Science.gov

Sample records for agencies industrial facilities

  1. COLUMBUS Orbital Facility and Automated Transfer Vehicle: a challenge for agency & industry.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, H; Luttmann, H

    1997-01-01

    Long term continuous operation of the COLUMBUS Orbital Facility (COF) flight- and ground segment requires continuous mission control and operations support capability to ensure proper operation and configuration of the COF systems in support of ongoing science and technology payloads. The ISS logistics scenario will be supported by the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). These operational needs require the built-up of a new ground infrastructure in Europe and USA, enabling an efficient operations for preparation, planning and mission execution. The challenge for the European space community consists in the development and operation of a user friendly operational environment but keeping costs within budgetary constraints. Results of detailed definition studies performed by both agency and industry for the ground infrastructure indicate solutions to those technical and programmatic requirements by using of existing centers and facilities, re-use of C/D phase products (Hardware, Software) and COTS equipment to avoid costly new developments, using engineering expertise of the industrial personnel from flight element phase C/D. The concept for operations execution defines the task sharing between Operations Control Facilities (OCF), Operations Support Facilities and User Operations Sites. Operations support consists of on-line engineering support, off-line engineering support, payload integration, logistics support and crew training support performed by industry. DASA RI has made internal investments in organizational concepts for mission operations as well as in mission technologies and tools based on the standard COLUMBUS Ground Software (CGS) toolset and on knowledge based systems to enable an efficient industrial operations support. These tools are available as prototypes being evaluated in a simulated operational environment. PMID:11541146

  2. REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O'Leary, E. M.

    2002-02-25

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

  3. Optimize Deployment of Renewable Energy Technologies for Government Agencies, Industrial Facilities, and Military Installations: NREL Offers Proven Tools and Resources to Reduce Energy Use and Improve Efficiency (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Lab provides expertise, facilities, and technical assistance to campuses, facilities, and government agencies to apply renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.

  4. Industrial Education Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Public Instruction, Lansing.

    Factors for consideration by an industrial education planning committee are discussed. Selection, purchasing, and storage of new types of equipment and supplies, in addition to students' project storage, are noted as worthy of consideration in planning the shop facility. Planning factors for the various types of industrial arts laboratories are…

  5. Industrial Arts Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Vocational Education.

    Requirements and planning guidelines for industrial arts facilities are outlined for application to three types of industrial arts shops. The ratios of areas to students are discussed in regard to the sizes, shapes, and locations of shops. Specifications for walls, floors, ceilings, windows, paint, and illumination are included. An equipment…

  6. Advertising Agencies: An Analysis of Industry Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra J.

    Noting that advertising agencies have not been examined as a collective industry, this paper looks at the development and structure of the advertising agency industry. The first portion of the paper discusses the development of the agency. The remaining two sections deal with trends in and the structure of the industry including: (1) the growth of…

  7. Industrial Facility Combustion Energy Use

    DOE Data Explorer

    McMillan, Colin

    2016-08-01

    Facility-level industrial combustion energy use is calculated from greenhouse gas emissions data reported by large emitters (>25,000 metric tons CO2e per year) under the U.S. EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP, https://www.epa.gov/ghgreporting). The calculation applies EPA default emissions factors to reported fuel use by fuel type. Additional facility information is included with calculated combustion energy values, such as industry type (six-digit NAICS code), location (lat, long, zip code, county, and state), combustion unit type, and combustion unit name. Further identification of combustion energy use is provided by calculating energy end use (e.g., conventional boiler use, co-generation/CHP use, process heating, other facility support) by manufacturing NAICS code. Manufacturing facilities are matched by their NAICS code and reported fuel type with the proportion of combustion fuel energy for each end use category identified in the 2010 Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS, http://www.eia.gov/consumption/manufacturing/data/2010/). MECS data are adjusted to account for data that were withheld or whose end use was unspecified following the procedure described in Fox, Don B., Daniel Sutter, and Jefferson W. Tester. 2011. The Thermal Spectrum of Low-Temperature Energy Use in the United States, NY: Cornell Energy Institute.

  8. The National Ignition Facility and Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harri, J. G.; Paisner, J. A.; Lowdermilk, W. H.; Boyes, J. D.; Kumpan, S. A.; Sorem, M. S.

    1994-09-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in inertial confinement fusion targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. The National Ignition Facility construction project will require the best of our construction industries and its success will depend on the best products offered by hundreds of the nation's high technology companies. Three-fourths of the construction costs will be invested in industry. This article reviews the design, cost and schedule, and required industrial involvement associated with the construction project.

  9. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S METAL FINISHING FACILITY POLLUTION PREVENTION TOOL (MFFP2T)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency has developed a pre-release version of a process simulation tool, the Metal Finishing Facility Pollution Prevention Tool (MFFP2T), for the metal finishing industry. This presentation will provide a demonstration of the current ver...

  10. Planning and Equipping Industrial Arts Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Robert L.; Myers, Norman L.

    Guidelines for secondary education, industrial arts programs and facility planning are overviewed along with data on their instructional and equipment needs. Spatial organization and dimensions are suggested in terms of flexibility and expansion. Different types of shops are discussed along with their own utilities, ventilation, exhausting,…

  11. A Guide for Equipping Industrial Arts Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Industrial Arts Association, Washington, DC. Equipment Guide Committee.

    A guide for planning new and revising existing industrial arts facilities which gives a listing of tools and equipment recommended for each of the major areas of instruction (automotive and power mechanics, ceramics, drafting, electronics, elementary, general shop, graphic arts, metalworking, plastics, and woodworking). General descriptions and…

  12. 44 CFR 321.5 - Retention of industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Retention of industrial..., DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, MARITIME ADMINISTRATION) § 321.5 Retention of industrial facilities. (a) Industrial..., shall be retained in the Industrial reserves (National Industrial Reserve, Departmental...

  13. 44 CFR 321.5 - Retention of industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Retention of industrial..., DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, MARITIME ADMINISTRATION) § 321.5 Retention of industrial facilities. (a) Industrial..., shall be retained in the Industrial reserves (National Industrial Reserve, Departmental...

  14. 44 CFR 321.5 - Retention of industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Retention of industrial..., DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, MARITIME ADMINISTRATION) § 321.5 Retention of industrial facilities. (a) Industrial..., shall be retained in the Industrial reserves (National Industrial Reserve, Departmental...

  15. 44 CFR 321.5 - Retention of industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Retention of industrial..., DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, MARITIME ADMINISTRATION) § 321.5 Retention of industrial facilities. (a) Industrial..., shall be retained in the Industrial reserves (National Industrial Reserve, Departmental...

  16. 44 CFR 321.5 - Retention of industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Retention of industrial..., DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, MARITIME ADMINISTRATION) § 321.5 Retention of industrial facilities. (a) Industrial..., shall be retained in the Industrial reserves (National Industrial Reserve, Departmental...

  17. Wind tunnel modeling of toxic gas releases at industrial facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    Government agencies and the petroleum, chemical and gas industries in the US and abroad have become increasingly concerned about the issues of toxic gas dispersal. Because of this concern, research programs have been sponsored by these various groups to improve the capabilities in hazard mitigation and response. Present computer models used to predict pollutant concentrations at industrial facilities do not properly account for the effects of structures. Structures can act to trap or deflect the cloud and modify the cloud dimensions, thereby possibly increasing or reducing downwind concentrations. The main purpose of this evaluation was to develop a hybrid modeling approach, which combines wind tunnel and dispersion modeling, to obtain more accurate concentration estimates when buildings or structures affect the dispersion of hazardous chemical vapors. To meet the study objectives, wind tunnel testing was performed on a building cluster typical of two industrial settings where accidental releases of toxic gases might occur. This data set was used to test the validity of the AFTOX and SLAB models for estimating concentrations and was used to develop and test two hybrid models. Two accident scenarios were simulated, an evaporating pool of a gas slightly heavier than air (Hydrazine-N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and a liquid jet release of Nitrogen Tetroxide (N{sub 2}O{sub 4}) where dense gas dispersion effects would be significant. Tests were conducted for a range of wind directions and wind speeds for two different building configurations (low rise and high rise structures).

  18. 77 FR 74671 - Guidance for Industry: Questions and Answers Regarding Food Facility Registration (Fifth Edition)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ..., 2003, FDA issued an interim final rule (68 FR 58894) to implement amendments to the FD&C Act made by... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry: Questions and Answers Regarding Food Facility Registration (Fifth Edition) AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice....

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.585 - What Federal facility telework policy must Executive agencies follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... telework policy must Executive agencies follow? 102-74.585 Section 102-74.585 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Telework § 102-74.585 What Federal facility telework policy must Executive agencies follow? Executive agencies must follow these telework policies: (a) In accordance with Section...

  20. 77 FR 57094 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Self-Identification of Generic Drug Facilities, Sites, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... Generic Drug Facilities, Sites, and Organizations; Availability; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug... notice that appeared in the Federal Register of Monday, August 27, 2012 (77 FR 51811). The document announced a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Self-Identification of Generic Drug Facilities,...

  1. Seismic evaluation criteria for existing critical industrial facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Manrod, W.E.; Hall, W.J.; Beavers, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines for the development of seismic evaluation criteria for existing critical industrial facilities are presented. Critical industrial facilities are considered as those facilities that, if damaged by natural phenomena, could result in the release of substances harmful to the public or the environment, or that could result in what owners consider as unacceptable financial losses. The guidelines are intended to assist in developing evaluation criteria for such facilities, which will result in realistic assessments that are representative of the state-of-the-art.

  2. 41 CFR 102-74.165 - What energy standards must Federal agencies follow for existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What energy standards... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.165 What energy standards must Federal agencies follow for existing facilities? Existing Federal facilities...

  3. 41 CFR 102-74.165 - What energy standards must Federal agencies follow for existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What energy standards... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.165 What energy standards must Federal agencies follow for existing facilities? Existing Federal facilities...

  4. Third Space Weather Summit Held for Industry and Government Agencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    2009-12-01

    The potential for space weather effects has been increasing significantly in recent years. For instance, in 2008 airlines flew about 8000 transpolar flights, which experience greater exposure to space weather than nontranspolar flights. This is up from 368 transpolar flights in 2000, and the number of such flights is expected to continue to grow. Transpolar flights are just one example of the diverse technologies susceptible to space weather effects identified by the National Research Council's Severe Space Weather Events—Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts: A Workshop Report (2008). To discuss issues related to the increasing need for reliable space weather information, experts from industry and government agencies met at the third summit of the Commercial Space Weather Interest Group (CSWIG) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), held 30 April 2009 during Space Weather Week (SWW), in Boulder, Colo.

  5. Guide for Planning Industrial Arts Laboratory Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Div. of Community Colleges and Vocational Education.

    This guide was developed following a review of literature and a survey questionnaire which was completed by industrial arts consultants, teacher educators, teachers, and supervisors. The first draft was circulated to a state advisory committee for suggestions. Major sections are titled: (1) General Laboratory Specifications for Planning Industrial…

  6. 50 CFR 80.64 - How does an agency allocate costs in multipurpose projects and facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS Allocation of Funds by an Agency § 80.64 How does an agency allocate costs... project or facility. The agency must describe the method used to allocate costs in multipurpose...

  7. 50 CFR 80.64 - How does an agency allocate costs in multipurpose projects and facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS Allocation of Funds by an Agency § 80.64 How does an agency allocate costs... project or facility. The agency must describe the method used to allocate costs in multipurpose...

  8. 50 CFR 80.64 - How does an agency allocate costs in multipurpose projects and facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS Allocation of Funds by an Agency § 80.64 How does an agency allocate costs... project or facility. The agency must describe the method used to allocate costs in multipurpose...

  9. 50 CFR 80.64 - How does an agency allocate costs in multipurpose projects and facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS Allocation of Funds by an Agency § 80.64 How does an agency allocate costs... project or facility. The agency must describe the method used to allocate costs in multipurpose...

  10. 78 FR 42821 - Agency Information Collection (Technical Industry Standards) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Technical Industry Standards) Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY... 852.211-75), Technical Industry Standards. OMB Control Number: 2900-0586. Type of Review: Revision of a currently approved collection. Abstract: VAAR provision 852.211-72, Technical Industry...

  11. 41 CFR 102-74.205 - What Federal facility ridesharing policy must Executive agencies follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Facility Ridesharing Program” (3 CFR, 1980 Comp., p. 138), Executive agencies must actively promote the use... than single-occupancy motor vehicles. (c) In accordance with the Transportation Equity Act for the...

  12. 41 CFR 102-74.205 - What Federal facility ridesharing policy must Executive agencies follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Facility Ridesharing Program” (3 CFR, 1980 Comp., p. 138), Executive agencies must actively promote the use... than single-occupancy motor vehicles. (c) In accordance with the Transportation Equity Act for the...

  13. 77 FR 51811 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Self-Identification of Generic Drug Facilities, Sites, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Self-Identification of Generic Drug Facilities, Sites, and Organizations; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a...

  14. 77 FR 48990 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Necessity of the Use of Food Categories in Food Facility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Necessity of the Use of Food Categories in Food Facility Registrations and Updates to Food Categories; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing...

  15. 77 FR 64999 - Guidance for Industry: Necessity of the Use of Food Product Categories in Food Facility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... Federal Register of August 15, 2012 (77 FR 48990), we made available a draft guidance entitled ``Guidance... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry: Necessity of the Use of Food Product Categories in Food Facility Registrations and Updates to Food Product Categories; Availability AGENCY:...

  16. 76 FR 48859 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Facility Ground...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ...-Water Monitoring Requirements AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In... Business or other for-profit; and State, Local, or Tribal Governments. Title: Facility Ground-Water.... Abstract: This ICR examines the ground-water monitoring standards for permitted and interim...

  17. 41 CFR 102-74.205 - What Federal facility ridesharing policy must Executive agencies follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Facility Ridesharing Program” (3 CFR, 1980 Comp., p. 138), Executive agencies must actively promote the use...-occupancy modes of travel) by personnel working at Federal facilities to conserve energy, reduce congestion... accordance with the Federal Employees Clean Air Incentives Act (Public Law 103-172), the Federal...

  18. 41 CFR 102-74.205 - What Federal facility ridesharing policy must Executive agencies follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Facility Ridesharing Program” (3 CFR, 1980 Comp., p. 138), Executive agencies must actively promote the use...-occupancy modes of travel) by personnel working at Federal facilities to conserve energy, reduce congestion... accordance with the Federal Employees Clean Air Incentives Act (Public Law 103-172), the Federal...

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.165 - What energy standards must Federal agencies follow for existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What energy standards must Federal agencies follow for existing facilities? 102-74.165 Section 102-74.165 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY...

  20. 41 CFR 102-74.165 - What energy standards must Federal agencies follow for existing facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What energy standards must Federal agencies follow for existing facilities? 102-74.165 Section 102-74.165 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY...

  1. Federal Agency Liability under the Superfund Act: It Goes Beyond Federal Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond Takashi Swenson

    2004-02-01

    While many readers of the Federal Facilities Environmental Journal are involved with the performance of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup on Department of Defense and Department of Energy facilities, many may be unfamiliar with the much broader CERCLA liability of federal agencies under other circumstances. This article places the various kinds of federal agency CERCLA liability into that wider context and serves as a lessons learned for environmental managers who want to avoid creating new CERCLA liability for their agencies.

  2. Operation of an industrial radiation processing facility in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres C., Gilberto

    A 10 years old JS-6500 industrial Cobalt 60 irradiator was installed in 1980 at the ININ Nuclear Center in Mexico with 960 kGy. The facility was commissioning in August with some minor changes with respect to the original AECL design, in order to give services to different industries and also to do research in several fields. During that year promotional activities were done to increase interest from industry in the use of radiation processing. In 1981, an interruption due to pool's leakage and its reparation, put the facility out of operation. During the next three years the demand increases but never reach more than 50% if the capacity. In that time, the potential users did not show confidence in the process, even knowing that health authorities approved with no restrictions radiation sterilization. Actually, there are 34 different companies irradiating 48 different products. Even those within the same grouping, require different minimum and maximum radiation doses, so the facility has been operated combining products and valumes. The experiences are presented in this paper. Also, maintenance of the irradiator is discussed and some modifications to the original programme have been done due to the necessity to use local spare parts instead of imported ones.

  3. Mercury control challenge for industrial boiler MACT affected facilities

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-15

    An industrial coal-fired boiler facility conducted a test program to evaluate the effectiveness of sorbent injection on mercury removal ahead of a fabric filter with an inlet flue gas temperature of 375{sup o}F. The results of the sorbent injection testing are essentially inconclusive relative to providing the facility with enough data upon which to base the design and implementation of permanent sorbent injection system(s). The mercury removal performance of the sorbents was significantly less than expected. The data suggests that 50 percent mercury removal across a baghouse with flue gas temperatures at or above 375{sup o}F and containing moderate levels of SO{sub 3} may be very difficult to achieve with activated carbon sorbent injection alone. The challenge many coal-fired industrial facilities may face is the implementation of additional measures beyond sorbent injection to achieve high levels of mercury removal that will likely be required by the upcoming new Industrial Boiler MACT rule. To counter the negative effects of high flue gas temperature on mercury removal with sorbents, it may be necessary to retrofit additional boiler heat transfer surface or spray cooling of the flue gas upstream of the baghouse. Furthermore, to counter the negative effect of moderate or high SO{sub 3} levels in the flue gas on mercury removal, it may be necessary to also inject sorbents, such as trona or hydrated lime, to reduce the SO{sub 3} concentrations in the flue gas. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  4. The Environmental protection agency industrial technology transfer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suter, K. H.

    1974-01-01

    Today TAC consists of a full service information center and five programs, which are: (1) our industrial program; (2) the energy information center; (3) the business and industry extension program; (4) the remote sensing program; and (5) the center for environmental research and development.

  5. Civilian Agency Industry Working Group EVM World Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerby, Jerald

    2013-01-01

    Objectives include: Promote the use of standards ]based, objective, and quantitative systems for managing projects and programs in the federal government. Understand how civilian agencies in general, manage their projects and programs. Project management survey expected to go out soon to civilian agencies. Describe how EVM and other best practices can be applied by the government to better manage its project and programs irrespective of whether work is contracted out or the types of contracts employed. Develop model policies aimed at project and program managers that are transportable across the government.

  6. 75 FR 16512 - Willstaff Staffing Agency, Willstaff Crystal, Inc., and MDS Industrial Resources, Inc., Working...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... on December 11, 2009 (74 FR 65798). At the request of the State Agency, the Department reviewed the... Employment and Training Administration Willstaff Staffing Agency, Willstaff Crystal, Inc., and MDS Industrial... under a separate unemployment insurance (UI) tax account under the name Willstaff Crystal,...

  7. Electrical studies for an industrial gas turbine cogeneration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, R.L.; Kalkstein, E.W. and Co., Newark, DE . Engineering Dept. Parsons Co., Pasadena, CA ); Willoughby, R.D. )

    1989-07-01

    Electrical studies are required to assure the proper integration of a gas-turbine cogeneration facility into an existing industrial-plant electrical system and the connected utility grid. Details of such a study effort are presented, including boundary-limit definition for the system model, individual component modeling, load-flow and short-circuit studies, stability studies, and simulation of on-line isolation from the electric utility during system undervoltage or underfrequency conditions. The impact of the studies on the design process and plant system reliability is discussed.

  8. Energy determination in industrial X-ray processing facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, M. R.; Gregoire, O.; Stichelbaut, F.; Gomola, I.; Galloway, R. A.; Schlecht, J.

    2005-12-01

    In industrial irradiation facilities, the determination of maximum photon or electron energy is important for regulated processes, such as food irradiation, and for assurance of treatment reproducibility. With electron beam irradiators, this has been done by measuring the depth-dose distribution in a homogeneous material. For X-ray irradiators, an analogous method has not yet been recommended. This paper describes a procedure suitable for typical industrial irradiation processes, which is based on common practice in the field of therapeutic X-ray treatment. It utilizes a measurement of the slope of the exponential attenuation curve of X-rays in a thick stack of polyethylene plates. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental tests have been performed to verify the suitability and accuracy of the method between 3 MeV and 8 MeV.

  9. 77 FR 37704 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Industrial Minerals Surveys (40...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... published a Federal Register Notice (77 FR 6580) announcing that we would submit this ICR to OMB for... Geological Survey Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Industrial Minerals... requirements for the Industrial Minerals Surveys. This collection consists of 40 forms. The revision...

  10. Industrial waste recycling at an automotive component manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffurs, J.A.; Hubler, R.L.; Behaylo, D.P.

    1995-09-01

    The AC Rochester Division of General Motors Corporation (GM) develops and manufacturers automotive components for engine management systems at nine facilities in the US. Its largest facility is located in flint, Michigan, and is known as the Flint East site. The Flint East site covers nearly two square miles and consists of several plants housing manufacturing operations for spark plugs, glow plugs, oil filters, air filters, air cleaner assemblies, fuel pumps, fuel level sensors, cruise control systems, and other components. The volume and diversity of the scrap and wastes generated from these operations require skillful waste management to provide environmentally safe and cost-effective disposal options. Over time, a full-scale recycling and waste disposal operation evolved at Flint East. The operation has grown over the past thirty years to handle over 68,000 tons of material annually. Flint East`s program is regarded as a model industrial waste reduction and recycling operation. Elements of the program are presented here as a guide to establishing a successful industrial recycling program.

  11. 76 FR 62818 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Critical Facility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... June 16, 2011, 76 FR 35229. The 9/11 Act required TSA to develop and implement a plan to inspect... OMB Review: Critical Facility Information of the Top 100 Most Critical Pipelines AGENCY... Information of the Top 100 Most Critical Pipelines. Type of Request: Revision of a currently...

  12. 41 CFR 102-74.180 - What illumination levels must Federal agencies maintain on Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What illumination levels must Federal agencies maintain on Federal facilities? 102-74.180 Section 102-74.180 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY...

  13. 41 CFR 102-74.15 - What are the facility management responsibilities of occupant agencies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the facility management responsibilities of occupant agencies? 102-74.15 Section 102-74.15 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION...

  14. 41 CFR 102-74.205 - What Federal facility ridesharing policy must Executive agencies follow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Facility Ridesharing Program” (3 CFR, 1980 Comp., p. 138), Executive agencies must actively promote the use... than single-occupancy motor vehicles. (c) In accordance with the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (Public Law 105-178), employers, including the Federal Government, are to offer...

  15. The Role of Land and Facilities in Fostering Linkages between Universities and High Technology Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Ira

    1985-01-01

    An overview of university industry research linkages and examples of how these linkages are occurring in various university and university-affiliated facility types are presented. Facility types are defined to include space used by either universities or industries including jointly owned facilities, innovation or incubator centers, supercenters,…

  16. Mitigation strategies for microbiologically influenced corrosion in gas industry facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, D.H.; Zintel, T.P. ); Cookingham, B.A. ); Howard, D.; Morris, R.G. ); Day, R.A.; Frank, J.R. ); Pogemiller, G.E. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) and its mitigation in gas industry facilities. The results show that MIC commonly occurs on both external and internal surfaces of pipes, in down hole tubulars and in process equipment such as separators. Mitigation strategies were tested in side-stream devices at several sites. The results demonstrate that many biocides and corrosion inhibitors are relatively ineffective in controlling the surface microbial populations, at least under the conditions of the tests. Detailed studies with glutaraldehyde demonstrated that reestablishment of surface MIC communities after removal of this biocide was very rapid. Continuous treatment with glutaraldehyde led to the development of surface microbial communities resistant to the effects of the biocide.

  17. 50 CFR 80.63 - Does an agency have to allocate costs in multipurpose projects and facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS Allocation of Funds by an Agency § 80.63 Does an agency have to allocate... in multipurpose projects and facilities. A grant-funded project or facility is multipurpose if...

  18. 50 CFR 80.63 - Does an agency have to allocate costs in multipurpose projects and facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS Allocation of Funds by an Agency § 80.63 Does an agency have to allocate... in multipurpose projects and facilities. A grant-funded project or facility is multipurpose if...

  19. 50 CFR 80.63 - Does an agency have to allocate costs in multipurpose projects and facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS Allocation of Funds by an Agency § 80.63 Does an agency have to allocate... in multipurpose projects and facilities. A grant-funded project or facility is multipurpose if...

  20. 50 CFR 80.63 - Does an agency have to allocate costs in multipurpose projects and facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS Allocation of Funds by an Agency § 80.63 Does an agency have to allocate... in multipurpose projects and facilities. A grant-funded project or facility is multipurpose if...

  1. 36 CFR 1232.16 - What documentation must an agency create before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... National Archives of the United States in accordance with 36 CFR part 1235. ... agency create before it transfers records to a records storage facility? 1232.16 Section 1232.16 Parks... RECORDS TO RECORDS STORAGE FACILITIES § 1232.16 What documentation must an agency create before...

  2. 36 CFR 1232.16 - What documentation must an agency create before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... National Archives of the United States in accordance with 36 CFR part 1235. ... agency create before it transfers records to a records storage facility? 1232.16 Section 1232.16 Parks... RECORDS TO RECORDS STORAGE FACILITIES § 1232.16 What documentation must an agency create before...

  3. 10 CFR 50.22 - Class 103 licenses; for commercial and industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class 103 licenses; for commercial and industrial... and industrial facilities. A class 103 license will be issued, to an applicant who qualifies, for any..., transfer, acquire, possess, or use a production or utilization facility for industrial or...

  4. 10 CFR 50.22 - Class 103 licenses; for commercial and industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Class 103 licenses; for commercial and industrial... and industrial facilities. A class 103 license will be issued, to an applicant who qualifies, for any..., transfer, acquire, possess, or use a production or utilization facility for industrial or...

  5. 10 CFR 50.22 - Class 103 licenses; for commercial and industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class 103 licenses; for commercial and industrial... and industrial facilities. A class 103 license will be issued, to an applicant who qualifies, for any..., transfer, acquire, possess, or use a production or utilization facility for industrial or...

  6. 10 CFR 50.22 - Class 103 licenses; for commercial and industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class 103 licenses; for commercial and industrial... and industrial facilities. A class 103 license will be issued, to an applicant who qualifies, for any..., transfer, acquire, possess, or use a production or utilization facility for industrial or...

  7. 10 CFR 50.22 - Class 103 licenses; for commercial and industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Class 103 licenses; for commercial and industrial... and industrial facilities. A class 103 license will be issued, to an applicant who qualifies, for any..., transfer, acquire, possess, or use a production or utilization facility for industrial or...

  8. Industrial Sanitation and Personal Facilities. Module SH-13. Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on industrial sanitation and personal facilities is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module deals wth many facets of industrial sanitation and the facilities industries should provide so that proper health procedures may be followed. Following the introduction, 14 objectives (each keyed to a page in…

  9. Estimating the contribution of industrial facilities to annual PM10 concentrations at industrially influenced sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladtke, Dieter; Volkhausen, Wolfgang; Bach, Bastian

    If measures to reduce the industrial discharge of PM10 shall be planned with high accuracy, a first step must be to estimate the contribution of single industrial facilities to the overall PM10 burden as accurately as possible. In northern Duisburg as an example, an area where iron and steel producing industry is concentrated, PM10 was measured at 4 sampling sites very close to an industrial complex of blast furnaces, a sinter plant, oxygen steel works and a coke oven plant for 9 months in 2006. At two sites metals in PM10 were determined. The results, together with analytical data of urban background sites in the region and data of wind direction and wind speed were used for an estimation of the contribution of single plants to the PM10 burden. A careful analysis of the data showed, that the data of PM10, calcium, iron and zinc measured at two sites close to the industrial area and information about the urban background aerosol were sufficient to calculate the PM10 contribution of the main single plants. The data could be compared with those of modelling.

  10. A UAV system for inspection of industrial facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, J.; Burri, M.; Rehder, J.; Leutenegger, S.; Huerzeler, C.; Siegwart, R.

    This work presents a small-scale Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) capable of performing inspection tasks in enclosed industrial environments. Vehicles with such capabilities have the potential to reduce human involvement in hazardous tasks and can minimize facility outage periods. The results presented generalize to UAS exploration tasks in almost any GPS-denied indoor environment. The contribution of this work is twofold. First, results from autonomous flights inside an industrial boiler of a power plant are presented. A lightweight, vision-aided inertial navigation system provides reliable state estimates under difficult environmental conditions typical for such sites. It relies solely on measurements from an on-board MEMS inertial measurement unit and a pair of cameras arranged in a classical stereo configuration. A model-predictive controller allows for efficient trajectory following and enables flight in close proximity to the boiler surface. As a second contribution, we highlight ongoing developments by displaying state estimation and structure recovery results acquired with an integrated visual/inertial sensor that will be employed on future aerial service robotic platforms. A tight integration in hardware facilitates spatial and temporal calibration of the different sensors and thus enables more accurate and robust ego-motion estimates. Comparison with ground truth obtained from a laser tracker shows that such a sensor can provide motion estimates with drift rates of only few centimeters over the period of a typical flight.

  11. Some implications of the application or removal of agency seals by facility operators

    SciTech Connect

    Walford, F. ); Drayer, D.D.; Sonnier, C.S. )

    1990-04-01

    This report is the outcome of a study of the technical and procedural requirements which would need to be met if the Agency and facility operators were to agree that under certain circumstances the operator could remove or apply on Agency seal in the absence of an inspector. In the FRG and USA Support Programmes respectively an electronic seal (VACOSS) and a CCTV system (MIVS) have been developed. Through a joint project, an interface has been demonstrated which enables the seal data to be superimposed upon the surveillance data. This interface is briefly described in the appendix. A proposed application for this integrated system is to allow facility operators to carry-out some of the seal procedures normally performed by an inspector, thereby reducing the need for inspector presence at certain crucial times.

  12. 36 CFR 1234.30 - How does an agency request authority to establish or relocate records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authority to establish or relocate records storage facilities? 1234.30 Section 1234.30 Parks, Forests, and... RECORDS STORAGE FACILITIES Facility Approval and Inspection Requirements § 1234.30 How does an agency...” excludes NARA-owned and operated records centers. For purposes of this section and § 1234.34, the...

  13. 20 CFR 655.1101 - What are the responsibilities of the government agencies and the facilities that participate in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1101 What are the responsibilities of the government agencies and the.... (b) Facility's attestation responsibilities. Each facility seeking one or more H-1C nurse(s) must, as... admission or for the adjustment or extension of status of H-1C nurses. The facility must attach a copy...

  14. Vocational Instructional Materials for Trade and Industrial Occupations Available from Federal Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This annotated bibliography lists curriculum materials for trade and industrial education which were produced by Federal agencies and are appropriate for 36 subject matter areas, including: (1) air conditioning, (2) appliance repair, (3) automotive services, (4) aviation, (5) blueprint reading, (6) commercial arts, (7) construction and…

  15. 77 FR 6580 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Industrial Minerals Surveys (40...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... Minerals Surveys (40 Forms) AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of a revision... production and consumption data of industrial mineral commodities, some of which are considered strategic and critical. This information will be published as chapters in Minerals Yearbook, monthly Mineral...

  16. Federal agencies active in chemical industry-related research and development

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-29

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 calls for a program to further the commercialization of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies for the industrial sector.. The primary objective of the Office of Industrial Technologies Chemical Industry Team is to work in partnership with the US chemical industry to maximize economic, energy, and environmental benefits through research and development of innovative technologies. This document was developed to inventory organizations within the federal government on current chemical industry-related research and development. While an amount of funding or number of projects specifically relating to chemical industry research and development was not defined in all organizations, identified were about 60 distinct organizations representing 7 cabinet-level departments and 4 independent agencies, with research efforts exceeding $3.5 billion in fiscal year 1995. Effort were found to range from less than $500 thousand per year at the Departments of Agriculture and the Interior to over $100 million per year at the Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and Health and Human Services and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The total number of projects in these programs exceeded 10,000. This document is complete to the extent that agencies volunteered information. Additions, corrections, and changes are encouraged and will be incorporated in future revisions.

  17. A Guide to Preparing Educational Specifications for Secondary Industrial Arts Facilities. Monograph No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeb, Ralph V.

    The guide describes procedures for designing secondary industrial arts facilities based on careful scrutiny of the educational program which the facilities are intended to serve. It offers a four step general outline for planning such facilities and discusses in detail the following considerations with respect to writing subject area…

  18. Collaborating for breast health education and research. A university, industry, and community agency partnership.

    PubMed

    Thomas, B; Stamler, L L; Malinowski, A

    1999-11-01

    Initiating a collaborative health education program about breast health required talent, expertise, and workload contributions from all involved including university researchers, a regional breast screening agency, and local industries. The credibility and opinions of liaisons or key informants were valued highly, and their support was critical to the success of the project. Participation in any collaborative project is predicated on benefits perceived by each of the partners. The community agency reaped the benefits of greater dissemination of their educational materials through the interventions. The project increased corporate and union awareness of the resources of this agency and in this community. Throughout the project, meetings and telephone conferences were held on a weekly or biweekly basis with the liaisons. Liaisons disseminated updates to management and union representatives. PMID:10865537

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.185 - What heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What heating and cooling... heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities? Within the limitations of the building systems, Federal agencies must— (a) Operate heating and cooling systems in the...

  20. 41 CFR 102-74.185 - What heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What heating and cooling... heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities? Within the limitations of the building systems, Federal agencies must— (a) Operate heating and cooling systems in the...

  1. 41 CFR 102-74.185 - What heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What heating and cooling... heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities? Within the limitations of the building systems, Federal agencies must— (a) Operate heating and cooling systems in the...

  2. 41 CFR 102-74.185 - What heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What heating and cooling... heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities? Within the limitations of the building systems, Federal agencies must— (a) Operate heating and cooling systems in the...

  3. 41 CFR 102-74.50 - Are Federal agencies required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (ED) is responsible for the administration of the Randolph-Sheppard Act as set forth at 34 CFR part... required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities? 102-74.50 Section 102-74.50 Public....50 Are Federal agencies required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities?...

  4. 41 CFR 102-74.50 - Are Federal agencies required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (ED) is responsible for the administration of the Randolph-Sheppard Act as set forth at 34 CFR part... required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities? 102-74.50 Section 102-74.50 Public....50 Are Federal agencies required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities?...

  5. 41 CFR 102-74.50 - Are Federal agencies required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (ED) is responsible for the administration of the Randolph-Sheppard Act as set forth at 34 CFR part... required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities? 102-74.50 Section 102-74.50 Public....50 Are Federal agencies required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities?...

  6. 41 CFR 102-74.50 - Are Federal agencies required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (ED) is responsible for the administration of the Randolph-Sheppard Act as set forth at 34 CFR part... required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities? 102-74.50 Section 102-74.50 Public....50 Are Federal agencies required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities?...

  7. 41 CFR 102-74.50 - Are Federal agencies required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (ED) is responsible for the administration of the Randolph-Sheppard Act as set forth at 34 CFR part... required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities? 102-74.50 Section 102-74.50 Public....50 Are Federal agencies required to give blind vendors priority in operating vending facilities?...

  8. 36 CFR 1232.14 - What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... records to a records storage facility: (a) Ensure that the requirements of 36 CFR part 1234 are met... permanent retention, as those records typically require more stringent environmental controls (see 36 CFR... agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility? 1232.14 Section 1232.14...

  9. 36 CFR 1232.14 - What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... records to a records storage facility: (a) Ensure that the requirements of 36 CFR part 1234 are met... permanent retention, as those records typically require more stringent environmental controls (see 36 CFR... agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility? 1232.14 Section 1232.14...

  10. Facility Planning for 21st Century. Technology, Industry, and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Franklin

    When the Orange County School Board (Orlando, Florida) decided to build a new high school, they recognized Central Florida's high technology emphasis as a special challenge. The new facility needed to meet present instructional demands while being flexible enough to incorporate 21st century technologies. The final result is a new $30 million high…

  11. 32 CFR 644.424 - Development of public port or industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regulations published in the Federal Register 11 March 1961 (26 FR 2117-2118; 33 CFR 211.141 through 211.147... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Development of public port or industrial... Interests § 644.424 Development of public port or industrial facilities. (a) Authority. Section 108 of...

  12. 32 CFR 644.424 - Development of public port or industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regulations published in the Federal Register 11 March 1961 (26 FR 2117-2118; 33 CFR 211.141 through 211.147... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Development of public port or industrial... Interests § 644.424 Development of public port or industrial facilities. (a) Authority. Section 108 of...

  13. 32 CFR 644.424 - Development of public port or industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regulations published in the Federal Register 11 March 1961 (26 FR 2117-2118; 33 CFR 211.141 through 211.147... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Development of public port or industrial... Interests § 644.424 Development of public port or industrial facilities. (a) Authority. Section 108 of...

  14. 32 CFR 644.424 - Development of public port or industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regulations published in the Federal Register 11 March 1961 (26 FR 2117-2118; 33 CFR 211.141 through 211.147... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Development of public port or industrial... Interests § 644.424 Development of public port or industrial facilities. (a) Authority. Section 108 of...

  15. 78 FR 18353 - Guidance for Industry: Blood Establishment Computer System Validation in the User's Facility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... the Federal Register of October 29, 2007 (72 FR 61171), FDA announced the availability of the draft... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry: Blood Establishment Computer System... ``Guidance for Industry: Blood Establishment Computer System Validation in the User's Facility'' dated...

  16. Hepatitis B outbreak associated with a home health care agency serving multiple assisted living facilities in Texas, 2008-2010.

    PubMed

    Zheteyeva, Yenlik A; Tosh, Pritish; Patel, Priti R; Martinez, Diana; Kilborn, Cindy; Awosika-Olumo, Debo; Khuwaja, Salma; Ibrahim, Syed; Ryder, Anthony; Tohme, Rania A; Khudyakov, Yury; Thai, Hong; Drobeniuc, Jan; Heseltine, Gary; Guh, Alice Y

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a multifacility outbreak of acute hepatitis B virus infection involving 21 residents across 10 assisted living facilities in Texas during the period January 2008 through July 2010. Epidemiologic and laboratory data suggested that these infections belonged to a single outbreak. The only common exposure was receipt of assisted monitoring of blood glucose from the same home health care agency. Improved infection control oversight and training of assisted living facility and home health care agency personnel providing assisted monitoring of blood glucose is needed. PMID:24176604

  17. Energy management planning and control in a large industrial facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rood, L.; Korber, J.

    1995-06-01

    Eastman Kodak`s Kodak Park Manufacturing facility is a collection of hundreds of buildings and millions of square feet operated by dozens of semi-autonomous manufacturing units. The facility is served by a centralized Utilities system which cogenerates electricity and distributes steam, chilled water, compressed air, and several other services throughout the site. Energy management at Kodak Park has been active since the 70`s. In 1991, the Utilities Division took ownership of a site wide energy thrust to address capacity limitations of electric, compressed air and other services. Planning and organizing a program to meet Utilities Division goals in such a large complex site was a slightly daunting task. Tracking progress and keeping on schedule is also a challenge. The authors will describe innovative use of a project management software program called Open Plan{reg_sign} to accomplish much of the planning and control for this program. Open Plan{reg_sign} has been used since the initial planning to the current progress of about 50% completion of the program. Hundreds of activities performed by dozens of resource people are planned and tracked. Not only the usual cost and schedule information is reported, but also the schedule for savings in terms of kilowatt-hours, pounds of steam, etc. These savings schedules are very useful for tracking against energy goals and Utilities business planning. Motivation of the individual departments to participate in the program and collection of data from these departments will also be discussed.

  18. Study of Risk Assessment Programs at Federal Agencies and Commercial Industry Related to the Conduct or Regulation of High Hazard Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, R.; Rosenbloom, S.; O'Brien, J.

    2011-03-13

    In the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board's Recommendation 2009-1, the DOE committed to studying the use of quantitative risk assessment methodologies at government agencies and industry. This study consisted of document reviews and interviews of senior management and risk assessment staff at six organizations. Data were collected and analyzed on risk assessment applications, risk assessment tools, and controls and infrastructure supporting the correct usage of risk assessment and risk management tools. The study found that the agencies were in different degrees of maturity in the use of risk assessment to support the analysis of high hazard operations and to support decisions related to these operations. Agencies did not share a simple, 'one size fits all' approach to tools, controls, and infrastructure needs. The agencies recognized that flexibility was warranted to allow use of risk assessment tools in a manner that is commensurate with the complexity of the application. The study also found that, even with the lack of some data, agencies application of the risk analysis structured approach could provide useful insights such as potential system vulnerabilities. This study, in combination with a companion study of risk assessment programs in the DOE Offices involved in high hazard operations, is being used to determine the nature and type of controls and infrastructure needed to support risk assessments at the DOE.

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.210 - What steps must Executive agencies take to promote ridesharing at Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What steps must Executive agencies take to promote ridesharing at Federal facilities? 102-74.210 Section 102-74.210 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY...

  20. Industrial applications at the new cold neutron radiography and tomography facility of the HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardjilov, N.; Hilger, A.; Manke, I.; Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Banhart, J.

    2005-04-01

    The new cold neutron radiography and tomography facility at the Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin is suited for the investigation of components and materials from different industrial fields. The high-flux measuring position of the facility allows real-time imaging of fast dynamical processes. Cold neutrons interact stronger with the matter compared to thermal neutrons, which leads to a much better radiography contrast. Some examples of different industry applications like investigations on discharging of a Lithium battery or on oil sediments in a vent pipe are presented.

  1. Survey of earthquake-induced fires in electric power and industrial facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, S.W.; Harris, S.P. )

    1990-09-01

    Fires following earthquakes are a dramatic image, largely due to the destruction of much of the city of San Francisco by fire following the great earthquake of 1906. This report addresses the incidence of earthquake-induced fires, specifically in power and industrial facilities. Industrial and power facilities (including nuclear) share similar types of building construction and internal installations. More importantly, they share similar potential sources of ignition, such as electric power cable and bus bars, gas lines, furnaces, boilers, and water sources located in proximity to electrical equipment. 22 refs.

  2. New Oil Pollution Act of 1990 will impact facilities, terminals, and transports in the oil industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude of the Exxon Valdez spill galvanized the opinion of both the public and Congress on the need for new oil spill legislation. Consequently, the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 - a comprehensive prevention, response, liability, and compensation system for dealing with oil production - was passed by the 101st Congress. This book describes in detail the new law and the liabilities it imposes; the new financial responsibility requirements placed on oil-related facilities and vessels; oil spill prevention and response obligations; and the oil industry's activities to prevent and mitigate oil spills. Also discussed are the compliance problems faced by both fixed facilities and the transportation industry.

  3. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  4. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  5. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  6. Recent National Solar Thermal Test Facility activities, in partnership with industry

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanbari, C.; Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E.; Pacheco, J.E.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Evans, L.R.

    1994-10-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA conducts testing of solar thermal components and systems, funded primarily by the US Department of Energy. Activities are conducted in support of Central Receiver Technology, Distributed Receiver Technology and Design Assistance projects. All activities are performed in support of various cost-shared government/industry joint ventures and, on a design assistance basis, in support of a number of other industry partners.

  7. Recent National Solar Thermal Test Facility activities, in partnership with industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Cherly; Cameron, Christopher P.; Ralph, Mark E.; Pacheco, James E.; Rawlinson, K. Scott; Evans, Lindsey R.

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA conducts testing of solar thermal components and systems, funded primarily by the US Department of Energy. Activities are conducted in support of Central Receiver Technology, Distributed Receiver Technology and Design Assistance projects. All activities are performed in support of various cost-shared government/industry joint ventures and, on a design assistance basis, in support of a number of other industry partners.

  8. Safeguards by design - industry engagement for new uranium enrichment facilities in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Demuth, Scott F; Grice, Thomas; Lockwood, Dunbar

    2010-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) has initiated a Safeguards by Design (SBD) effort to encourage the incorporation of international (IAEA) safeguards features early in the design phase of a new nuclear facility in order to avoid the need to redesign or retrofit the facility at a later date. The main goals of Safeguards by Design are to (1) make the implementation of international safeguards at new civil nuclear facilities more effective and efficient, (2) avoid costly and time-consuming re-design work or retrofits at such facilities and (3) design such facilities in a way that makes proliferation as technically difficult, as time-consuming, and as detectable as possible. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has recently hosted efforts to facilitate the use of Safeguards by Design for new uranium enrichment facilities currently being planned for construction in the U.S. While SBD is not a NRC requirement, the NRC is aiding the implementation of SBD by coordinating discussions between DOE's NA-24 and industry's facility design teams. More specifically, during their normal course of licensing discussions the NRC has offered industry the opportunity to engage with NA-24 regarding SBD.

  9. 32 CFR 644.424 - Development of public port or industrial facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Development of public port or industrial facilities. 644.424 Section 644.424 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.424 Development of...

  10. MANAGING AND DISPOSING OF RESIDUES FROM ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL FACILITIES IN THE STEEL INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the management and disposal of residues from environmental control facilities in the steel industry. Information from 13 integrated U.S. steel mills is compared with that found in the literature and with data collected during visits to Engli...

  11. Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn

    2010-10-07

    Various studies in different countries have shown that significant energy-efficiency improvement opportunities exist in the industrial sector, many of which are cost-effective. These energy-efficiency options include both cross-cutting as well as sector-specific measures. However, industrial plants are not always aware of energy-efficiency improvement potentials. Conducting an energy audit is one of the first steps in identifying these potentials. Even so, many plants do not have the capacity to conduct an effective energy audit. In some countries, government policies and programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency. However, usually only limited technical and financial resources for improving energy efficiency are available, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises. Information on energy auditing and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to industrial plants. This guidebook provides guidelines for energy auditors regarding the key elements for preparing for an energy audit, conducting an inventory and measuring energy use, analyzing energy bills, benchmarking, analyzing energy use patterns, identifying energy-efficiency opportunities, conducting cost-benefit analysis, preparing energy audit reports, and undertaking post-audit activities. The purpose of this guidebook is to assist energy auditors and engineers in the plant to conduct a well-structured and effective energy audit.

  12. Steam plant ash disposal facility and industrial landfill at the Y-12 Plant, Anderson County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to install a wet ash handling system to dewater bottom ash from the coal-fired steam plant at its Y-12 Plant and to construct a new landfill for disposal of industrial wastes, including the dewatered bottom ash. The DOE operates three major facilities on its Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Operation of these facilities results in the production of a variety of nonhazardous, nonradioactive solid wastes (approximately 300 m{sup 3} per day, compacted) including sanitary wastes, common industrial wastes and construction debris. At the current rate of use, this existing landfill will be filled within approximately 18 months, and more space is urgently needed. In an effort to alleviate this problem, DOE and WMD management propose to create additional landfill facilities at a nearby site. The potential environmental impacts associated with this proposed action are the subject of this environmental assessment (EA).

  13. Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-08-16

    Changes in the electricity consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR) events are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models. Model error makes it difficult to precisely quantify these changes in consumption and understand if C&I facilities exhibit event-to-event variability in their response to DR signals. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and DR variability in C&I facilities facing dynamic electricity prices. Using a regression-based baseline model, we present a method to compute the error associated with estimates of several DR parameters. We also develop a metric to determine how much observed DR variability results from baseline model error rather than real variability in response. We analyze 38 C&I facilities participating in an automated DR program and find that DR parameter errors are large. Though some facilities exhibit real DR variability, most observed variability results from baseline model error. Therefore, facilities with variable DR parameters may actually respond consistently from event to event. Consequently, in DR programs in which repeatability is valued, individual buildings may be performing better than previously thought. In some cases, however, aggregations of C&I facilities exhibit real DR variability, which could create challenges for power system operation.

  14. Petroleum and hazardous material releases from industrial facilities associated with Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Sengul, Hatice

    2010-04-01

    Hurricane Katrina struck an area dense with industry, causing numerous releases of petroleum and hazardous materials. This study integrates information from a number of sources to describe the frequency, causes, and effects of these releases in order to inform analysis of risk from future hurricanes. Over 200 onshore releases of hazardous chemicals, petroleum, or natural gas were reported. Storm surge was responsible for the majority of petroleum releases and failure of storage tanks was the most common mechanism of release. Of the smaller number of hazardous chemical releases reported, many were associated with flaring from plant startup, shutdown, or process upset. In areas impacted by storm surge, 10% of the facilities within the Risk Management Plan (RMP) and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) databases and 28% of SIC 1311 facilities experienced accidental releases. In areas subject only to hurricane strength winds, a lower fraction (1% of RMP and TRI and 10% of SIC 1311 facilities) experienced a release while 1% of all facility types reported a release in areas that experienced tropical storm strength winds. Of industrial facilities surveyed, more experienced indirect disruptions such as displacement of workers, loss of electricity and communication systems, and difficulty acquiring supplies and contractors for operations or reconstruction (55%), than experienced releases. To reduce the risk of hazardous material releases and speed the return to normal operations under these difficult conditions, greater attention should be devoted to risk-based facility design and improved prevention and response planning. PMID:20345576

  15. Investigating the Role of State Permitting and Agriculture Agencies in Addressing Public Health Concerns Related to Industrial Food Animal Production

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Jillian P.; Laestadius, Linnea I.; Grechis, Clare; Nachman, Keeve E.; Neff, Roni A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Industrial food animal production (IFAP) operations adversely impact environmental public health through air, water, and soil contamination. We sought to determine how state permitting and agriculture agencies respond to these public health concerns. Methods We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with staff at 12 state agencies in seven states, which were chosen based on high numbers or rapid increase of IFAP operations. The interviews served to gather information regarding agency involvement in regulating IFAP operations, the frequency and type of contacts received about public health concerns, how the agency responds to such contacts, and barriers to additional involvement. Results Permitting and agriculture agencies’ responses to health-based IFAP concerns are constrained by significant barriers including narrow regulations, a lack of public health expertise within the agencies, and limited resources. Conclusions State agencies with jurisdiction over IFAP operations are unable to adequately address relevant public health concerns due to multiple factors. Combining these results with previously published findings on barriers facing local and state health departments in the same states reveals significant gaps between these agencies regarding public health and IFAP. There is a clear need for regulations to protect public health and for public health professionals to provide complementary expertise to agencies responsible for regulating IFAP operations. PMID:24587087

  16. Recruiting Trends 1993-94. A Study of Businesses, Industries, and Governmental Agencies Employing New College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheetz, L. Patrick

    This report examines job market trends for new college graduates based on a survey of 618 organizations (businesses, industries, manufacturing organizations, service sector employers, government agencies and military services. Topics considered include: (1) anticipated changes in hiring trends for new college graduates, (2) changes in campus…

  17. Recruiting Trends 1981-82: A Study of 428 Businesses, Industries, Government Agencies, and Educational Institutions Employing New College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingleton, John D.; Scheetz, L. Patrick

    Results of the 1981-82 recruiting trends survey conducted by Placement Services at Michigan State University are summarized. A cross-section of 428 businesses, industries, government agencies, and educational institutions were surveyed to determine trends in hiring new college graduates, expected starting salaries, campus recruiting activities,…

  18. Characterizing the Response of Commercial and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Pricing Signals from the Utility

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Price, Phillip N.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-07-01

    We describe a method to generate statistical models of electricity demand from Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities including their response to dynamic pricing signals. Models are built with historical electricity demand data. A facility model is the sum of a baseline demand model and a residual demand model; the latter quantifies deviations from the baseline model due to dynamic pricing signals from the utility. Three regression-based baseline computation methods were developed and analyzed. All methods performed similarly. To understand the diversity of facility responses to dynamic pricing signals, we have characterized the response of 44 C&I facilities participating in a Demand Response (DR) program using dynamic pricing in California (Pacific Gas and Electric's Critical Peak Pricing Program). In most cases, facilities shed load during DR events but there is significant heterogeneity in facility responses. Modeling facility response to dynamic price signals is beneficial to the Independent System Operator for scheduling supply to meet demand, to the utility for improving dynamic pricing programs, and to the customer for minimizing energy costs.

  19. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health...' services furnished in the following settings that meet the specified requirements: (1) Skilled...

  20. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health...' services furnished in the following settings that meet the specified requirements: (1) Skilled...

  1. FACILITY POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) has developed the Facility Pollution Prevention Guide for those who are interested in and responsible for pollution prevention in industrial or service facilities. t summarizes the benefits of a company-wide pollution prevention...

  2. The December 7, 1988, Armenia earthquake: Effects on selected power, industrial, and commercial facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.J.; Bragagnolo, L.J.; Yanev, P.I. )

    1991-06-01

    The 6.8 magnitude Armenia earthquake caused catastrophic damage to buildings and heavy-industrial facilities and resulted in thousands of deaths in a 400-km region. However, properly anchored mechanical and electrical equipment of similar construction to US nuclear power plant equipment performed very well. Data from this earthquake demonstrate the high levels of seismic ruggedness for this type of equipment and the benefits of proper seismic design. Two separate investigation teams performed reconnaissance efforts in the epicentral region of the Armenia earthquake, including the heavily affected towns of Leninakan, Nalband, Spitak, and Kirovakan. Each team collected structure and equipment performance data from electrical facilities (including substations, geothermal power plants, and a nuclear power station) as well as several large industrial facilities. They also collected geologic data and recorded ground-motion data from strong-motion instruments in Gukasian and Leninakan. The earthquake resulted in local areas of very high Mercalli scale intensities, as evidenced by surface ruptures, catastrophic damage to numerous residential and industrial structures that led to thousands of deaths, and lesser damage to electrical production and transmission facilities. On the basis of observed damage, ground motions were estimated at 0.2 to 1.0 g in some investigated areas. Extensive damage occurred in precast-concrete residential and industrial buildings of both old and modern design. Poor seismic detailing of joints was a significant factor in building damage and collapse. Switchyard equipment -- especially marginally or unanchored transformers, air blast and oil circuit breakers, substation batteries, and electrical panels -- failed by experiencing large displacements from sliding or overturning. Properly anchored equipment similar to US nuclear power plant equipment performed very well.

  3. 41 CFR 102-74.180 - What illumination levels must Federal agencies maintain on Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... exist, Federal agencies must maintain illumination levels at— (a) 50 foot-candles at work station...) 30 foot-candles in work areas during working hours, measured at 30 inches above floor level; (c) 10 foot-candles, but not less than 1 foot-candle, in non-work areas, during working hours (normally...

  4. 41 CFR 102-74.180 - What illumination levels must Federal agencies maintain on Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exist, Federal agencies must maintain illumination levels at— (a) 50 foot-candles at work station...) 30 foot-candles in work areas during working hours, measured at 30 inches above floor level; (c) 10 foot-candles, but not less than 1 foot-candle, in non-work areas, during working hours (normally...

  5. 41 CFR 102-74.180 - What illumination levels must Federal agencies maintain on Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... exist, Federal agencies must maintain illumination levels at— (a) 50 foot-candles at work station...) 30 foot-candles in work areas during working hours, measured at 30 inches above floor level; (c) 10 foot-candles, but not less than 1 foot-candle, in non-work areas, during working hours (normally...

  6. 41 CFR 102-74.180 - What illumination levels must Federal agencies maintain on Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... exist, Federal agencies must maintain illumination levels at— (a) 50 foot-candles at work station...) 30 foot-candles in work areas during working hours, measured at 30 inches above floor level; (c) 10 foot-candles, but not less than 1 foot-candle, in non-work areas, during working hours (normally...

  7. RCRA Subtitle C TSD facilities and solvent recovery facilities: Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. Toxic chemical release inventory; Industry guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this guidance document is to assist facilities in SIC code 4953 that are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle C and facilities in SIC code 7389 that are primarily engaged in solvent recovery services on a contract or fee basis. This document explains the EPCRA Section 313 and PPA Section 6607 reporting requirements (collectively referred to as the EPCRA Section 313) reporting requirements, and discusses specific release and other waste management activities encountered at many facilities in these industries. The objectives of this manual are to: clarify EPCRA Section 313 requirements for industry; increase the accuracy and completeness of the data being reported by RCRA Subtitle C TSD and solvent recovery facilities; and reduce the level of effort expended by those facilities that prepare an EPCRA Section 313 report.

  8. Residential proximity to industrial combustion facilities and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Residence near municipal solid waste incinerators, a major historical source of dioxin emissions, has been associated with increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in European studies. The aim of our study was to evaluate residence near industrial combustion facilities and estimates of dioxin emissions in relation to NHL risk in the United States. Methods We conducted a population-based case–control study of NHL (1998–2000) in four National Cancer Institute-Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results centers (Detroit, Iowa, Los Angeles, Seattle). Residential histories 15 years before diagnosis (similar date for controls) were linked to an Environmental Protection Agency database of dioxin-emitting facilities for 969 cases and 749 controls. We evaluated proximity (3 and 5 km) to 10 facility types that accounted for >85% of U.S. emissions and a distance-weighted average emission index (AEI [ng toxic equivalency quotient (TEQ)/year]). Results Proximity to any dioxin-emitting facility was not associated with NHL risk (3 km OR = 1.0, 95% CI 0.8-1.3). Risk was elevated for residence near cement kilns (5 km OR = 1.7, 95% CI 0.8-3.3; 3 km OR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.1-14.0) and reduced for residence near municipal solid waste incinerators (5 km OR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-0.9; 3 km OR = 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-1.4). The AEI was not associated with risk of NHL overall. Risk for marginal zone lymphoma was increased for the highest versus lowest quartile (5 km OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.0-6.8; 3 km OR = 3.0, 95% CI 1.1-8.3). Conclusions Overall, we found no association with residential exposure to dioxins and NHL risk. However, findings for high emissions and marginal zone lymphoma and for specific facility types and all NHL provide some evidence of an association and deserve future study. PMID:23433489

  9. 41 CFR 102-80.60 - Are Federal agencies responsible for performing facility assessments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Safety and Environmental Management Facility Assessments... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Are Federal...

  10. 41 CFR 102-80.60 - Are Federal agencies responsible for performing facility assessments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Safety and Environmental Management Facility Assessments... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are Federal...

  11. Simulation of Hypersonic CO2 Flows in a Range of Academic and Industrial Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, J. C.; Smith, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in high enthalpy carbon dioxide flows have provided the opportunity to validate computational tools against a wide range of data from experiments in a wide range of facilities, from a classical shock tube to the industrial facility in which the ExoMars heatshield will be qualified. Computations of both nozzle flows and stagnation tests have been performed using the thermochemical non-equilibrium Navier-Stokes code TINA, and the shock tube has been simulated using the SHOCK2 code. In general, good agreement with the experimental data has been achieved. Thus, this work provides increased confidence in the thermochemical modelling of carbon dioxide flows and the applicability of tools used in the design of entry vehicles for Mars.

  12. The performance impact of context in TQM implementation: the nursing facility industry.

    PubMed

    Weech-Maldonado, R; Zinn, J E; Hamilton, R D

    2001-08-01

    This study develops a model and empirically assesses how# organizational context mediates the impact of total quality management (TQM) implementation on perceived performance in the nursing facility industry. Outcomes are analysed for financial, human resources and resident-care performance. Contextual factors related to TQM implementation include managerial control, reward systems, organizational structure and the extent of implementation. Duration of TQM implementation is included as a control variable. Benchmarking has a positive impact on financial outcomes, and the extent of TQM implementation and required reporting of quality improvement activity results have a positive impact on both financial and human resources performance. The presence of a Quality Steering Council has a positive impact on financial performance, but only among larger facilities. PMID:11507809

  13. A methodology to identify stranded generation facilities and estimate stranded costs for Louisiana's electric utility industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cope, Robert Frank, III

    1998-12-01

    The electric utility industry in the United States is currently experiencing a new and different type of growing pain. It is the pain of having to restructure itself into a competitive business. Many industry experts are trying to explain how the nation as a whole, as well as individual states, will implement restructuring and handle its numerous "transition problems." One significant transition problem for federal and state regulators rests with determining a utility's stranded costs. Stranded generation facilities are assets which would be uneconomic in a competitive environment or costs for assets whose regulated book value is greater than market value. At issue is the methodology which will be used to estimate stranded costs. The two primary methods are known as "Top-Down" and "Bottom-Up." The "Top-Down" approach simply determines the present value of the losses in revenue as the market price for electricity changes over a period of time into the future. The problem with this approach is that it does not take into account technical issues associated with the generation and wheeling of electricity. The "Bottom-Up" approach computes the present value of specific strandable generation facilities and compares the resulting valuations with their historical costs. It is regarded as a detailed and difficult, but more precise, approach to identifying stranded assets and their associated costs. This dissertation develops a "Bottom-Up" quantitative, optimization-based approach to electric power wheeling within the state of Louisiana. It optimally evaluates all production capabilities and coordinates the movement of bulk power through transmission interconnections of competing companies in and around the state. Sensitivity analysis to this approach is performed by varying seasonal consumer demand, electric power imports, and transmission inter-connection cost parameters. Generation facility economic dispatch and transmission interconnection bulk power transfers, specific

  14. NGNP Nuclear-Industrial Facility and Design Certification Boundaries White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Hicks

    2011-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project was initiated at Idaho National Laboratory by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act and based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is helium cooled and graphite moderated and can operate at reactor outlet temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. These varied industrial applications may involve a standard HTGR modular design using different Energy Conversion Systems. Additionally, some of these process heat applications will require process heat delivery systems to lie partially outside the HTGR operator’s facility.

  15. EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) INCINERATION OF AN INDUSTRIAL REFINERY. LAGOON SLUDGE USING INFRARED FURNACE TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report briefly presents a case study of a recent field-scale incineration test supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as one of over twenty projects under EPA's Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The purpose of these programs is to...

  16. Facility preparations for the initial International Atomic Energy Agency Inpsection of Hanford Site excess material

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.C.; Scott, D.D.; Bartlett, W.D.; Delegard, C.H.; McRae, L.P.; Six, D.E.; Amacker, O.P.

    1995-09-01

    In September 1993 President Clinton offered to place excess US nuclear materials under IAEA safeguards. In January 1994, the Hanford Site was identified as the second site in the US to be prepared for placement on the eligibility list for LAEA safeguards selection. Planning and preparation started at Hanford in February 1994. The PFP mission is to provide safe storage of Category 1 and 2 special nuclear material (SNM) and laboratory support to the Hanford Site. The mission includes the stabilizing and packaging of SNM for temporary storage sufficient to support the deactivation and cleanup function of the facility. The storage of Category 1 and 2 SNM at this facility indirectly supports national security interests, and safe storage is accomplished in a manner that ensures the health and safety of the public and employees are not compromised. The PFP is located in the approximate center of the Hanford Site inside the 200 West Area. The PFP is within a designated protected area (PA) and is located approximately 10.5 km from the Columbia River and 34 km northwest of the Richland city limits. The, Hanford Site is located in Southeastern Washington and has been associated with plutonium production since the mid 1940s. Excess plutonium oxide has been placed under IAEA safeguards in a phased approach at the PFP`s Plutonium Storage Vault. This paper is an overview and summary of the many tasks required to meet IAEA safeguards requirements.

  17. Concentration profiles and spatial distribution of perfluoroalkyl substances in an industrial center with condensed fluorochemical facilities.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guoqiang; Wei, Mingcui; Zhu, Lingyan; Liu, Zhengtao; Zhang, Yahui

    2014-08-15

    Jiangsu Hi-tech Fluorochemical Industry Park, China, is one of the largest fluorochemical industry centers in Asia and could be a point source of polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) to the surrounding environment. Besides water, sediment and soil samples, tree leaves and bark were also collected to monitor airborne PFASs around the facilities. Perfluorooctanoic acid and short-chain perfluorocarboxylates including perfluorohexanoic acid and perfluoropentanoic acid were found predominantly in all the samples. The target ∑PFASs were distributed in the dissolved phase with a proportion of 96.5±2.9%. High concentrations of ∑PFASs (up to 12,700 ng/L in surface water) were found at sites near and within the wastewater treatment plant and the facilities. The ∑PFASs in the sediment/sludge were in the range of 3.33-324 ng/g dw. For the first time, tree samples were used for bio-monitoring airborne PFASs in the environment. The ∑PFASs in the tree leaf and bark samples were in the range of 10.0-276 and 6.76-120 ng/g dw, respectively. The spatial distribution of ∑PFASs in the tree leaves suggested that airborne PFASs could be transported from the center to the surrounding environment by prevailing wind. PMID:24867700

  18. INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS RELEVANT TO NUCLEAR FACILITIES, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

    2011-07-01

    Typical questions surrounding industrial control system (ICS) cyber security always lead back to: What could a cyber attack do to my system(s) and; how much should I worry about it? These two leading questions represent only a fraction of questions asked when discussing cyber security as it applies to any program, company, business, or organization. The intent of this paper is to open a dialog of important pertinent questions and answers that managers of nuclear facilities engaged in nuclear facility security and safeguards should examine, i.e., what questions should be asked; and how do the answers affect an organization's ability to effectively safeguard and secure nuclear material. When a cyber intrusion is reported, what does that mean? Can an intrusion be detected or go un-noticed? Are nuclear security or safeguards systems potentially vulnerable? What about the digital systems employed in process monitoring, and international safeguards? Organizations expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against physical threats. However, cyber threats particularly on ICSs may not be well known or understood, and often do not receive adequate attention. With the disclosure of the Stuxnet virus that has recently attacked nuclear infrastructure, many organizations have recognized the need for an urgent interest in cyber attacks and defenses against them. Several questions arise including discussions about the insider threat, adequate cyber protections, program readiness, encryption, and many more. These questions, among others, are discussed so as to raise the awareness and shed light on ways to protect nuclear facilities and materials against such attacks.

  19. 77 FR 20026 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Modified Risk Tobacco Product Applications; Availability; Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... product; Sample product labels and labeling; All documents (including underlying scientific information... proposes to label and market the product, consumers will not be misled into believing that the product is... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Modified Risk Tobacco...

  20. Vocational Instructional Materials for Trade and Industrial Education Available from Federal Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Carol L., Comp.

    This listing of federally produced curriculum and instructional materials for trade and industrial education is one of eight annotated bibliographies that provide information for vocational educators at the secondary, postsecondary, and adult levels. Introductory information given includes a description of how to use the listing and sources and…

  1. State Development Agencies and Employment Expansion. Policy Papers in Human Resources and Industrial Relations 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Alfred S.

    The central aim of this study is to place into the perspective of history, economic theory, and public policy the steps taken by the states to attract new industries, to stimulate the demand for new products, to encourage more tourists, and thus to speed their economic growth and increase employment. Thus, this is a study of the state development…

  2. Curriculum Materials for "Trade and Industrial Occupations." Annotated Listing of Materials Available from Public Education Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.

    This annotated listing of curriculum materials for Trade and Industrial Occupations provides planners, administrators, vocational educators, and others with information as to available curriculum materials developed by the various States. The materials are identified with the instructional titles and codes from the classification system of the…

  3. Evaluation test of the energy monitoring device in industrial electron beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuochi, P. G.; Lavalle, M.; Martelli, A.; Corda, U.; Cornia, G.; Kovács, A.

    2009-07-01

    The electron beam energy monitoring device, previously developed and tested under standard laboratory conditions using electron beams in the energy range 4-12 MeV, has now been tested under industrial irradiation conditions in high-energy, high-power electron beam facilities. The measuring instrument was improved in order to measure high peak current delivered at low pulse repetition rate as well. Tests, with good results, were carried out at two different EB plants: one equipped with a LUE-8 linear electron accelerator of 7 MeV maximum energy used for cross-linking of cables and for medical device sterilization, and the other with a 10 MeV Rhodotron type TT 100 used for in-house sterilization.

  4. NIST Accelerator Facilities And Programs In Support Of Industrial Radiation Research

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, F.B.; Desrosiers, M.F.; Hudson, L.T.; Coursey, B.M.; Bergstrom, P.M. Jr.; Seltzer, S.M.

    2003-08-26

    NIST's Ionizing Radiation Division maintains and operates three electron accelerators used in a number of applications including waste treatment and sterilization, radiation hardness testing, detector calibrations and materials modification studies. These facilities serve a large number of governmental, academic and industrial users as well as an active intramural research program. They include a 500 kV cascaded-rectifier accelerator, a 2.5 MV electron Van de Graaff accelerator and a 7 to 32 MeV electron linac, supplying beams ranging in energy from a few keV up to 32 MeV. In response to the recent anthrax incident, NIST along with the US Postal Service and the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) are working to develop protocols and testing procedures for the USPS mail sanitization program. NIST facilities and personnel are being employed in a series of quality-assurance measurements for both electron- and photon-beam sanitization. These include computational modeling, dose verification and VOC (volatile organic compounds) testing using megavoltage electron and photon sources.

  5. The Environmental Agency's Assessment of the Post-Closure Safety Case for the BNFL DRIGG Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Streatfield, I. J.; Duerden, S. L.; Yearsley, R. A.

    2002-02-26

    The Environment Agency is responsible, in England and Wales, for authorization of radioactive waste disposal under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) is currently authorized by the Environment Agency to dispose of solid low level radioactive waste at its site at Drigg, near Sellafield, NW England. As part of a planned review of this authorization, the Environment Agency is currently undertaking an assessment of BNFL's Post-Closure Safety Case Development Programme for the Drigg disposal facility. This paper presents an outline of the review methodology developed and implemented by the Environment Agency specifically for the planned review of BNFL's Post-Closure Safety Case. The paper also provides an overview of the Environment Agency's progress in its on-going assessment programme.

  6. Food Fraud Prevention: Policy, Strategy, and Decision-Making - Implementation Steps for a Government Agency or Industry.

    PubMed

    Spink, John; Fortin, Neal D; Moyer, Douglas C; Miao, Hong; Wu, Yongning

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of governments, industry, academics, and non-governmental organizations in Food Fraud prevention. Before providing strategic concepts for governments and authorities, definitions of Food Fraud are reviewed and discussed. Next there is a review of Food Fraud activities by the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI), the Elliott Review in the United Kingdom, the European Commission resolution on Food Fraud, and the US Food Safety Modernization Act including the Preventative Controls Rule. Two key concepts for governments or a company are: (1) formally, and specifically, mention food fraud as a food issue and (2) create an enterprise-wide Food Fraud prevention plan. The research includes a case study of the implementation of the concepts by a state or provincial agency. This analysis provides a foundation to review the role of science and technology in detection, deterrence and then contributing to prevention. PMID:27198808

  7. Toxic Release Inventory reporting requirement: Estimating volatile organic compound releases from industrial wastewater treatment facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.E. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    In production/maintenance processes at the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center, industrial wastewater streams are generated which contain organic compounds. These wastewaters are collected and treated in a variety of ways. Some of these collection and treatment steps result in the release of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the wastewater to the ambient air. This paper provides a discussion of the potential VOC emission sources and presents estimates of emissions for an Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP). As regulatory reporting requirements become increasingly more stringent, Air Force installations are being required to quantify and report VOC releases to the environment. The computer software described in this paper was used to identify and quantify VOC discharges to the environment. The magnitude of VOC emissions depends greatly on many factors such as the physical properties of the pollutants, the temperature of the wastewater, and the design of the individual collection and treatment process units. IWTP VOC releases can be estimated using a computer model designed by the Environmental Protection Agency. The Surface Impoundment Model System (SIMS) model utilizes equipment information to predict air emissions discharged from each individual process unit. SIMS utilizes mass transfer expressions, process unit information, in addition to chemical/physical property data for the interested chemicals. By inputting process conditions and constraints, SIMS determines the effluent concentrations along with the air emissions discharged from each individual process unit. The software is user-friendly with the capable of estimating effluent concentration and ambient air releases. The SIMS software was used by Tinker AFB chemical engineers to predict VOC releases to satisfy the Toxic Release Inventory reporting requirements.

  8. Sample registration software for process automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Facility in Malaysia nuclear agency

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd Yussup, Nolida; Ibrahim, Maslina Bt. Mohd; Mokhtar, Mukhlis B.; Soh Shaari, Syirrazie Bin Che; Azman, Azraf B.; Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa Bt. Abdullah; Ismail, Nadiah Binti

    2015-04-29

    Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) had been established in Nuclear Malaysia since 1980s. Most of the procedures established were done manually including sample registration. The samples were recorded manually in a logbook and given ID number. Then all samples, standards, SRM and blank were recorded on the irradiation vial and several forms prior to irradiation. These manual procedures carried out by the NAA laboratory personnel were time consuming and not efficient. Sample registration software is developed as part of IAEA/CRP project on ‘Development of Process Automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Facility in Malaysia Nuclear Agency (RC17399)’. The objective of the project is to create a pc-based data entry software during sample preparation stage. This is an effective method to replace redundant manual data entries that needs to be completed by laboratory personnel. The software developed will automatically generate sample code for each sample in one batch, create printable registration forms for administration purpose, and store selected parameters that will be passed to sample analysis program. The software is developed by using National Instruments Labview 8.6.

  9. Sample registration software for process automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Facility in Malaysia nuclear agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Yussup, Nolida; Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa Bt. Abdullah; Ibrahim, Maslina Bt. Mohd; Mokhtar, Mukhlis B.; Soh@Shaari, Syirrazie Bin Che; Azman, Azraf B.; Ismail, Nadiah Binti

    2015-04-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) had been established in Nuclear Malaysia since 1980s. Most of the procedures established were done manually including sample registration. The samples were recorded manually in a logbook and given ID number. Then all samples, standards, SRM and blank were recorded on the irradiation vial and several forms prior to irradiation. These manual procedures carried out by the NAA laboratory personnel were time consuming and not efficient. Sample registration software is developed as part of IAEA/CRP project on `Development of Process Automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Facility in Malaysia Nuclear Agency (RC17399)'. The objective of the project is to create a pc-based data entry software during sample preparation stage. This is an effective method to replace redundant manual data entries that needs to be completed by laboratory personnel. The software developed will automatically generate sample code for each sample in one batch, create printable registration forms for administration purpose, and store selected parameters that will be passed to sample analysis program. The software is developed by using National Instruments Labview 8.6.

  10. A PLANNING GUIDE FOR VOCATIONAL-INDUSTRIAL AND VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL BUILDING FACILITIES FOR COMPREHENSIVE HIGH SCHOOLS, NUMBER 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Albany.

    THIS BOOKLET IS INTENDED AS A GUIDE FOR THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR PLANNING VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL FACILITIES. DISCUSSION OF TYPES OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION, PLANNING PROCEDURES, AND GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ARE INCLUDED AND INFORMATION IS GIVEN ON--(1) SIZES, SHAPES, AND NUMBER OF SHOPS, (2) BUILDING FLEXIBILITY, (3) LAYOUT OF FLOOR SPACE, (4) SERVICES IN…

  11. Steam plant ash disposal facility and industrial landfill at the Y-12 Plant, Anderson County, Tennessee. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to install a wet ash handling system to dewater bottom ash from the coal-fired steam plant at its Y-12 Plant and to construct a new landfill for disposal of industrial wastes, including the dewatered bottom ash. The DOE operates three major facilities on its Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Operation of these facilities results in the production of a variety of nonhazardous, nonradioactive solid wastes (approximately 300 m{sup 3} per day, compacted) including sanitary wastes, common industrial wastes and construction debris. At the current rate of use, this existing landfill will be filled within approximately 18 months, and more space is urgently needed. In an effort to alleviate this problem, DOE and WMD management propose to create additional landfill facilities at a nearby site. The potential environmental impacts associated with this proposed action are the subject of this environmental assessment (EA).

  12. The Attached Payload Facility Program: A Family of In-Space Commercial Facilities for Technology, Science and Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E.; Kaszubowski, Martin J.; Kearney, Michael E.; Howard, Trevor P.

    1996-01-01

    It is anticipated that as the utilization of space increases in both the government and commercial sec tors the re will be a high degree of interest in materials and coatings research as well as research in space environment definition, deployable structures, multi-functional structures and electronics. The International Space Station (ISS) is an excellent platform for long-term technology development because it provides large areas for external attached payloads, power and data capability, and ready access for experiment exchange and return. An alliance of SPACEHAB, MicroCraft, Inc. and SpaceTec, Inc. has been formed to satisfy this research need through commercial utilization of the capabilities of ISS. The alliance will provide a family of facilities designed to provide low-cost, reliable access to space for experimenters. This service would start as early as 1997 and mature to a fully functional attached facility on ISS by 2001. The alliances facilities are based on early activities by NASA, Langley Research Center (LaRC) to determine the feasibility of a Material Exposure Facility (MEF).

  13. Development of an XUV-IR free-electron laser user facility for scientific research and industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Conradson, S.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Elliott, C.J.; Burns, M.J.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.; Johnson, W.J.; Wang, T.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Meier, K.L.; Olsher, R.H.; Scott, M.L.; Griggs, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos has designed and proposes to establish an XUV-IR free- electron laser (FEL) user facility for scientific research and industrial applications based on coherent radiation ranging from soft x-rays as short as 1 nm to far-infrared wavelengths as long as 100 {mu}m. As the next-generation light source beyond low-emittance storage rings with undulator insertion devices, this proposed national FEL user facility should make available to researchers broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation with 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} greater spectral flux and brightness. The facility design is based on two series of FEL oscillators including one regenerative amplifier. The primary series of seven FEL oscillators, driven by a single, 1-GeV rf linac, spans the short-wavelength range from 1 to 600 nm. A second 60-MeV rf linac, synchronized with the first, drives a series of three Vis/IR FEL oscillators to cover the 0. 5 to 100-{mu}m range. This paper presents the motivation for such a facility arising from its inherently high power per unit bandwidth and its potential use for an array of scientific and industrial applications, describes the facility design, output parameters, and user laboratories, makes comparisons with synchrotron radiation sources, and summarizes recent technical progress that supports the technical feasibility. 80 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Forum Guide to Facilities Information Management: A Resource for State and Local Education Agencies. NFES 2012-808

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Forum on Education Statistics, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Safe and secure facilities that foster learning are crucial to providing quality education services, and developing and maintaining these facilities requires considerable resources and organization. Facility information systems allow education organizations to collect and manage data that can be used to inform and guide decisionmaking about the…

  15. Hurdles in tissue engineering/regenerative medicine product commercialization: a pilot survey of governmental funding agencies and the financial industry.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Timothy A; Tentoff, Edward; Johnson, Peter C; Tawil, Bill; Van Dyke, Mark; Hellman, Kiki B

    2012-11-01

    The Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society of the Americas (TERMIS-AM) Industry Committee conducted a semiquantitative opinion survey in 2010 to delineate potential hurdles to commercialization perceived by the TERMIS constituency groups that participate in the stream of technology commercialization (academia, start-up companies, development-stage companies, and established companies). A significant hurdle identified consistently by each group was access to capital for advancing potential technologies into development pathways leading to commercialization. A follow-on survey was developed by the TERMIS-AM Industry Committee to evaluate the financial industry's perspectives on investing in regenerative medical technologies. The survey, composed of 15 questions, was developed and provided to 37 investment organizations in one of three sectors (governmental, private, and public investors). The survey was anonymous and confidential with sector designation the only identifying feature of each respondent's organization. Approximately 80% of the survey was composed of respondents from the public (n=14) and private (n=15) sectors. Each respondent represents one investment organization with the potential of multiple participants participating to form the organization's response. The remaining organizations represented governmental agencies (n=8). Results from this survey indicate that a high percentage (<60%) of respondents (governmental, private, and public) were willing to invest >$2MM into regenerative medical companies at the different stages of a company's life cycle. Investors recognized major hurdles to this emerging industry, including regulatory pathway, clinical translation, and reimbursement of these new products. Investments in regenerative technologies have been cyclical over the past 10-15 years, but investors recognized a 1-5-year investment period before the exit via Merger and Acquisition (M&A). Investors considered

  16. Recruiting Trends 1990-91: A Study of 549 Businesses, Industries, Governmental Agencies, and Educational Institutions Employing New College Graduates. 20th Anniversary Abridged Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheetz, L. Patrick

    This summary of recruiting trends survey reviews the expectations of employers hiring new college graduates for the 1990-91 college labor market and is based on a national survey of 549 businesses, industries, service sector employers, government agencies, military services, and school districts. Survey questions focused on anticipated changes in…

  17. 36 CFR 1260.42 - What are the procedures for agency personnel to review records at a NARA facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SECURITY INFORMATION Systematic Review § 1260.42 What are the procedures for agency personnel to review... damage to archival materials. See 36 CFR part 1254 for more information on acceptable equipment....

  18. OC-ALC hazardous waste minimization strategy: Reduction of industrial biological sludge from industrial wastewater treatment facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.E. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center (OC-ALC) is one of five US Air Force Logistic Centers that perform depot level maintenance of aircraft. As part of the maintenance process, aircraft are cleaned, chemically depainted, repainted, and electroplated. These repair/maintenance processes generate large quantities of dilute liquid effluent which are collected and treated in the Industrial Waste Treatment Plant (IWTP) prior to hazardous waste disposal. OC-ALC is committed to reducing the use of hazardous materials in the repair and maintenance of aircraft and ancillary components. A major Air Force initiative is to reduce the amount of hazardous waste discharged off-site by 25% by the end of CY96 and 50% by CY99 end. During maintenance and repair operations, organic chemicals are employed. These organics are discharged to the IWTP for biological degradation. During the biological digestion process, a biological sludge is generated. OC-ALC engineers are evaluating the applicability of a biosludge acid/heat treatment process. In the acid hydrolysis process, an acid is added to the biosludge and processed through a hot, pressurized reactor where the majority of the biosolids are broken down and solubilized. The resulting aqueous product stream is then recycled back to the traditional biotreatment process for digestion of the solubilized organics. The solid waste stream is dewatered prior to disposal. The objective of the subsequent effort is to achieve a reduction in hazardous waste generation and disposal by focusing primarily on end-of-the-pipe treatment at the IWTP. Acid hydrolysis of biosludge is proving to be a practical process for use in industrial and municipal wastewater biotreatment systems that will lower environmental and economic costs by minimizing the production and disposal of biosludge.

  19. 36 CFR 1234.30 - How does an agency request authority to establish or relocate records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT FACILITY STANDARDS FOR... submitted in writing to the Director, Space and Security Management Division (NAS), National Archives and... to the Director, Space and Security Management Division (NAS), National Archives and...

  20. 36 CFR 1234.30 - How does an agency request authority to establish or relocate records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT FACILITY STANDARDS FOR... submitted in writing to the Director, Space and Security Management Division (NAS), National Archives and... to the Director, Space and Security Management Division (NAS), National Archives and...

  1. 36 CFR 1234.30 - How does an agency request authority to establish or relocate records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT FACILITY STANDARDS FOR... submitted in writing to the Director, Space and Security Management Division (NAS), National Archives and... to the Director, Space and Security Management Division (NAS), National Archives and...

  2. Valleys' Girls: Re-Theorising Bodies and Agency in a Semi-Rural Post-Industrial Locale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivinson, Gabrielle; Renold, Emma

    2013-01-01

    This paper draws on materialist feminist theories to rethink relationships between girls' bodies and agency. New feminist onto-epistemologies redefine agency as "becomings" that dynamically emerge through assemblages comprising moving bodies, material, mechanical, organic, virtual, affective and less-than-conscious elements.…

  3. Industrial-hygiene report, walk-through survey, papaya packing/shipping facilities, Hilo, Hawaii, July 1983. [Ethylene dibromide exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, D.

    1983-07-01

    Worker exposure to ethylene dibromide (EDB) was investigated at three papaya packing and shipping facilities in Hilo, Hawaii. Breathing-zone samples were collected in the three facilities over a three day period. Blind spikes were submitted as a control on time and temperature effects. Blank samples were also prepared. Spike results reflected the effects of time and temperature in shipment from Hawaii to Massachusetts. All spikes were roughly comparable and showed a recovery of about 68%. Overnight laboratory results were adjusted upward by 72% and NIOSH laboratory results by 68%. Six out of 38 samples exceeded the NIOSH recommended amount of 130 ppb. The author concludes that there is a chronic, low-concentration exposure to EDB for all workers in the papaya industry in Hilo. An epidemiological study of reproductive and cytogenetic effects of EDB exposure on these workers is recommended.

  4. 41 CFR 102-80.45 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning seismic safety in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Safety and Environmental Management Seismic Safety § 102-80.45 What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What are...

  5. Rape and Its Victims: A Report for Citizens, Health Facilities, and Criminal Justice Agencies. A Prescriptive Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodyaga, Lisa; And Others

    This book is addressed to police administrators, hospital administrators, prosecutors, and citizens involved in community action who are prepared to re-examine their agencies' response to cases of rape. It provides information and analysis to spark such a review and outlines suggestions for coping with problems that commonly hinder change. The…

  6. 36 CFR 1234.30 - How does an agency request authority to establish or relocate records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... responsible for ensuring that records in their legal custody are stored in appropriate space as outlined in... space that does not meet these standards if deficiencies are not corrected within 6 months after initial discovery of the deficiencies by NARA or the agency and to complete removal of the records within 18...

  7. 36 CFR 1260.42 - What are the procedures for agency personnel to review records at a NARA facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... damage to archival materials. See 36 CFR part 1254 for more information on acceptable equipment. ... handling of archival materials. (b) Agency reviewers must: (1) Follow NARA security regulations and abide by NARA procedures for handling archival materials; (2) Follow NARA procedures for identifying...

  8. 41 CFR 102-80.45 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning seismic safety in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Safety and Environmental Management Seismic Safety § 102-80.45 What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are...

  9. 41 CFR 102-73.250 - Are agencies required to adhere to the policies for locating Federal facilities when purchasing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-73.250 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 73-REAL ESTATE ACQUISITION Acquisition by Purchase or... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are agencies required...

  10. Occurrence of hearing loss in a cohort of civilians employed at a US Navy industrial facility. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Helmkamp, J.C.; Bone, C.M.; Blood, C.G.; Kelley, J.B.; Seidman, J.H.

    1986-12-18

    Although hearing loss has been the focus of national surveys in the civilian population, these surveys typically do not include occupational exposure information. Furthermore, very few studies have addressed this problem in the military, particularly in industrial settings. Audiometric data, including hearing loss information, recorded and stored in the prototype application of the Navy's Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS) has not been systematically evaluated to identify military and civilian populations that are at high risk for hearing loss. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of hearing loss in a cohort of Navy civilian workers employed at an industrialized facility. It is both appropriate and timely to look at hearing loss among civilian workers, as well as among the military, especially in relation to the recent Presidential initiative that established a government-wide five year goal of reducing civilian workplace injury/illness 3% per year.

  11. School Facilities and Student Achievement in Industrial Countries: Evidence from the TIMSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopland, Arnt O.

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the link between school facilities (buildings and grounds) and student achievement in eight countries using data from the TIMSS 2003 database. The results indicate a negative relationship, but the estimated coefficients are mainly insignificant. Interestingly, the coefficients differ heavily across countries. Whereas there seem…

  12. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

  13. Industrial-hygiene survey report of Dow Chemical USA SB (styrene butadiene) Latex Facility, Freeport, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Fajen, J.M.; Krishnan, E.R.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on the SB latex production process and assess the potential for occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene at the SB latex facility. The information will be used in determining the suitability of including the plant in an in-depth survey.

  14. 78 FR 72899 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Registration for Human Drug Compounding Outsourcing Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... Compounding Outsourcing Facilities Under Section 503B of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act..., and Cosmetic Act.'' The draft guidance addresses new provisions in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA). The draft guidance...

  15. Chemical characterization of odors due to some industrial and urban facilities in Izmir, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, Faruk; Muezzinoglu, Aysen

    The relationship between odor concentrations (olfactometry) and chemical concentrations (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, GC-MS) was studied for the odorous air compositions of a rendering plant, a sanitary landfill and an industrial area with large petroleum and petrochemical industries. Samples taken from the university campus located in a non-industrial and non-urban area were also studied for several organic components for comparison. Ambient air samples were taken into special bags by using an odor sampling device designed for field sampling of odors. In the laboratory odorous chemicals in the samples were transferred into adsorbent tubes and analyzed using a combination of thermal desorption and GC-MS. Results point to different characteristics of the odorous gases and air in and around the urban and industrial sources. Among the 64 specific compounds studied, 49 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected in rendering plant, 53 VOCs were detected in sanitary landfill and 44 VOCs were detected in petroleum and petrochemical industries. The compounds measured in the odorous gas composition are the alkanes, alkenes, carbonyls, arenes, chlorinated and other halogenated compounds and organic chlorides as well as the volatile fatty acids.

  16. Lessons learned in over 100 zebra mussel control applications at industrial facilities

    SciTech Connect

    McGough, C.M.; Gilland, P.H.; Muia, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    Since their introduction into US waterways, Zebra Mussels (Dreissena polymorphae) have spread rapidly throughout the Great Lakes and Mississippi regions. These mussels have continued to colonize the intake pipes of industrial water supplies and water distribution systems throughout the affected areas. Their colonization has compromised plant safety and production efficiency, and steadily increased costs to water users. The design of each industrial plant water distribution system is unique. A comprehensive zebra mussel control strategy using the best available options must be considered in each specific situation. This paper discusses the successful use of one strategy (a quaternary ammonia-based molluscicide) in the battle against zebra mussels. The commercial life cycle of an industrial molluscicide began with initial toxicity screening in the laboratory. The evaluation continued at plant sites through field trials and applications. Lessons learned from these experiences helped direct the efforts toward the development of a second generation program.

  17. 36 CFR 1232.14 - What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Administration, Modern Records Programs (NWM), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number (301... records to a records storage facility: (a) Ensure that the requirements of 36 CFR part 1234 are met... permanent retention, as those records typically require more stringent environmental controls (see 36...

  18. 36 CFR 1232.14 - What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Administration, Modern Records Programs (NWM), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number (301... records to a records storage facility: (a) Ensure that the requirements of 36 CFR part 1234 are met... permanent retention, as those records typically require more stringent environmental controls (see 36...

  19. 36 CFR 1232.14 - What requirements must an agency meet before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Administration, Modern Records Programs (NWM), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number (301... records to a records storage facility: (a) Ensure that the requirements of 36 CFR part 1234 are met... permanent retention, as those records typically require more stringent environmental controls (see 36...

  20. 36 CFR 1232.16 - What documentation must an agency create before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facility; and (12) Control number or identifier used to track records. (b) In the case of permanent and... (NWM), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number (301) 837-1738, no later than 30... National Archives of the United States in accordance with 36 CFR part 1235....

  1. 36 CFR 1232.16 - What documentation must an agency create before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facility; and (12) Control number or identifier used to track records. (b) In the case of permanent and... (NWM), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number (301) 837-1738, no later than 30... National Archives of the United States in accordance with 36 CFR part 1235....

  2. 36 CFR 1232.16 - What documentation must an agency create before it transfers records to a records storage facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facility; and (12) Control number or identifier used to track records. (b) In the case of permanent and... (NWM), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number (301) 837-1738, no later than 30... National Archives of the United States in accordance with 36 CFR part 1235....

  3. AIR POLLUTION AND TERRAIN AERODYNAMICS: A REVIEW OF FLUID MODELING STUDIES AT THE EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) FLUID MODELING FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A review is given of recent fluid modeling studies conducted at the EPA Fluid Modeling Facility of flow and diffusion in complex terrain. Estimates are given for the ratio of the maximum concentration on a hill surface to the maximum concentration in the absence of the hill. The ...

  4. Jernberg Industries, Inc: Forging Facility Uses Plant-Wide Assessment to Aid Conversion to Lean Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-01

    Jernberg Industries conducted a plant-wide assessment while converting to lean manufacturing at a forging plant. Seven projects were identified that could yield annual savings of $791,000, 64,000 MMBtu in fuel and 6 million kWh.

  5. Characteristics of a contract electron beam and bremsstrahlung (X-ray) irradiation facility of Radia industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehisa, Masaaki; Saito, Toshio; Takahashi, Thoru; Sato, Yoshishige; Sato, Toshio

    1993-07-01

    A contract electron beam(EB) and bremsstrahlung(X-ray) facility with use of NHV 5 MeV, 30 mA Cock-Croft Walton machine is operational for EB since April 1991, and X-ray commercial irradiation was started in 1992 summer. The facility is consisted of the EB machine, bremsstrahlung target, chain and roller conveyor, and automatic turnover machine for dual sided irradiation. The operation of the system is fully controlled by LAN of personal computers for client's order, EB characteristics, beam current control proportional to the conveyor speed, turnover of product in processing mid point, and output of processing record to clients. The control and recording systems avoid human errors. This paper mainly discusses X-ray processing.

  6. Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility industrial process heat, category A. Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, P.; Brzeczek, M.; Seilestad, H.; Silverman, C.; Yenetchi, G.

    1981-07-01

    The conceptual design of a central receiver solar cogeneration facility at a California oil field is described. The process of selecting the final cogeneration system configuration is described and the various system level and subsystem level tradeoff studies are presented, including the system configuration study, technology options, and system sizing. The facility is described, and the functional aspects, requirements operational characteristics, and performance are discussed. Capital and operating costs, safety, environmental, regulatory issues and potential limiting considerations for the design are included. Each subsystem is described in detail including a discussion of the functional requirements, design, operating characteristics performance estimates and a top level cost estimate. An economic assessment is performed to determine the near-term economic viability of the project and to examine the impact of variations in major economic parameters such as capital and operating and maintenance costs on economic viability. Two measures of economic viability used are levelized energy cost and net present value.

  7. Real Time Air Quality Forecasting System for a Large Industrial Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radonjic, Z.; Chambers, D.; Telenta, B.; Janjic, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Forecasts of air quality are provided using a weather forecasting model coupled with an air dispersion model. The advanced mesoscale WRF- NMM (Weather Research and Forecasting - Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model) is set up to provide meteorological forecasts initially over a larger domain with resolution 3 by 3 km which is subsequently nested down to a smaller domain of 1 by 1 km horizontal resolution around a copper smelter in Serbia. The refined meteorological forecast is used as input to drive the CALMET/CALPUFF modeling system to predict hour by hour concentrations of the facility's key pollutant (SO2). CALMET/CALPUFF is the U.S. EPA's regulatory model for long-range transport and on a case by case basis is applied in complex terrain and shore-line settings. The CALMET/CALPUFF modeling system is accepted as a regulatory model for short-range applications in several jurisdictions in Canada. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the good performance of the weather model in forecasting mode with fine resolution and in complex terrain, as well as the comparison of predicted SO2 air concentrations with measurements taken at four nearby air quality ambient monitoring stations. The forecasts of SO2 concentrations are used by the facility to adjust the production schedule to avoid high level concentrations in the city and maximize production during favourable meteorological conditions. Since the facility is located in a valley, during stagnant meteorological conditions there is a potential for the build up of high concentrations of SO2. With the use of this air quality forecasting system, the facility can avoid the worst meteorological situations and reduce concentrations in the populated areas.

  8. Tracking toxic substances at industrial facilities: Engineering mass balance versus materials accounting. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In response to a congressional mandate, this book examines whether knowing the amounts of toxic substances entering and leaving manufacturing facilities is useful in evaluating chemical releases to the environment, waste reduction progress, and chemical management practices. Tracking these substances with rigorous engineering data is compared with a less resource-intensive alternative to determine the feasibility and potential usefulness to the public and the government.

  9. DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

    2011-07-01

    Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

  10. Contribution of personal radios to the noise exposure of employees at one industrial facility

    SciTech Connect

    Skrainar, S.F.; Royster, L.H.; Berger, E.H.; Pearson, R.G.

    1987-04-01

    An investigation of the contribution made to an employee's noise dose from the output of personal radios was performed at a North Carolina textile manufacturing facility where the daily time-weighted average sound level (TWA) was approximately 87 dB, A-weighted sound pressure level (dB(A)). The measured mean equivalent diffuse field output level of the personal radios was determined to be 83 dB(A) with a range from 70 to 98 dB(A). The daily TWA of a typical employee who did not use a personal radio was determined to be 86.6 dB(A), whereas the exposure of personal radio users was 88.5 dB(A)--an increase of 1.9 dB(A). This increase in exposure was estimated to result in 4 dB of additional permanent noise-induced hearing loss at 4 kHz for the 5th percentile (most sensitive portion) of the population after 20 years of exposure beginning at age 20. The study concluded that the additional contribution of the personal radios to the employee's daily TWA did not pose a significant additional threat to their hearing. Specific hearing conservation criteria, however, were recommended for continuation of personal radio use at the facility.

  11. Selection of Waste Water Equalization Systems for Multi Product Batch Production Facility: An Industrial Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Vaidehi; Srinivasarao, Meka.; Dhanwani, Anand

    2010-10-01

    The generation rates of waste water from a batch plant causes significant variations in the flow rate as well as concentrations in the influent to effluent treatment plant. Flow equalization systems are used to reduce the shock loads. The present study deals with the suitability of two flow equalization schemes practiced in the industry with an objective of increasing production flexibility. The simulation study has conclusively established suitability of combined segregation tanks over distributed segregation tanks for a given production capacity. It is also shown that the production flexibility is more for combined scheme in comparison with the distributed scheme.

  12. Comparison of various methods to distribute supply air in industrial facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, A.T.; Strobel, K.

    1999-07-01

    The evaluation of the ventilation effectiveness and thermal comfort for various industrial ventilation schemes has been carried out by scale model experimentation. Forty experiments involving ten ventilation arrangements, each with three supply airflow rates and two possible industrial process heat loads, were performed. Measurements of airspeed, temperature, and contaminant concentration allowed the thermal comfort and contaminant removal to be quantified using the ISO Comfort Standard ISO-7730 and the ventilation effectiveness indices, respectively. Archimedes number scaling was used to convert the small-scale measurements to full-scale conditions. The largest ventilation effectiveness occurred for a low supply/high return configuration, with values above 1.6, followed by a high supply/high return configuration with values in the range from 1.0 to 1.2. A low supply/low return configuration had values of about 1.0. The ventilation efficiency generally increased when the heat load was increased and/or the flow rate decreased. Increasing the number of diffusers in the occupied zone increased the ventilation effectiveness. The thermal comfort results depended on the diffuser configuration and the activity level of the worker. Most of the configurations produced acceptable thermal comfort results for a seated worker and unacceptable conditions at an increased activity and clothing level.

  13. The TACO approach to establishing risk-based corrective action objectives for a former industrial facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, J.L.; Nienkerk, M.M.

    1999-07-01

    Illinois' Tiered Approach to Corrective Action Objectives (35 Ill Adm Code Part 742) regulations have been used to evaluate site-specific remediation objectives for a site contaminated with methylene chloride. Remediation objectives evaluated through this approach have provided the opportunity to implement a technically feasible cleanup of the site. Site-specific soil cleanup objectives of 24 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) for the unsaturated soils and 2,000 mg/kg for the underlying saturated soils were established. These cleanup objectives were based on the use of a city ordinance prohibiting well installation and groundwater use within one-half mile of the site and did not require the use of an engineered barrier which would have to be maintained throughout the life of the facility. Without the city ordinance and risk-based cleanup objectives, the cleanup objective would have been 0.02 mg/kg, making remediation of the site technically and economically infeasible.

  14. ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

  15. Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  16. Quantitative Exposure Assessment of Various Chemical Substances in a Wafer Fabrication Industry Facility

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae-Kil; Shin, Jung-Ah

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to evaluate exposure levels of various chemicals used in wafer fabrication product lines in the semiconductor industry where work-related leukemia has occurred. Methods The research focused on 9 representative wafer fabrication bays among a total of 25 bays in a semiconductor product line. We monitored the chemical substances categorized as human carcinogens with respect to leukemia as well as harmful chemicals used in the bays and substances with hematologic and reproductive toxicities to evaluate the overall health effect for semiconductor industry workers. With respect to monitoring, active and passive sampling techniques were introduced. Eight-hour long-term and 15-minute short-term sampling was conducted for the area as well as on personal samples. Results The results of the measurements for each substance showed that benzene, toluene, xylene, n-butyl acetate, 2-methoxyethanol, 2-heptanone, ethylene glycol, sulfuric acid, and phosphoric acid were non-detectable (ND) in all samples. Arsine was either "ND" or it existed only in trace form in the bay air. The maximum exposure concentration of fluorides was approximately 0.17% of the Korea occupational exposure limits, with hydrofluoric acid at about 0.2%, hydrochloric acid 0.06%, nitric acid 0.05%, isopropyl alcohol 0.4%, and phosphine at about 2%. The maximum exposure concentration of propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (PGMEA) was 0.0870 ppm, representing only 0.1% or less than the American Industrial Hygiene Association recommended standard (100 ppm). Conclusion Benzene, a known human carcinogen for leukemia, and arsine, a hematologic toxin, were not detected in wafer fabrication sites in this study. Among reproductive toxic substances, n-butyl acetate was not detected, but fluorides and PGMEA existed in small amounts in the air. This investigation was focused on the air-borne chemical concentrations only in regular working conditions. Unconditional exposures during

  17. The application of Sunna dosimeter film for process control at industrial gamma- and electron beam irradiation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, A.; Baranyai, M.; Fuochi, P. G.; Lavalle, M.; Corda, U.; Miller, S.; Murphy, M.; O'Doherty, J.

    2004-09-01

    The Sunna dosimeter was introduced for dose determination in the dose range of 50-300 kGy by measuring optically stimulated luminescence. The usefulness of the dosimeter film has already been shown in food irradiation for routine process control. The aim of the present study was to check the performance of the Sunna dosimeter film for process control in radiation sterilization under industrial processing conditions, i.e. at high activity gamma irradiators and at high energy electron beam facilities. To ensure similar irradiation conditions during calibration and routine irradiation "in-plant calibration" was performed by irradiating the Sunna dosimeters together with ethanol-monochlorobenzene transfer standard and alanine reference standard dosimeters. The Sunna dosimeters were then irradiated together with the routine dosimeter of the actual plant during regular production runs and the absorbed doses measured by the different dosimeters agreed within ±2%(1 σ).

  18. Interim status standards for owners and operators of hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities: Environmental Protection Agency. Proposed amendments to rule.

    PubMed

    1982-02-25

    On May 19, 1980, EPA promulgated regulations, applicable to owners and operators of hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities during interim status, which prohibited the landfill disposal of most containerized liquid waste or waste containing free liquid on and after November 19, 1981. As a result of issues raised by the regulated community with respect to this prohibition, the Agency is today proposing an amendment to this regulation to allow some containers holding free liquids to be disposed of in a landfill, in some circumstances. In a separate action in today's federal Register, EPA is providing a 90-day extension (from today's date) of the compliance date for the prohibition of landfill disposal of containerized liquid waste and the restrictions on the landfill disposal of liquid ignitable waste to allow time to complete this rulemaking action and to avoid immediately imposing requirements that might be changed as a result of this rulemaking action. PMID:10254380

  19. Fiber Bragg grating microphone system for condition-based maintenance of industrial facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, D.; Olivero, M.; Perrone, G.; Vallan, A.

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a multipoint fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing system operating as a precision microphone. This instrument aims to become the best performing technology for condition-based maintenance (CBM) of critical elements, like ball bearings and cogwheels, embedded in industrial manufacturing machineries. The system architecture is based on the simple matched-laser principle, leading to a low-cost and high-sensitivity system, operating in time and wavelength multiplexing mode. Then, heavy signal processing is applied, providing an outstanding performance improvement of 59 dB in terms of signal-to-noise ratio. A demonstration of condition-based maintenance operation has been performed using standard models of ball bearing sound spectra. Compared to traditional microphones applied to CBM, the signal processing-powered FBG system provides remarkable advantages in terms of sensitivity and rejection of environment noise, providing an improvement of cost-effectiveness of CBM.

  20. Investigation of potential soil contamination with Cr and Ni in four metal finishing facilities at Asopos industrial area.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Karayannis, Athanassios; Kollias, Konstantinos; Xenidis, Anthimos; Papassiopi, Nymphodora

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate whether previous disposal practices in four metal finishing facilities, located at Asopos river basin (East-Central Greece), have caused any potential serious contamination of soils. The study focused mainly on Cr and Ni, which are the primary elements of concern in the area. To estimate the natural geochemical levels of Cr and Ni, thirty soil samples were collected from locations that were not suspected of any contamination. In this group of samples, Cr concentration varied between 60 and 418 mg/kg, and Ni concentrations varied from 91 to 1200 mg/kg. The second group of samples consisted of more than 100 drill cores and surface soil samples, potentially affected by the disposal of effluents and/or the drainage of runoff water from the industrial facilities. According to the findings of the study, the disposal of treated effluents in absorption type sinks resulted occasionally in the contamination of a thin layer of soil just at the bottom of the sinks, but there was no indication of downward migration, since Cr and Ni concentrations in the lower soil layers were similar to those of the reference soils. PMID:25112552

  1. Potential soil contaminant levels of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans at industrial facilities employing heat transfer operations

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, N.E.; Muhr, C.A.; Greene, D.W.

    1992-04-01

    Certain manufacturing facilities formerly used large quantities of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) fluids in heat transfer operations. At many of these locations, operations have also involved PCB-containing electrical equipment. Commonly, over many years of plant operations, spills and leaks have resulted in PCB soil contamination. Dioxins and furans have been associated with PCB contamination in both the technical and popular press. Consequently, the need for analyses for dioxins and furans must be evaluated at locations where soils are contaminated with PCBs. This report presents an evaluation of potential dioxin and furan soil contamination based on heat transfer operations and spills from electrical equipment. The following five scenarios were examined for dioxin and furan contamination: (1) impurities in heat transfer fluids, (2) formation during heat transfer operations, (3) pyrolysis of heat transfer fluids, (4) impurities in dielectric fluids, and (5) pyrolysis of dielectric fluids. The potential contamination with dioxins and furans was calculated and compared with a 20 ppb guideline that has been used by the Centers for Disease Control for dioxin in subsoil. The results demonstrated that dioxins are formed only under pyrolytic conditions and only from the trichlorobenzenes present in dielectric fluids. Furans are found as impurities in PCB fluids but, as with dioxins, are not formed in significant quantities except during pyrolysis. Fortunately, pyrolytic conditions involving PCB fluids and soil contamination are unlikely; therefore, analyses for dioxin and furan contamination in soils will rarely be needed.

  2. Recruiting Trends 1983-84. A Study of 617 Businesses, Industries, Governmental Agencies, and Educational Institutions Employing New College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingleton, John D.; Scheetz, L. Patrick

    Information on job market trends for 1983-1984 college graduates are presented in narrative summaries and statistical tables. Attention is directed to trends in hiring, expected starting salaries, campus recruiting activities, and other related topics, based on a survey of a cross-section of 617 employers from business, industry, government, and…

  3. Recruiting Trends 1986-87. A Study of 761 Businesses, Industries, Governmental Agencies, and Educational Institutions Employing New College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingleton, John D.; Scheetz, L. Patrick

    Information on job market trends for 1986-87 college graduates is presented in narrative summaries and statistical tables. A survey of a cross-section of 761 employers from business, industry, government, and education explored: trends in hiring, hiring quotas and the influence of the organization size, demand for various majors, job availability…

  4. Recruiting Trends 1982-83. A Study of 637 Businesses, Industries, Government Agencies, and Educational Institutions Employing New College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingleton, John D.; Scheetz, L. Patrick

    Results of the 1982-1983 Recruiting Trends Survey of Michigan State University are presented, based on a cross-section of 637 responding employers in business, industry, government, and education. After an overview of the findings, statistical tables and observations for each table are presented. Results indicate that the class of 1982-1983 will…

  5. Recruiting Trends 1984-85. A Study of 658 Businesses, Industries, Governmental Agencies, and Educational Institutions Employing New College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingleton, John D.; Scheetz, L. Patrick

    Information on job market trends for 1984-1985 college graduates are presented in narrative summaries and statistical tables. Attention is directed to trends in hiring, expected starting salaries, campus recruiting activities, and other related topics, based on a survey of a cross-section of 658 employers from business, industry, government, and…

  6. Recruiting Trends 1988-89. A Study of 739 Businesses, Industries, Governmental Agencies, and Educational Institutions Employing New College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheetz, L. Patrick

    Results from the 18th annual Recruiting Trends survey completed by the Collegiate Employment Research Institute for Career Development and Placement Services at Michigan State University are presented. For this 1988-89 survey, cross-sections of employers from business, industry, government, and education were contacted, and responses were received…

  7. Recruiting Trends 1994-95. A Study of Businesses, Industries, and Governmental Agencies Employing New College Graduates. 24th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheetz, L. Patrick

    This survey of employers sought to determine recruiting trends of business, industry, and government among college graduates. Questionnaires were sent to 4,154 employers of which about 13 percent, or 545, responded. Highlights of the findings include the following: (1) for a second consecutive year employers predicted increased job opportunities…

  8. Monitoring industrial facilities using principles of integration of fiber classifier and local sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotaev, Valery V.; Denisov, Victor M.; Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.; Serikova, Mariya G.; Timofeev, Andrey V.

    2015-05-01

    The paper deals with the creation of integrated monitoring systems. They combine fiber-optic classifiers and local sensor networks. These systems allow for the monitoring of complex industrial objects. Together with adjacent natural objects, they form the so-called geotechnical systems. An integrated monitoring system may include one or more spatially continuous fiber-optic classifiers based on optic fiber and one or more arrays of discrete measurement sensors, which are usually combined in sensor networks. Fiber-optic classifiers are already widely used for the control of hazardous extended objects (oil and gas pipelines, railways, high-rise buildings, etc.). To monitor local objects, discrete measurement sensors are generally used (temperature, pressure, inclinometers, strain gauges, accelerometers, sensors measuring the composition of impurities in the air, and many others). However, monitoring complex geotechnical systems require a simultaneous use of continuous spatially distributed sensors based on fiber-optic cable and connected local discrete sensors networks. In fact, we are talking about integration of the two monitoring methods. This combination provides an additional way to create intelligent monitoring systems. Modes of operation of intelligent systems can automatically adapt to changing environmental conditions. For this purpose, context data received from one sensor (e.g., optical channel) may be used to change modes of work of other sensors within the same monitoring system. This work also presents experimental results of the prototype of the integrated monitoring system.

  9. Standards applicable to owners and operators of hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities: liability requirements. Environmental Protection Agency. Revised interim final rule.

    PubMed

    1982-04-16

    The Environmental Protection Agency is today revising regulations of January 12, 1981, on liability coverage requirements for hazardous waste facility owners or operators. Under these requirements, owners or operators must demonstrate liability coverage for bodily injury and property damage to third parties resulting from facility operations. The major revisions are: addition of the option of a financial test as a means of demonstrating liability coverage to satisfy the requirements; addition of the option of submitting a certificate of insurance as evidence of insurance; and changes in the requirements for the endorsement and certificate. In a future document, EPA will propose to delete two provisions of the January 12, 1981 regulations. These provisions are: the procedure to obtain a variance for liability coverage requirements; and the provision allowing an owner or operator to use State assumption of legal responsibility for liability coverage to satisfy the liability requirements. The January 12, 1981, regulations were issued under an accelerated schedule imposed by a court order. The revisions that are being made today are necessary to eliminate unworkable aspects of the previous regulations, improve their effectiveness, and allow reasonable flexibility in satisfying the requirements. PMID:10255071

  10. Analysis on online word-of-mouth of customer satisfaction in cultural and creative industries of Taiwan: using cultural heritage application and performance facilities as examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Li-Fen; Shaw, Jing-Chi; Wang, Pei-Wen; Shih, Meng-Long; Su, Yi-Jing

    2011-10-01

    This study aims to probe into customers' online word-of-mouth regarding cultural heritage applications and performance facilities in Cultural and Creative Industries. Findings demonstrate that, regarding online word-of-mouth for art museums, museums, and art villages, items valued by customers are design aesthetics of displays and collections, educational functions, and environments and landscapes. The percentages are 10.102%, 11.208% and 11.44%, respectively. In addition, cultural heritage applications and performance facility industries in Taiwan are highly valued in online word-of-mouth.

  11. The January 17, 1994 Northridge Earthquake: Effects on selected industrial facilities and lifelines

    SciTech Connect

    Eli, M.W.; Sommer, S.C.; Roche, T.R.; Merz, K.L.

    1995-02-01

    Revision 0 of this report is being published in February 1995 to closely mark the one-year anniversary of the Northridge Earthquake. A September 1994 Draft version of the report was reviewed by DOE and NRC, and many of the review comments are incorporated into Revision 0. While this revision of the report is not entirely complete, it is being made available for comment, review, and evaluation. Since the report was written by several authors, sections of the report have slightly different styles. Several sections of Revision 0 are not complete, but are planned to be completed in Revision 1. The primary unfinished section is Section 3.3 on Electric Power Transmission. Other sections of Revision 0, such as Section 4.5.2 on the Energy Technology Engineering Center and 3.2 on Electric Power Generation, will be enhanced with further detailed information as it becomes available. In addition, further data, including processed response spectra for investigated facilities and cataloging of relay performance, will be added to Revision 1 depending upon investigation support. While Revision 0 of this report is being published by LLNL, Revision 1 is planned to be published by EPRI. The anticipated release date for Revision 1 is December 1995. Unfortunately, the one-year anniversary of the Northridge Earthquake was also marked by the devastating Hyogo-Ken Nanbu (or Hanshin-Awaji) Earthquake in Kobe, Japan. As compared to the Northridge Earthquake, there were many more deaths, collapsed structures, destroyed lifelines, and fires following the Kobe Earthquake. Lessons from the Kobe Earthquake will both reemphasize topics discussed in this report and provide further issues to be addressed when designing and retrofitting structures, systems, and components for seismic strong motion.

  12. Argonne's performance assessment of major facility systems to support semiconductor manufacturing by the National Security Agency/R Group, Ft. Meade, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, W.; Miller, G.M.

    1990-12-01

    The National Security Agency (NSA) was authorized in 1983 to construct a semiconductor and circuit-board manufacturing plant at its Ft. Meade, Maryland, facility. This facility was to become known as the Special Process Laboratories (SPL) building. Phase I construction was managed by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District (USACE/BD) and commenced in January 1986. Phase I construction provided the basic building and support systems, such as the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system, the deionized-water and wastewater-treatment systems, and the high-purity-gas piping system. Phase II construction involved fitting the semiconductor manufacturing side of the building with manufacturing tools and enhancing various aspects of the Phase I construction. Phase II construction was managed by NSA and commenced in April 1989. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) was contracted by USACE/BD midway through the Phase I construction period to provide quality-assured performance reviews of major facility systems in the SPL. Following completion of the Phase I construction, ANL continued its performance reviews under NSA sponsorship, focusing its attention on the enhancements to the various manufacturing support systems of interest. The purpose of this document is to provide a guide to the files that were generated by ANL during its term of technical assistance to USACE/BD and NSA and to explain the quality assurance program that was implemented when ANL conducted its performance reviews of the SPL building's systems. One set of the ANL project files is located at NSA, Ft. Meade, and two sets are at Argonne, Illinois. The ANL sets will be maintained until the year 2000, or for the 10-year estimated life of the project. 1 fig.

  13. ENGINEERED NEAR SURFACE DISPOSAL FACILITY OF THE INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX FOR SOLID RADWASTE MANAGEMENT AT CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Ziehm, Ronny; Pichurin, Sergey Grigorevich

    2003-02-27

    As a part of the turnkey project ''Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management (ICSRM) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP)'' an Engineered Near Surface Disposal Facility (ENSDF, LOT 3) will be built on the VEKTOR site within the 30 km Exclusion Zone of the ChNPP. This will be performed by RWE NUKEM GmbH, Germany, and it governs the design, licensing support, fabrication, assembly, testing, inspection, delivery, erection, installation and commissioning of the ENSDF. The ENSDF will receive low to intermediate level, short lived, processed/conditioned wastes from the ICSRM Solid Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, LOT 2), the ChNPP Liquid Radwaste Treatment Plant (LRTP) and the ChNPP Interim Storage Facility for RBMK Fuel Assemblies (ISF). The ENSDF has a capacity of 55,000 m{sup 3}. The primary functions of the ENSDF are: to receive, monitor and record waste packages, to load the waste packages into concrete disposal units, to enable capping and closure of the disposal unit s, to allow monitoring following closure. The ENSDF comprises the turnkey installation of a near surface repository in the form of an engineered facility for the final disposal of LILW-SL conditioned in the ICSRM SWPF and other sources of Chernobyl waste. The project has to deal with the challenges of the Chernobyl environment, the fulfillment of both Western and Ukrainian standards, and the installation and coordination of an international project team. It will be shown that proven technologies and processes can be assembled into a unique Management Concept dealing with all the necessary demands and requirements of a turnkey project. The paper emphasizes the proposed concepts for the ENSDF and their integration into existing infrastructure and installations of the VEKTOR site. Further, the paper will consider the integration of Western and Ukrainian Organizations into a cohesive project team and the requirement to guarantee the fulfillment of both Western standards and Ukrainian

  14. US Environmental rotection Agency's strategy for ground-water-quality monitoring at hazardous-waste land-disposal facilities located in karst terranes

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M.S.

    1988-11-01

    Ground-water monitoring of hazardous-waste land-disposal units by a network of wells is ineffective when located in karstic terranes. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently proposing to modify its current ground-water-quality monitoring requirement of one upgradient well and three downgradient wells for disposal units located in karstic terranes. The convergent nature of subsurface flow to cave streams in karstic terranes requires that effective monitoring wells intercept the cave streams. Wells located around a hazardous-waste disposal unit, but not in the specific cave stream draining the site, are only providing irrelevant data and a false sense of security because the water samples from such wells are not necessarily from the hazardous-waste disposal unit. A case study is provided in this paper. EPA is drafting a guidance document that will allow monitoring by wells, only if the up- and down-gradient wells can be demonstrated to be hydraulically connected by means of dye-trace studies. If not, then the monitoring of springs shown to be hydraulically connected to the facility by dye-tracing studies would be required. Monitoring for sinkhole development will also be required to provide advance warning of sinkhole collapse. The investigation and determination of the probability of sinkhole collapse is given special treatment.

  15. Nuclear electric propulsion development and qualification facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutt, D. S.; Thomassen, K.; Sovey, J.; Fontana, Mario

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of a Tri-Agency panel consisting of members from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) that were charged with reviewing the status and availability of facilities to test components and subsystems for megawatt-class nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems. The facilities required to support development of NEP are available in NASA centers, DOE laboratories, and industry. However, several key facilities require significant and near-term modification in order to perform the testing required to meet a 2014 launch date. For the higher powered Mars cargo and piloted missions, the priority established for facility preparation is: (1) a thruster developmental testing facility, (2) a thruster lifetime testing facility, (3) a dynamic energy conversion development and demonstration facility, and (4) an advanced reactor testing facility (if required to demonstrate an advanced multiwatt power system). Facilities to support development of the power conditioning and heat rejection subsystems are available in industry, federal laboratories, and universities. In addition to the development facilities, a new preflight qualifications and acceptance testing facility will be required to support the deployment of NEP systems for precursor, cargo, or piloted Mars missions. Because the deployment strategy for NEP involves early demonstration missions, the demonstration of the SP-100 power system is needed by the early 2000's.

  16. Nuclear electric propulsion development and qualification facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, D. S.; Thomassen, K.; Sovey, J.; Fontana, Mario

    1991-11-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of a Tri-Agency panel consisting of members from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) that were charged with reviewing the status and availability of facilities to test components and subsystems for megawatt-class nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems. The facilities required to support development of NEP are available in NASA centers, DOE laboratories, and industry. However, several key facilities require significant and near-term modification in order to perform the testing required to meet a 2014 launch date. For the higher powered Mars cargo and piloted missions, the priority established for facility preparation is: (1) a thruster developmental testing facility, (2) a thruster lifetime testing facility, (3) a dynamic energy conversion development and demonstration facility, and (4) an advanced reactor testing facility (if required to demonstrate an advanced multiwatt power system). Facilities to support development of the power conditioning and heat rejection subsystems are available in industry, federal laboratories, and universities. In addition to the development facilities, a new preflight qualifications and acceptance testing facility will be required to support the deployment of NEP systems for precursor, cargo, or piloted Mars missions. Because the deployment strategy for NEP involves early demonstration missions, the demonstration of the SP-100 power system is needed by the early 2000's.

  17. Nuclear electric propulsion development and qualification facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Dale; Thomassen, Keith; Sovey, Jim; Fontana, Mario

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of a Tri-Agency panel; consisting of members from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD); charged with reviewing the status and availability of facilities to test components and subsystems for megawatt-class nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems. The facilities required to support development of NEP are available in NASA centers, DOE laboratories, and industry. However, several key facilities require significant and near-term modification in order to perform the testing required to meet a 2014 launch date. For the higher powered Mars cargo and piloted missions, the priority established for facility preparation is: (1 thruster developmental testing facility, (2 thruster lifetime testing facility, (3 dynamic energy conversion development and demonstration facility, and (4 advanced reactor testing facility (if required to demonstrate an advanced multiwatt power system). Facilities to support development of the power conditioning and heat rejection subsystems are available in industry, federal laboratories, and universities. In addition to the development facilities, a new preflight qualification and acceptance testing facility will be required to support the deployment of NEP systems for precursor, cargo, or piloted Mars missions. Because the deployment strategy for NEP involves early demonstration missions, the demonstration of the SP-100 power system is needed by the early 2000s.

  18. 32 CFR 148.6 - Agency review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agency review. 148.6 Section 148.6 National... Inspections of Facilities § 148.6 Agency review. Agencies will continue to review and assess the potential... government. As this review continues, agencies creating or modifying facilities databases will do so in...

  19. 75 FR 5715 - Identification of Additional Classes of Facilities for Development of Financial Responsibility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... January 6, 2010, the Agency published in the Federal Register (75 FR 816) an Advance Notice of Proposed... industry (NAICS 334 and 335), as well as facilities engaged in the recycling of materials containing CERCLA... and 335), as well as facilities engaged in the recycling of materials containing CERCLA...

  20. 41 CFR 102-5.90 - Should an agency consider whether to base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... consider whether to base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility near the employee's home... Government facility near the employee's home or work rather than authorize the employee home-to-work... base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility located near the employee's home or...

  1. 41 CFR 102-5.90 - Should an agency consider whether to base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... consider whether to base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility near the employee's home... Government facility near the employee's home or work rather than authorize the employee home-to-work... base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility located near the employee's home or...

  2. 41 CFR 102-5.90 - Should an agency consider whether to base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... consider whether to base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility near the employee's home... Government facility near the employee's home or work rather than authorize the employee home-to-work... base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility located near the employee's home or...

  3. 41 CFR 102-5.90 - Should an agency consider whether to base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... consider whether to base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility near the employee's home... Government facility near the employee's home or work rather than authorize the employee home-to-work... base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility located near the employee's home or...

  4. 41 CFR 102-5.90 - Should an agency consider whether to base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... consider whether to base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility near the employee's home... Government facility near the employee's home or work rather than authorize the employee home-to-work... base a Government passenger carrier at a Government facility located near the employee's home or...

  5. Electricity generating facilities. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, toxic chemical release inventory: Industry guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended to assist establishments and facilities designated by the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes 4911 (limited to facilities that combust coal and/or oil for the purpose of generating electricity for distribution in commerce), 4931 (limited to facilities that combust coal and/or oil for the purpose of generating electricity for distribution in commerce), and 4939 (limited to facilities that combust coal and/or oil for the purpose of generating electricity for distribution in commerce) in making compliance determinations under the EPCRA Section 313 reporting requirements and preparing Form R(s) or the Form A certification statement(s) as required. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction to TRI reporting and provides a brief background on the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act and information on where to obtain additional compliance assistance. Chapter 2 begins with how to determine if a facility must report. Chapter 2 concludes with a discussion on how to address trade secrets in reporting and the kinds of records that should be kept to support reporting. Chapter 3 discusses how to calculate the activity thresholds (manufacture, process, and otherwise use) for the EPCRA Section 313 chemicals. Chapter 3 concludes with a discussion of how to determine whether EPCRA Section 313 chemicals exceed a reporting threshold, including focused discussions on issues specific to electricity generating facilities. Chapter 4 discusses how to calculate the release and other waste management amounts for those EPCRA Section 313 chemicals for which a report must be prepared. This chapter provides a step-by-step approach designed to minimize the risk of overlooking an activity involving an EPCRA Section 313 chemical and any potential sources or types of releases and other waste management activities that a facility may conduct.

  6. Concentrations, profiles, and estimated human exposures for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans from electronic waste recycling facilities and a chemical industrial complex in Eastern China

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Kannan, K.; Cheng, J.; Horii, Y.; Wu, Q.; Wang, W.

    2008-11-15

    Electronic shredder waste and dust from e-waste facilities, and leaves and surface soil collected in the vicinity of a large scale e-waste recycling facility in Taizhou, Eastern China, were analyzed for total dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) including 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners. We also determined PCDD/Fs in surface agricultural soils from several provinces in China for comparison with soils from e-waste facilities. Concentrations of total PCDD/Fs were high in all of the matrices analyzed and ranged from 30.9 to 11,400 pg/g for shredder waste, 3460 to 9820 pg/g dry weight for leaves, 2560 to 148,000 pg/g dry weight for workshop-floor dust, and 854 to 10200 pg/g dry weight for soils. We also analyzed surface soils from a chemical industrial complex (a coke-oven plant, a coal-fired power plant, and a chlor-alkali plant) in Shanghai. Concentrations of total PCDD/Fs in surface soil from the chemical industrial complex were lower than the concentrations found in soils from e-waste recycling plants, but higher than the concentrations found in agricultural soils. Agricultural soils from six cities in China contained low levels of total PCDD/Fs. Profiles of dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs in soils from e-waste facilities in Taizhou differed from the profiles found in agricultural soils. The estimated daily intakes of TEQs of PCDD/Fs via soil/dust ingestion and dermal exposure were 2 orders of magnitude higher in people at e-waste recycling facilities than in people at the chemical industrial site, implying greater health risk for humans from dioxin exposures at e-waste recycling facilities. The calculated TEQ exposures for e-waste workers from dust and soil ingestion alone were 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the exposures from soils in reference locations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Metal mining facilities. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, toxic chemical release inventory: Industry guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended to assist establishments and facilities designated by the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Major Group 10 (except SIC codes 1011, 1081, and 1094) in making compliance determinations under the EPCRA Section 313 reporting requirements and preparing Form R(s) or the Form A certification statement(s) as required. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction to TRI reporting and provides a brief background on the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act and information on where to obtain additional compliance assistance. Chapter 2 begins with how to determine if a facility must report. Chapter 2 concludes with a discussion on how to address trade secrets in reporting and the kinds of records that should be kept to support reporting. Chapter 3 discusses how to calculate the activity thresholds (manufacture, process, and otherwise use) for the EPCRA Section 313 chemicals. Chapter 3 concludes with a discussion of how to determine whether EPCRA Section 313 chemicals exceed a reporting threshold, including focused discussions on issues specific to metal mining facilities. Chapter 4 discusses how to calculate the release and other waste management amounts for those EPCRA Section 313 chemicals for which a report must be prepared. This chapter provides a step-by-step approach designed to minimize the risk of overlooking an activity involving an EPCRA Section 313 chemical and any potential sources or types of releases and other waste management activities that a facility may conduct.

  8. 41 CFR 101-26.702 - Purchase of products manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc. 101-26.702 Section 101-26.702 Public Contracts and Property... Defense § 101-26.702 Purchase of products manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc. (a) Purchases by executive agencies of prison-made products carried in GSA supply distribution facilities...

  9. 41 CFR 101-26.702 - Purchase of products manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc. 101-26.702 Section 101-26.702 Public Contracts and Property... Defense § 101-26.702 Purchase of products manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc. (a) Purchases by executive agencies of prison-made products carried in GSA supply distribution facilities...

  10. 41 CFR 101-26.702 - Purchase of products manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc. 101-26.702 Section 101-26.702 Public Contracts and Property... Defense § 101-26.702 Purchase of products manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc. (a) Purchases by executive agencies of prison-made products carried in GSA supply distribution facilities...

  11. 41 CFR 101-26.702 - Purchase of products manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc. 101-26.702 Section 101-26.702 Public Contracts and Property... Defense § 101-26.702 Purchase of products manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc. (a) Purchases by executive agencies of prison-made products carried in GSA supply distribution facilities...

  12. Final Assessment: U.S. Virgin Islands Industrial Development Park and Adjacent Facilities Energy-Efficiency and Micro-Grid Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Joseph M.; Boyd, Paul A.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Parker, Graham B.

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of this assessment was to undertake an assessment and analysis of cost-effective options for energy-efficiency improvements and the deployment of a micro-grid to increase the energy resilience at the U.S. Virgin Islands Industrial Development Park (IDP) and adjacent facilities in St. Croix, Virgin Islands. The Economic Development Authority sought assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy to undertake this assessment undertaken by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The assessment included 18 buildings plus the perimeter security lighting at the Virgin Islands Bureau of Correctional Facility, four buildings plus exterior lighting at the IDP, and five buildings (one of which is to be constructed) at the Virgin Islands Police Department for a total of 27 buildings with a total of nearly 323,000 square feet.

  13. Chemical and radioactive carcinogens in cigarettes: associated health impacts and responses of the tobacco industry, U.S. Congress, and federal regulatory agencies.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Dade W; Sun, Lin-Shen C

    2010-11-01

    ²¹⁰Po and ²¹⁰Pb were discovered in tobacco in 1964. This was followed by detailed assessments of the nature of their deposition, and accompanying dose rates to the lungs of cigarette smokers. Subsequent studies revealed: (1) the sources and pathways through which they gain access to tobacco; (2) the mechanisms through which they preferentially deposit in key segments of the bronchial epithelium; and (3) the fact that the accompanying alpha radiation plays a synergistic role in combination with the chemical carcinogens, to increase the fatal cancer risk coefficient in cigarette smokers by a factor of 8 to 25. Nonetheless, it was not until 2009 that Congress mandated that the Food and Drug Administration require that the cigarette industry reveal the presence of these carcinogens. In the meantime, cigarette smoking has become not only the number one source of cancer deaths in the United States, but also a major contributor to heart disease and other health impacts. If the latter effects are included, smoking is estimated to have caused an average of 443,000 deaths and 5.1 million years of potential life lost among the U.S. population each year from 2000 through 2004. The estimated associated collective dose is more than 36 times that to the workers at all the U.S. nuclear power plants, U.S. Department of Energy nuclear weapons facilities, and crews of all the vessels in the U.S. Nuclear Navy. This unnecessary source of lung cancer deaths demands the utmost attention of the radiation protection and public health professions. PMID:20938238

  14. 26 CFR 17.1 - Industrial development bonds used to provide solid waste disposal facilities; temporary rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... materials or heat are recovered, the waste disposal function includes the processing of such materials or... used in solid waste disposal. The heat can be used by A to produce steam. Company B operates an... solid waste disposal facilities; temporary rules. 17.1 Section 17.1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...

  15. 26 CFR 17.1 - Industrial development bonds used to provide solid waste disposal facilities; temporary rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... materials or heat are recovered, the waste disposal function includes the processing of such materials or... used in solid waste disposal. The heat can be used by A to produce steam. Company B operates an... solid waste disposal facilities; temporary rules. 17.1 Section 17.1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...

  16. A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

  17. 13 CFR 127.501 - How will SBA and the agencies determine the industries that are eligible for EDWOSB or WOSB...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... determine the industries that are eligible for EDWOSB or WOSB requirements? 127.501 Section 127.501 Business... industries that are eligible for EDWOSB or WOSB requirements? (a) SBA determination of underrepresented or substantially underrepresented industries. (1) Approximately every five years, SBA will conduct a study...

  18. Jernberg Industries, Inc.: Forging Facility Uses Plant-Wide Energy Assessment to Aid Conversion to Lean Manufacturing (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-10-01

    Jernberg Industries conducted a plant-wide assessment while converting to lean manufacturing at a forging plant. Seven projects were identified that could yield annual savings of $791,000, 64,000 MMBtu in fuel and 6 million kWh

  19. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This volume provides a description of the facility, and its location and setting in the three-state area of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia; an overview of previous risk assessments conducted by U.S. EPA for this site, including the preliminary assessment of inhalation exposure and the screening-level risk analyses of indirect exposure; and a summary of comments provided by the Peer Review Panel on the Project Plan.

  20. DOE/Industrial Technologies Program DOE Award Number DE-FG36-05GO15099 Plant Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment Pilgrims Pride Corporation – Mt Pleasant Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Paper, Riyaz; Dooley, Bill; Turpish, William J; Symonds, Mark; Carswell, Needham

    2007-04-13

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), through Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is supporting plant wide energy efficiency assessments that will lead to substantial improvements in industrial efficiency, waste reduction, productivity, and global competitiveness in industries identified in ITP’s Industries of the Future. The stated goal of the assessments is to develop a comprehensive strategy at manufacturing locations that will significantly increase plant productivity, profitability, and energy efficiency, and reduce environmental emissions. ITP awarded a contract to Pilgrim’s Pride Corporation to conduct a plant wide energy efficiency assessment for their Mt Pleasant Facility in Mt Pleasant, Texas. Pilgrim’s Pride Corporation is the largest poultry company in the U.S. and Mexico producing nearly 9 billion pounds of poultry per year. Pilgrim's Pride products are sold to foodservice, retail and frozen entrée customers. Pilgrim's Pride owns and operates 37 chicken processing plants (34 in the U.S. and three in Mexico), 12 prepared foods plants and one turkey processing plant. Thirty-five feed mills and 49 hatcheries support these plants. Pilgrim's Pride is ranked number 382 on 2006's FORTUNE 500 list and net sales were $7.4 billion. In Mt. Pleasant, Texas, Pilgrim's Pride operates one of the largest prepared foods plants in the United States, with the capability of producing 2,000 different products and the capacity to turn out more than 7 million pounds of finished goods per week. The facility is divided into distinct departments: East Kill, West Kill, Prepared Foods, Protein Conversion, Wastewater Treatment, and Truck Shop. Facility processes include killing, eviscerating, refrigeration, baking, frying, and protein conversion. Pilgrim’s Pride formed a team to complete the plant wide energy efficiency assessment. The scope of work for this project was to: provide the analysis of departmental energy use, identify

  1. Hazardous waste management system: standards applicable to generators of hazardous waste and standards applicable to owners and operators of hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities--Environmental Protection Agency. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    1982-10-12

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is today proposing amendments to its hazardous waste regulations under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These amendments would replace the annual reporting requirements for hazardous waste generators and owners and operators of hazardous waste treatment, storage, ad disposal (TSD) facilities with a biennial survey of representative samples of those populations. This approach will provide verifiable data on a wider range of topics, better serve EPA's long term regulatory needs under RCRA, and reduce significantly the information burden on the regulated community. PMID:10258157

  2. Head Start Facilities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Assessment Management, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    A quality Head Start facility should provide a physical environment responsive both to the needs of the children and families served and to the needs of staff, volunteers, and community agencies that share space with Head Start. This manual is a tool for Head Start grantees and delegate agencies for assessing existing facilities, making…

  3. AN OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SMALL SYSTEMS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER AT THE EPA TEST AND EVALUATION FACILITY IN CINCINNATI, OHIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) landmark Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996 promised to bring and provide safe drinking water to all Americans. Since that time many have not understood or appreciated EPA involvement in the research and development (...

  4. Industrial sector-based volatile organic compound (VOC) source profiles measured in manufacturing facilities in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junyu; Yu, Yufan; Mo, Ziwei; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Xinming; Yin, Shasha; Peng, Kang; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaoqiong; Cai, Huihua

    2013-07-01

    Industrial sector-based VOC source profiles are reported for the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China, based source samples (stack emissions and fugitive emissions) analyzed from sources operating under normal conditions. The industrial sectors considered are printing (letterpress, offset and gravure printing processes), wood furniture coating, shoemaking, paint manufacturing and metal surface coating. More than 250 VOC species were detected following US EPA methods TO-14 and TO-15. The results indicated that benzene and toluene were the major species associated with letterpress printing, while ethyl acetate and isopropyl alcohol were the most abundant compounds of other two printing processes. Acetone and 2-butanone were the major species observed in the shoemaking sector. The source profile patterns were found to be similar for the paint manufacturing, wood furniture coating, and metal surface coating sectors, with aromatics being the most abundant group and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) as the second largest contributor in the profiles. While OVOCs were one of the most significant VOC groups detected in these five industrial sectors in the PRD region, they have not been reported in most other source profile studies. Such comparisons with other studies show that there are differences in source profiles for different regions or countries, indicating the importance of developing local source profiles. PMID:23584189

  5. Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506

    SciTech Connect

    Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph; Boyle, James D.

    2013-07-01

    The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

  6. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration, site characterization plan: Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility at the Nevada Test Site which will be conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division. The objectives of the planned activities are to: obtain sufficient, sample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies may be developed for the site; obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste. The scope of the characterization may include surface radiation survey(s), surface soil sampling, subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), and sampling of soil in and around the pond; in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings; and sample analysis for both site characterization and waste management purposes.

  7. Facility safety study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The safety of NASA's in house microelectronics facility is addressed. Industrial health standards, facility emission control requirements, operation and safety checklists, and the disposal of epitaxial vent gas are considered.

  8. Time-integrated, flux-based monitoring using semipermeable membrane devices to estimate the contribution of industrial facilities to regional polychlorinated biphenyl budgets

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.; Southworth, G.R.; Ham, K.D.; Palmer, J.A.

    2000-02-01

    Passive monitoring of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMD) was employed to evaluate the contribution of point and nonpoint sources to the flux of PCB in a drainage system encompassing three US Department of Energy (US DOE) industrial and research facilities in eastern Tennessee, USA. Polychlorinated biphenyls concentrations were highest at outfalls containing process waste from the DOE industrial facilities. The significance of these releases was evaluated by calculating the PCB flux (mass per unit time) at different monitoring locations. The flux was calculated from the time-integrated estimates of the aqueous concentrations of PCB and estimates of the volumetric flow rates of discharges and receiving streams during the deployment period. The DOE discharges accounted for most of the flux of PCB entering the Clinch River from the DOE drainage areas, but these sources constituted only 10% of the flux in the Clinch River about the DOE sources. Principal components analysis was helpful in attributing sources of PCB. In a stream receiving multiple inputs of PCB, congener profiles from upstream sources and discrete discharges were consistent with a mixture of those congener profiles in the downstream receiving water. In another stream with a single upstream source of PCB, changes in PCB flux and congener profiles suggested an apparent steady-state distribution between dissolved PCB and PCB adsorbed to organic matter on the streambed. The flux of dissolved PCB along different stream reaches reflected changes in the sediment organic content. Subtle alterations in congener profiles moving downstream suggested preferential desorption of less chlorinated congeners and sorption of more highly chlorinated congeners to sediment. Time-integrated, flux-based monitoring can be useful across a range of spatial scales for evaluating the significance of point and nonpoint contaminant sources and can help identify and prioritize feasible remedial

  9. H.R. 3593: This act may be cited as the Department of Energy Small Business and Industry Partnership Enhancement Act of 1998, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, March 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The purposes of this Act are to improve the ability of small businesses, Federal agencies, industry, and universities to work with the contractor-operated facilities of the Department of Energy while ensuring full cost recovery of each contractor-operated facility`s expenses incurred in such work; to encourage the contractor-operated facilities to expand their partnerships with universities and industries; and to expand interactions of contractor-operated facilities with small businesses so as to encourage commercial evaluation and development of the science and technology base of the contractor-operated facilities; and provide technical assistance to small businesses.

  10. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Plan, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-12

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which will be conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations OffIce (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration Division (ERD). The objectives of the planned activities are to: o Obtain sufficient, ample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies maybe developed for the site. o Obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste. All references to regulations contained in this plan are to the versions of the regulations that are current at the time of publication of this plan. The scope of the characterization may include surface radiation survey(s), surface soil sampling, subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), and sampling of soil in and Mound the pond; in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings; and sample analysis for both site . . characterization and waste management purposes.