Science.gov

Sample records for aggregates by shape and surface texture

  1. Designing electron spin textures and spin interferometers by shape deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zu-Jian; Gentile, Paola; Ortix, Carmine; Cuoco, Mario

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that the spin orientation of an electron propagating in a one-dimensional nanostructure with Rashba spin-orbit (SO) coupling can be manipulated on demand by changing the geometry of the nanosystem. Shape deformations that result in a nonuniform curvature give rise to complex three-dimensional spin textures in space. We employ the paradigmatic example of an elliptically deformed quantum ring to unveil the way to get an all-geometrical and all-electrical control of the spin orientation. The resulting spin textures exhibit a tunable topological character with windings around the radial and the out-of-plane directions. We show that these topologically nontrivial spin patterns affect the spin interference effect in the deformed ring, thereby resulting in different geometry-driven ballistic electronic transport behaviors. Our results establish a deep connection between electronic spin textures, spin transport, and the nanoscale shape of the system.

  2. Capturing the Surface Texture and Shape of Pollen: A Comparison of Microscopy Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Mander, Luke; Fried, Glenn; Punyasena, Surangi W.

    2012-01-01

    Research on the comparative morphology of pollen grains depends crucially on the application of appropriate microscopy techniques. Information on the performance of microscopy techniques can be used to inform that choice. We compared the ability of several microscopy techniques to provide information on the shape and surface texture of three pollen types with differing morphologies. These techniques are: widefield, apotome, confocal and two-photon microscopy (reflected light techniques), and brightfield and differential interference contrast microscopy (DIC) (transmitted light techniques). We also provide a first view of pollen using super-resolution microscopy. The three pollen types used to contrast the performance of each technique are: Croton hirtus (Euphorbiaceae), Mabea occidentalis (Euphorbiaceae) and Agropyron repens (Poaceae). No single microscopy technique provided an adequate picture of both the shape and surface texture of any of the three pollen types investigated here. The wavelength of incident light, photon-collection ability of the optical technique, signal-to-noise ratio, and the thickness and light absorption characteristics of the exine profoundly affect the recovery of morphological information by a given optical microscopy technique. Reflected light techniques, particularly confocal and two-photon microscopy, best capture pollen shape but provide limited information on very fine surface texture. In contrast, transmitted light techniques, particularly differential interference contrast microscopy, can resolve very fine surface texture but provide limited information on shape. Texture comprising sculptural elements that are spaced near the diffraction limit of light (∼250 nm; NDL) presents an acute challenge to optical microscopy. Super-resolution structured illumination microscopy provides data on the NDL texture of A. repens that is more comparable to textural data from scanning electron microscopy than any other optical microscopy technique

  3. Shape and texture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, A.

    1982-01-01

    Methods used to measure the geometrical properties of regions in a segmented image are discussed including the use of centroids, moments, and principle axes. In addition, statistical picture properties, particularly those which describe visual texture, are discussed. Gray level statistics, local property statistics, and autocorrelation and power spectrum are addressed.

  4. Tribological performance of surfaces enhanced by texturing and nitrogen implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Derong; Zhang, Qi; Qin, Zhenbo; Luo, Qin; Wu, Zhong; Liu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a novel texturing technology by means of electrodepositon is introduced. Textured surface covered with small bumps with the average size of 28 μm in diameter and 10 μm in height was fabricated. The trough around the bumps acts as the pocket to trap the debris. The nitrogen implantation was used to enhance the tribological properties of textured surfaces. The effects of implanted energy and dose on the structures of coating and tribological performances of textured surfaces were studied. The results show that the formation of Cr2N or CrN depends on the implanted dose. After nitrogen ion implantation, the friction coefficient of textured surface reduced and the wear resistance of textured surface was improved. The wear resistance enhances with increase of implanted dose, and has little to do with implanted energy.

  5. Shapes and textures for rendering coral

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.L. ); Wyvill, G. )

    1990-10-18

    A growth algorithm has been developed to build coral shapes out of a tree of spheres. A volume density defined by the spheres is contoured to give a soft object.'' The resulting contour surfaces are rendered by ray tracing, using a generalized volume texture to produce shading and bump mapped'' normal perturbations. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Conveying the 3D Shape of Transparent Surfaces Via Texture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Fuchs, Henry; Pizer, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    Transparency can be a useful device for depicting multiple overlapping surfaces in a single image. The challenge is to render the transparent surfaces in such a way that their three-dimensional shape can be readily understood and their depth distance from underlying structures clearly perceived. This paper describes our investigations into the use of sparsely-distributed discrete, opaque texture as an 'artistic device' for more explicitly indicating the relative depth of a transparent surface and for communicating the essential features of its 3D shape in an intuitively meaningful and minimally occluding way. The driving application for this work is the visualization of layered surfaces in radiation therapy treatment planning data, and the technique is illustrated on transparent isointensity surfaces of radiation dose. We describe the perceptual motivation and artistic inspiration for defining a stroke texture that is locally oriented in the direction of greatest normal curvature (and in which individual strokes are of a length proportional to the magnitude of the curvature in the direction they indicate), and discuss several alternative methods for applying this texture to isointensity surfaces defined in a volume. We propose an experimental paradigm for objectively measuring observers' ability to judge the shape and depth of a layered transparent surface, in the course of a task relevant to the needs of radiotherapy treatment planning, and use this paradigm to evaluate the practical effectiveness of our approach through a controlled observer experiment based on images generated from actual clinical data.

  7. QBIC project: querying images by content, using color, texture, and shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niblack, Carlton W.; Barber, Ron; Equitz, Will; Flickner, Myron D.; Glasman, Eduardo H.; Petkovic, Dragutin; Yanker, Peter; Faloutsos, Christos; Taubin, Gabriel

    1993-04-01

    In the query by image content (QBIC) project we are studying methods to query large on-line image databases using the images' content as the basis of the queries. Examples of the content we use include color, texture, and shape of image objects and regions. Potential applications include medical (`Give me other images that contain a tumor with a texture like this one'), photo-journalism (`Give me images that have blue at the top and red at the bottom'), and many others in art, fashion, cataloging, retailing, and industry. Key issues include derivation and computation of attributes of images and objects that provide useful query functionality, retrieval methods based on similarity as opposed to exact match, query by image example or user drawn image, the user interfaces, query refinement and navigation, high dimensional database indexing, and automatic and semi-automatic database population. We currently have a prototype system written in X/Motif and C running on an RS/6000 that allows a variety of queries, and a test database of over 1000 images and 1000 objects populated from commercially available photo clip art images. In this paper we present the main algorithms for color texture, shape and sketch query that we use, show example query results, and discuss future directions.

  8. Effect of surface texture by ion beam sputtering on implant biocompatibility and soft tissue attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, D. F.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives in this report were to use the ion beam sputtering technique to produce surface textures on polymers, metals, and ceramics. The morphology of the texture was altered by varying both the width and depth of the square pits which were formed by ion beam erosion. The width of the ribs separating the pits were defined by the mask used to produce the texture. The area of the surface containing pits varies as the width was changed. The biological parameters used to evaluate the biological response to the texture were: (1) fibrous capsule and inflammatory response in subcutaneous soft tissue; (2) strength of the mechanical attachment of the textured surface by the soft tissue; and (3) morphology of the epidermal layer interfacing the textured surface of percutaneous connectors. Because the sputter yield on teflon ribs was approximately an order of magnitude larger than any other material the majority of the measurements presented in the report were obtained with teflon.

  9. Textured carbon surfaces on copper by sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, A. N. (Inventor); Jensen, K. A. (Inventor); Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A very thin layer of highly textured carbon is applied to a copper surface by a triode sputtering process. A carbon target and a copper substrate are simultaneously exposed to an argon plasma in a vacuum chamber. The resulting carbon surface is characterized by a dense, random array of needle like spires or peaks which extend perpendicularly from the copper surface. The coated copper is especially useful for electrode plates in multistage depressed collectors.

  10. Personal recognition using hand shape and texture.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Zhang, David

    2006-08-01

    This paper proposes a new bimodal biometric system using feature-level fusion of hand shape and palm texture. The proposed combination is of significance since both the palmprint and hand-shape images are proposed to be extracted from the single hand image acquired from a digital camera. Several new hand-shape features that can be used to represent the hand shape and improve the performance are investigated. The new approach for palmprint recognition using discrete cosine transform coefficients, which can be directly obtained from the camera hardware, is demonstrated. None of the prior work on hand-shape or palmprint recognition has given any attention on the critical issue of feature selection. Our experimental results demonstrate that while majority of palmprint or hand-shape features are useful in predicting the subjects identity, only a small subset of these features are necessary in practice for building an accurate model for identification. The comparison and combination of proposed features is evaluated on the diverse classification schemes; naive Bayes (normal, estimated, multinomial), decision trees (C4.5, LMT), k-NN, SVM, and FFN. Although more work remains to be done, our results to date indicate that the combination of selected hand-shape and palmprint features constitutes a promising addition to the biometrics-based personal recognition systems. PMID:16900698

  11. ATR applications of minimax entropy models of texture and shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Song-Chun; Yuille, Alan L.; Lanterman, Aaron D.

    2001-10-01

    Concepts from information theory have recently found favor in both the mainstream computer vision community and the military automatic target recognition community. In the computer vision literature, the principles of minimax entropy learning theory have been used to generate rich probabilitistic models of texture and shape. In addition, the method of types and large deviation theory has permitted the difficulty of various texture and shape recognition tasks to be characterized by 'order parameters' that determine how fundamentally vexing a task is, independent of the particular algorithm used. These information-theoretic techniques have been demonstrated using traditional visual imagery in applications such as simulating cheetah skin textures and such as finding roads in aerial imagery. We discuss their application to problems in the specific application domain of automatic target recognition using infrared imagery. We also review recent theoretical and algorithmic developments which permit learning minimax entropy texture models for infrared textures in reasonable timeframes.

  12. Surface texturing and patterning in solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1993-11-01

    Surface texture can perform a number of functions in modern solar cell design. The most obvious function is in control of reflection from surfaces on which sunlight is incident. However, texture can also be used to influence the fate of light that is refracted into the cell. Light steering by surface texture can ensure this refracted light is absorbed in regions of the cell which are most responsive. When used with rear reflectors, surface texture can help trap weakly absorbed light into the cell, increasing the effective path length or optical thickness of the cell by factors of 30--60. Two general types of texture are considered. One involves macroscopic features of controlled shape designed to control the direction of interacting light. The other is based on the use of irregular features of size comparable to wavelength of the light. These can be very effective in scattering light into a wide range of directions. Non-optical uses of texture are also briefly described. 62 refs., 22 figs.

  13. Texture memory and strain-texture mapping in a NiTi shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, B.; Majumdar, B. S.; Dutta, I.

    2007-08-06

    The authors report on the near-reversible strain hysteresis during thermal cycling of a polycrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy at a constant stress that is below the yield strength of the martensite. In situ neutron diffraction experiments are used to demonstrate that the strain hysteresis occurs due to a texture memory effect, where the martensite develops a texture when it is cooled under load from the austenite phase and is thereafter ''remembered.'' Further, the authors quantitatively relate the texture to the strain by developing a calculated strain-texture map or pole figure for the martensite phase, and indicate its applicability in other martensitic transformations.

  14. Lava Flows and Surface Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 17 November 2003

    The striking surface textures observed in this THEMIS image taken south of the volcano Arsia Mons are from different erupted lava flows. Many flows extend for several kilometers and are observed to crosscut previous existing flows. The variable surface textures could result from older and younger lava flows, differences in the composition and vessicularity of magma, or different degrees of weathering.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -20.4, Longitude 242.2 East (117.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Superoleophobic textured copper surfaces fabricated by chemical etching/oxidation and surface fluorination.

    PubMed

    Ou, Junfei; Hu, Weihua; Liu, Sheng; Xue, Mingshan; Wang, Fajun; Li, Wen

    2013-10-23

    We report a convenient route to fabricate superoleophobic surfaces (abridged as SOS) on copper substrate by combining a two-step surface texturing process (first, the substrate is immersed in an aqueous solution of HNO3 and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, and then in an aqueous solution of NaOH and (NH4)2S2O8) and succeeding surface fluorination with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol (PFDT) or 1-decanethiol. The surface morphologies and compositions were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The results showed that spherical micro-pits (SMP) with diameter of 50-100 μm were formed in the first step of surface texturing; in the second step, Cu(OH)2 or/and CuO with structures of nanorods/microflowers/microballs were formed thereon. The surface wettability was further assessed by optical contact angle meter by using water (surface tension of 72.1 mN m(-1) at 20°C), rapeseed oil (35.7 mN m(-1) at 20°C), and hexadecane (25.7 mN m(-1) at 20°C) as probe liquids. The results showed that, as the surface tension decreasing, stricter choosing of surface structures and surface chemistry are required to obtain SOS. Specifically, for hexadecane, which records the lowest surface tension, the ideal surface structures are a combination of densely distributed SMP and nanorods, and the surface chemistry should be tuned by grafted with low-surface-energy molecules of PFDT. Moreover, the stability of the so-fabricated sample was tested and the results showed that, under the testing conditions, superhydrophobicity and superoleophobicity may be deteriorated after wear/humidity resistance test. Such deterioration may be due to the loss of outermost PFDT layer or/and the destruction of the above-mentioned ideal surface structures. For UV and oxidation resistance, the sample remained stable for a period of 10 days. PMID:24073938

  16. Effect of the surface texturing shapes fabricated using dry etching on the extraction efficiency of vertical light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. C.; Park, J. B.; Bae, J. W.; Thuy, Pham Thi Thu; Yoo, M. C.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2008-08-01

    On the surfaces of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) having an n-side-up vertical electrode structure formed by the laser lift-off, various shapes of photoresist-patterned surface textures were formed by inductively coupled plasma etching and their effect on the light emission efficiencies was investigated. By the formation of various shapes of surface textures, the light output efficiency was increased from 37% to 45% compared to that without surface textures. The increase of light output efficiency was related to the increase of sidewall scattering, the decrease of reflected loss, and the decrease of cavity wall effect that occurs for the vertical LEDs by the increase of sidewall surface area.

  17. Comparing the role of shape and texture on staging hepatic fibrosis from medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuejun; Louie, Ryan; Liu, Brent J.; Gao, Xin; Tan, Xiaomin; Qu, Xianghe; Long, Liling

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of shape and texture in the classification of hepatic fibrosis by selecting the optimal parameters for a better Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system. 10 surface shape features are extracted from a standardized profile of liver; while15 texture features calculated from gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) are extracted within an ROI in liver. Each combination of these input subsets is checked by using support vector machine (SVM) with leave-one-case-out method to differentiate fibrosis into two groups: normal or abnormal. The accurate rate value of all 10/15 types number of features is 66.83% by texture, while 85.74% by shape features, respectively. The irregularity of liver shape can demonstrate fibrotic grade efficiently and texture feature of CT image is not recommended to use with shape feature for interpretation of cirrhosis.

  18. Texture- and deformability-based surface recognition by tactile image analysis.

    PubMed

    Khasnobish, Anwesha; Pal, Monalisa; Tibarewala, D N; Konar, Amit; Pal, Kunal

    2016-08-01

    Deformability and texture are two unique object characteristics which are essential for appropriate surface recognition by tactile exploration. Tactile sensation is required to be incorporated in artificial arms for rehabilitative and other human-computer interface applications to achieve efficient and human-like manoeuvring. To accomplish the same, surface recognition by tactile data analysis is one of the prerequisites. The aim of this work is to develop effective technique for identification of various surfaces based on deformability and texture by analysing tactile images which are obtained during dynamic exploration of the item by artificial arms whose gripper is fitted with tactile sensors. Tactile data have been acquired, while human beings as well as a robot hand fitted with tactile sensors explored the objects. The tactile images are pre-processed, and relevant features are extracted from the tactile images. These features are provided as input to the variants of support vector machine (SVM), linear discriminant analysis and k-nearest neighbour (kNN) for classification. Based on deformability, six household surfaces are recognized from their corresponding tactile images. Moreover, based on texture five surfaces of daily use are classified. The method adopted in the former two cases has also been applied for deformability- and texture-based recognition of four biomembranes, i.e. membranes prepared from biomaterials which can be used for various applications such as drug delivery and implants. Linear SVM performed best for recognizing surface deformability with an accuracy of 83 % in 82.60 ms, whereas kNN classifier recognizes surfaces of daily use having different textures with an accuracy of 89 % in 54.25 ms and SVM with radial basis function kernel recognizes biomembranes with an accuracy of 78 % in 53.35 ms. The classifiers are observed to generalize well on the unseen test datasets with very high performance to achieve efficient material

  19. Electric Arc and Electrochemical Surface Texturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Snyder, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface texturing of conductive materials can readily be accomplished by means of a moving electric arc which produces a plasma from the environmental gases as well as from the vaporized substrate and arc electrode materials. As the arc is forced to move across the substrate surface, a condensate from the plasma re-deposits an extremely rough surface which is intimately mixed and attached to the substrate material. The arc textured surfaces produce greatly enhanced thermal emittance and hold potential for use as high temperature radiator surfaces in space, as well as in systems which use radiative heat dissipation such as computer assisted tomography (CAT) scan systems. Electrochemical texturing of titanium alloys can be accomplished by using sodium chloride solutions along with ultrasonic agitation to produce a random distribution of craters on the surface. The crater size and density can be controlled to produce surface craters appropriately sized for direct bone in-growth of orthopaedic implants. Electric arc texturing and electrochemical texturing techniques, surface properties and potential applications will be presented.

  20. Quantitative Morphologic Analysis of Boulder Shape and Surface Texture to Infer Environmental History: A Case Study of Rock Breakdown at the Ephrata Fan, Channeled Scabland, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Viles, Heather A.; Bourke, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    Boulder morphology reflects both lithology and climate and is dictated by the combined effects of erosion, transport, and weathering. At present, morphologic information at the boulder scale is underutilized as a recorder of environmental processes, partly because of the lack of a systematic quantitative parameter set for reporting and comparing data sets. We develop such a parameter set, incorporating a range of measures of boulder form and surface texture. We use standard shape metrics measured in the field and fractal and morphometric classification methods borrowed from landscape analysis and applied to laser-scanned molds. The parameter set was pilot tested on three populations of basalt boulders with distinct breakdown histories in the Channeled Scabland, Washington: (1) basalt outcrop talus; (2) flood-transported boulders recently excavated from a quarry; and (3) flood-transported boulders, extensively weathered in situ on the Ephrata Fan surface. Size and shape data were found to distinguish between flood-transported and untransported boulders. Size and edge angles (approximately 120 degrees) of flood-transported boulders suggest removal by preferential fracturing along preexisting columnar joints, and curvature data indicate rounding relative to outcrop boulders. Surface textural data show that boulders which have been exposed at the surface are significantly rougher than those buried by fan sediments. Past signatures diagnostic of flood transport still persist on surface boulders, despite ongoing overprinting by processes in the present breakdown environment through roughening and fracturing in situ. Further use of this quantitative boulder parameter set at other terrestrial and planetary sites will aid in cataloging and understanding morphologic signatures of environmental processes.

  1. Quantitative morphologic analysis of boulder shape and surface texture to infer environmental history: A case study of rock breakdown at the Ephrata Fan, Channeled Scabland, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Viles, Heather A.; Bourke, Mary C.

    2008-05-01

    Boulder morphology reflects both lithology and climate and is dictated by the combined effects of erosion, transport, and weathering. At present, morphologic information at the boulder scale is underutilized as a recorder of environmental processes, partly because of the lack of a systematic quantitative parameter set for reporting and comparing data sets. We develop such a parameter set, incorporating a range of measures of boulder form and surface texture. We use standard shape metrics measured in the field and fractal and morphometric classification methods borrowed from landscape analysis and applied to laser-scanned molds. The parameter set was pilot tested on three populations of basalt boulders with distinct breakdown histories in the Channeled Scabland, Washington: (1) basalt outcrop talus; (2) flood-transported boulders recently excavated from a quarry; and (3) flood-transported boulders, extensively weathered in situ on the Ephrata Fan surface. Size and shape data were found to distinguish between flood-transported and untransported boulders. Size and edge angles (~120°) of flood-transported boulders suggest removal by preferential fracturing along preexisting columnar joints, and curvature data indicate rounding relative to outcrop boulders. Surface textural data show that boulders which have been exposed at the surface are significantly rougher than those buried by fan sediments. Past signatures diagnostic of flood transport still persist on surface boulders, despite ongoing overprinting by processes in the present breakdown environment through roughening and fracturing in situ. Further use of this quantitative boulder parameter set at other terrestrial and planetary sites will aid in cataloging and understanding morphologic signatures of environmental processes.

  2. Comments on comet shapes and aggregation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, William K.

    1989-01-01

    An important question for a comet mission is whether comet nuclei preserve information clarifying aggregation processes of planetary matter. New observational evidence shows that Trojan asteroids, as a group, display a higher fraction of highly-elongated objects than the belt. More recently evidence has accumulated that comet nuclei, as a group, also display highly-elongated shapes at macro-scale. This evidence comes from the several comets whose nuclear lightcurves or shapes have been well studied. Trojans and comet nuclei share other properties. Both groups have extremely low albedos and reddish-to neutral-black colors typical of asteroids of spectral class D, P, and C. Both groups may have had relatively low collision frequencies. An important problem to resolve with spacecraft imaging is whether these elongated shapes are primordial, or due to evolution of the objects. Two hypotheses that might be tested by a combination of global-scale and close-up imaging from various directions are: (1) The irregular shapes are primordial and related to the fact that these bodies have had lower collision frequencies than belt asteroids; or (2) The irregular shapes may be due to volatile loss.

  3. Surface Texture and Structure of ZnO Films Synthesized by Off-Axis Sputtering Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.; George, M. A.; Lowndes, D. H.

    1999-01-01

    Morphology and structure of ZnO films deposited on (0001) sapphire and glass substrates by off-axis sputtering are investigated at various temperatures and pressures. All films show highly textured structures on glass substrates and epitaxial growth on sapphire substrates. The full width at half maximum of theta rocking curves for epitaxial films is less than 0.5 degrees. In textured films, it rises to several degrees. The trend of surface textures in films grown at low pressures is similar to those grown at high temperatures. A morphology transition from large well-defined hexagonal grains to flat surface was observed at a pressure of 50 mtorr and temperature of 550 C. The experiment results are explained by the transport behavior of depositing species.

  4. Texturing polymer surfaces by transfer casting. [cardiovascular prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Sovey, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A technique for fabricating textured surfaces on polymers without altering their surface chemistries is described. A surface of a fluorocarbon polymer is exposed to a beam of ions to texture it. The polymer which is to be surface-roughened is then cast over the textured surface of the fluorocarbon polymer. After curing, the cast polymer is peeled off the textured fluorocarbon polymer, and the peeled off surface has negative replica of the textured surface. The microscopic surface texture provides large surface areas for adhesive bonding. In cardiovascular prosthesis applications the surfaces are relied on for the development of a thin adherent well nourished thrombus.

  5. Optical and electrical properties of porous silicon layer formed on the textured surface by electrochemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiying, Ou; Lei, Zhao; Hongwei, Diao; Jun, Zhang; Wenjing, Wang

    2011-05-01

    Porous silicon (PS) layers were formed on textured crystalline silicon by electrochemical etching in HF-based electrolyte. Optical and electrical properties of the TMAH textured surfaces with PS formation are studied. Moreover, the influences of the initial structures and the anodizing time on the optical and electrical properties of the surfaces after PS formation are investigated. The results show that the TMAH textured surfaces with PS formation present a dramatic decrease in reflectance. The longer the anodizing time is, the lower the reflectance. Moreover, an initial surface with bigger pyramids achieved lower reflectance in a short wavelength range. A minimum reflectance of 3.86% at 460 nm is achieved for a short anodizing time of 2 min. Furthermore, the reflectance spectrum of the sample, which was etched in 3 vol.% TMAH for 25 min and then anodized for 20 min, is extremely flat and lies between 3.67% and 6.15% in the wavelength range from 400 to 1040 nm. In addition, for a short anodizing time, a slight increase in the effective carrier lifetime is observed. Our results indicate that PS layers formed on a TMAH textured surface for a short anodization treatment can be used as both broadband antireflection coatings and passivation layers for the application in solar cells.

  6. Aggregate stability as affected by polyacrylamide molecular weight, soil texture and water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The favorable effects of the environmentally friendly, non toxic, anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) as a soil conditioner have long been established. However, some uncertainties exist regarding the effects of PAM molecular weight (MW) on its performance as a soil amendment and the ability of PAM to penet...

  7. An Approach to 3d Digital Modeling of Surfaces with Poor Texture by Range Imaging Techniques. `SHAPE from Stereo' VS. `SHAPE from Silhouette' in Digitizing Jorge Oteiza's Sculptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Fernández, J.; Álvaro Tordesillas, A.; Barba, S.

    2015-02-01

    Despite eminent development of digital range imaging techniques, difficulties persist in the virtualization of objects with poor radiometric information, in other words, objects consisting of homogeneous colours (totally white, black, etc.), repetitive patterns, translucence, or materials with specular reflection. This is the case for much of the Jorge Oteiza's works, particularly in the sculpture collection of the Museo Fundación Jorge Oteiza (Navarra, Spain). The present study intend to analyse and asses the performance of two digital 3D-modeling methods based on imaging techniques, facing cultural heritage in singular cases, determined by radiometric characteristics as mentioned: Shape from Silhouette and Shape from Stereo. On the other hand, the text proposes the definition of a documentation workflow and presents the results of its application in the collection of sculptures created by Oteiza.

  8. Advanced measurement and analysis of surface textures produced by micro-machining processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordatchev, Evgueni V.; Hafiz, Abdullah M. K.

    2014-09-01

    Surface texture of a part or a product has significant effects on its functionality, physical-mechanical properties and visual appearance. In particular for miniature products, the implication of surface quality becomes critical owing to the presence of geometrical features with micro/nano-scale dimensions. Qualitative and quantitative assessments of surface texture are carried out predominantly by profile parameters, which are often insufficient to address the contribution of constituent spatial components with varied amplitudes and wavelengths. In this context, this article presents a novel approach for advanced measurement and analysis of profile average roughness (Ra) and its spatial distribution at different wavelength intervals. The applicability of the proposed approach was verified for three different surface topographies prepared by grinding, laser micro-polishing and micro-milling processes. From the measurement and analysis results, Ra(λ) spatial distribution was found to be an effective measure of revealing the contributions of various spatial components within specific wavelength intervals towards formation of the entire surface profile. In addition, the approach was extended to the measurement and analysis of areal average roughness Sa(λ) spatial distribution within different wavelength intervals. Besides, the proposed method was demonstrated to be a useful technique in developing a functional correlation between a manufacturing process and its corresponding surface profile.

  9. Holographic measurement of wall stress distribution and 3D flow over a surface textured by microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra, Humberto; Gorumlu, Seder; Aksak, Burak; Castillo, Luciano; Sheng, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how fluid flow interacts with micro-textured surfaces is crucial for a broad range of key biological processes and engineering applications including particle dispersion, pathogenic infections, and drag manipulation by surface topology. Existing methods, such as μPIV, suffers from low spatial resolution and fail to track tracer particle motion very close to a rough surface and within roughness elements. In this paper, we present a technique that combines high speed digital holographic microscopy (DHM) with a correlation based de-noising algorithm to overcome the optical interference generated by surface roughness and to capture a large number of 3D particle trajectories. It allows us to obtain a 3D velocity field with an uncertainty of 0.01% and 2D wall shear stress distribution at the resolution of ~ 65 μPa. Applying the technique to a microfluidics with a surface textured by microfibers, we find that the flow is three-dimensional and complex. While the microfibers affect the velocity flow field locally, their presence is felt globally in terms of wall shear stresses. The study of effect of microfiber patterns and flow characteristics on skin frictions are ongoing and will be reported.

  10. Texture development and slip systems in bridgmanite and bridgmanite + ferropericlase aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, L.; Wenk, H.-R.

    2016-06-01

    Bridgmanite (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O are the most abundant phases in the lower mantle and localized regions of the D″ layer just above the core mantle boundary. Seismic anisotropy is observed near subduction zones at the top of the lower mantle and in the D″ region. One source of anisotropy is dislocation glide and associated texture (crystallographic preferred orientation) development. Thus, in order to interpret seismic anisotropy, it is important to understand texture development and slip system activities in bridgmanite and bridgmanite + ferropericlase aggregates. Here we report on in situ texture development in bridgmanite and bridgmanite + ferropericlase aggregates deformed in the diamond anvil cell up to 61 GPa. When bridgmanite is synthesized from enstatite, it exhibits a strong (4.2 m.r.d.) 001 transformation texture due to a structural relationship with the precursor enstatite phase. When bridgmanite + ferropericlase are synthesized from olivine or ringwoodite, bridgmanite exhibits a relatively weak 100 transformation texture (1.2 and 1.6 m.r.d., respectively). This is likely due to minimization of elastic strain energy as a result of Young's modulus anisotropy. In bridgmanite, 001 deformation textures are observed at pressures <55 GPa. The 001 texture is likely due to slip on (001) planes in the [100], [010] and < {110} rangle directions. Stress relaxation by laser annealing to 1500-1600 K does not result in a change in this texture type. However, at pressures >55 GPa a change in texture to a 100 maximum is observed, consistent with slip on the (100) plane. Ferropericlase, when deformed with bridgmanite, does not develop a coherent texture. This is likely due to strain heterogeneity within the softer ferropericlase grains. Thus, it is plausible that ferropericlase is not a significant source of anisotropy in the lower mantle.

  11. Control and characterization of textured, hydrophobic ionomer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueyuan

    Polymer thin films are of increasing interest in many industrial and technological applications. Superhydrophobic, self-cleaning surfaces have attracted a lot of attention for their application in self-cleaning, anti-sticking coatings, stain resistance, or anti-contamination surfaces in diverse technologies, including medical, transportation, textiles, electronics and paints. This thesis focuses on the preparation of nanometer to micrometer-size particle textured surfaces which are desirable for super water repellency. Textured surfaces consisting of nanometer to micrometer-sized lightly sulfonated polystyrene ionomer (SPS) particles were prepared by rapid evaporation of the solvent from a dilute polymer solution cast onto silica. The effect of the solvent used to spin coat the film, the molecular weight of the ionomer, and the rate of solvent evaporation were investigated. The nano-particle or micron-particle textured ionomer surfaces were prepared by either spin coating or solution casting ionomer solutions at controlled evaporation rates. The surface morphologies were consistent with a spinodal decomposition mechanism where the surface first existed as a percolated-like structure and then ripened into droplets if molecular mobility was retained for sufficient time. The SPS particles or particle aggregates were robust and resisted deformation even after annealing at 120°C for one week. The water contact angles on as-prepared surfaces were relatively low, ~ 90° since the polar groups in ionomer reduce the surface hydrophobicity. After chemical vapor deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane, the surface contact angles increased to ~ 109° on smooth surfaces and ~140° on the textured surfaces. Water droplets stuck to these surfaces even when tilted 90 degrees. Superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared by spraying coating ionomer solutions and Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane onto textured surfaces. The

  12. Road surface texture and skid resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Minh-Tan; Cerezo, Veronique

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the relationship between road surface texture and skid resistance. Mechanisms underlying the tire/wet road friction are first described. Definitions of road surface irregularities scales are given. The rest of the paper is then focused on the macrotexture and microtexture scales and their respective roles in what happens at the tire/road interface. Existing methods to measure and characterize the road surface texture are presented. On the one hand, problems encountered when using sensors developed for machined surfaces for the measurement of road surface profiles or cartographies are discussed. On the other hand, potential improvements when applying characterization methods developed for machined surfaces to road surfaces are highlighted. The paper presents finally modeling approaches to calculate friction forces from road surface texture. The generalized form of the models is presented from which terms related respectively to the macrotexture and the microtexture are identified. Approaches used to calculate these terms, integrating eventually other variables, are presented.

  13. Surface Texture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03191 Surface Texture

    Now that all the frost is gone, the south polar region is exhibiting more than just layering and surface markings. As this image shows, the polar surface is not smooth at this resolution.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 85.9S, Longitude 192.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Superhydrophylic textures fabricated by femtosecond laser pulses on sub-micro- and nano-crystalline titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, Yury R.; Smolyakova, Marina Yu; Kolobova, Anastasia Yu; Ionin, Andrey A.; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Makarov, Sergey V.; Saltuganov, Pavel N.; Zayarny, Dmitry A.; Ligachev, Alexander E.

    2014-12-01

    Sub-micron quasi-regular surface textures were fabricated on surfaces of pure titanium (VT1-0) with micro- and ultrafine-grained bulk structures by multiple femtosecond laser pulses in the scanning mode and characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Their wetting characteristics acquired for the initial non-textured and as-textured samples, as well as upon ultrasonic and plasma cleaning, demonstrate corresponding drastic changes of the wetting angles from 87° to ≤ 10°, with much more pronounced contamination, cleaning and wetting effects for the ultrafine-grained titanium.

  15. Shape from texture: an evaluation of visual cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Wolfgang; Hildebrand, Axel

    1994-05-01

    In this paper an integrated approach is presented to understand and control the influence of texture on shape perception. Following Gibson's hypotheses, which states that texture is a mathematically and psychological sufficient stimulus for surface perception, we evaluate different perceptual cues. Starting out from a perception-based texture classification introduced by Tamura et al., we build up a uniform sampled parameter space. For the synthesis of some of our textures we use the texture description language HiLDTe. To acquire the desired texture specification we take advantage of a genetic algorithm. Employing these textures we practice a number of psychological tests to evaluate the significance of the different texture features. A comprehension of the results derived from the psychological tests is done to constitute new shape analyzing techniques. Since the vanishing point seems to be an important visual cue we introduce the Hough transform. A prospective of future work within the field of visual computing is provided within the final section.

  16. Lava flow surface textures - SIR-B radar image texture, field observations, and terrain measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, Lisa R.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Hayashi, Joan N.

    1990-01-01

    SIR-B images, field observations, and small-scale (cm) terrain measurements are used to study lave flow surface textures related to emplacement processes of a single Hawaiian lava flow. Although smooth pahoehoe textures are poorly characterized on the SIR-B data, rougher pahoehoe types and the a'a flow portion show image textures attributed to spatial variations in surface roughness. Field observations of six distinct lava flow textural units are described and used to interpret modes of emplacement. The radar smooth/rough boundary between pahoehoe and a'a occurs at a vertical relief of about 10 cm on this lava flow. While direct observation and measurement most readily yield information related to lava eruption and emplacement processes, analyses of remote sensing data such as those acquired by imaging radars and altimeters can provide a means of quantifying surface texture, identifying the size and distribution of flow components, and delineating textural unit boundaries.

  17. From nanoscale cohesion to macroscale entanglement: Opportunities for designing granular aggregate behavior by tailoring grain shape and interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Miskin, Marc Z.; Waitukaitis, Scott R.

    2013-06-01

    The packing arrangement of individual particles inside a granular material and the resulting response to applied stresses depend critically on particle-particle interactions. One aspect that recently received attention are nanoscale surface features of particles, which play an important role in determining the strength of cohesive van der Waals and capillary interactions and also affect tribo-charging of grains. We describe experiments on freely falling granular streams that can detect the contributions from all three of these forces. We show that it is possible to measure the charge of individual grains and build up distributions that are detailed enough to provide stringent tests of tribo-charging models currently available. A second aspect concerns particle shape. In this case steric interactions become important and new types of aggregate behavior can be expected when non-convex particle shapes are considered that can interlock or entangle. However, a general connection between the mechanical response of a granular material and the constituents' shape remains unknown. This has made it infeasible to tackle the "inverse packing problem", namely to start from a given, desired behavior for the aggregate as a whole and then find the particle shape the produces it. We discuss a new approach, using concepts rooted in artificial evolution that provides a way to solve this inverse problem. This approach facilitates exploring the role of arbitrary particle geometry in jammed systems and invites the discovery and design of granular matter with optimized properties.

  18. Nanometer Scale Titanium Surface Texturing Are Detected by Signaling Pathways Involving Transient FAK and Src Activations

    PubMed Central

    Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Jimbo, Ryo; Hayashi, Mariko; Andersson, Martin; Alves, Gutemberg; Takamori, Esther R.; Beltrão, Paulo J.; Coelho, Paulo G.; Granjeiro, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is known that physico/chemical alterations on biomaterial surfaces have the capability to modulate cellular behavior, affecting early tissue repair. Such surface modifications are aimed to improve early healing response and, clinically, offer the possibility to shorten the time from implant placement to functional loading. Since FAK and Src are intracellular proteins able to predict the quality of osteoblast adhesion, this study evaluated the osteoblast behavior in response to nanometer scale titanium surface texturing by monitoring FAK and Src phosphorylations. Methodology Four engineered titanium surfaces were used for the study: machined (M), dual acid-etched (DAA), resorbable media microblasted and acid-etched (MBAA), and acid-etch microblasted (AAMB). Surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thereafter, those 4 samples were used to evaluate their cytotoxicity and interference on FAK and Src phosphorylations. Both Src and FAK were investigated by using specific antibody against specific phosphorylation sites. Principal Findings The results showed that both FAK and Src activations were differently modulated as a function of titanium surfaces physico/chemical configuration and protein adsorption. Conclusions It can be suggested that signaling pathways involving both FAK and Src could provide biomarkers to predict osteoblast adhesion onto different surfaces. PMID:24999733

  19. Adhesive behavior of micro/nano-textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuyan; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Hanqing; Wang, Ben

    2015-02-01

    A numerical model of the adhesive contact between a rigid smooth sphere and an elastic textured surface based on the Lennard-Jones interatomic potential law and the Hamaker summation method is established. Textures are considered by introducing the texture height distribution into the gap equation. Simulation results show that the pull-off force on textured surfaces decreases compared to that on smooth surfaces. Furthermore, effects of sphere-shaped textures on reducing adhesion are more obvious than cylinder-shaped or cube-shaped textures when the coverage area ratio, maximum height and interval of textures are fixed. For surfaces with sphere-shaped textures, variation trends of the mean pull-off force with texture density are not monotonous, and there exists a certain range of texture densities in which the mean pull-off force is small and its variation is insignificant. In addition, the pull-off force depends also on the maximum height and radius of textures. On one hand, if the texture radius is fixed, larger maximum height results in smaller pull-off force, and if the maximum height is fixed, the pull-off force tends to increase almost linearly with increases in texture radius. On the other hand, if the height-diameter ratio of textures is fixed, the pull-off force reaches a minimum at an optimum texture radius or maximum height.

  20. Viscous anisotropy of textured olivine aggregates, Part 1: Measurement of the magnitude and evolution of anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Lars N.; Warren, Jessica M.; Zimmerman, Mark E.; Kohlstedt, David L.

    2016-07-01

    The development of crystallographic textures in olivine-rich rocks leads to a marked anisotropy in viscosity of the upper mantle, strongly influencing a variety of large-scale geodynamic processes. Most estimates of the magnitude of viscous anisotropy in the upper mantle are derived from micromechanical models that predict textural and mechanical evolution numerically. Unfortunately, relatively few data exist with which to benchmark these models, and therefore their applicability to geodynamic processes remains in question. Here we present the results from a series of laboratory deformation experiments that yield insight into the magnitude and evolution of the anisotropy of olivine aggregates during deformation along complex loading paths. Aggregates of Fo50 olivine were first deformed in extension in a gas-medium apparatus at a temperature of 1473 K, confining pressure of 300 MPa, and a variety of stresses and strain rates. Early in the extension experiments, samples exhibited viscosities similar to those previously determined for isotropic aggregates. Extensional deformation was accompanied by formation of crystallographic textures with [100] axes dominantly aligned with the extension axis. Samples were subsequently deformed in torsion under similar conditions to shear strains of up to 15.5. Early in the torsion experiments, samples supported stresses a factor of ∼2 larger than measured at the end of extension experiments, demonstrating a marked anisotropy in viscosity. Textures at the end of torsion experiments exhibited [100] axes dominantly aligned with the shear direction, comparable to previous experimental observations. Evolution of the textures resulting from extension to those resulting from torsion was analyzed through examination of radial sections of torsion samples. Our results confirm that texture produces viscous anisotropy in olivine aggregates, and we provide a simple, calibrated parameterization of viscous anisotropy for use in geodynamic

  1. Aggregate breakdown and surface seal development influenced by rain intensity, slope gradient and soil particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand Sajjadi, S.; Mahmoodabadi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Aggregate breakdown is an important process which controls infiltration rate (IR) and the availability of fine materials necessary for structural sealing under rainfall. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different slope gradients, rain intensities and particle size distributions on aggregate breakdown and IR to describe the formation of surface sealing. To address this issue, 60 experiments were carried out in a 35 cm x 30 cm x 10 cm detachment tray using a rainfall simulator. By sieving a sandy loam soil, two sub-samples with different maximum aggregate sizes of 2 mm (Dmax 2 mm) and 4.75 mm (Dmax 4.75 mm) were prepared. The soils were exposed to two different rain intensities (57 and 80 mm h-1) on several slopes (0.5, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20%) each at three replications. The result showed that the most fraction percentages in soils Dmax 2 mm and Dmax 4.75 mm were in the finest size classes of 0.02 and 0.043 mm, respectively for all slope gradients and rain intensities. The soil containing finer aggregates exhibited higher transportability of pre-detached material than the soil containing larger aggregates. Also, IR increased with increasing slope gradient, rain intensity and aggregate size under unsteady state conditions because of less development of surface seal. But under steady state conditions, no significant relationship was found between slope and IR. The finding of this study revealed the importance of rain intensity, slope steepness and soil aggregate size on aggregate breakdown and seal formation, which can control infiltration rate and the consequent runoff and erosion rates.

  2. Towards near-permanent CoCrMo prosthesis surface by combining micro-texturing and low temperature plasma carburising.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yangchun; Svoboda, Petr; Vrbka, Martin; Kostal, David; Urban, Filip; Cizek, Jan; Roupcova, Pavla; Dong, Hanshan; Krupka, Ivan; Hartl, Martin

    2015-03-01

    An advanced surface engineering process combining micro-texture with a plasma carburising process was produced on CoCrMo femoral head, and their tribological properties were evaluated by the cutting-edge pendulum hip joint simulator coupled with thin film colorimetric interferometry. FESEM and GDOES showed that precipitation-free C S-phase with a uniform case depth of 10μm was formed across the micro-textures after duplex treatment. Hip simulator tests showed that the friction coefficient was reduced by 20% for micro-metre sized texture, and the long-term tribological property of microtexture was enhanced by the C-supersaturated crystalline microstructure formed on the surface of duplex treated CoCrMo, thereby enhancing biotribological durability significantly. In-situ colorimetric interferometry confirmed that the maximum film thickness around texture area was 530nm, indicating that the additional lubricant during sliding motion might provide exceptional bearing life. PMID:26594781

  3. Slow Relaxation of Shape and Orientational Texture in Membrane Gel Domains.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Jonas Camillus; Solovyeva, Vita; Brewer, Jonathan R; Johannes, Ludger; Hansen, Per Lyngs; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2015-11-24

    Gel domains in lipid bilayers are structurally more complex than fluid domains. Growth dynamics can lead to noncircular domains with a heterogeneous orientational texture. Most model membrane studies involving gel domain morphology and lateral organization assume the domains to be static. Here we show that rosette shaped gel domains, with heterogeneous orientational texture and a central topological defect, after early stage growth, undergo slow relaxation. On a time scale of days to weeks domains converge to circular shapes and approach uniform texture. 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) enriched gel domains are grown by cooling 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC):DPPC bilayers into the solid-liquid phase coexistence region and are visualized with fluorescence microscopy. The relaxation of individual domains is quantified through image analysis of time-lapse image series. We find a shape relaxation mechanism which is inconsistent with Ostwald ripening and coalescence as observed in membrane systems with coexisting liquid phases. Moreover, domain texture changes in parallel with the changes in domain shape, and selective melting and growth of particular subdomains cause the texture to become more uniform. We propose a relaxation mechanism based on relocation of lipids from high-energy lattice positions, through evaporation-condensation and edge diffusion, to low-energy positions. The relaxation process is modified significantly by binding Shiga toxin, a bacterial toxin from Shigella dysenteriae, to the membrane surface. Binding alters the equilibrium shape of the gel domains from circular to eroded rosettes with disjointed subdomains. This observation may be explained by edge diffusion while evaporation-condensation is restricted, and it provides further support for the proposed overall relaxation mechanism. PMID:26501924

  4. Improving efficiency of silicon heterojunction solar cells by surface texturing of silicon wafers using tetramethylammonium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liguo; Wang, Fengyou; Zhang, Xiaodan; Wang, Ning; Jiang, Yuanjian; Hao, Qiuyan; Zhao, Ying

    2014-12-01

    Texturing of silicon surfaces is an effective method for improving the efficiency of silicon solar cells. Etching by using tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) is more attractive than other texturing processes because TMAH is non-toxic, and high-quality anisotropic features can be realized without any metal ion contaminants. In this study, TMAH texturing conditions are varied to optimize the surface morphology of silicon wafers. Excellent optical properties are obtained. This is because of the formation of pyramidal structures with different random sizes but uniform shapes; in fact, when the optimal etching conditions (2% TMAH, 10% isopropyl alcohol (IPA) at 80 °C) are used, the reflectance is only 10.7%. In comparison with NaOH texturing, the TMAH process described here yields smaller pyramids with smoother (111) facets, leading to improved performance in silicon heterojunction solar cells, with a conversion efficiency of 17.8%.

  5. Laser surface texturing of tool steel: textured surfaces quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šugár, Peter; Šugárová, Jana; Frnčík, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this experimental investigation the laser surface texturing of tool steel of type 90MnCrV8 has been conducted. The 5-axis highly dynamic laser precision machining centre Lasertec 80 Shape equipped with the nano-second pulsed ytterbium fibre laser and CNC system Siemens 840 D was used. The planar and spherical surfaces first prepared by turning have been textured. The regular array of spherical and ellipsoidal dimples with a different dimensions and different surface density has been created. Laser surface texturing has been realized under different combinations of process parameters: pulse frequency, pulse energy and laser beam scanning speed. The morphological characterization of ablated surfaces has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. The results show limited possibility of ns pulse fibre laser application to generate different surface structures for tribological modification of metallic materials. These structures were obtained by varying the processing conditions between surface ablation, to surface remelting. In all cases the areas of molten material and re-cast layers were observed on the bottom and walls of the dimples. Beside the influence of laser beam parameters on the machined surface quality during laser machining of regular hemispherical and elipsoidal dimple texture on parabolic and hemispherical surfaces has been studied.

  6. Surface Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 8 May 2003

    The variable surface textures observed in this THEMIS image are the result of different lava flow units. Flow fronts indicate material was once semi-fluid and filled in pre-existing impact craters. Channels observed in the eastern half of the image suggest additional materials may have once flowed and eroded older units.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 36.5, Longitude 217.6East (142.4). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Aluminum Surface Texturing by Means of Laser Interference Metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Sabau, Adrian S; Jones, Jonaaron F.; Hackett, Alexandra C.; Daniel, Claus; Warren, Charles David

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of lightweight materials, such as aluminum alloys, in auto body structures requires more effective surface cleaning and texturing techniques to improve the quality of the structural components. The present work introduces a novel surface treatment method using laser interferometry produced by two beams of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 10Hz of frequency to clean aluminum surfaces, and meanwhile creating periodic and rough surface structures. The influences of beam size, laser fluence, wavelength, and pulse number per spot are investigated. High resolution optical profiler images reveal the change of the peak-to-valley height on the laser-treated surface.

  8. Distinct roles of GPVI and integrin α2β1 in platelet shape change and aggregation induced by different collagens

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Gavin E; Atkinson, Ben T; Snell, Daniel C; Watson, Steve P

    2002-01-01

    Various platelet membrane glycoproteins have been proposed as receptors for collagen, in some cases as receptors for specific collagen types. In this study we have compared the ability of a range of collagen types to activate platelets. Bovine collagen types I–V, native equine tendon collagen fibrils and collagen-related peptide (CRP) all induced platelet aggregation and shape change. Responses were abolished in FcRγ chain-deficient platelets, which also lack GPVI, indicating a critical dependence on the GPVI/FcRγ chain complex. Responses to all collagens were unaffected in CD36-deficient platelets. A monoclonal antibody (6F1) which binds to the α2 integrin subunit of human platelets had a minimal effect on the rate and extent of aggregation induced by the collagens; however, it delayed the onset of aggregation following addition of all collagens. For shape change, 6F1 abolished the response induced by collagen types I and IV, substantially attenuated that to collagen types II, III and V, but only partially inhibited Horm collagen. Simultaneous blockade of the P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors, and inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase demonstrated that CRP can activate platelets independently of ADP and TxA2; however, responses to the collagens were dependent on these mediators. This study confirms the importance of the GPVI/FcRγ chain complex in platelet responses induced by a range of collagen agonists, while providing no evidence for collagen type-specific receptors. It also provides evidence for a modulatory role of α2β1, the significance of which depends on the collagen preparation. PMID:12183336

  9. Shape Effect in Aggregation and Thermal Evolution of Comet Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasue, Jeremie; Coradini, A.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Botet, R.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Capria, M. T.; Magni, G.; Turrini, D.

    2007-10-01

    Comet nuclei are considered as the most pristine bodies of the Solar System. Their study consequently sheds an important light on the processes occurring during the initial stages of the solar system formation. Simulations have been developed in our teams to describe new aspects of comet formation and evolution. Particle aggregation simulations taking into account age-related cohesive energy of cometesimals during accretions in the Kuiper belt can be used to interpret the layered structure and surface features observed for comet 9P/Tempel 1 [1] and quantify the tensile strengths of these objects. Thermal evolution models of comet nuclei have been rather successful in explaining global aspects of comet observations [2]. A new quasi-3D approach for non-spherically shaped comet nuclei has been developed to analyse the effect of the irregular shapes (non-spherical shapes, mountain-like and crater-like features) of comet nuclei on their thermal evolution, on the local crust formation and the onset of their activity. Our simulations suggest that depressions on the surface play a role in the internal stratification of the nucleus and can disappear in a comet's lifetime [3]. New simulations specifically designed for the orbital history and irregular shape of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko will be presented. These tensile strength indications and activity predictions will provide vital clues for the international Rosetta mission rendezvous that will provide further constraints on the formation and evolution processes of comets. [1] Belton et al., Icarus 187, 332 (2007) [2] DeSanctis et al., Astron. Astrophys. 444, 605 (2005) [3] Lasue et al., in preparation This research has been funded by the French Space Agency (CNES)

  10. Tactile texture and friction of soft sponge surfaces.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akira; Suzuki, Makoto; Imai, Yumi; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the tactile texture and frictional properties of five soft sponges with various cell sizes. The frictional forces were measured by a friction meter containing a contact probe with human-finger-like geometry and mechanical properties. When the subjects touched these sponges with their fingers, hard-textured sponges were deemed unpleasant. This tactile feeling changed with friction factors including friction coefficients, their temporal patterns, as well as mechanical and shape factors. These findings provide useful information on how to control the tactile textures of various sponges. PMID:25884490

  11. Effect of Salinity, Sodicity and Soil Texture on Aggregate Stability of Semi-arid Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil texture, sodicity and salinity or water quality play a significant role in determining soil aggregate stability, hydraulic properties and the response of soil clays to dispersion and swelling. We studied aggregate stability from 60 samples of Israeli top soils, widely varying in clay content an...

  12. A pancake-shaped nano-aggregate for focusing surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying Huang, Shao; Cho Chew, Weng; Liu, Yang G.; Wu, Bae-Ian; Choi, H. W.

    2012-02-01

    We proposed a pancake-shaped nano-aggregate that highly focuses surface plasmons. The structure is a superposition of bowtie-shaped dimers, where surface plasmons are excited, resonated with the structure, and coupled. Surface integral equation method (Poggio-Miller-Chang-Harrington-Wu-Tsai method) is used to predict the performance of the proposed structure. It is a method which can accurately calculate the near-fields of nanoparticles. Based on the numerical prediction, the proposed structure shows an electric field (E-field) enhancement of more than 400 times, which is equivalent to a Raman enhancement factor of more than 2.5e10 times. It is promising for single molecule detections using surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The physics of the proposed structure are revealed. It is useful to design nanostructures for high E-field enhancement.

  13. Common Dorsal Stream Substrates for the Mapping of Surface Texture to Object Parts and Visual Spatial Processing.

    PubMed

    Zachariou, Valentinos; Nikas, Christine V; Safiullah, Zaid N; Behrmann, Marlene; Klatzky, Roberta; Ungerleider, Leslie G

    2015-12-01

    Everyday objects are often composed of multiple parts, each with a unique surface texture. The neural substrates mediating the integration of surface features on different object parts are not fully understood, and potential contributions by both the ventral and dorsal visual pathways are possible. To explore these substrates, we collected fMRI data while human participants performed a difference detection task on two objects with textured parts. The objects could either differ in the assignment of the same texture to different object parts ("texture-location") or the types of texture ("texture-type"). In the ventral stream, comparable BOLD activation levels were observed in response to texture-location and texture-type differences. In contrast, in a priori localized spatial processing regions of the dorsal stream, activation was greater for texture-location than texture-type differences, and the magnitude of the activation correlated with behavioral performance. We confirmed the reliance of surface texture to object part mapping on spatial processing mechanisms in subsequent psychophysical experiments, in which participants detected a difference in the spatial distance of an object relative to a reference line. In this task, distracter objects occasionally appeared, which differed in either texture-location or texture-type. Distracter texture-location differences slowed detection of spatial distance differences, but texture-type differences did not. More importantly, the distracter effects were only observed when texture-location differences were presented within whole shapes and not between separated shape parts at distinct spatial locations. We conclude that both the mapping of texture features to object parts and the representation of object spatial position are mediated by common neural substrates within the dorsal visual pathway. PMID:26359538

  14. Static and Dynamic Aspects of Surfactant Surface Aggregates studied by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schniepp, Hannes; Saville, Dudley; Aksay, Ilhan

    2006-03-01

    Using AFM, we show that surfactants form micellar aggregates of varying morphology, depending on the surface structure. While all previous studies were limited to atomically flat substrates, we achieve imaging the micelles on rough gold. By gradually annealing these surfaces, we show the influence of roughness on the aggregate structures. For crystalline gold (111), aligned, hemi-cylindrical micelles that recognize the symmetry axes of the gold lattice are found. With increasing roughness, the degree of organization of the aggregates decreases. We also show that the micellar pattern on HOPG and gold(111) surfaces changes with time and responds to perturbations in a self-healing way. Our results suggest that this organization happens at the molecular scale. Theoretical analysis for HOPG, however, show that the micelle orientation cannot be explained on the molecular level, but the anisotropic van der Waals interaction between micelles and HOPG has to be considered as well [1]. [1] Saville, D. A.; Chun, J.; Li, J.-L.; Schniepp, H. C.; Car, R.; Aksay, I. A., accepted by Physical Review Letters.

  15. Shaped beam scattering by an aggregate of particles using generalized Lorenz-Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briard, Paul; Wang, Jia jie; Han, Yi Ping

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the light scattering by an aggregate of particles illuminated by an arbitrary shaped beam is analyzed within the framework of generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT). The theoretical derivations of aggregated particles illuminated by an arbitrary shaped beam are revisited, with special attention paid to the computation of beam shape coefficients of a shaped beam for aggregated particles. The theoretical treatments as well as a home-made code are then verified by making comparisons between our numerical results and those calculated using a public available T-Matrix code MSTM. Good agreements are achieved which partially indicate the correctness of both codes. Additionally, more numerical results are presented to study the scattered fields of aggregated particles illuminated by a focused Gaussian beam. Several large enhancements in the scattered intensity distributions are found which are believed to be due to the Bragg's scattering by a linear chain of spheres.

  16. Effects of Particle Size and Shape, and Soil Structure on Thermal Properties of Non-aggregated and Aggregated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamoshida, T.; Hamamoto, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Sakaki, T.; Komatsu, T.; Hu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal properties including thermal conductivity and heat capacity are very important for understanding heat transport processes in landfill site cover soil to control the microbial processes in the cover soil. Previous studies have shown effects of soil conditions such as moisture content and degree of compaction on the thermal properties for differently-textured soils. However, there are few studies on the relations between the thermal properties and micro-scale soil information such as particle size and shape although the size and shape of soil particles highly affect soil packing configuration. In addition, it is not fully understood that soil structure (i.e., aggregate structure) affects behaviors of thermal properties. In this study, non-aggregated (sandy) and aggregated soils with different size fractions at variably-saturated conditions were used for measuring thermal properties. Micro-scale characterizations of soil-pore structure and soil particle configuration using a X-ray CT device were also performed for sandy soils. For sandy soils, the relation between measured thermal properties and mineral composition (i.e., quartz content), roundness/sphericity of soil particles, and particle size, and solid-phase tortuosity based on X-ray CT images, were investigated. For aggregated soils, the measured thermal conductivities at variably-saturated conditions were discussed based on the water retention characteristics and pore-size distribution in inter- and intra-aggregate pore regions.

  17. Color and texture of low-calorie peanuts as affected by a new oil extraction process named "Mechanical Expression Preserving Shape Integrity" (MEPSI).

    PubMed

    Nader, Joelle; Afif, Charbel; Louka, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    The current healthy life style pushed to develop and implement a novel efficient defatting process of high quality called "Mechanical Expression Preserving Shape Integrity" that conserved the sensory, color, textural, morphological and acceptability of partially defatted roasted peanuts. In this study, Response Surface Methodology was used to investigate the best extraction parameters (initial water content, pressure and pressing duration) based on the highest Color Consumer Evaluation scores, the best colorimetric parameters (L*, a*, b*, ΔE*) and the most appealing textural attributes (Fracturability, First Fracture Work Done, First Fracture Percentage of Deformation, Rupture Force, Percentage of Deformation at Rupture). Experimental results showed that defatting promotes a lighter and neutral grain color, higher fracturability and rupture force as well as higher deformation strength. Aiming to retain most of the colorimetric and textural properties after defatting and roasting, it was found that peanuts should be hydrated to 7 % d.b. and treated at 4.74 MPa for 14.22 min. PMID:27570290

  18. Wetting and spreading behaviors of impinging microdroplets on textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Dae Hee; Lee, Sang Joon; CenterBiofluid and Biomimic Reseach Team

    2012-11-01

    Textured surfaces having an array of microscale pillars have been receiving large attention because of their potential uses for robust superhydrophobic and superoleophobic surfaces. In many practical applications, the textured surfaces usually accompany impinging small-scale droplets. To better understand the impinging phenomena on the textured surfaces, the wetting and spreading behaviors of water microdroplets are investigated experimentally. Microdroplets with diameter less than 50 μm are ejected from a piezoelectric printhead with varying Weber number. The final wetting state of an impinging droplet can be estimated by comparing the wetting pressures of the droplet and the capillary pressure of the textured surface. The wetting behaviors obtained experimentally are well agreed with the estimated results. In addition, the transition from bouncing to non-bouncing behaviors in the partially penetrated wetting state is observed. This transition implies the possibility of withdrawal of the penetrated liquid from the inter-pillar space. The maximum spreading factors (ratio of the maximum spreading diameter to the initial diameter) of the impinging droplets have close correlation with the texture area fraction of the surfaces. This work was supported by Creative Research Initiatives (Diagnosis of Biofluid Flow Phenomena and Biomimic Research) of MEST/KOSEF.

  19. Characterization and chemical surface texturization of bulk ZnTe crystals grown by temperature gradient solution growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui; Jie, Wan-qi; Liu, Hang

    2015-07-01

    Using tellurium as a solvent, we grew ZnTe ingots of 30 mm in diameter and 70 mm in length by a temperature gradient solution growth method. Hall tests conducted at 300 K indicated that the as-grown ZnTe exhibits p-type conductivity, with a carrier concentration of approximately 1014 cm-3, a mobility of approximately 300 cm2·V-1·s-1, and a resistivity of approximately 102 Ω·cm. A simple and effective method was proposed for chemical surface texturization of ZnTe using an HF:H2O2:H2O etchant. Textures with the sizes of approximately 1 µm were produced on {100}, {110}, and {111}Zn surfaces after etching. The etchant is also very promising in crystal characterization because of its strong anisotropic character and Te-phase selectivity.

  20. Fabrication of broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with ultra-light-trapping structures by picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid method consisting of ultrafast laser-assisted texturing and chemical fluorination treatment was applied for efficiently enhancing the surface broadband antireflection to fabricate black titanium alloy surface with ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructure. Based on the theoretical analysis of surface antireflective principle of micro-nanostructures and fluoride film, the ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructures have been processed using a picosecond pulsed ultrafast laser on titanium alloy surfaces. Then fluorination treatment has been performed by using fluoroalkyl silane solution. According to X-ray diffraction phase analysis of the surface compositions and measurement of the surface reflectance using spectrophotometer, the broadband antireflective properties of titanium alloy surface with micro-nano structural characteristics were investigated before and after fluorination treatment. The results show that the surface morphology of micro-nanostructures processed by picosecond laser has significant effects on the antireflection of light waves to reduce the surface reflectance, which can be further reduced using chemical fluorination treatment. The high antireflection of over 98 % in a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared on the surface of metal material has been achieved for the surface structures, and the broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with an extremely low reflectance of ultra-light-trapping structures have been obtained in the wavelength range from ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared, middle-wave infrared. The average reflectance of microgroove groups structured surface reaches as low as 2.43 % over a broad wavelength range from 200 to 2600 nm. It indicates that the hybrid method comprising of picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination can effectively induce the broadband antireflective black metal surface. This method has a potential application for fabricating antireflective surface used to improve the

  1. Aeolian bedforms, yardangs, and indurated surfaces in the Tharsis Montes as seen by the HiRISE Camera: Evidence for dust aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, N.T.; Banks, M.E.; Beyer, R.A.; Chuang, F.C.; Noe Dobrea, E.Z.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Fishbaugh, K.E.; McEwen, A.S.; Michaels, T.I.; Thomson, B.J.; Wray, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    HiRISE images of Mars with ground sampling down to 25 cm/pixel show that the dust-rich mantle covering the surfaces of the Tharsis Montes is organized into ridges whose form and distribution are consistent with formation by aeolian saltation. Other dusty areas near the volcanoes and elsewhere on the planet exhibit a similar morphology. The material composing these "reticulate" bedforms is constrained by their remote sensing properties and the threshold curve combined with the saltation/suspension boundary, both of which vary as a function of elevation (atmospheric pressure), particle size, and particle composition. Considering all of these factors, dust aggregates are the most likely material composing these bedforms. We propose that airfall dust on and near the volcanoes aggregates in situ over time, maybe due to electrostatic charging followed by cementation by salts. The aggregates eventually reach a particle size at which saltation is possible. Aggregates on the flanks are transported downslope by katabatic winds and form linear and "accordion" morphologies. Materials within the calderas and other depressions remain trapped and are subjected to multidirectional winds, forming an interlinked "honeycomb" texture. In many places on and near the volcanoes, light-toned, low thermal inertia yardangs and indurated surfaces are present. These may represent "duststone" formed when aggregates reach a particle size below the threshold curve, such that they become stabilized and subsequently undergo cementation. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  2. Aeolian bedforms, yardangs, and indurated surfaces in the Tharsis Montes as seen by the HiRISE Camera: Evidence for dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Banks, M. E.; Beyer, R. A.; Chuang, F. C.; Noe Dobrea, E. Z.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Fishbaugh, K. E.; McEwen, A. S.; Michaels, T. I.; Thomson, B. J.; Wray, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    HiRISE images of Mars with ground sampling down to 25 cm/pixel show that the dust-rich mantle covering the surfaces of the Tharsis Montes is organized into ridges whose form and distribution are consistent with formation by aeolian saltation. Other dusty areas near the volcanoes and elsewhere on the planet exhibit a similar morphology. The material composing these "reticulate" bedforms is constrained by their remote sensing properties and the threshold curve combined with the saltation/suspension boundary, both of which vary as a function of elevation (atmospheric pressure), particle size, and particle composition. Considering all of these factors, dust aggregates are the most likely material composing these bedforms. We propose that airfall dust on and near the volcanoes aggregates in situ over time, maybe due to electrostatic charging followed by cementation by salts. The aggregates eventually reach a particle size at which saltation is possible. Aggregates on the flanks are transported downslope by katabatic winds and form linear and "accordion" morphologies. Materials within the calderas and other depressions remain trapped and are subjected to multidirectional winds, forming an interlinked "honeycomb" texture. In many places on and near the volcanoes, light-toned, low thermal inertia yardangs and indurated surfaces are present. These may represent "duststone" formed when aggregates reach a particle size below the threshold curve, such that they become stabilized and subsequently undergo cementation.

  3. Surface textures and Non-Newtonian fluids for decreased friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, Jonathon; Ewoldt, Randy

    2015-11-01

    Using surface textures has been shown to decrease friction in lubricated sliding contact. A growing trend in the lubrication industry is to add polymers to base oils in order to improve the oil's effectiveness as a lubricant. These polymer additives cause the oil to become a viscoelastic lubricant that will behave differently than a simple Newtonian lubricant. We present an experimental investigation varying both the surface texture depth profile and the viscoelastic lubricant in order to determine their effects on friction reduction. Gap-controlled experiments were performed on a custom tribo-rheometer in order to systematically examine the friction reduction by varying the Reynolds number, Weissenberg number, and Deborah number in bi-directional motion. Cavitation effects are not present so that the normal force is produced solely by the surface textures and the lubricants. We show that the symmetry of the surface textures must be broken in order to produce normal forces above the viscoelastic response, and that an optimal angle of asymmetry β exists for decreasing friction with asymmetric surface textures and viscoelastic lubricants.

  4. Automatic inspection of textured surfaces by support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanbin, Sina; Bovik, Alan C.; Pérez, Eduardo; Nair, Dinesh

    2009-08-01

    Automatic inspection of manufactured products with natural looking textures is a challenging task. Products such as tiles, textile, leather, and lumber project image textures that cannot be modeled as periodic or otherwise regular; therefore, a stochastic modeling of local intensity distribution is required. An inspection system to replace human inspectors should be flexible in detecting flaws such as scratches, cracks, and stains occurring in various shapes and sizes that have never been seen before. A computer vision algorithm is proposed in this paper that extracts local statistical features from grey-level texture images decomposed with wavelet frames into subbands of various orientations and scales. The local features extracted are second order statistics derived from grey-level co-occurrence matrices. Subsequently, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is trained to learn a general description of normal texture from defect-free samples. This algorithm is implemented in LabVIEW and is capable of processing natural texture images in real-time.

  5. Surface texturing of superconductors by controlled oxygen pressure

    DOEpatents

    Chen, N.; Goretta, K.C.; Dorris, S.E.

    1999-01-05

    A method of manufacture of a textured layer of a high temperature superconductor on a substrate is disclosed. The method involves providing an untextured high temperature superconductor material having a characteristic ambient pressure peritectic melting point, heating the superconductor to a temperature below the peritectic temperature, establishing a reduced pO{sub 2} atmosphere below ambient pressure causing reduction of the peritectic melting point to a reduced temperature which causes melting from an exposed surface of the superconductor and raising pressure of the reduced pO{sub 2} atmosphere to cause solidification of the molten superconductor in a textured surface layer. 8 figs.

  6. Surface texturing of superconductors by controlled oxygen pressure

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Nan; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Dorris, Stephen E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of manufacture of a textured layer of a high temperature superconductor on a substrate. The method involves providing an untextured high temperature superconductor material having a characteristic ambient pressure peritectic melting point, heating the superconductor to a temperature below the peritectic temperature, establishing a reduced pO.sub.2 atmosphere below ambient pressure causing reduction of the peritectic melting point to a reduced temperature which causes melting from an exposed surface of the superconductor and raising pressure of the reduced pO.sub.2 atmosphere to cause solidification of the molten superconductor in a textured surface layer.

  7. Surface parametrization and shape description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brechbuehler, Christian; Gerig, Guido; Kuebler, Olaf

    1992-09-01

    Procedures for the parameterization and description of the surface of simply connected 3-D objects are presented. Critical issues for shape-based categorization and comparison of 3-D objects are addressed, which are generality with respect to object complexity, invariance to standard transformations, and descriptive power in terms of object geometry. Starting from segmented volume data, a relational data structure describing the adjacency of local surface elements is generated. The representation is used to parametrize the surface by defining a continuous, one-to-one mapping from the surface of the original object to the surface of a unit sphere. The mapping is constrained by two requirements, minimization of distortions and preservation of area. The former is formulated as the goal function of a nonlinear optimization problem and the latter as its constraints. Practicable starting values are obtained by an initial mapping based on a heat conduction model. In contract to earlier approaches, the novel parameterization method provides a mapping of arbitrarily shaped simply connected objects, i.e., it performs an unfolding of convoluted surface structures. This global parameterization allows the systematical scanning of the object surface by the variation of two parameters. As one possible approach to shape analysis, it enables us to expand the object surface into a series of spherical harmonic functions, extending the concept of elliptical Fourier descriptors for 2-D closed curves. The novel parameterization overcomes the traditional limitations of expressing an object surface in polar coordinates, which restricts such descriptions to star-shaped objects. The numerical coefficients in the Fourier series form an object-centered, surface-oriented descriptor of the object''s form. Rotating the coefficients in parameter space and object space puts the object into a standard position and yields a spherical harmonic descriptor which is invariant to translations, rotations

  8. High-speed sorting of grains by color and surface texture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high-speed, low-cost, image-based sorting device was developed to detect and separate grains with different colors/textures. The device directly combines a complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) color image sensor with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) that was programmed to execute ...

  9. Holographic microscopy and microfluidics platform for measuring wall stress and 3D flow over surfaces textured by micro-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Gorumlu, Serdar; Aksak, Burak; Castillo, Luciano; Sheng, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how fluid flow interacts with micro-textured surfaces is crucial for a broad range of key biological processes and engineering applications including particle dispersion, pathogenic infections, and drag manipulation by surface topology. We use high-speed digital holographic microscopy (DHM) in combination with a correlation based de-noising algorithm to overcome the optical interference generated by surface roughness and to capture a large number of 3D particle trajectories in a microfluidic channel with one surface patterned with micropillars. It allows us to obtain a 3D ensembled velocity field with an uncertainty of 0.06% and 2D wall shear stress distribution at the resolution of ~65 μPa. Contrary to laminar flow in most microfluidics, we find that the flow is three-dimensional and complex for the textured microchannel. While the micropillars affect the velocity flow field locally, their presence is felt globally in terms of wall shear stresses at the channel walls. These findings imply that micro-scale mixing and wall stress sensing/manipulation can be achieved through hydro-dynamically smooth but topologically rough micropillars.

  10. Holographic microscopy and microfluidics platform for measuring wall stress and 3D flow over surfaces textured by micro-pillars.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Gorumlu, Serdar; Aksak, Burak; Castillo, Luciano; Sheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how fluid flow interacts with micro-textured surfaces is crucial for a broad range of key biological processes and engineering applications including particle dispersion, pathogenic infections, and drag manipulation by surface topology. We use high-speed digital holographic microscopy (DHM) in combination with a correlation based de-noising algorithm to overcome the optical interference generated by surface roughness and to capture a large number of 3D particle trajectories in a microfluidic channel with one surface patterned with micropillars. It allows us to obtain a 3D ensembled velocity field with an uncertainty of 0.06% and 2D wall shear stress distribution at the resolution of ~65 μPa. Contrary to laminar flow in most microfluidics, we find that the flow is three-dimensional and complex for the textured microchannel. While the micropillars affect the velocity flow field locally, their presence is felt globally in terms of wall shear stresses at the channel walls. These findings imply that micro-scale mixing and wall stress sensing/manipulation can be achieved through hydro-dynamically smooth but topologically rough micropillars. PMID:27353632

  11. Holographic microscopy and microfluidics platform for measuring wall stress and 3D flow over surfaces textured by micro-pillars

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Gorumlu, Serdar; Aksak, Burak; Castillo, Luciano; Sheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how fluid flow interacts with micro-textured surfaces is crucial for a broad range of key biological processes and engineering applications including particle dispersion, pathogenic infections, and drag manipulation by surface topology. We use high-speed digital holographic microscopy (DHM) in combination with a correlation based de-noising algorithm to overcome the optical interference generated by surface roughness and to capture a large number of 3D particle trajectories in a microfluidic channel with one surface patterned with micropillars. It allows us to obtain a 3D ensembled velocity field with an uncertainty of 0.06% and 2D wall shear stress distribution at the resolution of ~65 μPa. Contrary to laminar flow in most microfluidics, we find that the flow is three-dimensional and complex for the textured microchannel. While the micropillars affect the velocity flow field locally, their presence is felt globally in terms of wall shear stresses at the channel walls. These findings imply that micro-scale mixing and wall stress sensing/manipulation can be achieved through hydro-dynamically smooth but topologically rough micropillars. PMID:27353632

  12. The Extraction of 3D Shape from Texture and Shading in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Svetlana S.; Todd, James T.; Peeters, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the human cortical areas involved in processing 3-dimensional (3D) shape from texture (SfT) and shading. The stimuli included monocular images of randomly shaped 3D surfaces and a wide variety of 2-dimensional (2D) controls. The results of both passive and active experiments reveal that the extraction of 3D SfT involves the bilateral caudal inferior temporal gyrus (caudal ITG), lateral occipital sulcus (LOS) and several bilateral sites along the intraparietal sulcus. These areas are largely consistent with those involved in the processing of 3D shape from motion and stereo. The experiments also demonstrate, however, that the analysis of 3D shape from shading is primarily restricted to the caudal ITG areas. Additional results from psychophysical experiments reveal that this difference in neuronal substrate cannot be explained by a difference in strength between the 2 cues. These results underscore the importance of the posterior part of the lateral occipital complex for the extraction of visual 3D shape information from all depth cues, and they suggest strongly that the importance of shading is diminished relative to other cues for the analysis of 3D shape in parietal regions. PMID:18281304

  13. Surface textural features and its formation process of AISI 304 stainless steel subjected to massive LSP impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, K. Y.; Yao, H. X.; Dai, F. Z.; Lu, J. Z.

    2014-04-01

    The effects of massive laser shock peening (LSP) impacts on surface textural feature of AISI 304 stainless steel (AISI 304 SS), including surface waviness, surface roughness, and machining texture and direction, have been investigated by using WKYO-NT1100 surface profiler and TR300 stylus roughness shape measuring instrument. Experimental results show that massive LSP impacts have an important influence on the surface waviness of the AISI 304 SS sample, but do not have a measurable impact on the surface roughness. Moreover, massive LSP impacts with constraint and ablation mode generate a novel compound texture on the surface of the AISI 304 SS sample. In addition, the formation process of surface compound texture in AISI 304 SS by massive LSP impacts is also entirely revealed.

  14. A Finger-Shaped Tactile Sensor for Fabric Surfaces Evaluation by 2-Dimensional Active Sliding Touch

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haihua; Han, Yezhen; Song, Aiguo; Chen, Shanguang; Wang, Chunhui; Wang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Sliding tactile perception is a basic function for human beings to determine the mechanical properties of object surfaces and recognize materials. Imitating this process, this paper proposes a novel finger-shaped tactile sensor based on a thin piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film for surface texture measurement. A parallelogram mechanism is designed to ensure that the sensor applies a constant contact force perpendicular to the object surface, and a 2-dimensional movable mechanical structure is utilized to generate the relative motion at a certain speed between the sensor and the object surface. By controlling the 2-dimensional motion of the finger-shaped sensor along the object surface, small height/depth variation of surface texture changes the output charge of PVDF film then surface texture can be measured. In this paper, the finger-shaped tactile sensor is used to evaluate and classify five different kinds of linen. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) is utilized to get original attribute data of surface in the frequency domain, and principal component analysis (PCA) is used to compress the attribute data and extract feature information. Finally, low dimensional features are classified by Support Vector Machine (SVM). The experimental results show that this finger-shaped tactile sensor is effective and high accurate for discriminating the five textures. PMID:24618775

  15. A finger-shaped tactile sensor for fabric surfaces evaluation by 2-dimensional active sliding touch.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haihua; Han, Yezhen; Song, Aiguo; Chen, Shanguang; Wang, Chunhui; Wang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Sliding tactile perception is a basic function for human beings to determine the mechanical properties of object surfaces and recognize materials. Imitating this process, this paper proposes a novel finger-shaped tactile sensor based on a thin piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film for surface texture measurement. A parallelogram mechanism is designed to ensure that the sensor applies a constant contact force perpendicular to the object surface, and a 2-dimensional movable mechanical structure is utilized to generate the relative motion at a certain speed between the sensor and the object surface. By controlling the 2-dimensional motion of the finger-shaped sensor along the object surface, small height/depth variation of surface texture changes the output charge of PVDF film then surface texture can be measured. In this paper, the finger-shaped tactile sensor is used to evaluate and classify five different kinds of linen. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) is utilized to get original attribute data of surface in the frequency domain, and principal component analysis (PCA) is used to compress the attribute data and extract feature information. Finally, low dimensional features are classified by Support Vector Machine (SVM). The experimental results show that this finger-shaped tactile sensor is effective and high accurate for discriminating the five textures. PMID:24618775

  16. Perception of Object Shape and Texture in Human Newborns: Evidence from Cross-Modal Transfer Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sann, Coralie; Streri, Arlette

    2007-01-01

    The present research investigates newborn infants' perceptions of the shape and texture of objects through studies of the bi-directionality of cross-modal transfer between vision and touch. Using an intersensory procedure, four experiments were performed in newborns to study their ability to transfer shape and texture information from vision to…

  17. Theoretical and experimental approach to the texturization process of bioreactive surfaces by high-power laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, J. C.; Riveiro, A.; Comesana, R.; Pou, J.

    2011-11-01

    The properties of orthopaedic/dental implants can be tuned through the laser surface modifications that take place during a laser ablation process. Processing assisted by a laser is adequate to produce macro- and micro-structures on metallic alloys and polymer surfaces in order to improve their biological response. The evaluation of the minimum energy density that causes an optimum ablation process on different kinds of surfaces was theoretically established by numerical simulation of the thermal process and some experiments have been systematically carried out to produce a periodic pattern in the surface. The selection of the laser power has been predicted from numerical analysis solving of the heat conduction differential equation using commercial software, ANSYS (11.0). This analysis has allowed us to predict the extent and the depth of the holes. The theoretical results agree with the experimental measurements that were carried out by profilometry.

  18. Tactile discrimination and representations of texture, shape, and softness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, M. A.; Lamotte, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    We present here some of the salient results on the tactual discriminabilities of human subjects obtained through psychophysical experiments, and the associated peripheral neural codes obtained through electrophysiological recordings from monkey single nerve fibers. Humans can detect the presence of a 2 micron high single dot on a smooth glass plate stroked on the skin, based on the responses of Meissner type rapidly adapting fibers (RAs). They can also detect a 0.06 micron high grating on the plate, owing to the response of Pacinian corpuscle fibers. Among all the possible representations of the shapes of objects, the surface curvature distribution seems to be the most relevant for tactile sensing. Slowly adapting fibers respond to both the change and rate of change of curvature of the skin surface at the most sensitive spot in their receptive fields, whereas RAs respond only to the rate of change of curvature. Human discriminability of compliance of objects depends on whether the object has a deformable or rigid surface. When the surface is deformable, the spatial pressure distribution within the contact region is dependent on object compliance, and hence information from cutaneous mechanoreceptors is sufficient for discrimination of subtle differences in compliance. When the surface is rigid, kinesthetic information is necessary for discrimination, and the discriminability is much poorer than that for objects with deformable surfaces.

  19. Laser textured surface gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a novel technique for fabricating surfaces with roughness and wettability gradients and their subsequent applications for chemical sensors. Surface roughness gradients on brass sheets are obtained directly by nanosecond laser texturing. When these structured surfaces are exposed to air, their wettability decreases with time (up to 20 days) achieving both spatial and temporal wettability gradients. The surfaces are responsive to organic solvents. Contact angles of a series of dilute isopropanol solutions decay exponentially with concentration. In particular, a fall of 132° in contact angle is observed on a surface gradient, one order of magnitude higher than the 14° observed for the unprocessed surface, when the isopropanol concentration increased from 0 to 15.6 wt%. As the wettability changes gradually over the surface, contact angle also changes correspondingly. This effect offers multi-sensitivity at different zones on the surface and is useful for accurate measurement of chemical concentration.

  20. Scale Space Graph Representation and Kernel Matching for Non Rigid and Textured 3D Shape Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Garro, Valeria; Giachetti, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel framework for 3D object retrieval that relies on tree-based shape representations (TreeSha) derived from the analysis of the scale-space of the Auto Diffusion Function (ADF) and on specialized graph kernels designed for their comparison. By coupling maxima of the Auto Diffusion Function with the related basins of attraction, we can link the information at different scales encoding spatial relationships in a graph description that is isometry invariant and can easily incorporate texture and additional geometrical information as node and edge features. Using custom graph kernels it is then possible to estimate shape dissimilarities adapted to different specific tasks and on different categories of models, making the procedure a powerful and flexible tool for shape recognition and retrieval. Experimental results demonstrate that the method can provide retrieval scores similar or better than state-of-the-art on textured and non textured shape retrieval benchmarks and give interesting insights on effectiveness of different shape descriptors and graph kernels. PMID:26372206

  1. Adsorption of dyes by ACs prepared from waste tyre reinforcing fibre. Effect of texture, surface chemistry and pH.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Beatriz; Rocha, Raquel P; Pereira, Manuel F R; Figueiredo, José L; Barriocanal, Carmen

    2015-12-01

    This paper compares the importance of the texture and surface chemistry of waste tyre activated carbons in the adsorption of commercial dyes. The adsorption of two commercial dyes, Basic Astrazon Yellow 7GLL and Reactive Rifafix Red 3BN on activated carbons made up of reinforcing fibres from tyre waste and low-rank bituminous coal was studied. The surface chemistry of activated carbons was modified by means of HCl-HNO3 treatment in order to increase the number of functional groups. Moreover, the influence of the pH on the process was also studied, this factor being of great importance due to the amphoteric characteristics of activated carbons. The activated carbons made with reinforcing fibre and coal had the highest SBET, but the reinforcing fibre activated carbon samples had the highest mesopore volume. The texture of the activated carbons was not modified upon acid oxidation treatment, unlike their surface chemistry which underwent considerable modification. The activated carbons made with a mixture of reinforcing fibre and coal experienced the largest degree of oxidation, and so had more acid surface groups. The adsorption of reactive dye was governed by the mesoporous volume, whilst surface chemistry played only a secondary role. However, the surface chemistry of the activated carbons and dispersive interactions played a key role in the adsorption of the basic dye. The adsorption of the reactive dye was more favored in a solution of pH 2, whereas the basic dye was adsorbed more easily in a solution of pH 12. PMID:26295195

  2. [Texture variation of CC 5052 aluminum alloy slab from surface to center layer by XRD].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Biao; Liu, Wen-Chang; Ma, Xiao-Yi; Li, Jian; Yang, Qing-Xiang; Wang, Shan; Ma, Min; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Y M

    2013-05-01

    For improvement of the processing and gaining uniformity texture structure and performance of direct chill cast CCAA 5052 aluminum alloy band after first hot rolling with different reduction, the material was annealed at 454 degrees C and then cold rolling with different reduction was conducted, the texture at surface, quarter and center layer of the sample was tested and examined by X-ray diffraction method, the data calculated using special software and the difference of texture at surface, quarter and center layer was analyzed. There existed an elevated gradient of intensity from surface layer to center layer after cold rolled with less than or equal to 40% reduction, The main texture of beta is stronger mainly due to transformation from remainder exposure, while the goss and remainder is infirm, the state of texture at each layer is close to each other after cold rolling with reduction high than 56.1%. PMID:23905353

  3. Complex polyion-surfactant ion salts in equilibrium with water: changing aggregate shape and size by adding oil.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Juliana S; Norrman, Jens; Piculell, Lennart; Loh, Watson

    2006-11-23

    The phase behavior of ternary mixtures containing an alkyltrimethylammonium polyacrylate complex salt, water, and a nonpolar "oil" (n-decanol, p-xylene or cyclohexane) is investigated. The complex salts were prepared with short or long polyacrylates (30 or 6000 repeating units) and with hexadecyltrimethylammonium or dodecyltrimethylammonium surfactant ions. Phase diagrams and structures were determined by visual inspection and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses. Systems containing decanol display a predominance of lamellar phases, while hexagonal phases prevail in systems containing p-xylene or cyclohexane. The difference is interpreted as a result of the different locations of the oils within the surfactant aggregates. Decanol is incorporated at the aggregate interface, leading to a decrease in its curvature, which favors the appearance of lamellar structures. p-Xylene and cyclohexane, on the other hand, are mostly incorporated in the interior of the cylindrical aggregate, as reflected by its swelling as the oil content increases. The comparison of these results with those reported for similar systems with monovalent (bromide) counterions indicates a much more limited swelling of the lamellar phases with polymeric counterions by water. This limited swelling behavior is predominantly ascribed to bridging due to the polyions. PMID:17107195

  4. Reversible surface aggregation in pore formation by pardaxin.

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, D; Peled, R; Nir, S; Shai, Y

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of leakage induced by surface active peptides is not yet fully understood. To gain insight into the molecular events underlying this process, the leakage induced by the peptide pardaxin from phosphatidylcholine/ phosphatidylserine/cholesterol large unilamellar vesicles was studied by monitoring the rate and extent of dye release and by theoretical modeling. The leakage occurred by an all-or-none mechanism: vesicles either leaked or retained all of their contents. We further developed a mathematical model that includes the assumption that certain peptides become incorporated into the vesicle bilayer and aggregate to form a pore. The current experimental results can be explained by the model only if the surface aggregation of the peptide is reversible. Considering this reversibility, the model can explain the final extents of calcein leakage for lipid/peptide ratios of > 2000:1 to 25:1 by assuming that only a fraction of the bound peptide forms pores consisting of M = 6 +/- 3 peptides. Interestingly, less leakage occurred at 43 degrees C, than at 30 degrees C, although peptide partitioning into the bilayer was enhanced upon elevation of the temperature. We deduced that the increased leakage at 30 degrees C was due to an increase in the extent of reversible surface aggregation at the lower temperature. Experiments employing fluorescein-labeled pardaxin demonstrated reversible aggregation of the peptide in suspension and within the membrane, and exchange of the peptide between liposomes. In summary, our experimental and theoretical results support reversible surface aggregation as the mechanism of pore formation by pardaxin. Images FIGURE 7 PMID:8744290

  5. Synergistic Effect of Superhydrophobicity and Oxidized Layers on Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum Alloy Surface Textured by Nanosecond Laser Treatment.

    PubMed

    Boinovich, Ludmila B; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M; Modestov, Alexander D; Domantovsky, Alexandr G; Emelyanenko, Kirill A

    2015-09-01

    We report a new efficient method for fabricating a superhydrophobic oxidized surface of aluminum alloys with enhanced resistance to pitting corrosion in sodium chloride solutions. The developed coatings are considered very prospective materials for the automotive industry, shipbuilding, aviation, construction, and medicine. The method is based on nanosecond laser treatment of the surface followed by chemisorption of a hydrophobic agent to achieve the superhydrophobic state of the alloy surface. We have shown that the surface texturing used to fabricate multimodal roughness of the surface may be simultaneously used for modifying the physicochemical properties of the thick surface layer of the substrate itself. Electrochemical and wetting experiments demonstrated that the superhydrophobic state of the metal surface inhibits corrosion processes in chloride solutions for a few days. However, during long-term contact of a superhydrophobic coating with a solution, the wetted area of the coating is subjected to corrosion processes due to the formation of defects. In contrast, the combination of an oxide layer with good barrier properties and the superhydrophobic state of the coating provides remarkable corrosion resistance. The mechanisms for enhancing corrosion protective properties are discussed. PMID:26271017

  6. Surface classification and detection of latent fingerprints based on 3D surface texture parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruhn, Stefan; Fischer, Robert; Vielhauer, Claus

    2012-06-01

    In the field of latent fingerprint detection in crime scene forensics the classification of surfaces has importance. A new method for the scientific analysis of image based information for forensic science was investigated in the last years. Our image acquisition based on a sensor using Chromatic White Light (CWL) with a lateral resolution up to 2 μm. The used FRT-MicroProf 200 CWL 600 measurement device is able to capture high-resolution intensity and topography images in an optical and contact-less way. In prior work, we have suggested to use 2D surface texture parameters to classify various materials, which was a novel approach in the field of criminalistic forensic using knowledge from surface appearance and a chromatic white light sensor. A meaningful and useful classification of different crime scene specific surfaces is not existent. In this work, we want to extend such considerations by the usage of fourteen 3D surface parameters, called 'Birmingham 14'. In our experiment we define these surface texture parameters and use them to classify ten different materials in this test set-up and create specific material classes. Further it is shown in first experiments, that some surface texture parameters are sensitive to separate fingerprints from carrier surfaces. So far, the use of surface roughness is mainly known within the framework of material quality control. The analysis and classification of the captured 3D-topography images from crime scenes is important for the adaptive preprocessing depending on the surface texture. The adaptive preprocessing in dependency of surface classification is necessary for precise detection because of the wide variety of surface textures. We perform a preliminary study in usage of these 3D surface texture parameters as feature for the fingerprint detection. In combination with a reference sample we show that surface texture parameters can be an indication for a fingerprint and can be a feature in latent fingerprint detection.

  7. Texture descriptions of lunar surface derived from LOLA data: Kilometer-scale roughness and entropy maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Ling, Zongcheng; Zhang, Jiang; Chen, Jian; Wu, Zhongchen; Ni, Yuheng; Zhao, Haowei

    2015-11-01

    The lunar global texture maps of roughness and entropy are derived at kilometer scales from Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) data obtained by Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) aboard on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft. We use statistical moments of a gray-level histogram of elevations in a neighborhood to compute the roughness and entropy value. Our texture descriptors measurements are shown in global maps at multi-sized square neighborhoods, whose length of side is 3, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 pixels, respectively. We found that large-scale topographical changes can only be displayed in maps with longer side of neighborhood, but the small scale global texture maps are more disorderly and unsystematic because of more complicated textures' details. Then, the frequency curves of texture maps are made out, whose shapes and distributions are changing as the spatial scales increases. Entropy frequency curve with minimum 3-pixel scale has large fluctuations and six peaks. According to this entropy curve we can classify lunar surface into maria, highlands, different parts of craters preliminarily. The most obvious textures in the middle-scale roughness and entropy maps are the two typical morphological units, smooth maria and rough highlands. For the impact crater, its roughness and entropy value are characterized by a multiple-ring structure obviously, and its different parts have different texture results. In the last, we made a 2D scatter plot between the two texture results of typical lunar maria and highlands. There are two clusters with largest dot density which are corresponded to the lunar highlands and maria separately. In the lunar mare regions (cluster A), there is a high correlation between roughness and entropy, but in the highlands (Cluster B), the entropy shows little change. This could be subjected to different geological processes of maria and highlands forming different landforms.

  8. Cooling of hot bubbles by surface texture during the boiling crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Navdeep; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa

    2015-11-01

    We report the existence of maxima in critical heat flux (CHF) enhancement for pool boiling on textured hydrophilic surfaces and reveal the interaction mechanism between bubbles and surface texture that governs the boiling crisis phenomenon. Boiling is a process of fundamental importance in many engineering and industrial applications but the maximum heat flux that can be absorbed by the boiling liquid (or CHF) is limited by the boiling crisis. Enhancing the CHF of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and reduction in greenhouse gas emissions on a global scale. However, the fundamental mechanisms behind this enhancement are not well understood, with some previous studies indicating that CHF should increase monotonically with increasing texture density. However, using pool boiling experiments on a parametrically designed set of plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces, we show that there is an optimum intermediate texture density that maximizes CHF and further that the length scale of this texture is of fundamental significance. Using imbibition experiments and high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we reveal the fundamental mechanisms governing the CHF enhancement maxima in boiling crisis. We acknowledge funding from the Chevron corporation.

  9. Sizing highly-ordered buckyball-shaped aggregates of colloidal nanoparticles by light extinction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofri, F. R. A.; Barbosa, S.; Touré, O.; Woźniak, M.; Grisolia, C.

    2013-09-01

    We produced self-assembled, densely-packed and highly-ordered aggregates of silica nanoparticles arranged in a rather regular hexagonal-pentagonal surface lattice. To investigate the formation of these aggregates, produced by means of a spray drying method, we developed a light extinction setup and all related models. It is shown that with a geodesic dome model, to describe their morphology, and a T-matrix method to calculate their extinction cross sections, the size distribution and concentration of these flowing aggregates may be recovered from the inversion of transmission spectra.

  10. Systematic Surface Phase Transition of Ag Thin Films by Iodine Functionalization at Room Temperature: Evolution of Optoelectronic and Texture Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashouti, Muhammad Y.; Talebi, Razieh; Kassar, Thaer; Nahal, Arashmid; Ristein, Jürgen; Unruh, Tobias; Christiansen, Silke H.

    2016-02-01

    We show a simple room temperature surface functionalization approach using iodine vapour to control a surface phase transition from cubic silver (Ag) of thin films into wurtzite silver-iodid (β-AgI) films. A combination of surface characterization techniques (optical, electronical and structural characterization) reveal distinct physical properties of the new surface phase. We discuss the AgI thin film formation dynamics and related transformation of physical properties by determining the work-function, dielectric constant and pyroelectric behavior together with morphological and structural thin film properties such as layer thickness, grain structure and texture formation. Notable results are: (i) a remarkable increase of the work-function (by 0.9 eV) of the Ag thin layer after short a iodine exposure time (≤60 s), with simultaneous increase of the thin film transparency (by two orders of magnitude), (ii) pinning of the Fermi level at the valance band maximum upon iodine functionalization, (iii) 84% of all crystallites grain were aligned as a result of the evolution of an internal electric field. Realizing a nano-scale layer stack composed of a dielectric AgI layer on top of a metallic thin Ag layer with such a simple method has some technological implications e.g. to realize optical elements such as planar optical waveguides.

  11. Systematic Surface Phase Transition of Ag Thin Films by Iodine Functionalization at Room Temperature: Evolution of Optoelectronic and Texture Properties.

    PubMed

    Bashouti, Muhammad Y; Talebi, Razieh; Kassar, Thaer; Nahal, Arashmid; Ristein, Jürgen; Unruh, Tobias; Christiansen, Silke H

    2016-01-01

    We show a simple room temperature surface functionalization approach using iodine vapour to control a surface phase transition from cubic silver (Ag) of thin films into wurtzite silver-iodid (β-AgI) films. A combination of surface characterization techniques (optical, electronical and structural characterization) reveal distinct physical properties of the new surface phase. We discuss the AgI thin film formation dynamics and related transformation of physical properties by determining the work-function, dielectric constant and pyroelectric behavior together with morphological and structural thin film properties such as layer thickness, grain structure and texture formation. Notable results are: (i) a remarkable increase of the work-function (by 0.9 eV) of the Ag thin layer after short a iodine exposure time (≤60 s), with simultaneous increase of the thin film transparency (by two orders of magnitude), (ii) pinning of the Fermi level at the valance band maximum upon iodine functionalization, (iii) 84% of all crystallites grain were aligned as a result of the evolution of an internal electric field. Realizing a nano-scale layer stack composed of a dielectric AgI layer on top of a metallic thin Ag layer with such a simple method has some technological implications e.g. to realize optical elements such as planar optical waveguides. PMID:26899434

  12. Systematic Surface Phase Transition of Ag Thin Films by Iodine Functionalization at Room Temperature: Evolution of Optoelectronic and Texture Properties

    PubMed Central

    Bashouti, Muhammad Y.; Talebi, Razieh; Kassar, Thaer; Nahal, Arashmid; Ristein, Jürgen; Unruh, Tobias; Christiansen, Silke H.

    2016-01-01

    We show a simple room temperature surface functionalization approach using iodine vapour to control a surface phase transition from cubic silver (Ag) of thin films into wurtzite silver-iodid (β-AgI) films. A combination of surface characterization techniques (optical, electronical and structural characterization) reveal distinct physical properties of the new surface phase. We discuss the AgI thin film formation dynamics and related transformation of physical properties by determining the work-function, dielectric constant and pyroelectric behavior together with morphological and structural thin film properties such as layer thickness, grain structure and texture formation. Notable results are: (i) a remarkable increase of the work-function (by 0.9 eV) of the Ag thin layer after short a iodine exposure time (≤60 s), with simultaneous increase of the thin film transparency (by two orders of magnitude), (ii) pinning of the Fermi level at the valance band maximum upon iodine functionalization, (iii) 84% of all crystallites grain were aligned as a result of the evolution of an internal electric field. Realizing a nano-scale layer stack composed of a dielectric AgI layer on top of a metallic thin Ag layer with such a simple method has some technological implications e.g. to realize optical elements such as planar optical waveguides. PMID:26899434

  13. Comparing Shape and Texture Features for Pattern Recognition in Simulation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Newsam, S; Kamath, C

    2004-12-10

    Shape and texture features have been used for some time for pattern recognition in datasets such as remote sensed imagery, medical imagery, photographs, etc. In this paper, we investigate shape and texture features for pattern recognition in simulation data. In particular, we explore which features are suitable for characterizing regions of interest in images resulting from fluid mixing simulations. Three texture features--gray level co-occurrence matrices, wavelets, and Gabor filters--and two shape features--geometric moments and the angular radial transform--are compared. The features are evaluated using a similarity retrieval framework. Our preliminary results indicate that Gabor filters perform the best among the texture features and the angular radial transform performs the best among the shape features. The feature which performs the best overall is dependent on how the groundtruth dataset is created.

  14. Comparing shape and texture features for pattern recognition in simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsam, Shawn D.; Kamath, Chandrika

    2005-03-01

    Shape and texture features have been used for some time for pattern recognition in datasets such as remote sensed imagery, medical imagery, photographs, etc. In this paper, we investigate shape and texture features for pattern recognition in simulation data. In particular, we explore which features are suitable for characterizing regions of interest in images resulting from fluid mixing simulations. Three texture features -- gray level co-occurrence matrices, wavelets, and Gabor filters -- and two shape features -- geometric moments and the angular radial transform -- are compared. The features are evaluated using a similarity retrieval framework. Our preliminary results indicate that Gabor filters perform the best among the texture features and the angular radial transform performs the best among the shape features. The feature which performs the best overall is dependent on how the groundtruth dataset is created.

  15. Assessing breathing motion by shape matching of lung and diaphragm surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urschler, Martin; Bischof, Horst

    2005-04-01

    Studying complex thorax breating motion is an important research topic for accurate fusion of functional and anatomical data, radiotherapy planning or reduction of breathing motion artifacts. We investigate segmented CT lung, airway and diaphragm surfaces at several different breathing states between Functional Residual and Total Lung Capacity. In general, it is hard to robustly derive corresponding shape features like curvature maxima from lung and diaphragm surfaces since diaphragm and rib cage muscles tend to deform the elastic lung tissue such that e.g. ridges might disappear. A novel registration method based on the shape context approach for shape matching is presented where we extend shape context to 3D surfaces. The shape context approach was reported as a promising method for matching 2D shapes without relying on extracted shape features. We use the point correspondences for a non-rigid thin-plate-spline registration to get deformation fields that describe the movement of lung and diaphragm. Our validation consists of experiments on phantom and real sheep thorax data sets. Phantom experiments make use of shapes that are manipulated with known transformations that simulate breathing behaviour. Real thorax data experiments use a data set showing lungs and diaphragm at 5 distinct breathing states, where we compare subsets of the data sets and qualitatively and quantitatively asses the registration performance by using manually identified corresponding landmarks.

  16. Investigation of relationship between interfacial electroadhesive force and surface texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Tailor, M.; Bamber, T.; Chamberlain, M.; Justham, L.; Jackson, M.

    2016-01-01

    A novel investigation into the relationship between the obtainable interfacial electroadhesive forces and different surface textures is presented in this paper. Different surface textures were generated then characterized based on a recognized areal-based non-contact surface texture measurement platform and procedure. An advanced electroadhesive force measurement platform and procedure were then implemented to measure the obtainable electroadhesive forces on those different surface textures. The results show that the obtained interfacial electroadhesive forces increase with decreasing Sq (root mean square height) value of the substrate surface provided that the difference in Sq between the different substrates is over 5 μm. Also, the higher the applied voltage, the larger the relative increase in electroadhesive forces observed. However, when the difference of Sq value between different substrate surfaces is below 2 μm, the obtained interfacial electroadhesive forces do not necessarily increase with decreasing Sq. Furthermore, the obtainable electroadhesive forces are not necessarily the same when the Sq value of two substrate surfaces are the same due to the fact that the direction of the surface texture plays an important role in achieving electroadhesive forces.

  17. Textured-surface quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Wiczer, James J.; Cernosek, Richard W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Gebert, Charles T.; Casaus, Leonard; Mitchell, Mary A.

    1998-08-25

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  18. Texture and Strain Measurements from Bending of NiTi Shape Memory Alloy Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carl, Matthew; Zhang, Baozhuo; Young, Marcus L.

    2016-07-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are a new generation of materials that exhibit unique nonlinear deformations due to a phase transformation which allows the material to return to its original shape after removal of stress or a change in temperature. These unique properties are the result of a martensitic/austenitic phase transformation through the application of temperature changes or applied stress. Many technological applications of austenitic SMAs involve cyclical mechanical loading and unloading in order to take advantage of pseudoelasticity, but are limited due to poor fatigue life. In this paper, commercial pseudoelastic NiTi SMA wires (50.7 at.% Ni) were placed under different bending strains and examined using scanning electron microscopy and high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD). By observing the microstructure, phase transformation temperatures, surface texture and diffraction patterns along the wire, it is shown that the wire exhibits a strong anisotropic behavior whether on the tensile or compressive side of the bending axis and that the initiation of micro-cracks in the wires is localized on the compression side, but that crack propagation will still happen if the wire is reloaded in the opposite direction. In addition, lattice strains are examined for both the austenite and martensite phases.

  19. Directional growth and crystallization of silicon thin films prepared by electron-beam evaporation on oblique and textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, J. J.; Sontheimer, T.; Rech, B.; Becker, C.

    2013-03-01

    Electron-beam evaporation (EBE) of silicon permits the high-rate deposition of photovoltaic thin-film devices at low costs. The directional, non-conformal growth characteristic of EBE is systematically investigated by varying the silicon flux angle of incidence γ on the substrate surface between 0° and 49°. After solid phase crystallization the micro-structural properties of these silicon films are investigated and correlated with the electronic quality of n+/p-/p+-type solar cell stacks. As γ exceeds 30°, the porosity and oxygen content of the silicon films increase significantly coming along with the break-down of the electronic material quality. At γ>40° the silicon crystallization process is even found to be suppressed resulting from a columnar film morphology infiltrated by oxygen-rich pores. The knowledge of this critical angle is essential when textured substrates, consisting of many tilted micro-areas, are used for enhanced light absorption in the silicon film simultaneously ensuring the growth of high-quality material. Furthermore, the inclination angle γ can serve as design parameter for tailored substrate templates for the fabrication of advanced light-harvesting structures by self-organized solid phase crystallization.

  20. Photogrammetry of the three-dimensional shape and texture of a nanoscale particle using scanning electron microscopy and free software.

    PubMed

    Gontard, Lionel C; Schierholz, Roland; Yu, Shicheng; Cintas, Jesús; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E

    2016-10-01

    We apply photogrammetry in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study the three-dimensional shape and surface texture of a nanoscale LiTi2(PO4)3 particle. We highlight the fact that the technique can be applied non-invasively in any SEM using free software (freeware) and does not require special sample preparation. Three-dimensional information is obtained in the form of a surface mesh, with the texture of the sample stored as a separate two-dimensional image (referred to as a UV Map). The mesh can be used to measure parameters such as surface area, volume, moment of inertia and center of mass, while the UV map can be used to study the surface texture using conventional image processing techniques. We also illustrate the use of 3D printing to visualize the reconstructed model. PMID:27449277

  1. Correlation of soil organic carbon and nutrients (NPK) to soil mineralogy, texture, aggregation, and land use pattern.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Gopi; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2015-11-01

    This work investigates the correlations existing among soil organic carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), potassium (K), and physicochemical properties like clay mineralogy, textural components, soil aggregation, and land use pattern. Seven different locations were chosen in the tropical rainforest climate region of Assam, India, for the work. The soil texture classifications were clay, sandy clay loam, and sandy loam with mixed clay mineralogy consisting of tectosilicates and phylosilicates. Two distinct compositions of total Fe/Al oxides≥11.5 and <10.8% were observed along with two distinct groups of water stable soil aggregates of mean weight diameter≈6.42 and ≤3.26 mm. The soil clay and sand had positive and negative contributions respectively to the soil organic carbon (SOC) protection, which was observed to be dependent on lesser sand content, higher silt+clay content, and the presence of higher percentages of total Fe/Al oxides. Soil clay mineralogy suggested that the mineral, chlorite, favored retention of higher SOC content in a particular site. Under similar climatic and mineralogical conditions, both natural and anthropogenic soil disturbances destabilized SOC protection through SOM mineralization and soil aggregate destabilization as indicated by SOC protective capacity studies. Urbanization resulting in soil compaction contributed to enhanced SOC level through increased contact between the occluded organic carbon and the soil mineralogical constituents. PMID:26553358

  2. Differential survival of solitary and aggregated bacterial cells promotes aggregate formation on leaf surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Monier, J.-M.; Lindow, S. E.

    2003-01-01

    The survival of individual Pseudomonas syringae cells was determined on bean leaf surfaces maintained under humid conditions or periodically exposed to desiccation stress. Cells of P. syringae strain B728a harboring a GFP marker gene were visualized by epifluorescence microscopy, either directly in situ or after recovery from leaves, and dead cells were identified as those that were stained with propidium iodide in such populations. Under moist, conducive conditions on plants, the proportion of total live cells was always high, irrespective of their aggregated state. In contrast, the proportion of the total cells that remained alive on leaves that were periodically exposed to desiccation stress decreased through time and was only ≈15% after 5 days. However, the fraction of cells in large aggregates that were alive on such plants in both condition was much higher than more solitary cells. Immediately after inoculation, cells were randomly distributed over the leaf surface and no aggregates were observed. However, a very aggregated pattern of colonization was apparent within 7 days, and >90% of the living cells were located in aggregates of 100 cells or more. Our results strongly suggest that, although conducive conditions favor aggregate formation, such cells are much more capable of tolerating environmental stresses, and the preferential survival of cells in aggregates promotes a highly clustered spatial distribution of bacteria on leaf surfaces. PMID:14665692

  3. Effects of total thickness on (001) texture, surface morphology, and magnetic properties of [Fe/Pt]{sub n} multilayer films by monatomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y. S.; George, T. A.; Yue, L. P.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Li, W. L.; Fei, W. D.; Li Haibo; Liu Mei

    2010-10-15

    Atomic-scale [Fe/Pt]{sub n} multilayer films with different total thickness were prepared on thermally oxidized Si (100) substrates at room temperature by monatomic layer deposition using dc-magnetron and rf-magnetron sputtering. Effects of the total thickness on (001) texture, surface morphology, and magnetic properties of the postannealed films have been investigated. It is found that the particlelike structure films with perfect (001) texture and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are obtained with a thickness of less than or equal to 6.5 nm. After 500 deg. C annealing, the films with thickness of 6.5 and 11.9 nm show very smooth surface. In addition, with increasing total thickness of the films, (001) texture and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of the annealed films deteriorate, and the films become continuous in structure. The total thickness of the films also affects the exchange-coupling interaction among FePt magnetic grains and the magnetization reversal process.

  4. Localized spoof surface plasmons in textured open metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Xu, Hongyi; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Baile

    2016-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate that textured open metal surfaces, i.e., the ultrathin fan-shaped metallic strips, are able to support spoof localized surface plasmons (spoof-LSPs) in the microwave frequencies. Unlike conventional spoof-LSPs supported on textured closed metal surfaces, which originate from the interference of clockwise and counterclockwise propagating surface modes, spoof-LSPs on textured open metal surfaces arise from the Fabry-Perot-like resonances due to the terminations of the open surfaces. We show that both the number of modes and the resonance frequencies of spoof-LSPs on textured open metal surfaces can be engineered through tuning the grating numbers (or total length) of the structured fan-shaped metallic strip. This enables the tuning of the spoof-plasmonic resonator by simply changing its length, rather than the complete geometry, simplifying the design to just one degree of freedom. Experimental evidence of the spoof-LSP Fabry-Perot resonators in the microwave regimes is presented with near-field response spectra and mode profiles imaged directly. PMID:27176957

  5. Simulation studies on shape and growth kinetics for fractal aggregates in aerosol and colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinson, William Raymond

    The aim of this work is to explore, using computational techniques that simulate the motion and subsequent aggregation of particles in aerosol and colloidal systems, many common but not well studied systems that form fractal clusters. Primarily the focus is on cluster shape and growth kinetics. The structure of clusters made under diffusion limited cluster-cluster aggregation (DLCA) is looked at. More specifically, the shape anisotropy is found to have an inverse relationship on the scaling prefactor k0 and have no effect on the fractal dimension Df . An analytical model that predicts the shape and fractal dimension of diffusion limited cluster-cluster aggregates is tested and successfully predicts cluster shape and dimensionality. Growth kinetics of cluster-cluster aggregation in the free molecular regime where the system starts with ballistic motion and then transitions to diffusive motion as the aggregates grow in size is studied. It is shown that the kinetic exponent will crossover from the ballistic to the diffusional values and the onset of this crossover is predicted by when the nearest neighbor Knudsen number reaches unity. Simulations were carried out for a system in which molten particles coalesce into spheres, then cool till coalescing stops and finally the polydispersed monomers stick at point contacts to form fractal clusters. The kinetic exponent and overall cluster structure for these aggregates was found to be in agreement with DLCA that started with monodispersed monomers. Colloidal aggregation in the presence of shear was studied in detail. Study of a colloidal system characterized a by short-range attractive potential showed that weak shear enhanced the aggregation process. Strong shear led to fragmentation and subsequent nucleation as cluster growth rebounded after an induction time.

  6. Effect of irregularity in shape and boundary of a macro-texture region in titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jeong K.; Blackshire, James L.; Freed, Shaun L.

    2016-02-01

    Peak amplitudes of mode converted shear wave signals back scattered from macro-texture regions (MTRs) in an aerospace grade titanium alloy material are measured to be about the same level as corner trapped shear wave signals. In addition to the abnormally high shear wave responses, the time of flight data indicates that the MTR signals are back scattered from a location deep in the sample so that the round trip travel time is close to that of corner trapped signals. In this work, these two ultrasonic properties of an MTR in a test specimen cut from a titanium jet engine disk are closely studied to understand the root cause of abnormally high shear wave responses. Based on the amplitude and time of flight data collected in a laboratory condition, a decision has been made to investigate further experimentally and computationally how surface irregularity of an acoustically reflective surface affects incoming shear waves upon reflection. Attempts are made to correlate the localized back scattered signal response of the MTR in the test specimen to the beam focusing effect of a non-planar surface of an acoustically impedance mismatched boundary layer such as a fatigue crack face. From the current experimental and computational results on the reflection of corner trapped shear waves from a concave shaped section of a non-planar crack face and the time of flight data, it is speculated that the root cause of the abnormally high peak amplitude MTR signal is possibly due to the beam focusing effect caused by the shape of the MTR.

  7. Angle-dependent lubricated tribological properties of stainless steel by femtosecond laser surface texturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuo; Li, Yang-Bo; Bai, Feng; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Lubricated tribological properties of stainless steel were investigated by femtosecond laser surface texturing. Regular-arranged micro-grooved textures with different spacing and micro-groove inclination angles (between micro-groove path and sliding direction) were produced on AISI 304L steel surfaces by an 800 nm femtosecond laser. The spacing of micro-groove was varied from 25 to 300 μm, and the inclination angles of micro-groove were measured as 90° and 45°. The tribological properties of the smooth and textured surfaces with micro-grooves were investigated by reciprocating ball-on-flat tests against Al2O3 ceramic balls under starved oil lubricated conditions. Results showed that the spacing of micro-grooves significantly affected the tribological property. With the increase of micro-groove spacing, the average friction coefficients and wear rates of textured surfaces initially decreased then increased. The tribological performance also depended on the inclination angles of micro-grooves. Among the investigated patterns, the micro-grooves perpendicular to the sliding direction exhibited the lowest average friction coefficient and wear rate to a certain extent. Femtosecond laser-induced surface texturing may remarkably improve friction and wear properties if the micro-grooves were properly distributed.

  8. HOS cell adhesion on Ti6Al4V surfaces texturized by laser engraving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval Amador, A.; Carreño Garcia, H.; Escobar Rivero, P.; Peña Ballesteros, D. Y.; Estupiñán Duran, H. A.

    2016-02-01

    The cell adhesion of the implant is determinate by the chemical composition, topography, wettability, surface energy and biocompatibility of the biomaterial. In this work the interaction between human osteosarcoma HOS cells and textured Ti6Al4V surfaces were evaluated. Ti6Al4V surfaces were textured using a CO2 laser in order to obtain circular spots on the surfaces. Test surfaces were uncoated (C1) used as a control surface, and surfaces with points obtained by laser engraving, with 1mm spacing (C2) and 0.5mm (C3). The HOS cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% antibiotics. No cells toxicity after one month incubation time occurred. The increased cell adhesion and cell spreading was observed after 1, 3 and 5 days without significant differences between the sample surfaces (C2 and C3) and control (uncoated) at the end of the experiment.

  9. Fabrication, surface properties, and origin of superoleophobicity for a model textured surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Law, Kock-Yee; Sambhy, Varun

    2011-05-17

    Inspired by the superhydrophobic effect displayed in nature, we set out to mimic the interplay between the chemistry and physics in the lotus leaf to see if the same design principle can be applied to control wetting and adhesion between toners and inks on various printing surfaces. Since toners and inks are organic materials, superoleophobicity has become our design target. In this work, we report the design and fabrication of a model superoleophobic surface on silicon wafer. The model surface was created by photolithography, consisting of texture made of arrays of ∼3 μm diameter pillars, ∼7 μm in height with a center-to-center spacing of 6 μm. The surface was then made oleophobic with a fluorosilane coating, FOTS, synthesized by the molecular vapor deposition technique with tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyltrichlorosilane. Contact angle measurement shows that the surface exhibits super repellency toward water and oil (hexadecane) with a water and hexadecane contact angles at 156° and 158°, respectively. Since the sliding angles for both liquids are also very small (∼10°), we conclude that the model surface is both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic. By comparing with the contact angle data of the bare silicon surfaces (both smooth and textured), we also conclude that the superoleophobicity is a result of both surface texturing and fluorination. Results from investigations of the effects of surface modification and pillar geometry indicate that both surface oleophobicity and pillar geometry are contributors to the superoleophobicity. More specifically, we found that superoleophobicity can only be attained on our model textured surface when the flat surface coating has a relatively high oleophobicity (i.e., with a hexadecane contact angle of >73°). SEM examination of the pillars with higher magnification reveals that the side wall in each pillar is not smooth; rather it consists of a ∼300 nm wavy structure (due to the Bosch etching process

  10. Young children retain fast mapped object labels better than shape, color, and texture words.

    PubMed

    Holland, Amanda; Simpson, Andrew; Riggs, Kevin J

    2015-06-01

    We compared short- and long-term retention of fast mapped color, shape, and texture words as well as object labels. In an exposure session, 354 3- and 4-year-old children were shown a set of two familiar and three novel stimuli. One of the novel stimuli was labeled with a new object label, color, shape, or texture word. Retention of the mapping between the new word and the novel object or property was measured either 5 min or 1 week later. After 5 min, retention was significantly above chance in all conditions. However, after 1 week, only the mappings for object labels were retained above chance levels. Our findings suggest that fast mapped object labels are retained long term better than color, shape, and texture words. The results also highlight the importance of comparing short- and long-term retention when studying children's word learning. PMID:25765990

  11. Tunable Kondo effect and spin textures on topological insulators surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekhter, Ilya; Ortiz, Gerardo; Isaev, Leonid

    We consider screening of a spin- 1 / 2 impurity at the surface of a topological insulator, and show that the very existence of Kondo screening strongly depend on details of the bulk material and surface preparation whose details are encoded in time-reversal preserving boundary conditions for electronic wavefunctions. We investigate in detail the formation of the Kondo resonance by studying the ''orbital-flip'' processes that screen the impurity spin in the resulting strongly spin-orbit coupled system. This mechanism gives rise to spin textures that can be used to experimentally probe signatures of a Kondo resonance in topological insulators, and we give examples relevant to specific materials. L.I. was supported by the NSF (PIF-1211914 and PFC-1125844), AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI, NIST and ARO individual investigator awards, and also in part by ICAM. I.V. acknowledges support from NSF Grant DMR-1105339.

  12. DDA Computations of Porous Aggregates with Forsterite Crystals: Effects of Crystal Shape and Crystal Mass Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lindsay, Sean S.; Harker, David; Woodward, Charles; Kelley, Michael S.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla

    2015-01-01

    Porous aggregate grains are commonly found in cometary dust samples and are needed to model cometary IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Models for thermal emissions from comets require two forms of silicates: amorphous and crystalline. The dominant crystal resonances observed in comet SEDs are from Forsterite (Mg2SiO4). The mass fractions that are crystalline span a large range from 0.0 < or = fcrystal < or = 0.74. Radial transport models that predict the enrichment of the outer disk (>25 AU at 1E6 yr) by inner disk materials (crystals) are challenged to yield the highend-range of cometary crystal mass fractions. However, in current thermal models, Forsterite crystals are not incorporated into larger aggregate grains but instead only are considered as discrete crystals. A complicating factor is that Forsterite crystals with rectangular shapes better fit the observed spectral resonances in wavelength (11.0-11.15 microns, 16, 19, 23.5, 27, and 33 microns), feature asymmetry and relative height (Lindley et al. 2013) than spherically or elliptically shaped crystals. We present DDA-DDSCAT computations of IR absorptivities (Qabs) of 3 micron-radii porous aggregates with 0.13 < or = fcrystal < or = 0.35 and with polyhedral-shaped Forsterite crystals. We can produce crystal resonances with similar appearance to the observed resonances of comet Hale- Bopp. Also, a lower mass fraction of crystals in aggregates can produce the same spectral contrast as a higher mass fraction of discrete crystals; the 11micron and 23 micron crystalline resonances appear amplified when crystals are incorporated into aggregates composed otherwise of spherically shaped amorphous Fe-Mg olivines and pyroxenes. We show that the optical properties of a porous aggregate is not linear combination of its monomers, so aggregates need to be computed. We discuss the consequence of lowering comet crystal mass fractions by modeling IR SEDs with aggregates with crystals, and the implications for radial

  13. Shapes of krill swarms and fish schools emerge as aggregation members avoid predators and access oxygen.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Andrew S; Cox, Martin J

    2010-10-12

    Many types of animals exhibit aggregative behavior: birds flock, bees swarm, fish shoal, and ungulates herd. Terrestrial and aerial aggregations can be observed directly, and photographic techniques have provided insights into the behaviors of animals in these environments and data against which behavioral theory can be tested. Underwater, however, limited visibility can hamper direct observation, and understanding of shoaling remains incomplete. We used multibeam sonar to observe three-dimensional structure of Antarctic krill shoals acoustically. Shoal size and packing density varied greatly, but surface area:volume ratios (roughnesses) were distributed narrowly about ∼3.3 m(-1). Shoals of clupeid fish (e.g., sardine, anchovy) from geographically and oceanographically diverse locations have very similar roughnesses. This common emergent shape property suggests common driving forces across diverse ecosystems. Group behavior can be complex, but a simple tradeoff--that we model--in which individual fish and krill juggle only their access to oxygen-replete water and exposure to predation can explain the observed shoal shape. Decreasing oxygen availability in a warming world ocean may impact shoal structure: because structure affects catchability by predators and fishers, understanding the response will be necessary for ecological and commercial reasons. PMID:20850320

  14. Volcanic Surface Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 16 June 2003

    The platy surface texture observed in this THEMIS image of the vast plains southeast of the volcano Elysium Mons likely formed by very fluid cooling lava. Variations in the surface texture may reflect different cooling or flow rates of the lava. The lack of any large impact craters also points to a relatively young age for these volcanic materials. The two largest impact craters occur in the higher plateau unit indicating that these materials are older.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 11.6, Longitude 182.4 East (177.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Using combination of color, texture, and shape features for image retrieval in melanomas databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larabi, Mohamed-Chaker; Richard, Noel; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2001-12-01

    This paper deals with Computer Aided Diagnosis for skin cancers (melanomas). The diagnosis is based on some rules called the ABCD mnemonics. They take into account color distribution, lesion's diameter, etc. The goal isn't to classify the lesion but to find those, which are the most similar, in order to help the expert to confirm his diagnosis and to avoid any useless excision. This is done thanks to an indexation system, which compare the signatures of previously diagnosed lesions contained in a database and patient's lesion signature. This last is constructed by translating the rules into image processing attributes. We have divided then into three families: Color attributes (color and fuzzy histograms), Texture attributes (co-occurrence matrix and Haralick indices) and Shape attributes (lesion surface and maximum included circle). Image quantization permits us to keep only the most significant colors, thus giving a light structure. Finally, we define a distance for each attribute and use weighted combination for the similarity measure.

  16. Investigating playa surface textures: The impact of chemistry and environment on surface morphology and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollerud, H. J.; Fantle, M. S.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral dust is an important component of geochemical cycles, but its impact on those cycles is not thoroughly understood. For instance, dust inputs to the ocean have been suggested to affect the iron cycle by stimulating natural iron fertilization, which then could modify climate. The influence of dust on geochemical cycles is determined by the chemical and mineralogical composition of dust inputs, which is governed in turn by the composition of dust source regions. A loose, unconsolidated surface texture is more easily ablated by wind, and so a location where composition and environmental characteristics encourage this type of surface is more likely to produce dust and influence geochemical cycles. Also, if evaporation concentrates evaporites such as calcite at the surface of a dust producing region, dust Ca concentrations are likely to be higher. Playas can be regionally significant dust source regions, and they are amenable to study as their surface textures often vary significantly across small areas. This study investigates surface processes experimentally, and compares the results to observations of surface texture in a natural playa system (the Black Rock Desert, Nevada). We dry surfaces with 25% to 75% clay and quartz at 40°C for approximately a day, wet the surface to simulate rain, and then repeat the cycle multiple times. We estimate surface roughness, measure surface strength with a penetrometer, and investigate thermal characteristics with an IR camera (wavelength range 8-12μm). We find that textures similar to those in playas can be reproduced with cycles of wetting and drying, such as might occur in an arid environment with intermittent rain. We investigate the addition of calcite and halite, since their precipitation potentially can disrupt the clay surfaces through the formation and expansion of crystals, thereby linking the chemical composition with the disruption of a strong surface texture and an increased chance of dust production. In the

  17. Identification of aggregates for Tennessee bituminous surface courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, Heather Jean

    Tennessee road construction is a major venue for federal and state spending. Tax dollars each year go to the maintenance and construction of roads. One aspect of highway construction that affects the public is the safety of its state roads. There are many factors that affect the safety of a given road. One factor that was focused on in this research was the polish resistance capabilities of aggregates. Several pre-evaluation methods have been used in the laboratory to predict what will happen in a field situation. A new pre-evaluation method was invented that utilized AASHTO T 304 procedure upscaled to accommodate surface bituminous aggregates. This new method, called the Tennessee Terminal Textural Condition Method (T3CM), was approved by Tennessee Department of Transportation to be used as a pre-evaluation method on bituminous surface courses. It was proven to be operator insensitive, repeatable, and an accurate indication of particle shape and texture. Further research was needed to correlate pre-evaluation methods to the current field method, ASTM E 274-85 Locked Wheel Skid Trailer. In this research, twenty-five in-place bituminous projects and eight source evaluations were investigated. The information gathered would further validate the T3CM and find the pre-evaluation method that best predicted the field method. In addition, new sources of aggregates for bituminous surface courses were revealed. The results of this research have shown T3CM to be highly repeatable with an overall coefficient of variation of 0.26% for an eight sample repeatability test. It was the best correlated pre-evaluation method with the locked wheel skid trailer method giving an R2 value of 0.3946 and a Pearson coefficient of 0.710. Being able to predict field performance of aggregates prior to construction is a powerful tool capable of saving time, money, labor, and possibly lives.

  18. Classification of benign and malignant breast masses based on shape and texture features in sonography images.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Fahimeh Sadat; Behnam, Hamid; Ahmadinejad, Nasrin

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this research was evaluating novel shape and texture feature' efficiency in classification of benign and malignant breast masses in sonography images. First, mass regions were extracted from the region of interest (ROI) sub-image by implementing a new hybrid segmentation approach based on level set algorithms. Then two left and right side areas of the masses are elicited. After that, six features (Eccentricity_feature, Solidity_feature, DeferenceArea_Hull_Rectangular, DeferenceArea_Mass_Rectangular, Cross-correlation-left and Cross-correlation-right) based on shape, texture and region characteristics of the masses were extracted for further classification. Finally a support vector machine (SVM) classifier was utilized to classify breast masses. The leave-one-case-out protocol was utilized on a database of eighty pathologically-proven breast sonographic images of patients (forty-seven benign cases and thirty-three malignant cases) to evaluate our method. The classification results showed an overall accuracy of 95.00%, sensitivity of 90.91%, specificity of 97.87%, positive predictive value of 96.77%, negative predictive value of 93.88%, and Matthew's correlation coefficient of 89.71%. The experimental results declare that our proposed method is actually a beneficial tool for the diagnosis of the breast cancer and can provide a second opinion for a physician's decision or can be used for the medicine training especially when coupled with other modalities. PMID:21082222

  19. Control of crystallographic texture and surface morphology of Pt/Tio2 templates for enhanced PZT thin film texture.

    PubMed

    Fox, Austin J; Drawl, Bill; Fox, Glen R; Gibbons, Brady J; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Optimized processing conditions for Pt/TiO2/SiO2/Si templating electrodes were investigated. These electrodes are used to obtain [111] textured thin film lead zirconate titanate (Pb[ZrxTi1-x ]O3 0 ≤ x ≤ 1) (PZT). Titanium deposited by dc magnetron sputtering yields [0001] texture on a thermally oxidized Si wafer. It was found that by optimizing deposition time, pressure, power, and the chamber pre-conditioning, the Ti texture could be maximized while maintaining low surface roughness. When oxidized, titanium yields [100]-oriented rutile. This seed layer has as low as a 4.6% lattice mismatch with [111] Pt; thus, it is possible to achieve strongly oriented [111] Pt. The quality of the orientation and surface roughness of the TiO2 and the Ti directly affect the achievable Pt texture and surface morphology. A transition between optimal crystallographic texture and the smoothest templating surface occurs at approximately 30 nm of original Ti thickness (45 nm TiO2). This corresponds to 0.5 nm (2 nm for TiO2) rms roughness as determined by atomic force microscopy and a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the rocking curve 0002 (200) peak of 5.5/spl degrees/ (3.1/spl degrees/ for TiO2). A Pb[Zr0.52Ti 0.48]O3 layer was deposited and shown to template from the textured Pt electrode, with a maximum [111] Lotgering factor of 87% and a minimum 111 FWHM of 2.4/spl degrees/ at approximately 30 nm of original Ti. PMID:25585390

  20. Soil Texture Estimates: A Tool to Compare Texture-by-Feel and Lab Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzmeier, D.P.; Owens, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    Soil texture is a fundamental soil property that impacts agricultural and engineering land-use. Comparing texture estimates-by-feel to laboratory-known values to calibrate fingers is a common practice. As educators, it is difficult to assess this field skill consistently and fairly. The instructor may give full credit for the correct texture class…

  1. Three-dimensional shape analysis of coarse aggregates: New techniques for and preliminary results on several different coarse aggregates and reference rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogan, S.T.; Quiroga, P.N.; Fowler, D.W.; Saleh, H.A.; Livingston, R.A.; Garboczi, E.J. . E-mail: edward.garboczi@nist.gov; Ketcham, P.M.; Hagedorn, J.G.; Satterfield, S.G.

    2006-09-15

    The shape of aggregates used in concrete is an important parameter that helps determine many concrete properties, especially the rheology of fresh concrete and early-age mechanical properties. This paper discusses the sample preparation and image analysis techniques necessary for obtaining an aggregate particle image in 3-D, using X-ray computed tomography, which is then suitable for spherical harmonic analysis. The shapes of three reference rocks are analyzed for uncertainty determination via direct comparison to the geometry of their reconstructed images. A Virtual Reality Modeling Language technique is demonstrated that can give quick and accurate 3-D views of aggregates. Shape data on several different kinds of coarse aggregates are compared and used to illustrate potential mathematical shape analyses made possible by the spherical harmonic information.

  2. Shaping the Growth Behaviour of Biofilms Initiated from Bacterial Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Melaugh, Gavin; Hutchison, Jaime; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Irie, Yasuhiko; Roberts, Aled; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Diggle, Stephen P; Gordon, Vernita D; Allen, Rosalind J

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are usually assumed to originate from individual cells deposited on a surface. However, many biofilm-forming bacteria tend to aggregate in the planktonic phase so that it is possible that many natural and infectious biofilms originate wholly or partially from pre-formed cell aggregates. Here, we use agent-based computer simulations to investigate the role of pre-formed aggregates in biofilm development. Focusing on the initial shape the aggregate forms on the surface, we find that the degree of spreading of an aggregate on a surface can play an important role in determining its eventual fate during biofilm development. Specifically, initially spread aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated bacterial cells is low, while initially rounded aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated cells is high. These contrasting outcomes are governed by a trade-off between aggregate surface area and height. Our results provide new insight into biofilm formation and development, and reveal new factors that may be at play in the social evolution of biofilm communities. PMID:26934187

  3. Shaping the Growth Behaviour of Biofilms Initiated from Bacterial Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Melaugh, Gavin; Hutchison, Jaime; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Irie, Yasuhiko; Roberts, Aled; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Diggle, Stephen P.; Gordon, Vernita D.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are usually assumed to originate from individual cells deposited on a surface. However, many biofilm-forming bacteria tend to aggregate in the planktonic phase so that it is possible that many natural and infectious biofilms originate wholly or partially from pre-formed cell aggregates. Here, we use agent-based computer simulations to investigate the role of pre-formed aggregates in biofilm development. Focusing on the initial shape the aggregate forms on the surface, we find that the degree of spreading of an aggregate on a surface can play an important role in determining its eventual fate during biofilm development. Specifically, initially spread aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated bacterial cells is low, while initially rounded aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated cells is high. These contrasting outcomes are governed by a trade-off between aggregate surface area and height. Our results provide new insight into biofilm formation and development, and reveal new factors that may be at play in the social evolution of biofilm communities. PMID:26934187

  4. In vitro platelet activation, aggregation and platelet-granulocyte complex formation induced by surface modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fent, János; Bihari, Péter; Vippola, Minnamari; Sarlin, Essi; Lakatos, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Surface modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) such as carboxylation, amidation, hydroxylation and pegylation is used to reduce the nanotube toxicity and render them more suitable for biomedical applications than their pristine counterparts. Toxicity can be manifested in platelet activation as it has been shown for SWCNTs. However, the effect of various surface modifications on the platelet activating potential of SWCNTs has not been tested yet. In vitro platelet activation (CD62P) as well as the platelet-granulocyte complex formation (CD15/CD41 double positivity) in human whole blood were measured by flow cytometry in the presence of 0.1mg/ml of pristine or various surface modified SWCNTs. The effect of various SWCNTs was tested by whole blood impedance aggregometry, too. All tested SWCNTs but the hydroxylated ones activate platelets and promote platelet-granulocyte complex formation in vitro. Carboxylated, pegylated and pristine SWCNTs induce whole blood aggregation as well. Although pegylation is preferred from biomedical point of view, among the samples tested by us pegylated SWCNTs induced far the most prominent activation and a well detectable aggregation of platelets in whole blood. PMID:25956790

  5. Soil texture and granulometry at the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollfus, A.; Deschamps, M.; Zimbelman, J.

    1992-01-01

    The microtexture of the near-surface Martian soil was sensed with three diagnostic parameters: (1) the albedo A at normal incidence and phase angle 5 degrees, which relates to the composition of the top surface exposed layer; (2) the polarization parameter b characterizes the texture of the top surface layer in terms of grain size; and (3) the thermal inertia parameter I which refers to the soil compaction through the first few decimeters below the top surface sensed by polarimetry, in terms of size for the pieces making a granular regolith. Parameter b was derived from instrument VPM on board the Soviet spacecraft MARS-5, inertial I is from IRTM on the American Viking, and albedo A from both. The polarimetric scans racked strips covering two contrasted regions, the dark hued Mare Erythraeum, and the adjacent bright orange Thaumasia. Erythraem is characterized everywhere by a same type of terrain, despite the large geomorphological diversity of the surface. There is an ubiquitous coating or mantling with small dark grains, of both albedo 12.7 percent and particle size 10 to 20 microns, above a subsurface dislocation in pieces around 300 to 600 microns. A simple model is with sand-size particles completely coated with 15 micron dark grains.

  6. Effect of Groove Surface Texture on Tribological Characteristics and Energy Consumption under High Temperature Friction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Chen, Guiming; Fan, Boxuan; Liu, Jianyou

    2016-01-01

    Energy consumption and tribological properties could be improved by proper design of surface texture in friction. However, some literature focused on investigating their performance under high temperature. In the study, different groove surface textures were fabricated on steels by a laser machine, and their tribological behaviors were experimentally studied with the employment of the friction and wear tester under distinct high temperature and other working conditions. The friction coefficient was recorded, and wear performance were characterized by double light interference microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Then, the performances of energy consumptions were carefully estimated. Results showed that friction coefficient, wear, and energy consumption could almost all be reduced by most textures under high temperature conditions, but to a different extent which depends on the experimental conditions and texture parameters. The main improvement mechanisms were analyzed, such as the hardness change, wear debris storage, thermal stress release and friction induced temperature reduction by the textures. Finally, a scattergram of the relatively reduced ratio of the energy consumption was drawn for different surface textures under four distinctive experimental conditions to illustrate the comprehensive energy consumption improving ability of textures, which was of benefit for the application of texture design. PMID:27035658

  7. Effect of Groove Surface Texture on Tribological Characteristics and Energy Consumption under High Temperature Friction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Chen, Guiming; Fan, Boxuan; Liu, Jianyou

    2016-01-01

    Energy consumption and tribological properties could be improved by proper design of surface texture in friction. However, some literature focused on investigating their performance under high temperature. In the study, different groove surface textures were fabricated on steels by a laser machine, and their tribological behaviors were experimentally studied with the employment of the friction and wear tester under distinct high temperature and other working conditions. The friction coefficient was recorded, and wear performance were characterized by double light interference microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Then, the performances of energy consumptions were carefully estimated. Results showed that friction coefficient, wear, and energy consumption could almost all be reduced by most textures under high temperature conditions, but to a different extent which depends on the experimental conditions and texture parameters. The main improvement mechanisms were analyzed, such as the hardness change, wear debris storage, thermal stress release and friction induced temperature reduction by the textures. Finally, a scattergram of the relatively reduced ratio of the energy consumption was drawn for different surface textures under four distinctive experimental conditions to illustrate the comprehensive energy consumption improving ability of textures, which was of benefit for the application of texture design. PMID:27035658

  8. Two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ruiting; Liu, Geng; Liu, Tianxiang

    2016-05-01

    Detailed behaviors of nanoscale textured surfaces during the reciprocating sliding contacts are still unknown although they are widely used in mechanical components to improve tribological characteristics. The current research of sliding contacts of textured surfaces mainly focuses on the experimental studies, while the cost is too high. Molecular dynamics(MD) simulation is widely used in the studies of nanoscale single-pass sliding contacts, but the CPU cost of MD simulation is also too high to simulate the reciprocating sliding contacts. In this paper, employing multiscale method which couples molecular dynamics simulation and finite element method, two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces are investigated. Four textured surfaces with different texture shapes are designed, and a rigid cylindrical tip is used to slide on these textured surfaces. For different textured surfaces, average potential energies and average friction forces of the corresponding sliding processes are analyzed. The analyzing results show that "running-in" stages are different for each texture, and steady friction processes are discovered for textured surfaces II, III and IV. Texture shape and sliding direction play important roles in reciprocating sliding contacts, which influence average friction forces greatly. This research can help to design textured surfaces to improve tribological behaviors in nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts.

  9. Two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ruiting; Liu, Geng; Liu, Tianxiang

    2016-04-01

    Detailed behaviors of nanoscale textured surfaces during the reciprocating sliding contacts are still unknown although they are widely used in mechanical components to improve tribological characteristics. The current research of sliding contacts of textured surfaces mainly focuses on the experimental studies, while the cost is too high. Molecular dynamics(MD) simulation is widely used in the studies of nanoscale single-pass sliding contacts, but the CPU cost of MD simulation is also too high to simulate the reciprocating sliding contacts. In this paper, employing multiscale method which couples molecular dynamics simulation and finite element method, two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces are investigated. Four textured surfaces with different texture shapes are designed, and a rigid cylindrical tip is used to slide on these textured surfaces. For different textured surfaces, average potential energies and average friction forces of the corresponding sliding processes are analyzed. The analyzing results show that "running-in" stages are different for each texture, and steady friction processes are discovered for textured surfaces II, III and IV. Texture shape and sliding direction play important roles in reciprocating sliding contacts, which influence average friction forces greatly. This research can help to design textured surfaces to improve tribological behaviors in nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts.

  10. Recognition methods for 3D textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cula, Oana G.; Dana, Kristin J.

    2001-06-01

    Texture as a surface representation is the subject of a wide body of computer vision and computer graphics literature. While texture is always associated with a form of repetition in the image, the repeating quantity may vary. The texture may be a color or albedo variation as in a checkerboard, a paisley print or zebra stripes. Very often in real-world scenes, texture is instead due to a surface height variation, e.g. pebbles, gravel, foliage and any rough surface. Such surfaces are referred to here as 3D textured surfaces. Standard texture recognition algorithms are not appropriate for 3D textured surfaces because the appearance of these surfaces changes in a complex manner with viewing direction and illumination direction. Recent methods have been developed for recognition of 3D textured surfaces using a database of surfaces observed under varied imaging parameters. One of these methods is based on 3D textons obtained using K-means clustering of multiscale feature vectors. Another method uses eigen-analysis originally developed for appearance-based object recognition. In this work we develop a hybrid approach that employs both feature grouping and dimensionality reduction. The method is tested using the Columbia-Utrecht texture database and provides excellent recognition rates. The method is compared with existing recognition methods for 3D textured surfaces. A direct comparison is facilitated by empirical recognition rates from the same texture data set. The current method has key advantages over existing methods including requiring less prior information on both the training and novel images.

  11. Texture, shape and context for automatic target detection and classification in spectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazel, Geoffrey Glenn

    This dissertation addresses the detection and classification of man-made objects, or targets, in spectral imagery. The exploitation of spectral texture, object shape, spatial context, and temporal context for detection and classification are examined. Several data collection and demonstration programs are described. The Dark HORSE 1 (DH1) hyperspectral detection experiment is detailed. DH1 represents the first demonstration of real-time autonomous target detection and cuing from hyperspectral imagery. The Daedalus and SEBASS sensors, whose data are used throughout the dissertation, are discussed. The use of multivariate Gauss-Markov random fields (MGMRFs) to model spectral texture is studied. New parameter estimation, spectral texture segmentation and anomaly detection algorithms are developed based on an unrestricted first-order isotropic MGMRF. The first demonstration of this model for spectral texture segmentation and anomaly detection in spectral imagery is described. The new algorithms yield segmentation and anomaly detection results superior to the previously available Gaussian spectral clustering (GSC). The influence of parameter estimation method and the number of segments is quantified. Stochastic boundary unmixing, a novel detection approach utilizing scene segmentation, spatial context, and linear spectral mixing is developed. A novel automatic target classifier that exploits shape and spectral characteristics is demonstrated. The classifier uses GSC and competitive region growing to extract spatial and spectral object features that are classified by an artificial neural network (ANN). Discrimination between multiple object classes including excellent discrimination between natural and man-made objects is demonstrated. The first reported demonstration of object level change detection (OLCD) in spectral imagery is discussed. This method uses anomaly detection, segmentation and competitive region growth to find anomalous objects in multiple images of a

  12. Soil surface protection by Biocrusts: effects of functional groups on textural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concostrina-Zubiri, Laura; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Martínez, Isabel; Flores Flores, José Luis; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-04-01

    In drylands, where vegetation cover is commonly scarce, soil surface is prone to wind and water soil erosion, with the subsequent loss of topsoil structure and chemical properties. These processes are even more pronounced in ecosystems subjected to extra erosive forces, such as grasslands and rangelands that support livestock production. However, some of the physiological and functional traits of biocrusts (i.e., complex association of cyanobacteria, lichens, mosses, fungi and soil particles) make them ideal to resist in disturbed environments and at the same time to protect soil surface from mechanical perturbations. In particular, the filaments and exudates of soil cyanobacteria and the rhizines of lichen can bind together soil particles, forming soil aggregates at the soil surface and thus enhancing soil stability. Also, they act as "biological covers" that preserve the most vulnerable soil layer from wind and runoff erosion and raindrop impact, maintaining soil structure and composition. In this work, we evaluated soil textural properties and organic matter content under different functional groups of biocrusts (i.e., cyanobacteria crust, 3 lichen species, 1 moss species) and in bare soil. In order to assess the impact of livestock trampling on soil properties and on Biocrust function, we sampled three sites conforming a disturbance gradient (low, medium and high impact sites) and a long-term livestock exclusion as control site. We found that the presence of biocrusts had little effects on soil textural properties and organic matter content in the control site, while noticeable differences were found between bare soil and soil under biocrusts (e.g., up to 16-37% higher clay content, compared to bare soil and up to 10% higher organic matter content). In addition, we found that depending on morphological traits and grazing regime, the effects of biocrusts changed along the gradient. For example, soil under the lichen Diploschistes diacapsis, with thick thallus

  13. Optimization of surface morphology and scattering properties of TCO/AIT textured glass front electrode for thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addonizio, M. L.; Fusco, L.; Antonaia, A.; Cominale, F.; Usatii, I.

    2015-12-01

    Aluminium induced texture (AIT) method has been used for obtaining highly textured glass substrate suitable for silicon based thin film solar cell technology. Wet etch step parameters of AIT process have been varied and effect of different etchants and different etching times on morphological and optical properties has been analyzed. The resulting morphology features (shape, size distribution, inclination angle) have been optimized in order to obtain the best scattering properties. ZnO:Ga (GZO) films have been deposited by sputtering technique on AIT-processed glass. Two different ZnO surface morphologies have been obtained, strongly depending on the underlying glass substrate morphology induced by different etching times. Very rough and porous texture (σrms ∼ 150 nm) was obtained on glass etched 2 min showing cauliflower-like structure, whereas a softer texture (σrms ∼ 78 nm) was obtained on glass etched 7 min giving wider and smoother U-shaped craters. The effect of different glass textures on optical confinement has been tested in amorphous silicon based p-i-n devices. Devices fabricated on GZO/high textured glass showed a quantum efficiency enhancement due to both an effective light trapping phenomenon and an effective anti-reflective optical behaviour. Short etching time produce smaller cavities (<1 μm) with deep U-shape characterized by high roughness, high inclination angle and low autocorrelation length. This surface morphology promoted a large light scattering phenomenon, as evidenced by haze value and by angular resolved scattering (ARS) behaviour, into a large range of diffraction angles, giving high probability of effective light trapping inside a PV device.

  14. Textured surface identification in noisy color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celenk, Mehmet

    1996-06-01

    Automatic identification of textured surfaces is essential in many imaging applications such as image data compression and scene recognition. In these applications, a vision system is required to detect and identify irregular textures in the noisy color images. This work proposes a method for texture field characterization based on the local textural features. We first divide a given color image into n multiplied by n local windows and extract textural features in each window independently. In this step, the size of a window should be small enough so that each window can include only two texture fields. Separation of texture areas in a local window is first carried out by the Otsu or Kullback threshold selection technique on three color components separately. The 3-D class separation is then performed using the Fisher discriminant. The result of local texture classification is combined by the K-means clustering algorithm. The texture fields detected in a window are characterized by their mean vectors and an element-to-set membership relation. We have experimented with the local feature extraction part of the method using a color image of irregular textures. Results show that the method is effective for capturing the local textural features.

  15. Relation between Molecular Shape and the Morphology of Self-Assembling Aggregates: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Vácha, Robert; Frenkel, Daan

    2011-01-01

    Proteins can aggregate in a wide variety of structures, both compact and extended. We present simulations of a coarse-grained anisotropic model that reproduce many of the experimentally observed aggregate structures. Conversely, all structures predicted by our model have experimental counterparts (ribbons, multistranded fibrils, and vesicles). The model we use is that of a rodlike particle with an attractive (hydrophobic) stripe on its side. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that aggregate morphologies crucially depend on two parameters. The first one is the width of the attractive stripe and the second one is a presence or absence of attractive interactions at the particle ends. These results provide us with a generic insight into the relation between the shape of protein-protein interaction potential and the morphology of protein aggregates. PMID:21943424

  16. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  17. On Frictional Forces between the Finger and a Textured Surface during Active Touch.

    PubMed

    Janko, Marco; Primerano, Richard; Visell, Yon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated forces felt by a bare finger in sliding contact with a textured surface, and how they depend on properties of the surface and contact interaction. Prior research has shed light on haptic texture perception. Nevertheless, how texture-produced forces depend on the properties of a touched object or the way that it is touched is less clear. To address this, we designed an apparatus to accurately measure contact forces between a sliding finger and a textured surface. We fabricated textured surfaces, and measured spatial variations in forces produced as subjects explored the surfaces with a bare finger. We analyzed variations in these force signals, and their dependence on object geometry and contact parameters. We observed a number of phenomena, including transient stick-slip behavior, nonlinearities, phase variations, and large force fluctuations, in the form of aperiodic signal components that proved difficult to model for fine surfaces. Moreover, metrics such as total harmonic distortion and normalized variance decreased as the spatial scale of the stimuli increased. The results of this study suggest that surface geometry and contact parameters are insufficient to account for force production during such interactions. Moreover, the results shed light on perceptual challenges solved by the haptic system during active touch sensing of surface texture. PMID:26685262

  18. Strain Partitioning and Crystallographic Textures of Experimentally Deformed Olivine + Orthopyroxene Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, M.; Cooper, R. F.

    2005-12-01

    The plastic deformation of polycrystalline rocks incorporates the grain matrix deformation of the individual grains (via chemical diffusion and/or dislocation propagation) acting in kinetic series with inter-grain sliding along grain- and phase-boundaries. In a polyphase aggregate where multiple types of interfaces exist, plastic deformation necessarily leads to strain partitioning and phase separation predicated on the relative effective viscosities of grain- and phase-boundaries. This segregation is sensitive both to lithology and stress, and manifests itself both in the grain-scale microstructures and in the lattice preferred orientations of the component phases. We have deformed fine-grained (~5 μm) aggregates of Balsam Gap dunite + Bamble, Norway orthopyroxene in triaxial compression and in (nominally) simple shear to investigate textural development in polyphase mantle rocks. Constant-load triaxial compression tests were conducted at P=300 MPa, T=1200°C in a Paterson-type gas medium apparatus. Simple shear tests were conducted at P=1.6 GPa and T=1200°C in a Griggs apparatus using a molten-salt cell at strain rates of 10-5s-1 to 10-4s-1. Samples were dried for 12 h (CO:CO2 buffer at 950-1000°C) prior to sintering to ensure that these experiments were conducted in an anhydrous environment. No melt was produced during these experiments. Constant-load tests, conducted over the range of strain-rates used in the constant displacement-rate shear experiments, on a 50:50 mixture of olivine and orthopyroxene, reveal a stress exponent of 1.5±0.2. Similar experiments conducted on a 35:65 mixture of olivine and orthopyroxene reveal a stress exponent of 2.0±0.2. The fine grain size of the aggregates and the small stresses (<15 MPa) used in the creep tests would seem to preclude significant contribution of dislocation motion to the rheology. Samples composed of 35 vol% orthopyroxene deformed in shear at a constant strain-rate of 10-5s-1 develop a pronounced olivine

  19. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2016-07-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  20. Modeling and rendering realistic textures from unconstrained tool-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Culbertson, Heather; Unwin, Juliette; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J

    2014-01-01

    Texture gives real objects an important perceptual dimension that is largely missing from virtual haptic interactions due to limitations of standard modeling and rendering approaches. This paper presents a set of methods for creating a haptic texture model from tool-surface interaction data recorded by a human in a natural and unconstrained manner. The recorded high-frequency tool acceleration signal, which varies as a function of normal force and scanning speed, is segmented and modeled as a piecewise autoregressive (AR) model. Each AR model is labeled with the source segment's median force and speed values and stored in a Delaunay triangulation to create a model set for a given texture. We use these texture model sets to render synthetic vibration signals in real time as a user interacts with our TexturePad system, which includes a Wacom tablet and a stylus augmented with a Haptuator. We ran a human-subject study with two sets of ten participants to evaluate the realism of our virtual textures and the strengths and weaknesses of this approach. The results indicated that our virtual textures accurately capture and recreate the roughness of real textures, but other modeling and rendering approaches are required to completely match surface hardness and slipperiness. PMID:25248220

  1. Shape and Size of Microfine Aggregates: X-ray Microcomputed Tomgraphy vs. Laser Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogan,S.; Garboczi, E.; Fowler, D.

    2007-01-01

    Microfine rock aggregates, formed naturally or in a crushing process, pass a No. 200 ASTM sieve, so have at least two orthogonal principal dimensions less than 75 {mu}m, the sieve opening size. In this paper, for the first time, we capture true 3-D shape and size data of several different types of microfine aggregates, using X-ray microcomputed tomography ({mu}CT) with a voxel size of 2 {mu}m. This information is used to generate shape analyses of various kinds. Particle size distributions are also generated from the {mu}CT data and quantitatively compared to the results of laser diffraction, which is the leading method for measuring particle size distributions of sub-millimeter size particles. By taking into account the actual particle shape, the differences between {mu}CT and laser diffraction can be qualitatively explained.

  2. Biomimetic control over size, shape and aggregation in magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerdijk, Nico

    2013-03-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a widespread magnetic iron oxide encountered in both geological and biomineralizing systems, which also has many technological applications, e.g. in ferrofluids, inks, magnetic data storage materials and as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. As its magnetic properties depend largely on the size and shape of the crystals, control over crystal morphology is an important aspect in the application of magnetite nanoparticles, both in biology and synthetic systems. Indeed, in nature organisms such as magnetotactic bacteria demonstrate a precise control over the magnetite crystal morphology, resulting in uniform and monodisperse nanoparticles. The magnetite formation in these bacteria is believed to occur through the co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, which is also the most widely applied synthetic route in industry. Synthetic strategies to magnetite with controlled size and shape exist, but involve high temperatures and rather harsh chemical conditions. However, synthesis via co-precipitation generally yields poor control over the morphology and therefore over the magnetic properties of the obtained crystals. Here we demonstrate that by tuning the reaction kinetics we can achieve biomimetic control over the size and shape of magnetite crystals but also over their organization in solution as well as their magnetic properties. We employ amino acids-based polymers to direct the formation of magnetite in aqueous media at room temperature via both the co-precipitation and the partial oxidation method. By using 2D and 3D (cryo)TEM it is shown that acidic amino acid monomers are most effective in affecting the magnetite particle morphology. By changing the composition of the polymers we can tune the morphology, the dispersibility as well as the magnetic properties of these nanoparticles.

  3. A new texture and shape based technique for improving meningioma classification.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Kiran; Arooj, Arshia; Majeed, Hammad

    2014-11-01

    Over the past decade, computer-aided diagnosis is rapidly growing due to the availability of patient data, sophisticated image acquisition tools and advancement in image processing and machine learning algorithms. Meningiomas are the tumors of brain and spinal cord. They account for 20% of all the brain tumors. Meningioma subtype classification involves the classification of benign meningioma into four major subtypes: meningothelial, fibroblastic, transitional, and psammomatous. Under the microscope, the histology images of these four subtypes show a variety of textural and structural characteristics. High intraclass and low interclass variabilities in meningioma subtypes make it an extremely complex classification problem. A number of techniques have been proposed for meningioma subtype classification with varying performances on different subtypes. Most of these techniques employed wavelet packet transforms for textural features extraction and analysis of meningioma histology images. In this article, a hybrid classification technique based on texture and shape characteristics is proposed for the classification of meningioma subtypes. Meningothelial and fibroblastic subtypes are classified on the basis of nuclei shapes while grey-level co-occurrence matrix textural features are used to train a multilayer perceptron for the classification of transitional and psammomatous subtypes. On the whole, average classification accuracy of 92.50% is achieved through the proposed hybrid classifier; which to the best of our knowledge is the highest. PMID:25060536

  4. Effect of regular surface textures generated by laser on tribological behavior of Si3N4/TiC ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Youqiang; Deng, Jianxin; Wu, Ze; Cheng, Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    Two kinds of regular micro-grooved textures with different geometric characteristics were fabricated on the surfaces of Si3N4/TiC ceramics by Nd:YAG laser; friction and wear tests were carried out to investigate the tribological properties of these textured ceramics in unlubricated and MoS2 lubricated conditions. The wear surfaces of the textured ceramics and the balls were examined by SEM and the possible friction reduction and wear resistant mechanisms were discussed. The results show that the friction coefficient of the textured ceramics was reduced compared with the smooth ceramics among all the experiments, the wavy grooves are the most effective in the friction-reduction among the patterns investigated, and the wear life of textured ceramics can be increased in MoS2 lubricated condition. Furthermore, it is observed that the textured ceramics produce more abrasive wear on the ball specimens in unlubricated friction, while it reduces the wear of balls in MoS2 lubricated condition. The main effect mechanism of textures is to capture debris and reduces the contact area of couples in unlubricated condition, and increase lubricant supply by reservoir creation and form the continued lubricating film on the surfaces of spacing between the textures in MoS2 solid lubricated condition.

  5. Influence of Surface Texture and Roughness of Softer and Harder Counter Materials on Friction During Sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Pradeep L.; Kishore; Kailas, Satish V.; Lovell, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Surface texture influences friction during sliding contact conditions. In the present investigation, the effect of surface texture and roughness of softer and harder counter materials on friction during sliding was analyzed using an inclined scratch testing system. In the experiments, two test configurations, namely (a) steel balls against aluminum alloy flats of different surface textures and (b) aluminum alloy pins against steel flats of different surface textures, are utilized. The surface textures were classified into unidirectionally ground, 8-ground, and randomly polished. For a given texture, the roughness of the flat surfaces was varied using grinding or polishing methods. Optical profilometer and scanning electron microscope were used to characterize the contact surfaces before and after the experiments. Experimental results showed that the surface textures of both harder and softer materials are important in controlling the frictional behavior. The softer material surface textures showed larger variations in friction between ground and polished surfaces. However, the harder material surface textures demonstrated a better control over friction among the ground surfaces. Although the effect of roughness on friction was less significant when compared to textures, the harder material roughness showed better correlations when compared to the softer material roughness.

  6. DDA Computations of Porous Aggregates with Forsterite Crystals: Effects of Crystal Shape and Crystal Mass Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lindsay, Sean S.; Harker, David; Woodward, Charles; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla

    2015-08-01

    Porous aggregate grains are commonly found in cometary dust samples and are needed to model cometary IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Models for thermal emissions from comets require two forms of silicates: amorphous and crystalline. The dominant crystal resonances observed in comet SEDs are from Forsterite (Mg2SiO4). The mass fractions that are crystalline span a large range from 0.0 ≤ fcrystal ≤ 0.74. Radial transport models that predict the enrichment of the outer disk (>25 AU at 1E6 yr) by inner disk materials (crystals) are challenged to yield the highend-range of cometary crystal mass fractions. However, in current thermal models, Forsterite crystals are not incorporated into larger aggregate grains but instead only are considered as discrete crystals. A complicating factor is that Forsterite crystals with rectangular shapes better fit the observed spectral resonances in wavelength (11.0-11.15 μm, 16, 19, 23.5, 27, and 33 μm), feature asymmetry and relative height (Lindley et al. 2013) than spherically or elliptically shaped crystals. We present DDA-DDSCAT computations of IR absorptivities (Qabs) of 3 μm-radii porous aggregates with 0.13 ≤ fcrystal ≤ 0.35 and with polyhedral-shaped Forsterite crystals. We can produce crystal resonances with similar appearance to the observed resonances of comet Hale-Bopp. Also, a lower mass fraction of crystals in aggregates can produce the same spectral contrast as a higher mass fraction of discrete crystals; the 11µm and 23 µm crystalline resonances appear amplified when crystals are incorporated into aggregates composed otherwise of spherically shaped amorphous Fe-Mg olivines and pyroxenes. We show that the optical properties of a porous aggregate is not linear combination of its monomers, so aggregates need to be computed. We discuss the consequence of lowering comet crystal mass fractions by modeling IR SEDs with aggregates with crystals, and the implications for radial transport models of our

  7. Systems and Methods of Laser Texturing of Material Surfaces and Their Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Mool C. (Inventor); Nayak, Barada K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The surface of a material is textured and by exposing the surface to pulses from an ultrafast laser. The laser treatment causes pillars to form on the treated surface. These pillars provide for greater light absorption. Texturing and crystallization can be carried out as a single step process. The crystallization of the material provides for higher electric conductivity and changes in optical and electronic properties of the material. The method may be performed in vacuum or a gaseous environment. The gaseous environment may aid in texturing and/or modifying physical and chemical properties of the surfaces. This method may be used on various material surfaces, such as semiconductors, metals and their alloys, ceramics, polymers, glasses, composites, as well as crystalline, nanocrystalline, polycrystalline, microcrystalline, and amorphous phases.

  8. Effects of Polyacrylamide Molecular Weight, Soil Texture and Electrolyte Concentration on Drainable Porosity and Aggregate Stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The literature reports on the intricate relations between soil type and molecular weight (MW) of polyacrylamide (PAM) with respect to PAM efficacy as a soil conditioner. This relation may depend on the ability of PAM to penetrate into aggregates and thus stabilize both outer and inner aggregate surf...

  9. Microstructured block copolymer surfaces for control of microbe capture and aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ryan R; Shubert, Katherine R; Morrell, Jennifer L.; Lokitz, Bradley S; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T

    2014-01-01

    The capture and arrangement of surface-associated microbes is influenced by biochemical and physical properties of the substrate. In this report, we develop lectin-functionalized substrates containing patterned, three-dimensional polymeric structures of varied shapes and densities and use these to investigate the effects of topology and spatial confinement on lectin-mediated microbe capture. Films of poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-block-4,4-dimethyl-2-vinylazlactone (PGMA-b-PVDMA) were patterned on silicon surfaces into line or square grid patterns with 5 m wide features and varied edge spacing. The patterned films had three-dimensional geometries with 900 nm film thickness. After surface functionalization with wheat germ agglutinin, the size of Pseudomonas fluorescens aggregates captured was dependent on the pattern dimensions. Line patterns with edge spacing of 5 m or less led to the capture of individual microbes with minimal formation of aggregates, while grid patterns with the same spacing also captured individual microbes with further reduction in aggregation. Both geometries allowed for increases in aggregate size distribution with increased in edge spacing. These engineered surfaces combine spatial confinement with affinity-based microbe capture based on exopolysaccharide content to control the degree of microbe aggregation, and can also be used as a platform to investigate intercellular interactions and biofilm formation in microbial populations of controlled sizes.

  10. Diamond-shaped small-angle scattering and the deformation of fibrous textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Sanjeeva Murthy, N.

    2009-03-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering from materials with fibrous texture are typically characterized by intense diamond-shaped equatorial streaks. Single family of elongated voids aligned along the fiber axis modeled as ellipsoids with a certain orientation distribution yield a fan-like 2D pattern. The diamond-shaped patterns from fibers, such as polyesters, polyamide 6 and polyacrylonitrile, could not be explained with such single class of misoriented voids. Analysis of the orientation distribution and the isointensity contours suggest that there are at least two distinct entities that contribute to this equatorial scattering. Voids with larger cross section (˜ 20 nm dia.), which are likely to be in the interfibrillar regions, give rise to low-q contours with smaller eccentricities and respond poorly to deformation. Entities with smaller cross section (˜ 5 nm dia.), which are likely to be in the intrafibrillar regions, give rise to high-q contours with larger eccentricities and respond to deformation in the same way as crystalline domains. The scattering from these objects appear as two distinct families of elliptical contours with different eccentricities, and the observed diamond-shaped scattering results from the superposition of these two sets of contours.

  11. Energetic atomic and ionic oxygen textured optical surfaces for blood glucose monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and the resulting product thereof comprising a solid light-conducting fiber with a point of attachment and having a textured surface site consisting a textured distal end prepared by being placed in a vacuum and then subjected to directed hyperthermal beams comprising oxygen ions or atoms. The textured distal end comprises cones or pillars that are spaced upon from each other by less than 1 micron and are extremely suitable to prevent cellular components of blood from entering the valleys between the cones or pillars so as to effectively separate the cellular components in the blood from interfering with optical sensing of the glucose concentration for diabetic patients.

  12. Use of Textured Surfaces to Mitigate Sliding Friction and Wear of Lubricated and Non-Lubricated Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2012-03-01

    If properly employed, the placement of three-dimensional feature patterns, also referred to as textures, on relatively-moving, load-bearing surfaces can be beneficial to their friction and wear characteristics. For example, geometric patterns can function as lubricant supply channels or depressions in which to trap debris. They can also alter lubricant flow in a manner that produces thicker load-bearing films locally. Considering the area occupied by solid areas and spaces, textures also change the load distribution on surfaces. At least ten different attributes of textures can be specified, and their combinations offer wide latitude in surface engineering. By employing directional machining and grinding procedures, texturing has been used on bearings and seals for well over a half century, and the size scales of texturing vary widely. This report summarizes past work on the texturing of load-bearing surfaces, including past research on laser surface dimpling of ceramics done at ORNL. Textured surfaces generally show most pronounced effects when they are used in conformal or nearly conformal contacts, like that in face seals. Combining textures with other forms of surface modification and lubrication methods can offer additional benefits in surface engineering for tribology. As the literature and past work at ORNL shows, texturing does not always provide benefits. Rather, the selected pattern and arrangement of features must be matched to characteristics of the proposed application, bearing materials, and lubricants.

  13. Microstructure and Texture of Y123 Ceramics after Hot Deformation by Torsion Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imayev, M. F.; Kabirova, D. B.; Pavlova, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    The method of EBSD analysis has been used to investigate the microstructure and texture of the YBa2Cu3O7-х (Y123) ceramics, deformed by hot torsion under quasi-hydrostatic pressure. It is shown that the local average grain size does not depend on the distance to the center of the sample. The texture along a radius of the samples is inhomogeneous. The presence of a ring-shaped region with very weak texture has been detected both in a sample with strong texture and in a sample with weak average texture.

  14. The effect of surface texture on evaporation, infiltration and storage properties of paved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mansell, M; Rollet, F

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns an investigation of evaporation, infiltration and detention storage on paved surfaces and the effect of surface texture and microtopography on these processes. A numerical model has been developed which represents the evaporation and infiltration processes on a nominally impervious surface as well as the depression storage due to the surface microtopography. The model was applied to semi-randomly generated surfaces and the results show the relationship between surface microtopography and initial storage losses. PMID:19587404

  15. Generation of digital textured surface models from hologram recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Susanne; Thelen, Andrea; Hirsch, Sven; Hering, Peter

    2007-04-01

    Digital sensors and fast digital image processing facilitate the use of pulsed holography for 3D surface measurement of moving objects. The real image of a hologram is reconstructed optically. A sequence of high-resolution projection images of the real image with a varying distance to the hologram is recorded digitally. Focus detection in this image sequence by digital image processing yields the shape of the recorded object. The image intensity serves as a precise pixel-matching texture. An application of this concept is the generation of a textured 3D computer model of a facial surface from a portrait hologram.

  16. α- and γ-mangostin cause shape changes, inhibit aggregation and induce cytolysis of rat platelets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingqiu; Park, Jung-Min; Chang, Kyung-Hwa; Chin, Young-Won; Lee, Moo-Yeol

    2015-10-01

    α- and γ-mangostin are natural xanthones isolated from mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) and the major constituents responsible for the plant's diverse biological activities. In this study, the effects of α- and γ-mangostin on platelets were investigated based on their possible antiplatelet activity. Treatment of isolated platelets with α-mangostin resulted in attenuation of platelet aggregatory response to collagen, thrombin or ADP. Such antiaggregatory effects were concentration-dependent in ranges of 1-10 μM. Interestingly, α-mangostin alone induced shape changes in platelets at the same concentration, and higher levels, 25 and 50 μM caused platelet lysis. Similarly, γ-mangostin induced shape changes and inhibited aggregation at 2.5-25 μM, while 50 and 100 μM γ-mangostin exhibited cytotoxicity. Platelet shape change induced by α- and γ-mangostin was accompanied by increases in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. MLC phosphorylation and subsequent shape changes were prevented by pretreatment with Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632, but not by the intracellular Ca(2+) chelating with BAPTA-AM and extracellular Ca(2+) removal. Cytolysis by both α- and γ-mangostin was abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Taken together, α- and γ-mangostin have differential effects on platelets depending on their concentration, which includes inducing shape change, inhibiting aggregation and causing cytolysis. Platelet shape change is attributed to stimulation of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway, while platelet lysis is presumably mediated by extracellular Ca(2+) influx. These results suggest that mangosteen consumption may have potential platelet effects, although the in vivo or clinical consequences have yet to be assessed. PMID:26343955

  17. Aesthetics by Numbers: Links between Perceived Texture Qualities and Computed Visual Texture Properties.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Richard H A H; Haak, Koen V; Thumfart, Stefan; Renken, Remco; Henson, Brian; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2016-01-01

    Our world is filled with texture. For the human visual system, this is an important source of information for assessing environmental and material properties. Indeed-and presumably for this reason-the human visual system has regions dedicated to processing textures. Despite their abundance and apparent relevance, only recently the relationships between texture features and high-level judgments have captured the interest of mainstream science, despite long-standing indications for such relationships. In this study, we explore such relationships, as these might be used to predict perceived texture qualities. This is relevant, not only from a psychological/neuroscience perspective, but also for more applied fields such as design, architecture, and the visual arts. In two separate experiments, observers judged various qualities of visual textures such as beauty, roughness, naturalness, elegance, and complexity. Based on factor analysis, we find that in both experiments, ~75% of the variability in the judgments could be explained by a two-dimensional space, with axes that are closely aligned to the beauty and roughness judgments. That a two-dimensional judgment space suffices to capture most of the variability in the perceived texture qualities suggests that observers use a relatively limited set of internal scales on which to base various judgments, including aesthetic ones. Finally, for both of these judgments, we determined the relationship with a large number of texture features computed for each of the texture stimuli. We find that the presence of lower spatial frequencies, oblique orientations, higher intensity variation, higher saturation, and redness correlates with higher beauty ratings. Features that captured image intensity and uniformity correlated with roughness ratings. Therefore, a number of computational texture features are predictive of these judgments. This suggests that perceived texture qualities-including the aesthetic appreciation-are sufficiently

  18. Aesthetics by Numbers: Links between Perceived Texture Qualities and Computed Visual Texture Properties

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Richard H. A. H.; Haak, Koen V.; Thumfart, Stefan; Renken, Remco; Henson, Brian; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2016-01-01

    Our world is filled with texture. For the human visual system, this is an important source of information for assessing environmental and material properties. Indeed—and presumably for this reason—the human visual system has regions dedicated to processing textures. Despite their abundance and apparent relevance, only recently the relationships between texture features and high-level judgments have captured the interest of mainstream science, despite long-standing indications for such relationships. In this study, we explore such relationships, as these might be used to predict perceived texture qualities. This is relevant, not only from a psychological/neuroscience perspective, but also for more applied fields such as design, architecture, and the visual arts. In two separate experiments, observers judged various qualities of visual textures such as beauty, roughness, naturalness, elegance, and complexity. Based on factor analysis, we find that in both experiments, ~75% of the variability in the judgments could be explained by a two-dimensional space, with axes that are closely aligned to the beauty and roughness judgments. That a two-dimensional judgment space suffices to capture most of the variability in the perceived texture qualities suggests that observers use a relatively limited set of internal scales on which to base various judgments, including aesthetic ones. Finally, for both of these judgments, we determined the relationship with a large number of texture features computed for each of the texture stimuli. We find that the presence of lower spatial frequencies, oblique orientations, higher intensity variation, higher saturation, and redness correlates with higher beauty ratings. Features that captured image intensity and uniformity correlated with roughness ratings. Therefore, a number of computational texture features are predictive of these judgments. This suggests that perceived texture qualities—including the aesthetic appreciation

  19. Observations of Nuclear Explosive Melt Glass Textures and Surface Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Kersting, A B; Smith, D K

    2006-01-17

    This memo report summarizes our current knowledge of the appearance of melt glass formed and subsequently deposited in the subsurface after an underground nuclear test. We have collected archived pictures and melt glass samples from a variety of underground nuclear tests that were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the U.S. nuclear testing program. The purpose of our work is to better determine the actual variation in texture and surface area of the melt glass material. This study is motivated by our need to better determine the rate at which the radionuclides incorporated in the melt glass are released into the subsurface under saturated and partially saturated conditions. The rate at which radionuclides are released from the glass is controlled by the dissolution rate of the glass. Glass dissolution, in turn, is a strong function of surface area, glass composition, water temperature and water chemistry (Bourcier, 1994). This work feeds into an ongoing experimental effort to measure the change in surface area of analog glasses as a function of dissolution rate. The conclusions drawn from this study help bound the variation in the textures of analog glass samples needed for the experimental studies. The experimental work is a collaboration between Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Earth and Environmental Sciences-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (EES-LLNL). On March 4, 1999 we hosted a meeting at LLNL to present and discuss our findings. The names of the attendees appear at the end of this memo. This memo report further serves to outline and summarize the conclusions drawn from our meeting. The United States detonated over 800 underground nuclear tests at the NTS between 1951 and 1992. In an effort to evaluate the performance of the nuclear tests, drill-back operations were carried out to retrieve samples of rock in the vicinity of the nuclear test. Drill-back samples were sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore

  20. How Do the Size, Charge and Shape of Nanoparticles Affect Amyloid β Aggregation on Brain Lipid Bilayer?

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuna; Park, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyojin; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the effect of the size, shape, and surface charge of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregation on a total brain lipid-based supported lipid bilayer (brain SLB), a fluid platform that facilitates Aβ-AuNP aggregation process. We found that larger AuNPs induce large and amorphous aggregates on the brain SLB, whereas smaller AuNPs induce protofibrillar Aβ structures. Positively charged AuNPs were more strongly attracted to Aβ than negatively charged AuNPs, and the stronger interactions between AuNPs and Aβ resulted in fewer β-sheets and more random coil structures. We also compared spherical AuNPs, gold nanorods (AuNRs), and gold nanocubes (AuNCs) to study the effect of nanoparticle shape on Aβ aggregation on the brain SLB. Aβ was preferentially bound to the long axis of AuNRs and fewer fibrils were formed whereas all the facets of AuNCs interacted with Aβ to produce the fibril networks. Finally, it was revealed that different nanostructures induce different cytotoxicity on neuroblastoma cells, and, overall, smaller Aβ aggregates induce higher cytotoxicity. The results offer insight into the roles of NPs and brain SLB in Aβ aggregation on the cell membrane and can facilitate the understanding of Aβ-nanostructure co-aggregation mechanism and tuning Aβ aggregate structures. PMID:26782664

  1. How Do the Size, Charge and Shape of Nanoparticles Affect Amyloid β Aggregation on Brain Lipid Bilayer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yuna; Park, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyojin; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the effect of the size, shape, and surface charge of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregation on a total brain lipid-based supported lipid bilayer (brain SLB), a fluid platform that facilitates Aβ-AuNP aggregation process. We found that larger AuNPs induce large and amorphous aggregates on the brain SLB, whereas smaller AuNPs induce protofibrillar Aβ structures. Positively charged AuNPs were more strongly attracted to Aβ than negatively charged AuNPs, and the stronger interactions between AuNPs and Aβ resulted in fewer β-sheets and more random coil structures. We also compared spherical AuNPs, gold nanorods (AuNRs), and gold nanocubes (AuNCs) to study the effect of nanoparticle shape on Aβ aggregation on the brain SLB. Aβ was preferentially bound to the long axis of AuNRs and fewer fibrils were formed whereas all the facets of AuNCs interacted with Aβ to produce the fibril networks. Finally, it was revealed that different nanostructures induce different cytotoxicity on neuroblastoma cells, and, overall, smaller Aβ aggregates induce higher cytotoxicity. The results offer insight into the roles of NPs and brain SLB in Aβ aggregation on the cell membrane and can facilitate the understanding of Aβ-nanostructure co-aggregation mechanism and tuning Aβ aggregate structures.

  2. Comparison of the predictive power of beef surface wavelet texture features at high and low magnification.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Patrick; Sun, Da-Wen; Allen, Paul

    2009-07-01

    Beef longissimus dorsi surface texture is an indicator used in predicting beef palatability by expert graders. Computer vision systems have previously used imaging at normal view to develop surface texture features with some success. Good models of beef overall acceptability using imaging at high magnification have been recently developed. As a comparison the same surface texture features were computed from the corresponding images at normal view and used to model overall acceptability. Both sets of texture features were also combined with muscle colour and marbling features and used to model overall acceptability. Models using texture features alone were more successful at normal modality. However colour and marbling features combined much better with texture features at high modality to yield the most accurate model of overall acceptability (r(2)=0.93). Accurate Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) models were computed at both modalities with and without inclusion of colour and marbling features. Addition of squared terms to the models failed to improve accuracy. PMID:20416713

  3. Differentiation of salivary agglutinin-mediated adherence and aggregation of mutans streptococci by use of monoclonal antibodies against the major surface adhesin P1.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, L J; Piacentini, D A; Crowley, P J; Oyston, P C; Bleiweis, A S

    1992-01-01

    The ability to adhere to salivary agglutinin-coated hydroxyapatite beads and to aggregate in the presence of fluid-phase salivary agglutinin was tested by using 25 isolates of mutants streptococci representing eight serotypes. Both adherence and aggregation activity correlated with expression of the Mr-185,000 cell surface antigen P1 on Streptococcus mutans serotype c, e, and f strains. In addition, it was shown that the P1 molecule itself served as the adhesin of S. mutans serotype c, since adherence was significantly inhibited by the presence of recombinant-specified Mr-150,000 P1. The ability of S. sobrinus strains to adhere or aggregate did not correlate with expression of the P1 cross-reactive antigen SpaA. There was also evidence for interaction with salivary agglutinin, as manifested by aggregation but not adherence of S. rattus serotype b, which does not express a P1 cross-reactive antigen. To understand the interaction of P1 with salivary agglutinin at the molecular level, a panel of 11 anti-P1 monoclonal antibodies was tested for inhibitory activity in adherence and aggregation inhibition assays. Overlapping, but not identical, subsets of monoclonal antibodies were found to inhibit adherence and aggregation, indicating that the interactions of P1 with salivary agglutinin which mediate these two phenomena are different. The localization of functional domains of P1 which may mediate the aggregation and adherence reactions is discussed. PMID:1541515

  4. Retrieval and Mapping of Soil Texture Based on Land Surface Diurnal Temperature Range Data from MODIS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, De-Cai; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Zhao, Ming-Song; Pan, Xian-Zhang; Zhao, Yu-Guo; Li, De-Cheng; Macmillan, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the direct retrieval of soil properties, including soil texture, using remotely sensed images. However, few have considered how soil properties influence dynamic changes in remote images or how soil processes affect the characteristics of the spectrum. This study investigated a new method for mapping regional soil texture based on the hypothesis that the rate of change of land surface temperature is related to soil texture, given the assumption of similar starting soil moisture conditions. The study area was a typical flat area in the Yangtze-Huai River Plain, East China. We used the widely available land surface temperature product of MODIS as the main data source. We analyzed the relationships between the content of different particle soil size fractions at the soil surface and land surface day temperature, night temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) during three selected time periods. These periods occurred after rainfalls and between the previous harvest and the subsequent autumn sowing in 2004, 2007 and 2008. Then, linear regression models were developed between the land surface DTR and sand (> 0.05 mm), clay (< 0.001 mm) and physical clay (< 0.01 mm) contents. The models for each day were used to estimate soil texture. The spatial distribution of soil texture from the studied area was mapped based on the model with the minimum RMSE. A validation dataset produced error estimates for the predicted maps of sand, clay and physical clay, expressed as RMSE of 10.69%, 4.57%, and 12.99%, respectively. The absolute error of the predictions is largely influenced by variations in land cover. Additionally, the maps produced by the models illustrate the natural spatial continuity of soil texture. This study demonstrates the potential for digitally mapping regional soil texture variations in flat areas using readily available MODIS data. PMID:26090852

  5. Retrieval and Mapping of Soil Texture Based on Land Surface Diurnal Temperature Range Data from MODIS.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Cai; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Zhao, Ming-Song; Pan, Xian-Zhang; Zhao, Yu-Guo; Li, De-Cheng; Macmillan, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the direct retrieval of soil properties, including soil texture, using remotely sensed images. However, few have considered how soil properties influence dynamic changes in remote images or how soil processes affect the characteristics of the spectrum. This study investigated a new method for mapping regional soil texture based on the hypothesis that the rate of change of land surface temperature is related to soil texture, given the assumption of similar starting soil moisture conditions. The study area was a typical flat area in the Yangtze-Huai River Plain, East China. We used the widely available land surface temperature product of MODIS as the main data source. We analyzed the relationships between the content of different particle soil size fractions at the soil surface and land surface day temperature, night temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) during three selected time periods. These periods occurred after rainfalls and between the previous harvest and the subsequent autumn sowing in 2004, 2007 and 2008. Then, linear regression models were developed between the land surface DTR and sand (> 0.05 mm), clay (< 0.001 mm) and physical clay (< 0.01 mm) contents. The models for each day were used to estimate soil texture. The spatial distribution of soil texture from the studied area was mapped based on the model with the minimum RMSE. A validation dataset produced error estimates for the predicted maps of sand, clay and physical clay, expressed as RMSE of 10.69%, 4.57%, and 12.99%, respectively. The absolute error of the predictions is largely influenced by variations in land cover. Additionally, the maps produced by the models illustrate the natural spatial continuity of soil texture. This study demonstrates the potential for digitally mapping regional soil texture variations in flat areas using readily available MODIS data. PMID:26090852

  6. Surface roughness of MgO thin film and its critical thickness for optimal biaxial texturing by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, S.; Ibi, A.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the deposition time dependences of the in-plane grain alignment ({Delta}{phi}) and the surface roughness (w) of biaxially textured MgO thin films fabricated by ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) and found a strong correlation between them. The time evolution of the surface roughness of IBAD-MgO showed an abrupt increase at the same time corresponding to the beginning of the deterioration in {Delta}{phi}. The roughness versus thickness profiles obtained under different deposition conditions with different assisting ion-beam currents collapsed to a single curve, even though the deposition rates were significantly different in each condition. This implies that the abrupt increase in roughness occurred at the same thickness--of about 4 nm--irrespective of the deposition rate. The result also indicated that the {Delta}{phi} deterioration began with the same thickness of about 4 nm. This ''critical'' thickness of about 4 nm might be related to the completion of the crystallization of the film. Further, deposition beyond the critical thickness, therefore, became merely a homoepitaxial deposition under the ''IBAD'' condition, which was far from optimal because of the ion bombardment and low temperature (no-heating), and thus {Delta}{phi} deteriorated. Based on these considerations, we propose an approach to attain a sharp texture in a IBAD-MgO-based biaxial substrate; moreover, we demonstrated this approach using a two-step deposition process.

  7. A Combination of Shape and Texture Features for Classification of Pulmonary Nodules in Lung CT Images.

    PubMed

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Dutta, Anirvan; Garg, Mandeep; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2016-08-01

    Classification of malignant and benign pulmonary nodules is important for further treatment plan. The present work focuses on the classification of benign and malignant pulmonary nodules using support vector machine. The pulmonary nodules are segmented using a semi-automated technique, which requires only a seed point from the end user. Several shape-based, margin-based, and texture-based features are computed to represent the pulmonary nodules. A set of relevant features is determined for the efficient representation of nodules in the feature space. The proposed classification scheme is validated on a data set of 891 nodules of Lung Image Database Consortium and Image Database Resource Initiative public database. The proposed classification scheme is evaluated for three configurations such as configuration 1 (composite rank of malignancy "1" and "2" as benign and "4" and "5" as malignant), configuration 2 (composite rank of malignancy "1","2", and "3" as benign and "4" and "5" as malignant), and configuration 3 (composite rank of malignancy "1" and "2" as benign and "3","4" and "5" as malignant). The performance of the classification is evaluated in terms of area (A z) under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The A z achieved by the proposed method for configuration-1, configuration-2, and configuration-3 are 0.9505, 0.8822, and 0.8488, respectively. The proposed method outperforms the most recent technique, which depends on the manual segmentation of pulmonary nodules by a trained radiologist. PMID:26738871

  8. Genie Pro: robust image classification using shape, texture, and spectral information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Simon; Edlund, Kim; Esch-Mosher, Diana; Eads, Damian; Harvey, Neal; Brumby, Steven

    2005-06-01

    We present Genie Pro, a new software tool for image analysis produced by the ISIS (Intelligent Search in Images and Signals) group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Like the earlier GENIE tool produced by the same group, Genie Pro is a general purpose adaptive tool that derives automatic pixel classification algorithms for satellite/aerial imagery, from training input provided by a human expert. Genie Pro is a complete rewrite of our earlier work that incorporates many new ideas and concepts. In particular, the new software integrates spectral information; and spatial cues such as texture, local morphology and large-scale shape information; in a much more sophisticated way. In addition, attention has been paid to how the human expert interacts with the software: Genie Pro facilitates highly efficient training through an interactive and iterative "training dialog". Finally, the new software runs on both Linux and Windows platforms, increasing its versatility. We give detailed descriptions of the new techniques and ideas in Genie Pro, and summarize the results of a recent evaluation of the software.

  9. Interplay of model ingredients affecting aggregate shape plasticity in diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Neto, P.; Stošić, T.; Stošić, B.; Lessa, R.; Milošević, M. V.

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the combined effect of three ingredients of an aggregation model—surface tension, particle flow and particle source—representing typical characteristics of many aggregation growth processes in nature. Through extensive numerical experiments and for different underlying lattice structures we demonstrate that the location of incoming particles and their preferential direction of flow can significantly affect the resulting general shape of the aggregate, while the surface tension controls the surface roughness. Combining all three ingredients increases the aggregate shape plasticity, yielding a wider spectrum of shapes as compared to earlier works that analyzed these ingredients separately. Our results indicate that the considered combination of effects is fundamental for modeling the polymorphic growth of a wide variety of structures in confined geometries and/or in the presence of external fields, such as rocks, crystals, corals, and biominerals.

  10. Interplay of model ingredients affecting aggregate shape plasticity in diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Neto, P; Stošić, T; Stošić, B; Lessa, R; Milošević, M V

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the combined effect of three ingredients of an aggregation model--surface tension, particle flow and particle source--representing typical characteristics of many aggregation growth processes in nature. Through extensive numerical experiments and for different underlying lattice structures we demonstrate that the location of incoming particles and their preferential direction of flow can significantly affect the resulting general shape of the aggregate, while the surface tension controls the surface roughness. Combining all three ingredients increases the aggregate shape plasticity, yielding a wider spectrum of shapes as compared to earlier works that analyzed these ingredients separately. Our results indicate that the considered combination of effects is fundamental for modeling the polymorphic growth of a wide variety of structures in confined geometries and/or in the presence of external fields, such as rocks, crystals, corals, and biominerals. PMID:25122308

  11. Method for Surface Texturing Titanium Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention teaches a method of producing a textured surface upon an arbitrarily configured titanium or titanium alloy object for the purpose of improving bonding between the object and other materials such as polymer matrix composites and/or human bone for the direct in-growth of orthopaedic implants. The titanium or titanium alloy object is placed in an electrolytic cell having an ultrasonically agitated solution of sodium chloride therein whereby a pattern of uniform "pock mark" like pores or cavities are produced upon the object's surface. The process is very cost effective compared to other methods of producing rough surfaces on titanium and titanium alloy components. The surface textures produced by the present invention are etched directly into the parent metal at discrete sites separated by areas unaffected by the etching process. Bonding materials to such surface textures on titanium or titanium alloy can thus support a shear load even if adhesion of the bonding material is poor.

  12. Pool-riffle sedimentation and surface texture trends in a gravel bed stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartrand, Shawn M.; Hassan, Marwan A.; Radić, Valentina

    2015-11-01

    A 3 year field campaign was completed to investigate spatial and temporal variability of sedimentation trends for a single pool-riffle pair located in the Santa Cruz Mountains, California. Our measurements represent a range of hydrologic conditions over 11 sediment-mobilizing events. Two different statistical methods were used to explore riffle sedimentation. Cochran's Q and McNemar's nonparametric tests (one method) indicate that riffle sediment surface texture was spatially and temporally varied at the transect level. For McNemar's test, variation was significant at p<0.05, with several trends evident, including strong riffle fining triggered by a 20 year flood event. A nonlinear empirical orthogonal function method known as self-organizing maps (SOMs; the second method) shows that riffle sediment surface texture is well described by two characteristic temporal signals, and one transitional signal at the sampling node level. SOM mapping to each sampling node clearly shows riffle sediment surface texture change was spatially organized over the 11 sediment-mobilizing events. Observations of pool sediment storage indicate that the pool-riffle pair exhibited a coupled sedimentation response (i.e., similar texture trends between pool and riffle) following the 20-year flood. The coupled response was characterized by a trend toward overall sedimentation conditions that were similar to those measured at the beginning of the study. The reported texture trends may be of interest to salmonid habitat studies that examine factors contributing to successful versus unsuccessful fry emergence.

  13. Chemical and textural surface features of pyroclasts from hydrovolcanic eruption sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    Hydrovolcanic pyroclasts are produced by the interaction of erupting magma with surface or near-surface water. Eruption energy determining pyroclast transport and depositional modes is dependent upon the amount of water interacting with magma. Grain morphologies, size distributions, surface textures, and chemical effects studied record the history of eruption cycles for volcanoes under consideration. Samples of crater-rim stratigraphic sequences from Crater Elegante and Cerro Colorado, Mexico, and from Panum Crater and Obsidian Dome, California, illustrate a basaltic tuff ring and tuff cone and two rhyolitic tuff rings respectively. Grain morphologies observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal information on the process of melt fragmentation. Surface alteration and diagenesis have greater effect on pyroclasts from wet eruptions compared to dry ones. These textures are patchy overgrowths of microcrystalline and hydrated materials. Surface chemical characteristics observed with energy dispersive spectral analysis (EDS) show relative gains or losses of elements and an apparent enrichment of silica on altered surfaces.

  14. Surface texture and priming play important roles in predator recognition by the red-backed shrike in field experiments.

    PubMed

    Němec, Michal; Syrová, Michaela; Dokoupilová, Lenka; Veselý, Petr; Šmilauer, Petr; Landová, Eva; Lišková, Silvie; Fuchs, Roman

    2015-01-01

    We compared the responses of the nesting red-backed shrikes (Lanius collurio) to three dummies of a common nest predator, the Eurasian jay (Garrulus glandarius), each made from a different material (stuffed, plush, and silicone). The shrikes performed defensive behaviour including attacks on all three dummies. Nevertheless, the number of attacks significantly decreased from the stuffed dummy through the plush dummy and finally to the silicone dummy. Our results show that wild birds use not only colours but also other surface features as important cues for recognition and categorization of other bird species. Moreover, the silicone dummy was attacked only when presented after the stuffed or plush dummy. Thus, we concluded that the shrikes recognized the jay only the stuffed (with feathered surface) and plush (with hairy surface) dummies during the first encounter. Recognition of the silicon dummy (with glossy surface) was facilitated by previous encounters with the more accurate model. This process resembles the effect of perceptual priming, which is widely described in the literature on humans. PMID:25107529

  15. Energy regimes for aeolian sand grain surface textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.; Bull, P. A.; Morgan, R. M.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental study of aeolian sand grain surface texture development was undertaken with an air-driven grain-recirculating desktop apparatus. Scanning electron microscope analysis of resulting textures indicated that different texture types can be associated with distinct zones in a grain-shape/grain speed matrix. In particular, for subrounded and rounded grains, low and high energy transport can be unequivocally distinguished by the occurrence of upturned plates and Hertzian frustra respectively. Textural development does not have a simple relationship to grain velocity, but appears to relate to the energy expended per unit area within the contact zone generated by elastic deformation during impact. Hertzian theory was adapted to irregular sand grain shapes and close agreement was found between experimental results and theoretical predictions for textural development. Results of this study improve our ability to reconstruct palaeoaeolian environments and therefore our ability to determine grain provenance; in particular, the latter is shown to have direct relevance to forensic inquiries and terrorism investigations.

  16. Texture and grain neighborhood effects on Ni-Ti shape memory alloy performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Harshad; Anderson, Peter M.

    2014-10-01

    This work demonstrates how the statistical pseudoelastic performance of individual grains is affected by the local grain neighborhood in polycrystalline shape memory alloys (SMAs). This is achieved using a microstructural finite element (FE) model calibrated to homogenized Ti-50.9 at% Ni SMA. The results show a three-fold variation in the grain level axial transformation strain pT in randomly textured polycrystals, and a ˜20-30% reduction in average pT if plastically predeformed. A key outcome is a performance function to predict pT of a grain, based on the orientations of the grain and its neighbors. Two key strategies to improve polycrystalline SMA performance are identified. The first is to minimize the number of grain boundaries between high-and low-performing grains: plate and bamboo geometries achieve this. The second is to employ high-symmetry orientation relationships between these grains. The results draw on recent experimental studies of grain level performance and provide a theoretical framework to interpret future diffraction tomography studies.

  17. Simulation of infrared scattering from ice aggregates by use of a size-shape distribution of circular ice cylinders.

    PubMed

    Baran, Anthony J

    2003-05-20

    The scalar optical properties (extinction coefficient, mass extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter) of a distribution of randomly oriented ice aggregates are simulated generally to well within 4% accuracy by use of a size-shape distribution of randomly oriented circular ice cylinders at wavelengths in the terrestrial window region. The single-scattering properties of the ice aggregates are calculated over the whole size distribution function by the finite-difference time-domain and improved geometric optics methods. The single-scattering properties of the size-shape distribution of circular ice cylinders are calculated by the T-matrix method supplemented by scattering solutions obtained from complex-angular-momentum theory. Moreover, radiative-transfer studies demonstrate that the maximum error in brightness temperature space when the size-shape distribution of circular ice cylinders is used to represent scattering from ice aggregates is only approximately 0.4 K The methodology presented should find wide applicability in remote sensing of ice cloud and parameterization of cirrus cloud scalar optical properties in climate models. PMID:12777019

  18. Geometry- and Length Scale-Dependent Deformation and Recovery on Micro- and Nanopatterned Shape Memory Polymer Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Li; Low, Hong Yee

    2016-01-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface textures, when optimally designed, present a unique approach to improve surface functionalities. Coupling surface texture with shape memory polymers may generate reversibly tuneable surface properties. A shape memory polyetherurethane is used to prepare various surface textures including 2 μm- and 200 nm-gratings, 250 nm-pillars and 200 nm-holes. The mechanical deformation via stretching and recovery of the surface texture are investigated as a function of length scales and shapes. Results show the 200 nm-grating exhibiting more deformation than 2 μm-grating. Grating imparts anisotropic and surface area-to-volume effects, causing different degree of deformation between gratings and pillars under the same applied macroscopic strain. Full distribution of stress within the film causes the holes to deform more substantially than the pillars. In the recovery study, unlike a nearly complete recovery for the gratings after 10 transformation cycles, the high contribution of surface energy impedes the recovery of holes and pillars. The surface textures are shown to perform a switchable wetting function. This study provides insights into how geometric features of shape memory surface patterns can be designed to modulate the shape programming and recovery, and how the control of reversibly deformable surface textures can be applied to transfer microdroplets. PMID:27026290

  19. Geometry- and Length Scale-Dependent Deformation and Recovery on Micro- and Nanopatterned Shape Memory Polymer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei Li; Low, Hong Yee

    2016-03-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface textures, when optimally designed, present a unique approach to improve surface functionalities. Coupling surface texture with shape memory polymers may generate reversibly tuneable surface properties. A shape memory polyetherurethane is used to prepare various surface textures including 2 μm- and 200 nm-gratings, 250 nm-pillars and 200 nm-holes. The mechanical deformation via stretching and recovery of the surface texture are investigated as a function of length scales and shapes. Results show the 200 nm-grating exhibiting more deformation than 2 μm-grating. Grating imparts anisotropic and surface area-to-volume effects, causing different degree of deformation between gratings and pillars under the same applied macroscopic strain. Full distribution of stress within the film causes the holes to deform more substantially than the pillars. In the recovery study, unlike a nearly complete recovery for the gratings after 10 transformation cycles, the high contribution of surface energy impedes the recovery of holes and pillars. The surface textures are shown to perform a switchable wetting function. This study provides insights into how geometric features of shape memory surface patterns can be designed to modulate the shape programming and recovery, and how the control of reversibly deformable surface textures can be applied to transfer microdroplets.

  20. Improving copper plating adhesion on glass using laser machining techniques and areal surface texture parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Baofeng; Petzing, Jon; Webb, Patrick; Leach, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Glass is a promising substitute substrate material being evaluated for electronic packaging technology. Improving the electroless copper plated layer adhesion of the glass is one of the most important considerations for development of the technology. An excimer laser (248 nm) was used for structured texturing of glass surfaces (to improve adhesion) by changing mask dimensions, laser operating parameters and overlapping pitch spacing, and therefore producing a range of micro-scale features. Electroless plated copper adhesion strength was assessed using quantitative scratch testing, demonstrating that micro-patterned structures can significantly improve copper/glass adhesion. New ISO 25178 Part 2 areal surface texture parameters were used to characterise the surface roughness of ablated glass surfaces, and correlated to the scratch testing results. Highly correlated parameters were identified that could be used as predictive surface design tools, directly linking surface topography to adhesion performance, without the need for destructive adhesion quantification via scratch testing.

  1. Electrochemical behavior of nano and femtosecond laser textured titanium alloy for implant surface modification.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Won-Gi; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the electrochemical behavior of nano and femtosecond laser textured titanium alloy for implant surface modification has been researched using the potentiostat equipment. Cp-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy, located on X-Y motorized stage, were irradiated using femtosecond laser. The corrosion properties were examined by a potentiodynamic and AC impedance test. PMID:21456241

  2. The visual appearance and surface texture of materials according to the old masters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parraman, Carinna

    2014-02-01

    Primary components in the colour reproduction of textured materials are firstly, the accurate rendering of the appearance of texture, and secondly the ability to print a surface topology that moves towards 2.5D printing. However, in order to render surfaces that contain no discernable pattern structure, unlimited variations in pattern can result in enormous file sizes. The paper explores how painters from the 15th to 21st century were absorbed in creating convincing representations of the attributes of materials. However, on close inspection, these paintings demonstrate a gestural, almost abstracted approach to capturing the appearance of the material, surface and object. The evolving question is: what are the key elements in paintings produced by artists that through the application of coloured brush marks, are able to create a verisimilitude of the material qualities of wood, metal, glass and fabric? The paper suggests that in order to create both a convincing visual appearance, a high level of detail is not necessary, and, that too much information possibly hinders the final appearance. It suggests that by using a more gestural approach, whereby the relationship of mark and colour, and by modulating the fluid dynamics of a mark through a textured surface, a more convincing rendering of texture can be achieved. Finally, by exploring analogue approaches to image making, and by addressing the complex way digital images are constructed, new methods could assist in reducing huge memory and image processing requirements.

  3. Molecular diffusion and tensorial slip at surfaces with periodic and random nanoscale textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priezjev, Nikolai

    2012-02-01

    The influence of periodic and random surface textures on the flow structure and effective slip length in Newtonian fluids is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This study is motivated by the possibility to generate transverse flows in microfluidics devices to enhance mixing and separation processes. We consider a situation where the typical pattern size is smaller than the channel height and the local boundary conditions at wetting and nonwetting regions are characterized by finite slip lengths. In case of anisotropic textures, the interfacial diffusion coefficient of fluid molecules near heterogeneous surfaces correlates well with the effective slip length as a function of the shear flow direction with respect to the texture orientation. In addition, it was found that the angular dependence of the effective slip length obtained from MD simulations is in good agreement with hydrodynamic predictions provided that the pattern size is larger than several molecular diameters. These findings lend support for the microscopic justification of recently introduced tensor formulation of the effective slip boundary conditions in the case of noninertial flows of Newtonian fluids over smooth surfaces with nanoscale anisotropic textures.

  4. Molecular diffusion and tensorial slip at surfaces with periodic and random nanoscale textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priezjev, Nikolai

    2011-11-01

    The influence of periodic and random surface textures on the flow structure and effective slip length in Newtonian fluids is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This study is motivated by the possibility to generate transverse flows in microfluidics devices to enhance mixing and separation processes. We consider a situation where the typical pattern size is smaller than the channel height and the local boundary conditions at wetting and nonwetting regions are characterized by finite slip lengths. In case of anisotropic textures, the interfacial diffusion coefficient of fluid molecules near heterogeneous surfaces correlates well with the effective slip length as a function of the shear flow direction with respect to the texture orientation. In addition, it was found that the angular dependence of the effective slip length obtained from MD simulations is in good agreement with hydrodynamic predictions provided that the pattern size is larger than several molecular diameters. These findings lend support for the microscopic justification of recently introduced tensor formulation of the effective slip boundary conditions in the case of noninertial flows of Newtonian fluids over smooth surfaces with nanoscale anisotropic textures. Funding from NSF (CBET-1033662) is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Modeling Changes in Bed Surface Texture and Aquatic Habitat Caused by Run-of-River Hydropower Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, T. K.; Venditti, J. G.; Nelson, P. A.; Popescu, V.; Palen, W.

    2014-12-01

    Run-of-river (RoR) hydropower has emerged as an important alternative to large reservoir-based dams in the renewable energy portfolios of China, India, Canada, and other areas around the globe. RoR projects generate electricity by diverting a portion of the channel discharge through a large pipe for several kilometers downhill where it is used to drive turbines before being returned to the channel. Individual RoR projects are thought to be less disruptive to local ecosystems than large hydropower because they involve minimal water storage, more closely match the natural hydrograph downstream of the project, and are capable of bypassing trapped sediment. However, there is concern that temporary sediment supply disruption may degrade the productivity of salmon spawning habitat downstream of the dam by causing changes in the grain size distribution of bed surface sediment. We hypothesize that salmon populations will be most susceptible to disruptions in sediment supply in channels where; 1) sediment supply is high relative to transport capacity prior to RoR development, and 2) project design creates substantial sediment storage volume. Determining the geomorphic effect of RoR development on aquatic habitat requires many years of field data collection, and even then it can be difficult to link geomorphic change to RoR development alone. As an alternative, we used a one-dimensional morphodynamic model to test our hypothesis across a range of pre-development sediment supply conditions and sediment storage volumes. Our results confirm that coarsening of the median surface grain-size is greatest in cases where pre-development sediment supply was highest and sediment storage volumes were large enough to disrupt supply over the course of the annual hydrograph or longer. In cases where the pre-development sediment supply is low, coarsening of the median surface grain-size is less than 2 mm over a multiple-year disruption period. When sediment supply is restored, our results

  6. Femtosecond laser full and partial texturing of steel surfaces to reduce friction in lubricated contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, Antonio; Carbone, Giuseppe; De Filippis, Michele; Volpe, Annalisa; Lugarà, Pietro Mario

    2014-12-01

    Minimizing mechanical losses and friction in vehicle engines would have a great impact on reducing fuel consumption and exhaust emissions, to the benefit of environmental protection. With this scope, laser surface texturing (LST) with femtosecond pulses is an emerging technology, which consists of creating, by laser ablation, an array of high-density microdimples on the surface of a mechanical device. The microtexture decreases the effective contact area and, in case of lubricated contact, acts as oil reservoir and trap for wear debris, leading to an overall friction reduction. Depending on the lubrication regime and on the texture geometry, several mechanisms may concur to modify friction such as the local reduction of the shear stress, the generation of a hydrodynamic lift between the surfaces or the formation of eddy-like flows at the bottom of the dimple cavities. All these effects have been investigated by fabricating and characterizing several LST surfaces by femtosecond laser ablation with different features: partial/full texture, circular/elliptical dimples, variable diameters, and depths but equivalent areal density. More than 85% of friction reduction has been obtained from the circular dimple geometry, but the elliptical texture allows adjusting the friction coefficient by changing its orientation with respect to the sliding direction.

  7. Fabrication and Characterization of Nano/Micro Textured Electret to Avoid Electrostatic Stiction and Enhance Its Surface Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, M.; Shimokizaki, M.; Takahashi, T.; Yoshikawa, Y.; Aoyagi, S.

    2015-12-01

    An SiO2 electret with nano/micro scaled texture was developed to enhance generation power of our previously developed electrostatic vibration energy harvester. The texture on SiO2 was formed by lithography and wet etching process. The width /pitch of the each texture is 0.2 μm/0.6 μm or 1.0 μm/2.0 μm, respectively. Both initial value and stability of surface potential of textured electret was better than that of control sample. It was also found that the smaller texture enhance these properties. On the other hand, the stiction force using textured electret was smaller than that using control electret.

  8. Average shape of transport-limited aggregates.

    PubMed

    Davidovitch, Benny; Choi, Jaehyuk; Bazant, Martin Z

    2005-08-12

    We study the relation between stochastic and continuous transport-limited growth models. We derive a nonlinear integro-differential equation for the average shape of stochastic aggregates, whose mean-field approximation is the corresponding continuous equation. Focusing on the advection-diffusion-limited aggregation (ADLA) model, we show that the average shape of the stochastic growth is similar, but not identical, to the corresponding continuous dynamics. Similar results should apply to DLA, thus explaining the known discrepancies between average DLA shapes and viscous fingers in a channel geometry. PMID:16196793

  9. Average Shape of Transport-Limited Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovitch, Benny; Choi, Jaehyuk; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2005-08-01

    We study the relation between stochastic and continuous transport-limited growth models. We derive a nonlinear integro-differential equation for the average shape of stochastic aggregates, whose mean-field approximation is the corresponding continuous equation. Focusing on the advection-diffusion-limited aggregation (ADLA) model, we show that the average shape of the stochastic growth is similar, but not identical, to the corresponding continuous dynamics. Similar results should apply to DLA, thus explaining the known discrepancies between average DLA shapes and viscous fingers in a channel geometry.

  10. Mathematical and computer modeling of component surface shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyashkov, A.

    2016-04-01

    The process of shaping technical surfaces is an interaction of a tool (a shape element) and a component (a formable element or a workpiece) in their relative movements. It was established that the main objects of formation are: 1) a discriminant of a surfaces family, formed by the movement of the shape element relatively the workpiece; 2) an enveloping model of the real component surface obtained after machining, including transition curves and undercut lines; 3) The model of cut-off layers obtained in the process of shaping. When modeling shaping objects there are a lot of insufficiently solved or unsolved issues that make up a single scientific problem - a problem of qualitative shaping of the surface of the tool and then the component surface produced by this tool. The improvement of known metal-cutting tools, intensive development of systems of their computer-aided design requires further improvement of the methods of shaping the mating surfaces. In this regard, an important role is played by the study of the processes of shaping of technical surfaces with the use of the positive aspects of analytical and numerical mathematical methods and techniques associated with the use of mathematical and computer modeling. The author of the paper has posed and has solved the problem of development of mathematical, geometric and algorithmic support of computer-aided design of cutting tools based on computer simulation of the shaping process of surfaces.

  11. Multiple fano resonances in spatially compact and spectrally efficient spoof surface plasmon resonators with composite textures.

    PubMed

    Qin, F F; Xiao, J J; Zhang, Q; Liang, W G

    2016-01-01

    Spoof surface plasmons derive their properties from structure resonance rather than from electronic resonance, enabling an extremely high degree of freedom for tuning and modulating different resonances. Here, a composite resonator based on multiscale textured metal surface of different grooves is presented, and spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) are shown to emerge and interact coherently. Each band of the spoof LSPs resembles those generated by the homogenously textured surface with the corresponding groove. By adjusting the geometry and filling medium of each substructure in the composite system, we find that the multipole resonant modes sustained by one substructure can couple with those in the other, giving rise to multi-band Fano resonances. Such multiple-Fano resonance structures are spatially more compact while spectrally more comprehensive than usual spoof structures. They can be used for unique resonant devices such as microwave antennas and metasurfaces. PMID:26696158

  12. Energetic Atomic and Ionic Oxygen Textured Optical Surfaces for Blood Glucose Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and the resulting product thereof comprising a solid light-conducting fiber with a point of attachment and having a textured surface site consisting of a textured distal end prepared by being placed in a vacuum and then subjected to directed hyperthermal beams comprising oxygen ions or atoms. The textured distal end comprises cones or pillars that are spaced upon from each other by less than 1 micron and are extremely suitable to prevent cellular components of blood from entering the valleys between the cones or pillars so as to effectively separate the cellular components in the blood from interfering with optical sensing of the glucose concentration for diabetic patients.

  13. Thermal changes in texture of aggregates of ultra-fine crystallites in hydrolysed zirconia particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Yoshio; Kato, Etsuro

    1980-10-01

    Zirconia particles of about 1000 × 1000 × 300 Å in size, which were aggregates of rectangular shaped and regularly oriented ultra-fine crystallites of about 30 × 100 Å, were prepared by hydrolysis from 0.1 moll -1 ZrOCl 2 solution. Changes in the texture of the particles on heating were studied by electron microscopy. The growth of the crystallites occurred predominantly at peripheries of the particles at 500°C and in the whole particles at 600°C, resulting in crystallites of 160-360 Å in diameter at 800°C. The voids which were present initially among the crystallites, coalesced and increased in size at temperatures up to 600°C, but diminished above 800°C. Single crystals and (100) twins were formed at 1000°C.

  14. Laser textured superhydrophobic surfaces and their applications for homogeneous spot deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-03-01

    This work reports the laser surface modification of 304S15 stainless steel to develop superhydrophobic properties and the subsequent application for homogeneous spot deposition. Superhydrophobic surfaces, with steady contact angle of ∼154° and contact angle hysteresis of ∼4°, are fabricated by direct laser texturing. In comparison with common pico-/femto-second lasers employed for this patterning, the nanosecond fiber laser used in this work is more cost-effective, compact and allows higher processing rates. The effect of laser power and scan line separation on surface wettability of textured surfaces are investigated and optimized fabrication parameters are given. Fluid flows and transportations of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles suspension droplets on the processed surfaces and unprocessed wetting substrates are investigated. After evaporation is complete, the coffee-stain effect is observed on the untextured substrates but not on the superhydrophobic surfaces. Uniform deposition of PS particles on the laser textured surfaces is achieved and the deposited material is confined to smaller area.

  15. Spin texture induced by oxygen vacancies in strontium perovskite (001) surfaces: A theoretical comparison between SrTiO3 and SrHfO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Castro, A. C.; Vergniory, M. G.; Bousquet, E.; Romero, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structure of SrTiO3 and SrHfO3 (001) surfaces with oxygen vacancies is studied by means of first-principles calculations. We reveal how oxygen vacancies within the first atomic layer of the SrTiO3 surface (i) induce a large antiferrodistortive motion of the oxygen octahedra at the surface, (ii) drive localized magnetic moments on the Ti 3 d orbitals close to the vacancies, and (iii) form a two-dimensional electron gas localized within the first layers. The analysis of the spin texture of this system exhibits a splitting of the energy bands according to the Zeeman interaction, lowering of the Ti 3 dx y level in comparison with dx z and dy z, and also an in-plane precession of the spins. No Rashba-like splitting for the ground state or for the ab initio molecular dynamics trajectory at 400 K is recognized as suggested recently by A. F. Santander-Syro et al. [Nat. Mater. 13, 1085 (2014), 10.1038/nmat4107]. Instead, a sizable Rashba-like splitting is observed when the Ti atom is replaced by a heavier Hf atom with a much larger spin-orbit interaction. However, we observe the disappearance of the magnetism and the surface two-dimensional electron gas when full structural optimization of the SrHfO3 surface is performed. Our results uncover the sensitive interplay of spin-orbit coupling, atomic relaxations, and magnetism when tuning these Sr-based perovskites.

  16. Effect of surface roughness on the texture and oxidation behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhiani, Hamed; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2013-11-01

    Conventional pressure water reactors like CANDU use Zircaloy-4 as a fuel cladding tube. Surface roughness that arises from the manufacturing process, pilgering, may alter these tubes' properties in various ways. This paper presents a comparative study of cladding tubes with different surface conditions in order to investigate their effect on the Zircaloy-4 substrate and oxide textures as well as the oxidation kinetic. The experimental results reveal that surface roughness affects the oxidation rate and weight gain of the cladding tubes. Although surface polishing slightly changes the substrate texture, it induces no significant change in the oxide texture. Moreover, oxidation time does not significantly change the preferred orientation of the zirconium oxide.

  17. Frequency, Size, and Localization of Bacterial Aggregates on Bean Leaf Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Monier, J.-M.; Lindow, S. E.

    2004-01-01

    Using epifluorescence microscopy and image analysis, we have quantitatively described the frequency, size, and spatial distribution of bacterial aggregates on leaf surfaces of greenhouse-grown bean plants inoculated with the plant-pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain B728a. Bacterial cells were not randomly distributed on the leaf surface but occurred in a wide range of cluster sizes, ranging from single cells to over 104 cells per aggregate. The average cluster size increased through time, and aggregates were more numerous and larger when plants were maintained under conditions of high relative humidity levels than under dry conditions. The large majority of aggregates observed were small (less than 100 cells), and aggregate sizes exhibited a strong right-hand-skewed frequency distribution. While large aggregates are not frequent on a given leaf, they often accounted for the majority of cells present. We observed that up to 50% of cells present on a leaf were located in aggregates containing 103 cells or more. Aggregates were associated with several different anatomical features of the leaf surface but not with stomates. Aggregates were preferentially associated with glandular trichomes and veins. The biological and ecological significance of aggregate formation by epiphytic bacteria is discussed. PMID:14711662

  18. Control of grating-coupled ultrafast surface plasmon pulse and its nonlinear emission by shaping femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kazunori; Masaki, Yuta; Kusaba, Miyuki; Hirosawa, Kenichi; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2015-09-01

    Spatiotemporal nanofocusing of ultrafast surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) coupled on a metal Au tapered tip with a curvature radius of a few tens of nanometers is deterministically controlled based on the measured plasmon response function. We control the SPP pulse shape and the second harmonic generation at the apex of the Au tapered tip by shaping the excitation femtosecond laser pulses based on the response function. We also adapted a similar control scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and achieved selective CARS excitation of a single Raman mode of carbon nanotubes with only a single excitation laser pulse at the apex of the tip.

  19. Hydration and diffusion dynamics shape microbial community composition and function in soil aggregates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Ebrahimi, A.

    2014-12-01

    Natural variations in soil hydration conditions (rainfall, evaporation, root water uptake) affect gas and nutrient diffusion and soil microbial community composition and function. The conditions in soil aggregates are of particular interest due to limitations to oxygen diffusion into the core often containing organic carbon (as aggregation agent). The constantly varying soil hydration conditions affect the spatial extent of anoxic conditions in aggregates and thus the sized and self-organization of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities. We developed an artificial soil aggregate composed of 3-D angular pore network combined with individual based models of motile microbial cells that grow, move, intercept nutrients and are inhibited by presence or absence of oxygen. The hydration conditions in the model aggregate affect community size, spatial segregation, and growth rates. The opposing diffusion directions of oxygen and carbon were essential to maintenance of aerobic and anaerobic communities within an aggregate (anaerobes become extinct when carbon sources are external). Cohabited soil aggregates promoted onset of anaerobic conditions by oxygen consumption by peripheral aerobes. Model predictions of CO2 and N2O production rates were in good agreement with experimental data. Results illustrate how aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities are activated by certain hydration conditions that enhance either nitrogen losses or decomposition of organic matter both contributing to GHG emissions.

  20. Separation Surfaces in the Spectral TV Domain for Texture Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horesh, Dikla; Gilboa, Guy

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel notion of separation surfaces for image decomposition. A surface is embedded in the spectral total-variation (TV) three dimensional domain and encodes a spatially-varying separation scale. The method allows good separation of textures with gradually varying pattern-size, pattern-contrast or illumination. The recently proposed total variation spectral framework is used to decompose the image into a continuum of textural scales. A desired texture, within a scale range, is found by fitting a surface to the local maximal responses in the spectral domain. A band above and below the surface, referred to as the \\textit{Texture Stratum}, defines for each pixel the adaptive scale-range of the texture. Based on the decomposition an application is proposed which can attenuate or enhance textures in the image in a very natural and visually convincing manner.

  1. Anisotropic texture of ice sheet surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Benjamin E.; Raymond, Charles F.; Scambos, Theodore

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the magnitude and spatial organization of small-scale surface features (the surface texture) of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. The texture is revealed in shaded relief maps of digital elevation models because surface slopes emphasize short-wavelength topography. We show that the surface slope components parallel to and perpendicular to the ice flow direction of ice sheets are both qualitatively and quantitatively different from one another. The parallel component variations are larger in magnitude than the perpendicular component variations, and features in maps of the parallel component are elongated perpendicular to the ice flow direction, while features in maps of the perpendicular component are elongated at a diagonal to the ice flow direction. These properties may be explained by a simple model of glacier dynamics in which a linearly viscous slab of ice flows over a random, isotropic, red noise bed. In this model an anisotropic surface results from an isotropic bed because the surface anisotropy derives from the anisotropic transfer of bed topography to the surface by viscous flow dynamics. The modeling results suggest that analysis of surface texture magnitude and anisotropy can be used to identify areas of sliding ice from surface topography data alone and can be used to roughly estimate sliding rates where bed topography is known.

  2. Graphene-based textured surface by pulsed laser deposition as a robust platform for surface enhanced Raman scattering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tite, T.; Donnet, C.; Loir, A.-S.; Reynaud, S.; Michalon, J.-Y.; Vocanson, F.; Garrelie, F.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrate based on gold nanoparticles-decorated few-layer (fl) graphene grown by pulsed laser deposition. Diamond-Like Carbon film has been converted to fl-graphene after thermal annealing at low temperature. The formation of fl-graphene was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, and surface morphology was highlighted by scanning electron microscopy. We found that textured fl-graphene film with nanoscale roughness was highly beneficial for SERS detection. Rhodamine 6G and p-aminothiophenol proposed as test molecules were detected with high sensitivity. The detection at low concentration of deltamethrin, an active molecule of a commercial pesticide was further demonstrated.

  3. Graphene-based textured surface by pulsed laser deposition as a robust platform for surface enhanced Raman scattering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tite, T.; Donnet, C.; Loir, A.-S.; Reynaud, S.; Michalon, J.-Y.; Vocanson, F.; Garrelie, F.

    2014-01-27

    We have developed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrate based on gold nanoparticles-decorated few-layer (fl) graphene grown by pulsed laser deposition. Diamond-Like Carbon film has been converted to fl-graphene after thermal annealing at low temperature. The formation of fl-graphene was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, and surface morphology was highlighted by scanning electron microscopy. We found that textured fl-graphene film with nanoscale roughness was highly beneficial for SERS detection. Rhodamine 6G and p-aminothiophenol proposed as test molecules were detected with high sensitivity. The detection at low concentration of deltamethrin, an active molecule of a commercial pesticide was further demonstrated.

  4. Characterization of nanoparticle formation and aggregation on mineral surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn Waychunas; Young-Shin Jun

    2007-04-19

    The research effort in the Waychunas group is focused on the characterization and measurement of processes at the mineral-water interfaces specifically related to the onset of precipitation. This effort maps into one of the main project groups with the Penn State University EMSI (CEKA) known as PIG (Precipitation Interest Group), and involves collaborations with several members of that group. Both synchrotron experimentation and technique development are objectives, with the goals of allowing precipitation from single molecule attachment to sub-monolayer coverage to be detected and analyzed. The problem being addressed is the change in reactivity of mineral interfaces due to passivation or activation by precipitates or sorbates. In the case of passivation, fewer active sites may be involved in reactions with environmental fluids, while in the activated case the precipitate may be much more reactive than the substrate, or result in the creation of a higher density of active sites. We approach this problem by making direct measurements of several types of precipitation reactions: iron-aluminum oxide formation on quartz and other substrates from both homogeneous (in solution) nucleation, and heterogeneous (on the surface) nucleation; precipitation and sorption of silicate monomers and polymers on Fe oxide surfaces; and development of grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) as a tool for in-situ measurement of precipitate growth, morphology and aggregation. We expect that these projects will produce new fundamental information on reactive interface growth, passivation and activation, and be applicable to a wide range of environmental interfaces.

  5. A three dimensional scaffold with precise micro-architecture and surface micro-textures

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Alvaro; Kim, Eun Jung; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Fleischman, Aaron J.; Muschler, George F.; Roy, Shuvo

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) structure comprising precisely defined microarchitecture and surface micro-textures, designed to present specific physical cues to cells and tissues, may provide an efficient scaffold in a variety of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. We report a fabrication technique based on microfabrication and soft lithography that permits for the development of 3D scaffolds with both precisely engineered architecture and tailored surface topography. The scaffold fabrication technique consists of three key steps starting with microfabrication of a mold using an epoxy-based photoresist (SU-8), followed by dual-sided molding of a single layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using a mechanical jig for precise motion control; and finally, alignment, stacking, and adhesion of multiple PDMS layers to achieve a 3D structure. This technique was used to produce 3D Texture and 3D Smooth PDMS scaffolds, where the surface topography comprised 10 μm-diameter/height posts and smooth surfaces, respectively. The potential utility of the 3D microfabricated scaffolds, and the role of surface topography, were subsequently investigated in vitro with a combined heterogeneous population of adult human stem cells and their resultant progenitor cells, collectively termed connective tissue progenitors (CTPs), under conditions promoting the osteoblastic phenotype. Examination of bone-marrow derived CTPs cultured on the 3D Texture scaffold for 9 days revealed cell growth in three dimensions and increased cell numbers compared to those on the 3D Smooth scaffold. Furthermore, expression of alkaline phosphatase mRNA was higher on the 3D Texture scaffold, while osteocalcin mRNA expression was comparable for both types of scaffolds. PMID:19524292

  6. Assessment of optimum threshold and particle shape parameter for the image analysis of aggregate size distribution of concrete sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozen, Murat; Guler, Murat

    2014-02-01

    Aggregate gradation is one of the key design parameters affecting the workability and strength properties of concrete mixtures. Estimating aggregate gradation from hardened concrete samples can offer valuable insights into the quality of mixtures in terms of the degree of segregation and the amount of deviation from the specified gradation limits. In this study, a methodology is introduced to determine the particle size distribution of aggregates from 2D cross sectional images of concrete samples. The samples used in the study were fabricated from six mix designs by varying the aggregate gradation, aggregate source and maximum aggregate size with five replicates of each design combination. Each sample was cut into three pieces using a diamond saw and then scanned to obtain the cross sectional images using a desktop flatbed scanner. An algorithm is proposed to determine the optimum threshold for the image analysis of the cross sections. A procedure was also suggested to determine a suitable particle shape parameter to be used in the analysis of aggregate size distribution within each cross section. Results of analyses indicated that the optimum threshold hence the pixel distribution functions may be different even for the cross sections of an identical concrete sample. Besides, the maximum ferret diameter is the most suitable shape parameter to estimate the size distribution of aggregates when computed based on the diagonal sieve opening. The outcome of this study can be of practical value for the practitioners to evaluate concrete in terms of the degree of segregation and the bounds of mixture's gradation achieved during manufacturing.

  7. Color and texture morphing with colloids on multilayered surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziguang; Li, Shumin; Arkebauer, Andrew; Gogos, George; Tan, Li

    2015-05-20

    Dynamic morphing of marine species to match with environment changes in color and texture is an advanced means for surviving, self-defense, and reproduction. Here we use colloids that are placed inside a multilayered structure to demonstrate color and texture morphing. The multilayer is composed of a thermal insulating base layer, a light absorbing mid layer, and a liquid top layer. When external light of moderate intensity (∼0.2 W cm(-2)) strikes the structure, colloids inside the liquid layer will be assembled to locations with an optimal absorption. When this system is exposed to continuous laser pulses, more than 18,000 times of reversible responses are recorded, where the system requests 20 ms to start the response and another 160 ms to complete. The flexibility of our concept further allows the system to be built on a variety of light-absorbing substrates, including dyed paper, gold thin film, and amorphous silicon, with the top layer even a solid. PMID:25782081

  8. Molecular-scale investigations of structures and surface charge distribution of surfactant aggregates by three-dimensional force mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Oyabu, Noriaki; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kei

    2014-02-07

    Surface charges on nanoscale structures in liquids, such as biomolecules and nano-micelles, play an essentially important role in their structural stability as well as their chemical activities. These structures interact with each other through electric double layers (EDLs) formed by the counter ions in electrolyte solution. Although static-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) including colloidal-probe AFM is a powerful technique for surface charge density measurements and EDL analysis on a submicron scale in liquids, precise surface charge density analysis with single-nanometer resolution has not been made because of its limitation of the resolution and the detection sensitivity. Here we demonstrate molecular-scale surface charge measurements of self-assembled micellar structures, molecular hemicylinders of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), by three-dimensional (3D) force mapping based on frequency modulation AFM. The SDS hemicylindrical structures with a diameter of 4.8 nm on a graphite surface were clearly imaged. We have succeeded in visualizing 3D EDL forces on the SDS hemicylinder surfaces and obtaining the molecular-scale charge density for the first time. The results showed that the surface charge on the trench regions between the hemicylinders was much smaller than that on the hemicylinder tops. The method can be applied to a wide variety of local charge distribution studies, such as spatial charge variation on a single protein molecule.

  9. Stability of Shapes Held by Surface Tension and Subjected to Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Robinson, Nathaniel D.; Steen, Paul H.

    1999-01-01

    Results of three problems are summarized in this contribution. Each involves the fundamental capillary instability of an interfacial bridge and is an extension of previous work. The first two problems concern equilibrium shapes of liquid bridges near the stability boundary corresponding to maximum length (Plateau-Rayleigh limit). For the first problem, a previously formulated nonlinear theory to account for imposed gravity and interfacial shear disturbances in an isothermal environment is quantitatively tested in experiment. For the second problem, the liquid bridge is subjected to a shear that models the effect of a thermocapillary flow generated by a ring heater in a liquid encapsulated float-zone configuration. In the absence of gravity, this symmetric perturbation can stabilize the bridge to lengths on the order of 30 percent beyond the Plateau-Rayleigh limit, which is on the order of heretofore unexplained Shuttle observations. The third problem considers the dynamics of collapse and pinchoff of a film bridge (no gravity), which happens in the absence of stabilization. Here, we summarize experimental efforts to measure the self-similar cone-and-crater structure predicted by a previous theory.

  10. Optical simulation of surface textured TCO using FDTD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elviyanti, I. L.; Purwanto, H.; Kusumandari

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this research is simulating the transmittance of surface textured transparent conducting oxide (TCO) for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) application. The simulation based on finite difference time domain (FDTD) was performed using the MatLab software for flat and pyramid surface textured TCO. Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) and indium tin oxide (ITO) were used as TCO material. The transmittance simulation of flat TCO was compared to UV-Vis spectrophotometer measurement of real TCO to ensure the accuracy of the simulation. Then, the transmittance simulation of pyramid surface textures of TCO is higher than a flat one. It suggested that surface texturing enhance the path of light through dispersion and reflectance light by the pattern of the surface. This result indicates that surface textured increasing the transmittance of TCO through a complex light trapping mechanism which might be used to increase the light harvesting for DSSC application.

  11. Lizard-Skin Surface Texture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    The south polar region of Mars is covered seasonally with translucent carbon dioxide ice. In the spring gas subliming (evaporating) from the underside of the seasonal layer of ice bursts through weak spots, carrying dust from below with it, to form numerous dust fans aligned in the direction of the prevailing wind.

    The dust gets trapped in the shallow grooves on the surface, helping to define the small-scale structure of the surface. The surface texture is reminiscent of lizard skin (figure 1).

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003730_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 14-May-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.2 degrees latitude, 181.5 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 248.5 km (155.3 miles). At this distance the image scale is 24.9 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 75 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:04 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 69 degrees, thus the sun was about 21 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 237.5 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  12. Absorption and elastic scattering of light by particle aggregates.

    PubMed

    Quinten, M; Kreibig, U

    1993-10-20

    Light scattering and absorption by spherical particles is extended to aggregates of spheres with arbitrary shape and size. We applied the theory of G6rardy and Ausloos [Phys. Rev. B 25, 4204-4229 (1082)] to compute the total extinction loss spectra of several aggregates of nanometer-sized silver spheres from the near IR to the near UV. Silver was best suited to provide quantitative comparison with experiments concerning the scattering and absorption in the visible spectral region. Additional resonant extinction was obtained besides the resonant extinction of the single silver sphere. The spectra were discussed in detail to give general results that are independent of the particle material. PMID:20856447

  13. Textures in deforming forsterite aggregates up to 8 GPa and 1673 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, Caroline; Raterron, Paul; Castelnau, Olivier; Detrez, Fabrice; Merkel, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    We report results from axisymmetric deformation experiments carried out on forsterite aggregates in the deformation-DIA apparatus, at upper mantle pressures and temperatures (3.1-8.1 GPa, 1373-1673 K). We quantified the resulting lattice preferred orientations (LPO) and compare experimental observations with results from micromechanical modeling (viscoplastic second-order self-consistent model—SO). Up to 6 GPa (~185-km depth in the Earth), we observe a marked LPO consistent with a dominant slip in the (010) plane with one observation of a dominant [100] direction, suggesting that [100](010) slip system was strongly activated. At higher pressures (deeper depth), the LPO becomes less marked and more complex with no evidence of a dominant slip system, which we attribute to the activation of several concurrent slip systems. These results are consistent with the pressure-induced transition in the dominant slip system previously reported for olivine and forsterite. They are also consistent with the decrease in the seismic anisotropy amplitude observed in the Earth's mantle at depth greater than ~200 km.

  14. Textures in deforming forsterite aggregates up to 8 GPa and 1673 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, Caroline; Raterron, Paul; Castelnau, Olivier; Detrez, Fabrice; Merkel, Sébastien

    2016-06-01

    We report results from axisymmetric deformation experiments carried out on forsterite aggregates in the deformation-DIA apparatus, at upper mantle pressures and temperatures (3.1-8.1 GPa, 1373-1673 K). We quantified the resulting lattice preferred orientations (LPO) and compare experimental observations with results from micromechanical modeling (viscoplastic second-order self-consistent model—SO). Up to 6 GPa (~185-km depth in the Earth), we observe a marked LPO consistent with a dominant slip in the (010) plane with one observation of a dominant [100] direction, suggesting that [100](010) slip system was strongly activated. At higher pressures (deeper depth), the LPO becomes less marked and more complex with no evidence of a dominant slip system, which we attribute to the activation of several concurrent slip systems. These results are consistent with the pressure-induced transition in the dominant slip system previously reported for olivine and forsterite. They are also consistent with the decrease in the seismic anisotropy amplitude observed in the Earth's mantle at depth greater than ~200 km.

  15. Self-adaptive surface texture design for friction reduction across the lubrication regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen M.; Jing, Yang; Zhao, Fei

    2016-03-01

    Surface texturing has been shown to reduce friction and improve durability in mechanical face seals and metal forming operations, and lightly loaded thrust bearings. However, the success has been limited to conformal contacts and low load high speed operating conditions, i.e. hydrodynamic lubrication dominated regime. Both experiments and numerical simulations have shown that textural patterns, under higher loading and/or slower speeds may increase friction and even cause the lubrication film collapse. Specific designs of surface texture pattern, as its shape, depth and density, are required for different lubrication regimes. Our own study has shown (Hsu et al 2014 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 47 335307) that large/shallow dimple reduces friction in hydrodynamic lubrication regime, whereas small/deep dimple shows benefit in mixed/boundary lubrication regimes (if the textural designs can provides hydrodynamic/hydrostatic lift forces to reduce the machine loading). In considering an engine component typically experiences duty cycles that may cross various lubrication regimes, a multiscale surface texture design appears attractive. This type of mixed shape texturing combines textures designed for low load, high speed operating conditions and the textures that are designed for high load, low speed operations. In this paper, two types of multiscale surface texture designs are presented. Ball-on-three-flats (BOTF) wear tester (under high loading conditions) is used to evaluate the performance of these multiscale texture designs along with the baselines of un-textured surfaces under the same surface preparation procedures. Two texture designs with only a single shape dimples are included in the study. Results suggest that multiscale surface texture design not only further reduces friction in comparison to the textures with single shape dimples, but also shows the effectiveness across hydrodynamic regimes to the mixed lubrication regimes.

  16. Bio-inspired scale-like surface textures and their tribological properties.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Christian; Schäfer, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Friction, wear and the associated energy dissipation are major challenges in all systems containing moving parts. Examples range from nanoelectromechanical systems over hip prosthesis to off-shore wind turbines. Bionic approaches have proven to be very successful in many engineering problems, while investigating the potential of a bio-inspired approach in creating morphological surface textures is a relatively new field of research. Here, we developed laser-created textures inspired by the scales found on the skin of snakes and certain lizards. We show that this bio-inspired surface morphology reduced dry sliding friction forces by more than 40%. In lubricated contacts the same morphology increased friction by a factor of three. Two different kinds of morphologies, one with completely overlapping scales and one with the scales arranged in individual rows, were chosen. In lubricated as well as unlubricated contacts, the surface texture with the scales in rows showed lower friction forces than the completely overlapping ones. We anticipate that these results could have significant impact in all dry sliding contacts, ranging from nanoelectromechanical and micro-positioning systems up to large-scale tribological contacts which cannot be lubricated, e.g. because they are employed in a vacuum environment. PMID:26125522

  17. Secondary electron emission characteristics of ion-textured copper and high-purity isotropic graphite surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, A. N.; Jensen, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    Experimentally determined values of true secondary electron emission and relative values of reflected primary electron yield for untreated and ion textured oxygen free high conductivity copper and untreated and ion textured high purity isotropic graphite surfaces are presented for a range of primary electron beam energies and beam impingement angles. This investigation was conducted to provide information that would improve the efficiency of multistage depressed collectors (MDC's) for microwave amplifier traveling wave tubes in space communications and aircraft applications. For high efficiency, MDC electrode surfaces must have low secondary electron emission characteristics. Although copper is a commonly used material for MDC electrodes, it exhibits relatively high levels of secondary electron emission if its surface is not treated for emission control. Recent studies demonstrated that high purity isotropic graphite is a promising material for MDC electrodes, particularly with ion textured surfaces. The materials were tested at primary electron beam energies of 200 to 2000 eV and at direct (0 deg) to near grazing (85 deg) beam impingement angles. True secondary electron emission and relative reflected primary electron yield characteristics of the ion textured surfaces were compared with each other and with those of untreated surfaces of the same materials. Both the untreated and ion textured graphite surfaces and the ion treated copper surface exhibited sharply reduced secondary electron emission characteristics relative to those of untreated copper. The ion treated graphite surface yielded the lowest emission levels.

  18. Recognition of silver nanoparticles surface-adsorbed citrate anions by macrocyclic polyammonium cations: a spectrophotometric approach to study aggregation kinetics and evaluation of association constant.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Rupasree; Purkayastha, Atanu; Debnath, Diptanu; Misra, Tarun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    In this report, we have studied the recognition of citrate anions adsorbed on the surface of silver nanoparticles (cit-Ag-NPs), by macrocyclic polyammonium cations (MCPACs): Me6 [14]ane-N4 H8 (4+) (Tet-A/Tet-B cations) and [32]ane-N8 H16 (8+) , which are well reputed anion recognizers and are treated as to mimic of biological polyamines. The study was monitored on ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy by performing a titration of the aqueous dispersion of the cit-Ag-NPs by the aqueous solution of MCPACs. The ultraviolet-visible time-scan plots over the reduction of the absorption band of surface plasmon resonance of cit-Ag-NPs at 390 nm are well fitted with fourth-order polynomial equation and are employed to determine the initial aggregation rate constants. It has been stated that the aggregation is the result in electrostatic attraction followed by H-bond formation between the surface-adsorbed citrate anions and added MCPACs. The atomic force microscopy results have evidenced aggregation of cit-Ag-NPs in presence of MCPACs. The evaluated H-bonded association constant (Kasso ) using Benesi-Hildebrand method reveals that [32]ane-N8 H16 (8+) cations form stronger association complex, as expected, with the citrate anions than the Me6 [14]ane-N4 H8 (4+) cations. The study would thus provide the insight of molecular interactions involved in nanoparticle surface-adsorbed anions with biological polyamines. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27146323

  19. Wetting state and maximum spreading factor of microdroplets impacting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces with anisotropic arrays of pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Dae Hee; Huh, Hyung Kyu; Lee, Sang Joon

    2013-07-01

    The dynamic behaviors of microdroplets that impact on textured surfaces with various patterns of microscale pillars are experimentally investigated in this study. A piezoelectric inkjet is used to generate the microdroplets that have a diameter of less than 46 μm and a controlled Weber number. The impact and spreading dynamics of an individual droplet are captured by using a high-speed imaging system. The anisotropic and directional wettability and the wetting states on the textured surfaces with anisotropically arranged pillars are revealed for the first time in this study. The impalement transition from the Cassie-Baxter state to the partially impaled state is evaluated by balancing the wetting pressure P wet and the capillary pressure P C even on the anisotropic textured surfaces. The maximum spreading factor is measured and compared with the theoretical prediction to elucidate the wettability of the textured surfaces. For a given Weber number, the maximum spreading factor decreases as the texture area fraction of the textured surface decreases. In addition, the maximum spreading factors along the direction of longer inter-pillar spacing always have smaller values than those along the direction of shorter inter-pillar spacing when a droplet impacts on the anisotropic arrays of pillars.

  20. Hydration and diffusion processes shape microbial community organization and function in model soil aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2015-12-01

    The constantly changing soil hydration status affects gas and nutrient diffusion through soil pores and thus the functioning of soil microbial communities. The conditions within soil aggregates are of particular interest due to limitations to oxygen diffusion into their core, and the presence of organic carbon often acting as binding agent. We developed a model for microbial life in simulated soil aggregates comprising of 3-D angular pore network model (APNM) that mimics soil hydraulic and transport properties. Within these APNM, we introduced individual motile (flagellated) microbial cells with different physiological traits that grow, disperse, and respond to local nutrients and oxygen concentrations. The model quantifies the dynamics and spatial extent of anoxic regions that vary with hydration conditions, and their role in shaping microbial community size and activity and the spatial (self) segregation of anaerobes and aerobes. Internal carbon source and opposing diffusion directions of oxygen and carbon within an aggregate were essential to emergence of stable coexistence of aerobic and anaerobic communities (anaerobes become extinct when carbon sources are external). The model illustrates a range of hydration conditions that promote or suppress denitrification or decomposition of organic matter and thus affect soil GHG emissions. Model predictions of CO2 and N2O production rates were in good agreement with limited experimental data. These limited tests support the dynamic modeling approach whereby microbial community size, composition, and spatial arrangement emerge from internal interactions within soil aggregates. The upscaling of the results to a population of aggregates of different sizes embedded in a soil profile is underway.

  1. Correlations Between Textures and Infrared Spectra of the Martian Surface in Valles Marineris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, S. J.; Wray, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    RALSTON, S. J., School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332, sralston3@gatech.edu, WRAY, James, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332, jwray@eas.gatech.edu In the past few decades, a wealth of information has become available on the appearance and composition of the Martian surface. While some previous research has examined possible correlations between certain surface features and mineralogy (such as the hypothesized connection between Recurring Slope Lineae and perchlorate salts), little has yet been done to determine possible correlations between mineralogy and texture in less extraordinary circumstances. In this project, one hundred images taken from across the Valles Marineris region were examined both in infrared (obtained from the CRISM instrument aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) and in visible-light images from the HiRISE camera. Spectra were obtained from regions of interest, focusing mainly on the identification of monohydrated and polyhydrated sulfates. Other materials were included in the imaging, including phyllosilicate clays, gypsum, and jarosite, although those materials proved less abundant than the sulfates. The areas from which the spectra were taken were then examined in visible-light wavelengths using HiRISE images to determine textural qualities. The focus of this research was on two particular textures, a 'reticulated' texture and a 'stepped texture,' hypothesized to correlate to monohydrated and polyhydrated sulfates, respectively. Results showed that over 55% of areas containing monohydrated sulfates also contained reticulate texture, whereas areas that contained other materials, such as polyhydrated sulfates and clays, had only a 2-8% correlation with reticulate texture. The stepped texture was shown to have no significant correlation to any one material, although other texture/mineral pairs did

  2. Hedgehog spin texture and competing orders on the surface of strained topological crystalline insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng-Yi; Tsai, Wei-Feng; Wang, Yung Jui; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2014-03-01

    We discuss spin reorientation phenomena, which may or may not yield gap formation, on the surface of topological crystalline insulators Pb1-xSnx(Te, Se) under various applied strains. The low-energy surface electrons on the (001) surface behave like massless Dirac particles with four Dirac points centered along the intersection of the mirror (xz or yz) plane and the surface plane. We use a four-band k.p model, which captures the spin and orbital texture of the surface states around surface X (or Y) point up to the energy around the Lifshitz transition, and systematically study effects of the applied strain. In contrast to the case without any strain, where the absence of the out-of-the-plane spin component is guaranteed by both the mirror and the time-reversal symmetries, we find that without time-reversal symmetry breaking, the hedgehog-like spin textures associated with a gap formation can be induced by the strain only, breaking the xz mirror symmetry. The other cases cannot induce a gap at Dirac points. We also investigate interaction-driven competing orders under the strain and obtain a phase diagram at the mean-field level to reveal the possible novel surface states in the system.

  3. Ganymede and Callisto - Surface textural dichotomies and photometric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.

    1991-01-01

    Complete solar phase curves of the Ganymede and Callisto leading and trailing hemispheres, which have been obtained by reducing Voyager imaging observations and combining them with ground-based telescopic data, are presently fit to scattering models in order to derive hemispherical values of the single scattering albedo, the single particle phase function (SPPF), the compaction state (CS) of the optically active portion of the regolith, and the mean slope angle of macroscopic features. While Callisto's leading side is composed of particles that are more strongly backscattering than the trailing side, no hemispheric differences are found in the CS, surface roughness, or SPPF.

  4. Texture development during progressive deformation of hematite aggregates: Constraints from VPSC models and naturally deformed iron oxides from Minas Gerais, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Filippe; Lagoeiro, Leonardo; Morales, Luiz F. G.; Oliveira, Claudinei G. de; Barbosa, Paola; Ávila, Carlos; Cavalcante, Geane C. G.

    2016-09-01

    We show that naturally-deformed hematite from the Quadrilátero Ferrífero Province, Minas Gerais, Brazil, develops CPOs by dislocation creep, strongly influenced by basal plane parallel glide, even when this is not the favored slip system. Characterization of microstructure and texture, particularly intragranular misorientations, of naturally deformed hematite aggregates by EBSD allowed us to determine the importance of different slip systems, and confirm dislocation creep as the dominant deformation mechanism. Viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) models were constructed to constrain the slip systems required to operate for the observed CPO to develop, and its rheological implications. Changes in the CRSS ratio of hematite prism and basal slip systems and deformation regime lead to the development of distinct patterns of hematite crystallographic orientations. The basal slip-dominated simple shear model is the only one that can develop quasi-single-crystal CPO of the kind observed in highly deformed rocks from Quadrilátero Ferrífero. Comparison between naturally deformed hematite aggregates and VPSC models shows that CPO development of hematite is strongly influenced by a highly viscoplastic anisotropy through dislocation creep on hematite basal plane. Nonetheless, our results demonstrate that even the unfavorable slip systems should be regarded when the bulk rheology of mineral aggregates is evaluated.

  5. What Controls the Sizes and Shapes of Volcanic Ash? Integrating Morphological, Textural and Geochemical Ash Properties to Decipher Eruptive Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, E. J.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash particles encompass a diverse spectrum of shapes as a consequence of differences in the magma properties and the magma ascent and eruption conditions. We show how the quantitative analysis of ash particle shapes can be a valuable tool for deciphering magma fragmentation and transport processes. Importantly, integrating morphological data with ash texture (e.g. bubble and crystal sizes) and dissolved volatile data provides valuable insights into the physical and chemical controls on the resulting ash deposit. To explore the influence of magma-water interaction (MWI) on fine ash generation, we apply this multi-component characterisation to tephra from the 2500BC Hverfjall Fires, Iceland. Here, coeval fissure vents spanned sub-aerial to shallow lacustrine environments. Differences in the size and morphology of pyroclasts thus reflect fragmentation mechanisms under different near-surface conditions. Using shape parameters sensitive to both particle roughness and internal vesicularity, we quantify the relative proportions of dense fragments, bubble shards, and vesicular grains from 2-D SEM images. We show that componentry (and particle morphology) varies as a function of grain size, and that this variation can be related back to the bubble size distribution. Although both magmatic and hydromagmatic deposits exhibit similar component assemblages, they differ in how these assemblages change with grain size. These results highlight the benefits of characterising ash deposits over a wide range of grain sizes, and caution against inferring fragmentation mechanism from a narrow grain size range. Elevated matrix glass S concentrations in hydromagmatic ash (600-1500 ppm) compared to those in magmatic ash and scoria lapilli (200-500 ppm) indicate interrupted vesiculation. In contrast to the subaerial 'dry' deposits, fragmentation during MWI likely occurred over a greater range of depths with quench rates sufficient to prevent post-fragmentation degassing. High

  6. Capillary Rise on Legs of a Small Animal and on Artificially Textured Surfaces Mimicking Them

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Marie; Ishii, Daisuke; Ito, Shuto; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Okumura, Ko

    2014-01-01

    The wharf roach Ligia exotica is a small animal that lives by the sea and absorbs water from the sea through its legs by virtue of a remarkable array of small blades of micron scale. We find that the imbibition dynamics on the legs is rather complex on a microscopic scale, but on a macroscopic scale the imbibition length seems to simply scale linearly with elapsed time. This unusual dynamics of imbibition, which usually slows down with time, is advantageous for long-distance water transport and results from repetition of unit dynamics. Inspired by the remarkable features, we study artificially textured surfaces mimicking the structure on the legs of the animal. Unlike the case of the wharf roach, the linear dynamics were not reproduced on the artificial surfaces, which may result from more subtle features on the real legs that are not faithfully reflected on the artificial surfaces. Instead, the nonlinear dynamics revealed that hybrid structures on the artificial surfaces speed up the water transport compared with non-hybrid ones. In addition, the dynamics on the artificial surfaces turn out to be well described by a composite theory developed here, with the theory giving useful guiding principles for designing hybrid textured surfaces for rapid imbibition and elucidating physical advantages of the microscopic design on the legs. PMID:24849071

  7. Soil texture and granulometry at the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollfus, A.; Deschamps, M.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    1993-02-01

    Attention is given to a characterization of the physical behavior of the Martian upper surface in its first few decimeters on the basis of mutual relationships between three parameters: the linear polarization of the reflected light, the visual albedo, and the thermal inertia. Polarimetric scans raked a strip covering two contrasting regions, the dark-hued Mare Erythraeum, and the light-hued Thaumasia. Erythraeum is characterized everywhere by a uniform polarization response, despite the large geomorphological diversity of the surface. A ubiquitous coating or mantling with small dark grains of albedo 12.7 percent, with a radius of 10 to 20 microns, is indicated. Thaumasia exhibits a large variety of soil properties. A typical location with albedo of 16.3 percent has a surface covered with orange grains, probably very dispersed in size, for which the largest grains are 20 to 40 microns.

  8. Soil texture and granulometry at the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollfus, Audouin; Deschamps, Marc; Zimbelman, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to a characterization of the physical behavior of the Martian upper surface in its first few decimeters on the basis of mutual relationships between three parameters: the linear polarization of the reflected light, the visual albedo, and the thermal inertia. Polarimetric scans raked a strip covering two contrasting regions, the dark-hued Mare Erythraeum, and the light-hued Thaumasia. Erythraeum is characterized everywhere by a uniform polarization response, despite the large geomorphological diversity of the surface. A ubiquitous coating or mantling with small dark grains of albedo 12.7 percent, with a radius of 10 to 20 microns, is indicated. Thaumasia exhibits a large variety of soil properties. A typical location with albedo of 16.3 percent has a surface covered with orange grains, probably very dispersed in size, for which the largest grains are 20 to 40 microns.

  9. Design, fabrication, and measured performance of anti-reflecting surface textures in infrared transmitting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Douglas S.; MacLeod, Bruce D.

    2005-05-01

    Rugged infrared transmitting materials have a high refractive index, which leads to large reflection losses. Multi-layer thin-film coatings designed for anti-reflection (AR), exhibit good performance, but have limited bandwidths, narrow acceptance angles, polarization effects, high costs, and short lifetimes in harsh environments. Many aerospace and military applications requiring high optical transmission, durability, survivability, and radiation resistance, are inadequately addressed by thin-film coating technology. Surface relief microstructures have been shown to be an effective alternative to thin-film AR coatings in many infrared and visible-band applications. These microstructures, etched directly into the window surface and commonly referred to as "Motheye" textures, impart an optical function that minimizes surface reflections without compromising the inherent durability of the window material. Reflection losses are reduced to a minimum for broad-band light incident over a wide angular range. For narrow-band applications such as laser communications, a simpler type of AR surface structure called a sub-wavelength, or "SWS" surface, is used. In general, both the Motheye and SWS surface textures will exhibit the same characteristics as the bulk material with respect to durability, thermal issues, and radiation resistance. The problems associated with thin-film coating adhesion and stress, are thus eliminated by design. Optical performance data for AR structures fabricated in fused silica, sapphire, Clear ZnS, ZnSe, cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), silicon, and germanium, will be presented.

  10. Active shape models with optimised texture features for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K.; Montgomery, D.; Yang, F.; McLaren, D. B.; McLaughlin, S.; Nailon, W. H.

    2014-03-01

    There is now considerable interest in radiation oncology on the use of shape models of anatomy to improve target delineation and assess anatomical disparity at time of radiotherapy. In this paper a texture based active shape model (ASM) is presented for automatic delineation of the gross tumor volume (GTV), containing the prostate, on computed tomography (CT) images of prostate cancer patients. The model was trained on two-dimensional (2D) contours identified by a radiation oncologist on sequential CT image slices. A three-dimensional (3D) GTV shape was constructed from these and iteratively aligned using Procrustes analysis. To train the model the shape deformation variance was learnt using the Active Shape Model (ASM) approach. In a novel development to this approach a profile feature was selected from pre-computed texture features by minimizing the Mahalanobis distance to obtain the most distinct feature for each landmark. The interior of the GTV was modelled using quantile histograms to initialize the shape model on new cases. From the archive of 42 cases of contoured CT scans, 32 cases were randomly selected for training the model and 10 cases for evaluating performance. The gold standard was defined by the radiation oncologist. The shape model achieved an overall Dice coefficient of 0.81 for all test cases. Performance was found to increase, mean Dice coefficient of 0.87, when the volume size of the new case was similar to the mean shape of the model. With further work the approach has the potential to be used in real-time delineation of target volumes and improve segmentation accuracy.

  11. Surface passivation of nano-textured fluorescent SiC by atomic layer deposited TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Fadil, Ahmed; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Petersen, Paul Michael; Ou, Haiyan

    2016-07-01

    Nano-textured surfaces have played a key role in optoelectronic materials to enhance the light extraction efficiency. In this work, morphology and optical properties of nano-textured SiC covered with atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiO2 were investigated. In order to obtain a high quality surface for TiO2 deposition, a three-step cleaning procedure was introduced after RIE etching. The morphology of anatase TiO2 indicates that the nano-textured substrate has a much higher surface nucleated grain density than a flat substrate at the beginning of the deposition process. The corresponding reflectance increases with TiO2 thickness due to increased surface diffuse reflection. The passivation effect of ALD TiO2 thin film on the nano-textured fluorescent 6H-SiC sample was also investigated and a PL intensity improvement of 8.05% was obtained due to the surface passivation.

  12. The effects of texture and surface condition on the iodine stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of unirradiated Zircaloy-2

    SciTech Connect

    Syrett, B.C.; Cubicciotti, D.; Jones, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    Four lots of stress-relieved Zircaloy-2 tubing were prepared from a single heat of the alloy. Tube reduction parameters were controlled so that each lot had a different crystallographic texture. The tubing with the most radial (least tangential) basal pole intensity was shown to have a Kearns texture number in the radial direction of 0.61, whereas the equivalent value for the tubing with the least radial texture was 0.48. Each lot of tubing was given one of three surface treatments: etched, etched and grit blasted, or lightly etched and shot blasted. The iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of the unirradiated tubing was determined by measuring the time to failure in a standard tube pressurization test at about 593 K in which 6 mg of iodine was present for each square centimetre of exposed Zircaloy surface. The results showed that texture has a large effect on SCC susceptibility and that surface condition has a significant but lesser effect. The SCC resistance was lowest in the material with the most tangential basal pole intensity and increased as the texture became more radial. The lightly etched and shot-blasted surface resulted in times to failure that were shorter than the times for the other two surface conditions. However, it seems likely that the influence of surface treatment is quite complex and that SCC susceptibility can change significantly with a seemingly minor change in the surface treatment technique. The effect of texture was interpreted in terms of its influence on strength, on deformation characteristics, and on orientation of SCC susceptible planes with respect to the dominant tensile (hoop) stress. The effect of surface condition was interpreted in terms of its influence on residual stresses, on local texture changes, on local stress concentration, and on chemical activity.

  13. Development of anti-icing materials by chemical tailoring of hydrophobic textured metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Thibaut V J; Neville, Anne; Millner, Paul; Hewson, Rob W; Morina, Ardian

    2013-03-15

    Ice on surfaces can have dramatic consequences for human activities. Over the last decades, the design of new materials with anti-icing properties has generated significant research efforts for the prevention of ice accretion. Here we investigate water freezing temperatures on untreated and negatively charged hydrophobic stainless steel surfaces and use these temperatures to evaluate icephobicity. Supercooled water microdroplets are deposited and undergo a slow controlled cooling until spontaneous freezing occurs. Textured hydrophobic stainless steel surfaces functionalized with anionic polyelectrolytes brushes display unexpectedly lower freezing temperatures, at least 7 °C lower than polished untreated steel. On the basis of the entropy reduction of the crystalline phase near a charged solid surface, we used a modification of the classical heterogeneous nucleation theory to explain the observed freezing temperatures lessening. Our results could help the design of new composite materials that more efficiently prevent ice formation. PMID:23245630

  14. SIZE AND SURFACE AREA OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES AFTER A HEATING EVENT AT A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Sirono, Sin-iti

    2013-03-01

    The activity of a young star rises abruptly during an FU Orionis outburst. This event causes a temporary temperature increase in the protoplanetary nebula. H{sub 2}O icy grains are sublimated by this event, and silicate cores embedded inside the ice are ejected. During the high-temperature phase, the silicate grains coagulate to form silicate core aggregates. After the heating event, the temperature drops, and the ice recondenses onto the aggregates. I determined numerically the size distribution of the ice-covered aggregates. The size of the aggregates exceeds 10 {mu}m around the snow line. Because of the migration of the ice to large aggregates, only a small fraction of the silicate core aggregate is covered with H{sub 2}O ice. After the heating event, the surface of an ice-covered aggregate is totally covered by silicate core aggregates. This might reduce the fragmentation velocity of aggregates when they collide. It is possible that the covering silicate cores shield the UV radiation field which induces photodissociation of H{sub 2}O ice. This effect may cause the shortage of cold H{sub 2}O vapor observed by Herschel.

  15. The effect of controlled microrobotized blasting on implant surface texturing and early osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Gil, Luiz F; Marin, Charles; Teixeira, Hellen; Marão, Heloisa F; Tovar, Nick; Khan, Rehan; Bonfante, Estevam A; Janal, Malvin; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-02-01

    Surface topography modifications have become a key strategy for hastening the host-to-implant response to implantable materials. The present study evaluated the effect of three different carefully controlled surface texture patterns achieved through microrobotized blasting (controlled to high, medium and low roughness) relative to a larger scale blasting procedure (control) in early osseointegration in a canine model. Four commercially pure grade 2 titanium alloy implants (one of each surface) were bilaterally placed in the radii of six beagle dogs and allowed end points of 1 and 6 weeks in vivo. Following sacrifice, implants in bone were non-decalcified processed for bone morphologic and histometric (bone-to-implant contact; bone area fraction occupancy) evaluation. Surface topography was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical interferometry. Results showed initial osteogenic tissue interaction at one week and new bone in intimate contact with all implant surfaces at 6 weeks. At 1 and 6 weeks in vivo, higher bone-to-implant and bone area fraction occupancy were observed for the high texture pattern microrobotized blasted surface relative to others. PMID:26508287

  16. Soft electrostatic repulsion in particle monolayers at liquid interfaces: surface pressure and effect of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kralchevsky, Peter A; Danov, Krassimir D; Petkov, Plamen V

    2016-07-28

    Non-densely packed interfacial monolayers from charged micrometre-sized colloid particles find applications for producing micropatterned surfaces. The soft electrostatic repulsion between the particles in a monolayer on an air/water (or oil/water) interface is mediated by the non-polar fluid, where Debye screening is absent and the distances between the particles are considerably greater than their diameters. Surface pressure versus area isotherms were measured at the air/water interface. The experiments show that asymptotically the surface pressure is inversely proportional to the third power of the interparticle distance. A theoretical model is developed that predicts not only the aforementioned asymptotic law but also the whole surface pressure versus area dependence. An increase in the surface pressure upon aggregation of charged particles in the interfacial monolayers is experimentally established. This effect is explained by the developed theoretical model, which predicts that the surface pressure should linearly increase with the square root of the particle mean aggregation number. The effect of added electrolyte on the aggregation is also investigated. The data lead to the conclusion that 'limited aggregation' exists in the monolayers of charged particles. In brief, the stronger electrostatic repulsion between the bigger aggregates leads to a higher barrier to their coalescence that, in turn, prevents any further aggregation, i.e. negative feedback is present.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298437

  17. Optimal Multiple Surface Segmentation With Shape and Context Priors

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Junjie; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John M.; Wu, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of multiple surfaces in medical images is a challenging problem, further complicated by the frequent presence of weak boundary evidence, large object deformations, and mutual influence between adjacent objects. This paper reports a novel approach to multi-object segmentation that incorporates both shape and context prior knowledge in a 3-D graph-theoretic framework to help overcome the stated challenges. We employ an arc-based graph representation to incorporate a wide spectrum of prior information through pair-wise energy terms. In particular, a shape-prior term is used to penalize local shape changes and a context-prior term is used to penalize local surface-distance changes from a model of the expected shape and surface distances, respectively. The globally optimal solution for multiple surfaces is obtained by computing a maximum flow in a low-order polynomial time. The proposed method was validated on intraretinal layer segmentation of optical coherence tomography images and demonstrated statistically significant improvement of segmentation accuracy compared to our earlier graph-search method that was not utilizing shape and context priors. The mean unsigned surface positioning errors obtained by the conventional graph-search approach (6.30 ± 1.58 μm) was improved to 5.14 ± 0.99 μm when employing our new method with shape and context priors. PMID:23193309

  18. Textural evidence for jamming and dewatering of a sub-surface, fluid-saturated granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherry, T. J.; Rowe, C. D.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Sand injectites are spectacular examples of large-scale granular flows involving migration of hundreds of cubic meters of sand slurry over hundreds of meters to kilometers in the sub-surface. By studying the macro- and microstructural textures of a kilometer-scale sand injectite, we interpret the fluid flow regimes during emplacement and define the timing of formation of specific textures in the injected material. Fluidized sand sourced from the Santa Margarita Fm., was injected upward into the Santa Cruz Mudstone, Santa Cruz County, California. The sand injectite exposed at Yellow Bank Beach records emplacement of both hydrocarbon and aqueous sand slurries. Elongate, angular mudstone clasts were ripped from the wall rock during sand migration, providing evidence for high velocity, turbid flow. However, clast long axis orientations are consistently sub-horizontal suggesting the slurry transitioned to a laminar flow as the flow velocity decreased in the sill-like intrusion. Millimeter to centimeter scale laminations are ubiquitous throughout the sand body and are locally parallel to the mudstone clast long axes. The laminations are distinct in exposure because alternating layers are preferentially cemented with limonite sourced from later groundwater infiltration. Quantitative microstructural analyses show that the laminations are defined by subtle oscillations in grain alignment between limonite and non-limonite stained layers. Grain packing, size and shape distributions do not vary. The presence of limonite in alternating layers results from differential infiltration of groundwater, indicating permeability changes between the layers despite minimal grain scale differences. Convolute dewatering structures deform the laminations. Dolomite-cemented sand, a signature of hydrocarbon saturation, forms irregular bodies that cross-cut the laminations and dewatering structures. Laminations are not formed in the dolomite-cemented sand. The relative viscosity difference

  19. Electron reflection and secondary emission characteristics of sputter-textured pyrolytic graphite surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Curren, A. N.; Sovey, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements are presented of secondary electron emission and reflected primary electron characteristics of sputter-textured pyrolitic graphite surfaces with microstructures of various sizes and densities, made with an Auger cylindrical mirror analyzer in a high-vacuum chamber at pressures below 1.33 x 10 to the -7th N/sq m (10 to the -9th torr). A dense, tall, thin, spire-like microstructure, obtained at ion energies of 1000 eV and ion current densities of 5 mA/sq cm, is the most effective. The secondary electron emission from such a surface is lower than that of soot, whose secondary emission is among the lowest of any material. At a primary electron energy of 1000 eV, the secondary electron emission yield of smooth CU is about 350% greater than the lowest value obtained for sputter-textured pyrolitic graphite. The reflected primary electron index of smooth Cu is a factor of 80 greater. If the secondary electron emission yield is reduced to 0.3, which is possible with sputter-textured pyrolitic graphite, the traveling wave tube collector efficiency could be improved by as much as 4% over that for smooth copper.

  20. Hybrid micro/nano-structure formation by angular laser texturing of Si surface for surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kaichen; Zhang, Chentao; Zhou, Rui; Ji, Rong; Hong, Minghui

    2016-05-16

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has drawn much research interest in the past decades as an efficient technique to detect low-concentration molecules. Among many technologies, which can be used to fabricate SERS substrates, laser ablation is a simple and high-speed method to produce large-area SERS substrates. This work investigates the angular texturing effect by dynamic laser ablation and its influence on SERS signals. By tuning the angle between the Si surface and laser irradiation, the distributions and sizes of laser induced hybrid micro/nano-structures are studied. By decorating with a silver film, plenty of hot spots can be created among these structures for SERS. It is found that when the incident laser angle is 15° at the laser fluence of 16.0 J/cm2, the SERS performance is well optimized. This work realizes antisymmetric distribution of nanoparticles deposited on Si surface, which provides a flexible tuning of the hybrid micro/nano-structures' fabrication with high controllability for practical applications. PMID:27409859

  1. Electron reflection and secondary emission characteristics of sputter-textured pyrolytic graphite surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Curren, A. N.; Sovey, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Low secondary and reflected primary electron emission from the collector electrode surfaces is important for optimum collector efficiency and hence for high overall efficiency of microwave amplifier tubes used in communication satellites and in military systems. Ion sputter texturing of the surface effectively suppresses electron emission from pyrolytic graphite, which is a promising collector electrode material. Secondary and reflected primary electron emission characteristics of sputter textured pyrolytic graphite surfaces with microstructures of various sizes and densities are presented. The microstructure with the lowest electron emission levels, less than those of soot, consists of a dense array of tall, thin spires.

  2. Self-assembly of thiolated cyanine aggregates on Au(111) and Au nanoparticle surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, Guillermo O.; Cortés, Emiliano; Grumelli, Doris; Méndez de Leo, Lucila P.; Williams, Federico J.; Tognalli, Nicolás G.; Fainstein, Alejandro; Vela, María Elena; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A.; Salvarezza, Roberto C.

    2012-01-01

    Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show that CNN species adsorb on the Au surfaces by forming thiolate-Au bonds. We found that the J-aggregates are preferentially adsorbed on the Au(111) surface directly from the solution while adsorbed CNN monomers cannot organize into aggregates on the substrate surface. These results indicate that the CNN-Au interaction is not able to disorganize the large J-aggregates stabilized by π-π stacking to optimize the S-Au binding site but it is strong enough to hinder the π-π stacking when CNNs are chemisorbed as monomers. The optical properties of the J-aggregates remain active after adsorption. The possibility of covalently bonding CNN J-aggregates to Au planar surfaces and Au nanoparticles controlling the J-aggregate/Au distance opens a new path regarding their improved stability and the wide range of biological applications of both CNN and AuNP biocompatible systems.Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show

  3. Colorectal polyp segmentation using front propagation on surfaces guided by shape.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Karthik; Soniwal, Yogesh; Madrosiya, Akshay; Desai, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Polyp size is a biomarker of colon cancer. Manual size measurements are subject to a variety of sources of error. We present an automatic method for segmenting a polyp from a user clicked point. The method is based on front propagation on surface mesh, guided by features that characterize the local protrudedness, its thickness, its resemblance to wall like structures and ridge measures. These measures are designed to characterize growths in the colonic lumen and differentiate polyp growth from other protrusions such as haustral folds. These measures are aggregated and smoothed. Fast marching guided by these features extracts the polyps. Empirical observation suggests that the method successfully segments a variety of polyp shapes in less than 2 s. PMID:26736946

  4. Microstructure and micromorphology of Cu/Co nanoparticles: Surface texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Bramowicz, Miroslaw; Kulesza, Slawomir; Ghaderi, Atefeh; Dalouji, Vali; Solaymani, Shahram; Khalaj, Zahra

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyses the three-dimensional (3-D) surface texture of Cu/Co thin films deposited by DC-Magnetron sputtering method on the silicon substrates. The prepared Cu/Co nanoparticles were used as research materials. Three groups of samples were deposited on silicon substrates in the argon atmosphere and gradually cooled down to room temperature. The crystalline structures and elemental compositions were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum with conventional Bragg-Brentano geometry. X-ray diffraction profile indicates that Co and Cu interpenetrating crystalline structures are formed in these films. The sample surface images were recorded using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and analyzed by means of the fractal geometry. Statistical, fractal and functional surface properties of prepared samples were computed to describe major characteristics of the spatial surface texture of Cu/Co nanoparticles. Presented deposition method is a versatile, costeffective, and simple method to synthesize nano- and microstructures of Cu/Co thin films. This type of 3-D morphology allows to understand the structure/property relationships and to investigate defect-related properties of Cu/Co nanoparticles. Presented results confirm the possibility of preparing high-quality Cu/Co nanoparticles via DC-Magnetron sputtering method on silicon substrates.

  5. Ion beam textured and coated surfaces experiment (IBEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Stevens, Nicholas; Merrow, James

    1991-01-01

    The IBEX, with 36 samples of various materials, was placed aboard the LDEF. Twenty-seven of the samples had surfaces modified using ion beam technology, and nine were made up of commercially available materials. The materials are in some way useful in space power systems. The various types of materials tested included six categories: (1) ion beam structured surfaces suitable for solar thermal (concentrator) or space radiators; (2) ion beam sputtered conductive coatings for thermal and space charge control; (3) solar reflector surfaces; (4) flexible thin film coatings and solar array blanket material for protection of spacecraft polymers; (5) painted and/or state-of-the-art solar thermal materials; and (6) micrometeoroid sensitive detector. Data analysis presented include the optical properties of each surface before and after exposure to the space environment and the respective backup surfaces.

  6. Fabrication and selective surface modification of 3-dimensionally textured biomedical polymers from etched silicon substrates.

    PubMed

    Kapur, R; Spargo, B J; Chen, M S; Calvert, J M; Rudolph, A S

    1996-01-01

    A new method is described for producing biomedically relevant polymers with precisely defined micron scale surface texture in the x, y, and z planes. Patterned Si templates were fabricated using photolithography to create a relief pattern in photoresist with lateral dimensions as small as 1 micron. Electroless Ni was selectively deposited in the trenches of the patterned substrate. The Ni served as a resilient mask for transferring the patterns onto the Si substrate to depths of up to 8.5 microns by anisotropic reactive ion etching with a fluorine-based plasma. The 3-dimensional (3-D) textured silicon substrates were used as robust, reusable molds for pattern transfer onto poly (dimethyl siloxane), low density poly (ethylene), poly (L-lactide), and poly (glycolide) by either casting or injection molding. The fidelity of the pattern transfer from the silicon substrates to the polymers was 90 to 95% in all three planes for all polymers for more than 60 transfers from a single wafer, as determined by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Further, the 3-D textured polymers were selectively modified to coat proteins either in the trenches or on the mesas by capillary modification or selective coating techniques. These selectively patterned 3-D polymer substrates may be useful for a variety of biomaterial applications. PMID:8953387

  7. Texture synthesis and transfer from multiple samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yue; Zhao, Qinping

    2003-09-01

    Texture Mapping plays a very important role in Computer Graphics. Texture Synthesis is one of the main methods to obtain textures, it makes use of sample textures to generate new textures. Texture Transfer is based on Texture Synthesis, it renders objects with textures taken from different objects. Currently, most of Texture Synthesis and Transfer methods use a single sample texture. A method for Texture Synthesis adn Transfer from multi samples was presented. For texture synthesis, the L-shaped neighborhood seaching approach was used. Users specify the proportion of each sample, the number of seed points, and these seed points are scattered randomly according to their samples in horizontal and vertical direction synchronously to synthesize textures. The synthesized textures are very good. For texture transfer, the luminance of the target image and the sample textures are analyzed. This procedure is from coarse to fine, and can produce a visually pleasing result.

  8. Surface texture measurement for additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantaphyllou, Andrew; Giusca, Claudiu L.; Macaulay, Gavin D.; Roerig, Felix; Hoebel, Matthias; Leach, Richard K.; Tomita, Ben; Milne, Katherine A.

    2015-06-01

    The surface texture of additively manufactured metallic surfaces made by powder bed methods is affected by a number of factors, including the powder’s particle size distribution, the effect of the heat source, the thickness of the printed layers, the angle of the surface relative to the horizontal build bed and the effect of any post processing/finishing. The aim of the research reported here is to understand the way these surfaces should be measured in order to characterise them. In published research to date, the surface texture is generally reported as an Ra value, measured across the lay. The appropriateness of this method for such surfaces is investigated here. A preliminary investigation was carried out on two additive manufacturing processes—selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM)—focusing on the effect of build angle and post processing. The surfaces were measured using both tactile and optical methods and a range of profile and areal parameters were reported. Test coupons were manufactured at four angles relative to the horizontal plane of the powder bed using both SLM and EBM. The effect of lay—caused by the layered nature of the manufacturing process—was investigated, as was the required sample area for optical measurements. The surfaces were also measured before and after grit blasting.

  9. Integration of texture and disparity cues to surface slant in dorsal visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Aidan P.; Ban, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Reliable estimation of three-dimensional (3D) surface orientation is critical for recognizing and interacting with complex 3D objects in our environment. Human observers maximize the reliability of their estimates of surface slant by integrating multiple depth cues. Texture and binocular disparity are two such cues, but they are qualitatively very different. Existing evidence suggests that representations of surface tilt from each of these cues coincide at the single-neuron level in higher cortical areas. However, the cortical circuits responsible for 1) integration of such qualitatively distinct cues and 2) encoding the slant component of surface orientation have not been assessed. We tested for cortical responses related to slanted plane stimuli that were defined independently by texture, disparity, and combinations of these two cues. We analyzed the discriminability of functional MRI responses to two slant angles using multivariate pattern classification. Responses in visual area V3B/KO to stimuli containing congruent cues were more discriminable than those elicited by single cues, in line with predictions based on the fusion of slant estimates from component cues. This improvement was specific to congruent combinations of cues: incongruent cues yielded lower decoding accuracies, which suggests the robust use of individual cues in cases of large cue conflicts. These data suggest that area V3B/KO is intricately involved in the integration of qualitatively dissimilar depth cues. PMID:23576705

  10. High friction on ice provided by elastomeric fiber composites with textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, R.; Naguib, H.; Fernie, G.; Dutta, T.

    2015-03-01

    Two main applications requiring high friction on ice are automobile tires and footwear. The main motivation behind the use of soft rubbers in these applications is the relatively high friction force generated between a smooth rubber contacting smooth ice. Unfortunately, the friction force between rubber and ice is very low at temperatures near the melting point of ice and as a result we still experience automobile accidents and pedestrian slips and falls in the winter. Here, we report on a class of compliant fiber-composite materials with textured surfaces that provide outstanding coefficients of friction on wet ice. The fibrous composites consist of a hard glass-fiber phase reinforcing a compliant thermoplastic polyurethane matrix. The glass-fiber phase is textured such that it is aligned transversally and protruding out of the elastomer surface. Our analysis indicates that the exposed fiber phase exhibits a "micro-cleat" effect, allowing for it to fracture the ice and increase the interfacial contact area thereby requiring a high force to shear the interface.