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Sample records for agardh rhodomelaceae ceramiales

  1. Larvicidal Potential of the Halogenated Sesquiterpene (+)-Obtusol, Isolated from the Alga Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh (Ceramiales: Rhodomelaceae), against the Dengue Vector Mosquito Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Salvador-Neto, Orlando; Gomes, Simone Azevedo; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Machado, Fernanda Lacerda da Silva; Samuels, Richard Ian; Nunes da Fonseca, Rodrigo; Souza-Menezes, Jackson; Moraes, Jorge Luiz da Cunha; Campos, Eldo; Mury, Flávia Borges; Silva, José Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Dengue is considered a serious public health problem in many tropical regions of the world including Brazil. At the moment, there is no viable alternative to reduce dengue infections other than controlling the insect vector, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus. In the continuing search for new sources of chemicals targeted at vector control, natural products are a promising alternative to synthetic pesticides. In our work, we investigated the toxicity of a bioactive compound extracted from the red alga Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh. The initial results demonstrated that crude extracts, at a concentration of 5 ppm, caused pronounced mortality of second instar A. aegypti larvae. Two molecules, identified as (-)-elatol and (+)-obtusol were subsequently isolated from crude extract and further evaluated. Assays with (-)-elatol showed moderate larvicidal activity, whereas (+)-obtusol presented higher toxic activity than (-)-elatol, with a LC50 value of 3.5 ppm. Histological analysis of the larvae exposed to (+)-obtusol revealed damage to the intestinal epithelium. Moreover, (+)-obtusol-treated larvae incubated with 2 µM CM-H₂DCFDA showed the presence of reactive oxygen species, leading us to suggest that epithelial damage might be related to redox imbalance. These results demonstrate the potential of (+)-obtusol as a larvicide for use against A. aegypti and the possible mode of action of this compound. PMID:26821032

  2. Larvicidal Potential of the Halogenated Sesquiterpene (+)-Obtusol, Isolated from the Alga Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh (Ceramiales: Rhodomelaceae), against the Dengue Vector Mosquito Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Neto, Orlando; Gomes, Simone Azevedo; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Machado, Fernanda Lacerda da Silva; Samuels, Richard Ian; Nunes da Fonseca, Rodrigo; Souza-Menezes, Jackson; Moraes, Jorge Luiz da Cunha; Campos, Eldo; Mury, Flávia Borges; Silva, José Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is considered a serious public health problem in many tropical regions of the world including Brazil. At the moment, there is no viable alternative to reduce dengue infections other than controlling the insect vector, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus. In the continuing search for new sources of chemicals targeted at vector control, natural products are a promising alternative to synthetic pesticides. In our work, we investigated the toxicity of a bioactive compound extracted from the red alga Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh. The initial results demonstrated that crude extracts, at a concentration of 5 ppm, caused pronounced mortality of second instar A. aegypti larvae. Two molecules, identified as (−)-elatol and (+)-obtusol were subsequently isolated from crude extract and further evaluated. Assays with (−)-elatol showed moderate larvicidal activity, whereas (+)-obtusol presented higher toxic activity than (−)-elatol, with a LC50 value of 3.5 ppm. Histological analysis of the larvae exposed to (+)-obtusol revealed damage to the intestinal epithelium. Moreover, (+)-obtusol-treated larvae incubated with 2 µM CM-H2DCFDA showed the presence of reactive oxygen species, leading us to suggest that epithelial damage might be related to redox imbalance. These results demonstrate the potential of (+)-obtusol as a larvicide for use against A. aegypti and the possible mode of action of this compound. PMID:26821032

  3. Reproductive morphology of Eucheumagelatinae (Esper) J. Agardh (Solieriaceae, Gigartinales, rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Mei; Xia, Bang-Mei

    1996-03-01

    Eucheuma gelatinae (Esper) J. Agardh has vegetative and reproductive features distinguishing it from other species of Eucheuma. The occurrence of reproductive nemathecia containing carpogonial branches, auxiliary cells and post-fertilization stages including gonimoblast and pericarp initiation, fusion cell formation stages and carposporophyte development are described and ilustrated for the first time for this species.

  4. DNA barcode assessment of Ceramiales (Rhodophyta) in the intertidal zone of the northwestern Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guoying; Wu, Feifei; Guo, Hao; Xue, Hongfan; Mao, Yunxiang

    2015-05-01

    A total of 142 specimens of Ceramiales (Rhodophyta) were collected each month from October 2011 to November 2012 in the intertidal zone of the northwestern Yellow Sea. These specimens covered 21 species, 14 genera, and four families. Cluster analyses show that the specimens had a high diversity for the three DNA markers, namely, partial large subunit rRNA gene (LSU), universal plastid amplicon (UPA), and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI). No intraspecific divergence was found in our collection for these markers, except for a 1-3 bp divergence in the COI of Ceramium kondoi, Symphyocladia latiuscula, and Neosiphonia japonica. Because short DNA markers were used, the phylogenetic relationships of higher taxonomic levels were hard to evaluate with poor branch support. More than half species of our collection failed to find their matched sequences owing to shortage information of DNA barcodes for macroalgae in GenBank or BOLD (Barcode of Life Data) Systems. Three specimens were presumed as Heterosiphonia crispella by cluster analyses on DNA barcodes assisted by morphological identification, which was the first record in the investigated area, implying that it might be a cryptic or invasive species in the coastal area of northwestern Yellow Sea. In the neighbor-joining trees of all three DNA markers, Heterosiphonia japonica converged with Dasya spp. and was distant from the other Heterosiphonia spp., implying that H. japonica had affinities to the genus Dasya. The LSU and UPA markers amplified and sequenced easier than the COI marker across the Ceramiales species, but the COI had a higher ability to discriminate between species.

  5. [Biological activity of lipids and photosynthetic pigments of Sargassum pallidum C. Agardh].

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, N I; Martyias, E A; Logvinov, S V; Busarova, N G

    2014-01-01

    The biological activity of lipids and photosynthetic pigments of the kelp Sargassum pallidum (Turner) C. Agardh has been studied. Free fatty acids and their esters demonstrated considerable antimicrobial activity against bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus[ital] and Escherichia coli), yeast-like fungi (Candida albicans), and opportunistic pathogenic (Aspergilius niger) and phytopathogenic (Fusarium oxysporum, and Septoria glycines) fungi. Glyceroglycolipids and neutral lipids demonstrated moderate activity. Fucoxanthin and chlorophylls weakly suppressed the growth of microorganisms. None of the studied substances demonstrated activity against Ehrlich's carcinoma. It was shown that the season of weed harvesting affected both antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of different lipids due to changes in their fatty acid composition. PMID:25272757

  6. Geographic Distribution of Natural Products Produced by the Red Alga Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernanda L S; Duarte, Heitor M; Gestinari, Lísia M S; Cassano, Valéria; Kaiser, Carlos R; Soares, Angélica R

    2016-07-01

    In order to evaluate the chemical diversity of Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh, a widely distributed seaweed in Brazilian coast, a phytochemical study was carried out with algae collected from six different locations along the Southeast Brazilian coast. Purified compounds were identified by MS and NMR techniques. The chemical profiles of lipophilic extracts were obtained by GC/MS for each population. In total, 15 compounds were described. The sesquiterpene composition accounted for 49 - 63% of the GC/MS chromatogram area. The discrimination of three chemotypes was done by the use of HCA on GC/MS chromatograms. They were also analyzed by the PCA and, together with peak area analysis, it was possible to discriminate all populations by the main variation of elatol, obtusol, rogiolol, and triquinane. The results revealed the high diversity of sesquiterpene composition among populations of L. dendroidea. Curiously, the within and among population variation of elatol and obtusol suggested a biochemical interplay on the content of these compounds. More studies are necessary to understand the patterns of chemical diversity and compound variation within and among populations of L. dendroidea. PMID:27224289

  7. Acute toxicity study and antipyretic effect of the brown alga Turbinaria conoides (J. Agardh) Kuetz.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Sadish; Kumar, Y; Khan, M S Y; Anbu, J; Sam, K G

    2009-01-01

    The active principles of brown alga, Turbinaria conoides (J.Agardh) Kuetz. (Sargassaceae) was extracted with n-hexane, cyclohexane, methanol and ethanol-water (1:1) and investigated for acute toxicity and antipyretic activity. Phytochemical analysis of the extracts revealed the presence of steroids, flavonoids and reducing sugars. Acute toxicity study was performed in Wistar rats after administration of extracts orally. No mortality was observed up to the dose of 5 g/kg for methanol and ethanol-water (1:1) extracts whereas n-hexane and cyclohexane extracts were found to be toxic at the dose levels of 1 g/kg and 2 g/kg respectively. In biochemical analysis, n-hexane, cyclohexane and ethanol-water (1:1) extracts caused a significant (P<0.01) increase in serum cholesterol, protein and alkaline phosphatase levels. In haematological studies, a significant difference was observed for cyclohexane and ethanol-water (1:1) extracts in polymorphs, lymphocytes and eosinophils when compared to the control. Antipyretic activity of extracts (100-400 mg/kg doses) was carried out on yeast-induced pyrexia in rats. Cyclohexane extract exhibited more significant antipyretic activity (P<0.01) than the other extracts at a dose of 200 mg/kg (54.43%), which was comparable to that of paracetamol at a dose of 33 mg/kg. The findings validated the use of this brown alga in traditional cure of children's fever. PMID:20448848

  8. Early development of Costaria costata (C. Agardh) Saunders and cultivation trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Gang; Liu, Jidong; Wang, Gaoge; Yao, Jianting; Wang, Xiuliang; Duan, Delin

    2010-07-01

    Costaria costata (C. Agardh) Saunders is one of common kelps distributed in many coastal areas worldwide; however, in China, no reports have been made on cultivation of the genus. To investigate potential cultivation of the species in the northern part of China, trials on isolation and preservation of the gametophytes were conducted using C. costata from Korea; growth and development of the gametophytes were observed. We showed that at 10±1°C, 60 μmol m-2s-1 and 12:12 h (L:D), freshly released zoospores settled down within 1 hour, and then developed into the primary cell during the following 2 days. After a vegetative growth phase lasting 6-8 days, female gametophytes became 3-4 times larger in diameter than that of the primary cell, but still remained at a unicellular stage, while male gametophytes divided into 4-10 cells with only a slight change in size. Fertilization occurred within 10 days after the zoospores were released from the sporangia, and the apical and basal tissues of the juvenile sporophyte divided and differentiated into the blade and stipe. Temperature and irradiance influenced gametophytic vegetative growth and developmental patterns. Generally, low irradiance (15 μmol m-2s-1 and 30 μmol m-2s-1) was unfavorable to the induction of fertility, but it enhanced female gametophyte division. The optimal conditions for vegetative growth were 15°C and 30 μmol m-2s-1. After transplantation of the juvenile seedlings and after eight months cultivation, the harvested mature blade reached 194 cm in length and 32.7 cm in width. Our study proves that it is feasible to implement propagation and large scale cultivation of C. costata in northern China.

  9. Effects of sporophyll storage on giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera (Agardh) bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Gully, J.R.; Bottomley, J.P.; Baird, R.B.

    1999-07-01

    The giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera (Agardh) is a US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA)-approved west coast marine species for chronic toxicity monitoring and compliance in the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). The protocol allows field-collected sporophylls to be stored for up to 24 h at 9 to 12 C prior to use. However, the effects of sporophyll storage on the bioassay results have not been fully investigated, particularly with kelp collected from beds south of Point Conception, CA, USA. Therefore, 13 matched-pair reference toxicant bioassays using fresh and stored sporophylls collected from a subtidal kelp bed near Laguna Beach, CA, USA, were performed and compared. The results indicate that a lower percentage of spores germinate and the germ tube lengths are reduced when stored sporophylls are used. The intratest precision of the germination endpoint decreased as evidenced by significant increases in the percent minimum significant difference (%MSD) statistic. The intertest precision also decreased in the germination endpoint as demonstrated by significant increases in the coefficient of variation (CV) values at four effect levels. Conversely, a significant reduction in the CVs was observed in the germ tube length data, possibly as a consequence of the decrease in germ tube length associated with storage. Finally, significant decreases in mean effect concentrations in the germination endpoint in tests using stored sporophylls indicated that storage increased the sensitivity of the spores to the toxic effects of CuCl{sub 2}. The toxicological sensitivity and intratest precision of the germ tube length endpoint were not significantly affected by storage of the sporophylls. The effects of sporophyll storage resulted in a high frequency of invalid tests, lower statistical power, less effective quality assurance standards, and apparent bias in the observed toxicity of CuCl{sub 2}.

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of ethanolic extract from Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophage activation via NF-κB pathway regulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Eun; Jung, Yun Chan; Jung, Inae; Lee, Hee-Woo; Youn, Hwa-Young; Lee, Jun Sik

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is major symptom of the innate immune response by infection of microbes. Macrophages, one of immune response related cells, play a role in inflammatory response. Recent studies reported that various natural products can regulate the activation of immune cells such as macrophage. Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh is one of brown algae. Recently, various seaweeds including brown algae have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, anti-inflammatory effects of Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh are still unknown. In this study, we investigated anti-inflammatory effects of ethanolic extract of Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh (ESH) on RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. The ESH was extracted from dried Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh with 70% ethanol and then lyophilized at -40 °C. ESH was not cytotoxic to RAW 264.7, and nitric oxide (NO) production induced by LPS-stimulated macrophage activation was significantly decreased by the addition of 200 μg/mL of ESH. Moreover, ESH treatment reduced mRNA level of cytokines, including IL-1β, and pro-inflammatory genes such as iNOS and COX-2 in LPS-stimulated macrophage activation in a dose-dependent manner. ESH was found to elicit anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting ERK, p-p38 and NF-κB phosphorylation. In addition, ESH inhibited the release of IL-1β in LPS-stimulated macrophages. These results suggest that ESH elicits anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-stimulated macrophage activation via the inhibition of ERK, p-p38, NF-κB, and pro-inflammatory gene expression. PMID:25140761

  11. Morphological study of the genus Herposiphonia (Rhodophyta, Rhodomelaceae) on the coast of eastern Guangdong, China, with a description of H. pinnata sp. nov.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lanping; Tan, Huaqiang; Zhang, Quanliang; Zeng, Lingzhao; Huang, Bingxin

    2016-03-01

    We present a taxonomic study of taxa of the red algae genus Herposiphonia (Rhodophyta, Rhodomelaceae), collected from the coast of eastern Guangdong, China. We made detailed morphological studies and considered recent taxonomic criteria for species delimitation, and are making the first report of five different species on the coast of Guangdong, including a new species. The species identified were H. caespitosa Tseng, H. hollenbergii Dawson, H. pecten - veneris (Harvey) Falkenberg, H. subdisticha Okamura and H. pinnata Ding and Tan sp. nov. H. pinnata sp. nov. is characterized by bright green thalli; most parts of the feathery thalli are free of the substratum; determinate branches and indeterminate branches are arranged in a chaotic sequence; the primary axis has bare segments; the determinate branch has 9-11 periaxial cells per segment; vegetative trichoblasts are abundant; and tetrasporangia are formed on the middle of the determinate branch with 1-8 successive segments in a single rectilinear series. This paper is also the first record of sporophyte plants of H. pecten-veneris.

  12. The plastid genome of the red alga Laurencia.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Heroen; Costa, Joana F

    2015-06-01

    We present the 174,935 nt long plastid genome of the red alga Laurencia sp. JFC0032. It is the third plastid genome characterized for the largest order of red algae (Ceramiales). The circular-mapping plastid genome is small compared to most florideophyte red algae, and our comparisons show a trend toward smaller plastid genome sizes in the family Rhodomelaceae, independent from a similar trend in Cyanidiophyceae. The Laurencia genome is densely packed with 200 annotated protein-coding genes (188 widely conserved, 3 open reading frames shared with other red algae and 9 hypothetical coding regions). It has 29 tRNAs, a single-copy ribosomal RNA cistron, a tmRNA, and the RNase P RNA. PMID:26986672

  13. Antimicrobial and Cytotoxic Activities of Turbinariaconoides (J.Agardh) Kuetz

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Shanmugam, Sadish; Kumar, Yatendra; SardarYar, Khan Mohammad; Gupta, Vivek; De Clercq, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Brown alga, Turbinariaconoideswas successively extracted with n-hexane, cyclohexane, methanol and ethanol:water (1:1). The extracts were evaluated for antibacterial and antifungal activities by disc diffusion method. Minimal inhibitory concentration was determined for active extracts by broth dilution method. The antiviral activity and cytotoxicity of the extracts were tested in human embryonic lung (HEL) cells (herpes simplex virus-1, herpes simplex virus-2, vaccinia virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and herpes simplex virus-1 TK- KOS ACVr), human epithelial (HeLa) cells (vesicular stomatitis virus and coxsackie virus B4) and Vero cells (parainfluenza-3 virus, reovirus-1, sindbis virus coxsackie virus B4 and puntatoro virus). The results revealed that extracts exhibited cytotoxicity ranged from 20 to >100 μg/mL. Moderate activity was demonstrated by n-hexane and cyclohexane extracts against viruses, whereas methanol and ethanol:water (1:1) extracts were not active. Ethanol:water (1:1) presented neither antibacterial nor antifungal activity against tested organisms. Cyclohexane extract possessed a broad array of antibacterial activity and exhibited remarkable antifungal property. It is noteworthy that minimal inhibitory concentration of cyclohexane extract against Aspergillusnigeris comparable with that of clotrimazole. This potentiality demonstrates that it could be used to treat bacterial and fungal infections. PMID:24381606

  14. Sesquiterpenes from the Brazilian red alga Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh.

    PubMed

    da Silva Machado, Fernanda Lacerda; Ventura, Thatiana Lopes Biá; Gestinari, Lísia Mônica de Souza; Cassano, Valéria; Resende, Jackson Antônio Lamounier Camargos; Kaiser, Carlos Roland; Lasunskaia, Elena B; Muzitano, Michelle Frazão; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Two new chamigrane sesquiterpenes 1-2 and three known compounds 3-5 were isolated from a lipophilic extract of the red alga Laurencia dendroidea collected from the Southeastern Brazilian coast. Dendroidone (1) and dendroidiol (2) were isolated from samples collected at Biscaia Inlet, Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro and at Manguinhos Beach, Serra, Espírito Santo, respectively. Debromoelatol (3), obtusane (4) and (1S*,2S*,3S*,5S*,8S*,9S*)-2,3,5,9-tetramethyltricyclo[6.3.0.0¹·⁵]undecan-2-ol (5) were obtained from specimens collected at Vermelha Beach, Parati, Rio de Janeiro. The structures of new compounds were elucidated by extensive NMR (¹H-, ¹³C-, COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY) and high resolution mass spectrometry analysis. Additionally, the absolute configuration of compound 2 was assigned by X-ray analysis. Full spectroscopic data is described for the first time for compound 3. Anti-inflammatory and antimycobacterial activities of compounds 2-5 were evaluated. Compounds 3-5 inhibited the release of inflammatory mediator NO while TNF-α levels were only affected by 3. All compounds tested displayed moderate antimycobacterial action. PMID:24642907

  15. 24-Branched Δ5 sterols from Laurencia papillosa red seaweed with antibacterial activity against human pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kavita, Kumari; Singh, Vijay Kumar; Jha, Bhavanath

    2014-04-01

    Methanol extract of thirty-eight seaweeds samples were first screened against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051) and -negative (Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Pseudomonas aerugenosa ATCC 9027) bacteria. Laurencia papillosa (Ceramiales, Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) gave maximum antimicrobial activity against these bacteria. It was finally tested against four clinical Gram-negative isolates (E. coli, P. aerugenosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Shigella flexineri) and exhibited antibacterial activity. The extract was fractionated by column chromatography and the active fraction was identified as a cholesterol derivative, 24-propylidene cholest-5-en-3β-ol using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and FT-IR spectroscopic analysis also supported the structure of the compound. The minimum inhibitory concentration ranged from 1.2 to 1.7 μg/mL (IC50) against clinical isolates. This is the first report of antibacterial activity of this cholesterol derivative. This compound could be exploited as potential lead molecule against broad spectrum drug development. The results also affirm the potential of seaweeds as an important natural source of antimicrobial compounds for pharmaceutical industries. PMID:23910454

  16. Simulation of the clonal growth of Bostrychia radicans (Ceramiales-Rhodophyta) using Lindenmayer systems.

    PubMed

    Collado-Vides, L; Gómez-Alcaraz, G; Rivas-Lechuga, G; Gómez-Gutierrez, V

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model for the clonal growth of the alga Bostrychia radicans was constructed based on architectural growth rules and Lindenmayer systems. The sequence of theoretical growth and invasive strategy of space is shown in several graphical schemes which represent different steps of the model. We postulate that Bostrychia radicans has a 'phalanx' strategy of colonization (Lovett Doust, L. 1981. J. Ecol. 69, 743-755.) based on the biological interpretation of the model and field observations. PMID:9146832

  17. Species diversity of the genus Osmundea (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta) in the Macaronesian region.

    PubMed

    Machín-Sánchez, María; Rousseau, Florence; Le Gall, Line; Cassano, Valéria; Neto, Ana I; Sentíes, Abel; T Fujii, Mutue; Gil-Rodríguez, María Candelaria

    2016-08-01

    Species diversity within the genus Osmundea in the Macaronesian region was explored by conducting a comprehensive sampling in the Azores, the Canary, and the Madeira archipelagos. Toward identification, all specimens were first observed alive to verify the absence of corps en cerise, a diagnostic character for the genus and morphometric data were measured (thallus length and width, first-order branches length and width, branchlets length and width, cortical cell length and width in surface view, cortical cell length and width in transverse section). Specimens were sequenced for COI-5P (39 specimens) and three species delimitation methods (Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent, Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery method, and Poisson Tree Processes) were used to assess the threshold between infra- and interspecific relationships. Subsequently, one or several sequences of plastid-encoded large subunit of RuBisCO (21 specimens) per delimited species were generated to assess the phylogenetic relationships among Macaronesian Osmundea. Moreover, for each delineated species, vegetative and reproductive anatomy was thoroughly documented and, when possible, specimens were either assigned to existing taxa or described as novel species. This integrative approach has provided data for (i) the presence of O. oederi, O. pinnatifida, and O. truncata in Macaronesia; (ii) the proposal of two novel species, O. prudhommevanreinei sp. nov. and O. silvae sp. nov.; and (iii) evidence of an additional species referred as "Osmundea sp.1," which is a sister taxon of O. hybrida. PMID:27221970

  18. Host specificity and growth of kelp gametophytes symbiotic with filamentous red algae (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Charlene B.; Garbary, David J.; Kim, Kwang Young; Chiasson, David M.

    2004-02-01

    Kelp gametophytes were previously observed in nature living endophytically in red algal cell walls. Here we examine the interactions of two kelp species and six red algae in culture. Gametophytes of Nereocystis luetkeana (Mertens) Postels et Ruprecht became endophytic in the cell walls of Griffithsia pacifica Kylin and Antithamnion defectum Kylin, and grew epiphytically in high abundance on G. japonica Okamura and Aglaothamnion oosumiense Itono. Alaria esculenta (Linnaeus) Greville from the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia became endophytic in Aglaothamnion oosumiense, Antithamnion defectum, Callithamnion sp., G. japonica, G. pacifica, and Pleonosporium abysicola Gardner, all from the Pacific Ocean. Some cultures were treated with phloroglucinol before infection to thicken the cell walls. The endophytic gametophytes were smaller and grew more slowly than gametophytes epiphytic on the same host. N. luetkeana failed to become endophytic in some of the potential hosts, and this may reflect host specificity, or culture artifacts. This work improves our understanding of the process of infection of red algae by kelp gametophytes, and broadens our knowledge of host specificity in endophytic symbioses.

  19. Induction and cultivation of cloned filaments of Polysiphonia urceolata (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinxia; Shao, Kuishuang; Cheng, Bin; Lu, Qinqin; Zhou, Baicheng

    2011-11-01

    A filamentous clone of Polysiphonia urceolata was regenerated from segments cut from the fronds of gametophytes. Unlike wild thalli with short virgate branchlets, the clone was filamentous with few branches. Many transparent trichoblasts arose from pericentral cells during the induction culture, but these were seldom observed during normal growth. The trichoblasts were uniseriate, often colorless, and formed lobed rhizoids rapidly when they came into contact with solid substrates. In addition to morphological characteristics, the photosynthetic properties and growth conditions of the clone differed from those of the mother plant. Cross-gradient light and temperature culture experiments revealed that the most favorable conditions for culture of the filamentous clone were 22°C and 95-120 μE/(m2·s) light intensity. The photosynthetic light saturation value for filaments was approx. 100 μE/(m2·s), which is far lower than that of wild thalli. These results could be used to develop techniques for mass cultures of P. urceolata in photobioreactors for production of seed stock or bioactive products.

  20. Isolation, expression and characterization of rbcL gene from Ulva prolifera J. Agardh (Ulvophyceae, Chlorophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhanru; Li, Wei; Guo, Hui; Duan, Delin

    2015-12-01

    Ulva prolifera is a typical green alga in subtidal areas and can grow tremendously fast. A highly efficient Rubisco enzyme which is encoded by UpRbcL gene may contribute to the rapid growth. In this study, the full-length UpRbcL open reading frame (ORF) was identified, which encoded a protein of 474 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of UpRbcL sequences revealed that Chlorophyta had a closer genetic relationship with higher plants than with Rhodophyta and Phaeophyta. The two distinct residues (aa11 and aa91) were presumed to be unique for Rubisco catalytic activity. The predicted three-dimensional structure showed that one α/β-barrel existed in the C-terminal region, and the sites for Mg2+ coordination and CO2 fixation were also located in this region. Gene expression profile indicated that UpRbcL was expressed at a higher level under light exposure than in darkness. When the culture temperature reached 35°C, the expression level of UpRbcL was 2.5-fold lower than at 15°C, and the carboxylase activity exhibited 13.8-fold decrease. UpRbcL was heterologously expressed in E. coli and was purified by Ni2+ affinity chromatography. The physiological and biochemical characterization of recombinant Rubisco will be explored in the future.

  1. TRANSPORT AND DEFENSIVE ROLE OF ELATOL AT THE SURFACE OF THE RED SEAWEED LAURENCIA OBTUSA (CERAMIALES, RHODOPHYTA)(1).

    PubMed

    Sudatti, Daniela B; Rodrigues, Silvana V; Coutinho, Ricardo; Da Gama, Bernardo A P; Salgado, Leonardo T; Amado Filho, Gilberto M; Pereira, Renato C

    2008-06-01

    Natural within-thallus concentrations of elatol produced by Laurencia obtusa (Huds.) J. V. Lamour. inhibit herbivory and prevent fouling. However, elatol occurs in larger amounts within the thallus compared with the quantities from the surface of this alga. We evaluated whether the surface elatol concentrations inhibit both herbivory and fouling and whether the content of corps en cerise can be transferred to the external cell walls. Surface elatol concentrations did not inhibit herbivory by sea urchins, settlement of barnacle larvae, or mussel attachment. Evidence of a connection between the corps en cerise, where elatol is probably stored, and the cell wall of L. obtusa was based on channel-like membranous connections that transport vesicles from the corps to the cell wall region. Therefore, L. obtusa presents a specific process of chemical transport between the cell storage structures and the plant surface. We hypothesized that if high amounts of elatol are capable of inhibiting herbivory and fouling, if the tested organisms are ecologically relevant, and if elatol really occurs on the surface of L. obtusa and this seaweed can transport this compound to its surface, the low natural concentration of defensive chemicals on the surface of L. obtusa is probably not absolute but may be variable according to environmental conditions. We also hypothesized that herbivory and fouling would not exert the same selective force for the production of defensive chemicals on L. obtusa's surface since the low concentrations of elatol were inefficient to inhibit either processes or distinguish selective pressures. PMID:27041418

  2. Patterns of genetic diversity of the cryptogenic red alga Polysiphonia morrowii (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta) suggest multiple origins of the Atlantic populations.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Alexandre; Destombe, Christophe; Kim, Byeongseok; Mauger, Stéphane; Raffo, María Paula; Kim, Myung Sook; Le Gall, Line

    2016-08-01

    The red alga Polysiphonia morrowii, native to the North Pacific (Northeast Asia), has recently been reported worldwide. To determine the origin of the French and Argentine populations of this introduced species, we compared samples from these two areas with samples collected in Korea and at Hakodate, Japan, the type locality of the species. Combined analyses of chloroplastic (rbcL) and mitochondrial (cox1) DNA revealed that the French and Argentine populations are closely related and differ substantially from the Korean and Japanese populations. The genetic structure of P. morrowii populations from South Atlantic and North Atlantic, which showed high haplotype diversity compared with populations from the North Pacific, suggested the occurrence of multiple introduction events from areas outside of the so-called native regions. Although similar, the French and Argentine populations are not genetically identical. Thus, the genetic structure of these two introduced areas may have been modified by cryptic and recurrent introduction events directly from Asia or from other introduced areas that act as introduction relays. In addition, the large number of private cytoplasmic types identified in the two introduced regions strongly suggests that local populations of P. morrowii existed before the recent detection of these invasions. Our results suggest that the most likely scenario is that the source population(s) of the French and Argentine populations was not located only in the North Pacific and/or that P. morrowii is a cryptogenic species. PMID:27547343

  3. Contrasting patterns of population structure and demographic history in cryptic species of Bostrychia intricata (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) from New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Muangmai, Narongrit; Fraser, Ceridwen I; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C

    2015-06-01

    Spatial patterns of genetic diversity provide insight into the demography and history of species. Morphologically similar but genetically distinct "cryptic" species are increasingly being recognized in marine organisms through molecular analyses. Such species are, on closer inspection, often discovered to display contrasting life histories or occasionally minor morphological differences; molecular tools can thus be useful indicators of diversity. Bostrychia intricata, a marine red alga, is widely distributed throughout the Southern Hemisphere and comprises many cryptic species. We used mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene sequences to assess the genetic variation, population genetic structure, and demographic history of B. intricata in New Zealand. Our results supported the existence of three cryptic species of B. intricata (N2, N4, and N5) in New Zealand. Cryptic species N4, which was found throughout New Zealand, showed a higher genetic diversity and wider distribution than the other two species, which were only found in the North Island and northern South Island. Our analyses showed low to moderate genetic differentiation among eastern North Island populations for cryptic species N2, but high differentiation among North and South Island populations for N4, suggesting different population structure between these cryptic species. Data also indicated that N2 has recently undergone population expansion, probably since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), while the higher genetic diversity in N4 populations suggests persistence in situ through the LGM. The contrasting population structures and inferred demographic histories of these species highlight that life history can vary greatly even among morphologically indistinguishable taxa. PMID:26986671

  4. Assessment of four molecular markers as potential DNA barcodes for red algae Kappaphycus Doty and Eucheuma J. Agardh (Solieriaceae, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Tan, Ji; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi; Hong, Dang Diem; Sunarpi, H; Hurtado, Anicia Q

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been a major advancement in the field of taxonomy, seeing much effort put into the barcoding of wide taxa of organisms, macro and microalgae included. The mitochondrial-encoded cox1 and plastid-encoded rbcL has been proposed as potential DNA barcodes for rhodophytes, but are yet to be tested on the commercially important carrageenophytes Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. This study gauges the effectiveness of four markers, namely the mitochondrial cox1, cox2, cox2-3 spacer and the plastid rbcL in DNA barcoding on selected Kappaphycus and Eucheuma from Southeast Asia. Marker assessments were performed using established distance and tree-based identification criteria from earlier studies. Barcoding patterns on a larger scale were simulated by empirically testing on the commonly used cox2-3 spacer. The phylogeny of these rhodophytes was also briefly described. In this study, the cox2 marker which satisfies the prerequisites of DNA barcodes was found to exhibit moderately high interspecific divergences with no intraspecific variations, thus a promising marker for the DNA barcoding of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. However, the already extensively used cox2-3 spacer was deemed to be in overall more appropriate as a DNA barcode for these two genera. On a wider scale, cox1 and rbcL were still better DNA barcodes across the rhodophyte taxa when practicality and cost-efficiency were taken into account. The phylogeny of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma were generally similar to those earlier reported. Still, the application of DNA barcoding has demonstrated our relatively poor taxonomic comprehension of these seaweeds, thus suggesting more in-depth efforts in taxonomic restructuring as well as establishment. PMID:23285223

  5. Assessment of Four Molecular Markers as Potential DNA Barcodes for Red Algae Kappaphycus Doty and Eucheuma J. Agardh (Solieriaceae, Rhodophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ji; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi; Hong, Dang Diem; Sunarpi, H.; Hurtado, Anicia Q.

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been a major advancement in the field of taxonomy, seeing much effort put into the barcoding of wide taxa of organisms, macro and microalgae included. The mitochondrial-encoded cox1 and plastid-encoded rbcL has been proposed as potential DNA barcodes for rhodophytes, but are yet to be tested on the commercially important carrageenophytes Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. This study gauges the effectiveness of four markers, namely the mitochondrial cox1, cox2, cox2-3 spacer and the plastid rbcL in DNA barcoding on selected Kappaphycus and Eucheuma from Southeast Asia. Marker assessments were performed using established distance and tree-based identification criteria from earlier studies. Barcoding patterns on a larger scale were simulated by empirically testing on the commonly used cox2-3 spacer. The phylogeny of these rhodophytes was also briefly described. In this study, the cox2 marker which satisfies the prerequisites of DNA barcodes was found to exhibit moderately high interspecific divergences with no intraspecific variations, thus a promising marker for the DNA barcoding of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. However, the already extensively used cox2-3 spacer was deemed to be in overall more appropriate as a DNA barcode for these two genera. On a wider scale, cox1 and rbcL were still better DNA barcodes across the rhodophyte taxa when practicality and cost-efficiency were taken into account. The phylogeny of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma were generally similar to those earlier reported. Still, the application of DNA barcoding has demonstrated our relatively poor taxonomic comprehension of these seaweeds, thus suggesting more in-depth efforts in taxonomic restructuring as well as establishment. PMID:23285223

  6. Spatial variability of 13C: 12C and D:H in Ecklonia radiata (C.Ag.) J. Agardh (Laminariales)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, Gwen E.; Ritz, David A.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial variability of δ 13C and δD in four individual Ecklonia radiata plants was determined and the range compared to the range of individual values obtained for co-occuring macroalga species. Carbon values varied over a range of 3-4‰ in three of the E. radiata individuals, while values within another plant were found to vary by 7·43‰. Overall the carbon values ranged from -14·01 to -21·44‰, with a mean of overlinex = 16.06‰. SD = 1.43 . Hydrogen values however, exhibited a far greater range; within individual plants they ranged from 43·01‰ to 89·43‰. The isotopic range exhibited within E. radiata was half that of the range of carbon and one and a half times that of hydrogen values recorded for the co-occurring species analysed. This reduces the value of the techique for tracing the origin of detrital matter from seaweeds. The pattern of isotopic composition observed in E.radiata suggests differential storage of isotopically distinct compounds.

  7. Anti-proliferative and angio-suppressive effect of Stoechospermum marginatum (C. Agardh) Kutzing extract using various experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Puttananjaiah, Shilpa; Chatterji, Anil; Salimath, Bharati

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Abundant consumption of seaweeds in the diet is epidemiologically linked to the reduction in risk of developing cancer. In larger cases, however, identification of particular seaweeds that are accountable for these effects is still lacking, hindering the recognition of competent dietary-based chemo preventive approaches. The aim of this research was to establish the antiproliferative potency and angiosuppressive mode of action of Stoechospermum marginatum seaweed methanolic extract using various experimental models. MATERIALS/METHODS Among the 15 seaweeds screened for antiproliferative activity against Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cell line, Stoechospermum marginatum extract (SME) was found to be the most promising. Therefore, it was further investigated for its anti-proliferative activity in-vitro against choriocarcinoma (BeWo) and non-transformed Human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells, and for its anti-migratory/tube formation activity against HUVEC cells in-vitro. Subsequently, the angiosuppressive activity of S. marginatum was established by inhibition of angiogenesis in in-vivo (peritoneal angiogenesis and chorioallantoic membrane assay) and ex-vivo (rat cornea assay) models. RESULTS Most brown seaweed extracts inhibited the proliferation of EAT cells, while green and red seaweed extracts were much less effective. According to the results, SME selectively inhibited proliferation of BeWo cells in-vitro in a dose-dependent manner, but had a lesser effect on HEK 293 cells. SME also suppressed the migration and tube formation of HUVEC cells in-vitro. In addition, SME was able to suppress VEGF-induced angiogenesis in the chorio allantoic membrane, rat cornea, and tumor induced angiogenesis in the peritoneum of EAT bearing mice. A decrease in the microvessel density count and CD31 antigen staining of treated mice peritoneum provided further evidence of its angiosuppressive activity. CONCLUSIONS Altogether, the data underline that VEGF mediated angiogenesis is the target for the angiosuppressive action of SME and could potentially be useful in cancer prevention or treatment involving stimulated angiogenesis. PMID:25110556

  8. Evidence for the introduction of the Asian red alga Neosiphonia japonica and its introgression with Neosiphonia harveyi (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta) in the Northwest Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Amanda M; Saunders, Gary W

    2015-12-01

    There is currently conflict in the literature on the taxonomic status of the reportedly cosmopolitan species Neosiphonia harveyi, a common red alga along the coast of Atlantic Canada and New England, USA. Neosiphonia harveyi sensu lato was assessed using three molecular markers: COI-5P, ITS and rbcL. All three markers clearly delimited three genetic species groups within N. harveyi sensu lato in this region, which we identified as N. harveyi, N. japonica and Polysiphonia akkeshiensis (here resurrected from synonymy with N. japonica). Although Neosiphonia harveyi is considered by some authors to be introduced to the Atlantic from the western Pacific, it was only confirmed from the North Atlantic suggesting it is native to this area. In contrast, Neosiphonia japonica was collected from only two sites in Rhode Island, USA, as well as from its reported native range in Asia (South Korea), which when combined with data in GenBank indicates that this species was introduced to the Northwest Atlantic. The GenBank data further indicate that N. japonica was also introduced to North Carolina, Spain, Australia and New Zealand. Despite the fact that all three markers clearly delimited N. harveyi and N. japonica as distinct genetic species groups, the ITS sequences for some N. harveyi individuals displayed mixed patterns and additivity indicating introgression of nuclear DNA from N. japonica into N. harveyi in the Northwest Atlantic. Introgression of DNA from an introduced species to a native species (i.e. 'genetic pollution') is one of the possible consequences of species introductions, and we believe this is the first documented evidence for this phenomenon in red algae. PMID:26477438

  9. INDUCTION OF APOMIXIS BY OUTCROSSING BETWEEN GENETICALLY DIVERGENT ENTITIES OF CALOGLOSSA LEPRIEURII (CERAMIALES, RHODOPHYTA) AND EVIDENCE OF HYBRID APOMICTS IN NATURE(1).

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Mitsunobu; West, John A; Hara, Yoshiaki

    2011-08-01

    Our previous study revealed that apomixis, recycling of tetrasporophytes, can be generated through outcrossing between genetically divergent entities of Caloglossa monosticha M. Kamiya, though such apomicts have never been found in nature. In the case of C. leprieurii (Mont.) G. Martens, the most widespread species in this genus, many apomictic strains have been isolated worldwide, but it is unknown whether these apomicts evolved through an outcrossing process similar to that in C. monosticha. In this study, heterogeneity of the apomicts and their sexual relatives as well as their evolutionary relationships was examined using the nuclear-encoded actin gene and plastid-encoded RUBISCO spacer region. Thirteen out of 18 apomictic strains were heterogeneous and contained divergent actin alleles, whereas only two out of 23 sexual strains were heterogeneous. The five homogeneous apomicts were genetically identical, or quite similar, to the sexual strains isolated from adjacent sites. Furthermore, three of the five homogeneous apomicts frequently produced tetraspores that grew into gametophytes, while all the heterogeneous apomicts never generated gametophytes. Apomictic strains from Florida were allotriploid, and each of the three actin sequences was closely related to those of sexual strains from Florida, Peru, and Mexico/Guatemala. In crossing tests, obligate apomixis was generated through the outcrossing between the male from Madagascar and the female from the northwestern Atlantic. These results suggest that outcrossing between genetically divergent sexual entities is one factor that induces apomixis in C. leprieurii. PMID:27020011

  10. The Japanese alga Polysiphonia morrowii (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) on the South Atlantic Ocean: first report of an invasive macroalga inhabiting oyster reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croce, M. Emilia; Parodi, Elisa R.

    2014-06-01

    Conspicuous tufts of the filamentous algae Polysiphonia Greville inhabit the reefs of Crassostrea gigas on the Atlantic Patagonian coast. The population was recorded for the first time in 1994 and identified as P. argentinica. This study exhaustively investigated the morphology and reproduction of specimens and the seasonality of the population. The results revealed the identity of the specimens as the invasive Japanese macroalga Polysiphonia morrowii Harvey, on the basis of several striking features: the setaceous and tufted thalli, the corymbose growing apices, the endogenous axillary branches, the urceolate cystocarps and the sharply pointed branches. Sexual reproduction was evidenced; however, fertile male gametophytes were absent in the samples. The population was found almost all year round, but its abundance became higher in autumn and winter. The present study constitutes the first record of this invasive macroalga on the South Atlantic Ocean; the fourth record of an exotic macroalgal species on the Atlantic Patagonian coast; and the first record of an invasive species related to the establishment of C. gigas in Atlantic Patagonia.

  11. Deep-water stands of Cystoseira zosteroides C. Agardh (Fucales, Ochrophyta) in the Northwestern Mediterranean: Insights into assemblage structure and population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Enric; Garrabou, Joaquim; Hereu, Bernat; Zabala, Mikel; Cebrian, Emma; Sala, Enric

    2009-04-01

    Populations dominated by Cystoseira zosteroides, an endemic and threatened Mediterranean seaweed, colonize deep-water rocky habitats down to more than 50 m depth. Assemblages dominated by this species display high algal and invertebrate species richness. Algal biomass averages 1134 g dw m -2. Erect and turf algae account for only 25% of total algal dry weight, while encrusting corallines are responsible for the remaining 75%. Sponges, bryozoans and ascidians constitute the dominant sessile macrofauna. Cystoseira zosteroides is the dominant erect algae, with a mean biomass of 60.6 g dw m -2, and densities ranging from 4 to 7 plants m -2. The alien turf alga Womersleyella setacea has a biomass of 104.2 g dw m -2 and covers most of the understory substrate. The size-frequency distribution of C. zosteroides populations shows differences over time. Mean annual growth of the main axis is around 0.5 cm and mean annual mortality rate is lower than 2%. Recruitment was almost nil during the studied period of time (10 years). Processes structuring these deep-water Cystoseira stands must be driven by episodic disturbances, after-disturbance recruitment pulses, and long periods of steady growth that last at least 10 years. However, it is also possible that recruitment is irreversibly inhibited by the alien alga W. setacea in which case these old-growth stands are faced with extinction. The highly diversified assemblages and the low growth and low mortality rates of C. zosteroides indicate high vulnerability to natural and anthropogenic disturbances, and call for effective measures to ensure their conservation.

  12. Nitric Oxide Production Inhibition and Anti-Mycobacterial Activity of Extracts and Halogenated Sesquiterpenes from the Brazilian Red Alga Laurencia Dendroidea J. Agardh

    PubMed Central

    Biá Ventura, Thatiana Lopes; da Silva Machado, Fernanda Lacerda; de Araujo, Marlon Heggdorne; de Souza Gestinari, Lísia Mônica; Kaiser, Carlos Roland; de Assis Esteves, Francisco; Lasunskaia, Elena B.; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Muzitano, Michelle Frazão

    2015-01-01

    Background: Red algae of the genus Laurencia J. V. Lamouroux are a rich source of secondary metabolites with important pharmacological activities such as anti-tumoral, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, anti-viral, anti-leishmanial, anti-helminthic, anti-malarial, anti-trypanosomal, anti-microbial as well as anti-bacterial against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Objective: In the present study, we evaluated the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α production and the anti-mycobacterial activity of crude extracts from the red Alga Laurencia dendroidea (from the South-Eastern coast of Brazil). Halogenated sesquiterpenes elatol (1), obtusol (2) and cartilagineol (3), previously isolated from this Alga by our group, were also studied. Materials and Methods: The lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophage cells (RAW 264.7) were used as inflammation model. Cytotoxic effect was determined using a commercial lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) kit and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The growing Mycobacterium inhibition was verified against Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette–Guérin and M. tuberculosis H37 Rv strains. Results: The crude extract from Alga collected at Angra dos Reis, RJ, Brazil, was the most active inhibitor of both mycobacterial growth (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] 8.7 ± 1.4 μg/mL) and NO production by activated macrophages (IC50 5.3 ± 1.3 μg/mL). The assays with isolated compounds revealed the anti-mycobacterial activity of obtusol (2), whereas (-)-elatol (1) inhibited the release of inflammatory mediators, especially NO. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing an anti-mycobacterial effect of L. dendroidea extract and demonstrating the association of this activity with obtusol (2). Conclusion: The described effects of active compounds from L. dendroidea are promising for the control of inflammation in infectious diseases and specifically, against mycobacterial infections associated with exacerbated inflammation. SUMMARY Inflammation is strongly involved in the pathogenesis of most infectious diseases, including TB. The treatment of TB is based on the use of anti mycobacterial drugs, however the most severe forms of TB, require additional anti inflammatory therapy to prevent excessive inflammation. A combination of these properties in one compound could provide additional therapeutic benefits. In this work, we studied L. dendroidea extracts and purified compounds and demonstrated that the LDA extract and (-)-elatol (1) were potent in inhibiting NO production by macrophages through the specific inhibition of iNOS expression. The LDA and LDM extracts and obtusol (2) were active against virulent strain of M. tuberculosis. This is the first report demonstrating that the anti-inflammatory activities of L. dendroidea were associated with the presence of (-)-elatol (1), whereas anti-mycobacterial activities of L. dendroidea extracts were associated with obtusol (2). PMID:27013803

  13. Qualitative and quantitative determination of R-phycoerythrin from Halymenia floresia (Clemente) C. Agardh by polyacrylamide gel using electrophoretic elution technique.

    PubMed

    Malairaj, Sathuvan; Muthu, Sakthivel; Gopal, Venkatesh Babu; Perumal, Palani; Ramasamy, Rengasamy

    2016-07-01

    R-Phycoerythrin is one of the phycobiliproteins widely found in seaweeds. In this study, we have shown to extract and purify R-Phycoerythrin from the south east cost Indian red seaweed Halymenia floresia. R-Phycoerythrin was extracted in 50mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). The preparative native PAGE purification was employed alternative to the chromatography and therefore can be scaled up efficiently. Both the yield and the purity of R-Phycoerythrin are very effective. The purified R-Phycoerythrin showed a single band on the examination by native PAGE electrophrosis. SDS-PAGE analysis showed five bands at 16kDa, 21kDa, 30kDa, 39kDa and 47kDa which corresponds to the α, β and γ', γ and αβ subunits. This preparative method for R-Phycoerythrin purification can offer a reference for R-Phycoerythrin purification from other marine red macro algae. PMID:27266333

  14. Supply chain and marketing of sea grapes, Caulerpa racemosa (Forsskål) J. Agardh (Chlorophyta: Caulerpaceae) in Fiji, Samoa and Tonga.

    PubMed

    Morris, C; Bala, S; South, G R; Lako, J; Lober, M; Simos, T

    2014-01-01

    This report describes for the first time the supply chain of Caulerpa racemosa in three Pacific Island countries. The harvesting and marketing of C. racemosa are important subsistence activities for villagers in Fiji and Samoa, less so in Tonga. At least 150 harvesters are involved in Fiji, some 100 in Samoa and only a handful in Tonga. The annual combined crop is of some 123 t valued at around US$266,492. In Fiji, it is projected that supply does not meet local demand and there is a potential export market that is currently operating at a pilot project level. In Samoa, the supply is considered adequate for the current market. In Tonga, harvesting is carried out by a few families and supplies a niche market in that country. The possibilities of field cultivation of Caulerpa have been explored but, at present, with only limited success in Samoa. The supply chain is simple in all three countries, and only in Fiji are middlemen involved in the distribution process. The limitations for marketing include the fact that only a few sites supply most of the crop in all the three countries, that all sites need to be conserved through sustainable harvesting methods, the short shelf life of the crop and a lack of information on the carrying capacity of harvest sites. Caulerpa remains a crop that fulfils a niche market but has the potential to be scaled up for additional livelihood development in the future. PMID:24771972

  15. Systematics of marine brown alga Sargassum from Thailand: A preliminary study based on morphological data and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantachumpoo, Attachai; Uwai, Shinya; Noiraksar, Thidarat; Komatsu, Teruhisa

    2015-06-01

    The marine brown algal genus Sargassum has been investigated extensively based on genetic information. In this report, we performed the first comparative study of morphological and molecular data among common species of Sargassum found in Thailand and explored the phylogenetic diversity within the genus. Our results revealed an incongruent pattern for species classification in Thai Sargassum. Morphologically, our Sargassum specimens were distinguishable and represented 8 species, namely, S. aquifolium (Turner) C.Agardh, Sargassum baccularia (Mertens) C. Agardh, S. cinereum J. Agardh, S. ilicifolium (Turner) C.Agardh, S. oligocystum Montagne, S. plagiophyllum C. Agardh, S. polycystum C. Agardh and S. swartzii (Turuner) C. Agardh. In contrast, using three different methods, phylogenetic analysis of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) revealed six distinct clades, including S. baccularia/ S. oligosyntum clade, S. aquifolium/ S. swartzii clade, S. cinereum clade, S. aquifolium/ S. ilicifolium clade, S. polycystum clade, and S. plagiophyllum clade, which was suggestive of a phenotypic plasticity species complex. Our molecular data also confirmed the paraphyletic relationship in the section Binderianae and suggested that this section requires reassessment. Overall, further studies are required to increase our understanding of the taxonomy, phylogenetic relationships and species boundaries among Sargassum species in Thailand.

  16. Concentration of Inorganic Elements Content in Benthic Seaweeds of Fernando de Noronha Archipelago by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis (SRTXRF)

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Leandro De Santis; Lopes, Rosana Peporine; Ulbrich, Mabel Norma Costas; Guaratini, Thais; Colepicolo, Pio; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Garla, Ricardo Clapis; Oliveira Filho, Eurico Cabral; Pohlit, Adrian Martin; Zucchi, Orghêda Luiza Araújo Domingues

    2012-01-01

    SRTXRF was used to determine As, Ba, Br, Ca, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Dy, Fe, K, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn in eleven seaweed species commonly found in Fernando de Noronha: Caulerpa verticillata (J. Agardh) (Chlorophyta), Asparagopsis taxiformis (Delile), Dictyurus occidentalis (J. Agardh), Galaxaura rugosa (J. Ellis & Solander) J. V. Lamouroux, G. obtusata (J. Ellis & Solander) J. V. Lamouroux, G. marginata (J. Ellis & Solander) J. V. Lamouroux (Rhodophyta), Dictyota cervicornis (Kützing), Dictyopteris justii (J. V. Lamouroux), Dictyopteris plagiogramma (Montagne) Vickers, Padina gymnospora (Kützing) Sonder, and a Sargassum sp. (Phaeophyta). Data obtained were compared to those from the analysis of other parts of the world seaweeds using different analytical techniques and were found to be in general agreement in terms of major and minor elemental components. Results provide baseline information about the absorption and accumulation of these elements by macroalgae in the area. PMID:22505917

  17. Circadian Rhythms of Chloroplast Orientation and Photosynthetic Capacity in Ulva123

    PubMed Central

    Britz, Steven J.; Briggs, Winslow R.

    1976-01-01

    Ulva lactuca L. var. latissima (L.) Decandolle and var. rigida (C. Agardh) Le Jolis and U. mutabilis Foyn have a circadian rhythm of chloroplast orientation which results in large changes in the light-absorption properties of the thallus. During the day, the chloroplasts cover the outer face of the cells and absorbance is high. At night, the chloroplasts are along the side walls and absorbance is low. Enteromorpha linza (L.) J. Agardh, E. intestinalis (L.) Link, E. sp., and Monostroma grevillei (Thuret) Wittrock, members of the Ulvales, were not observed to have this rhythmic movement. Chloroplasts, when in the face position, could not be induced to move to the sides by high intensity light up to 80,000 lux. Unrelated to chloroplast position per se and light-absorption efficiency, there is a rhythm of photosynthetic capacity which peaks just before midday and which continues in constant darkness. Images PMID:16659613

  18. Lipoxygenase inhibitors derived from marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hideyuki; Kagawa, Yoshio; Konno, Remi; Kim, Sang Moo; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2014-03-01

    The solvent extracts from the algae Sargassum thunbergii (Sargassaceae) and Odonthalia corymbifera (Rhodomelaceae) were subjected to soybean lipoxygenase inhibitory screening. Two hydrophobic inhibitors were obtained from the extracts of S. thunbergii through inhibitory assay-guided fractionation. The inhibitors were identified as known exo-methylenic alkapolyenes (6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)-1,6,9,12,15-henicosapentaene (1) and (6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z,18Z)-1,6,9,12,15,18-henicosahexaene (2). The alkapolyenes 1 and 2 showed higher inhibitory activity than the known inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). Pheophytin a (3) was obtained from the extract of O. corymbifera. The inhibitor 3 also showed higher inhibitory activity than NDGA. This is the first report on lipoxygenase inhibition of exo-methylenic alkapolyenes and a chlorophyll a-related substance. PMID:24495846

  19. Possible sister groups and phylogenetic relationships among selected North Pacific and North Atlantic Rhodophyta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, Sandra C.

    1987-09-01

    Although the cool temperate (boreal) waters of the N. Pacific and N. Atlantic share many similar if not identical species, there have been few studies to test the identity of these species pairs. Whereas such tests are important from a taxonomic perspective, they tell us little if anything about biogeographic relationships. A more useful approach is one employing phylogenetic systematics (cladistics). The interpretation of phylogenetic diagrams (cladograms) in terms of biogeographic area relationships is explained. It is argued that cladistic analyses of taxa occurring in the cool temperate waters of the northern oceans can provide biogeographic tracks, which in turn can suggest the origins and migrations of species and possibly even floras. A number of cool temperate taxa that appear particularly amenable to this approach are discussed, including genera in the Palmariaceae, Corallinaceae, Dumontiaceae, Solieriaceae, Petrocelidaceae, Ceramiaceae and Rhodomelaceae.

  20. MORPHOLOGICAL AND GENETIC VARIATION IN THE POPULATIONS OF SARGASSUM HEMIPHYLLUM (PHAEOPHYCEAE) IN THE NORTHWESTERN PACIFIC(1).

    PubMed

    Cheang, Chi Chiu; Chu, Ka Hou; Ang, Put O

    2008-08-01

    Difficulty in species identification of Sargassum (Sargassaceae, Fucales) is partly attributed to the high polymorphism among its individuals and populations. This study aimed at assessing morphological and genetic variations in two varieties, var. hemiphyllum J. Agardh and var. chinense J. Agardh, of Sargassum hemiphyllum (Turner) C. Agardh, a widely distributed species in the northwestern Pacific. We investigated 26 measurable, five numerical, and 33 categorical morphological parameters associated with different branching levels of specimens from each of six localities within its distribution range using cluster analysis (CA) and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). Leaf size of the primary and secondary branching levels and the vesicle size of the secondary branches of the specimens examined were determined to be the most important morphological parameters that were significantly different among populations. Change in leaf and vesicle length of individuals among the six populations followed a latitudinal gradient, with smaller leaves and vesicles associated with northern populations and larger ones in the southern populations. The possible influence of the gradual change in sea surface temperatures (SSTs) along this gradient in the northwestern Pacific on leaf and vesicle morphologies of this species was suggested. PCR-RFLP analysis of the RUBISCO spacer in the chloroplast genome revealed two distinct and highly homogenous clades, a China clade and a Japan-Korea clade, which corresponded to var. chinense and var. hemiphyllum, respectively. The formation of refugia along the "Paleo-coast" in the East China Sea during glacial periods is suggested to have led to the vicariance of ancestral populations of S. hemiphyllum and thus to have promoted genetic differentiation. The massive freshwater outflow of the Yellow and Yangtze rivers may continue to act as a barrier, prolonging the allopatric distribution of the two varieties. PMID:27041602

  1. Effects of kelp forest removal on associated fish assemblages in central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Visual surveys along subtidal belt transects were used to compare fish assemblages on an experimental and a control site before and after the removal of a canopy-forming kelp forest. The giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) C.A. Agardh was removed at the holdfast from approximately equals 1 ha of high relief structurally complex rock substratum. The abundance of seven species of fish, of which five were considered midwater species, significantly declined after the kelp was removed. Results indicate that the presence of a giant kelp forest may increase the abundance and species diversity of the fish assemblages over a high relief rocky reef in central California, U.S.A.

  2. Experimental evidence for the effects of polyphenolic compounds from Dictyoneurum californicum Ruprecht (Phaeophyta: Laminariales) on feeding rate and growth in the red abalone Haliotus rufescens Swainson

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, Frank C.; Estes, James A.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of polyphenolic compounds from brown algae on grazing and growth rate of the California red abalone Haliotis rufescens Swainson were examined. Abalone consumed three phenolic-poor algal species, Laminaria sinclarii (Harvey) Farlow, Macrocystis pyrifera Agardh, and Nereocystis luetkeana Postels et Ruprecht (mean phenolic content = 0.52% dry mass), at a greater rate than two phenolic-rich species, Dictyoneurum californicum Ruprecht and Cystoseira osmundacea Agardh (mean phenolic content = 4.60% dry mass). This inverse relationship between phenolic content and consumption rate also existed after the algae were macerated and the liquid portion of the blended slurry incorporated in agar discs. However, the correlation between grazing rate and phenolic content imprpve d in this latter experiment, thus suggesting that abalone grazing was deterred significantly by the morphology of L. sinclarii and, to a lesser extent, of M. pyrifera. Polyphenolics extracted from D. californicum reduced abalone grazing rates by 90% when incorporated into agar discs at a concentration of 6 mg·ml−1. Although abalone were unable to maintain body mass when fed ad libitum on macerated M. pyrifera incorporated into agar discs, polyphenolics from D. californicum further inhibited shell growth when added to the discs at 5 mg·ml−1. The abalone ate less of the phenol-containing discs than of the discs lacking phenolics. Our results support findings of several prior studies that polyphenolic compounds from brown algae deter grazing by coastal zone herbivores in the northeast Pacific Ocean.

  3. Polysaccharides from the red seaweed Gracilaria dura (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Marinho-Soriano, E; Bourret, E

    2005-02-01

    The yield and physical and chemical properties of agars from Gracilaria dura (C. Agardh) J. Agardh, harvested in Thau lagoon (Mediterranean sea, France), were investigated. The agar yield ranged from 32% to 35%. Gel strength of agar ranged from 263 to 600 g cm(-2), with the maximum observed in October. A positive correlation was found between agar yield and gel strength (r = 0.82; P < 0.01). The gelling temperature followed the same pattern of gel strength and also showed higher value in October (43 degrees C). The nitrogen content varied from 1.04+/-0.60% (June) to 4.70+/-0.01% (October). A positive correlation was noted between nitrogen content and gel strength (r = 0.77; P < 0.05). The 3,6-anhydrogalactose content ranged from 0.70 to 0.84 and showed monthly significant differences (P < 0.05). There was a positive correlation between 3,6-anhydrogalactose content and gel strength. The values of sulfate content were relatively constant during the studied period and no significant differences were observed. The relative high gel strength indicates that this species may be considered as source of agar for commercial use. PMID:15474941

  4. Genetic affinities between trans-oceanic populations of non-buoyant macroalgae in the high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Ceridwen I; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C; Spencer, Hamish G; Salvatore, Laura C; Garcia, Gabriella R; Waters, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Marine biologists and biogeographers have long been puzzled by apparently non-dispersive coastal taxa that nonetheless have extensive transoceanic distributions. We here carried out a broad-scale phylogeographic study to test whether two widespread Southern Hemisphere species of non-buoyant littoral macroalgae are capable of long-distance dispersal. Samples were collected from along the coasts of southern Chile, New Zealand and several subAntarctic islands, with the focus on high latitude populations in the path of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current or West Wind Drift. We targeted two widespread littoral macroalgal species: the brown alga Adenocystisutricularis (Ectocarpales, Heterokontophyta) and the red alga Bostrychiaintricata (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta). Phylogenetic analyses were performed using partial mitochondrial (COI), chloroplast (rbcL) and ribosomal nuclear (LSU / 28S) DNA sequence data. Numerous deeply-divergent clades were resolved across all markers in each of the target species, but close phylogenetic relationships - even shared haplotypes - were observed among some populations separated by large oceanic distances. Despite not being particularly buoyant, both Adenocystisutricularis and Bostrychiaintricata thus show genetic signatures of recent dispersal across vast oceanic distances, presumably by attachment to floating substrata such as wood or buoyant macroalgae. PMID:23894421

  5. Genetic Affinities between Trans-Oceanic Populations of Non-Buoyant Macroalgae in the High Latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Ceridwen I.; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C.; Spencer, Hamish G.; Salvatore, Laura C.; Garcia, Gabriella R.; Waters, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine biologists and biogeographers have long been puzzled by apparently non-dispersive coastal taxa that nonetheless have extensive transoceanic distributions. We here carried out a broad-scale phylogeographic study to test whether two widespread Southern Hemisphere species of non-buoyant littoral macroalgae are capable of long-distance dispersal. Samples were collected from along the coasts of southern Chile, New Zealand and several subAntarctic islands, with the focus on high latitude populations in the path of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current or West Wind Drift. We targeted two widespread littoral macroalgal species: the brown alga Adenocystisutricularis (Ectocarpales, Heterokontophyta) and the red alga Bostrychiaintricata (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta). Phylogenetic analyses were performed using partial mitochondrial (COI), chloroplast (rbcL) and ribosomal nuclear (LSU / 28S) DNA sequence data. Numerous deeply-divergent clades were resolved across all markers in each of the target species, but close phylogenetic relationships – even shared haplotypes – were observed among some populations separated by large oceanic distances. Despite not being particularly buoyant, both Adenocystisutricularis and Bostrychiaintricata thus show genetic signatures of recent dispersal across vast oceanic distances, presumably by attachment to floating substrata such as wood or buoyant macroalgae. PMID:23894421

  6. Macroalgal Introductions by Hull Fouling on Recreational Vessels: Seaweeds and Sailors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineur, Frédéric; Johnson, Mark P.; Maggs, Christine A.

    2008-10-01

    Macroalgal invasions in coastal areas have been a growing concern during the past decade. The present study aimed to assess the role of hull fouling on recreational yachts as a vector for macroalgal introductions. Questionnaire and hull surveys were carried out in marinas in France and Spain. The questionnaires revealed that the majority of yacht owners are aware of seaweed introductions, usually undertake short range journeys, dry dock their boat at least once a year, and use antifouling paints. The hull survey showed that many in-service yachts were completely free of macroalgae. When present, fouling assemblages consisted mainly of one to two macroalgal species. The most commonly found species was the tolerant green seaweed Ulva flexuosa. Most of the other species found are also cosmopolitan and opportunistic. A few nonnative and potentially invasive Ceramiales (Rhodophyta) were found occasionally on in-service yachts. On the basis of the information gathered during interviews of yacht owners in the surveyed area, these occurrences are likely to be uncommon. However they can pose a significant risk of primary or secondary introductions of alien macroalgal species, especially in the light of the increase in yachting activities. With large numbers of recreational yachts and relatively rare occurrences of nonnative species on hulls, comprehensive screening programs do not seem justified or practical. The risks of transferring nonnative species may, however, be minimized by encouraging the behaviors that prevent fouling on hulls and by taking action against neglected boats before they can act as vectors.

  7. Macroalgal introductions by hull fouling on recreational vessels: seaweeds and sailors.

    PubMed

    Mineur, Frédéric; Johnson, Mark P; Maggs, Christine A

    2008-10-01

    Macroalgal invasions in coastal areas have been a growing concern during the past decade. The present study aimed to assess the role of hull fouling on recreational yachts as a vector for macroalgal introductions. Questionnaire and hull surveys were carried out in marinas in France and Spain. The questionnaires revealed that the majority of yacht owners are aware of seaweed introductions, usually undertake short range journeys, dry dock their boat at least once a year, and use antifouling paints. The hull survey showed that many in-service yachts were completely free of macroalgae. When present, fouling assemblages consisted mainly of one to two macroalgal species. The most commonly found species was the tolerant green seaweed Ulva flexuosa. Most of the other species found are also cosmopolitan and opportunistic. A few nonnative and potentially invasive Ceramiales (Rhodophyta) were found occasionally on in-service yachts. On the basis of the information gathered during interviews of yacht owners in the surveyed area, these occurrences are likely to be uncommon. However they can pose a significant risk of primary or secondary introductions of alien macroalgal species, especially in the light of the increase in yachting activities. With large numbers of recreational yachts and relatively rare occurrences of nonnative species on hulls, comprehensive screening programs do not seem justified or practical. The risks of transferring nonnative species may, however, be minimized by encouraging the behaviors that prevent fouling on hulls and by taking action against neglected boats before they can act as vectors. PMID:18704562

  8. Red algal exotics on North Sea coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, Christine A.; Stegenga, Herre

    1998-09-01

    A total of ten red seaweed species are recognized as introduced into the North Sea from other parts of the world. These are Asparagopsis armata and Bonnemaisonia hamifera (Bonnemaisoniales), Grateloupia doryphora (Halymeniales), Antithamnionella spirographidis, Antithamnionella ternifolia, Anotrichium furcellatum, Dasya baillouviana, ?Dasysiphonia sp., Polysiphonia harveyi and Polysiphonia senticulosa (Ceramiales). The oldest of these is B. hamifera, introduced prior to 1890, while the most recent, ?Dasysiphonia sp., was first found in 1994 and still requires taxonomic investigation. A variety of distribution patterns is seen, with geographical ranges varying from general within the North Sea to very restricted. The diversity of introduced red algae on eastern coasts of the North Sea is much greater than in the west. The most likely explanation for this pattern is that French coasts were the initial site of introduction for many of the seaweeds, which were then distributed northwards by the residual surface currents. Their increasing success in the Netherlands has probably been promoted by the drastically changed local hydrodynamic conditions which have also permitted the recent introduction of many native European species. Of the biological features of species that may favour their success as introductions, clonal vegetative propagation, often with specialized propagules or fragmentation mechanisms, is almost ubiquitous. Low-temperature tolerances can be inferred, but data are sparse. Many of the alien red algae in the North Sea contain anti-grazing compounds such as bromophenols, which may contribute to their invasive potential by deterring grazing sufficiently to permit establishment of an inoculum.

  9. Antiviral activity of the marine alga Symphyocladia latiuscula against herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in vitro and its therapeutic efficacy against HSV-1 infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jin; Kurokawa, Masahiko; Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Nakamura, Norio; Choi, Jae-Sue; Hattori, Masao

    2005-12-01

    The antiviral activities of extracts from 5 species of marine algae collected at Haeundae (Pusan, Korea), were examined using plaque reduction assays. Although the activity of a methanol (MeOH) extract of Sargassum ringoldianum (Sargassaceae) was the most potent against several types of viruses, it was also cytotoxic. A MeOH extract of Symphyocladia latiuscula (Rhodomelaceae) and its fractions exhibited antiviral activities against acyclovir (ACV) and phosphonoacetic acid (PAA)-resistant (AP(r)) herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1), thymidine kinase (TK(-)) deficient HSV-1 and wild type HSV-1 in vitro without cytotoxicity. The major component, 2,3,6-tribromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl methyl ether (TDB) of a CH(2)Cl(2)-soluble fraction was active against wild type HSV-1, as well as AP(r) HSV-1 and TK(-) HSV-1 (IC(50) values of 5.48, 4.81 and 23.3 microg/ml, respectively). The therapeutic effectiveness of the MeOH extract and TDB from S. latiuscula was further examined in BALB/c mice that were cutaneously infected with HSV-1 strain 7401H. Three daily oral administrations of the MeOH extract and TDB significantly delayed the appearance of score 2 skin lesions (local vesicles) and limited the development of further score 6 (mild zosteriform) lesions in infected mice without toxicity compared with controls. In addition, TDB suppressed virus yields in the brain and skin. Therefore TDB should be a promising anti HSV agent. PMID:16327161

  10. Anti-Angiogenic Properties of BDDPM, a Bromophenol from Marine Red Alga Rhodomela confervoides, with Multi Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition Effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuaiyu; Wang, Li-Jun; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Ning; Li, Xiangqian; Liu, Shaofang; Luo, Jiao; Shi, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    Bis-(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxy-phenyl)-methane (BDDPM) is a bromophenol first isolated from Rhodomelaceae confervoides. Our previous studies showed that BDDPM exerts PTP1B-inhibiting activity and anti-cancer activity against a wide range of tumor cells while it also showed lower cytotoxicity against normal cells. In the present study, we found that BDDPM exhibits significant activities toward angiogenesis in vitro. BDDPM inhibits multiple angiogenesis processes, including endothelial cell sprouting, migration, proliferation, and tube formation. Further kinase assays investigations found that BDDPM is a potent selective, but multi-target, receptor tyrosine kinase (RTKs) inhibitor. BDDPM (10 μM) inhibits the activities of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 and 3 (FGFR2, 3), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) (inhibition rate: 57.7%, 78.6%, 78.5% and 71.1%, respectively). Moreover, BDDPM also decreases the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as well as nitric oxide (NO) production in a dose dependent manner. These results indicate that BDDPM can be exploited as an anti-angiogenic drug, or as a lead compound for the development of novel multi-target RTKs inhibitors. PMID:26075871

  11. Anti-Angiogenic Properties of BDDPM, a Bromophenol from Marine Red Alga Rhodomela confervoides, with Multi Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition Effects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuaiyu; Wang, Li-Jun; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Ning; Li, Xiangqian; Liu, Shaofang; Luo, Jiao; Shi, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    Bis-(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxy-phenyl)-methane (BDDPM) is a bromophenol first isolated from Rhodomelaceae confervoides. Our previous studies showed that BDDPM exerts PTP1B-inhibiting activity and anti-cancer activity against a wide range of tumor cells while it also showed lower cytotoxicity against normal cells. In the present study, we found that BDDPM exhibits significant activities toward angiogenesis in vitro. BDDPM inhibits multiple angiogenesis processes, including endothelial cell sprouting, migration, proliferation, and tube formation. Further kinase assays investigations found that BDDPM is a potent selective, but multi-target, receptor tyrosine kinase (RTKs) inhibitor. BDDPM (10 μM) inhibits the activities of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 and 3 (FGFR2, 3), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) (inhibition rate: 57.7%, 78.6%, 78.5% and 71.1%, respectively). Moreover, BDDPM also decreases the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as well as nitric oxide (NO) production in a dose dependent manner. These results indicate that BDDPM can be exploited as an anti-angiogenic drug, or as a lead compound for the development of novel multi-target RTKs inhibitors. PMID:26075871

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF SOME HEAVY METALS BIOSORPTION BY REPRESENTATIVE EGYPTIAN MARINE ALGAE(1).

    PubMed

    Elrefaii, Abdelmonem H; Sallam, Lotfy A; Hamdy, Abdelhamid A; Ahmed, Eman F

    2012-04-01

    Marine algae-as inexpensive and renewable natural biomass-have attracted the attention of many investigators to be used to preconcentrate and biosorb many heavy metal ions. Impressed by this concept, the metal uptake capacity of Egyptian marine algae was examined using representatives of green and brown algae, namely, Ulva lactuca L. and Sargassum latifolium (Turner) C. Agardh, respectively. The biosorption efficiencies of Cu(2+) , Co(2+) , Ni(2+) , Cd(2+) , Hg(2+) , Ag(2+) , and Pb(2+) ions seem to depend on the type of the algae used as well as the conditions under which the uptake processes were conducted. It was demonstrated that a pH range of 7.5-8.8 was optimum for the removal of the tested metals. Similarly, the uptake process was markedly accelerated during the first 2 h using relatively low metal level and sufficient amounts of the dried powdered tested algae. PMID:27009736

  13. Complete mitochondrial genome of the brown alga Sargassum vachellianum (Sargassaceae, Phaeophyceae).

    PubMed

    Bi, Yanhui; Zhou, Zhigang

    2016-07-01

    Sargassum vachellianum C. Agardh is endemic to China. It inhabits in rocky intertidal zones and plays an important role in maintaining the structure and function of littoral ecosystems. In this study, we present the complete mitochondrial genome of S. vachellianum. The circular S. vachellianum mitogenome is 34,877 bp in size and contains the same set of 65 genes as the reported Sargassum mtDNAs. The overall AT content of the genome is 63.79%, and the inter-genic spacers constitute only 4.67%. The genome organization including the gene order, overlapping regions between genes, and the total length of inter-genic spacers is conserved among the known Sargassum mitogenomes. High divergence is in inter-genic spacer regions. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that S. vachellianum combined tightly with Sargassum species with strong support values (NJ/ML, 100%). PMID:26099977

  14. Identification of a new marine algal species Pyropia nitida sp. nov. (Bangiales: Rhodophyta) from Monterey, California.

    PubMed

    Harden, Leeanne K; Morales, Karina M; Hughey, Jeffery R

    2016-07-01

    An unidentified marine red algal species classified in Pyropia J. Agardh was discovered from Monterey, CA. Morphological, barcode, and complete mitochondrial genome analysis of the alga support its recognition as a new species, Pyropia nitida sp. nov. The species is a high-intertidal, winter annual that is lanceolate in shape, monostromatic, and dioecious. Based on CO1 sequences, P. nitida is closely allied with the P. nereocystis clade. The mitogenome of P. nitida is 35 313 bp in length and contains 53 genes, including two ribosomal RNAs, 24 transfer RNAs, four ribosomal proteins, two ymfs, four ORFs, and 17 genes involved in electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation. The results support the recognition of P. nitida as distinct from the morphologically similar P. lanceolata. PMID:26153737

  15. Identification of the toxic compounds produced by Sargassum thunbergii to red tide microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renjun; Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi

    2012-09-01

    The inhibitory effects of methanol extracts from the tissues of three macroalgal species on the growths of three marine red tide microalgae were assessed under laboratory conditions. Extracts of Sargassum thunbergii (Mertens ex Roth) Kuntz tissue had stronger inhibitory effects than those of either Sargassum pallidum (Turner) C. Agardh or Sargassum kjellmanianum Yendo on the growths of Heterosigma akashiwo (Hada) Hada, Skeletonema costatum (Grev.) Grev, and Prorocentrum micans Ehrenberg. Methanol extracts of S. thunbergii were further divided into petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, butanol, and distilled water phases by liquid-liquid fractionation. The petroleum ether and ethyl acetate fractions had strong algicidal effects on the microalgae. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of these two phases identified nine fatty acids, most of which were unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, pure compounds of four of the nine unsaturated fatty acids had effective concentrations below 5 mg/L. Therefore, unsaturated fatty acids are a component of the allelochemicals in S. thunbergii tissue.

  16. A vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidase in the marine red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii (Doty) Doty displays clear substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Kamenarska, Zornitsa; Taniguchi, Tomokazu; Ohsawa, Noboru; Hiraoka, Masanori; Itoh, Nobuya

    2007-05-01

    Bromoperoxidase activity was initially detected in marine macroalgae belonging to the Solieriaceae family (Gigartinales, Rhodophyta), including Solieria robusta (Greville) Kylin, Eucheuma serra J. Agardh and Kappaphycus alvarezii (Doty) Doty, which are important industrial sources of the polysaccharide carrageenan. Notably, the purification of bromoperoxidase was difficult because due to the coexistence of viscoid polysaccharides. The activity of the partially purified enzyme was dependent on the vanadate ion, and displayed a distinct substrate spectrum from that of previously reported vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidases of marine macroalgae. The enzyme was specific for Br- and I- ions and inactive toward F- and Cl-. The K(m) values for Br- and H2O2 were 2.5x10(-3) M and 8.5x10(-5) M, respectively. The halogenated product, dibromoacetaldehyde, that accumulated in K. alvarezii was additionally determined. PMID:17434548

  17. Environmental influences on kelp performance across the reproductive period: an ecological trade-off between gametophyte survival and growth?

    PubMed

    Mohring, Margaret B; Kendrick, Gary A; Wernberg, Thomas; Rule, Michael J; Vanderklift, Mathew A

    2013-01-01

    Most kelps (order Laminariales) exhibit distinct temporal patterns in zoospore production, gametogenesis and gametophyte reproduction. Natural fluctuations in ambient environmental conditions influence the intrinsic characteristics of gametes, which define their ability to tolerate varied conditions. The aim of this work was to document seasonal patterns in reproduction and gametophyte growth and survival of Ecklonia radiata (C. Agardh) J. Agardh in south-western Australia. These results were related to patterns in local environmental conditions in an attempt to ascertain which factors explain variation throughout the season. E. radiata was fertile (produced zoospores) for three and a half months over summer and autumn. Every two weeks during this time, gametophytes were grown in a range of temperatures (16-22 °C) in the laboratory. Zoospore densities were highly variable among sample periods; however, zoospores released early in the season produced gametophytes which had greater rates of growth and survival, and these rates declined towards the end of the reproductive season. Growth rates of gametophytes were positively related to day length, with the fastest growing recruits released when the days were longest. Gametophytes consistently survived best in the lowest temperature (16 °C), yet exhibited optimum growth in higher culture temperatures (20-22 °C). These results suggest that E. radiata releases gametes when conditions are favourable for growth, and E. radiata gametophytes are tolerant of the range of temperatures observed at this location. E. radiata releases the healthiest gametophytes when day length and temperature conditions are optimal for better germination, growth, and sporophyte production, perhaps as a mechanism to help compete against other species for space and other resources. PMID:23755217

  18. Estimates of nuclear DNA content in red algal lineages

    PubMed Central

    Kapraun, Donald F.; Freshwater, D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims The red algae are an evolutionarily ancient group of predominantly marine organisms with an estimated 6000 species. Consensus higher-level molecular phylogenies support a basal split between the unicellular Cyanidiophytina and morphologically diverse Rhodophytina, the later subphylum containing most red algal species. The Rhodophytina is divided into six classes, of which five represent early diverging lineages of generally uninucleate species, whose evolutionary relationships are poorly resolved. The remaining species compose the large (27 currently recognized orders), morphologically diverse and typically multinucleate Florideophyceae. Nuclear DNA content estimates have been published for <1 % of the described red algae. The present investigation summarizes the state of our knowledge and expands our coverage of DNA content information from 196 isolates of red algae. Methodology The DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and RBC (chicken erythrocytes) standards were used to estimate 2C values with static microspectrophotometry. Principal results Nuclear DNA contents are reported for 196 isolates of red algae, almost doubling the number of estimates available for these organisms. Present results also confirm the reported DNA content range of 0.1–2.8 pg, with species of Ceramiales, Nemaliales and Palmariales containing apparently polyploid genomes with 2C = 2.8, 2.3 and 2.8 pg, respectively. Conclusions Early diverging red algal lineages are characterized by relatively small 2C DNA contents while a wide range of 2C values is found within the derived Florideophyceae. An overall correlation between phylogenetic placement and 2C DNA content is not apparent; however, genome size data are available for only a small portion of red algae. Current data do support polyploidy and aneuploidy as pervasive features of red algal genome evolution. PMID:22479676

  19. NMR spectroscopy: structure elucidation of cycloelatanene A: a natural product case study.

    PubMed

    Urban, Sylvia; Dias, Daniel Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The structure elucidation of new secondary metabolites derived from marine and terrestrial sources is frequently a challenging task. The hurdles include the ability to isolate stable secondary metabolites of sufficient purity that are often present in <0.5 % of the dry weight of the sample. This usually involves a minimum of several chromatographic purification steps. The second issue is the stability of the compound isolated. It must always be assumed when dealing with the isolation of natural products that the compound may rapidly degrade during and/or after the isolation, due to sensitivity to light, air oxidation, and/or temperature. In this way, precautions need to be taken, as much as possible to avoid any such chemical inter-conversions and/or degradations. Immediately after purification, the next step is to rapidly acquire all analytical spectroscopic data in order to complete the characterization of the isolated secondary metabolite(s), prior to any possible decomposition. The final hurdle in this multiple step process, especially in the acquisition of the NMR spectroscopic and other analytical data (mass spectra, infrared and ultra-violet spectra, optical rotation, etc.), is to assemble the structural moieties/units in an effort to complete the structure elucidation. Often ambiguity with the elucidation of the final structure remains when structural fragments identified are difficult to piece together on the basis of the HMBC NMR correlations or when the relative configuration cannot be unequivocally identified on the basis of NOE NMR enhancements observed. Herein, we describe the methodology used to carry out the structure elucidation of a new C16 chamigrene, cycloelatanene A (5) which was isolated from the southern Australian marine alga Laurencia elata (Rhodomelaceae). The general approach and principles used in the structure determination of this compound can be applied to the structure elucidation of other small molecular weight compounds derived

  20. Marine Invasion in the Mediterranean Sea: The Role of Abiotic Factors When There Is No Biological Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The tropical red alga Womersleyella setacea (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) is causing increasing concern in the Mediterranean Sea because of its invasive behavior. After its introduction it has colonized most Mediterranean areas, but the mechanism underlying its acclimatization and invasion process remains unknown. To understand this process, we decided i) to assess in situ the seasonal biomass and phenological patterns of populations inhabiting the Mediterranean Sea in relation to the main environmental factors, and ii) to experimentally determine if the tolerance of W. setacea to different light and temperature conditions can explain its colonization success, as well as its bathymetric distribution range. The bathymetric distribution, biomass, and phenology of W. setacea were studied at two localities, and related to irradiance and temperature values recorded in situ. Laboratory experiments were set up to study survival, growth and reproduction under contrasting light and temperature conditions in the short, mid, and long term.Results showed that, in the studied area, the bathymetric distribution of W. setacea is restricted to a depth belt between 25 and 40 m deep, reaching maximum biomass values (126 g dw m−2) at 30 m depth. In concordance, although in the short term W. setacea survived and grew in a large range of environmental conditions, its life requirements for the mid and long term were dim light levels and low temperatures. Biomass of Womersleyella setacea did not show any clear seasonal pattern, though minimum values were reported in spring. Reproductive structures were always absent. Bearing in mind that no herbivores feed on Womersleyella setacea and that its thermal preferences are more characteristic of temperate than of tropical seaweeds, low light (50 µmol photon m−2 s−1) and low temperature (12°C) levels are critical for W. setacea survival and growth, thus probably determining its spread and bathymetric distribution across the Mediterranean

  1. Lipid Accumulation during the Establishment of Kleptoplasty in Elysia chlorotica

    PubMed Central

    Pelletreau, Karen N.; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Weber, Katrin L.; Rumpho, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of kleptoplasty (retention of “stolen plastids”) in the digestive tissue of the sacoglossan Elysia chlorotica Gould was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. Cellular processes occurring during the initial exposure to plastids were observed in laboratory raised animals ranging from 1–14 days post metamorphosis (dpm). These observations revealed an abundance of lipid droplets (LDs) correlating to plastid abundance. Starvation of animals resulted in LD and plastid decay in animals <5 dpm that had not yet achieved permanent kleptoplasty. Animals allowed to feed on algal prey (Vaucheria litorea C. Agardh) for 7 d or greater retained stable plastids resistant to cellular breakdown. Lipid analysis of algal and animal samples supports that these accumulating LDs may be of plastid origin, as the often algal-derived 20∶5 eicosapentaenoic acid was found in high abundance in the animal tissue. Subsequent culturing of animals in dark conditions revealed a reduced ability to establish permanent kleptoplasty in the absence of photosynthetic processes, coupled with increased mortality. Together, these data support an important role of photosynthetic lipid production in establishing and stabilizing this unique animal kleptoplasty. PMID:24828251

  2. Eukaryotic pathogens (Chytridiomycota and Oomycota) infecting marine microphytobenthic diatoms - a methodological comparison.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Bettina; Küpper, Frithjof C; Vyverman, Wim; Karsten, Ulf

    2014-12-01

    Using sediment samples from the Solthörn tidal flat (southern North Sea, Germany), collected in bi-weekly intervals from June to July 2012, a range of qualitative and quantitative screening methods for oomycete and chytrid pathogens infecting benthic diatoms were evaluated. Pre-treatment of sediment samples using short ultrasound pulses and gradient centrifugation, in combination with CalcoFluor White, showed the best results in the visualization of both pathogen groups. The highest number of infected benthic diatoms was observed in mid July (5.8% of the total benthic diatom community). Most infections were caused by chytrids and, in a few cases, oomycetes (Lagenisma Drebes (host: Coscinodiscus radiatus Ehrenberg) and Ectrogella Zopf (hosts: Dimeregramma minor in Pritchard and Gyrosigma peisonis). Among the chytrids, sporangium morphology indicated the presence of five different morphotypes, infecting mainly epipelic taxa of the orders Naviculales (e.g., Navicula digitoradiata) and Achnanthales (e.g., Achnanthes brevipes Agardh). The presence of multiple pathogens in several epipelic diatom taxa suggests a significant role for fungal parasitism in affecting microphytobenthic diatom succession. PMID:26988783

  3. A comparative study of the photosynthetic capacity in two green tide macroalgae using chlorophyll fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Qu, Tongfei; Zhao, Xinyu; Tang, Xianghai; Xiao, Hui; Tang, Xuexi

    2016-01-01

    Green tides have occurred in the Yellow Sea, China, every year from 2007 to 2015. The free-floating Ulva prolifera (Müller) J. Agardh was the causative macroalgal species. The co-occurring, attached U. intestinalis was also observed. Photosynthetic capacities were determined using chlorophyll fluorescence in situ and after 7 days lab acclimation, and a significant differences were noted. Pigment composition showed no obvious differences, but concentrations varied significantly, especially chlorophyll b in U. prolifera two times increase was observed after acclimation. The optimal photochemical efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm) was significantly higher in U. prolifera. Photosynthetic rate (α), maximum relative electron transport rate (rETRmax), and minimum saturating irradiance (Ek), obtained from rapid light response curves (RLCs), showed almost the same photosynthetic physiological status as Fv/Fm. Quenching coefficients and low temperature (77 K) chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra of thylakoid membranes analysis showed U. prolifera has a better recovery activity and plasticity of PSII than U. intestinalis. Furthermore, energy dissipation via non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and state transitions showed efficacious photoprotection solution especially in U. prolifera suffered from the severe stresses. Results in the present study suggested that U. prolifera's higher photosynthetic capacity would contribute to its free-floating proliferation, and efficacious photoprotection in addition to favorable oceanographic conditions and high nutrient levels support its growth and aggregation. PMID:27386261

  4. Historical and Current Perspectives on the Systematics of the ‘Enigmatic’ Diatom Genus Rhoicosphenia (Bacillariophyta), with Single and Multi-Molecular Marker and Morphological Analyses and Discussion on the Monophyly of ‘Monoraphid’ Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Evan W.; Stepanek, Joshua G.; Kociolek, J. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to determine the phylogenetic position of the diatom genus Rhoicosphenia. Currently, four hypotheses based on the morphology of the siliceous valve and its various ultrastructural components, sexual reproduction, and chloroplasts have been proposed. Two previous morphological studies have tentatively placed Rhoicosphenia near members of the Achnanthidiaceae and Gomphonemataceae, and no molecular studies have been completed. The position of Rhoicosphenia as sister to ‘monoraphid’ diatoms is problematic due to the apparent non-monophyly of that group, so hypotheses of ‘monoraphid’ monophyly are also tested. Using an analysis of morphological and cytological features, as well as sequences from three genes, SSU, LSU, and rbcL, recovered from several freshwater Rhoicosphenia populations that have similar morphology to Rhoicosphenia abbreviata (Agardh) Lange-Bertalot, we have analyzed the phylogenetic position of Rhoicosphenia in the context of raphid diatoms. Further, we have used topology testing to determine the statistical likelihoods of these relationships. The hypothesis that Rhoicosphenia is a member of the Achnanthidiaceae cannot be rejected, while the hypothesis that it is a member of the Gomphonemataceae can be rejected. In our analyses, members of the Achnanthidiaceae are basal to Rhoicosphenia, and Rhoicosphenia is basal to the Cymbellales, or a basal member of the Cymbellales, which includes the Gomphonemataceae. Hypothesis testing rejects the monophyly of ‘monoraphid’ diatoms. PMID:27045763

  5. Effects of experimental overgrowth on survival and change in the turf assemblage of a giant kelp forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miles, A.K.; Meslow, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    Crustose coralline algae were the prevalent cover among sessile organisms that paved or grew near the substratum, and also the most commonly overgrown species in a giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) C.A. Agardh forest located off San Nicolas Island, California. Giant kelp was the largest and most conspicuous species that overgrew large patches of the substrata; overgrowth among turf organisms also appeared common. To determine the effects of giant kelp holdfasts on crustose coralline algae and other turf organisms,'artificial holdfasts' were placed on 0.125-m2 plots for 5, 8 and 12 months. In these treatments, 50?57% of the crustose coralline algae survived. Because these algae also recruited while covered, the total cover (survivorship plus recruitment) differed by only 7?26% from that sampled at the start of the study. The decline of these algae in control plots was similar to that in the treatment plots mostly because of overgrowth by sessile invertebrates. Bryozoans increased markedly on the control plots, whereas 0?12% survived in the treatment plots. Bryozoans and sponges also recruited under the artificial holdfasts. Some arborescent turf algae survived in the 5- and 8-month treatments; articulated coralline algae survived better than did foliose algae. High survival recruitment of crustose coralline algae while overgrown contributed to their prevalence in benthic communities.

  6. Fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides from brown seaweeds inhibit proliferation of melanoma cells and induce apoptosis by activation of caspase-3 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tamauchi, Hidekazu; Mikkelsen, Jørn D; Meyer, Anne S

    2011-12-01

    Fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides (FCSPs) extracted from seaweeds, especially brown macro-algae, are known to possess essential bioactive properties, notably growth inhibitory effects on tumor cells. In this work, we conducted a series of in vitro studies to examine the influence of FCSPs products from Sargassumhenslowianum C. Agardh (FSAR) and Fucus vesiculosus (FVES), respectively, on proliferation of melanoma B16 cells and to investigate the underlying apoptosis promoting mechanisms. Cell viability analysis showed that both FCSPs products, i.e., FSAR and FVES, decreased the proliferation of the melanoma cells in a dose-response fashion, with FSAR being more potent at lower dosages, and FVES being relatively more anti-proliferative than FSAR at higher dosages. Flow cytometric analysis by Annexin V staining of the melanoma cells exposed to the FCSPs products confirmed that both FSAR and FVES induced apoptosis. The FCSPs-induced apoptosis was evidenced by loss of plasma membrane asymmetry and translocation of the cell membrane phospholipids and was accompanied by the activation of caspase-3. The FCSPs bioactivity is proposed to be attributable to distinct structural features of the FCSPs, particularly the presence of sulfated galactofucans (notably in S.henslowianum) and sulfated fucans (notably in F. vesiculosus). This study thus indicates that unfractionated FCSPs may exert bioactive effects on skin cancer cells via induction of apoptosis through cascades of reactions that involve activation of caspase-3. PMID:22363242

  7. Effects of UV-B irradiation on isoforms of antioxidant enzymes and their activities in red alga Grateloupia filicina (Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiqiang; Li, Lixia

    2014-11-01

    Macroalgae in a littoral zone are inevitably exposed to UV-B irradiance. We analyzed the effects of UV-B on isoenzyme patterns and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) of red algae Grateloupia filicina (Lamour.) C. Agardh. The activities of SOD, CAT, and APX changed in response to UV-B in a time- and dose-dependent manner. POX activity increased significantly under all three UV-B treatments. The enzymatic assay showed three distinct bands of SODI (Mn-SOD), SODII (Fe-SOD), and SODIII (CuZn-SOD) under a low (Luv) and medium (Muv) dose of UV-B irradiation, while SODI and SODIII activities decreased significantly when exposed to a high dose of UV-B irradiation (Huv). The activity of POX isoenzymes increased significantly after exposure to UV-B, which is consistent with the total activity. In addition, a clear decrease in activity of CATIV was detected in response to all the three doses of UV treatments. Some bands of APX isoenzyme were also clearly influenced by UV-B irradiation. Correspondingly, the daily growth rate declined under all the three exposure doses, and was especially significant under Muv and Huv treatments. These data suggest that, although the protection mechanisms of antioxidant defense system are partly inducible by UV-B to prevent the damage, G. filicina has incomplete tolerance to higher UV-B irradiation stress.

  8. Mitochondrial genome of Turbinaria ornata (Sargassaceae, Phaeophyceae): comparative mitogenomics of brown algae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Pang, Shaojun

    2015-11-01

    Turbinaria ornata (Turner) J. Agardh is a perennial brown alga native to coral reef ecosystems of tropical areas of the Pacific and Indian Ocean. Very little is known about its organellar genome structure. In the present work, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of T. ornata was determined and compared with other reported brown algal mtDNAs. The circular mitogenome of 34,981 bp contains a basic set of 65 mitochondrial genes. The structure and organization of T. ornata mitogenome is very similar to Sargassum species. Turbinaria ornata genes overlap by a total of 164 bp in 12 different locations from 1 to 66 bp, and the non-coding sequences are 1872 bp, constituting approximate 5.35 % of the genome. The total spacer size has positive correlation with the brown algal mitogenome size with the correlation coefficient of 0.7972. Several regions displaying greater inconsistency (rnl-trnK spacer, cox2 gene, cox3-atp6 spacer, rps14-rns middle region and trnP-rnl spacer) have been identified in brown algal mtDNAs. The observed uncertainty regarding the position and support values of some branches might be closely associated with the heterogeneity of evolutionary rate. PMID:25893565

  9. Antiviral property and mechanisms of a sulphated polysaccharide from the brown alga Sargassum patens against Herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Chiu, L C M; Ooi, V E C; Chan, P K S; Ang, P O

    2006-11-01

    A sulphated polysaccharide (SP-2a) from the brown alga Sargassum patens (Kütz.) Agardh (Sargassaceae) was found to significantly inhibit the in vitro replication of both the acyclovir (ACV)-sensitive and -resistant strains of Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), in dose-dependent manners, with 50% inhibitions occurring with 1.5-5.3 microg/ml of the polysaccharide. SP-2a exhibited extracellular virucidal activity only against the ACV-sensitive strains, but not the resistant strain, at the concentration of 100 microg/ml. The strongest antiviral activities against the different strains of HSV-1 were observed when this polysaccharide was present during and after adsorption of the virus to host cells. The inhibitory effect of SP-2a on virus adsorption occurred dose-dependently in all the HSV-1 strains tested, and the adsorption of the ACV-resistant DM2.1 strain was reduced by 81.9% (relative to control) with 4 microg/ml of the polysaccharide. This study clearly demonstrated that the antiviral mode of action of SP-2a is mediated mainly by inhibiting virus attachment to host cells, and this sulphated polysaccharide might have different modes of action against the ACV-sensitive and -resistant strains of HSV-1. PMID:16427262

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome of the brown alga Sargassum hemiphyllum (Sargassaceae, Phaeophyceae): comparative analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Pang, Shaojun; Chen, Weizhou

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum hemiphyllum (Turner) C. Agardh is a common low intertidal brown alga in the northwestern Pacific, and two varieties (var. chinense and var. hemiphyllum) of this alga have been determined based on morphological and molecular data. In this study, we present the complete mitochondrial genome of S. hemiphyllum var. chinense. The circular-mapping S. hemiphyllum mitogenome of 34,686 bp has an overall A+T content of 63.43%, and contains 65 densely packed genes. The total intergenic spacer regions are 1597 bp, constituting 4.60% of the mitogenome. The gene content and genome organization of S. hemiphyllum are identical to that of other reported Sargassum species. The identity comparison of overall mitogenome sequences and phylogenomic analyses indicate that S. hemiphyllum has a closer evolutionary relationship with Sargassum muticum than other Sargassum species analyzed. The present mitogenomic data provide a powerful tool for definition of varieties and studies of population structure in S. hemiphyllum. PMID:25162799

  11. Antioxidant Activity, Total Phenolics and Flavonoid Contents of some Edible Green Seaweeds from Northern Coasts of the Persian Gulf

    PubMed Central

    Farasat, Massoumeh; Khavari-Nejad, Ramazan-Ali; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Namjooyan, Foroogh

    2014-01-01

    The antioxidant activity, contents of total phenolics and flavonoids were quantified in the methanolic extracts of four Ulva species (Ulva clathrata (Roth) C.Agardh, Ulva linza Linnaeus, Ulva flexuosa Wulfen and Ulva intestinalis Linnaeus) grown at different parts of northern coasts of the Persian Gulf in south of Iran. The seaweeds were collected from Dayyer, Taheri and Northern Ouli coasts in April 2011. Methanolic extracts of the seaweeds were assessed for their antioxidant activity using DPPH radical scavenging assay and was performed in a microplate reader. All species exhibited a DPPH radical scavenging activity, and among the species, Ulva clathrata demonstrated greater antioxidant potential with a low IC50 (0.881 mg mL-1) in comparison with those of the other species. Also the highest phenolic content (5.080 mg GAE g-1) and flavonoid content (33.094 mg RE g-1) were observed in U.clathrata. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents showed positive correlations with the DPPH radical scavenging activity (p < 0.01) and negative correlations with IC50 (p < 0.01).The results suggest that these edible green seaweeds possess antioxidant potential which could be considered for future applications in medicine, dietary supplements ,cosmetics or food industries. PMID:24734068

  12. Spring and Summer Proliferation of Floating Macroalgae in a Mediterranean Coastal Lagoon (Tancada Lagoon, Ebro Delta, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, M.; Comín, F. A.

    2000-08-01

    During the last 10 years, a drastic change in the structure of the community of primary producers has been observed in Tancada Lagoon (Ebro Delta, NE Spain). This consisted of a decrease in the abundance of submerged rooted macrophyte cover and a spring and summer increase in floating macroalgae. Two spatial patterns have been observed. In the west part of the lagoon, Chaetomorpha linum Kützing, dominated during winter and decreased progressively in spring when Cladophora sp. reached its maximum development. In the east part of the lagoon, higher macroalgal diversity was observed, together with lower cover in winter and early spring. Cladophora sp., Gracilaria verrucosa Papenfuss and Chondria tenuissima Agardh, increased cover and biomass in summer. Maximum photosynthetic production was observed in spring for G. verrucosa (10·9 mg O 2 g -1 DW h -1) and C. tenuissima (19·0 mg O 2 g -1 DW h -1) in contrast with Cladophora sp. (15·9 mg O 2 g -1 DW h -1) and Chaetomorpha linum (7·2 mg O 2 g -1 DW h -1) which reached maximum production in summer. Increased conductivity from reduced freshwater inflow, and higher water temperatures during periods of lagoon isolation, mainly in summer, were the main physical factors associated with an increase in floating macroalgal biomass across the lagoon. Reduced nitrogen availability and temperature-related changes in carbon availability during summer were related to a decrease in abundance of C. linum and increases in G. verrucosa and Cladophora sp.

  13. Amino acid composition and crude protein values of some Cyanobacteria from Çanakkale (Turkey).

    PubMed

    Akgül, Rıza; Kızılkaya, Bayram; Akgül, Füsun; Erduğan, Hüseyin

    2015-09-01

    Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) form an important component of integrated nutrient managements in agriculture and are exploited in commercial biotechnological ventures. In this study, Rivularia bullata (Poir) Berkeley ex Bornet & Flahault, Nostocs pongiaeforme C. Agardh ex Bornet & Flahault were researched for their amino acid composition and crude protein values. R. bullata was collected from coastal zones of the Gulf of Saros and N. spongiaeforme from the Ayazma Stream. The levels of amino acids were measured in algae samples using EZ: fast kits (EZ: fast GC/FID Protein Hydrolysate Amino Acid Kit) by gas chromatography. The crude proteins of samples were determined by the Kjeldahl method and were calculated using a nitrogen conversion factor of 6.25. Thirty-two amino acids were investigated, for N. spongiaeforme eight free essential amino acids (EAA), eight free non-essential amino acids (NEAA) and eleven other amino acids (OAA); for R. bullata eight EAA, eight NEAA and eight OAA were detected. Aspartic acid is the major constituent for both species. The total protein percents were determined for N. spongiaeforme as % 19.83 and for R. bullata as % 6.15. When considering the increasing world population and reducing natural products; Cyanobacteria will benew feed sources for all living. PMID:26408895

  14. Antioxidant system responses in two co-occurring green-tide algae under stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Zhao, Xinyu; Tang, Xuexi

    2016-01-01

    Green tides have occurred every year from 2007 to 2014 in the Yellow Sea. Ulva prolifera (Müller) J. Agardh has been identified as the bloom-forming alga, co-occurring with U. intestinalis. We observed distinct strategies for both algal species during green tides. U. prolifera exhibited a high abundance initially and then decreased dramatically, while U. intestinalis persisted throughout. The antioxidant system responses of these two macroalgae were compared in the late phase of a green tide (in-situ) and after laboratory acclimation. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant system responses differed significantly between the two. Malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide contents increased significantly in-situ in U. prolifera, but not in U. intestinalis. In U. prolifera, we observed a significant decrease in total antioxidant ability (T-AOC), antioxidant enzymes (SOD and Apx), and non-enzyme antioxidants (GSH and AsA) in-situ. U. intestinalis showed the same pattern of T-AOC and SOD, but its Gpx, Apx, and GSH responses did not differ significantly. The results suggest that U. prolifera was more susceptible than U. intestinalis to the harsh environmental changes during the late phase of a Yellow Sea green tide. The boom and bust strategy exhibited by U. prolifera and the persistence of U. intestinalis can be explained by differences in enzyme activity and antioxidant systems.

  15. Historical and Current Perspectives on the Systematics of the 'Enigmatic' Diatom Genus Rhoicosphenia (Bacillariophyta), with Single and Multi-Molecular Marker and Morphological Analyses and Discussion on the Monophyly of 'Monoraphid' Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Evan W; Stepanek, Joshua G; Kociolek, J Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to determine the phylogenetic position of the diatom genus Rhoicosphenia. Currently, four hypotheses based on the morphology of the siliceous valve and its various ultrastructural components, sexual reproduction, and chloroplasts have been proposed. Two previous morphological studies have tentatively placed Rhoicosphenia near members of the Achnanthidiaceae and Gomphonemataceae, and no molecular studies have been completed. The position of Rhoicosphenia as sister to 'monoraphid' diatoms is problematic due to the apparent non-monophyly of that group, so hypotheses of 'monoraphid' monophyly are also tested. Using an analysis of morphological and cytological features, as well as sequences from three genes, SSU, LSU, and rbcL, recovered from several freshwater Rhoicosphenia populations that have similar morphology to Rhoicosphenia abbreviata (Agardh) Lange-Bertalot, we have analyzed the phylogenetic position of Rhoicosphenia in the context of raphid diatoms. Further, we have used topology testing to determine the statistical likelihoods of these relationships. The hypothesis that Rhoicosphenia is a member of the Achnanthidiaceae cannot be rejected, while the hypothesis that it is a member of the Gomphonemataceae can be rejected. In our analyses, members of the Achnanthidiaceae are basal to Rhoicosphenia, and Rhoicosphenia is basal to the Cymbellales, or a basal member of the Cymbellales, which includes the Gomphonemataceae. Hypothesis testing rejects the monophyly of 'monoraphid' diatoms. PMID:27045763

  16. Translocation of C in Macrocystis pyrifera (Giant Kelp).

    PubMed

    Lobban, C S

    1978-04-01

    The pattern of import and export of (14)C-labeled assimilates in Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) C. A. Agardh in southern California was studied by labeling single blades on fronds, in situ, with [(14)C]NaHCO(3) for 24 hours. The pattern was found to be similar to that known in dicotyledons: actively growing tissue imported and did not export. As a blade reached maturity it began to export, at first only acropetally to the apex which formed it, later also down the frond to sporophylls and frond initials at the base of the frond, and into the apical regions of juvenile fronds; finally there was a phase of declining export, late in the life of the blade, when transport was only downward. Young fronds imported from older fronds until they were approximately 3 meters long, by which time they had developed mature, upward exporting blades. No translocation was found from a younger frond to an older frond, nor was there transport upward from a blade on a frond lacking the apical region. PMID:16660341

  17. Mollusc-Algal Chloroplast Endosymbiosis. Photosynthesis, Thylakoid Protein Maintenance, and Chloroplast Gene Expression Continue for Many Months in the Absence of the Algal Nucleus1

    PubMed Central

    Green, Brian J.; Li, Wei-Ye; Manhart, James R.; Fox, Theodore C.; Summer, Elizabeth J.; Kennedy, Robert A.; Pierce, Sidney K.; Rumpho, Mary E.

    2000-01-01

    Early in its life cycle, the marine mollusc Elysia chlorotica Gould forms an intracellular endosymbiotic association with chloroplasts of the chromophytic alga Vaucheria litorea C. Agardh. As a result, the dark green sea slug can be sustained in culture solely by photoautotrophic CO2 fixation for at least 9 months if provided with only light and a source of CO2. Here we demonstrate that the sea slug symbiont chloroplasts maintain photosynthetic oxygen evolution and electron transport activity through photosystems I and II for several months in the absence of any external algal food supply. This activity is correlated to the maintenance of functional levels of chloroplast-encoded photosystem proteins, due in part at least to de novo protein synthesis of chloroplast proteins in the sea slug. Levels of at least one putative algal nuclear encoded protein, a light-harvesting complex protein homolog, were also maintained throughout the 9-month culture period. The chloroplast genome of V. litorea was found to be 119.1 kb, similar to that of other chromophytic algae. Southern analysis and polymerase chain reaction did not detect an algal nuclear genome in the slug, in agreement with earlier microscopic observations. Therefore, the maintenance of photosynthetic activity in the captured chloroplasts is regulated solely by the algal chloroplast and animal nuclear genomes. PMID:10982447

  18. Spatial distributions of floating seaweeds in the East China Sea from late winter to early spring.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, S; Ajisaka, T; Lahbib, S; Kokubu, Y; Alabsi, M N; Komatsu, T

    2014-01-01

    Floating seaweeds play an important role as a habitat for many animals accompanying or attaching to them in offshore waters. It was in 2000 that the first report described abundant distributions of floating seaweeds in offshore waters in the East China Sea in spring. Young individuals of the yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata are captured for aquaculture purposes from floating seaweeds in the East China Sea. Therefore, a sound understanding of the distributions of floating seaweeds in the East China Sea is needed. Detailed information is especially important during the late winter to early spring, which corresponds to the juvenile period of the yellowtail. Thus, field surveys using R/V Tansei-Maru were conducted in the Japanese Exclusive Economic Zone in the East China Sea from late winter to early spring in 2010 and 2011. We obtained positions of the vessel by GPS and transversal distances from the vessel to a raft by visual observation. Distance sampling method (Thomas et al. 2010) was applied to estimation of floating seaweed densities (rafts km(-2)). Seaweed rafts were also randomly sampled using nets during the research cruises. In the East China Sea, seaweed rafts were distributed mainly on the continental shelf west of the Kuroshio, especially in waters between 26° N and 30° N. Collected rafts consisted of only one species, Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh. Taking into account surface currents and geographical distribution of S. horneri, it is estimated that these floating seaweeds originated from natural beds along the coast between mid and south China. Considering the approximate travel times, it is suggested that floating patches are colonized by yellowtails early on during their trips, i.e., close to the Chinese coast. PMID:24771973

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF CELL WALL POLYSACCHARIDES OF THE COENCOCYTIC GREEN SEAWEED BRYOPSIS PLUMOSA (BRYOPSIDACEAE, CHLOROPHYTA) FROM THE ARGENTINE COAST(1).

    PubMed

    Ciancia, Marina; Alberghina, Josefina; Arata, Paula Ximena; Benavides, Hugo; Leliaert, Frederik; Verbruggen, Heroen; Estevez, Jose Manuel

    2012-04-01

    Bryopsis sp. from a restricted area of the rocky shore of Mar del Plata (Argentina) on the Atlantic coast was identified as Bryopsis plumosa (Hudson) C. Agardh (Bryopsidales, Chlorophyta) based on morphological characters and rbcL and tufA DNA barcodes. To analyze the cell wall polysaccharides of this seaweed, the major room temperature (B1) and 90°C (X1) water extracts were studied. By linkage analysis and NMR spectroscopy, the structure of a sulfated galactan was determined, and putative sulfated rhamnan structures and furanosidic nonsulfated arabinan structures were also found. By anion exchange chromatography of X1, a fraction (F4), comprising a sulfated galactan as major structure was isolated. Structural analysis showed a linear backbone constituted of 3-linked β-d-galactose units, partially sulfated on C-6 and partially substituted with pyruvic acid forming an acetal linked to O-4 and O-6. This galactan has common structural features with those of green seaweeds of the genus Codium (Bryopsidales, Chlorophyta), but some important differences were also found. This is the first report about the structure of the water-soluble polysaccharides biosynthesized by seaweeds of the genus Bryopsis. These sulfated galactans and rhamnans were in situ localized mostly in two layers, one close to the plasma membrane and the other close to the apoplast, leaving a middle amorphous, unstained cell wall zone. In addition, fibrillar polysaccharides, comprising (1→3)-β-d-xylans and cellulose, were obtained by treatment of the residue from the water extractions with an LiCl/DMSO solution at high temperature. These polymers were also localized in a bilayer arrangement. PMID:27009722

  20. Anti-genotoxic effect of the Sargassum dentifolium extracts: prevention of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei, and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Gamal-Eldeen, Amira M; Abo-Zeid, Mona A M; Ahmed, Eman F

    2013-01-01

    The alga Sargassum dentifolium (Turner) C. Agardh, belongs to Sargassaceae, is a brown seaweed in red sea shores in Egypt. This work aimed to extract different water-soluble polysaccharide extracts (E1, E2, and E3) from S. dentifolium and to investigate their protective effect against cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced genotoxicity. Mice bone marrow cells (BMCs) were collected and analyzed for the chromosomal aberration, micronucleated BMCs (MN-BMCs), the mitotic index, DNA fragmentation by comet assay, and histone deacetylases (HDACs), and radical scavenging capacity of extracts was evaluated by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay. The results indicated that E2 and E3 significantly inhibited CP-induced multiple chromosomal aberrations, where E1 and E3 significantly suppressed the number of CP-induced formation of tetraploidy. The extracts prohibited the cytotoxic effect of CP and recovered the mitotic activity, whereas E1 possessed the highest recovery and mitosis. In absence of MN, CP induced formation of bi- and poly-nucleated BMCs. E1 prohibited CP-induced formation of bi-nucleated BMCs, while E2 and E3 prohibited CP-induced formation of poly-nucleated BMCs. CP-induced MN-BMCs were accompanied with mono-, bi- and poly-nucleated cells. E1 and E3 remarkably suppressed mono-nucleated MN-BMCs, while E2 inhibited bi-nucleated MN-BMCs. All the extracts significantly inhibited the CP-induced formation of poly-nucleated MN-BMCs. CP-induced DNA fragmentation was inhibited by all extracts, where E1 was the strongest inhibitor as concluded from the comet tail moment. All the extracts were strong OH scavengers, while only E3 was ROO scavenger. The results revealed a drastic decline in HDACs activity by E1 and E3. In conclusion, S. dentifolium polysaccharide extracts E1 and E3 possessed a potential anti-genotoxic and a promising anti-mutagenic activity. PMID:21652192

  1. In vitro cancer chemopreventive properties of polysaccharide extract from the brown alga, Sargassum latifolium.

    PubMed

    Gamal-Eldeen, Amira M; Ahmed, Eman F; Abo-Zeid, Mona A

    2009-06-01

    Polysaccharides of edible algae attracted extensive interest due to their numerous biological activities. Sargassum latifolium (Turner) C. Agardh, belongs to Sargassaceae, is a brown algae in red sea shores in Egypt. This work is a novel attempt to explore the cancer chemopreventive activity of different fractions of water-soluble polysaccharide extract derived from S. latifolium. Estimation of cancer chemopreventive activity, specifically anti-initiation, including the modulation of carcinogen metabolism and the antioxidant capacity, revealed that E1 and E4 were potent anti-initiators, where they lead not only to an inhibition in the carcinogen activator cytochrome P450 1A (IC50 2.54 and 10.30 microg/ml, respectively), but also to an induction in the carcinogen detoxification enzymes glutathione-S-transferases (144% and 225% of the control, respectively). E1 and E4 inhibited 59% and 63% of the induced-DNA damage, as measured by comet assay. Similarly both E1 and E4 possessed potential anti-promoting properties as indicated by their anti-inflammatory activity. E1 and E4 enhanced the macrophage proliferation; however they dramatically inhibited the stimulated NO (30.7% and 59.3%), TNF-alpha (38.2% and 54.9) and COX-2 (20% and 18%), respectively. E3 showed a selective cytotoxicity against lymphoblastic leukemia (1301 cells), while other fraction extracts had no cytotoxic effect against all tested cell lines. E3 led to a major disturbance in cell cycle including arrest in both S-phases in 1301 cells. This disturbance was associated with an induced-cell death due to apoptosis, but not necrosis. In conclusion, E1 and E4 are promising cancer chemopreventive fractions, since they had tumor anti- initiating activity via their protective modulation of carcinogen metabolism, and tumor anti-promoting activity via their anti-inflammatory activity, while E3 can be considered as a promising anti-cancer agent against leukemia. PMID:19306910

  2. GLYCOCONJUGATE ORGANIZATION OF ENTEROMORPHA (=ULVA) FLEXUOSA AND ULVA FASCIATA (CHLOROPHYTA) ZOOSPORES(1).

    PubMed

    Michael, Teena Shen

    2009-06-01

    Ecologically successful algae that colonize natural and artificial substrates in the marine environment have distinct strategies for opportunistic dispersal and settlement. The objective of this research was to visualize molecular architecture of zoospores from Enteromorpha (=Ulva) flexuosa (Wulfen) J. Agardh and Ulva fasciata Delile that coexist but alternate in dominance on an intertidal bench. Multiple fluorescent lectins were used to stabilize and probe for diverse zoospore glycoconjugates (GC) that could be involved in cell and substrate interactions. Results from epifluorescence microscopy showed distinct cellular and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) domains of GC relative to settlement morphologies. Glycoconjugates were similar for both species with (1) α-d mannose and/or glucose moieties localized on flagella, the anterior domes and anterior regions, the plasma membranes, and EPS; (2) α-fucose localized on flagella and anterior regions; (3) N or α,ß-N acetylglucosamine localized on flagella, the anterior regions, and EPS; and (4) varied N-acetylgalactosamine and/or galactose moieties localized on each domain for both species excluding the plasma membranes. Some differences in lectin binding were observed for each species at the flagella, the anterior domes, and the plasma membranes. Glycoconjugate distributions shifted with morphological changes that followed initial adhesion. TEM of E. flexuosa zoospore stages following carbohydrate-stabilizing fixations and gold-conjugated lectin probes resolved GC with α-d mannose and/or glucose, and/or N-acetylglucosamine at the plasma membrane, ER and diverse vesicles of the anterior pole, EPS, and discontinuous regions or knobs associated with flagellar surfaces. The distinct distribution and diversity of zoospore GC may be central to recognition and attachment on diverse substrata by these algae. PMID:27034043

  3. PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF FLOATING GIANT KELP MACROCYSTIS PYRIFERA (PHAEOPHYCEAE): LATITUDINAL VARIABILITY IN THE EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND GRAZING(1).

    PubMed

    Rothäusler, Eva; Gómez, Iván; Hinojosa, Iván A; Karsten, Ulf; Tala, Fadia; Thiel, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Rafts of Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) C. Agardh can act as an important dispersal vehicle for a multitude of organisms, but this mechanism requires prolonged persistence of floating kelps at the sea surface. When detached, kelps become transferred into higher temperature and irradiance regimes at the sea surface, which may negatively affect kelp physiology and thus their ability to persist for long periods after detachment. To examine the effect of water temperature and herbivory on the photosynthetic performance, pigment composition, carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity, and the nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) content of floating M. pyrifera, experiments were conducted at three sites (20° S, 30° S, 40° S) along the Chilean Pacific coast. Sporophytes of M. pyrifera were maintained at three different temperatures (ambient, ambient - 4°C, ambient + 4°C) and in presence or absence of the amphipod Peramphithoe femorata for 14 d. CA activity decreased at 20° S and 30° S, where water temperatures and irradiances were highest. At both sites, pigment contents were substantially lower in the experimental algae than in the initial algae, an effect that was enhanced by grazers. Floating kelps at 20° S could not withstand water temperatures >24°C and sank at day 5 of experimentation. Maximal quantum yield decreased at 20° S and 30° S but remained high at 40° S. It is concluded that environmental stress is low for kelps floating under moderate temperature and irradiance conditions (i.e., at 40° S), ensuring their physiological integrity at the sea surface and, consequently, a high dispersal potential for associated biota. PMID:27021859

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of the red seaweed Laurencia dendroidea (Florideophyceae, Rhodophyta) and its microbiome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Seaweeds of the Laurencia genus have a broad geographic distribution and are largely recognized as important sources of secondary metabolites, mainly halogenated compounds exhibiting diverse potential pharmacological activities and relevant ecological role as anti-epibiosis. Host-microbe interaction is a driving force for co-evolution in the marine environment, but molecular studies of seaweed-associated microbial communities are still rare. Despite the large amount of research describing the chemical compositions of Laurencia species, the genetic knowledge regarding this genus is currently restricted to taxonomic markers and general genome features. In this work we analyze the transcriptomic profile of L. dendroidea J. Agardh, unveil the genes involved on the biosynthesis of terpenoid compounds in this seaweed and explore the interactions between this host and its associated microbiome. Results A total of 6 transcriptomes were obtained from specimens of L. dendroidea sampled in three different coastal locations of the Rio de Janeiro state. Functional annotations revealed predominantly basic cellular metabolic pathways. Bacteria was the dominant active group in the microbiome of L. dendroidea, standing out nitrogen fixing Cyanobacteria and aerobic heterotrophic Proteobacteria. The analysis of the relative contribution of each domain highlighted bacterial features related to glycolysis, lipid and polysaccharide breakdown, and also recognition of seaweed surface and establishment of biofilm. Eukaryotic transcripts, on the other hand, were associated with photosynthesis, synthesis of carbohydrate reserves, and defense mechanisms, including the biosynthesis of terpenoids through the mevalonate-independent pathway. Conclusions This work describes the first transcriptomic profile of the red seaweed L. dendroidea, increasing the knowledge about ESTs from the Florideophyceae algal class. Our data suggest an important role for L. dendroidea in the primary

  5. Distribution of drifting seaweeds in eastern East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Teruhisa; Tatsukawa, Kenichi; Filippi, Jean B.; Sagawa, Tatsuyuki; Matsunaga, Daisuke; Mikami, Atsuko; Ishida, Kenichi; Ajisaka, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Katsuhiko; Aoki, Masakazu; Wang, Wei-Ding; Liu, Hui-Fei; Zhang, Shou-Du; Zhou, Min-Dong; Sugimoto, Takashige

    2007-09-01

    In offshore waters with relatively low primary production, drifting seaweeds composed of Sargassum species form an identical ecosystem such as an oasis in desert. Commercially important pelagic fishes such as jack mackerel ( Trachurus japonicus) and yellow tail ( Seriola quinqueradiata) spawn in East China Sea pass their juvenile period accompanying drifting seaweeds. Therefore drifting seaweeds are very important not only in offshore ecosystem but also fishery resources. However the distribution of drifting seaweeds in East China Sea has scarcely known. Then we conducted two research cruises of R/V Hakuho-Maru in May 2002 and in March 2004. During the cruises, drifting seaweeds were visually observed from the bridge and sampled with a towing net. The observation revealed that the drifting seaweeds were distributed along the front between the Kuroshio Current and coastal waters and mainly composed of one seaweed species, Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh from spring to early summer. There are no reports on geographical distribution of this species in the coasts south of southern Kyushu Island in Japan. Kuroshio Current flows northeastward there. Buoys with GPS attached to drifting seaweeds released off Zhejiang Province, China, in March 2005 to track their transport. Their positions monitored by ORBCOM satellite showed that they were transported to the area in East China Sea, where the drifting seaweeds were observed during the cruises, in 2 months. These facts suggest that S. horneri detached from Chinese coast in March or months earlier than March could be transported to fringe area of continental shelf and waters influenced by Kuroshio Current from March to May. Therefore the Sargassum forests, especially S. horneri, along the Chinese coast play a very important role in the ecosystem of the East China Sea as a source of drifting seaweeds.

  6. Temporal variation in community composition, pigmentation, and Fv/Fm of desert cyanobacterial soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Reed, S.C.; Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    Summers on the Colorado Plateau (USA) are typified by harsh conditions such as high temperatures, brief soil hydration periods, and high UV and visible radiation. We investigated whether community composition, physiological status, and pigmentation might vary in biological soil crusts as a result of such conditions. Representative surface cores were sampled at the ENE, WSW, and top microaspects of 20 individual soil crust pedicels at a single site in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, in spring and fall of 1999. Frequency of cyanobacterial taxa, pigment concentrations, and dark adapted quantum yield (Fv/Fm) were measured for each core. The frequency of major cyanobacterial taxa was lower in the fall compared to spring. The less-pigmented cyanobacterium Microcoleus vaginatus showed significant mortality when not in the presence of Nostoc spp. and Scytonema myochrous (Dillw.) Agardh. (both synthesizers of UV radiation-linked pigments) but had little or no mortality when these species were abundant. We hypothesize that the sunscreen pigments produced by Nostoc and Scytonema in the surface of crusts protect other, less-pigmented taxa. When fall and spring samples were compared, overall cyanobacterial frequency was lower in fall, while sunscreen pigment concentrations, chlorophyll a concentration, and Fv/Fm were higher in fall. The ratio of cyanobacterial frequency/chlorophyll a concentrations was 2-3 times lower in fall than spring. Because chlorophyll a is commonly used as a surrogate measure of soil cyanobacterial biomass, these results indicate that seasonality needs to be taken into consideration. In the fall sample, most pigments associated with UV radiation protection or repair were at their highest concentrations on pedicel tops and WSW microaspects, and at their lowest concentrations on ENE microaspects. We suggest that differential pigment concentrations between microaspects are induced by varying UV radiation dosage at the soil surface on these different

  7. THE BIOGEOGRAPHIC ORIGIN OF ARCTIC ENDEMIC SEAWEEDS: A THERMOGEOGRAPHIC VIEW(1).

    PubMed

    Adey, Walter H; Lindstrom, Sandra C; Hommersand, Max H; Müller, Kirsten M

    2008-12-01

    The Arctic is geologically and biogeographically young, and the origin of its seaweed flora has been widely debated. The Arctic littoral biogeographic region dates from the latest Tertiary and Pleistocene. Following the opening of Bering Strait, about 3.5 mya, the "Great Trans-Arctic Biotic Interchange" populated the Arctic with a fauna strongly dominated by species of North Pacific origin. The Thermogeographic Model (TM) demonstrates why climate and geography continued to support this pattern in the Pleistocene. Thus, Arctic and Atlantic subarctic species of seaweeds are likely to be evolutionarily "based" in the North Pacific, subarctic species are likely to be widespread in the warmer Arctic, and species of Atlantic Boreal or warmer origin are unlikely in the Arctic and Subarctic. Although Arctic seaweeds have been thought to have a greater affinity with the North Atlantic, we have reanalyzed the Arctic endemic algal flora, using the Thermogeographic Model and evolutionary trees based on molecular data, to demonstrate otherwise. There are 35 congeneric species of the six, abundant Arctic Rhodophyta that we treat in this paper; 32 of these species (91%) occur in the North Pacific, two species (6%) occur in the Boreal or warmer Atlantic Ocean, and a single species is panoceanic, but restricted to the Subarctic. Laminaria solidungula J. Agardh, a kelp Arctic "endemic" species, has 18 sister species. While only eleven (61%) occur in the North Pacific, this rapidly dispersing and evolving genus is a terminal member of a diverse family and order (Laminariales) widely accepted to have evolved in the North Pacific. Thus, both the physical/time-based TM and the dominant biogeographic pattern of relatives of Arctic macrophytes suggest strong compliance with the evidence of zoology, geology, and paleoclimatology that the Arctic marine flora is largely of Pacific origin. PMID:27039853

  8. Benthic macrofauna changes in areas of Venice lagoon populated by seagrasses or seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Sfriso, A; Birkemeyer, T; Ghetti, P F

    2001-10-01

    Two areas of the Venice lagoon populated by seagrasses (three stations covered by Cymodocea nodosa (Ucria) Asherson, Zostera marina Linnaeus, Zostera noltii Hornemann) or seaweeds (two stations: one covered by Ulva rigida C. Agardh and another at present without seaweed biomass) were monitored by means of six surveys over a year in order to study macrofaunal composition and seasonal changes. The seagrass stations showed a mean species richness (28-30 S m(-2)), individual abundance (1854-4018 N m(-2)) and biomass (22.3-37.7 g m(-2) ash-free-dry-weight, AFDW) ca. 3-8 times higher than those populated by seaweeds (10-15 S m(-2), 494-1395 N m(-2) and 5.6-13.7 g m(-2) AFDW). Differences among seagrass or seaweed stations were much lower. The Ulva-dominated station showed a macrofauna completely different both from the other stations and the communities recorded ca. 30 years ago, before the prolific growth of Ulva. In this station, frequent biomass decompositions and anoxic crises created critical conditions for life favouring organisms with reduced life cycles, younger individuals and the epifaunal species instead of the infaunal ones. In particular, Ulva grazers and scrapers such as Gammarus aequicauda Stock and Gibbula adriatica Philippi were found to be by far the most abundant species, whereas the taxa characteristic of the associations found in the past, in the presence of seagrasses or seaweeds and typical of low eutrophicated environments, appear strongly reduced. Marked differences in the macrophyte dominance and in the bio-physico-chemical variables which characterise the main environmental conditions of the Venice lagoon support the different distribution and composition of macrofaunal communities. Seaweed stations appear mainly governed by the seasonal cycles of these un-rooted macrophytes which, by alternating periods of production and decomposition, are responsible for the drastic reduction of macrofauna biodiversity and biomass. Conversely, seagrass

  9. Chloroplast genes are expressed during intracellular symbiotic association of Vaucheria litorea plastids with the sea slug Elysia chlorotica.

    PubMed

    Mujer, C V; Andrews, D L; Manhart, J R; Pierce, S K; Rumpho, M E

    1996-10-29

    The marine slug Elysia chlorotica (Gould) forms an intracellular symbiosis with photosynthetically active chloroplasts from the chromophytic alga Vaucheria litorea (C. Agardh). This symbiotic association was characterized over a period of 8 months during which E. chlorotica was deprived of V. litorea but provided with light and CO2. The fine structure of the symbiotic chloroplasts remained intact in E. chlorotica even after 8 months of starvation as revealed by electron microscopy. Southern blot analysis of total DNA from E. chlorotica indicated that algal genes, i.e., rbcL, rbcS, psaB, psbA, and 16S rRNA are present in the animal. These genes are typically localized to the plastid genome in higher plants and algae except rbcS, which is nuclear-encoded in higher plants and green (chlorophyll a/b) algae. Our analysis suggests, however, that similar to the few other chromophytes (chlorophyll a/c) examined, rbcS is chloroplast encoded in V. litorea. Levels of psbA transcripts remained constant in E. chlorotica starved for 2 and 3 months and then gradually declined over the next 5 months corresponding with senescence of the animal in culture and in nature. The RNA synthesis inhibitor 6-methylpurine reduced the accumulation of psbA transcripts confirming active transcription. In contrast to psbA, levels of 16S rRNA transcripts remained constant throughout the starvation period. The levels of the photosystem II proteins, D1 and CP43, were high at 2 and 4 months of starvation and remained constant at a lower steady-state level after 6 months. In contrast, D2 protein levels, although high at 2 and 4 months, were very low at all other periods of starvation. At 8 months, de novo synthesis of several thylakoid membrane-enriched proteins, including D1, still occurred. To our knowledge, these results represent the first molecular evidence for active transcription and translation of algal chloroplast genes in an animal host and are discussed in relation to the endosymbiotic