Science.gov

Sample records for agonist diethylstilbestrol des

  1. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... products that contained DES. DES Product Names Nonsteroidal Estrogens Benzestrol Chlorotrianisene Comestrol Cyren A. Cyren B. Delvinal ... Stils Synestrin Synestrol Synthosestrin Tace Vallestril Willestrol Nonsteroidal Estrogen-Androgen Combinations Amperone Di-Erone Estan Metystil Teserene ...

  2. Diethylstilbestrol in the Treatment of Rape Victims

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Dianne; Gerety, Meghan; Bromberg, Shirley; Fullam, Susan; Divasto, Peter; Kaufman, Arthur

    1976-01-01

    Despite growing controversy surrounding its use as a “morning after pill,” diethylstilbestrol (DES) is prescribed liberally for rape victims. Guidelines for its use in these patients is lacking. Of 150 consecutive rape victims treated at a university medical center, 63 (42 percent) received prescriptions for DES. Of the 55 (87 percent) on whom follow-up was obtained, in 40 (73 percent) there were substantial side effects—nausea or vomiting, or both. At least six (11 percent) did not complete therapy because of these side effects. The authors offer guidelines for use of DES for rape victims and a plan for patient education and follow-up. PMID:1032235

  3. Effects of Diethylstilbestrol in Fathead Minnows: Part 2. Concentrations in Water and Tissues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen, was once widely prescribed to prevent miscarriages, and was used as a growth promoter in feed for beef and poultry production. After it was determined that DES caused significant adverse effects in the offspring of mot...

  4. Effects of Diethylstilbestrol in Fathead Minnows: Part 1. Effects on Reproductive Endocrine Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen, was once widely prescribed to prevent miscarriages, and was used as a growth promoter in feed for beef and poultry production. After it was determined that DES caused significant adverse effects in the offspring of mo...

  5. Bioactivation of diethylstilbestrol by the Syrian hamster kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    Male Syrian golden hamsters chronically exposed to diethylstilbestrol (DES) develop renal adenocarcinomas with an incidence approaching 100%. The ability of the hamster kidney to bioactivate DES was assessed using hamster kidney slices. The male hamster renal cortex has a 2- to 5-fold greater capacity to irreversibly bind ({sup 3}H)DES as compared with female hamster renal cortex and with male hamster renal medulla. Incubation of the tissue under anaerobic conditions inhibited the metabolism and irreversible binding of ({sup 3}H)DES. Gel electrophoresis analysis of covalently modified proteins revealed several radioactive peaks indicating that specific adduct formation had occurred. The cytochrome P-450 inhibitors SKF 525-A, metyrapone, carbon monoxide, butylated hydroxytoluene, and dicumarol decreased the irreversible binding of ({sup 3}H)DES to renal cortical protein by 38 to 72%.

  6. The DES Story: Lessons Learned

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Robert Hoover discusses the DES followup study, which follows diethylstilbestrol (DES) exposed and unexposed mothers, daughters and sons, and granddaughters for adverse health effects resulting from this exposure.

  7. Sister chromatid exchanges and cell division delays induced by diethylstilbestrol, estradiol, and estriol in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, A.; Wolff, S.

    1983-09-01

    It had been found previously that exposure of human lymphocytes in vitro to diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic estrogen and known human carcinogen, led to the induction of sister chromatid exchangers. More sister chromatid exchanges were induced in cells from pregnant women than from men. To see if the effects of DES could be induced by other estrogens, lymphocytes from a man and a pregnant woman were treated in vitro with the natural estrogens estradiol and estriol. These did not induce sister chromatid exchanges.

  8. Neonatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol causes granulomatous orchitis via epididymal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Miyaso, Hidenobu; Naito, Munekazu; Hirai, Shuichi; Matsuno, Yoshiharu; Komiyama, Masatoshi; Itoh, Masahiro; Mori, Chisato

    2014-09-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES), an endocrine-disrupting chemical, is an infamous artificial estrogenic compound. Although neonatal exposure to DES has been shown to result in inflammation of the male reproductive system, it has not, to our knowledge, been reported to induce testicular inflammation. Here we report that neonatal exposure to DES caused granulomatous orchitis with spermatogenic disturbance in 4 of 17 ICR male mice at 12 weeks of age. In the animals with spermatogenic disturbance, we observed either seminiferous tubules containing only cells with Sertoli cell features (likely Sertoli cell syndrome), or tubule cells in maturation arrest that contained only spermatogonia and/or spermatocytes. Following neonatal DES exposure, 5-week-old mice exhibited inflammation in cauda epididymis; by 8 weeks, the inflammation had spread to all segments of epididymis but not the testis; by 12 weeks, inflammation of the epididymis was observed in all mice. These data indicated that cauda epididymis has increased sensitivity to neonatal DES exposure compared to other segments of epididymis and testis. The data also implied that neonatal DES exposure-induced inflammation in cauda epididymis extended gradually to the testis via corpus and caput during development. PMID:24449359

  9. Effects of exogenous growth hormone and diethylstilbestrol on growth and carcass composition of growing lambs.

    PubMed

    Muir, L A; Wien, S; Duquette, P F; Rickes, E L; Cordes, E H

    1983-06-01

    An 8-wk growth trial was conducted to assess the effects of ovine growth hormone (oGH; 7 mg/d, sc) on growth performance and carcass composition of normal, growing wether lambs. Diethylstilbestrol (DES; .1 mg/d, sc) and control lambs were included for comparisons. Plasma oGH levels at 8 wk were 1.9, 5.5 (P less than .05) and 138.1 ng/ml (P less than .001) for controls, DES and oGH lambs, respectively. Diethylstilbestrol did not increase plasma oGH until the fourth week. The oGH improved feed conversion 7.4% (FC; P less than .05), but did not alter average daily gain (ADG) or feed intake (ADF). Diethylstilbestrol increased ADG 15.3% (P less than .05) and improved FC 16.1% (P less than .01), with no effect on ADF. The primary effect of oGH on carcass composition was to decrease the quantity of fat 8.9% (P less than .05). In addition, oGH may have increased protein 6.5% (P less than .10) and moisture 4.0% (not significant). Diethylstilbestrol increased the quantity of carcass protein 10% (P less than .01) and moisture 8.7% (P less than .05), with no effect on fat. In these studies, the primary effect of exogenous oGH on normal, growing lambs was to reduce carcass fat, which may account for the observed improvement in FC. Diethylstilbestrol, at 1/70th of the oGH dose, was superior to oGH for improving FC (P less than .05) and ADG (P less than .10). Improvements in body weight of the lambs given DES were observed 2 wk before an increase in plasma oGH. In addition, DES, unlike exogenous oGH, did not alter the quantity of carcass fat. These observations do not support the concept that the mode of action of DES is through increased GH secretion. PMID:6874614

  10. Extracellular distribution of radiolabel obscures specific binding of diethylstilbestrol in mouse skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, B.; Blix, P.M.; Cohen, L.

    1985-03-01

    The extracellular distribution of /sup 3/H-diethylstilbestrol (/sup 3/H-DES) in mouse skeletal muscle was assessed following intraperitoneal injection. Total muscle extracellular space was measured with /sup 14/C-inulin, and the vascular space with /sup 125/I-albumin. A significant difference in the distribution of native /sup 3/H-DES and its metabolites in muscle and blood was found. This could only be explained if these compounds distributed with the albumin space and not the inulin space.

  11. In utero diethylstilbestrol exposure: structural and epithelial abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Noller, K L

    1983-01-01

    Soon after the reported association between diethylstilbestrol (DES) and clear-cell adenocarcinoma, large numbers of women exposed in utero to DES underwent screening examinations. Almost no cases of cancer were detected during this screening, but various epithelial abnormalities were found in many exposed women. Cervical and vaginal epithelial and structural abnormalities found in many DES-exposed women are described. Some of these abnormalities can be seen only with the aid of the colposcope, but many are visible to the naked eye. The identification of potentially exposed women should become a part of every physician's pelvic examination of women born since 1940. The 1st part of the examination of any DES-exposed women should be palpation of the vaginal vault with the index finger. This is done before speculum examination to identify any ridges, constrictions, or masses so that these can be visually inspected. Following vaginal palpation a bivalve speculum is introduced into the vagina in the routine fashion. At this point it is sometimes possible to observe a structural abnormality of the vagina and/or cervix. Any reddened area in the vagina or on the cervix is suspicious for the presence of glandular epithelium. Cytologic specimens should be obtained; it is important to sample all abnormal areas. Many DES-exposed women require sampling of the complete cervix, cervical side walls, vaginal fornices, and the vaginal vault to the point at which normal glycogenated squamous epithelium appears. The largest DES project in the US, "The DESAD Project," recommends taking 1 sample from the cervix wall and a separate sample from the vagina in those women who have vaginal abnormalities. These specimens should be handled in the usual way. It is recommended that whenever a cytologic sample from a DES-exposed woman is reported as being abnormal, the sample be sent to a DES center where it can be reviewed by a cytologist who has seen many samples from exposed women. Colposcopy has been a useful technique for the examination of DES-exposed women, but the findings are often confusing since many "abnormal" areas may be seen in women in whom no pathology is demonstrated. The 1st finding that will be seen by the colposcopist is a widened transformation zone. This may be located only on the cervix or may extend quite far into the vagina. When the glandular epithelium begins to mature, areas stimulating intraepithelial neoplasms may be seen. The areas of vaginal squamous metaplasia may mature with time. PMID:12266371

  12. The endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol induces adipocyte differentiation and promotes obesity in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Chan-Juan; Cheng, Xue-Jia; Xia, Hong-Fei Ma, Xu

    2012-08-15

    Epidemiology studies indicate that exposure to endocrine disruptors during developmental “window” contributes to adipogenesis and the development of obesity. Implication of endocrine disruptor such as diethylstilbestrol (DES) on adipose tissue development has been poorly investigated. Here we evaluated the effects of DES on adipocyte differentiation in vitro and in vivo, and explored potential mechanism involved in its action. DES induced 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation in a dose-dependent manner, and activated the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and peroxisome proliferator-acivated receptor (PPAR) ? as well as its target genes required for adipogenesis in vitro. ER mediated the enhancement of DES-induced PPAR? activity. Moreover, DES perturbed key regulators of adipogenesis and lipogenic pathway in vivo. In utero exposure to low dose of DES significantly increased body weight, liver weight and fat mass in female offspring at postnatal day (PND) 60. In addition, serum triglyceride and glucose levels were also significantly elevated. These results suggest that perinatal exposure to DES may be expected to increase the incidence of obesity in a sex-dependent manner and can act as a potential chemical stressor for obesity and obesity-related disorders. -- Highlights: ? DES induced adipocyte differentiation in a dose-dependent manner in 3T3-L1 cells. ? DES activated adipogenic critical regulators and markers in vitro and in vivo. ? Perinatal exposure to DES led to the obese phenotype in female offspring. ? DES might be a potential chemical stressor for obesity and obesity-related disorders.

  13. Oxidative metabolites of diethylstilbestrol in the fetal Syrian golden hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Maydl, R.; Metzler, M.

    1984-12-01

    /sup 14/C-Diethylstilbestrol was administered orally, intraperitoneally, and intrafetally to 15-day pregnant hamsters at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and the radioactivity was determined in the fetus, placenta, and maternal liver after 6 hours. Significant amounts of radioactivity were found in these tissues in every case, indicating maternal-fetal and fetal-maternal transfer of diethylstilbestrol. Part of the radioactivity found in the tissues could not be extracted even after excessive washing. This implied the presence of reactive metabolites. In the fetal and placental extracts, eight oxidative metabolites of diethylstilbestrol were identified by mass fragmentography as hydroxy- and methoxy-derivatives of diethylstilbestrol, pseudodiethylstilbestrol, and dienestrol. The presence of oxidative metabolites in the hamster fetus and the covalent binding to tissue macromolecules are possibly associated with the fetotoxic effects of diethylstilbestrol.

  14. Neonatal diethylstilbestrol exposure alters the metabolic profile of uterine epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yan; Lin, Congxing; Veith, G. Michael; Chen, Hong; Dhandha, Maulik; Ma, Liang

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Developmental exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) causes reproductive tract malformations, affects fertility and increases the risk of clear cell carcinoma of the vagina and cervix in humans. Previous studies on a well-established mouse DES model demonstrated that it recapitulates many features of the human syndrome, yet the underlying molecular mechanism is far from clear. Using the neonatal DES mouse model, the present study uses global transcript profiling to systematically explore early gene expression changes in individual epithelial and mesenchymal compartments of the neonatal uterus. Over 900 genes show differential expression upon DES treatment in either one or both tissue layers. Interestingly, multiple components of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?)-mediated adipogenesis and lipid metabolism, including PPAR? itself, are targets of DES in the neonatal uterus. Transmission electron microscopy and Oil-Red O staining further demonstrate a dramatic increase in lipid deposition in uterine epithelial cells upon DES exposure. Neonatal DES exposure also perturbs glucose homeostasis in the uterine epithelium. Some of these neonatal DES-induced metabolic changes appear to last into adulthood, suggesting a permanent effect of DES on energy metabolism in uterine epithelial cells. This study extends the list of biological processes that can be regulated by estrogen or DES, and provides a novel perspective for endocrine disruptor-induced reproductive abnormalities. PMID:22679223

  15. Effects of Low-Dose Diethylstilbestrol Exposure on DNA Methylation in Mouse Spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Zheng, Li-juan; Jiang, Xiao; Liu, Wen-bin; Han, Fei; Cao, Jia; Liu, Jin-yi

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from previous studies suggests that the male reproductive system can be disrupted by fetal or neonatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES). However, the molecular basis for this effect remains unclear. To evaluate the effects of DES on mouse spermatocytes and to explore its potential mechanism of action, the levels of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and DNA methylation induced by DES were detected. The results showed that low doses of DES inhibited cell proliferation and cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis in GC-2 cells, an immortalized mouse pachytene spermatocyte-derived cell line, which reproduces primary cells responses to E2. Furthermore, global DNA methylation levels were increased and the expression levels of DNMTs were altered in DES-treated GC-2 cells. A total of 141 differentially methylated DNA sites were detected by microarray analysis. Rxra, an important component of the retinoic acid signaling pathway, and mybph, a RhoA pathway-related protein, were found to be hypermethylated, and Prkcd, an apoptosis-related protein, was hypomethylated. These results showed that low-dose DES was toxic to spermatocytes and that DNMT expression and DNA methylation were altered in DES-exposed cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate that DNA methylation likely plays an important role in mediating DES-induced spermatocyte toxicity in vitro. PMID:26588706

  16. Switched impulsive control of the endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol singular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, Iman; Shafiee, Masoud; Ibeas, Asier; de la Sen, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, a switched and impulsive controller is designed to control the Endocrine Disruptor Diethylstilbestrol mechanism which is usually modeled as a singular system. Then the exponential stabilization property of the proposed switched and impulsive singular model is discussed under matrix inequalities. A design algorithm is given and applied for the physiological process of endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol model to illustrate the effectiveness of the results.

  17. Timing and recovery of postweaning exposure to diethylstilbestrol on early pregnancy in CD-1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Zhou, Jun; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E.; Li, Rong; Dudley, Elizabeth A.; Ye, Xiaoqin

    2014-01-01

    Exposure timing could play an important role in the effects of estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EEDCs) on early pregnancy. This study examined the sensitivity of different exposure periods from weaning to gestation day 4.5 (D4.5) to 50 ppb diethylstilbestrol (DES, a test EEDC) diet on embryo implantation and potential recovery upon temporary cession of DES exposure in CD-1 mice. Peripubertal (3–5 weeks old) DES exposure reduced the numbers of corpora lutea and implantation sites. Postpubertal (5–7 weeks old) DES exposure did not have significant effects on early pregnancy. Postmating (D0.5–D4.5) DES exposure affected postovulation events leading to impaired embryo implantation. A 5-day premating rest from 5-week DES exposure (3–8 weeks old) resulted in recovery of early pregnancy rate. These data demonstrate that peripubertal and postmating periods are sensitive windows to endocrine disruption of early pregnancy and temporary cession of exposure could partially alleviate adverse effects of DES on early pregnancy. PMID:25062584

  18. Physiological and biochemical perturbations in Daphnia magna following exposure to the model environmental estrogen diethylstilbestrol

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, W.S.; Milam, D.L.; LeBlanc, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The estrogenic properties of many environmental contaminants, such as DDE and PCBs, have been associated with reproductive failure in a variety of vertebrate species. While estrogens have been measured in many invertebrate species, the function of this hormone in invertebrates is controversial. The objective of the present study was to identify possible physiological and biochemical target sites for the estrogenic effects of some xenobiotics on the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna using the model environmental estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES). Chronic exposure of daphnids to 0.50 mg/L DES reduced molting frequency among first-generation juveniles and decreased fecundity of second-generation daphnids. Adult first-generation daphnids chronically exposed to DES, as well as adult daphnids acutely exposed to DES for only 48 h, were examined for steroid hormone metabolic capabilities using testosterone as the model steroid. The rate of elimination of two major hydroxylated metabolites of testosterone was significantly reduced, and elimination of glucose conjugates of testosterone was significantly elevated from exposure to 0.50 mg/L DES. These results demonstrate that multigeneration exposure of daphnids to DES results in reduced fecundity and altered steroid metabolic capabilities. Thus, some arthropods, like vertebrates, are sensitive to the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

  19. Effects of diethylstilbestrol on the proliferation and tyrosinase activity of cultured human melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    TANG, JIANBING; LI, QIN; CHENG, BIAO; HUANG, CHONG; CHEN, KUI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of different exogenous estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) concentrations on the human melanocyte proliferation and tyrosinase activity. Skin specimens were obtained following blepharoplasty, and the melanocytes were primary cultured and passaged to the third generation. The melanocytes were seeded in 96-well plates, each well had 5×103 cells. The medium was changed after 24 h, and contained 10?4-10?8 M DES. After the melanocytes were incubated, the proliferation and tyrosinase activity were detected by the MTT assay and L-DOPA reaction. DES (10?8-10?6 M) enhanced the proliferation of cultured melanocytes. The intensity was positively correlated with the concentration of drug. DES, >10?5 M, inhibited the melanocytes proliferation or even produced the toxicity effect. Following the addition of 10?6 M DES to the medium, the tyrosinase activity of melanocytes was significantly increased, with P<0.05. In conclusion, a certain concentration of DES promoted the proliferation of melanocytes, enhanced the activity of tyrosinase and promoted pigment synthesis of melanocytes, with the optimal concentration of 10?6 M. PMID:26171155

  20. Urogenital teratogenicity of synthetic and natural estrogens in the rat: diethylstilbestrol and estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic estrogen and a carcinogen, is a potent urogenital teratogen in humans and rodents. The natural estrogen, estradiol (E/sub 2/), induces malformations in rats only at a maternal toxic dose. This difference in potency could result from differences in fetal sensitivity, or in the distribution and/or metabolism of the two compounds. The current studies tested the hypothesis that the teratogenicity of DES is mediated by its estrogenic activity (rather than its metabolic activation). The two estrogens were directly compared by injecting them into day 19 fetuses, bypassing any maternal modifying factors. Both DES (0.1, 1 or 10 ..mu..g/fetus) and E/sub 2/ (10 or 100 ..mu..g/fetus) caused dose-related incidences of urogenital malformations (diagnosed at 6-7 weeks), but DES was 10- to 100-fold more potent. Between 24 h and 9 days after DES or E/sub 2/ exposure, histologic evidence of estrogenic stimulation was observed, including premature myometrial growth and differentiation, and vaginal epithelial thickening. Thus, DES and E/sub 2/ act directly in the fetus, to produce similar teratogenic effects, without maternal mediation. Following both maternal and fetal administration of /sup 14/C-DES or /sup 3/H-E/sub 2/, the /sup 14/C (from DES) was concentrated in fetal tissues, whereas /sup 3/H (from E/sub 2/) was retained in fetal plasma (protein-bound). Fetal genital tract contained the largest proportion of unchanged E/sub 2/ (74%) or DES (86%). It was concluded that (1) the teratogenicity of DES reflects its estrogenic activity in the fetus; (2) the fetus is sensitive to a brief exposure to estrogens, including LY and (3) the synthetic estrogen is more potent that estradiol because of its greater availability to fetal genital tissues: protein binding and rapid metabolism reduce the teratogenicity of the natural estrogen.

  1. Effect of in utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol on lumbar and femoral bone, articular cartilage, and the intervertebral disc in male and female adult mice progeny with and without swimming exercise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Developmental exposure to estrogens has been shown to affect the musculoskeletal system. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that environmental exposure to estrogen-like compounds is much higher than originally anticipated. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), a well-known estrogen agonist, on articular cartilage, intervertebral disc (IVD), and bone phenotype. Methods C57Bl/6 pregnant mice were dosed orally with vehicle (peanut oil) or 0.1, 1.0, and 10 ?g/kg/day of DES on gestational days 11 to 14. Male and female pups were allowed to mature without further treatment until 3 months of age, when swim and sedentary groups were formed. After euthanasia, bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), bone area (BA), and trabecular bone area (TBA) of the lumbar vertebrae and femur were measured by using a PIXImus Bone Densitometer System. Intervertebral disc proteoglycan was measured with the DMMB assay. Histologic analysis of proteoglycan for IVD and articular cartilage was performed with safranin O staining, and degeneration parameters were scored. Results The lumbar BMC was significantly increased in female swimmers at both the highest and lowest dose of DES, whereas the femoral BMC was increased only at the highest. The males, conversely, showed a decreased BMC at the highest dose of DES for both lumbar and femoral bone. The female swim group had an increased BA at the highest dose of DES, whereas the male counterpart showed a decreased BA for femoral bone. The TBA showed a similar pattern. Proteoglycan analysis of lumbar IVDs showed a decrease at the lowest doses but a significant increase at the highest doses for both males and females. Histologic examination showed morphologic changes of the IVD and articular cartilage for all doses of DES. Conclusions DES significantly affected the musculoskeletal system of adult mice. Results suggest that environmental estrogen contaminants can have a detrimental effect on the developmental lumbar bone growth and mineralization in mice. Further studies measuring the impact of environmental estrogen mimics, such as bisphenol A, are then warranted. PMID:22269139

  2. Direct estradiol and diethylstilbestrol actions on early- vs. late-stage prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Koong, Luke Y.; Watson, Cheryl S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and other pharmaceutical estrogens have been used at ??M concentrations to treat advanced prostate tumors, with successes primarily attributed to indirect hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis control mechanisms. However, estrogens also directly affect tumor cells, though the mechanisms involved are not well understood. METHODS: LAPC-4 (androgen-dependent) and PC-3 (androgen-independent) cell viability was measured after estradiol (E2) or DES treatment across wide concentration ranges. We then examined multiple rapid signaling mechanisms at 0.1 nM E2 and 1?M DES optima including levels of: activation (phosphorylation) for mitogen-activated protein kinases, cell-cycle proteins, and caspase 3, necroptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). RESULTS: LAPC-4 cells were more responsive than PC-3 cells. Robust and sustained extracellular-regulated kinase activation with E2, but not DES, correlated with ROS generation and cell death. c-Jun N-terminal kinase was only activated in E2-treated PC-3 cells and was not correlated with caspase 3-mediated apoptosis; necroptosis was not involved. The cell-cycle inhibitor protein p16INK4A was phosphorylated in both cell lines by both E2 and DES, but to differing extents. In both cell types, both estrogens activated p38 kinase, which subsequently phosphorylated cyclin D1, tagging it for degradation, except in DES-treated PC-3 cells. CONCLUSIONS: Cyclin D1 status correlated most closely with disrupted cell cycling as a cause of reduced cell numbers, though other mechanisms also contributed. As low as 0.1 nM E2 effectively elicited these mechanisms, and its use could dramatically improve outcomes for both early- and late-stage prostate cancer patients, while avoiding the side effects of high-dose DES treatment. PMID:25213831

  3. Liver X receptors interfere with the deleterious effect of diethylstilbestrol on testicular physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Oumeddour, Abdelkader; Viennois, Emilie; Caira, Françoise; Decourbey, Clélia; Maqdasy, Salwan; and others

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • Part of the neonatal effect of DES on testis needs the presence of Lxr?/?. • Some DES-induced pathways are blocked in Lxr-deficient mice. • Lxr-deficient mice analysis defines DES-target genes protected by Lxr. - Abstract: Liver X receptors LXR? (NR1H3) and LXR? (NR1H2) are transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, activated by specific oxysterols, oxidized derivatives of cholesterol. These receptors are involved in the regulation of testis physiology. Lxr-deficient mice pointed to the physiological roles of these nuclear receptors in steroid synthesis, lipid homeostasis and germ cell apoptosis and proliferation. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic estrogen considered as an endocrine disruptor that affects the functions of the testis. Various lines of evidences have made a clear link between estrogens, their nuclear receptors ER? (NR3A1) and ER? (NR3A2), and Lxr?/?. As LXR activity could also be regulated by the nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP, NR0A2) and DES could act through SHP, we wondered whether LXR could be targeted by estrogen-like endocrine disruptors such as DES. For that purpose, wild-type and Lxr-deficient mice were daily treated with 0.75 ?g DES from days 1 to 5 after birth. The effects of DES were investigated at 10 or 45 days of age. We demonstrated that DES induced a decrease of the body mass at 10 days only in the Lxr-deficient mice suggesting a protective effect of Lxr. We defined three categories of DES-target genes in testis: those whose accumulation is independent of Lxr; those whose accumulation is enhanced by the lack of both Lxr?/?; those whose accumulation is repressed by the absence of Lxr?/?. Lipid accumulation is also modified by neonatal DES injection. Lxr-deficient mice present different lipid profiles, demonstrating that DES could have its effects in part due to Lxr?/?. Altogether, our study shows that both nuclear receptors Lxr? and Lxr? are not only basally important for testicular physiology but could also have a preventive effect against estrogen-like endocrine disruptors.

  4. Effects of diethylstilbestrol exposure during gestation on both maternal and offspring behavior

    PubMed Central

    Tomihara, Kazuya; Zoshiki, Takahiro; Kukita, Sayaka Y.; Nakamura, Kanako; Isogawa, Ayuko; Ishibashi, Sawako; Tanaka, Ayumi; Kuraoka, Ayaka S.; Matsumoto, Saki

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disruption during gestation impairs the physical and behavioral development of offspring. However, it is unclear whether endocrine disruption also impairs maternal behavior and in turn further contributes to the developmental and behavioral dysfunction of offspring. We orally administered the synthetic non-steroidal estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) to pregnant female C57BL/6J mice from gestation day 11–17 and then investigated the maternal behavior of mothers. In addition, we examined the direct effects of in utero DES exposure and the indirect effects of aberrant maternal behavior on offspring using the cross-fostering method. In mothers, endocrine disruption during gestation decreased maternal behavior. In addition, endocrine disruption of foster mother influenced anxiety-related behavior and passive avoidance learning of pups regardless of their exposure in utero. The influence of DES exposure in utero, irrespective of exposure to the foster mother, was also shown in female offspring. These results demonstrate the risks of endocrine disruptors on both mother as well as offspring and suggest that developmental deficits may stem from both in utero toxicity and aberrant maternal care. PMID:25852458

  5. Disruption of the thyroid system by diethylstilbestrol and ioxynil in the sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Morgado, Isabel; Campinho, Marco A; Costa, Rita; Jacinto, Rita; Power, Deborah M

    2009-05-17

    Some environmental contaminants are thought to cause disruption of the thyroid system in vertebrates acting as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Such chemicals may affect synthesis, transport and metabolism of thyroid hormones (THs). Ioxynil (IOX) and diethylstilbestrol (DES) are potential EDCs with strong affinity in vitro for sea bream transthyretin (TTR), a TH distributor protein (THDP). The aim of the present study was to establish how such chemicals influence the thyroid axis in sea bream (Sparus aurata). DES, IOX and propilthyouracil (PTU, a goitrogen) were administered in the diet to sea bream juveniles at 1 mg/kg fish (n = 14/treatment) for 21 days. After exposure plasma TH levels, quantified by RIA, were similar to those of control fish (p > 0.05) in all treatment groups. Analysis by quantitative PCR revealed that all treatments down-regulated TSH gene transcription (p < 0.05) in the brain and pituitary and deiodinase II and III transcription in the brain (p < 0.001). In contrast, PTU caused DII up-regulation in the liver (p < 0.05). Thyroid receptor beta (TRbeta) transcription was down-regulated in the pituitary by PTU (p < 0.001) and DES (p < 0.05). TTR plasma levels, quantified by ELISA, were elevated by all the chemicals including PTU (p < 0.001) which also increased TTR gene transcription in the liver (p < 0.05). Thyroid histology indicated follicular hyperstimulation in all treatments with marked hyperplasia, hypertrophy and colloid depletion in the PTU group. It appears therefore, that in vitro TTR-binders, IOX and DES, can strongly influence several components of the fish thyroid system in vivo but that the thyroid axis may have the ability to maintain or re-establish plasma TH homeostasis. PMID:19375178

  6. Exposure to diethylstilbestrol during pregnancy modulates microRNA expression profile in mothers and fetuses reflecting oncogenic and immunological changes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narendra P; Abbas, Ikbal K; Menard, Martine; Singh, Udai P; Zhang, Jiajia; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2015-05-01

    Prenatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) is known to cause an increased susceptibility to a wide array of clinical disorders in humans. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that prenatal exposure to DES induces thymic atrophy and apoptosis in the thymus. In the current study, we investigated if such effects on the thymus result from alterations in the expression of microRNA (miR). To that end, pregnant C57BL/6 mice who were exposed to DES and miR profiles in thymocytes of both the mother and fetuses on postnatal day 3 (gestation day 17) were studied. Of the 609 mouse miRs examined, we noted 59 altered miRs that were common for both mothers and fetuses, whereas 107 altered miRs were specific to mothers only and 101 altered miRs were specific to fetuses only. Upon further analyses in the fetuses, we observed that DES-mediated changes in miR expression may regulate genes involved in important functions, such as apoptosis, autophagy, toxicity, and cancer. Of the miRs that showed decreased expression following DES treatment, miR-18b and miR-23a were found to possess complementary sequences and binding affinity for 3' untranslated regions of the Fas ligand (FasL) and Fas, respectively. Transfection studies confirmed that DES-mediated downregulation of miR-18b and miR-23a led to increased FasL and Fas expression. These data demonstrated that prenatal DES exposure can cause alterations in miRs, leading to changes in the gene expression, specifically, miR-mediated increased expression in FasL and Fas causing apoptosis and thymic atrophy. PMID:25753120

  7. Gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol alters cardiac structure/function, protein expression and DNA methylation in adult male mice progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Rami; Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, McGill University, 850 Sherbrooke Street, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3A 1A2 ; Kasneci, Amanda; Mepham, Kathryn; Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, McGill University, 850 Sherbrooke Street, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3A 1A2 ; Sebag, Igal A.; and others

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women, and thus their fetuses, are exposed to many endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs). Fetal cardiomyocytes express sex hormone receptors making them potentially susceptible to re-programming by estrogenizing EDCs. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a proto-typical, non-steroidal estrogen. We hypothesized that changes in adult cardiac structure/function after gestational exposure to the test compound DES would be a proof in principle for the possibility of estrogenizing environmental EDCs to also alter the fetal heart. Vehicle (peanut oil) or DES (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 ?g/kg/da.) was orally delivered to pregnant C57bl/6n dams on gestation days 11.5–14.5. At 3 months, male progeny were left sedentary or were swim trained for 4 weeks. Echocardiography of isoflurane anesthetized mice revealed similar cardiac structure/function in all sedentary mice, but evidence of systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation after swim training at higher DES doses. The calcium homeostasis proteins, SERCA2a, phospholamban, phospho-serine 16 phospholamban and calsequestrin 2, are important for cardiac contraction and relaxation. Immunoblot analyses of ventricle homogenates showed increased expression of SERCA2a and calsequestrin 2 in DES mice and greater molecular remodeling of these proteins and phospho-serine 16 phospholamban in swim trained DES mice. DES increased cardiac DNA methyltransferase 3a expression and DNA methylation in the CpG island within the calsequestrin 2 promoter in heart. Thus, gestational DES epigenetically altered ventricular DNA, altered cardiac function and expression, and reduced the ability of adult progeny to cardiac remodel when physically challenged. We conclude that gestational exposure to estrogenizing EDCs may impact cardiac structure/function in adult males. -- Highlights: ? Gestational DES changes cardiac SERCA2a and CASQ2 expression. ? Echocardiography identified systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation. ? DES increased DNMT3a expression and increased CpG DNA methylation. ? DES impacts fetal heart reducing cardiac reserve on challenge in adulthood. ? Fetal heart can be re-programmed by a non-steroidal estrogen.

  8. Diethylstilbestrol alters positive and negative selection of T cells in the thymus and modulates T-cell repertoire in the periphery

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicole; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S. . E-mail: pnagark@hsc.vcu.edu

    2006-04-15

    Prenatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) is known to cause altered immune functions and increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease in humans. In the current study, we investigated the effects of DES on T-cell differentiation in the thymus using the HY-TCR transgenic (Tg) mouse model in which the female mice exhibit positive selection of T cells bearing the Tg TCR, while the male mice show negative selection of such T cells. In female HY-TCR-Tg mice, exposure to DES showed more pronounced decrease in thymic cellularity when compared to male mice. Additionally, female mice also showed a significant decrease in the proportion of double-positive (DP) T cells in the thymus and HY-TCR-specific CD8{sup +} T cells in the periphery. Male mice exhibiting negative selection also showed decreased thymic cellularity following DES exposure. Moreover, the male mice showed increased proportion of double-negative (DN) T cells in the thymus and decreased proportion of CD8{sup +} T cells. The density of expression of HY-TCR on CD8{sup +} cells was increased following DES exposure in both females and males. Finally, the proliferative response of thymocytes to mitogens and peripheral lymph node T cells to male H-Y antigen was significantly altered in female and male mice following DES treatment. Taken together, these data suggest that DES alters T-cell differentiation in the thymus by interfering with positive and negative selection processes, which in turn modulates the T-cell repertoire in the periphery.

  9. Enhanced urinary bladder and liver carcinogenesis in male CD1 mice exposed to transplacental inorganic arsenic and postnatal diethylstilbestrol or tamoxifen

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, Michael P. . E-mail: waalkes@niehs.nih.gov; Liu Jie; Ward, Jerrold M.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2006-09-15

    Pregnant CD1 mice received 85 ppm arsenite in the drinking water from gestation day 8 to 18, groups (n = 35) of male offspring were subsequently injected on postpartum days 1 through 5 with diethylstilbestrol (DES; 2 {mu}g/pup/day) or tamoxifen (TAM; 10 {mu}g/pup/day), and tumor formation was assessed over 90 weeks. Arsenic alone increased hepatocellular carcinoma (14%), adenoma (23%) and total tumors (31%) compared to control (0, 2 and 2%, respectively). Arsenic alone also increased lung adenocarcinoma, adrenal cortical adenoma and renal cystic tubular hyperplasia compared to control. Compared to arsenic alone, arsenic plus DES increased liver tumor incidence in mice at risk 2.2-fold and increased liver tumor multiplicity (tumors/liver) 1.8-fold. The treatments alone did not impact urinary bladder carcinogenesis, but arsenic plus TAM significantly increased formation of urinary bladder transitional cell tumors (papilloma and carcinoma; 13%) compared to control (0%). Urinary bladder proliferative lesions (combined tumors and hyperplasia) were also increased by arsenic plus TAM (40%) or arsenic plus DES (43%) compared to control (0%) or the treatments alone. Urinary bladder proliferative lesions occurred in the absence of any evidence of uroepithelial cytotoxic lesions. Urinary bladder lesions and hepatocellular carcinoma induced by arsenic plus TAM and/or DES overexpressed estrogen receptor-{alpha}, indicating that aberrant estrogen signaling may have been a factor in the enhanced carcinogenic response. Thus, in male CD1 mice, gestational arsenic exposure alone induced liver adenoma and carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, adrenal adenoma and renal cystic hyperplasia. Furthermore, DES enhanced transplacental arsenic-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. In utero arsenic also initiated urinary bladder tumor formation when followed by postnatal TAM and uroepithelial proliferative lesions when followed by TAM or DES.

  10. Response of Steers to Implantation of Diethylstilbestrol During Suckling, Wintering and Finishing Periods. 

    E-print Network

    Melton, A. A.; Riggs, J. K.

    1965-01-01

    in planning and conducting this work in its earlier phases is gratefully acknowl- . edged. The stilbestrol implants used in this work were provided by Charles Pfizer Inc., Terre Haute, Indiana and Discan Cor- poration, Los Angeles, California.... Implanting 3-month-old suckling steer calves with I? milligrams (mg.) of diethylstilbestrol increased weaning weight under West Texas range conditions by approximately 15 pounds, an average for 4 years. The weight advantage of tlie implanted calves ranged...

  11. In vitro effects of diethylstilbestrol, genistein, 4-tert-butylphenol, and 4-tert-octylphenol on steroidogenic activity of isolated immature rat ovarian follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Myllymaeki, Sari . E-mail: saanmy@utu.fi; Haavisto, Tapio; Vainio, Minna; Toppari, Jorma; Paranko, Jorma

    2005-04-01

    Isolated rat ovarian follicles grow and produce steroid hormones in vitro and so provide a good model for studying the effects of hormonally active compounds on follicular steroidogenesis. We have evaluated the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), genistein (GEN) and two alkylphenols, 4-tert-butylphenol (BP) and 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) on the growth, survival, and steroid hormone and cAMP production by isolated 14-day-old rat (Sprague-Dawley) ovarian follicles. During a 5-day culture, FSH was obligatory for follicle growth and increased estradiol and testosterone secretion in a dose-dependent manner. DES (10{sup -6} M) caused the strongest decline in estradiol and testosterone levels but did not have detectable effects on either cAMP production or aromatase enzyme activity. GEN caused a prominent decrease in cAMP and testosterone levels without significant changes in secreted estradiol. The latter, apparently, was due to a dose-dependent stimulation of aromatase enzyme activity in the presence of genistein. Both BP and OP decreased estradiol and testosterone secretion in a dose-dependent manner while no effect on aromatase activity was observed. OP, unlike BP, decreased forskolin-induced cAMP levels. Xenoestrogens at the used concentrations did not interfere with the growth and survival of the follicles. The results indicate that isolated ovarian follicles representing intact morphological and functional units offer a sensitive model system for elucidating the female-specific reproductive effects of environmental chemicals.

  12. Effects of a7nAChR agonist on the tissue estrogen receptor expression of castrated rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Feng; Gong, Fan; Lv, Jinhan; Gao, Jun; Ma, Jingzu

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one common disease in postmenopausal women due to depressed estrogen level. It has been known that inflammatory factors are involved in osteoporosis pathogenesis. One regulator of inflammatory cascade reaction, a7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR), therefore, may exert certain role in osteoporosis. This study thus investigated this question on an osteoporosis rat model after castration. Rats were firstly castrated to induce osteoporosis, and then received a7nAChR agonist (PNU-282987), diethylstilbestrol or saline via intraperitoneal injection. After 6 or 12 weeks, bone samples were collected for counting osteoblast number, bone density and estrogen receptor (ER? and ER?) expression, in addition to the serum laboratory of inflammatory factors. Bone density, osteoclast number, ER? and ER? expression level were significantly depressed in model group, and were remarkable potentiated in the drug treatment group (P<0.05). The levels of BGP and PTH in drug treatment group were decreased compared to diethylstilbestrol group, while E2 and IGF-1 showed up-regulation. Agonist of a7nAChR can up-regulate estrogen receptor expression and may prevent the occurrence and development of osteoporosis. PMID:26722551

  13. Gynaecomastia linked to the intake of a herbal supplement fortified with diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Toorians, A W F T; Bovee, T F H; De Rooy, J; Stolker, L A A M; Hoogenboom, R L A P

    2010-07-01

    This study reports the findings of a supplement marketed on the Internet for prostate problems. The supplement was orally taken by a 60-year-old man with divergent hormonal levels and who was surgically treated for gynaecomastia: development of abnormally large mammary glands in males. The supplement showed a strong effect in a yeast oestrogen bioassay, expressing a yeast-enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP) upon exposure to oestrogens. Using both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and a gradient liquid chromatographic time-of-flight mass spectrometric (LC/TOF-MS) method, the response was shown to be caused by very high levels of diethylstilbestrol, known for causing gynaecomastia. The gynaecomastia was most probably caused by this orally taken 'natural' herbal supplement, as the patient's hormonal levels also returned to normal again when stopping the use of it. This case demonstrates that physicians need to be aware of the use of supplements with illegal components that may be responsible for unwanted side-effects. PMID:20432093

  14. Alpha 2 agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Paddleford, R R; Harvey, R C

    1999-05-01

    The alpha 2 agonists can produce reliable dose-dependent sedation and analgesia in most species. Nevertheless, they can also produce significant physiological adverse side effects depending on dose, rate, route of administration, and the concurrent use of other CNS depressants. For this reason, it may be best to use a low dose of an alpha 2 agonist as a preanesthetic agent. The alpha 2 agonists are best suited for young, healthy, exercise-tolerant patients. The combining of low doses of alpha 2, opioid, and benzodiazepine agonists results in a synergistic CNS depressant response while minimizing the undesirable side effects of these three classes of drugs. Each group of drugs has specific antagonists available for their reversal, thus allowing veterinarians to reverse one or more of the agonists depending on the desired response. This may represent a significant advantage to the use of low-dose alpha 2 agonists in combination with opioids and benzodiazepines. PMID:10332820

  15. Induction at high incidence of ductal prostate adenocarcinomas in NBL/Cr and Sprague-Dawley Hsd:SD rats treated with a combination of testosterone and estradiol-17 beta or diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Bosland, M C; Ford, H; Horton, L

    1995-06-01

    This study determined the incidence of prostate adenocarcinoma following long-term treatment of NBL and Sprague-Dawley rats with estradiol-17 beta or diethylstilbestrol (DES) plus testosterone and it defined the origin of these tumors. NBL and Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with two Silastic tubing implants (i.d. 1.6 mm, o.d. 3.2 mm) containing a 2 cm long filling of testosterone and one implant containing a 1 cm long filling of estradiol-17 beta or DES. Control animals received empty implants. Treated animals were killed when moribund and controls were killed at 91 (NBL) or 75 (Sprague-Dawley) weeks after initiation of treatment and accessory sex glands were sampled for histopathological examination of multiple step sections. Prostatic adenocarcinoma occurred in 100% of NBL rats after treatment with estradiol-17 beta or DES plus testosterone for 44 and 59 weeks (group means) respectively. Adenocarcinoma incidences were lower in Sprague-Dawley rats. The adenocarcinomas were small, microscopic, invasive tumors and they were spatially closely associated with the periurethral ducts of the dorsal, lateral and/or anterior (= coagulating gland) prostate, but never with the ducts of the ventral lobe and seminal vesicles. One adenocarcinoma was of uncertain origin. Duct-acinar dysplastic lesions occurred in the periphery of the dorsal and lateral prostate of all hormone-treated NBL and many Sprague-Dawley rats, but did not appear to give rise to carcinoma. Although some adenocarcinomas were contiguous with dysplastic ducts of the peripheral dorsolateral prostate, the main mass of these neoplasms was located in the periurethral area. Also, most adenocarcinomas were only connected with the periurethral ducts, in which atypical hyperplasia occurred following hormone treatment for 36 weeks or longer. Thus atypical hyperplasia of the periurethral prostate ducts, but not peripheral duct-acinar dysplasia, appeared to be the likely precursor of the induced carcinomas. Testosterone plus DES, but not estradiol-17 beta, induced marked dysplasia-like lesions in the acini of the ventral prostate of all NBL and many Sprague-Dawley rats. These lesions had progressed to carcinoma in situ (or adenoma) in 46% of NBL rats. PMID:7788848

  16. Agonist-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper looks at ion channels as an example of the pharmacologist's stock in trade, the action of an agonist on a receptor to produce a response. Looked at in this way, ion channels have been helpful because they are still the only system which is simple enough for quantitative investigation of transduction mechanisms. A short history is given of attempts to elucidate what happens between the time when agonist first binds, and the time when the channel opens. PMID:16402101

  17. Diethylstilbestrol regulates expression of avian apolipoprotein D during regression and recrudescence of the oviduct and epithelial-derived ovarian carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, J; Bae, H; Lim, W; Bazer, F W; Song, G

    2015-07-01

    Apolipoprotein D (APOD) is a glycoprotein which is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. It is structurally and functionally similar to the lipocalins which are multiple lipid-binding proteins that transport hydrophobic ligands and other small hydrophobic molecules, including cholesterol and several steroid hormones. Although multiple functions for APOD in various tissues have been reported, its expression, biological function, and hormonal regulation in the female reproductive system are not known. Thus, in this study, we focused on correlations between APOD and estrogen during development, differentiation, regression, and regeneration of the oviduct in chickens and in the development of ovarian carcinogenesis in laying hens. Results of the present study indicated that APOD messenger RNA (mRNA) expression increased (P < 0.001) in the luminal and glandular (GE) epithelia of the chicken oviduct in response to diethylstilbestrol (a nonsteroidal synthetic estrogen). In addition, the expression of APOD mRNA and protein decreased (P < 0.001) as the oviduct regressed during induced molting, and gradually increased (P < 0.001) with abundant expression in GE of the oviduct during recrudescence after molting. Furthermore, APOD mRNA and protein were predominantly localized in GE of cancerous, but not normal ovaries from laying hens. Collectively, results of the present study suggest that APOD is a novel estrogen-stimulated gene in the chicken oviduct which likely regulates growth, differentiation, and remodeling of the oviduct during oviposition cycles. Moreover, up-regulated expression of APOD in epithelial cell-derived ovarian cancerous tissue suggests that it could be a candidate biomarker for early detection and treatment of ovarian cancer in laying hens and in women. PMID:25929245

  18. Histamine H3 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    De Esch, I J P; Belzar, K J

    2004-11-01

    The SAR of H3 ligands has been difficult to evaluate because of species differences, multiple isoforms and constitutive activity, among other complicating factors. A review is given of the sometimes-conflicting affinity, activity and efficacy data of H3 agonists that has been described in literature to date. PMID:15544556

  19. Influence of neonatal and postnatal administration of diethylstilbestrol on hepatic monooxygenase activities and lipid peroxidation in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Jahn, F; Karge, E; Klinger, W

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of adult male and female rats with DES caused a significant reduction of cytochrome P450 concentration, ethylmorphine N-demethylation and ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation. These decreases are not modified by a neonatal treatment with this hormone. In contrast to monooxygenase activities the NADPH-induced lipid peroxidation shows only a tendency to decrease if animals received DES as adults. But a decrease of about 50% is observed after "neonatal plus treatment of adults" with DES. The role of formation of reactive oxygen species characterized by chemiluminescence methods in connection with lipid peroxidation is discussed. PMID:1814470

  20. Discovery of AZD3199, An Inhaled Ultralong Acting ?2 Receptor Agonist with Rapid Onset of Action

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A series of dibasic des-hydroxy ?2 receptor agonists has been prepared and evaluated for potential as inhaled ultralong acting bronchodilators. Determination of activities at the human ?-adrenoreceptors demonstrated a series of highly potent and selective ?2 receptor agonists that were progressed to further study in a guinea pig histamine-induced bronchoconstriction model. Following further assessment by onset studies in guinea pig tracheal rings and human bronchial rings contracted with methacholine (guinea pigs) or carbachol (humans), duration of action studies in guinea pigs after intratracheal (i.t.) administration and further selectivity and safety profiling AZD3199 was shown to have an excellent over all profile and was progressed into clinical evaluation as a new ultralong acting inhaled ?2 receptor agonist with rapid onset of action. PMID:24900851

  1. Beta-agonists and animal welfare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of beta-agonists in animal feed is a high profile topic within the U.S. as consumers and activist groups continue to question its safety. The only beta-agonist currently available for use in swine is ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC). This is available as Paylean™ (Elanco Animal Health – FDA a...

  2. ?2-agonist therapy in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Page, Clive P; Rogliani, Paola; Matera, M Gabriella

    2013-04-01

    ?2-Agonists are effective bronchodilators due primarily to their ability to relax airway smooth muscle (ASM). They exert their effects via their binding to the active site of ?2-adrenoceptors on ASM, which triggers a signaling cascade that results in a number of events, all of which contribute to relaxation of ASM. There are some differences between ?2-agonists. Traditional inhaled short-acting ?2-agonists albuterol, fenoterol, and terbutaline provide rapid as-needed symptom relief and short-term prophylactic protection against bronchoconstriction induced by exercise or other stimuli. The twice-daily ?2-agonists formoterol and salmeterol represent important advances. Their effective bronchodilating properties and long-term improvement in lung function offer considerable clinical benefits to patients. More recently, a newer ?2-agonist (indacaterol) with a longer pharmacodynamic half-life has been discovered, with the hopes of achieving once-daily dosing. In general, ?2-agonists have an acceptable safety profile, although there is still controversy as to whether long-acting ?2-agonists may increase the risk of asthma mortality. In any case, they can induce adverse effects, such as increased heart rate, palpitations, transient decrease in PaO2, and tremor. Desensitization of ?2-adrenoceptors that occurs during the first few days of regular use of ?2-agonist treatment may account for the commonly observed resolution of the majority of these adverse events after the first few doses. Nevertheless, it can also induce tolerance to bronchoprotective effects of ?2-agonists and has the potential to reduce bronchodilator sensitivity to them. Some novel once-daily ?2-agonists (olodaterol, vilanterol, abediterol) are under development, mainly in combination with an inhaled corticosteroid or a long-acting antimuscarinic agent. PMID:23348973

  3. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  4. [Adrenergic beta-agonist intoxication].

    PubMed

    Carrola, Paulo; Devesa, Nuno; Silva, José Manuel; Ramos, Fernando; Alexandrino, Mário B; Moura, José J

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe two clinical cases (father and daughter), observed in the Hospital Urgency with distal tremors, anxiety, palpitations, nausea, headaches and dizziness, two hours after ingestión of cow liver. They also had leucocytosis (with neutrophylia), hypokalemia and hyperglycaemia. After treatment with potassium i.v. and propranolol, the symptoms disappeared. The symptoms recurred at home because the patients didn't take the prescribed medication and persisted for five days, with spontaneous disappearance. The serum of both patients revealed the presence of clenbuterol (65 hg/ml - father and 58 hg/ml - daughter). The animal's liver had a concentration of 1,42 mg/kg. Clenbuterol is a ß-adrenergic agonist with low specificity, with some veterinary indications. However, this substance has been illegally used as a growth's promotor. We intend to alert doctors for this problem, particularly those that work in the Urgency. PMID:22226216

  5. Effect of PCB and DES on rat monoamine oxidase, acetylcholinesterase, testosterone, and estradiol ontogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, D.R.; Bradshaw, W.S.; Booth, G.M.; Seegmiller, R.E.; Allen, S.D.

    1992-06-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) have been documented as potentially hazardous environmental agents. In utero exposure to DES produces human vaginal adenocarcinoma, male reproductive tract lesions in mice, and has been correlated with personality changes in human males. PCB (Kanechlor) was found to be the major toxin in the {open_quotes}Yusho{close_quotes} rice oil poisoning in Japan in 1968. Other investigators have shown in rats that PCB (Arochlor) causes liver adenofibrosis, thyroid dysfunction, atypical mitochondria, and dilation of both smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum. Matthews et al. (1978) also reported that 4, 4{prime} chlorinated biphenyl was the most potent inducer of monooxygenases, irrespective of chlorination at other sites. Although these compounds have been studied extensively in mammals, there is a paucity of data examining their effects when non-fetotoxic amounts are administered chronically and orally during gestation. The present study is part of a larger effort designed to establish a protocol for testing the developmental effects of xenobiotics such as DES and PCB. Levels of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were measured as an indicator of the integrity of nerve transmission in the central nervous system. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is a marker for the outer mitochondrial membrane and is an important amine metabolizing enzyme. Testosterone and estradiol are important sex steroids in mammals, and effects upon levels of the two hormones may signal anomalies in development of sex characteristics. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. ?(2) -adrenoceptor agonists: current and future direction.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Calzetta, Luigino; Matera, Maria Gabriella

    2011-05-01

    Despite the passionate debate over the use of ?(2) -adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of airway disorders, these agents are still central in the symptomatic management of asthma and COPD. A variety of ?(2) -adrenoceptor agonists with long half-lives, also called ultra long-acting ?(2) -adrenoceptor agonists (ultra-LABAs; indacaterol, olodaterol, vilanterol, carmoterol, LAS100977 and PF-610355) are currently under development with the hopes of achieving once-daily dosing. It is likely that the once-daily dosing of a bronchodilator would be a significant convenience and probably a compliance-enhancing advantage, leading to improved overall clinical outcomes. As combination therapy with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and a LABA is important for treating patients suffering from asthma, and a combination with an inhaled long-acting antimuscarinic agent (LAMA) is important for treating COPD patients whose conditions are not sufficiently controlled by monotherapy with a ?(2) -adrenoceptor agonist, some novel once-daily combinations of LABAs and ICSs or LAMAs are under development. PMID:21232045

  7. ?2-adrenoceptor agonists: current and future direction

    PubMed Central

    Cazzola, Mario; Calzetta, Luigino; Matera, Maria Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    Despite the passionate debate over the use of ?2-adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of airway disorders, these agents are still central in the symptomatic management of asthma and COPD. A variety of ?2-adrenoceptor agonists with long half-lives, also called ultra long-acting ?2-adrenoceptor agonists (ultra-LABAs; indacaterol, olodaterol, vilanterol, carmoterol, LAS100977 and PF-610355) are currently under development with the hopes of achieving once-daily dosing. It is likely that the once-daily dosing of a bronchodilator would be a significant convenience and probably a compliance-enhancing advantage, leading to improved overall clinical outcomes. As combination therapy with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and a LABA is important for treating patients suffering from asthma, and a combination with an inhaled long-acting antimuscarinic agent (LAMA) is important for treating COPD patients whose conditions are not sufficiently controlled by monotherapy with a ?2-adrenoceptor agonist, some novel once-daily combinations of LABAs and ICSs or LAMAs are under development. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Respiratory Pharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-1 PMID:21232045

  8. Lead Exposure Alters the Development of Agonistic

    E-print Network

    Delville, Yvon

    Lead Exposure Alters the Development of Agonistic Behavior in Golden Hamsters M. Catalina Cervantes@mail.utexas.edu ABSTRACT: We tested the effects of exposure to different doses of lead acetate (either 0, 25, 100, or 400-specific effect of lead exposure on the development of aggression during puberty at doses resulting in blood

  9. Corepressors of agonist-bound nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, Igor; Aneskievich, Brian J.

    2007-09-15

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) rely on coregulator proteins to modulate transcription of target genes. NR coregulators can be broadly subdivided into coactivators which potentiate transcription and corepressors which silence gene expression. The prevailing view of coregulator action holds that in the absence of agonist the receptor interacts with a corepressor via the corepressor nuclear receptor (CoRNR, 'corner') box motifs within the corepressor. Upon agonist binding, a conformational change in the receptor causes the shedding of corepressor and the binding of a coactivator which interacts with the receptor via NR boxes within the coregulator. This view was challenged with the discovery of RIP140 which acts as a NR corepressor in the presence of agonist and utilizes NR boxes. Since then a number of other corepressors of agonist-bound NRs have been discovered. Among them are LCoR, PRAME, REA, MTA1, NSD1, and COPR1 Although they exhibit a great diversity of structure, mechanism of repression and pathophysiological function, these corepressors frequently have one or more NR boxes and often recruit histone deacetylases to exert their repressive effects. This review highlights these more recently discovered corepressors and addresses their potential functions in transcription regulation, disease pharmacologic responses and xenobiotic metabolism.

  10. Reciprocity of agonistic support in ravens

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Orlaith N.; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cooperative behaviour through reciprocation or interchange of valuable services in primates has received considerable attention, especially regarding the timeframe of reciprocation and its ensuing cognitive implications. Much less, however, is known about reciprocity in other animals, particularly birds. We investigated patterns of agonistic support (defined as a third party intervening in an ongoing conflict to attack one of the conflict participants, thus supporting the other) in a group of 13 captive ravens, Corvus corax. We found support for long-term, but not short-term, reciprocation of agonistic support. Ravens were more likely to support individuals who preened them, kin and dominant group members. These results suggest that ravens do not reciprocate on a calculated tit-for-tat basis, but aid individuals from whom reciprocated support would be most useful and those with whom they share a good relationship. Additionally, dyadic levels of agonistic support and consolation (postconflict affiliation from a bystander to the victim) correlated strongly with each other, but we found no evidence to suggest that receiving agonistic support influences the victim’s likelihood of receiving support (consolation) after the conflict ends. Our findings are consistent with an emotionally mediated form of reciprocity in ravens and provide additional support for convergent cognitive evolution in birds and mammals. PMID:22298910

  11. Des Moines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Deborah, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This document, intended for elementary students, contains articles and activities designed to acquaint young people with the history of Des Moines, Iowa. The articles are short, and new or difficult words are highlighted and defined for young readers. "The Raccoon River Indian Agency" discusses the archeological exploration of the indian…

  12. Recent advances in the discovery of alpha1-adrenoceptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The alpha(1) adrenoceptors are three of nine well-characterized receptors that are activated by epinephrine and norepinephrine. Agonists acting at the alpha(1) adrenoceptors produce numerous physiological effects, and are used therapeutically for several indications. Many known alpha(1) adrenoceptor agonists are alpha(1A) selective, but the discovery of highly selective alpha(1B) and alpha(1D) adrenoceptor agonists has proven to be an extremely difficult goal to achieve. This review will focus on recent advances in the discovery, development and clinical utility of subtype-specific alpha(1) agonists as well as contributions to our understanding of agonist-receptor interactions. PMID:17266602

  13. Agonists block currents through acetylcholine receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Sine, S M; Steinbach, J H

    1984-08-01

    We have examined the effects of high concentrations of cholinergic agonists on currents through single acetylcholine receptor (AChR) channels on clonal BC3H1 cells. We find that raised concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh; above 300 microM) or carbamylcholine (Carb; above 1,000 microM) produce a voltage- and concentration-dependent reduction in the mean single-channel current. Raised concentrations of suberyldicholine (Sub; above 3 microM) produce a voltage- and concentration-dependent increase in the number of brief duration low-conductance interruptions of open-channel currents. These observations can be quantitatively described by a model in which agonist molecules enter and transiently occlude the ion-channel of the AChR. PMID:6478036

  14. Service des immeubles Service des Immeubles

    E-print Network

    Laval, Université

    les gaz ayant un effet de serre, trois des six gaz pris en compte par le protocole de Kyoto, soit le travail employés dans la réalisation du bilan des GES est basé sur les références suivantes : GHG Protocol

  15. Protection against cisplatin ototoxicity by adenosine agonists.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Craig A; Ramkumar, Vickram; Jones, Brett; Tsukasaki, Naoki; Rybak, Leonard P

    2004-05-01

    Cisplatin is a commonly used antineoplastic agent that causes ototoxicity through the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies have shown that cisplatin causes an upregulation of A(1) adenosine receptor (A(1)AR) in the cochlea, and that application of the adenosine agonist, R-phenylisopropyladenosine (R-PIA), to the round window (RW) results in significant increases in cochlear glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. These data suggest that adenosine receptors (ARs) are an important part of the cytoprotective system of the cochlea in response to oxidative stress. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of various adenosine agonists on cisplatin ototoxicity using RW application. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds were recorded in anesthetized chinchillas at 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16kHz. The auditory bullae were surgically opened, and 1mM R-PIA, 10microM 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX)/R-PIA (1mM) cocktail, 100microM 2-chloro-N-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), 2-[4-(2-p-carboxy-ethyl)phenylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS) or vehicle were applied to the RW. After 90min, the remaining solution was removed and cisplatin was applied to the RW. The bullae were closed and the animals recovered for 72h, after which, follow-up ABRs were performed. Cochleae were harvested for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and for lipid peroxides. Pre-administration of the A(1)AR agonists R-PIA or CCPA significantly reduced cisplatin-induced threshold changes at all but the highest test frequency. In addition, A(1)AR agonists protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell damage and significantly reduced cisplatin-induced lipid peroxidation. Co-administration of the A(1)AR antagonist, DPCPX, completely reversed the protective effects of R-PIA. In contrast, pretreatment with CGS-21680, an A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR) agonist, significantly increased cisplatin-induced threshold changes. Our findings are consistent with the notion that the A(1)AR contributes significantly to cytoprotection in the cochlea, and thereby protects against hearing loss. PMID:15081879

  16. Early exposure of 17?-ethynylestradiol and diethylstilbestrol induces morphological changes and alters ovarian steroidogenic pathway enzyme gene expression in catfish, Clarias gariepinus.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, P; Chaitanya, R K; Prathibha, Y; Balakrishna, S L; Dutta-Gupta, A; Senthilkumaran, B

    2015-04-01

    Environmental estrogens are major cause of endocrine disruption in vertebrates, including aquatic organisms. Teleosts are valuable and popular models for studying the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the environment. In the present study, we investigated the changes caused by exposure to the synthetic estrogens 17?-ethynylestradiol (EE2 ) and diethylstilbesterol (DES) during early stages of growth and sex differentiation of air-breathing catfish, Clarias gariepinus, at the morphological, histological, and molecular levels. Catfish hatchlings, 0 day post hatch (dph) were exposed continuously to sublethal doses of EE2 (50 ng/L) and DES (10 ng/L) until 50 dph and subsequently monitored for ovarian structural changes and alteration in the gene expression of steroidogenic enzymes till adulthood. Treated fish exhibited morphological deformities such as spinal curvature, stunted growth, and yolk-sac fluid retention. In addition to ovarian atrophy, DES-treated fish showed either rudimentary or malformed ovaries. Detailed histological studies revealed precocious oocyte development as well as follicular atresia. Further, transcript levels of various steroidogenic enzyme and transcription factor genes were altered in response to EE2 and DES. Activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of estrogen biosynthesis, aromatase, in the ovary as well as the brain of treated fish was in accordance with transcript level changes. These developmental and molecular effects imparted by EE2 and DES during early life stages of catfish could demonstrate the deleterious effects of estrogen exposure and provide reliable markers for estrogenic EDCs exposure in the environment. PMID:24273110

  17. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.

    1989-08-01

    During the past year, further studies on mAChR were conducted. These studies included verification of the difference in pituitary distribution based on ligand charge. The pituitary localization of TRB. A neutral mAChR ligand, was verified. The lack of QNB blockade of TRB uptake was tested by blockage with scopolamine, another mAChR antagonist and by testing the effect in a different strain of rat. Neither scopolamine or change of rat strain had any effect. We concluded that TRB uptake in pituitary is not a receptor-mediated process. Further studies were conducted with an additional quaternized mAChR ligand: MQNB. Pituitary localization of MQNB, like MTRB, could be blocked by pretreatment with QNB. We have tentatively concluded that permanent charge on a mAChR antagonist changes the mechanism of uptake in the pituitary. Time course studies and the effects of DES on myocardial uptake are reported. A brief report on preliminary results of evaluation of quaternized mAChR ligands in the heart is included. In a limited series of such ligands, we have observed a single binding site and a difference in B{sub max} values: QNB competition studies yield larger B{sub max} values than studies with {sup 3}H-NMS. Progress in the synthesis of D{sub 2} agonists includes solving a synthetic problem and preparation of the cold'' analogue of N-0437 using procedures applicable to eventual synthesis with {sup 11}C-CH{sub 3}I. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Modulation of Innate Immune Responses via Covalently Linked TLR Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present the synthesis of novel adjuvants for vaccine development using multivalent scaffolds and bioconjugation chemistry to spatially manipulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. TLRs are primary receptors for activation of the innate immune system during vaccination. Vaccines that contain a combination of small and macromolecule TLR agonists elicit more directed immune responses and prolong responses against foreign pathogens. In addition, immune activation is enhanced upon stimulation of two distinct TLRs. Here, we synthesized combinations of TLR agonists as spatially defined tri- and di-agonists to understand how specific TLR agonist combinations contribute to the overall immune response. We covalently conjugated three TLR agonists (TLR4, 7, and 9) to a small molecule core to probe the spatial arrangement of the agonists. Treating immune cells with the linked agonists increased activation of the transcription factor NF-?B and enhanced and directed immune related cytokine production and gene expression beyond cells treated with an unconjugated mixture of the same three agonists. The use of TLR signaling inhibitors and knockout studies confirmed that the tri-agonist molecule activated multiple signaling pathways leading to the observed higher activity. To validate that the TLR4, 7, and 9 agonist combination would activate the immune response to a greater extent, we performed in vivo studies using a vaccinia vaccination model. Mice vaccinated with the linked TLR agonists showed an increase in antibody depth and breadth compared to mice vaccinated with the unconjugated mixture. These studies demonstrate how activation of multiple TLRs through chemically and spatially defined organization assists in guiding immune responses, providing the potential to use chemical tools to design and develop more effective vaccines. PMID:26640818

  19. IL-15 Agonists: The Cancer Cure Cytokine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jennifer

    2013-10-28

    The immune stimulatory cytokine interleukin-15 was recognized as one of the most promising cancer cure drug in an NIH guided review and is currently in clinical trial alone or as an adjuvant for certain types of metastatic solid tumors. IL-15 is an essential survival factor for natural killer (NK), natural killer-like T (NKT), and CD44(hi) memory CD8 T cells. The bioactivity of IL-15 in vivo is conferred mainly through a trans-presentation mechanism in which IL-15 is presented in complex with the ?-subunit of soluble IL-15 receptor (IL-15R) to NK, NKT or T cells rather than directly interacts with membrane-bound IL-15R. With these understandings, recent studies have been focused on generating IL-15 agonists which consist of IL-15 and partial or whole of soluble IL-15R to improve its in vivo bioactivity. This minireview will summarize the key features of IL-15 as a potential cancer treatment cytokine and the most recent development of IL-15 agonists and preclinical studies. Critical milestones to translate the pre-clinical development to in-patients treatment are emphasized. PMID:24587813

  20. Therapeutic perspectives for melatonin agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Delagrange, P; Atkinson, J; Boutin, J A; Casteilla, L; Lesieur, D; Misslin, R; Pellissier, S; Pénicaud, L; Renard, P

    2003-04-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone synthesized in the pineal gland during the dark period in all species, including humans. The diversity and differences in melatonin receptor distribution in the brain and extracerebral organs suggest multiple functional roles for melatonin. Administration of melatonin agonists reduces neophobia and treatment with a melatonin antagonist during the dark period reverses the anxiolytic-like effect of endogenous melatonin. Chronic treatment with agonists prevents various perturbations induced by chronic mild stress. Melatonin in vivo directly constricts cerebral arterioles in rats and decreases the lower limit of cerebral blood flow autoregulation, suggesting that melatonin may diminish the risk of hypoperfusion-induced cerebral ischemia. At the extracerebral level, melatonin regulates intestinal motility in rats. The intestinal postprandial motor response is shorter in the dark phase than in the light phase and this reduction is reversed in animals pretreated with a melatonin antagonist. Moreover, melatonin reduces the duration of cholecystokinin excitomotor effect. Endogenous melatonin may modulate intestinal motility to coordinate intestinal functions such as digestion and transit and control the metabolism of the animal. An adipocyte melatonin binding site may also participate in this control. Melatonin is involved in a wide range of physiological functions. The question remains as to whether evolution, adaptation and diurnal life have modified the physiological role of melatonin in humans. Moreover, the functional role of each of the receptor subtypes has to be characterized to design selective ligands to treat specific diseases. PMID:12622848

  1. Agonist-induced displacement of quinacrine from its binding site on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: plausible agonist membrane partitioning mechanism.

    PubMed

    Arias, H R

    1995-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that high concentrations of cholinergic agonists such as acetylcholine (ACh), carbamylcholine (CCh), suberyldicholine (SubCh) and spin-labelled acetylcholine (SL-ACh) displaced quinacrine from its high-affinity binding site located at the lipid-protein interface of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) (Anas, H. R. and Johnson, D. A. (1995) Biochemistry, 34, 1589-1595). In order to account for the agonist self-inhibitory binding site which overlaps, at least partially, with the quinacrine binding site, we determined the partition coefficient (Kp) of these agonists relative to the local anaesthetic tetracaine in AChR native membranes from Torpedo californica electric organ by examining (1) the ability of tetracaine and SL-ACh to quench membrane-partitioned 1-pyrenedecanoic acid (C10-Py) monomer fluorescence, and (2) the ability of ACh, CCh and SubCh to induce an increase in the excimer/monomer ratio of C10-Py-labelled AChR membrane fluorescence. To further assess the differences in agonist accessibility to the quinacrine binding site, we calculated the agonist concentration in the lipid membrane (CM) at an external agonist concentration high enough to inhibit 50% of quinacrine binding (IC50), which in turn was obtained by agonist back titration of AChR-bound quinacrine. Initial experiments established that high agonist concentrations do not affect either transmembrane proton concentration equilibria (pH) of AChR membrane suspension or AChR-bound quinacrine fluorescence spectra. The agonist membrane partitioning experiments indicated relatively small (< or = 20) Kp values relative to tetracaine. These values follow the order: SL-ACh>SubCh>CCh-ACh. A direct correlation was observed between Kp and the apparent inhibition constant (Ki) for agonists to displace AChR-bound quinacrine. Particularly, agonist with high KpS such as SL-ACh and SubCh showed low Ki values, and this relationship was opposite for CCh and ACh. The calculated CM values indicated significant (between 7 and 54 mM) agonist accessibility to lipid membrane. By themselves, these results support the conjecture that agonist self-inhibition seems to be mediated by the quinacrine binding site via a membrane approach mechanism. The existence of an agonist self-inhibitory binding site, not located in the channel lumen would indicate an allosteric mechanism of ion channel inhibition; however, we can not discard that the process of agonist self-inhibition can also be mediated by a steric blockage of the ion channel. PMID:8747279

  2. Discovery of novel orally bioavailable GPR40 agonists.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hejun; Fei, Hongbo; Yang, Fanglong; Zheng, Suxin; Hu, Qiyue; Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Jijun; Feng, Jun; Sun, Piaoyang; Dong, Qing

    2013-05-15

    The GPR40 (FFA1) has emerged as an attractive target for a novel insulin secretagogue with glucose dependency. A series of novel orally bioavailable GPR40 agonists was discovered. SAR study and structural optimization led to identification of compounds 28a and 30a as potent GPR40 agonists with superior physiochemical properties and robust in vivo efficacy in rhesus monkeys. PMID:23582779

  3. TOXICITY OF AHR AGONISTS TO FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are exceptionally sensitive to the lethal toxicity of chemicals that act as arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Toxicity characterizations based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, generally the most potent AhR agonist, support the toxicity equiva...

  4. Estrogen receptor agonists for attenuation of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Haque, Azizul; Banik, Naren L.; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Ray, Swapan K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent results from laboratory investigations and clinical trials indicate important roles for estrogen receptor (ER) agonists in protecting the central nervous system (CNS) from noxious consequences of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative processes in several CNS disorders including spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are associated with activation of microglia and astrocytes, which drive the resident neuroinflammatory response. During neurodegenerative processes, activated microglia and astrocytes cause deleterious effects on surrounding neurons. The inhibitory activity of ER agonists on microglia activation might be a beneficial therapeutic option for delaying the onset or progression of neurodegenerative injuries and diseases. Recent studies suggest that ER agonists can provide neuroprotection by modulation of cell survival mechanisms, synaptic reorganization, regenerative responses to axonal injury, and neurogenesis process. The anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions of ER agonists are mediated mainly via two ERs known as ER? and ER?. Although some studies have suggested that ER agonists may be deleterious to some neuronal populations, the potential clinical benefits of ER agonists for augmenting cognitive function may triumph over the associated side effects. Also, understanding the modulatory activities of ER agonists on inflammatory pathways will possibly lead to the development of selective anti-inflammatory molecules with neuroprotective roles in different CNS disorders such as SCI, MS, PD, and AD in humans. Future studies should be concentrated on finding the most plausible molecular pathways for enhancing protective functions of ER agonists in treating neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative injuries and diseases in the CNS. PMID:25245209

  5. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  6. Additive antinociceptive effects of mixtures of the ?-opioid receptor agonist spiradoline and the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 in rats.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a significant clinical problem, and there is a need for pharmacotherapies that are more effective with fewer adverse effects than currently available medications. Cannabinoid receptor agonists enhance the antinociceptive effects of ?-opioid receptor agonists; it is unclear whether they impact the effects of agonists acting at other opioid receptors. ?-Opioid receptor agonists have antinociceptive effects, but their clinical use is precluded by adverse effects; however, their therapeutic potential might be realized if antinociceptive effects could be selectively enhanced. In this study, the antinociceptive effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 and the ?-opioid receptor agonist spiradoline, alone and in combination, were studied in rats (n=7) using a warm water tail-withdrawal procedure. When administered alone, CP55940 (0.032-1.0?mg/kg) and spiradoline (1.0-32.0?mg/kg) increased tail-withdrawal latency, and mixtures of CP55940 and spiradoline (ratios of 1?:?3, 1?:?1, and 3?:?1) produced additive effects. It remains to be determined whether this additive interaction between a ?-opioid receptor agonist and a cannabinoid receptor agonist is selective for antinociception and whether it can be generalized to other drugs. PMID:26292184

  7. Non-equivalent ligand selectivity of agonist sites in (?4?2)2?4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a key determinant of agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Mazzaferro, Simone; Gasparri, Federica; New, Karina; Alcaino, Constanza; Faundez, Manuel; Iturriaga Vasquez, Patricio; Vijayan, Ranjit; Biggin, Philip C; Bermudez, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    The ?4?2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant nAChR type in the brain, and this receptor type exists in alternate (?4?2)2?4 and (?4?2)2?2 forms, which are activated by agonists with strikingly differing efficacies. Recent breakthroughs have identified an additional operational agonist binding site in the (?4?2)2?4 nAChR that is responsible for the signature sensitivity of this receptor to activation by agonists, yet the structural mechanisms determining agonist efficacy at this receptor type are not yet fully understood. In this study, we characterized the ligand selectivity of the individual agonist sites of the (?4?2)2?4 nAChR to determine whether differences in agonist selectivity influence agonist efficacy. Applying the substituted cysteine accessibility method to individual agonist sites in concatenated (?4?2)2?4 receptors, we determined the agonist selectivity of the agonist sites of the (?4?2)2?4 receptor. We show that (a) accessibility of substituted cysteines to covalent modification by methanesulfonate reagent depends on the agonist site at which the modification occurs and (b) that agonists such as sazetidine-A and TC-2559 are excluded from the site at the ?4/?4 interface. Given that additional binding to the agonist site in the ?4/?4 interface increases acetylcholine efficacy and that agonists excluded from the agonist site at the ?4/?4 interface behave as partial agonists, we conclude that the ability to engage all agonist sites in (?4?2)2?4 nAChRs is a key determinant of agonist efficacy. The findings add another level of complexity to the structural mechanisms that govern agonist efficacy in heteromeric nAChRs and related ligand-gated ion channels. PMID:24936069

  8. DES RESSOURCES RENOUVELABLES

    E-print Network

    Laval, Université

    DES SCIENCES DE L'AGRICULTURE ET DE L'ALIMENTATION Vice-décanat à la recherche Pavillon Paul LA FSAA La Faculté des sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation (FSAA) permet d'accéder à l plantes, contribuent à la réduction du diabète et des maladies cardiovasculaires par l'alimentation

  9. Direction des Relations Internationales

    E-print Network

    Debarre, Olivier

    Direction des Relations Internationales ERASMUS : liste des accords par pays Les candidatures Philosophie des Sciences 15/06 15/12 COLOGNE Universität zu Köln Littérature et linguistique 15/06 15/12 WÜRZBOURG Université J. Maximilians Littérature et Linguistique 15/06 15/01 AUTRICHE VIENNE Université de

  10. Toll-like receptor 2 agonists inhibit human fibrocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In healing wounds, some monocytes enter the wound and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. Since Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are present on monocytes, and pathogens that can infect a wound have and/or release TLR agonists, we examined whether TLR agonists affect fibrocyte differentiation. Results When human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured with TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, TLR7, TLR8 or TLR9 agonists, there was no significant effect on fibrocyte differentiation, even though enhanced extracellular tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? accumulation and/or increased cell surface CD86 or major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II levels were observed. However, all TLR2 agonists tested inhibited fibrocyte differentiation without any significant effect on cell survival. Adding TLR2 agonists to purified monocytes had no effect on fibrocyte differentiation. However, some TLR2 agonists caused PBMCs to secrete a factor that inhibits the differentiation of purified monocytes into fibrocytes. This factor is not interferon (IFN)-?, IFN-?, interleukin (IL)-12, aggregated immunoglobulin G (IgG) or serum amyloid P (SAP), factors known to inhibit fibrocyte differentiation. TLR2 agonist-treated PBMCs secrete low levels of IL-6, TNF-?, IFN-?, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and tumor growth factor ?1, but combinations of these factors had no effect on fibrocyte differentiation from purified monocytes. Conclusions Our results indicate that TLR2 agonists indirectly inhibit fibrocyte differentiation and that, for some TLR2 agonists, this inhibition involves other cell types in the PBMC population secreting an unknown factor that inhibits fibrocyte differentiation. Together, these data suggest that the presence of some bacterial signals can inhibit fibrocyte differentiation and may thus slow wound closure. PMID:21106092

  11. In vivo receptor binding of the opiate partial agonist, buprenorphine, correlated with its agonistic and antagonistic actions.

    PubMed Central

    Dum, J. E.; Herz, A.

    1981-01-01

    1 In order to gain more insight into the mechanisms behind the actions of opiate partial agonists, an analysis of the dual agonist/antagonist properties of the partial agonist, buprenorphine, was made in conjunction with in vivo binding studies on the drug in the rat. 2 Buprenorphine revealed a bell-shaped dose-response curve for antinociception peaking at approx. 0.5 mg/kg subcutaneously. It antagonized morphine antinociception at doses which normally have agonistic effects and produced maximum antagonistic effects at doses above those having prominent agonistic activity. The withdrawal precipitating potency of buprenorphine as measured in highly morphine-dependent rats was present at doses above those having agonistic activity. The entire dose-response curve for buprenorphine was shifted symmetrically to the right by the opiate antagonist, naltrexone. 3 The dose-dependent occupation of receptors in vivo by buprenorphine seemed to be almost complete over the agonist dosage range; almost no further receptor occupation over the antagonist range was seen. 4 The possibility is discussed that site-to-site receptor interactions leading to cooperativity of effect may be the best explanation of these results. PMID:6271322

  12. Partial agonist therapy in schizophrenia: relevance to diminished criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Gavaudan, Gilles; Magalon, David; Cohen, Julien; Lançon, Christophe; Léonetti, Georges; Pélissier-Alicot, Anne-Laure

    2010-11-01

    Pathological gambling (PG), classified in the DSM-IV among impulse control disorders, is defined as inappropriate, persistent gaming for money with serious personal, family, and social consequences. Offenses are frequently committed to obtain money for gambling. Pathological gambling, a planned and structured behavioral disorder, has often been described as a complication of dopamine agonist treatment in patients with Parkinson's disease. It has never been described in patients with schizophrenia receiving dopamine agonists. We present two patients with schizophrenia, previously treated with antipsychotic drugs without any suggestion of PG, who a short time after starting aripiprazole, a dopamine partial agonist, developed PG and criminal behavior, which totally resolved when aripiprazole was discontinued. Based on recent advances in research on PG and adverse drug reactions to dopamine agonists in Parkinson's disease, we postulate a link between aripiprazole and PG in both our patients with schizophrenia and raise the question of criminal responsibility. PMID:20579229

  13. Potent Adjuvanticity of a Pure TLR7-Agonistic Imidazoquinoline Dendrimer

    E-print Network

    Shukla, Nikunj M.; Salunke, Deepak B.; Balakrishna, Rajalakshmi; Mutz, Cole A.; Malladi, Subbalakshmi S.; David, Sunil A.

    2012-08-28

    Engagement of toll-like receptors (TLRs) serve to link innate immune responses with adaptive immunity and can be exploited as powerful vaccine adjuvants for eliciting both primary and anamnestic immune responses. TLR7 agonists are highly...

  14. GPR119 agonists 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Buzard, Daniel J; Lehmann, Juerg; Han, Sangdon; Jones, Robert M

    2012-07-01

    The increasing incidence of Type II diabetes mellitus worldwide continues to attract the attention and resources of the pharmaceutical industry in the pursuit of more effective therapies for blood glucose control. New approaches that compare favorably with classical medicaments while avoiding hypoglycemic episodes or waning effectiveness are paramount. Recent advances toward this end have been realized based on the biology of the glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1R). This ?-cell-expressed GPCR has the ability to promote insulin release in a glucose-dependent fashion, and has been shown to elicit improved glycemic control and preservation of ?-cell mass. Direct activation of GLP1R utilizing peptide mimetics has been achieved; however, attempts to access the biology of this receptor via small-molecule approaches have thus far been elusive. In this context, GPR119 has emerged as a tractable new alternative to GLP1R. GPR119 is another GPCR expressed on the ?-cell, which, like GLP1R, signals in a glucose-dependent manner. Moreover, GPR119-mediated increases in GLP-1 and other incretins upon activation in the intestine further increase the insulinotropic activity of the ?-cell. The early success in identifying small-molecule agonists of the GPR119 has prompted a rapid increase in the number of patent applications filed in the last few years. In this review we provide a comprehensive summary of all patent activity in this field that has appeared within the 2009-2011 timeframe. PMID:24236842

  15. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    DOEpatents

    Pandit, Jayvardhan (Mystic, CT); Jancarik, Jarmila (Walnut Creek, CA); Kim, Sung-Hou (Moraga, CA); Koths, Kirston (El Cerrito, CA); Halenbeck, Robert (San Rafael, CA); Fear, Anna Lisa (Oakland, CA); Taylor, Eric (Oakland, CA); Yamamoto, Ralph (Martinez, CA); Bohm, Andrew (Armonk, NY)

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  16. Trial Watch: Toll-like receptor agonists for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have long been known for their ability to initiate innate immune responses upon exposure to conserved microbial components such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and double-stranded RNA. More recently, this family of pattern recognition receptors has been attributed a critical role in the elicitation of anticancer immune responses, raising interest in the development of immunochemotherapeutic regimens based on natural or synthetic TLR agonists. In spite of such an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation, only three TLR agonists are currently licensed by FDA for use in cancer patients: bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that operates as a mixed TLR2/TLR4 agonist; monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a derivative of Salmonella minnesota that functions as a potent agonist of TLR4; and imiquimod, a synthetic imidazoquinoline that activates TLR7. One year ago, in the August and September issues of OncoImmunology, we described the main biological features of TLRs and discussed the progress of clinical studies evaluating the safety and therapeutic potential of TLR agonists in cancer patients. Here, we summarize the latest developments in this exciting area of research, focusing on preclinical studies that have been published during the last 13 mo and clinical trials launched in the same period to investigate the antineoplastic activity of TLR agonists. PMID:24083080

  17. Profil des candidats : Master de Biologie ou Biologie des Systmes

    E-print Network

    Radulescu, Ovidiu

    Profil des candidats : Master de Biologie ou Biologie des Systèmes Candidatures en ligne : sur le approche de biologie des systèmes du contrôle de l'entrée et de la sortie mitotiques chez les eucaryotes

  18. Impact of Efficacy at the ?-Opioid Receptor on Antinociceptive Effects of Combinations of ?-Opioid Receptor Agonists and Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists, such as ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (?9-THC), enhance the antinociceptive effects of ?-opioid receptor agonists, which suggests that combining cannabinoids with opioids would improve pain treatment. Combinations with lower efficacy agonists might be preferred and could avoid adverse effects associated with large doses; however, it is unclear whether interactions between opioids and cannabinoids vary across drugs with different efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of ?-opioid receptor agonists alone and in combination with cannabinoid receptor agonists were studied in rhesus monkeys (n = 4) using a warm water tail withdrawal procedure. Etorphine, fentanyl, morphine, buprenorphine, nalbuphine, ?9-THC, and CP 55,940 (2-[(1R,2R,5R)-5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl) cyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol) each increased tail withdrawal latency. Pretreatment with doses of ?9-THC (1.0 mg/kg) or CP 55,940 (0.032 mg/kg) that were ineffective alone shifted the fentanyl dose-effect curve leftward 20.6- and 52.9-fold, respectively, and the etorphine dose-effect curve leftward 12.4- and 19.6-fold, respectively. ?9-THC and CP 55,940 shifted the morphine dose-effect curve leftward only 3.4- and 7.9-fold, respectively, and the buprenorphine curve only 5.4- and 4.1-fold, respectively. Neither ?9-THC nor CP 55,940 significantly altered the effects of nalbuphine. Cannabinoid receptor agonists increase the antinociceptive potency of higher efficacy opioid receptor agonists more than lower efficacy agonists; however, because much smaller doses of each drug can be administered in combinations while achieving adequate pain relief and that other (e.g., abuse-related) effects of opioids do not appear to be enhanced by cannabinoids, these results provide additional support for combining opioids with cannabinoids to treat pain. PMID:25194020

  19. Impact of efficacy at the ?-opioid receptor on antinociceptive effects of combinations of ?-opioid receptor agonists and cannabinoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2014-11-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists, such as ?(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (?(9)-THC), enhance the antinociceptive effects of ?-opioid receptor agonists, which suggests that combining cannabinoids with opioids would improve pain treatment. Combinations with lower efficacy agonists might be preferred and could avoid adverse effects associated with large doses; however, it is unclear whether interactions between opioids and cannabinoids vary across drugs with different efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of ?-opioid receptor agonists alone and in combination with cannabinoid receptor agonists were studied in rhesus monkeys (n = 4) using a warm water tail withdrawal procedure. Etorphine, fentanyl, morphine, buprenorphine, nalbuphine, ?(9)-THC, and CP 55,940 (2-[(1R,2R,5R)-5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl) cyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol) each increased tail withdrawal latency. Pretreatment with doses of ?(9)-THC (1.0 mg/kg) or CP 55,940 (0.032 mg/kg) that were ineffective alone shifted the fentanyl dose-effect curve leftward 20.6- and 52.9-fold, respectively, and the etorphine dose-effect curve leftward 12.4- and 19.6-fold, respectively. ?(9)-THC and CP 55,940 shifted the morphine dose-effect curve leftward only 3.4- and 7.9-fold, respectively, and the buprenorphine curve only 5.4- and 4.1-fold, respectively. Neither ?(9)-THC nor CP 55,940 significantly altered the effects of nalbuphine. Cannabinoid receptor agonists increase the antinociceptive potency of higher efficacy opioid receptor agonists more than lower efficacy agonists; however, because much smaller doses of each drug can be administered in combinations while achieving adequate pain relief and that other (e.g., abuse-related) effects of opioids do not appear to be enhanced by cannabinoids, these results provide additional support for combining opioids with cannabinoids to treat pain. PMID:25194020

  20. RXR Partial Agonist CBt-PMN Exerts Therapeutic Effects on Type 2 Diabetes without the Side Effects of RXR Full Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Treating insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in rodents, currently known retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonists induce significant adverse effects. Here we introduce a novel RXR partial agonist CBt-PMN (11b), which shows a potent glucose-lowering effect and improvements of insulin secretion and glucose tolerance without the serious adverse effects caused by RXR full agonists. We suggest that RXR partial agonists may be a new class of antitype 2 diabetes drug candidates. PMID:24900488

  1. Médecine des voyages

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Définir la pratique de la médecine des voyages, présenter les éléments fondamentaux d’une consultation complète préalable aux voyages à des voyageurs internationaux et aider à identifier les patients qu’il vaudrait mieux envoyer en consultation auprès de professionnels de la médecine des voyages. Sources des données Les lignes directrices et les recommandations sur la médecine des voyages et les maladies liées aux voyages publiées par les autorités sanitaires nationales et internationales ont fait l’objet d’un examen. Une recension des ouvrages connexes dans MEDLINE et EMBASE a aussi été effectuée. Message principal La médecine des voyages est une spécialité très dynamique qui se concentre sur les soins préventifs avant un voyage. Une évaluation exhaustive du risque pour chaque voyageur est essentielle pour mesurer avec exactitude les risques particuliers au voyageur, à son itinéraire et à sa destination et pour offrir des conseils sur les interventions les plus appropriées en gestion du risque afin de promouvoir la santé et prévenir les problèmes médicaux indésirables durant le voyage. Des vaccins peuvent aussi être nécessaires et doivent être personnalisés en fonction des antécédents d’immunisation du voyageur, de son itinéraire et du temps qu’il reste avant son départ. Conclusion La santé et la sécurité d’un voyageur dépendent du degré d’expertise du médecin qui offre le counseling préalable à son voyage et les vaccins, au besoin. On recommande à ceux qui donnent des conseils aux voyageurs d’être conscients de l’ampleur de cette responsabilité et de demander si possible une consultation auprès de professionnels de la médecine des voyages pour tous les voyageurs à risque élevé.

  2. Methamphetamine-like discriminative-stimulus effects of nicotinic agonists.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rajeev I; Bergman, Jack

    2014-03-01

    Nicotine was recently shown to engender d-methamphetamine (MA)-like discriminative-stimulus effects in rats, which may be indicative of shared psychomotor stimulant properties. To further investigate such overlapping discriminative-stimulus effects, nicotinic agonists varying in efficacy and selectivity were studied in squirrel monkeys that discriminated a moderate intramuscular dose of MA (0.1 mg/kg) from vehicle. These included ?4?2-selective ligands that may vary in efficacy from relatively high [nicotine, (+)- and (-)-epibatidine] to relatively low [isoarecolone, varenicline, (-)-cytisine, (-)-lobeline] and the ?7-selective ligands anabaseine and anabasine. Results show that nicotine, (+)-epibatidine, and (-)-epibatidine substituted fully for MA, whereas the highest doses of other nicotinic agonists produced intermediate levels of MA-like effects (isoarecolone, anabaseine, anabasine, and varenicline) or did not substitute for MA [(-)-cytisine and (-)-lobeline]. The relative potencies of nicotinic agonists, based on effective dose50 (ED50) values, corresponded more closely with their relative affinities at ?4?2 than at ?7 receptors. Regardless of selectivity or efficacy, nicotinic agonists also were observed to produce untoward effects, including salivation and emesis during or after experimental sessions. In pretreatment studies, the ?4?2-selective antagonist dihydro-?-erythroidine hydrobromide (DH?E) (0.032 and 0.1 mg/kg) and the partial agonists varenicline (0.0032-0.1 mg/kg) and (-)-cytisine (0.032 and 0.1 mg/kg) surmountably antagonized (>10-fold rightward shift) nicotine's MA-like effects but were ineffective in blocking nicotine's emetic effects. Overall, our results show that 1) MA-like discriminative-stimulus effects of nicotinic agonists likely are mediated through ?4?2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor actions, and 2) nicotinic ?4?2 partial agonists, like the nicotinic antagonist DH?E, can reduce MA-like behavioral effects of nicotine. PMID:24389640

  3. In vitro and in vivo effects of kinin B1 and B2 receptor agonists and antagonists in inbred control and cardiomyopathic hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Hallé, S; Gobeil, F; Ouellette, J; Lambert, C; Regoli, D

    2000-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the possible alterations occurring in the effects of kinins on isolated aortae of inbred control (CHF 148) and cardiomyopathic (CHF 146) hamsters of 150–175 and 350–375 days of age.Bradykinin (BK) and desArg9BK contracted isolated aortae (with or without endothelium) of hamsters of both strains and ages. After tissue equilibration (90?min), responses elicited by both kinin agonists were stable over the time of experiments. The patterns of isometric contractions of BK and desArg9BK were however found to be different; desArg9BK had a slower onset and a longer duration of action than BK.Potencies (pEC50 values) of BK in all groups of hamsters were significantly increased by preincubating the tissues with captopril (10?5?M).No differences in the pEC50 values and the Emax values for BK or desArg9BK were seen between isolated vessels from inbred control and cardiomyopathic hamsters.The myotropic effect of BK was inhibited by the selective non peptide antagonist, FR 173657 (pIC50 7.25±0.12 at the bradykinin B2 receptor subtype (B2 receptor)). Those of desArg9BK, at the bradykinin B1 receptor subtype (B1 receptor) were abolished by either R 715 (pIC50 of 7.55±0.05; ?E=0), Lys[Leu8]desArg9BK (pIC50 of 7.21±0.01; ?E=0.22) or [Leu8]desArg9BK (pIC50 of 7.25±0.02; ?E=0.18).FR 173657 had no agonistic activity, exerted a non competitive type of antagonism and was poorly reversible (lasting more than 5?h) from B2 receptor. In vivo, FR 173657 (given per os at 1 and 5?mg?kg?1, 1?h before the experiment) antagonized the acute hypotensive effect of BK in anaesthetized hamsters.It is concluded that aging and/or the presence of a congenital cardiovascular disorder in hamsters are not associated with changes in the in vitro aortic responses to either BK or desArg9BK. PMID:10780969

  4. RPERTOIRE DES PROJETS DE LA

    E-print Network

    .................................................................................. 57 Département des sciences animales Élaboration, mise à l'essai et implantation de mesure de la qualité des services de soutien Contrat

  5. Benzodiazepine agonist and inverse agonist actions on GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. II. Chronic effects of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, K.J.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Mice were made tolerant to and dependent on ethanol by administration of a liquid diet. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-dependent uptake of 36Cl- by mouse cortical microsacs was used to study the actions of benzodiazepine (BZ) agonists and inverse agonists. Chronic exposure to ethanol attenuated the ability of a BZ agonist, flunitrazepam, to augment muscimol-stimulated uptake of 36Cl- and enhanced the actions of BZ inverse agonists, Ro15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,4)-benzodiazepine - 3-carboxylate) and DMCM (methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate), to inhibit GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. Augmentation of chloride flux by pentobarbital was not reduced by chronic ethanol exposure. Attenuation of flunitrazepam efficacy was transient and returned to control levels within 6 to 24 hr after withdrawal from ethanol, but increased sensitivity to Ro15-4513 was observed as long as 8 days after withdrawal. Chronic exposure to ethanol did not alter (3H)SR 95531 (2-(3'-carbethoxy-2'propyl)-3-amino-6-p-methoxyphenylpyridazinium bromide) binding to low-affinity GABAA receptors or muscimol stimulation of chloride flux; and did not alter (3H)Ro15-4513 or (3H)flunitrazepam binding to central BZ receptors or allosteric modulation of this binding by muscimol (i.e., muscimol-shift). These results suggest that chronic exposure to ethanol reduces coupling between BZ agonist sites and the chloride channel, and may be responsible for the development of cross-tolerance between ethanol and BZ agonists. In contrast, coupling between BZ inverse agonist sites and the chloride channel is increased.

  6. Rat Urinary Bladder Carcinogenesis by Dual-Acting PPAR? + ? Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Southgate, Jennifer; Iversen, Lars; Egerod, Frederikke L.

    2008-01-01

    Despite clinical promise, dual-acting activators of PPAR? and ? (here termed PPAR?+? agonists) have experienced high attrition rates in preclinical and early clinical development, due to toxicity. In some cases, discontinuation was due to carcinogenic effect in the rat urothelium, the epithelial layer lining the urinary bladder, ureters, and kidney pelvis. Chronic pharmacological activation of PPAR? is invariably associated with cancer in rats and mice. Chronic pharmacological activation of PPAR? can in some cases also cause cancer in rats and mice. Urothelial cells coexpress PPAR? as well as PPAR?, making it plausible that the urothelial carcinogenicity of PPAR?+? agonists may be caused by receptor-mediated effects (exaggerated pharmacology). Based on previously published mode of action data for the PPAR?+? agonist ragaglitazar, and the available literature about the role of PPAR? and ? in rodent carcinogenesis, we propose a mode of action hypothesis for the carcinogenic effect of PPAR?+? agonists in the rat urothelium, which combines receptor-mediated and off-target cytotoxic effects. The proposed mode of action hypothesis is being explored in our laboratories, towards understanding the human relevance of the rat cancer findings, and developing rapid in vitro or short-term in vivo screening approaches to faciliate development of new dual-acting PPAR agonist compounds. PMID:19197366

  7. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  8. Tolerance with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists: time for reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Grove, A; Lipworth, B J

    1995-01-01

    1. In spite of the widespread use of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of asthma controversy continues regarding their possible role in increasing asthma mortality and morbidity. There is however no evidence available to suggest that tolerance to the bronchodilator or anti-bronchoconstrictor effects of these drugs is responsible for the deleterious effects reported with the regular use of bronchodilators. 2. There is no conclusive evidence to suggest that tolerance develops to the bronchodilator effects of short-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. Tolerance does however appear to develop to the anti-bronchoconstrictor effects of these drugs. 3. With regard to the long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, there is evidence to suggest that tolerance develops both to their anti-bronchoconstrictor, and bronchodilator effects. Tolerance was however demonstrated in the presence of improved symptom control, therefore the clinical relevance of this phenomenon is uncertain. 4. Systemic corticosteroids can modulate lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor function both preventing, and reversing tolerance. The situation regarding the effects of systemic or inhaled corticosteroids on modulating bronchodilator responses in asthmatics is less clear. There is some evidence to suggest that inhaled corticosteroids are unable to prevent bronchodilator or systemic tolerance to long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. 5. On the basis of the current evidence, the British Thoracic Society guidelines for the management of asthma appear appropriate with regard to their recommendations for the use of long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:7742147

  9. Portail des maths & PLM 2.0 Jacquelin Charbonnel -Journes des DU -Paris, 11 avril 2013 Portail des maths

    E-print Network

    Menichi, Luc

    Portail des maths & PLM 2.0 Jacquelin Charbonnel - Journées des DU - Paris, 11 avril 2013 Portail des maths et PLM 2.0 Jacquelin Charbonnel - Mathrice Journées des DU - Paris, 11 avril 2013 #12;Portail des maths & PLM 2.0 Jacquelin Charbonnel - Journées des DU - Paris, 11 avril 2013 Portail des

  10. Jahresbericht des Hochschulrates

    E-print Network

    Ferrari, Patrik L.

    1 Jahresbericht 2014 des Hochschulrates der Rheinischen Friedrich-Wilhelm-Universität Bonn #12;2 I Engels als Vorsitzender. Am 15. Juli 2014 wurde Prof. Dr. E. Jürgen Zöllner, auf Vorschlag des. Helmut Schwarz, Dr. Katrin Vernau und Prof. Dr. Dieter Engels, der zum Vorsitzenden dieser Kommission

  11. Direction des Ressources Humaines Bureau du recrutement et des

    E-print Network

    Wolf, Christian

    2015 Contact Direction des Ressources Humaines Bureau du recrutement et des concours Bâtiment Julie Maîtriser au moins une méthode de spécification et de conception . Maîtriser des méthodes et techniques de langages Objet (C++, Java), Web (PHP), SQL, script... . Avoir des compétences en programmation web et dans

  12. Des Moines and Raccoon Rivers, Des Moines, Iowa

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Des Moines and Raccoon Rivers, Des Moines, Iowa 18 October 2006 Abstract: The recommended plan opportunities along the Des Moines and Raccoon Rivers in the areas of Birdland Park, Central Place and downtown Additional Information: Mississippi Valley Division Rock Island District Des Moines and Raccoon River Damage

  13. Principles of agonist recognition in Cys-loop receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lynagh, Timothy; Pless, Stephan A.

    2014-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that are activated by a structurally diverse array of neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine, serotonin, glycine, and GABA. After the term “chemoreceptor” emerged over 100 years ago, there was some wait until affinity labeling, molecular cloning, functional studies, and X-ray crystallography experiments identified the extracellular interface of adjacent subunits as the principal site of agonist binding. The question of how subtle differences at and around agonist-binding sites of different Cys-loop receptors can accommodate transmitters as chemically diverse as glycine and serotonin has been subject to intense research over the last three decades. This review outlines the functional diversity and current structural understanding of agonist-binding sites, including those of invertebrate Cys-loop receptors. Together, this provides a framework to understand the atomic determinants involved in how these valuable therapeutic targets recognize and bind their ligands. PMID:24795655

  14. Radiolabelled D/sub 2/ agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents: Progress report for period February 1, 1987-January 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.

    1987-11-07

    Three D/sub 2/ agonists, /sup 3/H-DHEC, /sup 3/H-BrCr and /sup 3/H-ADTN, were evaluated with /sup 3/H-DHEC showing the most promise as a potential prolactinoma imaging agent. Concentration vs time plots for all three compounds in normal and in DES-treated pituitary tissue are reported. The exceptional D/sub 2/ receptor affinity of N-0437 has prompted synthetic efforts towards preparation of iodo-N-0437 in spite of a lack of preliminary tissue distribution data. An evaluation of /sup 18/F-FDG uptake in the prolactinoma model and as a muscarinic ligand in control animals were evaluated. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Les bonhommes-foumis Il y a des annes, bien des saisons et bien des jours, vivaient des petits

    E-print Network

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    Les bonhommes-foumis Il y a des années, bien des saisons et bien des jours, vivaient des petits petites colonies sur leur territoire principal ou en territoire éloigné. Un jour, elles se sont retrouvées sur un petit territoire charmant du nom de Cargèse. Les petits bonhommes-fourmis se sont retrouvés

  16. Systemic treatment with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) potentiates kinin B1 receptor agonist-induced nociception and oedema formation in the formalin test in mice.

    PubMed

    de Campos, R O; Henriques, M G; Calixto, J B

    1998-10-01

    This study investigates the effect and some of the mechanisms involved following systemic treatment of mice with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) (1 dose per animal containing 6.4 x 10(4) colony-forming units (CFu) 20-60 days beforehand) on modulation of the kinin B1 receptor agonist-induced nociception and oedema formation in the formalin test. Intraplantar (i.p.l.) co-injection of des-Arg9-bradykinin (4-32 nmol/paw) or des-Arg10-kallidin (1-15 nmol/paw), together with sub-maximal concentrations of formalin (0.01 or 0.5%), potentiated (P < 0.01) both pain phases and the paw oedema caused by formalin in animals pre-treated with saline. However, when animals were pre-treated with BCG, the dose-response curves for both B1 agonists were shifted 2 to 8-fold to the left. These B1-mediated effects peaked at 30-45 days after BCG treatment and were still elevated at 60 days after BCG injection. The pain response and oedema formation caused by i.p.l. co-injection of des-Arg9-bradykinin, together with formalin in BCG-pre-treated animals, were dose-dependently antagonised by i.p.l. co-injection of the B1 antagonist des-Arg9[Leu8]bradykinin (1-15 nmol/paw), but were not affected by the B2 antagonist Hoe 140 (10 nmol/paw). The i.p.l. co-injection of tyrosine8-bradykinin (a B2 agonist, 3-15 nmol/paw) with formalin (0.01 or 0.5%) potentiated the pain response and paw oedema in BCG and saline-pre-treated animals to the same extent (P < 0.01). The actions caused by tyrosine8-bradykinin were antagonised by Hoe 140, while des- Arg9[Leu8]bradykinin (10 nmol/paw) had no effect. Dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.), given every 24 h, from day 0 to 30-45, inhibited significantly the potentiation of nociceptive response and oedema formation caused by i.p.l. co-injection of formalin plus des-Arg9-bradykinin, while indomethacin (2 mg/kg, i.p.) or phenidone (30 mg/kg, i.p.), given 1 h prior, caused less inhibition. These data show that the long-term systemic treatment of mice with BCG produced dose-related potentiation of B1 receptor agonist-mediated nociception and oedema formation, without affecting similar responses caused by the B2 receptor agonist tyrosine8-bradykinin. Thus, systemic treatment of mice with BCG induces upregulation of B1 receptors, without affecting B2-mediated responses, by a mechanism that seems to be secondary to cytokine release. PMID:9844998

  17. Pyrrolo- and Pyridomorphinans: Non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, V.; Clark, M.J.; Traynor, J.R.; Lewis, J.W.; Husbands, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse. PMID:24973818

  18. Pyrrolo- and pyridomorphinans: non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Clark, M J; Traynor, J R; Lewis, J W; Husbands, S M

    2014-08-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse. PMID:24973818

  19. Screening of Receptor Antagonists Using Agonist-Activated Patch Clamp Detection in

    E-print Network

    selection and biosensor functionality is simply achieved by selection of an appropriate agonist-methyl-D-aspartate and the co-agonist glycine. The presented method offers new possibilities for drug screening

  20. VIE DES RESEAUX Exploration pluridisciplinaire des identits

    E-print Network

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    sous concentration solaire, caractérisée à l'iEs Dans le contexte budgétaire français des prochaines revues LIVRE REVUE PHOTO ©CNRsPhotothèque-FOUCARANAlain,CUMiNALYvan �LAUNEwww.cnrs.fr Cellule solaire

  1. RESEARCH ARTICLE Sex-Specific Differences in Agonistic

    E-print Network

    Ladich, Friedrich

    Sensitivity in the Callichthyid Armoured Catfish Megalechis thoracata Oliwia Hadjiaghai¤ , Friedrich Ladich in fishes are rare. Representatives of numerous catfish families are known to produce sounds in agonistic in males and females of a callichthyid catfish. Methodology/Principal Findings Eight males and nine females

  2. Potent Agonists of the Protease Activated Receptor 2 (PAR2)

    PubMed Central

    Boitano, Scott; Flynn, Andrea N.; Schulz, Stephanie M.; Hoffman, Justin; Price, Theodore J.; Vagner, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Novel peptidomimetic pharmacophores to PAR2 were designed based on the known activating peptide SLIGRL-NH2. A set of 15 analogues was evaluated with a model cell line (16HBE14o-) that highly expresses PAR2. Cells exposed to the PAR2 activating peptide with N-terminal 2-furoyl modification (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2) initiated increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i EC50 = 0.84 ?M) and in vitro physiological responses as measured by the xCELLigence real time cell analyzer (RTCA EC50 = 138 nM). We discovered two selective PAR2 agonists with comparable potency: compound 1 (2-aminothiazol-4-yl; Ca2+ EC50 = 1.77 ?M, RTCA EC50 = 142 nM) and compound 2 (6-aminonicotinyl; Ca2+ EC50 = 2.60 ?M, RTCA EC50 = 311 nM). Unlike the previously described agonist, these novel agonists are devoid of the metabolically unstable 2-furoyl modification and thus provide potential advantages for PAR2 peptide design for in vitro and in vivo studies. The novel compounds described herein also serve as a starting point for structure–activity relationship (SAR) design and are, for the first time, evaluated via a unique high throughput in vitro physiological assay. Together these will lead to discovery of more potent agonists and antagonists of PAR2. PMID:21294569

  3. Chemotype-selective Modes of Action of ?-Opioid Receptor Agonists*

    PubMed Central

    Vardy, Eyal; Mosier, Philip D.; Frankowski, Kevin J.; Wu, Huixian; Katritch, Vsevolod; Westkaemper, Richard B.; Aubé, Jeffrey; Stevens, Raymond C.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structures of opioid receptors provide a novel platform for inquiry into opioid receptor function. The molecular determinants for activation of the ?-opioid receptor (KOR) were studied using a combination of agonist docking, functional assays, and site-directed mutagenesis. Eighteen positions in the putative agonist binding site of KOR were selected and evaluated for their effects on receptor binding and activation by ligands representing four distinct chemotypes: the peptide dynorphin A(1–17), the arylacetamide U-69593, and the non-charged ligands salvinorin A and the octahydroisoquinolinone carboxamide 1xx. Minimally biased docking of the tested ligands into the antagonist-bound KOR structure generated distinct binding modes, which were then evaluated biochemically and pharmacologically. Our analysis identified two types of mutations: those that affect receptor function primarily via ligand binding and those that primarily affect function. The shared and differential mechanisms of agonist binding and activation in KOR are further discussed. Usually, mutations affecting function more than binding were located at the periphery of the binding site and did not interact strongly with the various ligands. Analysis of the crystal structure along with the present results provide fundamental insights into the activation mechanism of the KOR and suggest that “functional” residues, along with water molecules detected in the crystal structure, may be directly involved in transduction of the agonist binding event into structural changes at the conserved rotamer switches, thus leading to receptor activation. PMID:24121503

  4. Novel tricyclic pyrazolopyrimidines as potent and selective GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Azimioara, Mihai; Alper, Phil; Cow, Christopher; Mutnick, Daniel; Nikulin, Victor; Lelais, Gerald; Mecom, John; McNeill, Matthew; Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Wang, Zhiliang; Reding, Esther; Paliotti, Michael; Li, Jing; Bao, Dingjiu; Zoll, Jocelyn; Kim, Young; Zimmerman, Matthew; Groessl, Todd; Tuntland, Tove; Joseph, Sean B; McNamara, Peter; Seidel, H Martin; Epple, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Systematic SAR optimization of the GPR119 agonist lead 1, derived from an internal HTS campaign, led to compound 29. Compound 29 displays significantly improved in vitro activity and oral exposure, leading to GLP1 elevation in acutely dosed mice and reduced glucose excursion in an OGTT study in rats at doses ?10 mg/kg. PMID:25455488

  5. Partial Agonists Activate PPARgamma Using a Helix 12 Independent Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Bruning, J.B.; Chalmers, M.J.; Prasad, S.; Bushby, S.A.; Kamenecka, T.A.; He, Y.; Nettles, K.W.; Griffin, P.R.

    2009-05-28

    Binding to helix 12 of the ligand-binding domain of PPAR{gamma} is required for full agonist activity. Previously, the degree of stabilization of the activation function 2 (AF-2) surface was thought to correlate with the degree of agonism and transactivation. To examine this mechanism, we probed structural dynamics of PPAR{gamma} with agonists that induced graded transcriptional responses. Here we present crystal structures and amide H/D exchange (HDX) kinetics for six of these complexes. Amide HDX revealed each ligand induced unique changes to the dynamics of the ligand-binding domain (LBD). Full agonists stabilized helix 12, whereas intermediate and partial agonists did not at all, and rather differentially stabilized other regions of the binding pocket. The gradient of PPAR{gamma} transactivation cannot be accounted for solely through changes to the dynamics of AF-2. Thus, our understanding of allosteric signaling must be extended beyond the idea of a dynamic helix 12 acting as a molecular switch.

  6. Cloning and functional characterization of the ornithokinin receptor. Recognition of the major kinin receptor antagonist, HOE140, as a full agonist.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, C; Beug, H; Müller-Esterl, W

    1997-05-01

    Kinins are proinflammatory peptides that dilate vessels, increase vascular permeability, contract smooth muscles, and provoke pain. The known mammalian kinin receptors are classified as two subtypes, i.e. the B1 receptor triggered by [des-Arg9]bradykinin and inhibited by [des-Arg9,Leu8]bradykinin, and the B2 receptor stimulated by bradykinin and antagonized by HOE140. Here we report the cloning of a non-mammalian kinin receptor gene amplified from genomic chicken DNA. The protein predicted from the open reading frame shows 31 and 49% sequence identity to the human B1 and B2 receptors, respectively, suggesting that it represents a G protein-coupled receptor of the kinin receptor family. The recombinantly expressed chicken receptor had IC50 values of 4.7 nM for the authentic ligand, ornithokinin ([Thr6,Leu8]bradykinin), 3.8 nM for HOE140, and >/=10 microM for bradykinin, [des-Arg9]bradykinin, and [des-Arg9,Leu8]bradykinin. Ornithokinin and HOE140 at nanomolar concentrations stimulated intracellular inositol phosphate accumulation and induced a significant transient rise in intracelluar free Ca2+, whereas bradykinin was ineffective even at 100 nM. Hence the principal B2 receptor antagonist HOE140 is a potent agonist of the chicken kinin receptor. This unique pharmacological profile classifies the ornithokinin receptor as a novel subtype among kinin receptors and will facilitate further molecular studies on ligand binding and receptor activation. PMID:9139696

  7. Activation of endplate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by agonists.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Anthony

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of a small molecule made in one cell with a large receptor made in another is the signature event of cell signaling. Understanding the structure and energy changes associated with agonist activation is important for engineering drugs, receptors and synapses. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a ?300kD ion channel that binds the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists to elicit electrical responses in the central and peripheral nervous systems. This mini-review is in two sections. First, general concepts of skeletal muscle AChR operation are discussed in terms of energy landscapes for conformational change. Second, adult vs. fetal AChRs are compared with regard to interaction energies between ACh and agonist-site side chains, measured by single-channel electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations. The five aromatic residues that form the core of each agonist binding site can be divided into two working groups, a triad (led by ?Y190) that behaves similarly at all sites and a coupled pair (led by ?W55) that has a large influence on affinity only in fetal AChRs. Each endplate AChR has 5 homologous subunits, two of ?(1) and one each of ?, ?, and either ? (fetal) or ? (adult). These nicotinic AChRs have only 2 functional agonist binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at ?? and either ?? or ?? subunit interfaces. The receptor undergoes a reversible, global isomerization between structures called C and O. The C shape does not conduct ions and has a relatively low affinity for ACh, whereas O conducts cations and has a higher affinity. When both agonist sites are empty (filled only with water) the probability of taking on the O conformation (PO) is low, <10(-6). When ACh molecules occupy the agonist sites the C?O opening rate constant and C?O gating equilibrium constant increase dramatically. Following a pulse of ACh at the nerve-muscle synapse, the endplate current rises rapidly to reach a peak that corresponds to PO ?0.96. PMID:26206191

  8. A mathematical model of the nicotinic-agonist stimulated release of dopamine from striatal

    E-print Network

    Bath, University of

    A mathematical model of the nicotinic-agonist stimulated release of dopamine from striatal- ulation and nicotinic agonists has been well characterised experimentally. Based on these data we have of the involvement of voltage-sensitive Na + channels, whereas nicotinic agonists produce a series of Na + channel

  9. Synthesis and SAR of potent LXR agonists containing an indole pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Campobasso, Nino; Smallwood, Angela; Parks, Derek J.; Webb, Christine L.; Frank, Kelly A.; Nord, Melanie; Duraiswami, Chaya; Evans, Christopher; Jaye, Michael; Thompson, Scott K.

    2009-03-27

    A novel series of 1H-indol-1-yl tertiary amine LXR agonists has been designed. Compounds from this series were potent agonists with good rat pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, the crystal structure of an LXR agonist bound to LXR{alpha} will be disclosed.

  10. Facult des arts et des sciences Sciences sociales et psychologie | Cartographie de la recherche 2012 TABLE DES MATIRES

    E-print Network

    Montréal, Université de

    #12;Faculté des arts et des sciences ­ Sciences sociales et psychologie | Cartographie de la ..................................................................................................................................................................... 2 La Faculté des arts et des sciences (FAS), c'est....................................................................................... 3 Sciences sociales et psychologie

  11. Melatonin receptor agonists: new options for insomnia and depression treatment.

    PubMed

    Spadoni, Gilberto; Bedini, Annalida; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco

    2011-12-01

    The circadian nature of melatonin (MLT) secretion, coupled with the localization of MLT receptors to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, has led to numerous studies of the role of MLT in modulation of the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms in humans. Although much more needs to be understood about the various functions exerted by MLT and its mechanisms of action, three therapeutic agents (ramelteon, prolonged-release MLT, and agomelatine) are already in use, and MLT receptor agonists are now appearing as new promising treatment options for sleep and circadian-rhythm related disorders. In this review, emphasis has been placed on medicinal chemistry strategies leading to MLT receptor agonists, and on the evidence supporting therapeutic efficacy of compounds undergoing clinical evaluation. A wide range of clinical trials demonstrated that ramelteon, prolonged-release MLT and tasimelteon have sleep-promoting effects, providing an important treatment option for insomnia and transient insomnia, even if the improvements of sleep maintenance appear moderate. Well-documented effects of agomelatine suggest that this MLT agonist offers an attractive alternative for the treatment of depression, combining efficacy with a favorable side effect profile. Despite a large number of high affinity nonselective MLT receptor agonists, only limited data on MT? or MT? subtype-selective compounds are available up to now. Administration of the MT?-selective agonist IIK7 to rats has proved to decrease NREM sleep onset latency, suggesting that MT? receptor subtype is involved in the acute sleep-promoting action of MLT; rigorous clinical studies are needed to demonstrate this hypothesis. Further clinical candidates based on selective activation of MT? or MT? receptors are expected in coming years. PMID:21554566

  12. Nicotine enhances murine airway contractile responses to kinin receptor agonists via activation of JNK- and PDE4-related intracellular pathways

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nicotine plays an important role in cigarette-smoke-associated airway disease. The present study was designed to examine if nicotine could induce airway hyperresponsiveness through kinin receptors, and if so, explore the underlying mechanisms involved. Methods Murine tracheal segments were cultured for 1, 2 or 4 days in serum-free DMEM medium in presence of nicotine (1 and 10 ?M) or vehicle (DMSO). Contractile responses induced by kinin B1 receptor agonist, des-Arg9-bradykinin, and B2 receptor agonist, bradykinin, were monitored with myographs. The B1 and B2 receptor mRNA expressions were semi-quantified using real-time PCR and their corresponding protein expressions assessed with confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Various pharmacological inhibitors were used for studying intracellular signaling pathways. Results Four days of organ culture with nicotine concentration-dependently increased kinin B1 and B2 receptor-mediated airway contractions, without altering the kinin receptor-mediated relaxations. No such increase was seen at day 1 or day 2. The airway contractile responses to 5-HT, acetylcholine and endothelin receptor agonists remained unaffected by nicotine. Two different neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonists MG624 and hexamethonium blocked the nicotine-induced effects. The enhanced contractile responses were accompanied by increased mRNA and protein expression for both kinin receptors, suggesting the involvement of transcriptional mechanisms. Confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry showed that 4 days of nicotine treatment induced activation (phosphorylation) of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38. Inhibition of JNK with its specific inhibitor SP600125 abolished the nicotine-induced effects on kinin receptor-mediated contractions and reverted the enhanced receptor mRNA expression. Administration of phosphodiesterase inhibitors (YM976 and theophylline), glucocorticoid (dexamethasone) or adenylcyclase activator (forskolin) suppressed the nicotine-enhanced airway contractile response to des-Arg9-bradykinin and bradykinin. Conclusions Nicotine induces airway hyperresponsiveness via transcriptional up-regulation of airway kinin B1 and B2 receptors, an effect mediated via neuronal nicotinic receptors. The underlying molecular mechanisms involve activation of JNK- and PDE4-mediated intracellular inflammatory signal pathways. Our results might be relevant to active and passive smokers suffering from airway hyperresponsiveness, and suggest new therapeutic targets for the treatment of smoke-associated airway disease. PMID:20113502

  13. March 2012 Timeline

    Cancer.gov

    DES Timeline Year Event 1938 Diethylstilbestrol (DES) was produced for use in pregnancy. 1940 DES was widely prescribed to women for use in threatened miscarriages and was promoted to physicians through medical publications and other communications.

  14. Dopamine Agonists and the Suppression of Impulsive Motor Actions in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, S.A.; Claassen, D.O.; Huizenga, H.M.; Schewel, K.D.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Bashore, T.R.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The suppression of spontaneous motor impulses is an essential facet of cognitive control that is linked to frontal-basal ganglia circuitry. Basal ganglia dysfunction caused by Parkinson’s disease (PD) disrupts the proficiency of action suppression, but how pharmacotherapy for PD impacts impulsive motor control is poorly understood. Dopamine agonists improve motor symptoms of PD, but can also provoke impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICB). We investigated whether dopamine agonist medication has a beneficial or detrimental effect on impulsive action control in thirty-eight PD patients, half of whom had current ICB. Participants performed the Simon conflict task, which measures susceptibility to acting on spontaneous action impulses as well as the proficiency of suppressing these impulses. Compared to an off agonist state, patients on their agonist were no more susceptible to reacting impulsively, but were less proficient at suppressing the interference from the activation of impulsive actions. Importantly, agonist effects depended on baseline performance in the off agonist state; more proficient suppressors off agonist experienced a reduction in suppression on agonist, whereas less proficient suppressors off agonist showed improved suppression on agonist. Patients with active ICB were actually less susceptible to making fast, impulsive response errors than patients without ICB, suggesting that behavioral problems in this subset of patients may be less related to impulsivity in motor control. Our findings provide further evidence that dopamine agonist medication impacts specific cognitive control processes and that the direction of its effects depends on individual differences in performance off medication. PMID:22571461

  15. Cytokine-Induced Loss of Glucocorticoid Function: Effect of Kinase Inhibitors, Long-Acting ?2-Adrenoceptor Agonist and Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Christopher F.; Shah, Suharsh; Miller-Larsson, Anna; Giembycz, Mark A.; Newton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Acting on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), glucocorticoids are widely used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, glucocorticoid resistance often leads to suboptimal asthma control. Since glucocorticoid-induced gene expression contributes to glucocorticoid activity, the aim of this study was to use a 2×glucocorticoid response element (GRE) reporter and glucocorticoid-induced gene expression to investigate approaches to combat cytokine-induced glucocorticoid resistance. Pre-treatment with tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF) or interleukin-1? inhibited dexamethasone-induced mRNA expression of the putative anti-inflammatory genes RGS2 and TSC22D3, or just TSC22D3, in primary human airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells, respectively. Dexamethasone-induced DUSP1 mRNA was unaffected. In human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, dexamethasone-induced TSC22D3 and CDKN1C expression (at 6 h) was reduced by TNF pre-treatment, whereas DUSP1 and RGS2 mRNAs were unaffected. TNF pre-treatment also reduced dexamethasone-dependent 2×GRE reporter activation. This was partially reversed by PS-1145 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor VIII, inhibitors of IKK2 and JNK, respectively. However, neither inhibitor affected TNF-dependent loss of dexamethasone-induced CDKN1C or TSC22D3 mRNA. Similarly, inhibitors of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, phosphoinositide 3-kinase or protein kinase C pathways failed to attenuate TNF-dependent repression of the 2×GRE reporter. Fluticasone furoate, fluticasone propionate and budesonide were full agonists relative to dexamethasone, while GSK9027, RU24858, des-ciclesonide and GW870086X were partial agonists on the 2×GRE reporter. TNF reduced reporter activity in proportion with agonist efficacy. Full and partial agonists showed various degrees of agonism on RGS2 and TSC22D3 expression, but were equally effective at inducing CDKN1C and DUSP1, and did not affect the repression of CDKN1C or TSC22D3 expression by TNF. Finally, formoterol-enhanced 2×GRE reporter activity was also proportional to agonist efficacy and functionally reversed repression by TNF. As similar effects were apparent on glucocorticoid-induced gene expression, the most effective strategy to overcome glucocorticoid resistance in this model was addition of formoterol to high efficacy NR3C1 agonists. PMID:25625944

  16. Rpertoire des emplois en dcembre 2011 Des diplms de Master

    E-print Network

    Jeanjean, Louis

    du texte (UFR SLHS) - Sport langage et intervention (UPFR Sports) - Théâtres et cultures du monde administratif et financier (Entreprise) (IAE) - Management des relations humaines (UFR STGI) - Marketing et) - Sociologie et anthropologie des savoirs et des normes (UFR SLHS) - Sports, loisir, développement territorial

  17. Zoom mtierssur Les mtiers desLes mtiers des

    E-print Network

    de la Londe. DIFFUSION, COMMERCIALISATION, MARKETING Directeur du département: Philippe Gille ONISEP VPC, 12 mail Barthélemy Thimonnier, Lognes, 77437 Marne-la-Vallée Cedex 2 Internet: http (allocation des fréquences, gestion des appels), l'internet (concep- tion des protocoles de communication

  18. A Potent and Site-Selective Agonist of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Junichiro; Mio, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Otsuka, Shinya; Mori, Yasuo; Uesugi, Motonari

    2015-12-23

    TRPA1 is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel family that is expressed primarily on sensory neurons. This chemosensor is activated through covalent modification of multiple cysteine residues with a wide range of reactive compounds including allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), a spicy component of wasabi. The present study reports on potent and selective agonists of TRPA1, discovered through screening 1657 electrophilic molecules. In an effort to validate the mode of action of hit molecules, we noted a new TRPA1-selective agonist, JT010 (molecule 1), which opens the TRPA1 channel by covalently and site-selectively binding to Cys621 (EC50 = 0.65 nM). The results suggest that a single modification of Cys621 is sufficient to open the TRPA1 channel. The TRPA1-selective probe described herein might be useful for further mechanistic studies of TRPA1 activation. PMID:26630251

  19. A human platelet calcium calculator trained by pairwise agonist scanning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-02-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide. PMID:25723389

  20. Angiotensin receptor agonistic autoantibodies and hypertension: preeclampsia and beyond.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Kellems, Rodney E

    2013-06-21

    Hypertensive disorders are life-threatening diseases with high morbidity and mortality, affecting billions of individuals worldwide. A multitude of underlying conditions may contribute to hypertension, thus the need for a plethora of treatment options to identify the approach that best meets the needs of individual patients. A growing body of evidence indicates that (1) autoantibodies that bind to and activate the major angiotensin II type I (AT?) receptor exist in the circulation of patients with hypertensive disorders, (2) these autoantibodies contribute to disease pathophysiology, (3) antibody titers correlate to the severity of the disease, and (4) efforts to block or remove these pathogenic autoantibodies have therapeutic potential. These autoantibodies, termed AT? agonistic autoantibodies have been extensively characterized in preeclampsia, a life-threatening hypertensive condition of pregnancy. As reviewed here, these autoantibodies cause symptoms of preeclampsia when injected into pregnant mice. Somewhat surprisingly, these auto antibodies also appear in 3 animal models of preeclampsia. However, the occurrence of AT? agonistic autoantibodies is not restricted to pregnancy. These autoantibodies are prevalent among kidney transplant recipients who develop severe transplant rejection and malignant hypertension during the first week after transplantation. AT? agonistic autoantibodies are also highly abundant among a group of patients with essential hypertension that are refractory to standard therapy. More recently these autoantibodies have been seen in patients with the autoimmune disease, systemic sclerosis. These 3 examples extend the clinical impact of AT? agonistic autoantibodies beyond pregnancy. Research reviewed here raises the intriguing possibility that preeclampsia and other hypertensive conditions are autoimmune diseases characterized by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies that activate the major angiotensin receptor, AT?. These pathogenic autoantibodies could serve as presymptomatic biomarkers and therapeutic targets, thereby providing improved medical management for these conditions. PMID:23788505

  1. Identification of retinoic acid receptor agonists in sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Huajun; Wu, Xiaoqin; Hu, Jianying; Xiao, Yang; Yang, Min; Hirotsuji, Junji; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2009-09-01

    Retinoic acid receptor (RAR) agonists are speculated to be one possible cause for the widely observed frog deformities in North America, although little is known about the specific RAR agonists in aquatic environments. We identified the specific RAR egonists in sewage treatment plants (STPs) and receiving rivers using an RAR yeast two-hybrid bioassay. Water samples were extracted by solid-phase extract cartridges, which were successively eluted by hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol for bioassay. Among the three fractions, the ethyl acetate fraction showed the highest RAR agonistic activities. The bioassay-derived activity, expressed as all-trans-retinoic acid (all-transRA) equivalents (ATRA-EQ) were 10.9 +/- 2.2 and 1.7 +/- 1.0 ng/L in the STP influents and effluents, respectively, while the ATRA-EQs were as high as 7.1 and 8.3 ng/L in the two rivers receiving STP effluents. Following a two-step fractionation using high-performance liquid chromatography and ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) directed by the bioassay, two bioactive fractions were obtained from Gaobeidian STP influent and all-trans-4-oxo-RA (4.7-10.4 ng/L in influents, < 0.2-0.9 ng/L in effluents) and 13-cis-4-oxo-RA (2.3-7.1 ng/L in influents, < 0.4-1.1 ng/L in effluents) were identified in these fractions with UPLC-MS/MS. The EC50 for all-trans-4-oxo-RA or 13-cis-4-oxo-RA relative to that of all-trans-RA in exhibiting RARalpha agonistic activity was calculated to be 3.87 and 0.46, respectively. PMID:19764225

  2. Tolerance to beta-agonists during acute bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Hancox, R J; Aldridge, R E; Cowan, J O; Flannery, E M; Herbison, G P; McLachlan, C R; Town, G I; Taylor, D R

    1999-08-01

    Previous reports suggest that regular use of beta-agonists does not lead to tolerance to their bronchodilator effects. However, most studies have been conducted in stable asthma. This study investigates whether bronchodilator tolerance can be demonstrated during acute bronchoconstriction. Thirty-four asthmatic subjects were treated with 6 weeks inhaled terbutaline (1 mg q.i.d.), budesonide (400 microg, b.i.d.), both drugs or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study. After each treatment methacholine was administered to induce a 20% fall in the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). The response to inhaled salbutamol 100, 100, 200 microg at 5 min intervals) was then measured. Dose-response curves were compared using an analysis of covariance. Pre-methacholine FEV1, the highest pre-methacholine FEV1, the fall in FEV1 induced by methacholine and the logarithm of the provocative dose of methacholine required to induce the 20% fall in FEV1 (PD20) were used as covariates. There was a significantly reduced response to salbutamol after 6 weeks terbutaline treatment: the mean (95% confidence intervals (CI)) area under the dose-response curve was reduced by 36% (24, 47) compared to placebo (p<0.0001). The reduction in bronchodilator response was not affected by concomitant treatment with budesonide. Significant tolerance to the bronchodilator effect of inhaled beta-agonists may be demonstrated when tested during acute bronchoconstriction. Continuous treatment with inhaled beta-agonists may lead to a reduced response to emergency beta-agonist treatment during asthma exacerbations. PMID:10515402

  3. Improving the developability profile of pyrrolidine progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Kallander, Lara S.; Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Frazee, James S.; Stoy, Patrick; Johnson, Latisha; Lu, Qing; Hammond, Marlys; Barton, Linda S.; Patterson, Jaclyn R.; Azzarano, Leonard M.; Nagilla, Rakesh; Madauss, Kevin P.; Williams, Shawn P.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Duraiswami, Chaya; Grygielko, Eugene T.; Xu, Xiaoping; Laping, Nicholas J.; Bray, Jeffrey D.; Thompson, Scott K.

    2010-09-17

    The previously reported pyrrolidine class of progesterone receptor partial agonists demonstrated excellent potency but suffered from serious liabilities including hERG blockade and high volume of distribution in the rat. The basic pyrrolidine amine was intentionally converted to a sulfonamide, carbamate, or amide to address these liabilities. The evaluation of the degree of partial agonism for these non-basic pyrrolidine derivatives and demonstration of their efficacy in an in vivo model of endometriosis is disclosed herein.

  4. La biogenèse des mélanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Delevoye, Cédric; Giordano, Francesca; van Niel, Guillaume; Raposo, Graça

    2012-01-01

    Les mélanocytes situés à la base de l’épiderme produisent des mélanosomes qui sont transférés aux kératinocytes pour assurer la pigmentation de l’épiderme et sa photoprotection contre les rayons ultraviolets. Les mélanosomes, organites apparentés aux lysosomes, sont le lieu de synthèse et de stockage d’un pigment, la mélanine. Leur formation dépend de protéines mélanosomales qui transitent par les voies de biosynthèse et d’endocytose et exploitent les mécanismes moléculaires du trafic intracellulaire. Les acteurs moléculaires impliqués dans le transport des protéines mélanosomales et la biogenèse des mélanosomes sont la cible de mutations dans des maladies génétiques accompagnées d’hypopigmentation comme l’albinisme et les maladies lysosomales. Les études menées sur les mélanocytes issus de souris modèles de ces maladies permettent de comprendre certaines des étapes-clés de la mélanogenèse ainsi que les dysfonctionnements associés à ces pathologies. De plus, décrypter la mélanogenèse facilite également la compréhension d’autres processus physiologiques, comme l’illustrent les similitudes inattendues avec l’amyloïdogenèse dans les maladies neurodégénératives. PMID:21382323

  5. Emerging strategies for exploiting cannabinoid receptor agonists as medicines.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2009-02-01

    Medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptor are already in the clinic. These are Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) and Sativex (Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol with cannabidiol). The first two of these medicines can be prescribed to reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Marinol can also be prescribed to stimulate appetite, while Sativex is prescribed for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in adults with multiple sclerosis and as an adjunctive analgesic treatment for adult patients with advanced cancer. One challenge now is to identify additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a number of potential clinical applications for such agonists are mentioned in this review. A second challenge is to develop strategies that will improve the efficacy and/or the benefit-to-risk ratio of a cannabinoid receptor agonist. This review focuses on five strategies that have the potential to meet either or both of these objectives. These are strategies that involve: (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier; (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue; (iii) targeting up-regulated cannabinoid receptors; (iv) targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors; or (v) 'multi-targeting'. Preclinical data that justify additional research directed at evaluating the clinical importance of each of these strategies are also discussed. PMID:19226257

  6. Indacaterol: a novel long-acting ?(2) -agonist.

    PubMed

    Ray, Shaunta' M; McMillen, James C; Treadway, Sarah A; Helmer, Robert S; Franks, Andrea S

    2012-05-01

    Bronchodilator drugs are the foundation for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The principal inhaled bronchodilator treatments used are ?(2) -agonists and anticholinergics, either alone or in combination. Currently available ?(2) -agonists are of either short duration and used multiple times/day, or of long duration, which requires twice-daily administration. Indacaterol is considered an ultra-long-acting ?(2) -agonist and was recently approved for use in the United States. Its duration of action is approximately 24 hours, allowing for once-daily administration. Cough was the most commonly reported adverse effect with use of indacaterol. Cough usually occurred within 15 seconds of inhalation of the drug, lasted around 6 seconds, was not associated with bronchospasm, and did not cause discontinuation of the drug. Otherwise, the drug's safety profile was similar to that of other bronchodilators. Based on similar improvement in spirometric measurements compared with other bronchodilator drugs and the convenience of its once-daily dosing, indacaterol may be beneficial in the management of mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, either alone or in combination with anticholinergic drugs administered once/day. PMID:22499359

  7. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes. PMID:24038158

  8. Science gone translational: the OX40 agonist story

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Andrew D.; Morris, Nicholas P.; Kovacsovics-Bankowski, Magdalena; Urba, Walter J.; Curti, Brendan D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary OX40 (CD134) is a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor expressed primarily on activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and transmits a potent costimulatory signal when engaged. OX40 is transiently expressed after T-cell receptor engagement and is upregulated on the most recently antigen-activated T cells within inflammatory lesions (e.g. sites of autoimmune destruction and on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes). Hence, it is an attractive target to modulate immune responses: OX40 blocking agents to inhibit undesirable inflammation or OX40 agonists to enhance immune responses. In regards to this review, OX40 agonists enhance anti-tumor immunity, which leads to therapeutic effects in mouse tumor models. A team of laboratory and clinical scientists at the Providence Cancer Center has collaborated to bring the preclinical observations in cancer models from the bench to the bedside. This review describes the journey from in vitro experiments through preclinical mouse models to the successful translation of the first OX40 agonist to the clinic for the treatment of patients with cancer. PMID:22017441

  9. Agonistic sounds signal male quality in the Lusitanian toadfish.

    PubMed

    Amorim, M Clara P; Conti, Carlotta; Modesto, Teresa; Gonçalves, Amparo; Fonseca, Paulo J

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic communication during agonistic behaviour is widespread in fishes. Yet, compared to other taxa, little is known on the information content of fish agonistic calls and their effect on territorial defence. Lusitanian toadfish males (Halobatrachus didactylus) are highly territorial during the breeding season and use sounds (boatwhistles, BW) to defend nests from intruders. BW present most energy in either the fundamental frequency, set by the contraction rate of the sonic muscles attached to the swimbladder, or in the harmonics, which are multiples of the fundamental frequency. Here we investigated if temporal and spectral features of BW produced during territorial defence reflect aspects of male quality that may be important in resolving disputes. We found that higher mean pulse period (i.e. lower fundamental frequency) reflected higher levels of 11-ketotestosterone (11KT), the main teleost androgen which, in turn, was significantly related with male condition (relative body mass and glycogen content). BW dominant harmonic mean and variability decreased with sonic muscle lipid content. We found no association between BW duration and male quality. Taken together, these results suggest that the spectral content of fish agonistic sounds may signal male features that are key in fight outcome. PMID:26048302

  10. Architecture des ordinateurs I Prsentation

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Michel

    version anglaise o Structured Computer Organization, 5th edition. page 8IFT1227 ­ Architecture des99-06-09 1 IFT1227 Architecture des ordinateurs I Présentation El Mostapha Aboulhamid Em.aboulhamid@umontreal.ca Université de Montréal page 2IFT1227 ­ Architecture des ordinateurs 1 ­ JP DAVID & EM Aboulhamid Plan de

  11. Analysis of Full and Partial Agonists Binding to ?2-Adrenergic Receptor Suggests a Role of Transmembrane Helix V in Agonist-Specific Conformational Changes

    PubMed Central

    Katritch, Vsevolod; Reynolds, Kimberly A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A.; Roth, Christopher B.; Yeager, Mark; Abagyan, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    The 2.4 Å crystal structure of the ?2-adrenergic receptor (?2AR) in complex with the high-affinity inverse agonist (-)-carazolol provides a detailed structural framework for the analysis of ligand recognition by adrenergic receptors. Insights into agonist binding and the corresponding conformational changes triggering GPCR activation mechanism are of special interest. Here we show that while the carazolol pocket captured in the ?2AR crystal structure accommodates (-)-isoproterenol and other agonists without steric clashes, a finite movement of the flexible extracellular part of TM-V helix (TM-Ve) obtained by receptor optimization in the presence of docked ligand can further improve the calculated binding affinities for agonist compounds. Tilting of TM-Ve towards the receptor axis provides a more complete description of polar receptor/ligand interactions for full and partial agonists, by enabling optimal engagement of agonists with two experimentally identified anchor sites, formed by Asp113/Asn312 and Ser203/Ser204/Ser207 side chains. Further, receptor models incorporating a flexible TM-V backbone allow reliable prediction of binding affinities for a set of diverse ligands, suggesting potential utility of this approach to design of effective and subtype-specific agonists for adrenergic receptors. Systematic differences in capacity of partial, full and inverse agonists to induce TM-V helix tilt in the ?2AR model suggest potential role of TM-V as a conformational “rheostat” involved in the whole spectrum of ?2AR responses to small molecule signals. PMID:19353579

  12. Different skeletal effects of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)? agonist fenofibrate and the PPAR? agonist pioglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Syversen, Unni; Stunes, Astrid K; Gustafsson, Björn I; Obrant, Karl J; Nordsletten, Lars; Berge, Rolf; Thommesen, Liv; Reseland, Janne E

    2009-01-01

    Background All the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are found to be expressed in bone cells. The PPAR? agonist rosiglitazone has been shown to decrease bone mass in mice and thiazolidinediones (TZDs) have recently been found to increase bone loss and fracture risk in humans treated for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of the PPAR? agonist fenofibrate (FENO) and the PPAR? agonist pioglitazone (PIO) on bone in intact female rats. Methods Rats were given methylcellulose (vehicle), fenofibrate or pioglitazone (35 mg/kg body weight/day) by gavage for 4 months. BMC, BMD, and body composition were measured by DXA. Histomorphometry and biomechanical testing of excised femurs were performed. Effects of the compounds on bone cells were studied. Results The FENO group had higher femoral BMD and smaller medullary area at the distal femur; while trabecular bone volume was similar to controls. Whole body BMD, BMC, and trabecular bone volume were lower, while medullary area was increased in PIO rats compared to controls. Ultimate bending moment and energy absorption of the femoral shafts were reduced in the PIO group, while similar to controls in the FENO group. Plasma osteocalcin was higher in the FENO group than in the other groups. FENO stimulated proliferation and differentiation of, and OPG release from, the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. Conclusion We show opposite skeletal effects of PPAR? and ? agonists in intact female rats. FENO resulted in significantly higher femoral BMD and lower medullary area, while PIO induced bone loss and impairment of the mechanical strength. This represents a novel effect of PPAR? activation. PMID:19331671

  13. Des Vents et des Jets Astrophysiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauty, C.

    Plasma outflows from a central gravitating object are a widespread phenomenon in astrophysics. They include the solar and stellar winds, jets from Young Stellar Objects, jets from compact stellar objects and extra-galactic jets associated with Active Galactic Nuclei and quasars. Beyond this huge zoology, a common theoretical ground exists. The aim of this review is to present qualitatively the various theories of winds (Part 1) and how different astrophysical domains interplay. A more or less complete catalog of the ideas proposed for explaining the acceleration and the morphologies of winds and jets is intended. All this part avoids getting into any mathematical formalism. Some macroscopic properties of such outflows may be described by solving the time-independent and axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic equations. This formalism, underlying most of the theories, is presented in Part 2. It helps to introduce quantitatively the free integrals that such systems possess. Those integrals play an important role in the basic physics of acceleration and collimation, in particular the mass loss rate, the angular momentum loss rate and the energy of the magnetic rotator. Most of the difficulty in modelling flows lies in the necessity to cross critical points, characteristic of non linear equations. The physical nature and the location of such critical points is debated because they are the clue towards the resolution. We thus introduce the notions of topology and critical points (Parts 3 and 4) from the simplest hydrodynamic and spherically symmetric case to the most sophisticated, MHD and axisymmetric cases. Particular attention is given to self-similar models which allows to give some general and simple ideas on the problem due to their semi-analytical treatment. With the use of these notions, a more quantitative comparison of the various models is given (Parts 3 and 4), especially on the shape of the flows. It is thus shown that magnetic collimation of winds into jets is a well expected result from the theory. Although, collimation may be conical, paraboloidal or cylindrical (Part 4), cylindrical collimation is the more likely to occur. The shape of outflows may then be used as a tool to predict physical conditions on the flows or on their source. L'éjection continue de plasma autour d'objets massifs est un phénomène largement répandu en astrophysique, que ce soit sous la forme du vent solaire, de vents stellaires, de jets d'étoiles en formation, de jets stellaires autour d'objets compacts ou de jets extra-galactiques. Cette zoologie diversifiée fait pourtant l'objet d'un commun effort de modélisation. Le but de cette revue est d'abord de présenter qualitativement le développement, depuis leur origine, des diverses théories de vents (Partie 1) et l'inter disciplinarité dans ce domaine. Il s'agit d'une énumération, plus ou moins exhaustive, des idées proposées pour expliquer l'accélération et la morphologie des vents et des jets, accompagnée d'une présentation sommaire des aspects observationnels. Cette partie s'abstient de tout aspect faisant appel au formalisme mathématique. Ces écoulements peuvent être décrits, au moins partiellement, en résolvant les équations magnétohydrodynamiques, axisymétriques et stationnaires. Ce formalisme, à la base de la plupart des théories, est exposé dans la Partie 2. Il permet d'introduire quantitativement les intégrales premières qu'un tel système possède. Ces dernières sont amenées à jouer un rôle important dans la compréhension des phénomènes d'accélération ou de collimation, en particulier le taux de perte de masse, le taux de perte de moment angulaire ou l'énergie du rotateur magnétique. La difficulté de modélisation réside dans l'existence de points critiques, propres aux équations non linéaires, qu'il faut franchir. La nature physique et la localisation de ces points critiques fait l'objet d'un débat important car ils sont la clef de voute de la résolution. Nous introduisons donc la notion de topologie des points critiques (Parties 3 et 4

  14. Non-equivalent Ligand Selectivity of Agonist Sites in (?4?2)2?4 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaferro, Simone; Gasparri, Federica; New, Karina; Alcaino, Constanza; Faundez, Manuel; Iturriaga Vasquez, Patricio; Vijayan, Ranjit; Biggin, Philip C.; Bermudez, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The ?4?2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant nAChR type in the brain, and this receptor type exists in alternate (?4?2)2?4 and (?4?2)2?2 forms, which are activated by agonists with strikingly differing efficacies. Recent breakthroughs have identified an additional operational agonist binding site in the (?4?2)2?4 nAChR that is responsible for the signature sensitivity of this receptor to activation by agonists, yet the structural mechanisms determining agonist efficacy at this receptor type are not yet fully understood. In this study, we characterized the ligand selectivity of the individual agonist sites of the (?4?2)2?4 nAChR to determine whether differences in agonist selectivity influence agonist efficacy. Applying the substituted cysteine accessibility method to individual agonist sites in concatenated (?4?2)2?4 receptors, we determined the agonist selectivity of the agonist sites of the (?4?2)2?4 receptor. We show that (a) accessibility of substituted cysteines to covalent modification by methanesulfonate reagent depends on the agonist site at which the modification occurs and (b) that agonists such as sazetidine-A and TC-2559 are excluded from the site at the ?4/?4 interface. Given that additional binding to the agonist site in the ?4/?4 interface increases acetylcholine efficacy and that agonists excluded from the agonist site at the ?4/?4 interface behave as partial agonists, we conclude that the ability to engage all agonist sites in (?4?2)2?4 nAChRs is a key determinant of agonist efficacy. The findings add another level of complexity to the structural mechanisms that govern agonist efficacy in heteromeric nAChRs and related ligand-gated ion channels. PMID:24936069

  15. Pros and cons of using alpha-2 agonists in small animal anesthesia practice.

    PubMed

    Greene, S A

    1999-02-01

    The alpha-2 agonists have been used in veterinary practice for over 30 years following the introduction of xylazine (ROMPUN, Bayer Corp., Shawnee Mission, KS) in 1962. The decision to use alpha-2 agonists in anesthesia practice should be based on factors including patient disposition, presenting complaint, type of procedure, and the veterinarian's familiarity with the drug. Controversy surrounds the issue of using anticholinergic agents concurrent with the alpha-2 agonists. Patient selection and procedure type can aid in determining when use of an anticholinergic with the alpha-2 agonist is advantageous. Antagonism of alpha-2 agonists can be readily accomplished. Commonly, alpha-2 agonists are used in combination with other agents to provide neuroleptanalgesia or sedation prior to general anesthesia. PMID:10193041

  16. Injectabilite des coulis de ciment dans des milieux fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnif, Thameur

    Le travail presente ici est un bilan du travaux de recherche effectues sur l'injectabilite des coulis de ciment dans lu milieux fissures. Un certain nombre de coulis a base de ciment Portland et microfin ont ete selectionnes afin de caracteriser leur capacite a penetrer des milieux fissures. Une partie des essais a ete menee en laboratoire. L'etude rheologique des differents melanges a permis de tester l'influence de l'ajout de superplastifiant et/ou de fumee de silice sur la distribution granulometrique des coulis et par consequent sur leur capacite a injecter des colonnes de sable simulant un milieu fissure donne. La classe granulometrique d'un coulis, sa stabilite et sa fluidite sont apparus comme les trois facteurs principaux pour la reussite d'une injection. Un facteur de finesse a ete defini au cours de cette etude: base sur la classe granulometrique du ciment et sa stabilite, il peut entrer dans la formulation theorique du debit d'injection avant application sur chantier. La deuxieme et derniere partie de l'etude presente les resultats de deux projets de recherche sur l'injection realises sur chantier. L'injection de dalles de beton fissurees a permis le suivi de l'evolution des pressions avec la distance au point d'injection. L'injection de murs de maconnerie a caractere historique a montre l'importance de la definition de criteres de performance des coulis a utiliser pour traiter un milieu donne et pour un objectif donne. Plusieurs melanges peuvent ainsi etre predefinis et mis a disposition sur le chantier. La complementarite des ciments traditionnels et des ciments microfins devient alors un atout important. Le choix d'utilisation de ces melanges est fonction du terrain rencontre. En conclusion, cette recherche etablit une methodologie pour la selection des coulis a base de ciment et des pressions d'injection en fonction de l'ouverture des fissures ou joints de construction.

  17. Development of novel neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R) selective agonists with resistance to proteolytic degradation.

    PubMed

    Misu, Ryosuke; Oishi, Shinya; Yamada, Ai; Yamamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Fuko; Yamamoto, Koki; Noguchi, Taro; Ohno, Hiroaki; Okamura, Hiroaki; Ohkura, Satoshi; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2014-10-23

    Neurokinin B (NKB) regulates the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) via activation of the neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R). We evaluated the biological stability of NK3R selective agonists to develop novel NK3R agonists to regulate reproductive functions. On the basis of degradation profiles, several peptidomimetic derivatives were designed. The modification of senktide with (E)-alkene dipeptide isostere generated a novel potent NK3R agonist with high stability and prolonged bioactivity. PMID:25247671

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 2,4-disubstituted quinazoline analogues as GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tuan-Anh N; Yang, Zunhua; Fang, Yuanying; Luo, Jun; Lee, Jongkook; Park, Haeil

    2013-03-01

    GPR119 agonist has emerged as a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A series of novel 2,4-disubstituted quinazoline analogues was prepared and evaluated their agonistic activity against human GPR119. The analogues bearing azabicyclic amine substituents (12a, 12c and 12g) exhibited better EC(50) values than that of OEA though they appeared to be partial agonists. PMID:23357035

  19. Contamination with retinoic acid receptor agonists in two rivers in the Kinki region of Japan.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nakama, Koki; Sawada, Kazuko; Watanabe, Taro; Takagi, Mai; Sei, Kazunari; Yang, Min; Hirotsuji, Junji; Hu, Jianying; Nishikawa, Jun-ichi; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the agonistic activity against human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha in the Lake Biwa-Yodo River and the Ina River in the Kinki region of Japan. To accomplish this, a yeast two-hybrid assay was used to elucidate the spatial and temporal variations and potential sources of RARalpha agonist contamination in the river basins. RARalpha agonistic activity was commonly detected in the surface water samples collected along two rivers at different periods, with maximum all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) equivalents of 47.6 ng-atRA/L and 23.5 ng-atRA/L being observed in Lake Biwa-Yodo River and Ina River, respectively. The results indicated that RARalpha agonists are always present and widespread in the rivers. Comparative investigation of RARalpha and estrogen receptor alpha agonistic activities at 20 stations along each river revealed that the spatial variation pattern of RARalpha agonist contamination was entirely different from that of the estrogenic compound contamination. This suggests that the effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants, a primary source of estrogenic compounds, seemed not to be the cause of RARalpha agonist contamination in the rivers. Fractionation using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) directed by the bioassay found two bioactive fractions from river water samples, suggesting the presence of at least two RARalpha agonists in the rivers. Although a trial conducted to identify RARalpha agonists in the major bioactive fraction was not completed as part of this study, comparison of retention times in HPLC analysis and quantification with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the major causative contaminants responsible for the RARalpha agonistic activity were not RAs (natural RAR ligands) and 4-oxo-RAs, while 4-oxo-RAs were identified as the major RAR agonists in sewage in Beijing, China. These findings suggest that there are unknown RARalpha agonists with high activity in the rivers. PMID:20117817

  20. 3D-Pharmacophore Identification for ?-Opioid Agonists Using Ligand-Based Drug-Design Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Hirono, Shuichi

    A selective ?-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist might act as a powerful analgesic without the side effects of ?-opioid receptor-selective drugs such as morphine. The eight classes of known KOR agonists have different chemical structures, making it difficult to construct a pharmacophore model that takes them all into account. Here, we summarize previous efforts to identify the pharmacophore for ?-opioid agonists and propose a new three-dimensional pharmacophore model that encompasses the ?-activities of all classes. This utilizes conformational sampling of agonists by high-temperature molecular dynamics and pharmacophore extraction through a series of molecular superpositions.

  1. Two distinct classes of novel pyrazolinecarboxamides as potent cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jos H M; Attali, Amos; van der Neut, Martina A W; Wals, Henri C; Mulder, Arie; Zilaout, Hicham; Duursma, Ate; van Aken, Hans H M; van Vliet, Bernard J

    2010-09-01

    The synthesis and SAR of 3-alkyl-4-aryl-4,5-dihydropyrazole-1-carboxamides 1-23 and 1-alkyl-5-aryl-4,5-dihydropyrazole-3-carboxamides 24-27 as two novel cannabinoid CB(1) receptor agonist classes were described. The target compounds elicited high affinities to the CB(1) as well as the CB(2) receptor and were found to act as CB(1) receptor agonists. The key compound 19 elicited potent CB(1) agonistic and CB(2) inverse agonistic properties in vitro and showed in vivo activity in a rodent model for multiple sclerosis after oral administration. PMID:20688519

  2. Sustained wash-resistant receptor activation responses of GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Hothersall, J Daniel; Bussey, Charlotte E; Brown, Alastair J; Scott, James S; Dale, Ian; Rawlins, Philip

    2015-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) is involved in regulating metabolic homoeostasis, with GPR119 agonists targeted for the treatment of type-2 diabetes and obesity. Using the endogenous agonist oleoylethanolamide and a number of small molecule synthetic agonists we have investigated the temporal dynamics of receptor signalling. Using both a dynamic luminescence biosensor-based assay and an endpoint cAMP accumulation assay we show that agonist-driven desensitization is not a major regulatory mechanism for GPR119 despite robust activation responses, regardless of the agonist used. Temporal analysis of the cAMP responses demonstrated sustained signalling resistant to washout for some, but not all of the agonists tested. Further analysis indicated that the sustained effects of one synthetic agonist AR-231,453 were consistent with a role for slow dissociation kinetics. In contrast, the sustained responses to MBX-2982 and AZ1 appeared to involve membrane deposition. We also detect wash-resistant responses to AR-231,453 at the level of physiologically relevant responses in an endogenous expression system (GLP-1 secretion in GLUTag cells). In conclusion, our findings indicate that in a recombinant expression system GPR119 activation is sustained, with little evidence of pronounced receptor desensitization, and for some ligands persistent agonist responses continue despite removal of excess agonist. This provides novel understanding of the temporal responses profiles of potential drug candidates targetting GPR119, and highlights the importance of carefully examining the the mechanisms through which GPCRs generate sustained responses. PMID:26101059

  3. Noribogaine is a G-protein biased ?-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Emeline L; Milon, Nicolas; Heghinian, Mari D; Fishback, James; Schürer, Stephan C; Garamszegi, Nandor; Mash, Deborah C

    2015-12-01

    Noribogaine is the long-lived human metabolite of the anti-addictive substance ibogaine. Noribogaine efficaciously reaches the brain with concentrations up to 20 ?M after acute therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg ibogaine in animals. Noribogaine displays atypical opioid-like components in vivo, anti-addictive effects and potent modulatory properties of the tolerance to opiates for which the mode of action remained uncharacterized thus far. Our binding experiments and computational simulations indicate that noribogaine may bind to the orthosteric morphinan binding site of the opioid receptors. Functional activities of noribogaine at G-protein and non G-protein pathways of the mu and kappa opioid receptors were characterized. Noribogaine was a weak mu antagonist with a functional inhibition constants (Ke) of 20 ?M at the G-protein and ?-arrestin signaling pathways. Conversely, noribogaine was a G-protein biased kappa agonist 75% as efficacious as dynorphin A at stimulating GDP-GTP exchange (EC50 = 9 ?M) but only 12% as efficacious at recruiting ?-arrestin, which could contribute to the lack of dysphoric effects of noribogaine. In turn, noribogaine functionally inhibited dynorphin-induced kappa ?-arrestin recruitment and was more potent than its G-protein agonistic activity with an IC50 of 1 ?M. This biased agonist/antagonist pharmacology is unique to noribogaine in comparison to various other ligands including ibogaine, 18-MC, nalmefene, and 6'-GNTI. We predict noribogaine to promote certain analgesic effects as well as anti-addictive effects at effective concentrations >1 ?M in the brain. Because elevated levels of dynorphins are commonly observed and correlated with anxiety, dysphoric effects, and decreased dopaminergic tone, a therapeutically relevant functional inhibition bias to endogenously released dynorphins by noribogaine might be worthy of consideration for treating anxiety and substance related disorders. PMID:26302653

  4. Pharmacological properties of acid N-thiazolylamide FFA2 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew J; Tsoulou, Christina; Ward, Emma; Gower, Elaine; Bhudia, Nisha; Chowdhury, Forhad; Dean, Tony W; Faucher, Nicolas; Gangar, Akanksha; Dowell, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    FFA2 is a receptor for short-chain fatty acids. Propionate (C3) and 4-chloro-?-(1-methylethyl)-N-2-thiazolyl-benzeneacetamide (4-CMTB), the prototypical synthetic FFA2 agonist, evoke calcium mobilization in neutrophils and inhibit lipolysis in adipocytes via this G-protein-coupled receptor. 4-CMTB contains an N-thiazolylamide motif but no acid group, and 4-CMTB and C3 bind to different sites on FFA2 and show allosteric cooperativity. Recently, FFA2 agonists have been described that contain both N-thiazolylamide and carboxylate groups, reminiscent of bitopic ligands. These are thought to engage the carboxylate-binding site on FFA2, but preliminary evidence suggests they do not bind to the same site as 4-CMTB even though both contain N-thiazolylamide. Here, we describe the characterization of four FFA2 ligands containing both N-thiazolylamide and carboxylate. (R)-3-benzyl-4-((4-(2-chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)(methyl)amino)-4-oxobutanoic acid (compound 14) exhibits allosteric agonism with 4-CMTB but not C3. Three other compounds agonize FFA2 in [35S]GTP?S-incorporation or cAMP assays but behave as inverse agonists in yeast-based gene-reporter assays, showing orthosteric antagonism of C3 responses but allosteric antagonism of 4-CMTB responses. Thus, the bitopic-like FFA2 ligands engage the orthosteric site but do not compete at the site of 4-CMTB binding on an FFA2 receptor molecule. Compound 14 activates FFA2 on human neutrophils and mouse adipocytes, but appears not to inhibit lipolysis upon treatment of human primary adipocytes in spite of the presence of a functional FFA2 receptor in these cells. Hence, these new ligands may reveal differences in coupling of FFA2 between human and rodent adipose tissues. PMID:26236484

  5. Adjunctive ?2-agonists reverse neuromuscular involvement in murine Pompe disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songtao; Sun, Baodong; Nilsson, Mats I.; Bird, Andrew; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Thurberg, Beth L.; Bali, Deeksha; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease has resisted enzyme replacement therapy with acid ?-glucosidase (GAA), which has been attributed to inefficient cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) mediated uptake. We evaluated ?2-agonist drugs, which increased CI-MPR expression in GAA knockout (KO) mice. Clenbuterol along with a low-dose adeno-associated virus vector increased Rotarod latency by 75% at 4 wk, in comparison with vector alone (P<2×10?5). Glycogen content was lower in skeletal muscles, including soleus (P<0.01), extensor digitorum longus (EDL; P<0.001), and tibialis anterior (P<0.05) following combination therapy, in comparison with vector alone. Glycogen remained elevated in the muscles following clenbuterol alone, indicating an adjunctive effect with gene therapy. Elderly GAA-KO mice treated with combination therapy demonstrated 2-fold increased wirehang latency, in comparison with vector or clenbuterol alone (P<0.001). The glycogen content of skeletal muscle decreased following combination therapy in elderly mice (P<0.05). Finally, CI-MPR-KO/GAA-KO mice did not respond to combination therapy, indicating that clenbuterol's effect depended on CI-MPR expression. In summary, adjunctive ?2-agonist treatment increased CI-MPR expression and enhanced efficacy from gene therapy in Pompe disease, which has implications for other lysosomal storage disorders that involve primarily the brain.—Li, S., Sun, B., Nilsson, M. I., Bird, A., Tarnopolsky, M. A., Thurberg, B. L., Bali, D., Koeberl, D. D. Adjunctive ?2-agonists reverse neuromuscular involvement in murine Pompe disease. PMID:22993195

  6. PPARgamma agonist pioglitazone does not enhance performance in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Martinez-Bello, Vladimir E

    2014-09-01

    Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta and adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinases (AMPKs) regulate the metabolic and contractile characteristics of myofibres. PPAR proteins are nuclear receptors that function as transcription factors and regulate the expression of multiple genes. AMPK has been described as a master metabolic regulator which also controls gene expression through the direct phosphorylation of some nuclear proteins. Since it was discovered that both PPARdelta agonists (GW1516) and AMPK activators (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-?-D-ribofuranoside, known as AICAR) are very effective performance-enhancing substances in sedentary mice, the World Anti-doping Agency (WADA) included AICAR and GW1516 in the prohibited list of substances as metabolic modulators in the class 'Hormone and metabolic modulators'. Thiazolidinediones are PPARgamma agonists that can induce similar biological effects to those of PPARdelta and PPARdelta-AMPK agonists. Thus in this study, the effects of pioglitazone on mitochondrial biogenesis and performance were evaluated. Blood glucose levels and the protein expression of the intermediates involved in the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway and the citrate synthase activity were determined in both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Maximal aerobic velocity (MAV), endurance capacity, and grip strength before and after the training period were also determined. The MAV endurance capacity and grip strength of trained animals significantly increased. We found that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? coactivator-1? (PGC-1?) and the nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) protein content and citrate synthase activity significantly increased in the soleus muscle of trained animals. No effect of treatment was found. Therefore in our study, pioglitazone administration did not affect mitochondrial biogenesis signaling pathway. PMID:24259440

  7. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter. PMID:26585147

  8. Dopamine agonists suppress visual-cortical reflex myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Obeso, J A; Artieda, J; Tuñón, T; Luquin, M R; Martínez Lage, J M

    1985-12-01

    Two patients with a diagnosis of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy developed cortical reflex myoclonus to visual (flash) and somaesthetic stimuli. Oral treatment with levodopacarbidopa (1000/100 mg) or subcutaneous administration of apomorphine (1 mg) abolished the visually-triggered myoclonus, without modifying reflex myoclonus to electrical or tactile stimulation. Intravenous administration of lisuride (0.1 mg) produced a marked reduction in both types of reflex myoclonus. These results indicate a selective inhibitory effect of dopamine agonist drugs on visual reflex myoclonus of cortical origin. PMID:3936901

  9. Discovery of benzamides as potent human ?3 adrenergic receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cheng; Kar, Nam F; Li, Bing; Costa, Melissa; Dingley, Karen H; Di Salvo, Jerry; Ha, Sookhee N; Hurley, Amanda L; Li, Xiaofang; Miller, Randy R; Salituro, Gino M; Struthers, Mary; Weber, Ann E; Hale, Jeffrey J; Edmondson, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    The paper will describe the synthesis and SAR studies that led to the discovery of benzamide (reverse amide) as potent and selective human ?3-adrenergic receptor agonist. Based on conformationally restricted pyrrolidine scaffold we discovered earlier, pyrrolidine benzoic acid intermediate 22 was synthesized. From library synthesis and further optimization efforts, several structurally diverse reverse amides such as 24c and 24i were found to have excellent human ?3-adrenergic potency and good selectivity over the ?1 and ?2 receptors. In addition to human ?1, ?2, ?3 and hERG data, PK of selected compounds will be described. PMID:26590100

  10. Studiengang:_____________________________________________ Name des/der Stud. Matr. Nr.

    E-print Network

    Wichmann, Felix

    :_____________________________________________ ................................................................. ........................................... Name des/der Stud. Matr. Nr. Titel des Moduls (deutsch

  11. Colloque "Microstructure et Proprietes des Materiaux" ENPC, 17 et 18 mars 2005 MECANIQUE DES ROCHES EN GEOLOGIE : DES PROCESSUS

    E-print Network

    Fortin, Jérôme

    Colloque "Microstructure et Propri´et´es des Mat´eriaux" ENPC, 17 et 18 mars 2005 MECANIQUE DES.gueguen@ens.fr R´esum´e : Le domaine couvert par la M´ecanique des Roches en G´eologie s'´etend sur des ´echelles 1 Introduction La M´ecanique des roches intervient en G´eologie pour tenter d'apporter des r

  12. Cannabinoid receptor agonists protect cultured rat hippocampal neurons from excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shen, M; Thayer, S A

    1998-09-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists act presynaptically to inhibit the release of glutamate. Because other drugs with this action are known to reduce excitotoxicity, we tested several cannabimimetics in a model of synaptically mediated neuronal death. Reduction of the extracellular Mg2+ concentration to 0.1 mM evoked a repetitive pattern of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) spiking that, when maintained for 24 hr, resulted in significant neuronal death. The [Ca2+]i spiking and cell death in this model result from excessive activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, as indicated by the inhibition of both [Ca2+]i spiking and neuronal death by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist CGS19755 (10 microM). The cannabimimetic drug Win55212-2 (100 nM) completely blocked [Ca2+]i spiking and prevented neuronal death induced by low extracellular Mg2+ concentrations. These effects on [Ca2+]i spiking and viability were stereoselective and were prevented by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716 (100 nM). The partial agonist CP55940 (100 nM) also afforded significant protection from excitotoxicity. Cannabimimetic drugs did not protect cells from the direct application of glutamate (30 microM). These data suggest that cannabimimetic drugs may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:9730904

  13. Trial Watch: Toll-like receptor agonists in oncological indications.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Fernando; Vacchelli, Erika; Obrist, Florine; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cremer, Isabelle; Henrik Ter Meulen, Jan; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an evolutionarily conserved group of enzymatically inactive, single membrane-spanning proteins that recognize a wide panel of exogenous and endogenous danger signals. Besides constituting a crucial component of the innate immune response to bacterial and viral pathogens, TLRs appear to play a major role in anticancer immunosurveillance. In line with this notion, several natural and synthetic TLR ligands have been intensively investigated for their ability to boost tumor-targeting immune responses elicited by a variety of immunotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic interventions. Three of these agents are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or equivalent regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients: the so-called bacillus Calmette-Guérin, monophosphoryl lipid A, and imiquimod. However, the number of clinical trials testing the therapeutic potential of both FDA-approved and experimental TLR agonists in cancer patients is stably decreasing, suggesting that drug developers and oncologists are refocusing their interest on alternative immunostimulatory agents. Here, we summarize recent findings on the use of TLR agonists in cancer patients and discuss how the clinical evaluation of FDA-approved and experimental TLR ligands has evolved since the publication of our first Trial Watch dealing with this topic. PMID:25083332

  14. Pharmacology and toxicology of Cannabis derivatives and endocannabinoid agonists.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Zaimovic, Amir; Gerra, Maria L; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cippitelli, Andrea; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Somaini, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    For centuries Cannabis sativa and cannabis extracts have been used in natural medicine. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main active ingredient of Cannabis. THC seems to be responsible for most of the pharmacological and therapeutic actions of cannabis. In a few countries THC extracts (i.e. Sativex) or THC derivatives such as nabilone, and dronabinol are used in the clinic for the treatment of several pathological conditions like chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. On the other hand the severe side effects and the high abuse liability of these agents represent a serious limitation in their medical use. In addition, diversion in the use of these active ingredients for recreational purpose is a concern. Over recent years, alternative approaches using synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists or agents acting as activators of the endocannabinoid systems are under scrutiny with the hope to develop more effective and safer clinical applications. Likely, in the near future few of these new molecules will be available for clinical use. The present article review recent study and patents with focus on the cannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of central nervous system disorders with emphasis on agonists. PMID:19832688

  15. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Knight, John M; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A; Milner, Joshua D; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah; McMurray, John S; Corry, David B

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (?2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related ?2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related ?2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  16. Adjunctive ?2-agonists reverse neuromuscular involvement in murine Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Songtao; Sun, Baodong; Nilsson, Mats I; Bird, Andrew; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Thurberg, Beth L; Bali, Deeksha; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease has resisted enzyme replacement therapy with acid ?-glucosidase (GAA), which has been attributed to inefficient cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) mediated uptake. We evaluated ?2-agonist drugs, which increased CI-MPR expression in GAA knockout (KO) mice. Clenbuterol along with a low-dose adeno-associated virus vector increased Rotarod latency by 75% at 4 wk, in comparison with vector alone (P<2×10(-5)). Glycogen content was lower in skeletal muscles, including soleus (P<0.01), extensor digitorum longus (EDL; P<0.001), and tibialis anterior (P<0.05) following combination therapy, in comparison with vector alone. Glycogen remained elevated in the muscles following clenbuterol alone, indicating an adjunctive effect with gene therapy. Elderly GAA-KO mice treated with combination therapy demonstrated 2-fold increased wirehang latency, in comparison with vector or clenbuterol alone (P<0.001). The glycogen content of skeletal muscle decreased following combination therapy in elderly mice (P<0.05). Finally, CI-MPR-KO/GAA-KO mice did not respond to combination therapy, indicating that clenbuterol's effect depended on CI-MPR expression. In summary, adjunctive ?2-agonist treatment increased CI-MPR expression and enhanced efficacy from gene therapy in Pompe disease, which has implications for other lysosomal storage disorders that involve primarily the brain. PMID:22993195

  17. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Therapy and Obesity in Girls

    PubMed Central

    Shiasi Arani, Kobra; Heidari, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depot preparations of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) are the gold standard drugs for the treatment of central precocious puberty. A concern about these drugs is obesity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) therapy on body mass index (BMI) in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP). Patients and Methods: The girls with onset of puberty before eight years of age or menarche before nine years of age were studied. The weight, height, BMI, and pubertal stage were determined before and at sixth and 12th months of treatment. The GnRHa (Triptorelin) was administered intramuscularly for patients with rapidly progressive forms of CPP. Patients with slowly progressive forms of CPP were considered as control group. Results: From 110 subjects with CPP, 46 girls (41.8%) were considered as intervention and 64 (58.2%) as control groups. The mean age at initial visit was 7.46 ± 1.03 years. The BMI standard deviation scores in both groups was not significantly different at sixth and 12th months of treatment compared with baseline (P = 0.257 and P = 0.839, respectively). The prevalence of obesity was not significantly different between study groups at baseline and at and sixth and 12th months of therapy (P = 0.11, P = 0.068, and P = 0.052, respectively). Conclusions: The GnRHa therapy has no effect on BMI and the prevalence of obesity. PMID:26401141

  18. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John M.; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O.; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A.; Milner, Joshua D.; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K.; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (?2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related ?2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related ?2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  19. Serotonergic agonists stimulate inositol lipid metabolism in rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Schaechter, M.; Godfrey, P.P.; Minchin, M.C.W.; McClue, S.J.; Young, M.M.

    1985-10-28

    The metabolism of inositol phospholipids in response to serotonergic agonists was investigated in rabbit platelets. In platelets prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)-inositol, in a medium containing 10 mM LiCl which blocks the enzyme inositol-1-phosphatase, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) caused a dose-dependent accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP). This suggests a phospholipase-C-mediated breakdown of phosphoinositides. Ketanserin, a selective 5-HT/sub 2/ antagonist, was a potent inhibitor of the 5-HT response, with a Ki of 28 nM, indicating that 5-HT is activating receptors of the 5-HT/sub 2/ type in the platelet. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and quipazine also caused dose-related increases in inositol phosphate levels, though these were considerably less than those produced by 5-HT. These results show that relatively small changes in phosphoinositide metabolism induced by serotonergic agonists can be investigated in the rabbit platelet, and this cell may therefore be a useful model for the study of some 5-HT receptors. 30 references, 4 figures.

  20. Melatonin and melatonin agonist for delirium in the elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Dwaipayan; Tampi, Deena J; Tampi, Rajesh R

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize the available data on the use of melatonin and melatonin agonist for the prevention and management of delirium in the elderly patients from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A systematic search of 5 major databases PubMed, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Embase, and Cochrane Library was conducted. This search yielded a total of 2 RCTs for melatonin. One study compared melatonin to midazolam, clonidine, and control groups for the prevention and management of delirium in individuals who were pre- and posthip post-hip arthroplasty. The other study compared melatonin to placebo for the prevention of delirium in older adults admitted to an inpatient internal medicine service. Data from these 2 studies indicate that melatonin may have some benefit in the prevention and management of delirium in older adults. However, there is no evidence that melatonin reduces the severity of delirium or has any effect on behaviors or functions in these individuals. Melatonin was well tolerated in these 2 studies. The search for a melatonin agonist for delirium in the elderly patients yielded 1 study of ramelteon. In this study, ramelteon was found to be beneficial in preventing delirium in medically ill individuals when compared to placebo. Ramelteon was well tolerated in this study. PMID:24946785

  1. Identification of agonists for a group of human odorant receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Kristeller, Daniela C.; do Nascimento, João B. P.; Galante, Pedro A. F.; Malnic, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction plays a critical role in several aspects of the human life. Odorants are detected by hundreds of odorant receptors (ORs) which belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are expressed in the olfactory sensory neurons of the nose. The information provided by the activation of different combinations of ORs in the nose is transmitted to the brain, leading to odorant perception and emotional and behavioral responses. There are ~400 intact human ORs, and to date only a small percentage of these receptors (~10%) have known agonists. The determination of the specificity of the human ORs will contribute to a better understanding of how odorants are discriminated by the olfactory system. In this work, we aimed to identify human specific ORs, that is, ORs that are present in humans but absent from other species, and their corresponding agonists. To do this, we first selected 22 OR gene sequences from the human genome with no counterparts in the mouse, rat or dog genomes. Then we used a heterologous expression system to screen a subset of these human ORs against a panel of odorants of biological relevance, including foodborne aroma volatiles. We found that different types of odorants are able to activate some of these previously uncharacterized human ORs. PMID:25784876

  2. Mood Disorders, Circadian Rhythms, Melatonin and Melatonin Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Quera Salva, M.A.; Hartley, S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of circadian rhythms have led to an interest in the treatment of major depressive disorder with chronobiotic agents. Many tissues have autonomous circadian rhythms, which are orchestrated by the master clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SNC). Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine) is secreted from the pineal gland during darkness. Melatonin acts mainly on MT1 and MT2 receptors, which are present in the SNC, regulating physiological and neuroendocrine functions, including circadian entrainment, referred to as the chronobiotic effet. Circadian rhythms has been shown to be either misaligned or phase shifted or decreased in amplitude in both acute episodes and relapse of major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder. Manipulation of circadian rhythms either using physical treatments (such as high intensity light) or behavioral therapy has shown promise in improving symptoms. Pharmacotherapy using melatonin and pure melatonin receptor agonists, while improving sleep, has not been shown to improve symptoms of depression. A novel antidepressant, agomelatine, combines 5HT2c antagonist and melatonin agonist action, and has shown promise in both acute treatment of MDD and in preventing relapse. PMID:23650464

  3. Effects of ?-Opioid Receptor Agonists in Assays of Acute Pain-Stimulated and Pain-Depressed Behavior in Male Rats: Role of ?-Agonist Efficacy and Noxious Stimulus Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Kenner C.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    Pain is associated with stimulation of some behaviors and depression of others, and ?-opioid receptor agonists are among the most widely used analgesics. This study used parallel assays of pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior in male Sprague-Dawley rats to compare antinociception profiles for six ?-agonists that varied in efficacy at ?-opioid receptors (from highest to lowest: methadone, fentanyl, morphine, hydrocodone, buprenorphine, and nalbuphine). Intraperitoneal injection of diluted lactic acid served as an acute noxious stimulus to either stimulate stretching or depress operant responding maintained by electrical stimulation in an intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). All ?-agonists blocked both stimulation of stretching and depression of ICSS produced by 1.8% lactic acid. The high-efficacy agonists methadone and fentanyl were more potent at blocking acid-induced depression of ICSS than acid-stimulated stretching, whereas lower-efficacy agonists displayed similar potency across assays. All ?-agonists except morphine also facilitated ICSS in the absence of the noxious stimulus at doses similar to those that blocked acid-induced depression of ICSS. The potency of the low-efficacy ?-agonist nalbuphine, but not the high-efficacy ?-agonist methadone, to block acid-induced depression of ICSS was significantly reduced by increasing the intensity of the noxious stimulus to 5.6% acid. These results demonstrate sensitivity of acid-induced depression of ICSS to a range of clinically effective ?-opioid analgesics and reveal distinctions between opioids based on efficacy at the ?-receptor. These results also support the use of parallel assays of pain-stimulated and -depressed behaviors to evaluate analgesic efficacy of candidate drugs. PMID:25406170

  4. Nicotinic Partial Agonists Varenicline and Sazetidine-A Have Differential Effects on Affective Behavior

    E-print Network

    Shorter, James

    Nicotinic Partial Agonists Varenicline and Sazetidine-A Have Differential Effects on Affective and preclinical studies suggest that nicotinic acetylcho- line receptors are involved in affective disorders; therefore, the potential therapeutic value of nicotinic partial agonists as treat- ments of these disorders

  5. Classical and atypical agonists activate M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors through common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zim?ík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, Esam E; Jakubík, Jan

    2015-07-01

    We mutated key amino acids of the human variant of the M1 muscarinic receptor that target ligand binding, receptor activation, and receptor-G protein interaction. We compared the effects of these mutations on the action of two atypical M1 functionally preferring agonists (N-desmethylclozapine and xanomeline) and two classical non-selective orthosteric agonists (carbachol and oxotremorine). Mutations of D105 in the orthosteric binding site and mutation of D99 located out of the orthosteric binding site decreased affinity of all tested agonists that was translated as a decrease in potency in accumulation of inositol phosphates and intracellular calcium mobilization. Mutation of D105 decreased the potency of the atypical agonist xanomeline more than that of the classical agonists carbachol and oxotremorine. Mutation of the residues involved in receptor activation (D71) and coupling to G-proteins (R123) completely abolished the functional responses to both classical and atypical agonists. Our data show that both classical and atypical agonists activate hM1 receptors by the same molecular switch that involves D71 in the second transmembrane helix. The principal difference among the studied agonists is rather in the way they interact with D105 in the orthosteric binding site. Furthermore, our data demonstrate a key role of D105 in xanomeline wash-resistant binding and persistent activation of hM1 by wash-resistant xanomeline. PMID:25882246

  6. Glucocorticoids and the Development of Agonistic Behaviour during Puberty in Male Golden Hamsters

    E-print Network

    Delville, Yvon

    Glucocorticoids and the Development of Agonistic Behaviour during Puberty in Male Golden Hamsters J hamsters undergoes a transition from play fighting to adult aggression. Repeated exposure to social stress investigated the effects of stress hormones on the matur- ation of agonistic behaviour. Male hamsters were

  7. Design and Evaluation of a Biomimetic Agonist-Antagonist Active Knee Prosthesis

    E-print Network

    Herr, Hugh

    Design and Evaluation of a Biomimetic Agonist-Antagonist Active Knee Prosthesis by ARCHIVES Ernesto;Design and Evaluation of a Biomimetic Agonist-Antagonist Active Knee Prosthesis by Ernesto Carlos. This thesis presents the design and evaluation of a novel biomimetic active knee prosthesis capable

  8. Agonistic Behavior of the Mediterranean Gecko Hemidactylus turcicus Venetia S. Briggs1,2

    E-print Network

    Mazzotti, Frank

    Agonistic Behavior of the Mediterranean Gecko Hemidactylus turcicus Venetia S. Briggs1,2 1, USA (Accepted August 6, 2012) Venetia S. Briggs (2012) Agonistic behavior of the Mediterranean gecko of species and spatial distribution of individuals within a population. The Mediterranean gecko Hemidactylus

  9. DETERMINANTS OF OUTCOMES OF AGONISTIC INTERACTIONS AMONG MALE CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS

    E-print Network

    Gerber, Leah R.

    DETERMINANTS OF OUTCOMES OF AGONISTIC INTERACTIONS AMONG MALE CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS male California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) may be influenced by multiple factors, including who of the outcomes of agonistic interactions between territorial male California sea lions on 3 islands (Los Islotes

  10. Agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity requires shear and a Rac1-dependent signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Michael Keegan; Liu, Junling; Kim, Kyungho; Shen, Bo; Stojanovic-Terpo, Aleksandra; Zheng, Yi; Cho, Jaehyung; Du, Xiaoping

    2014-09-18

    Activated platelets facilitate blood coagulation by exposing phosphatidylserine (PS) and releasing microvesicles (MVs). However, the potent physiological agonists thrombin and collagen poorly induce PS exposure when a single agonist is used. To obtain a greater procoagulant response, thrombin is commonly used in combination with glycoprotein VI agonists. However, even under these conditions, only a percentage of platelets express procoagulant activity. To date, it remains unclear why platelets poorly expose PS even when stimulated with multiple agonists and what the signaling pathways are of soluble agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity. Here we show that physiological levels of shear present in blood significantly enhance agonist-induced platelet PS exposure and MV release, enabling low doses of a single agonist to induce full-scale platelet procoagulant activity. PS exposed on the platelet surface was immediately released as MVs, revealing a tight coupling between the 2 processes under shear. Using platelet-specific Rac1(-/-) mice, we discovered that Rac1 plays a common role in mediating the low-dose agonist-induced procoagulant response independent of platelet aggregation, secretion, and the apoptosis pathway. Platelet-specific Rac1 function was not only important for coagulation in vitro but also for fibrin accumulation in vivo following laser-induced arteriolar injury. PMID:25079357

  11. Discovery of a novel trans-1,4-dioxycyclohexane GPR119 agonist series.

    PubMed

    Han, Sangdon; Narayanan, Sanju; Kim, Sun Hee; Calderon, Imelda; Zhu, Xiuwen; Kawasaki, Andrew; Yue, Dawei; Lehmann, Juerg; Wong, Amy; Buzard, Daniel J; Semple, Graeme; Carroll, Chris; Chu, Zhi-Liang; Al-Sharmma, Hussein; Shu, Hsin-Hui; Tung, Shiu-Feng; Unett, David J; Behan, Dominic P; Yoon, Woo Hyun; Morgan, Michael; Usmani, Khawja A; Chen, Chuan; Sadeque, Abu; Leonard, James N; Jones, Robert M

    2015-08-01

    The design and optimization of a novel trans-1,4-dioxycyclohexane GPR119 agonist series is described. A lead compound 21 was found to be a potent and efficacious GPR119 agonist across species, and possessed overall favorable pharmaceutical properties. Compound 21 demonstrated robust acute and chronic regulatory effects on glycemic parameters in the diabetic or non-diabetic rodent models. PMID:26048791

  12. Discovery and optimization of arylsulfonyl 3-(pyridin-2-yloxy)anilines as novel GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian Ken; Li, An-Rong; Yu, Ming; Wang, Yingcai; Zhu, Jiang; Kayser, Frank; Medina, Julio C; Siegler, Karen; Conn, Marion; Shan, Bei; Grillo, Mark P; Eksterowicz, John; Coward, Peter; Liu, Jiwen Jim

    2013-06-15

    We describe the discovery of a series of arylsulfonyl 3-(pyridin-2-yloxy)anilines as GPR119 agonists derived from compound 1. Replacement of the three methyl groups in 1 with metabolically stable moieties led to the identification of compound 34, a potent and efficacious GPR119 agonist with improved pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. PMID:23648181

  13. New Agonists / Antagonists for Toll-like Receptors (TLR7 and TLR9)

    E-print Network

    New Agonists / Antagonists for Toll-like Receptors (TLR7 and TLR9) Technologieangebot B 67104 Description Toll-like receptors (TLRs) contribute to the recognition of ,,foreign" molecules including structure to bind to Toll-like receptors (preferably 7 and 9). As a result, new agonists / antagonists

  14. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of phenylglycinols and phenyl amines as agonists of GPR88.

    PubMed

    Dzierba, Carolyn D; Bi, Yingzhi; Dasgupta, Bireshwar; Hartz, Richard A; Ahuja, Vijay; Cianchetta, Giovanni; Kumi, Godwin; Dong, Li; Aleem, Saadat; Fink, Cynthia; Garcia, Yudith; Green, Michael; Han, Jianxin; Kwon, Soojin; Qiao, Ying; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Yulian; Liu, Ying; Zipp, Greg; Liang, Zhi; Burford, Neil; Ferrante, Meredith; Bertekap, Robert; Lewis, Martin; Cacace, Angela; Grace, James; Wilson, Alan; Nouraldeen, Amr; Westphal, Ryan; Kimball, David; Carson, Kenneth; Bronson, Joanne J; Macor, John E

    2015-04-01

    Small molecule modulators of GPR88 activity (agonists, antagonists, or modulators) are of interest as potential agents for the treatment of a variety of psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. A series of phenylglycinol and phenylamine analogs have been prepared and evaluated for their GPR88 agonist activity and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. PMID:25690789

  15. PROOF COPY 052808JAS Courtship and agonistic sounds by the cichlid fish

    E-print Network

    PROOF COPY 052808JAS PROOF COPY 052808JAS Courtship and agonistic sounds by the cichlid fish Courtship and agonistic interactions in an African cichlid species present a richer diversity of acoustic.), produce low frequency short pulsed sounds during courtship. Sounds emitted by P. zebra males in the early

  16. In vitro and in vivo effects of the PPAR-alpha agonists fenofibrate and retinoic acid in endometrial cancer

    E-print Network

    Saidi, Samir A.; Holland, Cathrine M.; Charnock-Jones, D. Stephen; Smith, Stephen K.

    2006-03-28

    Abstract Fenofibrate, an agonist of PPAR-alpha, in doses above 25 ?M, inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells. We show that these effects are potentiated by retinoic acid, an agonist of the retinoid...

  17. Benzodiazepine Site Agonists Differentially Alter Acetylcholine Release in Rat Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Hambrecht-Wiedbusch, Viviane S.; Mitchell, Melinda F.; Firn, Kelsie A.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Background Agonist binding at the benzodiazepine site of ?-aminobutric acid type A receptors diminishes anxiety and insomnia by actions in the amygdala. The neurochemical effects of benzodiazepine-site agonists remain incompletely understood. Cholinergic neurotransmission modulates amygdala function, and in this study we tested the hypothesis that benzodiazepine-site agonists alter acetylcholine (ACh) release in the amygdala. Methods Microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography quantified ACh release in the amygdala of Sprague-Dawley rats (n=33). ACh was measured before and after IV administration (3 mg/kg) of midazolam or eszopiclone, with and without anesthesia. ACh in isoflurane-anesthetized rats during dialysis with Ringer’s solution(control) was compared to ACh release during dialysis with Ringer’s solution containing (100 ?M) midazolam, diazepam, eszopiclone, or zolpidem. Results In unanesthetized rats, ACh in the amygdala was decreased by IV midazolam (?51.1%; P=0.0029; 95% CI= ?73.0% to ?29.2%) and eszopiclone (?39.6%; P=0.0222; 95% CI= ?69.8% to ?9.3%). In anesthetized rats, ACh in the amygdala was decreased by IV administration of midazolam (?46.2%; P=0.0041; 95% CI= ?67.9% to ?24.5%) and eszopiclone (?34.0%; P=0.0009; 95% CI= ?44.7% to ?23.3%), and increased by amygdala delivery of diazepam (43.2%; P=0.0434; 95% CI= 2.1% to 84.3%), and eszopiclone (222.2%; P=0.0159; 95% CI= 68.5% to 375.8%). Conclusions ACh release in the amygdala was decreased by IV delivery of midazolam and eszopiclone. Dialysis delivery directly into the amygdala caused either increased (eszopiclone and diazepam) or likely no significant change (midazolam and zolpidem) in ACh release. These contrasting effects of delivery route on ACh release support the interpretation that systemically administered midazolam and eszopiclone decrease ACh release in the amygdala by acting on neuronal systems outside of the amygdala. PMID:24842176

  18. Analyse des intensités et filtrage des énergies en émission électronique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, P.; Blaise, G.; Henry, L.

    1991-10-01

    A different method for using a dispersive system consisting of a magnetic prism and an electrostatic mirror is proposed. This method allows one to study electron intensities and energies coming from the surface of a sample which has been bombarded by an electron beam of a given energy. Le système dispersif constitué d'un prisme magnétique et d'un miroir électrostatique, utilisé jusqu'à présent en microscopie électronique par transmission pour l'analyse et le filtrage des énergies des électrons transmis à travers une couche mince, peut être adapté pour constituer une nouvelle méthode d'étude des intensités et des énergies des électrons diffusés par la surface d'un échantillon bombardé par un faisceau d'électrons d'énergie choisie.

  19. Use of Thrombopoietin Receptor Agonists in Childhood Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Garzon, Angelica Maria; Mitchell, William Beau

    2015-01-01

    Most children with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) will have spontaneous remission regardless of therapy, while about 20% will go on to have chronic ITP. In those children with chronic ITP who need treatment, standard therapies for acute ITP may have adverse effects that complicate their long-term use. Thus, alternative treatment options are needed for children with chronic ITP. Thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RA) have been shown to be safe and efficacious in adults with ITP, and represent a new treatment option for children with chronic ITP. One TPO-RA, eltrombopag, is now approved for children. Clinical trials in children are ongoing and data are emerging on safety and efficacy. This review will focus on the physiology of TPO-RA, their clinical use in children, as well as the long-term safety issues that need to be considered when using these agents. PMID:26322297

  20. TSH and Thyrotropic Agonists: Key Actors in Thyroid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Johannes W.; Landgrafe, Gabi; Fotiadou, Elisavet H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the reader with an overview of our current knowledge of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid feedback from a cybernetic standpoint. Over the past decades we have gained a plethora of information from biochemical, clinical, and epidemiological investigation, especially on the role of TSH and other thyrotropic agonists as critical components of this complex relationship. Integrating these data into a systems perspective delivers new insights into static and dynamic behaviour of thyroid homeostasis. Explicit usage of this information with mathematical methods promises to deliver a better understanding of thyrotropic feedback control and new options for personalised diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and targeted therapy, also by permitting a new perspective on the conundrum of the TSH reference range. PMID:23365787

  1. rencontre du non-lineaire 2000 1 Sur la similitude des morphologies des nervations des feuilles et de

    E-print Network

    Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    de celles des fractures Y. Couder*, L. Pauchard**, C. Allain**, M. Adda-Bedia* et S. Douady* *LPS, 24´esentent les formes de ces nervations diff`erent des formes engendr´ees lors de croissances dans des champs possible effet sur la diff´erentiation des nervures. 1 Introduction Les figures form´ees par les nervures

  2. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guido K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways. PMID:25988121

  3. Recent advances in the development of farnesoid X receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Elizabeth J.; Lindor, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are nuclear hormone receptors expressed in high amounts in body tissues that participate in bilirubin metabolism including the liver, intestines, and kidneys. Bile acids (BAs) are the natural ligands of the FXRs. FXRs regulate the expression of the gene encoding for cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase, which is the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis. In addition, FXRs play a critical role in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and regulation of insulin sensitivity. FXRs also modulate live growth and regeneration during liver injury. Preclinical studies have shown that FXR activation protects against cholestasis-induced liver injury. Moreover, FXR activation protects against fatty liver injury in animal models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and improved hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin sensitivity. Obeticholic acid (OCA), a 6?-ethyl derivative of the natural human BA chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) is the first-in-class selective FXR agonist that is ~100-fold more potent than CDCA. Preliminary human clinical trials have shown that OCA is safe and effective. In a phase II clinical trial, administration of OCA was well-tolerated, increased insulin sensitivity and reduced markers of liver inflammation and fibrosis in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and NAFLD. In two clinical trials of OCA in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), a progressive cholestatic liver disease, OCA significantly reduced serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, an important disease marker that correlates well with clinical outcomes of patients with PBC. Together, these studies suggest that FXR agonists could potentially be used as therapeutic tools in patients suffering from nonalcoholic fatty and cholestatic liver diseases. Larger and Longer-term studies are currently ongoing. PMID:25705637

  4. Juillet 2014 Sur les plages des Canaries, des grains de sable...

    E-print Network

    Huck, Thierry

    1 Juillet 2014 Sur les plages des Canaries, des grains de sable... et des micro-plastiques Les îles Canaries ne sont pas à l'abri de la pollution par les matières plastiques. Mais la localisation des plages'est focalisée sur une des composantes du problème (les micro-plastiques), une région côtière (les îles Canaries

  5. Effects of dopamine indirect agonists and selective D1-like and D2-like agonists and antagonists on cocaine self-administration and food maintained responding in rats.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Andrew C; Miller, John R; Dohrmann, Jennifer M; Caine, S Barak

    2004-01-01

    A procedure is described for comprehensive evaluation of the effects of acute drug pretreatments on the reinforcing effects of cocaine using the rat self-administration assay in combination with a novel control assay of liquid-food maintained responding. In sessions comprised of five 20-min components, either complete dose-effect functions for cocaine self-administration or complete concentration-effect functions for liquid-food maintained responding were evaluated. The schedule of reinforcement (FR 5 TO 20-s), drug pretreatment doses and time intervals (0-30 min), and duration of sessions (108 min) were identical for cocaine- and food-reinforced test sessions. Whereas acute pretreatment with indirect dopamine agonists (D-amphetamine, GBR 12909) and D2-like agonists (7-OH-DPAT, quinelorane) produced dose-dependent leftward shifts in dose-effect functions for cocaine self-administration, D1-like agonists (SKF 82958, R-6-Br-APB) and dopamine antagonists (D1-like, SCH 39166; D2-like, eticlopride) shifted dose-effect functions for cocaine downward and rightward, respectively. Interestingly, with the indirect dopamine agonists but not the D2-like agonists, increased responding maintained by low cocaine doses was paralleled by increased responding maintained by low food concentrations. Moreover, three of the four direct agonists were moderately selective (< or =5-fold more potent) in decreasing cocaine self-administration relative to food maintained responding. When data were analyzed according to alterations in total cocaine intake, all of the agonists uniformly decreased total cocaine intake, whereas both antagonists increased total cocaine intake. Overall, this procedure was sensitive to leftward, downward and rightward shifts in cocaine dose-effect functions and should be useful for evaluating the nature of pharmacological interactions between novel compounds and self-administered cocaine, as well as the potential for altering cocaine self-administration selectively with candidate treatments for cocaine abuse and dependence. PMID:15464142

  6. Modlisation des connaissances gographiques Pr. Robert Laurini

    E-print Network

    Laurini, Robert

    Modélisation des connaissances géographiques 1 Pr. Robert Laurini « 80 % des données existantes ont;Modélisation des connaissances géographiques 2 Pr. Robert Laurini 1.1 ­ Modélisation des objets géographiques géographiques 3 Pr. Robert Laurini Géodésie · La terre n'est pas tout à fait ronde ­ ellipsoïde ­ altitude

  7. FLORENT MARTOS Structuration ecologique et evolutive des

    E-print Network

    FLORENT MARTOS Structuration ´ecologique et ´evolutive des symbioses mycorhiziennes des orchid th`ese intitul´ee: Structuration ´ecologique et ´evolutive des symbioses mycorhiziennes des orchid`eces d'orchid´ees actuelles qui d´ependent toutes de champignons mycorhiziens pour accomplir leur cycle

  8. Sciences des aliments Mention : Nutrition, sant, aliments

    E-print Network

    Sart, Remi

    Sciences des aliments Mention : Nutrition, santé, aliments Nature de la formation : Diplôme-Ferrand) #12;2 Sciences des aliments UFR Sciences et Technologies PRÉSENTATION Objectifs Mention Nutrition scientifiques et techniques solides dans le domaine de la Nutrition, des Sciences des Aliments et de la Santé

  9. Ascorbic acid enables reversible dopamine receptor /sup 3/H-agonist binding

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.; Sibley, D.R.; Hamblin, M.; Creese, I.

    1981-11-16

    The effects of ascorbic acid on dopaminergic /sup 3/H-agonist receptor binding were studied in membrane homogenates of bovine anterior pituitary and caudate, and rat striatum. In all tissues virtually no stereospecific binding (defined using 1uM (+)butaclamol) of the /sup 3/H-agonists N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA), apomorphine, or dopamine could be demonstrated in the absence of ascorbic acid. Although levels of total /sup 3/H-agonist binding were three to five times greater in the absence than in the presence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, the increased binding was entirely non-stereospecific. Greater amounts of dopamine-inhibitable /sup 3/H-NPA binding could be demonstrated in the absence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, but this measure of ''specific binding'' was demonstrated not to represent dopamine receptor binding since several other catecholamines and catechol were equipotent with dopamine and more potent than the dopamine agonist (+/-)amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) in inhibiting this binding. High levels of dopamine-displaceable /sup 3/H-agonist binding were detected in fresh and boiled homogenates of cerebellum, an area of brain which receives no dopaminergic innervation, further demonstrating the non-specific nature of /sup 3/H-agonist binding in the absence of ascorbic acid. These studies emphasize that under typical assay conditions ascorbic acid is required in order to demonstrate reversible and specific /sup 3/H-agonist binding to dopamine receptors.

  10. Computational investigation of interactions between human H2 receptor and its agonists.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xianqiang; Li, Yaozong; Li, Weihua; Xu, Zhejun; Tang, Yun

    2011-02-01

    Type 2 histamine receptor (H(2)R) is widely distributed in the body. Its main function is modulating the secretion of gastric acid. Most gastric acid-related diseases are closely associated with it. In this study, a combination of pharmacophore modeling, homology modeling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics methods were performed on human H(2)R and its agonists to investigate interaction details between them. At first, a pharmacophore model of H(2)R agonists was developed, which was then validated by QSAR and database searching. Afterwards, a model of the H(2)R was built utilizing homology modeling method. Then, a reference agonist was docked into the receptor model by induced fit docking. The 'induced' model can dramatically improve the recovery ratio from 46.8% to 69.5% among top 10% of the ranked database in the simulated virtual screening. The pharmocophore model and the receptor model matched very well each other, which provided valuable information for future studies. Asp98, Asp186 and Tyr190 played key roles in the binding of H(2)R agonists, and direct interactions were observed between the three residues and agonists. Residue Tyr250 could also form a hydrogen bond with H(2)R agonists. These findings would be very useful for the discovery of novel and potent H(2)R agonists. PMID:21212009

  11. Identification of PPAR? Agonists from Natural Sources Using Different In Silico Approaches.

    PubMed

    El-Houri, Rime B; Mortier, Jérémie; Murgueitio, Manuela S; Wolber, Gerhard; Christensen, Lars P

    2015-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? plays an important role in lipid and glucose homeostasis and is the target of many drug discovery investigations because of its role in diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? by agonists leads to a conformational change in the ligand-binding domain altering the transcription of several target genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism, resulting in, for example, facilitation of glucose and lipid uptake and amelioration of insulin resistance, and other effects that are important in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? partial agonists are compounds with diminished agonist efficacy compared to full agonists; however, they maintain the antidiabetic effect of full agonists but do not induce the same magnitude of side effects. This mini-review gives a short introduction to in silico screening methods and recent research advances using computational approaches to identify peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? agonists, especially partial agonists, from natural sources and how these ligands bind to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? in order to better understand their biological effects. PMID:25251562

  12. Sécurité au-delà des mythes et des croyances

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Présentation orale en français, support visuel en français et en anglais. La pire des failles de sécurité est l'impression de sécurité. Le décalage entre la compréhension que l?on a des technologies utilisées, et leurs potentiels réels, ainsi que l'impact potentiellement négatif qu'elles peuvent avoir sur nos vies, n'est pas toujours compris, ou pris en compte par la plupart d'entre-nous. On se contente de nos perceptions pour ne pas avoir à se confronter à la réalité... Alors qu'en est-il vraiment ? En matière de sécurité qui de l'humain ou des technologies a le contrôle ?

  13. Inhibition by TRPA1 agonists of compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Akitomo; Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •TRPA1 agonists inhibited compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves. •This inhibition was not mediated by TRPA1 channels. •This efficacy was comparable to those of lidocaine and cocaine. •We found for the first time an ability of TRPA1 agonists to inhibit nerve conduction. -- Abstract: Although TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists (vanilloid capsaicin and menthol, respectively) at high concentrations inhibit action potential conduction, it remains to be unknown whether TRPA1 agonists have a similar action. The present study examined the actions of TRPA1 agonists, cinnamaldehyde (CA) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which differ in chemical structure from each other, on compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. CA and AITC concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP with the IC{sub 50} values of 1.2 and 1.5 mM, respectively; these activities were resistant to a non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red or a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The CA and AITC actions were distinct in property; the latter but not former action was delayed in onset and partially reversible, and CA but not AITC increased thresholds to elicit CAPs. A CAP inhibition was seen by hydroxy-?-sanshool (by 60% at 0.05 mM), which activates both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels, a non-vanilloid TRPV1 agonist piperine (by 20% at 0.07 mM) and tetrahydrolavandulol (where the six-membered ring of menthol is opened; IC{sub 50} = 0.38 mM). It is suggested that TRPA1 agonists as well as TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction without TRP activation, although their agonists are quite different in chemical structure from each other.

  14. CB(1) receptor allosteric modulators display both agonist and signaling pathway specificity.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Gemma L; Horswill, James G; Anavi-Goffer, Sharon; Reggio, Patricia H; Bolognini, Daniele; Abood, Mary E; McAllister, Sean; Strange, Phillip G; Stephens, Gary J; Pertwee, Roger G; Ross, Ruth A

    2013-02-01

    We have previously identified allosteric modulators of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor (Org 27569, PSNCBAM-1) that display a contradictory pharmacological profile: increasing the specific binding of the CB(1) receptor agonist [(3)H]CP55940 but producing a decrease in CB(1) receptor agonist efficacy. Here we investigated the effect one or both compounds in a broad range of signaling endpoints linked to CB(1) receptor activation. We assessed the effect of these compounds on CB(1) receptor agonist-induced [(35)S]GTP?S binding, inhibition, and stimulation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and ?-arrestin recruitment. We also investigated the effect of these allosteric modulators on CB(1) agonist binding kinetics. Both compounds display ligand dependence, being significantly more potent as modulators of CP55940 signaling as compared with WIN55212 and having little effect on [(3)H]WIN55212 binding. Org 27569 displays biased antagonism whereby it inhibits: agonist-induced guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP?S) binding, simulation (G?(s)-mediated), and inhibition (G?(i)-mediated) of cAMP production and ?-arrestin recruitment. In contrast, it acts as an enhancer of agonist-induced ERK phosphorylation. Alone, the compound can act also as an allosteric agonist, increasing cAMP production and ERK phosphorylation. We find that in both saturation and kinetic-binding experiments, the Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1 appeared to influence only orthosteric ligand maximum occupancy rather than affinity. The data indicate that the allosteric modulators share a common mechanism whereby they increase available high-affinity CB(1) agonist binding sites. The receptor conformation stabilized by the allosterics appears to induce signaling and also selectively traffics orthosteric agonist signaling via the ERK phosphorylation pathway. PMID:23160940

  15. N-methylthioureas as new agonists of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor.

    PubMed

    Park, Yohan; Hong, Suckchang; Lee, Myungmo; Jung, Hyojun; Cho, Won-Jea; Kim, Eun-Jin; Son, Ho-Young; Lee, Mi-Ock; Park, Hyeung-Geun

    2012-08-01

    Thirty two thiourea derivatives were prepared and their agonistic activities on the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor ? (ROR?) were evaluated. The replacement of the 3-allyl-2-imino-thiazolidin-4-one moiety of the lead compound CGP52608 (1) with various functional group substituted aromatic rings, improved the agonistic activity of ROR?. Among the prepared derivatives, 1-methyl-3-(4-phenoxy-benzyl)-thiourea (32) showed 2.6-fold higher agonistic activity than CGP52608 in the ROR?-activation assay. PMID:22941482

  16. Anaphylactic reaction to different gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists for the treatment of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Lüchinger, Annemarie B; Mijatovic, Velja; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Hompes, Peter G A

    2011-03-01

    Anaphylactic reactions to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists are exceedingly rare, but if they occur, they can be life threatening. This case describes a 33-year-old patient with endometriosis who developed an acute allergic reaction on leuprolide (Lucrin) administration. Although skin tests with the replacement goserelin (Zoladex) were negative, usage of this medication resulted in a similar allergic reaction. This is the first case report that shows that, in case of a proven allergy to one GnRH agonist, a switch to another GnRH agonist should not be made even if allergy tests are negative for this medication. PMID:21233692

  17. Differential behavioral effect of the TRPM8/TRPA1 channel agonist icilin (AG-3-5).

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Gomez, Teresa; Ding, Zhe; Raffa, Robert B

    2007-12-01

    Molecular identification of two new transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, TRPM8 and TRPA1, has prompted an intense interest in their functional roles. We report that an acute exposure to the TRPM8/TRPA1 agonist icilin (0.01-100 microM), but not TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (10 microM), causes an atypical dose-related increase in planarian motility. This is the first demonstration of a TRPM8/TRPA1 channel subtype agonist-induced differential pharmacological effect in invertebrates and provides a novel sensitive, quantifiable end-point for studying TRP channel pharmacology. PMID:17765220

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 5-nitropyrimidine analogs with azabicyclic substituents as GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zunhua; Fang, Yuanying; Pham, Tuan-Anh N; Lee, Jongkook; Park, Haeil

    2013-03-01

    5-Nitropyrimidine analogs substituted with conformationally restricted azabicyclic amines and alcohols were prepared and evaluated their agonistic activity against human GPR119. The analogs bearing endo-azabicyclic amines and alcohols (7, 8, 11, and 12) exhibited full agonistic activities while the analogs with exo-azabicyclic amines and alcohols were proved as partial agonists (9, 10, 13, and 14) regardless of their EC(50) values. 5-Nitropyrimidine analogs with (2-fluoro-4-methylsulfonyl)phenylamino group (8, 10, 12, 14) showed more potent GPR119 activation activities than the analogs without fluorine in all cases (7, 9, 11, 13). PMID:23374864

  19. Cannabinoid agonist rescues learning and memory after a traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Marium; Khan, Maida; Craig, Laura; Nakanishi, Stan T

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury can cause persistent challenges including problems with learning and memory. Previous studies suggest that the activation of the cannabinoid 1 receptor after a traumatic brain injury could be beneficial. We tested the hypothesis that posttraumatic brain injury administration of a cannabinoid 1 receptor agonist can rescue deficits in learning and memory. Young adult male rats were subjected to a moderately severe controlled cortical impact brain injury, with a subset given postinjury i.p. injections of a cannabinoid receptor agonist. Utilizing novel object recognition and the morris water task, we found that the brain-injured animals treated with the agonist showed a marked recovery. PMID:25815355

  20. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist testing of pituitary-gonadal function.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, D A; Rosenfield, R L

    1991-01-01

    The development of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists has provided a unique means to functionally assess the pituitary-gonadal axis in both males and females. These agonists, when given in a dose sufficient to stimulate the gonadotropes and induce a gonadal steroid response, have provided insights into normal reproductive physiology, hyperandrogenic conditions such as the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and disorders of pubertal development. This review provides an overview of the use of such agonists as probes of the functional status of the pituitary-gonadal axis in both normal and abnormal reproductive states. PMID:18411171

  1. DYNAMIQUE DES SYST ` EMES D'ISOM '

    E-print Network

    Gaboriau, Damien

    DYNAMIQUE DES SYST ` EMES D'ISOM ' ETRIES : SUR LES BOUTS DES ORBITES Damien Gaboriau Un syst`eme d'isom ; ' 2 ; : : : ; ' k d'isom'etries entre sous­intervalles ferm'es de D. Ces objets sont des syst : celui des actions de groupes par isom'etries sur des arbres r'eels. Un arbre r'eel est un espace m

  2. Fonction diélectrique des milieux inhomogènes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, Serge

    This review article is based on the thesis of Berthier — Laboratoire d'Optique des solides, Université P. et M. Curie— and on various contributions or ulterior works. Its aim is to present a critical and detailed review of the main theories of the optical dielectric function of inhomogeneous media. Together with a mathematical description of the theories, we give a physical interpretation of the results and the practical limits of validity. Each theory is compared to experimental results and other theoretical predictions as well. This study is introduced by theoretical reminders about the electric polarization and considerations about the physical meaning of some fundamental parameters when going from a microscopic to a macroscopic point of view. Cette revue est tirée de la thèse de Berthier préparée au Laboratoire d'Optique des Solides, Université P. et M. Curie, ainsi que des travaux qui lui font suite (thèse en préparation de Driss-Khodja) ou de ceux menés parallèlement (systèmes 2D) par d'autres membres de l'équipe. Son ambition est de présenter une étude approfondie et critique des différentes théories de la fonction diélectrique optique des milieux inhomogènes à trois dimensions. Après une description mathématique détaillée des principales théories, nous donnons une interprétation physique des résultats et les limites concrètes d'utilisation de chacune d'elles. Chaque grande théorie est confrontée à la fois à des résultats expérimentaux et aux prédictions des autres théories. Cette étude est précédée de rappels théoriques sur la polarisation électrique et de considérations sur la signification réelle de certains paramètres lors du passage d'un système microscopique isolé à un système macroscopique aléatoire.

  3. Rgles administratives Carrefour des arts et des sciences

    E-print Network

    Montréal, Université de

    , contrat et responsabilités Les demandes de réservation Frais de location, contrat et responsabilités Contrat - Le locataire doit obligatoirement signer le contrat de location disponible sur le site du Carrefour des arts et

  4. Des widgets aux comets pour la Plasticit des Systmes Interactifs

    E-print Network

    Des widgets aux comets pour la Plasticité des Systèmes Interactifs From widgets to comets utilisabilité. L'article propose une nouvelle génération de widgets, les « comets » (COntext Mouldable widgETs), pour la construction de systèmes interactifs plastiques. Une comet est, par définition, un widget

  5. Fiabilité des structures mécaniques adaptatives: effet de la panne des actionneurs ou des capteurs sur la stabilité

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, H.; Charon, W.; Kouta, R.

    2002-12-01

    Ces dernières décennies, des activités significatives dans le monde étaient dirigées autour du contrôle actif. Le but de ces recherches était essentiellement d'améliorer les performances, la fiabilité et la sécurité des systèmes. Notamment dans le cas des structures soumises à des vibrations aléatoires. D'importants travaux ont été consacré à l'utilisation des “matériaux intelligents” comme capteurs et actionneurs. Cette article propose l'analyse de la fiabilité des systèmes mécaniques en étudiant les pannes des actionneurs ou des capteurs. L'effet de ces pannes sur la stabilité et la performance du système y est démontré. Les méthodologies de conception y sont rappelées. Des exemples numériques sont fournis à travers le contrôle d'un panneau sous chargement dynamique pour illustrer la méthode proposée.

  6. gamma-Aminobutyric acidA agonists differentially augment gnawing induced by indirect-acting dopamine agonists in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Tirelli, E; Geter-Douglass, B; Witkin, J M

    1998-01-01

    Evidence from structure-activity, molecular biology, ligand binding and behavioral studies has suggested potential differences in the pharmacological effects of indirect dopamine agonists. Striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission is under the regulatory control of GABAergic inputs. The ability of agonists of gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptors to enhance stereotyped gnawing was used as a method for dissociating the pharmacological effects of indirect-acting dopamine agonists. Gnawing on corrugated cardboard was studied in C57BL/6J mice. The GABAA agonists, gaboxadol HCl (THIP) and muscimol, were not effective in augmenting gnawing in the presence of the direct-acting dopamine agonists, apomorphine, pergolide, RU 24213 or SKF 38393. In addition, THIP did not enhance the gnawing produced by cocaine, bupropion, GBR 12909 or WIN 35428. In contrast, THIP produced marked augmentation of the gnawing induced by methylphenidate, (+)-amphetamine, methamphetamine, amfonelic acid, indatraline, nomifensine, diclofensine, mazindol and GBR 12935. The qualitative differences in potentiation were not caused by differences in the maximal effect of the drugs alone, inadequate dose or routes of administration, or by differences in duration of action. Neither can the absence of potentiation be accounted for by unique effects of THIP; muscimol was only marginally effective in potentiating the effects of WIN 35428 and bupropion but completely inactive in augmenting the effects of cocaine and GBR 12909. Muscimol was efficacious in augmenting the effects of the drugs for which THIP was active. These results add to a small but growing literature that demonstrates differences in the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological effects of indirect dopamine agonists. The methods used here may help in defining the molecular and neural substrates of these differential effects. PMID:9435169

  7. Structure of an agonist-bound human A2A adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Wu, Huixian; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C

    2011-04-15

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors upon agonist binding is a critical step in the signaling cascade for this family of cell surface proteins. We report the crystal structure of the A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR) bound to an agonist UK-432097 at 2.7 angstrom resolution. Relative to inactive, antagonist-bound A(2A)AR, the agonist-bound structure displays an outward tilt and rotation of the cytoplasmic half of helix VI, a movement of helix V, and an axial shift of helix III, resembling the changes associated with the active-state opsin structure. Additionally, a seesaw movement of helix VII and a shift of extracellular loop 3 are likely specific to A(2A)AR and its ligand. The results define the molecule UK-432097 as a "conformationally selective agonist" capable of receptor stabilization in a specific active-state configuration. PMID:21393508

  8. INFLAMMATORY AGONIST STIMULATION AND SIGNAL PATHWAY OF OXIDATIVE BURST IN NEONATAL CHICKEN HETEROPHILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fluorescence microplate assay was adapted to examine the oxidative response by heterophils from neonatal chicks following in vitro stimulation with various inflammatory agonists. Both nonopsonized formalin-killed Salmonella enteritidis and Staphylococcus aureus stimulated significant heterophil o...

  9. Lepidozenolide from the liverwort Lepidozia fauriana acts as a farnesoid X receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiang-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Lepidozenolide is a sesquiterpenoid isolated from the liverwort Lepidozia fauriana and its possible bioactivity is unclear. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of nuclear receptor superfamily that has been widely targeted for developing treatments for chronic liver disease and hyperglycemia. In this study, whether lepidozenolide may act as a FXR agonist was determined. Indeed, in mammalian one-hybrid and transient transfection reporter assays, lepidozenolide transactivated FXR to modulate promoter action including GAL4, CYP7A1, and PLTP promoters in a dose-dependent manner, while it exhibited slightly less agonistic activity than chenodeoxycholic acid, an endogenous FXR agonist. Through the molecular modeling docking studies lepidozenolide was shown to bind to FXR ligand binding pocket fairly well. All these results indicate that lepidozenolide acts as a FXR agonist. PMID:25315435

  10. PII S0196-9781(98)00023-0 Interaction of Agonist Peptide [3

    E-print Network

    Vogel, Zvi

    and cloned -opioid receptor. © 1998 Elsevier Science Inc. Opioid receptors -Opioid agonist peptides Rat brain as therapeutic agents because they permit improved treatment for pain, but their use is complicated by many other

  11. Nanoparticulate STING agonists are potent lymph node–targeted vaccine adjuvants

    E-print Network

    Hanson, Melissa C.

    Cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs) are agonists of stimulator of IFN genes (STING) and have potential as vaccine adjuvants. However, cyclic di-GMP (cdGMP) injected s.c. shows minimal uptake into lymphatics/draining lymph nodes ...

  12. des sciences Dlai de candidature

    E-print Network

    Halazonetis, Thanos

    faculté des sciences Délai de candidature: Chaque année au 15 mars* Un montant de CHF 10 000.- à 15 archaeology, geology, environmental sciences, pharmacy, and neurosciences. There is also the possibility

  13. Information -Communication Communication des entreprises

    E-print Network

    Sart, Remi

    Information - Communication 2 PARCOURS Communication des entreprises Communication et solidarité;2 Information - Communication UFR Langues Appliquées, Commerce et Communication PRÉSENTATION Objectifs La Licence Information et communication est destinée aux étudiants qui souhaitent suivre un parcours

  14. Jahresbericht des Instituts fr Kognitionswissenschaft

    E-print Network

    Kallenrode, May-Britt

    die Arbeitsgruppe Philosophie des Geistes und der Kognition. Darüber hinaus wurde Prof. Dr. Robert C. Richardson (Cincinnati) das erste und landesweit einzige Gervinus-Fellowship zugesprochen, der damit ab 2008

  15. Thorie des probabilits LAVOISIER, 2008

    E-print Network

    Rioul, Olivier

    Théorie des probabilités #12;© LAVOISIER, 2008 LAVOISIER 11, rue Lavoisier 75008 Paris www.hermes-science.com www.lavoisier.fr ISBN 978-2-7462-1720-1 ISSN 1952­2401 Le Code de la propriété intellectuelle n

  16. Competitive molecular docking approach for predicting estrogen receptor subtype ? agonists and antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous compounds that interfere with the endocrine system of vertebrates, often through direct or indirect interactions with nuclear receptor proteins. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are particularly important protein targets and many EDCs are ER binders, capable of altering normal homeostatic transcription and signaling pathways. An estrogenic xenobiotic can bind ER as either an agonist or antagonist to increase or inhibit transcription, respectively. The receptor conformations in the complexes of ER bound with agonists and antagonists are different and dependent on interactions with co-regulator proteins that vary across tissue type. Assessment of chemical endocrine disruption potential depends not only on binding affinity to ERs, but also on changes that may alter the receptor conformation and its ability to subsequently bind DNA response elements and initiate transcription. Using both agonist and antagonist conformations of the ER?, we developed an in silico approach that can be used to differentiate agonist versus antagonist status of potential binders. Methods The approach combined separate molecular docking models for ER agonist and antagonist conformations. The ability of this approach to differentiate agonists and antagonists was first evaluated using true agonists and antagonists extracted from the crystal structures available in the protein data bank (PDB), and then further validated using a larger set of ligands from the literature. The usefulness of the approach was demonstrated with enrichment analysis in data sets with a large number of decoy ligands. Results The performance of individual agonist and antagonist docking models was found comparable to similar models in the literature. When combined in a competitive docking approach, they provided the ability to discriminate agonists from antagonists with good accuracy, as well as the ability to efficiently select true agonists and antagonists from decoys during enrichment analysis. Conclusion This approach enables evaluation of potential ER biological function changes caused by chemicals bound to the receptor which, in turn, allows the assessment of a chemical's endocrine disrupting potential. The approach can be used not only by regulatory authorities to perform risk assessments on potential EDCs but also by the industry in drug discovery projects to screen for potential agonists and antagonists. PMID:25349983

  17. Androgen Deprivation Therapy and the Re-emergence of Parenteral Estrogen in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Iain; Shah, Syed I A; Duong, Trinh; Abel, Paul; Langley, Ruth E

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) resulting in testosterone suppression is central to the management of prostate cancer (PC). As PC incidence increases, ADT is more frequently prescribed, and for longer periods of time as survival improves. Initial approaches to ADT included orchiectomy or oral estrogen (diethylstilbestrol [DES]). DES reduces PC-specific mortality, but causes substantial cardiovascular (CV) toxicity. Currently, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa) are mainly used; they produce low levels of both testosterone and estrogen (as estrogen in men results from the aromatization of testosterone), and many toxicities including osteoporosis, fractures, hot flashes, erectile dysfunction, muscle weakness, increased risk for diabetes, changes in body composition, and CV toxicity. An alternative approach is parenteral estrogen, it suppresses testosterone, appears to mitigate the CV complications of oral estrogen by avoiding first-pass hepatic metabolism, and avoids complications caused by estrogen deprivation. Recent research on the toxicity of ADT and the rationale for revisiting parenteral estrogen is discussed. PMID:24932461

  18. Agonist Derived Molecular Probes for A2A Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Ji, Xiao-duo; Jarvis, Michael F.; Williams, Michael; Hutchison, Alan J.; Barrington, William W.; Stiles, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The adenosine agonist 2-(4-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino)-5?-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680) was recently reported to be selective for the A2A adenosine receptor subtype, which mediates its hypotensive action. To investigate structurelactivity relationships at a distal site, CGS21680 was derivatized using a functionalized congener approach. The carboxylic group of CGS21680 has been esterified to form a methyl ester, which was then treated with ethylenediamine to produce an amine congener. The amine congener was an intermediate for acylation reactions, in which the reactive acyl species contained a reported group, or the precursor for such. For radioiodination, derivatives of p-hydroxyphenylpropionic, 2-thiophenylacetic, and p-aminophenylacetic acids were prepared. The latter derivative (PAPA-APEC) was iodinated electrophilically using [125I]iodide resulting in a radioligand which was used for studies of competition of binding to striatal A, adenosine receptors in bovine brain. A biotin conjugate and an aryl sulfonate were at least 350-fold selective for A, receptors. For spectroscopic detection, a derivative of the stable free radical tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) was prepared. For irreversible inhibition of receptors, meta- and para-phenylenediisothiocyanate groups were incorporated in the analogs. We have demonstrated that binding at A2A receptors is relatively insensitive to distal structural changes at the 2-position, and we report high affinity molecular probes for receptor characterization by radioactive, spectroscopic and affinity labelling methodology. PMID:2561548

  19. An unprecedented dual antagonist and agonist of human Transglutaminase 2.

    PubMed

    Yi, Michael C; Palanski, Brad A; Quintero, Steven A; Plugis, Nicholas M; Khosla, Chaitan

    2015-11-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a ubiquitously expressed, Ca(2+)-activated extracellular enzyme in mammals that is maintained in a catalytically dormant state by multiple mechanisms. Although its precise physiological role in the extracellular matrix remains unclear, aberrantly up-regulated TG2 activity is a hallmark of several maladies, including celiac disease. Previously, we reported the discovery of a class of acylideneoxoindoles as potent, reversible inhibitors of human TG2. Detailed analysis of one of those inhibitors (CK-IV-55) led to an unprecedented and striking observation. Whereas this compound was a non-competitive inhibitor (3.3±0.9?M) of human TG2 at saturating Ca(2+) concentrations, it activated TG2 in the presence of sub-saturating but physiologically relevant Ca(2+) concentrations (0.5-0.7mM). This finding was validated in a cellular model of TG2 activation and inhibition. Mutant TG2 analysis suggested that CK-IV-55 and its analogs bound to a low-affinity Ca(2+) binding site on the catalytic core of TG2. A mechanistic model for the dual agonistic/antagonistic action of CK-IV-55 on TG2 is presented, and the pathophysiological implications of basal activation of intestinal TG2 by small molecules are discussed. PMID:26004580

  20. Therapeutic applications of TRAIL receptor agonists in cancer and beyond.

    PubMed

    Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P; Griffith, Thomas S

    2015-11-01

    TRAIL/Apo-2L is a member of the TNF superfamily first described as an apoptosis-inducing cytokine in 1995. Similar to TNF and Fas ligand, TRAIL induces apoptosis in caspase-dependent manner following TRAIL death receptor trimerization. Because tumor cells were shown to be particularly sensitive to this cytokine while normal cells/tissues proved to be resistant along with being able to synthesize and release TRAIL, it was rapidly appreciated that TRAIL likely served as one of our major physiologic weapons against cancer. In line with this, a number of research laboratories and pharmaceutical companies have attempted to exploit the ability of TRAIL to kill cancer cells by developing recombinant forms of TRAIL or TRAIL receptor agonists (e.g., receptor-specific mAb) for therapeutic purposes. In this review article we will describe the biochemical pathways used by TRAIL to induce different cell death programs. We will also summarize the clinical trials related to this pathway and discuss possible novel uses of TRAIL-related therapies. In recent years, the physiological importance of TRAIL has expanded beyond being a tumoricidal molecule to one critical for a number of clinical settings - ranging from infectious disease and autoimmunity to cardiovascular anomalies. We will also highlight some of these conditions where modulation of the TRAIL/TRAIL receptor system may be targeted in the future. PMID:26343199

  1. Glyoxalase 1 increases anxiety by reducing GABAA receptor agonist methylglyoxal

    PubMed Central

    Distler, Margaret G.; Plant, Leigh D.; Sokoloff, Greta; Hawk, Andrew J.; Aneas, Ivy; Wuenschell, Gerald E.; Termini, John; Meredith, Stephen C.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2012-01-01

    Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) expression has previously been associated with anxiety in mice; however, its role in anxiety is controversial, and the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that GLO1 increases anxiety by reducing levels of methylglyoxal (MG), a GABAA receptor agonist. Mice overexpressing Glo1 on a Tg bacterial artificial chromosome displayed increased anxiety-like behavior and reduced brain MG concentrations. Treatment with low doses of MG reduced anxiety-like behavior, while higher doses caused locomotor depression, ataxia, and hypothermia, which are characteristic effects of GABAA receptor activation. Consistent with these data, we found that physiological concentrations of MG selectively activated GABAA receptors in primary neurons. These data indicate that GLO1 increases anxiety by reducing levels of MG, thereby decreasing GABAA receptor activation. More broadly, our findings potentially link metabolic state, neuronal inhibitory tone, and behavior. Finally, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of GLO1 reduced anxiety, suggesting that GLO1 is a possible target for the treatment of anxiety disorders. PMID:22585572

  2. Object-horning in goitered gazelle: agonistic or marking behaviour?

    PubMed

    Blank, David; Yang, Weikang

    2014-03-01

    We studied object-horning behaviour in goitered gazelles in the natural, arid environment of Kazakhstan over a 6-year period. We found that object-horning was used by adult males mostly as a threat display during territorial conflicts. Therefore object-horning was observed most frequently in territorial single males during the rut in November-December. Object-horning, though, also had a marking effect, with the males' use of this behaviour leaving visible traces that advertized the location of preorbital and urination-defecation scent marks. Therefore, this pattern also was observed linked with preorbital marking and urination-defecation marking behaviours, especially during the rut. Goitered gazelle males chose the most abundant and eatable shrubs for object horning. In contrast to other gazelle species, object-horning in goitered gazelle was observed much more frequently and at the same rate as preorbital and urination-defecation scent markings. This, then, proved a more vigorous and aggressive level of rutting behaviour of the goitered gazelle compared to tropical gazelles, and most likely connected to the short rutting period in the studied species. We concluded, therefore, that object-horning was a manifold phenomenon that played a very important role in goitered gazelle agonistic displays, but without loosing the marking intention of this behaviour. PMID:24365541

  3. Molecular basis for benzodiazepine agonist action at the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor.

    PubMed

    Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Cawston, Erin E; Lam, Polo C H; Patil, Achyut; Orry, Andrew; Henke, Brad R; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Miller, Laurence J

    2013-07-19

    Understanding the molecular basis of drug action can facilitate development of more potent and selective drugs. Here, we explore the molecular basis for action of a unique small molecule ligand that is a type 1 cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor agonist and type 2 CCK receptor antagonist, GI181771X. We characterize its binding utilizing structurally related radioiodinated ligands selective for CCK receptor subtypes that utilize the same allosteric ligand-binding pocket, using wild-type receptors and chimeric constructs exchanging the distinct residues lining this pocket. Intracellular calcium assays were performed to determine biological activity. Molecular models for docking small molecule agonists to the type 1 CCK receptor were developed using a ligand-guided refinement approach. The optimal model was distinct from the previous antagonist model for the same receptor and was mechanistically consistent with the current mutagenesis data. This study revealed a key role for Leu(7.39) that was predicted to interact with the isopropyl group in the N1 position of the benzodiazepine that acts as a "trigger" for biological activity. The molecular model was predictive of binding of other small molecule agonists, effectively distinguishing these from 1065 approved drug decoys with an area under curve value of 99%. The model also selectively enriched for agonist compounds, with 130 agonists identified by ROC analysis when seeded in 2175 non-agonist ligands of the type 1 CCK receptor (area under curve 78%). Benzodiazepine agonists in this series docked in consistent pose within this pocket, with a key role played by Leu(7.39), whereas the role of this residue was less clear for chemically distinct agonists. PMID:23754289

  4. Wnt Agonist Attenuates Liver Injury and Improves Survival after Hepatic Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kuncewitch, Michael; Yang, Weng-Lang; Molmenti, Ernesto; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F.; Wang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway is well characterized in stem cell biology and plays a critical role in liver development, regeneration, and homeostasis. We hypothesized that pharmacological activation of Wnt signaling protects against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury through its known proliferative and anti-apoptotic properties. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 70% hepatic ischemia by microvascular clamping of the hilum of the left and median lobes of the liver for 90 min, followed by reperfusion. Wnt agonist (2-amino-4-[3,4-(methylenedioxy)benzylamino]-6-(3-methoxyphenyl)pyrimidine, 5 mg/kg BW) or vehicle (20% DMSO in saline) in 0.5 ml was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) 1 h prior to ischemia or infused intravenously over 30 min right after ischemia. Blood and tissue samples from the pre-treated groups were collected 24 h after reperfusion, and a survival study was performed. Hepatic expression of ?-catenin and its downstream target gene Axin2 were decreased after I/R while Wnt agonist restored their expression to sham levels. Wnt agonist blunted I/R-induced elevations of AST, ALT, and LDH and significantly improved the microarchitecture of the liver. The cell proliferation determined by Ki67 immunostaining significantly increased with Wnt agonist treatment and inflammatory cascades were dampened in Wnt agonist-treated animals, as demonstrated by attenuations in IL-6, myeloperoxdase, iNOS and nitrotyrosine. Wnt agonist also significantly decreased the amount of apoptosis, as evidenced by decreases in both TUNEL staining as well as caspase-3 activity levels. Finally, the 10-day survival rate was increased from 27% in the vehicle group to 73% in the pre-treated Wnt agonist group and 55% in the Wnt agonist post-ischemia treatment group. Thus, we propose that direct Wnt/?-catenin stimulation may represent a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of hepatic I/R. PMID:23143067

  5. Rational design of orally-active, pyrrolidine-based progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Scott K.; Washburn, David G.; Frazee, James S.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Hoang, Tram H.; Lapinski, Leahann; Grygielko, Eugene T.; Glace, Lindsay E.; Trizna, Walter; Williams, Shawn P.; Duraiswami, Chaya; Bray, Jeffrey D.; Laping, Nicholas J.

    2010-09-03

    Using the X-ray crystal structure of an amide-based progesterone receptor (PR) partial agonist bound to the PR ligand binding domain, a novel PR partial agonist class containing a pyrrolidine ring was designed. Members of this class of N-alkylpyrrolidines demonstrate potent and highly selective partial agonism of the progesterone receptor, and one of these analogs was shown to be efficacious upon oral dosing in the OVX rat model of estrogen opposition.

  6. Identification of Hydroxybenzoic Acids as Selective Lactate Receptor (GPR81) Agonists with Antilipolytic Effects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Following the characterization of the lactate receptor (GPR81), a focused screening effort afforded 3-hydroxybenzoic acid 1 as a weak agonist of both GPR81 and GPR109a (niacin receptor). An examination of structurally similar arylhydroxy acids led to the identification of 3-chloro-5-hydroxybenzoic acid 2, a selective GPR81 agonist that exhibited favorable in vivo effects on lipolysis in a mouse model of obesity. PMID:24900524

  7. Discovery of GSK1997132B a novel centrally penetrant benzimidazole PPAR? partial agonist.

    PubMed

    Sime, Mairi; Allan, Amanda C; Chapman, Paul; Fieldhouse, Charlotte; Giblin, Gerard M P; Healy, Mark P; Lambert, Millard H; Leesnitzer, Lisa M; Lewis, Ann; Merrihew, Raymond V; Rutter, Richard A; Sasse, Rosemary; Shearer, Barry G; Willson, Timothy M; Wilson, Timothy M; Xu, Robert X; Virley, David J

    2011-09-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor, thought to play a role in energy metabolism, glucose homeostasis and microglia-mediated neuroinflammation. A novel benzimidazole series of centrally penetrant PPAR? partial agonists has been identified. The optimization of PPAR? activity and in vivo pharmacokinetics leading to the identification of GSK1997132B a potent, metabolically stable and centrally penetrant PPAR? partial agonist, is described. PMID:21798739

  8. Rapid kinetics of 2-adrenergic agonist binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, W.; Neubig, R.R.

    1987-05-01

    Activation of 2-adrenergic receptors in human platelets results in inhibition of adenylate cyclase (AC). To elucidate the relation between agonist binding and response, the authors have used a novel rapid-mix quench method to compare the kinetics of binding and response. At functionally effective concentrations, the time course of binding of the full 2-agonist, (TH)UK14,304 (UK), to purified platelet membranes was faster than could be measured manually. Using the rapid-mix quench method, agonist binding was quantitated for times for 0.3 to 60 seconds. UK binding exhibited biexponential kinetics. The rate constant of the fast binding component increases linearly with agonist concentration from 1 to 100 nM with a second order rate constant and 7 x 10WM s (at 25C). The slow rate constant was nearly independent of agonist concentration. The half times of the fast and slow components of binding for 100 nM UK are 1.5 seconds and approximately 2 minutes respectively. The rate and magnitude of the fast binding was unaffected by 10 M GTP whereas the magnitude of the slow phase was markedly reduced. Inhibition of forskolin stimulated AC by 100 M epinephrine occurs with a lag of 5-10 seconds in the presence of 10 M GTP. At lower GTP concentrations, this lag is prolonged. The observation that the fast component of agonist binding precedes inhibition even at agonist concentrations 20-fold lower than the EC40 for responses indicates that the rate limiting step in inhibition of AC is distal to the binding of agonist.

  9. Discovery of structurally novel, potent and orally efficacious GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Alper, Phil; Azimioara, Mihai; Cow, Christopher; Mutnick, Daniel; Nikulin, Victor; Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Wang, Zhiliang; Reding, Esther; Paliotti, Michael; Li, Jing; Bao, Dingjiu; Zoll, Jocelyn; Kim, Young; Zimmerman, Matthew; Groessel, Todd; Tuntland, Tove; Joseph, Sean B; McNamara, Peter; Seidel, H Martin; Epple, Robert

    2014-05-15

    Screening hit 5 was identified in a biochemical screen for GPR119 agonists. Compound 5 was structurally novel, displayed modest biochemical activity and no oral exposure, but was structurally distinct from typical GPR119 agonist scaffolds. Systematic optimization led to compound 36 with significantly improved in vitro activity and oral exposure, to elevate GLP1 acutely in an in vivo mouse model at a dose of 10mg/kg. PMID:24751443

  10. Discovery and optimization of 5-fluoro-4,6-dialkoxypyrimidine GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Buzard, Daniel J; Kim, Sun Hee; Lehmann, Juerg; Han, Sangdon; Calderon, Imelda; Wong, Amy; Kawasaki, Andrew; Narayanan, Sanju; Bhat, Rohit; Gharbaoui, Tawfik; Lopez, Luis; Yue, Dawei; Whelan, Kevin; Al-Shamma, Hussien; Unett, David J; Shu, Hsin-Hui; Tung, Shiu-Feng; Chang, Steve; Chuang, Ching-Fen; Morgan, Michael; Sadeque, Abu; Chu, Zhi-Liang; Leonard, James N; Jones, Robert M

    2014-09-01

    A series of 5-fluoro-4,6-dialkoxypyrimidine GPR119 modulators were discovered and optimized for in vitro agonist activity. A lead molecule was identified that has improved agonist efficacy relative to our clinical compound (APD597) and possesses reduced CYP2C9 inhibitory potential. This optimized lead was found to be efficacious in rodent models of glucose control both alone and in combination with a Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. PMID:25088191

  11. Discovery of a novel series of potent S1P1 agonists.

    PubMed

    Crosignani, Stefano; Bombrun, Agnes; Covini, David; Maio, Maurizio; Marin, Delphine; Quattropani, Anna; Swinnen, Dominique; Simpson, Don; Sauer, Wolfgang; Françon, Bernard; Martin, Thierry; Cambet, Yves; Nichols, Anthony; Martinou, Isabelle; Burgat-Charvillon, Fabienne; Rivron, Delphine; Donini, Cristina; Schott, Olivier; Eligert, Valerie; Novo-Perez, Laurence; Vitte, Pierre-Alain; Arrighi, Jean-François

    2010-03-01

    The discovery of a novel series of S1P1 agonists is described. Starting from a micromolar HTS positive, iterative optimization gave rise to several single-digit nanomolar S1P1 agonists. The compounds were able to induce internalization of the S1P1 receptor, and a selected compound was shown to be able to induce lymphopenia in mice after oral dosing. PMID:20149651

  12. Discovery of Azetidinone Acids as Conformationally-Constrained Dual PPARalpha/gamma Agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Devasthale, P; Farrelly, D; Gu, L; Harrity, T; Cap, M; Chu, C; Kunselman, L; Morgan, N; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    A novel class of azetidinone acid-derived dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists has been synthesized for the treatment of diabetes and dyslipidemia. The preferred stereochemistry in this series for binding and functional agonist activity against both PPARa and PPAR? receptors was shown to be 3S,4S. Synthesis, in vitro and in vivo activities of compounds in this series are described. A high-yielding method for N-arylation of azetidinone esters is also described.

  13. Comprendre le langage des toiles

    E-print Network

    Le Coroller, Hervé

    spectre. #12;Un spectre dans la nature Le spectre le plus simple est l'arc- en a expliqué l'origine de l'arc-en-ciel. #12;Le secret des spectres Mais il a fallu'est au début du 19ème siècle que l'on a découvert le secret des spectres

  14. Identification of metals from osteoblastic ST-2 cell supernatants as novel OGR1 agonists.

    PubMed

    Abe-Ohya, Rie; Ishikawa, Tomio; Shiozawa, Hideyuki; Suda, Koji; Nara, Futoshi

    2015-10-01

    Ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), which has previously been identified as a receptor for protons. It has been reported in this and previous studies that OGR1 expression was markedly up-regulated during osteoclast differentiation. We predicted the possibility of other molecules activating OGR1 in neutral pH, and that osteoblasts might release OGR1 agonistic molecules and activate OGR1 expressed in osteoclasts such as RANKL. We screened for cell supernatants and organ extracts and discovered OGR1 agonistic activity in ST-2 osteoblastic cell supernatants and pancreatic tissues. Finally, we partially purified and identified essential metals, Fe, Zn, Co, Ni and Mn, as novel OGR1 agonists. These OGR1 agonistic metals induce intracellular Gq-coupled inositol phosphate signals in OGR1-expressing cells and primary osteoclasts through OGR1. We also confirmed that these OGR1 agonistic metals activated OGR1 through the same residues which act with protons. Here, we demonstrate that metals, Fe, Zn, Co, Ni and Mn are the novel OGR1 agonists, which can singly activate OGR1 in neutral pH. PMID:26053506

  15. Targeted Delivery of LXR Agonist Using a Site-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Lim, Reyna K V; Yu, Shan; Cheng, Bo; Li, Sijia; Kim, Nam-Jung; Cao, Yu; Chi, Victor; Kim, Ji Young; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Schultz, Peter G; Tremblay, Matthew S; Kazane, Stephanie A

    2015-11-18

    Liver X receptor (LXR) agonists have been explored as potential treatments for atherosclerosis and other diseases based on their ability to induce reverse cholesterol transport and suppress inflammation. However, this therapeutic potential has been hindered by on-target adverse effects in the liver mediated by excessive lipogenesis. Herein, we report a novel site-specific antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) that selectively delivers a LXR agonist to monocytes/macrophages while sparing hepatocytes. The unnatural amino acid para-acetylphenylalanine (pAcF) was site-specifically incorporated into anti-CD11a IgG, which binds the ?-chain component of the lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) expressed on nearly all monocytes and macrophages. An aminooxy-modified LXR agonist was conjugated to anti-CD11a IgG through a stable, cathepsin B cleavable oxime linkage to afford a chemically defined ADC. The anti-CD11a IgG-LXR agonist ADC induced LXR activation specifically in human THP-1 monocyte/macrophage cells in vitro (EC50-27 nM), but had no significant effect in hepatocytes, indicating that payload delivery is CD11a-mediated. Moreover, the ADC exhibited higher-fold activation compared to a conventional synthetic LXR agonist T0901317 (Tularik) (3-fold). This novel ADC represents a fundamentally different strategy that uses tissue targeting to overcome the limitations of LXR agonists for potential use in treating atherosclerosis. PMID:25945727

  16. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Agonistic Behaviour in Juvenile Crocodilians

    PubMed Central

    Brien, Matthew L.; Lang, Jeffrey W.; Webb, Grahame J.; Stevenson, Colin; Christian, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    We examined agonistic behaviour in seven species of hatchling and juvenile crocodilians held in small groups (N?=?4) under similar laboratory conditions. Agonistic interactions occurred in all seven species, typically involved two individuals, were short in duration (5–15 seconds), and occurred between 1600–2200 h in open water. The nature and extent of agonistic interactions, the behaviours displayed, and the level of conspecific tolerance varied among species. Discrete postures, non-contact and contact movements are described. Three of these were species-specific: push downs by C. johnstoni; inflated tail sweeping by C. novaeguineae; and, side head striking combined with tail wagging by C. porosus. The two long-snouted species (C. johnstoni and G. gangeticus) avoided contact involving the head and often raised the head up out of the way during agonistic interactions. Several behaviours not associated with aggression are also described, including snout rubbing, raising the head up high while at rest, and the use of vocalizations. The two most aggressive species (C. porosus, C. novaeguineae) appeared to form dominance hierarchies, whereas the less aggressive species did not. Interspecific differences in agonistic behaviour may reflect evolutionary divergence associated with morphology, ecology, general life history and responses to interspecific conflict in areas where multiple species have co-existed. Understanding species-specific traits in agonistic behaviour and social tolerance has implications for the controlled raising of different species of hatchlings for conservation, management or production purposes. PMID:24349018

  17. Systemic Chemotherapy Is Modulated by Platelet-Activating Factor-Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Ferracini, Matheus; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is used to treat numerous cancers including melanoma. However, its effectiveness in clinical settings is often hampered by various mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that prooxidative stressor-mediated generation of oxidized lipids with platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) agonistic activity induces systemic immunosuppression that augments the growth of experimental melanoma tumors. We have recently shown that treatment of murine B16F10 melanoma cells in vitro or tumors implanted into syngeneic mice and treated intratumorally with various chemotherapeutic agents generated PAF-R agonists in a process blocked by antioxidants. Notably, these intratumoral chemotherapy-generated PAF-R agonists augmented the growth of secondary (untreated) tumors in a PAF-R dependent manner. As both localized and systemic chemotherapies are used based on tumor localization/stage and metastases, the current studies were sought to determine effects of PAF-R agonists on systemic chemotherapy against experimental melanoma. Here, we show that systemic chemotherapy with etoposide (ETOP) attenuates the growth of melanoma tumors when given subsequent to the tumor cell implantation. Importantly, this ETOP-mediated suppression of melanoma tumor growth was blocked by exogenous administration of a PAF-R agonist, CPAF. These findings indicate that PAF-R agonists not only negatively affect the ability of localized chemotherapy but also compromise the efficacy of systemic chemotherapy against murine melanoma. PMID:25922565

  18. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of peptidic erythropoiesis receptor agonist (ERA) in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sukyung; Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Duliege, Anne-Marie; Stead, Richard B; Jusko, William J

    2008-01-01

    Peptidic erythropoiesis receptor agonist is a synthetic, PEGylated peptide that can promote red blood cell production upon binding to the erythropoietin receptor. The objective of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics and erythropoietic effects of peptidic erythropoiesis receptor agonist in healthy volunteers. Plasma concentrations of peptidic erythropoiesis receptor agonist and pharmacodynamic responses were obtained after single intravenous injections at doses of 0.025, 0.05, and 0.1 mg/kg. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling was performed using NONMEM. Peptidic erythropoiesis receptor agonist exhibited nonlinear pharmacokinetics described by a 1-compartment model with parallel elimination by Michaelis-Menten and linear processes. A catenary, life span-based, indirect response model reflecting bone marrow erythroid and blood cells reflected the pharmacodynamics of peptidic erythropoiesis receptor agonist. A modest tolerance and rebound phenomenon in reticulocytes was modeled with negative feedback regulation related to hemoglobin. This pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model well characterized the prolonged disposition, intrinsic pharmacologic parameters, and typical hematological system properties following single doses of peptidic erythropoiesis receptor agonist in normal subjects. PMID:18025524

  19. The Therapeutic Potential of Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor Agonists as Analgesics without Abuse Liability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Although mu opioid (MOP) receptor agonists are the most commonly used analgesics for the treatment of moderate to severe pain in the clinic, the side effects of MOP agonists such as abuse liability limit their value as a medication. Research to identify novel analgesics without adverse effects is pivotal to advance the health care of humans. The nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor, the fourth opioid receptor subtype, mediates distinctive actions in nonhuman primates which suggests the possibility that activity at this receptor may result in strong analgesia in the absence of virtually all of the side effects associated with MOP agonists. The present review highlights the recent progress of pharmacological studies of NOP-related ligands in primates. Selective NOP agonists, either peptidic or nonpeptidic, produce full analgesia in various assays in primates, when delivered systemically or intrathecally. Yet small molecule NOP agonists do not serve as reinforcers, indicating a lack of abuse liability. Given that NOP agonists have low abuse liability and that coactivation of NOP and MOP receptors produces synergistic antinociception, it is worth developing bifunctional NOP/MOP ligands. The outcomes of these studies and recent developments provide new perspectives to establish a translational bridge for understanding the biobehavioral functions of NOP receptors in primates and for facilitating the development of NOP-related ligands as a new generation of analgesics without abuse liability in humans. PMID:23421672

  20. The actions of prolonged exposure to cholinergic agonists on isolated bladder strips from the rat.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, James I; Rouget, Celine; Palea, Stefano; Korstanje, Cees

    2015-07-01

    The present study was done to explore the cholinergic systems operating in the wall of the isolated rat bladder. In a first set of experiments, bladder strips in vitro were subjected to cumulative concentration-response curve (CRC) to non-selective muscarine agonist carbachol or the partially M2>M3 selective agonist arecaidine to establish optimal concentration to be used thereafter. In a second set of experiments, the effects of drugs (solifenacin, isoproterenol, and mirabegron) were tested on urinary bladder contraction induced by the non-selective muscarinergic agonist carbachol. For both agonists, the contractile responses are qualitatively similar: an initial transient rise in tension followed by complex bursts of high-frequency small 'micro'-contractions superposed on a tonic contraction, with immediate transient 'rebound' contraction after the agonist is washed from the preparation. This rebound contraction is greater with carbachol than arecaidine. Components of the responses to cholinergic stimulation, notably the micro-contractions, were found to be differently stimulated and inhibited by the M3>M2 selective antagonist solifenacin and by the ?-adrenoceptor agonists isoprenaline and mirabegron. A physiological role for the muscarinic dependent phasic contractions and the micro-anatomical elements that might be involved are not known but may be related to non-voiding activity observed during filling cystometry in conscious animals related to afferent discharge and possibly sensation. Furthermore, suggestions for the potential impact of these findings and design of further studies in relation to bladder physiology, pharmacology, and pathology are discussed. PMID:25980359

  1. Three-dimensional common-feature hypotheses for octopamine agonist 2-(arylimino)imidazolidines.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Eiji; Eto, Morifusa

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 10 octopamine (OA) agonist 2-(Arylimino)imidazolidines (AIIs), 2-(Arylimino)thiazolidines (AITs) and 2-(Arylimino)oxazolidines (AIOs). Among the 10 common-featured models generated by program Catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a ring aromatic (RA), a positive ionizable (PI) and three hydrophobic aliphatic (HpAl) features was considered to be important in evaluating the OA-agonist activity. Active OA agonist 2,6-Et2 AII mapped well onto all the RA, PI and HpAl features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, less active compounds were shown to be difficult to achieve the energetically favorable conformation which is found in the active molecules in order to fit the 3-D common-feature pharmacophore models. Taken together, 2,6-Et2-Ph and foramidine structures are important as OA agonists. The present studies on OA agonists demonstrate that a RA, a PI and three HpAl sites located on the molecule seem to be essential for OA-agonist activity. PMID:11738614

  2. Inhibitory effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? agonists on collagen IV production in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjiao; Shen, Yachen; Li, Min; Su, Dongming; Xu, Weifeng; Liang, Xiubin; Li, Rongshan

    2015-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR-?) agonists have beneficial effects on the kidney diseases through preventing microalbuminuria and glomerulosclerosis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain to be fully understood. In this study, we investigate the effects of PPAR-? agonist, rosiglitazone (Rosi) and pioglitazone (Pio), on collagen IV production in mouse podocytes. The endogenous expression of PPAR-? was found in the primary podocytes and can be upregulated by Rosi and Pio, respectively, detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. PPAR-? agonist markedly blunted the increasing of collagen IV expression and extraction in podocytes induced by TGF-?. In contrast, adding PPAR-? antagonist, GW9662, to podocytes largely prevented the inhibition of collagen IV expression from Pio treatment. Our data also showed that phosphorylation of Smad2/3 enhanced by TGF-? in a time-dependent manner was significantly attenuated by adding Pio. The promoter region of collagen IV gene contains one putative consensus sequence of Smad-binding element (SBE) by promoter analysis, Rosi and Pio significantly ameliorated TGF-?-induced SBE4-luciferase activity. In conclusion, PPAR-? activation by its agonist, Rosi or Pio, in vitro directly inhibits collagen IV expression and synthesis in primary mouse podocytes. The suppression of collagen IV production was related to the inhibition of TGF-?-driven phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and decreased response activity of SBEs of collagen IV in PPAR-? agonist-treated mouse podocytes. This represents a novel mechanistic support regarding PPAR-? agonists as podocyte protective agents. PMID:25920446

  3. Predicting selective liver X receptor ? agonists using multiple machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Yali; Wang, Ling; Liu, Zhihong; Li, Chanjuan; Xu, Jiake; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR) ? and ? are cholesterol sensors; they respond to excess cholesterol and stimulate reverse cholesterol transport. Activating LXRs represents a promising therapeutic option for dyslipidemia. However, activating LXR? may cause unwanted lipogenicity. A better anti-dyslipidemia strategy would be to develop selective LXR? agonists that do not activate LXR?. In this paper, a data set of 234 selective and non-selective LXR? agonists was collected from the literature. For the first time, we derived the classification models from the data set to predict selective LXR? agonists using multiple machine learning methods (naïve Bayesian (NB), Recursive Partitioning (RP), Support Vector Machine (SVM), and k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN) methods) with optimized property descriptors and structural fingerprints. The models were optimized from 324 multiple machine learning models, and most of the models showed high predictive abilities (overall predictive accuracies of >80%) for both training and test sets. The top 15 models were evaluated using an external test set of 76 compounds (all containing new scaffolds), and 10 of them displayed overall predictive accuracies exceeding 90%. The top models can be used for the virtual screening of selective LXR? agonists. The NB models can identify privileged and unprivileged fragments for selective LXR? agonists, and the fragments can be used to guide the design of new selective LXR? agonists. PMID:25734698

  4. In Vitro Effects of Beta-2 Agonists on Skeletal Muscle Differentiation, Hypertrophy, and Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Beta-2 agonists are widely used in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for their effect on airway smooth muscle relaxation. They also act on skeletal muscle, although their reported ergogenic effect is controversial. Aim To evaluate the in vitro effects of short-acting and long-acting beta-2 agonists on adrenergic receptor (ADR) expression, hypertrophy, and atrophy markers, in a skeletal muscle cell line. Methods The C2C12 cell line was used as a model of skeletal muscle differentiation. ADR messenger RNA expression was evaluated in proliferating myoblasts, committed cells, and differentiated myotubes, in basal conditions and after treatment with 10-6 M clenbuterol, salbutamol, salmeterol, and formoterol. Effect of beta-2 agonists on gene and protein expression of hypertrophy and atrophy markers was assessed in differentiated myotubes. Results Our study shows that beta-2 ADR messenger RNA was expressed and progressively increased during cell differentiation. Beta-2 agonist treatment did not affect its expression. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy markers (fast and slow myosin, myogenin) were not modulated by any of the beta-2 agonists evaluated. However, clenbuterol induced a significant, dose-dependent downregulation of skeletal muscle atrophy genes (atrogin-1, MuRF-1, and cathepsin L). Conclusions The reported ergogenic effect of beta-2 agonists, if any, should be considered as drug-specific and not class-specific and that of clenbuterol is mediated by the inhibition of the atrophic pathway. PMID:23283108

  5. Scaffold-Based Pan-Agonist Design for the PPAR?, PPAR? and PPAR? Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei-Ren; Wang, Run-Ling; Wang, Jing-Fang

    2012-01-01

    As important members of nuclear receptor superfamily, Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) play essential roles in regulating cellular differentiation, development, metabolism, and tumorigenesis of higher organisms. The PPAR receptors have 3 identified subtypes: PPAR?, PPAR? and PPAR?, all of which have been treated as attractive targets for developing drugs to treat type 2 diabetes. Due to the undesirable side-effects, many PPAR agonists including PPAR?/? and PPAR?/? dual agonists are stopped by US FDA in the clinical trials. An alternative strategy is to design novel pan-agonist that can simultaneously activate PPAR?, PPAR? and PPAR?. Under such an idea, in the current study we adopted the core hopping algorithm and glide docking procedure to generate 7 novel compounds based on a typical PPAR pan-agonist LY465608. It was observed by the docking procedures and molecular dynamics simulations that the compounds generated by the core hopping and glide docking not only possessed the similar functions as the original LY465608 compound to activate PPAR?, PPAR? and PPAR? receptors, but also had more favorable conformation for binding to the PPAR receptors. The additional absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) predictions showed that the 7 compounds (especially Cpd#1) hold high potential to be novel lead compounds for the PPAR pan-agonist. Our findings can provide a new strategy or useful insights for designing the effective pan-agonists against the type 2 diabetes. PMID:23119024

  6. Estrogen receptor (ER) subtype agonists alter monoamine levels in the female rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, Laura S; Zafian, Peter T; Gautreaux, Claris; Gordon, Marisa; Alves, Stephen E; Correa, Lucia; Lorrain, Daniel S; Hickey, Gerard J; Luine, Victoria

    2010-11-01

    We assessed the effects of subtype-selective ER agonists on monoamine levels in discrete regions of the female rat brain. Ovariectomized (ovx) rats were treated for 4 days with vehicle, 17?-estradiol (E; 0.05mg/kg), an ER? agonist (C19; 3mg/kg) or an ER? agonist (PPT; 3mg/kg) and samples from brain regions were assessed for monoamines and metabolites. We also assessed effects of ER? modulation on baseline and fenfluramine-induced release of monoamines in hippocampus using microdialysis. In the first study, E and the ER? agonist increased norepinephrine in cortex and all three ER ligands increased it in the ventral hippocampus. Changes in levels of the noradrenergic metabolite, MHPG and the dopaminergic metabolite, DOPAC were noted in brain areas of ER ligand-treated animals. E also increased levels of 5HIAA in three brain areas. In the microdialysis study, there were no differences among groups in baseline levels of monoamines. However, E and the ER? agonist increased levels of the dopaminergic metabolite, HVA following fenfluramine. In summary, activation of the two nuclear ERs with selective agonists affects monoamine and metabolite levels in discrete brain areas, a number of which are known to play key roles in cognitive and affective function. PMID:20800684

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation and pretreatment with (D-Leu6,des-Gly10) luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ethylamide on developing rat ovarian follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, J.; YoungLai, E.V.; McMahon, A.; Barr, R.; O'Connell, G.; Belbeck, L.

    1987-10-01

    To assess the effects of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, (D-Leu6,des-Gly10) luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ethylamide, in ameliorating the damage caused by ionizing radiation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist was administered to rats from day 22 to 37 of age in doses of 0.1, 0.4, and 1.0 microgram/day or vehicle and the rats were sacrificed on day 44 of age. There were no effects on estradiol, progesterone, luteinizing, or follicle-stimulating hormone, nor an effect on ovarian follicle numbers or development. In separate experiments, rats treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in doses of 0.04, 0.1, 0.4, or 1.0 microgram/day were either irradiated or sham irradiated on day 30 and all groups sacrificed on day 44 of age. Irradiation produced a reduction in ovarian weight and an increase in ovarian follicular atresia. Pretreatment with the agonist prevented the reduction in ovarian weight and numbers of primordial and preantral follicles but not healthy or atretic antral follicles. Such putative radioprotection should be tested on actual reproductive performance.

  8. Angiotensin Receptor Agonistic Autoantibodies and Hypertension: Preeclampsia and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Kellems, Rodney E.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders are life-threatening diseases with high morbidity and mortality, affecting billions of individuals worldwide. A multitude of underlying conditions can contribute to hypertension, thus the need for a plethora of treatment options to identify the approach that best meets the needs of individual patients. As reviewed here a growing body of evidence indicates that i) autoantibodies that bind to and activate the major angiotensin receptor, AT1R exist in the circulation of patients with hypertensive disorders, ii) these autoantibodies contribute to disease pathophysiology, iii) antibody titers correlate to the severity of the disease, and iv) efforts to block or remove these pathogenic autoantibodies have therapeutic potential. These autoantibodies, termed AT1 agonistic autoantibodies (AT1-AA) have been extensively characterized in preeclampsia (PE), a life-threatening hypertensive condition of pregnancy. As reviewed here these autoantibodies cause symptoms of PE when injected into pregnant mice. Somewhat surprisingly, these antibodies also appear in three animal models of preeclampsia. However, the occurrence of AT1-AA is not restricted to pregnancy. These autoantibodies are prevalent among kidney transplant recipients who develop severe transplant rejection and malignant hypertension during the first week following transplantation. AT1-AA are also highly abundant among a group of patients with essential hypertension that are refractory to standard therapy. More recently these autoantibodies have been seen in patients with the autoimmune disease, systemic sclerosis. These three examples extend the clinical impact of AT1-AA beyond pregnancy. Research reviewed here raises the intriguing possibility that preeclampsia and other hypertensive conditions are autoimmune diseases characterized by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies that activate the major angiotensin receptor, AT1R. These pathogenic autoantibodies could serve as pre-symptomatic biomarkers and therapeutic targets, thereby providing improved medical management for these conditions. PMID:23788505

  9. Agonistic TAM-163 antibody targeting tyrosine kinase receptor-B

    PubMed Central

    Vugmeyster, Yulia; Rohde, Cynthia; Perreault, Mylene; Gimeno, Ruth E.; Singh, Pratap

    2013-01-01

    TAM-163, an agonist monoclonal antibody targeting tyrosine receptor kinase-B (TrkB), is currently being investigated as a potential body weight modulatory agent in humans. To support the selection of the dose range for the first-in-human (FIH) trial of TAM-163, we conducted a mechanistic analysis of the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data (e.g., body weight gain) obtained in lean cynomolgus and obese rhesus monkeys following single doses ranging from 0.3 to 60 mg/kg. A target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) model was used to describe the observed nonlinear PK and Emax approach was used to describe the observed dose-dependent PD effect. The TMDD model development was supported by the experimental determination of the binding affinity constant (9.4 nM) and internalization rate of the drug-target complex (2.08 h?1). These mechanistic analyses enabled linking of exposure, target (TrkB) coverage, and pharmacological activity (e.g., PD) in monkeys, and indicated that ? 38% target coverage (time-average) was required to achieve significant body weight gain in monkeys. Based on the scaling of the TMDD model from monkeys to humans and assuming similar relationship between the target coverage and pharmacological activity between monkey and humans, subcutaneous (SC) doses of 1 and 15 mg/kg in humans were projected to be the minimally and the fully pharmacologically active doses, respectively. Based on the minimal anticipated biological effect level (MABEL) approach for starting dose selection, the dose of 0.05 mg/kg (3 mg for a 60 kg human) SC was recommended as the starting dose for FIH trials, because at this dose level < 10% target coverage was projected at Cmax (and all other time points). This study illustrates a rational mechanistic approach for the selection of FIH dose range for a therapeutic protein with a complex model of action. PMID:23529133

  10. Farnesyl pyrophosphate regulates adipocyte functions as an endogenous PPAR? agonist

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Nagai, Hiroyuki; Egawa, Kahori; Kim, Young-Il; Kato, Sota; Taimatsu, Aki; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Ebisu, Shogo; Hohsaka, Takahiro; Miyagawa, Hiroh; Murakami, Shigeru; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-01-01

    The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway produces not only sterols but also non-sterol mevalonate metabolites involved in isoprenoid synthesis. Mevalonate metabolites affect transcriptional and post-transcriptional events that in turn affect various biological processes including energy metabolism. In the present study, we examine whether mevalonate metabolites activate PPAR? (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor ?), a ligand-dependent transcription factor playing a central role in adipocyte differentiation. In the luciferase reporter assay using both GAL4 chimaera and full-length PPAR? systems, a mevalonate metabolite, FPP (farnesyl pyrophosphate), which is the precursor of almost all isoprenoids and is positioned at branch points leading to the synthesis of other longer-chain isoprenoids, activated PPAR? in a dose-dependent manner. FPP induced the in vitro binding of a co-activator, SRC-1 (steroid receptor co-activator-1), to GST (glutathione transferase)–PPAR?. Direct binding of FPP to PPAR? was also indicated by docking simulation studies. Moreover, the addition of FPP up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of PPAR? target genes during adipocyte differentiation induction. In the presence of lovastatin, an HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA) reductase inhibitor, both intracellular FPP levels and PPAR?-target gene expressions were decreased. In contrast, the increase in intracellular FPP level after the addition of zaragozic acid, a squalene synthase inhibitor, induced PPAR?-target gene expression. The addition of FPP and zaragozic acid promotes lipid accumulation during adipocyte differentiation. These findings indicated that FPP might function as an endogenous PPAR? agonist and regulate gene expression in adipocytes. PMID:21605082

  11. Structure, caractrisation et comportement mcanique des failles sismiques : Etude des pseudotachylites et gouges

    E-print Network

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Structure, caractérisation et comportement mécanique des failles sismiques : Etude des pseudotachylites et gouges Résumé L'objectif de ce projet est de mieux caractériser la structure et la formation des processus de formation des failles actives en prenant comme objet d'étude les gouges de failles et

  12. Nr. 057 / 2014 // 3. April 2014 Knstlerische Darstellung des ,,Giant impact", des Aufpralls eines kleineren

    E-print Network

    Schittkowski, Klaus

    Nr. 057 / 2014 // 3. April 2014 1/7 Künstlerische Darstellung des ,,Giant impact", des Aufpralls freundlicher Genehmigung des NASA/Jet Propulsion Labors am California Institute of Technology. In ,,Nature- zeichnet. Der ,,Giant impact" und seine Folgen: Die Entstehung des Mondes und Veränderungen im Erdmantel

  13. Des Lacs River and Souris River

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

     The Des Lacs River coming in to the Souris River. Des Lacs River is the darker water, which is sediment and the Souris River is the lighter water. >Photo taken by USGS personnel on a Civil Air Patrol flight....

  14. Peste des petits ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Parida, S.; Muniraju, M.; Mahapatra, M.; Muthuchelvan, D.; Buczkowski, H.; Banyard, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus causes a highly infectious disease of small ruminants that is endemic across Africa, the Middle East and large regions of Asia. The virus is considered to be a major obstacle to the development of sustainable agriculture across the developing world and has recently been targeted by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) for eradication with the aim of global elimination of the disease by 2030. Fundamentally, the vaccines required to successfully achieve this goal are currently available, but the availability of novel vaccine preparations to also fulfill the requisite for differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) may reduce the time taken and the financial costs of serological surveillance in the later stages of any eradication campaign. Here, we overview what is currently known about the virus, with reference to its origin, updated global circulation, molecular evolution, diagnostic tools and vaccines currently available to combat the disease. Further, we comment on recent developments in our knowledge of various recombinant vaccines and on the potential for the development of novel multivalent vaccines for small ruminants. PMID:26443889

  15. Peste des petits ruminants.

    PubMed

    Parida, S; Muniraju, M; Mahapatra, M; Muthuchelvan, D; Buczkowski, H; Banyard, A C

    2015-12-14

    Peste des petits ruminants virus causes a highly infectious disease of small ruminants that is endemic across Africa, the Middle East and large regions of Asia. The virus is considered to be a major obstacle to the development of sustainable agriculture across the developing world and has recently been targeted by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) for eradication with the aim of global elimination of the disease by 2030. Fundamentally, the vaccines required to successfully achieve this goal are currently available, but the availability of novel vaccine preparations to also fulfill the requisite for differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) may reduce the time taken and the financial costs of serological surveillance in the later stages of any eradication campaign. Here, we overview what is currently known about the virus, with reference to its origin, updated global circulation, molecular evolution, diagnostic tools and vaccines currently available to combat the disease. Further, we comment on recent developments in our knowledge of various recombinant vaccines and on the potential for the development of novel multivalent vaccines for small ruminants. PMID:26443889

  16. Diffusion incohérente des neutrons : modèles analytiques pour la dynamique interne des protéines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicout, D. J.

    2005-11-01

    La dynamique interne des protéines joue un rôle central dans la stabilité, la fonction et l'activité biologique de ces biomolécules. Il est maintenant établi que les fluctuations d'états conformationnels des protéines influencent fortement la plupart des réactions biochimiques et s'accompagnent d'une augmentation brutale des déplacements carrés moyens des atomes au dessus de la température de la transition dynamique. Dans cette contribution, nous présentons une revue critique de quelques modèles théoriques couramment utilisés dans la littérature pour l'analyse des mouvements internes des protéines et la description de la transition dynamique.

  17. CAR and PXR agonists stimulate hepatic bile acid and bilirubin detoxification and elimination pathways in mice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Halilbasic, Emina; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Zollner, Gernot; Fickert, Peter; Langner, Cord; Zatloukal, Kurt; Denk, Helmut; Trauner, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Induction of hepatic phase I/II detoxification enzymes and alternative excretory pumps may limit hepatocellular accumulation of toxic biliary compounds in cholestasis. Because the nuclear xenobiotic receptors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulate involved enzymes and transporters, we aimed to induce adaptive alternative pathways with different CAR and PXR agonists in vivo. Mice were treated with the CAR agonists phenobarbital and 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichlorpyridyloxy)]benzene, as well as the PXR agonists atorvastatin and pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile. Hepatic bile acid and bilirubin-metabolizing/detoxifying enzymes (Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Sult2a1), their regulatory nuclear receptors (CAR, PXR, farnesoid X receptor), and bile acid/organic anion and lipid transporters (Ntcp, Oatp1,2,4, Bsep, Mrp2-4, Mdr2, Abcg5/8, Asbt) in the liver and kidney were analyzed via reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Potential functional relevance was tested in common bile duct ligation (CBDL). CAR agonists induced Mrp2-4 and Oatp2; PXR agonists induced only Mrp3 and Oatp2. Both PXR and CAR agonists profoundly stimulated bile acid-hydroxylating/detoxifying enzymes Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10. In addition, CAR agonists upregulated bile acid-sulfating Sult2a1 and bilirubin-glucuronidating Ugt1a1. These changes were accompanied by reduced serum levels of bilirubin and bile acids in healthy and CBDL mice and by increased levels of polyhydroxylated bile acids in serum and urine of cholestatic mice. Atorvastatin significantly increased Oatp2, Mdr2, and Asbt, while other transporters and enzymes were moderately affected. In conclusion, administration of specific CAR or PXR ligands results in coordinated stimulation of major hepatic bile acid/bilirubin metabolizing and detoxifying enzymes and hepatic key alternative efflux systems, effects that are predicted to counteract cholestasis. PMID:15986414

  18. Bitter taste receptor agonists mediate relaxation of human and rodent vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Manson, Martijn L; Säfholm, Jesper; Al-Ameri, Mamdoh; Bergman, Per; Orre, Ann-Charlotte; Swärd, Karl; James, Anna; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Adner, Mikael

    2014-10-01

    Taste-sensing type 2 receptors (TAS2Rs) have been implicated in extraoral functions. Airway smooth muscle expresses TAS2Rs and is strongly relaxed by TAS2R agonists. We hypothesised that TAS2R agonists might affect vascular smooth muscle as well. Moreover, the general pharmacological profile of TAS2R agonists, which are used to investigate the functions of TAS2R?s, are undefined. The aim of this study was to pharmacologically characterise the effects of five prototype TAS2R agonists in vascular smooth muscle. Responses to the TAS2R agonists were investigated in guinea-pig aorta and taenia coli, mouse aorta (wild-type and caveolin-1-/- mice) and human pulmonary arteries. Chloroquine, denatonium, dextromethorphan, noscapine and quinine, agonists for TAS2R3, TAS2R4, TAS2R10 and TAS2R14, induced strong endothelium-independent relaxations (responses between 82-96% of maximal relaxations) in phenylephrine pre-contracted guinea-pig aorta that persisted in the presence of L-type Ca2+ and KCa1.1-channel blockers. Experiments in guinea-pig taenia coli revealed that denatonium and quinine also inhibited relaxations to phenylephrine, indicating antagonism of ?-adrenoceptors. Only chloroquine and noscapine mediated relaxations when the guinea pig aorta was pre-contracted by U-46619 or PGF2?. Relaxations to chloroquine and noscapine after U-46619 pre-contractions were however markedly impaired in aortae from caveolin-1-/- mice. Chloroquine and noscapine mediated relaxations of human pulmonary arteries that expressed also mRNA for TAS2R3, TAS2R4, TAS2R10 and TAS2R14, at levels similar to that of the ?1A adrenoceptor. Notwithstanding whether TAS2Rs are involved or not, TAS2R agonists have profound effects on vascular smooth muscle. Chloroquine and noscapine are of special interest as their effects cannot be accounted for by conventional pathways. PMID:25036266

  19. PPAR agonists regulate brain gene expression: relationship to their effects on ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Laura B; Most, Dana; Blednov, Yuri A; Harris, R Adron

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that act as ligand-activated transcription factors. Although prescribed for dyslipidemia and type-II diabetes, PPAR agonists also possess anti-addictive characteristics. PPAR agonists decrease ethanol consumption and reduce withdrawal severity and susceptibility to stress-induced relapse in rodents. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms facilitating these properties have yet to be investigated. We tested three PPAR agonists in a continuous access two-bottle choice (2BC) drinking paradigm and found that tesaglitazar (PPAR?/?; 1.5 mg/kg) and fenofibrate (PPAR?; 150 mg/kg) decreased ethanol consumption in male C57BL/6J mice while bezafibrate (PPAR?/?/?; 75 mg/kg) did not. We hypothesized that changes in brain gene expression following fenofibrate and tesaglitazar treatment lead to reduced ethanol drinking. We studied unbiased genomic profiles in areas of the brain known to be important for ethanol dependence, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and amygdala, and also profiled gene expression in liver. Genomic profiles from the non-effective bezafibrate treatment were used to filter out genes not associated with ethanol consumption. Because PPAR agonists are anti-inflammatory, they would be expected to target microglia and astrocytes. Surprisingly, PPAR agonists produced a strong neuronal signature in mouse brain, and fenofibrate and tesaglitazar (but not bezafibrate) targeted a subset of GABAergic interneurons in the amygdala. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) revealed co-expression of treatment-significant genes. Functional annotation of these gene networks suggested that PPAR agonists might act via neuropeptide and dopaminergic signaling pathways in the amygdala. Our results reveal gene targets through which PPAR agonists can affect alcohol consumption behavior. PMID:25036611

  20. Detection of glucocorticoid receptor agonists in effluents from sewage treatment plants in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Go; Sato, Kentaro; Isobe, Tomohiko; Takigami, Hidetaka; Brouwer, Abraham; Nakayama, Kei

    2015-09-15

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely used as anti-inflammatory drugs. Our previous study demonstrated that several GCs such as cortisol and dexamethasone (Dex) were frequently detected in effluents collected from Japanese sewage treatment plants (STPs) in 2012. In this study, we used the GC-Responsive Chemical-Activated LUciferase gene eXpression (GR-CALUX) assay to elucidate GC receptor (GR) agonistic activities of ten pure synthetic GCs and selected STP effluents in Japan for assessment of the risks associated with the presence of GR agonists. The tested GCs demonstrated dose-dependent agonistic effects in the GR-CALUX assay and their EC50 values were calculated for estimation of relative potencies (REPs) compared to Dex. The GR agonistic potency was in the rank of: clobetasol propionate > clobetasone butyrate > betamethasone 17-valerate > difluprednate > betamethasone 17,21-dipropionate > Dex > betamethasone > 6?-methylprednisolone > prednisolone > cortisol. The GR agonistic activity in STP effluents as measured in Dex-equivalent (Dex-EQ) activities ranged from < 3.0-78 ng L(-1) (median: 29 ng L(-1), n = 50). To evaluate the contribution of the target GCs, theoretical Dex-EQs were calculated by multiplying the concentrations of each GC by its respective REP. Our calculation of Dex-EQ contribution for individual GR agonists indicated that the well-known GCs cortisol and Dex should not be given priority for subsequent in vivo testing, monitoring and removal experiments, but rather the highly potent synthetic GCs clobetasol propionate and betamethasone 17-valerate (REP = 28 and 3.1) as well as other unidentified compounds are important GR agonists in STP effluents in Japan. PMID:25965047

  1. Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Agonist Overuse: Urologists’ Response to Reimbursement and Characteristics Associated with Persistent Overuse

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Shellie D.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Carpenter, William R.; Jackson, George L.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Liu, Huan; Weinberger, Morris

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Medicare reimbursement cuts have been associated with declining Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) agonist overuse in localized prostate cancer. Medical school affiliation and foreign training have been associated with persistent overuse. However, physician-level prescribing changes and the practice type of persistent overusers have not been examined. We sought to describe physician-level changes in GnRH agonist overuse and test the association of time in practice and solo practice type with GnRH agonist overuse. METHODS We matched American Medical Association physician data for 2,138 urologists to SEER–Medicare data for 12,943 men diagnosed with early stage and lower grade adenocarcinoma of the prostate between 2000 and 2007. We conducted a population-based, retrospective study using multi-level modeling to control for patient and provider characteristics. RESULTS Three distinct patterns of GnRH agonist overuse were observed. Urologists’ time in practice was not associated with GnRH agonist overuse (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.75–1.05).However, solo practice type (OR 1.65; 95% CI 1.34–2.02), medical school affiliation (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.55–0.77), and patient race were. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.37–2.27), Hispanics (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.12–1.79) and men of “other” race (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.04–1.99) had greater odds of receiving unnecessary GnRH agonists. CONCLUSIONS GnRH agonist overuse remains high among some urologists who may be professionally isolated and difficult to reach. These urologists treat more vulnerable populations, which may contribute to health disparities in prostate cancer treatment quality. Nonetheless, these findings provide guidance to develop interventions to address overuse in prostate cancer. PMID:25849354

  2. Agonist-Induced Endocytosis and Receptor Phosphorylation Mediate Resensitization of Dopamine D2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Dongim; Zheng, Mei; Min, Chengchun; Ma, Lan; Kurose, Hitoshi; Park, Jae H.; Kim, Kyeong-Man

    2010-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms and functional roles of agonist-induced internalization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) were analyzed using mutant dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) in which all possible GPCR kinase (GRK) phosphorylation sites were mutated or the affinity for ?-arrestins was altered. Agonist-induced internalization of D2Rs involved a phosphorylation-dependent component, which was mediated by serine/threonine (S/T) residues in the second loop and T225 in the third loop, and a phosphorylation-independent component. GRK2-mediated enhancement of the internalization and inhibition of D2R signaling did not involve receptor phosphorylation, and only the former required the enzymatic activity of GRK2. The phosphorylation-deficient mutant (D2R-intracellular loop 2/3) recycled more slowly and showed more agonist-induced desensitization than did the wild-type D2R, suggesting that receptor phosphorylation mediates the recycling of the internalized receptors and enhances receptor resensitization. Blockade of the agonist-induced internalization of D2R-intracellular loop 2/3 provoked desensitization as in wild-type D2R, suggesting that certain cellular processes other than receptor dephosphorylation occurring within the endocytic vesicle are responsible for the resensitization of D2R. When dissociation between D2R and ?-arrestin was inhibited or when the expression of cellular ?-arrestins was decreased, agonist-induced desensitization of D2R did not occur, suggesting that dissociation from ?-arrestin is the main cellular process required for resensitization of D2R and is achieved through agonist-induced internalization. These results indicate that, in the regulation of some GPCRs, phosphorylation-independent association with ?-arrestin plays a major role in agonist-induced desensitization. PMID:20160122

  3. ?2-Adrenoceptor agonists as novel, safe and potentially effective therapies for Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Bartus, Raymond T; Bétourné, Alexandre; Basile, Anthony; Peterson, Bethany L; Glass, Jonathan; Boulis, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a chronic and progressive neuromuscular disease for which no cure exists and better treatment options are desperately needed. We hypothesize that currently approved ?2-adrenoceptor agonists may effectively treat the symptoms and possibly slow the progression of ALS. Although ?2-agonists are primarily used to treat asthma, pharmacologic data from animal models of neuromuscular diseases suggest that these agents may have pharmacologic effects of benefit in treating ALS. These include inhibiting protein degradation, stimulating protein synthesis, inducing neurotrophic factor synthesis and release, positively modulating microglial and systemic immune function, maintaining the structural and functional integrity of motor endplates, and improving energy metabolism. Moreover, stimulation of ?2-adrenoceptors can activate a range of downstream signaling events in many different cell types that could account for the diverse array of effects of these agents. The evidence supporting the possible therapeutic benefits of ?2-agonists is briefly reviewed, followed by a more detailed review of clinical trials testing the efficacy of ?-agonists in a variety of human neuromuscular maladies. The weight of evidence of the potential benefits from treating these diseases supports the hypothesis that ?2-agonists may be efficacious in ALS. Finally, ways to monitor and manage the side effects that may arise with chronic administration of ?2-agonists are evaluated. In sum, effective, safe and orally-active ?2-agonists may provide a novel and convenient means to reduce the symptoms of ALS and possibly delay disease progression, affording a unique opportunity to repurpose these approved drugs for treating ALS, and rapidly transforming the management of this serious, unmet medical need. PMID:26459114

  4. Inhibition by TRPA1 agonists of compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Akitomo; Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2013-04-26

    Although TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists (vanilloid capsaicin and menthol, respectively) at high concentrations inhibit action potential conduction, it remains to be unknown whether TRPA1 agonists have a similar action. The present study examined the actions of TRPA1 agonists, cinnamaldehyde (CA) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which differ in chemical structure from each other, on compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. CA and AITC concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP with the IC50 values of 1.2 and 1.5mM, respectively; these activities were resistant to a non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red or a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The CA and AITC actions were distinct in property; the latter but not former action was delayed in onset and partially reversible, and CA but not AITC increased thresholds to elicit CAPs. A CAP inhibition was seen by hydroxy-?-sanshool (by 60% at 0.05 mM), which activates both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels, a non-vanilloid TRPV1 agonist piperine (by 20% at 0.07 mM) and tetrahydrolavandulol (where the six-membered ring of menthol is opened; IC50=0.38 mM). It is suggested that TRPA1 agonists as well as TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction without TRP activation, although their agonists are quite different in chemical structure from each other. PMID:23537660

  5. Agonistic onset during development differentiates wild house mouse males (Mus domesticus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krackow, Sven

    2005-02-01

    Wild house mouse populations have been suggested to locally adapt to varying dispersal regimes by expressing divergent aggressivity phenotypes. This conjecture implies, first, genetic polymorphism for dispersive strategies which is supported by the finding of heritable variation for male dispersal tendency in feral house mice. Secondly, aggressivity is assumed to translate into dispersal rates. This speculation is reinforced by experimental evidence showing that non-agonistic males display lower dispersal propensity than same-aged males that have established agonistic dominance. However, the actual ontogenetic behavioural pattern and its variability among populations remain unknown. Hence, in this study the timing of agonistic onset is quantified within laboratory-reared fraternal pairs, and compared between descendants from two different feral populations. Males from the two populations (G and Z) differed strongly in agonistic development, as Z fraternal pairs had a 50% risk of agonistic onset before 23.5±2.7 days of age, while this took 57.3±5.4 days in males from population G. This difference coincided with significant genetic differentiation between the males of the two populations as determined by 11 polymorphic microsatellite markers. Furthermore, in population G, males from agonistic and amicable fraternal pairs exhibited significant genetic differentiation. These results corroborate the supposition of genetic variability for dispersive strategies in house mice, and identify the ontogenetic timing of agonistic phenotype development as the potential basis for genetic differentiation. This opens a unique opportunity to study the genetic determination of a complex mammalian behavioural syndrome in a life history context, using a simple laboratory paradigm.

  6. L'astronomie des Anciens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazé, Yaël

    2009-04-01

    Quelle que soit la civilisation à laquelle il appartient, l'être humain cherche dans le ciel des réponses aux questions qu'il se pose sur son origine, son avenir et sa finalité. Le premier mérite de ce livre est de nous rappeler que l'astronomie a commencé ainsi à travers les mythes célestes imaginés par les Anciens pour expliquer l'ordre du monde et la place qu'ils y occupaient. Mais les savoirs astronomiques passés étaient loin d'être négligeables et certainement pas limités aux seuls travaux des Grecs : c'est ce que l'auteur montre à travers une passionnante enquête, de Stonehenge à Gizeh en passant par Pékin et Mexico, fondée sur l'étude des monuments anciens et des sources écrites encore accessibles. Les tablettes mésopotamiennes, les annales chinoises, les chroniques médiévales, etc. sont en outre d'une singulière utilité pour les astronomes modernes : comment sinon remonter aux variations de la durée du jour au cours des siècles, ou percer la nature de l'explosion qui a frappé tant d'observateurs en 1054 ? Ce livre offre un voyage magnifiquement illustré à travers les âges, entre astronomie et archéologie.

  7. Exploration des mécanismes de repliement des protéines par dynamique moléculaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilquin, B.

    2005-11-01

    Comment se replient les protéines? Cette question est ancienne. En introduction nous rappellerons ce qu'est le paradoxe de Levinthal et comment on est passé de la notion de chemin de repliement à la notion de paysage énergétique. Les simulations de dynamique moléculaire ont permis d'aborder la compréhension du processus de repliement au niveau atomique. Cependant l'échelle de temps des processus de repliement (de l'ordre de la milliseconde) n'est pas accessible aux simulations numériques (de l'ordre de la nanoseconde). Plusieurs auteurs ont donc proposé de simuler le dépliement des protéines par dynamique moléculaire. En admettant le principe de micro-réversibilité l'étude du processus de dépliement renseigne sur celui de repliement. Cependant, il est nécessaire d'accélérer le dépliement en introduisant un biais afin que les états dépliées soient accessibles aux échelles de temps des simulations. Nous présenterons un exemple de ce qui a été réalise dans le cas de l'étude de protéines de petite taille suivant un repliement simple, globalement à deux états. Nous présenterons ensuite ce que nous avons réalisé dans le cas d'une protéine de taille plus importante et pour laquelle le processus de repliement est plus complexe car il existe un intermédiaire transitoire de repliement. C'est le cas du lysozyme pour lequel les simulations de dépliement permettent d'accéder au mécanisme atomique de repliement et de comprendre pourquoi des mutants de cette protéine se replient plus lentement et forment des fibres amyloïdiques. Ainsi les intermédiaires de repliement seraient à l'origine de formes pathogènes des protéines observées dans les maladies neuro-dégéneratives. Enfin nous montrerons comment à partir de plusieurs simulations longues de dynamique moléculaire, le paysage énergétique pour de petites protéines peut être calculé.

  8. Induction of Selective Blood-Tumor Barrier Permeability and Macromolecular Transport by a Biostable Kinin B1 Receptor Agonist in a Glioma Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Jérôme; Bovenzi, Veronica; Savard, Martin; Dubuc, Céléna; Fortier, Audrey; Neugebauer, Witold; Tremblay, Luc; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Tsanaclis, Ana-Maria; Lepage, Martin; Fortin, David; Gobeil, Fernand

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of malignant glioma with chemotherapy is limited mostly because of delivery impediment related to the blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). B1 receptors (B1R), inducible prototypical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) can regulate permeability of vessels including possibly that of brain tumors. Here, we determine the extent of BTB permeability induced by the natural and synthetic peptide B1R agonists, LysdesArg9BK (LDBK) and SarLys[dPhe8]desArg9BK (NG29), in syngeneic F98 glioma-implanted Fischer rats. Ten days after tumor inoculation, we detected the presence of B1R on tumor cells and associated vasculature. NG29 infusion increased brain distribution volume and uptake profiles of paramagnetic probes (Magnevist and Gadomer) at tumoral sites (T1-weighted imaging). These effects were blocked by B1R antagonist and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, but not by B2R antagonist and non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. Consistent with MRI data, systemic co-administration of NG29 improved brain tumor delivery of Carboplatin chemotherapy (ICP-Mass spectrometry). We also detected elevated B1R expression in clinical samples of high-grade glioma. Our results documented a novel GPCR-signaling mechanism for promoting transient BTB disruption, involving activation of B1R and ensuing production of COX metabolites. They also underlined the potential value of synthetic biostable B1R agonists as selective BTB modulators for local delivery of different sized-therapeutics at (peri)tumoral sites. PMID:22629405

  9. Ansprache des Prsidenten anlsslich der Festveranstaltung

    E-print Network

    Falge, Eva

    Ansprache des Präsidenten anlässlich der Festveranstaltung zum 100jährigen Jubiläum des Fritz-Haber herzlich willkommen, 100 Jahre Fritz-Haber-Institut bzw. Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut für physikalische Chemie heute einen Einblick geben in 100 Jahre Fritz-Haber-Institut. MAX-PLANCK-GESELLSCHAFT Rede des

  10. Descriptif des fonctions postules CORPS EMPLOIS

    E-print Network

    Pouyanne, Nicolas

    - Architecte des systèmes d'information - Chef de projet ou expert en développement et déploiement d - Architecte des systèmes d'information - Chef de projet ou expert en développement et déploiement d télécommunications - Ingénieur statisticien - Ingénieur en calcul scientifique IR - Architecte des systèmes d

  11. Direction de la documentation, des archives

    E-print Network

    Ghorbel, Amin

    le travail des groupes. Désormais au nombre de trois, les espaces- projets ont fait l'objet de plus Bibliothèque #12;5 Le succès des espaces-projets de la Bibliothèque Pour toujours mieux répondre aux attentes des élèves, une nouvelle salle de travail, la salle Jean Rouch, a été ouverte en septembre 2014 au

  12. Emmanuel Frenod Professeur des Universites -Mathematiques Appliquees

    E-print Network

    Frénod, Emmanuel

    Emmanuel Fr´enod Professeur des Universit´es - Math´ematiques Appliqu´ees Professor - Applied, ´equations cin´etiques, homog´en´eisation, m´ethodes math´ematiques de mod´elisation, analyse num´erique, calcul scientifique, Lo- giciels encapsulant des math´ematiques, mod´elisation des environnements

  13. Mechanism of action of flibanserin, a multifunctional serotonin agonist and antagonist (MSAA), in hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-02-01

    Flibanserin is a novel multifunctional serotonin agonist and antagonist (MSAA) that improves sexual functioning in premenopausal women who suffer from reduced sexual interest and desire. PMID:25659981

  14. Infections fongiques des brûlé : revue

    PubMed Central

    Arnould, JF.; Le Floch, R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Les infections fongiques locales ou générales sont souvent d’une extrême gravité chez les brûlés. Les brûlés combinent de nombreux facteurs de risque à une immunodépression induite par la brûlure. Les infections de plaies sont le fait des genres Candida, Aspergillus et des agents de mucormycoses. Ces deux derniers cas sont à l’origine de lésions particulièrement sévères. Leur diagnostic repose sur la biopsie cutanée avec examens mycologique et anatomopathologique. Le traitement est essentiellement chirurgical, associé à une antibiothérapie adaptée. Les septicémies sont le fait de levures, essentiellement du genre Candida. Le diagnostic en est difficile dans le contexte des brûlés et repose souvent sur une forte suspicion clinique. Leur traitement repose sur les échinocandines et plus secondairement sur le fluconazole. PMID:26668558

  15. Identification of Adiponectin Receptor Agonist Utilizing a Fluorescence Polarization Based High Throughput Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yiyi; Zang, Zhihe; Zhong, Ling; Wu, Min; Su, Qing; Gao, Xiurong; Zan, Wang; Lin, Dong; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Zhonglin

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, the adipose-derived hormone, plays an important role in the suppression of metabolic disorders that can result in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. It has been shown that up-regulation of adiponectin or adiponectin receptor has a number of therapeutic benefits. Given that it is hard to convert the full size adiponectin protein into a viable drug, adiponectin receptor agonists could be designed or identified using high-throughput screening. Here, we report on the development of a two-step screening process to identify adiponectin agonists. First step, we developed a high throughput screening assay based on fluorescence polarization to identify adiponectin ligands. The fluorescence polarization assay reported here could be adapted to screening against larger small molecular compound libraries. A natural product library containing 10,000 compounds was screened and 9 hits were selected for validation. These compounds have been taken for the second-step in vitro tests to confirm their agonistic activity. The most active adiponectin receptor 1 agonists are matairesinol, arctiin, (-)-arctigenin and gramine. The most active adiponectin receptor 2 agonists are parthenolide, taxifoliol, deoxyschizandrin, and syringin. These compounds may be useful drug candidates for hypoadiponectin related diseases. PMID:23691032

  16. Can the anti-inflammatory activities of ?2-agonists be harnessed in the clinical setting?

    PubMed Central

    Theron, Annette J; Steel, Helen C; Tintinger, Gregory R; Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Beta2-adrenoreceptor agonists (?2-agonists) are primarily bronchodilators, targeting airway smooth muscle and providing critical symptomatic relief in conditions such as bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These agents also possess broad-spectrum, secondary, anti-inflammatory properties. These are mediated largely, though not exclusively, via interactions with adenylyl cyclase-coupled ?2-adrenoreceptors on a range of immune and inflammatory cells involved in the immunopathogenesis of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders of the airways. The clinical relevance of the anti-inflammatory actions of ?2-agonists, although often effective in the experimental setting, remains contentious. The primary objectives of the current review are: firstly, to assess the mechanisms, both molecular and cell-associated, that may limit the anti-inflammatory efficacy of ?2-agonists; secondly, to evaluate pharmacological strategies, several of which are recent and innovative, that may overcome these limitations. These are preceded by a consideration of the various types of ?2-agonists, their clinical applications, and spectrum of anti-inflammatory activities, particularly those involving adenosine 3?,5?-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-mediated clearance of cytosolic calcium, and altered gene expression in immune and inflammatory cells. PMID:24285920

  17. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  18. Functional selectivity of dopamine D1 receptor agonists in regulating the fate of internalized receptors *

    PubMed Central

    Ryman-Rasmussen, Jessica P.; Griffith, Adam; Oloff, Scott; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Brown, Justin T.; Goddard, William A.; Mailman, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that D1 agonists can cause functionally selective effects when the endpoints of receptor internalization and adenylate cyclase activation are compared. The present study was designed to probe the phenomenon of functional selectivity at the D1 receptor further by testing the hypothesis that structurally dissimilar agonists with efficacies at these endpoints that equal or exceed those of dopamine would differ in ability to influence receptor fate after internalization, a functional endpoint largely unexplored for the D1 receptor. We selected two novel agonists of therapeutic interest that meet these criteria (the isochroman A-77636, and the isoquinoline dinapsoline), and compared the fates of the D1 receptor after internalization in response to these two compounds with that of dopamine. We found that dopamine caused the receptor to be rapidly recycled to the cell surface within 1 h of removal. Conversely, A-77636 caused the receptor to be retained intracellularly up to 48 h after agonist removal. Most surprisingly, the D1 receptor recovered to the cell surface 48 h after removal of dinapsoline. Taken together, these data indicate that these agonists target the D1 receptor to different intracellular trafficking pathways, demonstrating that the phenomenon of functional selectivity at the D1 receptor is operative for cellular events that are temporally downstream of immediate receptor activation. We hypothesize that these differential effects result from interactions of the synthetic ligands with aspects of the D1 receptor that are distal from the ligand binding domain. PMID:17067639

  19. Agonist-dependent modulation of arterial endothelinA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Compeer, MG; Meens, MJPMT; Hackeng, TM; Neugebauer, WA; Höltke, C; De Mey, JGR

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Endothelin-1 (ET-1) causes long-lasting vasoconstrictions. These can be prevented by ETA receptor antagonists but are only poorly reversed by these drugs. We tested the hypothesis that endothelin ETA receptors are susceptible to allosteric modulation by endogenous agonists and exogenous ligands. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Rat isolated mesenteric resistance arteries were pretreated with capsaicin and studied in wire myographs, in the presence of L-NAME and indomethacin to concentrate on arterial smooth muscle responses. KEY RESULTS Endothelins caused contractions with equal maximum but differing potency (ET-1 = ET-2 > ET-3). ET-11–15 neither mimicked nor antagonized these effects in the absence and presence of ET16–21. 4AlaET-1 (ETB agonist) and BQ788 (ETB antagonist) were without effects. BQ123 (peptide ETA antagonist) reduced the sensitivity and relaxed the contractile responses to endothelins. Both effects depended on the agonist (pKB: ET-3 = ET-1 > ET-2; % relaxation: ET-3 = ET-2 > ET-1). Also, with PD156707 (non-peptide ETA antagonist) agonist-dependence and a discrepancy between preventive and inhibitory effects were observed. The latter was even more marked with bulky analogues of BQ123 and PD156707. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings indicate allosteric modulation of arterial smooth muscle ETA receptor function by endogenous agonists and by exogenous endothelin receptor antagonists. This may have consequences for the diagnosis and pharmacotherapy of diseases involving endothelins. PMID:22324472

  20. Evaluation of the interaction of mu and kappa opioid agonists on locomotor behavior in the horse.

    PubMed Central

    Mama, K R; Pascoe, P J; Steffey, E P

    1993-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the interactive effects of mu and kappa opioid agonists on locomotor behavior in the horse. Three doses of a mu agonist, fentanyl (5, 10, 20 micrograms/kg) and a kappa agonist U50,488H (30, 60, 120 micrograms/kg) were administered in a random order to six horses. Locomotor activity was measured using a two minute footstep count. Each dose of U50,488H was then combined with 20 micrograms/kg of fentanyl to determine the interactive effects of the drugs on locomotor activity. A significant increase in locomotor activity was seen with 20 micrograms/kg of fentanyl and all the drug combinations. The combination of U50,488H with fentanyl resulted in an earlier onset of locomotor activity. At the highest doses of the combination (U50,488H 120 micrograms/kg, fentanyl 20 micrograms/kg), the duration of locomotor activity was significantly increased when compared to the other doses. We conclude that locomotor activity is maintained or enhanced in horses when a receptor specific kappa agonist is combined with a mu receptor agonist. PMID:8490803

  1. Identification of dual PPAR?/? agonists and their effects on lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gao, Quanqing; Hanh, Jacky; Váradi, Linda; Cairns, Rose; Sjöström, Helena; Liao, Vivian W Y; Wood, Peta; Balaban, Seher; Ong, Jennifer Ai; Lin, Hsuan-Yu Jennifer; Lai, Felcia; Hoy, Andrew J; Grewal, Thomas; Groundwater, Paul W; Hibbs, David E

    2015-12-15

    The three peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms; PPAR?, PPAR? and PPAR?, play central roles in lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis. Dual PPAR?/? agonists, which stimulate both PPAR? and PPAR? isoforms to similar extents, are gaining popularity as it is believed that they are able to ameliorate the unwanted side effects of selective PPAR? and PPAR? agonists; and may also be used to treat dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus simultaneously. In this study, virtual screening of natural product libraries, using both structure-based and ligand-based drug discovery approaches, identified ten potential dual PPAR?/? agonist lead compounds (9-13 and 16-20). In vitro assays confirmed these compounds to show no statistically significant toxicity to cells, with the exception of compound 12 which inhibited cell growth to 74.5%±3.5 and 54.1%±3.7 at 50?M and 100?M, respectively. In support of their potential as dual PPAR?/? agonists, all ten compounds upregulated the expression of cholesterol transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 in THP-1 macrophages, with indoline derivative 16 producing the greatest elevation (2.3-fold; 3.3-fold, respectively). Furthermore, comparable to the activity of established PPAR? and PPAR? agonists, compound 16 stimulated triacylglycerol accumulation during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation as well as fatty acid ?-oxidation in HuH7 hepatocytes. PMID:26616289

  2. Effects of an LH-RH agonist on reproductive responses and endocrinological parameters in landais ganders.

    PubMed

    Sellier, N; Do Thi, D X; Rousselot-Pailley, D; Péczely, P; de Reviers, M; Guémené, D

    1995-10-15

    Semen quantitative (sperm production) and qualitative parameters (percentage of live and normal spermatozoa, sperm motility, egg fertility and hatchability), as well as hormonal parameters (LH and testosterone plasma concentrations) were compared for landais ganders, which were treated or not, with an LH-RH agonist prior to being sexually active. Treatment with the LH-RH agonist at this physiological stage delayed the onset of sperm production in some of the treated males. Although, comparable data were obtained during the first half of the reproductive period, treatment with the LH-RH agonist maintained sperm output at higher levels during its second half. Although the percentage of normal and live spermatozoa, sperm motility and true hatchability did not differ, the LH-RH agonist treatment had a positive effect on gosling production because of the higher fertility of the treated birds during the second part of the reproductive period. Treatment induced a large short-term decrease in testosterone levels followed by a rebound, leading to higher levels during the second half of the reproductive period. We conclude that treatment of ganders with an LH-RH agonist partially prevented the naturally occurring decline in sperm production and induced an increase in the rate of fertility rates during the second half of the productive period. PMID:16727776

  3. Can the anti-inflammatory activities of ?2-agonists be harnessed in the clinical setting?

    PubMed

    Theron, Annette J; Steel, Helen C; Tintinger, Gregory R; Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Beta2-adrenoreceptor agonists (?2-agonists) are primarily bronchodilators, targeting airway smooth muscle and providing critical symptomatic relief in conditions such as bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These agents also possess broad-spectrum, secondary, anti-inflammatory properties. These are mediated largely, though not exclusively, via interactions with adenylyl cyclase-coupled ?2-adrenoreceptors on a range of immune and inflammatory cells involved in the immunopathogenesis of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders of the airways. The clinical relevance of the anti-inflammatory actions of ?2-agonists, although often effective in the experimental setting, remains contentious. The primary objectives of the current review are: firstly, to assess the mechanisms, both molecular and cell-associated, that may limit the anti-inflammatory efficacy of ?2-agonists; secondly, to evaluate pharmacological strategies, several of which are recent and innovative, that may overcome these limitations. These are preceded by a consideration of the various types of ?2-agonists, their clinical applications, and spectrum of anti-inflammatory activities, particularly those involving adenosine 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-mediated clearance of cytosolic calcium, and altered gene expression in immune and inflammatory cells. PMID:24285920

  4. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists: Nonglycemic Clinical Effects in Weight Loss and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Donna; Acosta, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Obective Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are indicated for treatment of type 2 diabetes since they mimic the actions of native GLP-1 on pancreatic islet cells, stimulating insulin release, while inhibiting glucagon release, in a glucose-dependent manner. The observation of weight loss has led to exploration of their potential as antiobesity agents, with liraglutide 3.0 mg day?1 approved for weight management in the US on December 23, 2014, and in the EU on March 23, 2015. This review examines the potential nonglycemic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Methods A literature search was conducted to identify preclinical and clinical evidence on nonglycemic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Results GLP-1 receptors are distributed widely in a number of tissues in humans, and their effects are not limited to the well-recognized effects on glycemia. Nonglycemic effects include weight loss, which is perhaps the most widely recognized nonglycemic effect. In addition, effects on the cardiovascular, neurologic, and renal systems and on taste perception may occur independently of weight loss. Conclusions GLP-1 receptor agonists may provide other nonglycemic clinical effects besides weight loss. Understanding these effects is important for prescribers in using GLP-1 receptor agonists for diabetic patients, but also if approved for chronic weight management. PMID:25959380

  5. Alcohol Screening among Opioid Agonist Patients in a Primary Care Clinic and an Opioid Treatment Program.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Jan; Muench, John; Wiest, Katharina; Croff, Raina; Rieckman, Traci; McCarty, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Problem alcohol use is associated with adverse health and economic outcomes, especially among people in opioid agonist treatment. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) are effective in reducing alcohol use; however, issues involved in SBIRT implementation among opioid agonist patients are unknown. To assess identification and treatment of alcohol use disorders, we reviewed clinical records of opioid agonist patients screened for an alcohol use disorder in a primary care clinic (n = 208) and in an opioid treatment program (n = 204) over a two-year period. In the primary care clinic, 193 (93%) buprenorphine patients completed an annual alcohol screening and six (3%) had elevated AUDIT scores. In the opioid treatment program, an alcohol abuse or dependence diagnosis was recorded for 54 (27%) methadone patients. Practitioner focus groups were completed in the primary care (n = 4 physicians) and the opioid treatment program (n = 11 counselors) to assess experience with and attitudes towards screening opioid agonist patients for alcohol use disorders. Focus groups suggested that organizational, structural, provider, patient, and community variables hindered or fostered alcohol screening. Alcohol screening is feasible among opioid agonist patients. Effective implementation, however, requires physician training and systematic changes in workflow. PMID:25715074

  6. Design and synthesis of diazatricyclodecane agonists of the G-protein-coupled receptor 119.

    PubMed

    Darout, Etzer; Robinson, Ralph P; McClure, Kim F; Corbett, Matthew; Li, Bryan; Shavnya, Andrei; Andrews, Melissa P; Jones, Christopher S; Li, Qifang; Minich, Martha L; Mascitti, Vincent; Guimarães, Cristiano R W; Munchhof, Michael J; Bahnck, Kevin B; Cai, Cuiman; Price, David A; Liras, Spiros; Bonin, Paul D; Cornelius, Peter; Wang, Ruduan; Bagdasarian, Victoria; Sobota, Colleen P; Hornby, Sam; Masterson, Victoria M; Joseph, Reena M; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Chen, Yue

    2013-01-10

    A series of GPR119 agonists based on a 2,6-diazatricyclo[3.3.1.1?3,7?]decane ring system is described. Also provided is a detailed account of the development of a multigram scale synthesis of the diazatricyclic ring system, which was achieved using a Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction as the key step. The basis for the use of this complex framework lies in an attempt to constrain one end of the molecule in the "agonist conformation" as was previously described for 3-oxa-7-aza-bicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes. Optimization of carbamate analogues of the diazatricylic compounds led to the identification of 32i as a potent agonist of the GPR119 receptor with low unbound human liver microsomal clearance. The use of an agonist response weighted ligand lipophilic efficiency (LLE) termed AgLLE is discussed along with the issues of applying efficiency measures to agonist programs. Ultimately, solubility limited absorption and poor exposure reduced further interest in these molecules. PMID:23234271

  7. A combined ligand and structure based approach to design potent PPAR-alpha agonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhoke, Gaurao V.; Gangwal, Rahul P.; Sangamwar, Abhay T.

    2012-11-01

    A combined ligand and structure based pharmacophore modeling approach was employed to reveal structural and chemical features necessary for PPAR-alpha agonistic activity. The best HypoGen pharmacophore model Hypo1 for PPAR-alpha agonists contains two hydrogen-bond acceptor (HBA), two general hydrophobic (H), and one negative ionizable (NI) feature. In addition, one structure based pharmacophore model was developed using LigandScout3.0, which has identified additional three hydrophobic features. Further, molecular docking studies of all agonists showed hydrogen bond interactions with important amino acids (Ser280, Tyr314 and Tyr464) and these interactions were compared with Hypo1, which shows that the Hypo1 has a good predictive ability. The screened virtual hits from Hypo1 were subjected to the Lipinski's rule of five, structure based pharmacophore screening and molecular docking analysis. Finally, three novel compounds with diverse scaffolds were selected as possible candidates for the designing of potent PPAR-alpha agonists. Combination of these two approaches results in designing an ideal pharmacophore model, which provides a powerful tool for the discovery of novel PPAR-alpha agonists.

  8. Classification of 4 DES supernovae by OzDES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazebrook, K.; Amon, A.; Lidman, C.; Martini, P.; Tucker, B. E.; Yuan, F.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.

    2015-12-01

    We report new spectroscopic classifications by OzDES of supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATEL #4668). The spectra (370-885nm) were obtained with the AAOmega Spectrograph (Saunders et al. 2004, SPIE, 5492, 389) and the 2dF fibre positioner at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT).

  9. Classification of 15 DES supernovae by OzDES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F.; Tucker, B. E.; Lidman, C.; Martini, P.; Gshwend, Julia; Moller, A.; Zhang, B.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.

    2015-12-01

    We report new spectroscopic classifications by OzDES of supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATEL #4668). The spectra (370-885nm) were obtained with the AAOmega Spectrograph (Saunders et al. 2004, SPIE, 5492, 389) and the 2dF fibre positioner at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT).

  10. Classification of 20 DES Supernova with OzDES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. M.; Kim, A. G.; Macualay, E.; Lidman, C.; Sharp, R.; Tucker, B. E.; Yuan, F.; Zhang, B.; Lewis, G. F.; Sommer, N. E.; Martini, P.; Mould, J.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report new spectroscopic classifications by OzDES of supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATEL #4668). The spectra (370-885nm) were obtained with the AAOmega Spectrograph (Saunders et al. 2004, SPIE, 5492, 389) and the 2dF fibre positioner at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT).

  11. Classification of 14 DES Supernova with OzDES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, B. E.; Sharp, R.; Yuan, F.; Zhang, B.; Lidman, C.; Davis, T. M.; Hinton, S.; Mould, J.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Scolnic, D.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Brout, D. J.; Fischer, J. A.; Gladney, L.; March, M.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Childress, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.

    2015-10-01

    We report new spectroscopic classifications by OzDES of supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey. The spectra (370-885nm) were obtained with the AAOmega Spectrograph (Saunders et al. 2004, SPIE, 5492, 389) and the 2dF fibre positioner at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT).

  12. Classification of 6 DES Supernova with OzDES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. F.; Mould, J.; Lidman, C.; Tucker, B. E.; Sharp, R.; Yuan, F.; Martini, P.; Kessler, R.; Scolnic, D.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Brout, D. J.; Fischer, J. A.; Gladney, L.; March, M.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Childress, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.

    2015-10-01

    We report new spectroscopic classifications by OzDES of supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATEL #4668). The spectra (370-885nm) were obtained with the AAOmega Spectrograph (Saunders et al. 2004, SPIE, 5492, 389) and the 2dF fibre positioner at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT).

  13. Paternité des articles et intérêts concurrents : une analyse des recommandations aux auteurs des journaux traitant de pratique pharmaceutique

    PubMed Central

    Courbon, Ève; Tanguay, Cynthia; Lebel, Denis; Bussières, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ Contexte : La présence d’auteurs honorifiques et fantômes ainsi que les intérêts concurrents représentent des difficultés bien documentées, liées à la publication d’articles scientifiques. Il existe des lignes directrices encadrant la rédaction et la publication de manuscrits scientifiques, notamment celles de l’International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). Objectifs : L’objectif principal de cette étude descriptive et transversale visait à recenser les instructions portant sur la paternité des articles et les intérêts concurrents provenant des recommandations aux auteurs des journaux traitant de pratique pharmaceutique. L’objectif secondaire visait à déterminer des mesures correctrices pour une paternité des articles plus transparente. Méthode : La recherche a débuté par l’identification des journaux traitant de pratique pharmaceutique. La consultation des instructions aux auteurs des journaux a permis ensuite de recenser les recommandations destinées à éviter les problèmes de paternité des articles et d’intérêts concurrents. Finalement, les membres de l’équipe de recherche se sont consultés afin de définir des mesures correctrices possibles à l’intention des chercheurs. Résultats : Des 232 journaux traitant de pharmacie, 33 ont été définis comme traitant de pratique pharmaceutique. Un total de 24 (73 %) journaux mentionnaient suivre la politique de l’ICMJE, 14 (42 %) demandaient aux auteurs de remplir un formulaire de déclaration d’intérêts concurrents au moment de la soumission de l’article, 17 (52 %) présentaient une définition de la qualité d’auteur et 5 (15 %) demandaient de détailler les contributions de chaque auteur. Une grille de 40 critères a été élaborée pour définir l’attribution du statut d’auteur. Conclusion : Moins de la moitié des journaux demandait aux auteurs de transmettre un formulaire de déclaration des intérêts concurrents au moment de la soumission d’un article et seulement la moitié des journaux avait donné une définition de la qualité d’auteur. La publication scientifique de travaux sur les pratiques pharmaceutiques n’est pas à l’abri des manques de transparence liés à la publication. L’utilisation d’une grille décrivant la contribution de chaque auteur et la publication en ligne des travaux peuvent contribuer à limiter ces risques. PMID:24970938

  14. Transport quantique dans des nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naud, C.

    2002-09-01

    Quantum transport in nanostructures This work is devoted to the design, fabrication and magnetotransport investigations of mesoscopic devices. The sample are obtain by e-beam lithography and the measurements are performed at low temperature in a dilution refrigerator in the presence of a magnetic field. We have used MBE grown AlGaAs/GaAs heterojonctions as starting material to fabricate a bipartite tiling of rhombus called mathcal{T}3 lattice. We observe for the first time large amplitude h/e oscillations in this network as compared to the one measured in square lattices of similar size. These oscillations are the signature of a recently predited localization phenomenon induced by Aharonov-Bohm interferences on this peculiar topology. For particular values of the magnetic field the propagation of the electron wave function is bounded in a small number of cells, called Aharonov-Bohm cages. More strikingly, at high magnetic field, h/2e oscillations appear whose amplitude can be much higher than the fundamental period. Their temperature dependence is similar to that of the h/e signal. These observations withdraw a simple interpretation in terms of harmonics generation. The origin of this phenomenon is still unclear and needs more investigations. The influence electrical width of the wire defining the network and so the rule of the number of channels can be studied using a gate deposited over the lattice. In particular we have measured the amplitude dependence of the h/e and h/2e signal versus the gate voltage. Ce travail est consacré à la réalisation d'échantillons mésoscopiques à partir de la lithographie électronique ainsi qu'à leur caractérisation à très basse température en magnétotransport. Nous avons pour cela exploité le gaz bidimensionnel d'électrons situé à l'interface d'une hétérojonction AlGaAs/GaAs pour réaliser un réseau de boucle d'une géométrie particulière baptisée la géométrie mathcal{T}3. Nous avons observé sur cette structure des oscillations de conductance en fonction du flux du champ magnétique de période h/e dont l'amplitude est beaucoup plus importante que celle mesurée sur un réseau carré de même dimension. Cette différence constitue une signature d'un effet de localisation induit par le champ magnétique sur la topologie mathcal{T}3. Pour des valeurs spécifiques du champ magnétique, du fait des interférences destructives Aharonov-Bohm, la propagation des fonctions d'ondes est limitée à un ensemble fini de cellule du réseau appelé cage. De la dépendance en température des oscillations de période h/e mesurées sur le réseau mathcal{T}3 nous avons tiré une longueur caractéristique qui peut être rattachée au périmètre des cages. Un phénomène inattendu fut l'observation, pour des champs magnétiques plus importants, d'un doublement de fréquence des oscillations. Ces oscillations de période h/2e pouvant avoir une amplitude supérieure aux oscillations de période h/e, une interprétation en terme d'harmonique n'est pas possible. Enfin, l'influence de la largeur électrique des fils constituant le réseau et donc celle du nombre de canaux par brin a été étudiée en réalisant des grilles électrostatique. Les variations de l'amplitude des signaux en h/e et h/2e en fonction de la tension de grille ont été mesurés.

  15. Identification of multiple 5-HT? partial agonist clinical candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Brodney, Michael A; Johnson, David E; Sawant-Basak, Aarti; Coffman, Karen J; Drummond, Elena M; Hudson, Emily L; Fisher, Katherine E; Noguchi, Hirohide; Waizumi, Nobuaki; McDowell, Laura L; Papanikolaou, Alexandros; Pettersen, Betty A; Schmidt, Anne W; Tseng, Elaine; Stutzman-Engwall, Kim; Rubitski, David M; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle A; Grimwood, Sarah

    2012-11-01

    The cognitive impairments observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are in part a consequence of reduced acetylcholine (ACh) levels resulting from a loss of cholinergic neurons. Preclinically, serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT(4)) agonists are reported to modulate cholinergic function and therefore may provide a new mechanistic approach for treating cognitive deficits associated with AD. Herein we communicate the design and synthesis of potent, selective, and brain penetrant 5-HT(4) agonists. The overall goal of the medicinal chemistry strategy was identification of structurally diverse clinical candidates with varying intrinsic activities. The exposure-response relationships between binding affinity, intrinsic activity, receptor occupancy, drug exposure, and pharmacodynamic activity in relevant preclinical models of AD were utilized as key selection criteria for advancing compounds. On the basis of their excellent balance of pharmacokinetic attributes and safety, two lead 5-HT(4) partial agonist candidates 2d and 3 were chosen for clinical development. PMID:22974325

  16. Design and Synthesis of Non-Peptide, Selective Orexin Receptor 2 Agonists.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Takashi; Saitoh, Tsuyoshi; Kutsumura, Noriki; Irukayama-Tomobe, Yoko; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kuroda, Daisuke; Gouda, Hiroaki; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Fujii, Hideaki; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Nagase, Hiroshi

    2015-10-22

    Orexins are a family of neuropeptides that regulate sleep/wakefulness, acting on two G-protein-coupled receptors, orexin receptors 1 (OX1R) and 2 (OX2R). Genetic and pharmacologic evidence suggests that orexin receptor agonists, especially OX2R agonist, will be useful for mechanistic therapy of the sleep disorder narcolepsy/cataplexy. We herein report the discovery of a potent (EC50 on OX2R is 0.023 ?M) and OX2R-selective (OX1R/OX2R EC50 ratio is 70) agonist, 4'-methoxy-N,N-dimethyl-3'-[N-(3-{[2-(3-methylbenzamido)ethyl]amino}phenyl)sulfamoyl]-(1,1'-biphenyl)-3-carboxamide 26. PMID:26267383

  17. Anticancer Role of PPAR? Agonists in Hematological Malignancies Found in the Vasculature, Marrow, and Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Haidaris, P. J.; Pollock, S. J.; Ramon, S.; Guo, N.; Woeller, C. F.; Feldon, S. E.; Phipps, R. P.

    2010-01-01

    The use of targeted cancer therapies in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents and/or radiation treatment has increased overall survival of cancer patients. However, longer survival is accompanied by increased incidence of comorbidities due, in part, to drug side effects and toxicities. It is well accepted that inflammation and tumorigenesis are linked. Because peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-? agonists are potent mediators of anti-inflammatory responses, it was a logical extension to examine the role of PPAR? agonists in the treatment and prevention of cancer. This paper has two objectives: first to highlight the potential uses for PPAR? agonists in anticancer therapy with special emphasis on their role when used as adjuvant or combined therapy in the treatment of hematological malignancies found in the vasculature, marrow, and eyes, and second, to review the potential role PPAR? and/or its ligands may have in modulating cancer-associated angiogenesis and tumor-stromal microenvironment crosstalk in bone marrow. PMID:20204067

  18. The PPAR? Agonist Pioglitazone Ameliorates Aging-Related Progressive Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hai-Chun; Deleuze, Sebastien; Zuo, Yiqin; Potthoff, Sebastian A.; Ma, Li-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR-?) agonists not only improve metabolic abnormalities of diabetes and consequent diabetic nephropathy, but they also protect against nondiabetic chronic kidney disease in experimental models. Here, we found that the PPAR-? agonist pioglitazone protected against renal injury in aging; it reduced proteinuria, improved GFR, decreased sclerosis, and alleviated cell senescence. Increased local expression of PPAR-? paralleled these changes. Underlying mechanisms included increased expression of klotho, decreased systemic and renal oxidative stress, and decreased mitochondrial injury. Pioglitazone also regulated p66Shc phosphorylation, which integrates many signaling pathways that affect mitochondrial function and longevity, by reducing protein kinase C-?. These results suggest that PPAR-? agonists may benefit aging-related renal injury by improving mitochondrial function. PMID:19797472

  19. Clinical use of deslorelin (GnRH agonist) in companion animals: a review.

    PubMed

    Lucas, X

    2014-10-01

    Over the years, many contraceptive medications have been developed for companion animals, but many secondary adverse effects have limited their use. A major advancement was achieved with the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, mainly GnRH agonists, which mimic the effects of native GnRH. The development of effective low-dose, slow-release implants with potent agonists such as deslorelin (Suprelorin®, Virbac) have allowed their use to become widespread in recent years, with many potential benefits in companion animals. While the major application of deslorelin was initially male contraception, due to its two differing actions, either the stimulation of oestrus or the sterilization of fertility, its use has been increasing in the bitch as well. The aim of this study is to review the applications of deslorelin GnRH agonist implants in companion animal, such as dogs, cats and some exotic pets. PMID:25277434

  20. Metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists potentiate a slow afterdepolarization in CNS neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, F.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that, in the rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN), metabotropic glutamate receptor (met-GluR) agonists evoked a slow depolarization accompanied by an increase in membrane conductance and burst firing. We have speculated that the burst firing elicited by met-GluR agonists may be due to activation or enhancement of a non-specific cation current, which exists in some DLSN neurons. Now we report that a slow afterdepolarization (sADP) mediated by a non-specific cation current was potentiated by both 1S,3R-ACPD and quisqualate. In addition, met-GluR agonists unmask a sADP in DLSN neurons which did not show a sADP under control conditions. Our data suggest that a non-specific cation current can be potentiated by activation of the met-GluR.

  1. Beta-adrenergic agonists increase lung liquid clearance in anesthetized sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Berthiaume, Y; Staub, N C; Matthay, M A

    1987-01-01

    We did experiments to determine whether beta-adrenergic agonists increase lung liquid clearance in anesthetized ventilated adult sheep and, if so, whether the increase is mediated by beta receptors and what mechanism is involved. We instilled 100 ml of autologous serum either alone or with a beta-adrenergic agonist (terbutaline, 10(-5) M, or epinephrine, 5.5 X 10(-6) M) into one lower lobe. After 4 h both terbutaline and epinephrine increased lung liquid clearance. The increase in lung liquid clearance was inhibited when propranolol (a beta blocker) or amiloride (a sodium channel blocker) was added to the terbutaline. Increased clearance was not explained by changes in pulmonary hemodynamics, pulmonary blood flow, or lung lymph flow. We conclude that beta-adrenergic agonists increase lung liquid clearance in anesthetized intact adult sheep. This increase is mediated through beta receptors and probably depends on increased active transport of sodium across the alveolar barrier. Images PMID:2879851

  2. PPAR{alpha} agonists up-regulate organic cation transporters in rat liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luci, Sebastian; Geissler, Stefanie; Koenig, Bettina; Koch, Alexander; Stangl, Gabriele I.; Hirche, Frank; Eder, Klaus . E-mail: klaus.eder@landw.uni-halle.de

    2006-11-24

    It has been shown that clofibrate treatment increases the carnitine concentration in the liver of rats. However, the molecular mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we observed for the first time that treatment of rats with the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-{alpha} agonist clofibrate increases hepatic mRNA concentrations of organic cation transporters (OCTNs)-1 and -2 which act as transporters of carnitine into the cell. In rat hepatoma (Fao) cells, treatment with WY-14,643 also increased the mRNA concentration of OCTN-2. mRNA concentrations of enzymes involved in carnitine biosynthesis were not altered by treatment with the PPAR{alpha} agonists in livers of rats and in Fao cells. We conclude that PPAR{alpha} agonists increase carnitine concentrations in livers of rats and cells by an increased uptake of carnitine into the cell but not by an increased carnitine biosynthesis.

  3. Induction of locomotion in spinal tadpoles by excitatory amino acids and their agonists.

    PubMed

    Harrison, P H

    1990-04-01

    Bath application of the excitatory amino acids L-aspartate and/or L-glutamate or their agonists N-methyl-D,L-aspartate and/or kainate elicited swimming movements in spinal tadpoles. Swimming cycles induced by the amino acids were in the frequency range of natural movements, and could be evoked after sectioning all dorsal roots in the exposed spinal segments. Locomotion was only elicited by L-aspartate or L-glutamate at low concentrations when the bath medium was rapidly circulated over the exposed surface of the spinal cord, and was of much shorter duration than the agonist-induced movements. These results indicate some differences between the actions of L-aspartate and L-glutamate and their agonists on the tadpole spinal cord. PMID:1971849

  4. OX40 agonist therapy enhances CD8 infiltration and decreases immune suppression in the tumor.

    PubMed

    Gough, Michael J; Ruby, Carl E; Redmond, William L; Dhungel, Birat; Brown, Alexis; Weinberg, Andrew D

    2008-07-01

    Acquisition of full T-cell effector function and memory differentiation requires appropriate costimulatory signals, including ligation of the costimulatory molecule OX40 (TNFRSF4, CD134). Tumors often grow despite the presence of tumor-specific T cells and establish an environment with weak costimulation and immune suppression. Administration of OX40 agonists has been shown to significantly increase the survival of tumor-bearing mice and was dependent on the presence of both CD4 and CD8 T cells during tumor-specific priming. To understand how OX40 agonists work in mice with established tumors, we developed a model to study changes in immune cell populations within the tumor environment. We show here that systemic administration of OX40 agonist antibodies increased the proportion of CD8 T cells at the tumor site in three different tumor models. The function of the CD8 T cells at the tumor site was also increased by administration of OX40 agonist antibody, and we observed an increase in the proportion of antigen-specific CD8 T cells within the tumor. Despite decreases in the proportion of T regulatory cells at the tumor site, T regulatory cell function in the spleen was unaffected by OX40 agonist antibody therapy. Interestingly, administration of OX40 agonist antibody caused significant changes in the tumor stroma, including decreased macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and decreased expression of transforming growth factor-beta. Thus, therapies targeting OX40 dramatically changed the tumor environment by enhancing the infiltration and function of CD8 T cells combined with diminished suppressive influences within the tumor. PMID:18593921

  5. Attenuation of HIV-1 replication in macrophages by cannabinoid receptor 2 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Servio H.; Reichenbach, Nancy L.; Fan, Shongshan; Rom, Slava; Merkel, Steven F.; Wang, Xu; Ho, Wen-zhe; Persidsky, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Infiltrating monocytes and macrophages play a crucial role in the progression of HIV-1 infection in the CNS. Previous studies showed that activation of the CB2 can attenuate inflammatory responses and affect HIV-1 infectivity in T cells and microglia. Here, we report that CB2 agonists can also act as immunomodulators on HIV-1-infected macrophages. First, our findings indicated the presence of elevated levels of CB2 expression on monocytes/macrophages in perivascular cuffs of postmortem HIV-1 encephalitic cases. In vitro analysis by FACS of primary human monocytes revealed a step-wise increase in CB2 surface expression in monocytes, MDMs, and HIV-1-infected MDMs. We next tested the notion that up-regulation of CB2 may allow for the use of synthetic CB2 agonist to limit HIV-1 infection. Two commercially available CB2 agonists, JWH133 and GP1a, and a resorcinol-based CB2 agonist, O-1966, were evaluated. Results from measurements of HIV-1 RT activity in the culture media of 7 day-infected cells showed a significant decrease in RT activity when the CB2 agonist was present. Furthermore, CB2 activation also partially inhibited the expression of HIV-1 pol. CB2 agonists did not modulate surface expression of CXCR4 or CCR5 detected by FACS. We speculate that these findings indicate that prevention of viral entry is not a central mechanism for CB2-mediated suppression in viral replication. However, CB2 may affect the HIV-1 replication machinery. Results from a single-round infection with the pseudotyped virus revealed a marked decrease in HIV-1 LTR activation by the CB2 ligands. Together, these results indicate that CB2 may offer a means to limit HIV-1 infection in macrophages. PMID:23463725

  6. Identification of an extracellular segment of the oxytocin receptor providing agonist-specific binding epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Hawtin, S R; Howard, H C; Wheatley, M

    2001-01-01

    The effects of the peptide hormone oxytocin are mediated by oxytocin receptors (OTRs) expressed by the target tissue. The OTR is a member of the large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Defining differences between the interaction of agonists and antagonists with the OTR at the molecular level is of fundamental importance, and is addressed in this study. Using truncated and chimaeric receptor constructs, we establish that a small 12-residue segment in the distal portion of the N-terminus of the human OTR provides important epitopes which are required for agonist binding. In contrast, this segment does not contribute to the binding site for antagonists, whether peptide or non-peptide. It does, however, have a role in agonist-induced OTR signalling. Oxytocin is also an agonist at the vasopressin V(1a) receptor (V(1a)R). A chimaeric receptor (V(1a)R(N)-OTR) was engineered in which the N-terminus of the OTR was substituted by the corresponding, but unrelated, sequence from the N-terminus of the V(1a)R. We show that the V(1a)R N-terminus present in V(1a)R(N)-OTR fully restored both agonist binding and intracellular signalling to a dysfunctional truncated OTR construct. The N-terminal segment does not, however, contribute to receptor-selective agonism between the OTR and the V(1a)R. Our data establish a key role for the distal N-terminus of the OTR in providing agonist-specific binding epitopes. PMID:11171127

  7. Regulation of protein kinases in exocrine secretory cells during agonist-induced exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Söling, H D; Padel, U; Jahn, R; Thiel, G; Kricke, P; Fest, W

    1985-01-01

    Stimulation of exocytosis in exocrine glands is associated with an increased phosphorylation of several particulate proteins. Irrespective of the type of secretagogue (cAMP-dependent agonists, calcium-dependent agonists, calcium ionophores, phorbol esters) exocytosis is always accompanied by an enhanced phosphorylation of the ribosomal protein S6. It is shown by an analysis of the phosphopeptide pattern of the in vivo and the in vitro phosphorylated S6 protein that the protein kinase responsible for phosphorylation of the S6 protein during enhanced exocytosis is protein kinase C. This is so irrespective of whether the agonist uses cAMP or calcium as second messenger. Experiments with isolated guinea pig parotid gland lobules reveal that not only the acetylcholine analog carbamoylcholine, but also the beta-agonist isoproterenol lead within seconds to an increased formation of diacylglycerol. As diacylglycerol increases the affinity of protein kinase C for calcium this finding would explain why the phosphorylation pattern of the S6 protein reflects activation of protein kinase C also under conditions where (as in the case of stimulation with beta-agonists) cAMP is the primary second messenger. It would further explain why the changes of the phosphorylation of individual histones observed during agonist-induced exocytosis in the parotid gland are quite similar for isoproterenol on one hand and carbamoylcholine on the other. A 22 K protein which becomes phosphorylated only when cAMP serves as second messenger is located in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum. A possible relationship of this protein with the calcium transport ATPase of the endoplasmic reticulum is under investigation. PMID:4072796

  8. Effect of an ?2 agonist (mivazerol) on limiting myocardial ischaemia in stable angina

    PubMed Central

    Fox, K; Dargie, H; de Bono, D P; Oliver, M; Wulfert, E; Kharkevitch, T

    1999-01-01

    A specific ?2 agonist, mivazerol, known to be effective in reducing myocardial ischaemia when given intravenously immediately before an exercise tolerance test, produced a significant increase in exercise duration and time to the onset of angina when given orally over a two week period to 25 patients with stable angina. A non-significant trend to reduction in electrocardiographic signs of ischaemia was also noted. The clinical relevance of this improvement now needs to be tested in larger numbers.???Keywords: ?2 agonist; sympathetic activity; myocardial ischaemia; stable angina; exercise tolerance test PMID:10455094

  9. Potent complement C3a receptor agonists derived from oxazole amino acids: Structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranee; Reed, Anthony N; Chu, Peifei; Scully, Conor C G; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Suen, Jacky Y; Durek, Thomas; Reid, Robert C; Fairlie, David P

    2015-12-01

    Potent ligands for the human complement C3a receptor (C3aR) were developed from the almost inactive tripeptide Leu-Ala-Arg corresponding to the three C-terminal residues of the endogenous peptide agonist C3a. The analogous Leu-Ser-Arg was modified by condensing the serine side chain with the leucine carbonyl with elimination of water to form leucine-oxazole-arginine. Subsequent elaboration with a variety of N-terminal amide capping groups produced agonists as potent as human C3a itself in stimulating Ca(2+) release from human macrophages. Structure-activity relationships are discussed. PMID:26522948

  10. Disease modification of breast cancer-induced bone remodeling by cannabinoid 2 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Ondoua, Alysia N; Hanlon, Katherine E; Symons-Liguori, Ashley M; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Havelin, Josh J; Ferland, Henry L; Chandramouli, Anupama; Owusu-Ankomah, Mabel; Nikolich-Zugich, Tijana; Bloom, Aaron P; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; King, Tamara; Porreca, Frank; Nelson, Mark A; Mantyh, Patrick W; Vanderah, Todd W

    2013-01-01

    Most commonly originating from breast malignancies, metastatic bone cancer causes bone destruction and severe pain. Although novel chemotherapeutic agents have increased life expectancy, patients are experiencing higher incidences of fracture, pain, and drug-induced side effects; furthermore, recent findings suggest that patients are severely undertreated for their cancer pain. Strong analgesics, namely opiates, are first-line therapy in alleviating cancer-related pain despite the severe side effects, including enhanced bone destruction with sustained administration. Bone resorption is primarily treated with bisphosphonates, which are associated with highly undesirable side effects, including nephrotoxicity and osteonecrosis of the jaw. In contrast, cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB(2) ) receptor-specific agonists have been shown to reduce bone loss and stimulate bone formation in a model of osteoporosis. CB(2) agonists produce analgesia in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. Notably, mixed CB(1) /CB(2) agonists also demonstrate a reduction in ErbB2-driven breast cancer progression. Here we demonstrate for the first time that CB(2) agonists reduce breast cancer-induced bone pain, bone loss, and breast cancer proliferation via cytokine/chemokine suppression. Studies used the spontaneously-occurring murine mammary cell line (66.1) implanted into the femur intramedullary space; measurements of spontaneous pain, bone loss, and cancer proliferation were made. The systemic administration of a CB(2) agonist, JWH015, for 7 days significantly attenuated bone remodeling, assuaged spontaneous pain, and decreased primary tumor burden. CB(2) -mediated effects in vivo were reversed by concurrent treatment with a CB(2) antagonist/inverse agonist but not with a CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist. In vitro, JWH015 reduced cancer cell proliferation and inflammatory mediators that have been shown to promote pain, bone loss, and proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest CB(2) agonists as a novel treatment for breast cancer-induced bone pain, in which disease modifications include a reduction in bone loss, suppression of cancer growth, attenuation of severe bone pain, and increased survival without the major side effects of current therapeutic options. PMID:22903605

  11. Effect of Light and Melatonin and Other Melatonin Receptor Agonists on Human Circadian Physiology.

    PubMed

    Emens, Jonathan S; Burgess, Helen J

    2015-12-01

    Circadian (body clock) timing has a profound influence on mental health, physical health, and health behaviors. This review focuses on how light, melatonin, and other melatonin receptor agonist drugs can be used to shift circadian timing in patients with misaligned circadian rhythms. A brief overview of the human circadian system is provided, followed by a discussion of patient characteristics and safety considerations that can influence the treatment of choice. The important features of light treatment, light avoidance, exogenous melatonin, and other melatonin receptor agonists are reviewed, along with some of the practical aspects of light and melatonin treatment. PMID:26568121

  12. Synthesis and SAR studies of bicyclic amine series GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Sakairi, Masao; Kogami, Masakazu; Torii, Masafumi; Kataoka, Hiroyo; Fujieda, Hiroki; Makino, Mitsuhiro; Kataoka, Daisuke; Okamoto, Ryuji; Miyazawa, Toshiyuki; Okabe, Morio; Inoue, Megumi; Takahashi, Naoki; Harada, Satoko; Watanabe, Nobuhide

    2012-08-01

    We disclosed a novel series of G-protein coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) agonists based on a bicyclic amine scaffold. Through the optimization of hit compound 1, we discovered that the basic nitrogen atom of bicyclic amine played an important role in GPR119 agonist activity expression and that an indanone in various bicyclic rings was suitable in this series of compounds. The indanone derivative 2 showed the effect of plasma glucose control in oGTT and scGTT in the rodent model. PMID:22765901

  13. Design of Potent and Orally Active GPR119 Agonists for the Treatment of Type II Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Hu, Zhiyong; DuBois, Byron G; Moyes, Christopher R; Hunter, David N; Zhu, Cheng; Kar, Nam Fung; Zhu, Yuping; Garfunkle, Joie; Kang, Ling; Chicchi, Gary; Ehrhardt, Anka; Woods, Andrea; Seo, Toru; Woods, Morgan; van Heek, Margaret; Dingley, Karen H; Pang, Jianmei; Salituro, Gino M; Powell, Joyce; Terebetski, Jenna L; Hornak, Viktor; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Lamberson, Joe; Ujjainwalla, Fez; Miller, Michael; Stamford, Andrew; Wood, Harold B; Kowalski, Timothy; Nargund, Ravi P; Edmondson, Scott D

    2015-08-13

    We report herein the design and synthesis of a series of potent and selective GPR119 agonists. Our objective was to develop a GPR119 agonist with properties that were suitable for fixed-dose combination with a DPP4 inhibitor. Starting from a phenoxy analogue (1), medicinal chemistry efforts directed toward reducing half-life and increasing solubility led to the synthesis of a series of benzyloxy analogues. Compound 28 was chosen for further profiling because of its favorable physicochemical properties and excellent GPR119 potency across species. This compound exhibited a clean off-target profile in counterscreens and good in vivo efficacy in mouse oGTT. PMID:26288697

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of thienopyrimidine derivatives as GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Moon-Kook; Lee, Kyu Myung; Kim, Il Hyang; Jang, Yoon Kyung; Kang, Seung Kyu; Lee, Jun Mi; Jung, Kwan-Young; Kumar, Jaladi Ashok; Rhee, Sang Dal; Jung, Won Hoon; Song, Jin Sook; Bae, Myung Ae; Kim, Kwang Rok; Ahn, Jin Hee

    2014-09-01

    A series of thienopyrimidine derivatives was synthesized and evaluated for their GPR119 agonistic ability. Several thienopyrimidine derivatives containing R(1) and R(2) substituents displayed potent GPR119 agonistic activity. Among them, compound 5d, which is a prototype, showed good in vitro activity with an EC50 value of 3 nM and human and rat liver microsomal stability. Compound 5d exhibited no CYP inhibition and induction, Herg binding, or mutagenic potential. Compound 5d showed increase insulin secretion in beta TC-6 cell and lowered the glucose excursion in mice in an oral glucose-tolerance test. PMID:25082125

  15. hors les murs des plantes

    E-print Network

    hors les murs au jardin des plantes 16 oct./ 201523 nov. mnhn.fr -- fiac.com 57 rue Cuvier -- Paris Georges-Philippe et Nathalie Vallois, Paris 5 - Lara Almarcegui Rocks of Spitsbergen, 2014, Présentée par 11 - Virginie Yassef L'objet du doute, 2013 Présentée par la Galerie Georges-Philippe et Nathalie

  16. DIRECTEUR DU CENTRE DES HUMANITS

    E-print Network

    Fiore, Marco

    activité profes- sionnelle. Les cours de connaissance de l'entreprise et de management visent cette transversale de cinquième année consacrée à l'innovation et à la créativité. Il est impliqué dans le projet d campus, l'INSA Lyon propose un véri- table environnement où la créativité artistique et culturelle des

  17. Deuxi eme partie Structure des ^

    E-print Network

    Clouard, Valerie

    and depth of frozen magma chambers under atolls and islands of French Polynesia using detailed gravity des ^ les et atolls de Polyn esie francaise qui a donn e lieu #12;a une publication dans le Journal under atolls and islands of French Polynesia using detailed gravity studies" R esum e De nouvelles

  18. Conformational comparisons of oxytocin agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists using laser Raman and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Examination of 1-penicillamine and diastereoisomeric analogues.

    PubMed

    Hruby, V J; Mosberg, H I; Fox, J W; Tu, A T

    1982-05-10

    The biological activity of peptide hormones and analogues depends on the structural and conformational properties of these compounds. A comparative study of the conformational properties of diastereoisomeric analogues of oxytocin with weak agonist activities (fully active but low potency), partial agonist activity (only able to partially induce biological response), and of conformationally restricted 1-penicillamine analogues with potent antagonist activity (no intrinsic activity, but can block the hormone's activity) was made using circular dichroism and laser Raman spectroscopies. Conformational information regarding the peptide amide, disulfide, and tyrosine chromophores was obtained, and indicates differences in the hormone agonists and antagonists. The diastereoisomeric oxytocin analogues [1-hemi-D-cystine]-, [2-D-tyrosine]-, and [5-D-asparagine]-oxytocin, have spectral features consistent with overall backbone conformations similar to oxytocin itself, but with differences in side chain moieties. This suggests that the substantial decrease in potency of the diastereoisomeric oxytocin analogues is due to changes in the relative orientations of the side chains. In contrast, the 1-penicillamine analogues of the present study, [1-penicillamine, 4-threonine]- and [1-penicillamine, 2-phenylalanine, 4-threonine]-oxytocin, like 1-penicillamine oxytocin analogues previously examined, have different backbone and disulfide conformations than oxytocin. All the 1-penicillamine oxytocin derivatives thus far examined appear, from laser Raman and CD data, to have similar topologies. However, those of the present study seem to have more rigid conformations as evidenced by very intense amide n-pi* and tyrosine pi-pi* CD transitions. PMID:7068672

  19. Standard Opioid Agonists Activate Heteromeric Opioid Receptors: Evidence for Morphine and [d-Ala2-MePhe4-Glyol5]Enkephalin as Selective ??? Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Research in the opioid field has relied heavily on the use of standard agonist ligands such as morphine, [d-Ala2-MePhe4-Glyol5]enkephalin (DAMGO), U69593, bremazocine, [d-Pen2d-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE), and deltorphin-II as tools for investigating the three major types of opioid receptors, MOP (?), KOP (?), and DOP (?), that mediate antinociception. The functional selectivity of these ligands has been based on the assumption that opioid receptors exist as homomers. As numerous studies in cultured cells have suggested that opioid receptors can associate both as homomers and heteromers, we have investigated the selectivity of these standard ligands using intracellular calcium release and [35S]GTP?S assays in HEK-293 cells that contain singly and coexpressed opioid receptors. The present study reveals that morphine and DAMGO, traditionally classified as ? selective agonists, selectively activate ??? heteromeric opioid receptors with greater efficacy than homomeric opioid receptors. Moreover, standard ligands that have been widely employed as ?- and ?-selective agonists display little or no differences in the activation of homomeric and heteromeric opioid receptors. The far-reaching implications of these results are discussed. PMID:22816017

  20. Securinine, a GABAA receptor antagonist, enhances macrophage clearance of phase II C. burnetii: comparison with TLR agonists.

    PubMed

    Lubick, Kirk; Radke, Miranda; Jutila, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Innate immune cell stimulation represents a complementary approach to vaccines and antimicrobial drugs to counter infectious disease. We have used assays of macrophage activation and in vitro and in vivo phase II Coxiella burnetii infection models to compare and contrast the activity of a novel innate immune cell agonist, securinine, with known TLR agonists. As expected, TLR agonists, such as LPS (TLR4) and fibroblast-stimulating lipopeptide-1 (FSL-1; TLR2), induced macrophage activation and increased macrophage killing of phase II C. burnetii in vitro. FSL-1 also induced accelerated killing of C. burnetii in vivo. Securinine, a gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor antagonist, was found to induce TLR-independent macrophage activation in vitro, leading to IL-8 secretion, L-selectin down-regulation, and CD11b and MHC Class II antigen up-regulation. As seen with the TLR agonists, securinine also induced accelerated macrophage killing of C. burnetii in vitro and in vivo. In summary, as predicted by the literature, TLR agonists enhance macrophage killing of phase II C. burnetii in vitro, and at least for TLR2 agonists, this activity occurs in vivo as well. Securinine represents a novel macrophage agonist, which has similar effects as TLR agonists in this model yet apparently, does not act through known TLRs. Securinine has minimal toxicity in vivo, suggesting it or structurally similar compounds may represent novel, therapeutic adjuvants, which increase resistance to intracellular pathogens. PMID:17698917

  1. Probing the 2 Adrenoceptor Binding Site with Catechol Reveals Differences in Binding and Activation by Agonists and

    E-print Network

    Kobilka, Brian

    Probing the 2 Adrenoceptor Binding Site with Catechol Reveals Differences in Binding and Activation. In the present study, we use catechol (1,2-benzenediol, a structural component of catecholamine agonists, such as isoproterenol, and by the struc- turally related non-catechol partial agonist salbutamol. Us- ing biophysical

  2. Effect of beta-ADrenergic Agonist on Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Because it seems logical that these agonists exert their action on muscle through stimulation of cAMP synthesis, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax levels were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. In addition, the EC50 values for isoproterenol, cimaterol, clenbuterol, epinephrine, and albuterol were 360 nM, 630 nM, 900 nM, 2,470 nM, and 3,650 nM, respectively. Finally, dose response curves show that the concentrations of cimaterol and clenbuterol in culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals had no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP accumulation in chicken skeletal muscle cells.

  3. Can alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists reverse or prevent tolerance to the antinociceptive activity of opioids in rats?

    PubMed

    De Kock, M; Meert, T F

    1995-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the possible role of some alpha 2-agonists in the phenomenon of tolerance to opioid-induced antinociception. To do so, the alpha 2-agonists were tested alone and in combination with opioids in naive and repeatedly fentanyl-treated rats in the tail withdrawal reaction (TWR) test. Under the treatment schedule used, rats became tolerant to fentanyl and cross-tolerance was observed with other opioids. The alpha 2-agonists alone were inactive in opioid naive and repeatedly fentanyl-treated rats. The potentiating interaction between the alpha 2-agonists and fentanyl in naive animals diminished considerably after the repeated fentanyl treatment. Adding an alpha 2-agonist to high doses of fentanyl during repeated treatment resulted in a complete tolerance to both compounds. Using lower, but equipotent antinociceptive drug combinations of alpha 2-agonists and opioids, resulted in less tolerance. Alpha 2-agonists are thus unable to directly overcome tolerance to the antinociceptive activity of fentanyl in tolerant animals. Nevertheless, by lowering the dose of the opioid for an equipotent antinociceptive activity, alpha 2-agonists are able to delay the onset of tolerance, probably based on the concept of opioid receptor sparing. PMID:8669220

  4. Effect of mu Agonists on Long-Term Survival and Recurrence in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Qu, Xiao; Wang, Ying; Shen, Hongchang; Liu, Qi; Du, Jiajun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Opioids are widely used for postoperative analgesia. Morphine may have an effect on cell replication, migration, and cancer recurrence. However, the association of postoperative mu agonists with outcome of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients has not been fully investigated. We retrospectively evaluated the impact of postoperative mu agonists on overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in early stage NSCLC patients. Patients and relevant medical information were selected from the Bio-Bank of Shandong Provincial Hospital. Difference of clinicopathologic information in postoperative mu agonists group and no mu agonists group was analyzed by ?2 test. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis were conducted and represented as hazards ratio and 95% confidence interval form. The primary endpoint was OS and secondary endpoint was DFS. This retrospective study included 984 consecutive NSCLC patients who underwent surgery between January 2006 and December 2011. No significant difference existed between postoperative mu agonists usage group and no mu agonists usage group in clinicopathologic information except operation type (P?=?0.041). Postoperative mu agonists usage was related to shorter OS (HR 1.514, 95% CI 1.197–1.916, P?=?0.001) and shorter DFS (HR 1.415, 95% CI 1.123–1.781, P?=?0.003) in the multivariate Cox regression model. For the patients who received postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy postoperative mu agonists also predict shorter survival (HR 1.437, 95% CI 1.041–1.982, P?=?0.027). Subgroup analysis showed that administration of postoperative mu agonists was related to shorter OS, especially in males, more smoking, poor differential degree, bilobectomy or pneumonectomy, and stage III subgroup, respectively. Administration of postoperative mu agonists was related to shorter OS and DFS for the NSCLC patients who underwent surgery. PMID:26287418

  5. Comparative gene expression profiles induced by PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Renaud, Marie Pierre; Claude, Nancy; Guillouzo, Andre; Spire, Catherine

    2011-07-01

    Species-differential toxic effects have been described with PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists between rodent and human liver. PPAR{alpha} agonists (fibrates) are potent hypocholesterolemic agents in humans while they induce peroxisome proliferation and tumors in rodent liver. By contrast, PPAR{gamma} agonists (glitazones) and even dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists (glitazars) have caused idiosyncratic hepatic and nonhepatic toxicities in human without evidence of any damage in rodent during preclinical studies. The mechanisms involved in such differences remain largely unknown. Several studies have identified the major target genes of PPAR{alpha} agonists in rodent liver while no comprehensive analysis has been performed on gene expression changes induced by PPAR{gamma} and dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists. Here, we investigated transcriptomes of rat hepatocytes after 24 h treatment with two PPAR{gamma} (troglitazone and rosiglitazone) and two PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} (muraglitazar and tesaglitazar) agonists. Although, hierarchical clustering revealed a gene expression profile characteristic of each PPAR agonist class, only a limited number of genes was specifically deregulated by glitazars. Functional analyses showed that many genes known as PPAR{alpha} targets were also modulated by both PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists and quantitative differences in gene expression profiles were observed between these two classes. Moreover, most major genes modulated in rat hepatocytes were also found to be deregulated in rat liver after tesaglitazar treatment. Taken altogether, these results support the conclusion that differential toxic effects of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists in rodent liver do not result from transcriptional deregulation of major PPAR target genes but rather from qualitative and/or quantitative differential responses of a small subset of genes.

  6. 21 CFR 530.41 - Drugs prohibited for extralabel use in animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Chloramphenicol; (2) Clenbuterol; (3) Diethylstilbestrol (DES); (4) Dimetridazole; (5) Ipronidazole; (6) Other...) Adamantanes. (2) Neuraminidase inhibitors. Effective Date Note: At 77 FR 745, Jan. 6, 2012, § 530.41...

  7. Treatment Options by Stage (Vaginal Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... drug DES (diethylstilbestrol) before birth affect a woman’s risk of vaginal cancer. Anything that increases your risk ... another part of the body, it is called metastasis . Cancer cells break away from where they began ( ...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Vaginal Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... drug DES (diethylstilbestrol) before birth affect a woman’s risk of vaginal cancer. Anything that increases your risk ... another part of the body, it is called metastasis . Cancer cells break away from where they began ( ...

  9. Environmental enrichment improves novel object recognition and enhances agonistic behavior in male mice.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Gresa, Patricia; Pérez-Martinez, Asunción; Redolat, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an experimental paradigm in which rodents are housed in complex environments containing objects that provide stimulation, the effects of which are expected to improve the welfare of these subjects. EE has been shown to considerably improve learning and memory in rodents. However, knowledge about the effects of EE on social interaction is generally limited and rather controversial. Thus, our aim was to evaluate both novel object recognition and agonistic behavior in NMRI mice receiving EE, hypothesizing enhanced cognition and slightly enhanced agonistic interaction upon EE rearing. During a 4-week period half the mice (n = 16) were exposed to EE and the other half (n = 16) remained in a standard environment (SE). On PND 56-57, animals performed the object recognition test, in which recognition memory was measured using a discrimination index. The social interaction test consisted of an encounter between an experimental animal and a standard opponent. Results indicated that EE mice explored the new object for longer periods than SE animals (P < .05). During social encounters, EE mice devoted more time to sociability and agonistic behavior (P < .05) than their non-EE counterparts. In conclusion, EE has been shown to improve object recognition and increase agonistic behavior in adolescent/early adulthood mice. In the future we intend to extend this study on a longitudinal basis in order to assess in more depth the effect of EE and the consistency of the above-mentioned observations in NMRI mice. PMID:23588702

  10. Identification of a New Type of Covalent PPAR? Agonist using a Ligand-Linking Strategy.

    PubMed

    Ohtera, Anna; Miyamae, Yusaku; Yoshida, Kotaro; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Akita, Toru; Kakizuka, Akira; Irie, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Nagao, Masaya

    2015-12-18

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays an important role in adipogenesis and glucose metabolism. The ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of PPAR? has a large Y-shaped cavity with multiple subpockets where multiple ligands can simultaneously bind and cooperatively activate PPAR?. Focusing on this unique property of the PPAR? LBP, we describe a novel two-step cell-based strategy to develop PPAR? ligands. First, a combination of ligands that cooperatively activates PPAR? was identified using a luciferase reporter assay. Second, hybrid ligands were designed and synthesized. For proof of concept, we focused on covalent agonists, which activate PPAR? through a unique activation mechanism regulated by a covalent linkage with the Cys285 residue in the PPAR? LBP. Despite their biological significance and pharmacological potential, few covalent PPAR? agonists are known except for endogenous fatty acid metabolites. With our strategy, we determined that plant-derived cinnamic acid derivatives cooperatively activated PPAR? by combining with GW9662, an irreversible antagonist. GW9662 covalently reacts with the Cys285 residue. A docking study predicted that a cinnamic acid derivative can bind to the open cavity in GW9662-bound PPAR? LBP. On the basis of the putative binding mode, structures of both ligands were linked successfully to create a potent PPAR? agonist, which enhanced the transactivation potential of PPAR? at submicromolar levels through covalent modification of Cys285. Our approach could lead to the discovery of novel high-potency PPAR? agonists. PMID:26414848

  11. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    Along with the method of use, the technology encompasses the use of these agonist epitopes in peptide- and protein-based vaccines, with dendritic cells or other antigen presenting cells, or encoding sequences in DNA, viral, bacterial, yeast, or other types of vectors, or to stimulate T-cells in vitro for adoptive immunotherapy protocols.

  12. Trichokonin VI, a new Ca2+ channel agonist in bullfrog cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Q; Tezuka, Y; Kikuchi, T; Momose, Y

    1994-12-12

    The effects of trichokonin VI (= gliodeliquescin A), a peptaibol isolated from the culture broth of Trichoderma koningii Oudemans, on L-type Ca2+ channel currents in single bullfrog atrial cells were investigated. Our results showed that trichokonin VI is a new potent agonist of L-type Ca2+ channels in cardiac membranes. PMID:7698190

  13. Long-Term Consequences of Agonistic Interactions Between Socially Naive Juvenile American Lobsters

    E-print Network

    Cromarty, Stuart I.

    Long-Term Consequences of Agonistic Interactions Between Socially Nai¨ve Juvenile American Lobsters¨ve juvenile American lobsters (Homarus americanus) by examining the time frame over which be- havior changes- cially nai¨ve juvenile lobsters is influenced by fight experi- ence for at least 4 days. Though

  14. [Male-to-female agonistic support for copulation in Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Huangshan, China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Li, Jin-Hua; Xia, Dong-Po; Zhu, Yong; Sun, Bing-Hua; Wang, Xi; Zhu, Lei

    2013-06-01

    Biological market theory predicts that animals exchange the same commodities, or interchange different ones, to their mutual benefit. Using focal and behavioral sampling methods and continuous recording techniques, we studied Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) in two study groups (YA1 and YA2) at Huangshan, China to see whether adults interchanged male-to-female agonistic support for copulation. Overall, male-to-female agonistic support was significantly correlated with copulation behaviors when data from both study groups were combined. For YA1, copulations in post-agonistic support observation (PO) was greater, but not significantly so, than random observation (RO) in the breeding season, and copulation in PO was significantly greater than RO in the non-breeding season. For YA2 copulations in PO were significantly greater than RO in both breeding and non-breeding seasons. These results suggest that a male who extends post-agonistic support to a female is significantly more likely to copulate with her. Our study provides evidence for the existence of a biological market involving interchanged social behaviors. Our study also illuminates the reproductive strategies of male competition and female choice in this species. PMID:23775987

  15. Nebulized PPAR? Agonists: A Novel Approach to Augment Neonatal Lung Maturation and Injury Repair

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Edith; Sakurai, Reiko; Husain, Sumair; Paek, Dave; Gong, Ming; Ibe, Basil; Li, Yishi; Husain, Maleha; Torday, John S.; Rehan, Virender K.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND By stimulating lipofibroblast maturation, parenterally administered PPAR? agonists promote lung homeostasis and injury repair in the neonatal lung. In this study, we determined whether PPAR? agonists could be delivered effectively via nebulization to neonates, and whether this approach would also protect against hyperoxia-induced lung injury. METHODS One-day old Sprague-Dawley rat pups were administered PPAR? agonists rosiglitazone (RGZ, 3 mg/kg), pioglitazone (PGZ, 3 mg/kg), or the diluent, via nebulization every 24h; animals were exposed to 21% or 95% O2 for up to 72h. Twenty-four and 72h following initial nebulization, the pups were sacrificed for lung tissue and blood collection to determine markers of lung maturation, injury repair, and RGZ and PGZ plasma levels. RESULTS Nebulized RGZ and PGZ enhanced lung maturation in both males and females, as evidenced by the increased expression of markers of alveolar epithelial and mesenchymal maturation. This approach also protected against hyperoxia-induced lung injury, since hyperoxia-induced changes in bronchoalveolar lavage cell and protein contents and lung injury markers were all blocked by nebulized PGZ. CONCLUSIONS Nebulized PPAR? agonist administration promotes lung maturation and prevents neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury in both males and females. PMID:24488089

  16. Disruption of insect diapause using agonists and an antagonist of diapause hormone

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qirui; Nachman, Ronald J.; Kaczmarek, Krzysztof; Zabrocki, Janusz; Denlinger, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The dormant state known as diapause is widely exploited by insects to circumvent winter and other adverse seasons. For an insect to survive, feed, and reproduce at the appropriate time of year requires fine coordination of the timing of entry into and exit from diapause. One of the hormones that regulates diapause in moths is the 24-aa neuropeptide, diapause hormone (DH). Among members of the Helicoverpa/Heliothis complex of agricultural pests, DH prompts the termination of pupal diapause. Based on the structure of DH, we designed several agonists that are much more active than DH in breaking diapause. One such agonist that we describe also prevents the entry into pupal diapause when administered to larvae that are environmentally programmed for diapause. In addition, we used the unique antagonist development strategy of incorporating a dihydroimidazole (“Jones”) trans-Proline mimetic motif into one of our DH agonists, thereby converting the agonist into a DH antagonist that blocks the termination of diapause. These results suggest potential for using such agents or next-generation derivatives for derailing the success of overwintering in pest species. PMID:21940497

  17. An Assessment of the Potential Uses of Agonistic Behaviors in Termite Control1

    E-print Network

    An Assessment of the Potential Uses of Agonistic Behaviors in Termite Control1 Barbara L. Thorne Michael I. Haverty2 Abstract: The potential use of termite-termite agonism in pest control is explored and evaluated. Intra- and interspecific en- counters among termites from different colonies are known to result

  18. Predicted structure of agonist-bound glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor, a class

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    receptor (GLP1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in insulin synthesis and regulation; therePredicted structure of agonist-bound glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor, a class B G protein the MembStruk method for scanning TM bundle conformations. We used protein­protein docking methods

  19. Agonistic aptamer to the insulin receptor leads to biased signaling and functional selectivity through allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Yunn, Na-Oh; Koh, Ara; Han, Seungmin; Lim, Jong Hun; Park, Sehoon; Lee, Jiyoun; Kim, Eui; Jang, Sung Key; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-09-18

    Due to their high affinity and specificity, aptamers have been widely used as effective inhibitors in clinical applications. However, the ability to activate protein function through aptamer-protein interaction has not been well-elucidated. To investigate their potential as target-specific agonists, we used SELEX to generate aptamers to the insulin receptor (IR) and identified an agonistic aptamer named IR-A48 that specifically binds to IR, but not to IGF-1 receptor. Despite its capacity to stimulate IR autophosphorylation, similar to insulin, we found that IR-A48 not only binds to an allosteric site distinct from the insulin binding site, but also preferentially induces Y1150 phosphorylation in the IR kinase domain. Moreover, Y1150-biased phosphorylation induced by IR-A48 selectively activates specific signaling pathways downstream of IR. In contrast to insulin-mediated activation of IR, IR-A48 binding has little effect on the MAPK pathway and proliferation of cancer cells. Instead, AKT S473 phosphorylation is highly stimulated by IR-A48, resulting in increased glucose uptake both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we present IR-A48 as a biased agonist able to selectively induce the metabolic activity of IR through allosteric binding. Furthermore, our study also suggests that aptamers can be a promising tool for developing artificial biased agonists to targeted receptors. PMID:26245346

  20. MECHANISMS UNDERLYING ALC13 INHIBITION OF AGONIST-STIMULATED INOSITOL PHOSPHATE ACCUMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Possible mechanisms of AlC13-induced inhibition of agonist-stimulated inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation were investigated using rat brain cortex slices, synaptosomes or homogenates. nder conditions in which AlC13 inhibits carbachol (CARB) stimulated IP accumulation (Gp-mediate...

  1. The ?7 nAChR selective agonists as drug candidates for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huaimeng; Gu, Ruoxu; Wei, Dongqing

    2015-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ion channels distribute in the central or peripheral nervous system. They are receptors of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and activation of them by agonists mediates synaptic transmission in the neuron and muscle contraction in the neuromuscular junction. Current studies reveal relationship between the nAChRs and the learning and memory as well as cognation deficit in various neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and drug addiction. There are various subtypes in the nAChR family and the ?7 nAChR is one of the most abundant subtypes in the brain. The ?7 nAChR is significantly reduced in the patients of Alzheimer's disease and is believed to interact with the A? amyloid. A? amyloid is co-localized with ?7 nAChR in the senile plaque and interaction between them induces neuron apoptosis and reduction of the ?7 nAChR expression. Treatment with ?7 agonist in vivo shows its neuron protective and procognation properties and significantly improves the learning and memory ability of the animal models. Therefore, the ?7 nAChR agonists are excellent drug candidates for Alzheimer's disease and we summarized here the current agonists that have selectivity of the ?7 nAChR over the other nAChR, introduced recent molecular modeling works trying to explain the molecular mechanism of their selectivity and described the design of novel allosteric modulators in our lab. PMID:25387975

  2. Agonist-induced activation of rat mesenteric resistance vessels: comparison between noradrenaline and vasopressin

    SciTech Connect

    Cauvin, C.; Weir, S.W.; Wallnoefer, A.R.; Rueegg, U.P.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of noradrenaline (NA, 10(-5) M) and (arginine8)vasopressin (AVP, 10(-7) M) on tension in Ca2+-free medium and on membrane potential, and the inhibition of NA- and AVP-induced contractions by isradipine, have been compared in mesenteric resistance vessels (MRVs) from Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. The release of intracellular Ca2+ by AVP contributed significantly less to its tension development than does that by NA. Nonetheless, the concentration-response curves for inhibition by isradipine of NA- and AVP-induced tonic tension were nearly identical. Similarly, these two agonists produced the same degree of membrane depolarization. In addition, both agonists were able to stimulate large contractions in vessels previously depolarized by 80 mM K+. AVP also stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx into rat cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. In contrast to the stimulation of /sup 45/Ca influx by KCl depolarization, the agonist-stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx was insensitive to inhibition by organic Ca2+ antagonists. It is concluded that Ca2+ entry through receptor-operated Ca2+-permeable channels (ROCs) may contribute to agonist-induced activation of rat aortic and MRV smooth muscle.

  3. The transcriptional PPAR?/? network in human macrophages defines a unique agonist-induced activation state

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Till; Wortmann, Annika; Schumann, Tim; Finkernagel, Florian; Lieber, Sonja; Roth, Katrin; Toth, Philipp M.; Diederich, Wibke E.; Nist, Andrea; Stiewe, Thorsten; Kleinesudeik, Lara; Reinartz, Silke; Müller-Brüsselbach, Sabine; Müller, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ?/? (PPAR?/?) is a lipid ligand-inducible transcription factor with established metabolic functions, whereas its anti-inflammatory function is poorly understood. To address this issue, we determined the global PPAR?/?-regulated signaling network in human monocyte-derived macrophages. Besides cell type-independent, canonical target genes with metabolic and immune regulatory functions we identified a large number of inflammation-associated NF?B and STAT1 target genes that are repressed by agonists. Accordingly, PPAR?/? agonists inhibited the expression of multiple pro-inflammatory mediators and induced an anti-inflammatory, IL-4-like morphological phenotype. Surprisingly, bioinformatic analyses also identified immune stimulatory effects. Consistent with this prediction, PPAR?/? agonists enhanced macrophage survival under hypoxic stress and stimulated CD8+ T cell activation, concomitantly with the repression of immune suppressive target genes and their encoded products CD274 (PD-1 ligand), CD32B (inhibitory Fc? receptor IIB) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO-1), as well as a diminished release of the immune suppressive IDO-1 metabolite kynurenine. Comparison with published data revealed a significant overlap of the PPAR?/? transcriptome with coexpression modules characteristic of both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our findings indicate that PPAR?/? agonists induce a unique macrophage activation state with strong anti-inflammatory but also specific immune stimulatory components, pointing to a context-dependent function of PPAR?/? in immune regulation. PMID:25934804

  4. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of novel ?-opioid receptor agonist compounds.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Yoshiaki; Kurosawa, Aya; Saikawa, Hitomi; Kuroiwa, Satoshi; Suzuki, Chiharu; Kuwabara, Nobuo; Hoshino, Hazime; Obata, Hideaki; Saito, Shigeru; Saito, Tamio; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Isao; Sezutsu, Hideki; Takeda, Shigeki

    2015-11-15

    Opioids are the most effective and widely used drugs for pain treatment. Morphine is an archetypal opioid and is an opioid receptor agonist. Unfortunately, the clinical usefulness of morphine is limited by adverse effects such as analgesic tolerance and addiction. Therefore, it is important to study the development of novel opioid agonists as part of pain control. The analgesic effects of opioids are mediated by three opioid receptors, namely opioid ?-, ?-, and ?-receptors. They belong to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily and are coupled to Gi proteins. In the present study, we developed a ligand screening system to identify novel opioid ?-receptor agonists that measures [(35)S]GTP?S binding to cell membrane fractions prepared from the fat body of transgenic silkworms expressing ?-receptor-Gi1? fusion protein. We screened the RIKEN Natural Products Depository (NPDepo) chemical library, which contains 5848 compounds, and analogs of hit compounds. We successfully identified a novel, structurally unique compound, that we named GUM1, with agonist activity for the opioid ?-receptor (EC50 of 1.2µM). The Plantar Test (Hargreaves' Method) demonstrated that subcutaneous injection of 3mg/kg of GUM1 into wild-type rats significantly extended latency time. This extension was also observed in a rat model of morphine tolerance and was inhibited by pre-treatment of naloxone. The unique molecular skeleton of GUM1 makes it an attractive molecule for further ligand-opioid receptor binding studies. PMID:26476280

  5. Use of toll-like receptor agonists to reduce Salmonella colonization in neonatal swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are members of a highly conserved group of receptors which recognize conserved molecular aspects of microbes. The purpose of these experiments were to ascertain the effects of the administration of the TLR 9 agonist, CpG, on the colonization of neonatal swine with Salmonel...

  6. Differential Effects of Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist on Social Discrimination and Contextual Fear in Amygdala and Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 5 [mu]g/side) microinjected into the hippocampus or the amygdala would differentially affect memory processes in a neutral vs. an aversive task. In the aversive contextual fear task, WIN into the basolateral amygdala impaired fear acquisition/consolidation, but not retrieval.…

  7. THE MORPHOLOGICAL BASIS FOR OLFACTORY PERCEPTION OF STEROIDS DUING AGONISTIC BEHAVIOR IN LOBSTER: PRELIMINARY EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The morphological basis for olfactory perception of steroids during agonistic behavior in lobsters: preliminary experiments. Borsay Horowitz, DJ1, Kass-Simon, G2, Coglianese, D2, Martin, L2, Boseman, M2, Cromarty, S3, Randall, K3, Fini, A.3 1US EPA, NHEERL, ORD, Atlantic Ecology...

  8. Primary Macrophage Chemotaxis Induced by Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Agonists Occurs Independently of the CB2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lewis; Christou, Ivy; Kapellos, Theodore S.; Buchan, Alice; Brodermann, Maximillian H.; Gianella-Borradori, Matteo; Russell, Angela; Iqbal, Asif J.; Greaves, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CB2 has been demonstrated to induce directed immune cell migration. However, the ability of CB2 to act as a chemoattractant receptor in macrophages remains largely unexplored. Using a real-time chemotaxis assay and a panel of chemically diverse and widely used CB2 agonists, we set out to examine whether CB2 modulates primary murine macrophage chemotaxis. We report that of 12 agonists tested, only JWH133, HU308, L-759,656 and L-759,633 acted as macrophage chemoattractants. Surprisingly, neither pharmacological inhibition nor genetic ablation of CB2 had any effect on CB2 agonist-induced macrophage chemotaxis. As chemotaxis was pertussis toxin sensitive in both WT and CB2-/- macrophages, we concluded that a non-CB1/CB2, Gi/o-coupled GPCR must be responsible for CB2 agonist-induced macrophage migration. The obvious candidate receptors GPR18 and GPR55 could not mediate JWH133 or HU308-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement or JWH133-induced ?-arrestin recruitment in cells transfected with either receptor, demonstrating that neither are the unidentified GPCR. Taken together our results conclusively demonstrate that CB2 is not a chemoattractant receptor for murine macrophages. Furthermore we show for the first time that JWH133, HU308, L-759,656 and L-759,633 have off-target effects of functional consequence in primary cells and we believe that our findings have wide ranging implications for the entire cannabinoid field. PMID:26033291

  9. Modeling the G-protein-coupled neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor agonist and antagonist binding sites.

    PubMed

    Du, P; Salon, J A; Tamm, J A; Hou, C; Cui, W; Walker, M W; Adham, N; Dhanoa, D S; Islam, I; Vaysse, P J; Dowling, B; Shifman, Y; Boyle, N; Rueger, H; Schmidlin, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Branchek, T A; Weinshank, R L; Gluchowski, C

    1997-02-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily and mediate several physiological responses, such as blood pressure, food intake, sedation and memory retention. To understand the interactions between the NPY Y1 receptor subtype and its ligands, computer modeling was applied to the natural peptide agonist, NPY and a small molecule antagonist, BIBP3226. An agonist and antagonist binding domain was elucidated using mutagenesis data for the Y1 receptor as well as for other GPCR families. The agonist and antagonist ligands which were investigated appear to share common residues for their interaction within the transmembrane regions of the Y1 receptor structure, including Gln120, Asn283 and His306. This is in contrast to findings with tachykinin receptors where the binding domains of the non-peptide antagonists have very little in common with the binding domains of the agonist, substance-P. In addition, a hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group of Tyr36 of NPY and the side chain of Gln219, an interaction that is absent in the model complex between Y1 and the antagonist BIBP3226, is proposed as one of the potential interactions necessary for receptor activation. PMID:9089810

  10. Discovery of Natural Phenols as G Protein-Coupled Receptor-35 (GPR35) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery and characterization of natural phenols as G protein-coupled receptor-35 (GPR35) agonists. Pharmacological characterization using label-free dynamic mass redistribution and Tango ?-arrestin translocation assays revealed that GPR35-active natural phenols are divergent in their biased agonism. PMID:24900447

  11. Discovery of a novel series of indoline carbamate and indolinylpyrimidine derivatives as potent GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kenjiro; Sugimoto, Hiromichi; Rikimaru, Kentaro; Imoto, Hiroshi; Kamaura, Masahiro; Negoro, Nobuyuki; Tsujihata, Yoshiyuki; Miyashita, Hirohisa; Odani, Tomoyuki; Murata, Toshiki

    2014-03-01

    GPR119 has emerged as an attractive target for anti-diabetic agents. We identified a structurally novel GPR119 agonist 22c that carries a 5-(methylsulfonyl)indoline motif as an early lead compound. To generate more potent compounds of this series, structural modifications were performed mainly to the central alkylene spacer. Installation of a carbonyl group and a methyl group on this spacer significantly enhanced agonistic activity, resulting in the identification of 2-[1-(5-ethylpyrimidin-2-yl)piperidin-4-yl]propyl 7-fluoro-5-(methylsulfonyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-indole-1-carboxylate (20). To further expand the chemical series of indoline-based GPR119 agonists, several heterocyclic core systems were introduced as surrogates of the carbamate spacer that mimic the presumed active conformation. This approach successfully produced an indolinylpyrimidine derivative 37, 5-(methylsulfonyl)-1-[6-({1-[3-(propan-2-yl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]piperidin-4-yl}oxy)pyrimidin-4-yl]-2,3-dihydro-1H-indole, which has potent GPR119 agonist activity. In rat oral glucose tolerance tests, these two indoline-based compounds effectively lowered plasma glucose excursion and glucose-dependent insulin secretion after oral administration. PMID:24508142

  12. MULTIPLE STRESSORS IN THE ENVIRONMENT: INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ARYL HYDROCARBON RECEPTOR AGONISTS AND HYPOXIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is predicted that reciprocal crosstalk occurs between these two pathways, such that activation of each pathway will cause decreased activity in the other pathway. Accordingly, it is predicted that hypoxia and AhR agonists will exacerbate one another’s toxicity. Thi...

  13. Agonistic aptamer to the insulin receptor leads to biased signaling and functional selectivity through allosteric modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yunn, Na-Oh; Koh, Ara; Han, Seungmin; Lim, Jong Hun; Park, Sehoon; Lee, Jiyoun; Kim, Eui; Jang, Sung Key; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high affinity and specificity, aptamers have been widely used as effective inhibitors in clinical applications. However, the ability to activate protein function through aptamer-protein interaction has not been well-elucidated. To investigate their potential as target-specific agonists, we used SELEX to generate aptamers to the insulin receptor (IR) and identified an agonistic aptamer named IR-A48 that specifically binds to IR, but not to IGF-1 receptor. Despite its capacity to stimulate IR autophosphorylation, similar to insulin, we found that IR-A48 not only binds to an allosteric site distinct from the insulin binding site, but also preferentially induces Y1150 phosphorylation in the IR kinase domain. Moreover, Y1150-biased phosphorylation induced by IR-A48 selectively activates specific signaling pathways downstream of IR. In contrast to insulin-mediated activation of IR, IR-A48 binding has little effect on the MAPK pathway and proliferation of cancer cells. Instead, AKT S473 phosphorylation is highly stimulated by IR-A48, resulting in increased glucose uptake both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we present IR-A48 as a biased agonist able to selectively induce the metabolic activity of IR through allosteric binding. Furthermore, our study also suggests that aptamers can be a promising tool for developing artificial biased agonists to targeted receptors. PMID:26245346

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Intra-sexual female agonistic behaviour of the South

    E-print Network

    Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    ORIGINAL PAPER Intra-sexual female agonistic behaviour of the South American sea lion (Otaria (homogeneous, Punta Norte; heterogeneous, Pirámide) of South American sea lions using two methods: weighted the Punta Norte colony. In Pirámide, open-mouth rates could be used more often as threats to minimise

  15. NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASE Toll-like receptor 4 agonist shows benefit in AD

    E-print Network

    Collins, James J.

    NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASE Toll-like receptor 4 agonist shows benefit in AD Compounds that stimulate et al. showed that systemic injections of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) -- a Toll-like receptor 4 only triggered a low inflammatory response). ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Michaud, J-. P. et al. Toll-like

  16. Identification of Novel Synthetic Toll-like Receptor 2 Agonists by High Throughput Screening*

    E-print Network

    Hergenrother, Paul J.

    Identification of Novel Synthetic Toll-like Receptor 2 Agonists by High Throughput Screening, Illinois 61801 Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a central role in host defense by inducing inflammatory as Toll-like receptors (TLRs).2 Humans possess 10 TLR family members, numbered 1 through 10, the subsets

  17. TIMP3 is the primary TIMP to regulate agonist-induced vascular remodelling and hypertension

    E-print Network

    MacMillan, Andrew

    3 is the primary TIMP to regulate agonist- induced vascular remodelling and hypertension Ratnadeep Hypertension is accompanied by structural remodelling of vascular extracellular matrix (ECM). Tissue inhibitor. In response to a hypertensive stimulus, the balance between MMPs and TIMPs is altered. We examined the role

  18. Systematic Review: Pharmacological Treatment of Tic Disorders – Efficacy of Antipsychotic and Alpha-2 Adrenergic Agonist Agents

    PubMed Central

    Weisman, Hannah; Qureshi, Imraan A.; Leckman, James F.; Scahill, Lawrence; Bloch, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled trials to determine the efficacy of antipsychotic and alpha-2 agonists in the treatment of chronic tic disorders and examine moderators of treatment effect. Meta-analysis demonstrated a significant benefit of antipsychotics compared to placebo (standardized mean difference (SMD)= 0.58 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.36–0.80). Stratified subgroup analysis found no significant difference in the efficacy of the 4 antipsychotic agents tested (risperidone, pimozide, haloperidol and ziprasidone). Meta-analysis also demonstrated a benefit of alpha-2 agonists compared to placebo (SMD = 0.31 (95% confidence interval CI: 0.15–0.48). Stratified subgroup analysis and meta-regression demonstrated a significant moderating effect of co-occurring ADHD. Trials which enrolled subjects with tics and ADHD demonstrated a medium-to-large effect (SMD=0.68 (95%CI: 0.36–1.01) whereas trials that excluded subjects with ADHD demonstrated a small, non-significant benefit (SMD=0.15 (95%CI: ?0.06–0.36). Our findings demonstrated significant benefit of both antipsychotics and alpha-2 agonists in treating tics but suggest alpha-2 agonists may have minimal benefit in tic patients without ADHD. PMID:23099282

  19. Conformationally constrained farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists: Heteroaryl replacements of the naphthalene

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Mills, Wendy Y.; Navas, III, Frank; Parks, Derek J.; Smalley, Jr., Terrence L.; Spearing, Paul K.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2014-08-13

    To improve on the drug properties of GSK8062 1b, a series of heteroaryl bicyclic naphthalene replacements were prepared. The quinoline 1c was an equipotent FXR agonist with improved drug developability parameters relative to 1b. In addition, analog 1c lowered body weight gain and serum glucose in a DIO mouse model of diabetes.

  20. Experimental Evidence That Ovary and Oviducal Gland Extracts Influence Male Agonistic Behavior

    E-print Network

    Boal, Jean

    Experimental Evidence That Ovary and Oviducal Gland Extracts Influence Male Agonistic Behavior factor originates in the ovary and perhaps the oviducal gland of the female reproductive tract of four female reproductive organs or glands: ovary, oviducal gland, nidamental gland, or accessory nida

  1. NICOTINE EFFECTS ON THE ACTIVITY OF MICE EXPOSED PRENATALLY TO THE NICOTINIC AGONIST ANATOXIN-A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considerable research has shown long-lasting effects of early exposure in experimental animals to nicotine. Anatoxin-a is produced by cyanobacteria and has been shown to be a potent nicotinic agonist. This experiment evaluated the motor activity of adult mice, and their respons...

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta agonist ameliorated inflammasome activation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Yeon, Jong Eun; Ko, Eun Jung; Yoon, Eileen L; Suh, Sang Jun; Kang, Keunhee; Kim, Hae Rim; Kang, Seoung Hee; Yoo, Yang Jae; Je, Jihye; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inflammasome activation and the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-? agonist treatment in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) models. METHODS: Male C57BL/6J mice were classified according to control or high fat diet (HFD) with or without PPAR-? agonist (GW) over period of 12 wk [control, HFD, HFD + lipopolysaccharide (LPS), HFD + LPS + GW group]. HepG2 cells were exposed to palmitic acid (PA) and/or LPS in the absence or presence of GW. RESULTS: HFD caused glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis. In mice fed an HFD with LPS, caspase-1 and interleukin (IL)-1? in the liver were significantly increased. Treatment with GW ameliorated the steatosis and inhibited overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In HepG2 cells, PA and LPS treatment markedly increased mRNA of several nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family members (NLRP3, NLRP6, and NLRP10), caspase-1 and IL-1?. PA and LPS also exaggerated reactive oxygen species production. All of the above effects of PA and LPS were reduced by GW. GW also enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK-?. CONCLUSION: PPAR-? agonist reduces fatty acid-induced inflammation and steatosis by suppressing inflammasome activation. Targeting the inflammasome by the PPAR-? agonist may have therapeutic implication for NAFLD. PMID:26668503

  3. Preclinical evaluation of SMM-189, a cannabinoid receptor 2-specific inverse agonist

    PubMed Central

    Presley, Chaela; Abidi, Ammaar; Suryawanshi, Satyendra; Mustafa, Suni; Meibohm, Bernd; Moore, Bob M

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 agonists and inverse agonists are emerging as new therapeutic options for a spectrum of autoimmune-related disease. Of particular interest, is the ability of CB2 ligands to regulate microglia function in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injury. We have previously reported the receptor affinity of 3?,5?-dichloro-2,6-dihydroxy-biphenyl-4-yl)-phenyl-methanone (SMM-189) and the characterization of the beneficial effects of SMM-189 in the mouse model of mild traumatic brain injury. Herein, we report the further characterization of SMM-189 as a potent and selective CB2 inverse agonist, which acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of CP 55,940. The ability of SMM-189 to regulate microglial activation, in terms of chemokine expression and cell morphology, has been determined. Finally, we have determined that SMM-189 possesses acceptable biopharmaceutical properties indicating that the triaryl class of CB2 inverse agonists are viable compounds for continued preclinical development for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and traumatic brain injury. PMID:26196013

  4. Classification of DES15S2myz and DES15S2mwz by GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.

    2015-12-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of DES15S2myz and DES15S2mwz discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATel #4668). The spectra (495-920nm) were obtained using OSIRIS on the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC).

  5. Traitement Automatique des Langues Naturelles, Marseille, 2014 Grammaire rcursive non linaire pour les langues des signes

    E-print Network

    linguistique. Par exemple, l'expression de relations spa les langues des signes, rendant compte de leurs particularités linguistiques. Comparable aux'analyse des liens entre formes produites/observées et fonctions linguistiques au sens large, on observe un

  6. Evaluation des connaissances des parents sur les bronchiolites aiguës

    PubMed Central

    Gueddari, Widad; Tazi, Abderrahmane; Ouardi, Amine; Nani, Samira; Zineddine, Abdelhadi

    2014-01-01

    Les infections respiratoires (IR) constituent la deuxième cause de mortalité infantile au Maroc, dû en partie à l'absence d'information et de sensibilisation. Le but de ce travail était d’évaluer les connaissances des parents sur la bronchiolite aiguë, infection respiratoire très fréquente. Nous avons réalisé une enquête basée sur un questionnaire, auprès de parents de nourrissons consultants pour toux, avec ou sans gêne respiratoire. 180 parents ont été inclus dans l’étude. Les parents pensaient que l'infection respiratoire était secondaire au climat froid (96%); seuls 4% ont évoqué une origine infectieuse. Aucun des parents ne savait que le lavage des mains était un moyen de prévention de la transmission. Les parents ont majoritairement répondu que la kinésithérapie respiratoire ne servait à rien (65%), et qu'elle était nocive (24.5%). Ce manque de connaissances fondamentales en matière d'IR et de bronchiolite en particulier, devrait inciter à entreprendre un programme de sensibilisation PMID:25328606

  7. Caractérisation des convertisseurs matriciels : II. Synthèse des fonctions de connexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, B.; Cambronne, J. P.; Hautier, J. P.

    1996-05-01

    Knowing the wished conversion levels (-1,0,1) of a power converter, this paper describes a particular method for setting the corresponding states of switches into the matrix converter. In a first step, a mathematical analysis establishes the relations linking the states of switches with the conversion functions. Afterwards, the presented method gives the inverse relations which constitute the sequential part of the converter control. The turn-on and the turn-off sequences are designed by considering the on-line wished level conversions. This general method enhances the idea that a converter functionnality must be defined by its structure and its control. Cet article propose une méthode originale pour définir la séquence de commande d'un convertisseur à partir de la fonction de conversion globalement souhaitée. Les auteurs procèdent d'abord à une analyse mathématique précise des relations qui existent entre les états des interrupteurs et les fonctions de conversion obtenues. À partir de cette analyse, la méthode developpée permet d'établir systématiquement les relations inverses qui constituent alors le module séquentiel de la commande rapprochée du convertisseur. Les ordres d'ouverture et de fermeture des interrupteurs sont élaborés en considérant à tout instant les niveaux de conversion souhaités pour les grandeurs électriques. Cette méthode générale renforce l'idée que la fonction remplie par un convertisseur moderne doit être définie à la fois par sa structure et sa commande.

  8. Effects of Intrathecal ?-Opioid Receptor Agonist on Morphine-Induced Itch and Antinociception in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sakakihara, Manabu; Imamachi, Noritaka; Saito, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    The ?-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist-induced itch is a significant issue associated with analgesic therapies. Research suggested that systemically administered ?-opioid receptor (KOR) agonists inhibit intrathecal morphine-induced itch in primates. However, serious adverse effects induced by systemically administered KOR agonists may restrict their usefulness in humans. We investigated the effects of intrathecal KOR agonists on intrathecal morphine-mediated itch and antinociception in mice.Mice received intrathecal injections of one of the following drugs: morphine (0.1-1.0 nmol), the selective KOR agonist TRK-820 100 pmol, the combination of morphine 0.3 nmol + TRK-820 (10-100 pmol), and 5 ?L of saline. One hour after intraperitoneal administration of the selective KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine 1.0 ?mol, the effect of TRK-820 100 pmol on intrathecal morphine 0.3 nmol-induced scratching was tested. Total numbers of scratches after intrathecal injection were analyzed. After observing scratching behavior, sedation level was evaluated subjectively. Nociceptive threshold was determined by tail immersion test with intrathecal injections of the following agents: morphine (0.1-1.0 nmol), TRK-820 (10-100 pmol), morphine 0.1 nmol + TRK-820 10 pmol, and 5 ?L of saline.Intrathecal TRK-820 dose-dependently inhibited intrathecal morphine-induced scratching compared with that in the saline group. Intraperitoneal nor-binaltorphimine completely inhibited the antiscratching effect of intrathecal TRK-820 100 pmol. The combination of morphine 0.3 nmol and TRK-820 did not alter the sedation score compared with that in the morphine 0.3 nmol group. Morphine 0.1 nmol + TRK-820 10 pmol significantly produced greater thermal antinociceptive effects than morphine 0.1 nmol.We demonstrated that intrathecal KOR agonists exert antipruritic effects on intrathecal morphine-induced itch without affecting sedation. The combination of intrathecal morphine and intrathecal KOR agonists produces more potent antinociceptive effects against a thermal stimulus compared with morphine alone. PMID:26587674

  9. EFFECT OF CHRONIC TREATMENT WITH THE GONADOTROPHIN-RELEASING HORMONE AGONIST AZAGLY-NAFARELIN ON BASAL CONCENTRATIONS OF LH IN PREPUBERTAL BULLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infusion of GnRH agonists for extended periods inhibits pulsatile LH release, but enhances testicular function of bulls. The reason long-term infusion of GnRH agonist enhances testosterone (T) concentration in blood of cattle treated for extended periods with GnRH agonists has not been delineated. T...

  10. Direction des Ressources Humaines Contacts Bureau des concours Ple GPEEC / Bureau des Concours nicole.berkowitz@univ-amu.fr

    E-print Network

    Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse, Université de

    (titulaires, non titulaires, contrats étudiants). Positionnement hiérarchique : sous l'autorité du responsable administratif. COMPETENCES REQUISES : Connaissances générales et intérêt pour la gestion des ressources humaines

  11. Les applications des faisceaux d'ions dans la physique des polymères

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratier, B.; Moliton, A.; Lucas, B.; Guille, B.; Clamadieu, M.

    1998-06-01

    Experimental configurations of ions beams are illustrated by diagrams in the case of low energy implantation, Reactive Ion Beam Etching (RIBE), Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD) of molecular layers (or oligomers). Nous présentons les configurations expérimentales (illustrées par des schémas) de trois applications des faisceaux d'ions au traitement physique des polymères : dopage par implantation (cité pour mémoire), gravure par faisceaux d'ions réactifs (RIBE), dépôt des couches moléculaires (ou oligomères) assistés par faisceau (IBAD).

  12. M2 OASC : Fiche de stage Titre du stage : Apport d'une simulation haute rsolution pour la description des tourbillons en mer des

    E-print Network

    description des tourbillons en mer des Salomon Nom et statut du (des) responsable (s) de stage : Gourdeau Sujet du stage : La mer des Salomon située dans le Pacifique sud ouest est le lieu de transit des courants de bord ouest lors de leur traversée de la mer des Salomon sont soumis à des contraintes

  13. Partager : des technologies de pointe au service de la société

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Médecine, climatologie, métrologie et informatique, les techniques utilisées par le LHC trouvent déjà des répercussions dans d?autres domaines scientifiques. Utilisant des techniques inédites, la physique des particules en fait bénéficier la société toute entière.

  14. Werkzeuge der Informatik Grundlagen und Werkzeuge des WWW (Teil 1)

    E-print Network

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    . Müller, 2011 Geschichte des WWW · Anfänge des WWW Geschichte des Internet · 1980: Tim Berners-Lee (CERN) schreibt Programm "ENQUIRE", das es erlaubt, Knoten im Internet zu verlinken · 1989: Tim Berners-Lee: CERN

  15. Universit Paris XIII Mmoire d'Habilitation Diriger des Recherches

    E-print Network

    Poinsot, Laurent

    Université Paris XIII Mémoire d'Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches Spécialités : Mathématiques Mathématiques, EA 4535 Claude Carlet Professeur des Universités, Université Paris VIII Vincennes. Duchamp Professeur des Universités, Université Paris XIII, Rapporteur Laboratoire d'Informatique de Paris

  16. A cannabinoid 2 receptor agonist attenuates bone cancer-induced pain and bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Alysia; Wright, Courtney; Vardanyan, Anna; King, Tamara; Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Nelson, Mark; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Mantyh, Patrick W; Vanderah, Todd W.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Cannabinoid CB2 agonists have been shown to alleviate behavioral signs of inflammatory and neuropathic pain in animal models. AM1241, a CB2 agonist, does not demonstrate central nervous system side-effects seen with CB1 agonists such as hypothermia and catalepsy. Metastatic bone cancer causes severe pain in patients and is treated with analgesics such as opiates. Recent reports suggest that sustained opiates can produce paradoxical hyperalgesic actions and enhance bone destruction in a murine model of bone cancer. In contrast, CB2 selective agonists have been shown to reduce bone loss associated with a model of osteoporosis. Here we tested whether a CB2 agonist administered over a 7 day period inhibits bone cancer-induced pain as well as attenuates cancer-induced bone degradation. Main Methods A murine bone cancer model was used in which osteolytic sarcoma cells were injected into the intramedullary space of the distal end of the femur. Behavioral and radiographic image analysis was performed at days 7, 10 and 14 after injection of tumor cells into the femur. Key Findings Osteolytic sarcoma within the femur produced spontaneous and touch evoked behavioral signs of pain within the tumor-bearing limb. The systemic administration of AM1241 acutely or for 7 days significantly attenuated spontaneous and evoked pain in the inoculated limb. Sustained AM1241 significantly reduced bone loss and decreased the incidence of cancer-induced bone fractures. Significance These findings suggest a novel therapy for cancer-induced bone pain, bone loss and bone fracture while lacking many unwanted side effects seen with current treatments for bone cancer pain. PMID:20176037

  17. Agonist binding to ?-adrenergic receptors on human airway epithelial cells inhibits migration and wound repair.

    PubMed

    Peitzman, Elizabeth R; Zaidman, Nathan A; Maniak, Peter J; O'Grady, Scott M

    2015-12-15

    Human airway epithelial cells express ?-adrenergic receptors (?-ARs), which regulate mucociliary clearance by stimulating transepithelial anion transport and ciliary beat frequency. Previous studies using airway epithelial cells showed that stimulation with isoproterenol increased cell migration and wound repair by a cAMP-dependent mechanism. In the present study, impedance-sensing arrays were used to measure cell migration and epithelial restitution following wounding of confluent normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and Calu-3 cells by electroporation. Stimulation with epinephrine or the ?2-AR-selective agonist salbutamol significantly delayed wound closure and reduced the mean surface area of lamellipodia protruding into the wound. Treatment with the ?-AR bias agonist carvedilol or isoetharine also produced a delay in epithelial restitution similar in magnitude to epinephrine and salbutamol. Measurements of extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation following salbutamol or carvedilol stimulation showed no significant change in the level of phosphorylation compared with untreated control cells. However, inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A activity completely blocked the delay in wound closure produced by ?-AR agonists. In Calu-3 cells, where CFTR expression was inhibited by RNAi, salbutamol did not inhibit wound repair, suggesting that ?-AR agonist stimulation and loss of CFTR function share a common pathway leading to inhibition of epithelial repair. Confocal images of the basal membrane of Calu-3 cells labeled with anti-?1-integrin (clone HUTS-4) antibody showed that treatment with epinephrine or carvedilol reduced the level of activated integrin in the membrane. These findings suggest that treatment with ?-AR agonists delays airway epithelial repair by a G protein- and cAMP-independent mechanism involving protein phosphatase 2A and a reduction in ?1-integrin activation in the basal membrane. PMID:26491049

  18. Estrogen Receptor ? Agonists Differentially Affect the Growth of Human Melanoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Marzagalli, Monica; Casati, Lavinia; Moretti, Roberta M.; Montagnani Marelli, Marina; Limonta, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Background Cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive malignancy; its incidence is increasing worldwide and its prognosis remains poor. Clinical observations indicate that estrogen receptor ? (ER?) is expressed in melanoma tissues and its expression decreases with tumor progression, suggesting its tumor suppressive function. These experiments were performed to investigate the effects of ER? activation on melanoma cell growth. Methods and Results Protein expression was analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence assays. Cell proliferation was assessed by counting the cells by hemocytometer. ER? transcriptional activity was evaluated by gene reporter assay. Global DNA methylation was analyzed by restriction enzyme assay and ER? isoforms were identified by qRT-PCR. We demonstrated that ER? is expressed in a panel of human melanoma cell lines (BLM, WM115, A375, WM1552). In BLM (NRAS-mutant) cells, ER? agonists significantly and specifically inhibited cell proliferation. ER? activation triggered its cytoplasmic-to-nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity. Moreover, the antiproliferative activity of ER? agonists was associated with an altered expression of G1-S transition-related proteins. In these cells, global DNA was found to be hypomethylated when compared to normal melanocytes; this DNA hypomethylation status was reverted by ER? activation. ER? agonists also decreased the proliferation of WM115 (BRAF V600D-mutant) cells, while they failed to reduce the growth of A375 and WM1552 (BRAF V600E-mutant) cells. Finally, we could observe that ER? isoforms are expressed at different levels in the various cell lines. Specific oncogenic mutations or differential expression of receptor isoforms might be responsible for the different responses of cell lines to ER? agonists. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that ER? is expressed in melanoma cell lines and that ER? agonists differentially regulate the proliferation of these cells. These data confirm the notion that melanoma is a heterogeneous tumor and that genetic profiling is mandatory for the development of effective personalized therapeutic approaches for melanoma patients. PMID:26225426

  19. Natural product agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?): a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limei; Waltenberger, Birgit; Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Blunder, Martina; Liu, Xin; Malainer, Clemens; Blazevic, Tina; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M; Heiss, Elke H; Schuster, Daniela; Kopp, Brigitte; Bauer, Rudolf; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M; Atanasov, Atanas G

    2014-11-01

    Agonists of the nuclear receptor PPAR? are therapeutically used to combat hyperglycaemia associated with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In spite of being effective in normalization of blood glucose levels, the currently used PPAR? agonists from the thiazolidinedione type have serious side effects, making the discovery of novel ligands highly relevant. Natural products have proven historically to be a promising pool of structures for drug discovery, and a significant research effort has recently been undertaken to explore the PPAR?-activating potential of a wide range of natural products originating from traditionally used medicinal plants or dietary sources. The majority of identified compounds are selective PPAR? modulators (SPPARMs), transactivating the expression of PPAR?-dependent reporter genes as partial agonists. Those natural PPAR? ligands have different binding modes to the receptor in comparison to the full thiazolidinedione agonists, and on some occasions activate in addition PPAR? (e.g. genistein, biochanin A, sargaquinoic acid, sargahydroquinoic acid, resveratrol, amorphastilbol) or the PPAR?-dimer partner retinoid X receptor (RXR; e.g. the neolignans magnolol and honokiol). A number of in vivo studies suggest that some of the natural product activators of PPAR? (e.g. honokiol, amorfrutin 1, amorfrutin B, amorphastilbol) improve metabolic parameters in diabetic animal models, partly with reduced side effects in comparison to full thiazolidinedione agonists. The bioactivity pattern as well as the dietary use of several of the identified active compounds and plant extracts warrants future research regarding their therapeutic potential and the possibility to modulate PPAR? activation by dietary interventions or food supplements. PMID:25083916

  20. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of ?4?2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Kenny, Paul J; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-05-29

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing ?4, ?2, and sometimes other subunits (?4?2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of ?4 and ?2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is ?4 but not if it is ?2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical ?4?2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (?4?2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and ?4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that ?2, ?3, ?4, and ?6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with ?4 subunits, but ?2 and ?4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, ?4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of ?4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the ?4?2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  1. NOP Receptor Mediates Anti-analgesia Induced by Agonist-Antagonist Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Gear, Robert W.; Bogen, Oliver; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ~90 minutes after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69,593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  2. Oxytocin and Vasopressin Agonists and Antagonists as Research Tools and Potential Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Manning, M; Misicka, A; Olma, A; Bankowski, K; Stoev, S; Chini, B; Durroux, T; Mouillac, B; Corbani, M; Guillon, G

    2012-01-01

    We recently reviewed the status of peptide and nonpeptide agonists and antagonists for the V1a, V1b and V2 receptors for arginine vasopressin (AVP) and the oxytocin receptor for oxytocin (OT). In the present review, we update the status of peptides and nonpeptides as: (i) research tools and (ii) therapeutic agents. We also present our recent findings on the design of fluorescent ligands for V1b receptor localisation and for OT receptor dimerisation. We note the exciting discoveries regarding two novel naturally occurring analogues of OT. Recent reports of a selective VP V1a agonist and a selective OT agonist point to the continued therapeutic potential of peptides in this field. To date, only two nonpeptides, the V2/V1a antagonist, conivaptan and the V2 antagonist tolvaptan have received Food and Drug Administration approval for clinical use. The development of nonpeptide AVP V1a, V1b and V2 antagonists and OT agonists and antagonists has recently been abandoned by Merck, Sanofi and Pfizer. A promising OT antagonist, Retosiban, developed at Glaxo SmithKline is currently in a Phase II clinical trial for the prevention of premature labour. A number of the nonpeptide ligands that were not successful in clinical trials are proving to be valuable as research tools. Peptide agonists and antagonists continue to be very widely used as research tools in this field. In this regard, we present receptor data on some of the most widely used peptide and nonpeptide ligands, as a guide for their use, especially with regard to receptor selectivity and species differences. PMID:22375852

  3. Cardiac dysfunction in adipose triglyceride lipase deficiency: treatment with a PPAR? agonist

    PubMed Central

    Wölkart, G; Schrammel, A; Dörffel, K; Haemmerle, G; Zechner, R; Mayer, B

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) has been identified as a rate-limiting enzyme of mammalian triglyceride catabolism. Deletion of the ATGL gene in mice results in severe lipid accumulation in a variety of tissues including the heart. In the present study we investigated cardiac function in ATGL-deficient mice and the potential therapeutic effects of the PPAR? and ? agonists Wy14,643 and rosiglitazone, respectively. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Hearts isolated from wild-type (WT) mice and ATGL(-/-) mice treated with Wy14,643 (PPAR? agonist), rosiglitazone (PPAR? agonist) or vehicle were perfused at a constant flow using the Langendorff technique. Left ventricular (LV) pressure–volume relationships were established, and the response to adrenergic stimulation was determined with noradrenaline (NA). KEY RESULTS Hearts from ATGL(-/-) mice generated higher LV end-diastolic pressure and lower LV developed pressure as a function of intracardiac balloon volume compared to those from WT mice. Likewise, passive wall stress was increased and active wall stress decreased in ATGL(-/-) hearts. Contractile and microvascular responses to NA were substantially reduced in ATGL(-/-) hearts. Cardiac contractility was improved by treating ATGL(-/-) mice with the PPAR? agonist Wy14,643 but not with the PPAR? agonist rosiglitazone. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results indicate that lipid accumulation in mouse hearts caused by ATGL gene deletion severely affects systolic and diastolic function, as well as the response to adrenergic stimulation. The beneficial effects of Wy14,643 suggest that the cardiac phenotype of these mice is partially due to impaired PPAR? signalling. PMID:21585347

  4. Heterologous Expression in Remodeled C. elegans: A Platform for Monoaminergic Agonist Identification and Anthelmintic Screening.

    PubMed

    Law, Wenjing; Wuescher, Leah M; Ortega, Amanda; Hapiak, Vera M; Komuniecki, Patricia R; Komuniecki, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Monoamines, such as 5-HT and tyramine (TA), paralyze both free-living and parasitic nematodes when applied exogenously and serotonergic agonists have been used to clear Haemonchus contortus infections in vivo. Since nematode cell lines are not available and animal screening options are limited, we have developed a screening platform to identify monoamine receptor agonists. Key receptors were expressed heterologously in chimeric, genetically-engineered Caenorhabditis elegans, at sites likely to yield robust phenotypes upon agonist stimulation. This approach potentially preserves the unique pharmacologies of the receptors, while including nematode-specific accessory proteins and the nematode cuticle. Importantly, the sensitivity of monoamine-dependent paralysis could be increased dramatically by hypotonic incubation or the use of bus mutants with increased cuticular permeabilities. We have demonstrated that the monoamine-dependent inhibition of key interneurons, cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscle inhibited locomotion and caused paralysis. Specifically, 5-HT paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT receptor null animals expressing either nematode, insect or human orthologues of a key G?o-coupled 5-HT1-like receptor in the cholinergic motor neurons. Importantly, 8-OH-DPAT and PAPP, 5-HT receptor agonists, differentially paralyzed the transgenic animals, with 8-OH-DPAT paralyzing mutant animals expressing the human receptor at concentrations well below those affecting its C. elegans or insect orthologues. Similarly, 5-HT and TA paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT or TA receptor null animals, respectively, expressing either C. elegans or H. contortus 5-HT or TA-gated Cl- channels in either C. elegans cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscles. Together, these data suggest that this heterologous, ectopic expression screening approach will be useful for the identification of agonists for key monoamine receptors from parasites and could have broad application for the identification of ligands for a host of potential anthelmintic targets. PMID:25928899

  5. Agonists with supraphysiological efficacy at the muscarinic M2 ACh receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schrage, R; Seemann, WK; Klöckner, J; Dallanoce, C; Racké, K; Kostenis, E; De Amici, M; Holzgrabe, U; Mohr, K

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Artificial agonists may have higher efficacy for receptor activation than the physiological agonist. Until now, such ‘superagonism’ has rarely been reported for GPCRs. Iperoxo is an extremely potent muscarinic receptor agonist. We hypothesized that iperoxo is a ‘superagonist’. Experimental Approach Signalling of iperoxo and newly synthesized structural analogues was compared with that of ACh at label-free M2 muscarinic receptors applying whole cell dynamic mass redistribution, measurement of G-protein activation, evaluation of cell surface agonist binding and computation of operational efficacies. Key Results In CHO-hM2 cells, iperoxo significantly exceeds ACh in Gi/Gs signalling competence. In the orthosteric loss-of-function mutant M2-Y1043.33A, the maximum effect of iperoxo is hardly compromised in contrast to ACh. ‘Superagonism’ is preserved in the physiological cellular context of MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts. Structure–signalling relationships including iperoxo derivatives with either modified positively charged head group or altered tail suggest that ‘superagonism’ of iperoxo is mechanistically based on parallel activation of the receptor protein via two orthosteric interaction points. Conclusion and Implications Supraphysiological agonist efficacy at muscarinic M2 ACh receptors is demonstrated for the first time. In addition, a possible underlying molecular mechanism of GPCR ‘superagonism’ is provided. We suggest that iperoxo-like orthosteric GPCR activation is a new avenue towards a novel class of receptor activators. Linked Article This article is commented on by Langmead and Christopoulos, pp. 353–356 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12142 PMID:23062057

  6. Natural product agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?): a review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limei; Waltenberger, Birgit; Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Blunder, Martina; Liu, Xin; Malainer, Clemens; Blazevic, Tina; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Heiss, Elke H.; Schuster, Daniela; Kopp, Brigitte; Bauer, Rudolf; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M.; Atanasov, Atanas G.

    2014-01-01

    Agonists of the nuclear receptor PPAR? are therapeutically used to combat hyperglycaemia associated with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In spite of being effective in normalization of blood glucose levels, the currently used PPAR? agonists from the thiazolidinedione type have serious side effects, making the discovery of novel ligands highly relevant. Natural products have proven historically to be a promising pool of structures for drug discovery, and a significant research effort has recently been undertaken to explore the PPAR?-activating potential of a wide range of natural products originating from traditionally used medicinal plants or dietary sources. The majority of identified compounds are selective PPAR? modulators (SPPARMs), transactivating the expression of PPAR?-dependent reporter genes as partial agonists. Those natural PPAR? ligands have different binding modes to the receptor in comparison to the full thiazolidinedione agonists, and on some occasions activate in addition PPAR? (e.g. genistein, biochanin A, sargaquinoic acid, sargahydroquinoic acid, resveratrol, amorphastilbol) or the PPAR?-dimer partner retinoid X receptor (RXR; e.g. the neolignans magnolol and honokiol). A number of in vivo studies suggest that some of the natural product activators of PPAR? (e.g. honokiol, amorfrutin 1, amorfrutin B, amorphastilbol) improve metabolic parameters in diabetic animal models, partly with reduced side effects in comparison to full thiazolidinedione agonists. The bioactivity pattern as well as the dietary use of several of the identified active compounds and plant extracts warrants future research regarding their therapeutic potential and the possibility to modulate PPAR? activation by dietary interventions or food supplements. PMID:25083916

  7. Heterologous Expression in Remodeled C. elegans: A Platform for Monoaminergic Agonist Identification and Anthelmintic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Law, Wenjing; Wuescher, Leah M.; Ortega, Amanda; Hapiak, Vera M.; Komuniecki, Patricia R.; Komuniecki, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Monoamines, such as 5-HT and tyramine (TA), paralyze both free-living and parasitic nematodes when applied exogenously and serotonergic agonists have been used to clear Haemonchus contortus infections in vivo. Since nematode cell lines are not available and animal screening options are limited, we have developed a screening platform to identify monoamine receptor agonists. Key receptors were expressed heterologously in chimeric, genetically-engineered Caenorhabditis elegans, at sites likely to yield robust phenotypes upon agonist stimulation. This approach potentially preserves the unique pharmacologies of the receptors, while including nematode-specific accessory proteins and the nematode cuticle. Importantly, the sensitivity of monoamine-dependent paralysis could be increased dramatically by hypotonic incubation or the use of bus mutants with increased cuticular permeabilities. We have demonstrated that the monoamine-dependent inhibition of key interneurons, cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscle inhibited locomotion and caused paralysis. Specifically, 5-HT paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT receptor null animals expressing either nematode, insect or human orthologues of a key G?o-coupled 5-HT1-like receptor in the cholinergic motor neurons. Importantly, 8-OH-DPAT and PAPP, 5-HT receptor agonists, differentially paralyzed the transgenic animals, with 8-OH-DPAT paralyzing mutant animals expressing the human receptor at concentrations well below those affecting its C. elegans or insect orthologues. Similarly, 5-HT and TA paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT or TA receptor null animals, respectively, expressing either C. elegans or H. contortus 5-HT or TA-gated Cl- channels in either C. elegans cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscles. Together, these data suggest that this heterologous, ectopic expression screening approach will be useful for the identification of agonists for key monoamine receptors from parasites and could have broad application for the identification of ligands for a host of potential anthelmintic targets. PMID:25928899

  8. Devenir des diplms Promotion 2011-2012

    E-print Network

    Sart, Remi

    de l'enquête. 64,6% occupent des fonctions cadres. Le salaire net mensuel moyen est de 1726 . Photo(s):©JérômePALL�-UniversitéBlaisePascal leur diplôme. Concernant les Masters de l'Université Blaise Pascal, sur les 1136 diplômés de la des diplômés de Master de l'Université Blaise Pascal, toutes formations confondues. > > Sommaire des

  9. Etude des Seuils de Poursuite et de Dmodulation des Signaux Galileo pour

    E-print Network

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    Etude des Seuils de Poursuite et de Démodulation des Signaux Galileo pour l'Aviation Civile Lieu'utilisation de Galileo par l'aviation civile. D'autre part, dans le cadre de discussions bilatérales entre les signaux GPS et Galileo, et, en particulier, afin de s'assurer que la co-existence des signaux GPS et

  10. Profil épidemio-clinique et radiologique des atteintes ostéo-articulaires des hémophiles à Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Narindra, Lova Hasina Rajaonarison Ny Ony; Rabemanorintsoa, Feno Hasina; Randrianantenaina, Faralahy Ravelonarivo; Rakoto, Olivat Alson Aimée; Ahmad, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Déterminer le profil épidémio-clinique et radiologique des atteintes ostéo-articulaires des hémophiles malagasy. Méthodes Une étude prospective, descriptive portant sur 25 patients hémophiles venant de tout Madagascar a été réalisée. Des radiographies numérisées des genoux, des chevilles et des coudes en incidence de face et de profil ainsi qu'une échographie des hanches, des genoux, des chevilles et des coudes ont été réalisées chez ces patients. Le type et la sévérité de la maladie ainsi que l'aspect de la cavité articulaire, la synoviale, les noyaux épiphysaires et les surfaces articulaires ont été analysés. Résultats Soixante-huit pourcent des patients étaient hémophiles de type A et 32 % de type B. Quarante pourcent étaient classés sévères, 28 % modérés et 32 % mineurs. Les atteintes ostéo-articulaires ont été retrouvées chez 56 % des patients. Il n'existait pas de prédominance d'atteinte selon le type ni la sévérité de la maladie. Les plus jeunes étaient les plus atteints et l'articulation du genou et de la cheville étaient les plus touchées. Conclusion Les complications ostéo-articulaire de l'hémophilie sont graves et ne dépendent pas du type ni de la sévérité de l'affection. Elles touchent surtout les enfants d'âge scolaire. Le couple radiographie-échographie permet de diagnostiquer et de surveiller ces lésions. PMID:25870742

  11. Aide aux doctorants pour la participation des Aide aux doctorants pour la participation des colloques

    E-print Network

    Di Girolami, Cristina

    Aide aux doctorants pour la participation à des colloques Aide aux doctorants pour la participation à des colloques retour Formation doctorale Aide aux doctorants pour la participation à des colloques aide vient compléter les financements déjà prévus par les laboratoires et les Écoles doctorales pour

  12. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Cureri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of cAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of cAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome Abolishes Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonist Stimulation of SERCA in Coronary Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Dineen, Stacey L; McKenney, Mikaela L; Bell, Lauren N; Fullenkamp, Allison M; Schultz, Kyle A; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Chalasani, Naga; Sturek, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) doubles the risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists induce weight loss, increase insulin secretion, and improve glucose tolerance. Studies in healthy animals suggest cardioprotective properties of GLP-1 receptor agonists, perhaps partially mediated by improved sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) activity. We examined the acute effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on coronary smooth muscle cells (CSM) enzymatically isolated from lean, healthy Ossabaw miniature swine. Intracellular Ca(2+) handling was interrogated with fura-2. The GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide activated SERCA but did not alter other Ca(2+) transporters. Further, we tested the hypothesis that chronic, in vivo treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonist AC3174 would attenuate coronary artery disease (CAD) in swine with MetS. MetS was induced in 20 swine by 6 months' feeding of a hypercaloric, atherogenic diet. Swine were then randomized (n = 10/group) into placebo or AC3174 treatment groups and continued the diet for an additional 6 months. AC3174 treatment attenuated weight gain, increased insulin secretion, and improved glucose tolerance. Intravascular ultrasound and histology showed no effect of AC3174 on CAD. MetS abolished SERCA activation by GLP-1 receptor agonists. We conclude that MetS confers vascular resistance to GLP-1 receptor agonists, partially through impaired cellular signaling steps involving SERCA. PMID:25845661

  14. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate CAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of CAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of CAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of CAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of CAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  15. Relation entre les caractéristiques des table-bancs et les mesures anthropométriques des écoliers au Benin

    PubMed Central

    Falola, Stève Marjelin; Gouthon, Polycarpe; Falola, Jean-Marie; Fiogbe, Michel Armand; Nigan, Issiako Bio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Le mobilier scolaire et la posture assise en classe sont souvent impliqués dans l'apparition des douleurs rachidiennes, influant de fait sur la qualité des tâches réalisées par les apprenants. Aucune étude n'a encore vérifié le degré d'adéquation entre les caractéristiques du mobilier et celles des écoliers au Bénin. L'objectif de cette étude transversale est donc de déterminer la relation entre les dimensions des table-bancs utilisées en classe et les mesures anthropométriques des écoliers au Bénin. Methods Elle a été réalisée avec un échantillon probabiliste de 678 écoliers, âgés de 4 à 17 ans. Les mesures anthropométriques des écoliers et les mensurations relatives aux longueurs, largeurs et hauteurs des table-bancs ont été mesurées, puis intégrées aux équations proposées dans la littérature. Les pourcentages des valeurs situées hors des limitesacceptables, dérivées de l'application des équations ont été calculés. Results La largeur et la hauteur des table-bancs utilisées par les écoliers étaient plus élevées (p < 0,05) que les valeurs de référence recommandées par les structures officielles de contrôle et de production des mobiliers scolaires au Bénin. Quel que soit le sexe, il y avait une inadéquation entre la largeur du banc et la longueur fesse-poplité, puis entre la hauteur de la table et la distance coude-bancdes écoliers. Conclusion Les résultats suggèrent de prendre en compte l’évolution des mesures anthropométriques des écoliers dans la confection des table-bancs, afin de promouvoir de bonnes postures assises en classe et de réduire le risque de troubles du rachis. PMID:25317232

  16. Agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulate self-renewal of cardiac stem cells and promote their survival

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Victoria; Majid, Sonia S.; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M.; Cai, Ren-Zhi; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Hare, Joshua M.; Rodrigues, Claudia O.

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effects of agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (GHRH-R) in heart failure models are associated with an increase in the number of ckit+ cardiac stem cells (CSCs). The goal of the present study was to determine the presence of GHRH-R in CSCs, the effect of GHRH-R agonists on their proliferation and survival, and the mechanisms involved. We investigated the expression of GHRH-R in CSCs of different species and the effect of GHRH-R agonists on their cell proliferation and survival. GHRH-R is expressed in ckit+ CSCs isolated from mouse, rat, and pig. Treatment of porcine CSCs with the GHRH-R agonist JI-38 significantly increased the rate of cell division. Similar results were observed with other GHRH-R agonists, MR-356 and MR-409. JI-38 exerted a protective effect on survival of porcine CSCs under conditions of oxidative stress induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Treatment with JI-38 before exposure to peroxide significantly reduced cell death. A similar effect was observed with MR-356. Addition of GHRH-R agonists to porcine CSCs induced activation of ERK and AKT pathways as determined by increased expression of phospho-ERK and phospho-AKT. Inhibitors of ERK and AKT pathways completely reversed the effect of GHRH-R agonists on CSC proliferation. Our findings extend the observations of the expression of GHRH-R by CSCs and demonstrate that GHRH-R agonists have a direct effect on proliferation and survival of CSCs. These results support the therapeutic use of GHRH-R agonists for stimulating endogenous mechanisms for myocardial repair or for preconditioning of stem cells before transplantation. PMID:25404316

  17. Agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulate self-renewal of cardiac stem cells and promote their survival.

    PubMed

    Florea, Victoria; Majid, Sonia S; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M; Cai, Ren-Zhi; Block, Norman L; Schally, Andrew V; Hare, Joshua M; Rodrigues, Claudia O

    2014-12-01

    The beneficial effects of agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (GHRH-R) in heart failure models are associated with an increase in the number of ckit(+) cardiac stem cells (CSCs). The goal of the present study was to determine the presence of GHRH-R in CSCs, the effect of GHRH-R agonists on their proliferation and survival, and the mechanisms involved. We investigated the expression of GHRH-R in CSCs of different species and the effect of GHRH-R agonists on their cell proliferation and survival. GHRH-R is expressed in ckit(+) CSCs isolated from mouse, rat, and pig. Treatment of porcine CSCs with the GHRH-R agonist JI-38 significantly increased the rate of cell division. Similar results were observed with other GHRH-R agonists, MR-356 and MR-409. JI-38 exerted a protective effect on survival of porcine CSCs under conditions of oxidative stress induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Treatment with JI-38 before exposure to peroxide significantly reduced cell death. A similar effect was observed with MR-356. Addition of GHRH-R agonists to porcine CSCs induced activation of ERK and AKT pathways as determined by increased expression of phospho-ERK and phospho-AKT. Inhibitors of ERK and AKT pathways completely reversed the effect of GHRH-R agonists on CSC proliferation. Our findings extend the observations of the expression of GHRH-R by CSCs and demonstrate that GHRH-R agonists have a direct effect on proliferation and survival of CSCs. These results support the therapeutic use of GHRH-R agonists for stimulating endogenous mechanisms for myocardial repair or for preconditioning of stem cells before transplantation. PMID:25404316

  18. Addition of gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist for luteal phase support in in-vitro fertilization: an analysis of 2739 cycles

    PubMed Central

    ?im?ek, Erhan; K?l?çda?, Esra Bulgan; Aytaç, P?nar Ça?lar; Çoban, Gonca; ?im?ek, Seda Yüksel; Çok, Tayfun; Haydardedeo?lu, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    Objective Luteal phase is defective in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles, and many regimens were tried for the very best luteal phase support (LPS). Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist use, which was administered as an adjunct to the luteal phase support in IVF cycles, was suggested to improve pregnancy outcome measures in certain randomized studies. We analyzed the effects of addition of GnRH agonist to standard progesterone luteal support on pregnancy outcome measures, particularly the live birth rates. Material and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study, including 2739 IVF cycles. Long GnRH agonist and antagonist stimulation IVF cycles with cleavage-stage embryo transfer were included. Cycles were divided into two groups: Group A included cycles with single-dose GnRH agonist plus progesterone LPS and Group B included progesterone only LPS. Live birth rates were the primary outcome measures of the analysis. Miscarriage rates and multiple pregnancy rates were the secondary outcome measures. Results Live birth rates were not statistically different in GnRH agonist plus progesterone (Group A) and progesterone only (Group B) groups in both the long agonist and antagonist stimulation arms (40.8%/41.2% and 32.8%/34.4%, p<0.05 respectively). Moreover, pregnancy rates, implantation rates, and miscarriage rates were found to be similar between groups. Multiple pregnancy rates in antagonist cycles were significantly higher in Group A than those in Group B (12.0% and 6.9%, respectively). Conclusion A beneficial effect of a single dose of GnRH agonist administration as a luteal phase supporting agent is yet to be determined because of the wide heterogeneity of data present in literature. Well-designed randomized clinical studies are required to clarify any effect of luteal GnRH agonist addition on pregnancy outcome measures with different doses, timing, and administration routes of GnRH agonists. PMID:26097392

  19. Le traitement familial des enfants et des adolescents anorexiques : Des lignes directrices pour le médecin communautaire

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, S; Pinzon, J; Taddeo, D; Katzman, DK

    2010-01-01

    L’anorexie mentale (AM) est une maladie grave qui met la vie en danger et qui fait généralement son apparition pendant l’adolescence. Les données probantes au sujet du traitement optimal de l’AM chez les enfants et les adolescents sont en croissance, mais il reste beaucoup à apprendre. Même si les démarches thérapeutiques actuelles varient au Canada et ailleurs, les données jusqu’à présent indiquent que le traitement familial (TF) est le plus efficace pour les enfants et les adolescents anorexiques. Un élément essentiel du modèle de TF, c’est que les parents sont investis de la responsabilité de rétablir la santé physique de leur enfant et de s’assurer de la reprise complète de son poids. Le médecin qui comprend les principes fondamentaux et la philosophie du TF peut mettre en place les éléments de cette intervention fondée sur des faits probants auprès des jeunes patients anorexiques et de leur famille.

  20. Agonist-, antagonist-, and inverse agonist-regulated trafficking of the delta-opioid receptor correlates with, but does not require, G protein activation.

    PubMed

    Zaki, P A; Keith, D E; Thomas, J B; Carroll, F I; Evans, C J

    2001-09-01

    In this study, we explored the relationship between ligand-induced regulation of surface delta opioid receptors and G protein activation. G protein activation was assessed with [(35)S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) binding assays conducted at both 37 and 0 degrees C. Ligand-independent (constitutive) activity of the delta-receptor was readily observed when the [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding assay was performed at 37 degrees C. We identified a new class of alkaloid inverse agonists (RTI-5989-1, RTI-5989-23, RTI-5989-25), which are more potent than the previously described peptide inverse agonist ICI-174864 (N,N-diallyl-Tyr-Aib-Aib-Phe-Leu). Treatment with these inverse agonists for 18 h caused up-regulation of surface receptors. Eighteen-hour treatment with etorphine resulted in approximately 90% loss of surface receptor, whereas fentanyl, diprenorphine, and morphine caused between 20 and 50% loss. The abilities of ligands to modulate [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding at 37 degrees C showed a strong correlation with their abilities to regulate surface receptor number (r(2) = 0.86). Interestingly, the ability of fentanyl to activate G proteins was markedly temperature sensitive. Fentanyl showed no stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding at 0 degrees C but was as efficacious as etorphine, morphine, and diprenorphine at 37 degrees C. Neither the ligand-induced receptor increases nor decreases were perturbed by pertussis toxin pretreatment, suggesting that functional G proteins are not required for ligand-regulated delta-opioid receptor trafficking. PMID:11504798

  1. Le dialecte natal: analyse de l’opinion des intellectuels et des villageois de Lituanie

    E-print Network

    Ka?iuškien?, Genovait?

    2010-02-01

    dialecte natal: analyse de l’opinion des intellectuels et des villageois de Lituanie Genovait? ka?iuškien? Université de Šiauliai, Faculté des sciences humaines, P. Višinskio 38, LT – 76352 Šiauliai, geno@splius.lt ?lanek temelji na izsledkih...–165 — 139 — Le dialecte natal: analyse de l’opinion des intellectuels et des villageois de Lituanie Le lituanien comporte deux grands groupes dialectaux : celui de l’ouest, la Basse-Lituanie ou Samogites (žemaitija), et celui de l’est, la Haute...

  2. A novel Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) agonist rescues the enzyme from inhibition by angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4).

    PubMed

    Geldenhuys, Werner J; Aring, Danielle; Sadana, Prabodh

    2014-05-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key physiological regulator of triglycerides and atherosclerosis risk. Random screening identified a compound designated C10, showing greater LPL agonist activity than NO-1886, a known LPL agonist. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) exploration of C10 led to the identification of C10d exhibiting at least two fold greater LPL activation than NO-1886. Unlike NO-1886, novel LPL agonists C10 and C10d reversed the LPL inhibition by angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4), a physiological inhibitor of LPL. PMID:24703657

  3. Exercise as an Adjunct Treatment for Opiate Agonist Treatment: Review of the Current Research and Implementation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, Jeremiah; Wadeson, Heather K.; VanHeest, Jaci L.

    2014-01-01

    Opiate dependence is a significant public health concern linked to poor quality of life, co-morbid psychiatric disorders, and high costs to society. Current opiate agonist treatments are an effective but limited intervention. Adjunctive interventions could improve and augment opiate agonist treatment outcomes, including drug abstinence, quality of life, and physical health. This article reviews exercise as an adjunctive intervention for opiate agonist treatment, especially in regards to improving mood and overall quality of life, while reducing other substance use. Poor adherence and dropout frequently prevent many individuals from garnering the many physical and mental health benefits of exercise. Strategies for implementing an exercise intervention, including safety considerations, are discussed. PMID:22989278

  4. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata

    PubMed Central

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. Materials and Methods: We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. Results: We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. Conclusions: All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs. PMID:21969921

  5. Amyloid-? Pathology and APOE Genotype Modulate Retinoid X Receptor Agonist Activity in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Leon M.; Koster, Kevin P.; Luo, Jia; Lee, Sue H.; Wang, Yue-ting; Collins, Nicole C.; Ben Aissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.; LaDu, Mary Jo

    2014-01-01

    Previous data demonstrate that bexarotene (Bex), retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist, reduces soluble and insoluble amyloid-? (A?) in Alzheimer disease (AD)-transgenic mice either by increasing the levels of mouse apolipoprotein E (apoE) or increasing ABCA1/ABCG1-induced apoE lipoprotein association/lipidation. However, although the mechanism of action of RXR agonists remains unclear, a major concern for their use is human (h)-APOE4, the greatest AD genetic risk factor. If APOE4 imparts a toxic gain-of-function, then increasing apoE4 may increase soluble A?, likely the proximal AD neurotoxin. If the APOE4 loss-of-function is lipidation of apoE4, then induction of ABCA1/ABCG1 may be beneficial. In novel EFAD-Tg mice (overexpressing h-A?42 with h-APOE), levels of soluble A? (A?42 and oligomeric A?) are highest in E4FAD hippocampus (HP) > E3FAD-HP > E4FAD cortex (CX) > E3FAD-CX, whereas levels of lipoprotein-associated/lipidated apoE have the opposite pattern (6 months). In E4FAD-HP, short-term RXR agonist treatment (Bex or LG100268; 5.75–6 months) increased ABCA1, apoE4 lipoprotein-association/lipidation, and apoE4/A? complex, decreased soluble A?, and increased PSD95. In addition, hydrogel delivery, which mimics low sustained release, was equally effective as gavage for Bex and LG100268. RXR agonists induced no beneficial effects in the E4FAD-HP in a prevention protocol (5–6 months) and actually increased soluble A? levels in E3FAD-CX and E4FAD-CX with the short-term protocol, possibly the result of systemic hepatomegaly. Thus, RXR agonists address the loss-of-function associated with APOE4 and exacerbated by A? pathology, i.e. low levels of apoE4 lipoprotein association/lipidation. Further studies are vital to address whether RXR agonists are an APOE4-specific AD therapeutic and the systemic side effects that limit translational application. PMID:25217640

  6. AIB1 = amplified in breast cancer; AF-1 = activation function-1; AF-2 = activation function-2; cAMP = cyclic AMP; CBP = CREB-binding protein; DES = diethylstilbestrol; E2 = 17-estradiol; ER = estrogen receptor; ERE = estrogen response element; EGF = epide

    E-print Network

    Brown, Myles

    39 AIB1 = amplified in breast cancer; AF-1 = activation function-1; AF-2 = activation function-2; c; PKA = protein kinase A; SERM = selective estrogen receptor modulator. Available online http://breast-cancer, they have also been associated pathologically with an increased risk for breast and endometrial cancer [2

  7. Agénésie bilatérale des vésicules séminales et des canaux déférents

    PubMed Central

    Kassogué, Amadou; El Ammari, J. Eddine; Diarra, Alkadri; Amiroune, Driss; Ahsaini, Mustapha; Ouldim, Karim; Traoré, Zacharia; Sqalli, H. Nadia; Tizniti, Siham; Mellas, Soufiane; Tazi, M. Fadl; Khallouk, Abdelhak; El Fassi, M. Jamal; Farih, My Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Résumé L’absence de canaux déférents et de vésicules séminales est une cause très rare d’infertilité masculine qui pose des difficultés d’ordre diagnostique. De plus, son traitement est complexe. Dans le présent article, nous rapportons le cas d’un patient âgé de 43 ans qui a consulté pour infertilité primaire évoluant depuis 5 ans (un conseil génétique a été réalisé) et nous examinons les difficultés diagnostiques et thérapeutiques liées à cette forme particulière d’infertilité. PMID:25132895

  8. Dies academicus 2012 Bericht des Rektors

    E-print Network

    Zürich, Universität

    Dies academicus 2012 Bericht des Rektors Wie es bereits zur Tradition geworden ist, nehme ich Sie Glanzlichtern des vergangenen Jahres zählte. Zum ersten Mal organisierten die Universität Zürich und die ETH gemeinsam die Zürcher Wissenschaftstage und luden während eines ganzen Wochenendes zur Begegnung und zum

  9. DES Chapter 10 The Condensed Financial

    E-print Network

    Schubart, Christoph

    or Actual sheets. The spreadsheet automatically condenses the Comprehensive sheet into a format called theComprehensive sheet into a format called the Condensed sheet. See DES Chapter 10 and its Appendix (continued) DES (Gerichtsverfahren), casualty losses due to flood, fire, or tornado, and gains or l th ti i h t (Ablö ) f d btlosses

  10. Copernic: la piste des influences arabes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalatbari, A.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J. M.

    2004-10-01

    Copernic a-t-il connu le travail des astronomes du Moyen-Orient ? S'en est-il inspiré pour élaborer sa théorie de l'héliocentrisme ? C'est l'hypothèse avancée par certains historiens des sciences pour comprendre le génie de celui qui, le premier, a placé le Soleil au centre du monde. Enquête.

  11. JOSEPH LOUIS LAGRANGE, THORIE DES FONCTIONS ANALYTIQUES,

    E-print Network

    Fraser, Craig

    CHAPTER 19 JOSEPH LOUIS LAGRANGE, TH�ORIE DES FONCTIONS ANALYTIQUES, FIRST EDITION (1797) Craig G (§25). 1 INTRODUCTION At the end of the 18th century Joseph Louis Lagrange (1736­1813) published a book Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 258 #12;Chapter 19. Joseph Louis Lagrange, Théorie des fonctions

  12. Facult des sciences de l'agriculture

    E-print Network

    Laval, Université

    #12;Faculté des sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation Rapport annuel des activités de'agriculture et de l'alimentation Vice-décanat à la recherche Madame, Monsieur, En 2007-2008, la Faculté de sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation a connu une autre très bonne année quant au financement de

  13. Facult des sciences de l'agriculture

    E-print Network

    Laval, Université

    Faculté des sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation Rapport annuel des activités de'agriculture et de l'alimentation Vice-décanat à la recherche Madame, Monsieur, C'est avec un plaisir renouvelé'agriculture et de l'alimentation (FSAA). Encore une fois, les chercheurs de la FSAA ont su démontrer une

  14. Quelques tendances actuelles en histoire des mathematiques.

    E-print Network

    Aubin, David

    Development, sous la dir. de Joseph W. Dauben et Christoph J. Scriba, Birkh¨auser, B^ale, 2002, p. 6. 3 Voir Catherine Goldstein, Jeremy Gray et Jim Ritter, dir., L'Europe math´ematique : histoire, mythes, identit´ematiques `a des ´epoques et dans des cultures diff´erentes. Dans un ouvrage r´ecent dirig´e par Joseph Dauben

  15. Gestion durable des ressources en agriculture

    E-print Network

    Sart, Remi

    Gestion durable des ressources en agriculture Mention : Agronomie Nature de la formation : Diplôme durable des ressources en agriculture UFR Sciences et Technologies PRÉSENTATION Objectifs La Licence diplôme sera donc un technicien spécialisé à l'interface entre l'agriculture et l

  16. Les implications du phénomène des médecins hospitaliers

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, François; Brunelle, Yvon; Dawes, Martin; Boulé, Richard; Bergeron, Rénald

    2007-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ OBJECTIF Évaluer l’impact de 2 systèmes de soins hospitaliers par une revue de la littérature. QUALITÉ DES DONNÉES Il reste des zones nébuleuses car plusieurs des études sont opportunistes, signalant une expérience isolée ou de simples avant-après. Peu sont vraiment expérimentales et toutes ont été menées dans des milieux universitaires, limitant ainsi leur validité externe. MESSAGE PRINCIPAL Les données supportent l’utilisation de médecins hospitaliers qui consacrent un minimum de 2 mois par année à ce travail et qui sont alors à plein temps sur les étages. Les coûts sont plus souvent qu’autrement réduits et l’enseignement est amélioré. Point de repère important de la qualité des soins, la mortalité est égale dans les 2 systèmes de soins. CONCLUSION Certaines questions demeurent sans réponse dont le choix de la meilleure formation en vue de préparer les résidents au travail hospitalier et la façon de maintenir les compétences acquises. PMID:18077751

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and PPAR agonists: the 'future' in dermatology therapeutics?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K; Mehta, Karaninder S; Chauhan, Pushpinder S; Rawat, Ritu

    2015-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors and comprise three different isoforms namely PPAR?, PPAR?, and PPAR?/? with PPAR?/? being the predominant subtype in human keratinocytes. After binding with specific ligands, PPARs regulate gene expression, cell growth and differentiation, apoptosis, inflammatory responses, and tumorogenesis. PPARs also modulate a wide variety of skin functions including keratinocyte proliferation, epidermal barrier formation, wound healing, melanocyte proliferation, and sebum production. Recent studies have shown the importance of PPARs in the pathogenesis of many dermatological disorders. Clinical trials have suggested possible role of PPAR agonists in the management of various dermatoses ranging from acne vulgaris, psoriasis, hirsutism, and lipodystrophy to cutaneous malignancies including melanoma. This article is intended to be a primer for dermatologists in their understanding of clinical relevance of PPARs and PPAR agonists in dermatology therapeutics. PMID:25986745

  18. Therapeutic Effects of Melatonin Receptor Agonists on Sleep and Comorbid Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Laudon, Moshe; Frydman-Marom, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Several melatonin receptors agonists (ramelteon, prolonged-release melatonin, agomelatine and tasimelteon) have recently become available for the treatment of insomnia, depression and circadian rhythms sleep-wake disorders. The efficacy and safety profiles of these compounds in the treatment of the indicated disorders are reviewed. Accumulating evidence indicates that sleep-wake disorders and co-existing medical conditions are mutually exacerbating. This understanding has now been incorporated into the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5). Therefore, when evaluating the risk/benefit ratio of sleep drugs, it is pertinent to also evaluate their effects on wake and comorbid condition. Beneficial effects of melatonin receptor agonists on comorbid neurological, psychiatric, cardiovascular and metabolic symptomatology beyond sleep regulation are also described. The review underlines the beneficial value of enhancing physiological sleep in comorbid conditions. PMID:25207602

  19. Recent progress in the development of agonists and antagonists for melatonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Zlotos, D P

    2012-01-01

    The various physiological actions of the neurohormone melatonin are mediated mainly by two G-protein-coupled MT(1) and MT(2) receptors. The melatoninergic drugs on the market, ramelteon and agomelatine, as well as the most advanced drug candidates under clinical evaluation, tasimelteon and PD-6735, are high-affinity nonselective MT(1) and MT(2) agonists. However, exploring the exact physiological role of the MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors requires subtype selective MT(1) and MT(2) ligands. This review covers novel melatoninergic agonists and antagonists published since 2010, focusing on high-affinity and subtype selective agents. Additionally, compounds not mentioned in the previous review articles and ligands selective for the MT(3) binding site are included. PMID:22680635

  20. Novel Oxazolidinone-Based Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Agonists: Molecular Modeling, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fresno, N; Macías-González, M; Torres-Zaguirre, A; Romero-Cuevas, M; Sanz-Camacho, P; Elguero, J; Pavón, F J; Rodríguez de Fonseca, F; Goya, P; Pérez-Fernández, R

    2015-08-27

    A series of new peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) chiral ligands have been designed following the accepted three-module structure comprising a polar head, linker, and hydrophobic tail. The majority of the ligands incorporate the oxazolidinone moiety as a novel polar head, and the nature of the hydrophobic tail has also been varied. Docking studies using the crystal structure of an agonist bound to the ligand binding domain of the PPAR? receptor have been performed as a tool for their design. Suitable synthetic procedures have been developed, and compounds with different stereochemistries have been prepared. Evaluation of basal and ligand-induced activity proved that several compounds showed agonist activity at the PPAR? receptor, thus validating the oxazolidinone template for PPAR activity. In addition, two compounds, 2 and 4, showed dual PPAR?/PPAR? agonism and interesting food intake reduction in rats. PMID:26226490

  1. FFA4/GPR120 agonists: a survey of the recent patent literature.

    PubMed

    Formicola, Rosa; Pevarello, Paolo; Kuhn, Christina; Liberati, Chiara; Piscitelli, Francesco; Sodano, Mariangela

    2015-11-01

    FFA4/GPR120, a member of the rhodopsin family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), is becoming an important target for therapeutic intervention in several areas of disease, including metabolic diseases, inflammation and cancer. In the last few years several patents on original chemotypes have been generated by different companies. In this review an analysis of the patents in the FFA4 agonism field is presented, with an emphasis on the documents published between 2013 and mid-2015. A discussion of the biological methods used in the patents is included. The general interest in this area is growing fast as half of the existing patents on FFA4 agonists have been issued after 2013. There is, however, a need of further diversifying new chemical classes away form the current substrate-like, carboxylic acid-containing agonists. PMID:26580993

  2. Conformationally restricted ?-opioid receptor agonists: Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of diastereoisomeric and enantiomeric decahydroquinoxalines.

    PubMed

    Molenveld, Peter; Bouzanne des Mazery, Renaud; Sterk, Geert Jan; Storcken, Roy P M; Autar, Reshma; van Oss, Bram; van der Haas, Richard N S; Fröhlich, Roland; Schepmann, Dirk; Wünsch, Bernhard; Soeberdt, Michael

    2015-11-15

    All diastereoisomeric decahydroquinoxalines representing conformationally restricted analogs of ? agonists U-50,488 and GR-89,696 have been prepared. Cis/trans configured compound 7 is by far the highest binding diastereoisomer with a Ki of 0.35nM. Racemates 4, 6, and 7 were separated into enantiomers. (+)-(4aR,5S,8aS)-Configured enantiomer 7b was identified as a high affinity (Ki=0.25nM) ? ligand with high selectivity over ? and ? receptors. It acts as full agonist with an EC50 value of 2.0nM in the [(35)S]GTP?S assay, while enantiomer 7a showed an EC50 value of 1000nM. PMID:26411794

  3. Weak rappers rock more: hermit crabs assess their own agonistic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Elizabeth; Briffa, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Fighting animals use a variety of information sources to make strategic decisions. A neglected potential source of information is an individual's own performance during a fight. Surprisingly, this possibility has yet to be incorporated into the large body of theory concerning the evolution of aggressive behaviour. Here, by experimentally dampening the impact of their shell rapping behaviour, we test for the possibility that attacking hermit crabs monitor their own fight performance. Attackers with dampened raps did not show a reduction in the number of raps used. By contrast, they showed an increased frequency of a less intense agonistic behaviour, shell rocking. This change in behaviour, in attackers that are forced to rap weakly, indicates that they assess their own agonistic behaviour. PMID:26740563

  4. ?-Mangostin from Garcinia mangostana pericarps as a dual agonist that activates Both PPAR? and PPAR?.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Nobuyasu; Gamo, Kanae; Miyachi, Hiroyuki; Iinuma, Munekazu; Kawada, Teruo; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Akao, Yukihiro; Tosa, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    We tested the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)? agonistic activity of a Garcinia mangostana pericarp extract to develop a treatment for the metabolic syndrome, and demonstrated ?-mangostin to be an active compound on the basis of a luciferase reporter gene assay. ?-Mangostin induced the expression of the uncoupling protein-3 (UCP-3) gene which is related to energy expenditure and fat metabolism in L6 cells. We showed that ?-mangostin is a dual agonist that activates both PPAR? and PPAR?. ?-Mangostin also induced the expression of acyl-CoA synthase and carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1A genes in HepG2 cells. These results suggest the potential of ?-mangostin as a preventive agent of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:24317060

  5. Apelin, Elabela/Toddler, and biased agonists as novel therapeutic agents in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peiran; Maguire, Janet J; Davenport, Anthony P

    2015-09-01

    Apelin and its G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) have emerged as a key signalling pathway in the cardiovascular system. The peptide is a potent inotropic agent and vasodilator. Remarkably, a peptide, Elabela/Toddler, that has little sequence similarity to apelin, has been proposed as a second endogenous apelin receptor ligand and is encoded by a gene from a region of the genome previously classified as 'non-coding'. Apelin is downregulated in pulmonary arterial hypertension and heart failure. To replace the missing endogenous peptide, 'biased' apelin agonists have been designed that preferentially activate G protein pathways, resulting in reduced ?-arrestin recruitment and receptor internalisation, with the additional benefit of attenuating detrimental ?-arrestin signalling. Proof-of-concept studies support the clinical potential for apelin receptor biased agonists. PMID:26143239

  6. Apelin, Elabela/Toddler, and biased agonists as novel therapeutic agents in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peiran; Maguire, Janet J.; Davenport, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Apelin and its G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) have emerged as a key signalling pathway in the cardiovascular system. The peptide is a potent inotropic agent and vasodilator. Remarkably, a peptide, Elabela/Toddler, that has little sequence similarity to apelin, has been proposed as a second endogenous apelin receptor ligand and is encoded by a gene from a region of the genome previously classified as ‘non-coding’. Apelin is downregulated in pulmonary arterial hypertension and heart failure. To replace the missing endogenous peptide, ‘biased’ apelin agonists have been designed that preferentially activate G protein pathways, resulting in reduced ?-arrestin recruitment and receptor internalisation, with the additional benefit of attenuating detrimental ?-arrestin signalling. Proof-of-concept studies support the clinical potential for apelin receptor biased agonists. PMID:26143239

  7. Discovery of Intestinal Targeted TGR5 Agonists for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongliang; Ning, Mengmeng; Zou, Qingan; Ye, Yangliang; Feng, Ying; Zhang, Lina; Leng, Ying; Shen, Jianhua

    2015-04-23

    Activation of TGR5 stimulates intestinal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, but activation of the receptors in gallbladder and heart has been shown to cause severe on-target side effects. A series of low-absorbed TGR5 agonists was prepared by modifying compound 2 with polar functional groups to limit systemic exposure and specifically activate TGR5 in the intestine. Compound 15c, with a molecular weight of 1401, a PSA value of 223 Å(2), and low permeability on Caco-2 cells, exhibited satisfactory potency both in vitro and in vivo. Low levels of 15c were detected in blood, bile, and gallbladder tissue, and gallbladder-related side effects were substantially decreased compared to the absorbed small-molecule TGR5 agonist 2. PMID:25710631

  8. Three-dimensional common-feature hypotheses for octopamine agonist arylethanolamines.

    PubMed

    Hirashim, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Eiji; Eto, Morifusa

    2002-10-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 12 octopamine (OA) agonist arylethanolamines (AEAs). Among the 10 common-featured models generated by program catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond donor (HBD) and a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid (HBA1) features was considered to be important in evaluating the OA activity. OA mapped well onto all the HBD and HBA1 features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, for some inactive compounds, their lack of affinity is primarily due to their inability to achieve an energetically favorable conformation shared by the active compounds. Taken together, structures of a 4-OH-Ph, alpha-OH, and a primary amine are important for OA activities. The present studies on OA agonists demonstrate that an HBD and an HBA1 sites located on the molecule seem to be essential for OA activity. PMID:12398339

  9. Comparison of two direct neutralizing assay formats using recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone as agonist.

    PubMed

    Ryding, J; Hjertberg, E; Rasmussen, B B

    2013-12-31

    Characterizing anti-drug antibodies for neutralizing activity is commonly part of the immunogenicity testing package for most therapeutic proteins. Cell-based neutralization assays can generally be categorized as direct- or indirect assays depending on whether they are associated with therapeutics with agonistic- or antagonistic properties. This paper's aim is a comparison of the two direct neutralization assay formats; the variable- and fixed concentration assay format, using recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone as drug agonist. Essential validation- and performance parameters, such as sample through-put, cut-point, precision, sensitivity and drug tolerance, were compared. The fixed concentration assay format offers superior sample through-put (40 versus 6 samples), precision (coefficient of variation of ?14% versus 34%) and almost 6 times better sensitivity and is generally recommended as the better option particularly for quasi-quantitative assessments of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:24184184

  10. DNA Aptamer Assembly as a Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Agonist.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Vidhya; Monsalve, Adam; Sautina, Larysa; Segal, Mark S; Dobson, Jon; Allen, Josephine B

    2015-10-01

    Controlling receptor-mediated processes in cells is paramount in many research areas. The activity of small molecules and growth factors is difficult to control and can lead to off-target effects through the activation of nonspecific receptors as well as binding affinity to nonspecific cell types. In this study, we report the development of a molecular trigger in the form of a divalent nucleic acid aptamer assembly toward vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2). The assembly binds to VEGFR2 and functions as a receptor agonist with targeted receptor binding, promoting receptor phosphorylation, activation of the downstream Akt pathway, upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and endothelial cell capillary tube formation. The agonist action we report makes this aptamer construct a promising strategy to control VEGFR2-mediated cell signaling. PMID:26125598

  11. Ligand-based virtual screening identifies a family of selective cannabinoid receptor 2 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Gianella-Borradori, Matteo; Christou, Ivy; Bataille, Carole J.R.; Cross, Rebecca L.; Wynne, Graham M.; Greaves, David R.; Russell, Angela J.

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R) has been linked with the regulation of inflammation, and selective receptor activation has been proposed as a target for the treatment of a range of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and arthritis. In order to identify selective CB2R agonists with appropriate physicochemical and ADME properties for future evaluation in vivo, we first performed a ligand-based virtual screen. Subsequent medicinal chemistry optimisation studies led to the identification of a new class of selective CB2R agonists. Several examples showed high levels of activity (EC50 < 200 nM) and binding affinity (Ki < 200 nM) for the CB2R, and no detectable activity at the CB1R. The most promising example, DIAS2, also showed favourable in vitro metabolic stability and absorption properties along with a clean selectivity profile when evaluated against a panel of GPCRs and kinases. PMID:25487422

  12. Structure-Guided Design of Selective Epac1 and Epac2 Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Schwede, Frank; Bertinetti, Daniela; Langerijs, Carianne N.; Hadders, Michael A.; Wienk, Hans; Ellenbroek, Johanne H.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.; Bos, Johannes L.; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Janssen, Richard A. J.; Rehmann, Holger

    2015-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP is known to augment glucose-induced insulin secretion. However, its downstream targets in pancreatic ?-cells have not been unequivocally determined. Therefore, we designed cAMP analogues by a structure-guided approach that act as Epac2-selective agonists both in vitro and in vivo. These analogues activate Epac2 about two orders of magnitude more potently than cAMP. The high potency arises from increased affinity as well as increased maximal activation. Crystallographic studies demonstrate that this is due to unique interactions. At least one of the Epac2-specific agonists, Sp-8-BnT-cAMPS (S-220), enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in human pancreatic cells. Selective targeting of Epac2 is thus proven possible and may be an option in diabetes treatment. PMID:25603503

  13. Identification of new potent GPR119 agonists by combining virtual screening and combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wellenzohn, Bernd; Lessel, Uta; Beller, Andreas; Isambert, Timo; Hoenke, Christoph; Nosse, Bernd

    2012-12-27

    Virtual screening in a huge collection of virtual combinatorial libraries has led to the identification of two new structural classes of GPR119 agonists with submicromolar in vitro potencies. Herein, we describe the virtual screening process involving feature trees fragment space searches followed by a 3D postprocessing step. The in silico findings were then filtered and prioritized, and finally, combinatorial libraries of target molecules were synthesized. Furthermore the so-called "activity-anchor principle" is introduced as an element to increase the chance to generate true hits. An activity anchor is a structural element expected to provide key contributions to a certain biological activity. Application of this technique has led to the discovery of two new GPR119-agonist hit series, one of which was further optimized to progress as a novel lead class. PMID:23211099

  14. Aminopyrazole–Phenylalanine Based GPR142 Agonists: Discovery of Tool Compound and in Vivo Efficacy Studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we report the lead optimization of amrinone–phenylalanine based GPR142 agonists. Structure–activity relationship studies led to the discovery of aminopyrazole–phenylalanine carboxylic acid 22, which exhibited good agonistic activity, high target selectivity, desirable pharmacokinetic properties, and no cytochrome P450 or hERG liability. Compound 22, together with its orally bioavailable ethyl ester prodrug 23, were found to be suitable for in vivo proof-of-concept studies. Compound 23 displayed good efficacy in a mouse oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Compound 22 showed GPR142 dependent stimulation of insulin secretion in isolated mouse islets and demonstrated a statistically significant glucose lowering effect in a mouse model bearing transplanted human islets. PMID:24900757

  15. Antinociceptive interactions of opioid delta receptor agonists with morphine in mice: supra- and sub-additivity.

    PubMed

    Horan, P; Tallarida, R J; Haaseth, R C; Matsunaga, T O; Hruby, V J; Porreca, F

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the antinociceptive interactions of fixed ratio combinations of intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) given morphine and subantinociceptive doses of the delta agonists, [D-Pen2, D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE), [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin (DELT) or [Met5]enkephalin (MET) were examined using the mouse warm water tail flick test. When morphine was coadministered with DPDPE or DELT in a 4:1 and 9:1 mixture, respectively, a synergistic antinociceptive effect was observed. In contrast, when morphine was coadministered with MET in a 1:2 fixed ratio mixture, a subadditive interaction occurred. These results demonstrate both positive and negative modulatory interactions of delta agonists with morphine in an antinociceptive endpoint and that these interactions can be either supra- or subadditive. The data support the concept of a functional interaction between opioid mu and delta receptors and a potential regulatory role for the endogenous ligands of the opioid delta receptor. PMID:1315897

  16. Selective ligand behaviors provide new insights into agonist activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Christopher B; Rreza, Iva; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2014-05-16

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are a diverse set of ion channels that are essential to everyday brain function. Contemporary research studies selective activation of individual subtypes of receptors, with the hope of increasing our understanding of behavioral responses and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we aim to expand current binding models to help explain the specificity seen among three activators of ?4?2 receptors: sazetidine-A, cytisine, and NS9283. Through mutational analysis, we can interchange the activation profiles of the stoichiometry-selective compounds sazetidine-A and cytisine. In addition, mutations render NS9283--currently identified as a positive allosteric modulator--into an agonist. These results lead to two conclusions: (1) occupation at each primary face of an ? subunit is needed to activate the channel and (2) the complementary face of the adjacent subunit dictates the binding ability of the agonist. PMID:24564429

  17. Therapeutic effects of melatonin receptor agonists on sleep and comorbid disorders.

    PubMed

    Laudon, Moshe; Frydman-Marom, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Several melatonin receptors agonists (ramelteon, prolonged-release melatonin, agomelatine and tasimelteon) have recently become available for the treatment of insomnia, depression and circadian rhythms sleep-wake disorders. The efficacy and safety profiles of these compounds in the treatment of the indicated disorders are reviewed. Accumulating evidence indicates that sleep-wake disorders and co-existing medical conditions are mutually exacerbating. This understanding has now been incorporated into the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5). Therefore, when evaluating the risk/benefit ratio of sleep drugs, it is pertinent to also evaluate their effects on wake and comorbid condition. Beneficial effects of melatonin receptor agonists on comorbid neurological, psychiatric, cardiovascular and metabolic symptomatology beyond sleep regulation are also described. The review underlines the beneficial value of enhancing physiological sleep in comorbid conditions. PMID:25207602

  18. Alpha-2 receptor agonists for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Belkin, Molly R; Schwartz, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    Clonidine and guanfacine are alpha-2 receptor agonists that decrease sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that is theorized to be related to a hyperactive sympathetic nervous system. Currently, the only US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medications for PTSD are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) sertraline and paroxetine. Sometimes use of the SSRIs may not lead to full remission and symptoms of hyperarousal often persist. This article specifically reviews the literature on alpha-2 receptor agonist use for the treatment of PTSD and concludes that while the evidence base is limited, these agents might be considered useful when SSRIs fail to treat symptoms of agitation and hyperarousal in patients with PTSD. PMID:26322115

  19. Scientific Rationale for the Use of Alpha-Adrenergic Agonists and Glucocorticoids in the Therapy of Pediatric Stridor

    PubMed Central

    Nino, Gustavo; Baloglu, Orkun; Gutierrez, Maria J.; Schwartz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The most common pharmacological therapies used in the treatment of stridor in children are glucocorticosteroids (GC) and alpha-adrenergic (?AR) agonists. Despite the long-standing reported efficacy of these medications, there is a paucity of data relating to their actual mechanisms of action in the upper airway. Summary. There is compelling scientific evidence supporting the use of ?AR-agonists and GCs in pediatric stridor. ?AR signaling and GCs regulate the vasomotor tone in the upper airway mucosa. The latter translates into better airflow dynamics, as delineated by human and nonhuman upper airway physiological models. In turn, clinical trials have demonstrated that GCs and the nonselective ?AR agonist, epinephrine, improve respiratory distress scores and reduce the need for further medical care in children with stridor. Future research is needed to investigate the role of selective ?AR agonists and the potential synergism of GCs and ?AR-signaling in the treatment of upper airway obstruction and stridor. PMID:22220172

  20. Glucagon-like polypeptide agonists in type 2 diabetes mellitus: efficacy and tolerability, a balance

    PubMed Central

    Tella, Sri Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like polypeptide (GLP-1) receptor agonist treatment has multiple effects on glucose metabolism, supports the ? cell, and promotes weight loss. There are now five GLP-1 agonists in clinical use with more in development. GLP-1 treatment typically can induce a lowering of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of 0.5–1.5% over time with weight loss of 2–5%. In some individuals, a progressive loss of weight occurs. There is evidence that GLP-1 therapy opposes the loss of ? cells which is a feature of type 2 diabetes. The chief downside of GLP-1 treatment is the gastrointestinal motility disturbance which is one of the modes of action of the hormone; significant nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may lead to discontinuation of treatment. Although daily injection of GLP-1 agents is successful, the development of extended release preparations allows for injection once weekly, and perhaps much longer in the future. The indication for GLP-1 use is diabetes, but now, liraglutide has been approved for primary treatment of obesity. When oral agents fail to control glucose levels in type 2 diabetes, there is a choice between long-acting insulin and GLP-1 agonists as additional treatments. The lowering of HbA1c by either modality is equivalent in most studies. Patients lose weight with GLP-1 treatment and gain weight on insulin. There is a lower incidence of hypoglycemia with GLP-1 therapy but a much higher incidence of gastrointestinal complaints. Insulin dosing is flexible while GLP-1 agents have historically been administered at fixed dosages. Now, the use of combined long-acting insulin and GLP-1 agonists is promising a major therapeutic change. Combined therapy takes advantage of the benefits of both insulin and GLP-1 agents. Furthermore, direct admixture of both in the same syringe will permit flexible dosing, improvement of glucose levels, and reduction of both hypoglycemia and gastrointestinal side effects. PMID:26137215

  1. Activation of Protease Activated Receptor 2 by Exogenous Agonist Exacerbates Early Radiation Injury in Rat Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR{sub 2}) is highly expressed throughout the gut and regulates the inflammatory, mitogenic, fibroproliferative, and nociceptive responses to injury. PAR{sub 2} is strikingly upregulated and exhibits increased activation in response to intestinal irradiation. We examined the mechanistic significance of radiation enteropathy development by assessing the effect of exogenous PAR{sub 2} activation. Methods and Materials: Rat small bowel was exposed to localized single-dose radiation (16.5 Gy). The PAR{sub 2} agonist (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH{sub 2}) or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally daily for 3 days before irradiation (before), for 7 days after irradiation (after), or both 3 days before and 7 days after irradiation (before-after). Early and delayed radiation enteropathy was assessed at 2 and 26 weeks after irradiation using quantitative histologic examination, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The PAR{sub 2} agonist did not elicit changes in the unirradiated (shielded) intestine. In contrast, in the irradiated intestine procured 2 weeks after irradiation, administration of the PAR{sub 2} agonist was associated with more severe mucosal injury and increased intestinal wall thickness in all three treatment groups (p <.05) compared with the vehicle-treated controls. The PAR{sub 2} agonist also exacerbated the radiation injury score, serosal thickening, and mucosal inflammation (p <.05) in the before and before-after groups. The short-term exogenous activation of PAR{sub 2} did not affect radiation-induced intestinal injury at 26 weeks. Conclusion: The results of the present study support a role for PAR{sub 2} activation in the pathogenesis of early radiation-induced intestinal injury. Pharmacologic PAR{sub 2} antagonists might have the potential to reduce the intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and/or as countermeasures in radiologic accidents or terrorism scenarios.

  2. The long-acting ?2-adrenoceptor agonist olodaterol attenuates pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wex, Eva; Kollak, Ines; Duechs, Matthias J; Naline, Emmanuel; Wollin, Lutz; Devillier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose ?2-adrenoceptor agonists are widely used in the management of obstructive airway diseases. Besides their bronchodilatory effect, several studies suggest inhibitory effects on various aspects of inflammation. The aim of our study was to determine the efficacy of the long-acting ?2-adrenoceptor agonist olodaterol to inhibit pulmonary inflammation and to elucidate mechanism(s) underlying its anti-inflammatory actions. Experimental Approach Olodaterol was tested in murine and guinea pig models of cigarette smoke- and LPS-induced lung inflammation. Furthermore, effects of olodaterol on the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mediator release from human parenchymal explants, CD11b adhesion molecule expression on human granulocytes TNF-? release from human whole blood and on the IL-8-induced migration of human peripheral blood neutrophils were investigated. Key Results Olodaterol dose-dependently attenuated cell influx and pro-inflammatory mediator release in murine and guinea pig models of pulmonary inflammation. These anti-inflammatory effects were observed at doses relevant to their bronchodilatory efficacy. Mechanistically, olodaterol attenuated pro-inflammatory mediator release from human parenchymal explants and whole blood and reduced expression of CD11b adhesion molecules on granulocytes, but without direct effects on IL-8-induced neutrophil transwell migration. Conclusions and Implications This is the first evidence for the anti-inflammatory efficacy of a ?2-adrenoceptor agonist in models of lung inflammation induced by cigarette smoke. The long-acting ?2-adrenoceptor agonist olodaterol attenuated pulmonary inflammation through mechanisms that are separate from direct inhibition of bronchoconstriction. Furthermore, the in vivo data suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of olodaterol are maintained after repeated dosing for 4 days. PMID:25824824

  3. Dihydromorphine-peptide hybrids with delta receptor agonistic and mu receptor antagonistic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.B.; Medzihradsky, F.; Woods, J.H.

    1986-03-05

    The actions of two morphine derivatives with short peptide side chains were evaluated upon the contraction of the isolated mouse vas deferens and upon displacement of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat brain membranes. NIH-9833 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl) was a potent agonist upon the vas deferens. Its EC50 for inhibition of the twitch was 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. Both naltrexone (10/sup -7/ M) a relatively nonselective opioid antagonist, and ICI-174864 (10/sup -/' M) a highly selective delta receptor antagonist, blocked the actions of NIH-9833 which indicates that this drug is a delta receptor agonist. In contrast, NIH-9835 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-glycyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl), which differs from NIH-9835 by the presence of a single amino acid residue, was devoid of opioid agonistic activity but was a potent antagonist of the inhibitory actions on the vas deferens of morphine and sufentanil. NIH-9833 and NIH-9835 were potent displacers of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat cerebral membranes with EC50's of 0.58 nM and 1.7 nM, respectively. The observation that addition of a single glycyl group changes a dihydromorphine-peptide analog from a potent delta receptor agonist to an equally potent mu receptor antagonist suggests that the two receptor sites might be structurally quite similar.

  4. Agonist-mediated changes in intracellular pH: role in vascular smooth muscle cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, B.C.; Canessa, M.; Vallega, G.; Alexander, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in intracellular pH (pHi) are likely to play an important role in regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function. In most blood vessels, acidification is associated with decreased contractile tone and alkalinization with increased tone. However, the nature of agonist-mediated alterations in pHi and the role of pHi in other VSMC responses has been little studied. We have used the pH sensitive dye, BCECF, to study pHi in cultured rat aortic VSMC. Basal pHi at 37 degrees C in physiologic saline buffer (pH 7.3) was 7.08 in suspended VSMC and 7.26 in substrate-attached VSMC. An amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ exchanger mediated pHi recovery following an acid load. Angiotensin II- and platelet-derived growth factor typified one class of VSMC agonists, causing an initial transient (less than 5 min) acidification followed by a sustained (greater than 20 min) alkalinization. The acidification phase was associated with increased Ca2+ mobilization as demonstrated by increases in intracellular Ca2+ and 45Ca2+ efflux. The alkalinization was associated with Na+ influx and H+ efflux consistent with Na+/H+ exchange. Epidermal growth factor and phorbol esters typified another class of agonists which stimulated only a sustained alkalinization. Alterations in regulation of VSMC pHi may play an important role in VSMC hypertrophy and/or proliferation as suggested by the finding of increased cell growth and Na+/H+ exchange in spontaneously hypertensive rat VSMC compared to Wistar-Kyoto VSMC. Although no functional correlate for initial acidification has been identified, cytoplasmic alkalinization appears to be required for the sustained formation of diacylglycerol following angiotensin II stimulation. These findings suggest that alterations in pHi may regulate several VSMC functions such as agonist-mediated signal transduction, excitation-response coupling, and growth.

  5. Antitussive activity of sigma-1 receptor agonists in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Brown, Claire; Fezoui, Malika; Selig, William M; Schwartz, Carl E; Ellis, James L

    2004-01-01

    1. Current antitussive medications have limited efficacy and often contain the opiate-like agent dextromethorphan (DEX). The mechanism whereby DEX inhibits cough is ill defined. DEX displays affinity at both NMDA and sigma receptors, suggesting that the antitussive activity may involve central or peripheral activity at either of these receptors. This study examined and compared the antitussive activity of DEX and various putative sigma receptor agonists in the guinea-pig citric-acid cough model. 2. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of DEX (30 mg kg(-1)) and the sigma-1 agonists SKF-10,047 (1-5 mg kg(-1)), Pre-084 (5 mg kg(-1)), and carbetapentane (1-5 mg kg(-1)) inhibited citric-acid-induced cough in guinea-pigs. Intraperitoneal administration of a sigma-1 antagonist, BD 1047 (1-5 mg kg(-1)), reversed the inhibition of cough elicited by SKF-10,047. In addition, two structurally dissimilar sigma agonists SKF-10,047 (1 mg ml(-1)) and Pre-084 (1 mg ml(-1)) inhibited cough when administered by aerosol. 3. Aerosolized BD 1047 (1 mg ml(-1), 30 min) prevented the antitussive action of SKF-10,047 (5 mg kg(-1)) or DEX (30 mg kg(-1)) given by i.p. administration and, likewise, i.p. administration of BD 1047 (5 mg kg(-1)) prevented the antitussive action of SKF-10,047 given by aerosol (1 mg ml(-1)). 4. These results therefore support the argument that antitussive effects of DEX may be mediated via sigma receptors, since both systemic and aerosol administration of sigma-1 receptor agonists inhibit citric-acid-induced cough in guinea-pigs. While significant systemic exposure is possible with aerosol administration, the very low doses administered (estimated <0.3 mg kg(-1)) suggest that there may be a peripheral component to the antitussive effect. PMID:14691051

  6. Peripheral neural serotonin receptors: identification and characterization with specific antagonists and agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Mawe, G M; Branchek, T A; Gershon, M D

    1986-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been shown to be a neurotransmitter in the enteric nervous system (ENS). Although 5-HT is a mediator of slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials evoked by stimulation of interganglionic connectives, the precise role it plays in the physiology of the gut is unclear. Research has been hampered by an inadequate knowledge of the types of 5-HT receptor in the ENS and thus the lack of well-characterized antagonists. We now report the identification of two classes of enteric neural 5-HT receptor, the effects of activating these receptors on myenteric type II/AH neurons, and their characterization with specific agonists and antagonists. One class, which we propose to call 5-HT1P, is characterized by a high affinity for [3H]5-HT in radioligand binding assays. This class of receptor mediates a slow depolarization of myenteric type II/AH neurons associated with an increase in input resistance. Agonists at this receptor include, in addition to 5-HT (in order of potency), 5- and 6-hydroxyindalpine and 2-methyl-5-HT. 5-HT1P-mediated responses are specifically antagonized by 5-hydroxytryptophyl-5-hydroxytryptophan amide. The other class of 5-HT receptor, which we propose to call 5-HT2P, appears not to have a high affinity for [3H]5-HT. This receptor mediates a brief depolarization of myenteric II/AH neurons associated with a fall in input resistance. 2-Methyl-5-HT, at low concentrations, is a specific agonist at this receptor and ICS 205-930 is a specific antagonist. Binding of [3H]5-HT to enteric membranes is inhibited by 5-HT1P receptor agonists and antagonists but not by the 5-HT2P receptor antagonist ICS 205-930 or by MDL 72222, another compound reported to be an antagonist of 5-HT at peripheral receptors. Images PMID:3467338

  7. Antagonist but not agonist labeling of serotonin-1A receptors is decreased in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Stockmeier, Craig A.; Howley, Eimear; Shi, Xiaochun; Sobanska, Anna; Clarke, Gerard; Friedman, Lee; Rajkowska, Grazyna

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin-1A receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of depression and suicide. In postmortem brain tissue, agonist binding to serotonin-1A receptors is reportedly increased or unchanged in depression or suicide, while neuroimaging studies report a decrease in antagonist binding to these receptors in subjects with depression. In this study, both agonist and antagonist radioligand binding to serotonin-1A receptors were examined in postmortem orbitofrontal cortex from subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). Brain tissue was collected at autopsy from 11 subjects with MDD and 11 age- and gender-matched normal control subjects. Two depressed subjects had a recent psychoactive substance use disorder. Six subjects with MDD had a prescription for an antidepressant drug in the last month of life, and, of these six, postmortem bloods from only two subjects tested positive for an antidepressant drug. There was no significant difference between cohorts for age, postmortem interval or tissue pH. The receptor agonist [3H]8-OH-DPAT or the antagonist [3H]MPPF were used to autoradiographically label serotonin-1A receptors in frozen sections from cytoarchitectonically-defined left rostral orbitofrontal cortex (area 47). There was no significant difference between depressed and control subjects in agonist binding to serotonin-1A receptors. However, antagonist binding was significantly decreased in outer layers of orbitofrontal cortex in MDD. This observation in postmortem tissue confirms reports using an antagonist radioligand in living subjects with depression. Decreased antagonist binding to serotonin-1A receptors in outer layers of orbitofrontal cortex suggests diminished receptor signaling and may be linked to corresponding neuronal changes detected previously in these depressed subjects. PMID:19215942

  8. Novel potent and selective ? ligands: evaluation of their agonist and antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Agostino; Cobos, Enrique J; Parenti, Carmela; Aricò, Giuseppina; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Ronsisvalle, Simone; Pasquinucci, Lorella; Prezzavento, Orazio; Colabufo, Nicola A; Contino, Marialessandra; González, Luis G; Scoto, Giovanna M; Ronsisvalle, Giuseppe

    2011-05-26

    Novel enantiomers and diastereoisomers structurally related to ? ligand (+)-MR200 were synthesized to improve ?(1)/?(2) subtype selectivity. The selective ?(1) ligand (-)-8 showed an antagonist profile determined by phenytoin differential modulation of binding affinity in vitro, confirmed in vivo by an increase of ? opioid analgesia. The ?(2) ligand (-)-9 displayed agonist properties in an in vitro isolated organ bath assay and antiproliferative effects on LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. PMID:21476493

  9. TLR3 and TLR9 Agonists Improve Postexposure Vaccination Efficacy of Live Smallpox Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Israely, Tomer; Erez, Noam; Politi, Boaz; Waner, Trevor; Lustig, Shlomo; Paran, Nir

    2014-01-01

    Eradication of smallpox and discontinuation of the vaccination campaign resulted in an increase in the percentage of unvaccinated individuals, highlighting the need for postexposure efficient countermeasures in case of accidental or deliberate viral release. Intranasal infection of mice with ectromelia virus (ECTV), a model for human smallpox, is curable by vaccination with a high vaccine dose given up to 3 days postexposure. To further extend this protective window and to reduce morbidity, mice were vaccinated postexposure with Vaccinia-Lister, the conventional smallpox vaccine or Modified Vaccinia Ankara, a highly attenuated vaccine in conjunction with TLR3 or TLR9 agonists. We show that co-administration of the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) even 5 days postexposure conferred protection, avoiding the need to increase the vaccination dose. Efficacious treatments prevented death, ameliorated disease symptoms, reduced viral load and maintained tissue integrity of target organs. Protection was associated with significant elevation of serum IFN? and anti-vaccinia IgM antibodies, modulation of IFN? response, and balanced activation of NK and T cells. TLR9 agonists (CpG ODNs) were less protective than the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C). We show that activation of type 1 IFN by poly(I:C) and protection is achievable even without co-vaccination, requiring sufficient amount of the viral antigens of the infective agent or the vaccine. This study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of postexposure immune modulation by TLR activation, allowing to alleviate the disease symptoms and to further extend the protective window of postexposure vaccination. PMID:25350003

  10. Discovery of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine derivatives as GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Paul; Goodnow, Robert A; Saha, Goutam; Bose, Gopal; Moulik, Kakali; Zwingelstein, Catherine; Myers, Michael; Conde-Knape, Karin; Pietranico-Cole, Sherrie; So, Sung-Sau

    2014-02-01

    We designed and synthesized a novel series of phenylamino- and phenoxy-substituted pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine derivatives as GPR119 agonists. SAR studies indicated that electron-withdrawing substituents on the phenyl ring are important for potency and full efficacy. Compound 26 combined good potency with a promising pharmacokinetic profile in mice, and lowered the glucose excursion in mice in an oral glucose-tolerance test. PMID:24412066

  11. Conformational restriction in a series of GPR119 agonists: differences in pharmacology between mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Scott, James S; Brocklehurst, Katy J; Brown, Hayley S; Clarke, David S; Coe, Helen; Groombridge, Sam D; Laber, David; MacFaul, Philip A; McKerrecher, Darren; Schofield, Paul

    2013-06-01

    A series of conformationally restricted GPR119 agonists were prepared based around a 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane scaffold. Examples were found to have markedly different pharmacology in mouse and human despite similar levels of binding to the receptor. This highlights the large effects on GPCR phamacology that can result from small structural changes in the ligand, together with inter-species differences between receptors. PMID:23628336

  12. The effect of dopamine agonists on adaptive and aberrant salience in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Helga; Levy-Gigi, Einat; Somlai, Zsuzsanna; Takáts, Annamária; Bereczki, Dániel; Kéri, Szabolcs

    2012-03-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that after initiation of dopaminergic medications some patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop psychotic symptoms, such as hallucinations and delusions. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the neurocognitive basis of this phenomenon can be defined as the formation of arbitrary and illusory associations between conditioned stimuli and reward signals, called aberrant salience. Young, never-medicated PD patients and matched controls were assessed on a speeded reaction time task in which the probe stimulus was preceded by conditioned stimuli that could signal monetary reward by color or shape. The patients and controls were re-evaluated after 12 weeks during which the patients received a dopamine agonist (pramipexole or ropinirole). Results indicated that dopamine agonists increased both adaptive and aberrant salience in PD patients, that is, formation of real and illusory associations between conditioned stimuli and reward, respectively. This effect was present when associations were assessed by means of faster responding after conditioned stimuli signaling reward (implicit salience) and overt rating of stimulus-reward links (explicit salience). However, unusual feelings and experiences, which are subclinical manifestations of psychotic-like symptoms, were specifically related to irrelevant and illusory stimulus-reward associations (aberrant salience) in PD patients receiving dopamine agonists. The learning of relevant and real stimulus-reward associations (adaptive salience) was not related to unusual experiences. These results suggest that dopamine agonists may increase psychotic-like experiences in young patients with PD, possibly by facilitating dopaminergic transmission in the ventral striatum, which results in aberrant associations between conditioned stimuli and reward. PMID:22089321

  13. Therapeutic Potential of 5-HT2C Receptor Agonists for Addictive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J

    2015-07-15

    The neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) has long been associated with the control of a variety of motivated behaviors, including feeding. Much of the evidence linking 5-HT and feeding behavior was obtained from studies of the effects of the 5-HT releaser (dex)fenfluramine in laboratory animals and humans. Recently, the selective 5-HT2C receptor agonist lorcaserin received FDA approval for the treatment of obesity. This review examines evidence to support the use of selective 5-HT2C receptor agonists as treatments for conditions beyond obesity, including substance abuse (particularly nicotine, psychostimulant, and alcohol dependence), obsessive compulsive, and excessive gambling disorder. Following a brief survey of the early literature supporting a role for 5-HT in modulating food and drug reinforcement, we propose that intrinsic differences between SSRI and serotonin releasers may have underestimated the value of serotonin-based pharmacotherapeutics to treat clinical forms of addictive behavior beyond obesity. We then highlight the critical involvement of the 5-HT2C receptor in mediating the effect of (dex)fenfluramine on feeding and body weight gain and the evidence that 5-HT2C receptor agonists reduce measures of drug reward and impulsivity. A recent report of lorcaserin efficacy in a smoking cessation trial further strengthens the idea that 5-HT2C receptor agonists may have potential as a treatment for addiction. This review was prepared as a contribution to the proceedings of the 11th International Society for Serotonin Research Meeting held in Hermanus, South Africa, July 9-12, 2014. PMID:25870913

  14. Effect of ?{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Kevin D.; Green, Benedict T.; Gardner, Dale R.

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline. -- Highlights: ? Mice treated with nAChR agonists and antagonists have a loss in motor function. ? These deficits are temporary as near normal motor function returns within 10 min. ? There are compound-specific differences in the effects on motor function.

  15. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [11C]Cimbi-36

    PubMed Central

    Ettrup, Anders; da Cunha-Bang, Sophie; McMahon, Brenda; Lehel, Szabolcs; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Skibsted, Anine W; Jørgensen, Louise M; Hansen, Martin; Baandrup, Anders O; Bache, Søren; Svarer, Claus; Kristensen, Jesper L; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Jacob; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2014-01-01

    [11C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [11C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT2A receptors with [11C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input measurements provided the most optimal quantification of cerebral [11C]Cimbi-36 binding. Reference tissue modeling was feasible as it induced a negative but predictable bias in [11C]Cimbi-36 PET outcome measures. In five subjects, pretreatment with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin before a second PET scan significantly decreased [11C]Cimbi-36 binding in all cortical regions with no effects in cerebellum. These results confirm that [11C]Cimbi-36 binding is selective for 5-HT2A receptors in the cerebral cortex and that cerebellum is an appropriate reference tissue for quantification of 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. Thus, we here describe [11C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. PMID:24780897

  16. Nigramide J is a novel potent inverse agonist of the human constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Tanuma, Nobuaki; Yatsu, Tomofumi; Li, Wei; Koike, Kazuo; Inouye, Yoshio

    2014-02-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is very important for drug development and for understanding pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. We screened by mammalian one hybrid assay among natural compounds to discover novel ligands of human constitutive androstane receptor (hCAR). hCAR transcriptional activity was measured by luciferase assay and mRNA levels of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 in HepTR-hCAR cells and human primary hepatocytes were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Nigramide J (NJ) whose efficacy is comparable to those of hitherto known inverse agonists such as clotrimazole, PK11195, and ethinylestradiol. NJ is a naturally occurring cyclohexane-type amide alkaloid that was isolated from the roots of Piper nigrum. The suppressive effect of NJ on the CAR-dependent transcriptional activity was found to be species specific, in the descending order of hCAR, rat CAR, and mouse CAR. The unliganded hCAR-dependent transactivation of reporter and endogenous genes was suppressed by NJ at concentrations higher than 5 ?mol/L. The ligand-binding cavity of hCAR was shared by NJ and CITCO, because they were competitive in the binding to hCAR. NJ interfered with the interaction of hCAR with coactivator SRC-1, but not with its interaction with the corepressor NCoR1. Furthermore, NJ is agonist of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR). NJ is a dual ligand of hCAR and hPXR, being an agonist of hPXR and an inverse agonist of hCAR. PMID:25505573

  17. Failure of CGS15943A to block the hypotensive action of agonists acting at the adenosine A3 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, M; Sheehan, M J; Strong, P

    1994-01-01

    1. Adenosine receptor agonists were evaluated for their activity at the putative adenosine A3 receptor which mediates a 'xanthine-resistant' hypotensive response in the anaesthetized rat. The compounds tested were: the A1/A3 receptor agonist, N-[2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyl]adenosine (APNEA), the non-selective adenosine receptor agonist, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), the adenosine A1 receptor-selective agonists, N-[(1S,trans)-2-hydroxycyclopentyl]adenosine (GR79236) and N6-cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), the A2a receptor-selective agonists, 2-[[2-[4-(2-carboxyethyl) phenyl] ethyl] amino]-N- ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680) and 2-phenylaminoadenosine (CV1808), and the moderately A2b selective agonist, N-[(2-methylphenyl)methyl]adenosine (metrifudil). 2. In confirmation of literature findings, APNEA (1-1000 nmol kg-1) induced hypotension and bradycardia; the hypotension was not blocked by pretreatment with the xanthine antagonist, 8-P-sulphophenyltheophylline (8-sPT; 40 mg kg-1, i.v.), whereas the bradycardia was attenuated. The non-xanthine antagonist, 9-fluoro-2-(2-furyl)-5,6-dihydro [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]- quinazin-5-imine (CGS15943A; 3 mg kg-1 i.v.), also attenuated the bradycardia without affecting the hypotension. 3. The adenosine A1 receptor-selective agonists, GR79236 and CPA, both produced dose-dependent falls in blood pressure and heart rate which were antagonized by 8-sPT (40 mg kg-1) and CGS15943A (3 mg kg-1). 4. The adenosine A2a receptor-selective agonists, CGS21680 and CV1808, produced only a hypotensive response which was antagonized by 8-sPT (40 mg kg-1) and to a much greater extent by CGS15943A (3 mg kg-1), consistent with the response being mediated solely by A2a receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7858863

  18. Discovery of the oxazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane derivatives as potent and orally active GPR119 agonists.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xing; Stamford, Andrew; Liu, Hong; Neustadt, Bernard; Hao, Jingsong; Kowalski, Tim; Hawes, Brian; Xu, Xiaoying; Baker, Hana; O'Neill, Kim; Woods, Morgan; Tang, Huadong; Greenlee, William

    2015-11-15

    The design and synthesis of two conformationally restricted oxazabicyclo octane derivatives as GRP119 agonists is described. Derivatives of scaffold C, with syn configuration, have the best overall profiles with respect to solubility and in vivo efficacy. Compound 25a was found to have extremely potent agonistic activity and was orally active in lowering blood glucose levels in a mouse oral glucose tolerance test at a dose of 0.1mg/kg. PMID:26433449

  19. A sensitive and quantitative fluorescent multi-component immuno-chromatographic sensor for ?-agonist residues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peilong; Wang, Zhi; Su, Xiaoou

    2015-02-15

    A sensitive and quantitative fluorescent multi-component immuno-chromatographic sensor was developed for detection of three ?-agonizts: clenbuterol, ractopamine and salbuterol. A competitive immune strategy between antibody conjugated fluorescent beads and ?-agonist or their antigens was employed. Each monoclonal antibody specifically recognizes it is corresponding ?-agonist in the conjugating zone. The unreacted antibodies were captured by ?-agonist antigens immobilized at three test lines in nitrocellulose membrane reaction zone. This enables simultaneous detection of 3 ?-agonizts in one single test without any further sample preparation. The test results can be obtained within 10 min. Limit of detections for clenbuterol, ractopamine and salbuterol were 0.10 ng/mL, 0.10 ng/mL and 0.09 ng/mL, respectively. Recoveries ranged from 70.0% to 100.5% and relative standard deviations were below 15%. The assay was evaluated using spiked and real samples and the results were compared with LC-MS/MS. The developed novel assay method provides a low cost, sensitive and rapid approach for on site detection of ?-agonizts. PMID:25310481

  20. TRAIL-R2 Superoligomerization Induced by Human Monoclonal Agonistic Antibody KMTR2

    PubMed Central

    Tamada, Taro; Shinmi, Daisuke; Ikeda, Masahiro; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Kataoka, Shiro; Kuroki, Ryota; Mori, Eiji; Motoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The fully human monoclonal antibody KMTR2 acts as a strong direct agonist for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor 2 (TRAIL-R2), which is capable of inducing apoptotic cell death without cross-linking. To investigate the mechanism of direct agonistic activity induced by KMTR2, the crystal structure of the extracellular region of TRAIL-R2 and a Fab fragment derived from KMTR2 (KMTR2-Fab) was determined to 2.1?Å resolution. Two KMTR2-Fabs assembled with the complementarity-determining region 2 of the light chain via two-fold crystallographic symmetry, suggesting that the KMTR2-Fab assembly tended to enhance TRAIL-R2 oligomerization. A single mutation at Asn53 to Arg located at the two-fold interface in the KMTR2 resulted in a loss of its apoptotic activity, although it retained its antigen-binding activity. These results indicate that the strong agonistic activity, such as apoptotic signaling and tumor regression, induced by KMTR2 is attributed to TRAIL-R2 superoligomerization induced by the interdimerization of KMTR2. PMID:26672965

  1. Beta agonists in livestock feed: status, health concerns, and international trade.

    PubMed

    Centner, T J; Alvey, J C; Stelzleni, A M

    2014-09-01

    Since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved ractopamine hydrochloride and zilpaterol hydrochloride in animal feeds, usage of those compounds has been a topic of worldwide debate. Ractopamine and zilpaterol are ?-adrenergic agonists used as veterinary drugs to increase weight gain in certain animals raised for food. The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) established maximum residue limits for ractopamine, which were adopted by the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex). No maximum residue limits for zilpaterol have been adopted by JECFA, and new reports of animal mobility issues confront the use of this feed additive. However, many countries disagree with the Codex standards and are restricting or banning meat products containing ? agonists. The bans by major importers of U.S. meat products have prompted some to advocate that the United States use the World Trade Organization dispute settlement body. This paper looks at the developments to provide a fuller accounting of what the issues may mean to U.S. firms selling meat products containing residues of ? agonists. PMID:25057027

  2. A clinical review of GLP-1 receptor agonists: efficacy and safety in diabetes and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Prasad-Reddy, Lalita; Isaacs, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at an astounding rate. Many of the agents used to treat type 2 diabetes have undesirable adverse effects of hypoglycemia and weight gain. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists represent a unique approach to the treatment of diabetes, with benefits extending outside glucose control, including positive effects on weight, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and beta-cell function. They mimic the effects of the incretin hormone GLP-1, which is released from the intestine in response to food intake. Their effects include increasing insulin secretion, decreasing glucagon release, increasing satiety, and slowing gastric emptying. There are currently four approved GLP-1 receptor agonists in the United States: exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, and dulaglutide. A fifth agent, lixisenatide, is available in Europe. There are important pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and clinical differences of each agent. The most common adverse effects seen with GLP-1 therapy include nausea, vomiting, and injection-site reactions. Other warnings and precautions include pancreatitis and thyroid cell carcinomas. GLP-1 receptor agonists are an innovative and effective option to improve blood glucose control, with other potential benefits of preserving beta-cell function, weight loss, and increasing insulin sensitivity. Once-weekly formulations may also improve patient adherence. Overall, these are effective agents for patients with type 2 diabetes, who are either uncontrolled on metformin or intolerant to metformin. PMID:26213556

  3. Suppression of interleukin-6-induced C-reactive protein expression by FXR agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Songwen Liu Qiangyuan; Wang Juan; Harnish, Douglas C.

    2009-02-06

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a human acute-phase protein, is a risk factor for future cardiovascular events and exerts direct pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic properties. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, plays an essential role in the regulation of enterohepatic circulation and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we report that two synthetic FXR agonists, WAY-362450 and GW4064, suppressed interleukin-6-induced CRP expression in human Hep3B hepatoma cells. Knockdown of FXR by short interfering RNA attenuated the inhibitory effect of the FXR agonists and also increased the ability of interleukin-6 to induce CRP production. Furthermore, treatment of wild type C57BL/6 mice with the FXR agonist, WAY-362450, attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced serum amyloid P component and serum amyloid A3 mRNA levels in the liver, whereas no effect was observed in FXR knockout mice. These data provide new evidence for direct anti-inflammatory properties of FXR.

  4. Agonist antibody that induces human malignant cells to kill one another.

    PubMed

    Yea, Kyungmoo; Zhang, Hongkai; Xie, Jia; Jones, Teresa M; Lin, Chih-Wei; Francesconi, Walter; Berton, Fulvia; Fallahi, Mohammad; Sauer, Karsten; Lerner, Richard A

    2015-11-10

    An attractive, but as yet generally unrealized, approach to cancer therapy concerns discovering agents that change the state of differentiation of the cancer cells. Recently, we discovered a phenomenon that we call "receptor pleiotropism" in which agonist antibodies against known receptors induce cell fates that are very different from those induced by the natural agonist to the same receptor. Here, we show that one can take advantage of this phenomenon to convert acute myeloblastic leukemic cells into natural killer cells. Upon induction with the antibody, these leukemic cells enter into a differentiation cascade in which as many as 80% of the starting leukemic cells can be differentiated. The antibody-induced killer cells make large amounts of perforin, IFN-?, and granzyme B and attack and kill other members of the leukemic cell population. Importantly, induction of killer cells is confined to transformed cells, in that normal bone marrow cells are not induced to form killer cells. Thus, it seems possible to use agonist antibodies to change the differentiation state of cancer cells into those that attack and kill other members of the malignant clone from which they originate. PMID:26487683

  5. Autocrine selection of a GLP-1R G-protein biased agonist with potent antidiabetic effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiang; Nieto, Ainhoa; Cistrone, Philip A; Xie, Jia; He, LinLing; Yea, Kyungmoo; Jones, Teresa; Turn, Rachel; Di Stefano, Peter S; Griffin, Patrick R; Dawson, Philip E; McDonald, Patricia H; Lerner, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have emerged as treatment options for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GLP-1R signals through G-protein-dependent, and G-protein-independent pathways by engaging the scaffold protein ?-arrestin; preferential signalling of ligands through one or the other of these branches is known as 'ligand bias'. Here we report the discovery of the potent and selective GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonist, P5. We identified P5 in a high-throughput autocrine-based screening of large combinatorial peptide libraries, and show that P5 promotes G-protein signalling comparable to GLP-1 and Exendin-4, but exhibited a significantly reduced ?-arrestin response. Preclinical studies using different mouse models of T2DM demonstrate that P5 is a weak insulin secretagogue. Nevertheless, chronic treatment of diabetic mice with P5 increased adipogenesis, reduced adipose tissue inflammation as well as hepatic steatosis and was more effective at correcting hyperglycaemia and lowering haemoglobin A1c levels than Exendin-4, suggesting that GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonists may provide a novel therapeutic approach to T2DM. PMID:26621478

  6. Agonist antibodies activating the Met receptor protect cardiomyoblasts from cobalt chloride-induced apoptosis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Gallo, S; Gatti, S; Sala, V; Albano, R; Costelli, P; Casanova, E; Comoglio, P M; Crepaldi, T

    2014-01-01

    Met, the tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), mainly activates prosurvival pathways, including protection from apoptosis. In this work, we investigated the cardioprotective mechanisms of Met activation by agonist monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a chemical mimetic of hypoxia, was used to induce cardiac damage in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts, which resulted in reduction of cell viability by (i) caspase-dependent apoptosis and (ii) - surprisingly - autophagy. Blocking either apoptosis with the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-VAD-fluoromethylketone or autophagosome formation with 3-methyladenine prevented loss of cell viability, which suggests that both processes contribute to cardiomyoblast injury. Concomitant treatment with Met-activating antibodies or HGF prevented apoptosis and autophagy. Pro-autophagic Redd1, Bnip3 and phospho-AMPK proteins, which are known to promote autophagy through inactivation of the mTOR pathway, were induced by CoCl2. Mechanistically, Met agonist antibodies or HGF prevented the inhibition of mTOR and reduced the flux of autophagosome formation. Accordingly, their anti-autophagic function was completely blunted by Temsirolimus, a specific mTOR inhibitor. Targeted Met activation was successful also in the setting of low oxygen conditions, in which Met agonist antibodies or HGF demonstrated anti-apoptotic and anti-autophagic effects. Activation of the Met pathway is thus a promising novel therapeutic tool for ischaemic injury. PMID:24743740

  7. Characterization of a new synthetic isoflavonoid with inverse agonist activity at the central benzodiazepine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Daniele V S; Caruso, Rodrigo R B; Castro, Newton G; Costa, Paulo R R; da Silva, Alcides J M; Noël, François

    2004-07-14

    Research aimed at developing selective drugs acting on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors introduced compounds from diverse chemical classes unrelated to the 1,4-benzodiazepines, including flavonoids. These studies also revealed the potential use of inverse agonists as cognition-enhancing agents. Here we report pharmacological properties of the novel synthetic isoflavonoid 2-methoxy-3,8,9-trihydroxy coumestan (PCALC36). PCALC36 displaced [3H]flunitrazepam binding to rat brain synaptosomes with an IC50 of 13.8 microM. Scatchard analysis of the effect of PCALC36 showed a concentration-dependent reduction of the Bmax of [3H]flunitrazepam, without a marked change in Kd. This effect could be reversed by diluting and washing the preparation. Addition of 20-microM GABA shifted to the right the inhibition curve of PCALC36 on [3H]flunitrazepam binding (IC50 ratio of 0.68), which is characteristic for inverse agonists. PCALC36 produced little change in the GABAergic tonic currents recorded by whole-cell patch clamp in cultured rat hippocampal neurones, but it caused a 20% reduction in miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current amplitude and completely antagonised the full (direct) agonist midazolam in a quickly reversible manner. The data suggest that the coumestan backbone can be useful for developing novel ligands at the GABAA receptor. PMID:15249156

  8. Ligand-binding domain of an ?7-nicotinic receptor chimera and its complex with agonist

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Xing; Huang, Sun; Bren, Nina; Noridomi, Kaori; Dellisanti, Cosma D; Sine, Steven M; Chen, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The ?7 acetylcholine receptor (AChR) mediates pre- and postsynaptic neurotransmission in the central nervous system and is a potential therapeutic target in neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric and inflammatory disorders. We determined the crystal structure of the extracellular domain of a receptor chimera constructed from the human ?7 AChR and Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), which shares 64% sequence identity and 71% similarity with native ?7. We also determined the structure with bound epibatidine, a potent AChR agonist. Comparison of the structures revealed molecular rearrangements and interactions that mediate agonist recognition and early steps in signal transduction in ?7 AChRs. The structures further revealed a ring of negative charge within the central vestibule, poised to contribute to cation selectivity. Structure-guided mutational studies disclosed distinctive contributions to agonist recognition and signal transduction in ?7 AChRs. The structures provide a realistic template for structure-aided drug design and for defining structure–function relationships of ?7 AChRs. PMID:21909087

  9. Topical Administration of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Prevents Retinal Neurodegeneration in Experimental Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Cristina; Bogdanov, Patricia; Corraliza, Lidia; García-Ramírez, Marta; Solà-Adell, Cristina; Arranz, José A; Arroba, Ana I; Valverde, Angela M; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Since glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) exerts neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system and the retina is ontogenically a brain-derived tissue, the aims of the current study were as follows: 1) to examine the expression and content of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in human and db/db mice retinas; 2) to determine the retinal neuroprotective effects of systemic and topical administration (eye drops) of GLP-1R agonists in db/db mice; and 3) to examine the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms. We have found abundant expression of GLP-1R in the human retina and retinas from db/db mice. Moreover, we have demonstrated that systemic administration of a GLP-1R agonist (liraglutide) prevents retinal neurodegeneration (glial activation, neural apoptosis, and electroretinographical abnormalities). This effect can be attributed to a significant reduction of extracellular glutamate and an increase of prosurvival signaling pathways. We have found a similar neuroprotective effect using topical administration of native GLP-1 and several GLP-1R agonists (liraglutide, lixisenatide, and exenatide). Notably, this neuroprotective action was observed without any reduction in blood glucose levels. These results suggest that GLP-1R activation itself prevents retinal neurodegeneration. Our results should open up a new approach in the treatment of the early stages of DR. PMID:26384381

  10. Important pharmacophoric features of pan PPAR agonists: common chemical feature analysis and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Sandeep; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2009-09-01

    HipHop program was used to generate a common chemical feature hypothesis for pan Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) agonists. The top scoring hypothesis (hypo-1) was found to differentiate the pan agonists (actives) from subtype-specific and dual PPAR agonists (inactives). The importance of individual features in hypo-1 was assessed by deleting a particular feature to generate a new hypothesis and observing its discriminating ability between 'actives' and 'inactives'. Deletion of aromatic features AR-1 (hypo-1b), AR-2 (hypo-1e) and a Hydrophobic feature HYD-1 (hypo-1c) individually did not affect the discriminating power of the hypo-1 significantly. However, deletion of a Hydrogen Bond Acceptor (HBA) feature (hypo-1f) in the hydrophobic tail group was found to be highly detrimental for the specificity of hypo-1 leading to high hit rate of 'inactives'. Since hypo-1 did not produce any useful hits from the database search, hypo-1b, hypo-1c and hypo-1e were used for virtual screening leading to the identification of new potential pan PPAR ligands. The docking studies were used to predict the binding pose of the proposed molecules in PPARgamma active site. PMID:19268404

  11. A system for screening agonists targeting beta2-adrenoceptor from Chinese medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Li, Shi-you; Zhao, Chuan-ke; Zeng, Xin

    2009-04-01

    In order to develop a model for screening the agonists of human beta(2)-adrenoceptor from Chinese medicinal herbs extracts, we used a cell-based functional assay based on a common G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) regulation mechanism and destabilized enhanced green fluorescent protein (d(2)EGFP) reporter gene technique. The positive cell clone was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and imaging analysis. To assess the value of this model, we screened over 2000 high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fractionated samples from the ethanol extracts of Chinese medicinal herbs. Six fractions (isolated from Panax japonicus, Veratrum nigrum, Phellodendron amurense, Fructus Aurantii Immaturus, Chaenomeles speciosa, and Dictamnus dasycarpus) showed significant effects on active reporter gene expression, three of which (isolated from Phellodendron amurense, Fructus Aurantii Immaturus, and Chaenomeles speciosa) were selected for further concentration response analysis and the half maximal effective concentration (EC(1/2 max)) values were 4.2, 2.7, and 4.8 microg/ml, respectively. Therefore, this reporter gene assay was suitable for screening beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists. The results suggest that the six herbal extracts are the possible agonists of beta(2)-adrenoceptor. PMID:19353741

  12. The PPAR alpha agonist gemfibrozil is an ineffective treatment for spinal cord injured mice.

    PubMed

    Almad, Akshata; Lash, A Todd; Wei, Ping; Lovett-Racke, Amy E; McTigue, Dana M

    2011-12-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor (PPAR)-? is a key regulator of lipid metabolism and recent studies reveal it also regulates inflammation in several different disease models. Gemfibrozil, an agonist of PPAR-?, is a FDA approved drug for hyperlipidemia and has been shown to inhibit clinical signs in a rodent model of multiple sclerosis. Since many studies have shown improved outcome from spinal cord injury (SCI) by anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agents, we tested the efficacy of oral gemfibrozil given before or after SCI for promoting tissue preservation and behavioral recovery after spinal contusion injury in mice. Unfortunately, the results were contrary to our hypothesis; in our first attempt, gemfibrozil treatment exacerbated locomotor deficits and increased tissue pathology after SCI. In subsequent experiments, the behavioral effects were not replicated but histological outcomes again were worse. We also tested the efficacy of a different PPAR-? agonist, fenofibrate, which also modulates immune responses and is beneficial in several neurodegenerative disease models. Fenofibrate treatment did not improve recovery, although there was a slight trend for a modest increase in histological tissue sparing. Based on our results, we conclude that PPAR-? agonists yield either no effect or worsen recovery from spinal cord injury, at least at the doses and the time points of drug delivery tested here. Further, patients sustaining spinal cord injury while taking gemfibrozil might be prone to exacerbated tissue damage. PMID:21963672

  13. Activation of human brown adipose tissue by a ?3-adrenergic receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Cypess, Aaron M; Weiner, Lauren S; Roberts-Toler, Carla; Franquet Elía, Elisa; Kessler, Skyler H; Kahn, Peter A; English, Jeffrey; Chatman, Kelly; Trauger, Sunia A; Doria, Alessandro; Kolodny, Gerald M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing energy expenditure through activation of endogenous brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a potential approach to treat obesity and diabetes. The class of ?3-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists stimulates rodent BAT, but this activity has never been demonstrated in humans. Here we determined the ability of 200 mg oral mirabegron (Myrbetriq, Astellas Pharma, Inc.), a ?3-AR agonist currently approved to treat overactive bladder, to stimulate BAT as compared to placebo. Mirabegron led to higher BAT metabolic activity as measured via (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) using positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (CT) in all twelve healthy male subjects (p = 0.001), and it increased resting metabolic rate (RMR) by 203 ± 40 kcal/day (+13%; p = 0.001). BAT metabolic activity was also a significant predictor of the changes in RMR (p = 0.006). Therefore, a ?3-AR agonist can stimulate human BAT thermogenesis and may be a promising treatment for metabolic disease. PMID:25565203

  14. Behavioral responses to dopamine agonists in adult rats exposed to cocaine during the preweaning period.

    PubMed

    Dow-Edwards, D L; Busidan, Y

    2001-09-01

    In order to determine whether developmental cocaine exposure altered the functional responses of dopamine systems, the behavioral responses to selective D1 or D2/D3 agonists were examined and compared to rats treated during the same period with a selective inhibitor of the dopamine transporter, GBR 12909. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered cocaine or GBR 12909 at 25 or 50 mg/kg/day during postnatal days (PND) 11-20. At 60+ days of age, rats were administered a challenge drug (either SKF 82958, a full D1 agonist, at 1.0 or 10 mg/kg, or quinpirole, a D2/D3 agonist, at 0.08 or 0.5 mg/kg, or saline) and subjected to 1 h of behavioral assessment. The cocaine or GBR treatments produced significant effects in three behavioral categories: distance traveled, sniffing, and rearing. For distance traveled, preweaning treatments interacted with sex since in the males, all cocaine- and GBR-treated groups showed relatively flat patterns of locomotor activity across time blocks, while in the treated females, locomotor activity typically increased across the time blocks. For other behaviors, the treatments generally produced enhanced responses to the challenge drugs. These results suggest that intermittent inhibition of the dopamine transporter with either cocaine or GBR during PND 11-20 produces long-term alterations in the functional responses of dopaminergic systems but that the neural substrates for these effects depend upon the sex of the animal. PMID:11566139

  15. Liver X Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonist from Cornus alternifolia

    PubMed Central

    He, Yang-Qing; Ma, Guo-Yi; Peng, Jiang-nan; Ma, Zhan-Ying; Hamann, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptors superfamily and are transcription factors activated by specific ligands. Liver X receptors (LXR) belong to the nuclear hormone receptors and have been shown to play an important role in cholesterol homeostasis. From the previous screening of several medicinal plants for potential partial PPAR? agonists, the extracts of Cornus alternifolia were found to exhibit promising bioactivity. In this paper, we report the isolation and structural elucidation of four new compounds and their potential as ligands for PPAR. Methods The new compounds were extracted from the leaves of Cornus alternifolia and fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and analysis of their hydrolysis products. Results Three new iridoid glycosides including an iridolactone, alternosides A-C (1–3), a new megastigmane glycoside, cornalternoside (4) and 10 known compounds, were obtained from the leaves of Cornus alternifolia. Kaempferol-3-O-?-glucopyranoside (5) exhibited potent agonistic activities for PPAR?, PPAR? and LXR with EC50 values of 0.62, 3.0 and 1.8 ? M, respectively. Conclusions We isolated four new and ten known compounds from Cornus alternifolia, and one known compound showed agonistic activities for PPAR?, PPAR? and LXR. General significance Compound 1 is the first example of a naturally occurring iridoid glycoside containing a ?-glucopyranoside moiety at C-6. PMID:22353334

  16. Agonists and protein kinase C-activation induce phosphorylation and internalization of FFA1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Alvarado, Carla; Hernández-Méndez, Aurelio; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Takei, Yoshinori; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Hirasawa, Akira; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2015-12-01

    FFA1 (previously known as GPR40) is a free fatty acid receptor involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes and insulin secretion. The cellular actions resulting from FFA1 activation have received considerable attention. However, little is known on the regulation of the receptor function. In the present work, using cells transfected with this receptor, docosahexaenoic acid and ?-linolenic acid increased intracellular calcium concentration and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. It was also observed that FFA1 is a phosphoprotein whose phosphorylation state was increased (2- to 3-fold) by agonists (i.e., free fatty acids) and also by phorbol myristate acetate. Agonist- and phorbol ester-mediated FFA1 phosphorylation was markedly reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase C. Receptor stimulation by free fatty acids and protein kinase C activation also induced receptor internalization as evidenced by confocal microscopy. In summary, our data show that FFA1 is a phosphoprotein whose phosphorylation state is modulated by agonists and protein kinase C activation; such covalent modification is associated with receptor internalization. PMID:26526350

  17. Autocrine selection of a GLP-1R G-protein biased agonist with potent antidiabetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkai; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiang; Nieto, Ainhoa; Cistrone, Philip A.; Xie, Jia; He, LinLing; Yea, Kyungmoo; Jones, Teresa; Turn, Rachel; Di Stefano, Peter S.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Dawson, Philip E.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have emerged as treatment options for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GLP-1R signals through G-protein-dependent, and G-protein-independent pathways by engaging the scaffold protein ?-arrestin; preferential signalling of ligands through one or the other of these branches is known as ‘ligand bias'. Here we report the discovery of the potent and selective GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonist, P5. We identified P5 in a high-throughput autocrine-based screening of large combinatorial peptide libraries, and show that P5 promotes G-protein signalling comparable to GLP-1 and Exendin-4, but exhibited a significantly reduced ?-arrestin response. Preclinical studies using different mouse models of T2DM demonstrate that P5 is a weak insulin secretagogue. Nevertheless, chronic treatment of diabetic mice with P5 increased adipogenesis, reduced adipose tissue inflammation as well as hepatic steatosis and was more effective at correcting hyperglycaemia and lowering haemoglobin A1c levels than Exendin-4, suggesting that GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonists may provide a novel therapeutic approach to T2DM. PMID:26621478

  18. Isoflavone agonists of IRF-3 dependent signaling have antiviral activity against RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Bedard, Kristin M; Wang, Myra L; Proll, Sean C; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Katze, Michael G; Gale, Michael; Iadonato, Shawn P

    2012-07-01

    There is a growing need for novel antiviral therapies that are broad spectrum, effective, and not subject to resistance due to viral mutations. Using high-throughput screening methods, including computational docking studies and an interferon-stimulated gene 54 (ISG54)-luciferase reporter assay, we identified a class of isoflavone compounds that act as specific agonists of innate immune signaling pathways and cause activation of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF-3) transcription factor. The isoflavone compounds activated the ISG54 promoter, mediated nuclear translocation of IRF-3, and displayed highly potent activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) and influenza virus. Additionally, these agonists efficiently activated IRF-3 in the presence of the HCV protease NS3-4A, which is known to blunt the host immune response. Furthermore, genomic studies showed that discrete innate immune pathways centered on IRF signaling were regulated following agonist treatment without causing global changes in host gene expression. Following treatment, the expression of only 64 cellular genes was significantly induced. This report provides the first evidence that innate immune pathways dependent on IRF-3 can be successfully targeted by small-molecule drugs for the development of novel broad-spectrum antiviral compounds. PMID:22532686

  19. TRAIL-R2 Superoligomerization Induced by Human Monoclonal Agonistic Antibody KMTR2.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Taro; Shinmi, Daisuke; Ikeda, Masahiro; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Kataoka, Shiro; Kuroki, Ryota; Mori, Eiji; Motoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The fully human monoclonal antibody KMTR2 acts as a strong direct agonist for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor 2 (TRAIL-R2), which is capable of inducing apoptotic cell death without cross-linking. To investigate the mechanism of direct agonistic activity induced by KMTR2, the crystal structure of the extracellular region of TRAIL-R2 and a Fab fragment derived from KMTR2 (KMTR2-Fab) was determined to 2.1?Å resolution. Two KMTR2-Fabs assembled with the complementarity-determining region 2 of the light chain via two-fold crystallographic symmetry, suggesting that the KMTR2-Fab assembly tended to enhance TRAIL-R2 oligomerization. A single mutation at Asn53 to Arg located at the two-fold interface in the KMTR2 resulted in a loss of its apoptotic activity, although it retained its antigen-binding activity. These results indicate that the strong agonistic activity, such as apoptotic signaling and tumor regression, induced by KMTR2 is attributed to TRAIL-R2 superoligomerization induced by the interdimerization of KMTR2. PMID:26672965

  20. Nonpeptidic Delta (?) Opioid Agonists and Antagonists of the Diarylmethylpiperazine Class: What Have We Learned?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Silvia N.

    The discovery of the selective delta (?) opioid agonists SNC 80 and BW373U86, which possess a diarylmethylpiperazine structure unique among opioids, represented a major advance in the field of ?-opioid ligands. Extensive research has recently been performed to uncover the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of this class of ligands, thereby providing valuable tools for the pharmacological characterization of the ? opioid receptor. This review focuses on the SAR of this unique series of ligands, and provides an overview of the various chemical routes that have been developed and optimized through the years to allow the syntheses of these ligands on a multigram scale. The search for selective ? opioid agonists and antagonists, as well as for those with mixed opioid agonist properties with potential therapeutic value, continues. Several questions regarding the interaction at the molecular level of diphenylmethylpiperazine derivatives and related analogs with opioid receptors and in particular with the ? opioid system still remain unanswered. Indeed, the development and pharmacological characterization of novel nonpeptidic ? opioid ligands remains an active area of research, as it may provide a better understanding of the role of this receptor in multiple disease states and disorders.

  1. APPEL DE COMMUNICATIONS la croise des chemins, les tudes sur

    E-print Network

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    APPEL DE COMMUNICATIONS À la croisée des chemins, les études sur l'alimentation : devant une bifurcation? SEPTIÈME ASSEMBLÉE GÉNÉRALE ANNUELLE DE L'ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE DES ÉTUDES SUR L'ALIMENTATION DU canadienne des sciences humaines, est « À la croisée des chemins, les études sur l'alimentation : devant une

  2. Vice-dcanat la recherche Rpertoire des projets

    E-print Network

    Laval, Université

    ........................................................................................................................ 18 Département des sciences des aliments et nutrition'agriculture, des pêcheries et de l'alimentation - 2008-05-08 au 2010-12-31 Réf. 91082 Chercheur(s) participant(s) # projet Montant Ministère de l'agriculture, des pêcheries et de l'alimentation GQ091082 DC 47 160

  3. Rapport annuel des activits de recherche 2008-2009

    E-print Network

    Laval, Université

    de l'alimentation Rapport annuel des activités de recherche 2008-2009 #12;#12;Page 3Rapport annuel des activités de recherche Faculté des sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation Vice-décanat à la recherche Madame, Monsieur, Les chercheurs de la Faculté des sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation

  4. Rapport annuel des activits de recherche 2010-2011

    E-print Network

    Laval, Université

    'équilibre parfait #12; #12;Faculté des sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation Rapport annuel des activités sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation Vice-décanat à la recherche Madame, Monsieur, Je suis très des activités de recherche 2010-2011 de la Faculté des sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation

  5. Implantation des Espaces de Travail I. Introduction.............................................................. 82

    E-print Network

    Donsez, Didier

    Chapitre 5 Implantation des Espaces de Travail I. Introduction Persistantes.....................................88 IV. Structure MultiThreadée des Espaces de Travail.... 105 : Implantation des Espaces de Travail - 82 - I. Introduction L'implantation des Espaces de Travail est basée sur

  6. PORTRAIT DES PERCEPTIONS RELATIVES L'ENVIRONNEMENT CONOMIQUE PAR

    E-print Network

    Asselin, Hugo

    PORTRAIT DES PERCEPTIONS RELATIVES À L'ENVIRONNEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE PAR LES COMMERÇANTS ET QUÉBEC EN ABITIBI-TÉMISCAMINGUE CHAIRE DESJARDINS EN DÉVELOPPEMENT DES PETITES COLLECTIVITÉS PORTRAIT DES;iii SOMMAIRE Cette enquête vise à tracer un portrait des perceptions relatives à l

  7. Journe des Nouveaux Entrants INEE, Paris, 4 Juillet 2013

    E-print Network

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    OHM & SEEG Journée des Nouveaux Entrants INEE, Paris, 4 Juillet 2013 1 Journée des Nouveaux Entrants INEE, Paris, 4 Juillet 2013 #12;Présenter deux outils de l'INEE pour l'étude des (socio INEE, Paris, 4 Juillet 2013 #12;3 Journée des Nouveaux Entrants INEE, Paris, 4 Juillet 2013 Ecologie

  8. Dplacer des tas de terre En 3 dimensions.

    E-print Network

    Pansu, Pierre

    le long d'un mur. #12;Monge : mémoire sur la théorie des déblais et des remblais (1776) A l'un marchand forain. A 14 ans, il invente une pompe à incendie. A 17 ans, il revient dans son collège enseigner froid de 1776 Machine à remonter les bateaux Théorie des torrents et des rivières et moyen d

  9. PPAR? partial agonist GQ-16 strongly represses a subset of genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Milton, Flora Aparecida; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Amato, Angelica A; Sieglaff, Douglas H; Filgueira, Carly S; Arumanayagam, Anithachristy Sigamani; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; Pitta, Ivan Rocha; de Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco; Webb, Paul

    2015-08-28

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?) agonists that improve insulin resistance but trigger side effects such as weight gain, edema, congestive heart failure and bone loss. GQ-16 is a PPAR? partial agonist that improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in mouse models of obesity and diabetes without inducing weight gain or edema. It is not clear whether GQ-16 acts as a partial agonist at all PPAR? target genes, or whether it displays gene-selective actions. To determine how GQ-16 influences PPAR? activity on a gene by gene basis, we compared effects of rosiglitazone (Rosi) and GQ-16 in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes using microarray and qRT-PCR. Rosi changed expression of 1156 genes in 3T3-L1, but GQ-16 only changed 89 genes. GQ-16 generally showed weak effects upon Rosi induced genes, consistent with partial agonist actions, but a subset of modestly Rosi induced and strongly repressed genes displayed disproportionately strong GQ-16 responses. PPAR? partial agonists MLR24 and SR1664 also exhibit disproportionately strong effects on transcriptional repression. We conclude that GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist effects but efficiently represses some negatively regulated PPAR? responsive genes. Strong repressive effects could contribute to physiologic actions of GQ-16. PMID:26168725

  10. ASSESSMENT OF THE KAPPA OPIOID AGONIST, SALVINORIN A, AS A PUNISHER OF DRUG SELF-ADMINISTRATION IN MONKEYS

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Kevin B.; Naylor, Jennifer E.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Woolverton, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Drugs can function as punishers. However, work on the study of drugs as punishers is limited, as are the range of compounds known to function as punishers. Kappa opioid agonists, which have received much experimental attention as potential therapeutics for drug abuse, reportedly produce aversive effects. However, kappa agonists have yet to be tested as punishers of behavior. Objective The goal of the current study was to determine if a kappa agonist could function as a punisher of drug self-administration. Method In separate experiments, monkeys were allowed to choose in a two-lever choice design between intravenous injections of equal doses of either cocaine (0.1 mg/kg/inj on each lever) or remifentanil (0.1 ?g/kg/inj on each lever) when one of the two options was mixed with various doses of the kappa agonist, salvinorin A. Results Choice for the cocaine and remifentanil options that were combined with salvinorin A decreased as a function of salvinorin A dose in all monkeys. However, operant response rates were not systematically affected by salvinorin A administration. Conclusion The present findings demonstrate that the kappa agonist, salvinorin A, can punish self-administration of a mu opioid, remifentanil, and a psychostimulant, cocaine. In consideration of these findings, it may be possible to curtail the abuse of some drugs by contingently delivering kappa agonists (e.g., as combination formularies for prescription medications). PMID:24481567

  11. PPAR alpha agonists improve renal preservation in kidneys subjected to chronic in vitro perfusion: interaction with mannitol.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Travis C; Mi, Zaichuan; Bastacky, Sheldon I; McHale, Teresa; Melhem, Mona F; Sonalker, Prajakta A; Tofovic, Stevan P; Jackson, Edwin K

    2007-03-01

    We developed methods for prolonged (12 h), sterile, normothermic perfusion of rat kidneys and screened compounds for renal preservation including: mitochondrial transition pore inhibitor (decylubiquinone); caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD); peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) agonists (gemfibrozil, WY-14643); antioxidants (trolox, luteolin, quercetin); growth factors (HGF, PDGF, EGF, IGF-1, VEGF, transferrin); calpain inhibitor (Z-Val-Phe-CHO); calmodulin inhibitor (W7); K(ATP) opener (minoxidil, minoxidil sulfate); PARP inhibitor (3-aminobenzamide); calcium channel blocker (verapamil); V(2) agonist (DDAVP); diuretics (acetazolamide, hydrochlorothiazide, furosemide, mannitol); peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-beta agonist (L-165041); dopamine agonist (dopamine); essential fatty acid (linolenic acid); beta-NAD; urea; uric acid; and aldosterone. In pilot studies, only PPARalpha agonists and mannitol provided promising results. Accordingly, these agents were investigated further. Fifteen rat kidneys were perfused for 12 h with L-15 media at 37 degrees C in the absence or presence of mannitol, gemfibrozil, gemfibrozil + mannitol or WY-14643. Chronic perfusion in untreated kidneys caused destruction of glomerular and tubular architecture (light and electron microscopy), disappearance of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-alpha(1) (Western blotting), and apoptosis (Apoptag staining). Gemfibrozil and WY-14643 marginally improved some biomarkers of renal preservation. However, the combination of gemfibrozil with mannitol markedly improved all parameters of renal preservation. We conclude that PPARalpha agonists, particularly when combined with mannitol, protect organs from normothermic, perfusion-induced damage. PMID:17291221

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists in the prevention and treatment of murine systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Aprahamian, Tamar R; Bonegio, Ramon G; Weitzner, Zachary; Gharakhanian, Raffi; Rifkin, Ian R

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?) agonists are known to have many immunomodulatory effects. We have previously shown that the PPAR? agonist rosiglitazone is beneficial when used early in prevention of disease in murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and SLE-related atherosclerosis. In this report, we demonstrate that another PPAR? agonist, pioglitazone is also beneficial as a treatment for early murine lupus, indicating that this is a class effect and not agent-specific. We further attempt to define the ability of PPAR? agonists to ameliorate established or severe autoimmune disease using two mouse models: the MRL.lpr SLE model and the gld.apoE?/? model of accelerated atherosclerosis and SLE. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the marked amelioration of disease seen when PPAR? agonist treatment was started before disease onset, treatment with rosiglitazone after disease onset in MRL.lpr or gld.apoE?/? mice had minimal beneficial effect on the development of the autoimmune phenotype; however, rosiglitazone treatment remained highly effective at reducing lupus-associated atherosclerosis in gld.apoE?/? mice after disease onset or when mice were maintained on a high cholesterol Western diet. These results suggest that beneficial effects of PPAR? agonists on the development of autoimmunity might be limited to the early stages of disease, but that atherosclerosis, a major cause of death in SLE patients, may be ameliorated even in established or severe disease. PMID:24456224

  13. Excitatory and inhibitory effects of opioid agonists on respiratory motor output produced by isolated brainstems from adult turtles (Trachemys)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephen M.; Moris, Christina M.; Bartman, Michelle E.; Wiegel, Liana M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine how central opioid receptor activation alters turtle breathing, respiratory-related hypoglossal (XII) motor bursts were recorded from isolated adult turtle brainstems during 60-min bath-applications of agonists for delta- (DOR), kappa- (KOR), or nociceptin/orphanin (NOR) receptors. DADLE (DOR agonist) abolished XII burst frequency at 0.3-0.5 ?M. DPDPE (DOR agonist) increased frequency by 40-44% at 0.01-0.1 ?M and decreased frequency by 88 ± 8% at 1.0 ?M. U-50488 and U-59693 (KOR agonists) decreased frequency by 65-68% at 100 ?M and 50 ?M, respectively. Orphanin (NOR agonist) decreased frequency by 31-51% at 1.0-2.0 ?M during the first 30-min period. Orphanin (0.5 and 2.0 ?M) increased bursts/episode. Although morphine (10 ?M) abolished frequency in nearly all brainstems, subsequent co-application of phenylephrine (?1-adrenergic agonist, 20-100 ?M) with morphine restored activity to 16-78% of baseline frequency. Thus, DOR, KOR, and NOR activation regulates frequency and NOR activation regulates episodicity, while ?1-adrenergic receptor activation reverses opioid-induced respiratory depression in turtles. PMID:19833235

  14. Agonist Met antibodies define the signalling threshold required for a full mitogenic and invasive program of Kaposi's Sarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bardelli, Claudio; Sala, Marilena; Cavallazzi, Umberto; Prat, Maria . E-mail: mprat@med.unipmn.it

    2005-09-09

    We previously showed that the Kaposi Sarcoma line KS-IMM express a functional Met tyrosine kinase receptor, which, upon HGF stimulation, activates motogenic, proliferative, and invasive responses. In this study, we investigated the signalling pathways activated by HGF, as well as by Met monoclonal antibodies (Mabs), acting as full or partial agonists. The full agonist Mab mimics HGF in all biological and biochemical aspects. It elicits the whole spectrum of responses, while the partial agonist Mab induces only wound healing. These differences correlated with a more prolonged and sustained tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor and MAPK evoked by HGF and by the full agonist Mab, relative to the partial agonist Mab. Since Gab1, JNK and PI 3-kinase are activated with same intensity and kinetics by HGF and by the two agonist antibodies, it is concluded that level and duration of MAPK activation by Met receptor are crucial for the induction of a full HGF-dependent mitogenic and invasive program in KS cells.

  15. Repliement des protéines : exemple de l'?-lactalbumine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushmarina, N. A.; Blanchet, C.; Vernier, G.; Forge, V.

    2005-11-01

    Cette revue sur le repliement des protéines ne fait appel à aucune expérience propre de diffusion de neutrons. Elle décrit les aspects cinétiques et thermodynamiques de la structuration des protéines sur leur chemin de repliement, en faisant référence à des techniques biophysiques variées permettant d'échantillonner des changements conformationnels sur des échelles de temps longues (ms. à s.). Les neutrons constituent une sonde évidemment complémentaire des techniques usuellement employées pour l'étude du repliement des protéines. Nous avons choisi un modèle d'étude, l'?-lactalbumine, pour donner un état de l'art des connaissances acquises à ce jour dans le domaine, et pour ainsi inciter biophysiciens et spectroscopistes à développer des techniques en temps résolu sur des échelles plus rapides, afin de pouvoir détecter les étapes précoces du repliement. Les neutrons doivent trouver une place logique dans de tels développements.

  16. Drug discrimination in methamphetamine-trained monkeys: agonist and antagonist effects of dopaminergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Tidey, J W; Bergman, J

    1998-06-01

    The involvement of D1 and D2 subtypes of dopamine receptors in behavioral effects of methamphetamine was studied in squirrel monkeys using a two-lever drug discrimination procedure. In monkeys that discriminated i.m. injections of 0.3 mg/kg methamphetamine from saline, methamphetamine (0.03-0.3 mg/kg), cocaine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) and the selective dopamine uptake inhibitor, GBR 12909 (3.0-17.8 mg/kg) produced dose-related increases in responding on the methamphetamine-associated lever and, at the highest doses, full substitution. In contrast, the norepinephrine and serotonin uptake inhibitors, tomoxetine (1.0-17.8 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (0.3-10.0 mg/kg), respectively, did not substitute appreciably for methamphetamine. Substitution for methamphetamine also was observed with the D1 receptor agonists, SKF 81297, SKF 82958 and dihydrexidine, and the D2 receptor agonist, (+)-PHNO in the majority of monkeys. Lower-efficacy D1 or D2 agonists substituted for methamphetamine either partially (SDZ 208-911) or not at all (SKF 77434, SDZ 208-912). Pretreatment with dopamine receptor blockers [D1 (SCH 39166, 0.1 mg/kg) or D2 (remoxipride, 3.0 mg/kg and nemonapride, 0.003 mg/kg)] and low-efficacy agonists [D1 (SKF 77434; 3.0 mg/kg) or D2 (SDZ 208-911 and SDZ 208-912; 0.01-0.03 mg/kg)] antagonized the discriminative-stimulus effects of methamphetamine. In separate studies, comparable doses of each of these drugs, except SKF 77434, induced significant levels of catalepsy-associated behavior. These results support the view that both dopaminergic D1 and D2 mechanisms mediate the discriminative-stimulus effects of methamphetamine; further, they indicate that selected dopamine D1 partial agonists may have antagonist actions at doses that do not produce undesirable effects associated with dopamine receptor blockade. PMID:9618419

  17. Interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with dopaminergic D3 binding sites in rat striatum. Evidence that (/sup 3/H)dopamine can label a high affinity agonist-binding state of the D1 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.E.; Creese, I.

    1985-02-01

    The interactions of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists with /sup 3/H-agonist labeled D3 dopaminergic binding sites of rat striatum have been characterized by radioligand-binding techniques. When the binding of (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)apomorphine to D2 dopamine receptors is blocked by the inclusion of D2 selective concentrations of unlabeled spiroperidol or domperidone, these ligands appear to label selectively the previously termed D3 binding site. Antagonist/(/sup 3/H)dopamine competition curves are of uniformly steep slope (nH . 1.0), suggesting the presence of a single D3 binding site. The relative potencies of antagonists to inhibit D3 specific (/sup 3/H)dopamine binding are significantly correlated with their potencies to block D1 dopamine receptors as measured by the inhibition of both dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase and (/sup 3/H)flupentixol-binding activities. The affinities of agonists to inhibit D3 specific (/sup 3/H)dopamine binding are also correlated with estimates of these agonists affinities for the high affinity binding component of agonist/(/sup 3/H)flupentixol competition curves. Both D3 specific (/sup 3/H) dopamine binding and the high affinity agonist-binding component of dopamine/(/sup 3/H)flupentixol competition curves show a similar sensitivity to guanine nucleotides. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the D3 binding site is related to a high affinity agonist-binding state of the D1 dopamine receptor.

  18. Rpertoire des emplois en dcembre 2011 Des diplms de Licence Professionnelle

    E-print Network

    Jeanjean, Louis

    gestion des automatismes (VEGA) (IUT de Belfort-Montbéliard) - Energie et génie climatique spécialité énergies renouvelables (IUT de Belfort-Montbéliard) - Gestion de la production industrielle spécialité

  19. Actes des Journes des Jeunes Chercheurs en Systmes Mmoire Logiquement Partage, Toulouse, Septembre 1993. Des Espaces de Travail Distribus

    E-print Network

    Donsez, Didier

    , Septembre 1993. WEA, Des Espaces de Travail Distribués à Objets Persistants Didier Donsez, Philippe Homond, Des Espaces de Travail Distribués à Objets Persistants 2 Le système WEA utilise ce deux techniques'architecture client-serveur. Ce modèle est fondé sur un graphe d'espaces de travail dont chacun peut être

  20. Chronic treatment in vivo with ?-adrenoceptor agonists induces dysfunction of airway ?2-adrenoceptors and exacerbates lung inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rui; Degan, Simone; Theriot, Barbara S; Fischer, Bernard M; Strachan, Ryan T; Liang, Jiurong; Pierce, Richard A; Sunday, Mary E; Noble, Paul W; Kraft, Monica; Brody, Arnold R; Walker, Julia KL

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inhalation of a ?-adrenoceptor agonist (?-agonist) is first-line asthma therapy, used for both prophylaxis against, and acute relief of, bronchoconstriction. However, repeated clinical use of ?-agonists leads to impaired bronchoprotection and, in some cases, adverse patient outcomes. Mechanisms underlying this ?2-adrenoceptor dysfunction are not well understood, due largely to the lack of a comprehensive animal model and the uncertainty as to whether or not bronchorelaxation in mice is mediated by ?2-adrenoceptors. Thus, we aimed to develop a mouse model that demonstrated functional ?-agonist-induced ?2-adrenoceptor desensitization in the context of allergic inflammatory airway disease. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We combined chronic allergen exposure with repeated ?-agonist inhalation in allergen-treated BALB/C mice and examined the contribution of ?2-adrenoceptors to albuterol-induced bronchoprotection using FVB/NJ mice with genetic deletion of ?2-adrenoceptors (KO). Associated inflammatory changes – cytokines (ELISA), cells in bronchoalevolar lavage and airway remodelling (histology) and ?2-adrenoceptor density (radioligand binding) – were also measured. KEY RESULTS ?2-Adrenoceptors mediated albuterol-induced bronchoprotection in mice. Chronic treatment with albuterol induced loss of bronchoprotection, associated with exacerbation of the inflammatory components of the asthma phenotype. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This animal model reproduced salient features of human asthma and linked loss of bronchoprotection with airway pathobiology. Accordingly, the model offers an advanced tool for understanding the mechanisms of the effects of chronic ?- agonist treatment on ?-adrenoceptor function in asthma. Such information may guide the clinical use of ?-agonists and provide insight into development of novel ?-adrenoceptor ligands for the treatment of asthma. PMID:22013997