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Sample records for agents including gadolinium

  1. Biodistribution of gadolinium-based contrast agents, including gadolinium deposition

    PubMed Central

    Aime, Silvio; Caravan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The biodistribution of approved gadolinium (Gd) based contrast agents (GBCA) is reviewed. After intravenous injection GBCA distribute in the blood and the extracellular space and transiently through the excretory organs. Preclinical animal studies and the available clinical literature indicate that all these compounds are excreted intact. Elimination tends to be rapid and for the most part, complete. In renally insufficient patients the plasma elimination half-life increases substantially from hours to days depending on renal function. In patients with impaired renal function and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), the agents gadodiamide, gadoversetamide, and gadopentetate dimeglumine have been shown to result in Gd deposition in the skin and internal organs. In these cases, it is likely that the Gd is no longer present as the GBCA, but this has still not been definitively shown. In preclinical models very small amounts of Gd are retained in the bone and liver, and the amount retained correlates with the kinetic and thermodynamic stability of the GBCA with respect to Gd release in vitro. The pattern of residual Gd deposition in NSF subjects may be different than that observed in preclinical rodent models. GBCA are designed to be used via intravenous administration. Altering the route of administration and/or the formulation of the GBCA can dramatically alter the biodistribution of the GBCA and can increase the likelihood of Gd deposition. PMID:19938038

  2. Tumor growth suppression by gadolinium-neutron capture therapy using gadolinium-entrapped liposome as gadolinium delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Zhu, Haito; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sekino, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuriko; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Iyomoto, Naoko; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is a promising non-invasive cancer therapy approach and some recent NCT research has focused on using compounds containing gadolinium as an alternative to currently used boron-10 considering several advantages that gadolinium offers compared to those of boron. In this study, we evaluated gadolinium-entrapped liposome compound as neutron capture therapy agent by in vivo experiment on colon-26 tumor-bearing mice. Gadolinium compound were injected intravenously via tail vein and allowed to accumulate into tumor site. Tumor samples were taken for quantitative analysis by ICP-MS at 2, 12, and 24 h after gadolinium compound injection. Highest gadolinium concentration was observed at about 2 h after gadolinium compound injection with an average of 40.3 μg/g of wet tumor tissue. We performed neutron irradiation at JRR-4 reactor facility of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokaimura with average neutron fluence of 2×10¹² n/cm². The experimental results showed that the tumor growth suppression of gadolinium-injected irradiated group was revealed until about four times higher compared to the control group, and no significant weight loss were observed after treatment suggesting low systemic toxicity of this compound. The gadolinium-entrapped liposome will become one of the candidates for Gd delivery system on NCT. PMID:23743325

  3. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent Accumulation and Toxicity: An Update.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, J; Semelka, R C; Ramalho, M; Nunes, R H; AlObaidy, M; Castillo, M

    2016-07-01

    In current practice, gadolinium-based contrast agents have been considered safe when used at clinically recommended doses in patients without severe renal insufficiency. The causal relationship between gadolinium-based contrast agents and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal insufficiency resulted in new policies regarding the administration of these agents. After an effective screening of patients with renal disease by performing either unenhanced or reduced-dose-enhanced studies in these patients and by using the most stable contrast agents, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis has been largely eliminated since 2009. Evidence of in vivo gadolinium deposition in bone tissue in patients with normal renal function is well-established, but recent literature showing that gadolinium might also deposit in the brain in patients with intact blood-brain barriers caught many individuals in the imaging community by surprise. The purpose of this review was to summarize the literature on gadolinium-based contrast agents, tying together information on agent stability and animal and human studies, and to emphasize that low-stability agents are the ones most often associated with brain deposition. PMID:26659341

  4. Gadolinium-based contrast agent toxicity: a review of known and proposed mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rogosnitzky, Moshe; Branch, Stacy

    2016-06-01

    Gadolinium chelates are widely used as contrast media for magnetic resonance imaging. The approved gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have historically been considered safe and well tolerated when used at recommended dosing levels. However, for nearly a decade, an association between GBCA administration and the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) has been recognized in patients with severe renal impairment. This has led to modifications in clinical practices aimed at reducing the potential and incidence of NSF development. Newer reports have emerged regarding the accumulation of gadolinium in various tissues of patients who do not have renal impairment, including bone, brain, and kidneys. Despite the observations of gadolinium accumulation in tissues regardless of renal function, very limited clinical data regarding the potential for and mechanisms of toxicity is available. This significant gap in knowledge warrants retrospective cohort study efforts, as well as prospective studies that involve gadolinium ion (Gd(3+)) testing in patients exposed to GBCA. This review examines the potential biochemical and molecular basis of gadolinium toxicity, possible clinical significance of gadolinium tissue retention and accumulation, and methods that can limit gadolinium body burden. PMID:27053146

  5. Linear Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Are Associated With Brain Gadolinium Retention in Healthy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Philippe; Violas, Xavier; Grand, Sylvie; Lehericy, Stéphane; Idée, Jean-Marc; Ballet, Sébastien; Corot, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate Gd retention in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) of linear gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) compared with a macrocyclic contrast agent. Materials and Methods The brain tissue retention of Gd of 3 linear GBCAs (gadobenate dimeglumine, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadodiamide) and a macrocyclic GBCA (gadoterate meglumine) was compared in healthy rats (n = 8 per group) that received 20 intravenous injections of 0.6 mmol Gd/kg (4 injections per week for 5 weeks). An additional control group with saline was included. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed before injection and once a week during the 5 weeks of injections and for another 4 additional weeks after contrast period. Total gadolinium concentration was measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Blinded qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the T1 signal intensity in DCN were performed, as well as a statistical analysis on quantitative data. Results At completion of the injection period, all the linear contrast agents (gadobenate dimeglumine, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadodiamide) induced a significant increase in signal intensity in DCN, unlike the macrocyclic GBCA (gadoterate meglumine) or saline. The T1 hypersignal enhancement kinetic was fast for gadodiamide. Total Gd concentrations for the 3 linear GBCAs groups at week 10 were significantly higher in the cerebellum (1.21 ± 0.48, 1.67 ± 0.17, and 3.75 ± 0.18 nmol/g for gadobenate dimeglumine, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadodiamide, respectively) than with the gadoterate meglumine (0.27 ± 0.16 nmol/g, P < 0.05) and saline (0.09 ± 0.12 nmol/g, P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed between the macrocyclic agent and saline. Conclusions Repeated administrations of the linear GBCAs gadodiamide, gadobenate dimeglumine, and gadopentetate dimeglumine to healthy rats were associated with progressive and significant T1 signal hyperintensity in the

  6. Gadolinium as a Neutron Capture Therapy Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Jing-Luen Allen

    The clinical results of treating brain tumors with boron neutron capture therapy are very encouraging and researchers around the world are once again making efforts to develop this therapeutic modality. Boron-10 is the agent receiving the most attention for neutron capture therapy but ^{157}Gd is a nuclide that also holds interesting properties of being a neutron capture therapy agent. The objective of this study is to evaluate ^{157}Gd as a neutron capture therapy agent. In this study it is determined that tumor concentrations of about 300 mug ^{157}Gd/g tumor can be achieved in brain tumors with some FDA approved MRI contrast agents such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, and up to 628 mug ^{157 }Gd/g tumor can be established in bone tumors with Gd-EDTMP. Monte Carlo calculations show that with only 250 ppm of ^{157}Gd in tumor, neutron capture therapy can deliver 2,000 cGy to a tumor of 2 cm diameter or larger with 5 times 10^{12} n/cm ^2 fluence at the tumor. Dose measurements which were made with films and TLD's in phantoms verified these calculations. More extended Monte Carlo calculations demonstrate that neutron capture therapy with Gd possesses comparable dose distribution to B neutron capture therapy. With 5 times 10^{12 } n/cm^2 thermal neutrons at the tumor, Auger electrons from the Gd produced an optical density enhancement on the films that is similar to the effect caused by about 300 cGy of Gd prompt gamma dose which will further enhance the therapeutic effects. A technique that combines brachytherapy with Gd neutron capture therapy has been evaluated. Monte Carlo calculations show that 5,000 cGy of prompt gamma dose can be delivered to a treatment volume of 40 cm^3 with a 3-plane implant of a total of 9 Gd needles. The tumor to normal tissue advantage of this method is as good as ^{60} Co brachytherapy. Measurements of prompt gamma dose with films and TLD-700's in a lucite phantom verify the Monte Carlo evaluation. A technique which displays the Gd

  7. Hepatobiliary MR Imaging with Gadolinium Based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Frydrychowicz, Alex; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brown, Jeffrey J.; Merkle, Elmar M.; Nagle, Scott K.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of gadolinium-based “hepatobiliary” contrast agents offers new opportunities for diagnostic MRI and has triggered a great interest for innovative imaging approaches to the liver and bile ducts. In this review article we will discuss the imaging properties of the two gadolinium-based hepatobiliary contrast agents currently available in the USA, gadobenate dimeglumine and gadoxetic acid, as well as important pharmacokinetic differences that affect their diagnostic performance. We will review potential applications, protocol optimization strategies, as well as diagnostic pitfalls. A variety of illustrative case examples will be used to demonstrate the role of these agents in detection and characterization of liver lesions as well as for imaging the biliary system. Changes in MR protocols geared towards optimizing workflow and imaging quality will also be discussed. It is our aim that the information provided in this article will facilitate the optimal utilization of these agents, and will stimulate the reader‘s pursuit of new applications for future benefit. PMID:22334493

  8. Gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as potential multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jeong; Chae, Kwon Seok; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Potentials of hydrophilic and biocompatible ligand coated gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents, drug carriers, and therapeutic agents are reviewed. First of all, they can be used as advanced T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents because they have r1 larger than those of Gd(III)-chelates due to a high density of Gd(III) per nanoparticle. They can be further functionalized by conjugating other imaging agents such as fluorescent imaging (FI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) agents. They can be also useful for drug carriers through morphology modifications. They themselves are also potential CT and ultrasound imaging (USI) contrast and thermal neutron capture therapeutic (NCT) agents, which are superior to commercial iodine compounds, air-filled albumin microspheres, and boron ((10)B) compounds, respectively. They, when conjugated with targeting agents such as antibodies and peptides, will provide enhanced images and be also very useful for diagnosis and therapy of diseases (so called theragnosis). PMID:23432005

  9. Gadolinium nanoparticles and contrast agent as radiation sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Delorme, Rachel; Brochard, Thierry; Mayol, Jean-François; Arnaud, Josiane; Perriat, Pascal; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Barth, Rolf F; Carrière, Marie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Elleaume, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing properties of gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs) with the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist(®) in order to better understand the mechanisms by which they act as radiation sensitizers. This was determined following either low energy synchrotron irradiation or high energy gamma irradiation of F98 rat glioma cells exposed to ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, hydrodynamic diameter of 3 nm) or GdCA. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify cell survival after irradiation in the presence of Gd using monochromatic x-rays with energies in the 25 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. Radiosensitization was demonstrated with both agents in combination with X-irradiation. At the same concentration (2.1 mg mL(-1)), GdNPS had a greater effect than GdCA. The maximum sensitization-enhancement ratio at 4 Gy (SER4Gy) was observed at an energy of 65 keV for both the nanoparticles and the contrast agent (2.44   ±   0.33 and 1.50   ±   0.20, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). At a higher energy (1.25 MeV), radiosensitization only was observed with GdNPs (1.66   ±   0.17 and 1.01   ±   0.11, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). The radiation dose enhancements were highly 'energy dependent' for both agents. Secondary-electron-emission generated after photoelectric events appeared to be the primary mechanism by which Gd contrast agents functioned as radiosensitizers. On the other hand, other biological mechanisms, such as alterations in the cell cycle may explain the enhanced radiosensitizing properties of GdNPs. PMID:25988839

  10. Gadolinium nanoparticles and contrast agent as radiation sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Delorme, Rachel; Brochard, Thierry; Mayol, Jean-François; Arnaud, Josiane; Perriat, Pascal; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Barth, Rolf F.; Carrière, Marie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Elleaume, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing properties of gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs) with the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist® in order to better understand the mechanisms by which they act as radiation sensitizers. This was determined following either low energy synchrotron irradiation or high energy gamma irradiation of F98 rat glioma cells exposed to ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, hydrodynamic diameter of 3 nm) or GdCA. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify cell survival after irradiation in the presence of Gd using monochromatic x-rays with energies in the 25 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. Radiosensitization was demonstrated with both agents in combination with X-irradiation. At the same concentration (2.1 mg mL-1), GdNPS had a greater effect than GdCA. The maximum sensitization-enhancement ratio at 4 Gy (SER4Gy) was observed at an energy of 65 keV for both the nanoparticles and the contrast agent (2.44   ±   0.33 and 1.50   ±   0.20, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). At a higher energy (1.25 MeV), radiosensitization only was observed with GdNPs (1.66   ±   0.17 and 1.01   ±   0.11, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). The radiation dose enhancements were highly ‘energy dependent’ for both agents. Secondary-electron-emission generated after photoelectric events appeared to be the primary mechanism by which Gd contrast agents functioned as radiosensitizers. On the other hand, other biological mechanisms, such as alterations in the cell cycle may explain the enhanced radiosensitizing properties of GdNPs.

  11. Gadolinium-based contrast agents: did we miss something in the last 25 years?

    PubMed

    Beomonte Zobel, Bruno; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Errante, Yuri; Grasso, Rosario Francesco

    2016-06-01

    In the last 24 months, several clinical and experimental studies, suggested first and demonstrated later, a progressive concentration of Gadolinium in the brain of normal renal function patients, following repeated injections of some of the commercially approved Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents. Although, till now, Gadolinium brain deposits have not been associated to any kind of neurological signs or symptoms, they oblige the radiology community to modify the actual approach in using Gadolinium contrast media in daily practice, to reduce unknown possible risks for patients. PMID:26706453

  12. Gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agents: important variations on a theme for NSF.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Phillip H

    2008-01-01

    Millions of doses of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are administered annually to improve the clinical utility of magnetic resonance imaging. All the approved agents incorporate one atom of the rare earth metal gadolinium into a chelate to improve the safety of the ordinarily toxic free gadolinium. The undeniable epidemiologic link between GBCAs and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) has prompted renewed investigation into the different chemical properties of the GBCAs despite their clinical interchangeability. Gadolinium-based contrast agents can be divided into different categories: linear versus macrocyclic structure, ionic versus nonionic, and non-protein-binding versus protein-binding agents. The GBCAs differ significantly with respect to transmetallation and kinetic and thermodynamic stability and therefore their propensity to release free gadolinium, which is hypothesized to induce NSF. That gadodiamide, with its susceptibility to transmetallation and relatively low thermodynamic and kinetic stability, is associated with the most cases of NSF supports this hypothesis. On the other hand, the greater stability of a macrocyclic agent hypothetically would confer a greater safety margin with regard to NSF. Because few published data on an experimental model of NSF exist, continuing vigilance is necessary to report new cases of NSF, especially with regard to the agents with small market share. PMID:18180006

  13. Biocompatible nanotemplate-engineered nanoparticles containing gadolinium: stability and relaxivity of a potential MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Donghua; White, R D; Hardy, Peter A; Weerapreeyakul, Natthida; Sutthanut, Khaetthareeya; Jay, Michael

    2006-04-01

    In this article, we use a nanotemplate engineering approach to prepare biodegradable nanoparticles composed of FDA-approved materials and possessing accessible gadolinium (Gd) atoms and demonstrate their potential as a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Nanoparticles containing dimyristoyl phosphoethanolamine diethylene triamine penta acetate (PE-DTPA) were prepared using 3.5 mg of Brij 78, 2.0 mg of emulsifying wax and 0.5 mg of PE-DTPA/ml from a microemulsion precursor. After the addition of GdCl3, the presence of Gd on the surface of nanoparticles was characterized using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). The in vitro relaxivities of the PE-DTPA-Gd nanoparticles in different media were assessed at different field strengths. The conditional stability constant of Gd binding to the nanoparticles was determined using competitive spectrophotometric titration. Transmetallation kinetics of the gadolinium ion from PE-DTPA-Gd nanoparticles with zinc as the competing ionic was measured using the relaxivity evolution method. Nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 130 nm possessing surface chelating functions were made from GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) materials. STEM demonstrated the uniform distribution of Gd3+ on the surface of the nanoparticles. The thermodynamic binding constant for Gd3+ to the nanoparticles was approximately 10(18) M(-1) and transmetallation studies with Zn2+ yielded kinetic constants K1 and K(-1) of 0.033 and 0.022 1/h, respectively, with an equilibrium constant of 1.5. A payload of approximately 10(5) Gd/nanoparticle was achieved; enhanced relaxivities were observed, including a pH dependence of the transverse relaxivity (r2). Nanoparticles composed of materials that have been demonstrated to be hemocompatible and enzymatically metabolized and possessing accessible Gd ions on their surface induce relaxivities in the bulk water signal that make them

  14. Gadolinium-phthalein complexone as a contrast agent for hepatobiliary MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Y.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Saga, T.; Konishi, J.; Horiuchi, K.; Yokoyama, A.

    1989-01-01

    Gadolinium-phthalein complexone (Gd-PC) was developed as a hepatobiliary magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Phthalein complexone is one of the iminodiacetic acid derivatives and a structural analogue of bromosulfophthalein. Gadolinium-PC substantially enhanced signal intensity of normal functioning livers on T1-weighted MR images. Contrast enhancement of rabbit liver and gradual accumulation of high intensity bile in the gallbladder were observed after intravenous injection of 0.05 and 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-PC. However, 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA caused little effect on liver MR.

  15. The evolution of gadolinium based contrast agents: from single-modality to multi-modality.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Ruiqing; Peng, Hui; Li, Penghui; Xu, Zushun; Whittaker, Andrew K

    2016-05-19

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extensively used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their outstanding signal enhancement and ease of chemical modification. However, it is increasingly recognized that information obtained from single modal molecular imaging cannot satisfy the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for clinical diagnosis and medical research, due to its limitation and default rooted in single molecular imaging technique itself. To compensate for the deficiencies of single function magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, the combination of multi-modality imaging has turned to be the research hotpot in recent years. This review presents an overview on the recent developments of the functionalization of gadolinium-based contrast agents, and their application in biomedicine applications. PMID:27159645

  16. The evolution of gadolinium based contrast agents: from single-modality to multi-modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Ruiqing; Peng, Hui; Li, Penghui; Xu, Zushun; Whittaker, Andrew K.

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extensively used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their outstanding signal enhancement and ease of chemical modification. However, it is increasingly recognized that information obtained from single modal molecular imaging cannot satisfy the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for clinical diagnosis and medical research, due to its limitation and default rooted in single molecular imaging technique itself. To compensate for the deficiencies of single function magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, the combination of multi-modality imaging has turned to be the research hotpot in recent years. This review presents an overview on the recent developments of the functionalization of gadolinium-based contrast agents, and their application in biomedicine applications.

  17. Insights into the use of gadolinium and gadolinium/boron-based agents in imaging-guided neutron capture therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Deagostino, Annamaria; Protti, Nicoletta; Alberti, Diego; Boggio, Paolo; Bortolussi, Silva; Altieri, Saverio; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) is currently under development as an alternative approach for cancer therapy. All of the clinical experience to date with NCT is done with (10)B, known as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a binary treatment combining neutron irradiation with the delivery of boron-containing compounds to tumors. Currently, the use of Gd for NCT has been getting more attention because of its highest neutron cross-section. Although Gd-NCT was first proposed many years ago, its development has suffered due to lack of appropriate tumor-selective Gd agents. This review aims to highlight the recent advances for the design, synthesis and biological testing of new Gd- and B-Gd-containing compounds with the task of finding the best systems able to improve the NCT clinical outcome. PMID:27195428

  18. Thermal Excitation of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Using Spin Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Fridjhon, Peter; Rubin, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations into the thermal excitation of liquid paramagnetic contrast agents using the spin resonance relaxation mechanism are presented. The electronic spin-lattice relaxation time τ1e of gadolinium-based contrast agents, which is estimated at 0.1 ns, is ten orders of magnitude faster than the relaxation time of protons in water. The shorter relaxation time is found to significantly increase the rate of thermal energy deposition. To the authors’ knowledge this is the first study of gadolinium based contrast agents in a liquid state used as thermal agents. Analysis shows that when τ1e and other experimental parameters are optimally selected, a maximum theoretical heating rate of 29.4 °C.s−1 could be achieved which would suffice for clinical thermal ablation of neoplasms. The experimental results show a statistically significant thermal response for two out of the four contrast agents tested. The results are compared to the simulated estimates via analysis of a detailed model of the system. While these experimentally determined temperature rises are small and thus of no clinical utility, their presence supports the theoretical analysis and strongly suggests that the chemical structure of the selected compounds plays an important role in this mechanism of heat deposition. There exists an opportunity for the development of alternative gadolinium-based compounds with an order of magnitude longer τ1e in a diluted form to be used as an efficient hyperthermia agent for clinical use. PMID:27341338

  19. Thermal Excitation of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Using Spin Resonance.

    PubMed

    Dinger, Steven C; Fridjhon, Peter; Rubin, David M

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations into the thermal excitation of liquid paramagnetic contrast agents using the spin resonance relaxation mechanism are presented. The electronic spin-lattice relaxation time τ1e of gadolinium-based contrast agents, which is estimated at 0.1 ns, is ten orders of magnitude faster than the relaxation time of protons in water. The shorter relaxation time is found to significantly increase the rate of thermal energy deposition. To the authors' knowledge this is the first study of gadolinium based contrast agents in a liquid state used as thermal agents. Analysis shows that when τ1e and other experimental parameters are optimally selected, a maximum theoretical heating rate of 29.4 °C.s-1 could be achieved which would suffice for clinical thermal ablation of neoplasms. The experimental results show a statistically significant thermal response for two out of the four contrast agents tested. The results are compared to the simulated estimates via analysis of a detailed model of the system. While these experimentally determined temperature rises are small and thus of no clinical utility, their presence supports the theoretical analysis and strongly suggests that the chemical structure of the selected compounds plays an important role in this mechanism of heat deposition. There exists an opportunity for the development of alternative gadolinium-based compounds with an order of magnitude longer τ1e in a diluted form to be used as an efficient hyperthermia agent for clinical use. PMID:27341338

  20. Re-evaluating gadolinium(III) texaphyrin as a radiosensitizing agent.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, E J; Mitchell, J B; Deen, D; Cardell, M; Rosenthal, D I; Brown, J M

    2000-01-01

    Gadolinium(III) texaphyrin (Gd-tex) was recently proposed as a radiosensitizing agent that combines preferential tumor uptake with detection of drug localization by magnetic resonance imaging (S. W. Young et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 93: 6610-6615, 1996). In view of the initial report on this compound, four radiobiology laboratories undertook independent efforts to further study radiosensitization by Gd-tex. In addition to repeating the previously reported studies on Gd-tex in HT-29 cells, we tested five other human tumor cell lines (U-87 MG, U251-NCI, SW480, A549, and MCF-7). These studies included a Gd-tex treatment period of 24 h before irradiation (as in the original publication), with concentrations of Gd-tex ranging from 20-500 microM. In neither the HT-29 cells nor any of the other five human cell lines did we see radiation sensitization by Gd-tex. Two cell lines (MCF-7 and U-87 MG) were further tested for radiosensitization by Gd-tex under hypoxic conditions. No radiosensitization was observed in either case. Finally, the radiation response of two tumor lines were assessed in vivo. Neither HT-29 xenografts in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice nor RIF-1 tumors growing in C3H mice demonstrated radiosensitization after Gd-tex treatment before single or fractionated doses of radiation. Our results raise questions about the efficacy of Gd-tex as a radiosensitizing agent. PMID:10646858

  1. Biocompatible Polyhydroxyethylaspartamide-based Micelles with Gadolinium for MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sang Young; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Lee, Ha-Young; Seong, Hasoo; Shin, Byung Cheol; Yuk, Soon Hong; Hwang, Sung-Joo; Cho, Sun Hang

    2010-12-01

    Biocompatible poly-[ N-(2-hydroxyethyl)- d, l-aspartamide]-methoxypoly(ethyleneglycol)-hexadecylamine (PHEA-mPEG-C16) conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecan-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-gadolinium (DOTA-Gd) via ethylenediamine (ED) was synthesized as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Amphiphilic PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd forms micelle in aqueous solution. All the synthesized materials were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). Micelle size and shape were examined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Micelles with PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd showed higher relaxivities than the commercially available gadolinium contrast agent. Moreover, the signal intensity of a rabbit liver was effectively increased after intravenous injection of PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd.

  2. Surface Modified Gadolinium Phosphate Nanoparticles as MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Matthieu F.; Baligand, Celine; Knowles, Elisabeth S.; Meisel, Mark W.; Walter, Glenn A.; Talham, Daniel R.

    2012-02-01

    Nanoparticles of GdPO4H2O were synthesized in a water/oil microemulsion using IGEPAL CO-520 as surfactant resulting in 50 nm to 100 nm particles that are dispersible and stable in water. Using surface modification chemistry previously established for zirconium phosphonate surfaces,ootnotetext J. Monot et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130 (2008) 6243. the particles are directly modified with 5'-phosphate terminated oligonucleotides, and the specific interaction of the divalent phosphate with Gd^3+ sites at the surface is demonstrated. The ability of the modified nanoparticles to act as MRI contrast agents was determined by performing MR relaxivity measurements at 14 T. Solutions of nanopure water, Feridex and Omniscan (FDA cleared contrast agents) in 0.25% agarose were used for comparison and control purposes. MRI data confirm that GdPO4H2O nanoparticles have relaxivities (r1,r2) comparable to commercially available contrast agents.ootnotetext H. Hifumi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128 (2006) 15090. In addition, biofunctionalization of the surface of the nanoparticles does not prevent their function as MRI contrast agents.

  3. Active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent into the subdural space following lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Pranay D; Hanser, Evelyn M; Wang, Harrison; Farid, Nikdokht

    2016-01-01

    A 38year-old male presented with cauda equina syndrome following multiple lumbar puncture attempts. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a subdural hematoma and an area of apparent contrast enhancement in the spinal canal on sagittal post-contrast images. Axial post-contrast images obtained seven minutes later demonstrated an increase in size and change in shape of the region of apparent contrast enhancement, indicating active extravasation of the contrast agent. This is the first reported case of active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent in the spine. PMID:27317202

  4. Simple method for quantification of gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents using ESR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Keizo; Kinoshita, Shota; Okazaki, Shoko

    2012-01-01

    To develop an estimation method of gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, the effect of concentration of Gd compounds on the ESR spectrum of nitroxyl radical was examined. A solution of either 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPONE) or 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) was mixed with a solution of Gd compound and the ESR spectrum was recorded. Increased concentration of gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid chelate (Gd-DTPA), an MRI contrast agent, increased the peak-to-peak line widths of ESR spectra of the nitroxyl radicals, in accordance with a decrease of their signal heights. A linear relationship was observed between concentration of Gd-DTPA and line width of ESR signal, up to approximately 50 mmol/L Gd-DTPA, with a high correlation coefficient. Response of TEMPONE was 1.4-times higher than that of TEMPOL as evaluated from the slopes of the lines. The response was slightly different among Gd compounds; the slopes of calibration curves for acua[N,N-bis[2-[(carboxymethyl)[(methylcarbamoyl)methyl]amino]ethyl]glycinato(3-)]gadolinium hydrate (Gd-DTPA-BMA) (6.22 μT·L/mmol) and gadolinium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid chelate (Gd-DOTA) (6.62 μT·L/mmol) were steeper than the slope for Gd-DTPA (5.45 μT·L/mmol), whereas the slope for gadolinium chloride (4.94 μT·L/mmol) was less steep than that for Gd-DTPA. This method is simple to apply. The results indicate that this method is useful for rough estimation of the concentration of Gd contrast agents if calibration is carried out with each standard compound. It was also found that the plot of the reciprocal square root of signal height against concentrations of contrast agents could be useful for the estimation if a constant volume of sample solution is taken and measured at the same position in the ESR cavity every time. PMID:22223372

  5. Tracing gadolinium-based contrast agents from surface water to drinking water by means of speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Birka, Marvin; Wehe, Christoph A; Hachmöller, Oliver; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades, a significant amount of anthropogenic gadolinium has been released into the environment as a result of the broad application of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Since this anthropogenic gadolinium anomaly has also been detected in drinking water, it has become necessary to investigate the possible effect of drinking water purification on these highly polar microcontaminats. Therefore, a novel highly sensitive method for speciation analysis of gadolinium is presented. For that purpose, the hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was employed. In order to enhance the detection power, sample introduction was carried out by ultrasonic nebulization. In combination with a novel HILIC method using a diol-based stationary phase, it was possible to achieve superior limits of detection for frequently applied gadolinium-based contrast agents below 20pmol/L. With this method, the contrast agents Gd-DTPA, Gd-DOTA and Gd-BT-DO3A were determined in concentrations up to 159pmol/L in samples from several waterworks in a densely populated region of Germany alongside the river Ruhr as well as from a waterworks near a catchment lake. Thereby, the direct impact of anthropogenic gadolinium species being present in the surface water on the amount of anthropogenic gadolinium in drinking water was shown. There was no evidence for the degradation of contrast agents, the release of Gd(3+) or the presence of further Gd species. PMID:26931429

  6. Safety of the Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Focusing in Part on Their Accumulation in the Brain and Especially the Dentate Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Runge, Val M

    2016-05-01

    The established class of intravenous contrast media for magnetic resonance imaging is the gadolinium chelates, more generally referred to as the gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). These can be differentiated on the basis of stability in vivo, with safety and tolerability of the GBCAs dependent upon chemical and biologic inertness. This review discusses first the background in terms of development of these agents and safety discussions therein, and second their relative stability based both on in vitro studies and clinical observations before and including the advent of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. This sets the stage for the subsequent focus of the review, the current knowledge regarding accumulation of gadolinium in the brain and specifically the dentate nucleus after intravenous administration of the GBCAs and differentiation among agents on this basis. The information available to date, from the initial conception of these agents in 1981 to the latest reports concerning safety, demonstrates a significant difference between the macrocyclic and linear chelates. The review concludes with a discussion of the predictable future, which includes, importantly, a reassessment of the use of the linear GBCAs or a subset thereof. PMID:26945278

  7. High Relaxivity Gadolinium Hydroxypyridonate-Viral Capsid Conjugates: Nano-sized MRI Contrast Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Meux, Susan C.; Datta, Ankona; Hooker, Jacob M.; Botta, Mauro; Francis, Matthew B.; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-08-29

    High relaxivity macromolecular contrast agents based on the conjugation of gadolinium chelates to the interior and exterior surfaces of MS2 viral capsids are assessed. The proton nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of the conjugates show up to a five-fold increase in relaxivity, leading to a peak relaxivity (per Gd{sup 3+} ion) of 41.6 mM{sup -1}s{sup -1} at 30 MHz for the internally modified capsids. Modification of the exterior was achieved through conjugation to flexible lysines, while internal modification was accomplished by conjugation to relatively rigid tyrosines. Higher relaxivities were obtained for the internally modified capsids, showing that (1) there is facile diffusion of water to the interior of capsids and (2) the rigidity of the linker attaching the complex to the macromolecule is important for obtaining high relaxivity enhancements. The viral capsid conjugated gadolinium hydroxypyridonate complexes appear to possess two inner-sphere water molecules (q = 2) and the NMRD fittings highlight the differences in the local motion for the internal ({tau}{sub RI} = 440 ps) and external ({tau}{sub RI} = 310 ps) conjugates. These results indicate that there are significant advantages of using the internal surface of the capsids for contrast agent attachment, leaving the exterior surface available for the installation of tissue targeting groups.

  8. Biochemical Safety Profiles of Gadolinium-Based Extracellular Contrast Agents and Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Hale; Rybicki, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-based paramagnetic contrast agents are relatively safe when used in clinically recommended doses. However, with the rapidly expanding body of literature linking Gd-based paramagnetic contrast agents and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), awareness of the potential side effects and adverse reactions from Gd is now an important requirement for practicing radiologists. In addition to the ongoing accumulation and analyses of clinical NSF data, it is also essential for the practicing radiologist to understand the biochemical characteristics of the extracellular Gd-chelates. The purpose of this review is to consolidate and update the available information on known side effects, adverse reactions, and toxicity of the Gd chelates, with particular emphasis on the potential mechanisms of NSF. PMID:17969161

  9. Comparison of gadolinium Cy{sub 2}DOTA, a new hepatobiliary agent, and gadolinium HP-DO3A, an extracellular agent, in healthy liver and metastatic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Wells, J.W.; Williams, N.M.

    1995-02-01

    A new gadolinium (Gd) chelate with preferential hepatobiliary uptake, Gd Cy{sub 2}DOTA, was compared in two animal species with Gd HP-DO3A (gadoteridol), a clinically approved contrast agent with extracellular distribution. Liver enhancement was evaluated for these two contrast agents using magnetic resonance imaging, whereas an experimental model of metastatic disease was used to evaluate the agents` efficacy for liver-lesion delineation. The two agents were compared in four healthy Rhesus monkeys (eight studies) and five New Zealand White rabbits with implanted VX-2 liver tumors (ten studies). The contrast dose was 0.1 mmol/kg, with the agents given in random order and at least 72 hours between contrast injections. Breathhold T1-weighted spin echo scans were obtained at 1.5 tesla (T) before and after contrast was administered. Postcontrast scans were obtained 1 to 90 minutes after injection in the monkeys and 1 to 240 minutes after injection in the rabbits. Prolonged hepatic enhancement, superior in degree to that with Gd HP-DO3A, was noted to both monkeys and rabbits after injection of Gd Cy{sub 2}DOTA. Two minutes after contrast, liver SI was 1.94 {+-} 0.05 with Gd Cy{sub 2}DOTA compared with 1.5 {+-} 0.05 with Gd HP-DO3A in monkeys. Sixty minutes after contrast, liver SI was 1.60 {+-} 0.09 compared with 1.20 {+-} 0.02. The difference between agents was significant at all times from 2 to 60 minutes after contrast injection (P < 0.01). Excretion of contrast into the gall bladder was observed in both animal species with Gd Cy{sub 2}DOTA but not with Gd HP-DO3A. The maximum improvement in lesion conspicuity (rabbit) occurred 45 minutes after injection of Gd Cy{sub 2}DOTA and 5 minutes after injection of Gd HP-DO3A. 22 refs., 12 figs.

  10. The use of innovative gadolinium-based contrast agent for MR-diagnosis of cancer in the experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Zelchan, R.; Grigorev, E.; Frolova, I.; Nam, I.

    2016-02-01

    The present study of the functional suitability and specific activity of the contrast agent gadolinium-based for magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that the investigated contrast agent intensively accumulates in organs and anatomical structures of the experimental animals. In the model of tumor lesions in animals, study have shown that investigational contrast agent accumulates in the tumor tissue and retained there in for a long enough time.

  11. Evaluation of a novel gadolinium-based contrast agent for intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Wu, Genevieve N.; Chow, Rayland; Kim, Sung-Yop; Hirschberg, Henry

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to determine whether Motexafin Gadolinium (MGd) could serve as an efficient intraoperative contrast agent avoiding problems that arise with surgically-induced intracranial enhancement. F98 orthotopic brain tumors or surgical lesions were induced in Fisher rats. T1-weighted MRI studies were performed with either a single or multiple daily doses of MGd. The last contrast dose was administered either 7 or 24 h prior to scanning in both tumor-bearing and surgically treated animals. Animals receiving either 30 or 60 mg/kg MGd i.v. developed clinical signs of impaired motor activity, and increasing lethargy. MGd given i.p. was tolerated up to a dose of 140 mg/kg. Despite multiple dosages, and several administration modes (i.p. and i.v.), no significant enhancement was observed if the scans were performed 7 or 24 h following the last MGd dose. Clear enhancement was observed if the scans were performed 30 min. following MGd administration. Scans of necrotic lesions were positive 7 h post MGd injection. MGd scans showed no significant enhancement following surgically-induced lesions while scans with conventional contrast agents showed both meningeal and intraparenchymal enhancement. This study suggests that MGd is not sequestered in viable tumor for the necessary time interval required to allow delayed imaging in this model. The agent does seem to remain in necrotic tissue for longer time intervals. MGd therefore would not be suitable as a contrast agent in iMRI for the detection of residual tumor tissue during surgery.

  12. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Qin; Tang, Ying; Fu, Rao; Meng, Qiu-Hua; Zhou, Xue; Ling, Ze-Min; Cheng, Xiao; Tian, Su-Wei; Wang, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xue-Guo; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats. PMID:25816076

  13. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YING-QIN; TANG, YING; FU, RAO; MENG, QIU-HUA; ZHOU, XUE; LING, ZE-MIN; CHENG, XIAO; TIAN, SU-WEI; WANG, GUO-JIE; LIU, XUE-GUO; ZHOU, LI-HUA

    2015-01-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats. PMID:25816076

  14. Investigating the stability of gadolinium based contrast agents towards UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Birka, Marvin; Roscher, Jörg; Holtkamp, Michael; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2016-03-15

    Since the 1980s, the broad application of gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has led to significantly increased concentrations of Gd in the aqueous environment. Little is known about the stability of these highly polar xenobiotics under environmental conditions, in wastewater and in drinking water treatment. Therefore, the stability of frequently applied Gd-based MRI contrast agents towards UV radiation was investigated. The hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and of HILIC with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) provided quantitative elemental information as well as structural information. The contrast agents Gd-DTPA, Gd-DOTA and Gd-BT-DO3A showed a high stability in irradiation experiments applying a wavelength range from 220 nm to 500 nm. Nevertheless, the degradation of Gd-BOPTA as well as the formation of Gd-containing transformation products was observed by means of HILIC-ICP-MS. Matrix-dependent irradiation experiments showed a degradation of Gd-BOPTA down to 3% of the initial amount in purified water after 300 min, whereas the degradation was slowed down in drinking water and surface water. Furthermore, it was observed that the sum of species continuously decreased with proceeding irradiation in all matrices. After irradiation in purified water for 300 min only 16% of the sum of species was left. This indicates a release of Gd(III) ions from the complex in course of irradiation. HILIC-ESI-MS measurements revealed that the transformation products mostly resulted from O-dealkylation and N-dealkylation reactions. In good correlation with retention times, the majority of transformation products were found to be more polar than Gd-BOPTA itself. Based on accurate masses, sum formulas were obtained and structures could be proposed. PMID:26802476

  15. Gadolinium(III) Complexes with N-Alkyl-N-methylglucamine Surfactants Incorporated into Liposomes as Potential MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Simone Rodrigues; Duarte, Érica Correia; Ramos, Guilherme Santos; Kock, Flávio Vinícius Crizóstomo; Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Frézard, Frédéric; Colnago, Luiz Alberto; Demicheli, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Complexes of gadolinium(III) with N-octanoyl-N-methylglucamine (L8) and N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamine (L10) with 1 : 2 stoichiometry were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and molar conductivity measurements. The transverse (r2) and longitudinal (r1) relaxivity protons were measured at 20 MHz and compared with those of the commercial contrasts. These complexes were incorporated in liposomes, resulting in the increase of the vesicle zeta potential. Both the free and liposome-incorporated gadolinium complexes showed high relaxation effectiveness, compared to commercial contrast agent gadopentetate dimeglumine (Magnevist). The high relaxivity of these complexes was attributed to the molecular rotation that occurs more slowly, because of the elevated molecular weight and incorporation in liposomes. The results establish that these paramagnetic complexes are highly potent contrast agents, making them excellent candidates for various applications in molecular MR imaging. PMID:26347596

  16. Native T1-mapping detects the location, extent and patterns of acute myocarditis without the need for gadolinium contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute myocarditis can be diagnosed on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) using multiple techniques, including late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging, which requires contrast administration. Native T1-mapping is significantly more sensitive than LGE and conventional T2-weighted (T2W) imaging in detecting myocarditis. The aims of this study were to demonstrate how to display the non-ischemic patterns of injury and to quantify myocardial involvement in acute myocarditis without the need for contrast agents, using topographic T1-maps and incremental T1 thresholds. Methods We studied 60 patients with suspected acute myocarditis (median 3 days from presentation) and 50 controls using CMR (1.5 T), including: (1) dark-blood T2W imaging; >(2) native T1-mapping (ShMOLLI); (3) LGE. Analysis included: (1) global myocardial T2 signal intensity (SI) ratio compared to skeletal muscle; (2) myocardial T1 times; (3) areas of injury by T2W, T1-mapping and LGE. Results Compared to controls, patients had more edema (global myocardial T2 SI ratio 1.71 ± 0.27 vs.1.56 ± 0.15), higher mean myocardial T1 (1011 ± 64 ms vs. 946 ± 23 ms) and more areas of injury as detected by T2W (median 5% vs. 0%), T1 (median 32% vs. 0.7%) and LGE (median 11% vs. 0%); all p < 0.001. A threshold of T1 > 990 ms (sensitivity 90%, specificity 88%) detected significantly larger areas of involvement than T2W and LGE imaging in patients, and additional areas of injury when T2W and LGE were negative. T1-mapping significantly improved the diagnostic confidence in an additional 30% of cases when at least one of the conventional methods (T2W, LGE) failed to identify any areas of abnormality. Using incremental thresholds, T1-mapping can display the non-ischemic patterns of injury typical of myocarditis. Conclusion Native T1-mapping can display the typical non-ischemic patterns in acute myocarditis, similar to LGE imaging but without the need for contrast agents. In

  17. Arterial double-contrast dual-energy MDCT: in-vivo rabbit atherosclerosis with iodinated nanoparticles and gadolinium agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Raz; Kafri, Galit; Altman, Ami; Goshen, Liran; Planer, David; Sosna, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    An in-vivo feasibility study of potentially improved atherosclerosis CT imaging is presented. By administration of two different contrast agents to rabbits with induced atherosclerotic plaques we aim at identifying both soft plaque and vessel lumen simultaneously. Initial injection of iodinated nanoparticle (INP) contrast agent (N1177 - Nanoscan Imaging), two to four hours before scan, leads to its later accumulation in macrophage-rich soft plaque, while a second gadolinium contrast agent (Magnevist) injected immediately prior to the scan blends with the aortic blood. The distinction between the two agents in a single scan is achieved with a double-layer dual-energy MDCT (Philips Healthcare) following material separation analysis using the reconstructed images of the different x-ray spectra. A single contrast agent injection scan, where only INP was injected two hours prior to the scan, was compared to a double-contrast scan taken four hours after INP injection and immediately after gadolinium injection. On the single contrast agent scan we observed along the aorta walls, localized iodine accumulation which can point on INP uptake by atherosclerotic plaque. In the double-contrast scan the gadolinium contributes a clearer depiction of the vessel lumen in addition to the lasting INP presence. The material separation shows a good correlation to the pathologies inferred from the conventional CT images of the two different scans while performing only a single scan prevents miss-registration problems and reduces radiation dose. These results suggest that a double-contrast dual-energy CT may be used for advanced clinical diagnostic applications.

  18. A smart T(1)-weighted MRI contrast agent for uranyl cations based on a DNAzyme-gadolinium conjugate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weichen; Xing, Hang; Lu, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Rational design of smart MRI contrast agents with high specificity for metal ions remains a challenge. Here, we report a general strategy for the design of smart MRI contrast agents for detecting metal ions based on conjugation of a DNAzyme with a gadolinium complex. The 39E DNAzyme, which has high selectivity for UO2(2+), was conjugated to Gd(III)-DOTA and streptavidin. The binding of UO2(2+) to its 39E DNAzyme resulted in the dissociation of Gd(III)-DOTA from the large streptavidin, leading to a decrease of the T1 correlation time, and a change in the MRI signal. PMID:24005082

  19. Effects of iodinated contrast agent, xylocaine and gadolinium concentration on the signal emitted in magnetic resonance arthrography: a samples study*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Yvana Lopes Pinheiro; Costa, Rita Zanlorensi Visneck; Pinho, Kátia Elisa Prus; Ferreira, Ricardo Rabello; Schuindt, Sueliton Miyamoto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of dilution of paramagnetic contrast agent with iodinated contrast and xylocaine on the signal intensity during magnetic resonance arthrography, and to improve the paramagnetic contrast agent concentration utilized in this imaging modality. Materials and Methods Samples specially prepared for the study with three different concentrations of paramagnetic contrast agent diluted in saline, iodinated contrast agent and xylocaine were imaged with fast spin echo T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation. The samples were placed into flasks and graphical analysis of the signal intensity was performed as a function of the paramagnetic contrast concentration. Results As compared with samples of equal concentrations diluted only with saline, the authors have observed an average signal intensity decrease of 20.67% for iodinated contrast agent, and of 28.34% for xylocaine. However, the increased gadolinium concentration in the samples caused decrease in signal intensity with all the dilutions. Conclusion Minimizing the use of iodinated contrast media and xylocaine and/or the use of a gadolinium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L diluted in saline will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance arthrography. PMID:25987746

  20. Spatially resolved quantification of gadolinium(III)-based magnetic resonance agents in tissue by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry after in vivo MRI.

    PubMed

    Aichler, Michaela; Huber, Katharina; Schilling, Franz; Lohöfer, Fabian; Kosanke, Katja; Meier, Reinhard; Rummeny, Ernst J; Walch, Axel; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2015-03-27

    Gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents improve the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially when targeted contrast agents are applied. Because of nonlinear correlation between the contrast agent concentration in tissue and the MRI signal obtained in vivo, quantification of certain biological or pathophysiological processes by MRI remains a challenge. Up to now, no technology has been able to provide a spatially resolved quantification of MRI agents directly within the tissue, which would allow a more precise verification of in vivo imaging results. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry for spatially resolved in situ quantification of gadolinium(III) agents, in correlation to in vivo MRI, were evaluated. Enhanced kinetics of Gadofluorine M were determined dynamically over time in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. MALDI imaging was able to corroborate the in vivo imaging MRI signals and enabled in situ quantification of the gadolinium probe with high spatial resolution. PMID:25689595

  1. Changes in Urinary and Serum Levels of Novel Biomarkers after Administration of Gadolinium-based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mawad, Habib; Laurin, Louis-Philippe; Naud, Jean-François; Leblond, François A.; Henley, Nathalie; Vallée, Michel; Pichette, Vincent; Leblanc, Martine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of our study is to describe the changes in urinary and serum levels of novel biomarkers after gadolinium contrast administration in patients with normal renal function. METHODS We measured four biomarkers in 28 volunteers: interleukin-18 (IL-18), N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, and cystatin C. Urinary and serum samples were collected at 0, 3, and 24 hours following gadolinium administration. RESULTS Baseline serum creatinine was 57.8 ± 34.5 µmol/L and remained stable. Urinary IL-18 levels increased significantly at three hours (10.7 vs. 7.3 ng/mg creatinine; P < 0.05). Similarly, urinary NAG levels increased significantly at three hours (3.9 vs. 2.2 IU/mg creatinine; P < 0.001). For both these markers, the difference was no longer significant at 24 hours. No statistically significant differences were observed for urinary and serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels and for serum cystatin C levels. CONCLUSIONS Urinary IL-18 and NAG levels increased transiently after administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with normal renal function. PMID:27398022

  2. 13 CFR 107.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 107.1620 Section 107.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance...

  3. 13 CFR 108.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 108.1620 Section 108.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA...

  4. Vibrational dynamics of zero-field-splitting hamiltonian in gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents from ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lasoroski, Aurélie; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Pollet, Rodolphe

    2014-07-01

    The electronic relaxation of gadolinium complexes used as MRI contrast agents was studied theoretically by following the short time evolution of zero-field-splitting parameters. The statistical analysis of ab initio molecular dynamics trajectories provided a clear separation between static and transient contributions to the zero-field-splitting. For the latter, the correlation time was estimated at approximately 0.1 ps. The influence of the ligand was also probed by replacing one pendant arm of our reference macrocyclic complex by a bulkier phosphonate arm. In contrast to the transient contribution, the static zero-field-splitting was significantly influenced by this substitution. PMID:25005282

  5. Vibrational dynamics of zero-field-splitting hamiltonian in gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lasoroski, Aurélie; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Pollet, Rodolphe

    2014-07-07

    The electronic relaxation of gadolinium complexes used as MRI contrast agents was studied theoretically by following the short time evolution of zero-field-splitting parameters. The statistical analysis of ab initio molecular dynamics trajectories provided a clear separation between static and transient contributions to the zero-field-splitting. For the latter, the correlation time was estimated at approximately 0.1 ps. The influence of the ligand was also probed by replacing one pendant arm of our reference macrocyclic complex by a bulkier phosphonate arm. In contrast to the transient contribution, the static zero-field-splitting was significantly influenced by this substitution.

  6. A small MRI contrast agent library of gadolinium(III)-encapsulated supramolecular nanoparticles for improved relaxivity and sensitivity**

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Ju; Wolahan, Stephanie M.; Wang, Hao; Hsu, Chao-Hsiung; Chang, Hsing-Wei; Durazo, Armando; Hwang, Lian-Pin; Garcia, Mitch A.; Jiang, Ziyue Karen; Wu, Lily

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new category of nanoparticle-based T1 MRI contrast agents (CAs) by encapsulating paramagnetic chelated gadolinium(III), i.e., Gd3+·DOTA, through supramolecular assembly of molecular building blocks that carry complementary molecular recognition motifs, including adamantane (Ad) and β-cyclodextrin (CD). A small library of Gd3+·DOTA-encapsulated supramolecular nanoparticles (Gd3+·DOTA⊂SNPs) was produced by systematically altering the molecular building block mixing ratios. A broad spectrum of relaxation rates was correlated to the resulting Gd3+·DOTA⊂SNP library. Consequently, an optimal synthetic formulation of Gd3+·DOTA⊂SNPs with an r1 of 17.3 s−1mM−1 (ca. 4-fold higher than clinical Gd3+ chelated complexes at high field strengths) was identified. T1-weighted imaging of Gd3+·DOTA⊂SNPs exhibits an enhanced sensitivity with a contrast-to-noise ratio (C/N ratio) ca. 3.6 times greater than that observed for free Gd3+·DTPA. A Gd3+·DOTA⊂SNPs solution was injected into foot pads of mice, and MRI was employed to monitor dynamic lymphatic drainage of the Gd3+·DOTA⊂SNPs-based CA. We observe an increase in signal intensity of the brachial lymph node in T1-weighted imaging after injecting Gd3+·DOTA⊂SNPs but not after injecting Gd3+·DTPA. The MRI results are supported by ICP-MS analysis ex vivo. These results show that Gd3+·DOTA⊂SNPs not only exhibits enhanced relaxivity and high sensitivity but also can serve as a potential tool for diagnosis of cancer metastasis. PMID:21167594

  7. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF. PMID:26768242

  8. Parallel Comparative Studies on Mouse Toxicity of Oxide Nanoparticle- and Gadolinium-Based T1 MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Ling, Daishun; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Shuaifei; Liu, Ying; Bai, Ru; Baik, Seungmin; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2015-12-22

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with high relaxivity are highly desirable because they can significantly increase the accuracy of diagnosis. However, they can be potentially toxic to the patients. In this study, using a mouse model, we investigate the toxic effects and subsequent tissue damage induced by three T1 MRI contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine injection (GDI), a clinically used gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent (GBCAs), and oxide nanoparticle (NP)-based contrast agents, extremely small-sized iron oxide NPs (ESIONs) and manganese oxide (MnO) NPs. Biodistribution, hematological and histopathological changes, inflammation, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses are evaluated for 24 h after intravenous injection. These thorough assessments of the toxic and stress responses of these agents provide a panoramic description of safety concerns and underlying mechanisms of the toxicity of contrast agents in the body. We demonstrate that ESIONs exhibit fewer adverse effects than the MnO NPs and the clinically used GDI GBCAs, providing useful information on future applications of ESIONs as potentially safe MRI contrast agents. PMID:26567968

  9. Assembly of Double-Hydrophilic Block Copolymers Triggered by Gadolinium Ions: New Colloidal MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Frangville, Camille; Li, Yichen; Billotey, Claire; Talham, Daniel R; Taleb, Jacqueline; Roux, Patrick; Marty, Jean-Daniel; Mingotaud, Christophe

    2016-07-13

    Mixing double-hydrophilic block copolymers containing a poly(acrylic acid) block with gadolinium ions in water leads to the spontaneous formation of polymeric nanoparticles. With an average diameter near 20 nm, the nanoparticles are exceptionally stable, even after dilution and over a large range of pH and ionic strength. High magnetic relaxivities were measured in vitro for these biocompatible colloids, and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging on rats demonstrates the potential utility of such polymeric assemblies. PMID:27224089

  10. Four Gadolinium(III) Complexes Appended to a Porphyrin: A Water-Soluble Molecular Theranostic Agent with Remarkable Relaxivity Suited for MRI Tracking of the Photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Sour, Angélique; Jenni, Sébastien; Ortí-Suárez, Ana; Schmitt, Julie; Heitz, Valérie; Bolze, Frédéric; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Po, Chrystelle; Bonnet, Célia S; Pallier, Agnès; Tóth, Éva; Ventura, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    A molecular theranostic agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) consisting of four [GdDTTA](-) complexes (DTTA(4-) = diethylenetriamine-N,N,N″,N″-tetraacetate) linked to a meso-tetraphenylporphyrin core, as well as its yttrium(III) analogue, was synthesized. A variety of physicochemical methods were used to characterize the gadolinium(III) conjugate 1 both as an MRI contrast agent and as a photosensitizer. The proton relaxivity measured in H2O at 20 MHz and 25 °C, r1 = 43.7 mmol(-1) s(-1) per gadolinium center, is the highest reported for a bishydrated gadolinium(III)-based contrast agent of medium size and can be related to the rigidity of the molecule. The complex displays also a remarkable singlet oxygen quantum yield of ϕΔ = 0.45 in H2O, similar to that of a meso-tetrasulfonated porphyrin. We also evidenced the ability of the gadolinium(III) conjugate to penetrate in cancer cells with low cytotoxicity. Its phototoxicity on Hela cells was evaluated following incubation at low micromolar concentration and moderate light irradiation (21 J cm(-2)) induced 50% of cell death. Altogether, these results demonstrate the high potential of this conjugate as a theranostic agent for MRI and PDT. PMID:27074089

  11. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and class labeling of gadolinium-based contrast agents by the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lucie; Krefting, Ira; Gorovets, Alex; Marzella, Louis; Kaiser, James; Boucher, Robert; Rieves, Dwaine

    2012-10-01

    In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration requested that manufacturers of all approved gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), drugs widely used in magnetic resonance imaging, use nearly identical text in their product labeling to describe the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Accumulating information about NSF risks led to revision of the labeling text for all of these drugs in 2010. The present report summarizes the basis and purpose of this class-labeling approach and describes some of the related challenges, given the evolutionary nature of the NSF risk evidence. The class-labeling approach for presentation of product risk is designed to decrease the occurrence of NSF and to enhance the safe use of GBCAs in radiologic practice. PMID:22923714

  12. In vivo selective cancer-tracking gadolinium eradicator as new-generation photodynamic therapy agent

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Lan, Rongfeng; Chan, Chi-Fai; Law, Ga-Lai; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a modality of photodynamic therapy (PDT) through the design of our truly dual-functional—PDT and imaging—gadolinium complex (Gd-N), which can target cancer cells specifically. In the light of our design, the PDT drug can specifically localize on the anionic cell membrane of cancer cells in which its laser-excited photoemission signal can be monitored without triggering the phototoxic generation of reactive oxygen species—singlet oxygen—before due excitation. Comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies had been conducted for the substantiation of the effectiveness of Gd-N as such a tumor-selective PDT photosensitizer. This treatment modality does initiate a new direction in the development of “precision medicine” in line with stem cell and gene therapies as tools in cancer therapy. PMID:25453097

  13. GADOLINIUM(Gd)-BASED and Ion Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Pre-Clinical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (mri) Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Thian C.

    2012-06-01

    It is known that one strength of MRI is its excellent soft tissue discrimination. It naturally provides sufficient contrast between the structural differences of normal and pathological tissues, their spatial extent and progression. However, to further extend its applications and enhance even more contrast for clinical studies, various Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents have been developed for different organs (brain strokes, cancer, cardio-MRI, etc). These Gd-based contrast agents are paramagnetic compounds that have strong T1-effect for enhancing the contrast between tissue types. Gd-contrast can also enhance magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) for studying stenosis and for measuring perfusion, vascular susceptibility, interstitial space, etc. Another class of contrast agents makes use of ferrite iron oxide nanoparticles (including Superparamagnetic Ion Oxide (SPIO) and Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO)). These nanoparticles have superior magnetic susceptibility effect and produce a drop in signal, namely in T2*-weighted images, useful for the determination of lymph nodes metastases, angiogenesis and arteriosclerosis plaques.

  14. Gadolinium-enhanced inner ear magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of delayed endolymphatic hydrops, including a bilateral case.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Munehisa; Oya, Ryohei; Akazawa, Hitoshi; Tsuruta, Yukinori; Inohara, Hidenori

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion The data suggests that gadolinium-enhanced inner ear MR imaging is useful for diagnosis of delayed endolymphatic hydrops (DEH) because it is independent of inner ear function, and the size of the affected endolymphatic space is clearly enlarged. Objective This study was performed to semi-quantitatively evaluate the endolymphatic space in patients with all types of DEH using gadolinium-enhanced inner ear magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Patients and methods Seven patients (age range = 21-77 years; five female, two male) with ipsilateral DEH (n = 5), contralateral DEH (n = 1), and bilateral DEH (n = 1). All patients underwent 3T MR imaging 4 h after intravenous injection of gadolinium. Software was used to determine the size of the endolymphatic space. Pure tone audiometry and caloric testing using an electronystagmogram were carried out. Results One side of the endolymphatic space was dominantly extended in patients with ipsilateral DEH, and both sides of the space were extended in patients with contralateral and bilateral DEH. In patients with ipsilateral DEH, the volume ratio of endolymph to vestibule was 2.5-4.3-times that in the unaffected ear. The volume ratio of endolymph to vestibule was nearly equal in patients with contralateral and bilateral DEH. PMID:26799493

  15. Gd(DOTAlaP): Exploring the Boundaries of Fast Water Exchange in Gadolinium-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the synthesis of the single amino acid chelator DOTAlaP and four of its derivatives. The corresponding gadolinium(III) complexes were investigated for their kinetic inertness, relaxometric properties at a range of fields and temperatures, water exchange rate, and interaction with human serum albumin (HSA). Derivatives with one inner-sphere water (q = 1) were determined to have a mean water residency time between 8 and 6 ns in phoshate-buffered saline at 37 °C. The corresponding europium complexes were also formed and used to obtain information on the hydration number of the corresponding coordination complexes. Two complexes capable of binding HSA were also synthesized, of which one, Gd(5b), contains no inner-sphere water, while the other derivative, Gd(4b), is a mixture of ca. 15% q =1 and 85% q = 0. In the presence of HSA, the latter displayed a very short mean water residency time (τM310 = 2.4 ns) and enhanced relaxivity at intermediate and high fields. The kinetic inertness of Gd(4b) with respect to complex dissociation was decreased compared to its DOTAla analogue but still 100-fold more inert than [Gd(BOPTA)(H2O)]2–. Magnetic resonance imaging in mice showed that Gd(4b) was able to provide 38% better vessel to muscle contrast compared to the clinically used HSA binding agent MS-325. PMID:24922178

  16. Study of suspending agents for gadolinium(III)-exchanged hectorite. An oral magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Balkus, K.J. Jr.; Shi, J.

    1996-12-25

    Clays modified with paramagnetic ions have been shown to be effective magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. The efficacy in part relies on the suspension of the small clay particles in aqueous solution. In this study a series of macromolecules were eveluated as suspending agents for Gd(III) ion exchanged hectorite clay in water. The room temperature relaxivities for the Gd-hectorite clays were enhanced by the addition of poly(ethylene oxide), poly(ethylene glycol), cyclodextrins, and cholic acid to aqueous suspensions. Additionally, there was no evidence of free Gd(III) in solution in the presence of these suspending agents. In contrast the combination of alginic acid or poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) with the clays resulted in release of the Gd(III) into solution. Xanthan gum, which is often used as an emulsifier and stabilizer in food products, forms a viscous suspension but also reacts with free Gd(III) ions. 25 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Preclinical animal acute toxicity studies of new developed MRI contrast agent based on gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, I. F.; Zhuk, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    Acute toxicity test of new developed MRI contrast agent based on disodium salt of gadopentetic acid complex were carried out on Mus musculus and Sprague Dawley rats according to guidelines of preclinical studies [1]. Groups of six animals each were selected for experiment. Death and clinical symptoms of animals were recorded during 14 days. As a result the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for female mice is 2.8 mM/kg of body weight, male mice - 1.4 mM/kg, female rats - 2.8 mM/kg, male rats - 5.6 mM/kg of body weight. No Observed Adverse Effect Dose (NOAEL) for female mice is 1.4 mM/kg, male mice - 0.7 mM/kg, male and female rats - 0.7 mM/kg. According to experimental data new developed MRI contrast agent based on Gd-DTPA complex is low-toxic.

  18. Gadolinium-labeled dendronized gold nanoparticles as new targeted MRI contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hongmu; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2010-04-01

    Early diagnosis is critical for positive outcome of cancer treatments. In many cases, lives would be saved if the tumor could be detected at a very early stage. Nanoparticles have the property of passively targeting tumor sites due to their enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. Thus they can play a critical role in improving the ability to find cancer in its earliest and most treatable stages. Furthermore magnetic resonance imaging is one of the most precise techniques for cancer screening since it can show 3D images of the tumors. For a better enhancement of the sensitivity of this method, MRI contrast agent (DOTA)Gd was attached to poly(propylene imine) dendrons of third generation and the obtained dendrons were used for modification of gold nanoparticles.

  19. MRI-Monitored Intra-Shunt Local Agent Delivery of Motexafin Gadolinium: Towards Improving Long-Term Patency of TIPS

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yanfeng; Zhang, Tong; Willis, Patrick; Le, Thomas; Soriano, Stephanie; Ray, Erik; Valji, Karim; Zhang, Guixiang; Yang, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Background Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has become an important and effective interventional procedure in treatment of the complications related to portal hypertension. Although the primary patency of TIPS has been greatly improved due to the clinical application of cover stent-grafts, the long-term patency is still suboptimal. This study was to investigate the feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-monitored intra-shunt local agent delivery of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) into shunt-vein walls of TIPS. This new technique aimed to ultimately inhibit shuntstenosis of TIPS. Methodology Human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were incubated with various concentrations of MGd, and then examed by confocal microscopy and T1-map MRI. In addition, the proliferation of MGd-treated cells was evaluated. For in vivo validation, seventeen pigs underwent TIPS. Before placement of the stent, an MGd/trypan-blue mixture was locally delivered, via a microporous balloon, into eleven shunt-hepatic vein walls under dynamic MRI monitoring, while trypan-blue only was locally delivered into six shunt-hepatic vein walls as serve as controls. T1-weighted MRI of the shunt-vein walls was achieved before- and at different time points after agent injections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the shunt-vein wall at each time-point was measured. Shunts were harvested for subsequent histology confirmation. Principal Findings In vitro studies confirmed the capability of SMCs in uptaking MGds in a concentration-dependent fashion, and demonstrated the suppression of cell proliferation by MGds as well. Dynamic MRI displayed MGd/blue penetration into the shunt-vein walls, showing significantly higher CNR of shunt-vein walls on post-delivery images than on pre-delivery images (49.5±9.4 vs 11.2±1.6, P<0.01), which was confirmed by histology. Conclusion Results of this study indicate that MRI-monitored intra-shunt local MGd delivery is feasible and MGd

  20. Gadolinium Nanoparticles Conjugated with Therapeutic Bifunctional Chelate as a Potential T1 Theranostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Gang Ho; Jung, Ki-Hye; Jung, Jae-Chang; Kim, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Jongmin; Ryeom, Hun-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Jeong; Chang, Yongmin

    2016-05-01

    This work is directed toward the synthesis of two types of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (Gd-oxide NPs), abbreviated as Gd@SiO2-DO3A and Gd@SiO2-DO2A-BTA, with diameters of 50-60 nm. The synthesis involves sequential coating of Gd-oxide NPs with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES), followed by functionalization of the aminopropylsilane group with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) or 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-trisacetic acid conjugates of benzothiazoles (DO3A-BTA). Gd@SiO2-DO3A and Gd@SiO2-DO2A-BTA exhibit high water solubility and colloidal stability. The r1 relaxivities of both Gd@SiO2-DO3A and Gd@SiO2-DO2A-BTA are higher than those of the corresponding low-molecular-weight magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (MRI CAs), and their r2/r1 ratios are close to 1, indicating that both can be used as potential T1 MRI CAs. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that Gd@SiO2-DO2A-BTA was excreted via both hepatobiliary and renal pathways. Gd@SiO2-DO2A-BTA exhibits a strong intracellular uptake property in a series of tumor cell lines, and has significant anticancer characteristics against cell lines such as SK-HEP-1, MDA-MB-231, HeLa, and Hep-3B. PMID:27305813

  1. Induction of a type I interferon signature in normal human monocytes by gadolinium-based contrast agents: comparison of linear and macrocyclic agents

    PubMed Central

    Wermuth, P J; Jimenez, S A

    2014-01-01

    The gadolinium-based contrast agent (GdBCA) Omniscan activates human macrophages through Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-7 signalling. To explore the mechanisms responsible we compared the ability of linear and macrocyclic GdBCA to induce a type I interferon signature and a proinflammatory/profibrotic phenotype in normal human monocytes in vitro. Expression of genes associated with type I interferon signalling and inflammation and production of their corresponding proteins were determined. Both linear and macrocyclic GdBCA stimulated expression of multiple type I interferon-regulated genes and the expression of numerous chemokines, cytokines and growth factors in normal human peripheral blood monocytes. There was no correlation between the magnitude of the measured response and the Gd chelate used. To explore the mechanisms responsible for GdBCA induction of fibrosis in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in vitro, normal human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with GdBCA-treated monocyte culture supernatants and the effects on profibrotic gene expression were examined. Supernatants from monocytes exposed to all GdBCA stimulated types I and III collagen, fibronectin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in normal dermal fibroblasts. The results indicate that the monocyte activation induced by GdBCA may be the initial step in the development of GdBCA associated fibrosis in NSF. PMID:24111526

  2. Agents in Safety Related Systems Including Ubiquitous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandén, Lars

    The ADM (Autonomous Decision Maker) concept concerns the possibility of including intelligent interfaces, agent like, for supporting the use of ubiquitous networks, such as the Internet, in safety related applications. The need for such interfaces is inevitable if remote surveillance and control shall be supported. The single most important aspect of ADM is its capability of handling limited resources when making intelligent decisions. Intelligence in ADM is manifested in reasoning and learning. This paper outlines the role of ADM and especially in relation to the standard IEC 61508 and presents the overall properties that result. These are exemplified by a presentation of ADM demonstrator.

  3. A primer on gadolinium chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, A. Dean; Caravan, Peter; Lenkinski, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Gadolinium is widely known by all practitioners of MRI but few appreciate the basic solution chemistry of this trivalent lanthanide ion. Given the recent linkage between gadolinium contrast agents and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, some basic chemistry of this ion must be more widely understood. This short primer on gadolinium chemistry is intended to provide the reader the background principles necessary to understand the basics of chelation chemistry, water hydration numbers, and the differences between thermodynamic stability and kinetic stability or inertness. We illustrate the fundamental importance of kinetic dissociation rates in determining gadolinium toxicity in vivo by presenting new data for a novel europium DOTA-tetraamide complex that is relatively unstable thermodynamically yet extraordinarily inert kinetically and also quite non-toxic. This, plus other literature evidence forms the basis of the fundamental axiom that it is the kinetic stability of a gadolinium complex, not its thermodynamic stability, that determines its in vivo toxicity. PMID:19938036

  4. Effect of ionic interaction between a hyperpolarized magnetic resonance chemical probe and a gadolinium contrast agent for the hyperpolarized lifetime after dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Inoue, Kaori; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In hyperpolarization of 13C-enriched magnetic resonance chemical probes in the solid-state, a trace amount of gadolinium (Gd) contrast agent can be used to maximize polarization of the 13C nuclear spins. Here, we report systematic measurement of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and enhancement level of 13C-enriched chemical probes in the presence of various Gd contrast agents in the liquid-state after dissolution. Using two different 13C probes having opposite electric charges at neutral pH, we clearly show the T1 of hyperpolarized 13C was barely affected by the use of a Gd complex that displays repulsive interaction with the 13C probe in solution, whilst T1 was drastically shortened when there was ionic attraction between probe and complex.

  5. Effect of ionic interaction between a hyperpolarized magnetic resonance chemical probe and a gadolinium contrast agent for the hyperpolarized lifetime after dissolution.

    PubMed

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Inoue, Kaori; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In hyperpolarization of (13)C-enriched magnetic resonance chemical probes in the solid-state, a trace amount of gadolinium (Gd) contrast agent can be used to maximize polarization of the (13)C nuclear spins. Here, we report systematic measurement of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and enhancement level of (13)C-enriched chemical probes in the presence of various Gd contrast agents in the liquid-state after dissolution. Using two different (13)C probes having opposite electric charges at neutral pH, we clearly show the T1 of hyperpolarized (13)C was barely affected by the use of a Gd complex that displays repulsive interaction with the (13)C probe in solution, whilst T1 was drastically shortened when there was ionic attraction between probe and complex. PMID:27490303

  6. Synthesis route and three different core-shell impacts on magnetic characterization of gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticles as new contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Despite its good resolution, magnetic resonance imaging intrinsically has low sensitivity. Recently, contrast agent nanoparticles have been used as sensitivity and contrast enhancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a new controlled synthesis method for gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticle preparation. For this purpose, diethyleneglycol coating of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3-DEG) was performed using new supervised polyol route, and small particulate gadolinium oxide (SPGO) PEGylation was obtained with methoxy-polyethylene-glycol-silane (550 and 2,000 Da) coatings as SPGO-mPEG-silane550 and 2,000, respectively. Physicochemical characterization and magnetic properties of these three contrast agents in comparison with conventional Gd-DTPA were verified by dynamic light scattering transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and the signal intensity and relaxivity measurements were performed using 1.5-T MRI scanner. As a result, the nanoparticle sizes of Gd2O3-DEG, SPGO-mPEG-silane550, and SPGO-mPEG-silane2000 could be reached to 5.9, 51.3, 194.2 nm, respectively. The image signal intensity and longitudinal (r1) and transverse relaxivity (r2) measurements in different concentrations (0.3 to approximately 2.5 mM), revealed the r2/r1 ratios of 1.13, 0.89, 33.34, and 33.72 for Gd-DTPA, Gd2O3-DEG, SPGO-mPEG-silane550, and SPGO-mPEG-silane2000, respectively. The achievement of new synthesis route of Gd2O3-DEG resulted in lower r2/r1 ratio for Gd2O3-DEG than Gd-DTPA and other previous synthesized methods by this and other groups. The smaller r2/r1 ratios of two PEGylated-SPGO contrast agents in our study in comparison with r2/r1 ratio of previous PEGylation (r2/r1 = 81.9 for mPEG-silane 6,000 MW) showed that these new three introduced contrast agents could potentially be proper contrast enhancers for cellular and molecular MR imaging. PMID:23033866

  7. Synthesis route and three different core-shell impacts on magnetic characterization of gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticles as new contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizian, Gholamreza; Riyahi-Alam, Nader; Haghgoo, Soheila; Moghimi, Hamid Reza; Zohdiaghdam, Reza; Rafiei, Behrooz; Gorji, Ensieh

    2012-10-01

    Despite its good resolution, magnetic resonance imaging intrinsically has low sensitivity. Recently, contrast agent nanoparticles have been used as sensitivity and contrast enhancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a new controlled synthesis method for gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticle preparation. For this purpose, diethyleneglycol coating of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3-DEG) was performed using new supervised polyol route, and small particulate gadolinium oxide (SPGO) PEGylation was obtained with methoxy-polyethylene-glycol-silane (550 and 2,000 Da) coatings as SPGO-mPEG-silane550 and 2,000, respectively. Physicochemical characterization and magnetic properties of these three contrast agents in comparison with conventional Gd-DTPA were verified by dynamic light scattering transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and the signal intensity and relaxivity measurements were performed using 1.5-T MRI scanner. As a result, the nanoparticle sizes of Gd2O3-DEG, SPGO-mPEG-silane550, and SPGO-mPEG-silane2000 could be reached to 5.9, 51.3, 194.2 nm, respectively. The image signal intensity and longitudinal ( r 1) and transverse relaxivity ( r 2) measurements in different concentrations (0.3 to approximately 2.5 mM), revealed the r 2/ r 1 ratios of 1.13, 0.89, 33.34, and 33.72 for Gd-DTPA, Gd2O3-DEG, SPGO-mPEG-silane550, and SPGO-mPEG-silane2000, respectively. The achievement of new synthesis route of Gd2O3-DEG resulted in lower r 2/ r 1 ratio for Gd2O3-DEG than Gd-DTPA and other previous synthesized methods by this and other groups. The smaller r 2/ r 1 ratios of two PEGylated-SPGO contrast agents in our study in comparison with r 2/ r 1 ratio of previous PEGylation ( r 2/ r 1 = 81.9 for mPEG-silane 6,000 MW) showed that these new three introduced contrast agents could potentially be proper contrast enhancers for cellular and molecular MR imaging.

  8. Poly(acrylic acid) Bridged Gadolinium Metal-Organic Framework-Gold Nanoparticle Composites as Contrast Agents for Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Bimodal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chixia; Zhu, Liping; Lin, Feng; Boyes, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) have received significant attention in the development of techniques for early-stage cancer diagnosis. Gadolinium (Gd) (III), which has seven unpaired electrons and a large magnetic moment, can dramatically influence the water proton relaxation and hence exhibits excellent MRI contrast. On the other hand, gold (Au), which has a high atomic number and high x-ray attenuation coefficient, is an ideal contrast agent candidate for x-ray based CT imaging. Gd metal organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles with tunable size, high Gd (III) loading and multivalency can potentially overcome the limitations of clinically utilized Gd chelate contrast agents. In this work, we report for the first time the integration of GdMOF nanoparticles with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the preparation of a MRI/CT bimodal imaging agent. Highly stable hybrid GdMOF/AuNPs composites have been prepared by using poly(acrylic acid) as a bridge between the GdMOF nanoparticles and AuNPs. The hybrid nanocomposites were then evaluated in MRI and CT imaging. The results revealed high longitudinal relaxivity in MRI and excellent CT imaging performance. Therefore, these GdMOF/AuNPs hybrid nanocomposites potentially provide a new platform for the development of multi-modal imaging probes. PMID:26147906

  9. Dual-mode T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent based on ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and in vivo application.

    PubMed

    Tegafaw, Tirusew; Xu, Wenlong; Ahmad, Md Wasi; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Gang Ho

    2015-09-11

    A new type of dual-mode T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles was synthesized. Gd(3+) ((8)S7/2) plays an important role in T1 MRI contrast agents because of its large electron spin magnetic moment resulting from its seven unpaired 4f-electrons, and Dy(3+) ((6)H15/2) has the potential to be used in T2 MRI contrast agents because of its very large total electron magnetic moment: among lanthanide oxide nanoparticles, Dy2O3 nanoparticles have the largest magnetic moments at room temperature. Using these properties of Gd(3+) and Dy(3+) and their oxide nanoparticles, ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide (GDO) nanoparticles were synthesized and their potential to act as a dual-mode T1 and T2 MRI contrast agent was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The D-glucuronic acid coated GDO nanoparticles (davg = 1.0 nm) showed large r1 and r2 values (r2/r1 ≈ 6.6) and as a result clear dose-dependent contrast enhancements in R1 and R2 map images. Finally, the dual-mode imaging capability of the nanoparticles was confirmed by obtaining in vivo T1 and T2 MR images. PMID:26291827

  10. Evaluation of absorbed dose in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Gayane; Djuraeva, Gulnara; Kim, Andrey; Koblik, Yuriy; Kulabdullaev, Gairatulla; Rakhmonov, Turdimukhammad; Saytjanov, Shavkat

    2015-02-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is used for treatment of radioresistant malignant tumors. The absorbed dose in GdNCT can be divided into four primary dose components: thermal neutron, fast neutron, photon and natural gadolinium doses. The most significant is the dose created by natural gadolinium. The amount of gadolinium at the irradiated region is changeable and depends on the gadolinium delivery agent and on the structure of the location where the agent is injected. To de- fine the time dependence of the gadolinium concentration ρ(t) in the irradiated region the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium delivery agent (Magnevist) was studied at intratumoral injection in mice and intramuscular injection in rats. A polynomial approximation was applied to the experimental data and the influence of ρ(t) on the relative change of the absorbed dose of gadolinium was studied.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system in children with a new nonionic gadolinium contrast agent--gadoteridol injection (ProHance).

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, S. E.; Darling, C. F.; Wilczynski, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    This article reports the results of clinical testing in pediatric patients of a new contrast agent, gadoteridol injection (ProHance), developed by Squibb Diagnostic as a nonionic gadolinium agent for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirteen children (four girls and nine boys) ranging in age from 10 to 18 years were enrolled in the study. The children had MR studies of the brain and/or spine with T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and postgadoteridol injection T1-weighted sequences. Five children had primary brain or spine neoplasms, three children had metastatic disease to the central nervous system, one child had a recurrent brain neoplasm and spinal canal metastasis, one child had an arteriovenous malformation, and two children were normal on the MRI studies. No minor or major reactions to gadoteridol injection developed in the 13 patients. Gadoteridol injection provided excellent delineation and enhancement of the arteriovenous malformation and all of the primary and secondary neoplasms of the central nervous system except for one case of a grade 1 glioma of the midbrain. Gadoteridol injection is a safe and excellent contrast agent for use in MRI. Images Figures 1-5 Figures 6-10 PMID:8496990

  12. Caspase-responsive smart gadolinium-based contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging of drug-induced apoptosis†

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Deju; Shuhendler, Adam J.; Pandit, Prachi; Brewer, Kimberly D.; Tee, Sui Seng; Cui, Lina; Tikhomirov, Grigory

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive detection of caspase-3/7 activity in vivo has provided invaluable predictive information regarding tumor therapeutic efficacy and anti-tumor drug selection. Although a number of caspase-3/7 targeted fluorescence and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging probes have been developed, there is still a lack of gadolinium (Gd)-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes that enable high spatial resolution detection of caspase-3/7 activity in vivo. Here we employ a self-assembly approach and develop a caspase-3/7 activatable Gd-based MRI probe for monitoring tumor apoptosis in mice. Upon reduction and caspase-3/7 activation, the caspase-sensitive nano-aggregation MR probe (C-SNAM: 1) undergoes biocompatible intramolecular cyclization and subsequent self-assembly into Gd-nanoparticles (GdNPs). This results in enhanced r1 relaxivity—19.0 (post-activation) vs. 10.2 mM−1 s−1 (pre-activation) at 1 T in solution—and prolonged accumulation in chemotherapy-induced apoptotic cells and tumors that express active caspase-3/7. We demonstrate that C-SNAM reports caspase-3/7 activity by generating a significantly brighter T1-weighted MR signal compared to non-treated tumors following intravenous administration of C-SNAM, providing great potential for high-resolution imaging of tumor apoptosis in vivo. PMID:25429349

  13. Cellular uptake and imaging studies of gadolinium-loaded single-walled carbon nanotubes as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Tang, Annie M; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Zhao, Hong; Cisneros, Brandon T; Lam, Edmund Y; Wong, Stephen T; Wilson, Lon J; Wong, Kelvin K

    2011-01-01

    We quantify here, for the first time, the intracellular uptake (J774A.1 murine macrophage cells) of gadolinium-loaded ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotubes (gadonanotubes or GNTs) in a 3 T MRI scanner using R(2) and R(2)* mapping in vitro. GNT-labeled cells exhibited high and linear changes in net transverse relaxations (ΔR(2) and ΔR 2*) with increasing cell concentration. The measured ΔR(2)* were about three to four times greater than the respective ΔR(2) for each cell concentration. The intracellular uptake of GNTs was validated with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), indicating an average cellular uptake of 0.44 ± 0.09 pg Gd per cell or 1.69 × 10(9) Gd(3+) ions per cell. Cell proliferation MTS assays demonstrated that the cells were effectively labeled, without cytotoxicity, for GNTs concentrations ≤28 µM Gd. In vivo relaxometry of a subcutaneously-injected GNT-labeled cell pellet in a mouse was also demonstrated at 3 T. Finally, the pronounced R(2)* effect of GNT-labeled cells enabled successful in vitro visualization of labeled cells at 9.4 T. PMID:21504063

  14. High relaxivity MRI contrast agents part 1: Impact of single donor atom substitution on relaxivity of serum albumin-bound gadolinium complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Stephane; Jacques, Vincent; Sun, Wei-Chuan; Troughton, Jeffrey S.; Welch, Joel T.; Chasse, Jaclyn M.; Schmitt-Willich, Heribert; Caravan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and objectives The donor atoms that bind to gadolinium in contrast agents influence inner-sphere water exchange and electronic relaxation, both of which determine observed relaxivity. These molecular parameters impact relaxivity greatest when the contrast agent is protein bound. We sought to determine an optimal donor atom set to yield high relaxivity compounds. Methods Thirty-eight Gd-DOTA derivatives were prepared and relaxivity determined in presence and absence of human serum albumin as a function of temperature and magnetic field. Each compound had a common albumin-binding group and differed only by substitution of different donor groups at one of the macrocycle nitrogens. O-17 relaxometry at 7.05T was performed to estimate water exchange rates. Results Changing a single donor atom resulted in changes in water exchange rates ranging across 3 orders of magnitude. Donor groups increased water exchange rate in the order: phosphonate ~ phenolate > α-substituted acetate > acetate > hydroxamate ~ sulfonamide > amide ~ pyridyl ~ imidazole. Relaxivites at 0.47T and 1.4T, 37 °C, ranged from 12.3 to 55.6 mM-1s-1 and from 8.3 to 32.6 mM-1s-1 respectively. Optimal relaxivities were observed when the donor group was an α-substituted acetate. Electronic relaxation was slowest for the acetate derivatives as well. Conclusions Water exchange dynamics and relaxivity can be predictably tuned by choice of donor atoms PMID:20808235

  15. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., including chemical agents. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  16. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., including chemical agents. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  17. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., including chemical agents. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  18. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., including chemical agents. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  19. Adenosine Stress and Rest T1 Mapping Can Differentiate Between Ischemic, Infarcted, Remote, and Normal Myocardium Without the Need for Gadolinium Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Alexander; Wijesurendra, Rohan S.; Francis, Jane M.; Robson, Matthew D.; Neubauer, Stefan; Piechnik, Stefan K.; Ferreira, Vanessa M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of T1 mapping at rest and during adenosine stress as a novel method for ischemia detection without the use of gadolinium contrast. Background In chronic coronary artery disease (CAD), accurate detection of ischemia is important because targeted revascularization improves clinical outcomes. Myocardial blood volume (MBV) may be a more comprehensive marker of ischemia than myocardial blood flow. T1 mapping using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is highly sensitive to changes in myocardial water content, including MBV. We propose that T1 mapping at rest and during adenosine vasodilatory stress can detect MBV changes in normal and diseased myocardium in CAD. Methods Twenty normal controls (10 at 1.5-T; 10 at 3.0-T) and 10 CAD patients (1.5-T) underwent conventional CMR to assess for left ventricular function (cine), infarction (late gadolinium enhancement [LGE]) and ischemia (myocardial perfusion reserve index [MPRI] on first-pass perfusion imaging during adenosine stress). These were compared to novel pre-contrast stress/rest T1 mapping using the Shortened Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery technique, which is heart rate independent. T1 values were derived for normal myocardium in controls and for infarcted, ischemic, and remote myocardium in CAD patients. Results Normal myocardium in controls (normal wall motion, MPRI, no LGE) showed normal resting T1 (954 ± 19 ms at 1.5-T; 1,189 ± 34 ms at 3.0-T) and significant positive T1 reactivity during adenosine stress compared to baseline (6.2 ± 0.5% at 1.5-T; 6.3 ± 1.1% at 3.0-T; all p < 0.0001). Infarcted myocardium showed the highest resting T1 of all tissue classes (1,442 ± 84 ms), without significant T1 reactivity (0.2 ± 1.5%). Ischemic myocardium showed elevated resting T1 compared to normal (987 ± 17 ms; p < 0.001) without significant T1 reactivity (0.2 ± 0.8%). Remote myocardium, although having comparable resting T1 to normal (955 ± 17 ms

  20. A Theranostic Agent Combining a Two-Photon-Absorbing Photosensitizer for Photodynamic Therapy and a Gadolinium(III) Complex for MRI Detection.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Julie; Heitz, Valérie; Sour, Angélique; Bolze, Frédéric; Kessler, Pascal; Flamigni, Lucia; Ventura, Barbara; Bonnet, Célia S; Tóth, Éva

    2016-02-18

    The convergent synthesis and characterization of a potential theranostic agent, [DPP-ZnP-GdDOTA](-), which combines a diketopyrrolopyrrole-porphyrin component DPP-ZnP as a two-photon photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy (PDT) with a gadolinium(III) DOTA complex as a magnetic resonance imaging probe, is presented. [DPP-ZnP-GdDOTA](-) has a remarkably high longitudinal water proton relaxivity (19.94 mm(-1)  s(-1) at 20 MHz and 25 °C) for a monohydrated molecular system of this size. The Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) profile is characteristic of slow rotation, related to the extended and rigid aromatic units integrated in the molecule and to self-aggregation occurring in aqueous solution. The two-photon properties were examined and large two-photon absorption cross-sections around 1000 GM were determined between 910 and 940 nm in DCM with 1 % pyridine and in DMSO. Furthermore, the new conjugate was able to generate singlet oxygen, with quantum yield of 0.42 and 0.68 in DCM with 1 % pyridine and DMSO, respectively. Cellular studies were also performed. The [DPP-ZnP-GdDOTA](-) conjugate demonstrated low dark toxicity and was able to induce high one-photon and moderate two-photon phototoxicity on cancer cells. PMID:26791109

  1. Gadolinium(III)-loaded nanoparticulate zeolites as potential high-field MRI contrast agents: relationship between structure and relaxivity.

    PubMed

    Csajbók, Eva; Bányai, István; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N; Zhou, Wuzong; Peters, Joop A

    2005-08-01

    The effects of dealumination, pore size, and calcination on the efficiency (as expressed in the relaxivity) of Gd3+-loaded zeolites for potential application as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents were studied. Partial dealumination of zeolites NaY or NaA by treatment with (NH4)2SiF6 or diluted HCl resulted in materials that, upon loading with Gd3+, had a much higher relaxivity than the corresponding non-dealuminated materials. Analysis of the 1H NMR dispersion profiles of the various zeolites showed that this can be mainly ascribed to an increase of the amount of water inside the zeolite cavities as a result of the destruction of walls between cavities. However, the average residence time of water inside the Gd3+-loaded cavities did not change significantly, which suggests that the windows of the Gd3+-loaded cavities are not affected by the dealumination. Upon calcination, the Gd3+ ions moved to the small sodalite cavities and became less accessible for water, resulting in a decrease in relaxivity. The important role of diffusion for the relaxivity was demonstrated by a comparison of the relaxivity of Gd3+-loaded zeolite NaY and NaA samples. NaA had much lower relaxivities due to the smaller pore sizes. The transversal relaxivities of the Gd3+-doped zeolites are comparable in magnitude to the longitudinal ones at low magnetic fields (<60 MHz). However at higher fields, the transversal relaxivities steeply increased, whereas the longitudinal relaxivities decreased as field strength increased. Therefore, these materials have potential as T1 MRI contrast agents at low field, and as T2 agents at higher fields. PMID:15929138

  2. The magnetic susceptibility effect of gadolinium-based contrast agents on PRFS-based MR thermometry during thermal interventions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry exploits the local magnetic field changes induced by the temperature dependence of the electron screening constant of water protons. Any other local magnetic field changes will therefore translate into incorrect temperature readings and need to be considered accordingly. Here, we investigated the susceptibility changes induced by the inflow and presence of a paramagnetic MR contrast agent and their implications on PRFS thermometry. Methods Phantom measurements were performed to demonstrate the effect of sudden gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) inflow on the phase shift measured using a PRFS thermometry sequence on a clinical 3 T magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) system. By proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the temperature dependence of the Gd-DTPA susceptibility was measured, as well as the effect of liposomal encapsulation and release on the bulk magnetic susceptibility of Gd-DTPA. In vivo studies were carried out to measure the temperature error induced in a rat hind leg muscle upon intravenous Gd-DTPA injection. Results The phantom study showed a significant phase shift inside the phantom of 0.6 ± 0.2 radians (mean ± standard deviation) upon Gd-DTPA injection (1.0 mM, clinically relevant amount). A Gd-DTPA-induced magnetic susceptibility shift of ΔχGd-DTPA = 0.109 ppm/mM was measured in a cylinder parallel to the main magnetic field at 37°C. The temperature dependence of the susceptibility shift showed dΔχGd-DTPA/dT = -0.00038 ± 0.00008 ppm/mM/°C. No additional susceptibility effect was measured upon Gd release from paramagnetic liposomes. In vivo, intravenous Gd-DTPA injection resulted in a perceived temperature change of 2.0°C ± 0.1°C at the center of the hind leg muscle. Conclusions The use of a paramagnetic MR contrast agent prior to MR-HIFU treatment may influence the accuracy of the PRFS MR thermometry

  3. A relaxometric method for the assessment of intestinal permeability based on the oral administration of gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Gianolio, Eliana; Boffa, Cinzia; Orecchia, Valeria; Bardini, Paola; Catanzaro, Valeria; Poli, Valeria; Aime, Silvio

    2016-04-01

    Herein, a new relaxometric method for the assessment of intestinal permeability based on the oral administration of clinically approved gadolinium (Gd)-based MRI contrast agents (CAs) is proposed. The fast, easily performed and cheap measurement of the longitudinal water proton relaxation rate (R1 ) in urine reports the amount of paramagnetic probe that has escaped the gastrointestinal tract. The proposed method appears to be a compelling alternative to the available methods for the assessment of intestinal permeability. The method was tested on the murine model of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in comparison with healthy mice. Three CAs were tested, namely ProHance®, MultiHance® and Magnevist®. Urine was collected for 24 h after the oral ingestion of the Gd-containing CA at day 3-4 (severe damage stage) and day 8-9 (recovery stage) after treatment with DSS. The Gd content in urine measured by (1) H relaxometry was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The extent of urinary excretion was given as a percentage of excreted Gd over the total ingested dose. The method was validated by comparing the results obtained with the established methodology based on the lactulose/mannitol and sucralose tests. For ProHance and Magnevist, the excreted amounts in the severe stage of damage were 2.5-3 times higher than in control mice. At the recovery stage, no significant differences were observed with respect to healthy mice. Overall, a very good correlation with the lactulose/mannitol and sucralose results was obtained. In the case of MultiHance, the percentage of excreted Gd complex was not significantly different from that of control mice in either the severe or recovery stages. The difference from ProHance and Magnevist was explained on the basis of the (known) partial biliary excretion of MultiHance in mice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26866929

  4. Toward single-walled carbon nanotube–gadolinium complex as advanced MRI contrast agents: pharmacodynamics and global genomic response in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Avti, Pramod K.; Talukdar, Yahfi; Sirotkin, Matvey V.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    Gadolinium nanoparticle-catalyzed single-walled carbon nanotubes (Gd-SWCNTs) have recently shown potential in vitro as high-performance T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs). Their preclinical safety assessment at nontoxic dosages is essential for MRI applications. Herein, the in vivo (in rats) pharmacodynamics of Gd-SWCNTs (water solubilized with the amphiphilic polymer PEG-DSPE) at the organ, tissue, molecular, and genetic level is reported. Gd-SWCNT, commercially available iron catalyzed SWCNTs (Fe-SWCNTs, control 1) and PEG-DSPE (control 2) solutions were intravenously injected at a potential nontoxic therapeutic dose (0.5 mg/kg body weight, single bolus). Post-injection, bright-field optical microscopy showed their macroscale distribution in lung, liver, kidney, brain, and spleen up to 5 days. Raman and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed their presence at the nanoscale within hepatocytes. Their effects on the host organ tissue, molecular, and genetic level were analyzed after 1, 5, 10, 20, and 30 days by histology, biomolecular [lipid peroxidation, plasma tumor necrosis factor TNF-α assay, microarrays] assays. The results indicate that Gd-SWCNTs neither cause any inflammation, nor damage to the above organs, nor any significant change in the lipid peroxidation or plasma proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) levels for all the groups at all time points. Global gene expression profile of liver (main organ for the metabolism) after day 1 treatment with Gd-SWCNTs shows that the gene regulation is directed toward maintaining normal homeostasis. The results taken together indicate that PEG-DSPE water-solubilized Gd-SWCNTs at potentially nontoxic dosages have pharmacodynamics similar to other commercially available Fe-SWCNTs and are suitable for future preclinical development as in vivo MRI CAs. PMID:23559429

  5. Approaching the Kinetic Inertness of Macrocyclic Gadolinium(III)-Based MRI Contrast Agents with Highly Rigid Open-Chain Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tircsó, Gyula; Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Nagy, Viktória; Garda, Zoltán; Garai, Tamás; Kálmán, Ferenc Krisztián; Esteban-Gómez, David; Tóth, Éva; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2016-01-18

    A highly rigid open-chain octadentate ligand (H4 cddadpa) containing a diaminocylohexane unit to replace the ethylenediamine bridge of 6,6'-[(ethane-1,2 diylbis{(carboxymethyl)azanediyl})bis(methylene)]dipicolinic acid (H4 octapa) was synthesized. This structural modification improves the thermodynamic stability of the Gd(3+) complex slightly (log KGdL =20.68 vs. 20.23 for [Gd(octapa)](-) ) while other MRI-relevant parameters remain unaffected (one coordinated water molecule; relaxivity r1 =5.73 mm(-1)  s(-1) at 20 MHz and 295 K). Kinetic inertness is improved by the rigidifying effect of the diaminocylohexane unit in the ligand skeleton (half-life of dissociation for physiological conditions is 6 orders of magnitude higher for [Gd(cddadpa)](-) (t1/2 =1.49×10(5)  h) than for [Gd(octapa)](-) . The kinetic inertness of this novel chelate is superior by 2-3 orders of magnitude compared to non-macrocyclic MRI contrast agents approved for clinical use. PMID:26583317

  6. GADOLINIUM SOLUBILITY AND VOLATILITY DURING DWPF PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S

    2008-01-30

    Understanding of gadolinium behavior, as it relates to potential neutron poisoning applications at the DWPF, has increased over the past several years as process specific data have been generated. Of primary importance are phenomena related to gadolinium solubility and volatility, which introduce the potential for gadolinium to be separated from fissile materials during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) and Melter operations. Existing data indicate that gadolinium solubilities under moderately low pH conditions can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on the quantities of other constituents that are present. With respect to sludge batching processes, the gadolinium solubility appears to be highly affected by iron. In cases where the mass ratio of Fe:Gd is 300 or more, the gadolinium solubility has been observed to be low, one milligram per liter or less. In contrast, when the ratio of Fe:Gd is 20 or less, the gadolinium solubility has been found to be relatively high, several thousands of milligrams per liter. For gadolinium to serve as an effective neutron poison in CPC operations, the solubility needs to be limited to approximately 100 mg/L. Unfortunately, the Fe:Gd ratio that corresponds to this solubility limit has not been identified. Existing data suggest gadolinium and plutonium are not volatile during melter operations. However, the data are subject to inherent uncertainties preventing definitive conclusions on this matter. In order to determine if gadolinium offers a practical means of poisoning waste in DWPF operations, generation of additional data is recommended. This includes: Gd solubility testing under conditions where the Fe:Gd ratio varies from 50 to 150; and Gd and Pu volatility studies tailored to quantifying high temperature partitioning. Additional tests focusing on crystal aging of Gd/Pu precipitates should be pursued if receipt of gadolinium-poisoned waste into the Tank Farm becomes routine.

  7. Characteristics of Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticles Using Terahertz Spectroscopy (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Maeng, Inhee; Oh, Seung Jae; Kim, Taekhoon; Cho, Byung Kyu; Lee, Kwangyeol; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2009-04-01

    The penetration property of the terahertz electromagnetic (THz) wave is relevant to its use. We used the THz wave spectroscopy system which easily penetrates some materials that do not contain water, e.g., plastic and ceramics. The system has been developed for several purposes, including measuring the properties of semiconductors and bio-materials, and detecting plastic bombs and ceramic knives at airports. It is also used for medical imaging systems, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), at some research institutes. It can show not only the difference in amplitude, but also the difference of the phase of each point of sample. MRI technology usually uses contrast agents to enhance the quality of the image. Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), made with a heavy metal ion, is commonly used as a clinical MRI contrast agent. Gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticle is a new contrast agent. It serves to equip the core of each particle with antibodies or ligands. It can freely circulate in blood vessels without amassing in the liver or lungs. This study shows the characteristics of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles to further advance terahertz medical imaging.

  8. Characteristics of Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticles Using Terahertz Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongkyu; Maeng, Inhee; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Oh, Seung Jae; Kim, Taekhoon; Cho, Byung Kyu; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2009-04-19

    The penetration property of the terahertz electromagnetic (THz) wave is relevant to its use. We used the THz wave spectroscopy system which easily penetrates some materials that do not contain water, e.g., plastic and ceramics. The system has been developed for several purposes, including measuring the properties of semiconductors and bio-materials, and detecting plastic bombs and ceramic knives at airports. It is also used for medical imaging systems, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), at some research institutes. It can show not only the difference in amplitude, but also the difference of the phase of each point of sample. MRI technology usually uses contrast agents to enhance the quality of the image. Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), made with a heavy metal ion, is commonly used as a clinical MRI contrast agent. Gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticle is a new contrast agent. It serves to equip the core of each particle with antibodies or ligands. It can freely circulate in blood vessels without amassing in the liver or lungs. This study shows the characteristics of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles to further advance terahertz medical imaging.

  9. Effects of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents on Thyroid Hormone Receptor Action and Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ariyani, Winda; Iwasaki, Toshiharu; Miyazaki, Wataru; Khongorzul, Erdene; Nakajima, Takahito; Kameo, Satomi; Koyama, Hiroshi; Tsushima, Yoshito; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used in diagnostic imaging to enhance the quality of magnetic resonance imaging or angiography. After intravenous injection, GBCAs can accumulate in the brain. Thyroid hormones (THs) are critical for the development and functional maintenance of the central nervous system. TH actions in brain are mainly exerted through nuclear TH receptors (TRs). We examined the effects of GBCAs on TR-mediated transcription in CV-1 cells using transient transfection-based reporter assay and TH-mediated cerebellar Purkinje cell morphogenesis in primary culture. We also measured the cellular accumulation and viability of Gd after representative GBCA treatments in cultured CV-1 cells. Both linear (Gd-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-bis methyl acid, Gd-DTPA-BMA) and macrocyclic (Gd-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid, Gd-DOTA) GBCAs were accumulated without inducing cell death in CV-1 cells. By contrast, Gd chloride (GdCl3) treatment induced approximately 100 times higher Gd accumulation and significantly reduced the number of cells. Low doses of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10(-8) to 10(-6)M) augmented TR-mediated transcription, but the transcription was suppressed at higher dose (10(-5) to 10(-4)M), with decreased β-galactosidase activity indicating cellular toxicity. TR-mediated transcription was not altered by Gd-DOTA or GdCl3, but the latter induced a significant reduction in β-galactosidase activity at high doses, indicating cellular toxicity. In cerebellar cultures, the dendrite arborization of Purkinje cells induced by 10(-9)M T4 was augmented by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA (10(-7)M) but was suppressed by higher dose (10(-5)M). Such augmentation by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA was not observed with 10(-9)M T3, probably because of the greater dendrite arborization by T3; however, the arborization by T3 was suppressed by a higher dose of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10(-5)M) as seen in T4 treatment. The effect of Gd-DOTA on dendrite arborization was much weaker

  10. Effects of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents on Thyroid Hormone Receptor Action and Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ariyani, Winda; Iwasaki, Toshiharu; Miyazaki, Wataru; Khongorzul, Erdene; Nakajima, Takahito; Kameo, Satomi; Koyama, Hiroshi; Tsushima, Yoshito; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used in diagnostic imaging to enhance the quality of magnetic resonance imaging or angiography. After intravenous injection, GBCAs can accumulate in the brain. Thyroid hormones (THs) are critical for the development and functional maintenance of the central nervous system. TH actions in brain are mainly exerted through nuclear TH receptors (TRs). We examined the effects of GBCAs on TR-mediated transcription in CV-1 cells using transient transfection-based reporter assay and TH-mediated cerebellar Purkinje cell morphogenesis in primary culture. We also measured the cellular accumulation and viability of Gd after representative GBCA treatments in cultured CV-1 cells. Both linear (Gd-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-bis methyl acid, Gd-DTPA-BMA) and macrocyclic (Gd-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid, Gd-DOTA) GBCAs were accumulated without inducing cell death in CV-1 cells. By contrast, Gd chloride (GdCl3) treatment induced approximately 100 times higher Gd accumulation and significantly reduced the number of cells. Low doses of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−8 to 10−6M) augmented TR-mediated transcription, but the transcription was suppressed at higher dose (10−5 to 10−4M), with decreased β-galactosidase activity indicating cellular toxicity. TR-mediated transcription was not altered by Gd-DOTA or GdCl3, but the latter induced a significant reduction in β-galactosidase activity at high doses, indicating cellular toxicity. In cerebellar cultures, the dendrite arborization of Purkinje cells induced by 10−9M T4 was augmented by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−7M) but was suppressed by higher dose (10−5M). Such augmentation by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA was not observed with 10−9M T3, probably because of the greater dendrite arborization by T3; however, the arborization by T3 was suppressed by a higher dose of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−5M) as seen in T4 treatment. The effect of Gd-DOTA on dendrite arborization was much weaker

  11. Emerging concepts for myocardial late gadolinium enhancement MRI.

    PubMed

    Doltra, Adelina; Amundsen, Brage Hoyem; Gebker, Rolf; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2013-08-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement is a useful tool for scar detection, based on differences in the volume of distribution of gadolinium, an extracellular agent. The presence of fibrosis in the myocardium amenable to be detected with late gadolinium enhancement MRI is found not only in ischemic cardiomyopathy, in which it offers information regarding viability and prognosis, but also in a wide variety of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. In the following review we will discuss the methodological aspects of gadolinium-based imaging, as well as its applications and anticipated future developments. PMID:23909638

  12. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Albert T

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10(-21)), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents. PMID:16024060

  13. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Albert T. . E-mail: lebedev@org.chem.msu.ru

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10{sup -21}), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  14. Signal Increase on Unenhanced T1-Weighted Images in the Rat Brain After Repeated, Extended Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin Andrew; Lohrke, Jessica; Frenzel, Thomas; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In this prospective preclinical study, we evaluated T1-weighted signal intensity in the deep cerebellar nuclei (CN) and globus pallidus (GP) up to 24 days after repeated administration of linear and macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) using homologous imaging and evaluation methods as in the recently published retrospective clinical studies. In a second part of the study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces were evaluated for contrast enhancement by fluid-attenuated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Sixty adult male Wistar-Han rats were randomly divided into a control and 5 GBCA groups (n = 10 per group). The administered GBCAs were gadodiamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadobenate dimeglumine (linear GBCAs) as well as gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine (macrocyclic GBCAs) and saline (control). Over a period of 2 weeks, the animals received 10 intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight, each on 5 consecutive days per week. Before GBCA administration, as well as 3 and 24 days after the last injection, a whole-brain MRI was performed using a standard T1-weighted 3-dimensional turbo spin echo sequence on a clinical 1.5 T scanner. The ratios of signal intensities in deep CN to pons (CN/Po) and GP to thalamus (GP/Th) were determined. For the evaluation of the CSF spaces, 18 additional rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 3 per group) that received the same GBCAs as in the first part of the study. After MR cisternography for anatomical reference, a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence was performed before and 1 minute after intravenous injection of a dose of 1 mmol Gd/kg body weight GBCA or saline. Results A significantly increased signal intensity ratio of CN/Po was observed 3 and 24 days after the last injection of gadodiamide and gadobenate dimeglumine. No significant changes were observed between the 2 time points. Gadopentetate dimeglumine injection led to a moderately elevated

  15. Toxicity of Gadolinium to Some Aquatic Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2001-01-24

    The toxicity of gadolinium to algae and bacteria was determined as part of an effort to develop a biological process to purify drums containing spent nuclear reactor heavy water moderator (D2O). This water was contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Nuclear reactors were operated for approximately 30 years at the SRS to produce nuclear weapons materials for national defense. Throughout this period, a heavy water solution of gadolinium nitrate was utilized in a standby emergency shutdown system that could inject this chemical into the reactor moderator coolant water. The chemical was used for this purpose because the high neutron absorption cross sections of some gadolinium isotopes make gadolinium salts such as GdNO3 effective in controlling nuclear activity in aqueous systems (Gilbert et al. 1985; Rodenas et al. 1990). The use of this practice resulted in a large inventory of this degraded heavy water containing gadolinium nitrate. Microbiological and chemical studies were initiated to evaluate the potential use of bacteria and algae for water purification of the drums. Since metals are often toxic to microbes when present at concentrations substantially higher than natural environmental levels, it was hypothesized that Gd may be toxic to selected microorganisms (algae and bacteria) at the very high concentrations (average 80,000 mg/L, maximum 259,000 mg/L) present in most of the drums. Two principal components of the study included: (1) chemical and microbiological characterization of representative drums, and (2) an evaluation of the toxicity of gadolinium to selected species of algae. In addition to wastewater from nuclear production reactor operations, gadolinium waste is also generated from medical applications, especially MRI, and various electronic components including CD disks. Despite growing and widespread

  16. Nanoparticles of gadolinium-incorporated Prussian blue with PEG coating as an effective oral MRI contrast agent for gastrointestinal tract imaging.

    PubMed

    Perera, Vindya S; Chen, Guojun; Cai, Qing; Huang, Songping D

    2016-03-01

    Biocompatible nanoparticles of gadolinium-incorporated Prussian blue with the empirical formula K0.94Gd0.02Fe[Fe(CN)6] exhibit extremely high stability against the release of Gd(3+) and CN(-) ions under the acidic conditions similar to stomach juice. The high r1 relaxivity, low cytotoxicity and the ability of such nanoparticles to penetrate the cell membrane suggest that this coordination-polymer structural platform offers a unique opportunity for developing the next generation of T1-weighted oral cellular MRI probes for the early detection of tumors in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26890149

  17. Gadolinium photoionization process

    DOEpatents

    Paisner, J.A.; Comaskey, B.J.; Haynam, C.A.; Eggert, J.H.

    1993-04-13

    A method is provided for selective photoionization of the odd-numbered atomic mass gadolinium isotopes 155 and 157. The selective photoionization is accomplished by circular or linear parallel polarized laser beam energy effecting a three-step photoionization pathway.

  18. Gadolinium photoionization process

    DOEpatents

    Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Comaskey, Brian J.; Haynam, Christopher A.; Eggert, Jon H.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for selective photoionization of the odd-numbered atomic mass gadolinium isotopes 155 and 157. The selective photoionization is accomplished by circular or linear parallel polarized laser beam energy effecting a three-step photoionization pathway.

  19. Gain of a 500-fold sensitivity on an intravital MR Contrast Agent based on an endohedral Gadolinium-Cluster-Fullerene-Conjugate: A new chance in cancer diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Klaus; Dunsch, Lothar; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Bock, Michael; Baeuerle, Tobias; Yang, Shangfeng; Waldeck, Waldemar; Wiessler, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    Among the applications of fullerene technology in health sciences the expanding field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of molecular processes is most challenging. Here we present the synthesis and application of a GdxSc3-xN@C80-BioShuttle-conjugate referred to as Gd-cluster@-BioShuttle, which features high proton relaxation and, in comparison to the commonly used contrast agents, high signal enhancement at very low Gd concentrations. This modularly designed contrast agent represents a new tool for improved monitoring and evaluation of interventions at the gene transcription level. Also, a widespread monitoring to track individual cells is possible, as well as sensing of microenvironments. Furthermore, BioShuttle can also deliver constructs for transfection or active pharmaceutical ingredients, and scaffolding for incorporation with the host's body. Using the Gd-cluster@-BioShuttle as MRI contrast agent allows an improved evaluation of radio- or chemotherapy treated tissues. PMID:20567614

  20. Genome Sequencing of Four Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, the Causative Agent of Epidemic Typhus, Including One Flying Squirrel Isolate.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Ge, Hong; Butani, Amy; Osborne, Brian; Verratti, Kathleen; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Pop, Mihai; Read, Timothy D; Richards, Allen L

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is a notable intracellular pathogen, the agent of epidemic typhus, and a potential biothreat agent. We present here whole-genome sequence data for four strains of R. prowazekii, including one from a flying squirrel. PMID:23814035

  1. Novel sorbents for removal of gadolinium-based contrast agents in sorbent dialysis and hemoperfusion: preventive approaches to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yantasee, Wassana; Fryxell, Glen E.; Porter, George A.; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Koonsiripaiboon, View; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2010-02-01

    Gd based contrast agents in many forms of organocomplex have recently been linked to a debilitating and a potentially fatal skin disease called Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF) in patients with renal failures. Free Gd released from the complexes by transmetallation is believed to be the most important trigger for NSF. Removal of Gd complex from the patients immediately after the contrast study would prevent the dissociation of Gd and should eliminate NSF as a complication. Although removal of Gd based contrast agents may be accomplished with conventional hemodialysis, it requires three hemodialysis sessions at 3 hours each to remove 98% of the contrast agents. In this work, mesoporous silica material that are functionalized with 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO-SAMMS®) has been evaluated for effective removal of both free and chelated Gd (Magnevist, a brand of gadopentetate dimeglumine) from the dialysate and sodium chloride solution. The material has high affinity, rapid removal rate, and large sorption capacity for both free and chelated Gd, the properties that are far superior to those of activated carbon and zirconium phosphate currently used in the state-of-the-art sorbent dialysis systems. 99% of both free and chelated Gd would be removed in a single pass thru the sorbent bed of 1,2-HOPO-SAMMS®. The sorbent provides an effective and predicable strategy for removing Gd from patients with impaired renal function, thus it would allow for the continued use of contrast MRI while removing the risk of NSF and would represent a safe alternative to traditional contrast studies in the patient population.

  2. Advancing pharmacovigilance through academic–legal collaboration: the case of gadolinium-based contrast agents and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis—a research on adverse drug events and reports (RADAR) report

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, B J; Laumann, A E; Nardone, B; Miller, F H; Restaino, J; Raisch, D W; McKoy, J M; Hammel, J A; Bhatt, K; Bauer, K; Samaras, A T; Fisher, M J; Bull, C; Saddleton, E; Belknap, S M; Thomsen, H S; Kanal, E; Cowper, S E; Abu Alfa, A K

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare and contrast three databases, that is, The International Centre for Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Registry (ICNSFR), the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and a legal data set, through pharmacovigilance and to evaluate international nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) safety efforts. Methods: The Research on Adverse Drug events And Reports methodology was used for assessment—the FAERS (through June 2009), ICNSFR and the legal data set (January 2002 to December 2010). Safety information was obtained from the European Medicines Agency, the Danish Medicine Agency and the Food and Drug Administration. Results: The FAERS encompassed the largest number (n = 1395) of NSF reports. The ICNSFR contained the most complete (n = 335, 100%) histopathological data. A total of 382 individual biopsy-proven, product-specific NSF cases were analysed from the legal data set. 76.2% (291/382) identified exposure to gadodiamide, of which 67.7% (197/291) were unconfounded. Additionally, 40.1% (153/382) of cases involved gadopentetate dimeglumine, of which 48.4% (74/153) were unconfounded, while gadoversetamide was identified in 7.3% (28/382) of which 28.6% (8/28) were unconfounded. Some cases involved gadobenate dimeglumine or gadoteridol, 5.8% (22/382), all of which were confounded. The mean number of exposures to gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) was gadodiamide (3), gadopentetate dimeglumine (5) and gadoversetamide (2). Of the 279 unconfounded cases, all involved a linear-structured GBCA. 205 (73.5%) were a non-ionic GBCA while 74 (26.5%) were an ionic GBCA. Conclusion: Clinical and legal databases exhibit unique characteristics that prove complementary in safety evaluations. Use of the legal data set allowed the identification of the most commonly implicated GBCA. Advances in knowledge: This article is the first to demonstrate explicitly the utility of a legal data set to pharmacovigilance research. PMID:25230161

  3. Synthesis, conjugation and relaxation studies of gadolinium(III)-4-benzothiazol-2-yl-phenylamine as a potential brain specific MR contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Saini, Nisha; Varshney, Raunak; Tiwari, Anjani K; Kaul, Ankur; Allard, Michele; Ishar, M P S; Mishra, Anil K

    2013-04-14

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is widely used in clinical research to map the structural and functional organization of the brain. We have designed and synthesized a Gd-based specific MR contrast agent that binds to regions in the brain. The presented compound {4-[(4-benzothiazol-2-yl-phenylcarbamoyl)-methyl]-7,10-bis-carboxymethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododec-1-yl} acetic acid (DO3A-BT) was synthesized by conjugating the chloroacetylated product of 4-benzothiazol-2-yl-phenylamine with a trisubstituted cyclen. The lanthanide complex (Ln-DO3A-BT) was evaluated in vitro for both MR (Gd-DO3A-BT) and optical (Eu-DO3A-BT) imaging applications. The complex Gd-DO3A-BT displays a relaxivity of r1 = 4.18 mM(-1) s(-1) at 4.7 T which is 1.2 times greater than Dotarem and significantly higher than the brain specific MR contrast agent Luxol Fast Blue (LFB). The protonation constant of the ligand (pKa1 = 9.91, pKa2 = 8.22, pKa3 = 5.01) and the stability constant of the complex formed between Gd(III), Eu(III) and Ca(II) and ligand DO3A-BT (log βGdL = 18.4, log βEuL = 18.3, log βZn2L = 7.1, log βCa2L = 6.3) were recorded by potentiometric titration. The constants reflect the high stability of the ligand with lanthanides compared with endogenous metal ions. The transmetalation stability of Gd-DO3A-BT toward Zn proved to be excellent with a rate constant of 3.07 × 10(-5) s(-1) which is in line with other tetraazatetraacetic acid (DOTA)-monoamide complexes. The hydration number (q) was found to be 0.92, and is calculated from the difference in the luminescence lifetime of Eu-DO3A-BT in H2O and D2O solutions to determine the coordination state of this complex. The in vivo biodistribution of (99m)Tc-DO3A-BT in BALB/c mice showed a brain uptake of 1.2% ID g(-1) at 2 min post injection when injected with mannitol which disrupts the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) due to osmotic shock. In vitro binding on the brain homogenate revealed a high uptake by the neuronal/glial cells for in vivo

  4. New synthesis of a high molecular weight ligand derived from dota; thermodynamic stability of the MRI contrast agent formed with gadolinium.

    PubMed

    Pierrard, Jean-Claude; Rimbault, Jean; Aplincourt, Michel; Le Greneur, Soizic; Port, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The new total synthesis in four steps of the compound P1041 is reported. This compound is a high molecular mass ligand (MW 6.32 kDa) derived from dota in which the four substituents are hydroxylated and contain amidic groups. The attribution of the nine protonation constants of P1041 is based on the comparison with the behaviour of the precursor ligands dota and tced, a tetracarboxylated derivative of dota. From these results, the studies of the systems P1041/Na(+) and P1041/Gd(3+) lead to the determination of the stability constants corresponding to the three species Na(P1041)H(h) (h = 0, 2 or 4) and to the five complexes Gd(P1041)H(h) (h = 0, 2, 3, 4 or 5). The complexing ability of P1041 towards Gd(3+) is compared with those of dota and tced. At physiological pH = 7.4, the very stable species Gd(P1041)H(4) (-) (currently named P792 in the literature) of this rapid clearance blood pool agent is predominant. PMID:19072772

  5. SIMS imaging of gadolinium isotopes in tissue from Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis patients: Release of free Gd from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jerrold L.; Chandra, Subhash; Thakral, Charu; Abraham, Joshua M.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (GBMCA) have been linked to a new disease, Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF), with skin and systemic toxicity and death in certain patients with renal failure. Due to widespread use of GBMCA in diagnostic MRI, it is essential to study their excretion, metabolism, and target sites in cells and tissues. A CAMECA IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used for imaging Gd isotopes in relation to calcium distributions in histologic sections of human tissues. SIMS imaging revealed two types of Gd localization in skin biopsies of patients who received GBMCA. The Gd was present in micrometer size deposits in association with calcium, and in detectable amounts in a more diffuse cellular distribution. Only the Gd-containing deposits associated with Ca and P were detectable using SEM/EDS. As only insoluble deposits remain in the biopsy tissues after aqueous and organic solvent processing of the tissue, our observations support release of free Gd from the GBMCA and selective localization of insoluble Gd in the target tissue from patients with NSF. This study opens new novel applications of SIMS for characterization of the safety of GBMCA.

  6. Distribution profile of gadolinium in gadolinium chelate-treated renally-impaired rats: role of pharmaceutical formulation.

    PubMed

    Fretellier, Nathalie; Salhi, Mariem; Schroeder, Josef; Siegmund, Heiko; Chevalier, Thibaut; Bruneval, Patrick; Jestin-Mayer, Gaëlle; Delaloge, Francette; Factor, Cécile; Mayer, Jean-François; Fabicki, Jean-Michel; Robic, Caroline; Bonnemain, Bruno; Idée, Jean-Marc; Corot, Claire

    2015-05-25

    While not acutely toxic, chronic hepatic effect of certain gadolinium chelates (GC), used as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging, might represent a risk in renally-impaired patients due to free gadolinium accumulation in the liver. To answer this question, this study investigated the consequences of the presence of small amounts of either a soluble gadolinium salt ("free" Gd) or low-stability chelating impurity in the pharmaceutical solution of gadoteric acid, a macrocyclic GC with high thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities, were investigated in renally-impaired rats. Renal failure was induced by adding 0.75% adenine in the diet for three weeks. The pharmaceutical and commercial solution of gadoteric acid was administered (5 daily intravenous injections of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg) either alone or after being spiked with either "free" gadolinium (i.e., 0.04% w/v) or low-stability impurity (i.e., 0.06 w/v). Another GC, gadodiamide (low thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities) was given as its commercial solution at a similar dose. Non-chelated gadolinium was tested at two doses (0.005 and 0.01 mmol Gd/kg) as acetate salt. Gadodiamide induced systemic toxicity (mortality, severe epidermal and dermal lesions) and substantial tissue Gd retention. The addition of very low amounts of "free", non-chelated gadolinium or low thermodynamic stability impurity to the pharmaceutical solution of the thermodynamically stable GC gadoteric acid resulted in substantial capture of metal by the liver, similar to what was observed in "free" gadolinium salt-treated rats. Relaxometry studies strongly suggested the presence of free and soluble gadolinium in the liver. Electron microscopy examinations revealed the presence of free and insoluble gadolinium deposits in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells of rats treated with gadoteric acid solution spiked with low-stability impurity, free gadolinium and gadodiamide, but not in rats treated with the pharmaceutical solution of gadoteric acid. The

  7. Laserspektroskopie Gadoliniums Fingerabdruck

    SciTech Connect

    Blaum, Klaus; Bushaw, Bruce A.; Nortershauser, Wilfried

    2003-05-31

    The minimum energy that is required to remove the first electron from e neutral atom, one call ionization energy E1. It is not only for every element of the periodic table but also even for every nuclide characteristic and therefore belongs to the most basic atomic properties. The ionization energy is important for the determination of a ‘row’ of properties, from the chemical reactivity to the color light absorbed and emitted from an atom. The value of E1 depends on the stationary state that the farthest electron originally occupies. If the electron finds itself, however, in the first excited stat, only 3.4 eV is required. Previously the ionization energy could be determined with high accuracy in the range of 10-8 by means of laser spectroscopy only for atoms with one or two valence electrons, whereby the most accurate to date result from measurements on Hydrogen. We could now, for the first time in a rare earth element, reach that kind of accuracy. Motivation for these investigations was the development of an analysis method for the ultra-trace detection of Gadolinium in tissue- and meteorite samples.

  8. Modified agar dilution susceptibility testing method for determining in vitro activities of antifungal agents, including azole compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T; Jono, K; Okonogi, K

    1997-01-01

    In vitro activities of antifungal agents, including azole compounds, against yeasts were easily determined by using RPMI-1640 agar medium and by incubating the plates in the presence of 20% CO2. The end point of inhibition was clear by this method, even in the case of azole compounds, because of the almost complete inhibition of yeast growth at high concentrations which permitted weak growth of some Candida strains by traditional methods. MICs obtained by the agar dilution method were similar to those obtained by the broth dilution method proposed by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. PMID:9174197

  9. Studies of MRI relaxivities of gadolinium-labeled dendrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hongmu; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    In cancer detection, imaging techniques have a great importance in early diagnosis. The more sensitive the imaging technique and the earlier the tumor can be detected. Contrast agents have the capability to increase the sensitivity in imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Until now, gadolinium-based contrast agents are mainly used for MRI, and show good enhancement. But improvement is needed for detection of smaller tumors at the earliest stage possible. The dendrons complexed with Gd(DOTA) were synthesized and evaluated as a new MRI contrast agent. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation effects were tested and compared with commercial drug Magnevist, Gd(DTPA).

  10. Tumor-induced lymph node alterations detected by MRI lymphography using gadolinium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, S. C.; Kurland, B. F.; Liu, C.-L.; Ho, R. J. Y.; Ruddell, A.

    2015-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI lymphography shows potential to identify alterations in lymph drainage through lymph nodes (LNs) in cancer and other diseases. MRI studies have typically used low molecular weight gadolinium contrast agents, however larger gadolinium-loaded nanoparticles possess characteristics that could improve the specificity and sensitivity of lymphography. The performance of three gadolinium contrast agents with different sizes and properties was compared by 3T MRI after subcutaneous injection. Mice bearing B16-F10 melanoma footpad tumors were imaged to assess tumor-induced alterations in lymph drainage through tumor-draining popliteal and inguinal LNs versus contralateral uninvolved drainage. Gadolinium lipid nanoparticles were able to identify tumor-induced alterations in contrast agent drainage into the popliteal LN, while lower molecular weight or albumin-binding gadolinium agents were less effective. All of the contrast agents distributed in foci around the cortex and medulla of tumor-draining popliteal LNs, while they were restricted to the cortex of non-draining LNs. Surprisingly, second-tier tumor-draining inguinal LNs exhibited reduced uptake, indicating that tumors can also divert LN drainage. These characteristics of tumor-induced lymph drainage could be useful for diagnosis of LN pathology in cancer and other diseases. The preferential uptake of nanoparticle contrasts into tumor-draining LNs could also allow selective targeting of therapies to tumor-draining LNs. PMID:26497382

  11. Thermodynamic properties of gadolinium disilicide

    SciTech Connect

    Lukashenko, G.M.; Polotskaya, R.I.

    1986-11-01

    The authors determine the Gibbs energy, enthalpy, formation heat, and other thermodynamic properties of gadolinium disilicide by measuring the electromotive force in the 830-960 K temperature range in electrolytes consisting of molten tin and various chlorides. The relationship of these properties to crystal structure is briefly discussed.

  12. Structural and chemical analysis of gadolinium halides encapsulated within WS2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anumol, E. A.; Enyashin, Andrey N.; Batra, Nitin M.; Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Deepak, Francis Leonard

    2016-06-01

    The hollow cavities of nanotubes serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of WS2 nanotubes by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is non-trivial due to the presence of multiple high atomic number elements. Therefore, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) tomography was employed revealing the three dimensional chemical composition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the filling procedure shed light into the mechanics behind the formation of the confined gadolinium halide crystals. The quasi-1D system employed here serves as an example of a TEM-based chemical nanotomography method that could be extended to other materials, including beam-sensitive soft materials.The hollow cavities of nanotubes serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of WS2 nanotubes by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is non-trivial due to the

  13. Safety profiles of gadolinium chelates in juvenile rats differ according to the risk of dissociation.

    PubMed

    Fretellier, Nathalie; Maazouz, Meryam; Luseau, Alexandrine; Baudimont, Fannie; Jestin-Mayer, Gaëlle; Bourgery, Simon; Rasschaert, Marlène; Bruneval, Patrick; Factor, Cécile; Mecieb, Fatiha; Idée, Jean-Marc; Corot, Claire

    2014-12-01

    This study was designed to compare the safety of two gadolinium chelates (GCs), used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, in juvenile rats. Juvenile rats received five intravenous administrations (between postnatal day [PND] 4 and 18) of gadoteric acid (macrocyclic ionic GC), gadodiamide (linear nonionic GC) or saline, and sacrificed at PND 25. Gadodiamide induced mortality, alopecia and hyperpigmentation of dorsal skin. Two gadodiamide-treated rats presented severe epidermal and dermal lesions. No abnormal signs were detected following administration of gadoteric acid. Higher tissue gadolinium concentrations were found in the gadodiamide group compared to the gadoteric acid group. Dissociation of gadodiamide was observed in skin and liver, with the presence of dissociated and soluble gadolinium. In conclusion, repeated administration of gadoteric acid was well tolerated by juvenile rats. In contrast, gadodiamide induced significant toxicity and more marked tissue gadolinium retention (at least partly in the dissociated and soluble form). PMID:25462783

  14. Discovery of samarium, europium, gadolinium, and terbium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    May, E.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-01-15

    Currently, thirty-four samarium, thirty-four europium, thirty-one gadolinium, and thirty-one terbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. Type of MRI contrast, tissue gadolinium, and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Do, Catherine; Barnes, Jeffrey L.; Tan, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    It has been presupposed that the thermodynamic stability constant (Ktherm) of gadolinium-based MRI chelates relate to the risk of precipitating nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The present study compared low-Ktherm gadodiamide with high-Ktherm gadoteridol in cultured fibroblasts and rats with uninephrectomies. Gadolinium content was assessed using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in paraffin-embedded tissues. In vitro, fibroblasts demonstrated dose-dependent fibronectin generation, transforming growth factor-β production, and expression of activated myofibroblast stress fiber protein α-smooth muscle actin. There were negligible differences with respect to toxicity or proliferation between the two contrast agents. In the rodent model, gadodiamide treatment led to greater skin fibrosis and dermal cellularity than gadoteridol. In the kidney, both contrast agents led to proximal tubule vacuolization and increased fibronectin accumulation. Despite large detectable gadolinium signals in the spleen, skin, muscle, and liver from the gadodiamide-treated group, contrast-induced fibrosis appeared to be limited to the skin and kidney. These findings support the hypothesis that low-Ktherm chelates have a greater propensity to elicit nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and demonstrate that certain tissues are resistant to these effects. PMID:25100280

  16. Type of MRI contrast, tissue gadolinium, and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Do, Catherine; Barnes, Jeffrey L; Tan, Chunyan; Wagner, Brent

    2014-10-01

    It has been presupposed that the thermodynamic stability constant (K(therm)) of gadolinium-based MRI chelates relate to the risk of precipitating nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The present study compared low-K(therm) gadodiamide with high-K(therm) gadoteridol in cultured fibroblasts and rats with uninephrectomies. Gadolinium content was assessed using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in paraffin-embedded tissues. In vitro, fibroblasts demonstrated dose-dependent fibronectin generation, transforming growth factor-β production, and expression of activated myofibroblast stress fiber protein α-smooth muscle actin. There were negligible differences with respect to toxicity or proliferation between the two contrast agents. In the rodent model, gadodiamide treatment led to greater skin fibrosis and dermal cellularity than gadoteridol. In the kidney, both contrast agents led to proximal tubule vacuolization and increased fibronectin accumulation. Despite large detectable gadolinium signals in the spleen, skin, muscle, and liver from the gadodiamide-treated group, contrast-induced fibrosis appeared to be limited to the skin and kidney. These findings support the hypothesis that low-K(therm) chelates have a greater propensity to elicit nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and demonstrate that certain tissues are resistant to these effects. PMID:25100280

  17. Cancer morbidity in British military veterans included in chemical warfare agent experiments at Porton Down: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Linsell, L; Brooks, C; Keegan, T J; Langdon, T; Doyle, P; Maconochie, N E S; Fletcher, T; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Beral, V

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine cancer morbidity in members of the armed forces who took part in tests of chemical warfare agents from 1941 to 1989. Design Historical cohort study, with cohort members followed up to December 2004. Data source Archive of UK government research facility at Porton Down, UK military personnel records, and national death and cancer records. Participants All veterans included in the cohort study of mortality, excluding those known to have died or been lost to follow-up before 1 January 1971 when the UK cancer registration system commenced: 17 013 male members of the UK armed forces who took part in tests (Porton Down veterans) and a similar group of 16 520 men who did not (non-Porton Down veterans). Main outcome measures Cancer morbidity in each group of veterans; rate ratios, with 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for age group and calendar period. Results 3457 cancers were reported in the Porton Down veterans compared with 3380 cancers in the non-Porton Down veterans. While overall cancer morbidity was the same in both groups (rate ratio 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 1.05), Porton Down veterans had higher rates of ill defined malignant neoplasms (1.12, 1.02 to 1.22), in situ neoplasms (1.45, 1.06 to 2.00), and those of uncertain or unknown behaviour (1.32, 1.01 to 1.73). Conclusion Overall cancer morbidity in Porton Down veterans was no different from that in non-Porton Down veterans. PMID:19318700

  18. Growth Control in Colon Epithelial Cells: Gadolinium Enhances Calcium-Mediated Growth Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1–5 µM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet. PMID:23008064

  19. Structural and chemical analysis of gadolinium halides encapsulated within WS2 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Anumol, E A; Enyashin, Andrey N; Batra, Nitin M; Costa, Pedro M F J; Deepak, Francis Leonard

    2016-06-16

    The hollow cavities of nanotubes serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of WS2 nanotubes by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is non-trivial due to the presence of multiple high atomic number elements. Therefore, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) tomography was employed revealing the three dimensional chemical composition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the filling procedure shed light into the mechanics behind the formation of the confined gadolinium halide crystals. The quasi-1D system employed here serves as an example of a TEM-based chemical nanotomography method that could be extended to other materials, including beam-sensitive soft materials. PMID:27250645

  20. Metals Fact Sheet: Gadolinium GD

    SciTech Connect

    1992-10-01

    Gadolinium is a silvery-white, malleable, ductile metallic element used to improve the high-temperature characteristics of iron, chromium, and related metallic alloys. It was named after the French chemist, Gadolin, discoverer of yttrium. This article discusses sources of the element, the world supply and demand, and also a number of applications. With the largest thermal neutron absorption cross section of any element, one of these applications is as a burnable poison in reactors and as neutron absorbers in other nuclear devices.

  1. Removal of gadolinium nitrate from heavy water

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2000-03-22

    Work was conducted to develop a cost-effective process to purify 181 55-gallon drums containing spent heavy water moderator (D2O) contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These drums also contain low level radioactive contamination, including tritium, which complicates treatment options. Presently, the drums of degraded moderator are being stored on site. It was suggested that a process utilizing biological mechanisms could potentially lower the total cost of heavy water purification by allowing the use of smaller equipment with less product loss and a reduction in the quantity of secondary waste materials produced by the current baseline process (ion exchange).

  2. Contrasting behaviour of anthropogenic gadolinium and natural rare earth elements in estuaries and the gadolinium input into the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulaksız, Serkan; Bau, Michael

    2007-08-01

    All major rivers in northwestern Germany that flow into the North Sea, including the Weser River, display rare earth element (REE) patterns with large positive gadolinium (Gd) anomalies that indicate the presence of anthropogenic Gd derived from contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging. This microcontaminant cannot be removed by common sewage treatment technology and enters rivers and lakes with the discharge from waste water treatment plants. As elsewhere, a large fraction of the natural dissolved REE in the Weser River are associated with colloids. These colloids aggregate during mixing of freshwater and seawater in the low-salinity part of the Weser Estuary and the dissolved REE are partially removed from the river water together with the colloids. In marked contrast to the natural REE, the anthropogenic Gd behaves conservatively during this estuarine mixing and transits through the Weser Estuary almost unaffected. This indicates that the speciation of anthropogenic Gd is different from that of natural Gd and suggests a long environmental half-life of the anthropogenic Gd complexes used as contrast agents. The amount of anthropogenic Gd introduced into seawater via rivers is significant and produces anthropogenic positive Gd anomalies in coastal seawater. This is observed in the southwestern North Sea, off the coast of the East Frisian Islands, where anthropogenic Gd is mostly derived from the rivers Rhine and Thames. Its long environmental half-life and conservative estuarine behaviour suggest that anthropogenic Gd might be utilized as a pseudo-natural far-field tracer for truly dissolved riverine REE input into seawater and for discharge from waste water treatment plants and for sewage in river, ground and drinking water. The widespread distribution of anthropogenic Gd is an example of how the increasing use of "exotic" (ultra)trace elements in high-tech processes will in the future significantly hamper studies of the distribution and geochemical

  3. A water-soluble gadolinium metallofullerenol: facile preparation, magnetic properties and magnetic resonance imaging application.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Wang, Taishan; Feng, Yongqiang; Zhang, Ying; Zhen, Mingming; Shu, Chunying; Jiang, Li; Wang, Yuqing; Wang, Chunru

    2016-06-01

    A new water-soluble gadolinium metallofullerenol was prepared through a solid-liquid reaction. It was characterized to have an enhanced effective magnetic moment, and improved T1-weighted relaxivity and magnetic resonance imaging performance in the liver. This material prepared by a facile method has wide application as a contrast agent and biological medicine. PMID:27064096

  4. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles for theranostic MRI-radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Lux, François; Sancey, Lucie; Bianchi, Andrea; Crémillieux, Yannick; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    A rapid development of gadolinium-based nanoparticles is observed due to their attractive properties as MRI-positive contrast agents. Indeed, they display high relaxivity, adapted biodistribution and passive uptake in the tumor thanks to enhanced permeability and retention effect. In addition to these imaging properties, it has been recently shown that they can act as effective radiosensitizers under different types of irradiation (radiotherapy, neutron therapy or hadron therapy). These new therapeutic modalities pave the way to therapy guided by imaging and to personalized medicine. PMID:25715316

  5. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  6. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps. PMID:27411781

  7. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps. PMID:27411781

  8. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps.

  9. The use of iodinated and gadolinium contrast media during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Webb, Judith A W; Thomsen, Henrik S; Morcos, Sameh K

    2005-06-01

    The use of iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast media in pregnant or lactating women often causes concerns in the radiology department because of the principle of not exposing a fetus or neonate to any drugs. Because of the uncertainty about the use of contrast media during pregnancy and lactation, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and draw up guidelines. An extensive literature search was carried out and summarized in a report. Based on the limited information available, simple guidelines have been drawn up. The report and guidelines were discussed at the 11th European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Mutagenic and teratogenic effects have not been described after administration of gadolinium or iodinated contrast media. Free iodide in radiographic contrast medium given to the mother has the potential to depress fetal/neonatal thyroid function. Neonatal thyroid function should be checked during the 1st week if iodinated contrast media have been given during pregnancy. No effect on the fetus has been seen after gadolinium contrast media. Only tiny amounts of iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast medium given to a lactating mother reach the milk, and only a minute proportion entering the baby's gut is absorbed. The very small potential risk associated with absorption of contrast medium may be considered insufficient to warrant stopping breast-feeding for 24 h following either iodinated or gadolinium contrast agents. PMID:15609057

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by different concentrations of gadolinium ion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Jin, Jian-Cheng; Yuan, Lian; He, Huan; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Yang, Xiao-Gang; Dai, Jie; Liu, Yi

    2014-04-01

    Gadolinium-based compounds are the most widely used paramagnetic contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging on the world. But the tricationic gadolinium ion (Gd(3+)) could induce cell apoptosis probably because of its effects on mitochondria. Until now, the mechanism about how Gd(3+) interacts with mitochondria is not well elucidated. In this work, mitochondrial swelling, collapsed transmembrane potential and decreased membrane fluidity were observed to be important factors for mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP) opening induced by Gd(3+). The protection effect of CsA (Cyclosporin A) could confirm high concentration of Gd(3+) (500 μM) would trigger mtPTP opening. Moreover, mitochondrial outer membrane breakdown and volume expansion observed clearly by transmission electron microscopy and the release of Cyt c (Cytochrome c) could explain the mtPTP opening from another aspect. In addition, MBM(+) (monobromobimane(+)) and DTT (dithiothreitol) could protect thiol (-SH) groups from oxidation so that the toxicity of Gd(3+) might be resulted from the chelation of -SH of membrane proteins by free Gd(3+). Gd(3+) could inhibit the initiation of mitochondrial membrane lipid peroxidation, so it might interact with anionic lipids too. These findings will highly contribute to the safe applications of Gd-based agents. PMID:24321333

  11. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  12. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  13. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use... GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  14. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  15. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  16. Extracellular gadolinium-based contrast media: an overview.

    PubMed

    Bellin, Marie-France; Van Der Molen, Aart J

    2008-05-01

    Increasing use is made of extracellular MRI contrast agents that alter the image contrast following intravenous administration; they predominantly shorten the T1 relaxation time of tissues. The degree and location of these changes provide substantial diagnostic information. However gadolinium-based contrast agents (Gd-CA) are not inert drugs. They may cause acute non-renal adverse reactions (e.g. anaphylactoid reactions), acute renal adverse reactions (e.g. contrast induced nephropathy), delayed adverse reactions (nephrogenic systemic fibrosis) and problems at the site of injection (e.g. local necrosis). This review describes the current status of Gd-CA, their mechanism of action, chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, dosage, elimination, nephrotoxicity and adverse events. PMID:18358659

  17. Mechanism of inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase with motexafin gadolinium (MGd)

    SciTech Connect

    Zahedi Avval, Farnaz; Berndt, Carsten; Pramanik, Aladdin; Holmgren, Arne

    2009-02-13

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is an expanded porphyrin anticancer agent which selectively targets tumor cells and works as a radiation enhancer, with promising results in clinical trials. Its mechanism of action is oxidation of intracellular reducing molecules and acting as a direct inhibitor of mammalian ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). This paper focuses on the mechanism of inhibition of RNR by MGd. Our experimental data present at least two pathways for inhibition of RNR; one precluding subunits oligomerization and the other direct inhibition of the large catalytic subunit of the enzyme. Co-localization of MGd and RNR in the cytoplasm particularly in the S-phase may account for its inhibitory properties. These data can elucidate an important effect of MGd on the cancer cells with overproduction of RNR and its efficacy as an anticancer agent and not only as a general radiosensitizer.

  18. Strategies for the preparation of bifunctional gadolinium(III) chelators

    PubMed Central

    Frullano, Luca; Caravan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The development of gadolinium chelators that can be easily and readily linked to various substrates is of primary importance for the development high relaxation efficiency and/or targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Over the last 25 years a large number of bifunctional chelators have been prepared. For the most part, these compounds are based on ligands that are already used in clinically approved contrast agents. More recently, new bifunctional chelators have been reported based on complexes that show a more potent relaxation effect, faster complexation kinetics and in some cases simpler synthetic procedures. This review provides an overview of the synthetic strategies used for the preparation of bifunctional chelators for MRI applications. PMID:22375102

  19. The use of theranostic gadolinium-based nanoprobes to improve radiotherapy efficacy.

    PubMed

    Sancey, L; Lux, F; Kotb, S; Roux, S; Dufort, S; Bianchi, A; Crémillieux, Y; Fries, P; Coll, J-L; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Janier, M; Dutreix, M; Barberi-Heyob, M; Boschetti, F; Denat, F; Louis, C; Porcel, E; Lacombe, S; Le Duc, G; Deutsch, E; Perfettini, J-L; Detappe, A; Verry, C; Berbeco, R; Butterworth, K T; McMahon, S J; Prise, K M; Perriat, P; Tillement, O

    2014-09-01

    A new efficient type of gadolinium-based theranostic agent (AGuIX®) has recently been developed for MRI-guided radiotherapy (RT). These new particles consist of a polysiloxane network surrounded by a number of gadolinium chelates, usually 10. Owing to their small size (<5 nm), AGuIX typically exhibit biodistributions that are almost ideal for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. For example, although a significant proportion of these particles accumulate in tumours, the remainder is rapidly eliminated by the renal route. In addition, in the absence of irradiation, the nanoparticles are well tolerated even at very high dose (10 times more than the dose used for mouse treatment). AGuIX particles have been proven to act as efficient radiosensitizers in a large variety of experimental in vitro scenarios, including different radioresistant cell lines, irradiation energies and radiation sources (sensitizing enhancement ratio ranging from 1.1 to 2.5). Pre-clinical studies have also demonstrated the impact of these particles on different heterotopic and orthotopic tumours, with both intratumoural or intravenous injection routes. A significant therapeutical effect has been observed in all contexts. Furthermore, MRI monitoring was proven to efficiently aid in determining a RT protocol and assessing tumour evolution following treatment. The usual theoretical models, based on energy attenuation and macroscopic dose enhancement, cannot account for all the results that have been obtained. Only theoretical models, which take into account the Auger electron cascades that occur between the different atoms constituting the particle and the related high radical concentrations in the vicinity of the particle, provide an explanation for the complex cell damage and death observed. PMID:24990037

  20. The use of theranostic gadolinium-based nanoprobes to improve radiotherapy efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Sancey, L; Kotb, S; Roux, S; Dufort, S; Bianchi, A; Crémillieux, Y; Fries, P; Coll, J-L; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Janier, M; Dutreix, M; Barberi-Heyob, M; Boschetti, F; Denat, F; Louis, C; Porcel, E; Lacombe, S; Le Duc, G; Deutsch, E; Perfettini, J-L; Detappe, A; Verry, C; Berbeco, R; Butterworth, K T; McMahon, S J; Prise, K M; Perriat, P; Tillement, O

    2014-01-01

    A new efficient type of gadolinium-based theranostic agent (AGuIX®) has recently been developed for MRI-guided radiotherapy (RT). These new particles consist of a polysiloxane network surrounded by a number of gadolinium chelates, usually 10. Owing to their small size (<5 nm), AGuIX typically exhibit biodistributions that are almost ideal for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. For example, although a significant proportion of these particles accumulate in tumours, the remainder is rapidly eliminated by the renal route. In addition, in the absence of irradiation, the nanoparticles are well tolerated even at very high dose (10 times more than the dose used for mouse treatment). AGuIX particles have been proven to act as efficient radiosensitizers in a large variety of experimental in vitro scenarios, including different radioresistant cell lines, irradiation energies and radiation sources (sensitizing enhancement ratio ranging from 1.1 to 2.5). Pre-clinical studies have also demonstrated the impact of these particles on different heterotopic and orthotopic tumours, with both intratumoural or intravenous injection routes. A significant therapeutical effect has been observed in all contexts. Furthermore, MRI monitoring was proven to efficiently aid in determining a RT protocol and assessing tumour evolution following treatment. The usual theoretical models, based on energy attenuation and macroscopic dose enhancement, cannot account for all the results that have been obtained. Only theoretical models, which take into account the Auger electron cascades that occur between the different atoms constituting the particle and the related high radical concentrations in the vicinity of the particle, provide an explanation for the complex cell damage and death observed. PMID:24990037

  1. Studies of narrow autoionizing resonances in gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, Bruce A.; Nortershauser, W.; Blaum, K.; Wendt, Klaus

    2003-06-30

    The autoionization (AI) spectrum of gadolinium between the first and second limits has been investigated by triple-resonance excitation with high-resolution cw lasers. A large number of narrow AI resonances have been observed and assigned total angular momentum J values. The resonances are further divided into members of AI Rydberg series converging to the second limit or other ''interloping'' levels. Fine structure in the Rydberg series has been identified and interpreted in terms of Jc j coupling. A number of detailed studies have been performed on the interloping resonances: These include lifetime determination by lineshape analysis, isotope shifts, hyperfine structure, and photoionization saturation parameters. The electronic structure of the interloping levels is discussed in terms of these studies. Linewidths generally decrease with increasing total angular momentum and the J = 7 resonances are extremely narrow with Lorentzian widths ranging from < 1 MHz up to 157 MHz. The strongest resonances are found to have cross-sections of {approx}10-12 cm{sup 2} and photoionization can be saturated with powers available from cw diode lasers.

  2. Structural, optical and magnetic properties of gadolinium sesquioxide nanobars synthesized via thermal decomposition of gadolinium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Manigandan, R.; Giribabu, K.; Suresh, R.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.; Narayanan, V.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanobars are synthesized by decomposition of C{sub 6}H{sub 20}Gd{sub 2}O{sub 22}. • The nanoparticles are rectangular bar shape with high porous surface. • The combination of magnetic and optical properties within a single particle. • The Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanobars have tailorable nanostructure, wide bandgap and are paramagnetic. - Abstract: Gadolinium oxide nanobars were obtained by thermal decomposition of gadolinium oxalate, which was synthesized by the chemical precipitation method along with glycerol. The functional group analysis and formation of gadolinium oxide from gadolinium oxalate were characterized by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analyzer. The crystal structure, average crystallite size, and lattice parameter were analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Moreover, Raman shifts, elemental composition and morphology of the gadolinium oxide was widely investigated by the laser Raman microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, FE-SEM-EDAX and HR-TEM, respectively. Furthermore, the optical properties like band gap, absorbance measurement of the gadolinium oxide were extensively examined. In addition, the paramagnetic property of gadolinium oxide nanobars was explored by the vibrating sample magnetometer.

  3. The relationship between thermodynamics and the toxicity of gadolinium complexes.

    PubMed

    Cacheris, W P; Quay, S C; Rocklage, S M

    1990-01-01

    The suitability of gadolinium complexes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents depends on a number of factors. A thermodynamic relationship to toxicity exists if one assumes that the chemotoxicity of the intact complex is minimal but that the toxicity of the components of the complex (free metal and uncomplexed ligands) is substantial. Release of Gd3+ from the complex is responsible for the toxicity associated with gadolinium complexes; this release appears to be a consequence of Zn2+, Cu2+, and Ca2+ transmetallation in vivo. This hypothesis is supported by acute toxicity experiments, which demonstrate that despite a 50-fold range of LD50 values for four Gd complexes, all become lethally toxic when they release precisely the same quantity of Gd3+, and by subchronic rodent toxicity experiments, which demonstrate a set of gross and microscopic findings similar to those known to be caused by Zn2+ deficiency. Finally, this hypothesis predicts that subtle changes in formulation can further enhance the intrinsic safety of these complexes. PMID:2118207

  4. Enhancement of the electron electric dipole moment in gadolinium garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhamedjanov, T.N.; Dzuba, V.A.; Sushkov, O.P.

    2003-10-01

    Effects caused by the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) in gadolinium garnets are considered. Experimental studies of these effects could improve the current upper limit on the electron EDM by several orders of magnitude. We suggest a consistent theoretical model and perform calculations of observable effects in gadolinium gallium garnet and gadolinium iron garnet. Our calculation accounts for both direct and exchange diagrams.

  5. Neutron autoradiography of trace amounts of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, J.L.A.; Brugger, R.M. )

    1992-05-01

    This paper reports that application of gadolinium in neutron capture therapy is under evaluation. Crucial to development of this therapy is an imaging technique that would show the distribution and concentration of parts-per-million amounts of {sup 157}Gd in sliced samples. A technique that utilizes the principles of autoradiography and neutron radiography has been tried. The images taken with this method display the gadolinium distribution and its relative concentration in samples. Concentrations of {sup 157}Gd ranging from {approximately}20 to 500 ppm can be determined. The intrinsic spatial resolution of the system used in the Missouri University Research Reactor is 70 {mu}m.

  6. Determination of stability constants and acute toxicity of potential hepatotropic gadolinium complexes.

    PubMed

    Mikiciuk-Olasik, Elzbieta; Wojewoda, Emilia; Bilichowski, Ireneusz; Witczak, Małgorzata; Karwowski, Bolesław; Wagrowska-Danilewicz, Małgorzata; Stasikowska, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Due to their high specificity for the hepatobiliary system, iminodiacetic acid derivatives are known to form a class of hepatobiliary agents. In this paper we present new hepatotropic gadolinium complexes to be used as potential MRI contrast agents. Derivatives of N-(2-phenylamine-2-oxoethyl) iminodiacetic acid are introduced as ligands into such complexes. In this way, we hope to achieve a valuable diagnostic tool for investigating of pathological changes in the liver. Stability constants of complexes were determined by potentiometric titration in 0.1 mol L(-1) NaNO3 solution at 20.0 +/- 0.1 degrees C. Stability and selectivity constants were also determined for endogenous metal ions such as Cu2+, Ca2+, and Zn2+ with the use of SUPERQUAD computer program. Acute toxicity of new gadolinium complexes was assessed in mice and histopathology examinations were carried out. PMID:20369788

  7. Detection of anthropogenic gadolinium in the Brisbane River plume in Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael G

    2010-07-01

    Wastewater effluent is known to contain macro and micropollutants, which may be deleterious to environmental health. One such class of micropollutants is chelated gadolinium, which are used as MRI contrast agents. As these MRI contrast agents can be assumed to behave conservatively during estuarine mixing, it is possible to calculate how much wastewater is represented in any particular sample. In this study, the percentage contribution of wastewater at specific locations in Moreton Bay, Qld, were determined by calculating the additional anthropogenic gadolinium contribution to the total rare earth element concentrations. Wastewater contributions were measured at concentrations as low as 0.2%, demonstrating the applicability of this technique for wastewater effluent plume mapping. PMID:20409563

  8. Gadolinium-modulated 19F signals from Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles as a New Strategy for Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Anne M.; Myerson, Jacob; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Hockett, Franklin D.; Winter, Patrick M.; Chen, Junjie; Gaffney, Patrick J.; Robertson, J. David; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in the design of fluorinated nanoparticles for magnetic resonance molecular imaging have enabled specific detection of 19F nuclei, providing unique and quantifiable spectral signatures. However, a pressing need for signal enhancement exists because the total 19F in imaging voxels is often limited. By directly incorporating a relaxation agent (gadolinium) into the lipid monolayer that surrounds the perfluorocarbon, a marked augmentation of the 19F signal from 200nm nanoparticles was achieved. This design increases the magnetic relaxation rate of the 19F nuclei 4-fold at 1.5 T and effects a 125% increase in signal, an effect which is maintained when they are targeted to human plasma clots. By varying the surface concentration of gadolinium, the relaxation effect can be quantitatively modulated to tailor particle properties. This novel strategy dramatically improves the sensitivity and range of 19F MRI/MRS and forms the basis for designing contrast agents capable of sensing their surface chemistry. PMID:18956457

  9. The feasibility of in vivo quantification of bone-gadolinium in humans by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) following gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chettle, D. R.; Noseworthy, M. D.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2015-11-01

    The feasibility of using a 238Pu/Be-based in vivo prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) system, previously successfully used for measurements of muscle, for the detection of gadolinium (Gd) in bone was presented. Gd is extensively used in contrast agents in MR imaging. We present phantom measurement data for the measurement of Gd in the tibia. Gd has seven naturally occurring isotopes, of which two have extremely large neutron capture cross sections; 155Gd (14.8% natural abundance (NA), σ= 60,900 barns) and 157Gd (15.65% NA, σ= 254,000 barns). Our previous work focused on muscle but this only informs about the short term kinetics of Gd. We studied the possibility of measuring bone, as it may be a long term storage site for Gd. A human simulating bone phantom set was developed. The phantoms were doped with seven concentrations of Gd of concentrations 0.0, 25, 50, 75, 100, 120 and 150 ppm. Additional elements important for neutron activation analysis, Na, Cl and Ca, were also included to create an overall elemental composition consistent with Reference Man. The overall conclusion is that the potential application of this Pu-Be-based prompt in vivo NAA for the monitoring of the storage and retention of Gd in bone is not feasible.

  10. Phospholipid micelle encapsulated gadolinium oxide nanoparticles for imaging and gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Suraj; Das, Mahasweta; Alwarappan, Subbiah; Goicochea, Nancy L.; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2014-01-01

    We encapsulated gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles within phospholipid micelles as a novel low cytotoxic T1-weighted MRI imaging contrast agent (MGdNPs) that can also deliver small molecules such as DNA plasmids. MGdNPs show relatively good MRI relaxivity values, negligible cytotoxicity, excellent cellular uptake and expression of DNA plasmids in vivo. Biodistribution studies in mice show that intranasal and intraperitoneal administration of MGdNPs can effectively target specific organs. PMID:24724012

  11. Gadolinium: Central Metal of the Lanthanoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laing, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of gadolinium are compared with those of the other lanthanoids. Some properties are intermediate between those of lanthanum and lutetium; some between those of barium and hafnium; and others (unexpectedly) between those of ytterbium and lutetium. Both the remarkably high molar heat capacity of the metal and the…

  12. A toxicological study of gadolinium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show gadolinium nitrate to have potential sensitizing properties. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated that it was cutaneously a severe irritant. This material was considered an irritant in the rabbit eye application studies. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Pineapple juice labeled with gadolinium: a convenient oral contrast for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Emmanuel; Metens, Thierry; Winant, Catherine; Matos, Celso

    2005-10-01

    The aim of our study was to prepare in vitro a pineapple juice (PJ) solution labeled with a minimal gadolinium concentration working as a negative contrast agent in heavily T2-weighted imaging and to assess that solution in vivo as a negative oral contrast agent for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Three PJs were compared in vitro according to their T2. Increasing concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DOTA in PJ were assessed in vitro for T2 reduction. Single-shot turbo spin echo T2-weighted MR cholangiopancreatograms were obtained for 35 patients with suspected biliopancreatic duct disease, before and after ingestion of the PJ/Gd-DOTA solution. Signal intensity (SI) measurements of gastroduodenal lumens, pancreatobiliary ducts, and image quality scores were obtained systematically before and after contrast ingestion. The in vitro selected Gd-DOTA concentration in the PJ was 2.76 mmol/l. Ingestion of 180 ml of PJ labeled with 1 ml of Gd-DOTA eliminated efficiently the gastroduodenal SI in MRCP, improving significantly the rates of complete visualization of the pancreatobiliary ducts (P<0.01) and the MRCP image quality scores (P<0.05). All patients easily ingested the contrast solution and found the solution palatable. PJ labeled with gadolinium constituted an efficient and convenient negative oral contrast agent for MRCP. PMID:15999215

  14. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  15. Gadolinium Deposition in Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis: An Examination of Tissue using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    High, W.; Ranville, J; Brown, M; Punshon, T; Lanzirotti, A; Jackson, B

    2010-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder associated with gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents dosed during renal insufficiency. In two patients, Gd deposition in tissue affected by nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was quantified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The presence of Gd was confirmed and mapped using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Affected skin and soft tissue from the lower extremity demonstrated 89 and 209 ppm ({micro}g/g, dry weight, formalin fixed) in cases 1 and 2, respectively. In case 2, the same skin and soft tissue was retested after paraffin embedding, with the fat content removed by xylene washes, and this resulted in a measured value of 189 ppm ({micro}g/g, dry weight, paraffin embedded). Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed Gd in the affected tissue of both cases, and provided high-sensitivity and high-resolution spatial mapping of Gd deposition. A gradient of Gd deposition in tissue correlated with fibrosis and cellularity. Gd deposited in periadnexal locations within the skin, including hair and eccrine ducts, where it colocalized to areas of high calcium and zinc content. Because of the difficulty in obtaining synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy scans, tissue from only two patients were mapped. A single control with kidney disease and gadolinium-based contrast agent exposure did not contain Gd. Gd content on a gravimetric basis was impacted by processing that removed fat and altered the dry weight of the specimens. Gradients of Gd deposition in tissue corresponded to fibrosis and cellularity. Adnexal deposition of Gd correlated with areas of high calcium and zinc content.

  16. Gadolinium-Enhanced Angiography for Diagnosis and Interventional Treatment of Subclavian Artery Stenosis Prior to Fistula Creation

    SciTech Connect

    Termote, Bruno; Maleux, Geert Heye, Sam; Fourneau, Inge; Claes, Kathleen

    2008-07-15

    We report the use of gadolinium-based contrast agent for both diagnostic and interventional subclavian angiography in two azotemic patients, presenting with an asymptomatic, high-grade stenosis of the left subclavian artery, ipsilateral to the site of choice for native fistula creation. Angiographic imaging performed with diluted gadolinium-based contrast material was clear enough to perform successful subclavian artery stenting, resulting in normalization of the arterial blood pressure in the afferent artery of the dialysis fistula. Clinically, no decrease in residual renal function and no other complication were noted immediately or a longer period after the interventional treatment.

  17. Acute adverse reactions to magnetic resonance contrast media--gadolinium chelates.

    PubMed

    Li, A; Wong, C S; Wong, M K; Lee, C M; Au Yeung, M C

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical safety of intravenous gadolinium-based contrast media used in patients who underwent MRI at a single institution. Acute adverse reactions to intravenous gadolinium-based contrast media used for MRI at the Princess Margaret Hospital, Hong Kong, SAR, from January 1999 to November 2004 were recorded in an incidence log book. The medical records of patients' demographics were retrospectively reviewed and the nature, frequency and severity of the adverse reactions were investigated and documented. The incidence of acute adverse reactions to intravenous gadolinium-based contrast media was 0.48% (45 patients with 46 adverse reactions). The severity of these adverse reactions were 96% mild, 2% moderate (one patient developed shortness of breath that required oxygen supplementation and intravenous steroidal management) and 2% severe (one patient developed an anaphylactoid reaction, but successfully recovered through timely resuscitation). No patients were recorded as having contrast extravasation and none died as a result of any adverse reaction. Among the 45 patients who developed adverse reactions, three patients (6.7%) had prior adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media, three (6.7%) had prior reactions to a different gadolinium-based contrast agent, one (2%) had asthma and nine (20%) had a history of drug/food allergy. Overall, 41% of the adverse reactions were not documented in the final MRI report or the clinical medical records. Gadolinium-based contrast media are safe and well tolerated by the vast majority of patients. In our study, the adverse reaction rate (0.48%) and the incidence of severe anaphylactoid reaction (0.01%) concur with those reported in the literature. Although most of the symptoms are mild and transient, these adverse reactions must be accurately documented and managed. PMID:16632615

  18. Gadolinium in human glioblastoma cells for gadolinium neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    De Stasio, G; Casalbore, P; Pallini, R; Gilbert, B; Sanità, F; Ciotti, M T; Rosi, G; Festinesi, A; Larocca, L M; Rinelli, A; Perret, D; Mogk, D W; Perfetti, P; Mehta, M P; Mercanti, D

    2001-05-15

    157Gd is a potential agent for neutron capture cancer therapy (GdNCT). We directly observed the microdistribution of Gd in cultured human glioblastoma cells exposed to Gd-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). We demonstrated, with three independent techniques, that Gd-DTPA penetrates the plasma membrane, and we observed no deleterious effect on cell survival. A systematic microchemical analysis revealed a higher Gd accumulation in cell nuclei compared with cytoplasm. This is significant for prospective GdNCT because the proximity of Gd to DNA increases the cell-killing potential of the short-range, high-energy electrons emitted during the neutron capture reaction. We also exposed Gd-containing cells to thermal neutrons and demonstrated the GdNC reaction effectiveness in inducing cell death. These results in vitro stimulated in vivo Gd-DTPA uptake studies, currently underway, in human glioblastoma patients. PMID:11358855

  19. Screening of antimicrobial agents for in vitro radiation protection and mitigation capacity, including those used in supportive care regimens for bone marrow transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Michael W; Franicola, Darcy; Shields, Donna; Rwigema, Jean-Claude; Stone, Brandon; Zhang, Xichen; McBride, William; Georges, George; Wipf, Peter; Greenberger, Joel S

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotic and antifungal agents used in supportive care regimens for bone marrow transplantation recipients contribute to a significant dose-modifying effect of otherwise lethal total body irradiation. To determine whether drugs used in supportive care and other commonly used antibiotics such as tetracycline function as radiation protectors or damage mitigators in vitro, 13 drugs were tested for radiation protection and radiation damage mitigation of 32D cl 3 hematopoietic progenitor cells in clonagenic survival curves in vitro. Antibiotic/Antifungal agents including cilastatin, amikacin, ceftazidine, vancomycin, tetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, methacycline, minocycline, meclocycline, oxytetracycline and rolitetracycline were added in 1, 10, or 100 micromolar concentrations to murine interleukin-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line 32D cl 3 cells either before or after irradiation of 0 to 8 Gy. Control irradiated 32D cl 3 cells showed radiosensitivity comparable to freshly explanted mouse marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells (D(0) 1.1+/-0.1 Gy, N 1.5+/-0.4). Positive control GS-nitroxide JP4-039 (known radiation mitigator) treated 32D cl 3 cells were radioresistant (D(0) 1.2+/-0.1, N 5.8+/-2.4 (p=0.009)). Of the 13 drugs tested, tetracycline was found to be a significant radiation mitigator (D(0) 0.9+/-0.1, N 13.9+/-0.4 (p=0.0027)). Thus, the radiation dose-modifying effect of some antibiotics, but not those currently used in the supportive care (antibiotic/antifungal regimens) for marrow transplant patients, may act as radiation damage mitigators for hematopoietic cells as well as decreasing the growth and inflammatory response to microbial pathogens. PMID:20133970

  20. Geometrically confined ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles boost the T1 contrast ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Kaiyuan; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhou, Zijian; Yang, Li; Wang, Lirong; Ai, Hua; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-01

    High-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and novel contrast enhancement strategies are urgently needed for sensitive and accurate diagnosis. Here we report a strategy to construct a new T1 contrast agent based on the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) theory. We loaded the ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into worm-like interior channels of mesoporous silica nanospheres (Gd2O3@MSN nanocomposites). This unique structure endows the nanocomposites with geometrical confinement, high molecular tumbling time, and a large coordinated number of water molecules, which results in a significant enhancement of the T1 contrast with longitudinal proton relaxivity (r1) as high as 45.08 mM-1 s-1. Such a high r1 value of Gd2O3@MSN, compared to those of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles and gadolinium-based clinical contrast agents, is mainly attributed to the strong geometrical confinement effect. This strategy provides new guidance for developing various high-performance T1 contrast agents for sensitive imaging and disease diagnosis.High-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and novel contrast enhancement strategies are urgently needed for sensitive and accurate diagnosis. Here we report a strategy to construct a new T1 contrast agent based on the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) theory. We loaded the ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into worm-like interior channels of mesoporous silica nanospheres (Gd2O3@MSN nanocomposites). This unique structure endows the nanocomposites with geometrical confinement, high molecular tumbling time, and a large coordinated number of water molecules, which results in a significant enhancement of the T1 contrast with longitudinal proton relaxivity (r1) as high as 45.08 mM-1 s-1. Such a high r1 value of Gd2O3@MSN, compared to those of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles and gadolinium-based clinical contrast agents, is mainly attributed to the strong geometrical confinement effect. This strategy

  1. Gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid-loaded chitosan microspheres for gadolinium neutron-capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tapan Kumar; Ichikawa, Hideki; Fukumori, Yoshinobu

    2006-12-11

    In order to provide a suitable device that would contain water-soluble drugs, highly water-soluble gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid-loaded chitosan microspheres (CMS-Gd-DTPA) were prepared by the emulsion method using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker and Span 80 as a surfactant for gadolinium neutron-capture therapy of cancer. The gadolinium content and the mass median diameter of CMS-Gd-DTPA were estimated. The size and morphology of the CMS-Gd-DTPA were strongly influenced by the initial applied weight ratio of Gd-DTPA:chitosan. FTIR spectra showed that the electrostatic interaction between chitosan and Gd-DTPA accelerated the formation of gadolinium-enriched chitosan microspheres. Sufficient amounts of glutaraldehyde and Span 80 were necessary for producing discrete CMS-Gd-DTPA. The CMS-Gd-DTPA having a mass median diameter 11.7microm and 11.6% of gadolinium could be used in Gd-NCT following intratumoral injection. PMID:17045253

  2. Current state of evidence on 'off-label' therapeutic options for systemic lupus erythematosus, including biological immunosuppressive agents, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland--a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Burkhardt, H; Burmester, G R; Fischer-Betz, R; Fleck, M; Graninger, W; Hiepe, F; Jacobi, A M; Kötter, I; Lakomek, H J; Lorenz, H M; Manger, B; Schett, G; Schmidt, R E; Schneider, M; Schulze-Koops, H; Smolen, J S; Specker, C; Stoll, T; Strangfeld, A; Tony, H P; Villiger, P M; Voll, R; Witte, T; Dörner, T

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a severe and potentially life-threatening disease that often represents a therapeutic challenge because of its heterogeneous organ manifestations. Only glucocorticoids, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide and very recently belimumab have been approved for SLE therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Dependence on glucocorticoids and resistance to the approved therapeutic agents, as well as substantial toxicity, are frequent. Therefore, treatment considerations will include 'off-label' use of medication approved for other indications. In this consensus approach, an effort has been undertaken to delineate the limits of the current evidence on therapeutic options for SLE organ disease, and to agree on common practice. This has been based on the best available evidence obtained by a rigorous literature review and the authors' own experience with available drugs derived under very similar health care conditions. Preparation of this consensus document included an initial meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review with subsequent formulation of a consensus and determination of the evidence level followed by collecting the level of agreement from the panel members. In addition to overarching principles, the panel have focused on the treatment of major SLE organ manifestations (lupus nephritis, arthritis, lung disease, neuropsychiatric and haematological manifestations, antiphospholipid syndrome and serositis). This consensus report is intended to support clinicians involved in the care of patients with difficult courses of SLE not responding to standard therapies by providing up-to-date information on the best available evidence. PMID:22072024

  3. Method of separating and purifying gadolinium-153

    DOEpatents

    Bray, Lane A [Richland, WA; Corneillie, Todd M [Davis, CA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement to the method of separating and purifying gadolinium from a mixture of gadolinium and europium having the steps of (a) dissolving the mixture in an acid; (b) reducing europium+3 to europium+2; and (c) precipitating the europium+2 with a sulfate ion in a superstoichiometric amount; wherein the improvement is achieved by using one or more of the following: (i) the acid is an anoic acid; (ii) the reducing is with zinc metal in the absence of a second metal or with an amount of the second metal that is ineffective in the reducing; (iii) adding a group IIA element after step (c) for precipitating the excess sulfate prior to repeating step (c); (iv) the sulfate is a sulfate salt with a monovalent cation; (v) adding cold europium+3 prior to repeating step (c).

  4. Progress Towards Laser Cooling and Trapping Gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Upendra; Simien, Clayton

    2016-05-01

    Lanthanide elements are of interest because of their potential for investigating next generation optical clock transitions, novel non-S ground state ultracold collisions, and the physics of quantum degenerate dipolar gases. We present our progress towards laser cooling and trapping atomic Gadolinium (Gd). A magneto-optical trap is the first step towards precision measurements, ultracold collision studies, and for probing dipolar physics of Gd. The design, construction, and performance of the apparatus will be presented.

  5. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles for highly efficient T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Kang, Byunghoon; Choi, Yuna; Jang, Eunji; Han, Seungmin; Lee, Kwangyeol; Suh, Jin-Suck; Haam, Seungjoo; Huh, Yong-Min

    2014-06-01

    We developed Pyrene-Gadolinium (Py-Gd) nanoparticles as pH-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents capable of showing a high-Mr signal in cancer-specific environments, such as acidic conditions. Py-Gd nanoparticles were prepared by coating Py-Gd, which is a complex of gadolinium with pyrenyl molecules, with pyrenyl polyethyleneglycol PEG using a nano-emulsion method. These particles show better longitudinal relaxation time (T1) MR signals in acidic conditions than they do in neutral conditions. Furthermore, the particles exhibit biocompatibility and MR contrast effects in both in vitro and in vivo studies. From these results, we confirm that Py-Gd nanoparticles have the potential to be applied for accurate cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  6. Gadofullerene MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bolskar, Robert D

    2008-04-01

    A promising new class of MRI contrast-enhancing agents with high relaxivities is based on gadolinium-containing metallofullerenes, which are also termed gadofullerenes. Detailed study of the water-proton relaxivity properties and intermolecular nanoclustering behavior of gadofullerene derivatives has revealed valuable information about their relaxivity mechanisms and given a deeper understanding of this new class of paramagnetic contrast agent. Here, the latest findings on water-solubilized gadofullerene materials and how these findings relate to their future applications in MRI are reviewed and discussed. PMID:18373426

  7. Polycatechol Nanoparticle MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiwen; Huang, Yuran; Wang, Zhao; Carniato, Fabio; Xie, Yijun; Patterson, Joseph P; Thompson, Matthew P; Andolina, Christopher M; Ditri, Treffly B; Millstone, Jill E; Figueroa, Joshua S; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Scadeng, Miriam; Botta, Mauro; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2016-02-01

    Amphiphilic triblock copolymers containing Fe(III) -catecholate complexes formulated as spherical- or cylindrical-shaped micellar nanoparticles (SMN and CMN, respectively) are described as new T1-weighted agents with high relaxivity, low cytotoxicity, and long-term stability in biological fluids. Relaxivities of both SMN and CMN exceed those of established gadolinium chelates across a wide range of magnetic field strengths. Interestingly, shape-dependent behavior is observed in terms of the particles' interactions with HeLa cells, with CMN exhibiting enhanced uptake and contrast via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with SMN. These results suggest that control over soft nanoparticle shape will provide an avenue for optimization of particle-based contrast agents as biodiagnostics. The polycatechol nanoparticles are proposed as suitable for preclinical investigations into their viability as gadolinium-free, safe, and effective imaging agents for MRI contrast enhancement. PMID:26681255

  8. Cationic gadolinium chelate for magnetic resonance imaging of cartilaginous defects.

    PubMed

    Nwe, Kido; Huang, Ching-Hui; Qu, Feini; Warden-Rothman, Robert; Zhang, Clare Y; Mauck, Robert L; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The ability to detect meniscus defects by magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) can be highly variable. To improve the delineation of fine tears, we synthesized a cationic gadolinium complex, (Gd-DOTA-AM4 )(2+) , that can electrostatically interact with Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The complex has a longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of 4.2 mM(-1) s(-1) and is highly stable in serum. Its efficacy in highlighting soft tissue tears was evaluated in comparison to a clinically employed contrast agent (Magnevist) using explants obtained from adult bovine menisci. In all cases, Gd-DOTA-AM4 appeared to improve the ability to detect the soft tissue defect by providing increased signal intensity along the length of the tear. Magnevist shows a strong signal near the liquid-meniscus interface, but much less contrast is observed within the defect at greater depths. This provides initial evidence that cationic contrast agents can be used to improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26853708

  9. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  10. Geometrically confined ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles boost the T(1) contrast ability.

    PubMed

    Ni, Kaiyuan; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhou, Zijian; Yang, Li; Wang, Lirong; Ai, Hua; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-14

    High-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and novel contrast enhancement strategies are urgently needed for sensitive and accurate diagnosis. Here we report a strategy to construct a new T1 contrast agent based on the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) theory. We loaded the ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into worm-like interior channels of mesoporous silica nanospheres (Gd2O3@MSN nanocomposites). This unique structure endows the nanocomposites with geometrical confinement, high molecular tumbling time, and a large coordinated number of water molecules, which results in a significant enhancement of the T1 contrast with longitudinal proton relaxivity (r1) as high as 45.08 mM(-1) s(-1). Such a high r1 value of Gd2O3@MSN, compared to those of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles and gadolinium-based clinical contrast agents, is mainly attributed to the strong geometrical confinement effect. This strategy provides new guidance for developing various high-performance T1 contrast agents for sensitive imaging and disease diagnosis. PMID:26814592

  11. Resonance parameter measurements and analysis of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Barry, D. P.; Trbovich, M. J.; Burke, J. A.; Drindak, N. J.; Knox, H. D.; Ballad, R. V.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.; Severnyak, L. I.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of gadolinium accurately. Gd has the highest thermal absorption cross section of any natural element. Therefore it is an important element for thermal reactor applications Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either {sup 155}Gd or {sup 157}Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a sodium iodide detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. The results of the thermal region analysis are significant. Resonance parameters for the low energy doublet, at 0.025 and 0.032 eV, are presented. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. Thermal capture cross sections and capture resonance integrals for each isotope as well as elemental gadolinium are presented. In the epithermal region, natural metal samples were measured in capture and transmission. Neutron interaction data up to 300 eV have been analyzed. Substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for {sup 155}Gd ends. (authors)

  12. Extraction-chromatographic affinage in gadolinium-153 preparation production technology

    SciTech Connect

    Melnik, M.I.; Karelin, E.A.; Kuznetsov, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    The gadolinium 153 preparation is used for production of medical gamma-sources which are applicable in bone densimeters for early diagnostics of osteoporosis. This preparation must meet strict requirements with respect to the content of europium radionuclides and specific activity. In The Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) the gadolinium 153 is produced by neutron irradiation of Europium 151. This process is described.

  13. Light deflection in gadolinium molybdate ferroelastic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniorowski, Piotr; Bornarel, Jean

    2000-02-01

    The deflection of a He-Ne light beam by polydomain gadolinium molybdate (GMO) crystals has been studied with respect to incidence angle icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i on the sample at room temperature. The A and B deflected beams do not cross each other during the icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> i variation, in contrast to results and calculations previously published. The model using the Fresnel equation confirms this result. The model presented is more accurate for numerical calculation than that using the Huygens construction.

  14. Towards modeling gadolinium-lead-borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rada, S.; Ristoiu, T.; Rada, M.; Coroiu, I.; Maties, V.; Culea, E.

    2010-01-15

    Infrared spectra of gadolinium-lead-borate glasses of the xGd{sub 2}O{sub 3}.(100 - x)[3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.PbO] system, where x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 35 and 50 mol.%, have been recorded to explore the role of content of gadolinium ions behaving as glass modifier. The FTIR spectroscopy data for the xGd{sub 2}O{sub 3}.(1 - x)[3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.PbO] glasses show the structural role of lead ions as a network-formers and of the gadolinium ions network modifiers. Adding of the rare earth ion up to 35 mol.% into the glass matrix, the IR bands characteristic to the studied glasses become sharper and more pronounced. Structural changes, as recognized by analyzing band shapes of IR spectra, revealed that Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} causes a change from the continuous borate network to the continuous lead-borate network interconnected through Pb-O-B and B-O-B bridges and the transformation of some tetrahedral [BO{sub 4}] units into trigonal [BO{sub 3}] units. Then, gadolinium ions have affinity towards [BO{sub 3}] structural units which contain non-bridging oxygens necessary for the charge compensation because the more electronegative [BO{sub 3}] structural units were implied in the formation of B-O-Gd bonds and the transformation of glass network into a glass ceramic. We propose a possible structural model of building blocks for the formation of continuous random 3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.PbO network glass used by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations show that lead atoms occupy three different sites in the proposed model. The first is coordinated with six oxygen atoms forming distorted octahedral geometries. The second lead atom has an octahedral oxygen environment and the five longer Pb-O bonds are considered as participating in the metal coordination scheme. The third lead atom has ionic character. In agreement with the results offered by the experimental FTIR data, the theoretical IR data confirm that our proposed structure is highly possible.

  15. In vitro study of novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer for promising tumor targeting and tumor diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Meng-Jie; Li, Kun-Feng; Zhang, Lan-Xin; Wang, Huan; Liu, Li-Si; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Han, Nan-Yin; Yang, Zhen-Jun; Fan, Tian-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer were developed and evaluated in vitro to enhance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis of tumor. Nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes were achieved by incorporating amphipathic material, Gd (III) [N,N-bis-stearylamidomethyl-N′-amidomethyl] diethylenetriamine tetraacetic acid, into the liposome membrane using lipid film hydration method. GBI-10, as the targeting ligand, was then conjugated onto the liposome surface to get GBI-10-targeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes (GTLs). Both nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes and GTLs displayed good dispersion stability, optimal size, and zeta potential for tumor targeting, as well as favorable imaging properties with enhanced relaxivity compared with a commercial MRI contrast agent (CA), gadopentetate dimeglumine. The use of GBI-10 aptamer in this liposomal system was intended to result in increased accumulation of gadolinium at the periphery of C6 glioma cells, where the targeting extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C is overexpressed. Increased cellular binding of GTLs to C6 cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and MRI, demonstrating the promise of this novel delivery system as a carrier of MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of tumor. These studies provide a new strategy furthering the development of nanomedicine for both diagnosis and therapy of tumor. PMID:26316749

  16. Comparison of inhibition kinetics of several organophosphates, including some nerve agent surrogates, using human erythrocyte and rat and mouse brain acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Coban, Alper; Carr, Russell L; Chambers, Howard W; Willeford, Kenneth O; Chambers, Janice E

    2016-04-25

    Because testing of nerve agents is limited to only authorized facilities, our laboratory developed several surrogates that resemble nerve agents because they phosphylate the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with the same moiety as the actual nerve agents. The inhibition kinetic parameters were determined for AChE by surrogates of cyclosarin (NCMP), sarin (NIMP, PIMP and TIMP) and VX (NEMP and TEMP) and other organophosphorus compounds derived from insecticides. All compounds were tested with rat brain and a subset was tested with mouse brain and purified human erythrocyte AChE. Within the compounds tested on all AChE sources, chlorpyrifos-oxon had the highest molecular rate constant followed by NCMP and NEMP. This was followed by NIMP then paraoxon and DFP with rat and mouse brain AChE but DFP was a more potent inhibitor than NIMP and paraoxon with human AChE. With the additional compounds tested only in rat brain, TEMP was slightly less potent than NEMP but more potent than PIMP which was more potent than NIMP. Methyl paraoxon was slightly less potent than paraoxon but more potent than TIMP which was more potent than DFP. Overall, this study validates that the pattern of inhibitory potencies of our surrogates is comparable to the pattern of inhibitory potencies of actual nerve agents (i.e., cyclosarin>VX>sarin), and that these are more potent than insecticidal organophosphates. PMID:26965078

  17. Magnetic resonance knee arthrography. Enhanced contrast by gadolinium complex in the rabbit and in humans.

    PubMed

    Engel, A

    1990-01-01

    This study contains the fundamentals and the technique of the intraarticular application of an MRI contrast agent in connection with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI arthrography). It also presents the resulting clinical relevance for knee joint diagnostics. The significance of MRI arthrography is linked above all to the central question of whether or not it is possible to depict the hyaline cartilage, its surface and its thickness with the help of MRI arthrography. MRI arthrography was used for in vitro examinations of rabbit knee joint cartilage and human joint cartilage. The in vivo application was carried out in 73 patients. Apart from the metric evaluation and the assessment of the information content of the MRI image, the corresponding histologic sections were made in 20 knee joints in order to compare the cartilage surface and the thickness of the cartilage with the results in the MRI image. The optimum amount of contrast agent for visualization was determined, the uptake and clearance of the contrast agent from the cartilage were assessed, and trace elements from the cartilage were also analyzed. The examination showed that the molecular structure of the contrast agent (gadolinium-DTPA) does not prevent the uptake of the contrast agent into the matrix of the hyaline cartilage. But this process is reversible. Thus, 14 hours after the intraarticular application of the contrast agent no measurable traces of gadolinium-DTPA could be established. The intraarticular application of the contrast agent also made it possible to achieve a constant and reproducible visualization of all joint structures. This affected mainly the surface of the hyaline cartilage. The best imaging quality was achieved with intraarticular application of 30 to 40 mL of a 2 mmolar solution of gadolinium-DTPA. The technique used for the intraarticular application is the same as for the common procedures of knee joint aspiration. The clinical importance of MRI arthrography lies in the fact that

  18. Bioconjugation of luminescent silicon quantum dots to gadolinium ions for bioimaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erogbogbo, Folarin; Chang, Ching-Wen; May, Jasmine L.; Liu, Liwei; Kumar, Rajiv; Law, Wing-Cheung; Ding, Hong; Yong, Ken Tye; Roy, Indrajit; Sheshadri, Mukund; Swihart, Mark T.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2012-08-01

    Luminescent imaging agents and MRI contrast agents are desirable components in the rational design of multifunctional nanoconstructs for biological imaging applications. Luminescent biocompatible silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) and gadolinium chelates can be applied for fluorescence microscopy and MRI, respectively. Here, we report the first synthesis of a nanocomplex incorporating SiQDs and gadolinium ions (Gd3+) for biological applications. The nanoconstruct is composed of a PEGylated micelle, with hydrophobic SiQDs in its core, covalently bound to DOTA-chelated Gd3+. Dynamic light scattering reveals a radius of 85 nm for these nanoconstructs, which is consistent with the electron microscopy results depicting radii ranging from 25 to 60 nm. Cellular uptake of the probes verified that they maintain their optical properties within the intracellular environment. The magnetic resonance relaxivity of the nanoconstruct was 2.4 mM-1 s-1 (in terms of Gd3+ concentration), calculated to be around 6000 mM-1 s-1 per nanoconstruct. These desirable optical and relaxivity properties of the newly developed probe open the door for use of SiQDs in future multimodal applications such as tumour imaging.Luminescent imaging agents and MRI contrast agents are desirable components in the rational design of multifunctional nanoconstructs for biological imaging applications. Luminescent biocompatible silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) and gadolinium chelates can be applied for fluorescence microscopy and MRI, respectively. Here, we report the first synthesis of a nanocomplex incorporating SiQDs and gadolinium ions (Gd3+) for biological applications. The nanoconstruct is composed of a PEGylated micelle, with hydrophobic SiQDs in its core, covalently bound to DOTA-chelated Gd3+. Dynamic light scattering reveals a radius of 85 nm for these nanoconstructs, which is consistent with the electron microscopy results depicting radii ranging from 25 to 60 nm. Cellular uptake of the probes verified that they

  19. A case of delayed onset nephrogenic systemic fibrosis after gadolinium based contrast injection.

    PubMed

    Do, Jong Geol; Kim, Young Bum; Lee, Dae Gu; Hwang, Ji Hye

    2012-12-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a rare fibrosing disorder of the skin and joints that occurs in patients with advanced renal insufficiency. This condition is progressive and can be seriously disabling. Gadolinium based contrast agent (GBCA) has been identified as a potential cause of this condition. A 56-years-old man in hemodialysis developed stiffness and contracture of the whole limbs eight years after frequent GBCA exposure for cervical magnetic resonance imaging. For the first time in Korea, we report late-onset nephrogenic systemic fibrosis after GBCA exposure and performed an electrophysiologic study of this condition. PMID:23342325

  20. Hybrid Calcium Phosphate-Polymeric Micelles Incorporating Gadolinium Chelates for Imaging-Guided Gadolinium Neutron Capture Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mi, Peng; Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Li, Yanmin; Aoki, Ichio; Ono, Koji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Cabral, Horacio; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2015-06-23

    Gadolinium (Gd) chelates-loaded nanocarriers have high potential for achieving magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided Gd neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) of tumors. Herein, we developed calcium phosphate micelles hybridized with PEG-polyanion block copolymers, and incorporated with the clinical MRI contrast agent Gd-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA/CaP). The Gd-DTPA/CaP were nontoxic to cancer cells at the concentration of 100 μM based on Gd-DTPA, while over 50% of the cancer cells were killed by thermal neutron irradiation at this concentration. Moreover, the Gd-DTPA/CaP showed a dramatically increased accumulation of Gd-DTPA in tumors, leading to the selective contrast enhancement of tumor tissues for precise tumor location by MRI. The enhanced tumor-to-blood distribution ratio of Gd-DTPA/CaP resulted in the effective suppression of tumor growth without loss of body weight, indicating the potential of Gd-DTPA/CaP for safe cancer treatment. PMID:26033034

  1. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  2. Gadolinium enrichment technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynam, Christopher A.; Comaskey, Brian J.; Conway, John; Eggert, Jon; Glaser, Joseph; Ng, Edmund W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Solarz, Richard W.; Worden, Earl F.

    1993-05-01

    A method based on polarization selectivity and three step laser photoionization is presented for separation of the odd isotopes of gadolinium. Measurements of the spectroscopic parameters needed to quantify the excitation pathway are discussed. Model results are presented for the efficiency of photoionization. The vapor properties of electron beam vaporized gadolinium are presented which show dramatic cooling during the expansion of the hot dense vapor into a vacuum. This results in a significant increase in the efficiency of conversion of natural feed into enriched product in the AVLIS process. Production of enriched gadolinium for use in commercial power reactors appears to be economically viable using technology in use at LLNL.

  3. Hypertrophic olivary degeneration with gadolinium enhancement after posterior fossa surgery in a child with medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Johannes; Alkonyi, Balint; Rutkowski, Stefan; Homola, György A; Warmuth-Metz, Monika

    2014-05-01

    Hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) is a rare transsynaptic form of degeneration occurring secondary to the disruption of the dentato-rubro-olivary pathway ("Guillain-Mollaret triangle"). HOD can be caused by ischemic, hemorrhagic, traumatic, or neoplastic lesions, and it can also occur following posterior fossa surgery. MRI characteristics of HOD include T2 signal increase and hypertrophy. To date, blood–brain barrier disruption has not been reported in HOD. Here, we present the first case of HOD with temporary gadolinium enhancement in a 10-year-old child 7 months after resection of a posterior fossa medulloblastoma. The recognition of gadolinium enhancement as a radiological feature of HOD may help to distinguish between this benign secondary condition and tumor recurrence. PMID:24122017

  4. Synthesis of gadolinium oxide magnetoliposomes for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Danielle; Zhu, Weibe L.; Frommen, Christoph M.; Rosenzweig, Zeev

    2000-05-01

    A method for the synthesis of gadolinium oxide magnetoliposomes, i.e., nanosized gadolinium oxide magnetic particles coated by a phospholipid membrane, is presented. Magnetoliposomes were prepared by reacting lauric acid coated gadolinium oxide nanoparticles with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes prepared using a direct injection method. The gadolinium oxide magnetoliposomes were characterized using transmission electron microscopy imaging, x-ray diffraction, and fluorescence. The magnetic properties of the magnetoliposomes were investigated with a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Our results indicate that the magnetoliposomes contain approximately spherical nanoparticles averaging 20 nm in diameter. The occurrence of a phospholipid bilayer surrounding the magnetic particles is confirmed both by transmission electron micrographs of samples negatively stained with uranyl acetate and by digital fluorescence imaging microscopy measurements of magnetoliposomes labeled with fluorescein. The particles are paramagnetic at room temperature. NMR measurements show that the ratio between the relaxivities of the particles depends largely on their preparation.

  5. Nickel-based gadolinium alloy for neutron adsorption application in RAM packages.

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald A.; Dupont, John Neuman; McConnell, Paul E.; Robino, Charles Victor

    2005-02-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), coordinates and integrates national efforts in management and disposal of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel. These management functions include development of standardised systems for long-term disposal in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Nuclear criticality control measures are needed in these systems to avoid restrictive fissile loading limits because of the enrichment and total quantity of fissile material in some types of the DOE spent nuclear fuel. This need is being addressed by development of corrosion-resistant, neutron-absorbing structural alloys for nuclear criticality control. This paper outlines results of a metallurgical development programme that is investigating the alloying of gadolinium into a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy matrix. Gadolinium has been chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element due to its high thermal neutron absorption cross section and low solubility in the expected repository environment. The nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy family was chosen for its known corrosion performance, mechanical properties, and weldability. The workflow of this programme includes chemical composition definition, primary and secondary melting studies, ingot conversion processes, properties testing, and national consensus codes and standards work. The microstructural investigation of these alloys shows that the gadolinium addition is present in the alloy as a gadolinium-rich second phase. The mechanical strength values are similar to those expected for commercial Ni-Cr-Mo alloys. The alloys have been corrosion tested with acceptable results. The initial results of weldability tests have also been acceptable. Neutronic testing in a moderated critical array has generated favourable results. An American Society for Testing and Materials material specification has been issued for the alloy and a Code Case has been submitted to the

  6. Hyperintense Dentate Nuclei on T1-Weighted MRI: Relation to Repeat Gadolinium Administration

    PubMed Central

    Adin, M.E.; Kleinberg, L.; Vaidya, D.; Zan, E.; Mirbagheri, S.; Yousem, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE A hyperintense appearance of the dentate nucleus on T1-weighted MR images has been related to various clinical conditions, but the etiology remains indeterminate. We aimed to investigate the possible associations between a hyperintense appearance of the dentate nucleus on T1-weighted MR images in patients exposed to radiation and factors including, but not limited to, the cumulative number of contrast-enhanced MR images, amount of gadolinium administration, dosage of ionizing radiation, and patient demographics. MATERIALS AND METHODS The medical records of 706 consecutive patients who were treated with brain irradiation at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions between 1995 and 2010 were blindly reviewed by 2 readers. RESULTS One hundred eighty-four subjects were included for dentate nuclei analysis. Among the 184 subjects who cumulatively underwent 2677 MR imaging studies following intravenous gadolinium administration, 103 patients had hyperintense dentate nuclei on precontrast T1-weighted MR images. The average number of gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging studies performed in the group with normal dentate nuclei was significantly lower than that of the group with hyperintense dentate nuclei. The average follow-up time was 62.5 months. No significant difference was observed between hyperintense and normal dentate nuclei groups in terms of exposed radiation dose, serum creatinine and calcium/phosphate levels, patient demographics, history of chemotherapy, and strength of the scanner. No dentate nuclei abnormalities were found on the corresponding CT scans of patients with hyperintense dentate nuclei (n = 44). No dentate nuclei abnormalities were found in 53 healthy volunteers. CONCLUSIONS Repeat performance of gadolinium-enhanced studies likely contributes to a long-standing hyperintense appearance of dentate nuclei on precontrast T1-weighted-MR images. PMID:26294649

  7. Bioconjugation of luminescent silicon quantum dots to gadolinium ions for bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Erogbogbo, Folarin; Chang, Ching-Wen; May, Jasmine L; Liu, Liwei; Kumar, Rajiv; Law, Wing-Cheung; Ding, Hong; Yong, Ken Tye; Roy, Indrajit; Sheshadri, Mukund; Swihart, Mark T; Prasad, Paras N

    2012-09-01

    Luminescent imaging agents and MRI contrast agents are desirable components in the rational design of multifunctional nanoconstructs for biological imaging applications. Luminescent biocompatible silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) and gadolinium chelates can be applied for fluorescence microscopy and MRI, respectively. Here, we report the first synthesis of a nanocomplex incorporating SiQDs and gadolinium ions (Gd³⁺) for biological applications. The nanoconstruct is composed of a PEGylated micelle, with hydrophobic SiQDs in its core, covalently bound to DOTA-chelated Gd³⁺. Dynamic light scattering reveals a radius of 85 nm for these nanoconstructs, which is consistent with the electron microscopy results depicting radii ranging from 25 to 60 nm. Cellular uptake of the probes verified that they maintain their optical properties within the intracellular environment. The magnetic resonance relaxivity of the nanoconstruct was 2.4 mM⁻¹ s⁻¹ (in terms of Gd³⁺ concentration), calculated to be around 6000 mM⁻¹ s⁻¹ per nanoconstruct. These desirable optical and relaxivity properties of the newly developed probe open the door for use of SiQDs in future multimodal applications such as tumour imaging. PMID:22854899

  8. Getting Acquainted: An Induction Training Guide for First-Year Extension Agents. Suggestions for Completing Certain Learning Experiences Included in the Induction Training Guide; a Supplement to "Getting Acquainted."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Mary Louise; Gassie, Edward W.

    An induction guide to help the extension agent get acquainted with his role and suggestions for completing learning experiences that are included in the guide comprise this two-part publication. The training guide learning experiences, a total of 25, are made up of: Objectives of the New Worker; When Completed; Learning Experiences; Person(s)…

  9. One-step synthesis of gradient gadolinium ironhexacyanoferrate nanoparticles: a new particle design easily combining MRI contrast and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yichen; Li, Carissa H.; Talham, Daniel R.

    2015-03-01

    A one-step synthesis of Prussian blue nanoparticles possessing a concentration gradient of Gd3+ counterions, g-Gd-PB, has been developed, and the potential for the particles to perform as both MRI positive contrast agents and photothermal therapy agents is demonstrated. The synthesis of potassium/gadolinium ironhexacyanoferrate is performed under increasing concentration of Gd3+ ions forming particles with a higher concentration of gadolinium toward the outer layers. The proton relaxivity (r1) measured for the particles is 12.3 mM-1 s-1, and T1 weighted images of phantoms containing the particles show their potential as MRI contrast agents. In addition, the Prussian blue host can rapidly and efficiently convert energy from near-IR light into thermal energy, allowing g-Gd-PB to be used as a photothermal therapy agent. The photothermal properties are demonstrated by measuring temperature changes of particle suspensions under irradiation and by photothermal ablation of CCRF-CEM cancer cells.A one-step synthesis of Prussian blue nanoparticles possessing a concentration gradient of Gd3+ counterions, g-Gd-PB, has been developed, and the potential for the particles to perform as both MRI positive contrast agents and photothermal therapy agents is demonstrated. The synthesis of potassium/gadolinium ironhexacyanoferrate is performed under increasing concentration of Gd3+ ions forming particles with a higher concentration of gadolinium toward the outer layers. The proton relaxivity (r1) measured for the particles is 12.3 mM-1 s-1, and T1 weighted images of phantoms containing the particles show their potential as MRI contrast agents. In addition, the Prussian blue host can rapidly and efficiently convert energy from near-IR light into thermal energy, allowing g-Gd-PB to be used as a photothermal therapy agent. The photothermal properties are demonstrated by measuring temperature changes of particle suspensions under irradiation and by photothermal ablation of CCRF-CEM cancer

  10. Discovery and basic pharmacology of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), including the hyperglycosylated ESA, darbepoetin alfa: an update of the rationale and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Zoltán; Elliott, Steven; Jedynasty, Kinga; Tesar, Vladimír; Szegedi, János

    2010-04-01

    Cloning of the human erythropoietin (EPO) gene and development of the first recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) drug were truly breakthroughs. This allowed a deeper understanding of the structure and pharmacology of rHuEpo, which in turn inspired the discovery and development of additional erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). In vivo specific activity and serum half-life of rHuEPO are influenced by the amount and structure of the attached carbohydrate. Increased numbers of sialic acids on carbohydrate attached to rHuEPO correlated with a relative increase in in-vivo-specific activity and increased serum half-life. The effect of increasing the number of sialic-acid-containing carbohydrates on in-vivo-specific activity was explored. Initial research focused on solving the problem of how the protein backbone could be engineered so a cell would add more carbohydrate to it. Additional work resulted in darbepoetin alfa, a longer-acting molecule with two additional carbohydrate chains. PMID:20127232

  11. Sensitive and transportable gadolinium-core plastic scintillator sphere for neutron detection and counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Carrel, Frédérick; Corre, Gwenolé; Normand, Stéphane; Méchin, Laurence; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    Neutron detection forms a critical branch of nuclear-related issues, currently driven by the search for competitive alternative technologies to neutron counters based on the helium-3 isotope. The deployment of plastic scintillators shows a high potential for efficient detectors, safer and more reliable than liquids, more easily scalable and cost-effective than inorganic. In the meantime, natural gadolinium, through its 155 and mostly 157 isotopes, presents an exceptionally high interaction probability with thermal neutrons. This paper introduces a dual system including a metal gadolinium core inserted at the center of a high-scale plastic scintillator sphere. Incident fast neutrons are thermalized by the scintillator shell and then may be captured with a significant probability by gadolinium 155 and 157 nuclei in the core. The deposition of a sufficient fraction of the capture high-energy prompt gamma signature inside the scintillator shell will then allow discrimination from background radiations by energy threshold, and therefore neutron detection. The scaling of the system with the Monte Carlo MCNPX2.7 code was carried out according to a tradeoff between the moderation of incident fast neutrons and the probability of slow neutron capture by a moderate-cost metal gadolinium core. Based on the parameters extracted from simulation, a first laboratory prototype for the assessment of the detection method principle has been synthetized. The robustness and sensitivity of the neutron detection principle are then assessed by counting measurement experiments. Experimental results confirm the potential for a stable, highly sensitive, transportable and cost-efficient neutron detector and orientate future investigation toward promising axes.

  12. Designing Tripodal and Triangular Gadolinium Oxide Nanoplates and Self-Assembled Nanofibrils as Potential Multimodal Bioimaging Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Paik, T; Gordon, TR; Prantner, AM; Yun, H; Murray, CB

    2013-03-01

    Here, we report the shape-controlled synthesis of tripodal and triangular gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates. In the presence of lithium ions, the shape of the nanocrystals is readily controlled by tailoring reaction parameters such as temperature and time. We observe that the morphology transforms from an initial tripodal shape to a triangular shape with increasing reaction time or elevated temperatures. Highly uniform Gd2O3 nanoplates are self-assembled into nanofibril-like liquid-crystalline superlattices with long-range orientational and positional order. In addition, shape-directed self-assemblies are investigated by tailoring the aspect ratio of the arms of the Gd2O3 nanoplates. Due to a strong paramagnetic response, Gd2O3 nanocrystals are excellent candidates for MRI contrast agents and also can be doped with rare-earth ions to form nanophosphors, pointing to their potential in multimodal imaging. In this work, we investigate the MR relaxometry at high magnetic fields (9,4 and 14.1 T) and the optical properties including near-IR to visible upconversion luminescence and X-ray excited optical luminescence of doped Gd2O3 nanoplates. The complex shape of Gd2O3 nanoplates, coupled with their magnetic properties and their ability to phosphoresce under NIR or X-ray excitation which penetrate deep into tissue, makes these nanoplates a promising platform for multimodal imaging in biomedical applications.

  13. Gadolinium-153 as a brachytherapy isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enger, Shirin A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to present the fundamental dosimetric characteristics of a hypothetical 153Gd brachytherapy source using the AAPM TG-43U1 dose-calculation formalism. Gadolinium-153 is an intermediate-energy isotope that emits 40-100 keV photons with a half-life of 242 days. The rationale for considering 153Gd as a brachytherapy source is for its potential of patient specific shielding and to enable reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to 192Ir, and as an isotope for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT). A hypothetical 153Gd brachytherapy source with an active core of 0.84 mm diameter, 10 mm length and specific activity of 5.55 TBq of 153Gd per gram of Gd was simulated with Geant4. The encapsulation material was stainless steel with a thickness of 0.08 mm. The radial dose function, anisotropy function and photon spectrum in water were calculated for the 153Gd source. The simulated 153Gd source had an activity of 242 GBq and a dose rate in water 1 cm off axis of 13.12 Gy h-1, indicating that it would be suitable as a low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The beta particles emitted have low enough energies to be absorbed in the source encapsulation. Gadolinium-153 has an increasing radial dose function due to multiple scatter of low-energy photons. Scattered photon dose takes over with distance from the source and contributes to the majority of the absorbed dose. The anisotropy function of the 153Gd source decreases at low polar angles, as a result of the long active core. The source is less anisotropic at polar angles away from the longitudinal axes. The anisotropy function increases with increasing distance. The 153Gd source considered would be suitable as an intermediate-energy low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The source could provide a means for I-RSBT delivery and enable brachytherapy treatments with patient specific shielding and reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to

  14. Gadolinium-153 as a brachytherapy isotope.

    PubMed

    Enger, Shirin A; Fisher, Darrell R; Flynn, Ryan T

    2013-02-21

    The purpose of this work was to present the fundamental dosimetric characteristics of a hypothetical (153)Gd brachytherapy source using the AAPM TG-43U1 dose-calculation formalism. Gadolinium-153 is an intermediate-energy isotope that emits 40-100 keV photons with a half-life of 242 days. The rationale for considering (153)Gd as a brachytherapy source is for its potential of patient specific shielding and to enable reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to (192)Ir, and as an isotope for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT). A hypothetical (153)Gd brachytherapy source with an active core of 0.84 mm diameter, 10 mm length and specific activity of 5.55 TBq of (153)Gd per gram of Gd was simulated with Geant4. The encapsulation material was stainless steel with a thickness of 0.08 mm. The radial dose function, anisotropy function and photon spectrum in water were calculated for the (153)Gd source. The simulated (153)Gd source had an activity of 242 GBq and a dose rate in water 1 cm off axis of 13.12 Gy h(-1), indicating that it would be suitable as a low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The beta particles emitted have low enough energies to be absorbed in the source encapsulation. Gadolinium-153 has an increasing radial dose function due to multiple scatter of low-energy photons. Scattered photon dose takes over with distance from the source and contributes to the majority of the absorbed dose. The anisotropy function of the (153)Gd source decreases at low polar angles, as a result of the long active core. The source is less anisotropic at polar angles away from the longitudinal axes. The anisotropy function increases with increasing distance. The (153)Gd source considered would be suitable as an intermediate-energy low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The source could provide a means for I-RSBT delivery and enable brachytherapy treatments with patient specific shielding and reduced personnel

  15. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrikossova, Natalia; Skoglund, Caroline; Ahrén, Maria; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2012-07-01

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd2O3 nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  16. High relaxivity MRI contrast agents part 2: Optimization of inner- and second-sphere relaxivity

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Vincent; Dumas, Stephane; Sun, Wei-Chuan; Troughton, Jeffrey S.; Greenfield, Matthew T.; Caravan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and objectives The observed relaxivity of gadolinium based contrast agents has contributions from the water molecule(s) that bind directly to the gadolinium ion (inner-sphere water), long lived water molecules and exchangeable protons that make up the second-sphere of coordination, and water molecules that diffuse near the contrast agent (outer-sphere). Inner- and second-sphere relaxivity can both be increased by optimization of the lifetimes of the water molecules and protons in these coordination spheres, the rotational motion of the complex, and the electronic relaxation of the gadolinium ion. We sought to identify new high relaxivity contrast agents by systematically varying the donor atoms that bind directly to gadolinium to increase inner-sphere relaxivity and concurrently including substituents that influence the second-sphere relaxivity. Methods Twenty GdDOTA derivatives were prepared and their relaxivity determined in presence and absence of human serum albumin as a function of temperature and magnetic field. Data was analyzed to extract the underlying molecular parameters influencing relaxivity. Each compound had a common albumin-binding group and an inner-sphere donor set comprising the 4 tertiary amine N atoms from cyclen, an α-substituted acetate oxygen atom, two amide oxygen atoms, an inner-sphere water oxygen atom, and a variable donor group. Each amide nitrogen was substituted with different groups to promote hydrogen bonding with second-sphere water molecules. Results Relaxivites at 0.47T and 1.4T, 37 °C, in serum albumin ranged from 16.0 to 58.1 mM−1s−1 and from 12.3 to 34.8 mM−1s−1 respectively. The reduction of inner-sphere water exchange typical of amide donor groups could be offset by incorporating a phosphonate or phenolate oxygen atom donor in the first coordination sphere resulting in higher relaxivity. Amide nitrogen substitution with pendant phosphonate or carboxylate groups increased relaxivity by as much as 88

  17. PARTITIONING OF GADOLINIUM IN THE CHEMICAL PROCESSING CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S.; Best, D.; Stone, M.; Click, D.

    2011-04-27

    A combination of short-term beaker tests and longer-duration Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) simulations were performed to investigate the relative partitioning behaviors of gadolinium and iron under conditions applicable to the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). The testing was performed utilizing non-radioactive simple Fe-Gd slurries, non-radioactive Sludge Batch 6 simulant slurries, and a radioactive real-waste slurry representative of Sludge Batch 7 material. The testing focused on the following range of conditions: (a) Fe:Gd ratios of 25-100; (b) pH values of 2-6; (c) acidification via addition of nitric, formic, and glycolic acids; (d) temperatures of {approx}93 C and {approx}22 C; and (e) oxalate concentrations of <100 mg/kg and {approx}10,000 mg/kg. The purpose of the testing was to provide data for assessing the potential use of gadolinium as a supplemental neutron poison when dispositioning excess plutonium. Understanding of the partitioning behavior of gadolinium in the CPC was the first step in assessing gadolinium's potential applicability. Significant fractions of gadolinium partitioned to the liquid-phase at pH values of 4.0 and below, regardless of the Fe:Gd ratio. In SRAT simulations targeting nitric and formic acid additions of 150% acid stoichiometry, the pH dropped to a minimum of 3.5-4.0, and the maximum fractions of gadolinium and iron partitioning to solution were both {approx}20%. In contrast, in a SRAT simulation utilizing a nitric and formic acid addition under atypical conditions (due to an anomalously low insoluble solids content), the pH dropped to a minimum of 3.7, and the maximum fractions of gadolinium and iron partitioning to solution were {approx}60% and {approx}70%, respectively. When glycolic acid was used in combination with nitric and formic acids at 100% acid stoichiometry, the pH dropped to a minimum of 3.6-4.0, and the maximum fractions of gadolinium and iron partitioning to solution were 60-80% and 3-5%, respectively

  18. Gadolinium Doped Water Cherenkov Detector for use as Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Patrick; Woltman, Brian; Mei, Dongming; Sun, Yongchen; Thomas, Keenan; Perevozchikov, Oleg

    2010-11-01

    Background characterization is imperative to the success of rare event physics research such as neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter searches. There are a number of different ways to measure backgrounds from muon-induced processes and other forms of high energy events. In our current research, we are constructing a research and development project for the feasibility of a Gadolinium doped water Cherenkov detector as a neutron detector. We are constructing a 46 liter acrylic housing for the Gd-doped water consisting of two acrylic cone sections connected to a middle acrylic cylinder to increase volume while still using 5 inch photo multiplier tubes (PMTs) on either end. I will present the challenges of a Gd-doped water detector and the reasons why our design should be much more successful than past metal housed detectors. I will also discuss our current progress and future goals of our detector including its use in characterizing the background in the future underground laboratory in the Sanford Lab, soon to be DUSEL.

  19. Susceptibility-Based Analysis Of Dynamic Gadolinium Bolus Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Barker, Peter B.; Leigh, Richard; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An algorithm is developed for the reconstruction of dynamic, gadolinium (Gd) bolus MR perfusion images of the human brain, based on quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). Methods The method is evaluated in 5 perfusion scans obtained from 4 different patients scanned at 3T, and compared to the conventional analysis based on changes in the transverse relaxation rate ΔR2* and to theoretical predictions. QSM images were referenced to ventricular CSF for each dynamic of the perfusion sequence. Results Images of cerebral blood flow and blood volume were successfully reconstructed from the QSM-analysis, and were comparable to those reconstructed using ΔR2*. The magnitudes of the Gd-associated susceptibility effects in gray and white matter were consistent with theoretical predictions. Conclusion QSM-based analysis may have some theoretical advantages compared to ΔR2*, including a simpler relationship between signal change and Gd concentration. However, disadvantages are its much lower contrast-to-noise ratio, artifacts due to respiration and other effects, and more complicated reconstruction methods. More work is required to optimize data acquisition protocols for QSM-based perfusion imaging. PMID:24604343

  20. Biomedical Nanocrystal Agents: Design, Synthesis, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjung

    In these days, nanomaterials are applied in a variety of biomedical applications including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cell imaging, drug delivery, and cell separation. Most MRI contrast agents affect the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and transverse relaxation time (T2 ) of water protons in the tissue and result in increased positive or negative contrast. Here, we report the optimization of r1 (1/T 1) or r2 (1/T2) relaxivity dynamics with diameter controlled gadolinium oxide nanocrystals (2˜22 nm) and iron based magnetic nanocrystals (4 ˜33 nm). The r1 and r2 MR relaxivity values of hydrated nanocrystals were optimized and examined depending on their core diameter, surface coating, and compositions; the high r1 value of gadolinium oxide was 40-60 S-1mM-1, which is 10-15 fold higher than that of commercial Gd (III) chelates (4.3˜4.6 S-1mM-1). Moreover, in vitro toxicological studies revealed that polymer coated nanocrystals suspensions had no significant effect on human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells even at high concentration. Towards multimodal imaging or multifunctional ability, we developed the iron oxide/QDs complexes, which consist of cores of iron oxide that act as nucleation sites for fluorescent QDs. The choice of variable QDs helped to visualize and remove large iron oxide materials in a magnetic separation. Additionally, diluted materials concentrated on the magnet could be fluorescently detected even at very low concentration. The designed MRI or multifunctional nanomaterials will give great and powerful uses in biomedical applications.

  1. One-step synthesis of gradient gadolinium ironhexacyanoferrate nanoparticles: a new particle design easily combining MRI contrast and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yichen; Li, Carissa H; Talham, Daniel R

    2015-03-12

    A one-step synthesis of Prussian blue nanoparticles possessing a concentration gradient of Gd3+ counterions, g-Gd-PB, has been developed, and the potential for the particles to perform as both MRI positive contrast agents and photothermal therapy agents is demonstrated. The synthesis of potassium/gadolinium ironhexacyanoferrate is performed under increasing concentration of Gd3+ ions forming particles with a higher concentration of gadolinium toward the outer layers. The proton relaxivity (r1) measured for the particles is 12.3 mM(-1) s(-1), and T1 weighted images of phantoms containing the particles show their potential as MRI contrast agents. In addition, the Prussian blue host can rapidly and efficiently convert energy from near-IR light into thermal energy, allowing g-Gd-PB to be used as a photothermal therapy agent. The photothermal properties are demonstrated by measuring temperature changes of particle suspensions under irradiation and by photothermal ablation of CCRF-CEM cancer cells. PMID:25706057

  2. Gadolinium metallo nanocongregates as potential magnetosensors for detecting early stage cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2015-04-27

    Gadolinium chelates and gadolinium based inorganic nanoparticles have been extensively studied, because of the high magnetic moment of gadolinium. Here, metallic gadolinium nanocongregates have been developed. Upon injecting these nanoparticles in the mice, they initially circulate in the blood stream and are localized at the cancer site, which could be visualized upon application of magnetic field hence acting as small magnetic nanosensors searching for even small cancers, detecting cancers at a very early stage.

  3. Microcalorimetric studies on the energy release of isolated rat mitochondria under different concentrations of gadolinium (III).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Ma, Long; Xiang, Xun; Guo, Qing-Lian; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Gadolinium-based compounds are most widely utilized for paramagnetic contrast agents, but, the toxicological mechanism of gadolinium (Gd) had not been fully elucidated since the first report about Gd anomaly. In this work, we analyzed the effect of Gd(3+) on mitochondria in vitro by microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetry can provide detailed kinetic and thermodynamic information from thermogenic curve. At the tested concentration, Gd(3+) induced the increase of growth rate constant (k1). At high concentration (100-500 μM), the maximum power output time (tm), the decline rate constant (-k2) and the time of activity recovery phase (tR) decreased with the addition of Gd(3+) and the maximum power output (Pm) increased. At low concentration (0-100 μM), the changes were different from high concentration. From the results we concluded that the effect of different concentrations of Gd(3+) had a relationship with time, high concentration of Gd(3+) induced mitochondrial energy metabolism disturb however low concentration may promote mitochondrial adaption to physiological stresses. The effect of low concentration of Gd(3+) need more work to elucidate the mechanism. The results of total heat output (Q) and mitochondrial respiratory activities suggested high concentrations of Gd(3+) could accelerate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption under respiratory system damaged. PMID:27031804

  4. Evaluation of gadolinium compounds potentially suitable for magnetic resonance using Gd-153 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Engelstad, B.; Huberty, J.; White, D.; Wynne, C.; Ramos, E.; Goldberg, H.

    1985-05-01

    Gd-153 is not customarily considered for scintigraphy, yet it: 1) is available at acceptable cost, 2) has a 242 day half-life suitable for prolonged animal studies and 3) has 97 keV (40%) and 103 keV (59%) photopeaks suitable for conventional scintigraphy. Gd-153 (10-15 ..mu..Ci; 370-555 kBq) was administered to normal rats in 5 forms: 1) carrier 0.1 mmole/kg Gd-EIDA (diethyl iminodiacetic acid), 2) tracer (<.1 umole/kg) Gd-EIDA, 3) tracer Gd-ISIDA (diisopropyl iminodiacetic acid), 4) tracer GdCl/sub 3/, and 5) tracer Gd-DTPA. Scintigraphy, performed continuously for 90 minutes following intravenous injection and at intervals at up to 2 weeks, depicted: 1) rapid, partial hepatobiliary and renal clearance of tracer Gd-EIDA and Gd-ISIDA; 2) slow blood clearance and partial hepatobiliary clearance of carrier Gd-EIDA; and 3) prolonged reticuloendothelial retention of all IDA complexes, similar to GdCl3. Whole body and tissue distribution data paralleled the scintigraphic findings. Gd-153 scintigraphy provides a simple method to assess balance, distribution, kinetics, and stability of new paramagnetic contrast agents, and bis-iminodiacetate gadolinium complexes, unlike technetium analogues, lack effective stability to prevent gadolinium hydrolysis or translocation.

  5. Comparison of MRI properties between derivatized DTPA and DOTA gadolinium-dendrimer conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Nwe, K.; Bernardo, M; Regino, C. A. S.; Williams, M; Brechbiel, M. W.

    2010-01-01

    In this report we directly compare the in vivo and in vitro MRI properties of gadolinium-dendrimer conjugates of derivatized acyclic diethylenetriamine-N,N’,N’,N’’, N’’-pentaacetic acid (1B4M-DTPA) and macrocyclic 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N’,N’’,N’’’-tetraacetic acid (C-DOTA). The metal-ligand chelates were pre-formed in alcohol prior to conjugation to the generation 4 PAMAM dendrimer (G4D), and the dendrimer-based agents were purified by Sephadex® G-25 column. The analysis and SE-HPLC data indicated chelate to dendrimer ratios of 30:1 and 28:1 respectively. Molar relaxivity measured at pH 7.4, 22°C, and 3T are comparable (29.5 vs. 26.9 mM−1s−1), and both conjugates are equally viable as MRI contrast agents based on the images obtained. The macrocyclic agent however exhibits a faster rate of clearance in vivo (t1/2 = 16 vs. 29 min.). Our conclusion is that the macrocyclic-based agent is the more suitable agent for in vivo use for these reasons combined with kinetic inertness associated with the Gd(III) DOTA complex stability properties. PMID:20663676

  6. Growth of bulk gadolinium pyrosilicate single crystals for scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasymov, I.; Sidletskiy, O.; Neicheva, S.; Grinyov, B.; Baumer, V.; Galenin, E.; Katrunov, K.; Tkachenko, S.; Voloshina, O.; Zhukov, A.

    2011-03-01

    Ce, Pr, and La-doped gadolinium pyrosilicate Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) single crystals were grown by the Czochralski and Top Seeded Solution Growth (TSSG) techniques for the first time. Formation conditions of different pyrosilicate phases were determined. X-ray luminescence integral intensity of Ce-doped GPS is about one order of magnitude higher in comparison with gadolinium oxyorthosilicate Gd2SiO5:Ce (GSO:Ce). All samples demonstrate temperature stability of luminescence yield up to 400 K.

  7. A feasibility study to determine the potential of in vivo detection of gadolinium by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) following gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Mostafaei, F; McNeill, F E; Chettle, D R; Noseworthy, M D

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using a (109)Cd γ-ray induced K x-ray fluorescence (K-XRF) system for the in vivo detection of gadolinium (Gd) in bone has been investigated. The K-XRF bone measurement system employs an array of four detectors, and is normally used for the non-invasive study of bone lead levels. The system was used to measure bone simulating phantoms doped with varying levels of gadolinium and fixed amounts of sodium (Na), chlorine (Cl) and calcium (Ca). The detection limits for bare bone phantoms, using a source of activity 0.17 GBq, were determined to be 3.9 ppm and 6.5 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom) for the Kα1 and Kα2 Gd x-ray peaks, respectively. This leads to an overall detection limit of 3.3 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom). Layers of plastic were used to simulate overlying soft tissue and this permitted prediction of a detection limit, using the current strength of our radioisotope source, of 6.1 ppm to 8.6 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom) for fingers with 2-4 mm of overlying tissue. With a new source of activity 5 GBq, we predict that this system could achieve a detection limit of 4-5.6 µg Gd g(-1) Ca. This is within the range of levels (2-30 µg Gd g(-1) Ca) previously found in the bone of patients receiving Gd based contrast imaging agents. The technique is promising and warrants further investigation. PMID:25501799

  8. Molecular characteristics and in vitro susceptibility to antimicrobial agents, including the des-fluoro(6) quinolone DX-619, of Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from the community and hospitals.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Dohmae, Soshi; Saito, Kohei; Otsuka, Taketo; Takano, Tomomi; Chiba, Megumi; Fujikawa, Katsuko; Tanaka, Mayumi

    2006-12-01

    Highly virulent, community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) genes have been found increasingly worldwide. Among a total of 2,101 MRSA strains isolated from patients in hospitals in Japan, two were positive for PVL genes. One strain was identified as a community-acquired MRSA strain with genotype sequence type 30 (ST30) and spa (staphylococcal protein A gene) type 19 from Japan and was resistant only to beta-lactam antimicrobial agents. The other strain was closely related to PVL+ multidrug-resistant, hospital-acquired MRSA strains (ST30, spa type 43) derived from nosocomial outbreaks in the 1980s to 1990s in Japan but with a divergent sequence type, ST765 (a single-locus variant of ST30). Twenty-two PVL+ MRSA strains, including those from Japan and those from other countries with various sequence types (ST1, ST8, ST30, ST59, and ST80) and genotypes, were examined for susceptibility to 31 antimicrobial agents. Among the agents, DX-619, a des-fluoro(6) quinolone, showed the greatest activity, followed by rifampin and sitafloxacin, a fluoroquinolone. The data suggest that DX-619 exhibits a superior activity against PVL+ MRSA strains with various virulence genetic traits from the community as well as from hospitals. PMID:17043124

  9. Redox-Triggered Self-Assembly of Gadolinium-Based MRI Probes for Sensing Reducing Environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Controlled self-assembly of small molecule gadolinium (Gd) complexes into nanoparticles (GdNPs) is emerging as an effective approach to design activatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes and amplify the r1 relaxivity. Herein, we employ a reduction-controlled macrocyclization reaction and self-assembly to develop a redox activated Gd-based MRI probe for sensing a reducing environment. Upon disulfide reduction at physiological conditions, an acyclic contrast agent 1 containing dual Gd-chelates undergoes intramolecular macrocyclization to form rigid and hydrophobic macrocycles, which subsequently self-assemble into GdNPs, resulting in a ∼60% increase in r1 relaxivity at 0.5 T. Probe 1 has high r1 relaxivity (up to 34.2 mM–1 s–1 per molecule at 0.5 T) upon activation, and also shows a high sensitivity and specificity for MR detection of thiol-containing biomolecules. PMID:24992373

  10. Fluorescent single-stranded DNA-based assay for detecting unchelated Gadolinium(III) ions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Edogun, Osafanmwen; Nguyen, Nghia Huu; Halim, Marlin

    2016-06-01

    The main concern pertaining to the safety of Gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) is the toxicity caused by the unchelated ion, which may be inadvertently present in the solution due most commonly to excess unreacted starting material or dissociation of the complexes. Detecting the aqueous free ion during the synthesis and preparation of GBCA solutions is therefore instrumental in ensuring the safety of the agents. This paper reports the development of a sensitive fluorogenic sensor for aqueous unchelated Gadolinium(III) (Gd(III)). Our design utilizes single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides with a specific sequence of 44 bases as the targeting moiety. The fluorescence-based assay may be run at ambient pH with very small amounts of samples in 384-well plates. The sensor is able to detect nanomolar concentration of Gd(III), and is relatively unresponsive toward a range of biologically relevant ions and the chelated Gd(III). Although some cross-reactivity with other trivalent lanthanide ions, such as Europium(III) and Terbium(III), is observed, these are not commonly found in biological systems and contrast agents. This convenient and rapid method may be useful in ascertaining a high purity of GBCA solutions. Graphical abstract Fluorescent aptamer-based assay for detecting unchelated Ln(III) ions in aqueous solution. PMID:27071762

  11. A Manganese Alternative to Gadolinium for MRI Contrast.

    PubMed

    Gale, Eric M; Atanasova, Iliyana P; Blasi, Francesco; Ay, Ilknur; Caravan, Peter

    2015-12-16

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are routinely used to diagnose soft tissue and vascular abnormalities. However, safety concerns limit the use of iodinated and gadolinium (Gd)-based CT and MRI contrast media in renally compromised patients. With an estimated 14% of the US population suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD), contrast media compatible with renal impairment is sorely needed. We present the new manganese(II) complex [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) as a Gd alternative. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) is among the most stable Mn(II) complexes at pH 7.4 (log KML = 11.40). In the presence of 25 mol equiv of Zn at pH 6.0, 37 °C, [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) is 20-fold more resistant to dissociation than [Gd(DTPA)(H2O)](2-). Relaxivity of [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) in blood plasma is comparable to commercial Gd contrast agents. Biodistribution analysis confirms that [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) clears via a mixed renal/hepatobiliary pathway with >99% elimination by 24 h. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) was modified to form a bifunctional chelator and 4 chelates were conjugated to a fibrin-specific peptide to give Mn-FBP. Mn-FBP binds the soluble fibrin fragment DD(E) with Kd = 110 nM. Per Mn relaxivity of Mn-FBP is 4-fold greater than [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) and increases 60% in the presence of fibrin, consistent with binding. Mn-FBP provided equivalent thrombus enhancement to the state of the art Gd analogue, EP-2104R, in a rat model of arterial thrombosis. Mn metabolite analysis reveals no evidence of dechelation and the probe was >99% eliminated after 24 h. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) is a lead development candidate for an imaging probe that is compatible with renally compromised patients. PMID:26588204

  12. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, R. S.; Barabash, A. S.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; Incicchitti, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search), 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β). The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical and chemical methods was applied to purify cerium, neodymium and gadolinium. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of Th and U from neodymium, gadolinium and for purification of cerium from Th, U, Ra and K. Co-precipitation and recrystallization methods were utilized for further reduction of the impurities. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe gamma spectrometry. As a result of the purification procedure the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide (a similar purification efficiency was reached also with cerium and neodymium oxides) was decreased from 0.12 Bq/kg to 0.007 Bq/kg in 228Th, from 0.04 Bq/kg to <0.006 Bq/kg in 226Ra, and from 0.9 Bq/kg to 0.04 Bq/kg in 40K. The purification methods are much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like actinium, lanthanum and lutetium.

  13. Development of gadolinium based nanoparticles having an affinity towards melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlieras, Jessica; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Roux, Amandine; Heinrich-Balard, Laurence; Cohen, Richard; Tarrit, Sébastien; Truillet, Charles; Mignot, Anna; Hachani, Roxanne; Kryza, David; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Perriat, Pascal; Janier, Marc; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Small Rigid Platforms (SRPs) are sub-5 nanometre gadolinium based nanoparticles that have been developed for multimodal imaging and theranostic applications. They are composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. A covalent coupling with quinoxaline derivatives has been performed. Such derivatives have proven their affinity for melanin frequently expressed in primary melanoma cases. Three different quinoxaline derivatives have been synthesised and coupled to the nanoparticles. The affinity of the grafted nanoparticles for melanin has then been shown in vitro by surface plasmon resonance on a homemade melanin grafted gold chip.Small Rigid Platforms (SRPs) are sub-5 nanometre gadolinium based nanoparticles that have been developed for multimodal imaging and theranostic applications. They are composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. A covalent coupling with quinoxaline derivatives has been performed. Such derivatives have proven their affinity for melanin frequently expressed in primary melanoma cases. Three different quinoxaline derivatives have been synthesised and coupled to the nanoparticles. The affinity of the grafted nanoparticles for melanin has then been shown in vitro by surface plasmon resonance on a homemade melanin grafted gold chip. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33457g

  14. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in gadolinium under high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-11-07

    High pressure structural transition studies have been carried out on rare earth metal gadolinium in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to 169 GPa. Gadolinium has been compressed to 38% of its initial volume at this pressure. With increasing pressure, a crystal structure sequence of hcp → Smtype→ dhcp → fcc → dfcc → monoclinic has been observed in our studies on gadolinium. The measured equation of state of gadolinium is presented to 169 GPa at ambient temperature. Magnetic ordering temperature of gadolinium has been studied using designer diamond anvils to a pressure of 25 GP and a temperature of 10 K. The magnetic ordering temperature has been determined from the four-point electrical resistivity measurements carried out on gadolinium. Furthermore, our experiments show that the magnetic transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure to 19 GPa and then increases when gadolinium is subjected to higher pressures.

  15. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in gadolinium under high pressures and low temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-11-07

    High pressure structural transition studies have been carried out on rare earth metal gadolinium in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to 169 GPa. Gadolinium has been compressed to 38% of its initial volume at this pressure. With increasing pressure, a crystal structure sequence of hcp → Smtype→ dhcp → fcc → dfcc → monoclinic has been observed in our studies on gadolinium. The measured equation of state of gadolinium is presented to 169 GPa at ambient temperature. Magnetic ordering temperature of gadolinium has been studied using designer diamond anvils to a pressure of 25 GP and a temperaturemore » of 10 K. The magnetic ordering temperature has been determined from the four-point electrical resistivity measurements carried out on gadolinium. Furthermore, our experiments show that the magnetic transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure to 19 GPa and then increases when gadolinium is subjected to higher pressures.« less

  16. Gadolinium block of calcium channels: influence of bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Boland, L M; Brown, T A; Dingledine, R

    1991-11-01

    The selectivity of block of voltage-activated barium (Ba2+) currents by lanthanide ions was studied in a rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cell line (F11-B9), rat and frog peripheral neurons, and rat cardiac myocytes using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Gadolinium (Gd3+) produced a dose-dependent and complete inhibition of whole-cell Ba2+ current in all cells studied, including cells expressing identified dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type currents and omega-conotoxin-sensitive N-type currents. Like Gd3+, lutetium (Lu3+) and lanthanum (La3+) blocked all Ba2+ current with little selectivity for different components of the whole-cell current. Gd3+ block of Ba2+ currents was incomplete, however, when sodium bicarbonate (5-22.6 mM) was added to the standard HEPES-buffered external Ba2+ solution. In rat DRG neurons and F11-B9 cells, a fraction of the whole-cell Ba2+ current recorded in the presence of bicarbonate was resistant to block by saturating concentrations of Gd3+ (50-100 microM). The resistant current inactivated more rapidly than the original current giving the appearance that, under these conditions, Gd3+ block is more selective for the slowly inactivating component of the whole-cell current. Bicarbonate modification of Gd3+ block occurred both before and after omega-conotoxin block of N-type currents in rat DRG neurons, suggesting that even in the presence of bicarbonate, Gd3+ block was not selective for N-type currents. PMID:1786527

  17. Cardiac sarcoidosis evaluated with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance and contrast-enhanced 64-slice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Smedema, Jan-Peter; Truter, Rene; de Klerk, Petra A; Zaaiman, Leonie; White, Leonie; Doubell, Anton F

    2006-09-20

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology with symptomatic cardiac involvement in up to 7% of patients. The clinical features of sarcoid heart disease include congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, and sudden death. We evaluated the value of contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography in delineating myocardial scar and granulomatous inflammation by comparing our findings with gadolinium magnetic resonance in a patient diagnosed with cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:16257460

  18. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage: pearls and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Zilkens, Christoph; Kim, Young-Jo; Werlen, Stefan; Siebenrock, Klaus A.; Mamisch, Tallal C.; Hosalkar, Harish S.

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing advances in hip joint preservation surgery, accurate diagnosis and assessment of femoral head and acetabular cartilage status is becoming increasingly important. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip does present technical difficulties. The fairly thin cartilage lining necessitates high image resolution and high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). With MR arthrography (MRA) using intraarticular injected gadolinium, labral tears and cartilage clefts may be better identified through the contrast medium filling into the clefts. However, the ability of MRA to detect varying grades of cartilage damage is fairly limited and early histological and biochemical changes in the beginning of osteoarthritis (OA) cannot be accurately delineated. Traditional MRI thus lacks the ability to analyze the biological status of cartilage degeneration. The technique of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is sensitive to the charge density of cartilage contributed by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which are lost early in the process of OA. Therefore, the dGEMRIC technique has a potential to detect early cartilage damage that is obviously critical for decision-making regarding time and extent of intervention for joint-preservation. In the last decade, cartilage imaging with dGEMRIC has been established as an accurate and reliable tool for assessment of cartilage status in the knee and hip joint. This review outlines the current status of dGEMRIC for assessment of hip joint cartilage. Practical modifications of the standard technique including three-dimensional (3D) dGEMRIC and dGEMRIC after intra-articular gadolinium instead of iv-dGEMRIC will also be addressed. PMID:22053252

  19. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Zilkens, Christoph; Kim, Young-Jo; Werlen, Stefan; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Mamisch, Tallal C; Hosalkar, Harish S

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing advances in hip joint preservation surgery, accurate diagnosis and assessment of femoral head and acetabular cartilage status is becoming increasingly important. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip does present technical difficulties. The fairly thin cartilage lining necessitates high image resolution and high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). With MR arthrography (MRA) using intraarticular injected gadolinium, labral tears and cartilage clefts may be better identified through the contrast medium filling into the clefts. However, the ability of MRA to detect varying grades of cartilage damage is fairly limited and early histological and biochemical changes in the beginning of osteoarthritis (OA) cannot be accurately delineated. Traditional MRI thus lacks the ability to analyze the biological status of cartilage degeneration. The technique of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is sensitive to the charge density of cartilage contributed by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which are lost early in the process of OA. Therefore, the dGEMRIC technique has a potential to detect early cartilage damage that is obviously critical for decision-making regarding time and extent of intervention for joint-preservation. In the last decade, cartilage imaging with dGEMRIC has been established as an accurate and reliable tool for assessment of cartilage status in the knee and hip joint.This review outlines the current status of dGEMRIC for assessment of hip joint cartilage. Practical modifications of the standard technique including three-dimensional (3D) dGEMRIC and dGEMRIC after intra-articular gadolinium instead of iv-dGEMRIC will also be addressed. PMID:22053252

  20. Late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac amyloidosis: attributable both to interstitial amyloid deposition and subendocardial fibrosis caused by ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hashimura, Hiromi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Yonemoto, Yumiko; Ohta-Ogo, Keiko; Matsuyama, Taka-Aki; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Morita, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Naoaki; Yasui, Hiroki; Naito, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Gadolinium contrast agents used for late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) distribute in the extracellular space. Global diffuse myocardial LGE pronounced in the subendocardial layers is common in cardiac amyloidosis. However, the pathophysiological basis of these findings has not been sufficiently explained. A 64-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with leg edema and nocturnal dyspnea. Bence Jones protein was positive in the urine, and an endomyocardial and skin biopsy showed light-chain (AL) amyloidosis. He died of ventricular fibrillation 3 months later. 9 days before death, the patient was examined by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging on a 3-T system. We acquired LGE data at 2, 5, 10, and 20 min after the injection of gadolinium contrast agents, with a fixed inversion time of 350 ms. Myocardial LGE developed sequentially. The myocardium was diffusely enhanced at 2 min, except for the subendocardium, but LGE had extended to almost the entire left ventricle at 5 min and predominantly localized to the subendocardial region at 10 and 20 min. An autopsy revealed massive and diffused amyloid deposits in perimyocytes throughout the myocardium. Old and recent ischemic findings, such as replacement fibrosis and coagulative myocyte necrosis, were evident in the subendocardium. In the intramural coronary arteries, mild amyloid deposits were present within the subepicardial to the mid layer of the left ventricle, but no stenotic lesions were evident. However, capillaries were obstructed by amyloid deposits in the subendocardium. In conclusion, the late phase of dynamic LGE (at 10 and 20 min) visualized in the subendocardium corresponded to the interstitial amyloid deposition and subendocardial fibrosis caused by ischemia in our patient. PMID:25794983

  1. Gadolinium oxide nanoplates with high longitudinal relaxivity for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjung; Sethi, Richa; Ananta Narayanan, Jeyarama Subramanian; Lee, Seung Soo; Benoit, Denise N.; Taheri, Nasim; Decuzzi, Paolo; Colvin, Vicki L.

    2014-10-01

    Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)-1 were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values moderately reduce as the size of the Gd2O3 nanoplates increases, and are always larger for the PAA-OA coating. Cytotoxicity studies on human dermal fibroblast cells documented no significant toxicity, with 100% cell viability preserved up to 250 μM for the PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates. Given the 10 times increase in longitudinal relaxivity over the commercially available Gd-based molecular agents and the favorable toxicity profile, the 2 nm PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates could represent a new class of highly effective T1 MRI contrast agents.Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)-1 were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Therapy-Induced Necrosis Using Gadolinium-Chelated Polyglutamic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Edward F.; Esparza-Coss, Emilio; Wen Xiaoxia; Ng, Chaan S.; Daniel, Sherita L.; Price, Roger E.; Rivera, Belinda; Charnsangavej, Chusilp; Gelovani, Juri G.; Li Chun . E-mail: cli@di.mdacc.tmc.edu

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Necrosis is the most common morphologic alteration found in tumors and surrounding normal tissues after radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Accurate measurement of necrosis may provide an early indication of treatment efficacy or associated toxicity. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the selective accumulation of polymeric paramagnetic magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents-gadolinium p-aminobenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-poly(glutamic acid) (L-PG-DTPA-Gd and D-PG-DTPA-Gd)-in necrotic tissue. Methods and Materials: Two different solid tumor models, human Colo-205 xenograft and syngeneic murine OCA-1 ovarian tumors, were used in this study. Necrotic response was induced by treatment with poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel conjugate (PG-TXL). T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo images were obtained immediately and up to 4 days after contrast injection and compared with corresponding histologic specimens. Two low-molecular-weight contrast agents, DTPA-Gd and oligomeric(L-glutamic acid)-DTPA-Gd, were used as nonspecific controls. Results: Initially, there was minimal tumor enhancement after injection of either L-PG-DTPA-Gd or D-PG-DTPA-Gd, but rapid enhancement after injection of low-molecular-weight agents. However, polymeric contrast agents, but not low-molecular-weight contrast agents, caused sustained enhancement in regions of tumor necrosis in both tumors treated with PG-TXL and untreated tumors. These data indicate that high molecular weight, rather than in vivo biodegradation, is necessary for the specific localization of polymeric MR contrast agents to necrotic tissue. Moreover, biotinylated L-PG-DTPA-Gd colocalized with macrophages in the tumor necrotic areas, suggesting that selective accumulation of L- and D-PG-DTPA-Gd in necrotic tissue was mediated through residing macrophages. Conclusions: Our data suggest that MR imaging with PG-DTPA-Gd may be a useful technique for noninvasive characterization of treatment-induced necrosis.

  3. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  4. Trends in the susceptibility of commonly encountered clinically significant anaerobes and susceptibilities of blood isolates of anaerobes to 16 antimicrobial agents, including fidaxomicin and rifaximin, 2008-2012, northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, F D; Liao, C H; Lin, Y T; Sheng, W H; Hsueh, P R

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial resistance trends and profiles of clinical anaerobic isolates in northern Taiwan. Trends in the susceptibility of five commonly encountered clinical anaerobic isolates to seven agents from 2008 to 2012 were measured using the Cochran-Armitage trend test. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 16 antimicrobial agents, including fidaxomicin and rifaximin, against anaerobic blood isolates from two medical centers were determined using the agar dilution method. During the study period, susceptibility data on 11,105 isolates were evaluated. Metronidazole and chloramphenicol retained excellent activities. Around 20-30 % of isolates of Bacteroides and Prevotella species were resistant to ampicillin-sulbactam, cefmetazole, flomoxef, and clindamycin. Of the 507 tested blood isolates, the rates of resistance to commonly used agents were much higher, namely, 16.2 % for amoxicillin-clavulanate, 15.6 % for ampicillin-sulbactam, 24.7 % for cefmetazole, and 36.1 % for clindamycin. Notably, 13.5 % of B. fragilis isolates were resistant to ertapenem. Also, 15.2 % of B. uniformis, 17.2 % of other Bacteroides species, 14.3 % of Prevotella species, and 14 % of Clostridium other than C. perfringens isolates were resistant to moxifloxacin. Cefoperazone-sulbactam was active against most isolates, except for Clostridium species other than perfringens (resistance rate, 18.6 %). Fidaxomicin exerted poor activities against most anaerobes tested (MIC90 of >128 μg/ml for B. fragilis and all isolates), except for C. perfringens (MIC90 of 0.03 μg/ml) and Peptostreptococcus micros (MIC90 of 2 μg/ml). However, rifaximin showed a wide range of susceptibilities against the tested anaerobes (MIC90 of 0.5 μg/ml for B. fragilis). The emergence of resistance to ertapenem and moxifloxacin among bacteremic anaerobes highlights the need for continuous monitoring. PMID:24930042

  5. The study of in vivo x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique for gadolinium (Gd) measurements in human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; Nie, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    An in vivo K x-ray fluorescence system, based on 109Cd source, for the detection of gadolinium has been investigated. Gd is of interest because of the extensive use of Gd-based contrast agents in MR imaging. A human simulating bone phantom set has been developed. The phantoms were doped with seven concentrations of Gd. Additional elements important for in vivo x-ray fluorescence, Na, Cl and Ca, were also included to create an overall elemental composition consistent with the Reference Man. A new 5 GBq 109Cd source was purchased to improve the source activity in comparison to the previous study (0.17 GBq). The previously published minimum detection limit (MDL) for Gd phantom measurements using KXRF system was 3.3 ppm. In this study the minimum detection limit for bare bone phantoms was found to reduce the MDL to 0.8, a factor of 4.1. The previous published data used only three layers of plastic as soft tissue equivalent materials and found the MDL of 4–4.8 ppm. In this study we have used the plastic with more realistic thicknesses to simulate a soft tissue at tibia. The detection limits for phantoms with Lucite as a tissue equivalent, using a new source, was determined to be 1.81 to 3.47 ppm (μg Gd per gram phantom). Our next study would be testing an in vivo K x-ray fluorescence system, based on 109Cd source on human volunteers who went through MR imaging and were injected by Gd.

  6. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in brain death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchtmann, M.; Beuing, O.; Skalej, M.; Kohl, J.; Serowy, S.; Bernarding, J.; Firsching, R.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory tests for the diagnosis of brain death in addition to clinical findings may shorten observation time required in some countries and may add certainty to the diagnosis under specific circumstances. The practicability of Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to confirm cerebral circulatory arrest was assessed after the diagnosis of brain death in 15 patients using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In all 15 patients extracranial blood flow distal to the external carotid arteries was undisturbed. In 14 patients no contrast medium was noted within intracerebral vessels above the proximal level of the intracerebral arteries. In one patient more distal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (A3 and M3) were filled with contrast medium. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA may be considered conclusive evidence of cerebral circulatory arrest, when major intracranial vessels fail to fill with contrast medium while extracranial vessels show normal blood flow.

  7. About a Gadolinium-doped Water Cherenkov LAGUNA Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Labarga, Luis

    2010-11-24

    Water Cherenkov (wC) detectors are extremely powerful apparatuses for scientific research. Nevertheless they lack of neutron tagging capabilities, which translates, mainly, into an inability to identify the anti-matter nature of the reacting incoming anti-neutrino particles. A solution was proposed by R. Beacon and M. Vagins back in 2004: by dissolving in the water a compound with nucleus with very large cross section for neutron capture like the Gadolinium, with a corresponding emission of photons of enough energy to be detected, they can tag thermal neutrons with an efficiency larger than 80%. In this talk we detail the technique and its implications in the measurement capabilities and, as well, the new backgrounds induced. We discuss the improvement on their physics program, also for the case of LAGUNA type detectors. We comment shortly the status of the pioneering R and D program of the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration towards dissolving a Gadolinium compound in its water.

  8. An organic electroluminescent device made from a gadolinium complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, D.-Q.; Huang, C.-H.; Ibrahim, K.; Liu, F.-Q.

    2002-01-01

    A gadolinium ternary complex, tris(1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-isobutyryl-5-pyrazolone) (phenanthroline) gadolinium [Gd(PMIP) 3(Phen)] was synthesized and used as a light emitting material in the organic electroluminescent (EL) devices. The triple layer device with a structure of indium tin oxide (ITO)/ N, N'-diphenyl- N, N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (TPD) (20 nm)/Gd(PMIP) 3(Phen) (80 nm)/2, 9-dimethyl-4, 7-diphenyl-1, 10-phenanthroline (bathocuproine or BCP) (20 nm)/Mg: Ag(200 nm)/Ag(100 nm) exhibited green emission peaking at 535 nm. A maximum luminance of 230 cd/m 2 at 17 V and a peak power efficiency of 0.02 lm/w at 9 V were obtained.

  9. About a Gadolinium-doped Water Cherenkov LAGUNA Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labarga, Luis

    2010-11-01

    Water Cherenkov (wC) detectors are extremely powerful apparatuses for scientific research. Nevertheless they lack of neutron tagging capabilities, which translates, mainly, into an inability to identify the anti-matter nature of the reacting incoming anti-neutrino particles. A solution was proposed by R. Beacon and M. Vagins back in 2004: by dissolving in the water a compound with nucleus with very large cross section for neutron capture like the Gadolinium, with a corresponding emission of photons of enough energy to be detected, they can tag thermal neutrons with an efficiency larger than 80%. In this talk we detail the technique and its implications in the measurement capabilities and, as well, the new backgrounds induced. We discuss the improvement on their physics program, also for the case of LAGUNA type detectors. We comment shortly the status of the pioneering R&D program of the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration towards dissolving a Gadolinium compound in its water.

  10. Growth and scintillation properties of gadolinium and yttrium orthovanadate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshina, O. V.; Baumer, V. N.; Bondar, V. G.; Kurtsev, D. A.; Gorbacheva, T. E.; Zenya, I. M.; Zhukov, A. V.; Sidletskiy, O. Ts.

    2012-02-01

    Aiming to explore the possibility of using the undoped rare-earth orthovanadates as scintillation materials, we developed the procedure for growth of gadolinium (GdVO 4) and yttrium (YVO 4) orthovanadate single crystals by Czochralski method, and determined the optimal conditions of their after-growth annealing. Optical, luminescent, and scintillation properties of YVO 4 and GdVO 4 were discussed versus known literature data. Scintillation characteristics of GdVO 4 were determined for the first time.

  11. Solid-state gadolinium{endash}magnesium hydride optical switch

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, R.; Rubin, M.; Richardson, T.; OBrien, N.; Chen, Y.

    1999-09-01

    The optical switching properties of gadolinium{endash}magnesium hydride have been demonstrated in a solid-state electrochromic device. With positive polarization of the hydride electrode, the visible reflectance approaches 35{percent} with virtually zero transmission, while with negative polarization, the visible transmission exceeds 25{percent} at 650 nm. The switching is reversible, with intermediate optical properties between the transparent and reflecting states. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Magnons as a Bose-Einstein Condensate in Nanocrystalline Gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S. N.; Mathew, S. P.

    2011-06-17

    The recent observation [S. P. Mathew et al., J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 200, 072047 (2010)] of the anomalous softening of spin-wave modes at low temperatures in nanocrystalline gadolinium is interpreted as a Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of magnons. A self-consistent calculation, based on the BEC picture, is shown to closely reproduce the observed temperature variations of magnetization and specific heat at constant magnetic fields.

  13. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Among Survivors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Neilan, Tomas G.; Farhad, Hoshang; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Shah, Ravi V.; Dodson, John A.; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Danik, Stephan B.; Verdini, Daniel J.; Tokuda, Michifumi; Tedrow, Usha B.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Hoffmann, Udo; Ghoshhajra, Brian B.; Stevenson, William G.; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to describe the role of contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in the workup of patients with aborted sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and in the prediction of long-term outcomes. BACKGROUND Myocardial fibrosis is a key substrate for SCA, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on a CMR study is a robust technique for imaging of myocardial fibrosis. METHODS We performed a retrospective review of all survivors of SCA who were referred for CMR studies and performed follow-up for the subsequent occurrence of an adverse event (death and appropriate defibrillator therapy). RESULTS After a workup that included a clinical history, electrocardiogram, echocardiography, and coronary angiogram, 137 patients underwent CMR for workup of aborted SCA (66% male; mean age 56 ± 11 years; left ventricular ejection fraction 43 ± 12%). The presenting arrhythmias were ventricular fibrillation (n = 105 [77%]) and ventricular tachycardia (n = 32 [23%]). Overall, LGE was found in 98 patients (71%), with an average extent of 9.9 ± 5% of the left ventricular myocardium. CMR imaging provided a diagnosis or an arrhythmic substrate in 104 patients (76%), including the presence of an infarct-pattern LGE in 60 patients (44%), noninfarct LGE in 21 (15%), active myocarditis in 14 (10%), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 3 (2%), sarcoidosis in 3, and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in 3. In a median follow-up of 29 months (range 18 to 43 months), there were 63 events. In a multivariable analysis, the strongest predictors of recurrent events were the presence of LGE (adjusted hazard ratio: 6.7; 95% CI: 2.38 to 18.85; p < 0.001) and the extent of LGE (hazard ratio: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.19; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Among patients with SCA, CMR with contrast identified LGE in 71% and provided a potential arrhythmic substrate in 76%. In follow-up, both the presence and extent of LGE identified a group at markedly increased risk of future adverse events. PMID

  14. Gadolinium nitride films deposited using a PEALD based process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ziwen; Williams, Paul A.; Odedra, Rajesh; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Potter, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Gadolinium nitride films have been deposited on Si(100) using a plasma-enhanced ALD (PEALD) based process. The deposition was carried out using tris(methylcyclopentadienyl)gadolinium {Gd(MeCp) 3} and remote nitrogen plasma, separated by argon pulses. Films were deposited at temperatures between 150 and 300 °C and capped with tantalum nitride to prevent post-deposition oxidation. Film composition was initially assessed using EDX and selected samples were subsequently depth profiled using medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) or AES. X-ray diffraction appears to show that the films are effectively amorphous. Films deposited at 200 °C were found to have a Gd:N ratio close to 1:1 and a low oxygen incorporation (˜5%). Although the growth was affected by partial thermal decomposition of the Gd(MeCp) 3, it was still possible to obtain smooth (Ra.=˜0.7 nm) films with good thickness uniformity (97%). Less successful attempts to deposit gadolinium nitride using thermal ALD with ammonia or mono-methyl-hydrazine are also reported.

  15. Antidiabetic Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antidiabetic agents is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  16. Quantitative imaging of the tissue contrast agent [Gd(DTPA)]²⁻ in articular cartilage by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sussulini, Alessandra; Wiener, Edzard; Marnitz, Tim; Wu, Bei; Müller, Berit; Hamm, Bernd; Sabine Becker, J

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is an emerging analytical technique in the generation of quantitative images of MR contrast agent distribution in thin tissue sections of articular cartilage. An analytical protocol is described that includes sample preparation by cryo-cutting of tissue sections, mass spectrometric measurements by LA-ICP-MS and quantification of gadolinium images by one-point calibration, standard addition method (employing matrix-matched laboratory standards) and isotope dilution analysis using highly enriched stable Gd-155 isotope (abundance 92 vs 14.8% in the [Gd(DTPA)]²⁻ contrast agent). The tissue contrast agent concentrations of [Gd(DTPA)]²⁻ in cartilage measured in this work are in agreement with findings obtained by magnetic resonance imaging and other analytical methodologies. The LA-ICP-MS imaging data also confirm the observation that the spatial distribution of [Gd(DTPA)]²⁻ in the near-equilibrium state is highly inhomogeneous across cartilage thickness with the highest concentration measured in superficial cartilage and a strong decrease toward the subchondral bone. In the present work, it is shown for the first time that LA-ICP-MS can be applied to validate the results from quantitative gadolinium-enhanced MRI technique of articular cartilage. PMID:23281293

  17. Synergistic enhancement of iron oxide nanoparticle and gadolinium for dual-contrast MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Huang, Xinglu; Qian, Chunqi; Zhu, Lei; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MR contrast agents exert influence on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2} relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined use of iron oxide and Gd-DTPA can improve the sensitivity/specificity of lesion detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual contrast MRI enhances the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can come from the high paramagnetic susceptibility of Gd{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can also come from the distinct pharmacokinetic distribution of SPIO and Gd-DTPA. -- Abstract: Purpose: The use of MR contrast agents allows accurate diagnosis by exerting an influence on the longitudinal (T{sub 1}) or transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. In this study, we combined the use of iron oxide (IO) particles and nonspecific extracellular gadolinium chelate (Gd) in order to further improve the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. Procedures: With a 7-Tesla scanner, pre-contrasted, IO-enhanced and dual contrast agent enhanced MRIs were performed in phantom, normal animals, and animal models of lymph node tumor metastases and orthotopic brain tumor. For the dual-contrast (DC) MRI, we focused on the evaluation of T{sub 2} weighted DC MRI with IO administered first, then followed by the injection of a bolus of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Results: Based on the C/N ratios and MRI relaxometry, the synergistic effect of coordinated administration of Gd-DTPA and IO was observed and confirmed in phantom, normal liver and tumor models. At 30 min after administration of Feridex, Gd-DTPA further decreased T{sub 2} relaxation in liver immediately after the injection. Additional administration of Gd-DTPA also immediately increased the signal contrast between tumor and brain parenchyma and maximized the C/N ratio to -4.12 {+-} 0.71. Dual contrast MRI also enhanced the

  18. Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mouse Model Using Macrophage-Targeted Gadolinium-Containing Synthetic Lipopeptide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zu T.; Zheng, Shaokuan; Gounis, Matthew J.; Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in Western cultures. The vast majority of cardiovascular events, including stroke and myocardial infarction, result from the rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, which are characterized by high and active macrophage content. Current imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) aim to characterize anatomic and structural features of plaques rather than their content. Previously, we reported that macrophage-targeted delivery of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent (GBCA-HDL) using high density lipoproteins (HDL)-like particles significantly enhances the detection of plaques in an apolipoprotein (apo) E knockout (KO) mouse model, with an atherosclerotic wall/muscle normalized enhancement ratio (NER) of 120% achieved. These particles are comprised of lipids and synthetic peptide fragments of the major protein of HDL, apo A-I, that contain a naturally occurring modification which targets the particles to macrophages. Targeted delivery minimizes the Gd dose and thus reduces the adverse effects of Gd. The aims of the current study were to test whether varying the GBCA-HDL particle shape and composition can further enhance atherosclerotic plaque MRI and control organ clearance of these agents. We show that the optimized GBCA-HDL particles are efficiently delivered intracellularly to and uptaken by both J774 macrophages in vitro and more importantly, by intraplaque macrophages in vivo, as evidenced by NER up to 160% and higher. This suggests high diagnostic power of our GBCA-HDL particles in the detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. Further, in contrast to discoidal, spherical GBCA-HDL exhibit hepatic clearance, which could further diminish adverse renal effects of Gd. Finally, activated macrophages are reliable indicators of any inflamed tissues and are implicated in other areas of unmet clinical need such as rheumatoid arthritis, sepsis and cancer, suggesting the expanded diagnostic

  19. Total gadolinium tissue deposition and skin structural findings following the administration of structurally different gadolinium chelates in healthy and ovariectomized female rats

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Joseph; Siegmund, Heiko; Idée, Jean-Marc; Fretellier, Nathalie; Jestin-Mayer, Gaëlle; Factor, Cecile; Deng, Min; Kang, Wei; Morcos, Sameh K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the retention of gadolinium (Gd) in skin, liver, and bone following gadodiamide or gadoteric acid administration. Methods Gd was measured in skin, liver and femur bone in female rats 10 weeks after administration of 17.5 mmol Gd/kg over 5 days of Gd agents. Rat skin microscopy, energy filtering transmission electron microscopy and elemental analysis were performed, and repeated after receiving the same dosage of gadodiamide in rats with osteoporosis induced with bilateral ovariectomy (OVX). The OVX was performed 60 days after the last injection of gadodiamide and animals sacrificed 3 weeks later. Results Gd concentration was 180-fold higher in the skin, 25-fold higher in the femur, and 30-fold higher in the liver in rats received gadodiamide than rats received gadoteric acid. The retention of Gd in the skin with gadodiamide was associated with an increase in dermal cellularity, and Gd encrustation of collagen fibers and deposition inside the fibroblasts and other cells. No differences in Gd concentration in liver, skin, and femur were observed between rats receiving gadodiamide with or without OVX. Conclusions Gd tissue retention with gadodiamide was higher than gadoteric acid. Tissues Gd deposition did not alter following gadodiamide administration to ovariectomized rats. PMID:26435917

  20. High longitudinal relaxivity of ultra-small gadolinium oxide prepared by microsecond laser ablation in diethylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Ningqi; Xiao Jun; Hu Wenyong; Chen Dihu; Tian Xiumei; Yang Chuan; Li Li

    2013-04-28

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) can be used as T{sub 1}-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent own to its high longitudinal relaxivity (r{sub 1}) and has attracted intensive attention in these years. In this paper, ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles of 3.8 nm in diameter have been successfully synthesized by a microsecond laser ablating a gadolinium (Gd) target in diethylene glycol (DEG). The growth inhibition effect induced by the large viscosity of DEG makes it possible to synthesize ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} by laser ablation in DEG. The r{sub 1} value and T{sub 1}-weighted MR images are measured by a 3.0 T MRI spectroscope. The results show these nanoparticles with a high r{sub 1} value of 9.76 s{sup -1} mM{sup -1} to be good MRI contrast agents. We propose an explanation for the high r{sub 1} value of ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} by considering the decreasing factor (surface to volume ratio of the nanoparticles, S/V) and the increasing factor (water hydration number of the Gd{sup 3+} on Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, q), which offer a new look into the relaxivity studies of MRI contrast agents. Our research provides a new approach to preparing ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} of high r{sub 1} value by laser ablation in DEG and develops the understanding of high relaxivity of ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} MRI contrast agents.

  1. A highly stable gadolinium complex with a fast, associative mechanism of water exchange.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Marlon K; Botta, Mauro; Nicolle, Gaëlle; Helm, Lothar; Aime, Silvio; Merbach, André E; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2003-11-26

    The stability and water exchange dynamics of gadolinium (GdIII) complexes are critical characteristics that determine their effectiveness as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A new heteropodal GdIII chelate, [Gd-TREN-bis(6-Me-HOPO)-(TAM-TRI)(H2O)2] (Gd-2), is presented which is based on a hydroxypyridinate (HOPO)-terephthalamide (TAM) ligand design. Thermodynamic equilibrium constants for the acid-base properties and the GdIII complexation strength of TREN-bis(6-Me-HOPO)-(TAM-TRI) (2) were measured by potentiometric and spectrophotometric titration techniques, respectively. The pGd of 2 is 20.6 (pH 7.4, 25 degrees C, I = 0.1 M), indicating that Gd-2 is of more than sufficient thermodynamic stability for in vivo MRI applications. The water exchange rate of Gd-2 (kex = 5.3(+/-0.6) x 107 s-1) was determined by variable temperature 17O NMR and is in the fast exchange regime - ideal for MRI. Variable pressure 17O NMR was used to determine the volume of activation (DeltaV) of Gd-2. DeltaV for Gd-2 is -5 cm3 mol-1, indicative of an interchange associative (Ia) water exchange mechanism. The results reported herein are important as they provide insight into the factors influencing high stability and fast water exchange in the HOPO series of complexes, potentially future clinical contrast agents. PMID:14624565

  2. QSPR prediction of the stability constants of gadolinium(III) complexes for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dioury, Fabienne; Duprat, Arthur; Dreyfus, Gérard; Ferroud, Clotilde; Cossy, Janine

    2014-10-27

    Gadolinium(III) complexes constitute the largest class of compounds used as contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) machine-learning based method is applied to predict the thermodynamic stability constants of these complexes (log KGdL), a property commonly associated with the toxicity of such organometallic pharmaceuticals. In this approach, the log KGdL value of each complex is predicted by a graph machine, a combination of parametrized functions that encodes the 2D structure of the ligand. The efficiency of the predictive model is estimated on an independent test set; in addition, the method is shown to be effective (i) for estimating the stability constants of uncharacterized, newly synthesized polyamino-polycarboxylic compounds and (ii) for providing independent log KGdL estimations for complexants for which conflicting or questionable experimental data were reported. The exhaustive database of log KGdL values for 158 complexants, reported for potential application as contrast agents for MRI and used in the present study, is available in the Supporting Information (122 primary literature sources). PMID:25181704

  3. MRI detection of breast cancer micrometastases with a fibronectin-targeting contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Qutaish, Mohammed; Han, Zheng; Schur, Rebecca M.; Liu, Yiqiao; Wilson, David L.; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in breast cancer patients. Early detection of high-risk breast cancer, including micrometastasis, is critical in tailoring appropriate and effective interventional therapies. Increased fibronectin expression, a hallmark of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, is associated with high-risk breast cancer and metastasis. We have previously developed a penta-peptide CREKA (Cys-Arg-Glu-Lys-Ala)-targeted gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, CREKA-Tris(Gd-DOTA)3 (Gd-DOTA (4,7,10-tris(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecyl gadolinium), which binds to fibrin–fibronectin complexes that are abundant in the tumour microenvironment of fast-growing breast cancer. Here we assess the capability of CREKA-Tris(Gd-DOTA)3 to detect micrometastasis with MRI in co-registration with high-resolution fluorescence cryo-imaging in female mice bearing metastatic 4T1 breast tumours. We find that CREKA-Tris(Gd-DOTA)3 provides robust contrast enhancement in the metastatic tumours and enables the detection of micrometastases of size <0.5 mm, extending the detection limit of the current clinical imaging modalities. These results demonstrate that molecular MRI with CREKA-Tris(Gd-DOTA)3 may facilitate early detection of high-risk breast cancer and micrometastasis in the clinic. PMID:26264658

  4. The effect of motexafin gadolinium on ALA photodynamic therapy in glioma spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Marlon S.; Sanchez, Rogelio; Sun, Chung-Ho; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2008-02-01

    Following surgical removal of malignant brain tumors 80% of all cases develop tumor recurrence within 2 cm of the resected margin. The aim of postoperative therapy is therefore elimination of nests of tumor cells remaining in the margins of the resection cavity. Light attenuation in tissue makes it difficult for adequate light fluences to reach depths of 1-2 cm in the resection margin making it difficult for standard intraoperative photodynamic therapy (PDT) to accomplish this goal. Thus additional agents are required that either increase the efficacy of low fluence PDT or inhibit cellular repair, to enhance effectiveness of PDT in the tumor resection cavity. Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is one such agent previously reported to enhance the cytotoxic potential of radiation therapy, as well as several chemotherapeutic agents by causing redox stress to cancerous cells. MGd is well tolerated with tumor specific uptake in clinical studies. The authors evaluated MGd as a potential PDT enhancing agent at low light fluences using an in vitro model. Multicellular Glioma spheroids (MGS) of approximately 300 micron diameter, obtained from ACBT cell lines were subjected to acute PDT treatments at 6J, 12J, and 18J light fluences. Growth was determined by measuring diameters in two axes. At four weeks a dose dependent inhibition of spheroid growth was seen in 33%, 55%, and 83% of the MGS at 6J, 12J, and 18J respectively, while inhibition followed by a partial reversal of growth was seen in 17%, 33%, and 17% respectively. This study provides a rationale for the use of this drug as a PDT enhancer in the management of brain tumors.

  5. Trace determination of gadolinium in biomedical samples by diode laser-based multi-step resonance ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Blaum, K; Geppert, C; Schreiber, W G; Hengstler, J G; Müller, P; Nörtershäuser, W; Wendt, K; Bushaw, B A

    2002-04-01

    The application of high-resolution multi-step resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) to the trace determination of the rare earth element gadolinium is described. Utilizing three-step resonant excitation into an autoionizing level, both isobaric and isotopic selectivity of >10(7) were attained. An overall detection efficiency of approximately 10(-7) and an isotope specific detection limit of 1.5 x 10(9) atoms have been demonstrated. When targeting the major isotope (158)Gd, this corresponds to a total Gd detection limit of 1.6 pg. Additionally, linear response has been demonstrated over a dynamic range of six orders of magnitude. The method has been used to determine the Gd content in various normal and tumor tissue samples, taken from a laboratory mouse shortly after injection of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA), which is used as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The RIMS results show Gd concentrations that vary by more than two orders of magnitude (0.07-11.5 microg mL(-1)) depending on the tissue type. This variability is similar to that observed in MRI scans that depict Gd-DTPA content in the mouse prior to dissection, and illustrates the potential for quantitative trace analysis in microsamples of biomedical materials. PMID:12012186

  6. Monte Carlo Study of Radiation Dose Enhancement by Gadolinium in Megavoltage and High Dose Rate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daniel G.; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G.; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed. PMID:25275550

  7. Use of Gadolinium as a Primary Criticality Control in Disposing Waste Containing Plutonium at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, Vincent

    2005-01-04

    Use of gadolinium as a neutron poison has been proposed for disposing of several metric tons of excess plutonium at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The plutonium will first be dissolved in nitric acid in small batches. Gadolinium nitrate will then be added to the plutonium nitrate solution. The Gd-poisoned plutonium solution will be neutralized and transferred to large under-ground tanks. The pH of small batches of neutralized plutonium solution will be adjusted prior to addition of the glass frit for eventual production as glass logs. The use of gadolinium as the neutron poison would minimize the number of glass logs generated from this disposition. The primary criticality safety concerns regarding the disposal process are: (1) maintaining neutron moderation under all processing conditions since gadolinium has a very large absorption cross section for thermal neutrons, (2) characteristics of plutonium and gadolinium precipitation during the neutralization process, (3) mixing characteristics of the precipitate to ensure that plutonium would remain homogeneously mixed with gadolinium, and (4) potential separation of plutonium and gadolinium during nitric and formic acids addition. A number of experiments were conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to study the behavior of plutonium and gadolinium at various stages of the disposition process.

  8. Dual-Energy X-Radiography With Gadolinium Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutt, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Image resolution increased, and cost reduced. Proposed dual-energy x-ray imaging system, continuous bremsstrahlung spectrum from x-ray tube filtered by foil of nonradioactive gadolinium or another rare-earth metal to form two-peaked energy spectrum. After passing through patient or object under examination, filtered radiation detected by array of energy-discriminating, photon-counting detectors. Detector outputs processed to form x-ray image for each peak and possibly enhanced image based on data taken at both peaks.

  9. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, A. Banerjee, M. Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-24

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  10. Ascorbate and endocytosed Motexafin gadolinium induce lysosomal rupture.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Carsten; Kurz, Tino; Bannenberg, Sarah; Jacob, Ralf; Holmgren, Arne; Brunk, Ulf T

    2011-08-28

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) sensitizes malignant cells to ionizing radiation, although the underlying mechanisms for uptake and sensitization are both unclear. Here we show that MGd is endocytosed by the clathrin-dependent pathway with ensuing lysosomal membrane permeabilization, most likely via formation of reactive oxygen species involving redox-active metabolites, such as ascorbate. We propose that subsequent apoptosis is a synergistic effect of irradiation and high MGd concentrations in malignant cells due to their pronounced endocytic activity. The results provide novel insights into the mode of action of this promising anti-cancer drug, which is currently under clinical trials. PMID:21492999