Sample records for agriculture animal husbandry

  1. Migration and animal husbandry: Competing or complementary livelihood strategies.

    E-print Network

    Richner, Heinz

    Migration and animal husbandry: Competing or complementary livelihood strategies. Evidence from Kyrgyzstan Nadia Schoch, Bernd Steimann and Susan Thieme Abstract Animal husbandry and labour migration is to explore the links between animal husbandry and labour migration. Results show that for most rural

  2. The Ethical Contract as a Tool in Organic Animal Husbandry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vonne Lund; Raymond Anthony; Helena Röcklinsberg

    2004-01-01

    This article explores what an ethicfor organic animal husbandry might look like,departing from the assumption that organicfarming is substantially based in ecocentricethics. We argue that farm animals arenecessary functional partners in sustainableagroecosystems. This opens up additional waysto argue for their moral standing. We suggestan ethical contract to be used as acomplementary to the ecocentric framework. Weexpound the content of the

  3. The introduction of expert systems in animal husbandry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Schreinemakers; M. L. Vos; A. Brand; D. S. Brée; J. H. M. Verheijden

    1988-01-01

    The intensive nature of modern animal husbandry has changed the environmental conditions, so that protection against diseases, especially those caused by secondary pathogenic organisms, becomes an increasing concern. Production inefficiencies become more and more important. Because of their complex nature, many associated problems cannot be solved by farmers alone. With the introduction of information technology in the form of expert

  4. Training Veterinary Care Technicians and Husbandry Staff Improves Animal Care

    PubMed Central

    Lockworth, Cynthia R; Craig, Suzanne L; Liu, Jun; Tinkey, Peggy T

    2011-01-01

    Our animal care facility has always relied on an animal health team consisting of veterinarians, veterinary care technicians, and husbandry staff to provide a high level of animal care. As our rodent population increased, it became necessary to modify the roles and responsibilities of these staff members to accommodate the program's expansion. To accomplish that modification, we developed a training program that focused primarily on technicians by using a case-management algorithm. To support our technicians, we provided additional training to animal husbandry staff as they assumed the primary role in the initial assessment of the animals’ health. After completing the training, technicians made the transition from simply identifying health issues to actually making decisions for treating and euthanizing rodents. This training program empowered all team members and resulted in a staff that could provide consistent, high-quality veterinary care more efficiently. PMID:21333169

  5. Grassland Butterfly Fauna under Traditional Animal Husbandry: Contrasts in Diversity in Mown Meadows and Grazed Pastures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimmo Saarinen; Juha Jantunen

    2005-01-01

    Semi-natural grasslands resulting from traditional land use practices (mowing and grazing) are severely endangered throughout Europe due to the intensification of agriculture. The ecological impact of mowing and grazing on grassland butterflies was studied in eight mown meadows and eight grazed pastures under traditional animal husbandry in NW Russia and adjacent Finland. Transect count data over 3 years (1997–1999) covered a

  6. Strengthening Agricultural Education in Africa: The Approach of the Forum for Agricultural Resource Husbandry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bharati K. Patel; Paul L. Woomer

    2000-01-01

    The attainment of sustainable food security in sub-Saharan Africa requires the efforts of a large cadre of well-trained agricultural resource specialists familiar with the constraints and perspectives of smallhold farmers and experienced in interdisciplinary problem-solving. The Forum for Agricultural Resource Husbandry (FORUM) was initiated in 1992 by The Rockefeller Foundation to stabilize Faculties of Agriculture in Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Uganda

  7. Biofiltration for mitigation of methane emission from animal husbandry.

    PubMed

    Melse, Roland W; Van der Werf, Arjan W

    2005-07-15

    Removal of methane from exhaust air of animal houses and manure storage has a large potential for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from animal husbandry. The aim of this study was to design a biofilter for methane removal at a full-scale livestock production facility. Air from the headspace of a covered 6 m3 liquid manure storage (air flow: 0.75-8.5 m3 m(-3) h(-1); CH4: 500-5500 mg m(-3)) was treated in an experimental biofilter (160 L). The filterbed, a mixture of compost and perlite in a 40:60 (v/v) ratio, was inoculated with activated sludge that had shown a good methane oxidation rate as compared to pure cultures in preceding laboratory tests. Methane removal up to 85% could be achieved in the experimental biofilter. The methane removal (g m(-3) h(-1)) appeared to be proportional to the concentration (g m(-3)) with k = 2.5 h(-1). Relatively low methane concentrations and high air flows, as reported for the exhaust air of animal houses, would require very large biofilter sizes. Extrapolation of the results showed that treatment of air from a 1000 m3 liquid manure storage with a methane concentration of 22 g m(-3) would require a 20 m3 biofilter for a desired emission reduction of 50%. The costs for such a biofilter are USD 26 per t of CO2 equiv reduction. PMID:16082981

  8. Animal and Range Sciences Department General Livestock Husbandry Policies and Procedures

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Animal and Range Sciences Department General Livestock Husbandry Policies and Procedures Approved the welfare and well-being of all animals in its care. The Department of Animal and Range Sciences seeks and managers. Proper management is essential for the well-being of the animals (FASS, 1999). The purpose

  9. Genomic interplay in bacterial communities: implications for growth promoting practices in animal husbandry

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Piklu; McKinnon, Jessica; Wyrsch, Ethan; Hammond, Jeffrey M.; Charles, Ian G.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of antibiotics heralded the start of a “Golden Age” in the history of medicine. Over the years, the use of antibiotics extended beyond medical practice into animal husbandry, aquaculture and agriculture. Now, however, we face the worldwide threat of diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to all existing major classes of antibiotic, reflecting the possibility of an end to the antibiotic era. The seriousness of the threat is underscored by the severely limited production of new classes of antibiotics. Evolution of bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics results from the inherent genetic capability that bacteria have to adapt rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Consequently, under antibiotic selection pressures, bacteria have acquired resistance to all classes of antibiotics, sometimes very shortly after their introduction. Arguably, the evolution and rapid dissemination of multiple drug resistant genes en-masse across microbial pathogens is one of the most serious threats to human health. In this context, effective surveillance strategies to track the development of resistance to multiple antibiotics are vital to managing global infection control. These surveillance strategies are necessary for not only human health but also for animal health, aquaculture and plant production. Shortfalls in the present surveillance strategies need to be identified. Raising awareness of the genetic events that promote co-selection of resistance to multiple antimicrobials is an important prerequisite to the design and implementation of molecular surveillance strategies. In this review we will discuss how lateral gene transfer (LGT), driven by the use of low-dose antibiotics in animal husbandry, has likely played a significant role in the evolution of multiple drug resistance (MDR) in Gram-negative bacteria and has complicated molecular surveillance strategies adopted for predicting imminent resistance threats. PMID:25161648

  10. New aspects of the use of tranquillizers in animal husbandry, with particular reference to pigs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Dantzer

    1977-01-01

    Tranquillizers have been used in animal husbandry to inorease production, to control stress from transport or herding together or to prevent abnormal behaviour patterns, such as fighting. Neuroleptic drugs (phenothiazine derivatives, reserpine and butyrophenones) have been widely used for these purposes, while anxiolytic sedatives (meprobamate and benzodiazepines), which have more limited effects, have only been little used. In view of

  11. Development of A General Principle Solution Forisoagrinet Compliant Networking System Components in Animal Husbandry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, Arne; Herd, Daniel; Rö?ler, Benjamin; Gallmann, Eva; Jungbluth, Thomas

    In pig production software and electronic systems are widely used for process control and management. Unfortunately most devices on farms are proprietary solutions and autonomically working. To unify data communication of devices in agricultural husbandry, the international standard ISOagriNET (ISO 17532:2007) was developed. It defines data formats and exchange protocols, to link up devices like climate controls, feeding systems and sensors, but also management software. The aim of the research project, "Information and Data Collection in Livestock Systems" is to develop an ISOagriNET compliant IT system, a so called Farming Cell. It integrates all electronic components to acquire the available data and information for pig fattening. That way, an additional benefit to humans, animals and the environment regarding process control and documentation, can be generated. Developing the Farming Cell is very complex; in detail it is very difficult and long-winded to integrate hardware and software by various vendors into an ISOagriNET compliant IT system. This ISOagriNET prototype shows as a test environment the potential of this new standard.

  12. [Appropriateness of animal rights in housing conditions in animal husbandry of domestic animals].

    PubMed

    Sundrum, A

    1998-02-01

    Along with a general redirection of values in agriculture, the need for action arises for veterinary medicine and other life sciences to establish suitable tools for the objective assessment of housing conditions with regard to their appropriateness concerning animal welfare. First communication between the disciplines involved demands a uniform use of terms. Assessment can be carried out generally either directly by using pathological, physiological and ethological reactions of the animals as criteria or indirectly by the means of technical criteria. Both approaches can indicate poor or good conditions with regard to animal welfare and are generally agreed upon. However using these measures in practise often yields problems referring to the methodology and to the results that are hard to interpret. Criteria referring to the state of the animals have a reduced meaningfulness due to the following aspects: A lot of criteria are lacking sensibility and specificity, which leads to a small diagnostic selectivity. A large number of sources for variance aggravate the use of reference values in order to distinguish between normal or abnormal levels. In many cases there is a lack of firm evidence that the level of changes correlates with the health and welfare of the animals. Due to contradictions caused by the differing properties of the variables being measured the measures do not always co-vary. Results and conclusions of the assessments are closely connected to the specific experimental design and cannot easily be transferred to the housing conditions in practice showing a large variance. Therefore criteria referring to the animals can be used primarily for the assessment of standardized or serial produced housing systems, where a direct comparison between systems is permissible. In order to find out the weak points of the housing conditions concerning animal welfare, on-farm assessment can be carried out more advantageous by using design criteria. Those criteria can be divided into structural and technical elements on the one hand and management born factors like hygiene, climate and feeding on the other. The use of structural and technical elements as criteria ensures a high level or repeatability of the results and practicability in the application. However, a confinement to structural and technical elements went along with a marked reduction in the meaningfulness of the assessment. The use of management born factors is governed by the specific situation. The variation of results depend to a high degree on the time of evaluation. Statements of the real situation within a longer period of time therefore require great efforts. Due to the complex phenomenon there is justified concern that a comprehensive assessment and conclusion referring to the appropriateness of housing conditions concerning animal welfare is not possible. Few criteria cannot be equated with the whole. However, partial statements can be achieved under a scientific point of view using a mixture of different criteria. In order to integrate and weigh the varied results reached by different criteria, a systemic approach and an integrative way of diagnosis is needed. Up to now there is a lack in matured concepts that put the integrative approach of assessment into practice. PMID:9528211

  13. [Development of animal husbandry in Groningen in the 18th and 19th century; a broad outline].

    PubMed

    Paping, R F

    2001-01-01

    This overview is mainly focussed on the clay area forming the northern half of the province. It is the wealthiest and most characteristic part, being cultured since the Middle Ages as testified by the many churches that even small villages were able to construct. About 1700 the province of Groningen enjoyed already a modern economy, fitting in with that of the other coastal areas of Friesland, Zeeland and Holland (the last mentioned was the richest region of the world in the 17th and 18th century). As aspects of modernity at that time can be considered: 1) the use of modern agricultural methods with higher yields per hectare and higher milk yields per cow than produced in the land provinces on the sandy soils; 2) Agriculture was aimed at earning money by selling of hte products. In opposition to the farmers in the land provinces, who mainly produced for subsistence farming, the farmers in the coastal areas produced for the trade; 3) A high degree of specialization was found in the rural areas. 30-40% of the families had own farms, 25% of the population were labourers, owing only small pieces of land and the rest of the working population had occupations outside agriculture (craftmen, shopkeepers, shipmasters, merchants etc.). Whereas on the sandy soils practically every family owned a farm, be it mostly a very small one. After reviewing the changes in the distribution of land in use of the production of fieldcrops or for meadows-always in function of the market value of the products-and after a discussion of type of cattle husbandry (breeding, fattening, dairying) it is concluded that a relative decrease of the importance of cattle husbandry in the clay region during the 18th - 19th century can be observed. Intensification of land use had a positive effect on crop-production. The much-heard opinion that the cattle plague epizootic of 1768-1786 caused a transition in land use through a switch from animal husbandry to arable farming, is not held by the author. Economic factors were of prime importance here. The introduction of fertilizer in the 19th century took away the necessity to keep cattle for manure. And mechanization did the same for the horse in the 20th century. In some parts of the clay region, however, cattle husbandry returned in the second half of the 20th century, due to the low prices of the fieldcrops. The arable land is then transformed again in meadows. Attention is given to the role of veterinary care given by the farmers themselves and in a later phase by veterinary professionals. PMID:15156851

  14. APPLICATIONS OF RADIO-ISOTOPES IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE; Primenenie Radioizotopov v Zhivotnovodstve i Veterinarii

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Kudryavtsev; A. I. Vertunov

    1962-01-01

    Translated from a paper presented at the Conference on the Use of ; Radioisotopes in Animal Biology and in the Medical Sciences held in Mexico City, ; November 21 to December 1, 1961. 20p. Work by Soviet researchers on the use of ; radioisotopes in animal husbandry and veterinary science is reviewed. M.C.G.);

  15. Human diarrhea infections associated with domestic animal husbandry: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Laura D.; Levy, Karen; Menezes, Neia P.; Freeman, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Domestic animal husbandry, a common practice globally, can lead to zoonotic transmission of enteric pathogens. However, this risk has received little attention to date. This systematic review and meta-analysis examines the evidence for an association between domestic exposure to food-producing animals and cases of human diarrhea and specific enteric infections. We performed a systematic review of available literature to examine domestic livestock and poultry as risk factors for diarrhea and applied pre-determined quality criteria. Where possible, we carried out meta-analysis of specific animal–pathogen pairs. We found consistent evidence of a positive association between exposure to domestic food-producing animals and diarrheal illness across a range of animal exposures and enteric pathogens. Out of 29 studies included in the review, 20 (69.0%) reported a positive association between domestic animal exposure and diarrhea. Domestic exposure to poultry revealed a substantial association with human campylobacteriosis (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.90–3.93). Our results suggest that domestic poultry and livestock exposures are associated with diarrheal illness in humans. Failure to ascertain the microbial cause of disease may mask this effect. Exposure to domestic animals should be considered a risk factor for human diarrheal illness and additional studies may identify potential mitigation strategies to address this risk. PMID:24812065

  16. Depressive-like behavioral response of adult male rhesus monkeys during routine animal husbandry procedure

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Michael B.; McCowan, Brenda; Jiang, Jing; Capitanio, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Social isolation is a major risk factor for the development of depressive illness; yet, no practical nonhuman primate model is available for studying processes involved in this effect. In a first study, we noted that adult male rhesus monkeys housed individually indoors occasionally exhibited a hunched, depressive-like posture. Therefore, Study 2 investigated the occurrence of a hunched posture by adult males brought from outdoor social groups to indoor individual housing. We also scored two other behaviors—lying on the substrate and day time sleeping—that convey an impression of depression. During the first week of observation following individual housing, 18 of 26 adult males exhibited the hunched posture and 21 of 26 displayed at least one depressive-like behavior. Over 2 weeks, 23 of 26 males showed depressive-like behavior during a total of only 20 min observation. Further, the behavior during the first week was positively related to the level of initial response to a maternal separation procedure experienced in infancy. In Study 3, more than half of 23 adult males of a new sample displayed depressive-like behavior during 10 min of observation each of Weeks 7–14 of individual housing. The surprisingly high frequency of depressive-like behavior in Studies 2 and 3 may have been due to recording behavior via camera with no human in the room to elicit competing responses. These results suggest that a common animal husbandry procedure might provide a practical means for examining effects of social isolation on depression-related endpoints in a nonhuman primate. The findings also suggest that trait-like differences in emotional responsiveness during separation in infancy may predict differences in responsiveness during social isolation in adulthood. PMID:25249954

  17. A C?As lyase for degradation of environmental organoarsenical herbicides and animal husbandry growth promoters

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is the most widespread environmental toxin. Substantial amounts of pentavalent organoarsenicals have been used as herbicides, such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA), and as growth enhancers for animal husbandry, such as roxarsone (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylarsonic acid) [Rox(V)]. These undergo environmental degradation to more toxic inorganic arsenite [As(III)]. We previously demonstrated a two-step pathway of degradation of MSMA to As(III) by microbial communities involving sequential reduction to methylarsonous acid [MAs(III)] by one bacterial species and demethylation from MAs(III) to As(III) by another. In this study, the gene responsible for MAs(III) demethylation was identified from an environmental MAs(III)-demethylating isolate, Bacillus sp. MD1. This gene, termed arsenic inducible gene (arsI), is in an arsenic resistance (ars) operon and encodes a nonheme iron-dependent dioxygenase with C?As lyase activity. Heterologous expression of ArsI conferred MAs(III)-demethylating activity and MAs(III) resistance to an arsenic-hypersensitive strain of Escherichia coli, demonstrating that MAs(III) demethylation is a detoxification process. Purified ArsI catalyzes Fe2+-dependent MAs(III) demethylation. In addition, ArsI cleaves the C?As bond in trivalent roxarsone and other aromatic arsenicals. ArsI homologs are widely distributed in prokaryotes, and we propose that ArsI-catalyzed organoarsenical degradation has a significant impact on the arsenic biogeocycle. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a molecular mechanism for organoarsenic degradation by a C?As lyase. PMID:24821808

  18. Depressive-like behavioral response of adult male rhesus monkeys during routine animal husbandry procedure.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Michael B; McCowan, Brenda; Jiang, Jing; Capitanio, John P

    2014-01-01

    Social isolation is a major risk factor for the development of depressive illness; yet, no practical nonhuman primate model is available for studying processes involved in this effect. In a first study, we noted that adult male rhesus monkeys housed individually indoors occasionally exhibited a hunched, depressive-like posture. Therefore, Study 2 investigated the occurrence of a hunched posture by adult males brought from outdoor social groups to indoor individual housing. We also scored two other behaviors-lying on the substrate and day time sleeping-that convey an impression of depression. During the first week of observation following individual housing, 18 of 26 adult males exhibited the hunched posture and 21 of 26 displayed at least one depressive-like behavior. Over 2 weeks, 23 of 26 males showed depressive-like behavior during a total of only 20 min observation. Further, the behavior during the first week was positively related to the level of initial response to a maternal separation procedure experienced in infancy. In Study 3, more than half of 23 adult males of a new sample displayed depressive-like behavior during 10 min of observation each of Weeks 7-14 of individual housing. The surprisingly high frequency of depressive-like behavior in Studies 2 and 3 may have been due to recording behavior via camera with no human in the room to elicit competing responses. These results suggest that a common animal husbandry procedure might provide a practical means for examining effects of social isolation on depression-related endpoints in a nonhuman primate. The findings also suggest that trait-like differences in emotional responsiveness during separation in infancy may predict differences in responsiveness during social isolation in adulthood. PMID:25249954

  19. Determination of antibiotic consumption index for animal originated foods produced in animal husbandry in Iran, 2010.

    PubMed

    Aalipour, Fathollah; Mirlohi, Maryam; Jalali, Mohammd

    2014-01-01

    The public health concerns over the long-term exposure to antibiotics have risen in different parts of the world. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antibiotic consumption pattern in livestock and poultry and to estimate the quantity of antibiotic active ingredient (mg) consumed per unit weight (Kg) of red meat, milk and egg production in Iran in 2010. A cross-sectional study was designed in charmahal - bakhtiary province-Iran. A questioner has been developed by naming 110 types of antibiotics. Twenty two veterinary clinicians and three livestock pharmaceutical distributor companies were included in the survey to determine the antibiotic prescription and distribution pattern in the farms. Veterinary organization of Iran supplied the information of the total antibiotic consumption in different dosage forms. National and international data on the livestock and poultry production were obtained from the relevant official web sites. Tetracycline class of antibiotics was the most common types of antibacterial prescribed and sold to both livestock and poultry farms. Amino glycoside, penicillin and macrolide in the cattle farms and furofenocole in broiler farms were the second most used groups of antibiotics. The quantity of antibiotic active ingredients consumed per unit weight of animal-originated food products was counted as 107.4 mg/kg for both milk and red meat and 249.5 mg/kg for broiler meat and egg. Totally, it was estimated that 133 mg antibiotic substances was used per kg of milk, meat and egg produced in 2010. In comparison to available data for other countries, consumption of antibiotics in livestock and poultry in Iran is higher than developed countries with an exception of South Korea. The findings of the present study could be alarming for the legislative authorities in food security and safety. More clear evaluation should be carried out as well as implementation of national monitoring and inspective programs in order to reach an added safety regarding animal-originated foods. PMID:24468281

  20. Determination of antibiotic consumption index for animal originated foods produced in animal husbandry in Iran, 2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The public health concerns over the long-term exposure to antibiotics have risen in different parts of the world. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antibiotic consumption pattern in livestock and poultry and to estimate the quantity of antibiotic active ingredient (mg) consumed per unit weight (Kg) of red meat, milk and egg production in Iran in 2010. A cross-sectional study was designed in charmahal - bakhtiary province-Iran. A questioner has been developed by naming 110 types of antibiotics. Twenty two veterinary clinicians and three livestock pharmaceutical distributor companies were included in the survey to determine the antibiotic prescription and distribution pattern in the farms. Veterinary organization of Iran supplied the information of the total antibiotic consumption in different dosage forms. National and international data on the livestock and poultry production were obtained from the relevant official web sites. Tetracycline class of antibiotics was the most common types of antibacterial prescribed and sold to both livestock and poultry farms. Amino glycoside, penicillin and macrolide in the cattle farms and furofenocole in broiler farms were the second most used groups of antibiotics. The quantity of antibiotic active ingredients consumed per unit weight of animal-originated food products was counted as 107.4 mg/kg for both milk and red meat and 249.5 mg/kg for broiler meat and egg. Totally, it was estimated that 133 mg antibiotic substances was used per kg of milk, meat and egg produced in 2010. In comparison to available data for other countries, consumption of antibiotics in livestock and poultry in Iran is higher than developed countries with an exception of South Korea. The findings of the present study could be alarming for the legislative authorities in food security and safety. More clear evaluation should be carried out as well as implementation of national monitoring and inspective programs in order to reach an added safety regarding animal-originated foods. PMID:24468281

  1. Animal and Range Sciences Department Agricultural Animal Care Training Program

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Animal and Range Sciences Department Agricultural Animal Care Training Program Approved by AACUC May 2003 Goals The goals of the Agricultural Animal Care Training Program are to ensure animal well-being, the validity and effectiveness of research and teaching activities, and the health and safety of animal care

  2. Breeding, Husbandry, Veterinary Care, and Hematology of Marsh Rice Rats (Oryzomys palustris), a Small Animal Model for Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, J Ignacio; Edmonds, Kent; Zamora, Bernadette; Pingel, Jennifer; Thomas, Linda; Cancel, Denisse; Schneider, Laura; Reinhard, Mary K; Battles, August H; Akhter, Mohammed P; Kimmel, Donald B; Wronski, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Rice rats (Oryzomys palustris) are a recognized animal model for studying periodontal disease and the photoperiodic regulation of reproduction. Here we share information regarding the breeding, husbandry, veterinary care, and hematologic findings about this animal species to facilitate its use in studies at other research institutions. Rice rats initially were quarantined and monitored for excluded pathogens by using microbiologic, parasitologic, and serologic methods with adult female Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus sentinel animals. Breeders were paired in a monogamous, continuous-breeding system. Rats were housed in static filter-top cages, maintained on commercial chow under 14:10-h light:dark cycles at 68 to 79 °F (20.0 to 26.1 °C) and 30% to 70% humidity. Rice rats apparently adapt relatively well to standard laboratory conditions, despite their aggressive behavior toward conspecifics and humans. Our analysis of 97 litters revealed that dams gave birth to an average of 5.2 pups per dam and weaned 4.2 pups per dam. Several procedures and biologic reagents normally used in standard laboratory rodents (mice and rats) can be used with rice rats. In addition, we present hematologic and serum chemistry values that can be used as preliminary reference values for future studies involving rice rats. PMID:25651091

  3. Breeding, husbandry, veterinary care, and hematology of marsh rice rats (Oryzomys palustris), a small animal model for periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, J Ignacio; Edmonds, Kent; Zamora, Bernadette; Pingel, Jennifer; Thomas, Linda; Cancel, Denisse; Schneider, Laura; Reinhard, Mary K; Battles, August H; Akhter, Mohammed P; Kimmel, Donald B; Wronski, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Rice rats (Oryzomys palustris) are a recognized animal model for studying periodontal disease and the photoperiodic regulation of reproduction. Here we share information regarding the breeding, husbandry, veterinary care, and hematologic findings about this animal species to facilitate its use in studies at other research institutions. Rice rats initially were quarantined and monitored for excluded pathogens by using microbiologic, parasitologic, and serologic methods with adult female Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus sentinel animals. Breeders were paired in a monogamous, continuous-breeding system. Rats were housed in static filter-top cages, maintained on commercial chow under 14:10-h light:dark cycles at 68 to 79 °F (20.0 to 26.1 °C) and 30% to 70% humidity. Rice rats apparently adapt relatively well to standard laboratory conditions, despite their aggressive behavior toward conspecifics and humans. Our analysis of 97 litters revealed that dams gave birth to an average of 5.2 pups per dam and weaned 4.2 pups per dam. Several procedures and biologic reagents normally used in standard laboratory rodents (mice and rats) can be used with rice rats. In addition, we present hematologic and serum chemistry values that can be used as preliminary reference values for future studies involving rice rats. PMID:25651091

  4. Willingness to pay for extension services in Uganda among farmers involved in crop and animal husbandry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francis Mwaura; Fred Roland Muwanika; Geofrey Okoboi

    2010-01-01

    Although the Ugandan government is determined to aid farmers increase agricultural productivity as an intervention on increasing food security and reducing poverty through extension services, resources constraints are dampening its efforts. Private extension services providers are being invited to take up information dissemination roles with queries on the availability and demand of the services among farmers to attract private sector

  5. Diet and Animal Husbandry of the Preclassic Maya at Cuello, Belize: Isotopic and Zooarchaeological Evidence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nikolaas Merwe; Robert Tykot; Norman Hammond; Kim Oakberg

    The diet of the Preclassic Maya at Cuello, Belize was studied by means of carbon and nitrogen isotope measurements on human and animal bones from the site, as well as on modern animals from the region. The average ?13C value for Preclassic human bone collagen was ?12.9±0.9‰ (n=28) and for tooth enamel apatite it was ?8.7±2.3‰ (n=33); the average ?13N

  6. Association between the consumption of antimicrobial agents in animal husbandry and the occurrence of resistant bacteria among food animals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Møller Aarestrup

    1999-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are used in food animals for therapy and prophylaxis of bacterial infections and in feed to promote growth. The use of antimicrobial agents for food animals may cause problems in the therapy of infections by selecting for resistance among bacteria pathogenic for animals or humans. The emergence of resistant bacteria and resistance genes following the use of antimicrobial

  7. The effect of a community-based animal health service programme on livestock mortality, off-take and selected husbandry applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Hüttner; K Leidl; D. U Pfeiffer; D Kasambara; F. B. D Jere

    2001-01-01

    Mortality, off-take and husbandry measures of 96 randomly selected users of a community-based animal health (BAHS) programme were compared with 96 matched part-users and 96 non-users, respectively. More than 5000 farm visits were conducted between July 1997 and February 1999, of which 3724 visits were used for this evaluation. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to compare farm characteristics and

  8. [Suitability of chemical neutralizers applied for disinfection control on commercial animal husbandry objects].

    PubMed

    Bineva, I; Karadzhov, S

    1979-01-01

    A study on the effect of various neutralizers of the most widely spread means of disinfection applied in animal rearing was made. For that purpose twin lecytine was tested for quadruple ammonium compounds: twin--for phenolic compounds, natrium thiosulfate--for iodoformium and chlor-containing compounds, as well as natrium sulfite--for formalin. As test micro-organisms were used Staph. aureus Sg 511, E. coli 078, and Ps. aeruginosa. The investigations were performed after the suspension method with dilutions in geometrical progressions. It was established that for the disinfection by quadruple ammonium compounds 3% twin-80 plus 0.3% lecytine is suitable as neutralizer. In disinfection with phenolic compounds the 1% twin-80 solution gives good results. As neutralizer of formalin disinfection 2% natrium sulfite solution can be successfully used. For iodoformium disinfection or disinfection with chlor-containing compounds good neutralizing effect can be achieved by 1% solution of natrium thiosulfate. PMID:120995

  9. Animal Enterprise Record Book. Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Agricultural Curriculum Materials Service.

    This record book is intended for use by agricultural education students who have ownership arrangements in animal enterprise experience programs. A major purpose of this book is to aid in separating out or allocating the costs and returns to a specific enterprise. The financial, labor, and management aspects of each enterprise can then be studied…

  10. Agricultural Animal Pest Control. Bulletin 767.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Maxcy P., Jr.

    Included in this training manual are descriptions and pictures of the following agricultural animal pests: mosquitoes, stable flies, horse flies and deer or yellow flies, house flies, horn flies, wound-infesting larvae, lice, mites, ticks, and bots and grubs. Information is given on the life-cycle and breeding habits of the pests. Methods of…

  11. Grain Sorghum By-Product Feeds for Farm Animals

    E-print Network

    1951-01-01

    in Texas have made available 1 livestock producers and the feed industry a considerab tonnage of sorghum gluten meal and sorghum gluten fee as by-products in sorghum grain processing. The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station conduct( a series.... Chemical analyses and amino acid assays were also mai on the feeds. The results reported in this bulletin represent the coop- erative effort of the Departments of Animal Husbandry, Biochemistry and Nutrition, Dairy Husbandry and Poultr Husbandry...

  12. Spanish for Agricultural Purposes: The Basic Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainous, Bruce H.; And Others

    This manual, part of a one-semester course for North American agriculture specialists preparing to work in Latin America, is built around specimens of agricultural writing in Spanish. The manual contains 12 lessons on general agriculture, sugar production, grain production, geography, forestry, animal husbandry, soy bean production, agricultural

  13. List of subject area codes 01 AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

    E-print Network

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    .7 Animal Husbandry 01.8 Tropical/Subtropical Agriculture 01.9 Others ­ Agricultural Sciences 02 Sciences 12.1 Medicine 12.2 Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 12.3 Dentistry 12.4 Veterinary Medicine 12List of subject area codes 01 AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES 01.0 Agricultural sciences 01.1 Agriculture 01

  14. Promoting transboundary animal disease risk management via a multiple health and husbandry intervention strategies in upland Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Nampanya, Sonevilay; Khounsy, Syseng; Rast, Luzia; Windsor, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    Surveys of smallholder farmer knowledge, attitude, practice (KAP) and income were conducted in 2011 and 2012 in five northern provinces of Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR; n = 200 farmers). Participating villages were classified as either from a livelihood development project (LV; n = 80 farmers) or a livestock research project that contained both 'high-intervention' (HI; n = 60 farmers) or 'low-intervention' (LI; n = 60 farmers) villages. Farmer training plus a suite of health and productivity interventions were implemented in HI sites; only vaccination was implemented in LI sites, whilst various interventions and limited vaccination were introduced to LV sites. Farmer interviews were conducted with survey questions on socioeconomic variables and KAP of large ruminant health and disease risk management, enabling determination of quantitative and dichotomous qualitative traits and comparison of results from HI, LI and LV villages. The average farmer income from sales of large ruminants in HI was USD 621, in LI was USD 547 and in LV was USD 225 (p < 0.001). The predicted mean of total knowledge scores (/42) in the 2012 survey in HI was 28, in LI was 22 and in LV was 17 (p < 0.001). We conclude that improved KAP of large ruminant health and production can be achieved by intensive training, although with some farmers yet to apply their knowledge on husbandry and biosecurity practices, continued learning support and closed linkage of research and development projects to improve extension capacity is recommended. This multiple participatory approach promoting biosecurity in addition to vaccination may provide a more sustainable pathway for the advancement of Lao PDR on the Progressive Control Pathway for foot and mouth disease control. PMID:24310441

  15. Advantages and Risks of Husbandry and Housing Changes to Improve Animal Wellbeing in a Breeding Colony of Common Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Bakker, Jaco; Ouwerling, Boudewijn; Heidt, Peter J; Kondova, Ivanela; Langermans, Jan Am

    2015-01-01

    Between 1975 and 2014, housing conditions for laboratory-housed marmosets changed dramatically after the introduction of new guidelines designed to improve their care and wellbeing. According to these guidelines, our facility provided marmosets with outside enclosures, switched to deep litter as bedding material, and discontinued the use of disinfectant agents in animal enclosures. However, both deep litter and access to outside enclosures hypothetically increase the risk of potential exposure to pathogenic microorganisms. We evaluated whether these housing and husbandry modifications constituted an increased veterinary risk for laboratory-housed common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). After the animals had been exposed to these new housing conditions for 2.5 y, we examined their intestinal bacterial flora and feces, the deep litter, and insects present in the housing. In addition, we assessed the marmosets' general health and the effect of outdoor housing on, for example, vitamin D levels. Although numerous bacterial strains-from nonpathogenic to potentially pathogenic-were cultured, we noted no increase in illness, mortality, or breeding problems related to this environmental microflora. Housing laboratory marmosets in large enriched cages, with both indoor and outdoor enclosures, providing them with deep litter, and eliminating the use of disinfectants present an increased veterinary risk. However, after evaluating all of the collected data, we estimate that the veterinary risk of the new housing conditions is minimal to none in terms of clinical disease, disease outbreaks, abnormal behavior, and negative effects on reproduction. PMID:26045452

  16. [The organization of veterinary services in African animal husbandry systems: chances for the exchange of interdisciplinary learning processes].

    PubMed

    Kirk, M

    1995-12-01

    The structure of the veterinary services to date hinders--together with massive intervention in the land tenure systems and the animal keepers' rights in arid and semi-arid areas--the future organization of productive animal-keeping systems adapted to the ecological conditions. The consensus of the findings of research in the social as well as in the natural sciences, is that state (agrarian) policies and international development cooperation have led to centralism and authoritarian administrations which formalize formerly informal, locally specific rules for securing the health of the animals and the maintenance of grazing and water resources. As a result, the animal-keeping groups have lost their rights, social conflicts arose and the environment suffered. Thus, decentralization, subsidarity and--above all--comprehensive participation on the part of the animal keepers are regarded as the guidelines for the future organization of state and/or private services for maintaining the health of the animals. Thereby, the planning at the various administrative levels is faced by great challenges in view of the progressing differentiation in the animal-keeping systems (e.g. peri-urban systems; urban absentee herd owners; marginalized, subsistence-oriented households). PMID:8651895

  17. Agriculture, Food, and Animal Sciences Art, Design, and Music

    E-print Network

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    #12;Agriculture, Food, and Animal Sciences Art, Design, and Music Contents 2013-2014 Program Guide #12;2 | W W W. G E T S T A R T E D W I T H C S U . C O M Osher Lifelong Learning Institute Agriculture, Food, and Animal Sciences DEGREES Agricultural Business ­ Bachelor of Science (Degree Completion) Use

  18. Validation of a quantitative method using liquid chromatography coupled to multiple mass spectrometry for thiouracil in feedstuffs used in animal husbandry.

    PubMed

    Kiebooms, Julie A L; Wauters, Jella; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2015-06-01

    The use of thyreostatic drugs, like thiouracil (TU), in animal production has been banned for over three decades by the European Union, due to potential teratogenic and carcinogenic effects of its residues upon human consumption. Besides, thyreostats induce water retention in livestock, causing fallacious weight gain and deterioration of meat quality. Development of more competent analytical methods gave rise to sporadic TU detection in urine of untreated animals, questioning the actual synthetic origin TU. Research showed that TU can be formed upon digestion of Brassicaceae feeds in vivo and in vitro, which called for a means of differentiation between endogenous formation of TU and illicit administration. Therefore, in the present study, a routinely applicable liquid chromatography (LC) ion trap multiple mass spectrometry (MS(2)) method for TU analysis in animal feeds was optimised and validated, according to CD 2002/657/EC. A fractional factorial Plackett-Burman design was used to optimise the extraction procedure for TU from Brassicaceae and non-Brassicaceae feeds. This resulted in the discrimination of five influential factors (amount of feed, myrosinase, pH 7 buffer, 3-iodobenzyl bromide and elution solvent), for which the most optimal conditions were perfected. The limit of quantification for TU amounted 0.5 ng g(-1). The individual recoveries for TU ranged between 90.9 and 99.7 %. Good results for repeatability and intra-laboratory reproducibility (RSD%) were observed, i.e. ?6.0 and ?5.2 %, respectively, for TU. Excellent linearity was proven based on determination coefficient (R (2)???0.99) and lack-of-fit test (F test, ??=?0.05). Subsequently, a selection of feeds sampled during European national monitoring campaigns were evaluated with the present method showing concentrations ranging from 0.32 to 20.60 ng g(-1), demonstrating the relevance of the method in the analysis of TU from animal feeds. Graphical abstract Validation of a quantitative method using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for thiouracil in feedstuffs used in animal husbandry by J. A. L. Kiebooms, J. Wauters, J. Vanden Bussche, and L. Vanhaecke. PMID:25424180

  19. Participatory assessment of animal health and husbandry practices in smallholder pig production systems in three high poverty districts in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Dione, Michel M; Ouma, Emily A; Roesel, Kristina; Kungu, Joseph; Lule, Peter; Pezo, Danilo

    2014-12-01

    While animal health constraints have been identified as a major limiting factor in smallholder pig production in Uganda, researchers and policy makers lack information on the relative incidence of diseases and their impacts on pig production. This study aimed to assess animal health and management practices, constraints and opportunities for intervention in smallholder pig value chains in three high poverty districts of Uganda. Semi-qualitative interview checklists through Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were administered to 340 pig farmers in 35 villages in Masaka, Kamuli and Mukono districts. Quantitative data was obtained during the exercise through group consensus. Results of FGDs were further triangulated with secondary data and information obtained from key informant interviews. Findings show that pig keeping systems are dominated by tethering and scavenging in rural areas. In peri-urban and urban areas, intensive production systems are more practiced, with pigs confined in pens. The main constraints identified by farmers include high disease burden such as African swine fever (ASF) and parasites, poor housing and feeding practices, poor veterinary services, ineffective drugs and a general lack of knowledge on piggery management. According to farmers, ASF is the primary cause of pig mortality with epidemics occurring mainly during the dry season. Worms and ectoparasites namely; mange, lice and flies are endemic leading to stunted growth which reduces the market value of pigs. Diarrhoea and malnutrition are common in piglets. Ninety-three percent of farmers say they practice deworming, 37% practice ectoparasite spraying and 77% castrate their boars. Indigenous curative treatments include the application of human urine and concoctions of local herbs for ASF control and use of old engine oil or tobacco extracts to control ectoparasites. There is a need for better technical services to assist farmers with these problems. PMID:25458705

  20. Recent advances in animal behaviour

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K M Alexander

    1985-01-01

    Ethology, a fast developing field of animal sciences has considerable relevance in animal husbandry, agriculture, control\\u000a of animal populations, pest control, medicine, wildlife biology, etc. It has made vast strides of progress during the past\\u000a few decades and some of these trends are reviewed.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Communication signals play a salient role in sociobiology of animal groups. Animals deploy visual, acoustic, tactile

  1. Technologies to address air quality issues impacting animal agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Williams

    The continued productivity, profitability and sustainability of animal production agriculture in most parts of the world will be dependent upon implementation of effective technologies and management practices to mitigate perceived and documented environmental impacts resulting from confined animal operation emissions. North Carolina State University Animal and Poultry Waste Management Center (APWMC) program efforts to identify such technologies through support of

  2. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment ASC Animal Sciences

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment ASC Animal Sciences KEY: # = new course * = course ANIMAL BIOLOGY. (3) The first in a sequence of two courses providing an introduction to the subject of animal science. Emphasis is placed on a fundamental understanding of anatomy, physiology, nutrition

  3. Amphibian biology and husbandry.

    PubMed

    Pough, F Harvey

    2007-01-01

    Extant amphibians comprise three lineages-- salamanders (Urodela or Caudata), frogs and toads (Anura), and caecilians (Gymnophiona, Apoda, or Caecilia)--which contain more than 6,000 species. Fewer than a dozen species of amphibians are commonly maintained in laboratory colonies, and the husbandry requirements for the vast majority of amphibians are poorly known. For these species, a review of basic characteristics of amphibian biology supplemented by inferences drawn from the morphological and physiological characteristics of the species in question provides a basis for decisions about housing and feeding. Amphibians are ectotherms, and their skin is permeable to water, ions, and respiratory gases. Most species are secretive and, in many cases, nocturnal. The essential characteristics of their environment include appropriate levels of humidity, temperature, and lighting as well as retreat sites. Terrestrial and arboreal species require moist substrates, water dishes, and high relative humidity. Because temperature requirements for most species are poorly known, it is advisable to use a temperature mosaic that will allow an animal to find an appropriate temperature within its cage. Photoperiod may affect physiology and behavior (especially reproduction and hibernation), and although the importance of ultraviolet light for calcium metabolism by amphibians is not yet known, ecological observations suggest that it might be important for some species of frogs. Some amphibians are territorial, and some use olfactory cues to mark their territory and to recognize other individuals of their species. All amphibians are carnivorous as adults, and the feeding response of many species is elicited by the movement of prey. Diets should include a mixture of prey species, and it may be advisable to load prey with vitamins and minerals. PMID:17592184

  4. Agricultural Mechanics and Basic Plant Science. Agricultural Mechanics and Basic Animal Science. An Administrative Guide for Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum Center.

    This basic instructional guide for the first two years of instruction in agricultural education is one in a series of such guides. It is useful in developing and selecting instructional material and implementing competency-based education for two courses: agricultural science and basic plant science and agricultural science and basic animal

  5. AGRICULTURAL WATER USE ASSOCIATED WITH ANIMAL PRODUCTION SYSTEMS IN GEORGIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. L. Newton; J. F. Baker; C. R. Dove; J. K. Bernard; M. D. McCranie; V. J. Boken; D. L. Thomas; G. Hoogenboom

    Agricultural waters use normally centers on the large cross-section of irrigation withdrawals by cropping systems. However, animal production systems are also a significant component of water use in the state of Georgia. These production systems are therefore directly affected by the continuing drought and limited availability of water. Many animal production facilities, such as dairies, poultry houses, processing plants, and

  6. Transgenic farm animals: applications in agriculture and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Tian, X C; Dai, Y; Wang, B

    2000-01-01

    During the last decade, tremendous progress has been made in the area of transgenic farm animals. While there are many important transgenic farm animal applications in agriculture, funding has been very limited and progress has been rather slow in this area. Encouragingly, the potential applications of transgenic farm animals as bioreactors for producing human therapeutic proteins and as organ donors for transplantations in humans have attracted vast funding from the private sectors. Several transgenic animal products are already in various phases of clinical trials. Estimates are, that in the near future, the worlds demands on human pharmaceutical proteins may largely be met by transgenic farm animals. While there are still major challenges ahead in the area of xenotransplantation using transgenic animal organs, transgenic tissues or cells have demonstrated promising results as a potential tool for gene therapy. Recent development on cloning, embryonic stem cells and alternative transgenic methods may further expand the transgenic applications in both agriculture and biomedicine. PMID:10875004

  7. Water Quality Monitoring in Animal Agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. F. Owsley; W. Deutsch; J. Oates

    Fecal pathogens originating from grazing animals can affect water quality in a manner that is harmful to humans and other organisms. Over 36% of the assessed rivers and streams in the Southeastern region are classified as impaired, meaning that they do not fully support one or more designated uses (USEPA, 2000). These impairments include various pollutants, including E. coli and

  8. Guidelines for Sheep and Goat Husbandry.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Guide for the Care and Use of Agricultural Animals in Agricultural Research and Teaching (Guide) is considered the standard for reference when protocols are developed for using agricultural animals in agricultural research or teaching. The Animal Welfare Act (CFR, 1992) regulates the use of agr...

  9. Environmental Policy and Technology Adoption in Animal Agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia E. Norris; Amy Purvis Thurow

    1997-01-01

    \\u000a The increasing number and concentration of animals in beef, swine and poultry production units has led to heightened concerns\\u000a over the environmental and nuisance impacts of such operations. Whether flexible incentives can be used effectively to reduce\\u000a such environmental risks requires consideration of the economic and institutional factors driving the structural changes in\\u000a animal agriculture. The design of environmental policy

  10. [Genetic behavioral aspects of agricultural animals].

    PubMed

    Buchenauer, D

    1990-06-01

    This paper reviews some experimental methods used in the study of genetic fixed behaviour, some examples of investigations in farm animals as well as some results of the author's studies on the emotionality in pigs are given. Many investigations have been made on the estimation of heritability of behaviour patterns in cattle, pigs, poultry and dogs. Behaviour patterns such as temperament, aggressiveness, and nervousness showed relatively high h2-values; other behaviours like trainability, emotionality, and pre-laying showed relatively low values. Selection experiments were carried out in poultry and dogs. The results showed that after a few generations remarkable differences in behaviour patterns between the new lines and the original populations were obvious. Besides the selected traits, modifications occurred in other behaviour patterns and in physiological responses. The emotionality in pigs was investigated with the open field test in 3 genetic groups: German Landrace (DL), Duroc (DU), and cross-breeding between these breeds (DU x DL). Increasing emotionality was displayed by increasing ambulatory activity and vocalization. The lowest activity was observed in the pure breeds, DU showed less signs of emotionality than DL, whereas DU x DL showed the highest of emotionality. PMID:2387229

  11. Importance of Animals in Agricultural Sustainability and Food Security.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Lawrence P; Wulster-Radcliffe, Meghan C; Aaron, Debra K; Davis, Teresa A

    2015-07-01

    A conservative projection shows the world's population growing by 32% (to 9.5 billion) by 2050 and 53% (to 11 billion) by 2100 compared with its current level of 7.2 billion. Because most arable land worldwide is already in use, and water and energy also are limiting, increased production of food will require a substantial increase in efficiency. In this article, we highlight the importance of animals to achieving food security in terms of their valuable contributions to agricultural sustainability, especially in developing countries, and the high nutritional value of animal products in the diet. PMID:25972529

  12. United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

    E-print Network

    United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Plant Protection and Quarantine April 2010 1 Lacey Act Primer United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Plant Protection and Quarantine #12;United States Department of Agriculture Animal

  13. A Comparative Study of Reproductive Performance in Organic and Conventional Dairy Husbandry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Reksen; A. Tverdal; E. Ropstad

    1999-01-01

    A comparative cohort study of reproductive perfor- mance in organic and conventional dairy husbandry was conducted using longitudinal data from the Norwe- gian National Board of Animal Production Recording from January 1, 1994 to December 31, 1996. The pres- ent study is the first study comparing reproductive effi- ciency in organic and conventional husbandry in which characteristics such as herd

  14. Mitigation of Nitrogen Emissions from Animal Agriculture in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oenema, O.

    2011-12-01

    More than 70% of the utilized agricultural area (187 Mha) in the 27 Member States of the European Union (EU-27) is used for animal production. In addition, a considerable amount of animal feed is imported. Dairy and beef cattle, pigs, and poultry are the dominant animal species. Total livestock density is highest in the Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland, Denmark and some regions in France, Germany and Italy. The mean nitrogen (N) retention in animal products in EU-27 in 2005 was 20% for milk, 8% for beef, 25% for pork, 38% for poultry and 28% for egg production. This indicates that dairy cows excreted on average 80% of the N intake, beef cattle 92%, pigs 75%, poultry 62% and layers 72%. There was a large variation in N retention between countries. Animal manures and nitrogen (N) fertilizers are main sources of N emissions. In 2005, mean N excretion by animals ranged from less than 25 kg per ha per year in Bulgaria to nearly 250 kg per ha in The Netherlands. On average 25% of the total amount of N excreted was lost as ammonia (NH3) to the atmosphere, though with a considerable variation between countries. About 10% was lost as NH3-N from housing systems, 9% from manure application to land, 4% from manure storage and treatment facilities, and 3% from grazing. Nitrogen leaching was in the same order of magnitude. Animal production also had a considerable share in the total emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere (range 5-25%). Especially dairy cattle and beef cattle contribute to the emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. Considerable efforts are being made to decrease N emissions from agriculture in EU-27. Good agricultural practices and mandatory emission mitigation measures are enforced through EU environmental policies, including Nitrates Directive, National Emissions Ceiling Directive, and Water Framework Directive. Some countries have succeeded to decrease the NH3 emissions to air and N leaching losses to groundwater and surface waters by more than 50%. However, other countries are less successful, and in general there is a delay in the implementation of effective emission mitigation measures in practice. Most effective measures include (i) Improving animal performance, i.e., increasing productivity and feed conversion of the animals, (ii) Improving manure management, using proper manure collection and low-emission manure storage and application techniques, and (iii) Balanced fertilization, i.e. applying manure and fertilizer N in the right ways, times and amounts. There is now a wealth of information about improving the recycling of manure nutrients effectively in crop production through proper implementation of management and technological measures. Some of this information is derived from experiments, some from practice. Our scenario analyses use information from experiments and practice and indicate that N emissions in EU-27 can decreased further by 25 to 50%, depending on N species and country. In conclusion, decreasing N emissions from animal production requires an integral whole-farming systems approach. The weakest part of the whole chain of activities in a farming system should be cured first. A coherent package of three types of measures provide the best result, i.e., improving animal performance, improving manure management and balanced fertilization.

  15. Alternatives to Antibiotics in Animal Agriculture: An Ecoimmunological View

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Blecha, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Ecological immunology (or ecoimmunology) is a new discipline in animal health and immunology that extends immunologists’ views into a natural context where animals and humans have co-evolved. Antibiotic resistance and tolerance (ART) in bacteria are manifested in antibiosis-surviving subsets of resisters and persisters. ART has emerged though natural evolutionary consequences enriched by human nosocomial and agricultural practices, in particular, wide use of antibiotics that overwhelms other ecological and immunological interactions. Most previous reviews of antibiotic resistance focus on resisters but overlook persisters, although both are fundamental to bacteria survival through antibiosis. Here, we discuss resisters and persisters together to contrast the distinct ecological responses of persisters during antibiotic stress and propose different regimens to eradicate persisters. Our intention is not only to provide an ecoimmunological interpretation, but also to use an ecoimmunological system to categorize available alternatives and promote the discovery of prospective approaches to relieve ART problems within the general scope of improving animal health. Thus, we will categorize available alternatives to antibiotics and envision applications of ecoimmunological tenets to promote related studies in animal production. PMID:25551290

  16. RESEARCH OF ANIMAL DISEASE INFORMATION SYSTEM BASED ON GIS

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    -occurring disease with regional feature, and the animal husbandry and veterinary health institutions are all closely Dong, Danning Xu, Jing Li College of Veterinary Medicine, NorthEast Agricultural University, Harbin,Heilongjiang Province, P. R. China, 150030 Corresponding author, Address: College of Veterinary Medicine, North

  17. [Data on animal husbandry and veterinary medicine in the middle of the 17th century in Bulgaria and neighboring countries based on a journey by Evliia Chelebi].

    PubMed

    Potov, M

    1975-01-01

    It has been established that Evliya Chelebby's travel notes contain valuable information about veterinary medicine. Evliya Chelebby himself was a Turkish traveller who had made a number of journeys throughout Bulgaria and its adjacent countries over the 1651-1655 period. According to the data found in these notes the ruined fortresses round the cities were used as folds for sheep and goats. During that period sheep-breeding was flourishing. Horse-breeding was concentrated in the various estates belonging to the Sultan, and was intended to supply the needs of the army and the administration. Information is also contained about the physiotherapy practised at that time on the territory of the enslaved peoples on the Balkan peninsula. Popular were the balneotherapy, mud-cure, spending the summer time up in the mountains, the alternation of warm and cold water procedures known as Scottish shower, etc. These procedures were likewise used in the treatment of domestic animals. PMID:1105958

  18. Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel Miller

    2009-03-25

    The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

  19. Complexities of nitrogen isotope biogeochemistry in plant-soil systems: implications for the study of ancient agricultural and animal management practices

    PubMed Central

    Szpak, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen isotopic studies have the potential to shed light on the structure of ancient ecosystems, agropastoral regimes, and human-environment interactions. Until relatively recently, however, little attention was paid to the complexities of nitrogen transformations in ancient plant-soil systems and their potential impact on plant and animal tissue nitrogen isotopic compositions. This paper discusses the importance of understanding nitrogen dynamics in ancient contexts, and highlights several key areas of archaeology where a more detailed understanding of these processes may enable us to answer some fundamental questions. This paper explores two larger themes that are prominent in archaeological studies using stable nitrogen isotope analysis: (1) agricultural practices (use of animal fertilizers, burning of vegetation or shifting cultivation, and tillage) and (2) animal domestication and husbandry (grazing intensity/stocking rate and the foddering of domestic animals with cultigens). The paucity of plant material in ancient deposits necessitates that these issues are addressed primarily through the isotopic analysis of skeletal material rather than the plants themselves, but the interpretation of these data hinges on a thorough understanding of the underlying biogeochemical processes in plant-soil systems. Building on studies conducted in modern ecosystems and under controlled conditions, these processes are reviewed, and their relevance discussed for ancient contexts. PMID:25002865

  20. ABE Agricultural and Biological Engineering F9 ADDL Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab G10

    E-print Network

    ABE Agricultural and Biological Engineering F9 ADDL Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab G10 AERO Aerospace Science Laboratory C11 AGAD Agricultural Administration Building G8 AHF Animal Holding Facility G10 AQUA Boilermaker Aquatic Center D6 AR Armory G6 ARMS Armstrong (Neil) Hall of Engineering G5 ASTL

  1. Pharmaceutical contamination in residential, industrial, and agricultural waste streams: Risk to aqueous environments in Taiwan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela Yu-Chen Lin; Tsung-Hsien Yu; Cheng-Fang Lin

    2008-01-01

    This is a comprehensive study of the occurrence of antibiotics, hormones and other pharmaceuticals in water sites that have major potential for downstream environmental contamination. These include residential (hospitals, sewage treatment plants, and regional discharges), industrial (pharmaceutical production facilities), and agricultural (animal husbandries and aquacultures) waste streams. We assayed 23 Taiwanese water sites for 97 targeted compounds, of which a

  2. A commentary on domestic animals as dual-purpose models that benefit agricultural and biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Ireland, J J; Roberts, R M; Palmer, G H; Bauman, D E; Bazer, F W

    2008-10-01

    Research on domestic animals (cattle, swine, sheep, goats, poultry, horses, and aquatic species) at land grant institutions is integral to improving the global competitiveness of US animal agriculture and to resolving complex animal and human diseases. However, dwindling federal and state budgets, years of stagnant funding from USDA for the Competitive State Research, Education, and Extension Service National Research Initiative (CSREES-NRI) Competitive Grants Program, significant reductions in farm animal species and in numbers at land grant institutions, and declining enrollment for graduate studies in animal science are diminishing the resources necessary to conduct research on domestic species. Consequently, recruitment of scientists who use such models to conduct research relevant to animal agriculture and biomedicine at land grant institutions is in jeopardy. Concerned stakeholders have addressed this critical problem by conducting workshops, holding a series of meetings with USDA and National Institutes of Health (NIH) officials, and developing a white paper to propose solutions to obstacles impeding the use of domestic species as dual-purpose animal models for high-priority problems common to agriculture and biomedicine. In addition to shortfalls in research support and human resources, overwhelming use of mouse models in biomedicine, lack of advocacy from university administrators, long-standing cultural barriers between agriculture and human medicine, inadequate grantsmanship by animal scientists, and a scarcity of key reagents and resources are major roadblocks to progress. Solutions will require a large financial enhancement of USDA's Competitive Grants Program, educational programs geared toward explaining how research using agricultural animals benefits both animal agriculture and human health, and the development of a new mind-set in land grant institutions that fosters greater cooperation among basic and applied researchers. Recruitment of outstanding scientists dedicated to using domestic animal models for agricultural and biomedical research, strong incentives for scientists to take advantage of training opportunities to write NIH grants, and greater NIH and USDA cooperation to sponsor the use of agricultural animals as dual-purpose animal models that benefit agriculture and biomedicine will also be necessary. In conclusion, the broad diversity of animal models needed for agricultural and biomedical research is at risk unless research priorities at the land grant universities are critically evaluated and financial support for such research is dramatically increased. PMID:18567718

  3. Ammonia Emissions and Animal Agriculture Susan W. Gay, Extension Engineer, Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Ammonia Emissions and Animal Agriculture Susan W. Gay, Extension Engineer, Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech Katharine F. Knowlton, Assistant Professor, Dairy Science, Virginia Tech during the past two decades, air quality issues have become an increasing concern. Odors have been

  4. Animal Science, Including Instruction in Agricultural Mechanics, Careers, Leadership, and Supervised Occupational Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Education, Jefferson City. Agricultural Education Section.

    Developed and reviewed by a committee of 16 teachers, the state supervisory staff, and the teacher education staff, this curriculum guide is for vocational agriculture teacher use with ninth grade students interested in agricultural occupations. Some objectives for this 1-year course in animal science are--(1) to develop competencies in…

  5. Frank Mitloehner is an expert for agricultural air quality, animal-environmental interactions, and agricultural engineering. He is a Professor and Air Quality

    E-print Network

    Delany, Mary E.

    Frank Mitloehner is an expert for agricultural air quality, animal-environmental interactions System". Dr. Mitloehner received his MS degree in Animal Science and Agricultural Engineering from joined the faculty in the Department of Animal Science at the University of California-Davis in 2002, Dr

  6. Who Monitors the Use of Animals in United States Department of Agriculture -Animal and Plant Health

    E-print Network

    , veterinary medical care for animals Guide also defines how animal care and use protocols must be reviewed or anesthetic events) REPLACE- Replace animals with other models or techniques e.g.. Screening pharmaceutical

  7. Growth and development symposium: Fetal programming in animal agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fetal programming is the ability to improve animal production and well-being by altering the maternal environment and holds enormous challenges and great opportunities for researchers and the animal industry. A symposium was held to provide an overview of current knowledge of fetal programming in re...

  8. ENHANCED USE OF FEED AND MANURE NUTRIENTS IN ANIMAL AGRICULTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole-farm nutrient balances and animal:cropland ratios are used to asses overall pollution risks of livestock farms. These whole-farm indicators cannot address, however, how nutrient management in one production component (e.g., feed) may affect nutrient cycling in other production components (e.g...

  9. Reuse of concentrated animal feed operation wastewater on agricultural lands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) generate large volumes of manure and manure-contaminated wash and runoff water. Transportation, storage, and treatment of manure and manure-contaminated water are costly. The large volume of waste generated, and the lack of disposal areas, further lim...

  10. Air Quality Standards and Nuisance Issues for Animal Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Mukhtar, Saqib; Auvermann, Brent W.

    2006-05-24

    :primary standardstoprotectpublichealth;andsecondary standardstoprotectpublicwelfare,suchas * Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialists, The Texas A&M University System. Chicagointhesummerof2000:aclearday(above) withPM 2.5 <5?g/m 3 ;andapoorvisibilityday(above right)withPM 2.5 ~35?g... (VOC) Sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) PM 10 Particulate Matter (PM) 4 197.3 177.8 169.6 120.0143.6 102.4184.0 19901985 1 198019751970 2000 1 2004 2 1995 26.9 31.2 33.7 0.221 301.5 0.16 275.8 267.2 249.2 218.2 160.2188.0 138.7 0.074 0.022 0.005 0.004 0.003 0...

  11. COMPARATIVE DIVERSITY OF FECAL BACTERIA IN AGRICULTURALLY SIGNIFICANT ANIMALS TO IDENTIFY ALTERNATIVE TARGETS FOR MICROBIAL SOURCE TRACKING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animals of agricultural significance contribute a large percentage of fecal pollution to waterways via runoff contamination. The premise of microbial source tracking is to utilize fecal bacteria to identify target populations which are directly correlated to specific animal feces...

  12. A Compendium of Transfer Factors for Agricultural and Animal Products

    SciTech Connect

    Staven, Lissa H.; Napier, Bruce A.; Rhoads, Kathleen; Strenge, Dennis L.

    2003-06-02

    Transfer factors are used in radiological risk assessments to estimate the amount of radioactivity that could be present in a food crop or organism based on the calculated concentration in the source medium (i.e., soil or animal feed). By calculating the concentration in the food, the total intake can be estimated and a dose calculated as a result of the annual intake. This report compiles transfer factors for radiological risk assessments, using common food products, including meats, eggs, and plants. Transfer factors used were most often selected from recommended values listed by national or international organizations for use in radiological food chain transport calculations. Several methods of estimation and extrapolation were used for radionuclides not listed in the primary information sources. Tables of transfer factors are listed by element and information source for beef, eggs, fish, fruit, grain, leafy vegetation, milk, poultry, and root vegetables.

  13. ANIMAL-BASED AGRICULTURE, PHOSPHORUS MANAGEMENT AND WATER QUALITY IN BRAZIL: OPTIONS FOR THE FUTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eutrophication has become a major threat to water quality in the U.S., Europe, and Australasia. In most cases, freshwater eutrophication is accelerated by increased inputs of phosphorus (P), of which agricultural runoff is now a major contributor, due to an intensification of crop and animal produc...

  14. Animating Community Supported Agriculture in North East England: Striving for a "Caring Practice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Liz

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on a case study of a new Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) scheme in the north of England to draw attention to some of the ethical issues encountered when using a participatory action research approach to animating CSA. Both CSA and participatory action research have been associated with the concept of "caring practice" and an…

  15. Specialty Animal Production Curriculum Guide for Vocational Agriculture/Agribusiness. Curriculum Development. Bulletin No. 1806.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette.

    This curriculum guide was developed to aid vocational agriculture/agribusiness teachers in Louisiana in improving their instruction and to provide students with the opportunity to obtain skills and knowledge in the production of nontraditional specialty animals. The guide covers the techniques of production, management, care, and marketing of…

  16. Cranes: Their Biology, Husbandry, and Conservation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ellis, David H.

    The Patuxent Wildlife Research Center has placed online this entire (1996) textbook entitled Cranes: Their Biology, Husbandry, and Conservation. Edited by David Ellis, George Gee, and Claire Mirande, the textbook contains thirteen chapters by the world's leading crane experts, covering general biology, husbandry, behavior, artificial insemination, pest management, and conservation, among other topics. In addition to the text, numerous illustrations capture the majesty of these birds. Chapters may be downloaded separately, or browsed online. For anyone interested in cranes and their conservation, this resource is definitely required reading.

  17. Husbandry Notes on the Lesser Electric Ray

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mason N. Dean; Theresa E. Nietfeld; Daniel S. Conklin

    2005-01-01

    The lesser electric ray Narcine brasiliensis is a small member of the electric ray order Torpediniformes (Elasmobranchii: Batoidea). Although common circumglobally in the wild, this genus does not traditionally fare well in captivity. This study expands on methods previously published for captive maintenance of the lesser electric ray in large recirculating systems and outlines the husbandry of this species in

  18. Zoo Biology 29 : 114 (2010) HUSBANDRY REPORTS

    E-print Network

    2010-01-01

    Zoo Biology 29 : 1­14 (2010) HUSBANDRY REPORTS First Captive Breeding of the Imperial Parrot the rearing and development of the first imperial parrot (Amazona imperialis) hatched and raised in captivity; captive breeding INTRODUCTION The imperial parrot, or sisserou (Amazona imperialis), Dominica's national

  19. Main achievements of the World Organisation for Animal Health/United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization network on animal influenza.

    PubMed

    Dauphin, Gwenaelle; Hamilton, Keith; Kim, L Mia; Choudhury, Bhudipa; Capua, Ilaria; Edwards, Steve

    2010-03-01

    The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)/United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) joint network of expertise on animal influenza (OFFLU) includes all ten OIE/FAO reference laboratories and collaborating centers for avian influenza, other diagnostic laboratories, research and academic institutions, and experts in the fields of virology, epidemiology, vaccinology, and molecular biology. OFFLU has made significant progress in improving its infrastructure, in identifying and addressing technical gaps, and in establishing associations among leading veterinary institutions. Interaction with the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Influenza Program is also critical, and mechanisms for permanent interaction are being developed. OFFLU played a key role in the WHO/OIE/FAO Joint Technical Consultation held in Verona (October 7-9, 2008), which provided an opportunity to highlight and share knowledge and identify potential gaps regarding issues at the human-animal interface for avian influenza. OFFLU experts also contributed to the working group for the Unified Nomenclature System for H5N1 influenza viruses based on hemagglutinin gene phylogeny (WHO/OIE/FAO, H5N1 Evolution Working Group, Towards a unified nomenclature system for highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) in Emerging Infectious Diseases 14:el, 2008). OFFLU technical activities, led by expert scientists from OIE/FAO reference institutions and coordinated by OIE and FAO focal points, have been prioritized to include commercial diagnostic kit evaluation, applied epidemiology, biosafety, vaccination, proficiency testing, development of standardized reference materials for sera and RNA, and issues at the human-animal interface. The progress to date and future plans for these groups will be presented. OFFLU is also involved in two national projects implemented by FAO in Indonesia and Egypt that seek to establish sustainable mechanisms for monitoring virus circulation, including viral characterization, and for streamlining the process to update poultry vaccines for avian influenza. PMID:20521664

  20. Prairie dog care and husbandry.

    PubMed

    Pilny, Anthony A; Hess, Laurie

    2004-05-01

    The species of prairie dog most commonly found in the pet trade is the black-tailed prairie dog, Cynomus ludovicianus. These prairie dogs are active, playful, and strong rodents that can make wonderful, affectionate pets when they are properly socialized and given attention. However, with a life span of 8 to 12 years, prairie dogs require a lot of care and a long-term commitment. Prairie dogs live in colonies; thus, they are highly social animals. Potential owners should understand a prairie dog's need for attention before adopting one. PMID:15145390

  1. Husbandry of the "nude" mouse in conventional and germfree environments.

    PubMed

    Eaton, G J; Outzen, H C; Custer, R P; Johnson, F N

    1975-06-01

    The "nude" mouse is a unique tool for immunologic studies. Its relatively short life span dictates the application of rigid environmental controls to increase longevity if the mouse is to assume the role of a practical experimental animal. In this paper we discussed the husbandry procedures employed to raise "nude" mice in our facilities under conventional, defined flora, and germfree conditions. Conventional and defined flora mice were raised on laminar flow stay-clean rocks, and germfree "nudes" were housed in self-contained germfree isolators. The major cause of morbidity and mortality among conventional and defined flora "nude" mice was fulminating hepatitis. We presented evidence that the etiologic agent of the disease was mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). Germfree "nude" mice were completely free from viral and bacterial diseases. PMID:167230

  2. The Effects of Predictability in Daily Husbandry Routines on Captive Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Daniel H; Coleman, Kristine; McCowan, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) housed indoors experience many routine husbandry activities on a daily basis. The anticipation of these events can lead to stress, regardless of whether the events themselves are positive or aversive in nature. The specific goal of this study was to identify whether increasing the predictability of husbandry events could decrease stress and anxiety in captive rhesus macaques. This study was conducted on 39 single-housed subjects in four indoor rooms at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. Temporal and signaled predictability were added to four daily husbandry events: morning and afternoon feeding, enrichment distribution, and room cleaning. Temporally predictable husbandry events occurred reliably at the same time daily, while signaled predictable husbandry events were preceded by a distinct event-specific signal in the form of a doorbell. Informal tests prior to study onset found the doorbells not to be aversive to the subjects. Subjects received each of four treatments: unpredictable events, temporally predictable events, signaled predictable events, and temporally and signaled predictable events. Change in stress was evaluated by monitoring changes in motor stereotypies and displacement behaviors. Our results showed that subjects displayed less stress and anticipatory behaviors related to feeding and enrichment events when the events were temporally predictable (P < 0 .0001). When husbandry events were preceded by a reliable signal, subjects vocalized less prior to the event and were less responsive to activity outside of the room (P < 0 .01). However this may have come at a cost as the animals were extremely reactive to the doorbell signals and showed a heightened stress response during the actual husbandry events (P < 0 .01). Similar to temporal predictability alone, when temporal predictability was combined with signaled predictability subjects displayed less stress and anticipatory behaviors related to feeding and enrichment events (P < 0 .0001). In addition, when both forms of predictability were combined subjects showed less stress behaviors while waiting for daily room cleaning (P < 0 .01). When signaled predictability was paired with temporal predictability subjects no longer had the negative response to the doorbell signal, as they were able to predict and anticipate when the events would occur. Because these results are not necessarily applicable to animals that are given control over their environment or housed in a group setting, the management recommendation that can be made from this study is that temporal predictability of feeding reduces stress and anxiety and is thus beneficial to captive indoor single-housed rhesus macaques. PMID:23439920

  3. Husbandry practices and health in smallholder dairy farms near Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. M. Mekonnen; K. Asmamaw; J. F. Courreau

    2006-01-01

    Our study was conducted from November 2001 to April 2002 in the Debre-Zeit area (near Addis Ababa), Ethiopia to assess the husbandry practices and to identify health constraints in 100 market-oriented smallholder dairy farms. A questionnaire survey, farm visit and animal examination were conducted.Thirty-eight percent of the smallholder farms were owned by women. Women-owned farms had more cows (median=3) than

  4. Principles in laboratory animal research for experimental purposes.

    PubMed

    Górska, P

    2000-01-01

    The present work contains information about proper husbandry and care of laboratory animals, microbiological monitoring of their health and protecting them against suffering and distress. The author also gives some advice on the improvement and unification of experimental research results through the standardisation of laboratory animals used for the experiments as well as imposing proper conditions for animal husbandry. PMID:11208307

  5. Husbandry of Spanish ribbed newts (Pleurodeles waltl).

    PubMed

    Joven, Alberto; Kirkham, Matthew; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    Research on urodele amphibians, such as newts, is constantly contributing to our understanding of fundamental biological processes. In the present chapter, we present detailed husbandry protocols for the Spanish ribbed newt (Pleurodeles waltl?). We describe the main phases of their life cycle, with emphasis on the progressive development of sensory, motor, and integration systems, which lead to the acquisition of specific stereotyped (and conditioned) behaviors. The methods are outlined to manage housing, feeding, handling, captive breeding, health monitoring, and euthanasia in this species under laboratory conditions. With minor changes, these protocols can also be applied to other species of urodele amphibians commonly used in laboratory research. PMID:25740476

  6. Animal Science Experts' Opinions on the Non-Technical Skills Secondary Agricultural Education Graduates Need for Employment in the Animal Science Industry: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slusher, Wendy L.; Robinson, J. Shane; Edwards, M. Craig

    2010-01-01

    Non-technical, employability skills are in high demand for entry-level job-seekers. As such, this study sought to describe the perceptions of Oklahoma's animal science industry leaders as it related to the employability skills needed for entry-level employment of high school graduates who had completed coursework in Oklahoma's Agricultural, Food…

  7. Let sleeping rats lie: Does the timing of husbandry procedures affect laboratory rat behaviour, physiology and welfare?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Usama A. Abou-Ismail; Oliver H. P. Burman; Christine J. Nicol; Michael Mendl

    2008-01-01

    Research has indicated that chronic stress can reduce sleep quality and quantity. Yet there has been little investigation into whether husbandry procedures carried out during an animal's normal sleeping period affect subsequent sleep behaviour and welfare. We housed 48 rats in enriched cages containing four rats, in either a light phase treatment (LPT) (n=6 cages) or a dark phase treatment

  8. Husbandry, health and biosecurity of the smallholder and pet pig population in England.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, A V; Grove-White, D H; Williams, H J

    2015-07-11

    Three hundred and thirteen pet and smallholder pig owners in England responded to an online questionnaire regarding husbandry and healthcare of their pigs. There was a lack of knowledge of the legislation regarding Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) registration, animal movements and feeding of domestic food waste. Only 83.8 per cent of respondents had registered their pigs with DEFRA, while 17.7 per cent were not familiar with the movement regulations, and 23.9 per cent were feeding their pigs with household scraps. Contact with veterinary surgeons may be positively associated with DEFRA registration, legal feeding practices and knowledge of vaccination. Furthermore, the veterinary surgeon was considered to be the primary source of husbandry and healthcare knowledge. This paper identifies the pet and smallholder pig population as a potential risk for the incursion and spread of infectious disease, while highlighting the need for improved owner education. PMID:26116269

  9. About the Work of Art Balance of Life symbolizes the monumental role animal agriculture plays in economic prosperity,

    E-print Network

    Mayfield, John

    About the Work of Art Balance of Life symbolizes the monumental role animal agriculture plays of these images are chromosomes in gold. University Museums - Art on Campus Program Iowa State University, Ames of Fine Arts at the NYU Art History Graduate School and Smyth spent a lot of his time in New Jersey

  10. Traditional llama husbandry and breeding management in the Ayopaya region, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Markemann, A; Valle Zárate, A

    2010-01-01

    The llama claims the largest population of the domestic South American camelids, most of which are raised in Bolivia. More than 53,000 rural families are dedicated to llama husbandry as part of their livelihood strategy. Contemporary Andean societies deliberately select animals for specific traits and employ substantial livestock management to secure subsistence. This study presents traditional llama husbandry and breeding management activities in the Ayopaya region, Bolivia. Traditional selection traits for male and female llamas are documented and assessed by a ranking and a ratio-scaled evaluation. Husbandry and management parameters are in concordance with other studies conducted in the region, but show a high variation. Average llama herd sizes are rather small (mu = 45.6). In some herds, breeding males are utilized for a long time and mix with other herds, causing concerns about inbreeding. Preferred trait groups for llama males according to farmers' responses were body conformation, fibre, testicle conformation, fleece colour and height at withers. Traditional selection criteria generally relate to the phenotype, but also include the commercially interesting fibre trait. The presented results should be considered in breeding and management programmes for the respective llama population to ensure sustainable use of this genetically and culturally valuable resource. PMID:19544004

  11. Animal Order Submission Schedule 20142015 Holiday Season

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    Animal Order Submission Schedule 20142015 Holiday Season No Animal Deliveries or Animal, December 18 by noon Wed, January 7 ULAR husbandry staff will continue to provide animal care during campus closures; however, there will be no animal deliveries over Thanksgiving or during winter break

  12. A survey of husbandry practices for lorisid primates in North American zoos and related facilities.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Grace; Kuhar, Christopher W; Dennis, Patricia M; Lukas, Kristen E

    2013-01-01

    Zoos and related facilities in North America currently manage five species in the primate family Lorisidae: the greater (Nycticebus coucang), Bengal (N. bengalensis) and pygmy (N. pygmaeus) slow lorises, red slender loris (Loris tardigradus), and potto (Perodicticus potto). We used an online survey to describe institutional housing and husbandry practices for these species and assess the extent to which practices are consistent with established guidelines. Our results show that most captive lorisids are housed solitarily or in pairs. Most individuals occupy a single exhibit space in a building dedicated to nocturnal animals. Facilities are commonly meeting recommendations for abiotic exhibit design and are providing animals with an enriched environment. However, pottos and slender lorises currently occupy exhibit spaces smaller than the recommended minimum, and the impact of cleaning protocols on olfactory communication should be critically evaluated. Few facilities are taking advantage of the benefits of positive reinforcement training for promoting animal welfare. Research is greatly needed on the effects of exhibit lighting on behavior, health, and reproduction; and to determine how best to manage the social needs of lorisids with naturally dispersed social structures. Although captive populations of slender lorises, pottos, and slow lorises are declining, we suggest that improved husbandry knowledge has the potential to positively influence population sustainability and to enhance future efforts to manage the growing pygmy loris population. PMID:23161761

  13. Refinement of the use of non-human primates in scientific research. Part II: housing, husbandry and acquisition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    AE Rennie; HM Buchanan-Smith

    In order to safeguard the welfare of laboratory-housed non-human primates, refinement techniques should be applied to every aspect of the life of animals used in the laboratory, from birth to death, with the aim of both minimising harm and maximising well-being. In this second part of a three-part review we summarise published information on housing and husbandry practices, and describe

  14. Principles of Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT): Providing Optimal Veterinary and Husbandry Care to Irradiated Mice in BMT Studies

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Dysko, Robert C

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the treatment of choice for many leukemias, solid tumors, and metabolic diseases. The field of bone marrow research is highly dependent on in vivo experimentation, because in vitro techniques do not mimic these complicated in vivo systems. Therefore, understanding the medical and husbandry care needs of these transiently immunodeficient bone marrow recipient animals is crucial for researchers, veterinary and animal care personnel. Here we discuss the principles of bone marrow transplantation, mouse pathogens that can interfere with transplantation research, and important husbandry and veterinary practices for mice that may help to minimize unnecessary infections during the transplantation process. Whole-body irradiation is one of the most common tools for myeloablation of the recipient's bone marrow. We discuss the crucial role of the irradiator for BMT research and the importance of aseptic husbandry practices to lessen the possibility of the irradiator for being a source for disease transmission. Finally, we discuss some important guidelines for Institutional Animal Use and Care Committees reviewing irradiation and BMT protocols. PMID:19245745

  15. Questionnaire survey of disease prevalence and veterinary treatments in organic layer husbandry in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, J; van der Werf, J T N; Kijlstra, A

    2007-04-15

    Disease prevalence and veterinary treatments in organic animal production differ from those in conventional systems. In order to gather information about current practices in organic layer husbandry, 33 organic egg producers of 16 small, 12 medium-sized, and 5 large farms were asked to complete a questionnaire on disease prevalence and treatments. On these farms, the mean mortality was 9% and the mean laying percentage was 79%. In contrast with the regulations for organic farming, the use of chemotherapeutics was not recorded on 30% of the farms. One third of the farmers were not aware of the type of vaccination given to their hens, and on the other farms hens had been vaccinated as pullets against nine or more viral and bacterial diseases. Several health problems were mentioned, such as feather pecking, red mites, helminths, infectious bronchitis, colibacillosis, and coccidiosis. On 19 farms, diseases were treated with homeopathic, phytotherapeutic, or other alternative medicines; on 10 of these farms chemotherapeutics were also used. On 4 farms only chemotherapeutics were used, on 10 farms no products were used, and on some farms up to seven products were used. Although quite a large number of organic layer farmers in the Netherlands used homeopathic, phytotherapeutic, or other alternative medicines, the use of chemotherapeutics is currently inevitable to prevent animal suffering or distress in organic husbandry. PMID:17489372

  16. Measuring the Interest of German Students in Agriculture: the Role of Knowledge, Nature Experience, Disgust, and Gender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Malte; Strack, Micha; Bögeholz, Susanne

    2015-06-01

    Modern knowledge-based societies, especially their younger members, have largely lost their bonds to farming. However, learning about agriculture and its interrelations with environmental issues may be facilitated by students' individual interests in agriculture. To date, an adequate instrument to investigate agricultural interests has been lacking. Research has infrequently considered students' interest in agricultural content areas as well as influencing factors on students' agricultural interests. In this study, a factorial design of agricultural interests was developed combining five agricultural content areas and four components of individual interest. The instrument was validated with German fifth and sixth graders ( N = 1,085) using a variance decomposition confirmatory factor analysis model. The results demonstrated a second-order factor of general agricultural interest, with animal husbandry, arable farming, vegetable and fruit cropping, primary food processing, and agricultural engineering as discrete content areas of agricultural interest. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that prior knowledge, garden experience, and disgust sensitivity are predictors of general agricultural interest. In addition, gender influenced interest in four of the five agricultural content areas. Implications are directed at researchers, teachers, and environmental educators concerning how to trigger and develop pupils' agricultural interests.

  17. Nutrient management for intensive animal agriculture: policies and practices for sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Sims; L. F. Bergstrom; B. T. Bowden; O. Oenema

    2005-01-01

    The intensity of animal production around the world has increased substantially during the last half-century, which has led to large problems with the disposal of manures and waste waters. The focus of this paper is on the development of national policies to improve the nutrient management of concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), where nutrients are invariably in surplus. To create

  18. Selected References and Aids for Teaching Animal Science to Students of Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Larry E.

    The resource guide for animal science education is divided into six subject areas: general animal science, beef, dairy, poultry, sheep, and swine. Within each of these areas, the guide provides bibliographic and availability data for relevant materials in the following forms: bulletins and circulars; textbooks; films, filmstrips, and slides; and…

  19. Selected Veterinary Pharmaceuticals in Agricultural Water and Soil from Land Application of Animal Manure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wenlu Song; Yunjie Ding; Cary T. Chiou; Hui Li

    2010-01-01

    Veterinary pharmaceuticals are commonly administered to animals for disease control, and added into feeds at subtherapeutic levels to improve feeding effi ciency. As a result of these practices, a certain fraction of the pharmaceuticals are excreted into animal manures. Land application of these manures contaminates soils with the veterinary pharmaceuticals, which can subsequently lead to contamination of surface and groundwaters.

  20. Gender involvement in manual material handling (mmh) tasks in agriculture and technology intervention to mitigate the resulting musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suman; Sinwal, Neelima; Rathore, Hemu

    2012-01-01

    The lifting and carrying of loads in agriculture on small landholdings are unavoidable. Rural communities often lack access to appropriate technologies which may result in various health hazards. The objective was to study gender participation in agricultural activities involving manual material handling tasks, to assess MSDs experienced in various MMH tasks and to evaluate traditional method and designed technology. The study was conducted on 100 agricultural workers. Data on gender participation in MMH tasks in household, animal husbandry and agriculture and resulting MSDs was gathered. Pre and post assessment of technology intervention was done for NIOSH Lifting Index, QEC, and RPE. The results revealed greater susceptibility of females to musculoskeletal problems in most of the household and animal husbandry tasks. The hand trucks designed were pushing type with power grasp handle. The respondents were advised to carry 5 kg of weight per lift instead of lifting more weight in one lift/minute while filling the hand truck. By decreasing the weight and increasing the number of lifts per minute the respondents were seen falling in green zone indicating significant reduction in NIOSH lifting index. QEC scores concluded that for filling the hand truck 5 kg of weight should be carried to keep the exposure level low. PMID:22317386

  1. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-print Network

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    with improving the quality of life and maintaining a productive, quality environment. Agricultural programsCollege of Agricultural Sciences _______________ 2.5 Page 1 College of Agricultural Sciences Office UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS Agricultural Business Agricultural Economics Agricultural Education Animal Science Equine

  2. Animator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  3. Health & National Animal Identification System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan L. McClanahan

    The health of cattle is most vulnerable during the period after arrival in a new environment. It is at this time that a combination of animal husbandry and animal science bring the greatest success. The Oklahoma fact sheet on stocker cattle referenced in this lesson and Lesson 3 of the \\

  4. A case study of Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus) husbandry practice across 10 zoological collections.

    PubMed

    Rose, Paul E; Roffe, Sarah M

    2013-01-01

    The Malayan, or Asian, tapir (Tapirus indicus) has a diminishing wild population and is becoming more common in captivity as zoos attempt to manage sustainable ex situ populations. Tapirs can be relatively easy to maintain and breed, but captive animals appear to suffer from reduced activity budgets, obesity, and poor public image. A questionnaire-based survey was designed and sent specifically to 10 collections around the world that exhibit Malayan tapirs, with the aim of assessing husbandry regimes to determine prevalence of standardized practices as well as highlighting any key differences, and to showcase good practice, thus providing information beneficial to those maintaining this species in their zoo. Twenty-five animals were included in the survey from collections across four continents. The research's major conclusions show differing dietary make-up, with a lack of forage provision, contrasting with a diverse array of enrichment protocols used. Significant differences were noted between zoos for total amount of food offered (P = 0.000) as well as ratios of forage to concentrate pellet offered (P = 0.004). Comparing food offered to male and female tapirs with published requirements for an "average" of either gender shows not all zoos providing the amount suggested in husbandry guidelines. Intelligently designed and original enrichment was provided to all animals but differences between zoos were noted in the application and "usefulness" of enrichment for individual tapir. Overall, animals are benefiting from enrichment but welfare could be further improved via consistent feeding of ad libitum forage and regular use of browse as a constituent part of daily rations. PMID:22610959

  5. Animal and industrial by-products management strategies for sustainable agricultural production system and environmental quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Repeated application of broiler (Gallus gallus domesticus) litter to agricultural lands often results in soil P and heavy metal accumulations, which may pose risks to water bodies. We evaluated six different application strategies on P, N and heavy metal losses from an established bermudagrass (Cyno...

  6. MYCOTOXINS AND FUNGI, CHRONIC DELETERIOUS CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL AGENTS IN US AGRICULTURE: PLANTS, ANIMALS, HUMANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Public health, the economy, and a country's independence is predicated on its food production and utilization. Mycotoxins are natural toxins produced by fungi growing on or in corn, wheat, barley, sorghum, other cereal grains, a variety of other agricultural commodities, and food and feed products....

  7. Estrogenic activity – a frame of reference for some foods, agricultural wastewaters, and animal feedstuffs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the last decade, several in vitro estrogenic activity assays have been used to assess municipal and agricultural wastewaters and surface waters. Some work has been published to provide context by measuring activity from waters collected in pristine or “control” sites, but the relative estrogenic...

  8. United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service APHIS 8135008 January 2004

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    with entry, establishment, or spread of an invasive species such as the giant African snail. The Giant species of this snail family are capable of becoming agricultural pests here and can pose a serious health a trip to Hawaii. His grandmother eventually released the snails into her garden. Seven years later, more

  9. Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christopher Griffith

    This collection contains animations of a nuclear chain reaction, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion. It also showcases interactive models of the first atomic bombs and simulation of the "Nuclear Winter" effect.

  10. Experimental and husbandry procedures as potential modifiers of the results of phenotyping tests

    PubMed Central

    Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Igosheva, Natalia; Roberson, Laura-Anne; Ismail, Ozama; Karp, Natasha; Sanderson, Mark; Cambridge, Emma; Shannon, Carl; Sunter, David; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bussell, James; White, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    To maximize the sensitivity of detecting affects of genetic variants in mice, variables have been minimized through the use of inbred mouse lines, by eliminating infectious organisms and controlling environmental variables. However, the impact of standard animal husbandry and experimental procedures on the validity of experimental data is under appreciated. In this study we monitored the impact of these procedures by using parameters that reflect stress and physiological responses to it. Short-term measures included telemetered heart rate and systolic arterial pressure, core body temperature and blood glucose, while longer-term parameters were assessed such as body weight. Male and female C57BL6/NTac mice were subjected to a range of stressors with different perceived severities ranging from repeated blood glucose and core temperature measurement procedures, intra-peritoneal injection and overnight fasting to cage transport and cage changing. Our studies reveal that common husbandry and experimental procedures significantly influence mouse physiology and behaviour. Systolic arterial pressure, heart rate, locomotor activity, core temperature and blood glucose were elevated in response to a range of experimental procedures. Differences between sexes were evident, female mice displayed more sustained cardiovascular responses and locomotor activity than male mice. These results have important implications for the design and implementation of multiple component experiments where the lasting effects of stress from previous tests may modify the outcomes of subsequent ones. PMID:22713295

  11. Review of Russian language studies on radionuclide behaviour in agricultural animals: biological half-lives.

    PubMed

    Fesenko, S; Isamov, N; Barnett, C L; Beresford, N A; Howard, B J; Sanzharova, N; Fesenko, E

    2015-04-01

    Extensive studies on transfer of radionuclides to animals were carried out in the USSR from the 1950s. Few of these studies were published in the international refereed literature or taken into account in international reviews. This paper continues a series of reviews of Russian language literature on radionuclide transfer to animals, providing information on biological half-lives of radionuclides in various animal tissues. The data are compared, where possible, with those reported in other countries. The data are normally quantified using a single or double exponential accounting for different proportions of the loss. For some products, such as milk, biological half-lives tend to be rapid at 1-3 d for most radionuclides and largely described by a single exponential. However, for other animal products biological half-lives can vary widely as they are influenced by many factors such as the age and size of the animal. Experimental protocols, such as the duration of the study, radionuclide administration and/or sample collection protocol also influence the value of biological half-lives estimated. PMID:25698629

  12. REMOVAL OF PHOSPHORUS FROM ANIMAL MANURES EXPERIENCES OF THE USDA - AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major problem in sustainability of animal production is surplus of manure phosphorus (P) exceeding land assimilative capacity. Land application of manure may result in P buildup in soil and increased potential for P losses through runoff and subsequent eutrophication of surface waters. A wastewate...

  13. Audiotutorial Teaching of Laboratory Animal Medicine and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, J. D.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This audiotutorial course consists of 35 minicourses including biology, husbandry, and diseases of the common laboratory animals. Each minicourse includes an audiocassette tape recording and visual and written materials. The course is available for distribution. (Author/LBH)

  14. The longevity legacy: the problem of old animals in zoos 

    E-print Network

    Kitchener, Andrew; Macdonald, Alastair A

    2002-01-01

    Zoos once demonstrated their skill in keeping wild mammals in captivity by longevity records. However, as our knowledge of animal husbandry in zoos has increased and breeding in most species has become commonplace, so the ...

  15. Effects of watershed densities of animal feeding operations on nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ciparis, Serena; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Voshell, J. Reese

    2012-01-01

    Application of manures from animal feeding operations (AFOs) as fertilizer on agricultural land can introduce nutrients and hormones (e.g. estrogens) to streams. A landscape-scale study was conducted in the Shenandoah River watershed (Virginia, USA) in order to assess the relationship between densities of AFOs in watersheds of agricultural streams and in-stream nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity. The effect of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on nutrients and estrogenic activity was also evaluated. During periods of high and low flow, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and orthophosphate (PO4-P) concentrations were analyzed and estrogens/estrogenic compounds were extracted and quantified as17?-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq) using a bioluminescent yeast estrogen screen. Estrogenic activity was measurable in the majority of collected samples, and 20% had E2Eq concentrations > 1 ng/L. Relatively high concentrations of DIN (> 1000 ?g/L) were also frequently detected. During all sampling periods, there were strong relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and in-stream concentrations of DIN (R2 = 0.56–0.81) and E2Eq (R2 = 0.39–0.75). Relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and PO4-P were weaker, but were also significant (R2 = 0.27–0.57). When combined with the effect of watershed AFO density, streams receiving WWTP effluent had higher concentrations of PO4-P than streams without WWTP discharges, and PO4-P was the only analyte with a consistent relationship to WWTPs. The results of this study suggest that as the watershed density of AFOs increases, there is a proportional increase in the potential for nonpoint source pollution of agricultural streams and their receiving waters by nutrients, particularly DIN, and compounds that can cause endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms.

  16. Effects of watershed densities of animal feeding operations on nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ciparis, S.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Voshell, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Application of manures from animal feeding operations (AFOs) as fertilizer on agricultural land can introduce nutrients and hormones (e.g. estrogens) to streams. A landscape-scale study was conducted in the Shenandoah River watershed (Virginia, USA) in order to assess the relationship between densities of AFOs in watersheds of agricultural streams and in-stream nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity. The effect of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on nutrients and estrogenic activity was also evaluated. During periods of high and low flow, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and orthophosphate (PO 4-P) concentrations were analyzed and estrogens/estrogenic compounds were extracted and quantified as17??-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq) using a bioluminescent yeast estrogen screen. Estrogenic activity was measurable in the majority of collected samples, and 20% had E2Eq concentrations >1ng/L. Relatively high concentrations of DIN (>1000??g/L) were also frequently detected. During all sampling periods, there were strong relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and in-stream concentrations of DIN (R 2=0.56-0.81) and E2Eq (R 2=0.39-0.75). Relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and PO 4-P were weaker, but were also significant (R 2=0.27-0.57). When combined with the effect of watershed AFO density, streams receiving WWTP effluent had higher concentrations of PO 4-P than streams without WWTP discharges, and PO 4-P was the only analyte with a consistent relationship to WWTPs. The results of this study suggest that as the watershed density of AFOs increases, there is a proportional increase in the potential for nonpoint source pollution of agricultural streams and their receiving waters by nutrients, particularly DIN, and compounds that can cause endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Pet husbandry and infection control practices related to zoonotic disease risks in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many human infections are transmitted through contact with animals (zoonoses), including household pets. Despite this concern, there is limited knowledge of the public’s pet husbandry and infection control practices. The objective of this study was to characterize zoonotic disease related-husbandry and infection preventive practices in pet-owning households in Ontario, Canada. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to individuals at two multi-physician clinics in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada during 2010. One adult from each household was invited to participate in the study. Results Four hundred one pet-owners completed the questionnaire. Households reported ownership of dogs (68%), cats (48%), fish (13%), exotic mammals (7%), such as hamsters, and reptiles and birds (each 6%). Across all species, individuals at higher risk of infections (i.e. < 5yrs, ? 65yrs, immunocompromised) were often (46-57%) present in households. Children < 16 yrs of age had close pet contact, as households reported dogs (13%) and cats (30%) usually slept in a child’s bed and dogs often licked a child’s face (24%). Household husbandry practices that increase zoonotic disease risk were frequently identified; some fed high-risk foods (i.e. raw eggs, raw meat, or raw animal product treats) to their dogs (28%) or cats (3%); 14% of reptile-owning households allowed the pet to roam through the kitchen or washed it in the kitchen sink. Reported hand washing by children was high for all species (> 76% washed hands sometimes or greater after touching the pet, its feces, or housing), although fewer reported children always washed their hands (3-57%; by species). With a few exceptions, practices were not associated with the presence of higher risk members in the household or recall of having previously received zoonotic disease education. Conclusions The results suggest there is a need for education on zoonotic disease prevention practices for pet-owning households with individuals at higher risk of infection and those with high-risk species (e.g., reptiles). Further research is needed to determine the role of education in altering higher risk pet practices. PMID:23714625

  18. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-print Network

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    and maintaining a productive, safe, and sustainable environment. Agricultural programs integrate biologicalCollege of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences Office in Shepardson Building MAJORS Agricultural Business Agricultural Education Animal Science Environmental and Natural Resource

  19. Recycling biosolids and lake-dredged materials to pasture-based animal agriculture: Alternative nutrient sources for forage productivity and sustainability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Domestic sewage sludge or biosolids and lake-dredged materials are examples of materials that can be used to cut fertilizer costs in pasture-based animal agriculture. Sustainable biosolids and lake-dredged materials management is based upon controlling and influencing the quantity, quality and chara...

  20. Animal products, diseases and drugs: a plea for better integration between agricultural sciences, human nutrition and human pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Eicosanoids are major players in the pathogenesis of several common diseases, with either overproduction or imbalance (e.g. between thromboxanes and prostacyclins) often leading to worsening of disease symptoms. Both the total rate of eicosanoid production and the balance between eicosanoids with opposite effects are strongly dependent on dietary factors, such as the daily intakes of various eicosanoid precursor fatty acids, and also on the intakes of several antioxidant nutrients including selenium and sulphur amino acids. Even though the underlying biochemical mechanisms have been thoroughly studied for more than 30 years, neither the agricultural sector nor medical practitioners have shown much interest in making practical use of the abundant high-quality research data now available. In this article, we discuss some specific examples of the interactions between diet and drugs in the pathogenesis and therapy of various common diseases. We also discuss, using common pain conditions and cancer as specific examples, how a better integration between agricultural science, nutrition and pharmacology could lead to improved treatment for important diseases (with improved overall therapeutic effect at the same time as negative side effects and therapy costs can be strongly reduced). It is shown how an unnaturally high omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid concentration ratio in meat, offal and eggs (because the omega-6/omega-3 ratio of the animal diet is unnaturally high) directly leads to exacerbation of pain conditions, cardiovascular disease and probably most cancers. It should be technologically easy and fairly inexpensive to produce poultry and pork meat with much more long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and less arachidonic acid than now, at the same time as they could also have a similar selenium concentration as is common in marine fish. The health economic benefits of such products for society as a whole must be expected vastly to outweigh the direct costs for the farming sector. PMID:21247506

  1. Agricultural Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This brochure describes the philosophy and scope of a secondary-level course in agricultural production. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: careers in agriculture and agribusiness, animal science and livestock production, agronomy, agricultural mechanics, supervised occupational experience programs, and the…

  2. Evolutionary demography of agricultural expansion in preindustrial northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Helle, Samuli; Brommer, Jon E; Pettay, Jenni E; Lummaa, Virpi; Enbuske, Matti; Jokela, Jukka

    2014-11-01

    A shift from nomadic foraging to sedentary agriculture was a major turning point in human evolutionary history, increasing our population size and eventually leading to the development of modern societies. We however lack understanding of the changes in life histories that contributed to the increased population growth rate of agriculturalists, because comparable individual-based reproductive records of sympatric populations of agriculturalists and foragers are rarely found. Here, we compared key life-history traits and population growth rate using comprehensive data from the seventieth to nineteenth century Northern Finland: indigenous Sami were nomadic hunter-fishers and reindeer herders, whereas sympatric agricultural Finns relied predominantly on animal husbandry. We found that agriculture-based families had higher lifetime fecundity, faster birth spacing and lower maternal mortality. Furthermore, agricultural Finns had 6.2% higher annual population growth rate than traditional Sami, which was accounted by differences between the subsistence modes in age-specific fecundity but not in mortality. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the most detailed demonstration yet of the demographic changes and evolutionary benefits that resulted from agricultural revolution. PMID:25232134

  3. Husbandry practices and health in smallholder dairy farms near Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, H M; Asmamaw, K; Courreau, J F

    2006-05-17

    Our study was conducted from November 2001 to April 2002 in the Debre-Zeit area (near Addis Ababa), Ethiopia to assess the husbandry practices and to identify health constraints in 100 market-oriented smallholder dairy farms. A questionnaire survey, farm visit and animal examination were conducted. Thirty-eight percent of the smallholder farms were owned by women. Women-owned farms had more cows (median=3) than men-owned ones. The median herd size (including young animals) was four animals per farm. Median age, parity number and daily milk production of cows were, respectively, 5 years, 3 and 10l. The housing conditions were tie-stall barns for 53% and shades for the rest. About 48% of the herd were kept under poor housing conditions; land-resource limitation was mentioned as the major problem. Twenty percent of the farms were using hired labour. Mastitis (both clinical and subclinical) was the most-frequently encountered disease condition (prevalence at herd level 30%) followed by foot-and-leg problems. Farms owned by men or using hired labour had higher disease prevalences. The poor housing conditions were associated with the observed prevalences of health constraints. PMID:16289383

  4. Integrating animal temperament within ecology and evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denis Réale; Simon M. Reader; Daniel Sol; Peter T. McDougall; Niels J. Dingemanse

    2007-01-01

    Temperament describes the idea that individual behavioural differences are repeatable over time and across situations. This common phenomenon covers numerous traits, such as aggressiveness, avoidance of novelty, willingness to take risks, exploration, and sociality. The study of temperament is central to animal psychology, behavioural genetics, pharmacology, and animal husbandry, but relatively few studies have examined the ecology and evolution of

  5. Eco-environment contribution of agroforestry to agriculture development in the plain area of China--Huai' an Prefecture, Jiangsu Province as the case study area.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hong-chang; Lu, Yong-long; Liu, Can; Meng, Qing-hua; Shi, Ya-juan

    2005-01-01

    For improving the environmental quality and ensuring supply of wood and non-timber forest products, many forests have been planted in plain areas of China. Scientists have studied their benefits, almost all of the approaches were based on fixed-point data, and few was considered on the non-efficient factors and temporal scale effects. This paper studies the positive and negative benefits at a large temporal scale, and the effects of plain afforestation on stockbreeding and rural economy. The benefits of plain afforestation, correlation coefficiency of agroforestry and production factors are analyzed via stochastic frontier modeling in Huanghuaihai Plain Area of China; elastic coefficient of agroforestry, husbandry, farming, and total output of agricultural sector are calculated through adopting partial differential equation. Some conclusions can be drawn that, plain forests have an important effect on the development of plain agriculture. But shelterbelts and small-scale forests have different effect on the development of agricultural economy. Shelterbelts have negative effect on the industries, but small-scale forest has positive effect. On the whole, contribution of forest resource to value of animal husbandry and gross production value of agriculture is positive, and to the value of farming is negative. PMID:16295915

  6. A Decision Support System for Climate Change Adaptation in Rainfed Sectors of Agriculture for Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mátyás, Csaba; Berki, Imre; Drüszler, Áron; Eredics, Attila; Gálos, Borbála; Illés, Gábor; Móricz, Norbert; Rasztovits, Ervin; Czimber, Kornél

    2013-04-01

    • Background and aims: Rainfed sectors of agriculture such as nature-close forestry, non-irrigated agriculture and animal husbandry on nature-close pastures are threatened by projected climate change especially in low-elevation regions in Southeast Europe, where precipitation is the limiting factor of production and ecosystem stability. Therefore the importance of complex, long term management planning and of land use optimization is increasing. The aim of the Decision Support System under development is to raise awareness and initiate preparation for frequency increase of extreme events, disasters and economic losses in the mentioned sectors. • Services provided: The Decision Support System provides GIS-supported information about the most important regional and local risks and mitigation options regarding climate change impacts, projected for reference periods until 2100 (e.g. land cover/use and expectable changes, potential production, water and carbon cycle, biodiversity and other ecosystem services, potential pests and diseases, tolerance limits etc.). The projections are referring first of all on biological production (natural produce), but the System includes also social and economic consequences. • Methods: In the raster based system, the latest image processing technology is used. We apply fuzzy membership functions, Support Vector Machine and Maximum Likelihood classifier. The System is developed in the first step for a reference area in SW Hungary (Zala county). • Novelty: The coherent, fine-scale regional system integrates the basic information about present and projected climates, extremes, hydrology and soil conditions and expected production potential for three sectors of agriculture as options for land use and conservation. • Funding: The development of the Decision Support System "Agrárklíma" is supported by TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV and 4.2.2.B-10/1-2010-0018 "Talentum" joint EU-national research projects. Keywords: climate change impacts, forestry, rainfed agriculture, animal husbandry

  7. Integrated Agricultural Systems Workgroup

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Integrated Agricultural Systems Workgroup is conducting research to developing principles of sustainable integrated agricultural systems. The Integrated Agriculture Systems (IAS) workgroup hosts producer focused workshops to examine crop and animal production practices. At each workshop, several...

  8. College of Agricultural and Life Sciences University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Animal Sciences1675 Observatory DriveMadison, Wisconsin 53706-1284 TEL 608-263-4300 FAX 608-

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    College of Agricultural and Life Sciences University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Animal Area Animal Science Days The 2011 Area Animal Science Days were held in Brown, Dodge, Monroe and Clark County's. Youth judged Breeding and Market classes of each of the following species, Swine, Beef

  9. The epidemiology of helminthosis in small ruminants under the traditional husbandry system in eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fakae, B B

    1990-01-01

    The epidemiology of helminth infections in West African dwarf sheep and goats under the traditional husbandry system prevailing in the derived savanna area of eastern Nigeria was studied for 12 months. The infections observed were due to Haemonchus contortus (87.1%), Trichostrongylus spp. (63.8%), metacestodes of Taenia hydatigena (30.2%), Oesophagostomum columbianum (22.4%), Strongyloides sp. (18.8%), Cooperia spp. (17.2%), Gaigeria pachyscelis (6.0%), Moniezia expansa (6.0%), Bunostomum trigonocephalum (4.3%), Trichuris ovis (3.5%), Capillaria sp. (0.9%) and paramphistomes (0.9%). Mixed infections were most prevalent. The endemicity of parasitic gastroenteritis in the area was indicated by the high prevalence of the helminths irrespective of the season of the year. The overall trend in helminthosis in these animals was that of an escalating worm burden during the period of confinement (April - October) and a low worm burden when animals were allowed free range (November - March), these periods corresponding to the cropping and harvest seasons respectively. A strong positive correlation (r = 0.73; p less than 0.01) was obtained between the mean strongyle worm burden and the eggs per gram (EPG) of faeces. A single treatment with a broad spectrum anthelmintic followed by movement into clean sheds at the beginning of confinement is suggested to give control of helminthosis in small ruminants in this area. PMID:2247944

  10. Harnessing: Technologies for Sustainable Reindeer Husbandry in the Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.; Yurchak, Boris; Turi, Johan Mathis; Mathiesen, Svein

    2004-01-01

    To accelerate the development of sustainable reindeer husbandry under the lead of indigenous reindeer herders, it is critical to empower reindeer herders with the best available technologies and to promote a new kind of science where traditional knowledge is fully integrated into the scientific management of the natural environment in the Arctic. This is particularly true given the dramatic environmental, climatic, economic, social and industrial changes, which have taken place across the Arctic in recent years, all of which have had serious impacts on the reindeer herding communities of the North. The Anar Declaration, adopted by the 2d World Reindeer Herders Congress (WRHC), in Inari, Finland, June 2001drew guidelines for the development of a sustainable reindeer husbandry based on reindeer peoples values and goals. The declaration calls for the reindeer herding peoples to be given the possibilities to develop and influence the management of the reindeer industry and its natural environment because of their knowledge and traditional practices. At the same time, Arctic scientists from many institutions and governments are carrying out increasingly highly technical reindeer related research activities. It is important that the technologies and results of these activities be more commonly co-produced with the reindeer herder community and/or made more readily available to the reindeer peoples for comparison with traditional knowledge for improved herd management. This paper describes a project in which reindeer herders and scientists are utilizing technologies to create a system for collecting and sharing knowledge. The project, Reindeer Mapper, is creating an information management and knowledge sharing system, which will help make technologies more readily available to the herder community for observing, data collection and analysis, monitoring, sharing, communications, and dissemination of information - to be integrated with traditional, local knowledge. The paper describes some of the technologies which comprise the system including an intranet system to enable the team members to work together and share information electronically, remote sensing data for monitoring environmental parameters important to reindeer husbandry (e.g. SAR, Landsat), acquisition of ground-based measurements, and the GIS-based information management and knowledge sharing system.

  11. VIRTUAL FENCING - AUTOMATED ANIMAL CONTROL IN THE 21ST CENTURY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlling free-ranging animal distribution is among the most challenging jobs a producer faces when managing livestock. Melding of time-tested animal husbandry practices with cutting-edge technological advances and scientific breakthroughs coming from the disciplines of range, animal and ethologi...

  12. What Do We Feed to Food-Production Animals? A Review of Animal Feed Ingredients and Their Potential Impacts on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Amy R.; Lefferts, Lisa Y.; McKenzie, Shawn; Walker, Polly

    2007-01-01

    Objective Animal feeding practices in the United States have changed considerably over the past century. As large-scale, concentrated production methods have become the predominant model for animal husbandry, animal feeds have been modified to include ingredients ranging from rendered animals and animal waste to antibiotics and organoarsenicals. In this article we review current U.S. animal feeding practices and etiologic agents that have been detected in animal feed. Evidence that current feeding practices may lead to adverse human health impacts is also evaluated. Data sources We reviewed published veterinary and human-health literature regarding animal feeding practices, etiologic agents present in feed, and human health effects along with proceedings from animal feed workshops. Data extraction Data were extracted from peer-reviewed articles and books identified using PubMed, Agricola, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Drug Administration, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention databases. Data synthesis Findings emphasize that current animal feeding practices can result in the presence of bacteria, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, prions, arsenicals, and dioxins in feed and animal-based food products. Despite a range of potential human health impacts that could ensue, there are significant data gaps that prevent comprehensive assessments of human health risks associated with animal feed. Limited data are collected at the federal or state level concerning the amounts of specific ingredients used in animal feed, and there are insufficient surveillance systems to monitor etiologic agents “from farm to fork.” Conclusions Increased funding for integrated veterinary and human health surveillance systems and increased collaboration among feed professionals, animal producers, and veterinary and public health officials is necessary to effectively address these issues. PMID:17520050

  13. Human and animal diet at Conchopata, Peru: stable isotope evidence for maize agriculture and animal management practices during the Middle Horizon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian Finucane; Patricia Maita Agurto; William H. Isbell

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports ?13C and ?15N values for human and animal skeletal remains from the Middle Horizon (AD 550–1000) site of Conchopata in the Peruvian highlands. The data indicate that maize was the dietary staple for both humans and the majority of animals at this urban site. Camelids at the site segregated into two groups according to ?13C values, reflecting

  14. The Post-Diploma B.Sc. degree program in Agricultural Studies employs a multidisciplinary perspective, including courses in Agricultural Studies, Biological Sciences, Economics and Geography. The

    E-print Network

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    Production Lethbridge Community College Agricultural Technology: General Agriculture (prior to 2003), Animal Agricultural Business Agricultural Production and Management (formerly Agricultural Production) Animal HealthThe Post-Diploma B.Sc. degree program in Agricultural Studies employs a multidisciplinary

  15. AGRICULTURAL WINTER/SPRING 2008

    E-print Network

    and agricultural engineering researcher, is director of environmental steward- ship in animal agriculture at MSU and main- taining good neighbor relations, maintaining environmental integrity, and quickly and effec

  16. Developing forage based rations for lactating buffaloes Department of Animal Nutrition, CCS Haryana Agricultural University Hisar, 125 004 Haryana, India

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    but its crude protein content, and its intake by the buffaloes are low which could be overcome by mixingDeveloping forage based rations for lactating buffaloes MA Akbar Department of Animal Nutrition into three groups of four in each, on the basis of their milk yield. In animals of group 1 (control

  17. 9 CFR 55.25 - Animal identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Animal identification. 55.25 Section 55.25 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  18. STRESS IN FARM ANIMALS: A NEED FOR REEVALUATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Dantzer; Pierre Morrnede

    2010-01-01

    Summary In animal husbandry, stress has usually been conceived as a reflex reaction that occurs ineluctably when animals are exposed to adverse environmental conditions, and which is the cause of many unfavorable consequences, ranging from discomfort to death. The inade- quacy of this view is apparent from the new concepts that have been developed from research aimed at understanding the

  19. The Therapeutic Use of Animals with the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Samuel B., Jr.

    Green Chimneys, a residential center for emotionally disturbed and learning disabled children in New York, uses farm animals in the treatment program. Children learn horseback riding, animal husbandry, gardening, and farming on a working farm. The program seeks to involve the community and provide training to volunteers, interns, and learning…

  20. Blowback: new formal perspectives on agriculturally driven pathogen evolution and spread.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R; Wallace, R G

    2015-07-01

    By their diversity in time, space, and mode, traditional and conservation agricultures can create barriers limiting pathogen evolution and spread analogous to a sterilizing temperature. Large-scale monocropping and confined animal feeding-lot operations remove such barriers, resulting, above agroecologically specific thresholds, in the development and wide propagation of novel disease strains. We apply a newly developed class of necessary-conditions statistical models of evolutionary process, first using the theory on an evolutionarily stable viral pathogen vulnerable to vaccine treatment: post-World War II poliomyelitis emerged in the UK and USA from sudden widespread adoption of automobile ownership and usage. We then examine an evolutionarily variable pathogen, swine influenza in North America. The model suggests epidemiological blowback from globalizing intensive husbandry and the raising and shipping of monoculture livestock across increasing expanses, is likely to be far more consequential, driving viral selection for greater virulence and lowered response to biomedical intervention. PMID:26050716

  1. Aquatic animal nutrition for the exotic animal practitioner.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Mike; Roberts-Sweeney, Helen

    2014-09-01

    Fish are the most popular pets in the United States based on numbers and high-quality medical care is coming to be expected by owners. Increasing numbers of veterinarians are responding to this need and providing veterinary care for aquatic animals. Part of good medical care for exotic animals is advice on husbandry, including nutrition. However, there are numerous missing areas of research for the nutritional needs of many ornamental fish species. What is known for food species can be combined with what is known for ornamental species to give nutritional advice to owners to maximize health in these animals. PMID:25155660

  2. Clinical approach to dermatologic disease in exotic animals.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Brian S; Roberts, Helen

    2013-09-01

    Skin disease is an extremely common presenting complaint to the exotic animal practitioner. A systematic diagnostic approach is necessary in these cases to achieve a diagnosis and formulate an effective treatment plan. In all exotic species, husbandry plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous disease, so a thorough evaluation of the husbandry is critical for successful management. The clinical approach to skin disease in exotic animal patients is reviewed with specific focus on structure and function of the skin, diagnostic testing, and differential diagnoses for commonly encountered cutaneous diseases. PMID:24018026

  3. Agricultural Extension in Kenya: Practice and Policy Lessons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milu Muyanga; Thomas S. Jayne

    2006-01-01

    A consensus exists that extension services, if functioning effectively, improve agricultural productivity through providing farmers with information that helps them to optimize their use of limited resources. Variations in management practices and husbandry skills among small farmers in Kenya are very great. Tremendous poverty-reducing benefits could be reaped by bringing the production costs of the most inefficient farmers to mean

  4. Impacts on rural livelihoods in Cambodia following adoption of best practice health and husbandry interventions by smallholder cattle farmers.

    PubMed

    Young, J R; O'Reilly, R A; Ashley, K; Suon, S; Leoung, I V; Windsor, P A; Bush, R D

    2014-08-01

    To better understand how smallholder farmers whom own the majority of Cambodian cattle can contribute to efforts to address food security needs in the Mekong region, a five-year research project investigating methods to improve cattle health and husbandry practices was conducted. Cattle production in Cambodia is constrained by transboundary animal diseases (TADs) including foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) plus poor nutrition, reproduction and marketing knowledge. The project worked in six villages in Kandal, Takeo and Kampong Cham province during 2007-12. Farmers from three 'high intervention' (HI) villages incrementally received a participatory extension programme that included FMD and HS vaccination, forage development and husbandry training. Evaluation of project impacts on livelihoods was facilitated by comparison with three 'low intervention' (LI) villages where farmers received vaccinations only. Results of knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) and socio-economic surveys conducted in 2012 of 120 participating farmers identified that farmer knowledge in the HI project sites exceeded LI sites on the topics of biosecurity, internal parasites, nutrition and reproduction. HI farmers adopted biosecurity practices including a willingness to vaccinate for FMD and HS at their own cost, separate sick from healthy cattle, grow and feed forages and displayed awareness of the benefits of building fattening pens. HI farmers that grew forages observed time savings exceeding two hours per day each for men, women and children, enabling expansion of farm enterprises, secondary employment and children's schooling. Logistic regression analysis revealed that farmers in the HI group significantly increased annual household income (P < 0.001), with 53% reporting an increase of 100% or more. We conclude that improving smallholder KAP of cattle health and production can lead to improved livelihoods. This strategy should be of interest to policymakers, donors, researchers and extension workers interested in addressing TAD control, food insecurity and rural poverty in Southeast Asia. PMID:24393407

  5. An Overview of the Design, Construction, and Operational Management of the US Department of Agriculture National Centers for Animal Health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    World-wide interest and demand for high containment, biosecure facilities for veterinary medicine and animal health research is increasing. This demand has been spurred on in part by the recent emergence of potential zoonotic pathogens such as Avian Influenza, West Nile Virus, and Tuberculosis, amo...

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD TO CONVERT GREEN AND ANIMAL WASTES TO A USEFUL AGRICULTURAL PRODUCT WITH POSSIBLE ALTERNATIVE FUEL USE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Initially, we thought that we would shred the green waste to use as a binder for the animal manure to produce a material useful as a fuel or soil amendment. Our first experiments in mixing the materials revealed that manure was, instead, better used as a binder for the green w...

  7. The Post-Diploma B.A. degree program in Agricultural Studies employs a multidisciplinary perspective, including courses in Agricultural Studies, Economics, Geography and other Humanities and Social Science

    E-print Network

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    Production Lethbridge Community College Agricultural Technology: General Agriculture (prior to 2003), Animal Agricultural Business Agricultural Production and Management (formerly Agricultural Production) Animal HealthThe Post-Diploma B.A. degree program in Agricultural Studies employs a multidisciplinary

  8. Assessment Plans College of Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    Education GR MS Agricultural Education Y 2014 Y Y Y Animal & Range Sciences GR MS Animal and Range Sciences Y 2014 Y Y Y Animal & Range Sciences GR MS Land Rehabilitation Y 2014 Y Y Y Animal & Range Sciences GR PHD Animal and Range Sciences Y 2014 Y Y Y Animal and Range Science UG BS Animal Science Y 2014 Y

  9. Management of antibiotic residues from agricultural sources: Use of composting to reduce chlortetracycline residues in beef manure from treated animals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osman A. Arikan; Walter Mulbry; Clifford Rice

    2009-01-01

    Chlortetracycline (CTC) is one of only ten antibiotics licensed in the U.S.A. for use as growth promoters for livestock. The widespread use and persistence of CTC may contribute in development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of composting on the fate of CTC residues found in manure from medicated animals. The effect of

  10. Essays on Modeling the Economic Impacts of a Foreign Animal Disease on the United States Agricultural Sector

    E-print Network

    Hagerman, Amy Deann

    2011-02-22

    /or responding to an animal disease outbreak by addressing three issues related to strategy assessment in the context of FMD: integrated multi region economic and epidemic evaluation, inclusion of risk, and information uncertainty. An integrated economic/epidemic.... In the analysis, strategies are examined in the context of California's dairy industry. Alternative vaccination, disease detection and movement restriction strategies are considered as are trade restrictions. The results reported include epidemic impacts...

  11. 42 CFR 9.6 - Animal care, well-being, husbandry, veterinary care, and euthanasia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...accrediting association in accordance...guidance see the American College of Laboratory...physiological, psychological, and nutritional...report of the American Veterinary Medical Association Panel on...counseling and psychological support...

  12. 42 CFR 9.6 - Animal care, well-being, husbandry, veterinary care, and euthanasia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...accrediting association in accordance...guidance see the American College of Laboratory...physiological, psychological, and nutritional...report of the American Veterinary Medical Association Panel on...counseling and psychological support...

  13. 42 CFR 9.6 - Animal care, well-being, husbandry, veterinary care, and euthanasia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...accrediting association in accordance...guidance see the American College of Laboratory...physiological, psychological, and nutritional...report of the American Veterinary Medical Association Panel on...counseling and psychological support...

  14. [Genetic variability of growth in sheep grown at the animal husbandry research center of Dahra].

    PubMed

    Missohou, A; Sow, R; Nahar, M T; Gongnet, P

    1993-01-01

    Data on growth performances of 778 Peulpeul and Touabire sheep were collected over five years (1983-1987) in APRC of Dahra. Studied parameters were: birth weight (BBW), one month weight (MBW), weaning weight (WBW) yearling weight (YBW) and growth rate between adjacent stages of growth. BBW, MBW, WBW and YBW are: 3.6 +/- 0.6 kg, 9.5 +/- 1.8 kg; 17.5 +/- 3.5 kg; 30.6 +/- 4.3 kg. Growth rates were 197.0 +/- 51.2 g between birth and one month (MGR), 87.2 +/- 28.1 g, between one month and weaning (WGR) and 50.8 +/- 15.3 g, between weaning and yearling (YGR). Year and season of birth, dam parity, prolificity, sex and race had significant effect on most of the parameters studied. The heritability estimates were 0.50 +/- 0.14 (BBW), 0.52 +/- 0.15 (MBW), 0.71 +/- 0.18 (WBW), 0.44 +/- 0.13 (MGR) and 0.60 +/- 0.16 (WGR). High and positive correlations existed between BBW and the other growth components. PMID:7882848

  15. HIGH-THROUGHPUT PHYLOGENOMICS: FROM ANCIENT DNA TO SIGNATURES OF HUMAN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We utilized the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip with 54,693 single nucleotide polymorphism loci developed for Bos taurus taurus to rapidly genotype 677 individuals representing 61 Pecoran (horned ruminant) species diverged by up to 29 million years. We produced a completely bifurcating tree, the first...

  16. ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DISEASE Reference: Biol. Bull. 195: 223-225. (October, 1998)

    E-print Network

    Hanlon, Roger T.

    Laboratory Culture Techniques for the European Cuttlefish Sepia officim-dis Janice S. Hanley, Nadav Shashar Resources Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02.543) The cuttlefish-scale re- circulating seawater systems. Recently, cuttlefish were brought to the Marine Resources Center

  17. [Studies of the decontamination of the sewage from animal husbandry farms].

    PubMed

    Bratanov, V; Penchev, P; Dinev, P

    1977-01-01

    Investigations revealed that under the conditions prevailing in the districts of Sofia and .pernik Ascaris suum and Trichocephalus suis eggs remained viable at the conventional storage of liquid manure on the large farms for about a year, and Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum sp. eggs--for 2 to 3 months. The methods of electrocoagulation and electroflotation could be employed with success in the cleansing and rendering harmless of the sewage waters after the preliminary treatment with calcium hydroxide. In terms of stabilizing the process, enhancing the cleansing effect and harmlessness, and lowering the use of electrical energy better results are obtainable with the use of pulsating current and constant current perdiodically changing its polarity. PMID:919336

  18. Veterinary medicine and animal husbandry in Mexico: From empiricism to science and technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larissa Adler Lomnitz; Leticia Mayer

    1994-01-01

    Conclusion Foot-and-mouth disease was the event which led to the increased and improved training of veterinarians able to produce through their research new veterinary knowledge for practical application.

  19. Brittany Joan Colbath Animal Science

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Brittany Joan Colbath 2014 Animal Science College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Annette Fey 2014 Animal Science College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Animalia #12;2 OVERVIEW OF THE PROGRAM Animalia, animalia is concerned with many aspects of animal life, human interface with animals, properly caring

  20. Husbandry stress exacerbates mycobacterial infections in adult zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsay, J.M.; Watral, V.; Schreck, C.B.; Kent, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacteria are significant pathogens of laboratory zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton). Stress is often implicated in clinical disease and morbidity associated with mycobacterial infections but has yet to be examined with zebrafish. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of husbandry stressors on zebrafish infected with mycobacteria. Adult zebrafish were exposed to Mycobacterium marinum or Mycobacterium chelonae, two species that have been associated with disease in zebrafish. Infected fish and controls were then subjected to chronic crowding and handling stressors and examined over an 8-week period. Whole-body cortisol was significantly elevated in stressed fish compared to non-stressed fish. Fish infected with M. marinum ATCC 927 and subjected to husbandry stressors had 14% cumulative mortality while no mortality occurred among infected fish not subjected to husbandry stressors. Stressed fish, infected with M. chelonae H1E2 from zebrafish, were 15-fold more likely to be infected than non-stressed fish at week 8 post-injection. Sub-acute, diffuse infections were more common among stressed fish infected with M. marinum or M. chelonae than non-stressed fish. This is the first study to demonstrate an effect of stress and elevated cortisol on the morbidity, prevalence, clinical disease and histological presentation associated with mycobacterial infections in zebrafish. Minimizing husbandry stress may be effective at reducing the severity of outbreaks of clinical mycobacteriosis in zebrafish facilities. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. The Effects of Husbandry Training on Stereotypic Pacing in Captive African Wild Dogs (Lycaon pictus)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amanda Shyne; Martin Block

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effects of operant conditioning on stereotypic pacing in 3 female African wild dogs located at the Franklin Park Zoo in Boston, this study made recordings of pacing behavior immediately following individual sessions of husbandry training and 2 no-training conditions. The study found significant differences in the percentage of observations spent in stereotypic pacing behaviors for all 3

  2. Health and welfare of dairy cows in different husbandry systems in Switzerland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Regula; J. Danuser; B. Spycher; B. Wechsler

    2004-01-01

    Our objective was to compare health and welfare of dairy cows kept in three types of husbandry systems: (1) tie stalls with regular exercise in summer but minimal outdoor access during winter (the reference level for analyses); (2) tie stalls with regular exercise in an exercise yard or pasture throughout the year; (3) loose-housing with regular access to an outdoor

  3. Ecosystems and the value of adjacent protected areas to agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Waltraud Kugler; Elli Broxham Stahl

    2008-01-01

    Without anthropogenic influence, Europe would not have the beautiful and rich landscape we see today. The development of open spaces through crop cultivation and animal husbandry has led to the wide diversity of landscape that exists in Europe… Over centuries people have bred livestock and cultivated plants especially suited to their local environment. Biologically valuable traditional agro-ecosystems developed within each

  4. Developing a systematic strategy incorporating ethical, animal welfare and practical principles to guide the genetic improvement of dairy cattle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MW Fisher; DJ Mellor

    2008-01-01

    People have complex and diverse relationships and interactions with, and expectations of, animals; relationships which are very important. In making sense of this complexity, we draw on our values. The objective of this study was to reflect upon, develop and articulate key values guiding the genetic improvement of dairy cattle.Animal husbandry is guided by the philosophy that while animals serve

  5. Colorimetric polymer-metal nanocomposite sensor of ammonia for the agricultural industry of confined animal feeding operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Czarick, Michael; Fairchild, Brian D.; Liang, Yi; Kukhtareva, Tatiana; Curley, Michael J.

    2014-02-01

    The proposed colorimetric sensor of ammonia for the confined animal feeding industry uses the method of optoelectronic spectroscopic measurement of the reversible change of the color of a nanocomposite reagent film in response to ammonia. The film is made of a gold nanocolloid in a polymer matrix with an ammonia-sensitive indicator dye additive. The response of the indicator dye (increase of the optical absorption between 550 and 650 nm) is enhanced by the nanoparticles (˜8 nm in size) in two ways: (a) concentration of the optical field near the nanoparticle due to the plasmon resonance and (b) catalytic acceleration of the chemical reaction of deprotonization of the indicator dye in the presence of ammonia and water vapor. This enhancement helps to miniaturize the sensing element without compromising its sensitivity of <1 parts per million (ppm) for the range 0 to 100 ppm. The sensor underwent field tests in commercial poultry farms in Georgia and Arkansas and was compared against a scientific-grade photoacoustic gas analyzer. The coefficient of correlation between the sensor and the photoacoustic data for several weeks of continuous side-by-side operation in a commercial poultry house was ˜0.9 and the linear regression slope was 1.0. The conclusions on the necessary improvements were made.

  6. Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma agriculture affects each of us every day, young and old, whether we live in largely rural regions or the state's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources promotes sustainable land use and embraces the land

  7. Traditional Animation Keyframe Animation

    E-print Network

    Treuille, Adrien

    #12;Traditional Animation: The Process · Story board ­ Sequence of drawings with descriptions ­ Story board ­ Animatic ­ Final Animation #12;Traditional Animation: The Process · Key Frames ­ Draw a fewAnimation Traditional Animation Keyframe Animation Interpolating Rotation Forward

  8. 9 CFR 98.36 - Animal semen from Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Certain Animal Semen § 98.36 Animal semen from Canada. (a) General importation requirements...

  9. 9 CFR 117.6 - Removal of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Removal of animals. 117.6 Section 117.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  10. 9 CFR 117.6 - Removal of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Removal of animals. 117.6 Section 117.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  11. 9 CFR 117.3 - Admittance of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Admittance of animals. 117.3 Section 117.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  12. 9 CFR 117.5 - Segregation of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Segregation of animals. 117.5 Section 117.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  13. 9 CFR 117.5 - Segregation of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Segregation of animals. 117.5 Section 117.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  14. 9 CFR 50.7 - Destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Destruction of animals. 50.7 Section 50.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  15. Medical Monitoring Program for Vertebrate Animal Users Enrollment and Risk Assessment Form Instructions

    E-print Network

    Sura, Philip

    . Laboratory technician Handling unfixed tissues Voles Hr min. Custodian/Janitor Husbandry & care of animalsMedical Monitoring Program for Vertebrate Animal Users Enrollment and Risk Assessment Form-8842), Campus Mail (Mail code 4481), or deliver it to 1200 Carothers Hall. Please note that the Medical

  16. Anim Cogn (2005) 8: 114121 DOI 10.1007/s10071-004-0242-y

    E-print Network

    2005-01-01

    (*) . A. KilBride . M. Mendl Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Centre for Behavioural Biology-117-9289582 J. Baumgartner Institute for Animal Husbandry and WelfAnim Cogn (2005) 8: 114­121 DOI 10.1007/s10071-004-0242-y ORIGINAL ARTICLE S Held . J Baumgartner

  17. Ants farm subterranean aphids mostly in single clone groups - an example of prudent husbandry for carbohydrates and proteins?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mutualistic interactions are wide-spread but the mechanisms underlying their evolutionary stability and ecological dynamics remain poorly understood. Cultivation mutualisms in which hosts consume symbionts occur in phylogenetically diverse groups, but often have symbiont monocultures for each host. This is consistent with the prediction that symbionts should avoid coexistence with other strains so that host services continue to benefit relatives, but it is less clear whether hosts should always favor monocultures and what mechanisms they might have to manipulate symbiont diversity. Few mutualisms have been studied in sufficient genetic detail to address these issues, so we decided to characterize symbiont diversity in the complex mutualism between multiple root aphid species and Lasius flavus ants. After showing elsewhere that three of these aphid species have low dispersal and mostly if not exclusively asexual reproduction, we here investigate aphid diversity within and between ant nest mounds. Results The three focal species (Geoica utricularia, Forda marginata and Tetraneura ulmi) had considerable clonal diversity at the population level. Yet more than half of the ant mounds contained just a single aphid species, a significantly higher percentage than expected from a random distribution. Over 60% of these single-species mounds had a single aphid clone, and clones tended to persist across subsequent years. Whenever multiple species/clones co-occurred in the same mound, they were spatially separated with more than 95% of the aphid chambers containing individuals of a single clone. Conclusions L. flavus “husbandry” is characterized by low aphid “livestock” diversity per colony, especially at the nest-chamber level, but it lacks the exclusive monocultures known from other cultivation mutualisms. The ants appear to eat most of the early instar aphids, so that adult aphids are unlikely to face limited phloem resources and scramble competition with other aphids. We suggest that such culling of carbohydrate-providing symbionts for protein ingestion may maintain maximal host yield per aphid while also benefitting the domesticated aphids as long as their clone-mates reproduce successfully. The cost-benefit logic of this type of polyculture husbandry has striking analogies with human farming practices based on slaughtering young animals for meat to maximize milk-production by a carefully regulated adult livestock population. PMID:22747564

  18. The epidemiology of helminthosis in small ruminants under the traditional husbandry system in eastern Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. B. Fakae

    1990-01-01

    The epidemiology of helminth infections in West African dwarf sheep and goats under the traditional husbandry system prevailing in the derived savanna area of eastern Nigeria was studied for 12 months. The infections observed were due to Haemonchus contortus (87.1%), Trichostrongylus spp. (63.8%), metacestodes of Taenia hydatigena (30.2%), Oesophagostomum columbianum (22.4%), Strongyloides sp. (18.8%), Cooperia spp. (17.2%), Gaigeria pachyscelis (6.0%),

  19. Forest Fragmentation and Landscape Transformation in a Reindeer Husbandry Area in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivinen, Sonja; Berg, Anna; Moen, Jon; Östlund, Lars; Olofsson, Johan

    2012-02-01

    Reindeer husbandry and forestry are two main land users in boreal forests in northern Sweden. Modern forestry has numerous negative effects on the ground-growing and arboreal lichens that are crucial winter resources for reindeer husbandry. Using digitized historical maps, we examined changes in the forest landscape structure during the past 100 years, and estimated corresponding changes in suitability of forest landscape mosaics for the reindeer winter grazing. Cover of old coniferous forests, a key habitat type of reindeer herding system, showed a strong decrease during the study period, whereas clear-cutting and young forests increased rapidly in the latter half of the 20th century. The dominance of young forests and fragmentation of old-growth forests (decreased patch sizes and increased isolation) reflect decreased amount of arboreal lichens as well as a lowered ability of the landscape to sustain long-term persistence of lichens. The results further showed that variation in ground lichen cover among sites was mainly related to soil moisture conditions, recent disturbances, such as soil scarification and prescribed burning, and possibly also to forest history. In general, the results suggest that the composition and configuration of the forest landscape mosaic has become less suitable for sustainable reindeer husbandry.

  20. 2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Hayes, Jane E.

    2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University about the accreditation of University of Kentucky. AgriculturalBiotechnology Agriculturalbiotechnologyencompassescellularandmolecularapproaches to the manipulation and improvement of agricultural plants, animals and microorganisms

  1. Project-oriented courses and project work can be realized even for the subject of animal genetics. Topics suited for this purpose are for instance the methods for optimizing breeding

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . RIEMENSCHNEIDER. Institute of Animal Husbandry and Breeding /Unit lor educational Research and Devetopnxent. - Department of Animal Production Agvicultuyal University Wageningen, The Netherlands. Animal Breeding withinProject-oriented courses and project work can be realized even for the subject of animal genetics

  2. Heavy metal driven co-selection of antibiotic resistance in soil and water bodies impacted by agriculture and aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Claudia; Berendonk, Thomas U.

    2012-01-01

    The use of antibiotic agents as growth promoters was banned in animal husbandry to prevent the selection and spread of antibiotic resistance. However, in addition to antibiotic agents, heavy metals used in animal farming and aquaculture might promote the spread of antibiotic resistance via co-selection. To investigate which heavy metals are likely to co-select for antibiotic resistance in soil and water, the available data on heavy metal pollution, heavy metal toxicity, heavy metal tolerance, and co-selection mechanisms was reviewed. Additionally, the risk of metal driven co-selection of antibiotic resistance in the environment was assessed based on heavy metal concentrations that potentially induce this co-selection process. Analyses of the data indicate that agricultural and aquacultural practices represent major sources of soil and water contamination with moderately to highly toxic metals such as mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn). If those metals reach the environment and accumulate to critical concentrations they can trigger co-selection of antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, co-selection mechanisms for these heavy metals and clinically as well as veterinary relevant antibiotics have been described. Therefore, studies investigating co-selection in environments impacted by agriculture and aquaculture should focus on Hg, Cd, Cu, and Zn as selecting heavy metals. Nevertheless, the respective environmental background has to be taken into account. PMID:23248620

  3. [Regionalisation of Germany by data of agricultural structures].

    PubMed

    Merle, Roswitha; Busse, Marc; Rechter, Galina; Meer, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    In order to simplify the design of representative studies in animal populations the structural differences of animal husbandry (cattle, pigs and laying hens) in Germany were characterised. Several regions were defined and thus districts identified which are typical for the respective region and can be regarded as representatives for the whole region. Data on animal husbandry as well as human population per district originated from the Federal Statistical Office and were linked to the geometric data of the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy. By this, data of "livestock units/square kilometre area" and "farms/square kilometre area" per district were calculated using methods of the spatial statistics Global Moran's Index, Anselin Local Moran's Index and Getis-Ord Gi*. With the help of these analyses six clusters could be identified which resulted in four large (Middle, Northwest, East, and South) and one smaller region (Northern Upper-Rhine) respecting the federal state borders. These regions differed significantly regarding animal and farm densities. The selection of typical districts was carried out with the help of the respective animal and farm data of the species pigs, dairy cattle and laying hens. The means of the selected districts (three to six per region) were within the 60%- and the 80%-percentile of at least two of the analysed variables. Concerning the region Northern Upper-Rhine no representative district was selected. This presented regionalisation including representative districts can be used for the design of scientific studies that are associated with animal husbandry in Germany. PMID:22372325

  4. Assessment of energy balance of Indian farm women in relation to their nutritional profile in lean and peak agricultural seasons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suman; Sinwal, Sushma; Rathore, Hemu

    2012-01-01

    In India, the farm women are not only involved in household activities but also contribute in various farm operations, animal husbandry. The objective was to assess nutritional profile of the farmwomen and their occupational health problems, to compare the physiological workload in lean and peak seasons and to find out relationship between physiological workload and nutritional intake. The study was conducted on a sample of 90 farmwomen. Energy Intake was calculated using physiological fuel values of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Energy Expenditure Rate (EER), Total Energy Expenditure (TEE) and Energy Balance were calculated. The physiological workload was assessed using sub-maximal workload technique. The results revealed that all the respondents of all categories were, more or less, performing all the agriculture, allied and household activities. In all the agriculture activities physiological hazards such as body pain and fatigue were dominant. Dietary, nutritional and energy intake was lower for heavy workers, from all landholding and BMI categories. HR and OCR were in linear relationship in all BMI categories. Physical work capacity increased with good nutritional status and decreased with age. Regression equations were suggested for calculating oxygen consumption (y) at their known heart rate (x) during various agriculture operations. PMID:22317390

  5. Space Technologies for Enhancing the Resilience and Sustainability of Indigenous Reindeer Husbandry in the Russian Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.; Yurchak, Boris S.; Sleptsov, Yuri A.; Turi, Johan Mathis; Mathlesen, Svein D.

    2005-01-01

    To adapt successfully to the major changes - climate, environment, economic, social and industrial - which have taken place across the Arctic. in recent years, indigenous communities such as reindeer herders must become increasingly empowered with the best available technologies to add to their storehouse of traditional knowledge. Remotely-sensed data and observations are providing increased capabilities for monitoring, risk mapping, and surveillance of parameters critical to the characterization of pasture quality and migratory routes, such as vegetation distribution, snow cover, infrastructure development, and pasture damages due to fires. This paper describes a series of remote sensing capabilities, which are useful to reindeer husbandry, and gives the results of the first year of a project, "Reindeer Mapper", which is a remote sensing and GIs-based system to bring together space technologies with indigenous knowledge for sustainable reindeer husbandry in the Russian Arctic. In this project, reindeer herders and scientists are joining together to utilize technologies to create a system for collecting and sharing space-based and indigenous knowledge in the Russian Arctic. The "Reindeer Mapper" system will help make technologies more readily available to the herder community for observing, data collection and analysis, monitoring, sharing, communications, and dissemination of information - to be integrated with traditional, local knowledge. This paper describes some of the technologies which comprise the system including an intranet system to enable to the team members to work together and share information electronically, remote sensing data for monitoring environmental parameters important to reindeer husbandry (e.g., SAR, Landsat, AVHRR, MODIS), indigenous knowledge about important environmental parameters, acquisition of ground- based measurements, and the integration of all useful data sets for more informed decision-making.

  6. Genet. Sel. Evol. 34 (2002) 729744 729 INRA, EDP Sciences, 2002

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    2002-01-01

    a a Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Animal Breeding, School of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Medicine Agriculture and Animal Husbandry College, Linzhi 860000, P.R. China c Institute of Criminal Science, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, P.R. China b Department of Animal Science, Tibet

  7. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    ScienceCinema

    Francesco Danuso

    2010-01-08

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed.  SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Jørgensen, 1994) in which systems are modelled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower  management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  8. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Francesco Danuso

    2008-06-18

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed.  SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Jørgensen, 1994) in which systems are modelled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower  management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  9. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Danuso, Francesco (University of Udine) [University of Udine

    2008-06-18

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed. SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Joergensen, 1994) in which systems are modeled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  10. Cattle brucellosis in traditional livestock husbandry practice in Southern and Eastern Ethiopia, and its zoonotic implication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bekele Megersa; Demelash Biffa; Fekadu Niguse; Tesfaye Rufael; Kassahun Asmare; Eystein Skjerve

    2011-01-01

    Background  Cattle brucellosis has significant economic and zoonotic implication for the rural communities in Ethiopia in consequence\\u000a of their traditional life styles, feeding habits and disease patterns. Hence, knowledge of brucellosis occurrence in traditional\\u000a livestock husbandry practice has considerable importance in reducing the economic and public health impacts of the disease.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A total of 1623 cattle sera were serially tested using

  11. Organic agriculture enhances agrobiodiversity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristina Grandi

    2008-01-01

    Farm specialization and the general abandonment of mixed farming is a significant factor in the decline of biodiversity, including genetic resources for food and agriculture and wildlife, and in the disintegration of traditional and community-based management. The use of uniform, high-yielding cultivars and breeds has reduced the number of species used in agriculture (crops and animals), contributing to the instability

  12. A history of the department of animal science at Texas A&M University 

    E-print Network

    Lucko, Paul Michael

    1975-01-01

    was the instruction of students in the practical arts of animal teeding, breeding, and management. The first Department Heads, John A. Craig, and Frederick Rupert Marshall, felt that their teaching suffered due to a lack of funds necessary to purchase of livestock... were so demanding, Craig could only devote minimal time to student instruction in the Animal Hus- bandry Department. To alleviate th', s condition the college hired Frederick Rupert Marshall as Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry. 4 1...

  13. 25 CFR 166.312 - Is a conservation plan required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Land and Operations Management Management Plans and Environmental Compliance...the tribe's agricultural resource management plan and must address the permittee's management objectives regarding animal husbandry and resource...

  14. 25 CFR 166.312 - Is a conservation plan required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Land and Operations Management Management Plans and Environmental Compliance...the tribe's agricultural resource management plan and must address the permittee's management objectives regarding animal husbandry and resource...

  15. 25 CFR 166.312 - Is a conservation plan required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Land and Operations Management Management Plans and Environmental Compliance...the tribe's agricultural resource management plan and must address the permittee's management objectives regarding animal husbandry and resource...

  16. 25 CFR 166.312 - Is a conservation plan required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Land and Operations Management Management Plans and Environmental Compliance...the tribe's agricultural resource management plan and must address the permittee's management objectives regarding animal husbandry and resource...

  17. 25 CFR 166.312 - Is a conservation plan required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Land and Operations Management Management Plans and Environmental Compliance...the tribe's agricultural resource management plan and must address the permittee's management objectives regarding animal husbandry and resource...

  18. 7 CFR 3201.61 - Animal repellents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false Animal repellents. 3201.61 ...OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...Designated Items § 3201.61 Animal repellents. (a) Definition...Products used to aid in deterring animals that cause destruction to...

  19. 7 CFR 3201.61 - Animal repellents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Animal repellents. 3201.61 ...OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...Designated Items § 3201.61 Animal repellents. (a) Definition...Products used to aid in deterring animals that cause destruction to...

  20. 7 CFR 3201.61 - Animal repellents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Animal repellents. 3201.61 ...OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...Designated Items § 3201.61 Animal repellents. (a) Definition...Products used to aid in deterring animals that cause destruction to...

  1. 9 CFR 117.2 - Animal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS ANIMALS AT LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 117.2 Animal facilities. Animal facilities shall comply with the...

  2. 9 CFR 117.2 - Animal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS ANIMALS AT LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 117.2 Animal facilities. Animal facilities shall comply with the...

  3. 9 CFR 117.2 - Animal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS ANIMALS AT LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 117.2 Animal facilities. Animal facilities shall comply with the...

  4. Food safety and animal production systems: controlling zoonoses at farm level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Collins; P. G. Wall

    Summary Controlling zoonotic agents in animal and poultry reservoirs has the effect of reducing the challenge to food safety management systems in processing and further along the food chain. Producing and maintaining healthy stock requires good husbandry practices, which include stock selection and veterinary attention. Feed is a key input, both as a source of pathogen-free nutrients and as a

  5. Residual veterinary antibiotics in swine manure from concentrated animal feeding operations in Shandong Province, China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xun Pan; Zhimin Qiang; Weiwei Ben; Meixue Chen

    2011-01-01

    The scientific interest in the occurrence and fate of antibiotics in animal husbandry has increased during the past decades because of the emergence and development of antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic bacteria. This study developed a method for simultaneous detection of five sulfonamides, three tetracyclines and one macrolide in swine manure with stable recoveries (73.0–110.6%) and high sensitivity (limit of quantification

  6. 1060 Animal Behaviour, 52, 5 Niko Tinbergen, Irwin Bernstein, C. Ray

    E-print Network

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    1060 Animal Behaviour, 52, 5 Niko Tinbergen, Irwin Bernstein, C. Ray Carpenter, Joe Erwin, William Resources of NIH. The Centers are to provide basic research resources in primatology, including clinical/veterinary and husbandry support, to researchers in the U.S.A. and from overseas. A small faculty is partially supported

  7. Combination of Regression Trees and Logistic Regression to Analyse Animal Management and Disease Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susanne Dahms

    Integrated quality control measures have been discussed in farm animal husbandry and veterinary medicine for some time in search of concepts to link information on management factors with disease data gained by veterinary meat inspection at slaughter. For this purpose an exploratory modelling strategy has been developed that combines a characterization of variance structures, the generation of regression trees to

  8. Revitalizing veterinary and animal science education for the future in India — Issues and approaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. V. K. Sasidhar

    2002-01-01

    In the veterinary science and animal husbandry education system, India has two deemed universities, three veterinary universities, several research stations and 34 veterinary colleges with an annual intake of 2000 students. Veterinary graduates have to play a very crucial role in extending the health coverage and enhancing the production of over 1000 million livestock and poultry. This paper presents a

  9. Husbandry risk factors associated with hock pododermatitis in UK pet rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, E; Keeble, E; Richardson, J; Hedley, J

    2014-04-26

    Pododermatitis, often called 'sore hocks', is a chronic, granulomatous, ulcerative dermatitis which most commonly affects the plantar aspect of the caudal metatarsal and tarsal areas. Pododermatitis is a common clinical finding in the pet rabbit population, but no data is available regarding the actual prevalence of this condition in the UK pet rabbit population or possible husbandry-related factors which may predispose pet rabbits to development of this condition. It was the aim of this study to determine the prevalence of pododermatitis within a sample pet rabbit population, and study possible correlations with husbandry, sex, breed and origin of the rabbits. Findings suggested that young rabbits are at a lower risk of pododermatitis compared with older rabbits; female domestic rabbits are more predisposed to pododermatitis than males; and 100 per cent of the neutered females examined showed clinical evidence of pododermatitis. The effect that different types of bedding may have on the prevalence of pododermatitis was also investigated. This study also produced a scoring system which can be used to score clinical cases. Our study is of clinical importance because it helps to recognise many of the factors which predispose pet rabbits to pododermatitis, representing the first step towards increased awareness of this extremely common problem. PMID:24572721

  10. Animal Cell Mitosis Animation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    This animation demonstrates the stages of mitosis in an animal cell. Use the control buttons in the upper left to run the complete animation. Click on any intermediate stage (for example, Anaphase), and see a representative still frame.

  11. Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers

    E-print Network

    Kaminsky, Werner

    Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers Agriculture is the primary economic activity Volunteers contribute sustain- able solutions to a community's agricultural issues and help preserve natural resources. Programs and Sample Projects Agriculture and Forestry Extension · Collaborate with farmers

  12. ALS 3133 section 9685 I. Title: Agriculture and Environmental Quality

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    on environmental quality, especially water quality, with emphasis on agricultural practices (fertilization, waste practices for agricultural irrigation Discuss the issues with managing animal wastes Name some biofuels

  13. Using timed automata and model-checking to simulate material flow in agricultural production systems—Application to animal waste management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnaud Hélias; François Guerrin; Jean-Philippe Steyer

    2008-01-01

    Due to intensification and specialisation of animal production and the increasing pressure of environmental regulations, the careful management of animal wastes becomes a key point for the sustainability of livestock farming. This paper addresses the dynamic representation of a network composed by a set of production units (i.e., livestock farms) that need to transfer their wastes to a set of

  14. Regulatory and Biosafety Issues in Relation to Transgenic Animals in Food and Agriculture, Feeds Containing Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) and Veterinary Biologics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. P. S. Kochhar; G. A. Gifford; S. Kahn

    Development of an effective regulatory system for genetically engineered animals and their products has been the subject of increasing discussion among researchers, industry and policy developers, as well as the public. Since transgenesis and cloning are relatively new scientific techniques, transgenic animals are new organisms for which there is limited information. The issues associated with the regulation and biosafety of

  15. 9 CFR 98.33 - Ports designated for the importation of certain animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Certain Animal Semen § 98.33 Ports designated for the importation of certain animal semen....

  16. 9 CFR 98.33 - Ports designated for the importation of certain animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Certain Animal Semen § 98.33 Ports designated for the importation of certain animal semen....

  17. 9 CFR 98.33 - Ports designated for the importation of certain animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Certain Animal Semen § 98.33 Ports designated for the importation of certain animal semen....

  18. 9 CFR 98.35 - Declaration, health certificate, and other documents for animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Certain Animal Semen § 98.35 Declaration, health certificate, and other documents for animal...

  19. 9 CFR 98.33 - Ports designated for the importation of certain animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Certain Animal Semen § 98.33 Ports designated for the importation of certain animal semen....

  20. 9 CFR 98.35 - Declaration, health certificate, and other documents for animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Certain Animal Semen § 98.35 Declaration, health certificate, and other documents for animal...

  1. 9 CFR 98.35 - Declaration, health certificate, and other documents for animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Certain Animal Semen § 98.35 Declaration, health certificate, and other documents for animal...

  2. 9 CFR 98.35 - Declaration, health certificate, and other documents for animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Certain Animal Semen § 98.35 Declaration, health certificate, and other documents for animal...

  3. 9 CFR 98.35 - Declaration, health certificate, and other documents for animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Certain Animal Semen § 98.35 Declaration, health certificate, and other documents for animal...

  4. 9 CFR 98.33 - Ports designated for the importation of certain animal semen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Certain Animal Semen § 98.33 Ports designated for the importation of certain animal semen....

  5. Animal Tracks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    For those of us living in Northern climates, when winter snow covers the landscape it provides great conditions to search for animal tracks. The following websites provide an abundance of information and resources about the ancient art of animal tracking.The first site(1 ), Beartracker's Animal Tracks Den, is an excellent comprehensive "online field guide to tracks and tracking." The site includes animal track images, photos, as well as information about mammals, reptiles, birds, insects, amphibians, and other tracking resources. The second site (2), is an article by Jon C. Boren, Extension Wildlife Specialist and Byron D. Wright, Agricultural Specialist both from the University of New Mexico entitled Identifying and Preserving Wildlife Tracks. The third site (3), on Tracking and Stalking Wildlife, comes from The Virtual Cub Scout Leader's Handbook and provides short information pages on a variety on animals including photos and images of tracks. The fourth site (4) is a well-organized lesson plan with activities on Animal Signs from Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center. The fifth site (5) is the Outdoor Action Guide to Animal Tracking by Rick Curtis of Princeton University. This website provides solid and detailed information on many aspects of animal tracking including parts of a track, pattern classification, aging tracks, and more. The sixth site (6) is an article by veteran tracker Jim Halfpenny, Ph.D. about how to determine the accurate track size for an animal. Site visitors can link from this article to the homepage for A Naturalist's World which has information about tracking classes offered in various North American locations. For anyone interested in developing their animal tracking skills, the final two websites also offer courses from very experienced trackers in different regions of North America. The seventh site (7), Tom Brown's Tracker School is the largest school of its kind with locations in New Jersey, California, and Florida. The eighth site, (8) Wilderness Awareness School is located in Washington but offers courses in other regions as well. This website also provides an extensive list of links for many other tracking resources.

  6. Genet. Sel. Evol. 35 (2003) 657671 657 INRA, EDP Sciences, 2003

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01

    , School of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, P Grass, National Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Service, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing 100094, P.R. China b Center of Preservation and Utilization of Germplasm Resource of Animal Husbandry and Forage

  7. Animal Science Curriculum (BS) (effective Spring Quarter 2011)

    E-print Network

    Selmic, Sandra

    Animal Science Curriculum (BS) (effective Spring Quarter 2011) Freshman Year Animal Science 111..........................................3 Animal Science 201, 202, 204 or 211....................... 3 Biological Sciences 260 Agricultural Business Any 300 or 400 level..................................................3 Animal Science

  8. Ecological implications of traditional livestock husbandry and associated land use practices: A case study from the trans-Himalaya, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Chandrasekhar; K. S. Rao; R. K. Maikhuri; K. G. Saxena

    2007-01-01

    The importance of indigenous knowledge is being increasingly realized for identifying sustainable interventions enabling environmental conservation coupled with socio-economic development of local communities. This study aimed to evaluate livestock diet composition, diet overlap, forage selection and livestock husbandry and associated land use practices in a typical traditional village landscape in the cold arid region of the trans-Himalaya, India. The village

  9. The Post-Diploma B.A. degree program in Agricultural Studies employs a multidisciplinary perspective, including courses in Agricultural Studies, Economics, Geography, and other Humanities and Social Science

    E-print Network

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    Agricultural Business Agricultural Production and Management (formerly Agricultural Production) Animal HealthThe Post-Diploma B.A. degree program in Agricultural Studies employs a multidisciplinary perspective, including courses in Agricultural Studies, Economics, Geography, and other Humanities and Social

  10. Data warehouse for assessing animal health, welfare, risk management and -communication.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Annette Cleveland

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give an overview of existing databases in Denmark and describe some of the most important of these in relation to establishment of the Danish Veterinary and Food Administrations' veterinary data warehouse. The purpose of the data warehouse and possible use of the data are described. Finally, sharing of data and validity of data is discussed. There are databases in other countries describing animal husbandry and veterinary antimicrobial consumption, but Denmark will be the first country relating all data concerning animal husbandry, -health and -welfare in Danish production animals to each other in a data warehouse. Moreover, creating access to these data for researchers and authorities will hopefully result in easier and more substantial risk based control, risk management and risk communication by the authorities and access to data for researchers for epidemiological studies in animal health and welfare. PMID:21999393

  11. Agriculture Education. Agriculture Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary agricultural education students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in agriculture structures. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) shop safety, (2) identification and general use of hand tools, (3) power tools, (4) carpentry, (5) blueprint…

  12. Impacts of trypanosomiasis on African agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brent M. Swallow

    African animal trypanosomiasis constrains agricultural production in areas of Africa that hold the continent's greatest potential for expanded agricultural production. Compared to animals kept in trypanosomiasis free areas, animals kept in areas of moderate risk of trypanosomiasis have lower calving rates, lower milk yields, higher rates of calf mortality, and require more frequent treatment with preventive and curative doses of

  13. Disease spread models to estimate highly uncertain emerging diseases losses for animal agriculture insurance policies: an application to the U.S. farm-raised catfish industry.

    PubMed

    Zagmutt, Francisco J; Sempier, Stephen H; Hanson, Terril R

    2013-10-01

    Emerging diseases (ED) can have devastating effects on agriculture. Consequently, agricultural insurance for ED can develop if basic insurability criteria are met, including the capability to estimate the severity of ED outbreaks with associated uncertainty. The U.S. farm-raised channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) industry was used to evaluate the feasibility of using a disease spread simulation modeling framework to estimate the potential losses from new ED for agricultural insurance purposes. Two stochastic models were used to simulate the spread of ED between and within channel catfish ponds in Mississippi (MS) under high, medium, and low disease impact scenarios. The mean (95% prediction interval (PI)) proportion of ponds infected within disease-impacted farms was 7.6% (3.8%, 22.8%), 24.5% (3.8%, 72.0%), and 45.6% (4.0%, 92.3%), and the mean (95% PI) proportion of fish mortalities in ponds affected by the disease was 9.8% (1.4%, 26.7%), 49.2% (4.7%, 60.7%), and 88.3% (85.9%, 90.5%) for the low, medium, and high impact scenarios, respectively. The farm-level mortality losses from an ED were up to 40.3% of the total farm inventory and can be used for insurance premium rate development. Disease spread modeling provides a systematic way to organize the current knowledge on the ED perils and, ultimately, use this information to help develop actuarially sound agricultural insurance policies and premiums. However, the estimates obtained will include a large amount of uncertainty driven by the stochastic nature of disease outbreaks, by the uncertainty in the frequency of future ED occurrences, and by the often sparse data available from past outbreaks. PMID:23560798

  14. Agriculture Education Curriculum Grades 6-12 (BS)

    E-print Network

    Selmic, Sandra

    Agriculture Education Curriculum Grades 6-12 (BS) Freshman Year English (GER) English 101, 102..................................................... 3 Agricultural Science 209,211..............................3 Animal Science 111...................................................3 Agricultural Business 220................................... 3 Content Electives

  15. Animal cloning: problems and prospects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. N. Wells

    2005-01-01

    Summary An efficient animal cloning technology would provide many new opportunities for livestock agriculture, human medicine, and animal conservation. Nuclear cloning involves the production of animals that are genetically identical to the donor cells used in a technique known as nuclear transfer (NT). However, at present it is an inefficient process: in cattle, only around 6% of the embryos transferred

  16. Agricultural & Environmental Sciences eap.ucop.edu

    E-print Network

    Hernes, Peter J.

    Agricultural & Environmental Sciences eap.ucop.edu #12;UC Education Abroad Program Special Focus Pilot Program in Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Wageningen University and Research Centre, animal sciences, environmental sciences, agrotechnology, food technology, nutrition, and biodiversity

  17. Introduction Agriculture/Agricultural Science

    E-print Network

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    38 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Agriculture/Agricultural Science Mission and goal of the Graduate School of Agricultural Science The mission of agricultural science organization which aims to realize this agricultural ideal, the Graduate School of Agricultural Science's basic

  18. School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences An investigation into factors affecting elephant welfare in UK zoos

    E-print Network

    Evans, Paul

    School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences An investigation into factors affecting elephant welfare in UK zoos A DEFRA-commissioned study to assess the `Welfare, Housing and Husbandry of Elephants in UK Zoos` identified areas for improvement relating to the continued maintenance of elephants in UK

  19. Standardization and the 3Rconcept in animal testing : effects and benefits of refinement in two test protocols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Verwer

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the impact of housing- and husbandry conditions and experimental procedures on the outcome of animal studies. The aim was 1) to improve the quality of experimental data by limiting confounding factors, either in a qualitative or quantitative way, and 2) to reduce the variance of experimental results. The ultimate goal was to suggest ways

  20. out in areas that are not suitable for agriculture and forage production ; in these situations, animals adapted to the harsh tropical environments are required. Due to superior resistance

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) but considerable increases in milk output are available by upgrading nondescript animals to the recognized dairy highly improved European cattle. Selection should be carried out in the type of environment where of these zones it is concluded that very important questions remain concerning which breed types to use, given

  1. Artificial Animals for Computer Animation

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    animals. We create self-animating, autonomous agents which emulate the realistic appearance, movementArtificial Animals for Computer Animation: Biomechanics, Locomotion, Perception, and Behavior ¡ Xiaoyuan Tu 1996 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED #12;Artificial Animals for Computer Animation: Biomechanics

  2. 7 CFR 318.47-4 - Shipments by the Department of Agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shipments by the Department of Agriculture. 318.47-4 Section 318.47-4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT...

  3. 7 CFR 318.47-4 - Shipments by the Department of Agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shipments by the Department of Agriculture. 318.47-4 Section 318.47-4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT...

  4. 7 CFR 318.47-4 - Shipments by the Department of Agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shipments by the Department of Agriculture. 318.47-4 Section 318.47-4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT...

  5. 7 CFR 318.47-4 - Shipments by the Department of Agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shipments by the Department of Agriculture. 318.47-4 Section 318.47-4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT...

  6. 7 CFR 318.47-4 - Shipments by the Department of Agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shipments by the Department of Agriculture. 318.47-4 Section 318.47-4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT...

  7. Anthrax in animals and humans in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Odontsetseg, N; Sh, Tserendorj; Adiyasuren, Z; Uuganbayar, D; Mweene, A S

    2007-12-01

    Anthrax is endemic throughout Mongolia, except in the semi-desert and desert areas of the south. The prevalence of anthrax in Mongolia had drastically decreased since the 1950s due to the use of anthrax antiserum and vaccines, but the privatisation of the animal husbandry sector and changes in the structures of the veterinary and medical delivery systems in Mongolia over the last decade have resulted in challenges for disease control. Animal and human anthrax has become an increasing problem since the mid-1990s. Human cutaneous anthrax is common in Mongolia as a result of exposure to infected animals. In this paper, the authors identify potential causes forthe increase of anthrax in Mongolia. The current prevention efforts may not be adequate. Anthrax surveillance and control must be intensified, particularly in areas of high prevalence. PMID:18293618

  8. Animal welfare and meat quality: the perspective of Uruguay, a "small" exporter country.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, M; Brito, G; Montossi, F; Soares de Lima, J M; San Julián, R

    2014-11-01

    Public sensitivity towards animal welfare has risen in recent years. Uruguay is a primary meat exporter. Therefore, it is compulsory not only to provide good quality and safe meat, but also to project a welfare friendly image. Uruguayan meat production systems are mainly based on rangeland pastures but, due to international meat prices and the opening of new markets, intensive fattening systems increased. These systems include a wide range of feeding alternatives between pasture and concentrate utilization, involving differences in terms of animal welfare, carcass and meat quality, that require to be studied. Accordingly, some husbandry practices associated mainly with extensive systems must be evaluated, as well as their applicability to international recommendations related to pre-slaughter handling which may not be suitable for local conditions. In the present paper we share scientific results related to the impact of different production systems, husbandry practices and pre-slaughter procedures associated to animal welfare and meat quality in Uruguayan conditions. PMID:25052465

  9. Saskatchewan Agricultural

    E-print Network

    Peak, Derek

    Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame College of Agriculture and Bioresources Inductees 2014 Edition #12;"SALUTE TO SASKATCHEWAN FARM LEADERS" Photos courtesy of the Saskatchewan Agriculture Hall Williams 1941- Lorne Alan Babiuk 1946- #12;"SALUTE TO SASKATCHEWAN FARM LEADERS" Photos courtesy

  10. Animal and Range Sciences Department Protocols for Animals Brought to MSU Farm Units

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Animal and Range Sciences Department Protocols for Animals Brought to MSU Farm Units March 2003 or delivered to the Animal and Range Sciences Department PRIOR to arrival of the animals. o Horses that arrive cattle involved in rodeo. College of Agriculture Animal and Range Sciences Department Michael W. Tess, Ph

  11. Shared Knowledge for Addressing Impacts of Land Use Transitions on Reindeer Husbandry in Northern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N.; Yurchak, B.; Sleptsov, Y.; Turi, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    Reindeer husbandry in Northern Russia is an economic activity with a special cultural dimension of utmost importance to the indigenous peoples. Climate changes with warmer temperatures are creating significant problems now in the Arctic for the reindeer herds. These climate factors, industrial development, and the recent transition of Russia to a market economy have resulted in a nearly complete disruption of any system of supply of goods and services and health care to indigenous peoples. In turn, this has caused rapidly deteriorating health and living conditions in the indigenous reindeer herder communities. To try to address some of these issues, a NASA-reindeer herder partnership, called Reindeer Mapper, has been initiated which is establishing a system to bring indigenous traditional and local knowledge together with scientific and engineering knowledge, remote sensing and information technologies to create a more powerful information base for addressing these environmental, climate, industrial, political, and business problems. Preliminary results from the Reindeer Mapper pilot project will be presented including a special information-sharing communications system for the Reindeer Mapper project (a private intranet system), several NASA data sets useful to the herders including SAR and Landsat imagery, local knowledge of herd distributions, ground-based data, and weather observations. Results will also be presented from the first NASA-reindeer herder science and indigenous knowledge summer camp for children of reindeer herders from the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia).

  12. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Assistant Professor in Animal Sciences

    E-print Network

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Assistant Professor in Animal Sciences Department of Animal and Food Sciences College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment Lexington, Kentucky The Department of Animal and Food Sciences invites applications for an Assistant Professor in Animal Sciences position, 12-month tenure track

  13. ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED AGRICULTURAL

    E-print Network

    and toxic blue-green algae to removing pollutants from soil and water using plants and other natural NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID GRAND RAPIDS, MI PERMIT NO. 1 109 Agriculture Hall Michigan State human needs water to live, as do the plants and animals that provide us with food and shelter. According

  14. Composting Large Animal Carcasses 

    E-print Network

    Auvermann, Brent W.; Mukhtar, Saqib; Heflin, Kevin

    2006-10-31

    Disposing of large animal carcasses can be a problem for agricultural producers. Composting is a simple, low-cost method that yields a useful product that can be used as fertilizer. In this publication you'll learn the basics of composting, how...

  15. [From Rumanian folk medicine: Non-specific stimulus therapy using transcutaneous implantation of hellebore (Helleborus purpurascens, Fam. Ranunculaceae) in agriculturally useful animals].

    PubMed

    Bogdan, I; Nechifor, A; B??ea, I; Hruban, E

    1990-12-01

    In the Rumanian traditional medicine a transcutaneous implantation of the root of Helleborus purpurascens is used to provoke leucocytosis and neutrophils with the aim to activate chronic diseases for better healing. The skin is perforated with a thick needle (in cattle and horses in the area of the thorax, in sheep and pigs in the ear flap), the transplant is introduced and after 24 hours removed. Though the method is more than 100 years old, it is not reported in the literature. The way of action is unknown. The investigation are performed to show the efficacy of this method of Helleborus-implants in comparison with the effect of an placebo. It could be shown that Helleborus-implant increased leucocytes in horses, sheep and pigs and increased neutrophils in all animal species. In the same way the phagocytosis was increased. Only in horses an abscess was observed. As a loss of performance may occur and fever and inappetence is followed by the implantation the authors dissuade from the use of Helleborus-implants in cattle and horses. Pigs and sheep tolerate this procedure without any problems, so that the methods may be used in modern treatment. PMID:2088706

  16. Optimal husbandry of hatchling Eastern Indigo Snakes (Drymarchon couperi) during a captive head-start program.

    PubMed

    Wines, Michael P; Johnson, Valerie M; Lock, Brad; Antonio, Fred; Godwin, James C; Rush, Elizabeth M; Guyer, Craig

    2015-05-01

    Optimal husbandry techniques are desirable for any headstart program, but frequently are unknown for rare species. Here we describe key reproductive variables and determine optimal incubation temperature and diet diversity for Eastern Indigo Snakes (Drymarchon couperi) grown in laboratory settings. Optimal incubation temperature was estimated from two variables dependent on temperature, shell dimpling, a surrogate for death from fungal infection, and deviation of an egg from an ovoid shape, a surrogate for death from developmental anomalies. Based on these relationships and size at hatching we determined optimal incubation temperature to be 26°C. Additionally, we used incubation data to assess the effect of temperature on duration of incubation and size of hatchlings. We also examined hatchling diets necessary to achieve optimal growth over a 21-month period. These snakes exhibited a positive linear relationship between total mass eaten and growth rate, when individuals were fed less than 1711?g of prey, and displayed constant growth for individuals exceeding 1711?g of prey. Similarly, growth rate increased linearly with increasing diet diversity up to a moderately diverse diet, followed by constant growth for higher levels of diet diversity. Of the two components of diet diversity, diet evenness played a stronger role than diet richness in explaining variance in hatchling growth. These patterns document that our goal of satiating snakes was achieved for some individuals but not others and that diets in which total grams consumed over the first 21 months of life is distributed equivalently among at least three prey genera yielded the fastest growth rates for hatchling snakes. Zoo Biol. 34:230-238, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc. PMID:25866094

  17. Investigation of the Influence of Odor Emission from Livestock Farms in the Surroundings Area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chung-Yi Chung; Pei-Ling Chung; Shao-Wei Liao; Wen-Liang Lai; Chang-Ling Miaw

    2011-01-01

    Animal husbandry always accumulates a large number of excrement that cause the serious air pollution problems if there were no effective air pollution prevention or controlling equipments. The odor was one of the serious problems of animal husbandry farms; it would influence the air quality in the surrounding residential area. There were 698 animal farms around the Pingtung Agricultural Biotechnology

  18. INFLUENCES GNTIQUES ET ENVIRONNEMENTALES SUR LES MCANISMES DE DFENSE

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    are described. Selection is based on performance testing of young kids. By the testing the animals are injected and environmental aspects of the immune response C.C. OOSTERLEE Department of Animal Husbandry, Agricultural be immunosuppressive. In modern animal husbandry practice.such factors exist and can influence disease resistance

  19. Animal Reproduction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Topic in Depth takes a look at organizations and educational websites concerned with reproduction in humans and other animals. The Society for the Study of Reproduction (SSR) "is an association of scientists and physicians interested in research in reproduction. Some members are engaged in basic or applied research, while others perform clinical practice." The SSR website (1) contains downloadable copies of the SSR Newsletter; position statements; and information about meetings, awards, and the organization. The Society for Reproduction and Fertility (SRF) "is open to scientists and students worldwide, who work on any aspect of reproductive biology or fertility in man and animals." The SRF website (2) contains sections regarding News, Events, Jobs, Honours, and Grants. SRF makes downloadable copies of its newsletter available as well. The primary aim of the European Society of Human Reproduction & Embryology (ESHRE) "is to promote interest in, and understanding of, reproductive biology and medicine. It does this through facilitating research and subsequent dissemination of research findings in human reproduction and embryology to the general public, scientists, clinicians and patient associations; it also works to inform politicians and policy makers throughout Europe." The ESHRE site (3) contains information about activities, membership, publications, special interest groups, and jobs. The primary function of the Centre for Reproductive Biology in Uppsala (CRU) "is to increase the knowledge about reproduction in animals and humans by applying a more comprehensive view on reproductive biology." CRU is composed of scientists from both Uppsala University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Science. The CRU site (4) contains information about a number of publications, and contact information for CRU members. The Population Council is a nonprofit "organization that conducts biomedical, social science, and public health research." The "Council's reproductive biology and immunology program undertakes fundamental research in the reproductive sciences and immunological processes related to sexually transmitted infections, particularly HIV." This website (5) provides information about different aspects of the research program including Germ Cell Dynamics, Sperm Maturation, and Physiology of Sertoli Cells. From Dr. Michael Gregory of Clinton Community College, the next site (6) is a concise overview of animal reproduction which addresses important aspects of sexual reproduction, and male and female reproductive systems. The final site (7) contains lecture notes regarding avian reproduction from Dr. Gary Ritchison's Ornithology course at Eastern Kentucky University. The lecture notes are interspersed with some especially nice images and diagrams.

  20. Animal feeds from waste materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gillies

    1978-01-01

    As any dirt farmer knows, cattle and poultry manure, sewage, and other animal waste products can be utilized directly in the producion of certain animal feeds (e.g. for piglets and chicks) without going through the agricultural cycle. In addition there are proven nutritional values in by-products from sugar factories, breweries, the dairy industry, and from the processing of wood, to

  1. AgExcellence 2007 The College of Agriculture and Montana Agricultural Experiment Station in Review

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    and Ranch Management Minor: Agricultural Business Master of Science: Applied Economics Animal and Range Sciences Baccalaureate: Animal Science Options: Equine Science Livestock Management and Industry Science and Management Minors: Animal Science Natural Resources and Rangeland Ecology Master of Science: Animal and Range

  2. Agricultural Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... submitted to the docket by May 27, 2015. Agriculture ranks among the most hazardous industries. Farmers are ... and illnesses experienced by workers and families in agriculture. NIOSH supports intramural research and funds extramural research ...

  3. Agricultural Operations

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Agriculture ranks among the most dangerous industries. Between 2003 ... by several Occupational Safety and Health standards including Agriculture ( 29 CFR 1928 ), General Industry ( 29 CFR 1910 ), ...

  4. Dairy animal welfare: current and needed research.

    PubMed

    Albright, J L

    1987-12-01

    Of 25 milestones in dairy animal welfare, 10 were linked to laws and regulations, 9 to research, education, and development, 4 to books and publications, and 2 to human error (accidents). Animal rightists have attacked the dairy industry because of farm conditions, bovine somatotropin, overproduction of milk, dairy lobbies, and advertising of milk products. Evidence from Europe suggests that animal welfare has been largely promoted as a sociopolitical issue by nonagriculturalists. Codes, guidelines, and recommendations are well-established for northern Europe. The American Veterinary Medical Association Animal Welfare Committee has prepared the pamphlet on food animal welfare and addressed specific bovine welfare issues in its guide for veal calf care and production. From 1978 to 1986, only four US experiment station projects were concerned with dairy animal welfare. Needed research includes studying learned helplessness; analysis and economics of alternative husbandry systems for veal calves (and cows) freestall design and surfaces; and shade, cooling, and misting of mangers and holding pens prior to entering the parlor. Alert caretakers are encouraged to read behavior signals of cattle. Increased standing of cattle is often taken now as a sign of discomfort or discontent in studies of cow and calf confinement. Criteria that should be considered in assessing welfare or well-being are behavior, health, musculoskeletal soundness, productivity, physiological and biochemical characteristics, and reproduction. PMID:3329200

  5. Agriculture INTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    1 Agriculture INTRODUCTION 1.1 Although its share in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has declined from over half at Independence to less than one-fifth currently, agriculture remains the predominant sector in it as the principal occupation. Agriculture still contributes significantly to export earnings and is an important

  6. Serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella spp. isolated from farm animals in China.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xiuhua; Hao, Haihong; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Yulian; Ahmad, Ijaz; Liu, Zhenli; Zonghui, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella spp. can indirectly infect humans via transfer from animals and animal-derived food products, and thereby cause potentially fatal diseases. Therefore, gaining an understanding of Salmonella infection in farm animals is increasingly important. The aim of this study was to identify the distribution of serotypes in Salmonella samples isolated from chickens (n = 837), pigs (n = 930), and dairy cows (n = 418) in central China (Henan, Hubei, and Hunan provinces) in 2010-2011, and investigate the susceptibility of strains to antimicrobial agents. Salmonella isolates were identified by PCR amplification of the invA gene, serotypes were determined by using a slide agglutination test for O and H antigens, and susceptibility to 24 antimicrobials was tested using the agar dilution method. In total, 248 Salmonella strains were identified: 105, 105, and 38 from chickens, dairy cows, and pigs, respectively. Additionally, 209 strains were identified in diseased pigs from the Huazhong Agricultural University veterinary hospital. Among these 457 strains, the dominant serotypes were Typhimurium in serogroup B, IIIb in serogroup C, and Enteritidis in serogroup D. In antimicrobial susceptibility tests, 41.14% of Salmonella spp. were susceptible to all antimicrobial agents, 48.14% were resistant to at least one, and 34.72% were resistant to more than three classes. Strains were highly resistant to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (39.61%), nalidixic acid (39.17%), doxycycline (28.22%), and tetracycline (27.58%). Resistance to cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones ranged from 5.25 to 7.44% and 19.04 to 24.51%, respectively. Among penicillin-resistant and cephalosporin-resistant strains, 25 isolates produced extended-spectrum ?-lactamases (ESBLs). The multidrug-resistant and ESBL-producing Salmonella strains identified in healthy animals here will present a challenge for veterinary medicine and farm animal husbandry, and could also pose a threat to public health. The level of antibiotic resistance observed in this study further highlights the need for careful and selective use of antibiotics. PMID:26157426

  7. Serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella spp. isolated from farm animals in China

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Xiuhua; Hao, Haihong; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Yulian; Ahmad, Ijaz; Liu, Zhenli; Zonghui, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella spp. can indirectly infect humans via transfer from animals and animal-derived food products, and thereby cause potentially fatal diseases. Therefore, gaining an understanding of Salmonella infection in farm animals is increasingly important. The aim of this study was to identify the distribution of serotypes in Salmonella samples isolated from chickens (n = 837), pigs (n = 930), and dairy cows (n = 418) in central China (Henan, Hubei, and Hunan provinces) in 2010–2011, and investigate the susceptibility of strains to antimicrobial agents. Salmonella isolates were identified by PCR amplification of the invA gene, serotypes were determined by using a slide agglutination test for O and H antigens, and susceptibility to 24 antimicrobials was tested using the agar dilution method. In total, 248 Salmonella strains were identified: 105, 105, and 38 from chickens, dairy cows, and pigs, respectively. Additionally, 209 strains were identified in diseased pigs from the Huazhong Agricultural University veterinary hospital. Among these 457 strains, the dominant serotypes were Typhimurium in serogroup B, IIIb in serogroup C, and Enteritidis in serogroup D. In antimicrobial susceptibility tests, 41.14% of Salmonella spp. were susceptible to all antimicrobial agents, 48.14% were resistant to at least one, and 34.72% were resistant to more than three classes. Strains were highly resistant to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (39.61%), nalidixic acid (39.17%), doxycycline (28.22%), and tetracycline (27.58%). Resistance to cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones ranged from 5.25 to 7.44% and 19.04 to 24.51%, respectively. Among penicillin-resistant and cephalosporin-resistant strains, 25 isolates produced extended-spectrum ?-lactamases (ESBLs). The multidrug-resistant and ESBL-producing Salmonella strains identified in healthy animals here will present a challenge for veterinary medicine and farm animal husbandry, and could also pose a threat to public health. The level of antibiotic resistance observed in this study further highlights the need for careful and selective use of antibiotics. PMID:26157426

  8. Animal Bites

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Never pet, handle, or feed unknown animals Leave snakes alone Watch your children closely around animals Vaccinate ... pants when you are in areas with venomous snakes If an animal bites you, clean the wound ...

  9. Exploring Animals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Miss Emily

    2009-03-02

    Each group will be given one of the following categories of animals to explore further and answer questions about. Mammals Invertebrates Fish Birds Amphibians Reptiles Explore your category of animals and answer these questions: 1. What makes an animal belong to this category? Do you think that an animal can only belong to one category? Why or why not? 2. Explain why these animals live where they do? 3. Does your category of animals have any interesting ...

  10. Agriculture 21

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    To "promote food security and sustainable development into the next millennium," the Agriculture Department of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations has recently created this new resource. An impressive and clearly arranged interface leads researchers to more than one gigabyte of data from various UN Agriculture Department sites. A detailed list of available software, databases, publication lists, and email conferences is provided via the Guides section of the site. Other services include Magazine, a monthly publication on international agricultural issues, and Gateway, a link pointing to UN Department of Agriculture divisional homepages.

  11. Determination of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to a semi-natural peat bog site in an intensively managed agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Mohr, Karsten; Grünhage, Ludger; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2014-11-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition have been found to affect the primary productivity and species composition of most terrestrial ecosystems. Highly vulnerable ecosystems such as nutrient-poor bogs are expected to respond to increasing N input rates with a decrease in plant species diversity. Our study site - a moderately drained raised bog and one of only very few remaining protected peatland areas in Northwestern Germany - is surrounded by highly fertilised agricultural land and intensive livestock production. We quantified the annual deposition of atmospheric N over a period of two years. Dry deposition rates of different N species and their reactants were calculated from day and night-time concentrations measured by a KAPS denuder filter system. Dry N deposition amounted to 10.9 ± 1.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (year 1) and 10.5 ± 1.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (year 2). More than 80% of total deposited N was attributed to ammonia (NH3). A strong seasonality in NH3 concentrations and depositions could be observed. Day and night-time concentrations and depositions, however, did not differ significantly. Total N deposition including bulk N deposition resulted in about 25 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Our results suggest that the intensive agricultural land management of surrounding areas and strongly emitting animal husbandry lead to N inputs into the protected peatland area that exceed the ecosystem's specific critical load up to fivefold. This gives rise to the assumption that a further shift in plant species composition with a subsequent alteration of the local hydrological regime can be expected.

  12. 7 CFR 319.8-20 - Importations by the Department of Agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...clearance through the New Crops Research Branch of the Plant Science Research Division, Agricultural Research...

  13. 7 CFR 319.8-20 - Importations by the Department of Agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...clearance through the New Crops Research Branch of the Plant Science Research Division, Agricultural Research...

  14. Intake of ²³?U and ²³²Th through the consumption of foodstuffs by tribal populations practicing slash and burn agriculture in an extremely high rainfall area.

    PubMed

    Jha, S K; Gothankar, S; Iongwai, P S; Kharbuli, B; War, S A; Puranik, V D

    2012-01-01

    The concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides ²³²Th, ²³?U was determined using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) in different food groups namely cereals, vegetables, leafy vegetables, roots and tubers cultivated and consumed by tribal population residing around the proposed uranium mine. The study area is a part of rural area K. P. Mawthabah (Domiasiat) in the west Khasi Hills District of Meghalaya, India located in the tropical region of high rainfall that remains steeped in tribal tradition without much outside influence. Agriculture by Jhum (slash and burn) cultivation and animal husbandry are the main occupation of the tribal populations. A total of 89 samples from locally grown food products were analyzed. The concentration of ²³?U and ²³²Th in the soil of the study area was found to vary 1.6-15.5 and 2.0-5.0 times respectively to the average mean value observed in India. The estimated daily dietary intake of ²³?U and ²³²Th were 2.0 ?g d?¹ (25 mBq d?¹) and 3.4 ?g d?¹ (14 mBq d?¹) is comparable with reported range 0.5-5.0 ?g d?¹ and 0.15-3.5 ?g d?¹ respectively for the Asian population. PMID:22036151

  15. College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology Applied Agricultural Management Option Checksheet for Students Graduating in Calendar Year 2013 Associate of Agriculture Degree Required Agricultural Technology Core Courses (31 credits) 3 AT 0104 Computer Applications 3 AT 0114 Applied

  16. MANAGING WATERBORNE PATHOGENS ASSOCIATED WITH CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pathogenic microorganisms of fecal origin are the leading cause of river and stream impairments in the United States. Runoff from agricultural operations, particularly animal agricultural, can be a major contributor of fecal microbial pollution in a watershed. Several management...

  17. Character Animation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A general discussion of the creation and animation of characters in computer animation. This section includes principles of traditional character animation techniques, such as those developed by the Disney animators, and also human modelling. The section includes html pages, images and several videos.

  18. Animal Diversity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Netlinks

    2004-02-05

    This lesson from Science NetLinks exposes children to a wide range of animals and guides them through observation of animal similarities, differences, and environmental adaptations. This lesson can be used as part of a study of plants and animals. Before doing the lesson, students should know the meanings of the terms: plant, animal, and living.

  19. Kaffir Corn and Milo Maize for Fattening Cattle. 

    E-print Network

    Marshall, F. R. (Frederick Rupert); Burns, John C.

    1907-01-01

    TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION: -- -- - - -- - - BULLETIN NO. 97. Animal Husbandry Section June, 1907. Kaffir Corn and Milo Mai Fattening Cattle BY F. R. MARSHAL AND J. C. BURNS, POSTOFFICE COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS... ....................................... M. FRANCIS. Veterinarian ...................................... E. J. KYLE.. Horticulturist ........................... F. R. MARSHALL. Animal Husbandry ............................... R. L. BENNETT.. Cotton Specialist...

  20. Ants and Sustainable Agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gero Benckiser

    \\u000a 60% of the world’s ecosystems are not used in a sustainable way. Modern agriculture is blamed for declining soil carbon and\\u000a biodiversity. Climate change, habitat fragmentation and other obstacles impede the movement of many animal species, and distribution\\u000a changes are projected to continue. Therefore, we need alternative management strategies. The colony organisation of social\\u000a insects, especially of ants, is seen

  1. Agricultural scientists

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Iowa Public Television. School to Careers Project

    2002-01-01

    What are agricultural scientists, and what do they actually do? This is the introductory page for a set of materials about agricultural science as a career. Here the job of an agricultural scientist is defined and described. In the rest of the resource, students can examine two specialized job titles associated with agricultural scientists: organic specialist/assistant professor and senior research associate. Students can read narratives that are a few paragraphs in length about an organic specialist and a senior research associate. In addition, the senior research associate poses a challenge to students that calls on them to investigate corn's resistance to insects. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

  2. Climate change, land use conflicts, predation and ecological degradation as challenges for reindeer husbandry in northern Europe: what do we really know after half a century of research?

    PubMed

    Pape, Roland; Löffler, Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Reindeer grazing has been entitled as ecological keystone in arctic-alpine landscapes. In addition, reindeer husbandry is tightly connected to the identity of the indigenous Sámi people in northern Europe. Nowadays, reindeer husbandry is challenged in several ways, of which pasture degradation, climate change, conflicting land uses and predation are the most important. Research on reindeer-related topics has been conducted for more than half a century and this review illuminates whether or not research is capable to match these challenges. Despite its high quality, traditional reindeer-related research is functionally isolated within the various disciplines. The meshwork of ecology, socio-economy, culture and politics, however, in which reindeer husbandry is embedded by various interactions, will remain unclear and difficult to manage, if actors and relationships are kept separate. We propose some targets for new integrative research approaches that incorporate traditional knowledge and focus on the entire human-ecological system 'reindeer husbandry' to develop solutions for its challenges. PMID:22451266

  3. Effects of husbandry conditions on the skin colour and stress response of red porgy, Pagrus pagrus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Van der Salm; M. Martínez; G. Flik; S. E. Wendelaar Bonga

    2004-01-01

    Red porgy, Pagrus pagrus, is a potential candidate for aquaculture. However, darkening of the body occurs after capture of wild fish and during farming of cultured animals. In fish, skin pigmentation is hormonally controlled and the main hormone involved in skin darkening, ?-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (?MSH), is not only involved in pigmentation but also in the regulation of the response to

  4. Effects of cattle husbandry on abundance and activity of methanogenic archaea in upland soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Viviane Radl; Andreas Gattinger; Alica Chro?áková; Anna N?mcová; Jiri ?uhel; Miloslav Šimek; Jean Charles Munch; Michael Schloter; Dana Elhottová

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that animal treading associated with a high input of organic matter would favour methanogenesis in soils used as overwintering pasture. Hence, methane emissions and methanogen populations were examined at sections with different degree of cattle impact in a Farm in South Bohemia, Czech Republic. In spring, methane emission positively corresponded to the

  5. The potential and sustainability of agricultural land use in a changing ecosystem in southern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Matthias; Caviezel, Chatrina; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2015-04-01

    Southern Greenland currently experiences an increase in summer temperatures and a prolonged growing season (Masson-Delmotte et al. 2012), resulting in an increased potential regarding agricultural land use. Subsequently, the agricultural sector is expected to grow. Thereby, a higher hay production and grazing capacity is pursued by applying more efficient farming practices (Greenland Agriculture Advisory Board 2009). However, agricultural potential at borderline ecotones is not only influenced by factors like temperature and growing season but also by other ecologic parameters. In addition, the intensification of land use in the fragile boreal - tundra border ecotone has various environmental impacts (Perren et al. 2012; Normand et al. 2013). Already the Norse settlers practiced animal husbandry in southern Greenland between 986-1450 AD. Several authors mention the unadapted land use as main reason for the demise of the Norse in Greenland, as grazing pressure exceeded the resilience of the landscape and pasture economy failed (Fredskild 1988; Perren et al. 2012). During the field work in summer 2014, we compared the pedologic properties of already used hay fields, grazed land, birch woodland and barren, unused land around Igaliku (South Greenland), in order to estimate the potential and the sustainability of the land use in southern Greenland. Beside physical soil properties, nutrient condition of the different land use types, the shrub woodland and barren areas was analyzed. The results of the study show that the most suitable areas for intensive agricultural activity are mostly occupied. Further on, the fields, which were used by the Norse, seem to be the most productive sites nowadays. Less productive hay fields are characterized by a higher coarse fraction, leading to a reduced ability to store water and to an unfavorable nutrient status. An intensification of the agricultural land use by applying fertilizer would lead to an increased environmental impact. Fredskild B (1988) Agriculture in a marginal area - South Greenland from the Norse landnam (985 A.D.) to the resent (1985 A.D.). In: Birks HH, Birks HJB, Kaland PE et al. (eds) The Cultural Landscape - Past, Present and Future, Cambridge University Press, pp. 381-393. Greenland Agriculture Advisory Board (2009). Available at: http://www.nunalerineq.gl/english/landbrug/index-landbrug.htm Masson-Delmotte, V., D. Swingedouw, A. Landais, M. S. Seidenkrantz, E. Gauthier, V. Bichet, C. Massa, B. Perren, V. Jomelli, and G. Adalgeirsdottir. 2012. "Greenland Climate Change: From the Past to the Future." Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/wcc.186/full. Normand, Signe, Christophe Randin, Ralf Ohlemüller, Christian Bay, Toke T. Høye, Erik D. Kjær, Christian Körner, et al. 2013. "A Greener Greenland? Climatic Potential and Long-Term Constraints on Future Expansions of Trees and Shrubs." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 368 (1624) (August 19): 20120479. doi:10.1098/rstb.2012.0479. Perren, B., B, Massa, C., Bichet, V., Gauthier, E., Mathieu, O., Petit, C., Richard, H. 2012. A paleoecological perspective on 1450 years of human impacts from a lake in southern Greenland. The Holocene, 22 (9), pp. 1025-1034.

  6. Agricultural Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, W. J.; Switzenbaum, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of agricultural wastes, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) water characteristics and impacts; (2) waste treatment; (3) reuse of agricultural wastes; and (4) nonpoint pollution sources. A list of 150 references is also presented. (HM)

  7. Flash Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This collections of Flash animations accompanies Chang's Essential Chemistry, 2/e, but is publically available. These animations are interactive and have voice-overs, thereby providing a multimedia presentation of basic chemical concepts.

  8. The impact of companion animal problems on society and the role of veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Voith, Victoria L

    2009-03-01

    The benefits of companion animals are immense, but there can be negative impacts also. Noise, destructive behaviors, excrement, bites, and the overpopulation of domestic cats and dogs are some of the major problems that can result in stress and hardships on owners, neighbors, the community, and the pets themselves. The perpetuation of pets in society requires that the negative aspects of living with dogs and cats be addressed. Veterinarians can play an important role in addressing these problems by incorporating the concept of behavior wellness into their practices and promoting education regarding husbandry, animal behavior, responsible pet ownership, and the effects of pets on the environment. PMID:19185196

  9. Going Forth and Multiplying: Animal Acclimatization and Invasion

    E-print Network

    Ritvo, Harriet

    The nineteenth century saw numerous transfers and attempted transfers of animal populations, mostly as the result of the spread of European agriculture. The exchange of animal populations facilitated by the acclimatization ...

  10. Incorporating Laptop Technologies into an Animal Sciences Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birrenkott, Glenn; Bertrand, Jean A.; Bolt, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Teaching animal sciences, like most agricultural disciplines, requires giving students hands-on learning opportunities in remote and often computer-unfriendly sites such as animal farms. How do faculty integrate laptop use into such an environment?

  11. 1 UW-Madison Animal Program Review Worksheet 2013 UW-Madison Animal Care and Use Program Review Worksheet: Spring 2013

    E-print Network

    1 UW-Madison Animal Program Review Worksheet 2013 UW-Madison Animal Care and Use Program Review Worksheet: Spring 2013 (based on Defining the Animal Care and Use Program, Lab Animal 34(10) 41-44, Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals 8th ed., and Guide for the Care and Use of Agricultural Animals

  12. 9 CFR 72.21 - Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.21 Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle. Animals...

  13. 9 CFR 72.21 - Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.21 Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle. Animals...

  14. 9 CFR 72.21 - Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.21 Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle. Animals...

  15. 9 CFR 72.21 - Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.21 Animals infested with or exposed to ticks subject to same restrictions as cattle. Animals...

  16. All farming operations that land apply manure or agricultural process wastewater, whether they generate the manure or import it from another operation, must have a written Manure Management Plan. All farming operations that include an Animal Concentra-

    E-print Network

    Guiltinan, Mark

    farming operations that include an Animal Concentra- tion Area (ACA) or pasture must have a written Manure Management Plan. For farms not defined as Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) or Concentrated Animal Operations (CAOs), Manure Management Plans can be prepared by the farmer, although the farmer may

  17. Computer Animation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A general discussion of computer animation. This section includes principles of camera animation, character animation and special effects such as particle systems. There is also a discussion of artificial life techniques such as the flocking algorithm and the graphical simulation of different types of life. This section includes html pages, images and several videos.

  18. Logical animation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. Costa; R. J. Cunningham; J. Booth

    1990-01-01

    When a formal specification of requirements is presented as a logical theory, symbolic animation of the theory can assist with validation. An animator displays a logical model of the formal specification. We show how minimal models can be derived from a tableau proof system. Examples illustrate the use of animation with a simple data base andfor validating specifications in the

  19. Animated Engines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Keveney, Matt

    This website includes a variety of animations explaining the mechanical workings of a variety of steam, Stirling and internal combustion engines. The animations may be paused, slowed or sped up. The animations are accompanied by additional text explaining how each engine works.

  20. Animal Scent

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

    2006-01-01

    This activity (on page 3 of the PDF) is a full inquiry investigation into animal behavior. Learners will create five or six scent blocks by rubbing wood blocks with different kitchen spices, foods, or animal scents. Then, learners let their pets investigate each block separately. Carefully observed behaviors are recorded for interpretation. Relates to linked video, DragonflyTV GPS: Animal Scent.

  1. Teaching Biology Using Agriculture as the Context: Perceptions of High School Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark A. Balschweid

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how high school students perceived science and agriculture after completing a traditional yearlong biology class that used animal agriculture as the context. The specific research questions asked respondents their perceptions concerning the relationship between science and agriculture, their perceptions of agriculture in general, and their knowledge of agriculture after completing a traditional

  2. NEW HAMPSHIRE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, MARKETS & FOOD DIVISION OF PESTICIDE CONTROL

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    NEW HAMPSHIRE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, MARKETS & FOOD DIVISION OF PESTICIDE CONTROL P O BOX 2042 AGRICULTURAL PEST CONTROL ­ FIELD CROPS A4 AGRICULTURAL PEST CONTROL - ANIMALS B RIGHT-OFWAY, AND COMMERCIAL: SUPERVISORY OPERATIONAL A1 AGRICULTURAL PEST CONTROL - FRUIT A2 AGRICULTURAL PEST CONTROL - HERBICIDES A3

  3. Agriculture Policy Briefing Book: Legislative Issues

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Congressional Research Service

    This website features links to information on legislative issues such as farm support, conservation and resources, animal agriculture, the 2002 Farm Bill and other topics. The research, analysis, and information on this website are provided by the Congressional Research Service.

  4. Agriculture Education. Agricultural Metal Working.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary agricultural education students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in agricultural metal working. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) oxyacetylene welding, (2) arc welding, (3) sheet metal, (4) blueprint reading for welders and (5) job…

  5. Animal Alert

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    This Web site from Animal Planet offers visitors the very latest news about animals around the globe. Scroll along the map of the world, and then click on an icon. A pop-up window will appear with a synopsis of a news story, a link to the full story, and a list of related features on the Animal Planet Web site. A key to the map icons is provided. The full news story page also provides general information and trivia about each animal. This is a great resource for anyone wishing to keep informed about animal-related current events without having to register for an email newsletter.

  6. Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture

    E-print Network

    Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture Sina Adl , David Iron and Theodore Agriculture | Pathogen Dispersal Introduction Organic farming [1, 2] is gaining in popularity in Eu- rope, because or- ganic agriculture avoids using environmentally harmful chem- icals that pollute soil

  7. Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture ­ Livestock, Crops and Land Use Report from a multidisciplinary research platform. Phase I (2009 ­ 2012) #12;Future Agriculture ­ Livestock Waldenström Utgivningsår: 2012, Uppsala Utgivare: SLU, Framtidens lantbruk/Future Agriculture Layout: Pelle

  8. Agricultural Production: Program Planning Guide: Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, William; Wood, Eugene

    The program planning guide for agricultural production was written to assist Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations (ABAO) teachers in enriching existing programs and/or to provide the basis for expansion of offerings to include additional materials for the cluster areas of animal science, plant science, farm mechanics, and farm business…

  9. Secondary and Postsecondary Agricultural Competency Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This articulation project includes competencies for secondary and postsecondary vocational agriculture in the cluster areas of animal science, plant science, and agricultural management. Each cluster includes three types of competencies: secondary competencies; postsecondary competencies; and a combination of secondary and postsecondary…

  10. Enhancing Water Use Efficiency in Irrigated Agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terry A. Howell

    2001-01-01

    Irrigated agriculture is a vital component of total agriculture and the world's food production to keep pace with its grow- supplies many of the fruits, vegetables, and cereal foods consumed ing population, if that is even possible. Sinclair et al. by humans; the grains fed to animals that are used as human food; (1984) described WUE on various scales from

  11. USDA APHIS-PPQ agriculture safeguard program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In 1998, the National Plant Board (NPB) reviewed the US Department of Agriculture (USDA)'s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) efforts to safeguard American agriculture and plant resources. The NPB review is presented here in full (in .pdf format).

  12. Agribusiness Management. The Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    These materials in agribusiness management for the Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum were designed for use in the following areas: Animal Science; Plant Science; Agricultural Mechanics; and Natural Resources and Aquaculture. Each unit of this competency-based guide contains title of unit, unit length, grade level, objectives, teacher…

  13. Undergraduate Teaching in the Animal Sciences, Proceedings of a Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Education in Agriculture and Natural Resources, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings of a conference which reviewed the content of undergraduate animal science curricula, content of courses in the animal sciences, and methods and materials used in undergraduate teaching in the animal sciences are presented in this bulletin. These individual papers are included: Trends in Animal Agriculture and the Future of…

  14. Agricultural Education--Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    This compilation presents over 950 resumes of instructional materials in agricultural education, which have appeared quarterly in "Abstracts of Instructional Materials in Vocational and Technical Education" (AIM), Fall 1967 through Fall 1971. Resumes cover a broad range of fields and occupations, such as agribusiness, agronomy, animal and plant…

  15. Wisconsin Agriculture SPECIAL ARTICLE

    E-print Network

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF Wisconsin Agriculture 2009 · SPECIAL ARTICLE: Bioenergy and Agriculture in Wisconsin Economy Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2009 An annual report by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department

  16. Water Animation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Kyrk

    This Flash animation provides a detailed explanation of the chemistry and properties of water. Animated diagrams accompanied by written explanations show the configuration of the water molecule, how water molecules link together, what the crystal structure of ice looks like, and how acids and bases are formed. There is also an animated diagram of the pH scale showing the range in which most cellular processes occur and the approximate pH of some common substances. A French translation is available.

  17. NMR Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site features animated tutorials on NMR with sufficient depth to be useful to the non NMR savvy. The animations are accompanied by short descriptions so that the processes displayed can be understood by the viewer. This site goes beyond just showing precession. There are nice animations showing the effect of different pulses, including composite pulses on the magnetization, the effects of magnetic gradient pulses to measure diffusion and do coherence pathway selection.

  18. Astronomy Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This collection of animations introduces students to planetary motions, gravitational effects, and the scale of astronomical distances. Students can view visualizations of Earth's changing seasons, circumpolar motion, and the celestial equator and ecliptic plane. Animations on gravity explain how satellites orbit, the motions of comets and meteor storms, and gravitational 'warping'. Other animations explain how Earth's tides are produced, how astronomical distances are calculated, the use of spectra in astronomy, and the lifecycles of stars.

  19. [Leptospirosis: occupational risk in the chain of food of animal origin].

    PubMed

    Colavita, G; Paoletti, M

    2007-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonotic infection. The source of infection in humans is usually either direct or indirect contact with the urine of infected animals. Occupation is a significant risk factor for humans. Direct contact with infected animals accounts for most infections in farmers, veterinarians, abattoir workers, meat inspectors. The highest risk is associated with swine farming, slaughterhouse and meat industry workers. Most cases are diagnosed by serology. Leptospirosis may be prevented trought appropriate hygiene, sanitization, animal husbandry. It is essential to educate people working with animals or animal tissues about measures for reducing the risk of exposure to Leptospira. Protective clothing provided included an apron, gloves and rubber boots. When the risk is high, serologic testing are useful also. PMID:17569414

  20. Neurobiology: Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From Blackwell Publishing, this entertaining series of animations is part of a companion website for _Neurobiology: Molecules, Cells and Systems_, a textbook by Gary G. Matthews. The ten instructive and easy-to-understand animations are worth a visit by anyone who has a curiosity about neurobiology. Animation titles include: Mechanosensory Transduction in Hair Cells, Granule Cell Migration Along Radial Glial Cells, Photo isomerization of Rhodopsin, and Propagation of the Action Potential, and more. For visitors lacking Macromedia Flash Player, which is necessary to view these animations, the site provides a link to a free Player download.

  1. Animal cytomegaloviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Staczek, J

    1990-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses are agents that infect a variety of animals. Human cytomegalovirus is associated with infections that may be inapparent or may result in severe body malformation. More recently, human cytomegalovirus infections have been recognized as causing severe complications in immunosuppressed individuals. In other animals, cytomegaloviruses are often associated with infections having relatively mild sequelae. Many of these sequelae parallel symptoms associated with human cytomegalovirus infections. Recent advances in biotechnology have permitted the study of many of the animal cytomegaloviruses in vitro. Consequently, animal cytomegaloviruses can be used as model systems for studying the pathogenesis, immunobiology, and molecular biology of cytomegalovirus-host and cytomegalovirus-cell interactions. PMID:2170830

  2. Assessing and Mitigating N2O Emissions from Agricultural Soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Mosier; J. M. Duxbury; J. R. Freney; O. Heinemeyer; K. Minami

    1998-01-01

    Agricultural cropping and animal production systems are important sources of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O). The assessment of the importance of N fertilization from synthetic fertilizer, animal wastes used as fertilizers and from N incorporated into the soil through biological N fixation, to global N2O emissions presented in this paper suggests that this source has been underestimated. We estimate that agricultural

  3. Identification of Emerging Science Competencies in Agriculture. Vocational Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge. School of Vocational Education.

    A research project identified new and emerging science concepts that should be taught in high school vocational agriculture. Agricultural scientists on an advisory panel identified the emerging science concepts. The majority were in the areas of plant science and animal science. Animal science was completely reorganized with greater emphasis on…

  4. Effects of land use, topography and socio-economic factors on river water quality in a mountainous watershed with intensive agricultural production in East china.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiabo; Lu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the primary effects of anthropogenic activities and natural factors on river water quality is important in the study and efficient management of water resources. In this study, analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Principal component analysis (PCA), Pearson correlations, Multiple regression analysis (MRA) and Redundancy analysis (RDA) were applied as an integrated approach in a GIS environment to explore the temporal and spatial variations in river water quality and to estimate the influence of watershed land use, topography and socio-economic factors on river water quality based on 3 years of water quality monitoring data for the Cao-E River system. The statistical analysis revealed that TN, pH and temperature were generally higher in the rainy season, whereas BOD5, DO and turbidity were higher in the dry season. Spatial variations in river water quality were related to numerous anthropogenic and natural factors. Urban land use was found to be the most important explanatory variable for BOD5, CODMn, TN, DN, NH4+-N, NO3--N, DO, pH and TP. The animal husbandry output per capita was an important predictor of TP and turbidity, and the gross domestic product per capita largely determined spatial variations in EC. The remaining unexplained variance was related to other factors, such as topography. Our results suggested that pollution control of animal waste discharge in rural settlements, agricultural runoff in cropland, industrial production pollution and domestic pollution in urban and industrial areas were important within the Cao-E River basin. Moreover, the percentage of the total overall river water quality variance explained by an individual variable and/or all environmental variables (according to RDA) can assist in quantitatively identifying the primary factors that control pollution at the watershed scale. PMID:25090375

  5. Effects of Land Use, Topography and Socio-Economic Factors on River Water Quality in a Mountainous Watershed with Intensive Agricultural Production in East China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiabo; Lu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the primary effects of anthropogenic activities and natural factors on river water quality is important in the study and efficient management of water resources. In this study, analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Principal component analysis (PCA), Pearson correlations, Multiple regression analysis (MRA) and Redundancy analysis (RDA) were applied as an integrated approach in a GIS environment to explore the temporal and spatial variations in river water quality and to estimate the influence of watershed land use, topography and socio-economic factors on river water quality based on 3 years of water quality monitoring data for the Cao-E River system. The statistical analysis revealed that TN, pH and temperature were generally higher in the rainy season, whereas BOD5, DO and turbidity were higher in the dry season. Spatial variations in river water quality were related to numerous anthropogenic and natural factors. Urban land use was found to be the most important explanatory variable for BOD5, CODMn, TN, DN, NH4+-N, NO3?-N, DO, pH and TP. The animal husbandry output per capita was an important predictor of TP and turbidity, and the gross domestic product per capita largely determined spatial variations in EC. The remaining unexplained variance was related to other factors, such as topography. Our results suggested that pollution control of animal waste discharge in rural settlements, agricultural runoff in cropland, industrial production pollution and domestic pollution in urban and industrial areas were important within the Cao-E River basin. Moreover, the percentage of the total overall river water quality variance explained by an individual variable and/or all environmental variables (according to RDA) can assist in quantitatively identifying the primary factors that control pollution at the watershed scale. PMID:25090375

  6. What Price Animal Health - And Whose Problem is it Anyway?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bill Malcolm

    The existence of diseases of agricultural animals impose costs on communities, either as costs of the disease or as costs of avoiding the costs of the disease. In this paper, the focus is on economic ways of thinking about the health of agricultural animals. In part one, the essence of economic approaches to analysis of problems is outlined. Then in

  7. Animal Traction. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Manual M-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Peter R.

    This manual is designed for use by Peace Corps volunteers and agricultural extension personnel working in animal traction development programs. While some of the information contained in the manual is specific to the extension of animal-powered agriculture in Africa, the principles covered are generally applicable wherever the method is being used…

  8. Animal-Plant/Animal-Animal-Interactions The module Animal-Plant/Animal-Animal-Interactions deals with various aspects of

    E-print Network

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Bio III Animal-Plant/Animal-Animal-Interactions SS 2014 The module Animal-Plant/Animal-Animal is taught: · Lecture: o Animal-plant interactions, e.g. mutualistic interactions (pollination, floral, tritrophic interactions, deception and others). o Furthermore, applied aspects of animal-plant interactions

  9. Husbandry and trade of indigenous chickens in Myanmar—Results of a participatory rural appraisal in the Yangon and the Mandalay divisions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Henning; A. Khin; T. Hla; J. Meers

    2006-01-01

    There is a variety of professions working with village chickens in developing countries, including farmers, veterinarians\\u000a and chicken traders. People from all these occupations were involved in a participatory rural appraisal to investigate husbandry\\u000a practices and trade of village chickens in Myanmar. Data were collected in two climatically different regions of the country,\\u000a in the Yangon and in the Mandalay

  10. Agricultural Science I. Supplementary Units. Instructor Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Donna; And Others

    These supplementary units are designed to help students with special needs learn and apply agricultural skills in the areas of animal breeding, animal nutrition, leadership, and power tools. Specific competencies are listed as study questions at the beginning of each of the 10 self-paced and self-contained units. Skill sheets, activity sheets, and…

  11. APPLICATION OF NANOTECHNOLOGY TO AGRICULTURAL AIR QUALITY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Vera; L. E. Erickson; R. G. Maghirang; K. J. Klabunde

    There is a growing need for air that is free of pathogenic organisms and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field of agriculture. In confined-animal feeding operations (CAFOs) infectious agents can enter with the air needed for ventilation. In order to prevent development and spread of diseases in animals contained in the area, there is a need to maintain acceptable

  12. GPS Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site features Flash animations that illustrate how the Global Positioning System (GPS) works. The animations depict how GPS signals are derived, compare geostationary and polar orbits, and explain satellites, ground control, and user segments, which comprise the three main GPS components. These resources are suitable for use in lectures, labs, or other teaching activities.

  13. Excelsior Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinkamp, Mary J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project where students used excelsior, shredded wood used for packing, to create animals. Explains that excelsior can be found at furniture and grocery stores. Discusses in detail the process of making the animals and includes learning objectives. (CMK)

  14. Immunoassay Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chung, Kyn Wai

    This site features animations showing the detailed steps involved in eight different immunoassay examples. The focus of the site is primarily on the biochemical aspects of the immunoassays, not on their analytical applications. The animations depict the following immunoassays: Dihydroxy Vitamin D, ACTH, Bone­specific Alkaline Phosphatase, Cortisol, Deoxypyridinoline, Osteocalcin, Prolactin and Thyroxine.

  15. Collision Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    University of Leeds School of Earth and Environment

    This series of interactive Flash animation explores all aspects of the India-Eurasian continental collision. Animations show the motion of the two continents, the growth of the Himalayas, earthquakes resulting from their collision, and the incredible rate of erosion of the newly formed mountains.

  16. Science Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The use of a well-placed animation in a lecture can help illuminate any number of important concepts in the sciences. Educators seeking high-quality animations need look no further than this very useful site created by staff members at North Harris Community College. The animations are divided into a number of topics, including plants, ecology, astronomy, geology, anatomy, and biology. Each section contains links to a host of fascinating and helpful animations from institutions like Florida State University, Cambridge University Press, the University of Nebraska, and the University of Alberta. As a note, the astronomy and physics areas are particularly strong, and visitors would do well to take a look at the lunar and planetary time-lapse animations offered up by Ant�³nio Cidad�£o.

  17. Agricultural Outlook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Economic Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture has recently made the Agricultural Outlook publication available (Adobe Acrobat [.pdf] format only). Agricultural Outlook, the monthly short and long term commodity outlook publication, long available via the USDA Economics and Statistics system at Cornell University's Mann Library, (discussed in the September 15, 1995 issue of the Scout Report) is now available with graphics and charts. Selected archives of the publication are available and articles can be downloaded individually. About the only drawback to this terrific addition to ERS's electronic holdings is that the separate statistical section that accompanies AO (over 20 pages of tables), is not available at this time. This is particularly unfortunate, as these tables are one of the most valuable aspects of the publication.

  18. Investigations on the Effects of Dietary Essential Oils and Different Husbandry Conditions on the Gut Ecology in Piglets after Weaning

    PubMed Central

    Janczyk, P.; Pieper, R.; Urubschurov, V.; Wendler, K. R.; Souffrant, W. B.

    2009-01-01

    Essential oils (EO) are being considered as possible alternatives to in-feed antibiotic growth promoters in pig nutrition. The effects of an EO mixture consisting of limonene, eugenol and pinene (10.0, 2.0, and 4.8 mg/kg diet, resp.) on gut physiology and ecology were studied in piglets. The experiment was conducted at low (commercial farm) and high hygienic conditions (experimental farm), to elucidate interactions between EO supplementation and husbandry methods. Piglets were weaned at 28 days of age, when they were offered either a control diet (C) or C with EO. Four piglets were sacrificed in each group on day 29, 30, 33 and 39. Digesta from the third distal part of the small intestine and from the colon were sampled and analysed for pH, dry matter, lactic acid, short chain fatty acids and ammonia concentrations. Enterobacteria, enterococci, lactobacilli and yeast counts were obtained by plating. Genomic DNA was extracted from digesta and polymerase chain reaction—denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was performed. Individual microbial communities were identified at each farm. Age affected the intestinal parameters. No effects of the EO with exception for a significant reduction in colon bacterial diversity at 39 days of age could be recorded at experimental farm. PMID:20016670

  19. Optimized axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) husbandry, breeding, metamorphosis, transgenesis and tamoxifen-mediated recombination.

    PubMed

    Khattak, Shahryar; Murawala, Prayag; Andreas, Heino; Kappert, Verena; Schuez, Maritta; Sandoval-Guzmán, Tatiana; Crawford, Karen; Tanaka, Elly M

    2014-03-01

    The axolotl (Mexican salamander, Ambystoma mexicanum) has become a very useful model organism for studying limb and spinal cord regeneration because of its high regenerative capacity. Here we present a protocol for successfully mating and breeding axolotls in the laboratory throughout the year, for metamorphosing axolotls by a single i.p. injection and for axolotl transgenesis using I-SceI meganuclease and the mini Tol2 transposon system. Tol2-mediated transgenesis provides different features and advantages compared with I-SceI-mediated transgenesis, and it can result in more than 30% of animals expressing the transgene throughout their bodies so that they can be directly used for experimentation. By using Tol2-mediated transgenesis, experiments can be performed within weeks (e.g., 5-6 weeks for obtaining 2-3-cm-long larvae) without the need to establish germline transgenic lines (which take 12-18 months). In addition, we describe here tamoxifen-induced Cre-mediated recombination in transgenic axolotls. PMID:24504478

  20. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in grassland soils used for cattle husbandry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannert, A.; Bogen, C.; Esperschütz, J.; Koubová, A.; Buegger, F.; Fischer, D.; Radl, V.; Fuß, R.; Chro?áková, A.; Elhottová, D.; Šimek, M.; Schloter, M.

    2012-10-01

    While the importance of anaerobic methane oxidation has been reported for marine ecosystems, the role of this process in soils is still questionable. Grasslands used as pastures for cattle overwintering show an increase in anaerobic soil micro-sites caused by animal treading and excrement deposition. Therefore, anaerobic potential methane oxidation activity of severely impacted soil from a cattle winter pasture was investigated in an incubation experiment under anaerobic conditions using 13C-labelled methane. We were able to detect a high microbial activity utilizing CH4 as nutrient source shown by the respiration of 13CO2. Measurements of possible terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane were carried out. Soil sulfate concentrations were too low to explain the oxidation of the amount of methane added, but enough nitrate and iron(III) were detected. However, only nitrate was consumed during the experiment. 13C-PLFA analyses clearly showed the utilization of CH4 as nutrient source mainly by organisms harbouring 16:1?7 PLFAs. These lipids were also found as most 13C-enriched fatty acids by Raghoebarsing et al. (2006) after addition of 13CH4 to an enrichment culture coupling denitrification of nitrate to anaerobic oxidation of methane. This might be an indication for anaerobic oxidation of methane by relatives of "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" in the investigated grassland soil under the conditions of the incubation experiment.

  1. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in grassland soils used for cattle husbandry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannert, A.; Bogen, C.; Esperschütz, J.; Koubová, A.; Buegger, F.; Fischer, D.; Radl, V.; Fuß, R.; Chro?áková, A.; Elhottová, D.; Šimek, M.; Schloter, M.

    2012-04-01

    While the importance of anaerobic methane oxidation has been reported for marine ecosystems, the role of this process in soils is still questionable. Grasslands used as pastures for cattle-overwintering show an increase in anaerobic soil micro-sites caused by animal treading and excrement deposition. Therefore anaerobic potential methane oxidation activity of severely impacted soil from a cattle winter pasture was investigated in an incubation experiment under anaerobic conditions using 13C-labeled methane. We were able to detect a high microbial activity utilizing CH4 as nutrient source shown by the respiration of 13CO2. Measurements of possible terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane were carried out. Soil sulfate concentrations were too low to explain the oxidation of the amount of methane added, but enough nitrate and iron(III) were detected. However, only nitrate was consumed during the experiment. 13C-PLFA analyses clearly showed the utilization of CH4 as nutrient source mainly by organisms harbouring 16:1?7 PLFAs. These lipids were found in Gram-negative microorganisms and anaerobes. The fact that these lipids are also typical for type I methanotrophs, known as aerobic methane oxidizers, might indicate a link between aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation.

  2. AgExcellence 2008The College of AgriCulTure And MonTAnA AgriCulTurAl experiMenT STATion in review

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Economics Animal and Range Sciences Bachelor of Science: Animal Science Options: Equine Science Livestock Ecology Master of Science: Animal and Range Sciences Doctor of Philosophy: Animal and Range Sciences Land Economics and Economics Bob Gough, Agricultural Education Bret Olson (Interim), Animal and Range Sciences

  3. Animal Presentations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kelly Godwin

    2009-10-05

    Students will pick an animal and create a presentation for the class about that animal. They will learn about research and PowerPoint while learning about animals. Also, students will build presentation skills. Kelly Godwin Instructional Architect 09/19/09 ASSURE Lesson Plan Analyze the learner The students are all in 4th grade so they are approximately 10 years old. Their academic abilities are that of a 10-year-old give or take 1 or 1.5 years. The students are mostly from the middle class suburbs. They have more than ...

  4. Microcomputers in Agriculture. A Resource Guide for California Community College Faculty in Agriculture & Natural Resources. Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    This resource guide contains descriptions of microcomputer programs that are suitable for use in community college courses in agriculture and natural resources. Product descriptions are organized according to the following subject areas: agricultural business, animal production, farm mechanics, farm management, forestry and natural resources,…

  5. Agricultural Bioterrorism

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Radford G. Davis (Iowa State University, College of Veterinary Medicine; )

    2001-10-01

    The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article warns that agricultural bioterrorism can be as devastating as other forms of terrorism because it: cripples the economy of a nation, can destroy the livelihood of many people puts food supply at risk, perhaps for a long time, and may not be detected before it reaches difficult-to-control levels.

  6. Assembling a geospatial database of tsetse-transmitted animal trypanosomosis for Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background African animal trypanosomosis (AAT), or nagana, is widespread within the tsetse-infested belt of sub-Saharan Africa. Although a wealth of information on its occurrence and prevalence is available in the literature, synthesized and harmonized data at the regional and continental scales are lacking. To fill this gap the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) launched the Atlas of tsetse and AAT, jointly implemented with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the framework of the Programme Against African Trypanosomosis (PAAT). Methods The Atlas aims to build and regularly update a geospatial database of tsetse species occurrence and AAT at the continental level. The present paper focuses on the methodology to assemble a dynamic database of AAT, which hinges on herd-level prevalence data as estimated using various diagnostic techniques. A range of ancillary information items is also included (e.g. trypanosome species, survey period, species and breed of animals, husbandry system, etc.). Input data were initially identified through a literature review. Results Preliminary results are presented for Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda in East Africa: 122 papers were identified and analyzed, which contained field data collected from January 1990 to December 2013. Information on AAT was extracted and recorded for 348 distinct geographic locations. The presented distribution maps exemplify the range of outputs that can be directly generated from the AAT database. Conclusions Activities are ongoing to map the distribution of AAT in all affected countries and to develop the tsetse component of the Atlas. The presented methodology is also being transferred to partners in affected countries, with a view to developing capacity and strengthening data management, harmonization and sharing. In the future, geospatial modelling will enable predictions to be made within and beyond the range of AAT field observations. This variety of information layers will inform decisions on the most appropriate, site-specific strategies for intervention against AAT. Data on the occurrence of human-infective trypanosomes in non-human hosts will also provide valuable information for sleeping sickness control and elimination. PMID:24447638

  7. Comparing Animals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Broadhead

    2007-12-05

    As you complete this WebQuest I would like you to think about the story that you are going to be writing. You may choose to write a true animal story. This would be like the news article about the cat and the dog that we read in class. Or you may chose to write a pretend story about a pretend animal. This will be like the folktale we read about the frogs finding their music. Look for ideas and stories that you may want to write your story on. It is okay to change your mind, but you must write a story about an animal. Webquest Introduction: Think about something that you may want to write your story about. Ask yourself: -Do I want to write a true story? -Do I want to write a pretend story? -What kinds of animals ...

  8. Camera Animation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A general discussion of the use of cameras in computer animation. This section includes principles of traditional film techniques and suggestions for the use of a camera during an architectural walkthrough. This section includes html pages, images and one video.

  9. Making Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, James

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author provides simple instructions for making an animation using "PowerPoint". He describes the process by walking readers through it for a sample image. (Contains 1 figure and 1 note.)

  10. Screen Animals

    E-print Network

    McMahon, Laura

    2014-01-01

    of Pennsylvania Press, 2000), Jonathan Burt, Animals in Film (London: Reaktion, 2002), Cynthia Chris, Watching Wildlife (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2006), Raymond Bellour, Le Corps du cinéma: hypnoses, émotions, animalités (Paris: P.O.L., 2009...

  11. Animated Engines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This remarkable Web site contains descriptions and animations of nineteen different kinds of engines. Engine types include internal combustion, steam, and sterling engines, and each page shows how the piston, crankshaft, and other components move together to generate power. The animations demonstrate the processes of intake, compression, and exhaust. Some of the featured engines have more detailed descriptions than others, and oftentimes, a brief account of the engine's history is included. One engine dates back to the early 1700s.

  12. An online agricultural genetics course.

    PubMed

    Moses, Vivian

    2014-07-01

    In this age of rapidly developing online learning, the advent of a series of talks and supplementary material devoted to genetics in agriculture from Henry Stewart Talks ( http://hstalks.com/main/browse_talks.php?r=776&c=252 ) is welcome indeed. The series is designed for researchers and graduate students in the fields of genetics, plant science, animal science, agricultural science, food science, human nutrition and environmental science, advanced undergraduate students, policy makers and managers in public and private sectors, and continuing professional education/development. PMID:25437233

  13. Environmental Risk Assessment for Veterinary Medicinal Products Part 5. A guide to risk assessment of veterinary medicinal products used in animal husbandry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Blackwell P; Boxall A; Haliing-Sorense B; Hermansen S; Ingerslev S; Jacobsen A; Kay P; Laak T ter; Moltmann J; Schmitt H; Soeborg T; Tarazona J; Tolls J; Verschoor A; Montforts MHMM

    2007-01-01

    The procedures described in this document give guidance on recommended\\u000amethods for the risk assessment of veterinary medicinal products applied\\u000ain slurry, for regulatory purposes. The document gives considerations to\\u000afate and effect testing strategies in particular with respect to the\\u000ahallmarks of veterinary medicinal antibiotics. It puts forward what\\u000amodelling approaches are available and what considerations to scenario\\u000adefinitions

  14. Behavioral responses of cattle to pain and implications for diagnosis, management, and animal welfare.

    PubMed

    Millman, Suzanne T

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a subjective experience in humans and livestock and can only be measured indirectly, posing challenges for veterinary practitioners in terms of diagnosis and treatment of bovine pain. In this review, attitudes of citizens, producers, and veterinarians are explored regarding pain and its associations with animal welfare and husbandry procedures. Behavior used to quantify pain in cattle is identified in terms of pain-specific behaviors and general behavioral responses that can be observed during painful procedures or convalescence. Finally, nociception and cognitive tests used for reporting pain in human patients are investigated for application to bovine patients. PMID:23438399

  15. Future Agricultures

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Future Agricultures group is a UK Department for International Development (DFID) funded consortium comprised of the Institute of Development Studies, Imperial College London, and Overseas Development Institute. The group is committed to examining the issues that surround agriculture and rural development across the world, with a particular focus on the developing world. Their work includes reports on water management in Ethiopia, a potential second "Green Revolution", and food security. The materials on their site are found in sections that include "News and Events", "Debates", and "Publications". The "Debates" area is a good one, as it includes thoughtful conversations on timely topics like pastoralism, the "Green Revolution" in Africa, and soil fertility. Scholars in the field will appreciate the "Publications" area, which includes policy briefs on poverty reduction in Kenya, coffee commercialization in Malawi, and rising food prices. Finally, visitors can also sign up to receive their RSS feed and provide feedback on their work.

  16. Integrated Crop\\/Livestock Agriculture in the United States: A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen Hilimire

    2011-01-01

    U.S. agriculture has become increasingly specialized over the last century with attendant benefits to food production and affordability. At the same time, specialized agricultural production has led to concerns for animal welfare, environmental degradation, and loss of biodiversity. An alternative to specialized agriculture is the integration of crops and livestock at the farm scale. Integrated crop\\/livestock agriculture could improve soil

  17. for a Minor in International Agriculture Academic Programs in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    3204*: International Agriculture Development and Trade - 3 credits ____________ CSES 3444: World Crops and Cropping Systems ­ 3 credits Select a minimum of three semester hours from the following: ____________ APSC 1454: Introduction to Animal and Poultry Science - 3 credits ____________ APSC 1464: Animal and Poultry

  18. 9 CFR 72.24 - Litter and manure from carriers and premises of tick-infested animals; destruction or treating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.24 Litter and manure from carriers and premises of tick-infested animals; destruction or treating...

  19. 9 CFR 72.24 - Litter and manure from carriers and premises of tick-infested animals; destruction or treating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.24 Litter and manure from carriers and premises of tick-infested animals; destruction or treating...

  20. 9 CFR 72.24 - Litter and manure from carriers and premises of tick-infested animals; destruction or treating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.24 Litter and manure from carriers and premises of tick-infested animals; destruction or treating...

  1. 9 CFR 72.24 - Litter and manure from carriers and premises of tick-infested animals; destruction or treating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.24 Litter and manure from carriers and premises of tick-infested animals; destruction or treating...

  2. Humane Disposability: Rethinking “Food Animals,” Animal Welfare, and Vegetarianism in Response to the Factory Farm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jessica L W Carey

    2011-01-01

    Intensively industrialized animal agriculture, or factory farming, poses many challenges for our notions of “life” and how it should be treated. Factory farming’s mass instrumentalization and exploitation of animals potentially unsettles both our most basic notions regarding the justice of sacrificing certain lives in order to improve other lives, and our decisions about which lives belong to each category. This

  3. Agricultural diseases on the move early in the third millennium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With few exceptions, the diseases that present the greatest risk to food animal production have been largely similar throughout the modern era of veterinary medicine. The current trend of ever - increasing globalization of trade of animals and animal products ensures that agricultural diseases will ...

  4. Animal models.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Antonietta; Moshé, Solomon L

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy accounts for a significant portion of the dis-ease burden worldwide. Research in this field is fundamental and mandatory. Animal models have played, and still play, a substantial role in understanding the patho-physiology and treatment of human epilepsies. A large number and variety of approaches are available, and they have been applied to many animals. In this chapter the in vitro and in vivo animal models are discussed,with major emphasis on the in vivo studies. Models have used phylogenetically different animals - from worms to monkeys. Our attention has been dedicated mainly to rodents.In clinical practice, developmental aspects of epilepsy often differ from those in adults. Animal models have often helped to clarify these differences. In this chapter, developmental aspects have been emphasized.Electrical stimulation and chemical-induced models of seizures have been described first, as they represent the oldest and most common models. Among these models, kindling raised great interest, especially for the study of the epileptogenesis. Acquired focal models mimic seizures and occasionally epilepsies secondary to abnormal cortical development, hypoxia, trauma, and hemorrhage.Better knowledge of epileptic syndromes will help to create new animal models. To date, absence epilepsy is one of the most common and (often) benign forms of epilepsy. There are several models, including acute pharmacological models (PTZ, penicillin, THIP, GBL) and chronic models (GAERS, WAG/Rij). Although atypical absence seizures are less benign, thus needing more investigation, only two models are so far available (AY-9944,MAM-AY). Infantile spasms are an early childhood encephalopathy that is usually associated with a poor out-come. The investigation of this syndrome in animal models is recent and fascinating. Different approaches have been used including genetic (Down syndrome,ARX mutation) and acquired (multiple hit, TTX, CRH,betamethasone-NMDA) models.An entire section has been dedicated to genetic models, from the older models obtained with spontaneous mutations (GEPRs) to the new engineered knockout, knocking, and transgenic models. Some of these models have been created based on recently recognized patho-genesis such as benign familial neonatal epilepsy, early infantile encephalopathy with suppression bursts, severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, the tuberous sclerosis model, and the progressive myoclonic epilepsy. The contribution of animal models to epilepsy re-search is unquestionable. The development of further strategies is necessary to find novel strategies to cure epileptic patients, and optimistically to allow scientists first and clinicians subsequently to prevent epilepsy and its consequences. PMID:22938964

  5. Economic Consideration of Mitigation of Foreign Animal Disease Introduction *

    E-print Network

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    topics ranging from mitigation of foreign animal disease introduction to water resource management. HisEconomic Consideration of Mitigation of Foreign Animal Disease Introduction * Levan Elbakidze, Bruce A. McCarl Department of Agricultural Economics National Center for Foreign Animal and Zoonotic

  6. Mercury in Animal Manures and Impacts on Environmental Health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is widely used as a cheap source of fertilizer all over the world, and is also used as animal feed. In industrialized countries, tons of animal manures per hectare each year are applied to agricultural lands as an easy means of disposal. Analysis of these manures shows low Hg concentra...

  7. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 84 (2001) 120 Economic and environmental threats of alien plant,

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    2001-01-01

    Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 84 (2001) 1­20 Economic and environmental threats of alien. Precise economic costs associated with some of the most ecologically damaging alien species; Animals; Alien; Economic; Ecology; Environment; Agriculture; Non-indigenous 1. Introduction Quantifying

  8. National Agricultural Library: Educational Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Agricultural Library (NAL) kids and teens page features links to book and magazine article abstracts, online interactives, educator resources and information about animals, livestock and agriculture; the environment, food and nutrition, general science, and horticulture. The education and outreach page fatures links to several collections of educational materials for teachers, parents, and students, as well as a directory of land-grant colleges with agricultural programs, a listing of events and conferences, and a link to the NAL Catalog (AGRICOLA) with citations for extension education and training from January 2005 to the present. There are also links to information on research and technology programs, natural resources and the environment, laws and regulations, and career information.

  9. Heavy metal loadings from animal manures to agricultural land in england and wales. Charge en métaux lourds apportés aux sols par les épandages de déjections animales en Angleterre et Pays de Galle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. Chambers; F. A. Nicholson; D. R. Soloman; R. J. Unwin

    The heavy metal contents of a range of animal manures (farmyard manures, slurries and poultry manures) were measured to give an indication of 'typical' concentrations, along with the metal contents of livestock feeds (dairy and beef cattle, pigs and poultry) from the same sampled farms. Based on the 'typical' manure metal analyses, standard total nitrogen (N) and dry matter contents,

  10. Transgenic Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaenisch, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    Describes three methods and their advantages and disadvantages for introducing genes into animals. Discusses the predictability and tissue-specificity of the injected genes. Outlines the applications of transgenic technology for studying gene expression, the early stages of mammalian development, mutations, and the molecular nature of chromosomes.…

  11. Animal Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    2001-01-01

    Presents a set of hands-on, outdoor science experiments designed to teach elementary school students about animal adaptation. The experiments focus on: how color camouflage affects an insect population; how spiderlings find a home; and how chameleons camouflage themselves by changing color. (SM)

  12. Curriculum Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gose, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five teachers with reputations for artistry in curriculum planning were interviewed about their "curriculum animation" plans or how they ensured their curriculum was brought to life. Their statements indicated that much of their planning is informal and intuitive, and that the criteria they use for their curriculum includes: (1) it is…

  13. Animation aerodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jakub Wejchert; David R. Haumann

    1991-01-01

    Methods based on aerodynamics are developed to simulate and control the motion of objects in fluid flows. To simplify the physics for animation, the problem is broken down into two parts: a fluid flow regime and an object boundary regime. With this simplification one can approximate the realistic behaviour of objects moving in liquids or air. It also enables a

  14. Animal Intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl Pearson

    1884-01-01

    THE following instance of animal intelligence may interest some of your readers. While walking through the forest here the other day, I found a young jay upon the ground scarcely able to fly. As I stooped down to examine it I was somewhat startled by a swoop made at my head by the old birds, their wings actually touching my

  15. Animal Transfer Agreement -1 ANIMAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Animal Transfer Agreement - 1 ANIMAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT This Animal Transfer Agreement has been adopted for use by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for use in transferring animals for research transferring the animal) Recipient: (name of laboratory/institution receiving the animal) The Provider agrees

  16. USDA: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The watchword of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is "protection". The APHIS is primarily considered with improving agricultural productivity and also ensuring the health and care of animals and plants. First-time visitors may wish to click on the "Hot Issues" section to learn more about some of the most pressing issues that the APHIS addresses. Here they will find fact sheets and news updates on avian influenza, the pesky light brown apple moth, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Moving on, visitors can also browse a list of subject headings that include animal health, biotechnology, plant health, and wildlife damage management. Finally, the site also contains an area where concerned visitors can report a pest infestation or suspected instances of agricultural smuggling.

  17. Novel mannose binding lectins from agricultural crops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elaine Davidson; Derek Stewart

    2004-01-01

    As part of a large programme [Scottish Executive Rural Affairs Department Programme of Agricultural, Biological and Related Research: Exploitation of Novel and Known Lectins in Agricultural and Biological Research—an Interdisciplinary Approach to Improve Crop Protection and Productivity, Animal (Including Human) Welfare and Health (Project No. FF821). Scottish Executive Rural Affairs Department (http:\\/\\/www.scotland.gov.uk\\/abrg\\/docs\\/pabr-00.asp)] concerned with the discovery and development of new

  18. Animated Atlas

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    A commercial site, Animated Atlas provides excellent audio-visual resources for teachers and students of European and American history. The resources combine maps and animation to create short video presentations on such subjects as the growth of the United States and the First World War. Though most of the videos must be ordered, the site provides free samples of its presentations, including a ten minute presentation on the westward expansion of the United States, the early history of the American Revolution, the European alliances before the First World War, and the beginnings of the Mexican American War. The site provides a timeline of American history that can be referred to during the American expansion video. Students and educators should also explore the site's listings of American history sites and primary source on the Web.

  19. Effects of dairy husbandry practices and farm types on raw milk quality collected by different categories of dairy processors in the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Bogue, Joe; Gómez, Carlos; Vargas, Jorge; Le Gal, Pierre-Yves

    2014-12-01

    In developing countries, milk quality is often mismanaged in relation to husbandry practices, collection logistics, and the production of small batches. This paper investigates how the management of milk quality from farm to dairy processor impacts on both chemical and hygienic indicators, in a context characterized by farm scale diversity, the co-existence of formal and informal markets, and high milk demand. It is based on an analysis of the chemical and hygienic quality of milk samples collected over a 12-month period from 20 farms and three dairy processors. Data from the farmers' husbandry practices and the logistics of milk collection were also collected. A large range of quality profiles and farming practices were observed. This diversity is explained by rainfall and temperature pattern, farm size which affects hygienic quality, and lack of efficient logistics between farms and dairy processors. The findings indicate that in a context of high demand for milk and poor private and public regulations, milk quality is impacted upon by poor stakeholders' management practices. PMID:25169697

  20. 75 FR 25199 - Solicitation of Input From Stakeholders Regarding the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ...extension, and education to address food and agricultural sciences. Subject...following areas: (A) Plant health and production and plant products; (B) Animal health and production and animal products; (C) Food safety, nutrition, and...

  1. 77 FR 4984 - Solicitation of Input From Stakeholders Regarding the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ...submitted to AFRI; Institute of Food Production and Sustainability (IFPS), National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S...B) Animal health and production and animal products; (C) Food safety, nutrition, and...

  2. Instructions for the care and husbandry of the Mini-Opossums (Monodelphis domestica). Important numbers for DLAR and the Vivarium

    E-print Network

    Smith, Kathleen K.

    , among other things, that: cages must be cleaned on a regular basis; proper food and water available be careful when handling animals. It is also important that you minimize contact with potential allergens

  3. An economic exploration of prevention versus response in animal related bioterrorism decision making 

    E-print Network

    Elbakidze, Levan

    2006-04-12

    and accidental introduction events largely in the animal disease management setting. General economic issues and the economic literature related to agricultural terrorism broadly and animal disease concerns specifically are reviewed. Basic economic aspects...

  4. Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference

    E-print Network

    Noble, James S.

    Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information This conference will discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuel markets and the implications for Missouri farmsDr.JonHagler, DirectoroftheMissouriDepartment ofAgriculture. · Outlookpresentationsderivedfrom thelatestbaselineresultsof

  5. Animal Cloning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lee, Amy.

    2002-01-01

    The past few years have seen many changes in the field of genetics, including the ability to genetically clone mammals, first achieved in 1997 with a sheep named Dolly. Still a relatively new phenomenon, news stories are continually detailing new advances in cloning, reasons why cloning is important, and concerns about the safety and ethics of cloning. This week's Topic In Depth highlights some recent news articles and Web sites that address the topic of animal cloning. The first site is a recent article from the Washington Post about the sheep named Dolly, the world's first cloned mammal, who has developed arthritis at a relatively young age and has caused some to question whether cloning can have adverse health effects. An ABC news.com article details the recent birth of five cloned piglets whose parent had been genetically engineered to remove a gene that causes human bodies to reject transplanted animal organs. An Associated Press article discusses some concerns raised by scientists and ethicists surrounding the idea of xenotransplantation (animal to human transplantation). For users who need a primer on what exactly cloning means and why it is done, check out the Cloning Fact Sheet. Developed by the Human Genome Project, it provides short, non-technical explanations of the different types of cloning and some links to other cloning related Web sites. Those users looking for more detailed information about cloning technology will find the next two sites interesting. PPL Therapeutics, which created the five piglets and collaborated with the Roslin Institute to clone Dolly, provides news articles and technical descriptions of cloning and related genetic technology. The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America's Web site provides links to a tremendous amount of information surrounding all aspects of cloning, including recent congressional activity, news, and general resources. Although focused more heavily on human cloning, The American Journal of Bioethics Online has a Web page with links to various articles relating to the ethical issues involved with cloning and genetics.

  6. Factors affecting agricultural journalists and agricultural communicators 

    E-print Network

    Chenault, Edith Anne

    2009-05-15

    Agricultural Journalists, and Association for Communication Excellence in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Life and Human Sciences responded to a researcher-designed instrument and a thirdparty Web-based survey tool. The respondents demographically resembled...

  7. Logic Animation and Logic Animation Platform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mao Chen; Qiang Ge; Qingtang Liu; Zhiguo Si

    2009-01-01

    Logic animation, a new style of animation, was first proposed in the application of dynamic geometry software. The concept, features, and possible application prospects of logic animation are further introduced in details in this paper, compared with the traditional style of animation-time-sequential animation. Based on the design ideas of dynamic geometry software, Flash and game engine, the design of a

  8. Character Animation Animation is a big topic

    E-print Network

    Stephenson, Ben

    Character Animation 1 #12;Overview · Animation is a big topic · We will concentrate on character animation as is used in many games today ­ humans, animals, monsters, robots, etc. #12;Character is called a pose ­ the state of a skeleton at a particular time of animation #12;Regular layout 2 (no arcade

  9. Studies of stress in farm animals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. J. Blokhuis; H. Hopster; N. A. Geverink; S. M. Korte; C. G. van Reenen

    1998-01-01

    Major changes have taken place in animal production over the last three decades. Housing conditions have changed dramatically\\u000a over this period, and there has been a striking increase in production. Agricultural animals try to cope with these highly\\u000a demanding conditions (stressors) using behavioural and physiological stress responses aiming to restore homeostasis. When\\u000a these responses are not successful or when they

  10. Economic Value of Ecosystem Services Provided by Agricultural Lands

    E-print Network

    Demers, Nora Egan

    Carbon sequestration in soils Manage soil organic matter Carbon sequestration in perennial plants Convert cropland to grassland or forest Methane emission reduction Capture and destroy methane from animal waste storage structure Water quality maintenance Reduce agricultural use, establish vegetable buffers

  11. Collection Policy: ANIMAL SCIENCE Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .

    E-print Network

    Angenent, Lars T.

    , livestock/poultry, international agriculture, and pre- veterinary. The special program Dairy Farm Management graduates typically pursue careers in research, veterinary medicine, animal production, agribusiness companies and pharmaceutical companies. Others work internationally in organizations such as the Peace Corps

  12. 48 CFR 1552.223-72 - Care of laboratory animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...acquire animals used in research and development...National Academy of Sciences (NAS)—National Research Council (NRC...the Agricultural Research Service,...

  13. 48 CFR 1552.223-72 - Care of laboratory animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...acquire animals used in research and development...National Academy of Sciences (NAS)—National Research Council (NRC...the Agricultural Research Service,...

  14. 48 CFR 1552.223-72 - Care of laboratory animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...acquire animals used in research and development...National Academy of Sciences (NAS)—National Research Council (NRC...the Agricultural Research Service,...

  15. Bioaerosols associated with animal production operations.

    PubMed

    Millner, Patricia D

    2009-11-01

    Air emissions from animal housing and manure management operations include a complex mixture of biological, microbial, and inorganic particulates along with odorous volatile compounds. This report highlights the state of current issues, technical knowledge, and remaining challenges to be addressed in evaluating the impacts of airborne microorganisms, dusts, and odorants on animals and workers at animal production facilities and nearby communities. Reports documenting bioaerosol measurements illustrate some of the technical issues related to sample collection, analysis, as well as dispersion and transport to off-farm locations. Approaches to analysis, mitigation and modeling transport are discussed in the context of the risk reduction and management of airborne spread of bioaerosols from animal operations. The need for standardization and validation of bioaerosol collection and analytical techniques for indoor as well as outdoor animal agriculture settings is critical to evaluation of health effects from modern animal production systems that are increasingly situated near communities. PMID:19395257

  16. AGLITE: A Portable Lidar for Agricultural Production Practice Optimization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. E. Bingham; T. D. Wilkerson; V. Zavyalov; S. S. Connelsen; J. Swasey; J. Hacock

    High quality air is important to the well-being of humans, animals, and plants. Agricultural operations produce a variety of particulates and gases that influence air quality. Agriculture-generated particulate matter can enter human lungs and cause pulmonary problems. Animal production operations produce gaseous emissions such as ammonia, odor-causing volatile organic compounds, hydrogen sulfide, greenhouse gases (methane, nitrous oxides) and airborne pathogens.

  17. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    40 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences (virtual- nity and Economic Development Concentration; Agricultural Education; Agricultural Mechanization

  18. Agricultural Career Education in the City of New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrein, George

    1975-01-01

    More than one thousand students in ten high schools throughout the City of New York are presently enrolled in an agricultural career program, specializing in farm production and management, ornamental horticulture, animal care, or conservation. More than 90 percent continue in occupational agriculture in the post-secondary schools. (Author/AJ)

  19. Research careers for microbiologists in the USDA Agricultural Research Service

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) employees microbiologists in a wide variety of diverse positions. This includes work involving animal health, infectious diseases and food safety. Various agencies within the USDA are responsible for monit...

  20. Impacts of Agricultural Nutrient Regulation in a Heterogeneous Region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Doug Parker; Erik Lichtenberg

    2004-01-01

    Nonpoint sources of water pollutants, in particular, nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus, are increasingly a focus of US water pollution policy. In most cases, agriculture is the largest contributor of these pollutants, in part because, until recently, it has largely remained unregulated. Recently, however, a number of initiatives have targeted nutrient runoff and leaching from animal agriculture. Many states have

  1. Agricultural Biotechnology Technician. National Voluntary Occupational Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Future Farmers of America Foundation, Madison, WI.

    The skill standards in this document were developed as a result of meetings between representatives of the agricultural industry and educational institutions to determine the skills and educational preparation required of an agricultural biotechnology technician, verified by technicians working in laboratories, greenhouses, animal facilities, and…

  2. BOOK: Development and Uses of Biofortified Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New strategies and techniques have recently been proposed and developed regarding the “functional foods and animal feeds” or biofortified agricultural products. It is foreseeable that the novel research endeavors in this research field will create a global demand for biofortified agricultural produc...

  3. COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE (AGRI) DEGREE PROGRAMS -UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT CURRICULUM/MAJOR

    E-print Network

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Agricultural Business AGBU BS 120 Without Concentration Agribusiness Finance AGBFIN Food Industry Management FIM International Business INTBUS Rural Development AGBRDV Animal Sciences, School of Animal, Dairy & Poultry Sciences ADP BS 120 Animal Science ANIMAL Dairy Foods Technology DRYFDS Dairy Production DRYPRD

  4. NEW YORK STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    to benefit society. In the next century, citizens of the world will benefit enormously from the revolution that is occurring in agriculture and the life sciences, and the close integra- tion of biology, chemistry, physics nutraceuticals and vaccines; and plants, animals and microorganisms will act as biological factories to produce

  5. 2014-2015Series College of Agriculture,

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    . The Food Industry option is designed to provide an emphasis on aspects of food processing, chemistry2014-2015Series College of Agriculture, Food and Environment University of Kentucky is accredited, animals and their interactions with humans have environmental conse- quences. Processing, preservation

  6. Climate and Agriculture: Challenges for Efficient Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate has always been and will continue to be an important factor in agricultural production. Evidence of this is apparent when looking at where plants or animals are distributed around the world and the variation among years in terms of grain, forage, vegetable, and fruit production. The recent r...

  7. Agriculture Supplies & Services. Volume 2 of 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Univ., Manhattan.

    The second of three volumes included in a secondary agricultural supplies and services curriculum guide, this volume contains units of instruction in three major areas: (1) Animal Science, (2) Supervised Training Programs--Farm Business Management, and (3) Career Selection/Public Relations. Typical of the sixteen units included in the first…

  8. ShapingTHE FUTURE Biofuels or food? Quest for land

    E-print Network

    , in animal welfare, and the way forestry and agricul- ture can play a part in creating the climate solutions change the landscape and create conflicts. Farm animals grazing in the park also arouse feelings, albeit animal husbandry and healthy animals. SLU ­ the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences ­ will play

  9. Transgenic Animals: Their Benefits To Human Welfare

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Endang Tri Margawati (Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia; )

    2003-01-01

    The issue-focused, reviewed, student article is about how transgenic animals, i.e., engineered to carry genes from other species, have the potential to improve human welfare in: agriculture, such as larger sheep that grow more wool, medicine, such as cows that produce insulin in their milk, andindustry, such as goats that produce spider silk for materials production.

  10. Managing animal health from an aquaculture perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture is the production of aquatic animals for food. The aquaculture industry is a rapidly expanding segment of U. S. agriculture and NOAA estimated the industry was worth $1.2 billion in 2011. Disease related losses in aquaculture either by decreased performance and/or mortality is estimate...

  11. Agriculture: access to technology limited.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    From country to country and even regionally, the roles of women in agriculture vary, but most of their labor is in unpaid subsistence production and their contributions tend to be underestimated, according to the results of the [UN] Secretary-General's report. Depending on circumstances, they have complementary roles with men, sharing or dividing tasks in the production of crops, care of animals, and forestry management. In sub-Saharan Africa, for example, women contribute 60-80% of labor in food production for both household consumption and sale, while in Malaysia the women account for only 35% of the agricultural labor force, and in Ireland the participation rate is only 10.4%. Although women make this important amount of labor contributions to agricultural production, "development policies tend to favor export crops to earn foreign exchange and the agricultural research tends to address the improvement of production and technologies for commercial production". This results in limited access for women to technical knowledge and innovations, including irrigation, machinery, farming techniques and extension services. This is strengthened by the fact that most of the extension services target farmers who own land and can obtain credit to invest in input and technology. PMID:12293737

  12. Vocational Agriculture Computer Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort.

    This document is a catalog of reviews of computer software suitable for use in vocational agriculture programs. The reviews were made by vocational agriculture teachers in Kentucky. The reviews cover software on the following topics: farm management, crop production, livestock production, horticulture, agricultural mechanics, general agriculture,…

  13. AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL USAGE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report, which summarizes the use of agricultural chemicals is issued by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) as part of its series on Agricultural Chemical Usage. Other publications in the series present statistics for on-farm agricultural chemical usage for f...

  14. environment and agriculture

    E-print Network

    environment and agriculture environmentagriculture.curtin.edu.au Bachelor of Science - majorS in agriculture, environmental Biology or coaStal Zone management Science and engineering #12;t he department of environment and agriculture caters for students who are passionate about agriculture, biology, conserving

  15. Animal Tails

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sohmer, Rachel.

    2003-01-01

    Call it tail envy. With only a vestigial nub to show for ourselves, perhaps it's no wonder that animal tails capture our attention. The following Web sites present some of the more interesting tails to be found in the animal kingdom. The first Web site contains a recent article from Discovery News describing new findings that at least one species of scorpion produces two distinct types of tail venom, which have completely different effects on their victims (1). The next site from Singapore Zoological Gardens introduces the cebids (our New World monkey cousins), some of which have amazing prehensile tails that are used like a fifth limb (2). The rattlesnake is another famously-tailed creature, highlighted in the following site from the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum (3). The site covers the main aspects of rattlesnake natural history, including a section on how the rattle forms. The Great Plains Nature Center in Wichita, Kansas, offers a Web page devoted to the beaver, including tail trivia and an audio clip of a resident beaver surprised in his den at the Kansas Wildlife Exhibit (4). Anyone who has witnessed the freakishly fascinating spectacle of a gecko leaving its tail behind to distract a would-be predator will appreciate this brief bio of the Tokay gecko, presented by ReptileCenter.com, the Herpetologist's Portal (5). Stacy's Wag'N'Train -- offering dog-training classes in San Jose, California -- provides this online guide to dog body language, which would have a very limited vocabulary without the tail (6). So, how did the peacock get its tail? It's a simple question that has driven zoologists crazy for over a century. The next Web site (7) contains an in-depth article on the subject from the Independent (London), offered through National Geographic News. And finally, the bizarre gulper eel -- able to tie its tail in several knots -- gets is own Web page on Pangea, the Web server for the Department of Educational Leadership and Technology at Southeastern Louisiana University (8). This deep-sea curiosity uses its bioluminescent tail tip to lure hapless prey into its impossibly gigantic mouth.

  16. Agriculture and nutrition at village level, Underexploited village resources.

    PubMed

    Vietmeyer, N D

    1980-07-28

    Developing country villages contain plants, animals and technologies whose extraordinary potentials are poorly appreciated by scientists. Examples of nutritious village crops that are still largely undeveloped and unappreciated outside their traditional villages are the winged bean, amaranths and the tepary bean. Tropical tree legumes, such as leucaena, grow fast and fix nitrogen and--although barely studied by foresters--are promising sources for village firewood and lumber. There are several animals with great promise for use in villages. The water buffalo is a gentle, productive village resource, neglected by the cow used by Indonesian villagers and unknown elsewhere in the tropics. And Papua New Guinea's new village farms for crocodiles and butterflies graphically demonstrate that wildlife husbandry can be valuable for remote rural areas, despite its neglect by animal science. Among exceptionally useful village technologies, an example is the amazingly efficient cooking system used on the small Indonesian islands of Roti and Sumba, which has so far been described only in Captain Cook's journals. PMID:6106942

  17. Educating About Agriculture

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture (AFBFA) offers projects which include K-12 and some college agricultural education, consumer education, agricultural research, scholarships and farm safety programs. Topics covered include: educational activities; educational resources, including opportunities in agricultural careers; news and information; a calendar of events; a children\\'s page; a teachers\\' toolbox; recommended books and videos; and state and county agricultural statistics. Consumer and student education about biotechnology is emphasized.

  18. Water Depletion Threatens Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauman, K. A.; Richter, B. D.; Postel, S.; Floerke, M.; Malsy, M.

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the human activity that has by far the largest impact on water, constituting 85% of global water consumption and 67% of global water withdrawals. Much of this water use occurs in places where water depletion, the ratio of water consumption to water availability, exceeds 75% for at least one month of the year. Although only 17% of global watershed area experiences depletion at this level or more, nearly 30% of total cropland and 60% of irrigated cropland are found in these depleted watersheds. Staple crops are particularly at risk, with 75% of global irrigated wheat production and 65% of irrigated maize production found in watersheds that are at least seasonally depleted. Of importance to textile production, 75% of cotton production occurs in the same watersheds. For crop production in depleted watersheds, we find that one half to two-thirds of production occurs in watersheds that have not just seasonal but annual water shortages, suggesting that re-distributing water supply over the course of the year cannot be an effective solution to shortage. We explore the degree to which irrigated production in depleted watersheds reflects limitations in supply, a byproduct of the need for irrigation in perennially or seasonally dry landscapes, and identify heavy irrigation consumption that leads to watershed depletion in more humid climates. For watersheds that are not depleted, we evaluate the potential impact of an increase in irrigated production. Finally, we evaluate the benefits of irrigated agriculture in depleted and non-depleted watersheds, quantifying the fraction of irrigated production going to food production, animal feed, and biofuels.

  19. Husbandry factors and the resumption of luteal activity in open and zero-grazed dairy cows in urban and peri-urban kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kanyima, B M; Båge, R; Owiny, D O; Ntallaris, T; Lindahl, J; Magnusson, U; Nassuna-Musoke, M G

    2014-08-01

    The study investigated the influence of selected husbandry factors on interval to resumption of post-partum cyclicity among dairy cows in urban and peri-urban Kampala. A prospective study of 85 day post-partum period of 59 dairy cows in open (n = 38) and zero grazing (n = 21) systems was conducted on 24 farms. Cows of parity 1-6 were recruited starting 15-30 days post-partum. Progesterone (P4) content in milk taken at 10-12 day intervals was analysed using ELISA. The cow P4 profiles were classified into 'normal' (< 56 days), 'delayed' (> 56 days), 'ceased' or 'prolonged' (if started < 56 days but with abnormal P4 displays) resumption of luteal activity and tested for association with husbandry and cow factors. Of the 59 cows, luteal activity in 81.4% resumed normally and in 18.6%, delayed. Only 23.7% maintained regular luteal activity, while the others had ceased (10.2%), prolonged (37.3%) or unclear luteal activity (20.3%). There were no differences between open and zero-grazed cows. Milk production was higher (p < 0.05) in zero than open grazing, in urban than peri-urban and in cows fed on brew waste (p < 0.001) compared with mill products and banana peels. Results suggest that luteal activity resumes normally in a majority of cows, although only a minority experienced continued normal cyclicity once ovulation had occurred, in the two farming systems irrespective of feed supplements or water, and that supplementing with brew waste is beneficial for milk production. PMID:24930481

  20. Husbandry Factors and the Resumption of Luteal Activity in Open and Zero-Grazed Dairy Cows in Urban and Peri-Urban Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kanyima, BM; Båge, R; Owiny, DO; Ntallaris, T; Lindahl, J; Magnusson, U; Nassuna-Musoke, MG

    2014-01-01

    Contents The study investigated the influence of selected husbandry factors on interval to resumption of post-partum cyclicity among dairy cows in urban and peri-urban Kampala. A prospective study of 85 day post-partum period of 59 dairy cows in open (n = 38) and zero grazing (n = 21) systems was conducted on 24 farms. Cows of parity 1–6 were recruited starting 15–30 days post-partum. Progesterone (P4) content in milk taken at 10–12 day intervals was analysed using ELISA. The cow P4 profiles were classified into ‘normal’ (< 56 days), ‘delayed’ (> 56 days), ‘ceased’ or ‘prolonged’ (if started < 56 days but with abnormal P4 displays) resumption of luteal activity and tested for association with husbandry and cow factors. Of the 59 cows, luteal activity in 81.4% resumed normally and in 18.6%, delayed. Only 23.7% maintained regular luteal activity, while the others had ceased (10.2%), prolonged (37.3%) or unclear luteal activity (20.3%). There were no differences between open and zero-grazed cows. Milk production was higher (p < 0.05) in zero than open grazing, in urban than peri-urban and in cows fed on brew waste (p < 0.001) compared with mill products and banana peels. Results suggest that luteal activity resumes normally in a majority of cows, although only a minority experienced continued normal cyclicity once ovulation had occurred, in the two farming systems irrespective of feed supplements or water, and that supplementing with brew waste is beneficial for milk production. PMID:24930481

  1. Geologic research in support of sustainable agriculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gough, L.P.; Herring, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The importance and role of the geosciences in studies of sustainable agriculture include such traditional research areas as, agromineral resource assessments, the mapping and classification of soils and soil amendments, and the evaluation of landscapes for their vulnerability to physical and chemical degradation. Less traditional areas of study, that are increasing in societal importance because of environmental concerns and research into sustainable systems in general, include regional geochemical studies of plant and animal trace element deficiencies and toxicities, broad-scale water quality investigations, agricultural chemicals and the hydrogeologic interface, and minimally processed and ion-exchange agrominerals. We discuss the importance and future of phosphate in the US and world based on human population growth, projected agromineral demands in general, and the unavailability of new, high-quality agricultural lands. We also present examples of studies that relate geochemistry and the hydrogeologic characteristics of a region to the bioavailability and cycling of trace elements important to sustainable agricultural systems. ?? 1993.

  2. Agricultural exposures and stroke mortality in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Rinsky, Jessica L.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Blair, Aaron; He, Ka; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Chen, Honglei

    2013-01-01

    Exposures associated with common agricultural activities may increase risk of stroke. The authors evaluated associations between self-reported agricultural activities including pesticide use and handling of crops and stroke mortality among 51,603 male pesticide applicators enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS). Vital status was obtained through 2008. Stroke mortality was defined by underlying or contributing cause of death (ICD-9 430–438, ICD-10 I60-I69). Information regarding lifetime pesticide use, working with crops or animals, engagement in other agricultural activities, and potential confounders was self-reported at enrollment. Cox proportional hazards models, with age as the time scale, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for state of residence, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Median follow-up time was 13 years, during which 308 stroke deaths occurred. No measure of overall or specific pesticide use was positively associated with mortality due to stroke. Stroke mortality was inversely associated with handling hay, grain, or silage at least once each year as reported at enrollment (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.58, 0.98). There was no evidence of an association between pesticide use and stroke mortality. The inverse association between handling of hays and grains and stroke mortality may be due to (1) those engaging in such activities being healthier than those who did not or (2) exposure to some biological agent present in hays and grains. Further investigation of incident stroke, rather than stroke mortality, as well as stroke subtypes are needed to determine the full role of agricultural exposures and stroke. PMID:24028665

  3. A Description and Source Listing of Curriculum Materials in Agricultural Education. 1972-73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Washington, DC. Agricultural Education Div.

    Listed are 246 curriculum material items in ten categories: field crops, horticulture, forestry, animal science, soils, diseases and pests, agricultural engineering, agricultural economics, agricultural occupations, and professional. Most materials are annotated and all are classified according to the AGPEX filing system. Bibliographic and…

  4. A Description and Source Listing of Curriculum Materials in Agricultural Education, 1970-1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Washington, DC. Agricultural Education Div.

    To provide teachers of vocational agriculture, agricultural supervisors, and agricultural teacher educators with information on current curriculum materials available to them, this annotated bibliography presents 207 references classified according to the AGDEX filing system. Topics are: (1) Field Crops, (2) Horticulture, (3) Forestry, (4) Animal

  5. Agricultural pathogen decontamination technology-reducing the threat of infectious agent spread

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rita G. Betty; Jill Marie Bieker; Mark David Tucker

    2005-01-01

    Outbreaks of infectious agricultural diseases, whether natural occurring or introduced intentionally, could have catastrophic impacts on the U.S. economy. Examples of such agricultural pathogens include foot and mouth disease (FMD), avian influenza (AI), citrus canker, wheat and soy rust, etc. Current approaches to mitigate the spread of agricultural pathogens include quarantine, development of vaccines for animal diseases, and development of

  6. Trends in the organization and financing of livestock and animal health services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tjaart W. Schillhorn van Veen; Cees de Haan

    1995-01-01

    The world wide avalanche of change related to new political and economic paradigms has also affected animal agriculture. Changing views and objectives with respect to government support for agriculture in OECD countries, economic changes in Latin American and Africa countries, the GATT process and outcome, and interest in an ecosystems approach towards agriculture, are leading to a rethinking of the

  7. 2013-2014Series College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    E-print Network

    Hayes, Jane E.

    2013-2014Series College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and School of Human Environmental ....................................................................................... 33 Animals have many important roles in human societies including the provision of food and fiber-derived foods significantly affect human health and economics. Animal Sciences involves studying and applying

  8. A brief review of anthrax in domestic animals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. M. Smith

    1973-01-01

    Although there exists in the U.K. a high degree of control of industrial and agricultural anthrax in man and anthrax in animals originating either from animal products or from materials contaminated by contact with them, total control of anthrax in this country seems unlikely to follow until the disease is eliminated from livestock in the enzootic areas abroad. This view

  9. NEED AND METHODS OF GENE CONSERVATION IN ANIMAL BREEDING (*)

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    NEED AND METHODS OF GENE CONSERVATION IN ANIMAL BREEDING (*) K. MAIJALA Agricultural Research Centre, Department of Animal Breeding, Tikkurila, Finland SUMMARY The problem of gene losses of present breeding methods on the genetic variability (both selection and random drift); 3)changing demand

  10. [Raising of fur-bearing animals and animal welfare].

    PubMed

    Grauvogl, A

    1990-04-01

    The Ministry of Agriculture has drafted a prescription for raising animals for fur production. It contains high standards of knowledge about raising, feeding and care for those animals. Included is combined interest and negotiation between farmers and the organisations for the protection of animals. Some facts of ethology need clarification soon. Special: the social deprive of Minks; the bath taking possibility for the Mink; the requirement of space for the Mink; the collar plate on Chinchillas; the water requirement of swamp Beavers; the size of group and dense occupation of Foxes. All recommendations, directions and prescriptions up to now are patchwork. In certain cases must the advisor and the farmer be in position to recognize deficiencies in care and management and be able to stop it if necessary. In this connection they must observe behaviour of tail biting, skin tearing and consumption of new born, disturbances in mating behaviour as well as in upbringing. They must also look for stereotyped movements and the expressions of pain and anxiety. The Council of Europe gave also a draft of recommendations concerning fur animals and in this paper is also attached the importance to farmers diagnosis of disturbed behaviour. PMID:2351052

  11. Experiential learning in the animal sciences: Development of a multispecies large-animal management and production practicum 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. A. Reiling; T. T. Marshall; J. H. Brendemuhl; J. A. McQuagge; J. E. Umphrey

    2010-01-01

    Students enrolled in an introductory animal science course (ASG 3003) at the University of Florida were surveyed (n = 788) over a 3-yr period to ascertain their current experience and career goals in animal agriculture. Sixty-one percent of the students indicated that they were from an urban background. Only 4% were raised on a farm or ranch where the majority

  12. Cottonseed Meal in Rations of Horses and Mules.

    E-print Network

    Williams, R. H.; Jones, J. M. (John McKinley); Jones, John H.

    1934-01-01

    . Scoates, A. E, Agricultural Engineins W. R. Horlacher. Ph. D.. Genetics A. K. Mackey, M. S., Animal Husbandry J. H. Knox, M. S., Animal Husbandry R. G. Reeves, Ph. D.. Biology A. L. Darnell, M. A.. Dairy Huebandw - *Dean. School of Veterinary Medicine..., Division Swine Husbandry, T.A.E.S., who repre- sented the Feeding and Breeding Station, Dr. R. P. Marsteller, Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, A. and M. College of Texas, and Major J. E. Sloan, U. S. Army. Grateful acknowledgment is also due...

  13. Agricultural Outlook Forum '97

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Agricultural Outlook Forum (1997 : Washington. D.C.).

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture has sponsored annual Agricultural Outlook conferences for 73 years, and those interested in the agricultural pulse of the nation can now download 23 presentations from the conference on all aspects of the agricultural economy. The site contains presentations on the outlook for various commodities, as well as other topics such as risk management, food security and food needs, the food Consumer Price Index, and "a farmer's experience with precision farming." The site also contains USDA data from its latest Agricultural Baseline Projections to 2005 dataset, 48 spreadsheets (in .wk1 format) covering agricultural commodities, trade, and aggregate income and price indicators.

  14. Agricultural Aircraft for Site-Specific Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a convenient platform to aid in precision agriculture, in which pesticide, fertilizer or other field inputs are applied only where they are needed. This saves on chemical and farm resources, and reduces environmental loading. Remote sensing is used to spot areas of the ...

  15. 1986 Agricultural Chartbook. Agriculture Handbook No. 663.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    This book contains 310 charts, tables, and graphs containing statistical information about agriculture-related commodities and services, primarily in the United States, in 1986. The book is organized in seven sections that cover the following topics: (1) the farm (farm income, farm population, farm workers, food and fiber system, agriculture and…

  16. 9 CFR 72.22 - Cars, vehicles, and premises; cleaning and treatment after containing infested or exposed animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.22 Cars, vehicles, and premises; cleaning and treatment after containing infested or exposed...

  17. 9 CFR 72.22 - Cars, vehicles, and premises; cleaning and treatment after containing infested or exposed animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.22 Cars, vehicles, and premises; cleaning and treatment after containing infested or exposed...

  18. 9 CFR 72.22 - Cars, vehicles, and premises; cleaning and treatment after containing infested or exposed animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.22 Cars, vehicles, and premises; cleaning and treatment after containing infested or exposed...

  19. 9 CFR 72.22 - Cars, vehicles, and premises; cleaning and treatment after containing infested or exposed animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.22 Cars, vehicles, and premises; cleaning and treatment after containing infested or exposed...

  20. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment GEN General Agriculture

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment GEN General Agriculture KEY: # = new course * = course IN AGRICULTURE. (3) Anintroductorycourserequiringcriticalanalysisofthemajorsocial. Prereq: Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture; freshmen only in fall semesters and transfers

  1. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture KEY: # = new course INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE. (3) Broad introduction to the environmental, economic and cultural agriculture are discussed along with pertinent soil, crop and livestock management practices. Relationships

  2. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEC Agricultural Economics

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEC Agricultural Economics KEY: # = new course THE ECONOMICS OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE. (3 of agriculture in both a national and international dimension. Students who have completed ECO 201

  3. Department of Agriculture

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Forestry Homeland Security Laws and Regulations Marketing and Trade Organic Agriculture Outreach Plant Health Research and Science ... Economic Research Food and Agriculture Research MARKETING AND TRADE Exporting Goods Importing Goods Newsroom Agency News Releases ...

  4. Traditional Agriculture and Permaculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Dick

    1997-01-01

    Discusses benefits of combining traditional agricultural techniques with the concepts of "permaculture," a framework for revitalizing traditions, culture, and spirituality. Describes school, college, and community projects that have assisted American Indian communities in revitalizing sustainable agricultural practices that incorporate cultural…

  5. SFRSF: Sustainable Agriculture

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This South Florida Restoration Science Forum (SFRSF) page discusses sustainable agriculture in southern Florida. Issues include: land managers and farmers working together to support habitat restoration; providing the agricultural and hydrologic science and technology needed to sustain agricultural production and a quality environment; reducing phosphorus and restoring natural hydrology in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA); and Best Management Practices developed to address these issues. There are links provided for additional information on this topic.

  6. [Risks due to chemical agents in agriculture].

    PubMed

    Robiony, D

    1978-01-01

    After a few notices about the contribution that chemistry has given for the development of the agriculture in this last century, we give a short description, with a classification supposition, of the main chemical agents used in the agricultural field, for the development and the defence of animal productions and crop-farming. Then, we present national statistical information about the use of chemical means of agrarian interest. We give also a short description of risks caused by chemical agents in agricolture (with hygienic implications concerning consumers also) prefiguring, in conclusion, some hypoteses for the substitution of the chemical mean with alternative techniques and methods. PMID:755403

  7. Health and safety risks in production agriculture.

    PubMed Central

    Von Essen, S G; McCurdy, S A

    1998-01-01

    Production agriculture is associated with a variety of occupational illnesses and injuries. Agricultural workers are at higher risk of death or disabling injury than most other workers. Traumatic injury commonly occurs from working with machinery or animals. Respiratory illness and health problems from exposures to farm chemicals are major concerns, and dermatoses, hearing loss, certain cancers, and zoonotic infections are important problems. Innovative means of encouraging safe work practices are being developed. Efforts are being made to reach all groups of farmworkers, including migrant and seasonal workers, farm youth, and older farmers. PMID:9795581

  8. The Animal Genetic Resource Information Network (AnimalGRIN) Database: A Database Design & Implementation Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Gretchen; Wessel, Lark; Blackman, Harvey

    2012-01-01

    This case describes a database redesign project for the United States Department of Agriculture's National Animal Germplasm Program (NAGP). The case provides a valuable context for teaching and practicing database analysis, design, and implementation skills, and can be used as the basis for a semester-long team project. The case demonstrates the…

  9. Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture Graduate Programs Available Agricultural Education Program (http:// catalog.montana.edu/graduate/agriculture/agricultural- education) · M.S. in Agricultural Education (http://catalog.montana.edu/graduate/ agriculture/agricultural-education) Department

  10. AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION Curriculum Checksheet

    E-print Network

    Rutledge, Steven

    \\ AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION Curriculum Checksheet 123 Credits This checksheet describes the curricular requirements for both the Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Education with a concentration in "Teaching" and for the teacher licensing program in agricultural education. The courses listed are courses

  11. Division of Agriculture,

    E-print Network

    Ray, David

    DAFVM Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary M e d i c i n e Visit us online at www to the Mississippi State University Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine. Discrimination based-3-14) Mississippi State University's Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine, or DAFVM

  12. European Commission Agriculture and

    E-print Network

    European Commission Agriculture and Rural Development Good practice guidance on the sustainable Commission (EC) DG Agriculture and Rural Development 130, Rue de la Loi B ­ 1049 Brussels, Belgium Phone: +32 (0) 2-2969909 Fax: +32 (0) 2-29211 33 E-mail: info@ec.europa.eu Web: https://www.ec.europa.eu/agriculture

  13. Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference

    E-print Network

    Noble, James S.

    Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information Join us to discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuels markets and participate in a special review of international policy implications for Missouri agriculture. Registration Deadline To guarantee space availability, please register

  14. International Programs in Agriculture

    E-print Network

    International Programs in Agriculture MessagefromtheDirector­ Staying Ahead of Globalization and more prosperous place for all. Fortunately, Purdue International Programs in Agriculture (IPIA) has natural disasters caution us to remember the power of nature. The United Nations Food and Agriculture

  15. Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE

    E-print Network

    Harms, Kyle E.

    COLLEGE OF Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE Dean M. E. GARRISON Associate Dean JACQUELINE M. MALLET BAKER Recruitment Coordinator 104 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2362 FAX 225/578-2526 Student Services 138 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2065 FAX 225/578-2526 The College

  16. Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry,

    E-print Network

    Program Overview Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry, one business at a time Website: http-3547 agincubator@ctahr.hawaii.edu Grow Your Business If you are looking to start an agriculture-related business with our program · Positively impact the agriculture industry in Hawaii with their success

  17. Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture Session Date Khosla (moderator) Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences College of Agricultural Climate Smart Agriculture is a multi-disciplinary approach to practice agriculture

  18. Game Animals of Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Div. of Wildlife, Denver.

    This booklet is intended to familiarize the reader with game animals typical of Colorado. Discussions in both English and Spanish are presented. Discussions cover the management of game animals, individual game species, and introduced species of game animals. (RE)

  19. Animal Industries - 10 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2006-06-02

    Three-dimensional computer character animation is becoming more and more prevalent in the entertainment industry. As the demand grows, so does the need for tools that allow animators to create animations quickly. In this thesis, we present a...

  20. Animal welfare in different human cultures, traditions and religious faiths.

    PubMed

    Sz?cs, E; Geers, R; Jezierski, T; Sossidou, E N; Broom, D M

    2012-11-01

    Animal welfare has become a growing concern affecting acceptability of agricultural systems in many countries around the world. An earlier Judeo-Christian interpretation of the Bible (1982) that dominion over animals meant that any degree of exploitation was acceptable has changed for most people to mean that each person has responsibility for animal welfare. This view was evident in some ancient Greek writings and has parallels in Islamic teaching. A minority view of Christians, which is a widespread view of Jains, Buddhists and many Hindus, is that animals should not be used by humans as food or for other purposes. The commonest philosophical positions now, concerning how animals should be treated, are a blend of deontological and utilitarian approaches. Most people think that extremes of poor welfare in animals are unacceptable and that those who keep animals should strive for good welfare. Hence animal welfare science, which allows the evaluation of welfare, has developed rapidly. PMID:25049508

  1. Animal Welfare in Different Human Cultures, Traditions and Religious Faiths

    PubMed Central

    Sz?cs, E.; Geers, R.; Jezierski, T.; Sossidou, E. N.; Broom, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Animal welfare has become a growing concern affecting acceptability of agricultural systems in many countries around the world. An earlier Judeo-Christian interpretation of the Bible (1982) that dominion over animals meant that any degree of exploitation was acceptable has changed for most people to mean that each person has responsibility for animal welfare. This view was evident in some ancient Greek writings and has parallels in Islamic teaching. A minority view of Christians, which is a widespread view of Jains, Buddhists and many Hindus, is that animals should not be used by humans as food or for other purposes. The commonest philosophical positions now, concerning how animals should be treated, are a blend of deontological and utilitarian approaches. Most people think that extremes of poor welfare in animals are unacceptable and that those who keep animals should strive for good welfare. Hence animal welfare science, which allows the evaluation of welfare, has developed rapidly. PMID:25049508

  2. Genet. Sel. Evol. 38 (2006) 201220 201 c INRA, EDP Sciences, 2006

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2006-01-01

    , Ruslan Popovf , Theo H.E. Meuwisseng a Institute of Animal Breeding and Husbandry, Christian for Farm Animal Genetics and Breeding, Moskowskoye shosse­55a, 189620 St. Petersburg-Pushkin, Russia f Department of Farm Animals and Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture and Resources of Sakha, Yakutsk, 677007

  3. there is a scarcity of relevant data (Kenny and Tarrant, 1982). Transportation is made up of a number of elements: loading and unloading, stationary confinement, confinement on a moving truck, and others

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and penning before slaughter. In R. Moss (ed.), Current Topics in Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, vol.G.P. Department of Animal Husbandry, Section of Ethology, Agricultural University, Marijkeweg 40, 6709 PG in the enforcement of hierarchy in pigs HAGELSO M. National Institute of Animal Science, Forsogsanlaeg Foulum

  4. there is a scarcity of relevant data (Kenny and Tarrant, 1982). Transportation is made up of a number of elements: loading and unloading, stationary confinement, confinement on a moving truck, and others

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and penning before slaughter. In R. Moss (ed.), Current Topics in Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, vol.G.P. Department of Animal Husbandry, Section of Ethology, Agricultural University, Marijkeweg 40, 6709 PG, cornering, acceleration) and animal movement (changes of position, loss of balance) may be established from

  5. Ann Yager, Animal Sciences Student Michael Neary, Extension Animal Scientist

    E-print Network

    Ann Yager, Animal Sciences Student Michael Neary, Extension Animal Scientist Wayne Singleton, Extension Reproductive Physiologist Photo Credits: Wayne Singleton AS-559-W Estrus Detection in Farm Animals Purdue University Department of Animal Sciences Farm Animal Management @Purdue Farm Animal Management

  6. Bridge Rectifier Animation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an animation of a bridge rectifier circuit or diode bridge. Voltages and parts of the circuit of this 3-D animated gif are highlighted with different colors. Current is displayed by green arrows indicating directional flow. The animation requires a Web browser or other video player software capable of displaying gif animations. A link provides an optional Quicktime version of this same animation.Other 3-D Circuit Animations can be seen here.

  7. Husbandry Trace Gas Emissions from a Dairy Complex By Mobile in Situ and Airborne and Spaceborne Remote Sensing: A Comex Campaign Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, I.; Tratt, D. M.; Bovensmann, H.; Buckland, K. N.; Burrows, J. P.; Frash, J.; Gerilowski, K.; Iraci, L. T.; Johnson, P. D.; Kolyer, R.; Krautwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Leen, J. B.; Hu, C.; Melton, C.; Vigil, S. A.; Yates, E. L.; Zhang, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field study reviews on the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) found significant underestimation from fossil fuel industry and husbandry. The 2014 COMEX campaign seeks to develop methods to derive CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) from remote sensing data by combining hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages synergies between high spatial resolution HSI column abundance maps and moderate spectral/spatial resolution NIS. Airborne husbandry data were collected for the Chino dairy complex (East Los Angeles Basin) by NIS-MAMAP, HSI-Mako thermal-infrared (TIR); AVIRIS NG shortwave IR (SWIR), with in situ surface mobile-AMOG Surveyor (AutoMObile greenhouse Gas)-and airborne in situ from a Twin Otter and the AlphaJet. AMOG Surveyor uses in situ Integrated Cavity Off Axis Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) to measure CH4, CO2, H2O, H2S and NH3 at 5-10 Hz, 2D winds, and thermal anomaly in an adapted commuter car. OA-ICOS provides high precision and accuracy with excellent stability. NH3 and CH4 emissions were correlated at dairy size-scales but not sub-dairy scales in surface and Mako data, showing fine-scale structure and large variations between the numerous dairies in the complex (herd ~200,000-250,000) embedded in an urban setting. Emissions hotspots were consistent between surface and airborne surveys. In June, surface and MAMAP data showed a weak overall plume, while surface and Mako data showed a stronger plume in late (hotter) July. Multiple surface plume transects using NH3 fingerprinting showed East and then NE advection out of the LA Basin consistent with airborne data. Long-term trends were investigated in satellite data. This study shows the value of synergistically combined NH3 and CH4 remote sensing data to the task of CH4 source attribution using airborne and space-based remote sensing (IASI for NH3) and top of atmosphere sensitivity calculations for Sentinel V and Carbon Sat (CH4).

  8. Capture, transport, and husbandry of elephant sharks (Callorhinchus milii) adults, eggs, and hatchlings for research and display.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Catherine A; Martins, Camila Leite; Edmunds, Alison Grace; Cocks, Julian; Currie, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Elephant sharks (Callorhinchus milii) have the slowest evolving genome of all vertebrates and are an interesting model species for evolution research and a prized display animal. However, their deep water habitat, short breeding season, fragility, and susceptibility to stress-induced mortality have made them difficult animals to capture, keep in captivity, and obtain fertilized eggs from. Gravid females were captured by rod and reel from Western Port Bay, Australia and transferred to a 40?000?L closed aquaculture system to lay their eggs before being released. The water quality parameters, averaged over three seasons of 4-6 weeks (mean?±?standard deviation) were: 16.8°C?±?2.31, salinity 37.1?±?2.9?g/L, ammonia 0.137?±?0.2?mg/L, nitrite levels 0.89?±?0.9?mg/L, nitrate 66.8?±?45.6?mg/L, pH 7.8?±?0.18, dissolved oxygen levels 93.6?±?5.3%, ORP 307?±?63.3?mV. Eggs were incubated in purpose built egg cages and embryos hatched after 143.6 days?±?1.3 at 16.9?±?0.9°C of incubation. These procedures led to no adult mortality in the last 2 years and 620 eggs with known deposition date were collected over 4 years, of which 81.5% (±4.8) were viable. Collection of abundant embryological material with known deposition date is of paramount importance for evolutionary developmental research. We attribute this success to excellent water quality, maximum reduction of stress during capture, transport, handling, and captive care. PMID:25400285

  9. Agricultural Occupations Programs Planning Guides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitt, Thomas R.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A set of program planning guides that include seven areas (1) Agricultural Production, (2) Agricultural Supplies and Services, (3) Agricultural Mechanics, (4) Agricultural Products, (5) Ornamental Horticulture, (6) Agricultural Resources, and (7) Forestry, were developed and introduced to high school applied biological and agricultural occupations…

  10. Agricultural Occupations Program Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Paul E.; Mayer, Leon

    The major program objectives of agricultural occupations courses are (1) to develop agricultural competencies needed by individuals engaged in or preparing to engage in production agriculture, and in agricultural occupations other than production agriculture; (2) to develop an understanding of the career opportunities in agriculture; (3) to…

  11. The changing face of agricultural health and safety--alternative agriculture.

    PubMed

    Donham, Kelley J; Larabee, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Alternative agriculture (defined as any production that is not commodity production) is an important growing area of agriculture. The produce ranges widely, from organic products, locally grown products, and exotic crops and animals. This conference included an overview of the evolving field of alternative agriculture plus descriptions of three different alternative agricultural operations, by the actual producers. These producers described the health and safety concerns encountered in their operations. Affordable and accessible health care was a common and very important concern of all these producers. Further, the extensive manual work load is extremely challenging, risking mental and physical stress and burnout. The major occupational health issues were musculoskeletal pain and dysfunction related to the extensive manual labor. Producers presented several suggestions for managing their occupational health issues. It was clear that research is warranted in investigating ergonomic solutions. Further, research and solutions to affordable and accessible health care is a priority issue. PMID:19214858

  12. Improving human and animal health using genetically engineered goats expressing lysozyme in their milk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Murray; E. A. Maga

    The application of genetic engineering should not be undertaken lightly as it requires extensive infrastructure and inputs before the genetically engineered animal enters a breeding and selection scheme; it does not provide a mechanism for bypassing good animal breeding and selection practices. However, there are instances where GE can provide an opportunity to address a problem in animal agriculture for

  13. Integrating Indigenous Traditional, Local and Scientific Knowledge for Improved Management, Policy and Decision-Making in Reindeer Husbandry in the Russian Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.; Yurchak, Boris; Turi, Johan Mathis; Mathiesen, Svein D.; Aissi-Wespi, Rita L.

    2004-01-01

    As scientists and policy-makers from both indigenous and non-indigenous communities begin to build closer partnerships to address common sustainability issues such as the health impacts of climate change and anthropogenic activities, it becomes increasingly important to create shared information management systems which integrate all relevant factors for optimal information sharing and decision-making. This paper describes a new GIs-based system being designed to bring local and indigenous traditional knowledge together with scientific data and information, remote sensing, and information technologies to address health-related environment, weather, climate, pollution and land use change issues for improved decision/policy-making for reindeer husbandry. The system is building an easily-accessible archive of relevant current and historical, traditional, local and remotely-sensed and other data and observations for shared analysis, measuring, and monitoring parameters of interest. Protection of indigenous culturally sensitive information will be respected through appropriate data protocols. A mechanism which enables easy information sharing among all participants, which is real time and geo-referenced and which allows interconnectivity with remote sites is also being designed into the system for maximum communication among partners. A preliminary version of our system will be described for a Russian reindeer test site, which will include a combination of indigenous knowledge about local conditions and issues, remote sensing and ground-based data on such parameters as the vegetation state and distribution, snow cover, temperature, ice condition, and infrastructure.

  14. Exotic Animal Grief Packet

    E-print Network

    Exotic Animal Grief Packet 300 West Drake Road Fort Collins, CO 80523 (970) 491-4143 www.argusinstitute.colostate.edu #12;Grieving The Loss Of Your Exotic Pet When an animal enters our life, a distinct relationship is created. Animals provide a truly unique relationship we cannot replicate anywhere else. Exotic animals

  15. Animal Thinking An Introduction

    E-print Network

    Menzel, Randolf - Institut für Biologie

    1 Animal Thinking An Introduction Randolf Menzel and Julia Fischer The topic of this Strüngmann Forum--animal thinking--was not formulated as a question--"Do animals think?--but rather as a statement species alone. The issue of whether animals experience conscious recollections in some similar way

  16. Gesture Driven Facial Animation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Junyong Noh; Douglas Fidaleo; Ulrich Neumann

    2002-01-01

    Gesture driven facial animation (GDFA) overcomes limitations in conventional performance driven facial animation (PDFA) by providing a high level gesture layer as an interface between the sensing and animation mechanisms. GDFA maintains the same spirit of PDFA in that sensing and analysis provide automatic animation control. A distinguishing factor, however, is the high level abstraction of the information flow between

  17. Agricultural Research and Productivity Growth in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert E. Evenson; Carl E. Pray; Mark W. Rosegrant

    1998-01-01

    s and BiologicalAbstracts.Note: Where n.a. appears, data were not available.aPlant pathology, plant physiology, soil science, animal biology.the fertilizer, pesticide, and agricultural machinery industries, and less important in th eseed industry because of agroclimatic differences between India and the West. Table 6shows imports and local production of tractors and fertilizers. Before 1960 almost alltractors were imported. In 1961\\/62, 880 tractors were

  18. An essay on agriculture and population pressure.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Andrew S

    2012-01-01

    This is an essay highlighting the fundamental importance of agriculture (historical and present) in the agro-socioeconomic evolution of human societies, from the times of the hunter/gatherers to the modern day. Attention is drawn in the text to the importance of deforestation in relation to micro and macro climate changes, and the vital role of carbon dioxide to plant and animal life. The essay also relates the world's natural resources to the present unsustainable population pressures. PMID:22544772

  19. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Maoka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of ?-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine animal carotenoids from natural product chemistry, metabolism, food chain, and chemosystematic viewpoints, and also describe new structural carotenoids isolated from marine animals over the last decade. PMID:21566799

  20. Bacterial Transport from Agricultural Lands Fertilized with Animal Manure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anurag Mishra; Brian L. Benham; Saied Mostaghimi

    2008-01-01

    A plot scale study was conducted to determine bacterial transport in runoff from cropland treated with poultry litter and\\u000a dairy manure applied at phosphorus (P) agronomic rates. Treatments included surface application of dairy manure, surface application\\u000a of poultry litter, incorporation of dairy manure and control. A rainfall simulator was used to induce runoff 1 and 2 days\\u000a after manure application. Runoff

  1. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences epartment of Animal Sciences

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    cell count standard will be much more difficult. Herds that are producing milk at or near the legal. But it can be done. We have producers in this state that consistently produce milk with a cell count as low of scientific evidence to support that stand. Yet we recognize that somatic cells can be called pus cells

  2. CALS WATER AND ENVIRONMENT INVENTORY 2012 ANIMAL AGRICULTURE

    E-print Network

    Sanderson, Mike

    . Perfluoronated compounds in Arizona ground water: sources of contamination ($10,061; National Institutes contaminants in groundwater in proximity to private and public water supply wells along the Santa Cruz River for Water Resources). Project identified two sources responsible for perfluoronated compound contamination

  3. Applicator Training Manual for: Agricultural Animal Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Christian M.

    This manual discusses pesticide safety and environmental considerations, pesticide toxicity, residue potential, pesticide formulations, and application techniques. In addition, descriptions of, and methods for controlling insects and related pests that attack cattle, sheep and goats, swine, horses and other equines, and poultry are given. These…

  4. Animals in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Angela

    1988-01-01

    Animals are indispensable to the space program. Their continued use could have many significant results. Those who are opposed to using animals in space should remember that space animals are treated humanely; they are necessary because results can be obtained from them that would be unobtainable from humans; and results from animal experiments can be applied to human systems. Therefore, NASA should continue to use animals in space research.

  5. Animal and Plant Cells

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    wlcounts

    2012-04-04

    What are the similarities and differences between plant cells and animal cells? Use the graphic organizer. Graphic Organizer Go here and look at the diagram. Make notes about the anatomy of an animal cell in your graphic organizer. Anatomy of an Animal Cell Go to this website and explore the typical animal cell. Press start and interact with the model. Typical Animal Cell Take the plant cell tutorial with this link. Interact ...

  6. Agricultural Statistics 1994

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1994-01-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) has made full text of "Agricultural Statistics 1994" available via its Web site. Agricultural Statistics is an annual compendium of data (and selected charts) relating to all aspects of the U.S. agricultural economy. Subject coverage includes all major crop and livestock sectors, farm income and credit, stabilization and price support, agricultural conservation and forestry statistics, and fertilizers and pesticides, among others. Tables include both state and national breakdowns, and most national tables include between two and ten year time series. The book is available as one large Adobe Acrobat .PDF file (about 5 megabytes), so you'll need a fast connection to get it. You'll also need a free Acrobat Reader, which can be obtained at the same page. Acrobat allows selective searching for specific tables, as well as selective printing of those tables. (See Network Tools, below.)

  7. The USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology: Developing new mosquito surveillance and control products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE), U.S. Department of AgricultureAgricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), conducts specific research directed at reducing or eliminating the harm caused by insects to humans, animals, and crops. CMAVE is an internationally ren...

  8. N 2 O: DIRECT EMISSIONS FROM AGRICULTURAL SOILS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Braatz

    The OECD\\/IPCC\\/IEA phase II development of the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (IPCC Guidelines) methodology for agricultural sources of N2O (IPCC, 1997; Mosier et al., 1998) includes methodologies for calculating both direct and indirect emissions of N2O related to agricultural production. It takes into account anthropogenic N inputs including synthetic fertilizers, animal wastes and other organic

  9. Wisconsin Agriculture Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics

    E-print Network

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    Wisconsin Agriculture 2012 STATUS OF Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics · Status­Extension College of Agricultural & Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MADISON #12;#12;Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2012 An annual report by the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, UW

  10. Agricultural aviation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, H. L. (compiler); Bouse, L. F. (compiler)

    1977-01-01

    A compilation of papers, comments, and results is provided during a workshop session. The purpose of the workshop was to review and evaluate the current state of the art of agricultural aviation, to identify and rank potentially productive short and long range research and development areas, and to strengthen communications between research scientists and engineers involved in agricultural research. Approximately 71 individuals actively engaged in agricultural aviation research were invited to participate in the workshop. These were persons familiar with problems related to agricultural aviation and processing expertise which are of value for identifying and proposing beneficial research.

  11. Understanding Animal Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Understanding Animal Research (Understanding Animal Research)

    2009-01-01

    The public debate on animal research sometimes gets so heated that the facts can be overlooked. How many animals are used in research every year? Do people know that most of them are mice or rats? Why are animals genetically modified? How is animal research regulated? How are the animals cared for? What actually happens to research animals? How does the use of animals in research and testing compare with other uses of animals by society? This website aims to answer all of these questions as well as provide information on animal research and human health, policy issues, and latest news. This website also includes a learning center. Information is geared towards learners in the U.K.

  12. Animals on drugs: understanding the role of pharmaceutical companies in the animal-industrial complex.

    PubMed

    Twine, Richard

    2013-12-01

    In this paper I revisit previous critiques that I have made of much, though by no means all, bioethical discourse. These pertain to faithfulness to dualistic ontology, a taken-for-granted normative anthropocentrism, and the exclusion of a consideration of how political economy shapes the conditions for bioethical discourse (Twine Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8(3):285-295, 2005; International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food 16(3):1-18, 2007, 2010). Part of my argument around bioethical dualist ontology is to critique the assumption of a division between the "medical" (human) and "agricultural" (nonhuman) and to show various ways in which they are interrelated. I deepen this analysis with a focus on transnational pharmaceutical companies, with specific attention to their role in enhancing agricultural production through animal drug administration. I employ the topical case of antibiotics in order to speak to current debates in not only the interdisciplinary field of bioethics but also that of animal studies. More generally, the animal-industrial complex (Twine Journal for Critical Animal Studies 10(1):12-39, 2012) is underlined as a highly relevant bioethical object that deserves more conceptual and empirical attention. PMID:24092398

  13. The roles and values of wild foods in agricultural systems

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Zareen; Pretty, Jules

    2010-01-01

    Almost every ecosystem has been amended so that plants and animals can be used as food, fibre, fodder, medicines, traps and weapons. Historically, wild plants and animals were sole dietary components for hunter–gatherer and forager cultures. Today, they remain key to many agricultural communities. The mean use of wild foods by agricultural and forager communities in 22 countries of Asia and Africa (36 studies) is 90–100 species per location. Aggregate country estimates can reach 300–800 species (e.g. India, Ethiopia, Kenya). The mean use of wild species is 120 per community for indigenous communities in both industrialized and developing countries. Many of these wild foods are actively managed, suggesting there is a false dichotomy around ideas of the agricultural and the wild: hunter–gatherers and foragers farm and manage their environments, and cultivators use many wild plants and animals. Yet, provision of and access to these sources of food may be declining as natural habitats come under increasing pressure from development, conservation-exclusions and agricultural expansion. Despite their value, wild foods are excluded from official statistics on economic values of natural resources. It is clear that wild plants and animals continue to form a significant proportion of the global food basket, and while a variety of social and ecological drivers are acting to reduce wild food use, their importance may be set to grow as pressures on agricultural productivity increase. PMID:20713393

  14. Innovative Programs in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Developmental programs resulting from the increased emphasis on off-farm agricultural occupations and considered innovative by state wupervisors of agricultural education are described: (1) 17 high school vocational agriculture programs in horticulture, agricultural mechanics, forestry and conservation, agriculture and distribution, cooperative…

  15. Beartracker's Animal Tracks Den

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Beartracker's Animal Tracks Den is an excellent comprehensive "online field guide to tracks and tracking." The site includes animal track images, photos, as well as information about mammals, reptiles, birds, insects, amphibians, and other tracking resources. Most of the animals featured on the site are inhabitants of North America. Images of animal tracks also contain descriptions to help users become familiar with the distinctive qualities of each animal's print. This is an excellent resource for nature enthusiasts, animal search and rescue trackers, and everyone in between.

  16. Early Cottons

    E-print Network

    Bennett, R. L. (Robert Love)

    1904-01-01

    TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS BULLETIN No. 75 COTTON INVESTIGATIONS OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND THE TEXAS EXPERIMENT STATION EARLY COTTONS POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS... ........................... F. R. MARSHALL. .Animal Husbandry EDWARD C. GREEN, B. S.. ................. .Assistant Horticultt~rist .................................. G. S. FRAPS. .Associate Chemist R. L. BENNETT. ................................ .Cotton Specialist 0. M...

  17. Topic 1: Data acquisition and evaluation of groundwater pollution by nitrates, pesticides, and disease-producing bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. P. Young

    1983-01-01

    The potential of certain agricultural activities for groundwater pollution has long been recognized. Intensification of agriculture, increases in land area devoted to arable crops, intensification of animal husbandry, and a move away from arable rotations toward monoculture have affected groundwater nitrate content and necessitate continued close monitoring of groundwater. Investigative techniques vary, and have included systematic collection of water quality

  18. Bovine Tb Eradication Project – Recognizing Hot Button Issues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bridget Kavanagh-Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The Michigan Departments of Agriculture, Community Health, and Natural Resources, US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Michigan State University work cooperatively together as the bovine TB eradication project partners. The interagency group combines expertise in epidemiology, veterinary and human medicine, pathology, wildlife biology, animal husbandry, regulatory law and policy and risk communications. The stakeholders, those impacted by the disease, include

  19. Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

    E-print Network

    Kaye, Jason P.

    Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension Engineering Robert E. Graves, Professor, Agricultural and Biological Engineering F-254 Introduction As liquid manure onto neighbor-· ing properties and highways widespread dispersal of odors· manure runoff due

  20. Agriculture in the Midwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture in the Midwest United States (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin) represents one of the most intense areas of agriculture in the world. This area is not only critically important for the United States, but also for world exports of grain and meat for the Un...