) lack of steppingstone jobs, (c) welfare programs, (d) low education levels, and (e) inferior trade skills, some feel America's leading minority groups will never become full-fledged, mainstream retail participants. This study, however, found that Asian and Hispanic immigrants assimilate as they move from cities. On the contrary, post-civil rights movement African Americans and Native

A. Bruce Clark

2003-01-01

372

The college life experiences of African American women athletes.  

PubMed

The present study provides a descriptive analysis of four areas of African American women student athletes' college life experiences: academic performance; alienation and abuse; perceived social advantage as the result of athletics; and life satisfaction. Multivariate comparisons were made between the four areas of college life experiences of 154 African American women student athletes and 793 White women student athletes, 250 African American women nonathletes, and 628 African American men student athletes from a national sample of 39 NCAA Division I universities. Overall, African American women student athletes are performing adequately academically, integrating socially within the university, perceiving some social advantage as the result of being athletes, and are fairly satisfied with their life. Their experiences seem most consistent with African American women nonathletes. Results are discussed in the context of potential policy recommendations as well as the need for more research on this particular population. PMID:9485580

Sellers, R M; Kuperminc, G P; Damas, A

1997-10-01

373

Comparing genetic ancestry and self-described race in african americans born in the United States and in Africa.  

PubMed

Genetic association studies can be used to identify factors that may contribute to disparities in disease evident across different racial and ethnic populations. However, such studies may not account for potential confounding if study populations are genetically heterogeneous. Racial and ethnic classifications have been used as proxies for genetic relatedness. We investigated genetic admixture and developed a questionnaire to explore variables used in constructing racial identity in two cohorts: 50 African Americans and 40 Nigerians. Genetic ancestry was determined by genotyping 107 ancestry informative markers. Ancestry estimates calculated with maximum likelihood estimation were compared with population stratification detected with principal components analysis. Ancestry was approximately 95% west African, 4% European, and 1% Native American in the Nigerian cohort and 83% west African, 15% European, and 2% Native American in the African American cohort. Therefore, self-identification as African American agreed well with inferred west African ancestry. However, the cohorts differed significantly in mean percentage west African and European ancestries (P < 0.0001) and in the variance for individual ancestry (P < or = 0.01). Among African Americans, no set of questionnaire items effectively estimated degree of west African ancestry, and self-report of a high degree of African ancestry in a three-generation family tree did not accurately predict degree of African ancestry. Our findings suggest that self-reported race and ancestry can predict ancestral clusters but do not reveal the extent of admixture. Genetic classifications of ancestry may provide a more objective and accurate method of defining homogenous populations for the investigation of specific population-disease associations. PMID:18559547

Yaeger, Rona; Avila-Bront, Alexa; Abdul, Kazeem; Nolan, Patricia C; Grann, Victor R; Birchette, Mark G; Choudhry, Shweta; Burchard, Esteban G; Beckman, Kenneth B; Gorroochurn, Prakash; Ziv, Elad; Consedine, Nathan S; Joe, Andrew K

2008-06-01

374

The Context for Choice: Health Implications of Targeted Food and Beverage Marketing to African Americans  

PubMed Central

Targeted marketing of high-calorie foods and beverages to ethnic minority populations, relative to more healthful foods, may contribute to ethnic disparities in obesity and other diet-related chronic conditions. We conducted a systematic review of studies published in June 1992 through 2006 (n = 20) that permitted comparison of food and beverage marketing to African Americans versus Whites and others. Eight studies reported on product promotions, 11 on retail food outlet locations, and 3 on food prices. Although the evidence base has limitations, studies indicated that African Americans are consistently exposed to food promotion and distribution patterns with relatively greater potential adverse health effects than are Whites. The limited evidence on price disparities was inconclusive. PMID:18633097

Grier, Sonya A.; Kumanyika, Shiriki K.

2008-01-01

375

Epidemiology, Determinants, and Consequences of Cigarette Smoking in African American Women: An Integrative Review  

PubMed Central

Tobacco smoking is a national public health problem that has been associated with numerous adverse health effects, including increased disease and cancer rates. Previous review articles on smoking in specific demographic populations have focused on smoking in women and on smoking in African Americans, but have not considered the dual roles of ethnicity and gender in smoking behavior. African American women (AAW) are an important subgroup to study because they are distinct from non-AAW and their male African American counterparts on biosychosocial factors that are relevant to smoking behavior. The purpose of the present review paper is to integrate and summarize the current literature on the epidemiology, determinants, and consequences of cigarette smoking among AAW, by contrasting them to relevant comparison groups (non-AAW and African American men). Evidence suggests that AAW are generally more likely to be light smokers and initiate smoking later. The prevalence rates of AAW smokers have decreased over the past 25 years, yet AAW are disproportionately affected by several smoking-related illnesses when compared to their ethnic and gender comparison groups. AAW smokers are distinct from relevant comparison groups in metabolic sensitivity to nicotine, aspects of smoking topography, and several psychosocial factors that influence smoking. Although a small literature on smoking in AAW is emerging, further empirical research of AAW smokers could inform the development of tailored interventions for AAW. PMID:20061090

Mickens, Lavonda; Ameringer, Katie; Brightman, Molly; Leventhal, Adam M.

2010-01-01

376

Associations among body size dissatisfaction, perceived dietary control, and diet history in African American and European American women  

PubMed Central

European American (EA) women report greater body dissatisfaction and less dietary control than do African American (AA) women. This study investigated whether ethnic differences in dieting history contributed to differences in body dissatisfaction and dietary control, or to differential changes that may occur during weight loss and regain. Eighty-nine EA and AA women underwent dual energy X-ray absorptiometry to measure body composition and completed questionnaires to assess body dissatisfaction and dietary control before, after, and one year following, a controlled weight loss intervention. While EA women reported a more extensive dieting history than AA women, this difference did not contribute to ethnic differences in body dissatisfaction and perceived dietary control. During weight loss, body satisfaction improved more for AA women, and during weight regain, dietary self-efficacy worsened to a greater degree for EA women. Ethnic differences in dieting history did not contribute significantly to these differential changes. Although ethnic differences in body image and dietary control are evident prior to weight loss, and some change differentially by ethnic group during weight loss and regain, differences in dieting history do not contribute significantly to ethnic differences in body image and dietary control. PMID:19778748

Chandler-Laney, Paula; Hunter, Gary; Bush, Nikki; Alvarez, Jessica; Roy, Jane; Byrne, Nuala; Gower, Barbara

2009-01-01

377

Symptoms of depression in adolescence: A comparison of Anglo, African, and Hispanic Americans.  

PubMed

This research investigated differences in prevalence of depressive symptoms among adolescents from diverse ethnocultural groups. Data from a national survey of persons 12-17 years of age (n=2200) were analyzed, comparing symptom levels of Anglo, African, Mexican, and other Hispanic Americans using a 12-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Overall, the results indicate differences in rates of depression. Females reported more symptoms of depression than males in every ethnic group. Among the ethnic groups, Mexican American males reported more depressive symptoms than other males and the same was true for Mexican American females, although to a lesser extent. Logistic regression of three different caseness scores (16+, 21+, 31+), adjusting for age, gender, perceived health, and occupation of the primary wage earner in the household, indicated that only Mexican American adolescents reported more depressive symptoms than the Anglo majority. The relative risk ranged from 1.46 to 1.83. PMID:24264167

Roberts, R E; Sobhan, M

1992-12-01

378

Attention-Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder in African American Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in African American youth. Tackling the myths and misinformation\\u000a surrounding ADHD in the African American community can be one of the most difficult issues in mental illness circles. There\\u000a is a lot of conflicting information about how African Americans are diagnosed, examined, and treated. This article clarifies\\u000a some of the misconceptions and offers some

Rahn K. Bailey; Shahid Ali; Shagufta Jabeen; Hilary Akpudo; Jaymie U. Avenido; Theresa Bailey; Jessica Lyons; Amelia A. Whitehead

2010-01-01

379

Gender role socialization in african american men: A conceptual framework  

Microsoft Academic Search

From educational institutions to the media, images about African American men are transmitted throughout society with few,\\u000a if any, positive portrayals. These myths, misconceptions, and stereotypes have been carried over to the developmental and\\u000a socialization processes experienced by African American men. More systematic and comprehensive ways of explaining the plight\\u000a of the African American male are needed in his quest

George T. Rowan; Eugene Pernell; Timothy A. Akers

1996-01-01

380

Anxiety disorders in African-American and white children  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are little available data on African-American children with anxiety disorders. Treatment-seeking African-American (n=30) and white children (n=139), with a current DSM-III-R anxiety disorder, were compared on sociodemographic background variables, clinical characteristics, and lifetime rates of specific DSM-III-R anxiety disorders. Overall, results suggested that the anxiety-disordered African-American and white children who sought treatment from an outpatient mental health facility were

Cynthia G. Last; Sean Perrin

1993-01-01

381

Beyond the Myth: Addressing Suicide Among African American Males  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Historically, African Americans were never considered at risk for suicide; however, in the last 20–30 years there has been\\u000a a precipitous increase in the number of suicides and suicide attempts among African American males. The authors of this chapter\\u000a provide an overview of the literature surrounding suicide and African American males. Furthermore, a number of preventative\\u000a measures are investigated, such

Michael A. Robinson; Armon R. Perry; Sharon E. Moore; Rudolph Alexander Jr

382

A genome scan for diabetic nephropathy in African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

A genome scan for diabetic nephropathy in African Americans.BackgroundThere is substantial evidence for a genetic contribution to diabetic nephropathy susceptibility in the African American population, but little is known about location or identity of susceptibility genes.MethodsDNA samples were collected from 206 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD)\\/nephropathy-affected sib pairs from 166 African American families (355 affected individuals).

DONALD W BOWDEN; CARLA J COLICIGNO; CARL D LANGEFELD; MICHÈLE M SALE; ADRIENNE WILLIAMS; PAMELA J ANDERSON; STEPHEN S RICH; BARRY I FREEDMAN

2004-01-01

383

Emotion Recognition Across Cultures: The Influence of Ethnicity on Empathic Accuracy and Physiological Linkage  

E-print Network

African American, Chinese American, European American, or Mexican American women who had been videotaped American, European American, or Mexican American ethnicity. To assess empathic accuracy-- knowing what) or unaffected (cultural equivalence model). Participants were 161 college students of African American, Chinese

Levenson, Robert W.

384

Disentangling the Influence of Socioeconomic Status on Differences Between African American and White Women in Unmet Medical Needs  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We sought to disentangle the relationships between race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), and unmet medical care needs. Methods. Data from the 2003–2004 Community Tracking Study Household Survey were used to examine associations between unmet medical needs and SES among African American and White women. Results. No significant racial/ethnic differences in unmet medical needs (24.8% of Whites, 25.9% of African Americans; P = .59) were detected in bivariate analyses. However, among women with 12 years of education or less, African Americans were less likely than were Whites to report unmet needs (odds ratio [OR] = 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.42, 0.79). Relative to African American women with 12 years of education or less, the odds of unmet needs were 1.69 (95% CI = 1.24, 2.31) and 2.18 (95% CI = 1.25, 3.82) among African American women with 13 to 15 years of education and 16 years of education or more, respectively. In contrast, the relationship between educational level and unmet needs was nonsignificant among White women. Conclusions. Among African American women, the failure to recognize unmet medical needs is related to educational attainment and may be an important driver of health disparities, representing a fruitful area for future interventions. PMID:19608942

Person, Sharina D.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Allison, Jeroan J.

2009-01-01

385

Examining the Relations Between Rumination and Adjustment: Do Ethnic Differences Exist Between Asian and European Americans?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Past studies have pointed to the dysfunctional nature of rumination in adults. However, past research has not examined ethnic variations. Accordingly, this study examined ethnic differences in rumination in 184 Asian American and 238 European American college students. Consistent with expectations, Asian Americans were found to ruminate more than European Americans. However, rumination was found to have a weaker association

Edward C. Chang; William Tsai; Lawrence J. Sanna

2010-01-01

386

Influence of Family Perceptions of Acting White on Acculturative Stress in African American College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined family-oriented stressors on acculturative stress in 83 African American college students attending a\\u000a predominately White university. Results showed that family pressure for participants not to acculturate, pressure to maintain\\u000a ethnic group language, perception of Acting White, and acculturation level were related to higher acculturative stress for\\u000a participants. After controlling for acculturation and general stress, family pressure to

Keisha V. Thompson; Nicole L. Lightfoot; Linda G. Castillo; Morgan L. Hurst

2010-01-01

387

Differences in Mental Health Outcomes among Whites, African Americans, and Hispanics Following a Community Disaster  

PubMed Central

A number of studies have assessed the association between race and ethnicity and psychological health status following exposure to a stressful event. However, some of these studies indicate racial and ethnic minorities have poorer mental health relative to Whites, while others show no differences or that minorities may actually have better psychological health. One year after the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, we collected data on a random sample of city residents (N = 2368). The dependent variables were posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), PTSD symptom severity, major depression, panic attack, and general physical and mental well–being. We categorized our respondents as Non–Hispanic White, Non–Hispanic African American, Dominican, Puerto Rican, and Other Hispanics. Bivariate results indicated racial/ethnic differences for PTSD symptom severity, depression, general physical and mental health, and panic attack. Using logistic regression and controlling for possible confounding factors, most of these associations were rendered non–significant. That is, we found no post-disaster racial/ethnic differences for PTSD, PTSD symptom severity, or physical health. African Americans and Other Hispanics were less likely to meet criteria for major depression or to be classified as unhealthy on the self–report SF–12 mental health scale compared to Whites. Only for panic attack were African Americans and Puerto Ricans more likely to meet criteria for this outcome. Thus, our study found little support for the hypothesis that Latinos or African Americans consistently suffered from poorer psychological and physical well–being in the aftermath of traumatic events, relative to Whites. PMID:16253112

Adams, Richard E.; Boscarino, Joseph A.

2009-01-01

388

Every Voice Counts... Proceedings [of] the Annual African American and Latino/a American Adult Education Research Symposium (10th, Chicago, Illinois, April 21, 2001).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This symposium publication consists of 26 presentations. Papers are "'How to Eat an Oreo': Using African American Research through Personal Narrative To Analyze Ethnic Dysmorphic Phenomenon" (Ashford); "Authentic Members: Uncovering Adult Children" (Barnes); "What Good Is Government? Assessment of Government Official Impact on Black Businesses"…

Garth, Phyllis Ham, Ed.

389

Normative changes in ethnic and American identities and links with adjustment among Asian American adolescents.  

PubMed

Identity development is a highly salient task for adolescents, especially those from immigrant backgrounds, yet longitudinal research that tracks simultaneous change in ethnic identity and American identity over time has been limited. With a focus on 177 Asian American adolescents recruited from an emerging immigrant community, in the current study, we used hierarchical linear modeling and found that ethnic identity tends to remain fairly stable across the 4 years of high school, whereas American identity increases over time. When ethnic identity and American identity were examined simultaneously, consistent with existing research, ethnic identity was positively associated with positive relationships, high self-esteem, academic motivation, and lower levels of depression over time. Although American identity was not significantly associated with depression, positive links with relationships, self-esteem, and academic motivation were found. Both identities were interactively associated with academic motivation. Acculturative implications and the importance of considering the dual construction of ethnic identity and American identity in light of adolescent adjustment are discussed. PMID:23231687

Kiang, Lisa; Witkow, Melissa R; Champagne, Mariette C

2013-09-01

390

Health and mental health policies' role in better understanding and closing African American-White American disparities in treatment access and quality of care.  

PubMed

Since publication of the U.S. Surgeon General's report Mental Health: Culture, Race and Ethnicity--A Supplement to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2001), several federal initiatives signal a sustained focus on addressing African American-White American disparities in mental health treatment access and quality and open the way to unprecedented disparity reduction. These initiatives include institutional commitments to (a) research by the National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities; (b) disparities monitoring by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; (c) new epidemiologic and service delivery information on African American populations from the National Survey of American Life sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health; as well as (d) opportunities inherent in the World Health Organization's interest in disease burden for making it possible to view African Americans' likely greater disease burden from mental illness as a legitimate source of concern. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act affords unprecedented opportunities for increasing African Americans' treatment access and quality of care nationwide. By familiarizing themselves with these initiatives, and taking advantage of possibilities they offer, those committed to reducing African American-White American disparities in mental illness, and treatment access and quality, can make inroads toward improving African Americans' mental health and facilitating their successful functioning in all spheres of community living. PMID:23046303

Snowden, Lonnie R

2012-10-01

391

Critical social theory and the domination of African American Women.  

PubMed

This historical reconstruction of the experiences of African American women in America from slavery to the present exposes the prevailing and enduring system of White male domination. From White men having control of their reproductive choices, to conspiracy to withhold the right to vote, African American women were victims of both sexism and racism. Later, as a result of the myth conceived by White sociologists of the super African American woman, further divisiveness became apparent in the African American home. As African American women took advantage of educational opportunities only to find that there was a dearth of similarly educated African American males to marry, increasing numbers of African American men were reported as parties to violent acts, drugs or illness. All of these variables are conjectured as impacting on the African American woman's experience. Lastly, data were presented depicting the increasing trend of African American women marrying White men, and the emergence of a more diverse workforce. It was concluded that economics serve as a catalyst for this change in human relations. PMID:8718416

Davis, S P

1995-01-01

392

Ending the Epidemic of Heterosexual HIV Transmission Among African Americans  

PubMed Central

This article examines factors responsible for the stark racial disparities in HIV infection in the U.S. and the now concentrated epidemic among African Americans. Sexual network patterns characterized by concurrency and mixing among different subpopulations, together with high rates of other sexually transmitted infections, facilitate dissemination of HIV among African Americans. The social and economic environment in which many African Americans live shapes sexual network patterns and increases personal infection risk almost independently of personal behavior. The African American HIV epidemic constitutes a national crisis whose successful resolution will require modifying the social and economic systems, structures, and processes that facilitate HIV transmission in this population. PMID:19840704

Adimora, Adaora A.; Schoenbach, Victor J.; Floris-Moore, Michelle A.

2014-01-01

393

Demographic Outcomes of Ethnic Intermarriage in American History: Italian-Americans through Four Generations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new approach to measuring the extent of intermarriage among Americans of different ethnic origins. Using U.S. Census microdata and CPS data, measurements of the rates of Italian- American intermarriages across four generations are made to demonstrate that these rates were not merely high following the immigrant generation, but that even low estimates of intermarriage rates will

Joel Perlmann

2000-01-01

394

Blurring Racial and Ethnic Boundaries in Asian American Families: Asian American Family Patterns, 1980-2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this work, the authors use statistics from the U.S. Census to examine trends in intermarriage, racial and ethnic combinations, and categorizations among Asian Americans. Specifically, the authors want to consider the extent to which family patterns may contribute to Asian Americans and their descendants' continuing as distinct, becoming members…

Hidalgo, Danielle Antoinette; Bankston, Carl L.

2010-01-01

395

Bibliographic Index of American Ethnic Groups, Volume I [And] Volume II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This index presents page references to topics on American ethnic groups in books, journals, and miscellaneous publications on ethnicity in America. The main purpose of the index is to enable the user to locate specific topics with relation to a particular ethnic group. The index lists 14 main subjects, comprised of topics and nine ethnic groups.…

Sowell, Thomas

396

A systematic review of weight loss, physical activity and dietary interventions involving African American men.  

PubMed

When compared with men of other racial or ethnic groups, African American men are more likely to experience adverse health conditions. The systematic review objectives were to (i) determine the current evidence base concerning African American men's response to lifestyle behavioural interventions designed to promote weight loss, increase physical activity, and/or improve healthy eating and (ii) determine the next steps for research in these areas. The PubMed, Web of Science, Psych Info and Cochrane databases were searched to identify papers published before January 1, 2013 that reported change in weight, physical activity and/or dietary patterns in African American men aged 18 and older, as a result of behavioural change strategies. The titles and abstracts of 1,403 papers were screened; after removing duplicates, 141 papers were read to determine their eligibility. Seventeen publications from 14 studies reported outcomes for African American men. Eight large multi-centre trials and six community-based studies were identified. African American men were an exclusive sample in only four studies. Five studies showed statistically significant improvements. Although the available evidence appears to show that these interventions produce positive results, the relative and the long-term effectiveness of weight loss, dietary and/or physical activity interventions for this population are unknown. PMID:25196408

Newton, R L; Griffith, D M; Kearney, W B; Bennett, G G

2014-10-01

397

Does treatment readiness enhance the response of African American substance users to Motivational Enhancement Therapy?  

PubMed

The development of effective treatments for African Americans and other ethnic minorities is essential for reducing health disparities in substance use. Despite research suggesting that Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET) may reduce substance use among African Americans, the findings have been inconsistent. This research examined the extent to which readiness-to-change (RTC) affects response to MET among African American substance users. The study was a secondary analysis of the 194 African American substance users participating in a multisite randomized clinical trial evaluating MET originally conducted within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. The participants were randomly assigned to receive either three sessions of MET or Counseling-As-Usual (CAU) followed by the ordinary treatment and other services offered at the five participating outpatient programs. Participants were categorized as either high or lower on RTC based on their scores on the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment. The participants reported their substance use at baseline and throughout the 16 weeks after randomization. Among the high RTC participants, those in MET tended to report fewer days of substance use per week over time than participants in CAU. However, among the lower RTC participants, the CAU group tended to report fewer days of substance use over time than MET participants. In contrast to previous thinking, the findings suggest that MET may be more effective for high than lower RTC African American participants. PMID:23421576

Burlew, Ann Kathleen; Montgomery, LaTrice; Kosinski, Andrzej S; Forcehimes, Alyssa A

2013-09-01

398

African-American heredity prostate cancer study: a model for genetic research.  

PubMed

A genome-wide scan of high-risk prostate cancer families in North America has demonstrated linkage of a particular marker to Chromosome Iq (HPC11. An even greater proportion of African-American families have shown linkage to HPC 1. Therefore, investigators at the National Human Genome Research Institute [NHGRI] in collaboration with Howard University and a predominantly African-American group of urologists established the African-American Hereditary Prostate Cancer (AAHPC) Study Network to confirm the suggested linkage of HPC in African Americans with a gene on Chromosome 1. Blood samples from recruited families were sent to Howard University for extraction of DNA. The DNA was sent to NHGRI at NIH where the genotyping and genetic sequence analysis was conducted. Genotype data are merged with pedigree information so that statistical analysis can be performed to establish potential linkage. From March 1, 1998, to June 1, 1999, a total of 40 African-American families have been recruited who met the study criteria. Preliminary results suggest that racial/ethnicity grouping may affect the incidence and extent of linkage of prostate cancer to specific loci. The importance of these findings lays in the future treatment of genetic-based diseases. PMID:11798061

Powell, I J; Carpten, J; Dunston, G; Kittles, R; Bennett, J; Hoke, G; Pettaway, C; Weinrich, S; Vijayakumar, S; Ahaghotu, C A; Boykin, W; Mason, T; Royal, C; Baffoe-Bonnie, A; Bailey-Wilson, J; Berg, K; Trent, J; Collins, F

2001-12-01

399

African-American heredity prostate cancer study: a model for genetic research.  

PubMed

A genome-wide scan of high-risk prostate cancer families in North America has demonstrated linkage of a particular marker to Chromosome 1q (HPC1). An even greater proportion of African-American families have shown linkage to HPC1. Therefore, investigators at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) in collaboration with Howard University and a predominantly African-American group of urologists established the African-American Hereditary Prostate Cancer (AAHPC) Study Network to confirm the suggested linkage of HPC in African Americans with a gene on Chromosome 1. Blood samples from recruited families were sent to Howard University for extraction of DNA. The DNA was sent to NHGRI at NIH where the genotyping and genetic sequence analysis was conducted. Genotype data are merged with pedigree information so that statistical analysis can be performed to establish potential linkage. From March 1, 1998, to June 1, 1999, a total of 40 African-American families have been recruited who met the study criteria. Preliminary results suggest that racial/ethnicity grouping may affect the incidence and extent of linkage of prostate cancer to specific loci. The importance of these findings lays in the future treatment of genetic-based diseases. PMID:12653398

Powell, I J; Carpten, J; Dunston, G; Kittles, R; Bennett, J; Hoke, G; Pettaway, C; Weinrich, S; Vijayakumar, S; Ahaghotu, C A; Boykin, W; Mason, T; Royal, C; Baffoe-Bonnie, A; Bailey-Wilson, J; Berg, K; Trent, J; Collins, F

2001-04-01

400

A New Audience Segmentation Tool for African Americans: The Black Identity Classification Scale  

PubMed Central

Many health communications target African Americans in an attempt to remediate race-based health disparities. Such materials often assume that African Americans are culturally homogeneous; however, research indicates that African Americans are heterogeneous in their attitudes, behaviors, and beliefs. The Black Identity Classification Scale (BICS) was designed as a telephone-administered tool to segment African American audiences into 16 ethnic identity types. The BICS was pretested using focus groups, telephone pretests, and a pilot study (n=306). The final scale was then administered to 625 Black adults participating in a dietary intervention study, where it generally demonstrated good internal consistency reliability. The construct validity of the BICS was also explored by comparing participants’ responses to culturally associated survey items. The distribution of the 16 BICS identity types in the intervention study is presented, as well as select characteristics for participants with core identity components. Although additional research is warranted, these findings suggest that the BICS has good psychometric properties and may be an effective tool for identifying African American audience segments. PMID:20677057

DAVIS, RACHEL E.; ALEXANDER, GWEN; CALVI, JOSEPHINE; WIESE, CHERYL; GREENE, SARAH; NOWAK, MIKE; CROSS, WILLIAM E.; RESNICOW, KEN

2011-01-01

401

Recruitment of a Hidden Population: African Americans with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

PubMed Central

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide, however for reasons that are poorly understood ethnic minority groups are not well represented in clinical research studies. Thus, although African Americans experience equivalent rates of OCD according to epidemiological surveys, the generalizability of findings from clinical trials remains unknown. Research designed to improve identification, assessment and treatment of OCD is an important public health priority. The purpose of this study is to report outreach methods used to recruit African American adults for participation in an OCD research study. A variety of methods were employed, including radio advertisements, public transportation advertising, community outreach, and online advertising. A total of 83 African American adult participants were recruited over a 9.5 month period at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and given comprehensive psychiatric assessments. African Americans with OCD symptoms were reliably identified and assessed, for a total of 75 with lifetime OCD (4 past and 71 current diagnoses). There was variability in the success and cost effectiveness of study recruitment methods. Radio ads were the most expensive means of recruitment, newspaper ads accounted for the largest number of eligible participants, and no cost methods such as Craig’s List and word of mouth were also effective. The authors conclude that, with focused efforts, there are many effective methods for recruiting African Americans with OCD. Guidelines for recruitment are discussed, with a focus on cultural considerations. PMID:21983626

Williams, Monnica T.; Proetto, Dante; Casiano, Delane; Franklin, Martin

2011-01-01

402

Weight Loss Maintenance in African American Women: A Systematic Review of the Behavioral Lifestyle Intervention Literature  

PubMed Central

We performed a systematic review of the behavioral lifestyle intervention trials conducted in the United States published between 1990 and 2011 that included a maintenance phase of at least six months, to identify intervention features that promote weight loss maintenance in African American women. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria. Generally, African American women lost less weight during the intensive weight loss phase and maintained a lower % of their weight loss compared to Caucasian women. The majority of studies failed to describe the specific strategies used in the delivery of the maintenance intervention, adherence to those strategies, and did not incorporate a maintenance phase process evaluation making it difficult to identify intervention characteristics associated with better weight loss maintenance. However, the inclusion of cultural adaptations, particularly in studies with a mixed ethnicity/race sample, resulted in less % weight regain for African American women. Studies with a formal maintenance intervention and weight management as the primary intervention focus reported more positive weight maintenance outcomes for African American women. Nonetheless, our results present both the difficulty in weight loss and maintenance experienced by African American women in behavioral lifestyle interventions. PMID:23691286

Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa M.; Fitzgibbon, Marian L.; Kong, Angela; Odoms-Young, Angela

2013-01-01

403

Toward cultural/ecological perspectives on schooling and achievement in African- and Asian-American children.  

PubMed

The review acknowledges that research on the family and its contribution to achievement in ethnic minority children is important. Past research and theorizing suggest the need for new directions, however. For example, research in educational achievement predicts educational failure for African-American students and educational success for Asian-American students. Little differentiation is made either among African-Americans or among Asian-Americans of different cultural, language, immigration, and economic backgrounds. The theory and design of research on family and educational achievement have been influenced by prevailing societal stereotypes. Research and policy implications of this review include the need to move toward cultural/ecological theories of achievement socialization and development. PMID:2188807

Slaughter-Defoe, D T; Nakagawa, K; Takanishi, R; Johnson, D J

1990-04-01

404

The Relevance of Cultural Activities in Ethnic Identity Among California Native American Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study analyzed data from a large statewide sample of Native American adolescents throughout California to determine whether participation in cultural practices was associated with stronger ethnic identity. The Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM) scale was used to measure the ethnic identity of 945 Native American adolescents (416 male, 529 female) aged 13 – 19 across California. Respondents who participated

Kurt Schweigman; Claradina Soto; Serena Wright; Jennifer Unger

2011-01-01

405

Engaging African American breast cancer survivors in an intervention trial: culture, responsiveness and community  

PubMed Central

Introduction Younger breast cancer survivors often lead extremely busy lives with multiple demands and responsibilities, making them difficult to recruit into clinical trials. African American women are even more difficult to recruit because of additional historical and cultural barriers. In a randomized clinical trial of an intervention, we successfully used culturally informed, population-specific recruitment and retention strategies to engage younger African-American breast cancer survivors. Methods Caucasian and African American breast cancer survivors were recruited from multiple communities and sites. A variety of planned recruitment and retention strategies addressed cultural and population-specific barriers and were guided by three key principals: increasing familiarity with the study in the communities of interest; increasing the availability and accessibility of study information and study participation; and using cultural brokers. Results Accrual of younger African-American breast cancer survivors increased by 373% in 11 months. The steepest rise in the numbers of African-American women recruited came when all strategies were in place and operating simultaneously. Retention rates were 87% for both Caucasian and African American women. Discusssion/Conclusions To successfully recruit busy, younger African American cancer survivors, it is important to use a multifaceted approach, addressing cultural and racial/ethnic barriers to research participation; bridging gaps across cultures and communities; including the role of faith and beliefs in considering research participation; recognizing the demands of different life stages and economic situations and the place of research in the larger picture of peoples’ lives. Designs for recruitment and retention need to be broadly conceptualized and specifically applied. Implications for Cancer Survivors For busy cancer survivors, willingness to participate in and complete research participation is enhanced by strategies that address barriers but also acknowledge the many demands on their time by making research familiar, available, accessible and credible. PMID:20886374

Mishel, Merle H.; Alexander, G. Rumay; Jenerette, Coretta; Blyler, Diane; Baker, Carol; Vines, Anissa I.; Green, Melissa; Long, Debra G.

2011-01-01

406

Modified-Symbol Digit Modalities Test for African Americans, Caribbean Black Americans, and non-Latino Whites: Nationally representative normative data from the National Survey of American Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Normative neuropsychological data for U.S. racial\\/ethnic minorities are limited. Extant norms are based on small, regional groups that may not be nationally representative. The objectives of this study were to (1) provide norms for a modified Symbol Digit Modalities Test (M-SDMT) based on a nationally representative sample of African Americans, Caribbean Blacks, and non-Latino Whites (NLW) living in areas with

Hector M. González; Keith E. Whitfield; Brady T. West; David R. Williams; Peter A. Lichtenberg; James S. Jackson

2007-01-01

407

Variation in Older Americans Act Caregiver Service Use, Unmet Hours of Care, and Independence Among Hispanics, African Americans, and Whites  

PubMed Central

Home- and community-based services (HCBS) are underused by minority seniors and their caregivers, despite greater rates of disability. We examined racial/ethnic variation among 1,749 Hispanic, African American, and Whites receiving Older Americans Act Title III caregiver services in 2009. In addition, we identified the volume of services used by caregivers, their unmet hours of respite care, and the relationship between service use and seniors’ ability to live independently. Minority caregivers cared for seniors in urban areas who had higher rates of disability, poverty, and Medicaid coverage. Hispanics had the highest rate of unmet hours of care, while caregiver services were less likely to help African Americans remain at home. Minorities sought services through community agencies and were more educated than demographically similar national cohorts. Greater efforts to reach minority caregivers of less educated, disabled seniors in urban areas and through community agencies may reduce unmet needs and support independent living. PMID:23438508

Herrera, Angelica P.; George, Rebecca; Angel, Jacqueline L.; Markides, Kyriakos; Torres-Gil, Fernando

2013-01-01

408

White problem gamblers discount delayed rewards less steeply than their African American and Hispanic counterparts.  

PubMed

Impulsivity is a core process underlying addictive behaviors, including nonpharmacological addictive behaviors such as problem gambling. Although considerable attention has been given to the investigation of delay discounting within the context of addiction-related behaviors, relatively little research has examined the relationship between discounting and individual variables, such as race/ethnicity. The purpose of this study was to compare discounting rates in the three most prevalent racial/ethnic groups in the United States: Whites, African Americans, and Hispanics. The study was conducted with 315 problem gamblers. Participants completed a delay-discounting questionnaire involving choices between a smaller amount of money delivered immediately and a larger amount delivered later. A hyperbolic discounting function estimated delay-discounting rates based on participants' indifference points obtained via the questionnaires. Results showed significant effects of race/ethnicity on delay discounting. White gamblers discounted delayed money at lower rates than African Americans and Hispanics, even after controlling for confounding variables. These data suggest that among individuals who develop problem gambling, Whites are less impulsive than African Americans and Hispanics, at least in terms of choosing between delayed and immediate reinforcers. These results have implications for evaluating the onset and treatment of addictive disorders from a health-disparities perspective. PMID:24955678

Andrade, Leonardo F; Petry, Nancy M

2014-06-01

409

Cultural perceptions in cancer care among African-American and Caucasian patients.  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE: This exploratory study examined perceptions and beliefs of African Americans and Caucasians related to cancer care. Understanding belief systems and cultures optimizes cancer treatment and care delivery to ethnic minority individuals. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Focus groups were conducted with 39 African-American and Caucasian cancer patients. Data analysis included whole group analysis with a team of five researchers. RESULTS: Regardless of ethnicity, cancer patients share many of the same emotions and experiences, and want complete information and quality care. Differences were also apparent. African-American participants were more likely to report increased religious behaviors, believe that healthcare providers demonstrate care with simple actions and provision of practical assistance, and use church and community information sources. Caucasian participants were more likely to report spiritual but not overtly religious changes, and depend on healthcare providers for information. CONCLUSION: Understanding how culture colors perceptions, communication and information requirements is critical to providing effective care to ethnically diverse cancer patients. Findings have implications for professionals understanding ways patients seek information, the role of spirituality and religion in care, and ways healthcare providers demonstrate care. PMID:17987914

Matsuyama, Robin K.; Grange, Christina; Lyckholm, Laurie J.; Utsey, Shawn O.; Smith, Thomas J.

2007-01-01

410

African American Faculty as Part of the Problem or Part of the Solution in the Retention of African American Students on "White" College Campuses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The extent to which African American faculty provide support and mentoring to African American students determines the ease of students' transition to predominantly white colleges. This paper examines the role of both white and African American faculty in responding to the needs of African American students. Two ways that white institutions…

Malone, Rubie M.; Malone, James A.

411

Early Life Adversity and Inflammation in African Americans and Whites in the Midlife in the United States Survey  

E-print Network

the consistency of these associations across racial groups. Methods: We analyzed data from 177 African Americans epidemiology, race/ethnicity, chronic disease risk. BMI body mass index; CRP C-reactive protein; CVD of health conditions that might vary by level of life adversity. Large-scale epidemiologic studies (8

Mladenoff, David

412

A Qualitative Evaluation of a Faith-Based Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Intervention for African American Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a formative evaluation of a CDC Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) 2010 faith-based breast and cervical cancer early detection and prevention intervention for African American women living in urban communities. Focus groups were conducted with a sample of women (N = 94) recruited from each church participating in the intervention. One focus group was

Alicia K. Matthews; Nerida Berrios; Julie S. Darnell; Elizabeth Calhoun

2006-01-01

413

A Qualitative Evaluation of a Faith-Based Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Intervention for African American Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a formative evaluation of a CDC Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) 2010 faith-based breast and cervical cancer early detection and prevention intervention for African American women living in urban communities. Focus groups were conducted with a sample of women (N = 94) recruited from each church…

Matthews, Alicia K.; Berrios, Nerida; Darnell, Julie S.; Calhoun, Elizabeth

2006-01-01

414

The Impact of Body Image and Afrocentric Appearance on Sexual Refusal Self-Efficacy in Early Adolescent African American Girls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research examining the association between body image and sexual risk-taking has been mostly limited to clinical and/or White female samples. It is unclear whether body image plays a role in sexual risk-taking among African American early adolescent females. Moreover, research has neglected to consider body image within a cultural and ethnic

Plybon, Laura E.; Holmer, Heidi; Hunter, Alexis; Sheffield, Charity; Stephens, Christopher; Cavolo, Lucas

2009-01-01

415

The politics of race and sport: Resistance and domination in the 1968 African American Olympic protest movement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the case of the African American Olympic protest movement that grew out of the crisis of the civil rights struggle in the late 1960s, this article is an attempt to argue that work involving identity, culture and popular culture is crucial to the study of race and ethnicity in the contemporary world. A reconstruction of this movement demonstrates, first

Douglas Hartmann

1996-01-01

416

Developing a study-centered mentoring program based on the perception of needs of the African-American nursing student  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to ascertain the African-American nursing student's perception of an ideal mentor to facilitate a study centered mentoring program. A secondary purpose was to determine the necessity of cultural inclusiveness in such a program. The percentage of ethnic minorities graduating from baccalaureate nursing programs has continued to decline since 1990 (National League of Nursing, 1995).

Barbara Williams Buchanan

1998-01-01

417

Estimates of African, European and Native American Ancestry in Afro-Caribbean Men on the Island of Tobago  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: The Tobago Afro-Caribbean population is a valuable resource for studying the genetics of diseases that show significant differences in prevalence between populations of African descent and populations of other ancestries. Empirical confirmation of low European and Native American admixture may help in clarifying the ethnic variation in risk for such diseases. We hypothesize that the degree of European and

Iva Miljkovic-Gacic; Robert E. Ferrell; Alan L. Patrick; Candace M. Kammerer; Clareann H. Bunker

2005-01-01

418

YOUR Blessed Health: A Faith-Based CBPR Approach to Addressing HIV/AIDS among African Americans  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite substantial federal, state, and local efforts to reduce the transmission of HIV/AIDS, African Americans experience higher rates of infection than any other ethnic or racial group in the United States. It is imperative to develop culturally and ecologically sensitive interventions to meet the sexual health needs of this population.…

Griffith, Derek M.; Pichon, Latrice C.; Campbell, Bettina; Allen, Julie Ober

2010-01-01

419

Heterogeneity in Patterns of Sexual Risk Behaviors among African-American Youth: Associations with General and Race-Specific Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This descriptive study employed a within-groups analytic approach to examine patterns of sexual risk behavior and co-occurring general and race/ethnicity-specific risk and protective factors in a community sample of African-American youth (n = 436). Cluster analysis was used to classify young adults by levels of self-reported past year sexual risk…

Burrow, Anthony L.; Tubman, Jonathan G.; Gil, Andres G.

2007-01-01

420

Minding "Our Cicero": Nineteenth-Century African American Women's Rhetoric and the Classical Tradition  

E-print Network

caricatured African Americans acting out racist stereotypes.African Americans, but racist attitudes dependent on stereotypesAfrican American poets of the Harlem Renaissance, for example, felt that Dunbar played into white stereotypes

Morse, Heidi

2014-01-01

421

3 CFR 8527 - Proclamation 8527 of May 28, 2010. African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2010  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Proclamation 8527 of May 28, 2010. African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2010 8527...May 28, 2010 Proc. 8527 African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2010By the...spirit. For many, including the African-American community, music unites...

2011-01-01

422

3 CFR 8684 - Proclamation 8684 of May 31, 2011. African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2011  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Proclamation 8684 of May 31, 2011. African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2011 8684...May 31, 2011 Proc. 8684 African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2011By the...the diversity of our Union. African-American musicians, composers,...

2012-01-01

423

The impact of family functioning on anxiety symptoms in African American and European American young adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study aimed to investigate reported family functioning and its impact on anxiety symptoms in a sample of African American and European American young adults. One hundred African American and one hundred twenty one European American young adults completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and a retrospective version of the McMaster Family Assessment

L. Kevin Chapman; Janet Woodruff-Borden

2009-01-01

424

Raising Cultural Awareness of Second Grade African American Students Using Mexican American Children's Literature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An increase in the Mexican American population within the predominantly African American community and school was the basis of this qualitative study. The purpose of the study was to introduce African American second grade students to authentic Mexican and Mexican American children's literature. Interactive read-alouds of nonfiction and realistic…

Pugh, Sandra Lyniece

2009-01-01

425

Recruiting intergenerational African American males for biomedical research Studies: a major research challenge.  

PubMed

The health and well-being of all individuals, independent of race, ethnicity, or gender, is a significant public health concern. Despite many improvements in the status of minority health, African American males continue to have the highest age-adjusted mortality rate of any race-sex group in the United States. Such disparities are accounted for by deaths from a number of diseases such as diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), cancer, and cardiovascular disease, as well as by many historical and present social and cultural constructs that present as obstacles to better health outcomes. Distrust of the medical community, inadequate education, low socioeconomic status, social deprivation, and underutilized primary health care services all contribute to disproportionate health and health care outcomes among African Americans compared to their Caucasian counterparts. Results of clinical research on diseases that disproportionately affect African American males are often limited in their reliability due to common sampling errors existing in the majority of biomedical research studies and clinical trials. There are many reasons for underrepresentation of African American males in clinical trials, including their common recollection and interpretation of relevant historical of biomedical events where minorities were abused or exposed to racial discrimination or racist provocation. In addition, African American males continue to be less educated and more disenfranchised from the majority in society than Caucasian males and females and their African American female counterparts. As such, understanding their perceptions, even in early developmental years, about health and obstacles to involvement in research is important. In an effort to understand perspectives about their level of participation, motivation for participation, impact of education, and engagement in research, this study was designed to explore factors that impact their willingness to participate. Our research suggests that: (1) African American males across all ages are willing to participate in several types of research studies, even those that require human samples; (2) their level of participation is significantly influenced by education level; and (3) their decision to participate in research studies is motivated by civic duty, monetary compensation, and whether they or a relative has had the disease of interest. However, African American males, across all age groups, continue to report a lack of trust as a primary reason for their unwillingness to participate in biomedical research. There is an ongoing need to continue to seek advice, improve communication, and design research studies that garner trust and improve participation among African American males as a targeted underrepresented population. Such communication and dialogues should occur at all age levels of research development to assess. current attitudes and behaviors of African American males around participation. PMID:21830630

Byrd, Goldie S; Edwards, Christopher L; Kelkar, Vinaya A; Phillips, Ruth G; Byrd, Jennifer R; Pim-Pong, Dora Som; Starks, Takiyah D; Taylor, Ashleigh L; Mckinley, Raechel E; Li, Yi-Ju; Pericak-Vance, Margaret

2011-06-01

426

Racial Narratives, Group Identity, and African-American Political Behavior  

E-print Network

My dissertation seeks to advance the racial politics and political behavior literatures in American politics by focusing on the role of "racial narratives" in explaining historical changes in African-American political behavior over time. I...

Delehanty, William

2010-05-13

427

76 FR 6519 - National African American History Month, 2011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...slowed the onward march of history and expansion of the American dream, African Americans braved bigotry and violence to organize schools, churches, and neighborhood organizations. Bolstered by strong values of faith and community, black...

2011-02-04

428

Comparison of craniofacial measurements of young adult African-American and North American white males and females.  

PubMed

Surgical correction of craniofacial disfigurements depends for its success on precise knowledge of the craniofacial norms of the patient's racial/ethnic groups. The norms of North American whites should be restricted to patients of Caucasian origin and not applied to members of other races. This study therefore sought to determine differences in anthropometric measurements of the craniofacial complex between African-American and North American white subjects of both sexes and of similar age (18-25 years old). The study group consisted of healthy young adult African-Americans, 50 males and 50 females. The analysis of craniofacial morphology was based on 51 anthropometric measurements: 9 cranial, 10 facial, 8 orbital, 14 nasal, 4 oral and 6 auricular. The results were compared with 51 norms previously established for North American whites in the same age group, generally based on 109 males and 200 females, fewer in comparisons of some nasal measurements (ac-ac, sbal-sbal, ac-sn, nostril axis). Highly significant differences between groups were found in every craniofacial region, especially in the orbital and nasal areas, and confirmed the need to establish separate norms for African-Americans to guide corrective surgery of the head and face. PMID:18046155

Farkas, Leslie G; Katic, Marko J; Forrest, Christopher R

2007-12-01

429

THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN RACIAL DISCRIMINATION AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS: AN EXAMINATION OF AFRICAN AMERICAN COUPLES.  

E-print Network

??An increasing number of studies have documented African Americans’ experiences with racial discrimination. These experiences have been shown to have implications for African Americans’ well-being… (more)

Wickrama, Thulitha

2007-01-01

430

Genome-wide patterns of population structure and admixture in West Africans and African Americans  

PubMed Central

Quantifying patterns of population structure in Africans and African Americans illuminates the history of human populations and is critical for undertaking medical genomic studies on a global scale. To obtain a fine-scale genome-wide perspective of ancestry, we analyze Affymetrix GeneChip 500K genotype data from African Americans (n = 365) and individuals with ancestry from West Africa (n = 203 from 12 populations) and Europe (n = 400 from 42 countries). We find that population structure within the West African sample reflects primarily language and secondarily geographical distance, echoing the Bantu expansion. Among African Americans, analysis of genomic admixture by a principal component-based approach indicates that the median proportion of European ancestry is 18.5% (25th–75th percentiles: 11.6–27.7%), with very large variation among individuals. In the African-American sample as a whole, few autosomal regions showed exceptionally high or low mean African ancestry, but the X chromosome showed elevated levels of African ancestry, consistent with a sex-biased pattern of gene flow with an excess of European male and African female ancestry. We also find that genomic profiles of individual African Americans afford personalized ancestry reconstructions differentiating ancient vs. recent European and African ancestry. Finally, patterns of genetic similarity among inferred African segments of African-American genomes and genomes of contemporary African populations included in this study suggest African ancestry is most similar to non-Bantu Niger-Kordofanian-speaking populations, consistent with historical documents of the African Diaspora and trans-Atlantic slave trade. PMID:20080753

Bryc, Katarzyna; Auton, Adam; Nelson, Matthew R.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Hauser, Stephen L.; Williams, Scott; Froment, Alain; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Wambebe, Charles; Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

2009-01-01

431

Caregiver Reports of Sleep Problems in Non-Hispanic White, Hispanic, and African American Patients with Alzheimer Dementia  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Sleep problems are common in persons with dementing illnesses and among the most stressful patient behaviors for caregivers. Although studies have shown differences in sleep across ethnic groups, little information is available on ethnic differences among persons with dementia. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible ethnic differences in sleep problems among patients with Alzheimer dementia. Method: Caregiver reports of 5 sleep- or circadian rhythm-related behavioral problems (behavior disturbance worse in the evening, difficulties falling asleep, frequent awakenings, early awakenings, and excessive daytime sleep) were evaluated in 395 patients who had received a diagnosis of Alzheimer disease after diagnostic evaluation. The average cognitive score of the groups suggested that they could be characterized as having moderately severe impairment. The frequency of sleep problems was then evaluated across subgroups defined by self-reported ethnicity (African American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white). As patient and caregiver characteristics may affect caregivers' reports of patients' behaviors, mixed effects regression models were used to adjust for patient and caregiver variables that might affect caregiver reports. Results: Analyses revealed ethnic differences in sleep or circadian rhythm disturbances. African American and Hispanic patients were reported to have more severe sleep disturbances than non-Hispanic whites. After correction for patient and caregiver variables that might have affected caregiver reports, differences between African Americans and others remained. Conclusions: Sleep problems in patients with dementing illnesses are reported by caregivers with differing frequencies across groups of African Americans, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic whites. Clinicians should be aware of these differences in assessing sleep disturbance in patients with dementia as well as the potential effects of patient and caregiver variables on reports of these problems. Citation: Ownby RL; Saeed M; Wohlgemuth W; Capasso R; Acevedo A; Peruyera G; Sevush S. Caregiver reports of sleep problems in non-Hispanic white, Hispanic, and African American patients with Alzheimer dementia. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(3):281-289. PMID:20572423

Ownby, Raymond L.; Saeed, Muhammad; Wohlgemuth, William; Capasso, Robson; Acevedo, Amarilis; Peruyera, Gloria; Sevush, Steven

2010-01-01

432

Psychosocial Correlates of Smoking Trajectories Among Urban African American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known of smoking trajectories or of the correlates of smoking trajectories among African American youth. Ninth-grade African American adolescents (n = 566) were interviewed in Year 1 and then were subsequently interviewed annually for 3 additional years. Five trajectories of cigarette smokers were identified: abstainers,…

Fergus, Stevenson; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Caldwell, Cleopatra H.

2005-01-01

433

The experiences of African American graduate students: A cultural transition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) have long been an intellectual resource for the African American community. HBCUs have provided and continue to provide an educational pathway for many Black students, particularly women who seek graduate and advanced degrees. However, despite the overwhelmingly positive presence of HBCU in the African American community, the academic training of students who graduate from

Joretta Joseph

2007-01-01

434

African Americans Respond Poorly to Hepatitis C Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

African Americans have a significantly lower response rate to treatment for chronic hepatitis C than non-Hispanic Whites, according to a new study led by Duke University Medical Center researchers. Some African Americans--19 percent--did respond to the drug combination of peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. But in non-Hispanic Whites with the…

Black Issues in Higher Education, 2004

2004-01-01

435

Creating Caring and Nurturing Educational Environments for African American Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case study focuses on an African American High school in Alabama, the Treholm High School tracing its history for its 90 years until it was closed by court order in 1969, and emphasizing what it was about the school that made it effective in the teaching of African American students. In order to present a perspective on which educational…

Morris, Vivian Gunn; Morris, Curtis L.

436

A Profile of Bereavement Supports in African American Church Congregations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bereavement educators, counselors, clergy, and other specialists have observed that African Americans tend to under-utilize end-of-life palliative care services and general bereavement resources. The literature suggests that involving clergy in outreach to the African American community may be a viable strategy for developing bereavement supports.…

Moore, Penelope J.; Hazell, LaVone V.; Honeyghan, Edna M.

437

Patterns of Violent Behavior and Victimization among African American Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews types of reported problems among African American youth exposed to violence and victimization. A substantial number of African American youth reported being exposed to direct victimization while in transit to and from school. Discusses the impact of violence on mental health status, in that subjects exposed to violence exhibited…

McGee, Zina T.

1999-01-01

438

Focus on the African American Male: A Response.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses the problems of African-American males, and argues that a focus on high literacy for this population is an important strategy for addressing the crisis of education and incarceration. Suggests that literacy is essential to African-American males' participation in the economy. (JB)

Scales, Alice M.

1992-01-01

439

Mathematics Education: The Voice of African American and White Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several studies have provided evidence regarding factors that contribute to the mathematics achievement gap between African American and White students. Byrnes (2003) found that 45%-50% of the difference in White and African American students' performance in mathematics was associated with socioeconomic status, exposure to learning opportunities,…

King, Sharondrea R.

2010-01-01

440

Bilingualism and How it Impacts the African American Child  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the era of bilingualism increase in many states, African American children are some how being overlooked. There are many challenges for non-native Spanish speakers. Many of the school programs are focused on ESL (English as a Second Language), ELL (English Language Learner), or LEP (Limited English Proficiency) students. The authors provide recommendations on how African American children should be

Taiwanna D. Anthony; William A. Kritsonis

2006-01-01

441

Enriching Inclusive Learning: African Americans in Historic Costume  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educating students to embrace diversity and value all people is a core value of educators in family and consumer sciences (FCS). For instructors in FCS, integrating the contributions of African Americans--particularly in textiles and clothing--can be an inclusive learning opportunity. The authors compiled resources on African Americans and…

Ratute, Ashley; Marcketti, Sara B.

2009-01-01

442

Higher Education and the Early Education of African American Ministers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The education of African American ministers in the United States has been little researched. Numerous books address the profession of ministry and the education of Blacks in general, but most do not specifically address issues pertaining to the professional education of Black ministers. The majority of the hurdles African Americans faced were…

Cooks, Michael

2010-01-01

443

Teaching African-American History in the Age of Obama  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When the author proposed a spring course on major topics in African-American history, drawing a large enrollment was her chief concern. She had previously taught the course under a different title at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, a campus with a sizable African-American presence among students and faculty members. She now teaches…

Millward, Jessica

2009-01-01

444

Perceived Peer Norms and Sexual Intentions Among African American Preadolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the research was to examine whether perceived peer dating and sexual experience norms are related to attitudes toward dating and sexual behavior and to precoital and sexual intentions among African American preadolescents. Participants included 1,046 African American youth aged 9-12 years (M = 10.57 years). Youth completed a…

Wallace, Scyatta A.; Miller, Kim S.; Forehand, Rex

2008-01-01

445

Breast cancer in African American women: Epidemiology and tumor biology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This review of published data on the epidemiology, pathology, and molecular biology of breast cancer in African American women seeks to identify how the etiology and presentation of the disease differ from those in white women. The crossover from higher to lower age-specific incidence rates in African American women at age 45 cannot be explained by current data on

Bruce J. Trock

1996-01-01

446

Clustering of Risk Behaviours among African American Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: Individuals may engage in more than one risk behaviour at any given time. The extent to which risk behaviours cluster among African American adults has been largely unexplored. This study examined the prevalence and clustering of three risk behaviours among African American church members: smoking; low moderate-to-vigorous intensity…

Baruth, M.; Addy, C. L.; Wilcox, S.; Dowda, M.

2012-01-01

447

Barriers to Breastfeeding Among African American Adolescent Mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to define the barriers to breastfeeding in the inner city African American adolescent mother. The study was conducted at Johnnie Ruth Clarke Health Center in St. Petersburg, Florida from October 1999 to February 2000. The study population included 25 African American adolescent mothers between the ages of 15 and 21 years. The results indicate

Kim Brownell; Laurencia Hutton; Jacqueline Hartman; Sharon Dabrow

2002-01-01

448

Race and gender in play practices: young African American males  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present a study with young African American men, to gain a better understanding of the impacts of cultural and gender identity on play practices and to explore the relationship between cultural play practices and interest in computing. Our findings indicate that while young African American men play video games frequently, their objectives in playing may be

Betsy DiSalvo; Amy Bruckman

2010-01-01

449

Perceived Racism as a Predictor of Paranoia Among African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent theoretical models suggest that perceived racism acts as a stressor for African Americans and may be associated with a variety of negative psychological consequences, notably paranoia. Paranoia among African Americans is believed to reflect the lower end of the paranoia continuum based on experiences with racism. Thus, it may be beneficial to measure paranoia on a continuum, but few

Dennis R. Combs; David L. Penn; Jeffrey Cassisi; Chris Michael; Terry Wood; Jill Wanner; Scott Adams

2006-01-01

450

Culture: A Possible Predictor of Morality for African American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the ways in which cultural orientation (communalism and material well-being) and empathy influence the moral reasoning of African American middle to late adolescents. Specifically, this study utilized path analysis to investigate Ward's (1995) hypothesis that a communal orientation would promote morality among African American

Humphries, Marisha L.; Jagers, Robert J.

2009-01-01

451

African American Athletes’ Experiences of Race in Sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is a qualitative exploration of male and female African American athletes’ experiences of race and race discrimination with regard to specific incidents that occurred during their athletic careers. Eight African American athletes from different competitive levels and sports were interviewed to obtain a deeper understanding of their experiences of race and race discrimination and the role it played

Suzanne Malia Lawrence

2005-01-01

452

Dimensions of Academic Contingencies among African American College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing from existing literature, the authors conceptualized a two-dimensional framework of African American students' academic contingencies of self-worth. The results from exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses with a sample of African American college freshmen (N = 330) supported this prediction. Self-Worth Dependent academic…

Griffin, Tiffany Monique; Chavous, Tabbye; Cogburn, Courtney; Branch, LaToya; Sellers, Robert

2012-01-01

453

Resiliency Instructional Tactics: African American Students with Learning Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Schools and classrooms, if well conceived, can serve as protective environments for the positive development of African American students with learning disabilities (LD) (Keogh & Weisner, 1993). Many African American students who lack resiliency often struggle with life's challenges and may be predisposed to negative outcomes in life, so the focus…

Jones, Vita L.

2011-01-01

454

African-American Girls’ Dietary Intake while Watching Television  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Television viewing has been associated with childhood obesity, although the mechanisms that link television viewing to higher BMI have not been established. Therefore, our objectives, in this report, were to describe the amount and types of foods that African-American girls consume while watching television and to examine the associations between African-American girls’ BMI and the food they consume while

Donna M. Matheson; Yun Wang; Lisa M. Klesges; Bettina M. Beech; Helena C. Kraemer; Thomas N. Robinson

2004-01-01

455

Barriers to Effective Mental Health Services for African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many African Americans—especially the most marginal—suffer from mental health problems and would benefit from timely access to appropriate forms of care. However, few seek treatment from outpatient providers in the specialty mental health sector and those who do are at risk of dropping out. African Americans visit providers in the general medical sector, although they use another hypothesized alternative to

Lonnie R. Snowden

2001-01-01

456

The Perceived Realism of African American Portrayals on Television  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on questionnaire responses from 412 undergraduate students, this study sought to examine specific perceptions (i.e., occupational roles, negative personality characteristics, low achieving status, and positive stereotypes) of African American portrayals on television. Results revealed that television viewers perceive the occupational roles and personality characteristics that African Americans portray on television as real or true to life. On the contrary,

Narissra M. Punyanunt-Carter

2008-01-01

457

Mentoring African American Faculty in Predominantly White Institutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mentoring has been identified as a method to facilitate the professional growth and development of African American faculty and to increase their representation in predominantly White institutions. However, there is little empirical evidence from studies of this group to suggest that this is the case. This article presents findings from a study of the mentoring experiences of African American faculty

Linda C. Tillman

2001-01-01

458

THE TELEVISION PORTRAYALS OF AFRICAN AMERICANS AND RACIAL ATTITUDES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Television often portrays African Americans in unfavorable positions in comparison to Caucasians. Typically these unfavorable depictions reinforce negative stereotypes associated with African Americans. Research indicates that television portrayals can influence people's attitudes toward one another. A question left unanswered by current research: are mass-mediated images as influential at reversing or counteracting stereotypes as they are at reinforcing them? An experiment

JONI G. V. DUBRIEL

459

Mattering: The African American Experience in Historically White Fraternities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore the issues of race and mattering in relation to African American participation within historically White fraternities. Participant perspectives were obtained through six interviews with African American males at four collegial institutions within the Southeastern Region of the United States. Critical Race Theory was utilized to framed issues surrounding race in a

Eric J. Summers

2010-01-01

460

Gender Role Identity and Stress in African American Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Womanism is a feminist perspective that has recently been appropriated for social work practice with African American women (Littlefleld, in press). It emphasizes the centrality of gender role in African American women's psychosocial adaptation, and asserts that the archetypal gender role for this group incorporates both nurturing and economic providing functions. This gender role fluidity has been characterized both as

Melissa B. Littlefield

2004-01-01

461

"Teaching while Black": Narratives of African American Student Affairs Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

African American faculty have historically been underrepresented within predominantly white institutions (PWIs) and deal with academic isolation, marginalization of their scholarship, and racial hostility. Little is known about the experiences of African American faculty who teach in student affairs graduate programs. The purpose of this study was…

Patton, Lori D.; Catching, Christopher

2009-01-01

462

76 FR 32851 - African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...8684 of May 31, 2011 African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2011 By the President...United States of America A Proclamation The music of our Nation has always spoken to the...shared values. During African-American Music Appreciation Month, we honor the...

2011-06-07

463

75 FR 32075 - African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...8527 of May 28, 2010 African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2010 By the President...United States of America A Proclamation Music can tell a story, assuage our sorrows...including the African- American community, music unites individuals through a shared...

2010-06-07

464

The Impact of Law on African American Males  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article analyzes whether federal and state constitutional and statutory provisions sufficiently protect African American male students from racism in public education. The first section explains how structural racism and unconscious racism have worked in tandem to prevent many African American males from experiencing the promise of equal educational opportunity in Brown v. Board of Education (1954). The second section

Preston C. Green

2008-01-01

465

HIV Treatment in African Americans: Challenges and Opportunities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews the current standard of care for HIV infection as well as how health disparities in the HIV care of African Americans present challenges for both providers and patients. The potential side effects in these antiretroviral treatment regimens that may be a source of additional challenges in treating African Americans are highlighted. A brief review of these issues

Victoria A. Cargill; Valerie E. Stone; M. Renee Robinson

2004-01-01

466

Retention Issues and Models for African American Male Athletes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focuses on the special challenges and benefits college athletes encounter. This in-depth study of 31 male athletes (part of an ongoing survey of 2,395 African-American students) points to the need for supported and structured programs. Offers three effective models for organizing initiatives to retain African-American male student athletes. (EMK)

Person, Dawn R.; LeNoir, Kenya M.

1997-01-01

467

Experiences of African American Empowerment: A Jamesian Perspective on Agency  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay draws from the work of William James and three African American pragmatists, W.E.B. Du Bois, Ralph Ellison and Cornel West, to explore the moral relevance of the self as an empowered agent among African American youth. The focus is on Jamesian agency as a function of the individual's awareness of options in context, the self-empowerment…

Curtis-Tweed, Phyllis

2003-01-01

468

African-American College Students' Perceptions Of Sexual Coercion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While the phenomenon of sexual coercion has been studied extensively, little is known about African-American college students' perceptions about verbal sexual coercion. Using a phenomenological approach, the researchers conducted five focus group interviews with 39 African-American students (20 females, 19 males) at a large Midwestern university…

Mouzon, LaTonya D.; Battle, Alicia; Clark, Kevin P.; Coleman, Stephanie; Ogletree, Roberta J.

2005-01-01

469

Family influences on the career development of African American children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate how families influence the career education and career awareness of African American students in grades K-3. Existing literature indicated that scholars have focused their attention on the career education of college level students and counselors working with students in high schools; however, research did not indicate how families influence African American children’s

Elaine Roundtree Love

2009-01-01

470

African Americans and Recovery from Severe Mental Illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This hermeneutic phenomenological study examined the lived experience of African-American persons recovering from serious and persistent mental illness (SPMI). Semi-structured interviews were conducted at three time points (6, 12, and 18 months) with nine African Americans with SPMI. A culturally sensitive perspective informed the data analysis. Interviews were transcribed, read, and coded to cluster thematic aspects in each case and

Marilyn Peterson Armour; William Bradshaw; David Roseborough

2009-01-01

471

Confluent paranoia and memory deficits in schizophrenia among African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whether or not there is a cultural dimension to paranoid symptom expression among African Americans has been debated for decades. A companion study has demonstrated the significance of culture as a moderator variable in African Americans expression of paranoia in terms of cognitive deficits among schizophrenics. Also, there is evidence that confluent paranoia or the interaction between culture and pathology

Arthur L. Whaley; John Dubose; Courtney Harris

2012-01-01

472

African American Women and Breastfeeding: An Integrative Literature Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to present a review of literature regarding factors that influence breastfeeding intentions, initiation, and duration in the African American population. Research related to health disparities experienced by African Americans in the United States, as well as research regarding the protective benefits of breastfeeding for those specific health disparities, are also presented. Community and institutional

Becky S. Spencer; Jane S. Grassley

2012-01-01

473

Counseling Groups for African American Women: A Focus on Spirituality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains cultural and spiritual traditions within African American women's experience that form the foundation for group counseling strategies. Reviews literature regarding African American women's experience in groups. Explains group interventions such as art, music, dance, imagery, journaling, and rituals that can help transcend, empower, and…

Williams, Carmen Braun; Frame, Marsha Wiggins; Green, Evelyn

1999-01-01

474

Counseling African American Men: A Contextualized Humanistic Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Historically, the humanity of African American men has been attacked in a cruel and vicious manner. African American men have been categorized as animalistic beings without intellectual or moral qualities. In this article, it is argued that a contextualized humanistic approach can offer counselors an important corrective to the typical dehumanized…

Johnson, Phillip D.

2006-01-01

475

Parental influences on academic performance in African-American students  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the relationship between parental influences and academic outcomes for African-American students. Secondary data analysis was conducted on the National Survey of Family and Household data set. Multiple regression analysis showed that parenting style (nurture and control) and parental involvement significantly predicted academic outcomes. Research has traditionally focused on the reasons for the failure of African-American students to succeed

Lorraine C. Taylor; Ivora D. Hinton; Melvin N. Wilson

1995-01-01

476

Boys into Men: Raising Our African American Teenage Sons.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide to rearing African American boys offers simple and effective strategies for problem-solving, improving communication, and instilling a positive racial identity. The book draws on strong African American family values and cultural and spiritual strengths. The chapters are: (1) "You Must Act As If It Is Impossible To Fail: Challenges in…

Boyd-Franklin, Nancy; Franklin, A. J.

477

Culturally Competent Counseling for Religious and Spiritual African American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Religion and spirituality are deeply rooted in traditional African American culture. Data suggest that African American adolescents maintain higher baseline rates of religious activities and beliefs than their peers (Bachman, Johnston, & O'Malley, 2005; Smith, Faris, Denton, & Regnerus, 2003). Recognizing these data, this article examines…

Moore-Thomas, Cheryl; Day-Vines, Norma L.

2008-01-01

478

Brother to Brother: Success for African-American Males  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses Brother to Brother, a program designed to help African-American men stay in college and graduate. St. Petersburg College formed this program seven years ago as a means not only of recruiting male African-American students, but also to identify issues that cause them to be at risk for dropping out and to use retention…

Henningsen, Stephanie

2005-01-01

479

African American History as Depicted in Recently Published Children's Books  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Exciting stories about African Americans in recently published historical fiction books for children concern Pea Island Life-Station, a private school for African American girls, a biracial slave, a black woman who homesteads for land in 1889, and an orphan who travels on his own to Flint, Michigan, during the Depression. Much of this history…

Lamme, Linda Leonard; Astengo, Be; Lowery, Ruth McCoy; Masla, Diane; Russo, Roseanne; Savage, Debbie; Shelton, Nancy Rankie

2002-01-01

480

Raising African American Student Achievement: California Goals, Local Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although academic performance is a concern, African American students represent less than 8 percent of California's K-12 students, and at times get lost in California policy debates about improving student performance. Findings of this study indicate that: (1) California's African American students are concentrated in relatively few counties and…

EdSource, 2008

2008-01-01

481

"Workin' on the Railroad": African American Labor History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the spring of 2003, the author worked with a team of eighth grade teachers at Asheville Middle School in North Carolina on a project that combined fine art, music, the history of the railroads, and the African American experience in the state and nation. In her classroom, students interviewed a retired train conductor, who was African American,…

Maher, Rebecca

2004-01-01

482

Access to Literacy Programs: Perspectives of African-American Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

African Americans are underrepresented in adult literacy programs. African-American adult literacy students were interviewed on their reasons for program attendance and nonattendance. Timing was the most important factor determining attendance. Subjects believed the educational system made learning difficult for them, and increased literacy would…

Denny, Verna Haskins

1992-01-01

483

African-American Grandmothers as Health Educators in the Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than 18,000 adolescents die each year in the United States from bicycle, motorcycle, car, and truck accidents. This study sought to understand the role of African-American grandmothers as prevention-oriented health educators in the family. Full Model Fitted Regression Analyses were conducted on a sample of African-American grandmothers (N =…

Watson, Jeffrey A.; Randolph, Suzanne M.; Lyons, James L.

2005-01-01

484

African Americans' Access to Vocational Rehabilitation Services after Antidiscrimination Legislation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine changes in African Americans' access to occasional rehabilitation (VR) services subsequent to landmark legislative and judicial antidiscrimination provisions of the mid-20th century. This study compared African American VR access before the antidiscrimination legislation in 1937 and after the legislation…

Mwachofi, Ari K.

2008-01-01

485

Promoting Achievement for African American Males through Group Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors describe how the effective use of groups can promote academic achievement for adolescent African American males. Literature regarding adolescents' and African Americans' experience with groups is reviewed. The authors provide information on academic disidentification and achievement gaps, both critical to understanding the problem of…

Bailey, Deryl F.; Bradbury-Bailey, Mary E.

2007-01-01

486

Local and External Language Standards in African American English  

Microsoft Academic Search

This investigation attempts to determine the social distribution and contextual shifting of African American English (AAE) within rural Southern African American communities. The study compares selective diagnostic AAE variables and features of speech rate and pause in the speech of three recognized sociopolitical leaders in public presentations and sociolinguistic interviews. The results show that there are not significant shifts in

Tyler Kendall; Walt Wolfram

2009-01-01

487

Educating African American Males: Examining Teacher Perceptions and Cultural Interpretations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For many decades, society has struggled with academic underachievement, particularly among African American males. Although a myriad of studies have identified significant causal factors of African American academic underachievement from the perspectives and circumstances of the student, limited studies focus on this problem from the perspective…

Rivers, Celeste A.

2010-01-01

488