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Sample records for aguas fluviales utilizando

  1. Secondary natural gas recovery in mature fluvial sandstone reservoirs, Frio Formation, Agua Dulce Field, South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.A.; Levey, R.A. ); Vidal, J.M. ); Sippel, M.A. ); Ballard, J.R. ); Coover, D.M. Jr. ); Bloxsom, W.E. )

    1993-09-01

    An approach that integrates detailed geologic, engineering, and petrophysical analyses combined with improved well-log analytical techniques can be used by independent oil and gas companies of successful infield exploration in mature Gulf Coast fields that larger companies may consider uneconomic. In a secondary gas recovery project conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and funded by the Gas Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, a potential incremental natural gas resource of 7.7 bcf, of which 4.0 bcf may be technically recoverable, was identified in a 490-ac lease in Agua Dulce field. Five wells in this lease had previously produced 13.7 bcf from Frio reservoirs at depths of 4600-6200 ft. The pay zones occur in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones offset by faults associated with the Vicksburg fault zone. The compartments may each contain up to 1.0 bcf of gas resources with estimates based on previous completions and the recent infield drilling experience of Pintas Creek Oil Company. Uncontacted gas resources occur in thin (typically less than 10 ft) bypassed zones that can be identified through a computed log evaluation that integrates open-hole logs, wireline pressure tests, fluid samples, and cores. At Agua Dulce field, such analysis identified at 4-ft bypassed zone uphole from previously produced reservoirs. This reservoir contained original reservoir pressure and flowed at rates exceeding 1 mmcf/d. The expected ultimate recovery is 0.4 bcf. Methodologies developed in the evaluation of Agua Dulce field can be successfully applied to other mature gas fields in the south Texas Gulf Coast. For example, Stratton and McFaddin are two fields in which the secondary gas recovery project has demonstrated the existence of thin, potentially bypassed zones that can yield significant incremental gas resources, extending the economic life of these fields.

  2. Simulations of Fluvial Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattan, D.; Birnir, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Smith-Bretherton-Birnir (SBB) model for fluvial landsurfaces consists of a pair of partial differential equations, one governing water flow and one governing the sediment flow. Numerical solutions of these equations have been shown to provide realistic models in the evolution of fluvial landscapes. Further analysis of these equations shows that they possess scaling laws (Hack's Law) that are known to exist in nature. However, the simulations are highly dependent on the numerical methods used; with implicit methods exhibiting the correct scaling laws, but the explicit methods fail to do so. These equations, and the resulting models, help to bridge the gap between the deterministic and the stochastic theories of landscape evolution. Slight modifications of the SBB equations make the results of the model more realistic. By modifying the sediment flow equation, the model obtains more pronounced meandering rivers. Typical landsurface with rivers.

  3. Floods and Fluvial Wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comiti, F.

    2014-12-01

    Several studies have recently addressed the complex interactions existing at various spatial scales among riparian vegetation, channel morphology and wood storage. The majority of these investigations has been carried out in relatively natural river systems, focusing mostly on the long-term vegetation-morphology dynamics under "equilibrium" conditions. Little is still known about the role of flood events - of different frequency/magnitude - on several aspects of such dynamics, e.g. entrainment conditions of in-channel wood, erosion rates of vegetation from channel margins and from islands, transport distances of wood elements of different size along the channel network. Even less understood is how the river's evolutionary trajectory may affect these processes, and thus the degree to which conceptual models derivable from near-natural systems could be applicable to human-disturbed channels. Indeed, the different human pressures - present on most river basins worldwide - have greatly impaired the morphological and ecological functions of fluvial wood, and the attempts to "restore" in-channel wood storage are currently carried out without a sufficient understanding of wood transport processes occurring during floods. On the other hand, the capability to correctly predict the magnitude of large wood transport during large floods is now seen as crucial - especially in mountain basins - for flood hazard mapping, as is the identification of the potential wood sources (e.g. landslides, floodplains, islands) for the implementation of sound and effective hazard mitigation measures. The presentation will first summarize the current knowledge on fluvial wood dynamics and modelling at different spatial and temporal scales, with a particular focus on mountain rivers. The effects of floods of different characteristics on vegetation erosion and wood transport will be then addressed presenting some study cases from rivers in the European Alps and in the Italian Apennines featuring

  4. Quaternary fluvial archives: achievements of the Fluvial Archives Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgland, David; Cordier, Stephane; Herget, Juergen; Mather, Ann; Vandenberghe, Jef; Maddy, Darrel

    2013-04-01

    In their geomorphological and sedimentary records, rivers provide valuable archives of environments and environmental change, at local to global scales. In particular, fluvial sediments represent databanks of palaeoenvironment and palaeoclimatic (for example) of fossils (micro- and macro-), sedimentary and post-depositional features and buried soils. Well-dated sequences are of the most value, with dating provided by a wide range of methods, from radiometric (numerical) techniques to included fossils (biostratigraphy) and/or archaeological material. Thus Quaternary fluvial archives can also provide important data for studies of Quaternary biotic evolution and early human occupation. In addition, the physical disposition of fluvial sequences, be it as fragmented terrace remnants or as stacked basin-fills, provides valuable information about geomorphological and crustal evolution. Since rivers are long-term persistent features in the landscape, their sedimentary archives can represent important frameworks for regional Quaternary stratigraphy. Fluvial archives are distributed globally, being represented on all continents and across all climatic zones, with the exception of the frozen polar regions and the driest deserts. In 1999 the Fluvial Archives Group (FLAG) was established, as a working group of the Quaternary Research Association (UK), aimed at bringing together those interested in such archives. This has evolved into an informal organization that has held regular biennial combined conference and field-trip meetings, has co-sponsored other meetings and conference sessions, and has presided over two International Geoscience Programme (IGCP) projects: IGCP 449 (2000-2004) 'Global Correlation of Late Cenozoic Fluvial Deposits' and IGCP 518 (2005-2007) 'Fluvial sequences as evidence for landscape and climatic evolution in the Late Cenozoic'. Through these various activities a sequence of FLAG publications has appeared, including special issues in a variety of

  5. Understanding the Fluvial Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bätz, N.; Lane, S. N.; Temme, A. J. A. M.; Lang, F.

    2012-04-01

    Geomorphological modelling has evolved significantly the representation of the link between river morphology, flow processes and sediment transport; notably recently, with an emphasis upon the interactions between vegetation dynamics and morphodynamics. Nevertheless, vegetation dynamics have tended to be treated as a simplistic "black box" in which time replaces the more complex underlying processes. Thus, riparian vegetation dynamics not only result from interactions between surface-flow, topography and vegetation resistance to disturbance, but also soil development within the fluvial zone, which affects nutrient and water supply. More generally labeled the critical zone, there is a lack of considering the "critical fluvial zone" in geomorphological models. Understanding the key drivers of this system, thus the processes interrelating vegetation, topography, soil (formation), subsurface- and surface-flow, are crucial to understand how riverine landscapes respond to increasing human pressure and to climate change. In this poster, we consider the likely nature of a braided river critical fluvial zone. Braided rivers in deglaciated forelands provide an opportunity to study the fluvial critical zone due to their dynamic properties, the restricted physical size, the simple ecosystems and the space-for-time relation caused by glacier retreatment after the "Little Ice Age". The poster aims to commence a discussion on the fluvial critical zone, showing first results about: a) the system understanding of a braided river set in a recently deglaciated alpine foreland; b) methodological approaches to quantify the identified interrelating key processes; c) how quantitative understanding can be integrated into fluvial geomorphological modelling.

  6. Meandering: fluvial versus tidal. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seminara, G.

    2009-12-01

    Tidal meanders (Marani et al, Water Resour Res, 2002) display similarities as well as important differences from fluvial meanders (Seminara, J Fluid Mech, 2006). Like fluvial meanders they have characteristic wavelengths scaling with channel width: this is why the convergent character of tidal channels leads to meander wavelengths decaying landward. Unlike fluvial meanders, the typical curvature spectra of tidal meanders contain even harmonics: hence, meander skewing does non display any distinct correlation with the flow direction and the known Kinoshita curve, which approximates the shape of fluvial meanders, is not appropriate to tidal meanders. Additional constraints are brought up by the spatial gradients of the basic bed profile connected to the finite length of tidal channels at equilibrium. In fact, it has been theoretically established (Schuttelaars and De Swart, Eur J Mech, B/Fluids, 1996, Seminara et al, J Fluid Mech submitted, 2009) and confirmed by controlled laboratory experiments (Tambroni et al., J Geoph Res, 2005) that tidal channels closed at one end and connected at the other end with a tidal sea, evolve towards an equilibrium configuration characterized by a ‘slow’ landward decay of the average flow depth. An equilibrium length of the channel is then determined by the formation of a shoreline. Channel curvature affects the lateral equilibrium topography and gives rise to a pattern of point bars and scour pools resembling that of fluvial channels. With some notable differences, though. In fact, Solari et al (J Fluid Mech, 2001) showed that long sequences of weakly sinuous identical meandering channels subject to a symmetrical tidal forcing develop a symmetrical bar-pool pattern with small symmetrical oscillations during the tidal cycle. However, in the laboratory investigations of Garotta et al. (Proceedings RCEM5,2007) the bar-pool pattern was somehow unexpected. In a first experiment, it was in phase with curvature only in the inner half of

  7. Computation of fluvial-sediment discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porterfield, George

    1972-01-01

    This report is one of a series concerning the concepts, measurement, laboratory procedures, and computation of fluvial-sediment discharge. Material in this report includes procedures and forms used to compile and evaluate particle-size and concentration data, to compute fluvial-sediment discharge, and to prepare sediment records for publication.

  8. Agua Caliente and Their Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryterband, Roman

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the traditional music of the Agua Caliente band of California's Desert Cahuilla Indian tribe, including accompanying instruments, types of songs, thematic material, and performance routines. Exploring the structure of the music, the article describes meter, tempo, harmony and tonal gravitations, and use of words. (DS)

  9. Fluvial Processes in River Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterkamp, W. R.

    Since 1971, when W. H. Grafs book, Hydraulics of Sediment Transport, was published, a number of other texts that also provide somewhat personal perspectives on water-sediment interactions in open-channel flows have appeared. The latest of these is Fluvial Processes in River Engineering, by Howard H. Chang. This text updates recent developments in the study of hydraulics and sediment transport of natural stream channels, but unlike the earlier books, it expands consideration to geomorphic processes and models of channel change. The author states that the book is intended as a text for senior and graduate-level engineering students. It appears that Chang has succeeded in tailoring the book for that audience, but it also appears that no fewer than two semesters of classroom time would be required to provide an adequate basis for understanding the considerable variety of subject matter covered.

  10. Fluvial geomorphology and paleohydrology in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, Takashi; Saito, Kyoji; Kadomura, Hiroshi; Grossman, Michael

    2001-07-01

    An introduction to fluvial geomorphology and paleohydrology in Japan is provided for researchers who are unfamiliar with these topics. Studies by Japanese geomorphologists are reviewed including those published only in Japanese-language journals. Emphasis is placed upon the following aspects: (1) abundant sediment yields from steep watersheds subjected to frequent heavy rains despite heavily vegetated conditions, (2) extensive sedimentation in mountain piedmonts and coastal fluvial plains especially during the Holocene, (3) catastrophic hydro-geomorphological events associated with earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, and (4) the impacts of the increased heavy rainfall during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition on the post glacial development of hillslopes and alluvial fans. These geomorphological characteristics differ from those in continental regions, such as Europe and North America, indicating that research on Japanese fluvial systems can contribute a great deal to the understanding of the global variety of fluvial geomorphology. Recent work on paleohydrological reconstruction in Japan is also reviewed.

  11. Laser Scanning Applications in Fluvial Geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alho, P.

    2014-12-01

    During recent decades, the use of high-resolution laser scanning data in fluvial studies has rapidly increased. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) can be used to extensively map riverine topography. Laser scanning data have great potential to improve the effectiveness of topographical data acquisition and the accuracy and resolution of DTMs (Digital Terrain Models) needed in fluvial geomorphology. Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) is applicable for mapping areas varying from reach to catchment scale and these data are, therefore, particularly suitable, especially for hydraulic modelling, mapping of flood inundation, and the detection of macro-scale fluvial geomorphology. With Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) a spatial resolution of less than 1 mm and a range accuracy of few millimetres can be achieved. Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) enables a remarkably faster survey approach compared to the conventional TLS method. One of the newest applications of MLS approaches involves a boat/cart/backpack -based mobile mapping system. This set-up includes laser scanning and imaging from a platform moving along a river course or floodplain and may be used to expand the spatial extent of terrestrial scanning. Detailed DTMs derived from laser scanning data can be used to improve the recognition of fluvial landforms, the geometric data of hydraulic modelling, and the estimation of flood inundation extents and the associated fluvial processes. Fluvial environments also offer challenges for the application of laser scanning techniques. Factors such as vegetation cover, terrain undulation, coarse surface materials and water surfaces may distort a laser scanning survey.

  12. Fluvial mudstone breccias and their petroleum significance

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, P.E.

    1987-05-01

    The classic fining-upward model of fluvial deposition places mudstone breccia fragments as basal channel lag deposits. Basal breccias can form by bank erosion and collapse by migrating channels and channel down-cutting into preexisting mudstones. However, mudstone breccias associated with fluvial sediments display much wider distributions and can be found at the top of channel fills. Some formative mechanisms for breccias found toward the tops of fluvial sequences are (1) gravity sliding down point bar surfaces; (2) bank erosion and collapse by migrating underfit streams found within abandoned channel reaches undergoing vertical accretion and; (3) oversteepening and collapse of channel banks in response to stage fluctuations. Thus, breccia deposits can be located above or adjacent to well-sorted porous and permeable sands. In the subsurface, fluvial breccias are difficult to recognize in core if individual clasts are larger than the borehole diameter and flat lying. Dense concentrations of clasts also influence log readings by displaying high gamma-ray and relatively positive spontaneous potential responses. Core analyses commonly give misleadingly low indications of porosity and permeability because of the relatively small sample sizes available. It is very easy to mistake thick, dense concentrations of mudstone breccia for the deposits of shale-filled channels. Breccias found at the top of fluvial sequences are commonly overlooked reservoirs because hydrocarbons will be found in zones characterized by very large impervious blocks formed of muddy sediment. Recognition of the presence and distribution of breccias is crucial in the exploration and development of channel reservoirs.

  13. AGUA TIBIA PRIMITIVE AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irwin, William P.; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    The Agua Tibia Primitive Area in southwestern California is underlain by igneous and metamorphic rocks that are siilar to those widely exposed throughout much of the Peninsular Ranges. To detect the presence of any concealed mineral deposits, samples of stream sediments were collected along the various creeks that head in the mountain. As an additional aid in evaluating the mineral potential, an aeromagnetic survey was made and interpreted. A search for records of past or existing mining claims within the primitive area was made but none was found. Evidence of deposits of metallic or nonmetallic minerals was not seen during the study.

  14. The fluvial record of climate change.

    PubMed

    Macklin, M G; Lewin, J; Woodward, J C

    2012-05-13

    Fluvial landforms and sediments can be used to reconstruct past hydrological conditions over different time scales once allowance has been made for tectonic, base-level and human complications. Field stratigraphic evidence is explored here at three time scales: the later Pleistocene, the Holocene, and the historical and instrumental period. New data from a range of field studies demonstrate that Croll-Milankovitch forcing, Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events, enhanced monsoon circulation, millennial- to centennial-scale climate variability within the Holocene (probably associated with solar forcing and deep ocean circulation) and flood-event variability in recent centuries can all be discerned in the fluvial record. Although very significant advances have been made in river system and climate change research in recent years, the potential of fluvial palaeohydrology has yet to be fully realized, to the detriment of climatology, public health, resource management and river engineering. PMID:22474679

  15. Fluvial architecture and reservoir compartmentalization in the Oligocene middle Frio Formation of south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, D.R.; Jirik, L.A. )

    1990-09-01

    Seeligson, Stratton, and Agua Dulce fields are being studied as part of a Gas Research Institute/Department of Energy/State of Texas cosponsored program designed to develop and test methodologies and technologies for gas reserve growth in conventional reservoirs in mature gas fields. Over the last four decades, each field has produced approximately 2 tcf of gas from middle Frio reservoirs alone. Recent drilling and workover results and reservoir pressure data, however, point to the possibility of additional reserves. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic studies based on well logs and cores indicate that middle Frio reservoirs are architecturally complex. Deposition on an aggrading coastal plain resulted in a continuum of architectural styles that has important implications for reservoir compartmentalization. The middle Frio is composed of sand-rich channel-fill and splay deposits interstratified with floodplain mudstones, all forming part of the Gueydan fluvial system. Relatively slow aggradation resulted in laterally stacked channel systems; whereas more rapid aggradation resulted in vertically stacked channel systems. Laterally stacked sandstone bodies predominate at Seeligson field, leading to separate but potentially leaky reservoir compartments. By contrast, vertically stacked sandstone bodies predominate at Stratton and Agua Dulce fields, favoring more isolated reservoir compartments. Thus, a high potential for reserve growth through the identification of untapped compartments, poorly drained acreage, and bypassed zones exists for each of these fields, but differences in reservoir architecture must be taken into account as part of exploitation strategies.

  16. Large Fluvial Fans and Exploration for Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Murray Justin

    2005-01-01

    A report discusses the geological phenomena known, variously, as modern large (or large modern) fluvial fans or large continental fans, from a perspective of exploring for hydrocarbons. These fans are partial cones of river sediment that spread out to radii of 100 km or more. Heretofore, they have not been much recognized in the geological literature probably because they are difficult to see from the ground. They can, however, be seen in photographs taken by astronauts and on other remotely sensed imagery. Among the topics discussed in the report is the need for research to understand what seems to be an association among fluvial fans, alluvial fans, and hydrocarbon deposits. Included in the report is an abstract that summarizes the global distribution of large modern fluvial fans and a proposal to use that distribution as a guide to understanding paleo-fluvial reservoir systems where oil and gas have formed. Also included is an abstract that summarizes what a continuing mapping project has thus far revealed about the characteristics of large fans that have been found in a variety of geological environments.

  17. Applied fluvial geomorphology. Report No. 31

    SciTech Connect

    MacBroom, J.G.

    1981-03-01

    The first portion of this report discusses the geologic properties and characteristics of natural rivers and floodplains. The second part outlines the influence of man on fluvial geomorphology, ecological considerations, and the natural characteristics of rivers that should be applied in the design of river and bridge projects.

  18. Applied fluvial geomorphology. Report No. 31

    SciTech Connect

    MacBroom, J.G.

    1981-03-01

    The first portion of this report discusse the geologic properties and characteristics of natural rivers and floodplains. The second part outlines the influence of man on fluvial geomorphology, ecological considerations, and the natural characteristics of rivers that should be applied in the design of river and bridge projects.

  19. A fluvial mercury budget for Lake Ontario.

    PubMed

    Denkenberger, Joseph S; Driscoll, Charles T; Mason, Edward; Branfireun, Brian; Warnock, Ashley

    2014-06-01

    Watershed mercury (Hg) flux was calculated for ten inflowing rivers and the outlet for Lake Ontario using empirical measurements from two independent field-sampling programs. Total Hg (THg) flux for nine study watersheds that directly drain into the lake ranged from 0.2 kg/yr to 13 kg/yr, with the dominant fluvial THg load from the Niagara River at 154 kg/yr. THg loss at the outlet (St. Lawrence River) was 68 kg/yr and has declined approximately 40% over the past decade. Fluvial Hg inputs largely (62%) occur in the dissolved fraction and are similar to estimates of atmospheric Hg inputs. Fluvial mass balances suggest strong in-lake retention of particulate Hg inputs (99%), compared to dissolved total Hg (45%) and methyl Hg (22%) fractions. Wetland land cover is a good predictor of methyl Hg yield for Lake Ontario watersheds. Sediment deposition studies, coupled atmospheric and fluvial Hg fluxes, and a comparison of this work with previous measurements indicate that Lake Ontario is a net sink of Hg inputs and not at steady state likely because of recent decreases in point source inputs and atmospheric Hg deposition. PMID:24783951

  20. A Field Exercise in Fluvial Sediment Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharp, Thomas M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an investigation which introduces the mathematical principles of stream hydraulics and fluvial sediment in a practical context. The investigation has four stages: defining hydrology of the stream; defining channel hydraulics in a study reach; measuring grain size; and calculating transportable grain size and comparing measure stream-bed…

  1. Martian Fluvial Conglomerates at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. M. E.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Dietrich, W. E.; Gupta, S.; Sumner, D. Y.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Malin, M. C.; Edgett, K. S.; Maurice, S.; Forni, O.; Gasnault, O.; Ollila, A.; Newsom, H. E.; Dromart, G.; Palucis, M. C.; Yingst, R. A.; Anderson, R. B.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Le Mouélic, S.; Goetz, W.; Madsen, M. B.; Koefoed, A.; Jensen, J. K.; Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Lewis, K. W.; Stack, K. M.; Rubin, D.; Kah, L. C.; Bell, J. F.; Farmer, J. D.; Sullivan, R.; Van Beek, T.; Blaney, D. L.; Pariser, O.; Deen, R. G.; Kemppinen, Osku; Bridges, Nathan; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Minitti, Michelle; Cremers, David; Edgar, Lauren; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Weigle, Gerald; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sobrón Sánchez, Pablo; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Aparicio, Carlos Armiens; Caride Rodríguez, Javier; Carrasco Blázquez, Isaías; Gómez Gómez, Felipe; Elvira, Javier Gómez; Hettrich, Sebastian; Lepinette Malvitte, Alain; Marín Jiménez, Mercedes; Frías, Jesús Martínez; Soler, Javier Martín; Torres, F. Javier Martín; Molina Jurado, Antonio; Sotomayor, Luis Mora; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo; Navarro López, Sara; González, Verónica Peinado; García, Jorge Pla; Rodriguez Manfredi, José Antonio; Planelló, Julio José Romeral; Alejandra Sans Fuentes, Sara; Sebastian Martinez, Eduardo; Torres Redondo, Josefina; O'Callaghan, Roser Urqui; Zorzano Mier, María-Paz; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; DeMarines, Julia; Grinspoon, David; Reitz, Günther; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; Uston, Claude d.; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Szopa, Cyril; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Posner, Arik; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Brinza, David; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; de la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Cucinotta, Francis; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Leshin, Laurie; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Bullock, Mark; Ehresmann, Bent; Hamilton, Victoria; Hassler, Donald; Peterson, Joseph; Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Blanco Ávalos, Juan José; Ramos, Miguel; Kim, Myung-Hee; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; González, Rafael Navarro; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Kortmann, Onno; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Jakosky, Bruce; Zunic, Tonci Balic; Frydenvang, Jens; Kinch, Kjartan; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Savijärvi, Hannu; Boehm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; García, César Martín; Mellin, Reinhold Mueller; Schweingruber, Robert Wimmer; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2013-05-01

    Observations by the Mars Science Laboratory Mast Camera (Mastcam) in Gale crater reveal isolated outcrops of cemented pebbles (2 to 40 millimeters in diameter) and sand grains with textures typical of fluvial sedimentary conglomerates. Rounded pebbles in the conglomerates indicate substantial fluvial abrasion. ChemCam emission spectra at one outcrop show a predominantly feldspathic composition, consistent with minimal aqueous alteration of sediments. Sediment was mobilized in ancient water flows that likely exceeded the threshold conditions (depth 0.03 to 0.9 meter, average velocity 0.20 to 0.75 meter per second) required to transport the pebbles. Climate conditions at the time sediment was transported must have differed substantially from the cold, hyper-arid modern environment to permit aqueous flows across several kilometers.

  2. Martian fluvial conglomerates at Gale crater.

    PubMed

    Williams, R M E; Grotzinger, J P; Dietrich, W E; Gupta, S; Sumner, D Y; Wiens, R C; Mangold, N; Malin, M C; Edgett, K S; Maurice, S; Forni, O; Gasnault, O; Ollila, A; Newsom, H E; Dromart, G; Palucis, M C; Yingst, R A; Anderson, R B; Herkenhoff, K E; Le Mouélic, S; Goetz, W; Madsen, M B; Koefoed, A; Jensen, J K; Bridges, J C; Schwenzer, S P; Lewis, K W; Stack, K M; Rubin, D; Kah, L C; Bell, J F; Farmer, J D; Sullivan, R; Van Beek, T; Blaney, D L; Pariser, O; Deen, R G

    2013-05-31

    Observations by the Mars Science Laboratory Mast Camera (Mastcam) in Gale crater reveal isolated outcrops of cemented pebbles (2 to 40 millimeters in diameter) and sand grains with textures typical of fluvial sedimentary conglomerates. Rounded pebbles in the conglomerates indicate substantial fluvial abrasion. ChemCam emission spectra at one outcrop show a predominantly feldspathic composition, consistent with minimal aqueous alteration of sediments. Sediment was mobilized in ancient water flows that likely exceeded the threshold conditions (depth 0.03 to 0.9 meter, average velocity 0.20 to 0.75 meter per second) required to transport the pebbles. Climate conditions at the time sediment was transported must have differed substantially from the cold, hyper-arid modern environment to permit aqueous flows across several kilometers. PMID:23723230

  3. Mobile TLS application for fluvial studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alho, P.; Kukko, A.; Hyyppä, H.; Kaartinen, H.; Hyyppä, J.; Jaakkola, A.

    2009-04-01

    In fluvial studies, different survey and modelling approaches have been used to study the interaction of landscape and flow processes, including response thresholds, feedback elements and other such complexities, requiring both high-quality topographical and bathymetrical data at different scales. Currently, tachymetry and GPS surveys are widely used in fluvial geomorphology, while more sophisticated survey methods such as close-range photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) are less common. Static TLS measurements provide a point density, ranging from 100-10000 points/m2 with a root mean square error of ±2 to ±25 mm. Although the TLS system allows the collection of data at a higher resolution and precision than ALS at a lower cost, its area is more limited than the latter method. This area limitation can be improved using mobile laser scanning. The typical requirements for a mobile mapping system (MMS) are that visible objects should be measured to an accuracy of a few centimetres with a maximum speed of 50-60 km h-1 and that desired objects should be collected within a radius of several tens of metres. Recently, it has been reported mobile mapping systems, which are based on laser scanning, the former work including an account of the FGI ROAMER system and a detailed description of its data processing. The boat-based, mobile mapping system (BoMMS, based on FGI ROAMER system) with a laser scanner for fluvial applications allows the derivation of detailed topographical data in river studies. Combined with data acquisition from static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), boat-based laser scanning enables a totally new field mapping approach for fluvial studies. In this paper, we demonstrate a BoMMS with a laser scanner for fluvial applications. This system enables rapid field surveying with accuracy of approximately 2 cm (relatively sub-centimetre) for river banks, point-bars and other features of the riverine landscape. This application offers a highly

  4. Martian fluvial conglomerates at Gale Crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Rebecca M.E.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Dietrich, W.E.; Gupta, S.; Sumner, D.Y.; Wiens, R.C.; Mangold, N.; Malin, M.C.; Edgett, K.S.; Maurice, S.; Forni, O.; Gasnault, O.; Ollila, A.; Newsom, Horton E.; Dromart, G.; Palucis, M.C.; Yingst, R.A.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Le Mouélic, S.; Goetz, W.; Madsen, M.B.; Koefoed, A.; Jensen, J.K.; Bridges, J.C.; Schwenzer, S.P.; Lewis, K.W.; Stack, K.M.; Rubin, D.; Kah, L.C.; Bell, J.F., III; Farmer, J.D.; Sullivan, R.; Van Beek, T.; Blaney, D.L.; Pariser, O.; Deen, R.G.

    2013-01-01

    Observations by the Mars Science Laboratory Mast Camera (Mastcam) in Gale crater reveal isolated outcrops of cemented pebbles (2 to 40 millimeters in diameter) and sand grains with textures typical of fluvial sedimentary conglomerates. Rounded pebbles in the conglomerates indicate substantial fluvial abrasion. ChemCam emission spectra at one outcrop show a predominantly feldspathic composition, consistent with minimal aqueous alteration of sediments. Sediment was mobilized in ancient water flows that likely exceeded the threshold conditions (depth 0.03 to 0.9 meter, average velocity 0.20 to 0.75 meter per second) required to transport the pebbles. Climate conditions at the time sediment was transported must have differed substantially from the cold, hyper-arid modern environment to permit aqueous flows across several kilometers.

  5. Lowland fluvial phosphorus altered by dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianjun; Zhang, Man; Lin, Binliang; Lu, Pingyu

    2015-04-01

    Dams affect ecosystems, but their physical link to the variations in fluvial fluxes and downstream ecological consequences are inadequately understood. After estimating the current effects of the Three Gorges project and other reservoirs upstream on the Yangtze River on the fluvial phosphorus (P) in the middle and lower Yangtze River, we further investigated the long-term effects of dams on the fluvial regimes of P and P-enriched sediment (PES). Simultaneously measured P distributions with sediment size (PDSS) from the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) proved that the areal density of particulate P (PP) bound on graded sediment can be measured using the surface area concentration of the total sediment. A PDSS relationship is obtained and the selective transport and long-term sedimentation of P are simulated using a nonuniform suspended sediment model, which incorporates the PDSS formula. The computations revealed that a reservoir would significantly lower the downstream availability of P in the dry season and promote high pulses of P in summer when the reservoir is flushed as sedimentation accumulates. As a result, the P buffering and replenishing mechanism in the pristine ecosystem from upstream supplies and local re-suspension are permanently eliminated when a regulating reservoir is built upstream. This change is irreversible if reservoir regulation continues. Changes could potentially aggravate the existing P-limitation, decrease the water's ability to adjust nutrient/pollutant fluctuations, accumulate a greater surplus of carbon and nitrogen, and even exacerbate blooms in favorable conditions.

  6. 72. Headgates for Agua Fria project canal on east end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. Headgates for Agua Fria project canal on east end of diversion dam. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  7. 54. Downstream face of Agua Fria project's diversion dam showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Downstream face of Agua Fria project's diversion dam showing initial masonry construction and poured concrete capping. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  8. 61. View of the Agua Fria River stream bed from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. View of the Agua Fria River stream bed from atop Waddell Dam. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. 74. View of flume crossing the Agua Fria River from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. View of flume crossing the Agua Fria River from the east embankment. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. Time and the rivers flowing: Fluvial geomorphology since 1960

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen

    2014-07-01

    Fluvial geomorphology has been the largest single subdiscipline within geomorphology for many decades. Fluvial geomorphic expertise is integral to understanding and managing rivers and to developing strategies for sustainable development. This paper provides an overview of some of the significant advances in fluvial geomorphology between 1960 and 2010 with respect to: conceptual models; fluvial features and environments being studied; tools used by fluvial geomorphologists; geomorphic specialty groups within professional societies; journals in which fluvial geomorphic research is published; and textbooks of fluvial geomorphology. During this half century, fluvial geomorphology broadened considerably in scope, from a focus primarily on physical principles underlying process and form in lower gradient channels with limited grain size range, to a more integrative view of rivers as ecosystems with nonlinear behavior and great diversity of gradient, substrate composition, and grain size. The array of tools for making basic observations, analyzing data, and disseminating research results also expanded considerably during this period, as did the diversity of the fluvial geomorphic community.

  11. Fluvial landscapes of the Harappan civilization.

    PubMed

    Giosan, Liviu; Clift, Peter D; Macklin, Mark G; Fuller, Dorian Q; Constantinescu, Stefan; Durcan, Julie A; Stevens, Thomas; Duller, Geoff A T; Tabrez, Ali R; Gangal, Kavita; Adhikari, Ronojoy; Alizai, Anwar; Filip, Florin; VanLaningham, Sam; Syvitski, James P M

    2012-06-26

    The collapse of the Bronze Age Harappan, one of the earliest urban civilizations, remains an enigma. Urbanism flourished in the western region of the Indo-Gangetic Plain for approximately 600 y, but since approximately 3,900 y ago, the total settled area and settlement sizes declined, many sites were abandoned, and a significant shift in site numbers and density towards the east is recorded. We report morphologic and chronologic evidence indicating that fluvial landscapes in Harappan territory became remarkably stable during the late Holocene as aridification intensified in the region after approximately 5,000 BP. Upstream on the alluvial plain, the large Himalayan rivers in Punjab stopped incising, while downstream, sedimentation slowed on the distinctive mega-fluvial ridge, which the Indus built in Sindh. This fluvial quiescence suggests a gradual decrease in flood intensity that probably stimulated intensive agriculture initially and encouraged urbanization around 4,500 BP. However, further decline in monsoon precipitation led to conditions adverse to both inundation- and rain-based farming. Contrary to earlier assumptions that a large glacier-fed Himalayan river, identified by some with the mythical Sarasvati, watered the Harappan heartland on the interfluve between the Indus and Ganges basins, we show that only monsoonal-fed rivers were active there during the Holocene. As the monsoon weakened, monsoonal rivers gradually dried or became seasonal, affecting habitability along their courses. Hydroclimatic stress increased the vulnerability of agricultural production supporting Harappan urbanism, leading to settlement downsizing, diversification of crops, and a drastic increase in settlements in the moister monsoon regions of the upper Punjab, Haryana, and Uttar Pradesh. PMID:22645375

  12. 7. Photocopy of map of the Agua Fria Valley and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of map of the Agua Fria Valley and lands to be irrigated by the Agua Fria Water and Land Company. Photographer Mark Durben, 1987 Source: 'Map of the Agua Fria Valley and the Western Portion of the Salt River Valley Showing the System of Reservoirs and Canals of the Agua Fria Water and Land Company and the Land to be Irrigated Thereby 160,000 Acres of New Land to be Reclaimed in the Maricopa County, Arizona Territory,' (Brochure) Union Photo Engraving Company, c. 1895, Salt River Project Research Archives, Tempe, Arizona. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  13. 2. William Beardsley standing along the Agua Fria River near ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. William Beardsley standing along the Agua Fria River near construction site of the Agua Fria project. Photographer James Dix Schuyler, 1903. Source: Schuyler, James D. 'Report on the Water Supply of the Agua Fria River, and the Storage Reservoir Project of the Agua Fria Water and Land Company For Irrigation in the Gila River Valley, Arizona,' (September 29, 1903). Arizona Historical Collection, Hayden Library, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona. (Typewritten.) - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. Meta-ecosystem metabolism across fluvial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulseth, A. J.; Singer, G. A.; Battin, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Freshwater ecosystems store, transform, and export terrestrial carbon and play an important role for regional and global carbon fluxes. Ecosystem metabolism is a measure of how and how much carbon is produced and transformed and - for streams and rivers - is typically estimated at the reach scale (typically tens to hundreds of meters). Due to methodological constraints we so far lack an understanding of metabolism of the fluvial meta-ecosystem continuum, i.e. at the scale of a fluvial network. To address this issue, we measured metabolism in multiple reaches across a 254 km2 catchment in Lower Austria, capturing both temporal dynamics and the spatial scale of the whole fluvial network. Stream metabolism was estimated from diel changes in oxygen and corrected for reaeration; continuously in 15 streams and during a short-term ';snap-shot' campaign across 42 streams. Across the network, the streams varied in catchment size (0.1 to 254 km2) and water chemistry (DOC: 1.0 to 2.7 mg L-1, NO3: 259 to 1277 μg L-1, NH4:<0.1 to 30 μg L-1, and PO4:<0.1 to 20 μg L-1) as a consequence of subcatchment landuse, elevation and geology. Gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) were suppressed across the network by high stream discharge events such as snow melt and heavy rains. Larger streams (catchment size > 35 km2) had higher GPP and tended to be more autotrophic than lower order streams. However, streams located above 1000 m elevation had higher GPP than streams of equivalent size found elsewhere in the stream network. During the winter months, all streams across the network were net heterotrophic, with GPP typically <1.0 g 02 m-2 d-1. The degree of autotrophy versus heterotrophy across the network was driven in part by light, which is contingent on location within the stream network. We will discuss scaling GPP and ER from the reach to the network scale in order to elucidate patterns of meta-ecosystem metabolism across fluvial networks.

  15. Fluvial processes on Mars: Erosion and sedimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, Steven W.

    1988-01-01

    One of the most important discoveries of the Mariner 9 and Viking missions to Mars was evidence of change of the Martian surface by the action of liquid water. From the standpoint of a Mars Rover/Sample Return Mission, fluvial activity on Mars is important in two ways: (1) channel formation has deeply eroded the Martian crust, providing access to relatively undisturbed subsurface units; and (2) much of the material eroded from channels may have been deposited in standing bodies of liquid water. The most striking fluvial erosion features on Mars are the outflow channels. A second type of channel apparently caused by flow of liquid water is the valley systems. These are similar to terrestial drainage systems. The sedimentary deposits of outflow channels are often difficult to identfy. No obvious deposits such as deltaic accumulations are visible in Viking images. Another set of deposits that may be water lain and that date approx. from the epoch of outflow channels are the layered deposits in the Valles Marineris. From the standpoint of a Mars Rover/Sample Return mission, the problem with all of these water-lain sediments is their age, or rather the lack of it.

  16. Fluvial supraglacial landscape evolution on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Yang, Kang

    2016-03-01

    Supraglacial stream networks incise via thermal erosion of underlying ice, reflecting a balance between localized fluvial incision and dynamic topography from underlying ice flow. We analyze high-resolution digital elevation models of the ice surface and bedrock in the southwest Greenland Ice Sheet from 1000-1600 m elevation to quantify the importance of fluvial erosion. At wavelengths greater than ice thickness, bedrock dominates surface topography so supraglacial drainage basins are fixed spatially. At smaller wavelengths, fluvial erosion significantly affects topography. Stream longitudinal profiles exhibit positive mean curvature and consistent power law scaling between local channel slope and drainage area, suggestive of adjustment toward topographic steady state. We interpret these observations with a model for fluvial thermal erosion on top of a flowing ice substrate that predicts concave up steady state longitudinal profiles, where average concavity is most sensitive to melt rate and the relative magnitudes of ice flow and fluvial erosion.

  17. Fluvial terraces of the lower Susquehanna River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazzaglia, Frank J.; Gardner, Thomas W.

    1993-11-01

    Fluvial terraces of the lower Susquehanna River offer a unique opportunity to investigate the late stage geologic and geomorphic evolution of the U.S. Atlantic passive margin. Petrography and elevation distinguish and provide a basis for correlation of two groups of terraces, the upland terraces and lower terraces, through the Piedmont, Newark Basin, and Great Valley. Downstream correlation to dated upper Coastal Plain and Fall Zone fluvial deposits, relative weathering, and soil profile development characteristics establish terrace age. Upland terraces (Tg1, Tg2, and Tg3), middle to late Miocene strath terraces 80 to 140 m above the present channel, occur only along the Piedmont reach. They are underlain by unstratified, texturally-mature, quartz-dominated roundstone diamictons. Lower terraces (QTg, Qt1-Qt6), Pliocene and Pleistocene strath and thin aggradational terraces within 45 m of the present channel, are underlain by stratified and unstratified, texturally and compositionally immature sand, gravel, and pebbly silt. Terrace age and longitudinal profiles suggest complex interactions among relative base level, long-term flexural isostatic processes, climate, and river grade. Our model for terrace genesis requires the Susquehanna River to attain and maintain a characteristics graded longitudinal profile over graded time. For the U.S. Atlantic margin, we propose that straths are continually cut along this graded profile during periods of relative base level stability, achieved by slow, steady, isostatic continental uplift acting in concert with eustatic rise. Change in an external modulating factor, such as eustatic fall or climate change, results in fluvial incision and subsequent genesis of strath terraces. Longitudinal profiles of lower Susquehanna River terraces, which converge at the river mouth, diverge through the Piedmont, and reconverge north of the Piedmont, contrast with their hypothesized, original concave-up profiles. Progressive and cumulative

  18. Five common mistakes in fluvial morphodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosselman, Erik; Le, Thai Binh

    2016-07-01

    Recent years have seen a marked increase in the availability of morphodynamic models and a proliferation of new morphodynamic codes. As a consequence, morphodynamic models are increasingly developed, used and evaluated by non-experts, possibly leading to mistakes. This paper draws attention to five types of common mistakes. First, new morphodynamic codes are developed as extensions of existing hydrodynamic codes without including all essential physical processes. Second, model inputs are specified in a way that imposes morphodynamic patterns beforehand rather than letting them evolve freely. Third, detailed processes are parameterized inadequately for application to larger spatial and temporal scales. Fourth, physical and numerical phenomena are confused when interpreting model results. Fifth, the selection of modeling approaches is driven by the belief that complete data are a prerequisite for modeling and that the application of 2D and 3D models requires more data than the application of 1D models. Examples from fluvial morphodynamics are presented to illustrate these mistakes.

  19. Predicting Facies Patterns within Fluvial Channel Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, B. J.; Sech, R.; Sun, T.; Pyrcz, M.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoirs (aquifers) in fluvial channel belt sandstones can have very different subsurface flow behavior depending on the degree and distribution of internal heterogeneities. Fluvial channel belts are composed of multiple "storeys" formed as individual channel segments increase in sinuosity and then are cut off and abandoned. Heterogeneities are defined by depositional variations across storeys and inter-story connectivity patterns along the channel belt. Although commonly inferred to reflect the formative river pattern (sinuosity & braiding), the spatial arrangement of facies depend most directly on the relative preservation of deposits formed within different areas of the migrating channels and the lateral stacking arrangement of storeys due to style of bend cutoff. Grains are poorly sorted across the inner bank along upstream parts of channel bends and become better sorted laterally in downstream areas adjacent to a deeper thalweg scour. If deposition occurs evenly along the entire inner bank (bar), this grain size pattern leads to an elliptical body in planview with weak vertical grain size trends upstream and more fining-upward trend downstream. As channel bend segments migrate to a greater extent downstream, preserved inner-bank-bar deposits are increasingly dominated by upward-fining deposits and more outer-bank-deposits are preserved ("concave bank" deposits). Although concave bank deposits have highly variable character in different systems, vertical-grainsize trends tend to be weaker in straighter systems dominated by downstream-accretion, and more strongly upward-fining in higher sinuosity systems where these deposits form by eddy accretion or low flow aggradation. River cutoffs of straighter channel segments abandon slowly, leading to more gradual vertical fining. Subsurface heterogeneity prediction requires documentation of shape and character of deposits preserved in different zones within the channel (upstream and downstream inner bank, concave bank

  20. Dating of Malaysian fluvial tin placers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Daud A. F.

    The richest tin placers in Malaysia—fluviatile and piedmont fan placers—formed mainly within the "Boulder Beds" (BB fan facies), "Old Alluvium" (OA alluvial plain facies) and "Transitional Unit" (TU) which are regional lithostratigraphic units that can be correlated throughout western Peninsular Malaysia. Palaeomagnetic studies show that the TU was deposited during the early part of the Brunhes Normal Polarity Epoch (0-0.73 Ma) whereas the OA and BB mainly formed during the Matuyama Reversed Epoch (0.73-2.48 Ma). Present environments are mostly unfavorable for tin placer formation. Economic placers are generally covered on land by Young Alluvium (YA) overburden or are submerged offshore. As many of the rich OA/BB near-source placers are now largely worked out, the transported TU fluvial placers are becoming more important economically. The latest Pliocene to Mid Pleistocene period represented the principal phase of economic tin placer formation. Evidence from palaeomagnetism and the stratigraphic context of placers, and the relationship between sea level change, climatic change and placer genesis, suggest that the bulk of OA placers formed during a Lower Pleistocene interglacial period. A Mid Pleistocene age for TU placers is indicated by vertebrate fossils, palaeomagnetism, and their stratigraphic position below Upper Quaternary YA and above OA which is older than 0.73 Ma.

  1. Fluvial erosion on Mars: Implications for paleoclimatic change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Baker, Victor R.

    1993-01-01

    Fluvial erosion on Mars has been nonuniform in both time and space. Viking orbiter images reveal a variety of different aged terrains exhibiting widely different degrees of erosion. Based on our terrestrial analog studies, rates of fluvial erosion associated with the formation of many of the valleys on Mars is probably on the order of hundreds of meters per million years, while rates of erosion associated with the formation of the outflow channels probably ranged from tens to hundreds of meters in several weeks to months. However, estimated rates of erosion of the Martian surface at the Viking Lander sites are extremely low, on the order of 1 micron/yr or less. At most this would result in a meter of material removed per million years, and it is unlikely that such an erosion rate would be able to produce the degree of geomorphic work required to form the fluvial features present elsewhere on the surface. In addition, single terrain units are not eroded uniformly by fluvial processes. Instead fluvial valleys, particularly in the cratered highlands, typically are situated in clusters surrounded by vast expanses of uneroded surfaces of the same apparent lithologic, structural, and hydrological setting. Clearly throughout its geologic history, Mars has experienced a nonuniformity in erosion rates. By estimating the amount of fluvial erosion on dissected terrains and by studying the spatial distribution of those locations which have experienced above normal erosion rates, it should be possible to place further constraints on Mars' paleoclimatic history.

  2. Bar morphodynamics in the tidally-influenced fluvial zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Daniel; Ashworth, Philip; Best, James; Nicholas, Andrew; Prokocki, Eric; Sambrook-Smith, Greg; Keevil, Claire; Sandbach, Steve

    2015-04-01

    The hydrodynamics and deposits of the Tidally-Influenced Fluvial Zone (TIFZ) are complex because it experiences competing fluvial and tidal flows and spatially and temporally variable rates of sediment transport and deposition. This paper presents a new integrated field dataset from the Columbia River Estuary, USA, that quantifies the morphodynamic response the bed morphology and bar stratigraphy to fluvial-tidal flows. A 3-year, field and modelling program that started in 2011, has been monitoring the dynamics and deposits of a 40 km-reach of the Columbia River Estuary. Data obtained so far throughout the TIFZ include: bathymetry using MBES, flow using ADCP, subsurface sedimentology using GPR and shallow coring to 5 m. Initial results from the programme suggest there is a complex spatial and temporal lag in the response of the bed morphology and deposits to the fluvial-tidal flows. Zones of strong ebb and flood flow do not necessarily produce channel beds dominated by bi-directional bedforms. Many mid-channel bars are stable over decadal time periods. This paper will illustrate the variety in bar morphologies and channel change throughout the fluvial-tidal zone and contrast these bar dynamics with examples from purely fluvial environments.

  3. Identification, Mapping, and Measurement of Titan Fluvial Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, R. E.; Roth, D. L.; Burr, D. M.; Phillips, C. B.; Mitchell, K. L.

    2008-12-01

    Data from the Cassini-Huygens mission show various individual and networked curvilinear features on Titan's surface interpreted to have been formed by the flow of liquid methane. These inferred fluvial features are seen in the three Cassini surface imaging instrument datasets (from the Imaging Subsystem for Science, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer, and the Cassini Titan RADAR Mapper). Such features are also seen in the Huygens Probe Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer images, in which they have been classified as fluvial valleys. The features are visible at all latitudes, although the characteristics that suggest formation by fluvial flow change with latitude. To investigate the formation of Titan's fluvial features, we mapped out their locations in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images from the Cassini Titan RADAR Mapper and quantified their network parameters. First, released Cassini SAR images from flybys Ta, T3, T7, T13, and T23 were processed and reprojected using ISIS2 into the best map projections for obtaining accurate measurements, depending on the characteristics to be measured. Equidistant sinusoidal map projections were used to measure feature lengths and widths, whereas conformal mercator projections were used to measure junction angles at the confluence of fluvial features. Next, criteria were devised based on radar reflectance, illumination, and morphology with which to consistently identify the fluvial features. These criteria were then applied to the reprojected Cassini SAR images to create maps of the fluvial features. Finally, measurements were made of these mapped features to calculate their sizes, sinuosities, and junction angle. Using a published algorithm to classify terrestrial drainage network type from measured morphologic parameters, we found that the equatorial network of fluvial features over western Xanadu observed in the T13 radar swath would be classified as rectangular. On Earth, rectangular drainage networks are

  4. The Agua Salud Project, Central Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallard, R. F.; Elsenbeer, H.; Ogden, F. L.; Hall, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    The Agua Salud Project utilizes the Panama Canal's central role in world commerce to focus global attention on the ecosystem services provided by tropical forests. It will be the largest field experiment of its kind in the tropics aimed at quantifying the environmental services (water, carbon, and biodiversity) provided by tropical forests. The Agua Salud Watershed is our principal field site. This watershed and the headwaters of several adjacent rivers include both protected mature forests and a wide variety of land uses that are typical of rural Panama. Experiments at the scale of entire catchments will permit complete water and carbon inventories and exchanges for different landscape uses. The following questions will be addressed: (1) How do landscape treatments and management approaches affect ecosystem services such as carbon storage, water quality and quantity, dry- season water supply, and biodiversity? (2) Can management techniques be designed to optimize forest production along with ecosystem services during reforestation? (3) Do different tree planting treatments and landscape management approaches influence groundwater storage, which is thought to be critical to maintaining dry-season flow, thus insuring the full operation of the Canal during periods of reduced rainfall and severe climatic events such as El Niño. In addition we anticipate expanding this project to address biodiversity, social, and economic values of these forests.

  5. Global effects of agriculture on fluvial dissolved organic matter

    PubMed Central

    Graeber, Daniel; Boëchat, Iola G.; Encina-Montoya, Francisco; Esse, Carlos; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Goyenola, Guillermo; Gücker, Björn; Heinz, Marlen; Kronvang, Brian; Meerhoff, Mariana; Nimptsch, Jorge; Pusch, Martin T.; Silva, Ricky C. S.; von Schiller, Daniel; Zwirnmann, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural land covers approximately 40% of Earth’s land surface and affects hydromorphological, biogeochemical and ecological characteristics of fluvial networks. In the northern temperate region, agriculture also strongly affects the amount and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), which constitutes the main vector of carbon transport from soils to fluvial networks and to the sea, and is involved in a large variety of biogeochemical processes. Here, we provide first evidence about the wider occurrence of agricultural impacts on the concentration and composition of fluvial DOM across climate zones of the northern and southern hemispheres. Both extensive and intensive farming altered fluvial DOM towards a more microbial and less plant-derived composition. Moreover, intensive farming significantly increased dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations. The DOM composition change and DON concentration increase differed among climate zones and could be related to the intensity of current and historical nitrogen fertilizer use. As a result of agriculture intensification, increased DON concentrations and a more microbial-like DOM composition likely will enhance the reactivity of catchment DOM emissions, thereby fuelling the biogeochemical processing in fluvial networks, and resulting in higher ecosystem productivity and CO2 outgassing. PMID:26541809

  6. Global effects of agriculture on fluvial dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeber, Daniel; Boëchat, Iola G.; Encina-Montoya, Francisco; Esse, Carlos; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Goyenola, Guillermo; Gücker, Björn; Heinz, Marlen; Kronvang, Brian; Meerhoff, Mariana; Nimptsch, Jorge; Pusch, Martin T.; Silva, Ricky C. S.; von Schiller, Daniel; Zwirnmann, Elke

    2015-11-01

    Agricultural land covers approximately 40% of Earth’s land surface and affects hydromorphological, biogeochemical and ecological characteristics of fluvial networks. In the northern temperate region, agriculture also strongly affects the amount and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), which constitutes the main vector of carbon transport from soils to fluvial networks and to the sea, and is involved in a large variety of biogeochemical processes. Here, we provide first evidence about the wider occurrence of agricultural impacts on the concentration and composition of fluvial DOM across climate zones of the northern and southern hemispheres. Both extensive and intensive farming altered fluvial DOM towards a more microbial and less plant-derived composition. Moreover, intensive farming significantly increased dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations. The DOM composition change and DON concentration increase differed among climate zones and could be related to the intensity of current and historical nitrogen fertilizer use. As a result of agriculture intensification, increased DON concentrations and a more microbial-like DOM composition likely will enhance the reactivity of catchment DOM emissions, thereby fuelling the biogeochemical processing in fluvial networks, and resulting in higher ecosystem productivity and CO2 outgassing.

  7. Fluvial erosion as a mechanism for crater modification on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neish, C. D.; Molaro, J. L.; Lora, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Kirk, R. L.; Schenk, P.; Bray, V. J.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2016-05-01

    There are few identifiable impact craters on Titan, especially in the polar regions. One explanation for this observation is that the craters are being destroyed through fluvial processes, such as weathering, mass wasting, fluvial incision and deposition. In this work, we use a landscape evolution model to determine whether or not this is a viable mechanism for crater destruction on Titan. We find that fluvial degradation can modify craters to the point where they would be unrecognizable by an orbiting spacecraft such as Cassini, given enough time and a large enough erosion rate. A difference in the erosion rate between the equator and the poles of a factor of a few could explain the latitudinal variation in Titan's crater population. Fluvial erosion also removes central peaks and fills in central pits, possibly explaining their infrequent occurrence in Titan craters. Although many craters on Titan appear to be modified by aeolian infilling, fluvial modification is necessary to explain the observed impact crater morphologies. Thus, it is an important secondary modification process even in Titan's drier equatorial regions.

  8. Global effects of agriculture on fluvial dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Graeber, Daniel; Boëchat, Iola G; Encina-Montoya, Francisco; Esse, Carlos; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Goyenola, Guillermo; Gücker, Björn; Heinz, Marlen; Kronvang, Brian; Meerhoff, Mariana; Nimptsch, Jorge; Pusch, Martin T; Silva, Ricky C S; von Schiller, Daniel; Zwirnmann, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural land covers approximately 40% of Earth's land surface and affects hydromorphological, biogeochemical and ecological characteristics of fluvial networks. In the northern temperate region, agriculture also strongly affects the amount and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), which constitutes the main vector of carbon transport from soils to fluvial networks and to the sea, and is involved in a large variety of biogeochemical processes. Here, we provide first evidence about the wider occurrence of agricultural impacts on the concentration and composition of fluvial DOM across climate zones of the northern and southern hemispheres. Both extensive and intensive farming altered fluvial DOM towards a more microbial and less plant-derived composition. Moreover, intensive farming significantly increased dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations. The DOM composition change and DON concentration increase differed among climate zones and could be related to the intensity of current and historical nitrogen fertilizer use. As a result of agriculture intensification, increased DON concentrations and a more microbial-like DOM composition likely will enhance the reactivity of catchment DOM emissions, thereby fuelling the biogeochemical processing in fluvial networks, and resulting in higher ecosystem productivity and CO2 outgassing. PMID:26541809

  9. Fluvial network organization imprints on microbial co-occurrence networks

    PubMed Central

    Widder, Stefanie; Besemer, Katharina; Singer, Gabriel A.; Ceola, Serena; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Quince, Christopher; Sloan, William T.; Rinaldo, Andrea; Battin, Tom J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies highlight linkages among the architecture of ecological networks, their persistence facing environmental disturbance, and the related patterns of biodiversity. A hitherto unresolved question is whether the structure of the landscape inhabited by organisms leaves an imprint on their ecological networks. We analyzed, based on pyrosequencing profiling of the biofilm communities in 114 streams, how features inherent to fluvial networks affect the co-occurrence networks that the microorganisms form in these biofilms. Our findings suggest that hydrology and metacommunity dynamics, both changing predictably across fluvial networks, affect the fragmentation of the microbial co-occurrence networks throughout the fluvial network. The loss of taxa from co-occurrence networks demonstrates that the removal of gatekeepers disproportionately contributed to network fragmentation, which has potential implications for the functions biofilms fulfill in stream ecosystems. Our findings are critical because of increased anthropogenic pressures deteriorating stream ecosystem integrity and biodiversity. PMID:25136087

  10. Fluvial network organization imprints on microbial co-occurrence networks.

    PubMed

    Widder, Stefanie; Besemer, Katharina; Singer, Gabriel A; Ceola, Serena; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Quince, Christopher; Sloan, William T; Rinaldo, Andrea; Battin, Tom J

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies highlight linkages among the architecture of ecological networks, their persistence facing environmental disturbance, and the related patterns of biodiversity. A hitherto unresolved question is whether the structure of the landscape inhabited by organisms leaves an imprint on their ecological networks. We analyzed, based on pyrosequencing profiling of the biofilm communities in 114 streams, how features inherent to fluvial networks affect the co-occurrence networks that the microorganisms form in these biofilms. Our findings suggest that hydrology and metacommunity dynamics, both changing predictably across fluvial networks, affect the fragmentation of the microbial co-occurrence networks throughout the fluvial network. The loss of taxa from co-occurrence networks demonstrates that the removal of gatekeepers disproportionately contributed to network fragmentation, which has potential implications for the functions biofilms fulfill in stream ecosystems. Our findings are critical because of increased anthropogenic pressures deteriorating stream ecosystem integrity and biodiversity. PMID:25136087

  11. Fluvial to Lacustrine Facies Transitions in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Schieber, Juergen; Palucis, Marisa C.; Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Mangold, Nicolas; Kah, Linda C.; Gupta, Sanjeev; Grotzinger, John P.; Grant, John A., III; Edgar, Lauren A.; Dietrich, William E.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Curiosity rover has documented predominantly fluvial sedimentary rocks along its path from the landing site to the toe of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan (0.5 km to the east) and then along its 8 km traverse across Aeolis Palus to the base of Aeolis Mons (Mount Sharp). Lacustrine facies have been identified at the toe of the Peace Vallis fan and in the lowermost geological unit exposed on Aeolis Mons. These two depositional systems provide end members for martian fluvial/alluvial-lacustrine facies models. The Peace Vallis system consisted of an 80 square kilometers alluvial fan with decimeter-thick, laterally continuous fluvial sandstones with few sedimentary structures. The thin lacustrine unit associated with the fan is interpreted as deposited in a small lake associated with fan runoff. In contrast, fluvial facies exposed over most of Curiosity's traverse to Aeolis Mons consist of sandstones with common dune-scale cross stratification (including trough cross stratification), interbedded conglomerates, and rare paleochannels. Along the southwest portion of the traverse, sandstone facies include south-dipping meter-scale clinoforms that are interbedded with finer-grained mudstone facies, interpreted as lacustrine. Sedimentary structures in these deposits are consistent with deltaic deposits. Deltaic deposition is also suggested by the scale of fluvial to lacustrine facies transitions, which occur over greater than 100 m laterally and greater than 10 m vertically. The large scale of the transitions and the predicted thickness of lacustrine deposits based on orbital mapping require deposition in a substantial river-lake system over an extended interval of time. Thus, the lowermost, and oldest, sedimentary rocks in Gale Crater suggest the presence of substantial fluvial flow into a long-lived lake. In contrast, the Peace Vallis alluvial fan onlaps these older deposits and overlies a major unconformity. It is one of the youngest deposits in the crater, and

  12. River Self-Restoration: Interactions between Plants and Fluvial Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnell, Angela

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents evidence from European rivers of the nature and consequences of plant-fluvial process interactions. While the examples are representative of different climates, riparian and aquatic plant species, and river geomorphological types, they are linked by a general conceptual model of plant-fluvial process interactions that can be adapted to local conditions. Riparian and aquatic plants both affect and respond to fluvial processes. Their above ground biomass modifies the flow field and retains sediment, whereas their below-ground biomass affects the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the substrate and consequently the moisture regime and erodibility of the land surface. At the same time plants are disturbed, removed and buried by fluvial processes. Thus the margins of river systems provide a critical zone where plants and fluvial processes interact to produce a diverse mosaic of dynamic landforms that are characteristic of naturally-functioning river ecosystems. It is important to understand these interactions between aquatic and riparian plants and fluvial processes, and to recognize how they contribute to trajectories of natural river channel recovery from human interventions. The interactions have a significant influence on river systems across space scales from individual plants to entire river corridors. Plant-scale phenomena structure patch-scale geomorphological forms and processes. Interactions between patches contribute to larger-scale and longer-term river geomorphological phenomena. Furthermore, the influence of plants varies through time as above and below ground biomass alter within the annual growth cycle, over longer-term growth trajectories, and in response to drivers of change such as climatic and hydrological fluctuations and extremes. If river management and restoration works with these natural interactions and recovery processes, outcomes have the best chance of being cost-effective and sustainable.

  13. Fluvial-deltaic sedimentation and stratigraphy of the ferron sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, P.B.; Chidsey, T.C., Jr.; Ryer, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    East-central Utah has world-class outcrops of dominantly fluvial-deltaic Turonian to Coniacian aged strata deposited in the Cretaceous foreland basin. The Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale records the influences of both tidal and wave energy on fluvial-dominated deltas on the western margin of the Cretaceous western interior seaway. Revisions of the stratigraphy are proposed for the Ferron Sandstone. Facies representing a variety of environments of deposition are well exposed, including delta-front, strandline, marginal marine, and coastal-plain. Some of these facies are described in detail for use in petroleum reservoir characterization and include permeability structure.

  14. Fluvial response to environmental perturbations: a perspective from physical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savi, Sara; Tofelde, Stefanie; Wickert, Andrew; Schildgen, Taylor; Paola, Chris; Strecker, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Fluvial terraces and alluvial fans that are perched above the modern base level testify to environmental conditions that were different from today. Sedimentological studies combined with chronological constraints can be used to reconstruct the evolution of these landforms in the context of past changes in regional to global forcing. Despite the improvements in the most commonly used dating techniques (e.g. cosmogenic nuclides, 14C, and OSL), field data from fluvial and alluvial archives often represent only a brief glimpse into the evolution of that particular landscape. As such, the challenge of interpreting landscape development and its relationship to external forcing in the remaining time gaps is often unclear. To gain more insight, we performed physical experiments to test how a fluvial system responds to changes in the boundary conditions. This approach allows us to continuously record the evolution of the fluvial system and to observe, step by step, the response of the fluvial system and the development of the landscape. Additionally, we can directly link the geomorphic modifications to a specific environmental perturbation. Starting with a simple model and a single channel, we changed the amount of discharge (Qw) and sediment supply (Qs) in the system. The most prominent response results from a sudden increase in water discharge. In general, changes in the Qs/Qw ratio control the fluvial morphology (particularly the height/width ratio), the channel's profile, the dynamics of the river, and its ability to modify the surrounding landscape. Responses get more complex with the introduction of a lateral tributary, which changes the dynamics of the main stem and creates feed-back mechanisms between the two systems. For example, a change in the main stem can influence the fluvial morphology and the steepness of the tributary (even with no perturbations in the tributary) and vice-versa, illustrating the potential for non-unique interpretations of fluvial landforms

  15. Tipping points in Anthropocene fluvial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notebaert, Bastiaan; Broothaerts, Nils; Verstraeten, Gert; Berger, Jean-François; Houbrechts, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    the river partially maintains its braided pattern. The Amblève River in the Belgian Ardennes uplands underwent less dramatic changes. Large parts of the catchment are deforested during the last 700 years, leading to an increase in floodplain sedimentation. Despite this major sediment pulse, change in floodplain morphology remained limited to an increase in bank height. We argue that a combination of floodplain and channel morphology, the fine texture of supplied sediment and the high stream power of channel forming events result is a system that is less sensitive to change. Also the relative short time of impact may play a role. These three examples demonstrate the varying impact of human deforestation on floodplain geomorphology. For the Dijle and Valdaine region this lead to dramatic changes once a certain tipping point is reached. In contrast the Amblève river is more resilient to human impact due to its specific morphological setting. The morphology of the catchments and the nature of supplied sediments plays a major role in the sensitivity of fluvial systems to environmental impact. Once the tipping points are reached, it is difficult for the river to revert to its original state and floodplains remain highly impacted.

  16. Lahar hazards at Agua volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Vallance, J.W.; Matías, O.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    At 3760 m, Agua volcano towers more than 3500 m above the Pacific coastal plain to the south and 2000 m above the Guatemalan highlands to the north. The volcano is within 5 to 10 kilometers (km) of Antigua, Guatemala and several other large towns situated on its northern apron. These towns have a combined population of nearly 100,000. It is within about 20 km of Escuintla (population, ca. 100,000) to the south. Though the volcano has not been active in historical time, or about the last 500 years, it has the potential to produce debris flows (watery flows of mud, rock, and debris—also known as lahars when they occur on a volcano) that could inundate these nearby populated areas.

  17. Architectural studies of Jurassic-Cretaceous fluvial units, Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Miall, A.D.; Bromley, M.H.; Cowan, E.J.; Turner-Peterson, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    A sixfold hierarchy of architectural elements and bounding surfaces evolved from outcrop studies of three fluvial units: Westwater Canyon member (WCM), Morrison Formation, Upper Jurassic; Torrivio sandstone member (TSM), Gallup Sandstone, Upper Cretaceous, northwestern New Mexico; and Kayenta Formation (KF), Lower Jurassic, southwestern Colorado. This hierarchy is discussed.

  18. Interannual variability of snow and fluvial regimes in Andorra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesado, Cristina; Riba, Sergi; Pons, Marc; Lopez-Moreno, Juan Ignacio

    2016-04-01

    Highlands in Andorra are snow-dominated areas during all the winter and most of the spring season. Interannual snow variability in these areas has a strong and straight influence on the amount and seasonality of river regimes at the bottom of the valley where most of the population and water requirements are concentrated. The present study analyzes the temporal and spatial variability of the fluvial regimes in Andorra and seeks to understand the interplay of different topographic and climatic variables on this variability. For example, in mountainous regions temperature determines the state of precipitation and this state can significantly affect runoff formation. The interannual temporal and spatial variability of temperatures, pluviometry and different snow indices such as snow heights and days with snow on the ground has been studied for the last decade and correlated with the fluvial dynamics and its variability using discharge measurements. This study focus especially in the assessment of the role of snow and its seasonality in the fluvial regime dynamics and the influence in the torrential flows and flood hazard. Flood hazard, force to take protection measures, which need information about flood frequency and magnitude. For this, flow instrumental series are used, but usually they do not consider phenomena like snowmelt. This study contributes intends to better understand the interplay between snow and fluvial dynamics and improve the assessment of the availability of water resources as well as the requirements in terms of protection measures.

  19. Bank stability analysis for fluvial erosion and mass failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The central objective of this study was to highlight the differences in magnitude between mechanical and fluvial streambank erosional strength with the purpose of developing a more comprehensive bank stability analysis. Mechanical erosion and ultimately failure signifies the general movement or coll...

  20. Heavy mineral analyses as a powerful tool in fluvial geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Suchodoletz, Hans; Gärtner, Andreas; Faust, Dominik

    2014-05-01

    The Marneuli depression is a tectonic sub-basin of the Transcaucasian depression in eastern Georgia, filled with several decametres of fluvial, lacustrine and aeolian Quaternary sediments. In order to reconstruct past landscape evolution of the region we studied Late Quaternary fluvial sediments found along several rivers that flow through that depression. Whereas Holocene river sediments could generally easily be assigned to corresponding rivers, this was not always the case for older fluvial sediments. For this reason, we studied the heavy mineral contents of five recent rivers and of four sedimentary deposits of potential precursors. A total of 4088 analysed heavy mineral grains enabled us to set up the characteristic heavy mineral distribution pattern for each sample. Using these data, we were able to reconstruct the most likely source areas of the Late Pleistocene fluvial sediments and to link them with the catchment areas of recent rivers. This allowed us to identify and to substantiate significant Late Quaternary river diversions that could at least partly be assigned to ongoing tectonic processes.

  1. Evaluating process origins of sand-dominated fluvial stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, E.; Hajek, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sand-dominated fluvial stratigraphy is often interpreted as indicating times of relatively slow subsidence because of the assumption that fine sediment (silt and clay) is reworked or bypassed during periods of low accommodation. However, sand-dominated successions may instead represent proximal, coarse-grained reaches of paleo-river basins and/or fluvial systems with a sandy sediment supply. Differentiating between these cases is critical for accurately interpreting mass-extraction profiles, basin-subsidence rates, and paleo-river avulsion and migration behavior from ancient fluvial deposits. We explore the degree to which sand-rich accumulations reflect supply-driven progradation or accommodation-limited reworking, by re-evaluating the Castlegate Sandstone (Utah, USA) and the upper Williams Fork Formation (Colorado, USA) - two Upper Cretaceous sandy fluvial deposits previously interpreted as having formed during periods of relatively low accommodation. Both units comprise amalgamated channel and bar deposits with minor intra-channel and overbank mudstones. To constrain relative reworking, we quantify the preservation of bar deposits in each unit using detailed facies and channel-deposit mapping, and compare bar-deposit preservation to expected preservation statistics generated with object-based models spanning a range of boundary conditions. To estimate the grain-size distribution of paleo-sediment input, we leverage results of experimental work that shows both bed-material deposits and accumulations on the downstream side of bars ("interbar fines") sample suspended and wash loads of active flows. We measure grain-size distributions of bar deposits and interbar fines to reconstruct the relative sandiness of paleo-sediment supplies for both systems. By using these novel approaches to test whether sand-rich fluvial deposits reflect river systems with accommodation-limited reworking and/or particularly sand-rich sediment loads, we can gain insight into large

  2. Multidecadal Fluvial Sediment Fluxes to Deltas under Environmental Change Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Frances; Darby, Stephen; Nicholls, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sediment delivery is vital to sustain delta environments on which over half a billion people live worldwide. Due to factors such as subsidence and sea level rise, deltas sink relative to sea level if sediment is not delivered to and retained on their surfaces. Deltas which sink relative to sea level experience flooding, land degradation and loss, which endangers anthropogenic activities and populations. The future of fluvial sediment fluxes, a key mechanism for sediment delivery to deltas, is uncertain due to complex environmental changes which are predicted to occur over the coming decades. This research investigates fluvial sediment fluxes under environmental changes in order to assess the sustainability of delta environments under potential future scenarios up to 2100. Global datasets of climate change, reservoir construction, and population and GDP as proxies for anthropogenic influence through land use changes are used to drive the catchment numerical model WBMsed, which is being used to investigate the effects of these environmental changes on fluvial sediment delivery. This process produces fluvial sediment fluxes under multiple future scenarios which will be used to assess the future sustainability of a selection of 8 vulnerable deltas, although the approach can be applied to deltas worldwide. By modelling potential future scenarios of fluvial sediment flux, this research contributes to the prognosis for delta environments. The future scenarios will inform management at multiple temporal scales, and indicate the potential consequences for deltas of various anthropogenic activities. This research will both forewarn managers of potentially unsustainable deltas and indicate those anthropogenic activities which encourage or hinder the creation of sustainable delta environments.

  3. New geologic slip rates for the Agua Blanca Fault, northern Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, P. O.; Behr, W. M.; Fletcher, J. M.; Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2015-12-01

    Within the southern San Andreas transform plate boundary system, relatively little is known regarding active faulting in northern Baja California, Mexico, or offshore along the Inner Continental Borderland. The inner offshore system appears to be fed from the south by the Agua Blanca Fault (ABF), which strikes northwest across the Peninsular Ranges of northern Baja California. Therefore, the geologic slip rate for the ABF also provides a minimum slip rate estimate for the offshore system, which is connected to the north to faults in the Los Angeles region. Previous studies along the ABF determined slip rates of ~4-6 mm/yr (~10% of relative plate motion). However, these rates relied on imprecise age estimates and offset geomorphic features of a type that require these rates to be interpreted as minima, allowing for the possibility that the slip rate for the ABF may be greater. Although seismically quiescent, the surface trace of the ABF clearly reflects Holocene activity, and given its connectivity with the offshore fault system, more quantitative slip rates for the ABF are needed to better understand earthquake hazard for both US and Mexican coastal populations. Using newly acquired airborne LiDAR, we have mapped primary and secondary fault strands along the segmented western 70 km of the ABF. Minimal development has left the geomorphic record of surface slip remarkably well preserved, and we have identified abundant evidence meter to km scale right-lateral displacement, including new Late Quaternary slip rate sites. We verified potential reconstructions at each site during summer 2015 fieldwork, and selected an initial group of three high potential slip rate sites for detailed mapping and geochronologic analyses. Offset landforms, including fluvial terrace risers, alluvial fans, and incised channel fill deposits, record displacements of ~5-80 m, and based on minimal soil development, none appear older than early Holocene. To quantitatively constrain landform ages

  4. Panama Canal Watershed Experiment- Agua Salud Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stallard, Robert F.; Ogden, Fred L.; Elsenbeer, Helmut; Hall, Jefferson S.

    2010-01-01

    The Agua Salud Project utilizes the Panama Canal’s (Canal) central role in world commerce to focus global attention on the ecosystem services provided by tropical forests. The Canal was one of the great engineering projects in the world. Completed in 1914, after almost a decade of concerted effort, its 80 km length greatly shortened the voyage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. An entire class of ships, the Panamax, has been constructed to maximize the amount of cargo that can be carried in a Canal passage. In today’s parlance, the Canal is a “green” operation, powered largely by water (Table 1). The locks, three pairs on each end with a net lift of 27 meters, are gravity fed. For each ton of cargo that is transferred from ocean to ocean, about 13 tons of water (m3) are used. Lake Gatún forms much of the waterway in the Canal transect. Hydroelectricity is generated at the Gatún dam, whenever there is surplus water, and at Madden Dam (completed in 1936) when water is transferred from Lake Alhajuela to Lake Gatún. The Canal watershed is the source of drinking water for Panama City and Colon City, at either end of the Canal, and numerous towns in between.

  5. Reservoir heterogeneity in the middle Frio Formation: Case studies in Stratton and Agua Dulce fields, Nueces County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, D.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Selected middle Frio (Oligocene) reservoirs of Stratton field and the contiguous Agua Dulce field are being studied as part of a Gas Research Institute/Department of Energy/State of Texas cosponsored program designed to improve reserve growth in mature gas fields. Over the past four decades, Stratton has produced 2.0 tcf of gas from 113 middle Frio reservoirs, and Agua Dulce has produced 1.6 tcf from 116 reservoirs. Recent drilling and workover activities, however, suggest the presence of additional untapped or bypassed middle Frio reservoirs. Four reservoirs, the E18/6,020-ft, E21/6,050-ft, E31/6,100-ft, and E41/Bertram, were evaluated over a 13,000-acre tract that includes areas adjacent to both fields. The middle Frio is composed of sand-rich channel-fill and splay deposits interstratified with floodplain mudstones, all forming part of the Gueydan fluvial system. Channel-fill deposits are 30 ({plus minus}15) ft thick and 2,500 ({plus minus}500) ft wide. Splay deposits are up to 30 ft thick proximal to channels and extend as much as 2 mi from channels. Channel-fill and associated splay sandstones are reservoir facies (porosity 20%; permeability = 10s to 100s md); floodplain mudstones and levee sandy mudstones are barriers to flow facies separating individual reservoirs vertically and laterally. The E41/Bertram reservoir is an example of a laterally stacked channel system deposited during relatively slow aggradation. This reservoir includes sand-on-sand contacts and is composed of mostly leaky compartments. The E 18/6,020-ft, E21/6,050-ft, and E31/6,100ft reservoirs are examples of vertically stacked channel systems reflecting higher rates of aggradation. Vertically stacked architectures are more favorable for isolated compartments and therefore are better candidates for infield reserve growth.

  6. Energy, time, and channel evolution in catastrophically disturbed fluvial systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, A.

    1992-01-01

    Specific energy is shown to decrease nonlinearly with time during channel evolution and provides a measure of reductions in available energy at the channel bed. Data from two sites show convergence towards a minimum specific energy with time. Time-dependent reductions in specific energy at a point act in concert with minimization of the rate of energy dissipation over a reach during channel evolution as the fluvial systems adjust to a new equilibrium.

  7. Interaction of fluvial and lacustrine/marine processes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonson, O.; Lucas, A.; Hayes, A. G.; Cassini Radar Science Team

    2011-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar images of Titan's surface acquired by Cassini reveal a host of lakes and seas at high latitudes, dominantly in the north. Channel systems are seen to drain into some bodies, while other shorelines appear relatively undissected at the resolution of the available data (≤300 m/pix). Digital Elevation Models derived from stereo SAR imagery allow quantitative analysis of near-shore topography, with improved accuracy due to an innovative de-noising algorithm (see also Lucas et al., AGU 2011). Here we consider the interaction of fluvial systems with lakes and seas, and their relative contribution to the liquid filling these as a function of size. We find evidence for the topographic effect of near-shore incision at the shorelines of Kraken Mare, at and near the island Mayda Insula. We identify a shoulder in the histogram (at an elevation of approximately -240 m in Figure 1) suggesting that fluvial and/or lacustrine processes redistributed near-shore material forming a topographic bench. Terrestrial examples show similar patterns in the hypsometric distribution, owing to fluvial erosion. These results are consistent with observations from SAR images and show that erosion and sediment transport have influenced the topography substantially, with their integrated action quantifiable volumetrically.

  8. Headwaters are critical reservoirs of microbial diversity for fluvial networks

    PubMed Central

    Besemer, Katharina; Singer, Gabriel; Quince, Christopher; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Sloan, William; Battin, Tom J.

    2013-01-01

    Streams and rivers form conspicuous networks on the Earth and are among nature's most effective integrators. Their dendritic structure reaches into the terrestrial landscape and accumulates water and sediment en route from abundant headwater streams to a single river mouth. The prevailing view over the last decades has been that biological diversity also accumulates downstream. Here, we show that this pattern does not hold for fluvial biofilms, which are the dominant mode of microbial life in streams and rivers and which fulfil critical ecosystem functions therein. Using 454 pyrosequencing on benthic biofilms from 114 streams, we found that microbial diversity decreased from headwaters downstream and especially at confluences. We suggest that the local environment and biotic interactions may modify the influence of metacommunity connectivity on local biofilm biodiversity throughout the network. In addition, there was a high degree of variability in species composition among headwater streams that could not be explained by geographical distance between catchments. This suggests that the dendritic nature of fluvial networks constrains the distributional patterns of microbial diversity similar to that of animals. Our observations highlight the contributions that headwaters make in the maintenance of microbial biodiversity in fluvial networks. PMID:24089333

  9. Does deposition depth control the OSL bleaching of fluvial sediment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, A. C.; Wallinga, J.; Hobo, N.; Versendaal, A. J.; Makaske, B.; Middelkoop, H.

    2014-07-01

    The Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) signal from fluvial sediment often contains a remnant from the previous deposition cycle, leading to a partially bleached equivalent-dose distribution. Although identification of the burial dose is of primary concern, the degree of bleaching could potentially provide insights into geomorphic processes. However, comparison of bleaching between samples is complicated by sample-to-sample variation in aliquot size and luminescence sensitivity. Here we develop an age model to account for these effects. With measurement data from multi-grain aliquots, we use Bayesian computational statistics to estimate the burial dose and bleaching parameters of the single-grain dose distribution. We apply the model to 46 samples taken from fluvial sediment of Rhine branches in the Netherlands, and compare the results with environmental predictor variables (depositional energy and environment, sample depth, depth relative to mean water level, dose rate). We find no significant correlations between any predictor variable and the bleaching parameters, although large uncertainties may be obscuring relationships. However, the best bleached samples are found close to the mean water level. Based on these results, we hypothesize that bleaching occurs mainly during fluvial transport rather than upon deposition, with extra bleaching possible for sediments near the transition of channel to overbank deposits due to local reworking after deposition either by wind or water.

  10. Protracted fluvial recovery from medieval earthquakes, Pokhara, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolle, Amelie; Bernhardt, Anne; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Andermann, Christoff; Schönfeldt, Elisabeth; Seidemann, Jan; Adhikari, Basanta R.; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg; Fort, Monique; Korup, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    River response to strong earthquake shaking in mountainous terrain often entails the flushing of sediments delivered by widespread co-seismic landsliding. Detailed mass-balance studies following major earthquakes in China, Taiwan, and New Zealand suggest fluvial recovery times ranging from several years to decades. We report a detailed chronology of earthquake-induced valley fills in the Pokhara region of western-central Nepal, and demonstrate that rivers continue to adjust to several large medieval earthquakes to the present day, thus challenging the notion of transient fluvial response to seismic disturbance. The Pokhara valley features one of the largest and most extensively dated sedimentary records of earthquake-triggered sedimentation in the Himalayas, and independently augments paleo-seismological archives obtained mainly from fault trenches and historic documents. New radiocarbon dates from the catastrophically deposited Pokhara Formation document multiple phases of extremely high geomorphic activity between ˜700 and ˜1700 AD, preserved in thick sequences of alternating fluvial conglomerates, massive mud and silt beds, and cohesive debris-flow deposits. These dated fan-marginal slackwater sediments indicate pronounced sediment pulses in the wake of at least three large medieval earthquakes in ˜1100, 1255, and 1344 AD. We combine these dates with digital elevation models, geological maps, differential GPS data, and sediment logs to estimate the extent of these three pulses that are characterized by sedimentation rates of ˜200 mm yr‑1 and peak rates as high as 1,000 mm yr‑1. Some 5.5 to 9 km3 of material infilled the pre-existing topography, and is now prone to ongoing fluvial dissection along major canyons. Contemporary river incision into the Pokhara Formation is rapid (120-170 mm yr‑1), triggering widespread bank erosion, channel changes, and very high sediment yields of the order of 103 to 105 t km‑2 yr‑1, that by far outweigh bedrock

  11. Estuarine fluvial floodplain formation in the Holocene Lower Tagus valley (Central Portugal) and implications for Quaternary fluvial system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schriek, Tim; Passmore, David G.; Rolão, Jose; Stevenson, Anthony C.

    2007-11-01

    We present a brief synthesis of the Quaternary fluvial record in the Lower Tagus Basin (central Portugal), concentrating on factors controlling infill and incision. The Holocene part of the record forms the focus of this paper and guides the questioning of the basic assumptions of the established Quaternary fluvial evolution model, in particular the link between sea-level change and fluvial incision-deposition. We suggest that several incision-aggradation phases may have occurred during glacial periods. Major aggradation events may overlap with cold episodes, while incision appears to concentrate on the warming limb of climate transitions. The complex stratigraphy of the Quaternary record in the Lower Tagus valley is influenced by repeated base-level and climate changes. This paper submits the first chronostratigraphic framework for valley fill deposits in the Lower Tagus area. Sea-level rise forced aggradation and controlled deposition of the fine-grained sedimentary wedge underlying the low-gradient Lower Tagus floodplain. Investigations have focused on the lower Muge tributary, where rapidly aggrading estuarine and fluvial environments were abruptly established (∼8150 cal BP) as sea level rose. Base level at the valley mouth controlled the upstream extent of the fine-grained backfill. Tidal environments disappeared abruptly (∼5800 cal BP) when the open estuary at the Muge confluence was infilled by the Tagus River. The decrease and final still stand of sea-level rise led to floodplain stabilisation with peat (∼6400-5200 cal BP) and soil formation (∼5200-2200 cal BP). Localised renewed sedimentation (∼2200-200 cal BP) is linked to human activity.

  12. A sedimentary model for early Palaeozoic fluvial fans, Alderney Sandstone Formation (Channel Islands, UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ielpi, Alessandro; Ghinassi, Massimiliano

    2016-08-01

    Fluvial fans in the rock record are inferred based on critical criteria such as: downstream grain-size fining; evidence for drainage fractionation along bifurcating channels; increasing fluvial-aeolian interaction in the basinward direction; and radial palaeoflow dispersion. Since pre-vegetation fluvial rocks often lack heterolithic alluvium and channelisation at the outcrop scale, the recognition of pre-Silurian fluvial fans has, so far, not been straightforward. This research proposes a sedimentary model for the Alderney Sandstone Formation of Channel Islands (UK), so far considered as a fine record of early Palaeozoic axial-fluvial sedimentation. Here, outcrop-based and remote-sensing analysis of the formation's type-section reveal the interaction of fluvial and aeolian processes, expressed by the alternation of: compound fluvial bars enclosing macroform surfaces, related to phases of perennial discharge; fluvial sandsheets containing antidunal forms and soft-sediment deformations, related to seasonal (i.e. flashy) discharge; and aeolian bedforms overlying thin stream-flow deposits. An up-section increase in aeolian deposits is accompanied by the shrinking of fluvial bars and minor-channel cuts, suggesting that drainage was fractioned along smaller channels terminating into marginal aeolian environments. Together with a propensity towards more dispersed values of fluvial cross-set thickness up-section (again due to discharge fractionation along intermittently active channels), these features depict an aeolian-influenced fluvial fan. This work discusses a set of criteria for the identification of fluvial fans in pre-vegetation environments. In doing so, it also explores possible parallels to modern environments, and underscores the potential of integrated outcrop and remotely sensed observations on ancient fluvial rocks and modern sedimentary realms.

  13. Western Mediterranean environmental changes: Evidences from fluvial archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Daniel; Faust, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    When dealing with current and past landscape evolution, a key issue addresses responses of geomorphic systems to the large number of influencing variables. Identifying morphodynamic phases and revealing interrelations with specific driving forces are demanding tasks for Quaternary research. In this paper, we present late Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial sedimentation patterns of three Western Mediterranean river catchments, namely Jarama River, Guadalete River and Guadalquivir River that extent along a climatic transect from semi-humid SW-Spain to semi-arid central Spain. These studies are based on extensive fieldwork conducted on 36 exposures and 13 drillings in floodplain positions. Field data is supported by geochemical analyses, while the chronological framework was obtained from the analyses of 70 radiocarbon samples. Results show distinct patterns of fluvial sedimentation as well as soil formation linked to floodplain stability for each river catchment. On regional or catchment scale, pollen stratigraphical correlation and comparison with lacustrine records show that fluvial dynamics have a strong reaction to climatic shifts, with phases of high fragility characterized by catchment erosion and floodplain sedimentation in response to climatic aridification events and phases of climate change in general. The comparison of the examined river systems reveals that periods of supra-regional floodplain sedimentation in several catchments occurred from 8.0 to 7.0, 5.0 to 3.8, 2.2 to 1.5, and around 1.0 as well as 0.4 ka cal. BP, while we found periods of supra-regional soil formation from 13.3 to 12.7, 7.0 to 5.1 (with a short interruption around 6.0 to 5.5 ka), 2.8 to 2.3 ka, 1.4 to 1.2 ka, and 0.8 to 0.5 ka cal. BP. Beside these consistencies we found deviating dynamic patterns that are apparently expressed in terms of differing onset and offset, differing durations, or even the lack of fluvial system response. The main reasons for this can be seen in

  14. Fluvial geomorphology: where do we go from here?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Derald G.

    1993-07-01

    The evolution of geomorphology and in particular, fluvial geomorphology, is at a crossroads. Currently, the discipline is dismally organized, without focus or direction, and is practised by individualists who rarely collaborate in numbers significant enough to generate major research initiatives. If the discipline is to mature and to prosper, we must make some very difficult decisions that will require major changes in our ways of thinking and operating. Either the field stays in its current operational mode and becomes a backwater science, or it moves forward and adopts the ways of the more competitive sectors of the earth and biosciences. For the discipline to evolve, fluvial geomorphologists must first organize an association within North America or at the international level. The 3rd International Geomorphology Conference may be a start, but within that organization we must develop our own divisional and/or regional organizations. Within the Quaternary geology/geomorphology divisions of the Geological Socieity of America (GSA), Association of American Geographers (AAG), American Geophysical Union (AGU) and British Geomorphology Research Group (BGRG) the voice of fluvial geomorphology is lost in a sea of diverse and competitive interests, though there is reason for hope resulting from some recent initiatives. In Canada, we have no national geomorphology organization per se; our closest organization is Canqua (Canadian Quaternary Association). Next, fluvial researchers must collaborate, by whatever means, to develop "scientific critical mass" in order to generate ideas and long-range goals of modest and major scientific importance. These projects will help secure major research funding without which, research opportunities will diminish and initiating major new research will become nearly impossible. Currently, we are being surpassed by the glaciologists, remote sensors, ecologists, oceanographers, climatologists-atmospheric researchers and some Quaternary

  15. Introduction to the special issue on discontinuity of fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchsted, Denise; Daniels, Melinda; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2014-01-01

    Fluvial systems include natural and human-created barriers that modify local base level; as such, these discontinuities alter the longitudinal flux of water and sediment by storing, releasing, or changing the flow path of those materials. Even in the absence of distinct barriers, fluvial systems are typically discontinuous and patchy. The size of fluvial discontinuities ranges across scales from 100 m, such as riffles, to 104 m, such as lava dams or major landslides. The frequency of occurrence appears to be inversely related to size, with creation and failure of the small features, such as beaver dams, occurring on a time scale of 100 to 101 years and a frequency of occurrence at scales as low as 101 m. In contrast, larger scale discontinuities, such as lava dams, can last for time scales up to 105 years and have a frequency of occurrence of approximately 104 m. The heterogeneity generated by features is an essential part of river networks and should be considered as part of river management. Therefore, we suggest that "natural" dams are a useful analog for human dams when evaluating options for river restoration. This collection of papers on the studies of natural dams includes bedrock barriers, log jams and beaver dams. The collection also addresses the discontinuity generated by a floodplain — in the absence of an obvious barrier in the channel — and tools for evaluation of riverbed heterogeneity. It is completed with a study of impact of human dams on floodplain sedimentation. These papers will help geomorphologists and river managers understand the factors that control river heterogeneity across scales and around the world.

  16. Downstream-migrating fluvial point bars in the rock record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Ielpi, Alessandro; Aldinucci, Mauro; Fustic, Milovan

    2016-04-01

    Classical models developed for ancient fluvial point bars are based on the assumption that meander bends invariably increase their radius as meander-bend apices migrate in a direction transverse to the channel-belt axis (i.e., meander bend expansion). However, many modern meandering rivers are also characterized by down-valley migration of the bend apex, a mechanism that takes place without a significant change in meander radius and wavelength. Downstream-migrating fluvial point bars (DMFPB) are the dominant architectural element of these types of meander belts. Yet they are poorly known from ancient fluvial-channel belts, since their disambiguation from expansional point bars often requires fully-3D perspectives. This study aims to review DMFPB deposits spanning in age from Devonian to Holocene, and to discuss their main architectural and sedimentological features from published outcrop, borehole and 3D-seismic datasets. Fluvial successions hosting DMFPB mainly accumulated in low accommodation conditions, where channel belts were affected by different degrees of morphological (e.g., valleys) or tectonic (e.g., axial drainage of shortening basins) confinement. In confined settings, bends migrate downstream along the erosion-resistant valley flanks and little or no floodplain deposits are preserved. Progressive floor aggradation (e.g., valley filling) allow meander belts with DMFPB to decrease their degree of confinement. In less confined settings, meander bends migrate downstream mainly after impinging against older, erosion-resistant channel fill mud. By contrast, tectonic confinement is commonly associated with uplifted alluvial plains that prevented meander-bend expansion, in turn triggering downstream translation. At the scale of individual point bars, translational morphodynamics promote the preservation of downstream-bar deposits, whereas the coarser-grained upstream and central beds are less frequently preserved. However, enhanced preservation of upstream

  17. Large Fluvial Fans: Aspects of the Attribute Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    In arguing for a strict definition of the alluvial fan (coarse-grained with radii less than10 km, in mountain-front settings), Blair and McPherson (1994) proposed that there is no meaningful difference between large fluvial fans (LFF) and floodplains, because the building blocks of both are channel-levee-overbank deposits. Sediment bodies at the LFF scale (greater than 100 km long, fan-shaped in planform), are relatively unstudied although greater than 160 are now identified globally. The following perspectives suggest that the significance of LFF needs to be reconsidered.

  18. New Mesoscale Fluvial Landscapes - Seismic Geomorphology and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Megafans (100-600 km radius) are very large alluvial fans that cover significant areas on most continents, the surprising finding of recent global surveys. The number of such fans and patterns of sedimentation on them provides new mesoscale architectures that can now be applied on continental fluvial depositional systems, and therefore on. Megafan-scale reconstructions underground as yet have not been attempted. Seismic surveys offer new possibilities in identifying the following prospective situations at potentially unsuspected locations: (i) sand concentrations points, (ii) sand-mud continuums at the mesoscale, (iii) paleo-valley forms in these generally unvalleyed landscapes, (iv) stratigraphic traps, and (v) structural traps.

  19. Wilmington Submarine Canyon: a marine fluvial-like system.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGregor, B.; Stubblefield, W.L.; Ryan, William B. F.; Twichell, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Midrange sidescan sonar data show that a system of gullies and small channels feeds into large submarine canyons on the Middle Atlantic Continental Slope of the US. The surveyed canyons all have relatively flat floors, but they have different channel morphologies. Wilmington Canyon has a meandering channel that extends down the Continental Slope and across the Continental Rise, whereas two canyons south of Wilmington Canyon have straight channels that trend directly downslope onto the rise. The morphology of these submarine canyon systems is remarkably similar to that of terrestrial fluvial systems.-Authors

  20. Quantifying the transition from fluvial- to wave-dominance for river deltas with multiple active channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, J.; Ashton, A. D.; Giosan, L.

    2012-12-01

    The plan-view morphologies of fluvial- and wave-dominated deltas are clearly distinctive, but transitional forms are numerous. A quantitative, process-based description of this transition remains unexplored, particularly for river deltas with multiple active channels. Previous studies focused on general attributes of the fluvial and marine environment, such as the balance between wave energy and river discharge. Here, we propose that the transition between fluvial and wave dominance is directly related to the magnitude of the fluvial bedload flux to the nearshore region versus the alongshore sediment transport capacity of waves removing sediment away from the mouth. In the case of a single-channel delta, this balance can be computed for a given distribution of waves approaching shore. Fluvial dominance occurs when fluvial sediment input exceeds the wave-sustained maximum alongshore sediment transport for all potential shoreline orientations both up- and downdrift of the river mouth. However, deltaic channels have the tendency to bifurcate with increasing fluvial strength. Initial bifurcation splits the fluvial sediment flux among individual channels, while the potential sediment transport by waves remains constant for both river mouths. At higher bifurcation orders, multiple channels interact with each other alongshore, a situation more complicated than the single channel case and one that cannot be simple addressed analytically. We apply a model of plan-view shoreline evolution to simulate the evolution of a deltaic environment with multiple active channels. A highly simplified fluvial domain is represented by deposition of sediment where channels meet the coast. We investigate two scenarios of fluvial delivery. The first scenario deposits fluvial sediment alongshore on a self-similar predefined network of channels. We analyze the effects of different network geometrical parameters, such as bifurcation length, bifurcation angle, and sediment partitioning. In the

  1. Fluvial sediment fingerprinting: literature review and annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Joyce E.; Haj, Adel E., Jr.; Stamm, John F.; Valder, Joshua F.; Prautzch, Vicki L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has evaluated and adopted various field methods for collecting real-time sediment and nutrient data. These methods have proven to be valuable representations of sediment and nutrient concentrations and loads but are not able to accurately identify specific source areas. Recently, more advanced data collection and analysis techniques have been evaluated that show promise in identifying specific source areas. Application of field methods could include studies of sources of fluvial sediment, otherwise referred to as sediment “fingerprinting.” The identification of sediment is important, in part, because knowing the primary sediment source areas in watersheds ensures that best management practices are incorporated in areas that maximize reductions in sediment loadings. This report provides a literature review and annotated bibliography of existing methodologies applied in the field of fluvial sediment fingerprinting. This literature review provides a bibliography of publications where sediment fingerprinting methods have been used; however, this report is not assumed to provide an exhaustive listing. Selected publications were categorized by methodology with some additional summary information. The information contained in the summary may help researchers select methods better suited to their particular study or study area, and identify methods in need of more testing and application.

  2. Fluvial deposits as an archive of early human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; White, M. J.; Beaumont, P.; Antoine, P.; Bridgland, D. R.; Limondin-Lozouet, N.; Santisteban, J. I.; Schreve, D. C.; Shaw, A. D.; Wenban-Smith, F. F.; Westaway, R. W. C.; White, T. S.

    2007-11-01

    River terraces are well established as an important source of Lower and Middle Palaeolithic artefacts in Europe, large collections having been assembled there during the years of manual gravel extraction. Now that many terrace sequences can be reliably dated and correlated with the oceanic record, potentially useful patterns can be recognized in the distribution of artefacts. The earliest appearance of artefacts in terrace staircases, marking the arrival of the first tool-making hominins in the region in question, is the first of several archaeological markers within fluvial sequences. The Lower to Middle Palaeolithic transition, with the appearance of Levallois, is another. Others may be more regional in significance: the occurrences of Clactonian (Mode 1) industry, twisted ovate handaxes and bout coupé handaxes, for example. IGCP Project no. 449 instigated the compilation of fluvial records from all over the 'old world'. Comparison between British and Central European sequences confirms the established view that there is a demarcation between handaxe making in the west and flake/core industries in the east. Other centres of activity reported here have been in the Middle East (Syria), South Africa and India. Data from such areas will be key in deciphering the story of the earlier 'out-of-Africa' migration, that by pre-Homo sapiens people. There is clear evidence for diachroneity between the first appearances of different industries, in keeping with the well-established idea of northward migration.

  3. Fluvial channels on Titan: Initial Cassini RADAR observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenz, R.D.; Lopes, R.M.; Paganelli, F.; Lunine, J.I.; Kirk, R.L.; Mitchell, K.L.; Soderblom, L.A.; Stofan, E.R.; Ori, G.; Myers, M.; Miyamoto, H.; Radebaugh, J.; Stiles, B.; Wall, S.D.; Wood, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Cassini radar images show a variety of fluvial channels on Titan's surface, often several hundreds of kilometers in length. Some (predominantly at low- and mid-latitude) are radar-bright and braided, resembling desert washes where fines have been removed by energetic surface liquid flow, presumably from methane rainstorms. Others (predominantly at high latitudes) are radar-dark and meandering and drain into or connect polar lakes, suggesting slower-moving flow depositing fine-grained sediments. A third type, seen predominantly at mid- and high latitudes, have radar brightness patterns indicating topographic incision, with valley widths of up to 3 km across and depth of several hundred meters. These observations show that fluvial activity occurs at least occasionally at all latitudes, not only at the Huygens landing site, and can produce channels much larger in scale than those observed there. The areas in which channels are prominent so far amount to about 1% of Titan's surface, of which only a fraction is actually occupied by channels. The corresponding global sediment volume inferred is not enough to account for the extensive sand seas. Channels observed so far have a consistent large-scale flow pattern, tending to flow polewards and eastwards. ?? 2008.

  4. Fluvial process and the establishment of bottomland trees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Michael L.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Auble, Gregor T.

    1996-01-01

    The relation between streamflow and establishment of bottomland trees is conditioned by the dominant fluvial process or processes acting along a stream. For successful establishment, cottonwoods, poplars, and willows require bare, moist surfaces protected from disturbance. Channel narrowing, channel meandering, and flood deposition promote different spatial and temporal patterns of establishment. During channel narrowing, the site requirements are met on portions of the bed abandoned by the stream, and establishment is associated with a period of low flow lasting one to several years. During channel meandering, the requirements are met on point bars following moderate or higher peak flows. Following flood deposition, the requirements are met on flood deposits ;high above the channel bed. Flood deposition can occur along most streams, but where a channel is constrained by a narrow valley, this process may be the only mechanism that can produce a bare, moist surface high enough to be safe from future disturbance. Because of differences in local bedrock, tributary influence, or geologic history, two nearby reaches of the same stream may be dominated by different fluvial processes and have different spatial and temporal patterns of trees. We illustrate this phenomenon with examples from forests of plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides ssp. monilifera) along meandering and constrained reaches of the Missouri River in Montana.

  5. Legitimizing fluvial ecosystems as users of water: an overview.

    PubMed

    Naiman, Robert J; Bunn, Stuart E; Nilsson, Christer; Petts, Geoff E; Pinay, Gilles; Thompson, Lisa C

    2002-10-01

    We suggest that fluvial ecosystems are legitimate users of water and that there are basic ecological principles guiding the maintenance of long-term ecological vitality. This article articulates some fundamental relationships between physical and ecological processes, presents basic principles for maintaining the vitality of fluvial ecosystems, identifies several major scientific challenges and opportunities for effective implementation of the basic ecological principles, and acts as an introduction to three specific articles to follow on biodiversity, biogeochemistry, and riparian communities. All the objectives, by necessity, link climate, land, and fresh water. The basic principles proposed are: (1) the natural flow regime shapes the evolution of aquatic biota and ecological processes, (2) every river has a characteristic flow regime and an associated biotic community, and (3) aquatic ecosystems are topographically unique in occupying the lowest position in the landscape, thereby integrating catchment-scale processes. Scientific challenges for the immediate future relate to quantifying cumulative effects, linking multidisciplinary knowledge and models, and formulating effective monitoring and assessment procedures. Additionally, forecasting the ecological consequences of changing water regimes is a fundamental challenge for science, especially as environmental issues related to fresh waters escalate in the next two to three decades. PMID:12481913

  6. Optimality approaches to describe characteristic fluvial patterns on landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Kyungrock; Kumar, Praveen

    2010-01-01

    Mother Nature has left amazingly regular geomorphic patterns on the Earth's surface. These patterns are often explained as having arisen as a result of some optimal behaviour of natural processes. However, there is little agreement on what is being optimized. As a result, a number of alternatives have been proposed, often with little a priori justification with the argument that successful predictions will lend a posteriori support to the hypothesized optimality principle. Given that maximum entropy production is an optimality principle attempting to predict the microscopic behaviour from a macroscopic characterization, this paper provides a review of similar approaches with the goal of providing a comparison and contrast between them to enable synthesis. While assumptions of optimal behaviour approach a system from a macroscopic viewpoint, process-based formulations attempt to resolve the mechanistic details whose interactions lead to the system level functions. Using observed optimality trends may help simplify problem formulation at appropriate levels of scale of interest. However, for such an approach to be successful, we suggest that optimality approaches should be formulated at a broader level of environmental systems' viewpoint, i.e. incorporating the dynamic nature of environmental variables and complex feedback mechanisms between fluvial and non-fluvial processes. PMID:20368257

  7. Fluvial erosion of impact craters: Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, V. R.

    1984-04-01

    Geomorphic studies of impact structures in central Australia are being used to understand the complexities of fluvial dissection in the heavily cratered terrains of Mars. At Henbury, Northern Territory, approximately 12 small meteorite craters have interacted with a semiarid drainage system. The detailed mapping of the geologic and structural features at Henbury allowed this study to concentrate on degradational landforms. The breaching of crater rims by gullies was facilitated by the northward movement of sheetwash along an extensive pediment surface extending from the Bacon Range. South-facing crater rims have been preferentially breached because gullies on those sides were able to tap the largest amounts of runoff. At crater 6 a probable rim-gully system has captured the headward reaches of a pre-impact stream channel. The interactive history of impacts and drainage development is critical to understanding the relationships in the heavily cratered uplands of Mars. Whereas Henbury craters are younger than 4700 yrs. B.P., the Gosses Bluff structure formed about 130 million years ago. The bluff is essentially an etched central peak composed of resistant sandstone units. Fluvial erosion of this structure is also discussed.

  8. Fluvial erosion of impact craters: Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V. R.

    1984-01-01

    Geomorphic studies of impact structures in central Australia are being used to understand the complexities of fluvial dissection in the heavily cratered terrains of Mars. At Henbury, Northern Territory, approximately 12 small meteorite craters have interacted with a semiarid drainage system. The detailed mapping of the geologic and structural features at Henbury allowed this study to concentrate on degradational landforms. The breaching of crater rims by gullies was facilitated by the northward movement of sheetwash along an extensive pediment surface extending from the Bacon Range. South-facing crater rims have been preferentially breached because gullies on those sides were able to tap the largest amounts of runoff. At crater 6 a probable rim-gully system has captured the headward reaches of a pre-impact stream channel. The interactive history of impacts and drainage development is critical to understanding the relationships in the heavily cratered uplands of Mars. Whereas Henbury craters are younger than 4700 yrs. B.P., the Gosses Bluff structure formed about 130 million years ago. The bluff is essentially an etched central peak composed of resistant sandstone units. Fluvial erosion of this structure is also discussed.

  9. Fluvial biogeomorphology in the Anthropocene: Managing rivers and managing landscapes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viles, Heather

    2015-04-01

    Biogeomorphology considers the many, and often complex, interactions between ecological and geomorphological processes. The concept of the Anthropocene deserves greater attention by scientists working on biogeomorphology, as will be demonstrated in this talk though a focus on fluvial environments. Rivers and river systems have been the subject of long-term human interference and management across the world, often in the form of direct manipulation of biogeomorphic interactions. Up to the present three broadly-defined phases of the Anthropocene can be identified - the Palaeoanthropocene, the Industrial Revolution and the Great Acceleration. Each of these broad phases of the Anthropocene has different implications for fluvial biogeomorphology and river management. The nature and dynamics of tufa-depositing systems provide good examples of the differing Anthropocene situations and will be focused on in this talk. We may now be entering a fourth phase of the Anthropocene called 'Earth system stewardship'. In terms of better understanding and managing the biogeomorphic interactions within rivers in such a phase, an improved conceptualisation of the Anthropocene and the complex web of interactions between human, ecological and geomorphological processes is needed.

  10. Revegetation of Fluvial Mine Tailing Deposits: The Use of Five Riparian Shrub Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluvial deposition of mine tailings has caused extensive damage to riparian ecosystems throughout the West. Willows are often used for revegetation of fluvial mine tailing deposits but some species accumulate toxic concentrations of metals in leaves and stems. A greenhouse experiment was conducted ...

  11. Riparian shrub metal concentrations and growth in amended fluvial mine tailings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluvial mine tailing deposition has caused extensive riparian damage throughout the western United States. Willows are often used for fluvial mine tailing revegetation, but some species accumulate excessive metal concentrations which could be detrimental to browsers. In a greenhouse experiment, gr...

  12. Fluvial sediment in Double Creek subwatershed No. 5, Washington County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bednar, Gene A.; Waldrep, Thomas E.

    1973-01-01

    A total of 21,370 tons of fluvial sediment was transported into reservoir No. 5 and a total of 19,930 tons was deposited. Seventy-eight percent of the total fluvial sediment was deposited during the first 9.2 years, or 63 percent of time of reservoir operation. The computed trap efficiency of reservoir No. 5 was 93 percent.

  13. Normal and Anomalous Dispersion in Fluvial Sediment Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. N.; Tucker, G. E.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the rate of motion and pattern of dispersion in fluvial sediment transport is essential for a variety of applications, including predicting the fate and transport of solid-phase contaminants and modeling the cosmogenic-nuclide inheritance of water-borne sediment. In order to create a probabilistic model of sediment particle motion, it is necessary to characterize the statistical properties of fluvial sediment dispersion. In general, two modes of behavior have been observed in advective-diffusive transport systems: normal and anomalous dispersion. Normal dispersion is characterized by a well-defined mean position and spatial variance and the time evolution of particle concentration is described by a simple advection-diffusion equation. In contrast, a transport system that exhibits anomalous dispersion will tend to have a heavy-tailed spatial distribution, a mean position that is different from the peak concentration, and a large variance. The fundamental difference lies in the probability distribution of individual particle velocities. When the distribution is sufficiently heavy-tailed, the resulting dispersion pattern will be anomalous. Anomalous dispersion has been observed in geophysical systems ranging from turbulent flow to transport in heterogeneous porous media. Several lines of evidence from the sediment transport literature suggest that fluvial sediment may undergo anomalous dispersion. Tracer experiments show a preference for right-skewed travel distance distributions, a characteristic of anomalous diffusion. Studies suggest that large inputs of sediment to rivers (such as a landslide) tend to disperse in place rather than translate downstream. In addition, the fact that sediment grains can become trapped in flood plains and bars for long periods of time and then move long distances in rare, short duration events such as floods suggests a potential for anomalous dispersion due to a broad distribution of particle residence times. We develop a

  14. Water soluble cations and the fluvial history of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Munoz, E. F.

    1975-01-01

    The electrical conductivity and water soluble Na, K, Ca, and Mg of aqueous solutions of terrestrial soils and finely divided igneous and metamorphic rocks were determined. Soils from dry terrestrial basins with a history of water accumulation as well as soils from the topographic lows of valleys accumulated water soluble cations, particularly Na and Ca. These soils as a group can be distinguished from the rocks or a second group of soils (leached upland soils and soils from sites other than the topographic lows of valleys) by significant differences in their mean electrical conductivity and water-soluble Na + Ca content. Similar measurements on multiple samples from the surface of Mars, collected by an automated long-range roving vehicle along a highlands-to-basin transect at sites with morphological features resembling dry riverlike channels, are suggested to determine the fluvial history of the planet.

  15. Modeling post-wildfire fluvial incision and terrace formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengers, F. K.; Tucker, G. E.

    2013-12-01

    Wildfires often lead to rapid erosion, sedimentation, and morphologic change. One of the challenges in developing quantitative models of post-fire landscape dynamics is a lack of high-quality datasets that document fluvial system evolution in the years to decades following a destructive fire. This study takes advantage of a natural experiment in post-fire fluvial incision to explore how the magnitude and timing of large flow events following a wildfire can change fluvial channel patterns. The study site is the Spring Creek watershed located in the foothills of central Colorado approximately 26 miles southwest of Denver, Colorado. The site burned during the Buffalo Creek wildfire, which was contained in May 1996. Within the Spring Creek watershed, 79% of the basin was burned and 63% of the burned area was considered high severity (Moody and Martin, 2001). In July 1996 a large rain storm hit the burned watershed and 110 mm of rain fell in one hour (Jarrett, 2001). This storm was larger than the estimated 100-year rainfall intensity of 60 mm/hr. Due to the increased surface erodibility after the wildfire, rapid erosion occurred within the watershed, while the main valley of Spring Creek aggraded with up to 2 m of sediment after this storm. Spring Creek has been incising through this post-wildfire sediment since the 1996 storm, and the terraces from this initial storm are still prevalent and identifiable along the valley. Repeated measurements of valley cross-sections since 1996 provide a comprehensive dataset for testing models of fluvial-system evolution on a decadal time scale. We hypothesize that the current channel pattern results from the specific sequence of rain events that occurred within the four years after the initial 1996 storm filled the valley with sediment. This hypothesis was tested using a two-dimensional coupled model of shallow-water flow, sediment transport, and topographic evolution. Discharge data were obtained from a stream gage installed at

  16. Probabilistic approaches to the modelling of fluvial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Fluvial systems generally exhibit sediment dynamics that are strongly stochastic. This stochasticity comes basically from three sources: (a) the variability and randomness in sediment supply due to surface properties and topography; (b) from the multitude of pathways that sediment may take on hillslopes and in channels, and the uncertainty in travel times and sediment storage along those pathways; and (c) from the stochasticity which is inherent in mobilizing sediment, either by heavy rain, landslides, debris flows, slope erosion, channel avulsions, etc. Fully deterministic models of fluvial systems, even if they are physically realistic and very complex, are likely going to be unable to capture this stochasticity and as a result will fail to reproduce long-term sediment dynamics. In this paper I will review another approach to modelling fluvial processes, which grossly simplifies the systems itself, but allows for stochasticity in sediment supply, mobilization and transport. I will demonstrate the benefits and limitations of this probabilistic approach to fluvial processes on three examples. The first example is a probabilistic sediment cascade which we developed for the Illgraben, a debris flow basin in the Rhone catchment. In this example it will be shown how the probability distribution of landslides generating sediment input into the channel system is transposed into that of sediment yield out of the basin by debris flows. The key role of transient sediment storage in the channel system, which limits the size of potential debris flows, is highlighted together with the influence of the landslide triggering mechanisms and climate stochasticity. The second example focuses on the river reach scale in the Maggia River, a braided gravel-bed stream where the exposed sediment on gravel bars is colonised by riparian vegetation in periods without floods. A simple autoregressive model with a disturbance and colonization term is used to simulate the growth and decline in

  17. Fluvial sensitivity to Late Quaternary climate changes in NW Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perşoiu, Ioana; Rădoane, Maria; Robu, Delia; Tanţău, Ioan

    2013-04-01

    Fluvial archives became increasingly important for the reconstruction of past environments, as they record a sum of climate, vegetation, hydrologic and anthropic changes. This is especially important for the Late Quaternary, when climate and human activities had recorded large spatial and temporal variations. Here we present a tale of fluvial behavior during the last ca. 24.000 years in NW Romania, based on 1) absolute ages and fluvial architecture of sediments exposed in 8 openings located along the Someşu Mic River, and 2) depth-age models, grain size, LOI and gastropods assemblage analysis on 2 cores located upstream from Ştiucilor Lake, a natural lake along a small tributary of the Someşu Mic River, formed by salt disolution on top of a narrow diapiric anticline. During the Late Glacial (LG), Ştiucilor Lake was more extended then is today, with a high input of coarse materials (sands) from the slopes; and dramatically reducing its size in the Early Holocene, a transition marked by the abrupt occurrence of Holocene gyttja on top of LG sands, 1 km upstream from the present lake. Further upstream, at ca. 4 km from the present day edge of the lake, clays and sandy clays were deposited during the Bolling - Allerod (BA), followed by fine - medium sands of Younger Dryas (YD) age. On top of these sands, clays, sandy clays and gyttja occur, suggesting a returning to a less energetic sedimentary environment in the Holocene. In both cores, the sediments become lacustrine, with clays and fine sands, attesting the expansion of the lake's surface, followed by large fluctuations during the Holocene. The river fed by this stream - Someşu Mic, was a coarse gravel, shallow braided river before the Last Glacial Maximum and until the YD. The channel metamorphosis into a narrow, incised, meandering one, occurred ca. 1500 years after the beginning of the Holocene. However, sedimentological evidences suggest that this transition from braided to meandering channel was not a

  18. Dynamic Flocculation of Muds in Fluvial to Marine Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvani, A.; Strom, K. B.

    2012-12-01

    Rivers are the primary conduits for delivery of sediment and organic matter to the sea. The sediments from river plumes may deposit and be preserved in estuarine and deltaic zones, or may be carried and mixed by ocean currents to deposit elsewhere on the shelf or basin. The sediment settling velocity is the most important parameter in terms of controlling and predicting depositional patterns in river mouths and coastal shelves. Settling velocity greatly impacts the distribution of muds in deltas and turbidity currents, and is largely controlled by grain size and density. The flocculation process yields mud aggregates of variable size and density as a function of turbulent energy and salt levels. Since turbulent energy and salinity both change during the fluvial to marine transition, dynamic flocculation processes may have a significant control to the eventual distribution of sediment through these zones. The purpose of this study is to quantify the evolution of floc size distribution and fractal dimension of suspended flocs with time as a function of time and space as turbulent shear and salinity levels vary in the fluvial to marine transition (river jet/plume and turbidity currents). To do this, experiments are carried out in a laboratory chamber where turbulent shear and salinity levels are varied to mimic a fixed volume of fluid being advected through the transition zone, and floc size distribution properties are measured within the mixing chamber using a specially designed floc imaging system and a set of image processing routines that allows us to measure floc size distributions of suspended flocs. Results demonstrate that floc properties and floc settling velocity change due to the dynamic flocculation and are dependent on the turbulent time history the mud suspension was exposed to under constant concentration. Results from the study are then used to frame a discussion on the relative importance of accounting for these dynamic effects in numerical models of

  19. Fluvial process and the establishment of bottomland trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Michael L.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Auble, Gregor T.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of river regulation on bottomland tree communities in western North America have generated substantial concern because of the important habitat and aesthetic values of these communities. Consideration of such effects in water management decisions has been hampered by the apparent variability of responses of bottomland tree communities to flow alteration. When the relation between streamflow and tree establishment is placed in a geomorphic context, however, much of that variability is explained, and prediction of changes in the tree community is improved. The relation between streamflow and establishment of bottomland trees is conditioned by the dominant fluvial process or processes acting along a stream. For successful establishment, cottonwoods, poplars, and willows require bare, moist surfaces protected from disturbance. Channel narrowing, channel meandering, and flood deposition promote different spatial and temporal patterns of establishment. During channel narrowing, the site requirements are met on portions of the bed abandoned by the stream, and establishment is associated with a period of low flow lasting one to several years. During channel meandering, the requirements are met on point bars following moderate or higher peak flows. Following flood deposition, the requirements are met on flood deposits ;high above the channel bed. Flood deposition can occur along most streams, but where a channel is constrained by a narrow valley, this process may be the only mechanism that can produce a bare, moist surface high enough to be safe from future disturbance. Because of differences in local bedrock, tributary influence, or geologic history, two nearby reaches of the same stream may be dominated by different fluvial processes and have different spatial and temporal patterns of trees. We illustrate this phenomenon with examples from forests of plains cottonwood ( Populus deltoides ssp. monilifera) along meandering and constrained reaches of the Missouri

  20. Dating fluvial archives of the Riverine Plain, Southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Daniela; Cohen, Tim; Reinfelds, Ivars; Jacobs, Zenobia; Shulmeister, James

    2016-04-01

    The Riverine Plain of Southeastern Australia is characterized by a multiplicity of relict river channels. Compared to the modern drainage system the most prominent of those distinct features are defined by large bankfull channel widths, large meander wavelengths and coarse sediment loads. Such morphological differences provide evidence for regimes of higher discharge, stemming from significant changes in runoff volumes, flood-frequency regimes and sediment supply. An existing geochronology for some of these channels is based on multi-grain thermoluminescence (Murrumbidgee River; Page et al., 1996) or radio-carbon dating (Goulburn River; Bowler, 1978) and indicates enhanced fluvial activity between 30 to 13 ka. The absence of exact Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21 ± 3 ka) ages of the Murrumbidgee palaeochannels was interpreted to indicate decreased fluvial activity during the peak of the LGM but was not inferred for the nearby Goulburn River. Recent developments in optical dating, especially measurements of individual grains of quartz, allow for an examination of these previous findings. Key sites along the Murrumbidgee and Goulburn Rivers have been revisited and new sites of the adjacent Murray River have been investigated. A revised, high-resolution geochronology based on single-grain optically stimulated luminescence dating is used to examine the precise occurrence of those massive channels and their implications for the Southern Hemisphere LGM. References: Page, K., Nanson, G., Price, D. (1996). Chronology of Murrumbidgee River palaeochannels on the Riverine Plain, southeastern Australia. Journal of Quaternary Science 11(4): 311-326. Bowler, J. (1978). Quaternary Climate and Tectonics in the Evolution of the Riverine Plain, Southeastern Australia. In: Davies, J. & Williams, M. (Editors). Landform Evolution in Australia, Australian National University Press: Canberra. p. 70-112.

  1. Episodes of fluvial and volcanic activity in Mangala Valles, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keske, Amber L.; Hamilton, Christopher W.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Daubar, Ingrid J.

    2015-01-01

    A new mapping-based study of the 900-km-long Mangala Valles outflow system was motivated by the availability of new high-resolution images and continued debates about the roles of water and lava in outflow channels on Mars. This study uses photogeologic analysis, geomorphic surface mapping, cratering statistics, and relative stratigraphy. Results show that Mangala Valles underwent at least two episodes of fluvial activity and at least three episodes of volcanic activity during the Late Amazonian. The occurrence of scoured bedrock at the base of the mapped stratigraphy, in addition to evidence provided by crater retention ages, suggests that fluvial activity preceded the deposition of two of the volcanic units. Crater counts performed at 30 locations throughout the area have allowed us to construct the following timeline: (1) formation of Noachian Highlands and possible initial flooding event(s) before ∼1 Ga, (2) emplacement of Tharsis lava flows in the valley from ∼700 to 1000 Ma, (3) a megaflooding event at ∼700-800 Ma sourced from Mangala Fossa, (4) valley fill by a sequence of lava flows sourced from Mangala Fossa ∼400-500 Ma, (5) another megaflooding event from ∼400 Ma, (6) a final phase of volcanism sourced from Mangala Fossa ∼300-350 Ma, and (7) emplacement of eolian sedimentary deposits in the northern portion of the valley ∼300 Ma. These results are consistent with alternating episodes of aqueous flooding and volcanism in the valles. This pattern of geologic activity is similar to that of other outflow systems, such as Kasei Valles, suggesting that there is a recurring, and perhaps coupled, nature of these processes on Mars.

  2. Applications of structure-from-motion photogrammetry to fluvial geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, James Thomas

    Since 2011, Structure-from-Motion Multi-View Stereo Photogrammetry (SfM or SfM-MVS) has gone from an overlooked computer vision technique to an emerging methodology for collecting low-cost, high spatial resolution three-dimensional data for topographic or surface modeling in many academic fields. This dissertation examines the applications of SfM to the field of fluvial geomorphology. My research objectives for this dissertation were to determine the error and uncertainty that are inherent in SfM datasets, the use of SfM to map and monitor geomorphic change in a small river restoration project, and the use of SfM to map and extract data to examine multi-scale geomorphic patterns for 32 kilometers of the Middle Fork John Day River. SfM provides extremely consistent results, although there are systematic errors that result from certain survey patterns that need to be accounted for in future applications. Monitoring change on small restoration stream channels with SfM gave a more complete spatial perspective than traditional cross sections on small-scale geomorphic change. Helicopter-based SfM was an excellent platform for low-cost, large scale fluvial remote sensing, and the data extracted from the imagery provided multi-scalar perspectives of downstream patterns of channel morphology. This dissertation makes many recommendations for better and more efficient SfM surveys at all of the spatial scales surveyed. By implementing the improvements laid out here and by other authors, SfM will be a powerful tool that will make 3D data collection more accessible to the wider geomorphic community.

  3. The fluvial system response to abrupt climate change during the last cold stage: the Upper Pleistocene River Thames fluvial succession at Ashton Keynes, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, S. G.; Maddy, D.; Scaife, R. G.

    2001-02-01

    The last interglacial-glacial cycle (125-10 ka BP) is characterised by numerous rapid shifts in global climate on sub-Milankovitch timescales, recorded in the ocean and ice core records. These climatic fluctuations are clearly recorded in those European terrestrial sedimentary sequences that span this time period without interruption. In the UK, only fragmentary Upper Pleistocene sequences exist, mainly within the fluvial archive of the major river systems such as the Thames. The response of the upper River Thames to abrupt fluctuations in climate is documented in the fluvial sediments beneath the Floodplain Terrace (Northmoor Member of the Upper Thames Formation) at Ashton Keynes, Wiltshire. A number of criteria are set out by which significant changes in the fluvial system may be established from the sedimentological, palaeoecological and geochronological information contained within the succession. The sedimentary succession is divisible into four facies associations, on the basis of their sedimentology and bounding surface characteristics. These represent distinct phases of fluvial activity at the site and allow changes in fluvial style to be inferred. Palaeoecological reconstructions from pollen analysis of peats within the sequence provides an indication of the nature and direction of Late Glacial environmental change and optically stimulated luminescence and radiocarbon dating methods provide chronological control on the sequence. These data suggest that major changes in fluvial style are recorded within the succession, which can be related to the climatic fluctuations that took place on the oxygen isotope stage 5a/4 transition (approximately 70 ka BP) and the Devensian Late Glacial climatic warm-cold-warm oscillation (13-11 ka BP). The changes in fluvial style are a result of variations in sediment supply to the river resulting from changes in slope stability, vegetation cover and cold-climate mass movement processes and variations in discharge regime

  4. Towards a phoenix phase in aeolian research: shifting geophysical perspectives from fluvial dominance

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Field, Jason P; Breshears, David D

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian processes are a fundamental driver of earth surface dynamics, yet the importance of aeolian processes in a broader geosciences context may be overshadowed by an unbalanced emphasis on fluvial processes. Here we wish to highlight that aeolian and fluvial processes need to be considered in concert relative to total erosion and to potential interactions, that relative dominance and sensitivity to disturbance vary with mean annual precipitation, and that there are important scale-dependencies associated with aeolian-fluvial interactions. We build on previous literature to present relevant conceptual syntheses highlighting these issues. We then highlight the relative investments that have been made in aeolian research on dust emission and management relative to that in fluvial research on sediment production. Literature searches highlight that aeolian processes are greatly understudied relative to fluvial processes when considering total erosion in different environmental settings. Notably, within the USA, aeolian research was triggered by the Dust Bowl catastrophe of the 1930s, but the resultant research agencies have shifted to almost completely focusing on fluvial processes, based on number of remaining research stations and on monetary investments in control measures. However, numerous research issues associated with intensification of land use and climate change impacts require a rapid ramping up in aeolian research that improves information about aeolian processes relative to fluvial processes, which could herald a post-Dust Bowl Phoenix phase in which aeolian processes are recognized as broadly critical to geo- and environmental sciences.

  5. Landform Evolution Modeling of Specific Fluvially Eroded Physiographic Units on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Schenk, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Several recent studies have proposed certain terrain types (i.e., physiographic units) on Titan thought to be formed by fluvial processes acting on local uplands of bedrock or in some cases sediment. We have earlier used our landform evolution models to make general comparisons between Titan and other ice world landscapes (principally those of the Galilean satellites) that we have modeled the action of fluvial processes. Here we give examples of specific landscapes that, subsequent to modeled fluvial work acting on the surfaces, produce landscapes which resemble mapped terrain types on Titan.

  6. Radon in the fluvial aquifers of the White River Basin, Indiana, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Moore, Rhett C.

    1996-01-01

    Water samples collected in 1995 from 57 monitoring wells (48 shallow and 9 deep) in the fluvial aquifers of the White River Basin were analyzed for radon. Radon concentrations in the shallow wells ranged from 140 to 1,600 pCi/L (picocuries per liter); the median concentration was 420 pCi/L. In comparison, analyses of the samples from the nine deep wells indicate that radon concentrations decrease with depth within the fluvial aquifers; the median concentration was 210 pCi/L. No areal trends in radon concentrations are evident in the water of the shallow fluvial aquifers of the basin

  7. Bottomland vegetation distribution along Passage Creek, Virginia, in relation to fluvial landforms.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, C.R.; Osterkamp, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Persistent distribution patterns of woody vegetation within the bottomland forest of Passage Creek, Virginia, were related to fluvial landforms, channel geometry, streamflow characteristics, and sediment-size characteristics. Distinct species distributional patterns were found on four common fluvial geomorphic landforms: depositional bar, active-channel shelf, floodplain, and terrace. Independent hydrologic characteristics (flow duration and flood frequency) were determined for each of the landforms. Vegetation patterns appear to develop more as a result of hydrologic processes associated with each fluvial landform rather than from sediment-size characteristics. -from Authors

  8. 75 FR 21034 - Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for the Agua Fria National Monument and Bradshaw...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for the Agua Fria National... Agua Fria National Monument and Bradshaw-Harquahala Planning Area, located in central Arizona. The... occupied or used portions of the planning area during prehistoric or historic times. The Agua Fria...

  9. What can we learn from fluvial incision in high mountains?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Margret; Gloaguen, Richard; Krbetschek, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    High and actively deforming mountain ranges attract the attention of geoscientists as they provide natural laboratories of fast evolving process-response systems. Tectonic compressional settings, often linked to perpendicular extension, control the topographic growth and hence, erosion, transport pathways and sedimentation. High altitude differences within short horizontal distances promote material re-organisation and high rates of surface processes. Furthermore, high mountains constitute orographic barriers that affect atmospheric circulations as well as host different climate regimes similar to those of widely separated latitudinal belts. Both cause a high sensitivity of surface processes to changes in climatic conditions. However, feedbacks between climatic and tectonic forcing are complex. Additionally, the dominance of one or the other varies in space and also over time, inheriting various traces of the paleo-morphodynamic conditions to the subsequent process regimes. To unravel the forces driving the evolution of relief in active mountains, numerous studies employ the drainage network of the corresponding mountains as a proxy of landscape evolution. Especially the rates of river incision provide a powerful tool to characterize the surface response and infer causes behind it. Several parameters of river incision are available to describe the fluvial incision at individual sites (e.g. terrace incision rates), along the river course (e.g. longitudinal river profiles, Hack index) and in its perpendicular dimension (e.g. valley cross sections, valley shape ratios). But they require careful interpretation. They are sensitive to both, climatic and tectonic forcing. Therefore, the synopsis of such indices for fluvial incision is essential to evaluate the role of climatic versus tectonic forcing. Here, we use the Panj river system, the major river draining the Pamir mountains of Central Asia, as an example. The Panj experiences high altitude changes of more than 4000

  10. Recent (Late Amazonian) Fluvial Features in Southeastern Elysium, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plescia, J.

    2002-12-01

    Cerberus Fossae, a major northwest trending tensional fracture in Elysium, has acted as a conduit for water in the very recent past (Late Amazonian). This same fracture system has also acted as a conduit for the release of the lavas that formed the Cerberus Plains. Water was released by the fracture in three locations in both catastrophic and non-catastrophic manners. At the northwest end of the fracture, two sources (Athabasca and Grjota' Valles) formed as the result of catastrophic flow away from the fracture carving channel systems hundreds of km long and tens of km wide. Both sources are at the same elevation -2.3 to -2.5 km suggesting they tapped the same reservoir beneath the Elysium rise. The third source is at the southeast end of Cerberus Fossae, southwest of Orcus Patera (Rahway Valles) which forms an extensive valley network. Some of these valleys begin at the fossae, others begin on the adjacent level plain to the north. This source is at a different elevation (-3.0 km) and apparently tapped a different, shallow reservoir. A shallow reservoir is suggested as there appear to be multiple sources over a broad area, possibly allowing headward erosion of some of the valleys by sapping, in addition to the larger (volume / rate) flows from the Cerberus Fossae fractures. Cerberus Fossae must have tapped two distinct reservoirs to release the water as the sources are restricted to a narrow elevation range, are at different elevations, and there are no release points between the two. Age relations suggest that all of the sources were active at the same point in geologic time. As faulting along the Cerberus Fossae trend has occurred repeatedly through time, the water must have been available for release only during the most recent episode of tectonism. Absolute timing, based on crater counts, is broadly constrained as only between 144 and 1700 Ma. These three fluvial channels can be integrated into a single fluvial system that exceeds 2500 km in length and extends

  11. Fluvial entrainment of low density peat blocks (block carbon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Jeff

    2014-05-01

    In many fluvial environments low density materials are transported in significant quantities and these form an important part of the stream load and /or have a distinct impact on sedimentation in these environments. However, there are significant gaps in understanding of how these materials are entrained and transported by streams and rivers. Eroding upland peatland environments in particular, frequently have fluvial systems in which large eroded peat blocks, often exceeding 1 m in length; form an important component of the stream material flux. Transport of this material is significant in determining rates of erosion but also has important impacts in terms of damage to infrastructure and carbon loss. This paper describes a field experiment designed to establish for the first time the conditions under which large peat blocks (c. > 0.1 m b axis) are initially entrained from a rough gravel bed. The field site is Trout Beck, in the North Pennines, Northern England which is an upland wandering river channel with occasional lateral and mid channel bars. Mean low flow stage is typically 0.2 m but during flood can rapidly rise, in one to two hours, to over 1.5 m. To study peat block entrainment a bespoke data acquisition system consisting of two pressure transducers, four release triggers and time lapse camera was set up. The pressure transducers provided a record of local depth and the release triggers were embedded in peat blocks to record initial motion and arranged on the rough stream bed. The time lapse camera provided verification of timing of block entrainment (during daylight hours) and also provided information on the mechanism of initial movement. Peat blocks were cut from a local source and were equidimensional, ranging in size from 0.1 to 0.7 m. The derived entrainment function is related to a critical depth of entrainment. Results demonstrate that peat blocks are entrained when the local depth approximates the height of the peat block. Blocks frequently shift

  12. Analysis of Ancient Fluvial Patterns on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jethani, Henna; Williams, M. E.

    2010-01-01

    This project involves the study of ancient fluvial patterns on the surface of Mars, including raised curvilinear features (RCFs) and negative relief channels. It requires the use of geological images provided by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to determine how water shaped the surface of Mars in the form of rivers, lakes and/or oceans approximately 3.5 billion years ago, during the Noachian period. The role of the intern is to examine the images and record the corresponding measurements of ancient river systems in an Excel spreadsheet to assist in determining the Noachian water cycle on Mars. Resources used to make these measurements include the Arena software, hand-drawn sketch maps, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel and the images provided by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The Context Imager (CTX) returns black and white images at a resolution of six meters per pixel. The camera can take images with a width of 30 km and a length of 160 km. Seventeen images were observed in total. Images are analyzed and notes are taken concerning their terminal deposits, stream ordering and drainage pattern. The Arena software is utilized to make the images more visible by allowing control of contrast and magnification. Once the image is adjusted, measurements: length, average width, drainage basin area, sinuous ridge area are recorded, at a magnification of one, through using the line segment and polygon tools. After an image has been analyzed and measured, a sketch map is drawn in order to clearly identify the various segments, basins and terminal deposits the intern observed. Observations are used to further classify the fluvial patterns; their drainage pattern is defined as dendritic, parallel, trellis, rectangular, radial, centripetal, deranged or discordant. Once observational notes are completed, mathematical relations are used to determine drainage density, stream frequency, theoretic basin area and sinuosity index. These data will be added to a larger data set that will

  13. Geologic Mapping to Constrain the Sources and Timing of Fluvial Activity in Western Ladon Basin, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Irwin, R. P.; Grant, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We are mapping two quadrangles in Margaritifer Terra (-15032 and -20032) to define the evolution of the western Ladon basin region as it relates to fluvial/alluvial events occurring on surrounding surfaces.

  14. Evolution of fluvial systems in salt-walled mini-basins: A review and new insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banham, Steven G.; Mountney, Nigel P.

    2013-10-01

    The preserved sedimentary expression of fluvial successions accumulated in salt-walled mini-basins records the complex history of basin subsidence, the style of sediment supply, and the pattern of sediment distribution in response to a range of fluvial processes throughout the evolution of such basins. Temporal and spatial variations in the rate of basin subsidence govern the generation of accommodation space, whereas the rate and style of sediment supply govern how available accommodation is filled; together these parameters act as principal controls that dictate the gross-scale pattern of fluvial sedimentation. Additional factors that influence fluvial stratigraphic architecture in salt-walled mini-basins are: (i) the trend and form of inherited basement lineations and faults that control the geometry, orientation and spacing of salt walls that develop in response to halokinesis; (ii) salt thickness and composition that dictate both the maximum potential basin-fill thickness within a developing mini-basin and the rate of evacuation (migration) of salt from beneath evolving mini-basins, leading to the growth of confining salt walls, uplift of which may generate surface topographic expression that influences fluvial drainage patterns; (iii) climate that dictates fluvial style and the processes by which sediment is distributed; and (iv) the inherited direction of drainage relative to the trend of elongate salt walls and locus of sediment supply that dictates how sediments are distributed both within a single mini-basin and between adjacent basins. Examples of fluvial sedimentary architectures preserved in salt-walled mini-basins from a number of geographic regions are used to illustrate and document the primary controls that influence patterns of fluvial sediment accumulation. The distribution of fluvial architectural elements preserved within mini-basins follows a predictable pattern, both within individual basin depocentres and between adjoining basins: drainage

  15. Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of Fluvially Deposited Sulfidic Mine Tailings

    PubMed Central

    Wielinga, Bruce; Lucy, Juliette K.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Seastone, October F.; Gannon, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The fluvial deposition of mine tailings generated from historic mining operations near Butte, Montana, has resulted in substantial surface and shallow groundwater contamination along Silver Bow Creek. Biogeochemical processes in the sediment and underlying hyporheic zone were studied in an attempt to characterize interactions consequential to heavy-metal contamination of shallow groundwater. Sediment cores were extracted and fractionated based on sediment stratification. Subsamples of each fraction were assayed for culturable heterotrophic microbiota, specific microbial guilds involved in metal redox transformations, and both aqueous- and solid-phase geochemistry. Populations of cultivable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were most prominent in the anoxic, circumneutral pH regions associated with a ferricrete layer or in an oxic zone high in organic carbon and soluble iron. Sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria were distributed in discrete zones throughout the tailings and were often recovered from sections at and below the anoxic groundwater interface. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were also widely distributed in the cores and often occurred in zones overlapping iron and sulfur oxidizers. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were consistently recovered from oxic zones that contained high concentrations of metals in the oxidizable fraction. Altogether, these results suggest a highly varied and complex microbial ecology within a very heterogeneous geochemical environment. Such physical and biological heterogeneity has often been overlooked when remediation strategies for metal contaminated environments are formulated. PMID:10103249

  16. Fluvial organic carbon losses from a Bornean blackwater river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, S.; Gauci, V.; Evans, C. D.; Page, S. E.

    2010-11-01

    The transport of carbon from terrestrial ecosystems such as peatlands into rivers and out to the oceans plays an important role in the carbon cycle because it provides a link between the terrestrial and marine carbon cycles. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) were analysed from the source to the mouth of the River Sebangau in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia during the dry and wet seasons in 2008/2009 and an annual total organic carbon (TOC) flux estimated. DOC concentrations were higher and POC concentrations lower in the wet season compared to the dry season. As seen in other tropical blackwater rivers, DOC concentration is consistently around 10 times greater than POC concentration. We estimate the annual TOC flux discharged to the Java Sea to be 0.46 Tg year-1 comprising of 93% (0.43 Tg) DOC and 7% (0.03 Tg) POC. This equates to a fluvial TOC loss flux per unit area over the entire Sebangau catchment of 88 g C m-2 yr-1. When extrapolating this TOC loss flux to the peat covered area of Indonesia (206 950 km2), we estimate a TOC loss of 18.2 Tg C yr-1 or ~10% of current estimates of the global annual riverine DOC discharge into the ocean.

  17. Fluvial organic carbon losses from a Bornean blackwater river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, S.; Gauci, V.; Page, S.; Evans, C.; Limin, S.

    2010-12-01

    The transport of carbon from terrestrial ecosystems such as peatlands into rivers and out to the oceans plays an important role in the carbon cycle because it provides a link between the terrestrial and marine carbon cycles. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) were analysed from the source to the mouth of the River Sebangau in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia during the dry and wet seasons in 2008/2009 and an annual total organic carbon (TOC) flux estimated. DOC concentrations were higher and POC concentrations lower in the wet season compared to the dry season. As seen in other tropical blackwater rivers, DOC concentration is consistently around 10 times greater than POC concentration. We estimate the annual TOC flux discharged to the Java Sea to be 0.46 Tg year-1 comprising of 93% (0.43 Tg) DOC and 7% (0.03 Tg) POC. This equates to a fluvial TOC loss flux per unit area over the entire Sebangau catchment of 88g C m-2 yr-1. When extrapolating the Sebangau catchment TOC loss flux (88g C m-2 yr-1) to the peat covered area of Indonesia (206,950 km2), we calculate a TOC loss of 18.2 Tg C yr-1 or ~10% of current estimates of the global annual riverine DOC discharge into the ocean.

  18. Fluvial organic carbon losses from a Bornean blackwater river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, S.; Gauci, V.; Evans, C. D.; Page, S. E.

    2011-04-01

    Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) were analysed from the source to the mouth of the River Sebangau in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia during the dry and wet seasons in 2008/2009 and an annual total organic carbon (TOC) flux estimated. DOC concentrations were higher and POC concentrations lower in the wet season compared to the dry season. As seen in other tropical blackwater rivers, DOC concentration is consistently around 10 times greater than POC concentration. We estimate the annual TOC flux discharged to the Java Sea to be 0.46 Tg year-1 comprising of 93% (0.43 Tg) DOC and 7% (0.03 Tg) POC. This equates to a fluvial TOC loss flux per unit area over the entire Sebangau catchment of 88 g C m-2 yr-1. When extrapolating the River Sebangau DOC loss flux (83 g C m-2 yr-1) to the peat covered area of Indonesia (206 950 km2), we estimate a DOC loss of 17.2 Tg C yr-1 or ~10% of current estimates of the global annual riverine DOC discharge into the ocean.

  19. Geomorphic evolution of the Martian highlands through ancient fluvial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craddock, Robert A.; Maxwell, Ted A.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of crater degradation in the Martian highlands based on variations in crater morphology is traced. The timing of this process related to geology, elevation, and latitude is examined, the nature of fluvial resurfacing is studied, and the approximate rate of denudation is determined. The obtained data make it possible to understand the early geologic history of Mars, the interaction between the atmosphere and surface processes through time, and the nature of highland surface materials. Degradation was found to begin with sheet-flooding and the formation of runoff channels in both the interior and exterior of the craters. Progressive stripping of the ejecta material led to craters with incised rims. Erosion and infilling led to flat doors. With time, continued erosion removed ejecta and rim materials completely. Timing of degradation based on cumulative size-frequency distribution curves of highland crater population indicates that the process ceased completely in the late Hesperian. Global average denudation rates were found to be between 0.0001 and 0.005 mm/yr.

  20. Human impacts on fluvial systems in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooke, J. M.

    2006-09-01

    The long history of substantial human impacts on the landscape of the Mediterranean region, and their effects on fluvial systems, is documented. These effects have included impacts of deforestation and other land use changes, agricultural terracing on a wide scale, water transfers, and irrigation schemes. During the 20th century, major changes were made directly to channels through channelisation, construction of dams of various sizes, and extraction of gravel, and indirectly by reforestation. These changes have caused a major phase of incision on some rivers. Runoff and soil erosion have been affected by types of crops and agricultural practices as well as by the varying extent of cultivation and grazing. Some recent agricultural practices involve wholescale relandscaping of the topography and alteration of surface properties of material. The importance of analysing the connectivity within different land units and of the spatial position of human activity within a catchment is illustrated. The analysis of connectivity is the key to understanding the variability of impact and the extent of propagation of effects.

  1. Progress in and prospects for fluvial flood modelling.

    PubMed

    Wheater, H S

    2002-07-15

    Recent floods in the UK have raised public and political awareness of flood risk. There is an increasing recognition that flood management and land-use planning are linked, and that decision-support modelling tools are required to address issues of climate and land-use change for integrated catchment management. In this paper, the scientific context for fluvial flood modelling is discussed, current modelling capability is considered and research challenges are identified. Priorities include (i) appropriate representation of spatial precipitation, including scenarios of climate change; (ii) development of a national capability for continuous hydrological simulation of ungauged catchments; (iii) improved scientific understanding of impacts of agricultural land-use and land-management change, and the development of new modelling approaches to represent those impacts; (iv) improved representation of urban flooding, at both local and catchment scale; (v) appropriate parametrizations for hydraulic simulation of in-channel and flood-plain flows, assimilating available ground observations and remotely sensed data; and (vi) a flexible decision-support modelling framework, incorporating developments in computing, data availability, data assimilation and uncertainty analysis. PMID:12804257

  2. An Early Warning System for fluvial flooding in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davids, Femke; Stam, Jasper; Sprokkereef, Eric; van Dijk, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Fluvial flooding is one of the major natural hazards in the modern world. In a densely populated area, such as The Netherlands, the possibility of flooding of the Rhine and Meuse poses a significant threat to society. There is a clear need for reliable and robust hydrological forecasting. The Water Management Centre for the Netherlands and Deltares have developed an early warning system that uses real-time data provided by a large number of European meteorological and hydrological gauging stations, weather forecasts from three different weather services, and rainfall-runoff and hydraulic models. Data assimilation techniques are used to update both model states and parameter outputs. In addition, a post processing method, quantile regression, is applied to hydrological ensemble output. This presentation will demonstrate the operational flood early warning system (based on Delft-FEWS) applied to these rivers. Recent challenges are, for example, the visualization of uncertainties on deterministic and probabilistic forecasts, the clear communication and visualization of the enormous amount of data available, and snow modelling.

  3. Timescales of fluvial response to climate and tectonic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelltort, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    Earth's landscapes are composed of connected elements such as hillslopes, bedrock and alluvial rivers, alluvial fans and floodplains for example. Because these entities are dominated by different processes, they might respond in different ways and at different rates to external forcings depending on the nature, magnitude and time scale of changes. Knowledge of those response times is fundamental if we want to extract past climate and tectonics from landscape forms and sedimentary archives. Moreover, the interactions between different landscape elements and their response times also control the response of the landscape as a whole, and the delivery of sediment flux to the basins. Here we review the timescales of fluvial response to perturbations in bedrock and alluvial rivers and discuss the implications for delivery of sediment to basins over multi-millenial timescales. We first use existing relationships for bedrock rivers to study their response to climatic and tectonic perturbations. For alluvial rivers, we consider a simple 1D alluvial reach with a single grain size and an equilibrium slope determined by classical bedload relations. Upstream perturbations of grain size, sediment concentration and water discharge induce river aggradation or degradation according to their effect on river equilibrium slope. While minimum aggradation time can be computed analytically as a function of slope change and sediment supply, the time necessary to degrade to a lower equilibrium slope may be only a function of the timescale of the perturbation in a transport-limited system. We explore the field of natural rivers and their possible response to upstream perturbations.

  4. Fluvial Drainage Basins and Valley Networks: Eastern Margaritifer Sinus, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothroyd, J. C.; Grant, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The fluvial drainage of the eastern Margaritifer Sinus (MC-19NE, SE) and northeastern Argyre (MC-26NE) Quadrangles is dominated by two major longitudinal valley networks, the Parana/Loire system on the east, and the Samara Himera system to the west. It is believed that both of these drainages are through-going to the northwest and debouch into Margaritifer Chaos (general location: 12S, 22.5W). The Parana/Loire drainage is bounded on the east in part by an ancient multi-ringed impact basin. The Parana multi-digitate network drains northwest into a depositional basin, and impact basin floor, characterized by positive relief chaos. It is believed that Loire Vallis heads in the basin; thus Parana and Loire Valles may be treated as one system. Samara Valles heads in the northeastern Argyre Quadrangle and extends as a major truck valley to the northwest. Samara Valles cuts through the hills forming one of the concentric rings of the Ladon impact basin and joins the Himera drainage to trend in a more northerly direction to Margaritifer Chaos. The downstream portion of Himera is considered to be part of the Samara

  5. Fluvial Placement of Radioactive Contaminants a Weldon Spring Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, J.

    2002-02-26

    The operation of the Weldon Spring Uranium Feed Materials Plant in St. Charles, MO between 1958 and 1966 resulted in the migration and emplacement of radioactive contaminants into surface water drainage systems. Multiple drainage systems, receiving from a variety of waste discharge points, combined to create unique and unexpected depositional environment. Discovery and investigation of the depositional environments was a significant technical challenge due to the complex nature of sediment movement and emplacement. The objective of this investigation was to show that application of the knowledge of geomorphic processes is an essential element of a complete stream characterization, pursuant to risk analysis and remediation. This paper sets out to describe many of the expected and unexpected findings of the investigations by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) into the placement and rework of contaminated sediments in stream systems. Information from this paper will be useful to other agencies and contractor personnel faced with the challenge of locating and quantifying contaminated sediments in seemingly haphazard fluvial depositional conditions.

  6. Fluvial sedimentation following Quaternary eruptions of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Janda, R.J.; Meyer, D.F

    1985-01-01

    Depositional records of convulsive volcanic events at Mount St. Helens are in many places obscured by rapid fluvial erosion and deposition close to the volcano. Some major eruptions are recorded primarily by lahars and alluvium deposited tens of kilometers away. About 35 percent of the distinctive hummocky topography of the 1980 North Fork Toutle debris avalanche deposit now resembles an alluvial fan or a braided glacial outwash plain covered with 10 m or more of alluvium. Deposits of small (20 x 10/sup 6/m/sup 3/) but damaging lahars, such as those generated in the afternoon of 18 May 1980 and on 19 March 1982, have been largely eroded away. Rivers draining rapidly eroding areas surrounding Mount St. Helens presently have sediment yields that are among the highest in the world for nonglaciated streams of comparable size. These sediment loads are capable of causing aggradation-induced flooding in populated areas along the lower Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers. Sediment retention structures and dredging have prevented such flooding. Immediately following prehistoric eruptions, however, coarse-grained volcanic alluvium was deposited in the Cowlitz River to levels more than 1 m above the 1980 mud flow inundation level. Post-1980 rapid landscape modifications and high sediment yields are noteworthy because the eruption-impact area has not yet had a major regional storm and potentially catastrophic breachings of avalanche-impounded lakes have been prevented through engineering measures.

  7. Spirosoma fluviale sp. nov., isolated from river water.

    PubMed

    Hatayama, Kouta; Kuno, Teruaki

    2015-10-01

    A bacterial strain, designated MSd3T, was isolated from a freshwater sample collected from the Hosoda River in Japan. The cells of strain MSd3T were Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, aerobic, non-motile, curved rods forming rings, coils and undulating filaments. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain MSd3T showed closest similarity to that of Spirosoma linguale DSM 74T (97.6 % similarity) and similarity to other members of the genus Spirosoma ranged from 90.3 to 95.9 %. Strain MSd3T contained menaquinone 7 as the sole respiratory quinone. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c) and C16 : 1ω5c. The polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, three unidentified aminophospholipids and three unidentified polar lipids. The DNA G+C content was 53.3 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness between strain MSd3T and S. linguale DSM 74T was 19 % or 25 % (reciprocal value). From the chemotaxonomic and physiological data and the levels of DNA-DNA relatedness, strain MSd3T should be classified as the representative of a novel species of the genus Spirosoma, for which the name Spirosoma fluviale sp. nov. (type strain MSd3T = JCM 30659T = DSM 29961T) is proposed. PMID:26297023

  8. Microbiological and geochemical characterization of fluvially deposited sulfidic mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Wielinga, B.; Lucy, J.K.; Moore, J.N.; Seastone, O.F.; Gannon, J.E.

    1999-04-01

    The fluvial deposition of mine tailings generated from historic mining operations near Butte, Montana, has resulted in substantial surface and shallow groundwater contamination along Silver Bow Creek. Biogeochemical processes in the sediment and underlying hyporheic zone were studied in an attempt to characterize interactions consequential to heavy-metal contamination of shallow groundwater. Sediment cores were extracted and fractionated based on sediment stratification. Subsamples of each fraction were assayed for culturable heterotrophic microbiota, specific microbial guilds involved in metal redox transformations, and both aqueous- and solid-phase geochemistry. Populations of cultivable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were most prominent in the anoxic, circumneutral pH regions associated with a ferricrete layer or in an oxic zone high in organic carbon and soluble iron. Sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria were distributed in discrete zones throughout the tailings and were often recovered from sections at and below the anoxic groundwater interface. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were also widely distributed in the cores and often occurred in zones overlapping iron and sulfur oxidizers. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were consistently recovered from oxic zones that contained high concentrations of metals in the oxidizable fraction. Altogether, these results suggest a highly varied and complex microbial ecology within a very heterogeneous geochemical environment. Such physical and biological heterogeneity has often been overlooked when remediation strategies for metal contaminated environments are formulated.

  9. Late Cenozoic fluvial development within the Sea of Azov and Black Sea coastal plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoshko, A.; Gozhik, P.; Semenenko, V.

    2009-09-01

    Late Cenozoic terrestrial deposits are widespread across the northern coastal regions of the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov and represent diverse fluvial, estuarine and deltaic environments. The dating and correlation of these deposits rely on stratigraphically-associated marine index beds, mammalian and molluscan faunas and magnetostratigraphy. In detail the geometries of these sediment bodies are extremely complex, typically varying between localities and representing many cycles of incision and aggradation. However, the overall disposition of the sediments reflects the transition from the uplifting sediment source region to the north and the subsiding depocentre in the interior of the Black Sea to the south. Since the Middle Miocene the area of the Paratethys/Black Sea depocentre has decreased significantly, but since the Middle Pliocene the hinge zone between uplift and subsidence has been located close to the modern coastline. A combination of regional and local differential crustal movements has given rise to the great variety of fluvial sediment bodies, to the erosion-aggradation cycles, different phases and river activity and to the various fluvial landforms that have all been important in landscape development in this region during the past 12 Ma. The fluvial erosion-accumulation cycles (during the upper Serravillian-Messinian, the Zanclean-late Gelasian, and the Pleistocene) and corresponding cycles of relief dissection and planation are reconstructed against a background of local sea-level changes and climatic variations determined from palaeobotanical data. The maximum fluvial incision occurred in the early Zanclean time with alluvial coastal plains, unique in this area, developing in the Gelasian. Increased climatic aridity during the Pleistocene caused a reduction of fluvial activity in comparison with the Late Miocene and Pliocene. The sea-level oscillations and Pleistocene glaciations affected fluvial processes in different ways. The most remarkable

  10. Paraglacial fluvial bedrock incision in postglacial landscapes: the NW Scottish Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbread, Katie; Jansen, John; Bishop, Paul; Fabel, Derek

    2010-05-01

    Glacial landscape forms are inherited by rivers following deglaciation. Hillslopes and valley floors configured by glacial erosion control the distribution of bedrock channels and potential sites for fluvial incision. The importance of 'stream power' parameters, channel slope and drainage area (discharge), in controlling the rate of incision is widely accepted, but the rate, timing and mechanisms of incision have yet to be quantified in these settings. The dual controls of glacially conditioned bedrock slopes and sediment supply set two of the key boundary conditions for temporally and spatially dynamic fluvial bedrock incision. Measurement of incision rates in these settings is key to understanding the influence of controls on fluvial erosion, and the role of the process in long-term evolution of deglaciated landscapes. In tectonically-passive, hard-rock terrains, such as the Scottish Highlands, incisional fluvial features such as bedrock channels, gorges and waterfalls are common on glacially carved valley steps. Here we report preliminary data on fluvial incision rates measured with cosmogenic 10Be. Our results confirm a postglacial age of bedrock straths in the NW Scottish Highlands and indicate a vertical incision rate of 0.3 mm/yr into resistant quartzites. Further work will explore erosion mechanisms and rates of incision across the Scottish Highlands, and assess controls on fluvial incision, including the potential role of paraglacial sediment.

  11. Assessing the nonconservative fluvial fluxes of dissolved organic carbon in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauerwald, Ronny; Hartmann, Jens; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Moosdorf, Nils

    2012-03-01

    Fluvial transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important link in the global carbon cycle. Previous studies largely increased our knowledge of fluvial exports of carbon to the marine system, but considerable uncertainty remains about in-stream/in-river losses of organic carbon. This study presents an empirical method to assess the nonconservative behavior of fluvial DOC at continental scale. An empirical DOC flux model was trained on two different subsets of training catchments, one with catchments smaller than 2,000 km2 (n = 246, avg. 494 km2) and one with catchments larger than 2,000 km2 (n = 207, avg. 26,525 km2). A variety of potential predictors and controlling factors of fluvial DOC fluxes is discussed. The predictors retained for the final DOC flux models are runoff, slope gradient, land cover, and areal proportions of wetlands. According to the spatially explicit extrapolation of the models, in North America south of 60°N, the total fluvial DOC flux from small catchments (25.8 Mt C a-1, std. err.: 12%) is higher than that from large catchments (19.9 Mt C a-1, std. err.: 10%), giving a total DOC loss of 5.9 Mt C a-1 (std. err.: 78%). As DOC losses in headwaters are not represented in this budget, the estimated DOC loss is rather a minimum value for the total DOC loss within the fluvial network.

  12. Disturbance of fluvial gravel substrates by signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew; Rice, Stephen; Reid, Ian

    2010-05-01

    The reworking of substrates by organisms, termed bioturbation, is considered a fundamental processes in marine and terrestrial environments but has remained relatively unstudied in fluvial environments. This studies looks at the bioturbation of fluvial gravel substrates by signal crayfish, an internationally important invasive species. We investigated the impact of signal crayfish activity in a laboratory flume. Bioturbation by crayfish on both loose arrangements of gravel and water-worked surfaces were studied and two sizes of narrowly-graded gravel were used; 11 - 16 mm and 16 - 22 mm. A laser scanner was used to obtain high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) of gravel surfaces before and after crayfish activity. These DEMs were used to quantify topographic and structural changes to the surfaces due to the activity of crayfish. It was found that crayfish moved substantial quantities of material from all surfaces within six hours of introduction. The majority of the disturbance was associated with small scale (≤ 1 median grain diameter) movements of surface grains due to walking and foraging by crayfish. This textural change resulted in a structural alteration to the substrate surface. After six hours of crayfish activity, there was a 14% reduction in the imbrication of the grains from water-worked surfaces. Crayfish also constructed shallow pits and heaped excavated material into a series of mounds around its edge. Crayfish would always posture in pits in the same way. They would fold their vulnerable tails under their body and place their claws in front of their heads. When in pits crayfish predominately orientated themselves so they were facing an upstream direction. This implies that crayfish dig pits in order to streamline their bodies in the flow and lower their protrusion. Although pits and mounds contributed a relatively small proportion to the overall disturbance of substrates, they significantly increased the roughness of substrates. Pit and

  13. Marine intervals in Neogene fluvial deposits of western Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonstra, Melanie; Troelstra, Simon; Lammertsma, Emmy; Hoorn, Carina

    2014-05-01

    Amazonia is one of the most species rich areas on Earth, but this high diversity is not homogeneous over the entire region. Highest mammal and tree-alpha diversity is found in the fluvio-lacustrine Pebas system, a Neogene wetland associated with rapid radiation of species. The estuarine to marine origin of various modern Amazonian fish, plants, and invertebrates has been associated with past marine ingressions into this freshwater Pebas system. The exact nature and age of these invasions is, however, debated. Here we present new evidence from fluvial and fluvio-lacustrine deposits of Neogene age in southeast Colombia, that point to periods of widespread marine conditions in western Amazonia. Our evidence is based on an analysis of marine palynomorphs, such as organic linings of foraminifera and dinoflagellate cysts, present in dark sandy clay sediments that outcrop along the Caqueta and Amazon rivers. Characteristically, the foraminiferal linings can be assigned to three benthic morphotypes only, e.g. Ammonia, Elphidium and Trochammina. This low diversity assemblage is associated with estuarine/marginal marine conditions. No distinct marine elements such as shelf or planktonic species were encountered. The observed foraminiferal linings and dinocyst assemblages are typical for a (eutrophic) shallow marine environment, suggesting that the Pebas freshwater wetland system occasionally changed to (marginal) marine. Although some reworked elements are found, a typical Neogene dinocyst taxon is commonly found supporting in situ deposition. Sedimentological features typical for tidal conditions that are reported for sites in Peru and northeastern Brazil likely relate to these marine ingressions. Sea level changes as well as foreland basin development related to Andes formation may have facilitated the entry of marine water during the Neogene.

  14. Fluvial erosion of physically modeled abrasion-dominated slot canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Carissa L.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2006-11-01

    Abrasion-dominated fluvial erosion generates slot canyons in massive bedrock with intricately undulating walls. Flows in slot canyons are unusual in that the walls comprise a significant portion of the wetted perimeter of the flow during geomorphically effective floods. In Wire Pass, Utah, the upper Paria River incises through massive, crossbedded Navajo Sandstone. Incision in Wire Pass and related slots occurs only during flash floods; paleoflood debris indicates that the width/depth ratios of these flows are at times as low as 1:1. Submeter resolution field mapping of a 20-m length of Wire Pass shows that the wall morphology is a complicated combination of in-phase (meander-like) and out-of-phase (pinch and swell) undulations. In order to investigate evolution of slot canyons and the influence of their wall shapes on flow dynamics, we recorded the evolution of four distinct canyon wall morphologies in a 2.4 m flume box at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. In a substrate consisting of ˜ 3:2 mixtures of F110 sand and Plaster of Paris, we molded canyons with in-phase and out-of-phase undulations, and wide (6.5 cm) and narrow (4 cm) straight initial wall profiles. Discharges ranged from 1.4 L/s to 2.9 L/s, and wall and bed morphology were measured at 5 h intervals at 0.5 cm resolution. Results show efficient back-eddy erosion in the undulating canyon walls and related erosional bedforms in all channels created by vortices in the flow. Maximum filaments of velocity are depressed and asymmetric, and the implied shear stress distribution varied in space and time on the channel beds. Flow width/depth ratios strongly influence the flow structure and distribution of shear stress in a slot and appear to be a factor in dictating whether a bedrock channel widens its walls or incises its bed.

  15. Dynamic LiDAR-NDVI classification of fluvial landscape units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Núñez, Carolina; Parrot, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    The lower basin of the Coatzacoalcos River is a wide floodplain in which, during the wet season, local and major flooding are distinguished. Both types of floods, intermittent and regional, are important in terms of resources; the regional flood sediments enrich the soils of the plains and intermittent floods allow obtaining aquatic resources for subsistence during the heatwave. In the floodplain different abandoned meanders and intermittent streams are quickly colonized by aquatic vegetation. However, from the 1990s, the Coatzacoalcos River floodplain has important topographic changes due to mining, road and bridges construction; erosion and sedimentation requires continuous parcel boundaries along with the increasing demand of channel reparation, embankments, levees and bridges associated to tributaries. NDVI data, LiDAR point cloud and various types of flood simulations taking into account the DTM are used to classify the dynamic landscape units. These units are associated to floods in relation with water resources, agriculture and livestock. In the study area, the first returns of the point cloud allow extracting vegetation strata. The last returns correspond to the bare earth surface, especially in this area with few human settlements. The surface that is not covered by trees or by aquatic vegetation, correspond to crops, pastures and bare soils. The classification is obtained by using the NDVI index coupled with vegetation strata and water bodies. The result shows that 47.96% of the area does not present active vegetation and it includes 31.53% of bare soils. Concerning the active vegetation, pastures, bushes and trees represent respectively 25.59%, 11.14% and 13.25%. The remaining 1.25% is distributed between water bodies with aquatic vegetation, trees and shrubs. Dynamic landscape units' classification represents a tool for monitoring water resources in a fluvial plain. This approach can be also applied to forest management, environmental services and

  16. Palaeo-fluvial origin for Jakobshavn Isbrae catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Michael; Michaelides, Katerina; Siegert, Martin; Bamber, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Subglacial topography exerts strong controls on ice dynamics, influencing the nature of ice flow, and modulating the distribution of basal waters and sediment. Bed geometry can provide a long-term record of geomorphic processes, allowing insight into landscape evolution, the origin of which, in some cases, can pre-date ice sheet inception. Here, we present evidence from ice-penetrating radar data for a large dendritic drainage network, radiating inland from Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland's largest outlet glacier. The size of the drainage basin is ~450,000 km-squared, comparable with that of the Ohio River in the United States, and accounts for ~20% of the land area of Greenland. Topographic, and basin morphometric analysis of isostatically compensated (ice-free) bedrock topography suggests that this catchment pre-dates ice sheet inception (~3.5 Ma), and will have been instrumental in influencing flow from the island's interior to the margin. The geological setting, and glacial history of Greenland lends itself well to the preservation of such landscapes; the island is dominated by erosion-resistant, Precambrian crystalline rocks with few sedimentary deposits, and has only been extensively ice-covered for ~3.5 million years (Ma). Despite this, most analysis of subglacial geomorphology, and of 'pre-glacial' landscapes, has been focused on Antarctica (e.g. the Ellsworth Subglacial Highlands and, 'pre-glacial erosional surfaces' of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS)), with little consideration for such associations in Greenland. However, a large subglacial 'mega-canyon' in northern Greenland, thought to of palaeo-fluvial origin, has recently been discovered.

  17. Practical Enhancement of Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Fluvial Geomorphology Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, K.; Chandler, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate measurement of microtopography plays an important role in fluvial geomorphology. Whereof the surface is obscured by vegetation or landform, airborne remote sensing can be impractical and ground-based surveys using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) show promise. TLS provides high resolution observations of the land surface for relatively low cost and with simple setup. However, the scanning range is effectively limited to less than 100 m, requiring individual scenes to be merged in software to represent larger landforms. For studies requiring several scenes, an efficient scanning strategy should be established in advance to optimize for time, resolution and spatial coverage. This requires careful consideration of scanner placement to merge scenes. We address problems encountered with blind spots. TLS is generally conducted on a 2-m (or shorter) tripod and the low scanning angle to the land surface at long distance inevitably causes blind spots in rugose or complex terrain. Similarly, the distance between TLS placement points is limited by the ability to resolve matching targets from sequential surveys. Here we present a simple geometry-based scanning plan regardless of the type and range of the instrument, with modification of the survey instrument platform. The half of a minimum range is used to make at least 18% of a superposed area with the next scan. Since scanning height barely affects the scanning range, the tripod was substituted to a 3-m stepladder and the platform of the scanner was modified to level and adjust the device easily with one hand. The results show that the new scanning plan performs well regardless of the topography and figure of the area of interest, with sufficient superposed area for combination with other adjacent scans. The modification of the platform also turned out to be more efficient to secure the observing angle and improve usability. The physical enhancement for TLS will provide valuable opportunity to conduct a standardized

  18. Fluvial erosion and post-erosional processes on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaumann, R.; Brown, R.H.; Stephan, K.; Barnes, J.W.; Soderblom, L.A.; Sotin, C.; Le, Mouelic S.; Clark, R.N.; Soderblom, J.; Buratti, B.J.; Wagner, R.; McCord, T.B.; Rodriguez, S.; Baines, K.H.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Nicholson, P.D.; Griffith, C.A.; Langhans, M.; Lorenz, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    The surface of Titan has been revealed by Cassini observations in the infrared and radar wavelength ranges as well as locally by the Huygens lander instruments. Sand seas, recently discovered lakes, distinct landscapes and dendritic erosion patterns indicate dynamic surface processes. This study focus on erosional and depositional features that can be used to constrain the amount of liquids involved in the erosional process as well as on the compositional characteristics of depositional areas. Fluvial erosion channels on Titan as identified at the Huygens landing site and in RADAR and Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observations have been compared to analogous channel widths on Earth yielding average discharges of up to 1600 m3/s for short recurrence intervals that are sufficient to move centimeter-sized sediment and significantly higher discharges for long intervals. With respect to the associated drainage areas, this roughly translates to 1-150 cm/day runoff production rates with 10 years recurrence intervals and by assuming precipitation this implies 0.6-60 mm/h rainfall rates. Thus the observed surface erosion fits with the methane convective storm models as well as with the rates needed to transport sediment. During Cassini's T20 fly-by, the VIMS observed an extremely eroded area at 30?? W, 7?? S with resolutions of up to 500 m/pixel that extends over thousands of square kilometers. The spectral characteristics of this area change systematically, reflecting continuous compositional and/or particle size variations indicative of transported sediment settling out while flow capacities cease. To account for the estimated runoff production and widespread alluvial deposits of fine-grained material, release of area-dependent large fluid volumes are required. Only frequent storms with heavy rainfall or cryovolcanic induced melting can explain these erosional features. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  19. Palaeoenvironment of braided fluvial systems in different tectonic realms of the Triassic Sherwood Sandstone Group, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medici, G.; Boulesteix, K.; Mountney, N. P.; West, L. J.; Odling, N. E.

    2015-11-01

    Fluvial successions comprising the fills of sedimentary basins occur in a variety of tectonic realms related to extensional, compressional and strike-slip settings, as well as on slowly subsiding, passive basin margins. A major rifting phase affected NW Europe during the Triassic and resulted in the generation of numerous sedimentary basins. In the UK, much of the fill of these basins is represented by fluvial and aeolian successions of the Sherwood Sandstone Group. Additionally, regions that experienced slow rates of Mesozoic subsidence unrelated to Triassic rifting also acted as sites of accumulation of the Sherwood Sandstone Group, one well-exposed example being the eastern England Shelf. The fluvial depositional architecture of deposits of the Sherwood Sandstone Group of the eastern England Shelf (a shelf-edge basin) is compared with similar fluvial deposits of the St Bees Sandstone Formation, eastern Irish Sea Basin (a half-graben). The two studied successions represent the preserved deposits of braided fluvial systems that were influenced by common allogenic factors (climate, sediment source, delivery style); differences in preserved sedimentary style principally reflect their different tectonics settings. Analysis of lithofacies and architectural elements demonstrates that both studied successions are characterized by amalgamated channel-fill elements that are recorded predominantly by downstream-accreting sandy barforms. The different tectonic settings in which the two braided-fluvial systems accumulated exerted a dominant control on preserved sedimentary style and long-term preservation potential. On the eastern England Shelf, the vertical stacking of pebbly units and the general absence of fine-grained units reflect a slow rate of sediment accommodation generation (18-19.4 m/Myr). In this shelf-edge basin, successive fluvial cycles repeatedly reworked the uppermost parts of earlier fluvial deposits such that only the lowermost channel lags tend to be

  20. Climate Controls on Sediment Discharge in Selected Fluvial Systems in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, C. B.

    2004-12-01

    Sediment discharge was evaluated in selected rivers in Indonesia where catchment basin size, relief, and gradient are somewhat similar, but where tectonic setting, bedrock lithology, and atmospheric circulation and rainfall, are variables. Rivers were studied in humid to perhumid regions where the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is relatively stable and rainfall exceeds evapotranspiration for all or most months of the year (Sumatra, Borneo, Seram, and Irian Jaya). In contrast, fluvial sediment discharge was evaluated in rivers in Timor where 85 percent of all rainfall occurs during a four-month rainy season (dry subhumid climate) in response to the passage of the ITCZ. Stream sampling was conducted for solid suspended sediment concentrations, solute concentrations, and pH. In addition, the nature of stream channels (meandering or braided), streambed materials, the degree and source of estuarine fill, the degree of delta formation, and the nature of coastlines were used to evaluate fluvial sediment discharge. Very low sediment concentrations (10 mg/l suspended and 10mg/l solute) in rivers in the perhumid to humid regions are indicative of a very low fluvial sediment discharge. The absence of fluvially derived bed loads, river mouth deltas, the lack of fluvial fill of estuaries, and mud-dominated coastal zones are consistent with this observation. In contrast, very high sediment concentrations (2100 mg/l suspended and 340 mg/l dissolved) during rainy season discharge in dry-subhumid regions (Timor) are indicative of very high sediment discharge in dry subhumid climates. Coarse-grained braided streams, the complete fluvial fill of estuaries, the formation of river-mouth deltas, cobbles transported to the coast, and coarse-grained beaches are consistent with this observation. All factors indicate that fluvial sediment discharge is exceedingly low in humid and perhumid areas where denudation is dominated by chemical weathering, whereas fluvial sediment discharge

  1. Fluvial processes in eastern Hellas Planitia, Mars - Insights from crater counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuschneid, W.; van Gasselt, S.

    2014-04-01

    With a diameter of 2,300 km and a depth of more than 8,000 m, the Hellas basin is one of the major geomorphic and topographic features in the southern Martian hemisphere. It has been acting as a depositional sink since its formation 4 Ga ago [1] and has been the location of a wide variety of geologic processes. In this ongoing study, we investigated the stratigraphy of fluvial features in the eastern Hellas region on Mars, focusing on apparently young fluvial depositional areas in the Dao and Harmakhis Valles region and on the eastern plains within the Hellas basin. The region connecting Hesperia Planum with Hellas Planitia is characterized by a patchwork of remnant massifs protruding through a set of plains units of varying morphology and surface texture, indicating a diverse and eventful geologic history. A variety of geologic processes has been observed, from the basin-forming Hellas impact, widespread plainsforming and central vent volcanism [2,3] to fluvial and cold climate processes [3,4]. In order to analyze the stratigraphy, we performed crater counts for selected areas to obtain absolute ages for young areas formed by fluvial processes. We also obtained a lower limit for the age of major fluvial processes.

  2. Annual loads of organic contaminants in Chesapeake Bay contributed through fluvial transport

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, G.D.; Lippa, K.A.

    1994-12-31

    Organic contaminants in fluvial transport, atmospheric deposition, urban runoff, and shoreline erosion are being quantified and compared in an effort to understand contaminant inputs and mass balances in Chesapeake Bay. Concentrations of nine organonitrogen and organophosphorus (organo-N/P) pesticides, eight organochlorine (OC) pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and four polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in fluvial transport were determined at the Susquehanna, Potomac, and James River fall lines for the period of March 1992 through February 1993. Together these rivers account for ca. 75% of the freshwater inflow to the bay from fluvial sources. Sampling was conducted monthly during base flow conditions and during all major storm events. Analysis of nanogram and picogram per liter concentrations of the organic contaminants was performed for both the dissolved and particulate phases of the surface water samples. Daily fluvial loads were calculated using an iterative-increment method from concentration and discharge data, and the resulting daily load estimates were summed to provide annual loads. Loads contributed by the three tributaries from March 1992 through February 1993 were 6.9 metric tons for the organo-N/P pesticides, 0.73 metric tons for the OC compounds and PCBs, and 1.2 metric tons for the PAH. Preliminary comparisons show that loads from fluvial transport are generally greater than other sources for most contaminants except PAH, where atmospheric deposition and urban runoff contribute greater loads of some compounds.

  3. Aeolian and fluvial processes in dryland regions: the need for integrated studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Munson, Seth M.; Field, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    Aeolian and fluvial processes play a fundamental role in dryland regions of the world and have important environmental and ecological consequences from local to global scales. Although both processes operate over similar spatial and temporal scales and are likely strongly coupled in many dryland systems, aeolian and fluvial processes have traditionally been studied separately, making it difficult to assess their relative importance in drylands, as well as their potential for synergistic interaction. Land degradation by accelerated wind and water erosion is a major problem throughout the world's drylands, and although recent studies suggest that these processes likely interact across broad spatial and temporal scales to amplify the transport of soil resources from and within drylands, many researchers and land managers continue to view them as separate and unrelated processes. Here, we illustrate how aeolian and fluvial sediment transport is coupled at multiple spatial and temporal scales and highlight the need for these interrelated processes to be studied from a more integrated perspective that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries. Special attention is given to how the growing threat of climate change and land-use disturbance will influence linkages between aeolian and fluvial processes in the future. We also present emerging directions for interdisciplinary needs within the aeolian and fluvial research communities that call for better integration across a broad range of traditional disciplines such as ecology, biogeochemistry, agronomy, and soil conservation.

  4. Fluvial signatures of modern and paleo orographic rainfall gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildgen, Taylor; Strecker, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    arid precipitation regimes. Indeed, despite uniform lithology and uplift history, we see patterns in river steepness values and in chi plots that are consistest a rainfall gradient on the (former) windward side of the range and asymmetric precipitation across the range. We suggest that morphological aspects of the river networks in such regions are dominated by their history of changing climate. These morphologic signatures appear to persist for millions of years in NW Argentina, most likely because the transition from a wetter to a drier climate has prevented a rapid readjustment to new forcing conditions. Reference: Han, J., Gasparini, N.M., and Johnson, J.P., 2015, Measuring the imprint of orographic rainfall gradients on the morphology of steady-state numerical fluvial landscapes. Earth Surf. Process. Landforms, 40(10), 1334-1350.

  5. Biomarkers in Transit Reveal the Nature of Fluvial Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponton, C.; West, A.; Feakins, S. J.; Galy, V.

    2013-12-01

    The carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of vascular plant leaf waxes are common proxies for hydrologic and vegetation change. Sedimentary archives off major river systems are prime targets for continental paleoclimate studies under the assumption that rivers integrate changes in terrestrial organic carbon (OC) composition over their drainage basin. However, the proportional contribution of sources within the basin (e.g. head waters vs. floodplain) and the transit times of OC through the fluvial system remain largely unknown. This lack of quantifiable information about the proportions and timescales of integration within large catchments poses a challenge for paleoclimate reconstructions. To examine the sources of terrestrial OC eroded and supplied to a river system and the spatial distribution of these sources, we use compound specific isotope analysis (i.e. δ13C, Δ14C, and δD) on plant-derived leaf waxes, filtered from large volumes of river water (20-200L) along a major river system. We selected the Kosñipata River that drains the western flank of the Andes in Peru, joins the Madre de Dios River across the Amazonian floodplain, and ultimately contributes to the Amazon River. Our study encompassed an elevation gradient of >4 km, in an almost entirely forested catchment. Precipitation δD values vary by >50‰ due to the isotopic effect of elevation, a feature we exploit to identify the sources of plant wax n-alkanoic acids transported by the river. We used the δD plant wax values from tributary rivers as source constrains and the main stem values as the integrated signal. In addition, compound specific radiocarbon on individual chain length n-alkanoic acids provide unprecedented detail on the integrated age of these compounds. Preliminary results have established that 1) most of the OC transport occurs in the wet season; 2) total carbon transport in the Madre de Dios is dominated by lowland sources because of the large floodplain area, but initial data

  6. Climate and the erosional efficiency of fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M. W.; Whipple, K. X.; Dibiase, R. A.; Heimsath, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    stochastic distribution of discharge events and thresholds of erosion. Stream gauges with long instrumental records provide the best observations to calibrate these models. However, not all parts of the Earth are sufficiently gauged for this approach. Instead, other atmospheric data products, like the North American Regional Analysis (NARR), can be used to provide more uniform spatial and temporal coverage and generate outputs comparable to fluvial discharge. Specifically, we evaluate the utility of NARR for assessing discharge variability in: the semi-arid SGM; the arid SSPM; the very wet SNdD. Since hydrological and meteorological data are more widely available for SGM, we use that site to calibrate our NARR interpretations for the other locations. The results of this analysis are used to refine stream erosion model predictions of erosional efficiency for all three sites that are then compared to field observations.

  7. Neotectonics and fluvial geomorphology of the Northern Sinai Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, T.; El-Baz, F.

    2000-08-01

    Large anticlinal ridges of Jurassic-Tertiary limestone in the northern Sinai Peninsula are part of the Syrian Arc Fold Belt, parts of which have been active intermittently from Late Cretaceous through the present. Recent uplift of the Syrian Arc Fold Belt is supported by quantitative indices of active tectonics including low values of mountain front sinuosity and, by recent seismicity, extending southwest past Cairo into the Fayoum Depression. The northern Sinai Desert has a climate similar to that of the adjacent part of the eastern Sahara. Sand sheets and dune fields cover its northwestern part, which is a depression extending from the Suez Canal to Wadi El-Arish. Numerous dry channels of palaeorivers and streams lead into this depression, where several temporary palaeolakes and flood overbank deposits have been identified. Some of the temporary pluvial palaeolakes developed behind natural dams formed by folds of the Syrian Arc, whereas others filled deeply-eroded fault traces. Migration of sand dunes may have blocked some channels, but the location of the dunes seems to be controlled by Recent uplift of parts of the fold belt, with the dunes residing in synclinal depressions and adjacent to fault scarps. The palaeolakes are correlated more with structures than with active dune fields. Wadi El-Arish abandoned a channel west of its present-day course, perhaps because of recent growth and uplift of the Gebel Halal Fold. This abandonment was synchronous with down-cutting of a gorge through Gebel Halal, which follows conjugate faults formed during uplift of an anticline. The presence of standing water during wetter climates in the past is supported by silt deposits and archaeological evidence of previous human habitation. The newly identified lake margin and fluvial sediments could be important targets for studying early-modern human and Neanderthal activities. In the eastern Sahara, cycles of pluvial periods that date back 320,000 years appear to correspond to

  8. Metabolism of mineral-sorbed organic matter and microbial lifestyles in fluvial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, William Ross; Niederdorfer, Robert; Gernand, Anna; Veuger, Bart; Prommer, Judith; Mooshammer, Maria; Wanek, Wolfgang; Battin, Tom J.

    2016-02-01

    In fluvial ecosystems mineral erosion, carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) fluxes are linked via organomineral complexation, where dissolved organic molecules bind to mineral surfaces. Biofilms and suspended aggregates represent major aquatic microbial lifestyles whose relative importance changes predictably through fluvial networks. We tested how organomineral sorption affects aquatic microbial metabolism, using organomineral particles containing a mix of 13C, 15N-labeled amino acids. We traced 13C and 15N retention within biofilm and suspended aggregate biomass and its mineralization. Organomineral complexation restricted C and N retention within biofilms and aggregates and also their mineralization. This reduced the efficiency with which biofilms mineralize C and N by 30% and 6%. By contrast, organominerals reduced the C and N mineralization efficiency of suspended aggregates by 41% and 93%. Our findings show how organomineral complexation affects microbial C:N stoichiometry, potentially altering the biogeochemical fate of C and N within fluvial ecosystems.

  9. Pollutant fates in fluvial systems: on need of individual approach to each case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matys Grygar, Tomas; Elznicova, Jitka; Novakova, Tereza

    2015-04-01

    To outline the pollutant fates in fluvial systems it is necessary to combine two main kinds of knowledge: sedimentation and erosion patterns of each individual river with spatio-temporal resolution higher than in most fluvial geomorphology/sedimentology studies and timing and way how the pollutants have entered the fluvial system. Most of these aspects are commonly neglected in environmental geochemistry, a domain to which pollution studies apparently belong. In fact, only when these two main components are established (at least in a qualitative manner), we can start reading (interpretation) of the fluvial sedimentary archives, e.g., decipher the way how the primary pollution signal has been distorted during passing through the fluvial system. We conducted empirical studies on Czech rivers impacted by pollution (by risk elements). We learnt how individual (site-specific) are the main processes responsible for the primary pollution input, spread through each fluvial system and inevitable secondary pollution ("lagged pollution improvement signal"). We will discuss main features of the story on pollutant fates in three different fluvial systems, which have not been impacted by "hard" river engineering and still undergo natural fluvial processes: 1. the Ohre (the Eger) impacted by production of Hg and its compounds, historical mining of Pb and more recent U ore processing, 2. the Ploucnice impacted by U mining, and 3. the Litavka, impacted by Pb-Zn(-Sb) mining and smelting. The Ohre is specific by most pollution having been temporarily deposited in an active channel, only minor reworking of older fluvial deposits diluting pollution during downstream transport, and pollution archives existing practically only in the form of lateral accretion deposits. The deposits of archive value are rare and can be revealed by detailed study of historical maps and well-planned field analysis, best using portable analytical instruments (XRF). The Ploucnice is specific by only transient

  10. Fluvial Channel Networks as Analogs for the Ridge-Forming Unit, Sinus Meridiani, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. J.; du Bois, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    Fluvial models have been generally discounted as analogs for the younger layered rock units of Sinus Meridiani. A fluvial model based on the large fluvial fan provides a possibly close analog for various features of the sinuous ridges of the etched, ridge-forming unit (RFU) in particular. The close spacing of the RFU ridges, their apparently chaotic orientations, and their organization in dense networks all appear unlike classical stream channel patterns. However, drainage patterns on large fluvial fans low-angle, fluvial aggradational features, 100s of km long, documented worldwide by us provide parallels. Some large fan characteristics resemble those of classical floodplains, but many differences have been demonstrated. One major distinction relevant to the RFU is that channel landscapes of large fans can dominate large areas (1.2 million km2 in one S. American study area). We compare channel morphologies on large fans in the southern Sahara Desert with ridge patterns in Sinus Meridiani (fig 1). Stream channels are the dominant landform on large terrestrial fans: they may equate to the ubiquitous, sinuous, elongated ridges of the RFU that cover areas region wide. Networks of convergent/divergent and crossing channels may equate to similar features in the ridge networks. Downslope divergence is absent in channels of terrestrial upland erosional landscapes (fig. 1, left), whereas it is common to both large fans (fig. 1, center) and RFU ridge patterns (fig 1, right downslope defined as the regional NW slope of Sinus Meridiani). RFU ridge orientation, judged from those areas apparently devoid of impact crater control, is broadly parallel with the regional slope (arrow, fig. 1, right), as is mean orientation of major channels on large fans (arrow, fig. 1, center). High densities per unit area characterize fan channels and martian ridges reaching an order of magnitude higher than those in uplands just upstream of the terrestrial study areas fig. 1. In concert with

  11. Ridge Orientations of the Ridge-Forming Unit, Sinus Meridiani, Mars-A Fluvial Explanation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. Justin; Herridge, A.

    2013-01-01

    Imagery and MOLA data were used in an analysis of the ridge-forming rock unit (RFU) exposed in Sinus Meridiani (SM). This unit shows parallels at different scales with fluvial sedimentary bodies. We propose the terrestrial megafan as the prime analog for the RFU, and likely for other members of the layered units. Megafans are partial cones of fluvial sediment, with radii up to hundreds of km. Although recent reviews of hypotheses for the RFU units exclude fluvial hypotheses [1], inverted ridges in the deserts of Oman have been suggested as putative analogs for some ridges [2], apparently without appreciating The wider context in which these ridges have formed is a series of megafans [3], a relatively unappreciated geomorphic feature. It has been argued that these units conform to the megafan model at the regional, subregional and local scales [4]. At the regional scale suites of terrestrial megafans are known to cover large areas at the foot of uplands on all continents - a close parallel with the setting of the Meridiani sediments at the foot of the southern uplands of Mars, with its incised fluvial systems leading down the regional NW slope [2, 3] towards the sedimentary units. At the subregional scale the layering and internal discontinuities of the Meridiani rocks are consistent, inter alia, with stacked fluvial units [4]. Although poorly recognized as such, the prime geomorphic environment in which stream channel networks cover large areas, without intervening hillslopes, is the megafan [see e.g. 4]. Single megafans can reach 200,000 km2 [5]. Megafans thus supply an analog for areas where channel-like ridges (as a palimpsest of a prior landscape) cover the intercrater plains of Meridiani [6]. At the local, or river-reach scale, the numerous sinuous features of the RFU are suggestive of fluvial channels. Cross-cutting relationships, a common feature of channels on terrestrial megafans, are ubiquitous. Desert megafans show cemented paleo-channels as inverted

  12. Integrated assessment of fluvial and pluvial flood hazards in the city of Salzburg, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinl, Korbinian

    2014-05-01

    Urban flooding can have various sources including floods from a river ('fluvial flooding'), from heavy rainfall usually from convective storms ('pluvial flooding') or from high tides ('storm surge'). Although awareness of pluvial flooding in the scientific community and among policymakers has been increasing, the term 'flooding' is still often seen as a phenomenon explicitly related to a river. Previous research primarily focused on fluvial flooding, with only very recent literature dealing with pluvial flooding. As a result, there are established methods to assess the hazards from fluvial floods, and a smaller number focusing on pluvial floods. Much less work has been conducted on integrated flood hazard assessment taking into account various types of flood hazards. In this work, an integrative, probabilistic modelling framework was developed to assess the urban flood hazard from fluvial and pluvial flooding in the city of Salzburg (Austria). The framework consists of a stochastic multi-site weather generator, which provides input for the hydrological model HBV. In the city of Salzburg, a kNN algorithm converts the simulated mean discharge into peak discharge as well as daily into sub-daily precipitation. The time series generated in this way make the identification of fluvial events (peak discharge) and pluvial events (sub-daily precipitation) possible. The kNN algorithm inherently considers weather situations to ensure a reasonable disaggregation of daily precipitation. Critical thresholds of pluvial flood events are empirically derived from damage data provided by a local insurer as well as action plans from the local fire service. The modelling framework is then applied to examine the probability of the two single flood hazards, as well as the probability of simultaneous pluvial-fluvial flood events.

  13. Coupled simulations of fluvial erosion and mass wasting for cohesive river banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, Stephen E.; Rinaldi, Massimo; Dapporto, Stefano

    2007-09-01

    The erosion of sediment from riverbanks affects a range of physical and ecological issues. Bank retreat often involves combinations of fluvial erosion and mass wasting, and in recent years, bank retreat models have been developed that combine hydraulic erosion and limit equilibrium stability models. In related work, finite element seepage analyses have also been used to account for the influence of pore water pressure in controlling the onset of mass wasting. This paper builds on these previous studies by developing a simulation modeling approach in which the hydraulic erosion, finite element seepage, and limit equilibrium stability models are, for the first time, fully coupled. Application of the model is demonstrated by undertaking simulations of a single flow event at a single study site for scenarios where (1) there is no fluvial erosion and the bank geometry profile remains constant throughout, (2) there is no fluvial erosion but the bank profile is deformed by simulated mass wasting, and (3) the bank profile is allowed to freely deform in response to both simulated fluvial erosion and mass wasting. The results are limited in scope to the specific conditions encountered at the study site, but they nevertheless demonstrate the significant role that fluvial erosion plays in steepening the bank profile or creating overhangs, thereby triggering mass wasting. However, feedbacks between the various processes also lead to unexpected outcomes. Specifically, fluvial erosion also affects bank stability indirectly, as deformation of the bank profile alters the hydraulic gradients driving infiltration into the bank, thereby modulating the evolution of the pore water pressure field. Consequently, the frequency, magnitude, and mode of bank erosion events in the fully coupled scenario differ from the two scenarios in which not all the relevant bank process interactions are included.

  14. Fluvial sediment inputs to upland gravel bed rivers draining forested catchments: potential ecological impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, S. D.; Rutt, G. P.

    As identified by the detailed long-term monitoring networks at Plynlimon, increased sediment supply to upland fluvial systems is often associated with forestry land-use and practice. Literature is reviewed, in the light of recent results from Plynlimon sediment studies, to enable identification of the potential ecological impacts of fluvial particulate inputs to upland gravel bed rivers draining forested catchments similar to the headwaters of the River Severn. Both sediment transport and deposition can have significant impacts upon aquatic vertebrates, invertebrates and plants.

  15. Debris Flow Control on Fluvial Hanging Valley Formation in the South Fork Eel River, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, N.; Perkins, J.; Finnegan, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of how base level signals are transmitted into landscapes is fundamental to interpreting river long profiles in tectonically active settings. Fluvial hanging valleys, locations where waves of incision have apparently arrested at tributary junctions, suggest that base level propagation is an unsteady process in many settings. A recent hypothesis (Wobus et al., 2006) explains the formation of fluvial hanging valleys via an instability in the saltation abrasion model of Sklar and Dietrich (2004). At locations where small steep tributaries join trunk streams, tributary incision rates can actually decrease with increasing channel slope when subjected to downstream base-level fall. However, we note that in mountainous river networks steep tributaries also commonly convey debris flows into trunk channels. Since these tributary junctions mark the upstream limit of channels whose beds are mobilized on a regular basis during flood events, here we hypothesize that transitions from fluvial to debris flow channels control the location of fluvial hanging valleys. To test our hypothesis, we exploit a natural experiment in base level fall and landscape evolution along the South Fork Eel River, which is argued to be responding to an increase in rock uplift rate associated with the passage of the Mendocino Triple Junction. In order to separate debris flow channels from fluvial channels, we use airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) to quantify channel slopes and concavities. In our analysis, concavity data are noisy and represent a poor metric for determination of debris flow channels. In lieu of this, we choose a more straightforward metric of channel slope to discriminate where debris flows occur on the landscape. We find that, on average, fluvial hanging valleys are only present in tributaries with average gradients above 0.10, consistent with empirical determinations of the gradient at which debris flow channels transition to fluvial channels (0.03-0.10). Field

  16. Fluvial Features on Titan: New Insights from Morphology and Hydraulic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, D. M.; Adamkovics, M.; Baker, V. R.; Collins, G. C.; Howard, A. D.; Irwin, R. P.; Lamb, M. P.; Moore, J. M.; Perron, T.; Sklar, L. S.; Drummond, S.; Black, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    Fluvial features on Titan have been inferred in data from surface imaging instruments on the Cassini spacecraft (Image Science Subsystem, ISS; Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer, VIMS; Cassini Titan RADAR Mapper, RADAR) and the Huygens probe (Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer, DISR). Interpretations of these features using terrestrial classifications and analogs offer insight into their formative processes and controls. Networks may be classified using a modified version of an algorithm developed from terrestrial drainage networks. As each network class carries different landscape-scale implications, these classifications provide information on the regional geology. For example, rectangular networks, the dominant drainage pattern on Titan, imply structural control. Individual fluvial features provide more localized information and may be classified using simple plan view parameters of relative width, length, and RADAR albedo into six descriptive classes, which have multiple hypothesized interpretations. At the highest resolution observations of Titan, DISR images show uplands dissected by river valley networks, which are not visible in lower resolution SAR data. This comparison of DISR and SAR images suggests (1) that some fluvial features observed in SAR data elsewhere may be river valleys instead of channels as previously denoted, and (2) that other uplands on Titan may likewise be fluvially dissected below SAR resolution. Crenulated (mountainous, hummocky) terrain is hypothesized here to have such sub-resolution fluvial dissection, based on (a) emergent fluvial features at lakes and (b) terrestrial data over dissected landscapes that illustrate the underrepresentation of fluvial dissection in SAR data. Fluvial deposits occur in (paleo)lake basins and on SAR-dark plains. For fully turbulent flow over a rough boundary, hydraulic equations are insensitive to fluid viscosity, so that terrestrial formulations are applicable to Titan flow when the difference in

  17. Diagenetic history of fluvial and lacustrine sandstones of the Hartford Basin (Triassic Jurassic), Newark Supergroup, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A. M.; Gierlowski-Kordesch, E. H.

    2007-04-01

    The early introduction of clays into continental sandstones has been attributed to mechanical infiltration by percolation of clay-rich surface waters into grain framework or cutans formed from pedogenic processes. The discovery of pedogenic mud aggregates as traction-load mud in ancient fluvial deposits suggests that permeability and porosity of terrigenous sandstones can be influenced at deposition and control early diagenetic patterns. This study compares diagenesis in fluvial (subaerially exposed) sandstones with lacustrine (subaqueous) sandstones in a Triassic-Jurassic continental rift basin (Hartford Basin, Newark Supergroup). Diversity of diagenetic minerals and sequence of diagenetic alteration can be directly related to depositional environment. The fluvial sandstones in the New Haven Arkose, East Berlin Formation, and Shuttle Meadow Formation of the Hartford Basin are dominated by concretionary calcite and early calcite cement, infiltrated clays (illite-smectite), pedogenic mud aggregates (smectite and illite-smectite), grain coating clays (illite/hematite, illite-chlorite/hematite), quartz overgrowths, late stage carbonate cements (calcite, ferroan calcite), pore-filling clays (illite, kaolinite with minor amounts of smectite, smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite) and hematite. However, pedogenic processes in these fluvial sandstones retarded the development of quartz and feldspar overgrowths, and carbonate authigenesis, as well as the quality of diagenetically enhanced porosity. Dark gray-black lacustrine (subaqueous) sandstones and mudrocks in the East Berlin and Shuttle Meadow Formations are dominated by pyrite, concretionary dolomite and early dolomite cement, radial grain coating clays (smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite), late stage carbonate cements (dolomite, ferroan dolomite, ankerite), albite and pore-filling clays (smectite-chlorite, illite-smectite, illite-chlorite). Clay minerals exist as detrital, mechanically infiltrated, and neoformed clay

  18. Stratigraphic and lithologic characteristics of Pleistocene fluvial deposits in the Danube and Sava riparian area near Belgrade (Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenadić, D.; Gaudenyi, T.; Bogićević, K.; Tošović, R.

    2016-07-01

    The Quaternary sediments in the Danube and Sava riparian area near Belgrade have a considerable thickness. Several categories of deposits (fluvial-lacustrine, fluvial and aeolian) of Pliocene and Quaternary age have been identified. Their thickness, granulometric composition and paleontological features change depending on the distance from the recent Danube and Sava riverbeds. The Pleistocene fluvial deposits are underlain by sediments of the Late Miocene (Sarmatian and Pannonian) or the Plio-Pleistocene age, and are overlain by fluvial-palustrine deposits of the Pleistocene age and recent alluvial deposits. Pleistocene fluvial deposits that form a major part of the Quaternary sediments, have a great significance, since they are proved to be excellent collectors of ground water. Although these deposits are at lower altitudes in the area of Srem, they could be correlated with the high Danube and Morava terraces in Serbia and Drava in Croatia on the basis of their lithologic and paleontological features.

  19. Birth and evolution of the Rio Grande-Rio Chama fluvial system: The influence of magma-driven dynamic topography on fluvial systems over the last 8 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repasch, M. N.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Heizler, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Grande-Rio Chama (RG-RC) fluvial system of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico preserves a record of southern Rocky Mountain erosion and sediment transport over the last 8 Ma. During this time the two rivers have evolved wildly, undergoing channel migrations, drainage capture and integration events, carving and refilling of paleocanyons, lake spill-overs, and reshaping of drainage divides. New 40Ar/39Ar basalt ages coupled with new detrital grain age population data for fluvial sediments are beginning to reconstruct the birth of the RG-RC fluvial system and elucidate the processes that drove its evolution over the last ~8 Ma. Twenty-three detrital grain samples have been collected from RG-RC river deposits ranging in age from ~8 Ma (RC) and 4.5 Ma (RG) to modern fluvial sediment. Detrital zircon age spectra for the RG reveal peaks at 25 Ma, 28 Ma, 30-35 Ma (San Juan volcanic), and 70-90Ma (San Juan Basin) in sediments deposited from 4.5 to 0 Ma. RC spectra are richer in San Juan Basin and San Juan volcanic detritus. A 2.6 Ma Totavi Lentil deposit downstream of today's RG-RC confluence is similar to the ancestral RG, while a 1.6 Ma Totavi Lentil is similar to the combined RG-RC, suggesting northward shift of the RG-RC confluence by 1.6 Ma due to Jemez Mountain volcanism. A 4.5 Ma basalt age from Black Mesa and occurrence of San Juan volcanic detritus in 3 to 5 Ma sediment suggests birth of an ancestral RG as early as 4.5 Ma. There is no record of an ancestral RG north of the Red River confluence for the 3.0 to 0.5 Ma time period, supporting prior work that northern San Luis Basin became integrated after 0.5 Ma spill-over of Lake Alamosa. We plan to add detrital sanidine dating to refine the age spectra and help further delineate drainage patterns. The RG-RC system drains a highly tectonically active region. Changes in the fluvial regime suggest: 1) long-lived source of detritus (some recycled) from the San Juan volcanic field, 2) downstream integration

  20. Mixed fluvial systems of the Messak Sandstone, a deposit of the Nubian lithofacies, southwestern Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, John C.

    1987-11-01

    The Messak Sandstone is a coarse-grained to pebbly, tabular-crossbedded deposit of the widespread nubian lithofacies. It was deposited during Late Jurassic and/or Early Cretaceous time at the northern edge of the Murzuq basin, in southwestern Libya. Although the sedimentary record is predominantly one of braided fluvial systems, a common subfacies within the formation is interpreted to record the passage of straight-crested sand waves across laterally migrating point bars in sinuous rivers, similar to parts of the modern Ganga and Yamuna rivers. Because the sand waves were larger on the lower parts of the point bar, lateral migration created diagnostic thinning-upward cosets of tabular crossbeds, as well as fining-upward grain-size trends. Common thick, interbedded claystones, deposited in associated paludal and lacustrine environments, and high variance in crossbed dispersion patterns, also suggest the local presence of sinuous fluvial systems within the overall braided regime. The Messak Sandstone contains some of the features that led to the proposal of an unconventional low-sinuosity fluvial environment for the Nubian lithofacies in Egypt, and the continuously high water levels of this model may explain channel-scale clay drapes and overturned crossbeds in the Messak. However, most of the Messak characteristics are incompatible with a low-sinuosity model, suggesting instead that the fluvial channels in the Murzuq basin alternated between braided and high-sinuosity channel patterns.

  1. Quantifying the seasonal variations in fluvial and eolian sources of terrigenous material to Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, Aurora C.; Thunell, Robert C.; Styles, Richard; Black, David; Murray, Richard W.; Martinez, Nahysa; Astor, Yrene

    2009-02-01

    The varved sediments that accumulate in the Cariaco Basin provide a detailed archive of the region's climatic history, including a record of the quantity of fluvial and wind-transported material. In this study, we examine the sedimentological characteristics (clay mineralogy and grain size) of both surface sediments and sinking lithogenic material collected from sediment trap samples over a three-year period from 1997 to 2000. Data from biweekly sediment trap samples show a tri-modal particle size distribution, with prominent peaks at 2, 22 and 80 μm, indicating sediment contributions from both eolian and fluvial sources. The clay mineralogy of the water column samples collected from 1997 to 1999 also shows distinctive characteristics of eolian and fluvial material. An examination of surface sediment samples from the Cariaco Basin indicates that the Unare River is the main source of riverine sediments to the eastern sub-basin. By combining these sedimentological proxies, we estimate that ˜10% of the terrigenous material delivered to the Cariaco Basin is eolian, while ˜90% is fluvial. This represents an annual dust accumulation rate of ˜0.59 mg/cm 2/yr. Since aerosols are closely linked to climate variability, the ability to quantify paleo-dust fluxes using sedimentological characteristics will be a useful tool for future paleoclimate studies looking at sub-Saharan aridity and latitudinal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone.

  2. Volcanogenic fluvial-lacustrine environments in iceland and their utility for identifying past habitability on Mars.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The search for once-habitable locations on Mars is increasingly focused on environments dominated by fluvial and lacustrine processes, such as those investigated by the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover. The availability of liquid water coupled with the potential longevity of such systems renders these localities prime targets for the future exploration of Martian biosignatures. Fluvial-lacustrine environments associated with basaltic volcanism are highly relevant to Mars, but their terrestrial counterparts have been largely overlooked as a field analogue. Such environments are common in Iceland, where basaltic volcanism interacts with glacial ice and surface snow to produce large volumes of meltwater within an otherwise cold and dry environment. This meltwater can be stored to create subglacial, englacial, and proglacial lakes, or be released as catastrophic floods and proglacial fluvial systems. Sedimentary deposits produced by the resulting fluvial-lacustrine activity are extensive, with lithologies dominated by basaltic minerals, low-temperature alteration assemblages (e.g., smectite clays, calcite), and amorphous, poorly crystalline phases (basaltic glass, palagonite, nanophase iron oxides). This paper reviews examples of these environments, including their sedimentary deposits and microbiology, within the context of utilising these localities for future Mars analogue studies and instrument testing. PMID:25692905

  3. Fluvial Degradation of the Highlands: The Terra Tyrrhena Region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mest, S. C.; Crown, D. A.; Harbert, W.

    2002-01-01

    Geologic and geomorphic analyses of highland terrains reveal the effects of fluvial erosion by well-integrated valley networks. Hydrologic modeling using 128 pix/deg Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA) gridded topography is being done to quantitatively characterize these systems. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Study on detailed geological modelling for fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Hanqing; Fu Zhiguo; Lu Xiaoguang

    1997-08-01

    Guided by the sedimentation theory and knowledge of modern and ancient fluvial deposition and utilizing the abundant information of sedimentary series, microfacies type and petrophysical parameters from well logging curves of close spaced thousands of wells located in a large area. A new method for establishing detailed sedimentation and permeability distribution models for fluvial reservoirs have been developed successfully. This study aimed at the geometry and internal architecture of sandbodies, in accordance to their hierarchical levels of heterogeneity and building up sedimentation and permeability distribution models of fluvial reservoirs, describing the reservoir heterogeneity on the light of the river sedimentary rules. The results and methods obtained in outcrop and modem sedimentation studies have successfully supported the study. Taking advantage of this method, the major producing layers (PI{sub 1-2}), which have been considered as heterogeneous and thick fluvial reservoirs extending widely in lateral are researched in detail. These layers are subdivided into single sedimentary units vertically and the microfacies are identified horizontally. Furthermore, a complex system is recognized according to their hierarchical levels from large to small, meander belt, single channel sandbody, meander scroll, point bar, and lateral accretion bodies of point bar. The achieved results improved the description of areal distribution of point bar sandbodies, provide an accurate and detailed framework model for establishing high resolution predicting model. By using geostatistic technique, it also plays an important role in searching for enriched zone of residual oil distribution.

  5. Phosphorus and nitrogen loading depths in fluvial sediments following manure spill simulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manure spills that enter streams can devastate the aquatic ecosystem. The depth of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loading in fluvial sediments following a manure spill have not been documented. Thus, the objectives of this study were (i) to determine the depth of N and P contamination as a result o...

  6. Mixed fluvial systems of Messak Sandstone, a deposit of Nubian lithofacies, southwestern Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Messak Sandstone is a coarse to pebbly, tabular cross-bedded, Lower Cretaceous deposit of the widespread Nubian lithofacies. It was deposited at the northern edge of the Murzuq basin in southwestern Libya. Although the sedimentary record is predominantly one of braided fluvial systems, a common subfacies within the formation is interpreted to record the passage of straight-crested sand waves across laterally migrating point bars in sinuous rivers, similar to the pattern documented by Singh and Kumar on the modern Ganga and Yamuna Rivers. Because the sand waves were larger on the lower parts of the point bars, lateral migration created diagnostic thinning-upward, unidirectional cosets of tabular cross-beds as well as fining-upward, grain-size trends. Common, thick, interbedded claystones, deposited in associated paludal and lacustrine environments, and high variance in cross-bed dispersion patterns also suggest the local presence of sinuous fluvial systems within the overall braided regime. The Messak Sandstone contains some of the features that led Harms et al to propose an unconventional low-sinuosity fluvial environment for the Nubian lithofacies in Egypt, and the continuously high water levels of this model may explain channel-scale clay drapes and overturned cross-beds in the Messak. However, most of the Messak characteristics are incompatible with the low-sinuosity model, suggesting instead that the fluvial channels in the Murzuq basin alternated between braided and high-sinuosity patterns.

  7. Volcanogenic Fluvial-Lacustrine Environments in Iceland and Their Utility for Identifying Past Habitability on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The search for once-habitable locations on Mars is increasingly focused on environments dominated by fluvial and lacustrine processes, such as those investigated by the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover. The availability of liquid water coupled with the potential longevity of such systems renders these localities prime targets for the future exploration of Martian biosignatures. Fluvial-lacustrine environments associated with basaltic volcanism are highly relevant to Mars, but their terrestrial counterparts have been largely overlooked as a field analogue. Such environments are common in Iceland, where basaltic volcanism interacts with glacial ice and surface snow to produce large volumes of meltwater within an otherwise cold and dry environment. This meltwater can be stored to create subglacial, englacial, and proglacial lakes, or be released as catastrophic floods and proglacial fluvial systems. Sedimentary deposits produced by the resulting fluvial-lacustrine activity are extensive, with lithologies dominated by basaltic minerals, low-temperature alteration assemblages (e.g., smectite clays, calcite), and amorphous, poorly crystalline phases (basaltic glass, palagonite, nanophase iron oxides). This paper reviews examples of these environments, including their sedimentary deposits and microbiology, within the context of utilising these localities for future Mars analogue studies and instrument testing. PMID:25692905

  8. Fluvial depositional systems of Carrizo-Upper Wilcox in south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, H.S.

    1983-09-01

    In the Rio Grande embayment of south Texas, the Carrizo-upper Wilcox interval (Eocene) consists of two sand-rich coastal plain fluvial depositional systems that grade basinward into several deltaic complexes. The bedload channel system is dominated by multi-story, multi-lateral, fluvial, channel-fill sandstones. This system is typically > 90% sandstone. Shales are thin and laterally discontinuous, the remnants of abandoned channel fills. Bedload channel sandstones dominate the major fluvial axes and form the depositional framework of the interval. The mixed alluvial system consists of a more typical suite of coastal plain facies. Mixed-load channel-fill sandstones tend to be isolated and surrounded by overbank shales and thin sandstones. Crevasse splay and lacustrine facies occur in the flood-plain area. Total-interval isopach patterns, sandstone geometries, and depositional systems distributions indicate that fluvial sediment input was converging upon the embayment from the west, northwest, and north. Economically, the Carrizo-upper Wilcox of south Texas has a three-fold significance. The updip Carrizo sandstone is a major source of fresh groundwater, includes several large oil fields, and also contains deposits of uranium minerals. The downdip upper Wilcox trend is an area of active hydrocarbon exploration.

  9. "The Waters of Meridiani" - Further Support for a Fluvial Interpretation of the Ridged, Layered Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Justin; Kreslavsky, Misha

    2009-01-01

    A relatively unknown terrestrial fluvial environment, the mesoscale megafan, provides analogs for various Martian landscapes, including the etched unit (etched unit, Unite E of Arvidson et al., 2003; ridge-forming unit R of Edgett, 2005) of the Sinus Meridiani region on Mars. A global survey of Earth shows that megafans are very large partial cones of dominantly fluvial sediment with radii on the order of hundreds of km, and very low slopes. Responsible fluvial processes are sufficiently different from those of classical arid alluvial fans and deltas that it is useful to class megafans as separate features. The megafan model calls into question two commonly held ideas. 1. Earth examples prove that topographic basins per se are unnecessary for the accumulation of large sedimentary bodies. 2. River channels are by no means restricted to valleys (Meridiani sediments are termed a "valley-ed volume" of Edgett). These perspectives reveal unexpected parallels with features at Meridiani-several channel-like features that are widespread, mostly as ridges inverted by eolian erosion; channel networks covering thousands of sq km, especially on intercrater plains; and regional relationships of sediment bodies situated immediately downstream of highland masses. These all suggest that fluvial explanations are at least part of the Meridiani story.

  10. Variables and potential models for the bleaching of luminescence signals in fluvial environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Harrison J.; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence dating of fluvial sediments rests on the assumption that sufficient sunlight is available to remove a previously obtained signal in a process deemed bleaching. However, luminescence signals obtained from sediment in the active channels of rivers often contain residual signals. This paper explores and attempts to build theoretical models for the bleaching of luminescence signals in fluvial settings. We present two models, one for sediment transported in an episodic manner, such as flood-driven washes in arid environments, and one for sediment transported in a continuous manner, such as in large continental scale rivers. The episodic flow model assumes that the majority of sediment is bleached while exposed to sunlight at the near surface between flood events and predicts a power-law decay in luminescence signal with downstream transport distance. The continuous flow model is developed by combining the Beer–Lambert law for the attenuation of light through a water column with a general-order kinetics equation to produce an equation with the form of a double negative exponential. The inflection point of this equation is compared with the sediment concentration from a Rouse profile to derive a non-dimensional number capable of assessing the likely extent of bleaching for a given set of luminescence and fluvial parameters. Although these models are theoretically based and not yet necessarily applicable to real-world fluvial systems, we introduce these ideas to stimulate discussion and encourage the development of comprehensive bleaching models with predictive power.

  11. A mechanistic detachment rate model to predict soil erodibility due to fluvial and seepage forces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The erosion rate of cohesive soils is typically computed using an excess shear stress model based on the applied fluvial shear stress. However, no mechanistic approaches are available for incorporating additional forces such as localized groundwater seepage forces into the excess shear stress model...

  12. Characterizing physical habitats in rivers using map-derived drivers of fluvial geomorphic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzi, Simone; Lerner, David N.

    2012-10-01

    New understanding of fluvial geomorphological processes has successfully informed flood mitigation strategies and rehabilitation schemes in recent years. However well established geomorphological assessments are location-specific and demanding in terms of resource and expertise required, and their routine application for regional or national river characterization, although desirable, is unlikely at present. This paper proposes a framework based on GIS procedures, empirical relationships and the self organized map for the analysis and classification of map-derived drivers of fluvial morphological processes. The geomorphic controls analysed are: channel gradient and hydrology, specific stream power, river order and floodplain extent. The case study is a gravel bed river in England. Using the self organized map, we analyse patterns of these controls along the river longitudinal profile and identify clusters of similar configuration. The reciprocal relationships that emerge amongst the geomorphic controls reflect the hierarchical nature of fluvial systems and are consistent with the current theoretical understanding of fluvial processes. Field observations from the River Habitat Survey are used to prove the influence of geomorphic drivers on reach-scale morphological forms. Six clusters are identified which describe six distinctive channel types. These proved to be characterized by distinctive configurations of geomorphic drivers and specific sets of physical habitat features. The method successfully characterizes the notable transitions in channel character along the river course. The framework is suitable for regional or national scale assessments through automatic GIS and statistical procedures with moderate effort.

  13. A Chemical Treatment to Reduce P Desorption From Manure Exposed Fluvial Sediments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current remediation methods for manure spills that have reached surface waters give no attention to the P enriched ditch sediments that remain in the fluvial system and continue to impair the water column. Consequently, no method exists to treat P contaminated sediments to reduce their ability ...

  14. Sinus Meridiani Landing Site for Human Exploration —- A Mesoscale Fluvial System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, M. J.; McGovern, P. J.

    2015-10-01

    SW Sinus Meridiani is proposed as an EZ as seen through the lens of the still poorly recognized large fluvial fan model. Hematite distribution, regional and Miyamoto Crater sedimentary stacks, sediment inundation of craters, and the rover traverse path are suggested ROIs.

  15. MODIFICATION OF PHOSPHORUS EXPORT FROM A CATCHMENT BY FLUVIAL SEDIMENT PHOSPHORUS INPUTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) export from agricultural watersheds can accelerate freshwater eutrophication. Landscape-based remedial measures can reduce edge-of-field P losses. However stream channel hydraulics and fluvial sediment properties can modify the forms and amounts of P exported by the time it reaches th...

  16. Using Mars's Sulfur Cycle to Constrain the Duration and Timing of Fluvial Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaney, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur exists in high abundances at diverse locations on Mars. This work uses knowledge of the Martian sulfate system to discriminate between leading hypotheses and discusses the implications for duration and timing of fluvial processes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Facies architecture in a fluvial-deltaic sequence, upper Crooked Fork Group (Pennsylvanian), Tennessee and Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Barden, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    The upper Crooked Fork Group on the Cumberland plateau in northeastern Tennessee and southeastern Kentucky includes the Wartburg Sandstone (Corbin of Kentucky) and surrounding fine-grained strata of the Breathitt Formation below the Poplar Creek Coal. Detailed study of outcrops employs lateral profiles and architectural element analysis. Examination of bounding surfaces within and between elements indicates a sixfold hierarchy based on areal extent and geometry. The Wartburg Sandstone consists largely of three-dimensional macroform bar complexes. Foreset macroform elements predominate, with minor lateral accretion elements present and no apparent internal cyclicity. The channelized base of the Wartburg, predominance of large-scale planar and trough cross-stratification, low paleocurrent variance, and presence of soft-sediment deformation elements and massive sandstone elements with large mudstone intraclasts suggest a low-sinuosity fluvial setting. Strata overlying the Wartburg display fine-grained lateral accretion elements and associated overbank-fines. This suggests an upward change in fluvial style in the upper Crooked Fork Group from a predominantly coarse-grained low-sinuosity setting to a fine-grained high-sinuosity setting. The abundance of downstream and lateral accretion elements, plant debris, rooting, and thin discontinuous coals; paucity of burrows and bioturbation; and presence of thin marine horizons combined with the facies architecture suggest a channelized depositional setting with some marine influence, indicative of fluvial or fluvial-dominated deltaic deposits.

  18. Misconceptions about mechanical and fluvial erosional strength: implications to streambank stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The central objective of this study was to highlight the differences in magnitude between the mechanical and fluvial streambank erosional strength measures of with the purpose of developing a more comprehensive bank stability analysis. Mechanical erosion and ultimately failure signifies the general ...

  19. Fluvial rainbow trout contribute to the colonization of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in a small stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weigel, Dana E.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Powell, Madison S.

    2013-01-01

    Life history polymorphisms provide ecological and genetic diversity important to the long term persistence of species responding to stochastic environments. Oncorhynchus mykiss have complex and overlapping life history strategies that are also sympatric with hatchery populations. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and parentage analysis were used to identify the life history, origin (hatchery or wild) and reproductive success of migratory rainbow/steelhead for two brood years after barriers were removed from a small stream. The fluvial rainbow trout provided a source of wild genotypes to the colonizing population boosting the number of successful spawners. Significantly more parr offspring were produced by anadromous parents than expected in brood year 2005, whereas significantly more parr offspring were produced by fluvial parents than expected in brood year 2006. Although hatchery steelhead were prevalent in the Methow Basin, they produced only 2 parr and no returning adults in Beaver Creek. On average, individual wild steelhead produced more parr offspring than the fluvial or hatchery groups. Yet, the offspring that returned as adult steelhead were from parents that produced few parr offspring, indicating that high production of parr offspring may not be related to greater returns of adult offspring. These data in combination with other studies of sympatric life histories of O. mykiss indicate that fluvial rainbow trout are important to the conservation and recovery of steelhead and should be included in the management and recovery efforts.

  20. Fluvial sediment of the Mississippi River at St. Louis, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, Paul Robert

    1965-01-01

    An investigation of the fluvial sediment of the Mississippi River at St. Louis, Mo., was begun in 1948. Most data have been obtained only to determine the daily suspended-sediment discharge and the particle-size distribution of suspended sediment and bed material, but a few data have been obtained to study the flow resistance, the vertical distribution of sediment and velocity, and the bed-material discharge. The flow of the Mississippi River at St. Louis is made up of the flows from the Missouri River, which had an average flow of 79,860 cubic feet per second for 1897-1958 at Hermann, Mo., and from the upper Mississippi River, which had an average flow of 91,890 cubic feet per second for 1928-58 at Alton, Il. The Missouri River is partly controlled by reservoirs that had a total capacity of 90,300,000 acre-feet in 1956, and the upper Mississippi River is partly controlled by lakes and reservoirs that had a total capacity of 4,890,000 acre-feet in 1956. The flows of the Missouri and upper Mississippi Rivers have not become mixed at St. Louis; so the river has a lateral gradient of suspended-sediment concentration. The concentration near the west bank has been as much as 2,400 parts per million greater than the concentration near the east bank. Suspended-sediment discharges from April 1948 to September 1958 ranged from 4,250 to 7,010,000 tons per day and averaged 496,000 tons per day. Mean concentrations for water years decreased steadily from 1,690 parts per million in 1949 to 403 parts per million in 1956, but they increased to 756 parts per million in 1958. Effects of new reservoirs in the Missouri River basin on the concentration have been obscured by the close relation of concentration to streamflow. Measured suspended-sediment discharge through September 1958 averaged 47 percent clay, 38 percent silt, and 15 percent sand. Variations of particle size were due mainly to differences in the source areas of the sediment. Most of the bed material in the main flow

  1. Debris-Flow Deposition, Valley Storage, and Fluvial Evacuation in Headwater Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, S. T.; Casebeer, N. E.

    2006-12-01

    Sediment from landscape disturbance often winds up in temporary storage, to be evacuated over longer time spans. In steeplands, there are few constraints on the rate at which sediment stored in valleys is released. We hypothesize that sediment in reaches characterized by debris-flow deposition and evacuation has a distribution of residence times that is distinguishable from those of sediment that is primarily released by fluvial processes. We use field surveys and extensive radiocarbon dating to assess the distribution of deposit ages in two mainstem reaches of a 2.23-km2 watershed in the Oregon Coast Range. In the downstream reach, fluvial deposits are impounded by encroaching debris fans, debris-flow, fine fluvial, and coarse fluvial deposits comprise roughly equal parts of valley storage, and deposits must be evacuated by fluvial erosion. Evacuation times are exponentially distributed with a sample mean of 1.22×103 14C yrs, a distribution indicating uniform probability of evacuation from storage. In the upstream reach, valley-spanning debris jams impound debris-flow deposits comprising >95% of valley storage, which is routinely scoured by debris flows. Evacuation times >100 14C yrs have a power law distribution with a sample mean of 4.43×102 14C yrs, a distribution indicating preferential evacuation of younger deposits and retention of older deposits. In both reaches most sediment is evacuated within short times (<500 14C yrs), but significant volumes remain for millennia. Less than half of basin-wide denudation passes through these "reservoirs," but the latter are still significant buffers between hillslope disturbance and downstream aquatic habitat.

  2. Late tertiary and quaternary fluvial deposits in the Mesilla and Hueco bolsons, El Paso area, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Charles J.; Willingham, Daniel L.

    1984-03-01

    The late Tertiary to Quaternary Fort Hancock and Camp Rice Formations fill several extensional basins of the southern Rio Grande Rift. Interior drainage and central playa lakes characterize most of these rift basins. However, sedimentation in two basins located in the central part of the southern rift, the Mesilla and Hueco bolsons, was also greatly influenced by a northern segment of the ancestral Rio Grande river system. During the late Pliocene, a large-scale stream system entered the north end of the Mesilla bolson and deposited a south-sloping fluvial plain that overwhelmed playa lake and bolson-margin areas. The fluvial plain subsequently advanced across the eastern or southeastern margins of the Mesilla bolson then inundated a playa lake in the adjacent Hueco bolson. The Fort Hancock Formation was deposited during fluvial inundation of the bolsons. Four lithofacies of the Fort Hancock Formation are recognized: claystone, mudstone and sandstone, channelized sandstone, and conglomerate. The conglomerate and claystone facies were deposited in bolson-margin and playa depositional environments, respectively. The channelized sandstone facies formed the proximal fluvial plain of the ancestral Rio Grande system. The mudstone and sandstone facies formed in both playa-margin and distal fluvial-plain environments. By the middle Pleistocene, a major drainage basin south of the Hueco bolson, which formed the southern segment of the ancestral Rio Grande system, extended northward into the Hueco and Mesilla bolsons. At this time, the Rio Grande system was entirely integrated from southern Colorado to the Gulf of Mexico. Pebbly, coarse sand transported through this channel system formed the middle Pleistocene Camp Rice Formation.

  3. Fluvial responses to late Quaternary climate change in the Shiyang River drainage system, western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongshan; Li, Zongmeng; Pan, Baotian; Liu, Fenliang; Liu, Xiaopeng

    2016-04-01

    As a drainage system located in arid western China, the Shiyang River, combined with considerable fluvial strata and landform information, provides an environmental context within which to investigate fluvial responses to late Quaternary climate change. Sedimentological analysis and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating enabled us to reconstruct the processes and fluvial styles of three sedimentary sequences of the Shagou and Hongshui rivers in the Shiyang drainage system. Our results present a variety of river behaviors during the late Quaternary in these areas. In the upstream Shiyang River, Zhangjiadazhuang (ZJDZ) profile of the Shagou was dominated by aggradation and a meandering channel pattern at 10.6-4.2 ka, while a noticeable channel incision occurred at ~ 4.2 ka followed by lateral channel migration. In the downstream Shiyang River, Datugou (DTG) profile of the Hongshui was an aggrading meandering river from 39.7 to 7.2 ka while channel incision occurred at 7.2 ka. Another downstream profile, Wudunwan (WDW) of the Hongshui was also characterized by aggradation from 22.4 to 4.8 ka; however, its channel pattern shifted from braided to meandering at ~ 13 ka. A discernable downcutting event occurred at ~ 4.8 ka, followed by three channel aggradation and incision episodes prior to 1.8 ka. The last 1.8 ka has been characterized by modern channel and floodplain development. The fluvial processes and styles investigated have a close correlation with late Quaternary climate change in the Shiyang River drainage. During cold phases, the WDW reach was dominated by aggradation with a braided channel pattern. During warm phases, the rivers that we investigated were also characterized by aggradation but with meandering channel patterns. Channel incision events and changes of fluvial style occurred mainly during climate transitions.

  4. Climate-sensitive feedbacks between hillslope processes and fluvial erosion in sediment-driven incision models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skov, Daniel; Egholm, David

    2015-04-01

    Surface erosion and sediment production accelerated dramatically in most parts of the world as the climate cooled in the Late Cenozoic, (e.g. Molnar, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 32, 2004). In many high mountain ranges, glaciers emerged for the first time during the Quaternary, and they represent a likely explanation for the accelerated erosion in such places. Still, observations and measurements point to increases in erosion rate also in landscapes where erosion is driven mainly by fluvial processes (e.g. Lease and Ehlers, Science 341, 2013). Why fluvial incision responds to climate change remains enigmatic, in particular because the obvious links to variations in precipitation, and hence water flux, are not generally supported by erosion rate measures (Stock et al., GSA Bulletin 117, 2005). This study explores potential links between accelerating rates of river incision and sediment production on hillslopes that surround the channel network. Hillslope soil production and soil transport are processes that are likely to respond to decreasing temperatures, because the density of vegetation and for example the occurrence of frost influence rates of weathering and sediment flow. We perform computational landscape evolution experiments where a sediment-flux-dependent model for fluvial incision (e.g. Sklar and Dietrich, Geology 29, 2001) is coupled to models for sediment production and transport on hillslopes. The resulting coupled landscape dynamics is of a highly nonlinear nature, where even small changes in hillslope sediment production far up in a drainage network propagate all the way through the downstream fluvial system. Dependent on the total sediment load, the fluvial system may respond with increased incision that steepens the hillslopes and starts a positive feedback loop that accelerates overall erosion.

  5. Legacies of Glacio-fluvial Interactions in the Finger Lakes, Central New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, E. B.; Fountain, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Finger Lakes region of central New York exhibits spectacular examples of the interplay between glacial and fluvial processes. The Finger Lakes themselves were carved by ice sheets and related subglacial hydrologic processes that enlarged, over-deepened, and reversed the drainage direction of pre-existing fluvial valleys. The region's famous gorges flank the glacial troughs and reflect ongoing fluvial adjustment to glacially driven base level variations. Modern tools of topographic analysis permit quantification of the imprint that glacial processes leave on fluvial form and process. Regionally, ice sheet erosion is maximized along the north end of the Seneca/Cayuga trough. Local relief ranges from ~100 m at the north end of Seneca and Cayuga lakes to 250-400 m on the southern ends of these lakes and on the smaller, flanking lakes (Keuka, Canandaigua, Skaneateles, Owasco). Concavity indices for lake-tributary stream profiles are predominantly in the range of -7 to 0, reflecting a convex initial form imposed by glacial processes, while normalized channel steepness (ksn) indices are generally under 40 (reference concavity of 0.45), reflecting the gentle gradients of the glacial uplands. Concavity index and ksn values are maximized (>0, and >75, respectively) along short segments at the downstream ends of the so-called interglacial or post-glacial gorge reaches, again maximized at the southern and peripheral parts of the Seneca/Cayuga trough. Finally, streams that cross former channel courses buried by subglacial debris typically have more numerous and/or more pronounced knickpoints and more concave long profile segments than streams that do not. In short, the legacy of glaciations from the regional to the reach scale appears to be driving patterns of fluvial response in the Finger Lakes.

  6. Geomorphic thresholds and complex response of fluvial systems - some implications for sequence stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wescott, W.A. )

    1993-07-01

    First-generation sequence stratigraphic models have dealt in a very rudimentary fashion with the response of fluvial systems to eustasy. A major element of presently accepted models is that rivers incise when sea level falls and aggrade during the ensuing rise. Geomorphic principles state that fluvial systems are complex, process-response systems that can adjust to internal and external changes in other ways besides incision and aggradation by modifying their stream patterns and channel geometries. Application of geomorphic principles to sequence stratigraphic models results in the following observations. During eustatic lowstands, rivers may adjust to lowered base levels and changes in slope by modifying channel patterns. Therefore, not all lowstands produce type 1 sequence boundaries. Type 1 sequence boundaries characterized by fluvial-valley incision are more likely to develop when sea level drops below the shelf-slope break, resulting in topological relief near the strandline in which headwardly eroding knickpoints form. Rate of eustatic change is sufficiently low that geomorphic systems can maintain their equilibrium during eustatic changes and migrate back and forth across the shelf without major modifications. Finally, under conditions of relatively static sea level, sequences and parasequences of the same scale in time and space can be deposited as the result of purely intrinsic causes and responses of a fluvial system. In general, eustasy controls the location of deposition and erosion, but the resultant stratal geometry is controlled by sediment supply and processes acting on the sediments as the shoreline moves across the shelf in response to eustasy. Sequence stratigraphy is frequently used in petroleum exploration and basin analysis. However, present models do not adequately in corporate modern principles of fluvial geomorphology and do not accurately predict sedimentary facies and surfaces in some basins. 33 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. [Water birds from Agua Dulce lake and El Ermitaño estuary, Jalisco, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Hernández Vázquez, Salvador

    2005-01-01

    Waterbird abundance, and seasonal and spatial distribution, were studied in two natural water pools at Jalisco, Mexico, from December 1997 through November 1998. Maximum monthly abundance in Agua Dulce lake and El Ermitaño estuary was 86 471 birds (29 686 in Agua Dulce and 56 785 in Ermitaño), with a total cummulative abundance of 179 808 individuals (66 976 in Agua Dulce and 112 832 in Ermitaño). A total of 87 waterbirds species were recorded, 78 in Agua Dulce and 73 in Ermitaño. The higher species richness and abundance was observed during winter, when migratory species arrived. Most species prefered shallow waters, except seabirds which prefered protected areas such as dunes in Agua Dulce. Other groups, like clucks and related species. prefered low salinity areas, for example in the south-east area of Ermitaño. The higher abundance of the shorehirds was found when the water level on the estuary was low. Herons were seen often at areas with high salinity and influenced by tides (e.g. mouth of Ermitaño). PMID:17354436

  8. Combined fluvial and pluvial urban flood hazard analysis: method development and application to Can Tho City, Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, H.; Trepat, O. M.; Hung, N. N.; Chinh, D. T.; Merz, B.; Dung, N. V.

    2015-08-01

    Many urban areas experience both fluvial and pluvial floods, because locations next to rivers are preferred settlement areas, and the predominantly sealed urban surface prevents infiltration and facilitates surface inundation. The latter problem is enhanced in cities with insufficient or non-existent sewer systems. While there are a number of approaches to analyse either fluvial or pluvial flood hazard, studies of combined fluvial and pluvial flood hazard are hardly available. Thus this study aims at the analysis of fluvial and pluvial flood hazard individually, but also at developing a method for the analysis of combined pluvial and fluvial flood hazard. This combined fluvial-pluvial flood hazard analysis is performed taking Can Tho city, the largest city in the Vietnamese part of the Mekong Delta, as example. In this tropical environment the annual monsoon triggered floods of the Mekong River can coincide with heavy local convective precipitation events causing both fluvial and pluvial flooding at the same time. Fluvial flood hazard was estimated with a copula based bivariate extreme value statistic for the gauge Kratie at the upper boundary of the Mekong Delta and a large-scale hydrodynamic model of the Mekong Delta. This provided the boundaries for 2-dimensional hydrodynamic inundation simulation for Can Tho city. Pluvial hazard was estimated by a peak-over-threshold frequency estimation based on local rain gauge data, and a stochastic rain storm generator. Inundation was simulated by a 2-dimensional hydrodynamic model implemented on a Graphical Processor Unit (GPU) for time-efficient flood propagation modelling. All hazards - fluvial, pluvial and combined - were accompanied by an uncertainty estimation considering the natural variability of the flood events. This resulted in probabilistic flood hazard maps showing the maximum inundation depths for a selected set of probabilities of occurrence, with maps showing the expectation (median) and the uncertainty by

  9. 76 FR 63614 - Agua Caliente Solar, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Agua Caliente Solar, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...-referenced proceeding of Agua Caliente Solar, LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with...

  10. Temporal and spatial variability of tidal-fluvial dynamics in the St. Lawrence fluvial estuary: An application of nonstationary tidal harmonic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matte, Pascal; Secretan, Yves; Morin, Jean

    2014-09-01

    Predicting tides in upstream reaches of rivers is a challenge, because tides are highly nonlinear and nonstationary, and accurate short-time predictions of river flow are hard to obtain. In the St. Lawrence fluvial estuary, tide forecasts are produced using a one-dimensional model (ONE-D), forced downstream with harmonic constituents, and upstream with daily discharges using 30 day flow forecasts from Lake Ontario and the Ottawa River. Although this operational forecast system serves its purpose of predicting water levels, information about nonstationary tidal-fluvial processes that can be gained from it is limited, particularly the temporal changes in mean water level and tidal properties (i.e., constituent amplitudes and phases), which are function of river flow and ocean tidal range. In this paper, a harmonic model adapted to nonstationary tides, NS_TIDE, was applied to the St. Lawrence fluvial estuary, where the time-varying external forcing is directly built into the tidal basis functions. Model coefficients from 13 analysis stations were spatially interpolated to allow tide predictions at arbitrary locations as well as to provide insights into the spatiotemporal evolution of tides. Model hindcasts showed substantial improvements compared to classical harmonic analyses at upstream stations. The model was further validated by comparison with ONE-D predictions at a total of 32 stations. The slightly lower accuracy obtained with NS_TIDE is compensated by model simplicity, efficiency, and capacity to represent stage and tidal variations in a very compact way and thus represents a new means for understanding tidal rivers.

  11. The potential of hydrodynamic analysis for the interpretation of Martian fluvial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungrack; Schumann, Guy; Neal, Jeffrey; Lin, Shih-Yuan

    2014-05-01

    After liquid water was identified as the agent of ancient Martian fluvial activities, the valley and channels on the Martian surface were investigated by a number of remote sensing and in-situ measurements. In particular, the stereo DTMs and ortho images from various successful orbital sensors are being effectively used to trace the origin and consequences of Martian hydrological channels. For instance, to analyze the Martian fluvial activities more quantitatively using the topographic products, Burr et al. (2003) employed 1D hydrodynamic models such as HEC-RAS together with the topography by MOLA to derive water flow estimates for the Athabasca Valles area on Mars [1]. Where extensive floodplain flows or detailed 2D bathymetry for the river channel exist, it may be more accurate to simulate flows in two dimensions, especially if the direction of flow is unclear a priori. Thus in this study we demonstrated a quantitative modeling method utilizing multi-resolution Martian DTMs, constructed in line with Kim and Muller's (2009) [2] approach, and an advanced hydraulics model LISFLOOD-FP (Bates et al., 2010) [3], which simulates in-channel dynamic wave behavior by solving for 2D shallow water equations without advection. Martian gravitation and manning constants were adjusted in the hydraulic model and the inflow values were iteratively refined from the outputs of the coarser to the finer model. Then we chose the target areas among Martian fluvial geomorphologies and tested the effectiveness of high resolution hydraulic modeling to retrieve the characteristics of fluvial systems. Test sites were established in the Athabasca Valles, Bahram Vallis, and Naktong Vallis respectively. Since those sites are proposed to be originated by different fluvial mechanisms, it is expected that the outputs from hydraulics modeling will provide important clues about the evolution of each fluvial system. Hydraulics modeling in the test areas with terrestrial simulation parameters was also

  12. Combined fluvial and pluvial urban flood hazard analysis: concept development and application to Can Tho city, Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, Heiko; Martínez Trepat, Oriol; Nghia Hung, Nguyen; Thi Chinh, Do; Merz, Bruno; Viet Dung, Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Many urban areas experience both fluvial and pluvial floods, because locations next to rivers are preferred settlement areas and the predominantly sealed urban surface prevents infiltration and facilitates surface inundation. The latter problem is enhanced in cities with insufficient or non-existent sewer systems. While there are a number of approaches to analyse either a fluvial or pluvial flood hazard, studies of a combined fluvial and pluvial flood hazard are hardly available. Thus this study aims to analyse a fluvial and a pluvial flood hazard individually, but also to develop a method for the analysis of a combined pluvial and fluvial flood hazard. This combined fluvial-pluvial flood hazard analysis is performed taking Can Tho city, the largest city in the Vietnamese part of the Mekong Delta, as an example. In this tropical environment the annual monsoon triggered floods of the Mekong River, which can coincide with heavy local convective precipitation events, causing both fluvial and pluvial flooding at the same time. The fluvial flood hazard was estimated with a copula-based bivariate extreme value statistic for the gauge Kratie at the upper boundary of the Mekong Delta and a large-scale hydrodynamic model of the Mekong Delta. This provided the boundaries for 2-dimensional hydrodynamic inundation simulation for Can Tho city. The pluvial hazard was estimated by a peak-over-threshold frequency estimation based on local rain gauge data and a stochastic rainstorm generator. Inundation for all flood scenarios was simulated by a 2-dimensional hydrodynamic model implemented on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for time-efficient flood propagation modelling. The combined fluvial-pluvial flood scenarios were derived by adding rainstorms to the fluvial flood events during the highest fluvial water levels. The probabilities of occurrence of the combined events were determined assuming independence of the two flood types and taking the seasonality and probability of

  13. Estimating the fluvial sediment input to the coastal sediment budget: A case study of Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boateng, Isaac; Bray, Malcolm; Hooke, Janet

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge of fluvial sediment supply to the coastal sediment budget is important for the assessment of the impacts on coastal stability. Such knowledge is valuable for designing coastal engineering schemes and the development of shoreline management planning policies. It also facilitates understanding of the connection between rivers in the hinterland and adjoining coastal systems. Ghana's coast has many fluvial sediment sources and this paper provides the first quantitative assessments of their contributions to the coastal sediment budget. The methods use largely existing data and attempt to cover all of Ghana's significant coastal rivers. Initially work was hindered by insufficient direct measured data. However, the problem was overcome by the application of a regression approach, which provides an estimated sediment yield for non-gauged rivers based on data from gauged rivers with similar characteristics. The regression approach was effective because a regional coherence in behaviour was determined between those rivers, where direct measured data were available. The results of the assessment revealed that Ghana's coast is dissected by many south-draining rivers, stream and lagoons. These rivers, streams and lagoons supply significant amounts of sediment to coastal lowlands and therefore contribute importantly to beaches. Anthropogenic impoundment of fluvial sediment, especially the Akosombo dam on the Volta River, has reduced the total fluvial sediment input to the coast from about 71 × 10 6 m 3/a before 1964 (pre-Akosombo dam) to about 7 × 10 6 m 3/a at present (post-Akosombo dam). This sharp reduction threatened the stability of the east coast and prompted an expensive ($83 million) defence scheme to be implemented to protect 8.4 km-long coastline at Keta. Sections of Ghana's coast are closely connected to the hinterland through the fluvial sediment input from local rivers. Therefore, development in the hinterland that alters the fluvial sediment input from

  14. The source, discharge, and chemical characteristics of water from Agua Caliente Spring, Palm Springs, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Martin, Peter, (Edited By); Contributors: Brandt, Justin; Catchings, Rufus D.; Christensen, Allen H.; Flint, Alan L.; Gandhok, Gini; Goldman, Mark R.; Halford, Keith J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Martin, Peter; Rymer, Michael J.; Schroeder, Roy A.; Smith, Gregory A.; Sneed, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Numerical models of fluid and temperature flow were developed for the Agua Caliente Spring to (1) test the validity of the conceptual model that the Agua Caliente Spring enters the valley-fill deposits from fractures in the underlying basement complex and rises through more than 800 feet of valley-fill deposits by way of a washed-sand conduit and surrounding low-permeability deposits (spring chimney) of its own making, (2) evaluate whether water-level declines in the regional aquifer will influence the temperature of discharging water, and (3) determine the source of thermal water in the perched aquifer. A radial-flow model was used to test the conceptual model and the effect of water-level declines. The observed spring discharge and temperature could be simulated if the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the spring orifice was about 200 feet per day and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the orifice (spring chimney) was about 0.00002 feet per day. The simulated vertical hydraulic conductivity is within the range of values reported for sand; however, the low value simulated for the horizontal hydraulic conductivity suggests that the spring chimney is cemented with increasing depth. Chemical data collected for this study indicate that the water at Agua Caliente Spring is at saturation with respect to both calcite and chalcedony, which provides a possible mechanism for cementation of the spring chimney. A simulated decline of about 100 feet in the regional aquifer had no effect on the simulated discharge of Agua Caliente Spring and resulted in a slight increase in the temperature of the spring discharge. Results from the radial-flow- and three-dimensional models of the Agua Caliente Spring area demonstrate that the distribution and temperature of thermal water in the perched water table can be explained by flow from a secondary shallow-subsurface spring orifice of the Agua Caliente Spring not contained by the steel collector tank, not by leakage from the

  15. Agua Caliente Wind/Solar Project at Whitewater Ranch

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, Todd; Stewart, Royce

    2014-12-16

    Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy (DOE) to study the feasibility of a wind and/or solar renewable energy project at the Whitewater Ranch (WWR) property of ACBCI. Red Mountain Energy Partners (RMEP) was engaged to conduct the study. The ACBCI tribal lands in the Coachella Valley have very rich renewable energy resources. The tribe has undertaken several studies to more fully understand the options available to them if they were to move forward with one or more renewable energy projects. With respect to the resources, the WWR property clearly has excellent wind and solar resources. The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has continued to upgrade and refine their library of resource maps. The newer, more precise maps quantify the resources as among the best in the world. The wind and solar technology available for deployment is also being improved. Both are reducing their costs to the point of being at or below the costs of fossil fuels. Technologies for energy storage and microgrids are also improving quickly and present additional ways to increase the wind and/or solar energy retained for later use with the network management flexibility to provide power to the appropriate locations when needed. As a result, renewable resources continue to gain more market share. The transitioning to renewables as the major resources for power will take some time as the conversion is complex and can have negative impacts if not managed well. While the economics for wind and solar systems continue to improve, the robustness of the WWR site was validated by the repeated queries of developers to place wind and/or solar there. The robust resources and improving technologies portends toward WWR land as a renewable energy site. The business case, however, is not so clear, especially when the potential investment portfolio for ACBCI has several very beneficial and profitable alternatives.

  16. Chances and pitfalls of leaf wax biomarker analyses applied to fluvial sediment sequences - the example of a Holocene fluvial sediment-paleosol sequence from the upper Alazani River, eastern Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Suchodoletz, Hans; Bliedtner, Marcel; Zielhofer, Christoph; Faust, Dominik; Zech, Roland

    2016-04-01

    During the last decades, fluvial sediment sequences in many regions have intensively been studied to reconstruct Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental and palaeohydrological conditions. However, up to now analyses of leaf wax biomarkers that are increasingly used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental and -climate conditions e.g. from lake sediments or loess-paleosol sequences were not systematically applied to Late Quaternary fluvial sediments. Given the ubiquitous distribution of fluvial sediment sequences on the earth's surface such investigations could potentially strongly enhance the knowledge about former environmental conditions in many regions. For this conceptual study we exemplarily analysed leaf wax biomarker (long-chain n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids) in a fluvial sediment palaeosol sequence from the upper Alazani River in eastern Georgia to discuss general possibilities and pitfalls: Generally, biomarker records from fluvial archives can be divided into i) a catchment signal recorded in the fluvial sediment layers and ii) a local in-situ signal recorded in the intercalated paleosols. This offers the great chance to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions in both the whole catchment and at the sampling site. However, potential pitfalls are, for example, that inherited catchment signals can bias the in-situ signal from paleosols, while intermediate sediment storage in the catchment prior to sediment deposition and postsedimentary processes may alter the original catchment signal in the fluvial sediment layers. Thus, when applying leaf wax biomarker analyses to fluvial sediment sequences one has to be careful: The interpretation of the biomarker record strongly depends on the specific geomorphological and sedimentological conditions of the investigated site and of the catchment area.

  17. Ichnofossils and rhizoliths of the nearshore fluvial Jebel Qatrani Formation (Oligocene), Fayum Province, Egypt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.

    1982-01-01

    The ichnofossils and rhizoliths of the Oligocene Jebel Qatrani Formation of Egypt are among the best preserved, most diverse in form, and most abundant of such structures yet recognized in fluvial rocks. Twenty-one forms are described. The ichnofauna contains traces (domichnia, fodinichnia, cubichnia) of probable annelid, insect, crustacean, and vertebrate origin. These include the first described fossil nest structures and gallery systems of subterranean termites (Isoptera), the first examples of Ophiomorpha from wholly fluvial rocks, and the first fossil vertebrate burrows from the African Tertiary. Rhizoliths associated with the ichnofauna and those occurring elsewhere document a variety of small, wetland plants, coastal mangroves, and much larger trees. The environment suggested by these traces is consistent with the coastal, tropical to subtropical, monsoonal rain forest, with adjacent more open areas, that is indicated by independent evidence of sedimentology, paleontology, and paleopedology. ?? 1982.

  18. Regional variations in the fluvial Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian(?) Kanayut Conglomerate, Brooks Range, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Nilsen, Tor H.

    1984-03-01

    The wholly allochthonous Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian(?) Kanayut Conglomerate is one of the most extensive fluvial deposits in North America. It crops out for 950 km along the crest of the Brooks Range in a series of thrust plates and is as thick as 2615 m. The Kanayut forms the fluvial part of a large, coarse-grained delta. The lower part of the Kanayut (the Ear Peak Member) overlies marginal-marine and prodelta turbidite deposits and consists of fining-upward meandering-stream-channel cycles of conglomerate and sandstone within black to maroon floodplain shale deposits. The middle part of the Kanayut (the Shainin Lake Member) lacks shale and consists of fining-upward couplets of channelized conglomerate and parallel- to cross-stratified sandstone interpreted as braidplain deposits. These deposits contain the largest clasts (23 cm) and were deposited during maximum progradation of the fluvial sequence. The upper part of the Kanayut (the Stuver Member), which consists of fining-upward meandering stream cycles similar to those of the lower part, grades upward into overlying Lower Mississippian tidal and marginal-marine deposits. Paleocurrent data and distribution of largest clasts indicate that the Kanayut was deposited by southwest-flowing streams fed by at least two major trunk streams that drained a mountainous region to the north and east. Comparison of stratigraphic and sedimentologic data collected at three selected locations representative of proximal, intermediate and distal parts of the Kanayut basin reveal regional variations in its fluvial character. These include a decrease in total thickness of fluvial strata, an increase in total thickness of associated marine sandstone, the pinch-out of the coarse-grained middle part of the Kanayut and decreases in the conglomerate/sandstone and sandstone/shale ratios from proximal to distal areas of the basin. The coarse-grained parts of the fluvial cycles decrease in thickness and lateral extent from

  19. The fluvial system — Research perspectives of its past and present dynamics and controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herget, Jürgen; Dikau, Richard; Gregory, Ken J.; Vandenberghe, Jef

    2007-12-01

    During the conference "The fluvial system — past and present dynamics and controls" held at the Department of Geography of Bonn University from 16 to 22 of May 2005 the participants organised in 12 international organisations working in the fluvial environment were asked about their opinions about the main aspects to be considered for sustainable progress in future research projects. The individual comments can be grouped by the following headlines: integration and application of experiences, considering system analytical approaches, considering effects of climate and global change, interdisciplinary work, regarding extreme events and their frequencies and quantification of human impact. Detailed explanations and selected references of previous studies initially considering the mentioned aspects are given as a review.

  20. Comparability and accuracy of fluvial-sediment data - A view from the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, J.R.; Glysson, G.D.; Mueller, D.S.

    2002-01-01

    The quality of historical fluvial-sediment data cannot be taken for granted, based on a review of upper Colorado River basin suspended-sediment discharges, and on an evaluation of the reliability of Total Suspended Solids (TSS) data. Additionally, the quality of future fluvial-sediment data are not assured. Sediment-surrogate technologies, including those that operate on acoustic, laser, bulk optic, digital optic, or pressure differential principles, are being used with increasing frequency to measure in-stream and (or) laboratory fluvial-sediment characteristics. Data from sediment-surrogate technologies may yield results that differ significantly from those obtained by traditional methods for the same sedimentary conditions. Development of national sediment data-quality criteria and rigorous comparisons of data derived from sediment-surrogate technologies to those obtained by traditional techniques will minimize the potential for future fluvial-sediment data-quality concerns.

  1. Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir, Class I

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Mikael, Sami

    2002-02-05

    This report demonstrates the effectiveness of the CO2 miscible process in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic reservoirs. It also evaluated the use of horizontal CO2 injection wells to improve the overall sweep efficiency. A database of FDD reservoirs for the gulf coast region was developed by LSU, using a screening model developed by Texaco Research Center in Houston. The results of the information gained in this project is disseminated throughout the oil industry via a series of SPE papers and industry open forums.

  2. Fluvial processes and vegetation — Glimpses of the past, the present, and perhaps the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterkamp, W. R.; Hupp, C. R.

    2010-04-01

    Most research before 1960 into interactions among fluvial processes, resulting landforms, and vegetation was descriptive. Since then, however, research has become more detailed and quantitative permitting numerical modeling and applications including agricultural-erosion abatement and rehabilitation of altered bottomlands. Although progress was largely observational, the empiricism increasingly yielded to objective recognition of how vegetation interacts with and influences geomorphic process. A review of advances relating fluvial processes and vegetation during the last 50 years centers on hydrologic reconstructions from tree rings, plant indicators of flow- and flood-frequency parameters, hydrologic controls on plant species, regulation of sediment movement by vegetation, vegetative controls on mass movement, and relations between plant cover and sediment movement. Extension of present studies of vegetation as a regulator of bottomland hydrologic and geomorphic processes may become markedly more sophisticated and widespread than at present. Research emphases that are likely to continue include vegetative considerations for erosion modeling, response of riparian-zone forests to disturbance such as dams and water diversion, the effect of vegetation on channel and bottomland dynamics, and rehabilitation of stream corridors. Research topics that presently are receiving attention are the effect of woody vegetation on the roughness of stream corridors and, hence, processes of flood conveyance and flood-plain sedimentation, the development of a theoretical basis for rehabilitation projects as opposed to fully empirical approaches, the effect of invasive plant species on the dynamics of bottomland vegetation, the quantification of below-surface biomass and related soil-stability factors for use in erosion-prediction models, and the effect of impoundments on downstream narrowing of channels and accompanying encroachment of vegetation. Bottomland vegetation partially

  3. Applicability of Complexity Theory to Martian Fluvial Systems: A Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenshein, E. B.

    2003-01-01

    In the last 15 years, terrestrial geomorphology has been revolutionized by the theories of chaotic systems, fractals, self-organization, and selforganized criticality. Except for the application of fractal theory to the analysis of lava flows and rampart craters on Mars, these theories have not yet been applied to problems of Martian landscape evolution. These complexity theories are elucidated below, along with the methods used to relate these theories to the realities of Martian fluvial systems.

  4. Fluvial processes and vegetation - Glimpses of the past, the present, and perhaps the future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Hupp, C.R.

    2010-01-01

    Most research before 1960 into interactions among fluvial processes, resulting landforms, and vegetation was descriptive. Since then, however, research has become more detailed and quantitative permitting numerical modeling and applications including agricultural-erosion abatement and rehabilitation of altered bottomlands. Although progress was largely observational, the empiricism increasingly yielded to objective recognition of how vegetation interacts with and influences geomorphic process. A review of advances relating fluvial processes and vegetation during the last 50 years centers on hydrologic reconstructions from tree rings, plant indicators of flow- and flood-frequency parameters, hydrologic controls on plant species, regulation of sediment movement by vegetation, vegetative controls on mass movement, and relations between plant cover and sediment movement. Extension of present studies of vegetation as a regulator of bottomland hydrologic and geomorphic processes may become markedly more sophisticated and widespread than at present. Research emphases that are likely to continue include vegetative considerations for erosion modeling, response of riparian-zone forests to disturbance such as dams and water diversion, the effect of vegetation on channel and bottomland dynamics, and rehabilitation of stream corridors. Research topics that presently are receiving attention are the effect of woody vegetation on the roughness of stream corridors and, hence, processes of flood conveyance and flood-plain sedimentation, the development of a theoretical basis for rehabilitation projects as opposed to fully empirical approaches, the effect of invasive plant species on the dynamics of bottomland vegetation, the quantification of below-surface biomass and related soil-stability factors for use in erosion-prediction models, and the effect of impoundments on downstream narrowing of channels and accompanying encroachment of vegetation. Bottomland vegetation partially

  5. Beaver ponds' impact on fluvial processes (Beskid Niski Mts., SE Poland).

    PubMed

    Giriat, Dorota; Gorczyca, Elżbieta; Sobucki, Mateusz

    2016-02-15

    Beaver (Castor sp.) can change the riverine environment through dam-building and other activities. The European beaver (Castor fiber) was extirpated in Poland by the nineteenth century, but populations are again present as a result of reintroductions that began in 1974. The goal of this paper is to assess the impact of beaver activity on montane fluvial system development by identifying and analysing changes in channel and valley morphology following expansion of beaver into a 7.5 km-long headwater reach of the upper Wisłoka River in southeast Poland. We document the distribution of beaver in the reach, the change in river profile, sedimentation type and storage in beaver ponds, and assess how beaver dams and ponds have altered channel and valley bottom morphology. The upper Wisłoka River fluvial system underwent a series of anthropogenic disturbances during the last few centuries. The rapid spread of C. fiber in the upper Wisłoka River valley was promoted by the valley's morphology, including a low-gradient channel and silty-sand deposits in the valley bottom. At the time of our survey (2011), beaver ponds occupied 17% of the length of the study reach channel. Two types of beaver dams were noted: in-channel dams and valley-wide dams. The primary effect of dams, investigated in an intensively studied 300-m long subreach (Radocyna Pond), was a change in the longitudinal profile from smooth to stepped, a local reduction of the water surface slope, and an increase in the variability of both the thalweg profile and surface water depths. We estimate the current rate of sedimentation in beaver ponds to be about 14 cm per year. A three-stage scheme of fluvial processes in the longitudinal and transverse profile of the river channel is proposed. C. fiber reintroduction may be considered as another important stage of the upper Wisłoka fluvial system development. PMID:26657380

  6. The Holocene landscape development of the Gareja region in eastern Georgia - a fluvial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhishvili, Lasha; Elashvili, Mikheil; Janelidze, Zurab; Kikvadze, Bagrat; Navrozashvili, Levan; von Suchodoletz, Hans

    2013-04-01

    The semi-arid Gareja region in the Iori Highland in the southeastern part of the Republic of Georgia is characterized by an annual precipitation < 500 mm and shows an open steppic landscape today. As is known from historical sources, the landscape showed the same character already during the 6th century AD when the Gareja monastery located in the center of the region was founded by Assyrian monks. However, archaeological research carried out during the Soviet Period showed that there were dozens of settlements of bronze and iron age in this region almost devoid of water resources today, hinting to some sources of fresh water allowing people to live there during those periods. Furthermore, former archaeobotanical studies assume that the region was covered by forests instead of steppes during the past, although there is no final proof yet. The goal of this study is to shed light on the development of the palaeo-landscape during the prehistoric period and thus to address some of the issues described above. To do so, our work is based on the network of episodic streams that cross the region, running from the Iori mountains towards the Mtkvari (Kura) river as the main gaining stream of the region. Using rain water flow direction modeling in GIS we determined the main fluvial courses according to their. This pattern was compared with that of prehistoric settlements known from archaeologic studies, in order to get information about the possible perennial character of some rivers during the past. Furthermore, we did first investigations of outcrops with fluvial sediments found along some of such fluvial courses: Based on stratigraphic observations, pedologic investigations of potential palaeosols as indicators of landscape stability as well as on first numerical datings, we started to unravel the fluvial pattern of that region.

  7. Modeling Fluvial Incision and Transient Landscape Evolution: Influence of Dynamic Channel Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, M.; Tucker, G. E.; Cowie, P. A.; Whittaker, A. C.; Roberts, G. P.

    2007-12-01

    Channel geometry exerts a fundamental control on fluvial processes. Recent work has shown that bedrock channel width (W) depends on a number of parameters, including channel slope, and is not only a function of drainage area (A) as is commonly assumed. The present work represents the first attempt to investigate the consequences, for landscape evolution, of using a static expression of channel width (W ~ A0.5) versus a relationship that allows channels to dynamically adjust to changes in slope. We consider different models for the evolution of the channel geometry, including constant width-to-depth ratio (after Finnegan et al., Geology, v. 33, no. 3, 2005), and width-to-depth ratio varying as a function of slope (after Whittaker et al., Geology, v. 35, no. 2, 2007). We use the Channel-Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development (CHILD) model to analyze the response of a catchment to a given tectonic disturbance. The topography of a catchment in the footwall of an active normal fault in the Apennines (Italy) is used as a template for the study. We show that, for this catchment, the transient response can be fairly well reproduced using a simple detachment-limited fluvial incision law. We also show that, depending on the relationship used to express channel width, initial steady-state topographies differ, as do transient channel width, slope, and the response time of the fluvial system. These differences lead to contrasting landscape morphologies when integrated at the scale of a whole catchment. Our results emphasize the importance of channel width in controlling fluvial processes and landscape evolution. They stress the need for using a dynamic hydraulic scaling law when modeling landscape evolution, particularly when the uplift field is non-uniform.

  8. Identification of remaining oil resource potential in the Frio Fluvial/Deltaic Sandstone play, South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, M.H.; McRae, L.E.; Tyler, N.

    1994-05-01

    The Frio Fluvial/Deltaic Sandstone (Vicksburg Fault Zone) oil play of South Texas has produced nearly 1 billion stock tank barrels (BSTB) of oil, yet still contains about 1.2 BSTB of unrecovered mobile oil and an even greater amount of residual oil resources (1.5 BSTB). More than half of the reservoirs in this depositionally complex play have been abandoned, and large volumes of oil may remain unproduced. Interwell-scale geological facies models of Frio fluvial/deltaic reservoirs will be combined with engineering assessments and geophysical evaluations in order to characterize Frio fluvial/deltaic reservoir architecture, flow unit boundaries, and the controls that these characteristics exert on the location and volume of unrecovered mobile and residual oil. Reservoir attribute data were statistically analyzed from oil and gas fields throughout the geographic area covered by the Frio Fluvial/Deltaic Sandstone oil play. General reservoir attributes analyzed in detail included porosity, initial water saturation, residual oil saturation, net pay, reservoir area, and fluid characteristics. Statistical analysis of variance demonstrated no difference between oil reservoir attributes and gas reservoir attributes. Probability functions that describe attribute frequency distributions were determined for use in risk adjusting resource calculations. The oil play was found to contain significant volumes of remaining oil. The volumetric probability distribution between 5- and 95-percent probability for original oil in place ranges from 3.8 to 5.6 BSTB, original mobile oil in place ranges from 2.5 to 3.6 BSTB, and residual oil ranges from 1.5 to 2.3 BSTB. The untapped oil resource may be 10 percent of the original oil in place, or 380 million stock tank barrels.

  9. Modelling Multidecadal Fluvial Sediment Fluxes to Deltas Under Future Environmental Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, F. E.; Darby, S. E.; Nicholls, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    As low lying coastal regions deltas are prone to land loss, degradation, and flooding due to relative sea level rise. These processes endanger delta populations and infrastructure, a situation which is increasingly exacerbated by anthropogenic activities. The flux of fluvial sediment to deltas is a first order control on delta aggradation and thus the potential for the surface elevation of a delta to be maintained or rise relative to sea level. Aggradation may occur without anthropogenic interference, but it can also be induced by controlled flooding. This research investigates how future environmental changes through to 2100 will influence fluvial sediment delivery to a selection of 10 vulnerable deltas, thereby contributing to the understanding of relative sea level change projections for these fragile coastal systems. The key environmental changes investigated in this study include anthropogenic climate change, reservoir construction, and land cover changes induced by changes in agricultural practices and vegetation cover. The effects of these environmental changes on fluvial sediment delivery are being evaluated using the catchment numerical model WBMsed, which is being calibrated for the selection of deltas using historical reference data. As a test case, the inputs for modelling current and future sediment fluxes to the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta are refined using economic and population projections as proxies for anthropogenic influences on delta catchments. This research will contribute to the prognosis for vulnerable deltas and inform their short- and long-term management by indicating the consequences of anthropogenic activities which affect delta elevation and sustainability via altering fluvial sediment processes. While this could give forewarning for the residents and managers of unsustainable deltas, it could also be used as an argument for or against various anthropogenic activities.

  10. Application of UAS photogrammetry for assessment of flood driven fluvial dynamics of montane stream. Case study - Roklansky creek, Sumava Mts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhammer, Jakub; Miřijovský, Jakub; Hartvich, Filip; Kaiglová, Jana

    2014-05-01

    Current progress in hydrology and fluvial geomorphology is largely based on new field survey and analysis techniques, employing advanced technologies for monitoring the dynamics of the runoff process, field surveying and for remote monitoring of changes in riverbeds and of fluvial dynamics. Application of these techniques allows researchers to obtain information on a significantly higher qualitative level than using traditional methods of field survey and measurement, either in terms of spatial accuracy and resolution, frequency of sampling or qualitative characteristics of acquired data. The contribution demonstrates the potential of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for analysis of fluvial dynamics of montane stream, driven by flood in combination with other survey techniques, namely the ground LiDAR scanning, digital granulometry and automated water level monitoring. The UAS photogrammetry is employed in the study to acquire high precision DTMs, enabling reconstruction of riverbed and quantitative analysis of volumetric changes related to initial flood events. The hexacopter UAS platform has been used to acquire the data for photogrammetric analysis of complex stretch of stream with historically elevated fluvial dynamics. The photogrammetric reconstruction enabled to build accurate DTM of riverbed and floodplain before and after the initial event and to calculate the extent of volumetric changes. The potential of UAS photogrammetry for fluvio morphological study is in combination with other monitoring and survey techniques, enabling complex analysis of fluvial dynamics. The magnitude, duration and hydrological properties of initial flood event were derived from automated high frequency water level monitoring. The digital granulometry enabled to analyze the structure of sedimentary material in floodplain. The terrestrial LiDAR scanning allows construction of very detailed 3D models of selected fluvial forms, enabling deeper insight into the effects of fluvial

  11. Fluvial deposits of Yellowstone tephras: Implications for late Cenozoic history of the Bighorn basin area, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Several deposits of tephra derived from eruptions in Yellowstone National Park occur in the northern Bighorn basin area of Wyoming and Montana. These tephra deposits are mixed and interbedded with fluvial gravel and sand deposited by several different rivers. The fluvial tephra deposits are used to calculate stream incision rates, to provide insight into drainage histories and Quaternary tectonics, to infer the timing of alluvial erosion-deposition cycles, and to calibrate rates of soil development. ?? 1992.

  12. A comprehensive fluvial geomorphology study of riverbank erosion on the Red River in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimiaghalam, Navid; Goharrokhi, Masoud; Clark, Shawn P.; Ahmari, Habib

    2015-10-01

    Riverbank erosion on the Red River in Winnipeg, Manitoba has raised concerns over the last 20 years and more. Although several recent studies have shown that fluvial erosion can reduce riverbank stability and promote geotechnical slope failure, there are too few that have focused on this phenomenon. The present study includes field measurements, experimental testing, and numerical modelling to quantify fluvial erosion through a 10 km reach of the Red River. Results have shown that seasonal freeze-thaw processes can dramatically reduce the critical shear stress and increase erodibility of the riverbanks. Moreover, a simple method has been employed using hydrodynamic numerical models to define the applied shear stresses on the river banks based on the river water level, which will be useful for further research and design purposes. The TEMP/W numerical model was used to define seasonal frost depth to estimate freeze-thaw effects. Finally all field measurements, experimental and numerical models results were used to predict annual fluvial erosion through this reach of the river.

  13. Transport and deposition of plutonium-contaminated sediments by fluvial processes, Los Alamos Canyon, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, W.L.

    1996-10-01

    Between 1945 and 1952 the development of nuclear weapons at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, resulted in the disposal of plutonium into the alluvium of nearby Acid and (to a lesser degree) DP Canyons. The purpose of this paper is to explore the connection between the disposal sites and the main river, a 20 km link formed by the fluvial system of Acid, Pueblo, DP, and Los Alamos Canyons. Empirical data from 15 yr of annual sediment sampling throughout the canyon system has produced 458 observations of plutonium concentration in fluvial sediments. These data show that, overall, mean plutonium concentrations in fluvial sediment decline from 10,000 fCi/g near the disposal area to 100 fCi/g at the confluence of the canyon system and the Rio Grande. Simulations using a computer model for water, sediment, and plutonium routing in the canyon system show that discharges as large as the 25 yr event would fail to develop enough transport capacity to completely remove the contaminated sediments from Pueblo Canyon. Lesser flows would move some materials to the Rio Grande by remobilization of stored sediments. The simulations also show that the deposits and their contaminants have a predictable geography because they occur where stream power is low, hydraulic resistance is high, and the geologic and/or geomorphic conditions provide enough space for storage. 38 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Validation of a stochastic digital packing algorithm for porosity prediction in fluvial gravel deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Rui; Schruff, Tobias; Jia, Xiaodong; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Frings, Roy M.

    2015-11-01

    Porosity as one of the key properties of sediment mixtures is poorly understood. Most of the existing porosity predictors based upon grain size characteristics have been unable to produce satisfying results for fluvial sediment porosity, due to the lack of consideration of other porosity-controlling factors like grain shape and depositional condition. Considering this, a stochastic digital packing algorithm was applied in this work, which provides an innovative way to pack particles of arbitrary shapes and sizes based on digitization of both particles and packing space. The purpose was to test the applicability of this packing algorithm in predicting fluvial sediment porosity by comparing its predictions with outcomes obtained from laboratory measurements. Laboratory samples examined were two natural fluvial sediments from the Rhine River and Kall River (Germany), and commercial glass beads (spheres). All samples were artificially combined into seven grain size distributions: four unimodal distributions and three bimodal distributions. Our study demonstrates that apart from grain size, grain shape also has a clear impact on porosity. The stochastic digital packing algorithm successfully reproduced the measured variations in porosity for the three different particle sources. However, the packing algorithm systematically overpredicted the porosity measured in random dense packing conditions, mainly because the random motion of particles during settling introduced unwanted kinematic sorting and shape effects. The results suggest that the packing algorithm produces loose packing structures, and is useful for trend analysis of packing porosity.

  15. Recent Fluvial, Volcanic, and Tectonic Activity on the Cerberus Plains of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Daniel C.; Hartmann, William K.

    2002-09-01

    Athabasca and Marte Valles lie on the Cerberus plains, between the young, lava-covered plains of Elysium Planitia and Amazonis Planitia. To test pre- MGS ( Mars Global Surveyor) suggestions of extremely young volcanic and fluvial activity, we present the first crater counts from MGS imagery, at resolutions (˜2-20 m/pixel) much higher than previously available. The most striking result, based on morphologic relations as well as crater counts from different stratigraphic units, is to confirm quantitatively that these channel systems are much younger than most other major outflow channels. The general region has an average model age for lava and fluvial surfaces of ≤200 Myr, and has possibly seen localized water releases, interspersed with lava flows, within the past 20 Myr. The youngest lavas may be no more than a few megayears old. Access of lava and liquid brines to the surface may be favored by openings of the Cerberus Fossae fracture system, but, as shown in the new images, the fractures appear to have continued developing more recently than the most recent lavas or fluvial activity. The Cerberus Fossae system may be an analog to an early stage of Valles Marineris, and its youthful activity raises questions about regional tectonic history. Large-volume water delivery to the surface of young lava flows in recent martian history puts significant boundary conditions on the storage and history of water on Mars.

  16. Fluvial Wetland Nitrogen Removal in Shallow Sloped, Coastal New England Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, C. T.; Wollheim, W. M.; Mulukutla, G.; Lightbody, A.

    2015-12-01

    Excess nitrogen (N) in the environment contributes to eutrophication that can result in "dead zones" and fish kills. Most of the anthropogenic N is retained or removed by terrestrial and aquatic systems within watersheds, preventing this N from reaching the coast. Much research has focused on N removal in channelized stream reaches but recent studies have suggested that fluvial wetlands may play a larger role in the removal of anthropogenic N from aquatic ecosystems. We use the "Tracer Additions for Spiraling Curve Characterization" (TASCC) method coupled with deployment of new in situ nitrate analyzer technology to conduct experiments in long residence time, wetland dominated stream reaches (e.g. beaver ponds, flood plains, natural wetlands). These sensor based TASCC experiments were performed in three headwater fluvial wetlands in the spring and early summer and repeated in the fall and early winter during the 2014 field season. Preliminary results from a beaver pond reach show that N removal (as a percentage of inputs) was greater than in similar length channelized streams in the same region, but that most of this was due to longer residence time rather than increased biological uptake rates. This suggests that increased abundance of fluvial wetlands due to beaver activity will enhance network-scale retention. Use of the in situ sensor allows us to capture fine-scale variability, allowing for a better understanding of different flow paths taken by water parcels traversing a wetland and providing a better estimate of N removal compared to the discrete grab sampling method.

  17. Fractal topography and subsurface water flows from fluvial bedforms to the continental shield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worman, A.; Packman, A.I.; Marklund, L.; Harvey, J.W.; Stone, S.H.

    2007-01-01

    Surface-subsurface flow interactions are critical to a wide range of geochemical and ecological processes and to the fate of contaminants in freshwater environments. Fractal scaling relationships have been found in distributions of both land surface topography and solute efflux from watersheds, but the linkage between those observations has not been realized. We show that the fractal nature of the land surface in fluvial and glacial systems produces fractal distributions of recharge, discharge, and associated subsurface flow patterns. Interfacial flux tends to be dominated by small-scale features while the flux through deeper subsurface flow paths tends to be controlled by larger-scale features. This scaling behavior holds at all scales, from small fluvial bedforms (tens of centimeters) to the continental landscape (hundreds of kilometers). The fractal nature of surface-subsurface water fluxes yields a single scale-independent distribution of subsurface water residence times for both near-surface fluvial systems and deeper hydrogeological flows. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Isotope-based Fluvial Organic Carbon (ISOFLOC) Model: Model formulation, sensitivity, and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, William I.; Fox, James F.

    2015-06-01

    Watershed-scale carbon budgets remain poorly understood, in part due to inadequate simulation tools to assess in-stream carbon fate and transport. A new numerical model termed ISOtope-based FLuvial Organic Carbon (ISOFLOC) is formulated to simulate the fluvial organic carbon budget in watersheds where hydrologic, sediment transport, and biogeochemical processes are coupled to control benthic and transported carbon composition and flux. One ISOFLOC innovation is the formulation of new stable carbon isotope model subroutines that include isotope fractionation processes in order to estimate carbon isotope source, fate, and transport. A second innovation is the coupling of transfers between carbon pools, including algal particulate organic carbon, fine particulate and dissolved organic carbon, and particulate and dissolved inorganic carbon, to simulate the carbon cycle in a comprehensive manner beyond that of existing watershed water quality models. ISOFLOC was tested and verified in a low-gradient, agriculturally impacted stream. Results of a global sensitivity analysis suggested the isotope response variable had unique sensitivity to the coupled interaction between fluvial shear resistance of algal biomass and the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon. Model calibration and validation suggested good agreement at event, seasonal, and annual timescales. Multiobjective uncertainty analysis suggested inclusion of the carbon stable isotope routine reduced uncertainty by 80% for algal particulate organic carbon flux estimates.

  19. The fluvial sediment budget of the proglacial Fagge River derived from repeated laser scanning surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morche, D.; Bryk, A.; Baewert, H.

    2013-12-01

    Alpine regions are strongly affected by the global climate change. Alpine glaciers have had a negative net balance since the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA). Proglacial areas with freshly exposed subglacial sediments are expanding due to the retreat of glaciers. These sediments (moraines, tills, glaciofluvial deposits, etc.) are unconsolidated, unvegetated and are therefore highly unstable. During heavy rainfall events, glacial and glaciofluvial deposits are often remobilized and transported down the fluvial system. This study is focused on rapidly changing surfaces in the proglacial fluvial system of the Fagge River, which drains the Gepatschferner, one of the largest glaciers in Austria. . The field site is located in the Kaunertal/Austria and covers an area from the snout of the glacier (2206 m a.s.l.) to the outlet of the Fagge River at the Gepatsch Reservoir at (1750 m a.s.l.). The main goals of this study are to measure surface changes and calculate mass balances of major sediment sources (alluvial plains, bars) in the proglacial area that are directly connected to the fluvial system. Towards this end, multiple terrestrial laser scans were performed with an Optech ILRIS-36D laser scanner during the field season in 2011 and 2012. Significant surface changes occurred during the investigation period, mainly caused by an extreme flood event occurred after heavy rain on August 26, 2012. Large amounts of sediment (>70000 m^3) were remobilized, especially in the upper parts of the proglacial area, and were redeposited further downstream during this extraordinary event.

  20. Human-induced changes in animal populations and distributions, and the subsequent effects on fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, David R.

    2006-09-01

    Humans have profoundly altered hydrological pathways and fluvial systems through their near-extirpation of native populations of animal species that strongly influenced hydrology and removal of surface sediment, and through the introduction of now-feral populations of animals that bring to bear a suite of different geomorphic effects on the fluvial system. In the category of effects of extirpation, examples are offered through an examination of the geomorphic effects and former spatial extent of beavers, bison, prairie dogs, and grizzly bears. Beavers entrapped hundreds of billions of cubic meters of sediment in North American stream systems prior to European contact. Individual bison wallows, that numbered in the range of 100 million wallows, each displaced up to 23 m 3 of sediment. Burrowing by prairie dogs displaced more than 5000 kg and possibly up to 67,500 kg of sediment per hectare. In the category of feral populations, the roles of feral rabbits, burros and horses, and pigs are highlighted. Much work remains to adequately quantify the geomorphic effects animals have on fluvial systems, but the influence is undeniable.

  1. Geomechanical controls on fluvial erosion and sediment transport in a plate corner: Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Samuel; Koons, Peter; Boucher, Annie

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical properties of rock and soil play a critical role in orogenic landscape evolution by supporting a positive feedback between strain and erosion, localized within fault damage zones. Strain-induced damage can permanently reduce brittle rock strength by more than three orders of magnitude. As a result, faults can more efficiently localize tectonic strain, but fluvial processes of erosion and transport are also sensitive to a significant local increase in erodibility attributed to rock disaggregation and a comparatively smaller critical discharge required to transport fine grained fault gouge. We combine geomechanical, fluvial, and orographic climate models to investigate the influence of fault damage on the rates and patterns of landscape erosion and sediment transport in a tectonically active plate corner. Model results suggest a heterogeneous erosional response emerges, driving the rapid erosion of fault damage zones and the formation of deep structurally confined valleys buttressed by adjacent intact rock. The resulting topographic pattern amplifies strain localization by unloading the topographic stresses that resist shear failure right above the shear zones. The network of damaged rock associated with strain weakening also leads to faster landscape response times, but also longer sediment residence times. We compare model results to Southeast Alaska, where large glacial valleys, originally generated by fluvial incision, follow the complex pattern of deformation associated with plate corner collision.

  2. Applying fluvial geomorphology to river channel management: Background for progress towards a palaeohydrology protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, K. J.; Benito, G.; Downs, P. W.

    2008-06-01

    Significant developments have been achieved in applicable and applied fluvial geomorphology as shown in publications of the last three decades, analyzed as the basis for using results of studies of environmental change as a basis for management. The range of types of publications and of activities are more pertinent to river channel management as a result of concern with sustainability, global climate change, environmental ethics, ecosystem health concepts and public participation. Possible applications, with particular reference to river channel changes, include those concerned with form and process, assessment of channel change, urbanization, channelization, extractive industries, impact of engineering works, historical changes in land use, and restoration with specific examples illustrated in Table 1. In order to achieve general significance for fluvial geomorphology, more theory and extension by modelling methods is needed, and examples related to morphology and process characteristics, integrated approaches, and changes of the fluvial system are collected in Table 2. The ways in which potential applications are communicated to decision-makers range from applicable outputs including publications ranging from review papers, book chapters, and books, to applied outputs which include interdisciplinary problem solving, educational outreach, and direct involvement, with examples summarized in Table 3. On the basis of results gained from investigations covering periods longer than continuous records, a protocol embracing palaeohydrological inputs for application to river channel management is illustrated and developed as a synopsis version (Table 4), demonstrating how conclusions from geomorphological research can be expressed in a format which can be considered by managers.

  3. Fluvial drainage systems: Margaritifer Sinus and Agyre (NC, NE) quadrangles, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothroyd, J. C.; Grant, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Fluvial drainage systems, delineated by mapping on stereo pairs of Viking Orbiter images, have developed in various-sized basins in the Margaritifer Sinus (MC-19) and Agyre (MC-26) Quadrangles, Mars. The Ladon Valles system is the largest, draining into and through two multi-ringed impact basins. Smaller fluvial basins to the southeast of the Ladon structural basin appear to have internal drainage. An intermediate-scale fluvial basin containing Himera Vallis extends along a north-south axis at 22 W and opens northward toward outflow channels south of Margaritifer Chaos. Stereo-pair mapping was extended furhter to the east, in MC-19 Ne, Se, and MC-26 NE, to investigate sources of outflow to the Ares Vallis system. The direction of flow in the channel at the northeast quadrant of the Ladon Basin is unresolved at present because of the poor quality of images available to form stereo pairs. However, an easterly drainage basin boundary running north-south along longitude 9 W, and extending westward at latitude 32-35 S, encloses a series of longitudinal drainage systems. Both the Parana Valles-Loire Vallis system and the Samara Valles system appear to drain in a northwesterly direction. The Samara flows to the Himera drainage basin, and the Parana-Loire to the northeast Ladon channel area.

  4. Re-evaluating luminescence burial doses and bleaching of fluvial deposits using Bayesian computational statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, A. C.; Wallinga, J.; Hobo, N.; Versendaal, A. J.; Makaske, B.; Middelkoop, H.

    2015-01-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal from fluvial sediment often contains a remnant from the previous deposition cycle, leading to a partially bleached equivalent-dose distribution. Although identification of the burial dose is of primary concern, the degree of bleaching could potentially provide insights into sediment transport processes. However, comparison of bleaching between samples is complicated by sample-to-sample variation in aliquot size and luminescence sensitivity. Here we begin development of an age model to account for these effects. With measurement data from multi-grain aliquots, we use Bayesian computational statistics to estimate the burial dose and bleaching parameters of the single-grain dose distribution. We apply the model to 46 samples taken from fluvial sediment of Rhine branches in the Netherlands, and compare the results with environmental predictor variables (depositional environment, texture, sample depth, depth relative to mean water level, dose rate). Although obvious correlations with predictor variables are absent, there is some suggestion that the best-bleached samples are found close to the modern mean water level, and that the extent of bleaching has changed over the recent past. We hypothesise that sediment deposited near the transition of channel to overbank deposits receives the most sunlight exposure, due to local reworking after deposition. However, nearly all samples are inferred to have at least some well-bleached grains, suggesting that bleaching also occurs during fluvial transport.

  5. Modeling fluvial incision and transient landscape evolution: Influence of dynamic channel adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, M.; Tucker, G. E.; Whittaker, A. C.; Cowie, P. A.; Roberts, G. P.

    2008-09-01

    Channel geometry exerts a fundamental control on fluvial processes. Recent work has shown that bedrock channel width depends on a number of parameters, including channel slope, and is not solely a function of drainage area as is commonly assumed. The present work represents the first attempt to investigate the consequences of dynamic, gradient-sensitive channel adjustment for drainage-basin evolution. We use the Channel-Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development (CHILD) model to analyze the response of a catchment to a given tectonic perturbation, using, as a template, the topography of a well-documented catchment in the footwall of an active normal fault in the Apennines (Italy) that is known to be undergoing a transient response to tectonic forcing. We show that the observed transient response can be reproduced to first order with a simple detachment-limited fluvial incision law. Transient landscape is characterized by gentler gradients and a shorter response time when dynamic channel adjustment is allowed. The differences in predicted channel geometry between the static case (width dependent solely on upstream area) and dynamic case (width dependent on both drainage area and channel slope) lead to contrasting landscape morphologies when integrated at the scale of a whole catchment, particularly in presence of strong tilting and/or pronounced slip-rate acceleration. Our results emphasize the importance of channel width in controlling fluvial processes and landscape evolution. They stress the need for using a dynamic hydraulic scaling law when modeling landscape evolution, particularly when the relative uplift field is nonuniform.

  6. Heterogeneity in a Suburban River Network: Understanding the Impact of Fluvial Wetlands on Dissolved Oxygen and Metabolism in Headwater Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, J. S.; Wollheim, W. M.; Sheehan, K.; Lightbody, A.

    2014-12-01

    Low dissolved oxygen content in rivers threatens fish populations, aquatic organisms, and the health of entire ecosystems. River systems with high fluvial wetland abundance and organic matter, may result in high metabolism that in conjunction with low re-aeration rates, lead to low oxygen conditions. Increasing abundance of beaver ponds in many areas may exacerbate this phenomenon. This research aims to understand the impact of fluvial wetlands, including beaver ponds, on dissolved oxygen (D.O.) and metabolism throughout the headwaters of the Ipswich R. watershed, MA, USA. In several fluvial wetland dominated systems, we measured diel D.O. and metabolism in the upstream inflow, the surface water transient storage zones of fluvial wetland sidepools, and at the outflow to understand how the wetlands modify dissolved oxygen. D.O. was also measured longitudinally along entire surface water flow paths (x-y km long) to determine how low levels of D.O. propagate downstream. Nutrient samples were also collected to understand how their behavior was related to D.O. behavior. Results show that D.O. in fluvial wetlands has large swings with periods of very low D.O. at night. D.O. swings were also seen in downstream outflow, though lagged and somewhat attenuated. Flow conditions affect the level of inundation and the subsequent effects of fluvial wetlands on main channel D.O.. Understanding the D.O. behavior throughout river systems has important implications for the ability of river systems to remove anthropogenic nitrogen.

  7. Liquefaction susceptibility assessment in fluvial plains using airborne lidar: the case of the 2012 Emilia earthquake sequence area (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civico, R.; Brunori, C. A.; De Martini, P. M.; Pucci, S.; Cinti, F. R.; Pantosti, D.

    2015-11-01

    We report a case study from the Po River plain region (northern Italy), where significant liquefaction-related land and property damage occurred during the 2012 Emilia seismic sequence. We took advantage of a 1 m pixel lidar digital terrain model (DTM) and of the 2012 Emilia coseismic liquefaction data set to (a) perform a detailed geomorphological study of the Po River plain area and (b) quantitatively define the liquefaction susceptibility of the geomorphologic features that experienced different abundance of liquefaction. One main finding is that linear topographic highs of fluvial origin - together with crevasse splays, abandoned riverbeds and very young land reclamation areas - acted as a preferential location for the occurrence of liquefaction phenomena. Moreover, we quantitatively defined a hierarchy in terms of liquefaction susceptibility for an ideal fluvial environment. We observed that a very high liquefaction susceptibility is found in coincidence with fluvial landforms, a high-to-moderate liquefaction susceptibility within a buffer distance of 100 and 200 m from mapped fluvial landforms and a low liquefaction susceptibility outside fluvial landforms and relative buffer areas. Lidar data allowed a significant improvement in mapping with respect to conventionally available topographic data and/or aerial imagery. These results have significant implications for accurate hazard and risk assessment as well as for land-use planning. We propose a simple geomorphological approach for liquefaction susceptibility estimation. Our findings can be applied to areas beyond Emilia that are characterized by similar fluvial-dominated environments and prone to significant seismic hazard.

  8. Preservation of distributive vs. tributive and other fluvial system deposits in the rock record (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    A recent paper (Weissmann et al., 2010, Geology 38, 39-42) has suggested that deposits of distributive fluvial systems (DFS) “may represent the norm in the continental rock record, with axial and incised river deposits composing a relatively minor proportion of the succession”. Herein, I examine this hypothesis by reference to a number of well-exposed fluvial successions from a variety of basinal settings. The cited paper suggests that DFS dominate modern fluvial landscapes in subsiding sedimentary basins, while acknowledging that many merge into a trunk stream in the basin depocenter. Most of the modern World’s largest rivers, however, are tributive, and many of them preserve significant thicknesses of alluvium beneath and lateral to the modern channel belt. Because DFS are abundant on modern landscapes does not necessarily mean that they will be proportionately well-represented in the ancient. Consideration must also be given to the location within a basin where fluvial systems are most likely to be preserved (the depocenter), and to other factors. DFS (or fluvial/alluvial fans) are commonly developed on the tilted margins of asymmetric basins (hangingwalls of half-grabens and supradetachment basins, transtensional and foreland basins), but not in the depocenters. Symmetrically subsiding basins and long wavelength passive margin basins, however, facilitate development of extensive, very low-gradient plains where trunk streams with tributive or anabranching planforms are typical. Such basins, and the depocenters of asymmetric basins, are most likely to facilitate long-term establishment of trunk systems that have the greatest preservation potential. Incised and/or trunk stream deposits have, furthermore, been interpreted from a large number of ancient examples, some long-lived on timescales of millions of years. In the latter cases it has been argued that tectonic stability of the drainage basin is a key characteristic. A survey of the modern landscape

  9. Suspended sediment transport trough a large fluvial-tidal channel network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Scott A.; Morgan, Tara

    2015-01-01

    The confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, CA, forms a large network of interconnected channels, referred to as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Delta). The Delta comprises the transition zone from the fluvial influences of the upstream rivers and tidal influences of San Francisco Bay downstream. Formerly an extensive tidal marsh, the hydrodynamics and geomorphology of Delta have been substantially modified by humans to support agriculture, navigation, and water supply. These modifications, including construction of new channels, diking and draining of tidal wetlands, dredging of navigation channels, and the operation of large pumping facilities for distribution of freshwater from the Delta to other parts of the state, have had a dramatic impact on the physical and ecological processes within the Delta. To better understand the current physical processes, and their linkages to ecological processes, the USGS maintains an extensive network of flow, sediment, and water quality gages in the Delta. Flow gaging is accomplished through use of the index-velocity method, and sediment monitoring uses turbidity as a surrogate for suspended-sediment concentration. Herein, we present analyses of the transport and dispersal of suspended sediment through the complex network of channels in the Delta. The primary source of sediment to the Delta is the Sacramento River, which delivers pulses of sediment primarily during winter and spring runoff events. Upon reaching the Delta, the sediment pulses move through the fluvial-tidal transition while also encountering numerous channel junctions as the Sacramento River branches into several distributary channels. The monitoring network allows us to track these pulses through the network and document the dominant transport pathways for suspended sediment. Further, the flow gaging allows for an assessment of the relative effects of advection (the fluvial signal) and dispersion (from the tides) on the sediment pulses as they

  10. Fluvial Interpretation of Ridged Units, Northern Sinus Meridiani/Southwest Arabia Terra, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, J.; Allen, C. C.; Oehler, D. Z.

    2007-12-01

    THEMIS, MOC, and HiRISE imagery shows features at various scales that suggest fluvial emplacement of the ridge-forming rock units exposed in northern Sinus Meridiani and southwestern Arabia Terra. The study area -- 10 N to 2 S latitude and 10 W to 8 E longitude -- spans the interface from the southern highlands to the northern plains. Numerous, linear ridges of varying width, orientation and sinuosity (mainly lower sinuosity) are suggestive of fluvial channels. Sets of features can be interpreted as braided channel reaches. Cross-cutting relationships, a common feature of channels on terrestrial fluvial plains, are ubiquitous. Many sinuous features appear as twinned parallel lines, suggesting preferential cementing of coarser channel-bank sediments. A few examples exist of features that can be interpreted as scroll bars and channel augmentation in locally narrow reaches. Layering and internal discontinuities of the Meridiani rocks are consistent with a fluvial interpretation. The regional setting of study-area units accords closely with many terrestrial basins which are occupied by fluvially emplaced sediment bodies known as megafans. Contiguous megafan surfaces (characterized by numerous channel traces, of varied orientation) cover large areas -- 1.25 million sq. km. in S. America -- with radii of hundreds of km. Megafans characteristically lie at the foot of a backing highland, from which rivers supply sediment. The ridged units on Mars lie at the foot of the southern highlands from which numerous river valleys have drained towards Meridiani Planum/southwest Arabia Terra. Further, the present regional slope is apparently away from the highlands, with downslope dimensions of hundreds of km. The low slopes of the northern Meridiani units mirror the typically low regional slopes of terrestrial megafans. Low slopes are conducive to the development of water bodies, which are numerous on some terrestrial megafans. The lacustrine model for the formation of the hematite

  11. Fluvial sedimentation on a quivering craton: Influence of slight crustal movements on fluvial processes, upper Jurassic Morrison formation, western Colorado plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, F.

    1984-01-01

    One of the most important challenges facing the fluvial sedimentologist is identification of processes outside the stream channel that influence deposition of fluvial sediments. Detailed studies in the lower sequence of the Salt Wash Member (Morrison Formation, Upper Jurassic) demonstrate that crustal deformation at the site of deposition may considerably influence braided-stream processes. Late Jurassic crustal movements in the western part of the Colorado Plateau are interpreted largely from thickness variations and facies distribution, but other features such as vertical repetition of facies, coincidence with at least parts of present-day folds, and the geographic distribution of bedding parameters measured in the fluvial deposits, are also used as corroborating evidence of syndepositional tectonism. These features indicate that several of the large uplifts and basins in the region as well as some of the smaller folds within them were actively moving during deposition of the lower sequence. Tectonic activity altered the stream gradients, which in turn governed sinuosity, flow regime, energy levels, and sediment distribution. Cross-bedding studies indicate that reduced gradients within downwarped areas led to slight increases in sinuosity of the braided-stream channels and of the small sub-channels within them. The lowered gradients apparently resulted in a decrease in the depth of the channels and allowed the streams to flood more readily, producing abundant upper-flow regime horizontal laminations in the channel deposits. In addition, greater quantities of sediment containing higher proportions of sand were deposited in downwarped areas than in positive localities. The inability of the streams to transport bed load through downwarped areas indicates loss of stream energy. However, an increase in the quantity of upper-flow regime horizontal laminations in the same downwarped areas suggests that an increase in flow regime is not necessarily accompanied by an

  12. 25 CFR 115.106 - Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians. 115.106 Section 115.106 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.106 Assets of members of the...

  13. 25 CFR 115.106 - Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians. 115.106 Section 115.106 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.106 Assets of members of the...

  14. Geologie study off gravels of the Agua Fria River, Phoenix, AZ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Dewitt, E.; Adams, D.T.; O'Briens, T.

    2010-01-01

    The annual consumption of sand and gravel aggregate in 2006 in the Phoenix, AZ metropolitan area was about 76 Mt (84 million st) (USGS, 2009), or about 18 t (20 st) per capita. Quaternary alluvial deposits in the modern stream channel of the Agua Fria River west of Phoenix are mined and processed to provide some of this aggregate to the greater Phoenix area. The Agua Fria drainage basin (Fig. 1) is characterized by rugged mountains with high elevations and steep stream gradients in the north, and by broad alluvial filled basins separated by elongated faultblock mountain ranges in the south. The Agua Fria River, the basin’s main drainage, flows south from Prescott, AZ and west of Phoenix to the Gila River. The Waddel Dam impounds Lake Pleasant and greatly limits the flow of the Agua Fria River south of the lake. The southern portion of the watershed, south of Lake Pleasant, opens out into a broad valley where the river flows through urban and agricultural lands to its confluence with the Gila River, a tributary of the Colorado River.

  15. 25 CFR 115.106 - Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians. 115.106 Section 115.106 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.106 Assets of members of the...

  16. 25 CFR 115.106 - Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians. 115.106 Section 115.106 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.106 Assets of members of the...

  17. A fluvial and pluvial probabilistic flood hazard analysis for Can Tho city, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, Heiko; Martinez, Oriol; Thi Chinh, Do; Viet Dung, Nguyen

    2014-05-01

    Can Tho city is the largest city and the economic heart of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Due to its economic importance and envisaged development goals the city grew rapidly in population size and extend over the last two decades. Large parts of the city are located in flood prone areas, and also the central parts of the city recently experienced an increasing number of flood events, both of fluvial and pluvial nature. As the economic power and asset values are constantly increasing, this poses a considerable risk for the city. The the aim of this study is to perform a flood hazard analysis considering both fluvial and pluvial floods and to derive probabilistic flood hazard maps. This requires in a first step an understanding of the typical flood mechanisms. Fluvial floods are triggered by a coincidence of high water levels during the annual flood period in the Mekong Delta with high tidal levels, which cause in combination short term inundations in Can Tho. Pluvial floods are triggered by typical tropical convective rain storms during the monsoon season. These two flood pathways are essentially independent in its sources and can thus be treated in the hazard analysis accordingly. For the fluvial hazard analysis we propose a bivariate frequency analysis of the Mekong flood characteristics, the annual maximum flood discharge Q and the annual flood volume V at the upper boundary of the Mekong Delta, the gauging station Kratie. This defines probabilities of exceedance of different Q-V pairs, which are transferred into synthetic flood hydrographs. The synthetic hydrographs are routed through a quasi-2D hydrodynamic model of the entire Mekong Delta in order to provide boundary conditions for a detailed hazard mapping of Can Tho. This downscaling step is necessary, because the huge complexity of the river and channel network does not allow for a proper definition of boundary conditions for Can Tho city by gauge data alone. In addition the available gauge data around Can Tho

  18. Gully annealing by fluvially-sourced Aeolian sand: remote sensing investigations of connectivity along the Fluvial-Aeolian-hillslope continuum on the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Joel B.; East, Amy E.; Collins, Brian D.; Caster, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Processes contributing to development of ephemeral gully channels are of great importance to landscapes worldwide, and particularly in dryland regions where soil loss and land degradation from gully erosion pose long-term, land-management problems. Whereas gully formation has been relatively well studied, much less is known of the processes that anneal gullies and impede their growth. This work investigates gully annealing by aeolian sediment, along the Colorado River downstream of Glen Canyon Dam in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons, Arizona, USA (Figure 1). In this segment of the Colorado River, gully erosion potentially affects the stability and preservation of archaeological sites that are located within valley margins. Gully erosion occurs as a function of ephemeral, rainfall-induced overland flow associated with intense episodes of seasonal precipitation. Measurements of sediment transport and topographic change have demonstrated that fluvial sand in some locations is transported inland and upslope by aeolian processes to areas affected by gully erosion, and aeolian sediment activity can be locally effective at counteracting gully erosion (Draut, 2012; Collins and others, 2009, 2012; Sankey and Draut, 2014). The degree to which specific locations are affected by upslope wind redistribution of sand from active channel sandbars to higher elevation valley margins is termed “connectivity”. Connectivity is controlled spatially throughout the river by (1) the presence of upwind sources of fluvial sand within the contemporary active river channel (e.g., sandbars), and (2) bio-physical barriers that include vegetation and topography that might impede aeolian sediment transport. The primary hypothesis of this work is that high degrees of connectivity lead to less gullying potential.

  19. Facies architecture and sequence stratigraphy of an early post-rift fluvial succession, Aptian Barbalha Formation, Araripe Basin, northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Claiton M. S.; Goldberg, Karin; Bardola, Tatiana

    2015-06-01

    The Barbalha Formation (Aptian) records deposition in a fluvial and lacustrine environment accumulated in an early post-rift sag basin. Characterization of the facies architecture and sequence stratigraphic framework of the alluvial succession was carried out through detailed description and interpretation of outcrops and cored wells. The development of depositional sequences in this unit reflects variation in the accommodation-to-sediment supply (A/S) ratio. Two depositional sequences, showing an overall fining-upward trend, are preserved within the succession. The sequences are bounded by regional subaerial unconformities formed during negative A/S ratio, and may be subdivided in Low-accommodation Systems Tracts (LAST) (positive A/S ratio close to zero) and High accommodation Systems Tracts (HAST) (A/S ratio between 0.5 and 1). Sequence 1, with a minimum thickness of 100 m, is characterized by amalgamated, multi-storey, braided fluvial channel sand bodies, defining a LAST. These are interlayered with crevasse splay and floodplain deposits toward the top, passing to open lacustrine deposits, defining a HAST. Sequence 2, with minimum thickness ranging from 50 to 90 m, overlies the organic-rich lacustrine deposits. At the base, this sequence is composed of amalgamated, multistorey braided fluvial channel sand bodies (LAST), similar to Sequence 1, overlain by well-drained floodplain with fixed fluvial channel deposits, interpreted as an anastomosed fluvial system, which are in turn capped by lacustrine deposits, both grouped in a HAST. Paleocurrent data on fluvial deposits of sequences 1 and 2 show a consistent paleoflow to the SE. Sedimentological evidence indicates humid to sub-humid climatic conditions during deposition of sequences 1 and 2. Accumulation of fluvial sequences 1 and 2 was mainly controlled by tectonics. Variation in A/S ratios must be related to tectonic subsidence and uplift of the basin.

  20. Biosorption behavior and mechanism of cesium-137 on Rhodosporidium fluviale strain UA2 isolated from cesium solution.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tu; Feng, Yue; Liao, Jiali; Li, Xiaolong; Ding, Congcong; Zhang, Dong; Yang, Jijun; Zeng, Junhui; Yang, Yuanyou; Tang, Jun; Liu, Ning

    2014-08-01

    In order to identify a more efficient biosorbent for (137)Cs, we have investigated the biosorption behavior and mechanism of (137)Cs on Rhodosporidium fluviale (R. fluviale) strain UA2, one of the dominant species of a fungal group isolated from a stable cesium solution. We observed that the biosorption of (137)Cs on R. fluviale strain UA2 was a fast and pH-dependent process in the solution composed of R. fluviale strain UA2 (5 g/L) and cesium (1 mg/L). While a Langmuir isotherm equation indicated that the biosorption of (137)Cs was a monolayer adsorption, the biosorption behavior implied that R. fluviale strain UA2 adsorbed cesium ions by electrostatic attraction. The TEM analysis revealed that cesium ions were absorbed into the cytoplasm of R. fluviale strain UA2 across the cell membrane, not merely fixed on the cell surface, which implied that a mechanism of metal uptake contributed largely to the cesium biosorption process. Moreover, PIXE and EPBS analyses showed that ion-exchange was another biosorption mechanism for the cell biosorption of (137)Cs, in which the decreased potassium ions were replaced by cesium ions. All the above results implied that the biosorption of (137)Cs on R. fluviale strain UA2 involved a two-step process. The first step is passive biosorption that cesium ions are adsorbed to cells surface by electrostatic attraction; after that, the second step is active biosorption that cesium ions penetrate the cell membrane and accumulate in the cytoplasm. PMID:24631916

  1. Fluvial ecosystem services in the Rhine delta distributaries between 1995 and 2035

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatsma, Menno; Kleinhans, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Mapping of ecosystem services (ES) and documenting their change over time provides important information for the societal debate and decision making on river management. Large and Gilvear (2014) showed how to score fluvial ES using imagery and tools available through Google Earth, linking observable features, or landcover to ES through inferred fluvial processes, and natural ecosystem functions. While the use of Google Earth enables application anywhere on the globe, their method is labor intensive, and involves subjective judgement as not all parameters are easily observable in spectral data, e.g. the location of embankments. In addition, the method does not take advantage of readily available spatial databases, and existing hydrodynamic model parameterizations, nor can it be used in scenario studies of future fluvial landscapes. Therefore, we aimed at the development of a generic GIS routine to extract the ecosystem services from existing spatial and hydrodynamic model data, and its application to historic and future fluvial landscapes in the Rhine delta. Here, we consider the Rhine distributaries, sized 400 km2, where river restoration measures were carried out between 1995 and 2015 to reduce flood risk reduction and simultaneously improve the ecological status. We computed ES scores for provisioning ES (fisheries, agriculture, timber, water supply), regulating ES (flood mitigation, carbon sequestration, water quality), and supporting ES (biodiversity). Historic ES were derived for the years 1997, 2005, and 2012, based on ecotope maps for these respective years, combined with a water levels and flow velocities derived from a calibrated 2D hydrodynamic model (WAQUA). Ecotopes are defined as 'spatial landscape units that are homogeneous as to vegetation structure, succession stage, and the main abiotic factors that are relevant to plant growth'. ES for 2035 were based on scenarios of landscaping measures. Suitable locations for the measures were determined

  2. Comparing OSL and CN techniques for dating fluvial terraces and estimating surface process rates in Pamir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Margret; Gloaguen, Richard; Pohl, Eric; Sulaymonova, Vasila; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of surface process rates is crucial for understanding the topographic evolution of high mountains. Spatial and temporal variations in fluvial incision and basin-wide erosion enable to decipher the role of tectonic and climatic drivers. The Pamir is peculiar in both aspects because of its location at the western end of the India-Asia collision zone, and its position at the edge of two atmospheric circulation systems, the Westerlies and the Indian Summer Monsoon. The architecture of the Panj river network indicates prominent variations across the main tectonic structures of the Pamir. The trunk stream, deflects from the predominantly westward river orientation and cuts across the southern and central Pamir domes before doubling back to the west and leaving the orogen. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of fluvial terraces reveals short-term sedimentation along the trunk stream during the last ~25 kyr. The agreement of OSL results to new exposure ages based on the cosmogenic nuclide (CN) 10Be confirms accurate terrace age modelling and treatment of incomplete bleaching. The consistent terrace sedimentation and exposure ages suggest also fast terrace abandonment and rapid onset of incision. Considerable differences in terrace heights reflect high spatial variations of fluvial incision, independent of time interval, change in rock type or catchment increase. Highest rates of (5.9 ± 1.1) mm/yr to (10.0 ± 2.0) mm/yr describe the fluvial dynamic across the Shakhdara Dome and that related to the Darvaz Fault Zone. Lower rates of (3.9 ± 0.6) mm/yr to (4.5 ± 0.7) mm/yr indicate a transient stage north of the Yazgulom Dome. Fluvial incision decreases to rates ranging from (1.7 ± 0.3) mm/yr to (3.9 ± 0.7) mm/yr in graded river reaches associated to southern dome boundaries. The pattern agrees to the interpretation of successive upstream river captures across the southern and central Pamir domes inferred from morphometric analyses of river

  3. Fluvial Record of Active Deformation Along the Canyon River Fault in the Wynoochee River Valley, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delano, J.; Amos, C. B.; Loveless, J. P.; Rittenour, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ongoing uplift of the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State represents unknown contributions from Cascadia subduction zone processes, including earthquakes, interseismic deformation, aseismic slow slip events, and north-south shortening of the North American plate focused on upper plate faults. The relationship between upper plate faults and Cascadia subduction is poorly understood, as is the seismic hazard posed by these structures to the greater Puget Sound region. The Wynoochee River is a south-flowing drainage in the southern Olympic Mountains bisected by a previously uncharacterized section of the Canyon River reverse fault. In this study we utilize high-resolution aerial lidar and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of offset fluvial terraces to determine the kinematics and slip rate of the Canyon River fault over the late Quaternary. In combination with surficial geologic mapping and differential GPS surveys of terrace straths observed in the field, we also determine incision rates along the Wynoochee River from OSL dates. Our mapping reveals eight generations of fluvial and glaciofluvial terraces, with twenty-one pending ages from OSL sampling of fluvial sands intercalated with outwash and river gravels. Additionally, we compare our slip rate results with a boundary element model, estimating the stress on the Canyon River fault over the recent decades, as constrained by GPS data from the Cascadia subduction zone. Preliminary results indicate that the Canyon River fault is a long-lived feature with south-side-up and left-lateral displacement. Taken together, our results enable comparison of deformation rates constrained by short-term, geodetic data with those acting over longer-term geologic time scales.

  4. Fluvial Erosion Measurements of Streambank Using Photo-Electronic Erosion Pins (peep)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutarto, T.; Papanicolaou, T.; Wilson, C. G.; Bertrand, F.

    2010-12-01

    Cohesive streambank erosion is characterized by two main mechanisms, fluvial entrainment of individual particles and bank failure due to gravity (Thorne, 1980). In this study, the relative importance of fluvial erosion (compared to mass failure) was determined in two reaches from different locations of the Clear Creek Watershed (CCW). The main goal of the project was the identification of the key erosion process at each site. Beyond the distinguished flow conditions (hydraulic forces), different stream orders, and land-use, no further attempts were made to identify other key driving agents behind the erosion, such subaerial processes (e.g., seepage, freeze/thaw) acting at the cohesive riverbanks (Lindow et al., 2009). Erosion lengths up to 38 cm were detected. The bank erosion monitoring at high resolution intervals due to the PEEPS allowed for better characterization the fluvial erosion occurring at this site and develop a correspondence between sedigraphs and hydrographs. .Similar statistical methods were used at both sites to support our findings. The moving average identified the dominant trend of the data and the variability of the erosion lengths at the two sites. Further, the use of the Shewhart Charts allowed us to detect the critical erosion events during the period of observation. Finally the overall performance of the PEEPs was evaluated during this study. A correlation analysis was conducted between the direct measurements of traditional methods (e.g., erosion pins, geodetical surveys, measure tape) and the automated data recorded by the PEEP. The maximum error between manual and automated measurements of the exposed length of the PEEPs was less than 27%. The error between the channel survey and the automated PEEP measurements was less than 14%.

  5. Study on fine geological modelling of the fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oilfield

    SciTech Connect

    Zhoa Han-Qing

    1997-08-01

    These paper aims at developing a method for fine reservoir description in maturing oilfields by using close spaced well logging data. The main productive reservoirs in Daqing oilfield is a set of large fluvial-deltaic deposits in the Songliao Lake Basin, characterized by multi-layers and serious heterogeneities. Various fluvial channel sandstone reservoirs cover a fairly important proportion of reserves. After a long period of water flooding, most of them have turned into high water cut layers, but there are considerable residual reserves within them, which are difficult to find and tap. Making fine reservoir description and developing sound a geological model is essential for tapping residual oil and enhancing oil recovery. The principal reason for relative lower precision of predicting model developed by using geostatistics is incomplete recognition of complex distribution of fluvial reservoirs and their internal architecture`s. Tasking advantage of limited outcrop data from other regions (suppose no outcrop data available in oilfield) can only provide the knowledge of subtle changing of reservoir parameters and internal architecture. For the specific geometry distribution and internal architecture of subsurface reservoirs (such as in produced regions) can be gained only from continuous infilling logging well data available from studied areas. For developing a geological model, we think the first important thing is to characterize sandbodies geometries and their general architecture`s, which are the framework of models, and then the slight changing of interwell parameters and internal architecture`s, which are the contents and cells of the model. An excellent model should possess both of them, but the geometry is the key to model, because it controls the contents and cells distribution within a model.

  6. Fluvial sedimentology of a Mesozoic petrified forest assemblage, Shishu Formation, Junggar foreland basin, Xinjiang, China

    SciTech Connect

    McKnight, C.L.; Gan, O.; Carroll, A.R.; Dilcher, D.; Zhao, M.; Liang, Y.H.; Graham, S.A.

    1988-02-01

    The Upper Jurassic(.) Shishu Formation of the eastern Junggar basin, Xinjiang, northwest China, is a fluvial sand unit containing an important assemblage of well-preserved, silicified tree trunks and rooted stumps. Numerous logs, up to 83 ft (25.5 m) long, occur at several levels within a 33.6-ft (10.3 m) stratigraphic section of fluvial sand, gravel, and mud and several paleosol horizons. The uppermost logbearing layer includes a number of rooted tree stumps in growth position, with diameters of up to 8 ft (2.5 m). The maximum root length observed is 40 ft (12.3 m). The trees have been identified by Chinese paleontologists as Cupressinoxylon. The petrified forest assemblage is preserved on the northeast margin of the Mesozoic Junggar foreland basin, a large continental basin subsiding under thrust loading from the south. Logs found within channel gravel units are oriented with their log axes parallel to the channel axis. Sedimentary structures, including epsilon and trough cross-stratification and imbricated channel gravels, indicate paleocurrent flow generally to the south, toward the basin center. The size of the logs suggests the presence of a major fluvial system. The epsilon cross-sets suggest a channel depth of 26 ft (8 m). The oriented silicified logs and their enclosing clastic sediments provide important information on the depositional systems active on the northeastern margin of the Junggar basin in the Late Jurassic(.) time. Hopefully, further detailed study of the fossil trees, including the spacing of the rooted stumps, will provide new information on the paleoecology of Mesozoic forests and the climatic conditions prevailing in the region at the time of deposition.

  7. External controls on Quaternary fluvial incision and terrace formation at the Segre River, Southern Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, Kurt Martin; van Balen, Ronald; Vandenberghe, Jef; Peña, Jose Luis; Sancho, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Focusing on climatic- and structural (tectonic) controls, we aim to determine their relative importance for the (Pliocene to Quaternary) fluvial landscape evolution in the Southern Pyrenees foreland. We investigate the Segre River, which is one of the major streams of the Southern Pyrenees that drains the elevated chain towards the Ebro foreland basin. Along its course, the Segre River has a flight of fluvial cut-and-fill (and strath-type) terraces preserved that have been mapped based on DEM's and geomorphological fieldwork. This paper presents the first results of our study and reports on the Segre terrace staircase, which is characterized by seven major Quaternary terrace levels with elevations up to more than 110 m above the modern floodplain. At the upper and middle reaches, the semi-parallel terraces of the Segre River occasionally show anomalies featuring extensive gravel thickness and deformation caused by faulting, folding and local subsidence. The longitudinal correlations of terrace levels reveal increased vertical terrace spacing in the foreland, which could originate from enhanced fluvial erosion after the Mid-Pleistocene climate transition in combination with base level lowering controlled by the progressive downcutting of the Catalan Coastal Range. Since the Ebro Basin opening (Late Miocene), the Catalan Coastal Range, which borders the Ebro foreland basin to the Mediterranean Sea, was progressively cut down and the exorheic drainage system gradually adjusted to sea level. The Segre longitudinal terrace profiles and the Ebro gorge morphology at the Catalan Coastal Range indicate a base-level of about 200 m.s.l. at the beginning of (Pleistocene) terrace formation, which implies that the Catalan Coastal Range might have functioned as a local base-level upstream of the sea outlet, presumably until the Late Pleistocene. Alternatively, a yet unknown tectonic process might have caused base level lowering and the preservation of terrace staircases at the

  8. Analysis of crater valleys, Noachis Terra, Mars: Evidence of fluvial and glacial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, S. W.; Clarke, J. D. A.; Paull, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    The precise mechanism for the formation and evolution of crater valley networks in the Martian southern highlands remains under debate, with precipitation, groundwater flow, and melting induced by impact being suggested. We studied valley networks within four craters of the Noachis Terra highlands that were representative of similar features in Noachis Terra and where orbital data existed for analysis in order to characterise their morphology and infer possible processes involved in their formation and evolution. We found evidence for valleys carved by liquid water and ice-related processes. This included strong evidence of liquid water-based valley formation through melting of ice-rich deposits throughout our study area, suggesting an alternative to previously suggested rainfall or groundwater-based scenarios. The location of these valleys on steeply sloping crater walls, as opposed to the shallow slopes of the highlands where Martian valleys are typically found, suggested that our 'fluvial' valleys had not evolved a more structured fluvial morphology as valley networks found on the Martian plains. Our studied valleys' association with ice-rich material and abundant evidence for erosion caused by downslope flow of ice-rich material are consistent with a cold, wet Mars hypothesis where accumulation, flow, and melting of ice have been dominant factors in eroding crater valleys. Additionally, analysis of valley morphology with slope and aspect suggested a greater dependence on local geology and presence of volatiles than larger valley networks, though ice-related valleys were consistently wider for their length than valleys assessed as fluvial carved. We assessed that local conditions such as climate, geology, and availability of ice-rich material played a major role in the erosion of crater valleys at our study site.

  9. Reservoir heterogeneity in middle Frio fluvial sandstones: Case studies in Seeligson field, Jim Wells County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Jirik, L.A. )

    1990-09-01

    Detailed evaluation of middle Frio (Oligocene) fluvial sandstones reveals a complex architectural style potentially suited to the addition of gas reserves through recognition of poorly drained reservoir compartments and bypassed gas zones. Seeligson field is being studied as part of a Gas Research Institute/US Department of Energy/State of Texas-sponsored program, with the cooperation of Oryx Energy Company and Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Inc. Four reservoirs, Zones 15, 16D, 16E, and 19C, were studied in a 20 mi{sup 2} area within Seeligson field. Collectively, these reservoirs have produced more than 240 bcf of gas from wells within the study area. Detailed electric log correlation of individual reservoirs enabled subdivision of aggregate producing zones into component genetic units. Cross sections, net-sandstone maps, and log-facies maps were prepared to illustrate depositional style, sand-body geometry, and reservoir heterogeneity. Zones 15 and 19C are examples of laterally stacked fluvial architecture. Individual channel-fill sandstones range from 10 to 50 ft thick, and channel widths are approximately 2,500 ft. Crevasse-splay sandstones may extend a few thousand feet from the main channel system. Multiple, overlapping channel and splay deposits commonly form sand-rich belts that result in leaky reservoir compartments that may be incompletely drained. Zones 16D and 16E are examples of vertically stacked fluvial architecture, with discrete, relatively thin and narrow channel and splay sandstones generally encased within floodplain muds. This architectural style is likely to form more isolated reservoir compartments. Although all of these reservoirs are currently considered nearly depleted, low-pressure producers, recent well completions and bottomhole pressure data indicate that untapped or poorly drained compartments are being encountered.

  10. Modelling river bank retreat by combining fluvial erosion, seepage and mass failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapporto, S.; Rinaldi, M.

    2003-04-01

    Streambank erosion processes contribute significantly to the sediment yielded from a river system and represent an important issue in the contexts of soil degradation and river management. Bank retreat is controlled by a complex interaction of hydrologic, geotechnical, and hydraulic processes. The capability of modelling these different components allows for a full reconstruction and comprehension of the causes and rates of bank erosion. River bank retreat during a single flow event has been modelled by combining simulation of fluvial erosion, seepage, and mass failures. The study site, along the Sieve River (Central Italy), has been subject to extensive researches, including monitoring of pore water pressures for a period of 4 years. The simulation reconstructs fairly faithfully the observed changes, and is used to: a) test the potentiality and discuss advantages and limitations of such type of methodology for modelling bank retreat; c) quantify the contribution and mutual role of the different processes determining bank retreat. The hydrograph of the event is divided in a series of time steps. Modelling of the riverbank retreat includes for each step the following components: a) fluvial erosion and consequent changes in bank geometry; b) finite element seepage analysis; c) stability analysis by limit equilibrium method. Direct fluvial shear erosion is computed using empirically derived relationships expressing lateral erosion rate as a function of the excess of shear stress to the critical entrainment value for the different materials along the bank profile. Lateral erosion rate has been calibrated on the basis of the total bank retreat measured by digital terrestrial photogrammetry. Finite element seepage analysis is then conducted to reconstruct the saturated and unsaturated flow within the bank and the pore water pressure distribution for each time step. The safety factor for mass failures is then computed, using the pore water pressure distribution obtained

  11. An evaluation of stream characteristics in glacial versus fluvial process domains in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livers, Bridget; Wohl, Ellen

    2015-02-01

    Many of the conceptual models developed for river networks emphasize progressive downstream trends in morphology and processes. Such models can fall short in describing the longitudinal variability associated with low-order streams. A more thorough understanding of the influence of local variability of process and form in low-order stream channels is required to remotely and accurately predict channel geometry characteristics for management purposes, and in this context designating process domains is useful. We define process domains with respect to glacial versus fluvial valleys and lateral confinement of valley segments. We evaluated local variability of process domains in the Colorado Front Range by systematically following streams, categorizing them into stream morphologic type and process domain, and evaluating a number of channel geometry characteristics. We evaluated 111 stream reaches for significant differences in channel geometry among stream types and process domains, location and clustering of stream types on a slope-drainage area (S-A) plot and downstream hydraulic geometry relationships. Although individual channel geometry variables differed significantly between individual stream types in glacial and fluvial process domains, no single channel geometry variable consistently differentiated all stream types between process domains. Hypothetical S-A boundaries between bedrock- and alluvial-bed channels proposed in previous studies did not reliably divide bedrock and alluvial reaches for our study sites. Although downstream hydraulic geometry relationships are well-defined using all reaches in the study area, reaches in glacial valleys display much more variability in channel geometry characteristics than reaches in fluvial valleys, less pronounced downstream hydraulic geometry relationships, and greater scatter of reaches on an S-A plot. Local spatial variability associated with process domains at the reach scale (101-103 m) overrides progressive

  12. Digital stereo photogrammetry for grain-scale monitoring of fluvial surfaces: Error evaluation and workflow optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, Stephane; Friedrich, Heide; Delmas, Patrice; Chan, Edwin; Gimel'farb, Georgy

    2015-03-01

    Grain-scale monitoring of fluvial morphology is important for the evaluation of river system dynamics. Significant progress in remote sensing and computer performance allows rapid high-resolution data acquisition, however, applications in fluvial environments remain challenging. Even in a controlled environment, such as a laboratory, the extensive acquisition workflow is prone to the propagation of errors in digital elevation models (DEMs). This is valid for both of the common surface recording techniques: digital stereo photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). The optimisation of the acquisition process, an effective way to reduce the occurrence of errors, is generally limited by the use of commercial software. Therefore, the removal of evident blunders during post processing is regarded as standard practice, although this may introduce new errors. This paper presents a detailed evaluation of a digital stereo-photogrammetric workflow developed for fluvial hydraulic applications. The introduced workflow is user-friendly and can be adapted to various close-range measurements: imagery is acquired with two Nikon D5100 cameras and processed using non-proprietary "on-the-job" calibration and dense scanline-based stereo matching algorithms. Novel ground truth evaluation studies were designed to identify the DEM errors, which resulted from a combination of calibration errors, inaccurate image rectifications and stereo-matching errors. To ensure optimum DEM quality, we show that systematic DEM errors must be minimised by ensuring a good distribution of control points throughout the image format during calibration. DEM quality is then largely dependent on the imagery utilised. We evaluated the open access multi-scale Retinex algorithm to facilitate the stereo matching, and quantified its influence on DEM quality. Occlusions, inherent to any roughness element, are still a major limiting factor to DEM accuracy. We show that a careful selection of the camera

  13. From the Cover: PNAS Plus: Fluvial landscapes of the Harappan civilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giosan, Liviu; Clift, Peter D.; Macklin, Mark G.; Fuller, Dorian Q.; Constantinescu, Stefan; Durcan, Julie A.; Stevens, Thomas; Duller, Geoff A. T.; Tabrez, Ali R.; Gangal, Kavita; Adhikari, Ronojoy; Alizai, Anwar; Filip, Florin; VanLaningham, Sam; Syvitski, James P. M.

    2012-06-01

    The collapse of the Bronze Age Harappan, one of the earliest urban civilizations, remains an enigma. Urbanism flourished in the western region of the Indo-Gangetic Plain for approximately 600 y, but since approximately 3,900 y ago, the total settled area and settlement sizes declined, many sites were abandoned, and a significant shift in site numbers and density towards the east is recorded. We report morphologic and chronologic evidence indicating that fluvial landscapes in Harappan territory became remarkably stable during the late Holocene as aridification intensified in the region after approximately 5,000 BP. Upstream on the alluvial plain, the large Himalayan rivers in Punjab stopped incising, while downstream, sedimentation slowed on the distinctive mega-fluvial ridge, which the Indus built in Sindh. This fluvial quiescence suggests a gradual decrease in flood intensity that probably stimulated intensive agriculture initially and encouraged urbanization around 4,500 BP. However, further decline in monsoon precipitation led to conditions adverse to both inundation- and rain-based farming. Contrary to earlier assumptions that a large glacier-fed Himalayan river, identified by some with the mythical Sarasvati, watered the Harappan heartland on the interfluve between the Indus and Ganges basins, we show that only monsoonal-fed rivers were active there during the Holocene. As the monsoon weakened, monsoonal rivers gradually dried or became seasonal, affecting habitability along their courses. Hydroclimatic stress increased the vulnerability of agricultural production supporting Harappan urbanism, leading to settlement downsizing, diversification of crops, and a drastic increase in settlements in the moister monsoon regions of the upper Punjab, Haryana, and Uttar Pradesh.

  14. Analysis on the Characteristics of Fluvial Evolution with Climate Changes from Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenzhen

    2014-05-01

    Landform evolution is one part of the Earth system behaviors. Products from the landform evolution are faithful records for the global change. They are created by complex interaction between geomorphic processes and environmental factors, and be able to provide the most important and intuitive evidences for investigating the interaction between the Earth's tectonic processes and climate changes. Because of very limited geodetic and geological data, we need a profound understanding of how landscapes respond and erode in response to changes in tectonic or climate boundary conditions. Quantitative study on landform evolution in different spatial and temporal scales using numerical simulation has important scientific interest and practical significance for investigating the nonlinear coupling relationship and response mechanism between tectonic activity, climate change, and surface processes. Under background of the global climate change, rivers have been a major focus of research in landform evolution because they are patently sensitive to tectonic and climate forcing via their channel characteristics. According to the existing research on the channel profiles, in this study, we employ numerical method incorporated with remote sensing techniques to investigate the surface process response to climate-tectonic-landscape through analysis and verification exploration. We build a numerical model based on the theory of geomorphic evolution, and take study on dynamical processes of the channel profile evolution with tectonic and climate boundary. Primary simulation results show that the linear diffusion is not enough to demonstrate the whole evolution. The analyses show that erosion plays a major role in fluvial evolution. Analysis on the dynamic processes of fluvial evolution, clarification its morphological characteristics, and exploration its formation and evolution is helpful for thorough study and understanding the relationship between the various factors of fluvial

  15. Human impacts on headwater fluvial systems in the northern and central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harden, Carol P.

    2006-09-01

    South America delivers more freshwater runoff to the ocean per km 2 land area than any other continent, and much of that water enters the fluvial system from headwaters in the Andes Mountains. This paper reviews ways in which human occupation of high mountain landscapes in the Andes have affected the delivery of water and sediment to headwater river channels at local to regional scales for millennia, and provides special focus on the vulnerability of páramo soils to human impact. People have intentionally altered the fluvial system by damming rivers at a few strategic locations, and more widely by withdrawing surface water, primarily for irrigation. Unintended changes brought about by human activities are even more widespread and include forest clearance, agriculture, grazing, road construction, and urbanization, which increase rates of rainfall runoff and accelerate processes of water erosion. Some excavations deliver more sediment to river channels by destabilizing slopes and triggering processes of mass-movement. The northern and central Andes are more affected by human activity than most high mountain regions. The wetter northern Andes are also unusual for the very high water retention characteristics of páramo (high elevation grass and shrub) soils, which cover most of the land above 3000 m. Páramo soils are important regulators of headwater hydrology, but human activities that promote vegetation loss and drying cause them to lose water storage capacity. New data from a case study in southern Ecuador show very low bulk densities (median 0.26 g cm - 3 ), high organic matter contents (median 43%), and high water-holding capacities (12% to 86% volumetrically). These data document wetter soils under grass than under tree cover. Effects of human activity on the fluvial system are evident at local scales, but difficult to discern at broader scales in the regional context of geomorphic adjustment to tectonic and volcanic processes.

  16. OSL and Cosmogenic 10Be Dating of Fluvial Terraces on the Northeast Pamir Margin, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. A.; Chen, J.; Yang, H.; Li, T.; Bookhagen, B.; Burbank, D. W.; Bufe, A.

    2015-12-01

    Along the northeast Pamir margin in northwest China, flights of late Pleistocene fluvial terraces span actively deforming structures. We present detailed results on three terraces that we dated using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and cosmogenic 10Be techniques. Quartz OSL dating of two different grain sizes (4-11 and 90-180 μm) revealed the fine-grain quartz fraction overestimates the terrace ages by up to an order of magnitude. Two-mm, small-aliquot, coarse-grain quartz OSL ages, calculated using the finite mixture model, yielded stratigraphically consistent ages within error and dated times of terrace deposition to ~15 ka, ~18.5 ka, and ~75 ka. We speculate the observed grain-size dependence of OSL ages is likely related to the mode of transport of the grains in the fluvial system, with coarser grains sizes spending more time on sand bars where they are more thoroughly bleached than grains in the turbid, commonly episodic flows that carry the silt fraction. Our study suggests that, in flashy, turbid fluvial systems, coarse-grain OSL samples are likely to yield more reliable depositional ages than will fine-grain samples. Cosmogenic 10Be depth profiles date the times of terrace abandonment to ~8 ka, ~15 ka, and ~75 ka, yielding ages in overall agreement with the coarse-grain OSL ages. These ages are generally consistent with other dated terraces in the region that place their deposition and subsequent abandonment during the last deglaciation (13-18 ka) and suggest the formation of these terraces on the margins of the Tarim Basin and along the flanks of the Tian Shan is climatically controlled.

  17. Quantifying fluvial topography using UAS imagery and SfM photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodget, Amy; Carbonneau, Patrice; Visser, Fleur; Maddock, Ian; Habit, Evelyn

    2014-05-01

    The measurement and monitoring of fluvial topography at high spatial and temporal resolutions is in increasing demand for a range of river science and management applications, including change detection, hydraulic models, habitat assessments, river restorations and sediment budgets. Existing approaches are yet to provide a single technique for rapidly quantifying fluvial topography in both exposed and submerged areas, with high spatial resolution, reach-scale continuous coverage, high accuracy and reasonable cost. In this paper, we explore the potential of using imagery acquired from a small unmanned aerial system (UAS) and processed using Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry for filling this gap. We use a rotary winged hexacopter known as the Draganflyer X6, a consumer grade digital camera (Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3) and the commercially available PhotoScan Pro SfM software (Agisoft LLC). We test the approach on three contrasting river systems; a shallow margin of the San Pedro River in the Valdivia region of south-central Chile, the lowland River Arrow in Warwickshire, UK, and the upland Coledale Beck in Cumbria, UK. Digital elevation models (DEMs) and orthophotos of hyperspatial resolution (0.01-0.02m) are produced. Mean elevation errors are found to vary somewhat between sites, dependent on vegetation coverage and the spatial arrangement of ground control points (GCPs) used to georeference the data. Mean errors are in the range 4-44mm for exposed areas and 17-89mm for submerged areas. Errors in submerged areas can be improved to 4-56mm with the application of a simple refraction correction procedure. Multiple surveys of the River Arrow site show consistently high quality results, indicating the repeatability of the approach. This work therefore demonstrates the potential of a UAS-SfM approach for quantifying fluvial topography.

  18. Fluvial particle characterization using artificial neural network and spectral image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Bim Prasad; Gautam, Bijaya; Nagata, Masateru

    2008-03-01

    Sand, chemical waste, microbes and other solid materials flowing with the water bodies are of great significance to us as they cause substantial impact to different sectors including drinking water management, hydropower generation, irrigation, aquatic life preservation and various other socio-ecological factors. Such particles can't completely be avoided due to the high cost of construction and maintenance of the waste-treatment methods. A detailed understanding of solid particles in surface water system can have benefit in effective, economic, environmental and social management of water resources. This paper describes an automated system of fluvial particle characterization based on spectral image processing that lead to the development of devices for monitoring flowing particles in river. Previous research in coherent field has shown that it is possible to automatically classify shapes and sizes of solid particles ranging from 300-400 μm using artificial neural networks (ANN) and image processing. Computer facilitated with hyper spectral and multi spectral images using ANN can further classify fluvial materials into organic, inorganic, biodegradable, bio non degradable and microbes. This makes the method attractive for real time monitoring of particles, sand and microorganism in water bodies at strategic locations. Continuous monitoring can be used to determine the effect of socio-economic activities in upstream rivers, or to monitor solid waste disposal from treatment plants and industries or to monitor erosive characteristic of sand and its contribution to degradation of efficiency of hydropower plant or to identify microorganism, calculate their population and study the impact of their presence. Such system can also be used to characterize fluvial particles for planning effective utilization of water resources in micro-mega hydropower plant, irrigation, aquatic life preservation etc.

  19. Architecture and Channel-Belt Clustering in the Fluvial lower Wasatch Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisel, J. R.; Pyles, D. R.; Bracken, B.; Rosenbaum, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Eocene lower Wasatch Formation of the Uinta Basin contains exceptional outcrops of low net-sand content (27% sand) fluvial strata. This study quantitatively documents the stratigraphy of a 7 km wide by 300 meter thick strike-oriented outcrop in order to develop a quantitative data base that can be used to improve our knowledge of how some fluvial systems evolve over geologic time scales. Data used to document the outcrop are: (1) 550 meters of decimeter to half meter scale resolution stratigraphic columns that document grain size and physical sedimentary structures; (2) detailed photopanels used to document architectural style and lithofacies types in the outcrop; (3) thickness, width, and spatial position for all channel belts in the outcrop, and (4) directional measurements of paleocurrent indicators. Two channel-belt styles are recognized: lateral and downstream accreting channel belts; both of which occur as either single or multi-story. Floodplain strata are well exposed and consist of overbank fines and sand-rich crevasse splay deposits. Key upward and lateral characteristics of the outcrop documented herein are the following. First, the shapes of 243 channels are documented. The average width, thickness and aspect ratios of the channel belts are 110 m, 7 m, and 16:1, respectively. Importantly, the size and shape of channel belts does not change upward through the 300 meter transect. Second, channels are documented to spatially cluster. 9 clusters are documented using a spatial statistic. Key upward patterns in channel belt clustering are a marked change from non-amalgamated isolated channel-belt clusters to amalgamated channel-belt clusters. Critically, stratal surfaces can be correlated from mudstone units within the clusters to time-equivalent floodplain strata adjacent to the cluster demonstrating that clusters are not confined within fluvial valleys. Finally, proportions of floodplain and channel belt elements underlying clusters and channel belts

  20. The development of fluvial stochastic modelling in the Norwegian oil industry: A historical review, subsurface implementation and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keogh, Kevin Joseph; Martinius, Allard Willem; Osland, Rune

    2007-11-01

    Fluvial sandstones are an important reservoir type for the petroleum industry. In the late 1970's and early 1980's, large hydrocarbon discoveries in the Norwegian North Sea in fluvial strata prompted the need for generating geologically meaningful, stochastic, object-based models of fluvial deposits. The aim of this focus was to allow the geologist to provide the reservoir engineers with a more realistic representation of permeability contrasts within channelised, fluvial deposits by being able to use appropriate measurements from outcrop analogues as direct input data into the modelling software. This initiative resulted in the development of a suite of geologically driven, stochastic modelling algorithms supported by an extensive fieldwork program aimed at collecting stratigraphic and quantitative data from ancient outcrop analogues to support enhanced reservoir characterisation and geological modelling. Today, these reservoirs are still important hydrocarbon producing fields with accurate reservoir description and 3D modelling capabilities playing a vital role in targeting remaining oil, especially now that many of the fields on the Norwegian continental shelf are past peak production and are in a decline phase. As both computing capabilities and quantitative outcrop analogue studies have increased the understanding of, and the ability to model fluvial reservoirs, so have stochastic modelling techniques continued to provide the most suitable and robust means of building geologically realistic 3D reservoir models that incorporate increased geological understanding and heterogeneity complexity. In the recent past, a multitude of data, such as seismic and production data have been used to condition the stochastic algorithms. This review paper aims to outline the role of stochastic algorithms in building geologically-realistic, 3D fluvial reservoir models and highlight the success of these developments with case studies from both producing fields and ancient outcrop

  1. Investigation of fluvial landforms in the north-eastern Pannonian Basin, using cartographic materials from the XIX-XXI Centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robu, Delia; Niga, Bogdan; Perşoiu, Ioana

    2015-04-01

    The study area is located in the north-eastern Pannonian Basin, and covers approximately 3700 km2. Using cartographic materials for the last 155 years, we analyzed and defined river network and relict fluvial morphologies created by the rivers Tur, Someş, Homorod and Crasna. Database extraction from each set of historical maps was performed by field verification and validation, associated to GIS techniques. Relict fluvial morphologies on the Someş alluvial cone comprise a wide variety of channel typologies and sizes, drainage directions and their consequent typology, which indicates a complex fluvial evolution. The dominant category of relict fluvial morphology is represented by the meander loop. Following the quantitative analysis on the successive sets of maps we identified and delimited meander loops and meandering paths formed prior to the reference year 1860. Generally, the post-1860 relict fluvial morphologies are secondary morphologies, as the keynote is given by those formed previous to the reference moment 1860. An analysis of the share of the relict fluvial morphologies on the three sets of reference cartographic materials (the second Austro-Hungarian topographic survey, Google Earth and orthophotoplans) highlights that most relict fluvial morphologies were identified on the second Austro-Hungarian topographic survey, followed by those identified in Google Earth and orthophotoplans. The map of fluvial morphologies constructed in this study enables a discussion on drainage directions, based on the observation that a series of abandoned meander loops and segments follow clear directions. We applied several quantitative indices in assessing the relict fluvial morphology (radius of curvature, paleochannel width). Consequently, we identified underfit stream sectors with meander loops larger than the modern ones Someş meanders (on the Racta River), uncharacteristic features such as braided riverbed reaches, a high frequency of meander scrolls present on the

  2. Rock slope response to fluvial incision in the central Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Kerry; Fox, Matthew; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2016-04-01

    The longitudinal profile of rivers intersecting the Rhone Valley in the central Swiss Alps suggests the development of topography throughout much of this region has been dominated by interglacial fluvial incision and ongoing tectonic uplift with only minimal glacial erosion since the mid-Pleistocene transition. Evidence indicates bedrock river incision during this period reflects a base level fall of between 500 m and 800 m (depending on the degree of overdeepening following an early period of enhanced glacial incision). This observation raises important questions regarding the preservation, or development of hillslope morphologies through multiple glacial-interglacial cycles. Since the pioneering works of Richter (1900) and Penck and Brückner (1909), Alpine geomorphologists have commented on a sequence of between three and five moderately dipping matched terraces that converge toward inferred paleo-river channels up to 800 m above the axis of many valleys. Here, we use a combination of integral analysis, forward streampower models, and a new method of topographic analysis based on high resolution LiDAR DEMs in order to test the correspondence of valley morphologies in this formerly glaciated landscape, with hillslope processes initiated by fluvial incision up to 700,000 years ago. Results indicate topography adjacent to reaches subjected to transient fluvial incision is characterized by a coherent region of consistently steep slopes, while narrow gorges correspond to rapid incision close to the Rhone valley since MIS 5. A majority of hillslopes converge to our initial fluvial valley floor, or the location of propagating knickpoints. The correspondence between intermediate-level terraces and modeled stages of river incision is, however, currently unclear. These results offer a unique insight into the long-term response of bedrock slopes to varying rates of base level fall, and the cumulative impact of glacial erosion on Alpine valley walls since MIS 11. Penck, A

  3. Analysis of Fluvial Bed Sediments Along the Apalachicola River, Florida through Field Reconnaissance Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passeri, D.; Hagen, S. C.; Daranpob, A.; Smar, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    River competence is an important parameter in understanding sediment transport in fluvial systems. Competence is defined as the measure of a stream's ability to transport a certain maximum grain size of sediment. Studies have shown that bed sediment particle size in rivers and streams tends to vary spatially along the direction of stream flow. Over a river section several reaches long, variability of sediment particle sizes can be seen, often becoming finer downstream. This phenomenon is attributed to mechanisms such as local control of stream gradient, coarse tributary sediment supply or particle breakdown. Average particle size may also be smaller in tributary sections of rivers due to river morphology. The relationship between river mean velocity and particle size that can be transported has also been explored. The Hjulstrom curve classifies this relationship by relating particle size to velocity, dividing the regions of sedimentation, transportation, and erosion. The curve can also be used to find values such as the critical erosion velocity (the velocity required to transport particles of various sizes in suspension) and settling velocity (the velocity at which particles of a given size become too heavy to be transported and fall out of suspension, consequently causing deposition). The purpose of this research is to explore the principles of river competence through field reconnaissance collection and laboratory analysis of fluvial sediment core samples along the Apalachicola River, FL and its distributaries. Sediment core samples were collected in the wetlands and estuarine regions of the Apalachicola River. Sieve and hydrometer analyses were performed to determine the spatial distribution of particle sizes along the river. An existing high resolution hydrodynamic model of the study domain was used to simulate tides and generate river velocities. The Hjulstrom curve and the generated river velocities were used to define whether sediment was being transported

  4. Hydrological and sedimentological regime of lower Vistula fluvial lakes (North Central Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordowski, Jarosław; Kubiak-Wójcicka, Katarzyna; Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Solarczyk, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Regarding the outflow the Vistula River is the largest river in the Baltic catchment. In its lower course it has developed an anastomosing channel pattern modified strongly by intensive human hydrotechnical activity and by the regulation which have intensified about 200 years ago. Channel regulation apart from already existing lakes have left many new artificially created ones. This activity have also altered the hydrological and sedimentary regime. It turned out that only the small portion of the lakes infilled rapidly but the majority have persisted to present day almost unchanged in spite of regulation. The reason of this resistence to silting is connected with specific interaction of sediment removing during high flood water episodes and strong groundwater circulation in former river arms transformed in present-day lakes. As an example of a lake with an intensive groundwater exchange rate with the main Vistula channel and supposed Quaternary and Tertiary aquifers was selected the Old Vistula lake (Stara Wisła) near Grudziądz town. It has got an area of 50 ha, mean depth 1,73 m, maximum depth 8 m, length about 4 km and medium width about 100 m. In the years 2011-2015 in its surficial water were conducted measures with two weeks frequency which included: temperature, pH, Eh, suspended matter amount, total and carbonaceous mineralization. For comparison similar measurements were also conducted in other fluvial lakes and Vistula tributaries. Hydrological data were supplemented by geological investigations of floodplain sediments cover which has important impact on the rate of groundwater migration and circulation. Investigations carried proved that there exists distinct gradient of carbonaceous mineralization from small values in the Vistula channel to high values at the valley edges. PH and Eh parameters in the Old Vistula lake were different than in all other surveyed sites what leads to conclusion that it is fed by deeper groundwaters than in the case of other

  5. Stochastic Modeling of Vegetation Growth, Mortality and Invasion in a Fluvial Floodplain in Interaction with Floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Toshimori, Nobuhiko; Kimura, Ryo

    2013-04-01

    Vegetation overgrowth in fluvial floodplains and sand bars has become a serious engineering problem for riparian management in Japan. From both viewpoints of flood control and ecological conservation, it would be necessary to predict the vegetation dynamics accurately for long-term duration. In this research, we have tried to develop a stochastic model for predicting the dynamics of trees in fluvial floodplains with emphasis on the interaction with flood impacts. The model consists of the following four components: (i) long-term stochastic behavior of flow discharge, (ii) hydrodynamics in a channel with floodplain vegetation, (iii) variation of riverbed topography, and (iv) vegetation dynamics on floodplains. In the model, the flood discharge is stochastically simulated using a filtered Poisson process, one of the conventional approaches in hydrological time-series generation. The modeling for vegetation dynamics includes the effects of tree growth, mortality by flood impacts, and infant tree invasion. Vegetation condition has been observed mainly before and after flood impacts since 2008 at a field site located between 23.2-24.0 km from the river mouth in Kako River, Japan. The Kako River has the catchment area of 1,730 km2 and the main channel length of 96 km. This site is one of the vegetation overgrowth locations in the Kako River floodplains, where the predominant tree species are willows and bamboos. In the field survey, the position, trunk diameter and height of each tree as well as the riverbed materials were measured after several flood events to investigate their impacts on the floodplain vegetation community. In this presentation, the three effects in vegetation dynamics, i.e., the tree growth rate, mortality, and infant tree invasion, are refined for improving the model predictability. The growth rate curve proposed here is derived by introducing inhibition effect of larger trees into the conventional Richards growth curve. As for the mortality rate

  6. The human role in changing fluvial systems: Retrospect, inventory and prospect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, L. Allan; Marcus, W. Andrew

    2006-09-01

    Historical and modern scientific contexts are provided for the 2006 Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium on the Human Role in Changing Fluvial Systems. The 2006 symposium provides a synthesis of research concerned with human impacts on fluvial systems — including hydrologic and geomorphic changes to watersheds — while also commemorating the 50th anniversary of the 1955 Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth Symposium [Thomas, Jr., W. L. (Ed.), 1956a. Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth. Univ. Chicago Press, Chicago. 1193 pp]. This paper examines the 1955 symposium from the perspective of human impacts on rivers, reviews current inquiry on anthropogenic interactions in fluvial systems, and anticipates future directions in this field. Although the 1955 symposium did not have an explicit geomorphic focus, it set the stage for many subsequent anthropogeomorphic studies. The 1955 conference provided guidance to geomorphologists by recommending and practicing interdisciplinary scholarship, through the use of diverse methodologies applied at extensive temporal and geographical scales, and through its insistence on an integrated understanding of human interactions with nature. Since 1956, research on human impacts to fluvial systems has been influenced by fundamental changes in why the research is done, what is studied, how river studies are conducted, and who does the research. Rationales for river research are now driven to a greater degree by institutional needs, environmental regulations, and aquatic restoration. New techniques include a host of dating, spatial imaging, and ground measurement methods that can be coupled with analytical functions and digital models. These new methods have led to a greater understanding of channel change, variations across multiple temporal and spatial scales, and integrated watershed perspectives; all changes that are reflected by the papers in this volume. These new methods also bring a set of technical demands for the

  7. Progressive changes in the morphology of fluvial terraces and scarps along the Rappahannock River, Virginia.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.

    1983-01-01

    Progressive geomorphic changes in the flight of fluvial terraces along the Rappahannock River, Virginia, provide a framework for analysing the effect of time on landforms. Indices of terrace preservation, especially drainage densities and area to perimeter ratios, show systematic changes with terrace age. Higher scarps tend to have steeper slopes and, for a given scarp height, older scarps tend to have gentler slopes. Depositional features such as bars and channels with 1-3m of relief are preserved on terraces on the order of 105 yr old.-from Author

  8. Computer programs for computing particle-size statistics of fluvial sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, H.H.; Hubbell, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    Two versions of computer programs for inputing data and computing particle-size statistics of fluvial sediments are presented. The FORTRAN 77 language versions are for use on the Prime computer, and the BASIC language versions are for use on microcomputers. The size-statistics program compute Inman, Trask , and Folk statistical parameters from phi values and sizes determined for 10 specified percent-finer values from inputed size and percent-finer data. The program also determines the percentage gravel, sand, silt, and clay, and the Meyer-Peter effective diameter. Documentation and listings for both versions of the programs are included. (Author 's abstract)

  9. Comparison of knobs on Mars to isolated hills in eolian, fluvial and glacial environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manent, L. S.; El-Baz, F.

    1986-01-01

    The isolated knobs of Mars, characterized in terms of length, width, geographic location, proximity to streaks, and geologic surroundings through Viking Orbiters' photomosaics, are compared to isolated hills on earth eroded by eolian, fluvia, and glacial processes. Comparison of length-to-width ratios indicates similarity of the knobs to the hills formed in a hyperarid environment. The hills formed on earth by fluvial and glacial processes have length-to-width ratios significantly higher than those of the Martian knobs and have other diagnostic features not associated with the knobs. Moreover, streaks, splotches, dunes, and pitted and fluted rocks, all indicative of an eolian regime, are associated with the Martian knobs.

  10. Stream capture and piracy recorded by provenance in fluvial fan strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikesell, Leslie R.; Weissmann, Gary S.; Karachewski, John A.

    2010-03-01

    Stream capture and piracy in tectonically active regions have been described in geomorphic systems worldwide; however, few studies show the influence stream capture has on the rock record. We present an analysis of fluvial fan stratigraphy that developed as a result of multiple stream capture events, building a complex stratigraphic succession beneath the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), California. The LLNL site is located in the southeast portion of the tectonically active Livermore Basin, a transpressional basin in the California Coast Ranges. Geomorphic evidence for this stream capture include: (1) the Arroyo Seco enters the basin from the south through an uplifted fault block, (2) south of this fault block lies an abandoned Arroyo Seco fluvial fan, (3) north of the fault block, in the Livermore Basin, Arroyo Seco built a 7-km 2 fluvial fan, apparently forcing the Arroyo Las Positas, a smaller stream that enters the basin from the east, northward around the Arroyo Seco fan, and (4) a knickpoint exists near the point of capture on Arroyo Seco. Stratigraphic evidence reflecting this shift in the Arroyo Seco position into the Livermore Basin was evaluated through a provenance study of 215 gravel units from 34 boreholes spaced evenly over the 2.6 km 2 LLNL site. The Arroyo Seco derives its sediment from both the Jurassic-Cretaceous Franciscan Assemblage and the Altamont Hills (which are comprised of Mesozoic Great Valley Group and Tertiary continental sediments). The Arroyo Las Positas drains only the Altamont Hills and thus lacks the Franciscan Assemblage-derived clasts. The origin of the individual gravel units was determined by the percentage of Franciscan Assemblage indicator pebbles (red chert, green chert and blueschist) in the samples. Through this analysis, we determined that high-percentage Franciscan Assemblage-derived clasts were present below a depth of approximately 35 m below the surface, low-percentage Franciscan Assemblage

  11. Late Holocene fluvial activity and correlations with dendrochronology of subfossil trunks: Case studies of northeastern Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rădoane, Maria; Nechita, Constantin; Chiriloaei, Francisca; Rădoane, Nicolae; Popa, Ionel; Roibu, Cătălin; Robu, Delia

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to describe the late Holocene behaviour of rivers using an interdisciplinary approach combining fluvial geomorphology and subfossil trunk dendrochronology. The subfossil wood material collected along the rivers was investigated for dendrometric and dendrochronologic parameters. The research methods in these fields helped us to understand the effect of the fluvial environment on riparian trees and their records and helped in reconstructing the riparian palaeoenvironment. The study area consists of two rivers with different typologies but comparable sizes: the Moldova River, which features a braided to wandering channel in its lower reach, and the Siret River, which features a sinuous-meandering channel. Along the 100-km-long floodplain of the former and the 144-km-long floodplain of the latter, we found and sampled 77 subfossil trunks, of which 26 were subjected to 14C dating. The resulting data consist of floodplain facies mapping data, electric resistivity measurements, absolute dates, and dendrometric and dendrochronologic data. The results indicate that during a 100-year period, the two rivers were sensitive to climate change and anthropogenic effects, particularly a narrowing of the active channel by 76% in the braided channel and 38% in the sinuous-meandering channel. During the past 3300-3000 YBP, the Moldova River maintained its braided style, whereas the sinuous-meandering style has been characteristic of the Siret River for the previous 6800-4600 YBP. The two distinct fluvial environments are recorded in the dendrometric structure of the trunks buried in the channel-fill sediments. The braided fluvial environment was more effective in uprooting riparian trees and incorporating them in the floodplain deposits, whereas the sinuous-meandering style of stream effectively buried tree trunks in lateral accretion lobes. Absolute and dendrochronologic dating allowed for the reconstruction of timelines of the felling of the trees

  12. Fluvial filtering of land-to-ocean fluxes: from natural Holocene variations to Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meybeck, Michel; Vörösmarty, Charles

    2005-02-01

    The evolution of river systems and their related fluxes is considered at various time scales: ( i) over the last 18 000 years, under climatic variability control, ( ii) over the last 50 to 200 years (Anthropocene) due to direct human impacts. Natural Holocene variations in time and space depend on ( i) land-to-ocean connections (endorheism, glacial cover, exposure of continental shelf); ( ii) types of natural fluvial filters (e.g., wetlands, lakes, floodplains, estuaries). Anthropocene changes concern ( i) land-ocean connection (e.g., partial to total runoff reduction resulting from water management), ( ii) modification and removal of natural filters, ( iii) creation of new filters, particularly irrigated fields and reservoirs, ( iv) acceleration and/or development of material sources from human activities. The total river basin area directly affected by human activities is of the same order of magnitude ( >40 Mkm) as the total area affected over the last 18 000 years. A tentative analysis of 38 major river systems totaling 55 Mkm is proposed for several criteria: ( i) trajectories of Holocene evolution, ( ii) occurrence of natural fluvial filters, ( iii) present-day fluvial filters: most river basins are unique. Riverine fluxes per unit area are characterized by hot spots that exceed the world average by one order of magnitude. At the Anthropocene (i.e., since 1950), many riverine fluxes have globally increased (sodium, chloride, sulfate, nitrogen, phosphorous, heavy metals), others are stable (calcium, bicarbonate, sediments) or likely to decrease (dissolved silica). Future trajectories of river fluxes will depend on the balance between increased sources of material (e.g., soil erosion, pollution, fertilization), water abstraction for irrigation and the modification of fluvial filters, particularly the occurrence of reservoirs that already intercept half of the water and store at least 30% of river sediment fluxes. In some river systems, retention actually

  13. Sediment storage and evacuation in headwater valleys at the transition between debris-flow and fluvial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Stephen T.; Casebeer, Nathan E.

    2007-11-01

    Sediment from landscape disturbance often enters temporary storage in valleys and evacuates over longer times, which in steeplands are poorly delimited. We hypothesize that, across process transitions (e.g., debris flow versus fluvial transport), distributions of sediment transit times also change. We use field surveys and extensive radiocarbon dating to assess the distribution of transit (residence) times through the proxy measurement of ages of bank deposits in two mainstem reaches of a 2.23 km2 watershed in the Oregon Coast Range. In the downstream reach, debris fans impound fluvial deposits; debris-flow, fine fluvial, and coarse fluvial deposits compose nearly equal parts of the valley fill; and fluvial erosion evacuates deposits. Transit times have a sample mean of 1.22 × 103 14C yr and an exponential distribution, indicating uniform probability of evacuation from storage. In the upstream reach, valley-spanning debris jams impound debris-flow deposits composing >95% of the valley fill, which is routinely scoured by debris flows. Transit times have a sample mean of 4.43 × 102 14C yr and, if >100 14C yr, a power-law distribution, indicating preferential evacuation of younger deposits and retention of older deposits. In both reaches, most sediment has short transit times (<600 14C yr), but significant volumes remain for millennia. Less than 20% of basin-wide denudation passes through these reservoirs, but the latter are still significant buffers between hillslope disturbance and downstream aquatic habitat, especially for coarse sediment.

  14. Fluvial and glacial implications of tephra localities in the western Wind River basin, Wyoming, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworowski, C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Examination of Quaternary fluvial and glacial deposits in the western Wind River Basin allows a new understanding of the Quaternary Wind River fluvial system. Interbedded fluvial sediments and volcanic ashes provide important temporal information for correlation of Quaternary deposits. In the western Wind River Basin, six mid-Pleistocene localities of tephra, the Muddy Creek, Red Creek, Lander, Kinnear, Morton and Yellow Calf ashes are known. Geochronologic studies confirm the Muddy Creek, Red Creek, Kinnear and Lander ashes as the 620--650ka Lava Creek tephra from the Yellowstone region in northwestern Wyoming. The stratigraphic position and index of refraction of volcanic glass from the Morton and Yellow Calf ashes are consistent with identification as Lava Creek tephra. Approximately 350 feet (106 meters) above the Wind River and 13 miles downstream from Bull Lake, interbedded Wind River fluvial gravels, volcanic glass and pumice at the Morton locality correlate to late (upper) Sacajawea Ridge gravels mapped by Richmond and Murphy. Associated with the oxygen isotope 16--15 boundary, the ash-bearing terrace deposits reveal the nature of the Wind River fluvial system during late glacial-early interglacial times. The Lander and Yellow Calf ashes, are found in terrace deposits along tributaries of the Wind River. Differences in timing and rates of incision between the Wind River and its tributary, the Little Wind River, results in complex terrace development near their junction.

  15. Selective deposition response to aeolian-fluvial sediment supply in the desert braided channel of the upper Yellow River, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Jia, X.; Li, Y.; Peng, W.

    2015-09-01

    Rivers flow across aeolian dunes and develop braided stream channels. Both aeolian and fluvial sediment supplies regulate sediment transport and deposition in such cross-dune braided rivers. Here we show a significant selective deposition in response to both aeolian and fluvial sediment supplies in the Ulan Buh desert braided channel. The Ulan Buh desert is the main coarse sediment source for this desert braided channel, and the mean percentage of the coarser (> 0.08 mm) grains on the aeolian dunes surface is 95.34 %. The lateral selective deposition process is developed by the interaction between the flows and the aeolian-fluvial sediment supplies, causing the coarser sediments (> 0.08 mm) from aeolian sand supply and bank erosion to accumulate in the channel centre and the finer fluvial sediments (< 0.08 mm) to be deposited on the bar and floodplain surfaces, forming a coarser-grained thalweg bed bounded by finer-grained floodplain surfaces. This lateral selective deposition reduces the downstream sediment transport and is a primary reason for the formation of an "above-ground" river in the braided reach of the upper Yellow River in response to aeolian and fluvial sediment supplies.

  16. Models of marine transgression —Example from Lower Cretaceous fluvial and paralic deposits, north-central Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franks, Paul C.

    1980-01-01

    Transgression of the Early Cretaceous Kiowa sea in north-central Kansas led to deposition and preservation of fluvial, estuarine, and lagoon or bay deposits behind Kiowa barrier systems. The fluvial, estuarine, and part of the lagoon or bay deposits compose the Longford Member of the Kiowa Formation. The member is thickest in broad valleys that were eroded into Permian bed rock prior to deposition of the Cretaceous strata. Overlying Kiowa beds include open-sea deposits of shale., and barrier-system deposits of sandstone. Transgression was not accompanied by near-shore erosion of barrier, paralic, or fluvial deposits, nor by development of transgressive disconformities within the transgressive sequence, nor by deposition of transgressive sand sheets. Progradational pulses that might account for the generation and preservation of the barrier, paralic, and fluvial deposits are not apparent in the Longford-Kiowa record. An upward gradation from fluvial deposits at the base of the member to lagoonal deposits at the top and an apparently scattered distribution of Kiowa open-sea and barrier deposits above the member indicate that rising sea level or basin subsidence was accompanied by vertical growth, eventual submergence, and stepwise landward shift of barrier systems across expanding lagoons or bays. *Temporary address, until August 1980: c/o Amoco Production Company, P.O. Box 591, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74102

  17. Influence of composition and temperature on hydrocarbon migration through Morrow fluvial reservoirs, Las Animas Arch, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Bolyard, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    Precipitation of wax in pores may impair permeability and prohibit the flow of oil. Crude oil composition and temperature are the most important controlling factors. Oils are chemically complex, may contain up to 45 wax compounds and may vary significantly even in the same pool. High-wax oils are common in the Morrow of eastern Colorado. Narrow fluvial sandstones provide migration paths toward the Las Animas Arch from adjacent basins. Temperatures range from less than 110{degrees}F. on the top of the arch to 180{degrees}F at a structural position only 1,400 feet lower. A range of 30{degrees}F has been observed in individual pools. Wax has precipitated in the 120-140{degrees}F range, creating relative permeability barriers which cut across the sandstones. Wax barriers are impermeable to oil, but may be permeable to gas and water. They account for certain dry holes with high porosity, permeability and oil saturation (and low water saturation) in both core and electrical log analysis. They explain why some oil wells with impaired permeability are adjacent to structurally lower gas wells with good permeability. A network of wax barriers around the Las Animas Arch accounts for approximately 300 feet of variation in the structural position of a line separating oil from gas fields. Since the low temperature bands may be short and discontinuous, wax barriers are more effective in narrow fluvial reservoirs than in blanket reservoirs.

  18. Lakota Formation, southern Black Hills, South Dakota: an Early Cretaceous evolving fluvial system

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlstrom D.J.; Fox, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    The fluvial, Early Cretaceous Lakota Formation consists of four spatially and temporally distinct sandstone units in the southern Black Hills and southeastern Powder River basin. Three of these units crop out in proximity to an area of uranium roll-front development (Edgemont mining district) where approximately 2300 wells were drilled and logged. Comparison of the resistivity logs of several of these wells with continuous cores of the Lakota Formation confirms their lithologic sensitivity. These logs (utilized to assist in subsurface facies interpretations where cores were not available), cores, and outcrops are the basis for the following facies interpretations. The discharge, sediment load, and resulting sinuosity of this fluvial system varied substantially throughout the time of Lakota deposition. The oldest unit consists of tabular deposits with complex internal architecture comprised of cross-cutting lateral accretion deposits. Upward-fining grain size, upward-decreasing scale of sedimentary structures, and the angular relationship between lateral accretion surfaces and overlying crevasse-splay deposits support this conclusion. The intermediate unit of ephemeral stream sediments is characterized by abundant pebble- and cobble-strewn erosional surfaces with up to 1.5 m relief, very poor clast sorting, and trough and planar cross-bedding with concave-upward foresets. The youngest unit has a predominance of tabular cross-bedding with back flow climbing ripples and low dispersion of paleocurrent directions, suggesting a relatively straight, bed-load-type channel dominated by trains of sand waves.

  19. Episodic Ocean-Induced CO2 Greenhouse on Mars: Implications for Fluvial Valley Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Tyler, D.; McKay, C. P.; Haberle, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    Pulses of CO2 injected into the martian atmosphere more recently than 4 Ga can place the atmosphere into a stable, higher pressure, warmer greenhouse state. One to two bar pulses of CO2 added to the atmosphere during the past several billion years are sufficient to raise global mean temperatures above 240 or 250 K for tens to hundreds of millions of years, even when accounting for CO2 condensation. Over time, the added CO2 is lost to carbonates, the atmosphere collapses and returns to its buffered state. A substantial amount of water could be transported during the greenhouse periods from the surface of a frozen body of water created by outflow channel discharges to higher elevations, despite global temperatures well below freezing. This water, precipitated as snow, could ultimately form fluvial valleys if deposition sites are associated with localized heat sources, such as magmatic intrusions or volcanoes. Thus, if outflow channel discharges were accompanied by the release of sufficient quantities of CO2, a limited hydrological cycle could have resulted that would have been capable of producing geomorphic change sufficient for fluvial erosion and valley formation. Glacial or periglacial landforms would also be a consequence of such a mechanism.

  20. Sediment Transport Dynamic in a Meandering Fluvial System: Case Study of Chini River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazir, M. H. M.; Awang, S.; Shaaban, A. J.; Yahaya, N. K. E. M.; Jusoh, A. M.; Arumugam, M. A. R. M. A.; Ghani, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Sedimentation in river reduces the flood carrying capacity which lead to the increasing of inundation area in the river basin. Basic sediment transport can predict the fluvial processes in natural rivers and stream through modeling approaches. However, the sediment transport dynamic in a small meandering and low-lying fluvial system is considered scarce in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to analyze the current riverbed erosion and sedimentation scenarios along the Chini River, Pekan, Pahang. The present study revealed that silt and clay has potentially been eroded several parts of the river. Sinuosity index (1.98) indicates that Chini River is very unstable and continuous erosion process in waterways has increase the riverbank instability due to the meandering factors. The riverbed erosional and depositional process in the Chini River is a sluggish process since the lake reduces the flow velocity and causes the deposited particles into the silt and clay soil at the bed of the lake. Besides, the bed layer of the lake comprised of cohesive silt and clayey composition that tend to attach the larger grain size of sediment. The present study estimated the total sediment accumulated along the Chini River is 1.72 ton. The HEC-RAS was employed in the simulations and in general the model performed well, once all parameters were set within their effective ranges.

  1. Monitoring of Fluvial Transport in the Mountain River Bed Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozkow, G.; Borkowski, A.; Kasprzak, M.

    2016-06-01

    The fluvial transport is the surface process that has a strong impact on the topography changes, especially in mountain areas. Traditional hydrological measurements usually give a good understanding of the river flow, however, the information of the bedload movement in the rivers is still insufficient. In particular, there is limited knowledge about the movement of the largest clasts, i.e. boulders. This investigation addresses mentioned issues by employing Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to monitor annual changes of the mountain river bed. The vertical changes were estimated based on the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of difference (DoD) while transported boulders were identified based on the distances between point clouds and RGB-coloured points. Combined RGB point clouds allowed also to measure 3D displacements of boulders. The results showed that the highest dynamic of the fluvial process occurred between years 2012-2013. Obtained DoD clearly indicated alternating zones of erosion and deposition of the sediment finer fractions in the local sedimentary traps. The horizontal displacement of the rock material in the river bed showed high complexity resulting in the displacement of large boulders (major axis about 0.8 m) for the distance up to 2.3 m.

  2. Utilization of ancient permafrost carbon in headwaters of Arctic fluvial networks.

    PubMed

    Mann, Paul J; Eglinton, Timothy I; McIntyre, Cameron P; Zimov, Nikita; Davydova, Anna; Vonk, Jorien E; Holmes, Robert M; Spencer, Robert G M

    2015-01-01

    Northern high-latitude rivers are major conduits of carbon from land to coastal seas and the Arctic Ocean. Arctic warming is promoting terrestrial permafrost thaw and shifting hydrologic flowpaths, leading to fluvial mobilization of ancient carbon stores. Here we describe (14)C and (13)C characteristics of dissolved organic carbon from fluvial networks across the Kolyma River Basin (Siberia), and isotopic changes during bioincubation experiments. Microbial communities utilized ancient carbon (11,300 to >50,000 (14)C years) in permafrost thaw waters and millennial-aged carbon (up to 10,000 (14)C years) across headwater streams. Microbial demand was supported by progressively younger ((14)C-enriched) carbon downstream through the network, with predominantly modern carbon pools subsidizing microorganisms in large rivers and main-stem waters. Permafrost acts as a significant and preferentially degradable source of bioavailable carbon in Arctic freshwaters, which is likely to increase as permafrost thaw intensifies causing positive climate feedbacks in response to on-going climate change. PMID:26206473

  3. Archaeological horizons and fluvial processes at the Lower Paleolithic open-air site of Revadim (Israel).

    PubMed

    Marder, Ofer; Malinsky-Buller, Ariel; Shahack-Gross, Ruth; Ackermann, Oren; Ayalon, Avner; Bar-Matthews, Miryam; Goldsmith, Yonaton; Inbar, Moshe; Rabinovich, Rivka; Hovers, Erella

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we present new data pertaining to the paleo-landscape characteristics at the Acheulian site of Revadim, on the southern coastal plain of Israel. Sedimentological, isotopic, granulometric and micromorphological studies showed that the archaeological remains accumulated in an active fluvial environment where channel action, overbank flooding and episodic inundation occurred. Measurements of total organic matter and its carbon isotopic composition indicate that the hominin activity at the site started at a period of relatively drier conditions, which coincided with erosion of the preceding soil sequence. This process led to the formation of a gently-undulating topography, as reconstructed by a GIS model. Later deposition documents relatively wetter conditions, as indicated by carbon isotopic composition. Formation processes identified at the site include fluvial processes, inundation episodes that resulted in anaerobic conditions and formation of oxide nodules, as well as small-scale bioturbation and later infiltration of carbonate-rich solutions that resulted in the formation of calcite nodules and crusts. The combination of micro-habitats created favorable conditions that repeatedly drew hominins to the area, as seen by a series of super-imposed archaeological horizons. This study shows that site-specific paleo-landscape reconstructions should play an important role in understanding regional variation among hominin occupations and in extrapolating long-term behavioral patterns during the Middle Pleistocene. PMID:20304463

  4. Floodplain forest succession reveals fluvial processes: A hydrogeomorphic model for temperate riparian woodlands.

    PubMed

    Egger, Gregory; Politti, Emilio; Lautsch, Erwin; Benjankar, Rohan; Gill, Karen M; Rood, Stewart B

    2015-09-15

    River valley floodplains are physically-dynamic environments where fluvial processes determine habitat gradients for riparian vegetation. These zones support trees and shrubs whose life stages are adapted to specific habitat types and consequently forest composition and successional stage reflect the underlying hydrogeomorphic processes and history. In this study we investigated woodland vegetation composition, successional stage and habitat properties, and compared these with physically-based indicators of hydraulic processes. We thus sought to develop a hydrogeomorphic model to evaluate riparian woodland condition based on the spatial mosaic of successional phases of the floodplain forest. The study investigated free-flowing and dam-impacted reaches of the Kootenai and Flathead Rivers, in Idaho and Montana, USA and British Columbia, Canada. The analyses revealed strong correspondence between vegetation assessments and metrics of fluvial processes indicating morphodynamics (erosion and shear stress), inundation and depth to groundwater. The results indicated that common successional stages generally occupied similar hydraulic environments along the different river segments. Comparison of the spatial patterns between the free-flowing and regulated reaches revealed greater deviation from the natural condition for the braided channel segment than for the meandering segment. This demonstrates the utility of the hydrogeomorphic approach and suggests that riparian woodlands along braided channels could have lower resilience than those along meandering channels and might be more vulnerable to influences such as from river damming or climate change. PMID:26160662

  5. Preparing for uncertainty: toward managing fluvial geomorphic assessment of Massachusetts rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, C. E.; Mabee, S. B.; Slovin, N. B.; Vogel, E.

    2014-12-01

    Climate scientists predict (and have already observed) that in the Northeastern U.S., individual storms may be more intense, and that there will be more precipitation on an annual basis. In steep post-glacial terrain, erosion caused by floodwaters is the largest destructive force during high-intensity storm events, and the force most likely to drive major morphological changes to riverbanks and channels. What remains uncertain is which watersheds or river reaches may be subjected to increased damage from more intense storms. This presents a challenge for scientific outreach and management. Many New England states have developed systems for delineating the potentially geomorphically active zones adjacent to rivers, and Vermont has an excellent assessment and land use management system informed by process-based fluvial geomorphologic science. To date, however, Massachusetts has neither. In this project we survey existing protocols for accurately predicting locations of fluvial erosion hazard, including using LiDAR and DEM models to extract basic morphologic metrics. Particularly in states or landscapes with high river density, and during a time of tight fiscal constraints, managers need automated methods that require a minimum of expert input. We test these methods in the Deerfield river watershed in Massachusetts and Vermont, and integrate our knowledge with that of the basin's agricultural and floodplain stakeholders. The results will inform development of a comprehensive river assessment and land use management system for the state of Massachusetts.

  6. Utilization of ancient permafrost carbon in headwaters of Arctic fluvial networks

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Paul J.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Zimov, Nikita; Davydova, Anna; Vonk, Jorien E.; Holmes, Robert M.; Spencer, Robert G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Northern high-latitude rivers are major conduits of carbon from land to coastal seas and the Arctic Ocean. Arctic warming is promoting terrestrial permafrost thaw and shifting hydrologic flowpaths, leading to fluvial mobilization of ancient carbon stores. Here we describe 14C and 13C characteristics of dissolved organic carbon from fluvial networks across the Kolyma River Basin (Siberia), and isotopic changes during bioincubation experiments. Microbial communities utilized ancient carbon (11,300 to >50,000 14C years) in permafrost thaw waters and millennial-aged carbon (up to 10,000 14C years) across headwater streams. Microbial demand was supported by progressively younger (14C-enriched) carbon downstream through the network, with predominantly modern carbon pools subsidizing microorganisms in large rivers and main-stem waters. Permafrost acts as a significant and preferentially degradable source of bioavailable carbon in Arctic freshwaters, which is likely to increase as permafrost thaw intensifies causing positive climate feedbacks in response to on-going climate change. PMID:26206473

  7. An inventory of published and unpublished fluvial-sediment data for California, 1956-70

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porterfield, George

    1972-01-01

    This inventory was prepared to provide a convenient reference to published and unpublished fluvial-sediment data for water years 1956-70, and updates substantially previous inventories. Sediment stations are listed in downstream order, and an alphabetical list of stations is also included. Figure 1 shows the approximate location of sediment stations in California. Most of the fluvial-sediment data in California were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, under cooperative agreements with the following Federal, State, and local agencies: California Department of Water Resources, California Department of Navigation and Ocean Development, California Department of Fish and Game, Bolinas Harbor District, Monterey County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, Orange County Flood Control District, Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, San Diego County Department of Sanitation and Flood Control, San Luis Obispo County, San Mateo County, Santa Clara County Flood Control and Water District, Santa Cruz County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, Santa Cruz, city of, University of California, Ventura County Flood Control District, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. This report was prepared by the Geological Survey under the general supervision of R. Stanley Lord, district chief in charge of water-resources investigations in California.

  8. Interaction of marine and fluvial clastic sedimentation, central Italy, Tyrrhenian coast

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelista, S.; Full, W.E.; Tortora, P.

    1989-03-01

    An integrated approach was used to study the interaction of fluvial, beach, and marine processes on sedimentation at the west-central coast of Italy along the Tyrrhenian Sea. The study area, 120 km northwest of Rome, is bounded on the north by Mt. Argentario, on the east by Pleistocene volcanics, on the south by the St. Augustine River, and on the west by the 50-mn bathymetric isopleth. The primary tools used included field work, textural analysis, high-resolution marine seismic, SEM, and Fourier shape analysis. Field work revealed incised streams, potentially relict beach ridges and lagoons, and relatively steep nearshore marine slopes in the northern portions of the study area. The result of the shape analysis performed on 56 samples was the definition of four end members. Each end member reflects a sedimentation process. Three end members were directly associated with fluvial sedimentation, and the fourth reflected marine processes. The seismic data along with the SEM analysis strongly supported the interpretation of four processes that dominate the recent sedimentation history. The sand interpreted to be associated with marine processes was found to represent the smoothest end member. SEM analysis suggests that the smoothing is not due to abrasion but to plastering associated with biologic processes (digestion.) and/or with silica precipitation associated with clay alteration at the freshwater/saltwater interface.

  9. Fluvial architecture of dinosaur bonebeds in the Cretaceous Judith River Formation, south-central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K.M. ); Dodson, P. ); Fiorillo, A.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Fluvial architecture of dinosaur bonebeds in the Cretaceous Judith River Formation, south-central Montana, has been the subject of intensive paleontological study for many years. However, little has been published on the sedimentology of the formation in this area. The authors have completed a preliminary field study of fluvial facies, with a view towards correcting this omission. Initial results include detailed facies descriptions and maps for five quarries along a line of transect stretching some 40 km parallel to depositional dip. Facies identified are predominantly overbank splays and levees, with common point bar/alluvial channel units and occasional small, possibly estuarine sand bodies in parts of the section. Shell beds (mainly oysters) and bedded, 1 m thick coals are also significant in some sections. Preliminary attempts at paleohydrology suggest river channels in some parts of the section were about 100 m wide and 2 m deep; however, other parts of the section exhibit much larger channel widths. Channel stacking is common. Preliminary results suggest a strong correlation between the occurrence of reddish brown carbonaceous silty shales, and dinosaur bone deposits.

  10. Hydrological and sedimentary controls over fluvial thermal erosion, the Lena River, central Yakutia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tananaev, Nikita I.

    2016-01-01

    Water regime and sedimentary features of the middle Lena River reach near Yakutsk, central Yakutia, were studied to assess their control over fluvial thermal erosion. The Lena River floodplain in the studied reach has complex structure and embodies multiple levels varying in height and origin. Two key sites, corresponding to high and medium floodplain levels, were surveyed in 2008 to describe major sedimentary units and properties of bank material. Three units are present in both profiles, corresponding to topsoil, overbank (cohesive), and channel fill (noncohesive) deposits. Thermoerosional activity is mostly confined to a basal layer of frozen channel fill deposits and in general occurs within a certain water level interval. Magnitude-frequency analysis of water level data from Tabaga gauging station shows that a single interval can be deemed responsible for the initiation of thermal action and development of thermoerosional notches. This interval corresponds to the discharges between 21,000 and 31,000 m3 s- 1, observed normally during spring meltwater peak and summer floods. Competence of fluvial thermal erosion depends on the height of floodplain level being eroded, as it acts preferentially in high floodplain banks. In medium floodplain banks, thermal erosion during spring flood is constrained by insufficient bank height, and erosion is essentially mechanical during summer flood season. Bank retreat rate is argued to be positively linked with bank height under periglacial conditions.

  11. A Method for Applying Fluvial Geomorphology in Support of Catchment-Scale River Restoration Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sear, D.; Newson, M.; Hill, C.; Branson, J.; Old, J.

    2005-12-01

    Fluvial geomorphology is increasingly used by those responsible for conserving river ecosystems; survey techniques are used to derive conceptual models of the processes and forms that characterise particular systems and locations, with a view to making statements of `condition' or `status' and providing fundamental strategies for rehabilitation/restoration. However, there are important scale-related problems in developing catchments scale restoration plans that inevitably are implemented on a reach- by-reach basis. This paper reports on a watershed scale methodology for setting geomorphological and physical habitat reference conditions based on a science-based conceptual model of cachment:channel function. Using a case study from the River Nar, a gravel-bed groundwater dominated river in the UK with important conservation status, the paper describes the sequences of the methodology; from analysis of available evidence, process of field data capture and development of a conceptual model of catchment-wide fluvial dynamics. Reference conditions were derived from the conceptual model and gathered from the literature for the two main river types found on the river Nar, and compared with the current situation in 76 sub-reaches from source to mouth. Multi-Criteria Analysis (MCA) was used to score the extent of channel departures from `natural' and to suggest the basis for a progressive restoration strategy for the whole river system. MCA is shown to be a flexible method for setting and communicating decisions that are amenable to stakeholder and public consultation.

  12. Modelling Landscape Morphodynamics by Terrestrial Photogrammetry: AN Application to Beach and Fluvial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-García, E.; Balaguer-Beser, A.; Taborda, R.; Pardo-Pascual, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    Beach and fluvial systems are highly dynamic environments, being constantly modified by the action of different natural and anthropic phenomena. To understand their behaviour and to support a sustainable management of these fragile environments, it is very important to have access to cost-effective tools. These methods should be supported on cutting-edge technologies that allow monitoring the dynamics of the natural systems with high periodicity and repeatability at different temporal and spatial scales instead the tedious and expensive field-work that has been carried out up to date. The work herein presented analyses the potential of terrestrial photogrammetry to describe beach morphology. Data processing and generation of high resolution 3D point clouds and derived DEMs is supported by the commercial Agisoft PhotoScan. Model validation is done by comparison of the differences in the elevation among the photogrammetric point cloud and the GPS data along different beach profiles. Results obtained denote the potential that the photogrammetry 3D modelling has to monitor morphological changes and natural events getting differences between 6 and 25 cm. Furthermore, the usefulness of these techniques to control the layout of a fluvial system is tested by the performance of some modeling essays in a hydraulic pilot channel.

  13. Structural control of fluvial drainage in the western domain of the Cape Fold Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjoro, Munyaradzi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the extent to which drainage morphology has been influenced by faulting, folding and bedrock lithology in the Cape Fold Belt (CFB) of South Africa. This region was formed during Paleozoic-Mesozoic convergence along the south-western margin of Gondwana. An extensive structural geology database, terrain characteristics and stream network data were analysed using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to examine the possible linkages between structure and fluvial drainage. Results indicated that the contemporary geomorphology of the area reflects the influence of folding and faulting as well as differential erosion. The following drainage anomalies suggestive of strong structural control were identified: orientation of flow direction of major streams corresponding to structural lineaments, abrupt changes in stream direction influenced by anticline fold axes, faults and joints, and fault-aligned streams. Drainage development in the study area responded noticeably to the underlying structure. The study raises questions with regard to the implications of one major or multiple dominant structural controls on drainage morphology and pattern. The findings have relevance with regard to the understanding fluvial drainage development and landform evolution in tectonically deformed regions.

  14. Episodic ocean-induced CO2 greenhouse on Mars: implications for fluvial valley formation.

    PubMed

    Gulick, V C; Tyler, D; McKay, C P; Haberle, R M

    1997-11-01

    Pulses of CO2 injected into the martian atmosphere more recently than 4 Ga can place the atmosphere into a stable, higher pressure, warmer greenhouse state. One to two bar pulses of CO2 added to the atmosphere during the past several billion years are sufficient to raise global mean temperatures above 240 or 250 K for tens to hundreds of millions of years, even when accounting for CO2 condensation. Over time, the added CO2 is lost to carbonates, the atmosphere collapses and returns to its buffered state. A substantial amount of water could be transported during the greenhouse periods from the surface of a frozen body of water created by outflow channel discharges to higher elevations, despite global temperatures well below freezing. This water, precipitated as snow, could ultimately form fluvial valleys if deposition sites are associated with localized heat sources, such as magmatic intrusions or volcanoes. Thus, if outflow channel discharges were accompanied by the release of sufficient quantities of CO2, a limited hydrological cycle could have resulted that would have been capable of producing geomorphic change sufficient for fluvial erosion and valley formation. Glacial or periglacial landforms would also be a consequence of such a mechanism. PMID:11541758

  15. Fluvial and Lacustrine Processes in Meridiani Planum and the Origin of the Hematite by Aqueous Alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; Barber, C. A.; Schelble, R. T.; Hare, T. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Sutherland, V.; Livingston, A.; Lewis, K.

    2003-01-01

    The prime MER landing site in Meridiani Planum is located on layered materials, including hematite, whose origin as lacustrine or aeolian sediments, or volcanic materials is uncertain. Our detailed mapping of the region provides important constraints on the history of the region. Our mapping of the location of fluvial and lacustrine land forms in the region relative to the layered deposits provides new evidence of a long history of erosion and deposition as has long been noted . In addition, our detailed mapping of the southern boundary of the hematite deposit strongly supports an association between longlived fluvial channels and lacustrine basins and the strongest hematite signatures. This evidence supports an origin of the hematite deposits by interaction with water under ambient conditions in contrast to suggestions of hydrothermal processes due to volcanic or impact crater processes. An important part of the story is the evidence for the localization of the layered deposits due to topographic control induce by the presence of a large early basin we have identified that extends to the north-east of the landing site. Distribution of current channel networks, drainages,

  16. Tertiary fluvial systems within the Bear Creek coal field, northern Big Horn basin, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.N. ); Gruber, J.R. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    The Bear Creek coal field contains the 250-m-thick coal-bearing Paludal Member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the northern Big Horn Basin, Montana. Detailed field and subsurface data show two contrasting geometries in alluvial strata, each bounded by an economic coal bed. The lower 50 m of the Paludal Member is dominated by sheet and ribbon sandstones. The sheet sandstones are as long as 1.5 km and fine upwards from medium to fine grained. Some sandstones are multistory with sharp upoper and lower contacts. The upper portion has convolute bedding, ripple lamination, and some horizontal and tabular crossbeds. Stratigraphically higher is a 12-m-thick fine-grained sequence, containing large tree trunks in growth position and extensively rooted mud rocks. Sandstone bodies, 6 m thick and 10 m wide, are enclosed within mudstones and siltstones. The sandstones are primarily ripple laminated and have stepped bases and internal erosion surfaces. This interval has previously been interpreted as deposits of an anastomosed fluvial system. The sandstones show little evidence of significant lateral migration. In contrast to the lower interval, the environment here consisted of well-developed vegetated islands separating fluvial channels. Subsurface data show that the major coal beds are laterally continuous within the study area. The cyclic development of the coals reflects intermittent periods of long-term basin stability. Alternating dominance of the sandstones suggests that influx and distribution were controlled through episodic uplift of the nearby Beartooth Mountains.

  17. Magmatic Intrusions and a Hydrothermal Origin for Fluvial Valleys on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C

    1998-01-01

    Numerical models of Martian hydrothermal systems demonstrate that systems associated with magmatic intrusions greater than several hundred cubic kilometers can provide sufficient groundwater outflow to form the observed fluvial valleys, if subsurface permeability exceeds about 1.0 darcy. Groundwater outflow increases with increasing intrusion volume and subsurface permeability and is relatively insensitive to intrusion depth and subsurface porosity within the range considered here. Hydrothermally-derived fluids can melt through 1 to 2 km thick ice-rich permafrost layers in several thousand years. Hydrothermal systems thus provide a viable alternative to rainfall for providing surface water for valley formation. This mechanism can form fluvial valleys not only during the postulated early warm, wet climatic epoch, but also during more recent epochs when atmospheric conditions did not favor atmospheric cycling of water. The clustered distribution of the valley networks on a given geologic surface or terrain unit of Mars may also be more compatible with localized, hydrothermally-driven groundwater outflow than regional rainfall. Hydrothermal centers on Mars may have provided appropriate environments for the initiation of life or final oases for the long-term persistence of life.

  18. The relative efficacy of fluvial and glacial erosion over modern to orogenic timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppes, Michele N.; Montgomery, David R.

    2009-09-01

    Since the late nineteenth century, it has been debated whether rivers or glaciers are more effective agents of erosion. The dramatic landscapes associated with glaciated terrain have often led to the argument that glaciers are more erosive than rivers, and recent studies have documented the topographic signature of an ice-controlled limit of mountain height known as the `glacial buzz-saw'. Here we present a new global compilation of erosion rates, which questions the conventional view of glaciers and erosion. In regions of rapid tectonic uplift, erosion rates from rivers and glaciers both range from 1 to over 10mmyr-1, indicating that both are capable of generating erosion rates matching or exceeding the highest rates of rock uplift. Moreover, a comparison of erosion rates over timescales ranging from 101 to 107years indicates that glacial erosion tends to decrease by one to two orders of magnitude over glacial cycles, whereas fluvial erosion rates show no apparent dependence on time. We conclude that tectonics controls rates of both fluvial and glacial erosion over millennial and longer timescales and that the highest rates of erosion (>10mmyr-1) generally result from a transient response to disturbance by volcanic eruptions, climate change and modern agriculture.

  19. Hydraulics are a first-order control on CO2 efflux from fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Hazel; Vihermaa, Leena; Waldron, Susan; Hoey, Trevor; Quemin, Simon; Newton, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Evasion of carbon dioxide (CO2) from fluvial systems is now recognized as a significant component of the global carbon cycle. However, the magnitude of, and controls on, this flux remains uncertain, and improved understanding of both is required to refine global estimates of fluvial CO2 efflux. CO2 efflux data show no pattern with latitude suggesting that catchment biological productivity is not a primary control and that an alternative explanation for intersite variability is required. It has been suggested that increased flow velocity and turbulence enhance CO2 efflux, but this is not confirmed. Here using contemporaneous measurements of efflux (range: 0.07-107 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1), flow hydraulics (mean velocity range: 0.03-1.39 m s-1), and pCO2 (range: 174-10712 µatm) at six sites, we find that flow intensity is a primary control on efflux across two climatically different locations (where pH is not a limiting factor) and that the relationship is refined by incorporating the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) of the water. A remaining challenge is how to upscale from point to reach or river basin level. Remote imaging or river surface may be worth exploring if subjectivity in interpreting surface state can be overcome.

  20. SEISMIC STUDY OF THE AGUA DE PAU GEOTHERMAL PROSPECT, SAO MIGUEL, AZORES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Rodrigues da Silva, Antonio; Iyer, H.M.; Evans, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A 16 station array was operated over the 200 km**2 central portion of Sao Miguel utilizing 8 permanent Instituto Nacional de Meterologia e Geofisica stations and 8 USGS portable stations. Forty four local events with well constrained solutions and 15 regional events were located. In addition, hundreds of unlocatable seismic events were recorded. The most interesting seismic activity occurred in a swarm on September 6 and 7, 1983 when over 200 events were recorded in a 16 hour period. The seismic activity around Agua de Pau was centered on the east and northeast slopes of the volcano. The data suggest a boiling hydrothermal system beneath the Agua de Pau volcano, consistent with a variety of other data.

  1. Flood of February 1980 along the Agua Fria River, Maricopa County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomsen, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The flood of February 20, 1980, along the Agua Fria River below Waddell Dam, Maricopa County, Ariz., was caused by heavy rains during February 13-20. The runoff filled Lake Pleasant and resulted in the largest release--66,600 cubic feet per second--from the reservoir since it was built in 1927; the maximum inflow to the reservoir was about 73,300 cubic feet per second. The area inundated by the releases includes about 28 miles along the channel from the mouth of the Agua Fria River to the Beardsley Canal flume crossing 5 miles downstream from Waddell Dam. The flood of 1980 into Lake Pleasant has a recurrence interval of about 47 years, whereas the flood of record (1919) has a recurrence interval of about 100 years. (USGS)

  2. Agua Caliente Solar Feasibility and Pre-Development Study Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Carolyn T. Stewart, Managing Partner; Red Mountain Energy Partners

    2011-04-26

    Evaluation of facility- and commercial-scale solar energy projects on the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians Reservation in Palm Springs, CA. The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) conducted a feasibility and pre-development study of potential solar projects on its lands in southern California. As described below, this study as a logical and necessary next step for ACBCI. Support for solar project development in California, provided through the statewide California Solar Initiative (CSI), its Renewable Portfolio Standard and Feed-in Tariff Program, and recently announced Reverse Auction Mechanism, provide unprecedented support and incentives that can be utilized by customers of California's investor-owned utilities. Department of Energy (DOE) Tribal Energy Program funding allowed ACBCI to complete its next logical step to implement its Strategic Energy Plan, consistent with its energy and sustainability goals.

  3. Numerical modeling of Martian gully sediment transport: Testing the fluvial hypothesis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, R.; Nimmo, F.

    2009-12-01

    Using a stereo pair of HiRISE images of a pole-facing crater slope at 38°S, 218°E, we measure relative elevation changes between manually-selected points to generate topographic profiles along 9 gullies. Based on the topography measurements, the gully alcove accounts for a volume of 6 x105 m3 of eroded material and typical slopes of the interior channel region (above the depositional apron) is ~20°. Using these observations, we focus on the hypothesis that sediment transport on gully slopes occurs via fluvial transport processes in order to determine if it is consistent with the expected timescales and water volumes available for gully formation. To test this hypothesis, we develop a numerical sediment transport model based on steep slope flume experiments performed by Smart [1984]. These "low flow," steep slope conditions make Smart's sediment transport predictor the most relevant to Martian gullies. The finite difference numerical model we employ calculates sediment discharge rate along a gully channel of specified width, depth, and sediment grainsize. We crudely account for three dimensional effects of sediment infilling from valley sides and fan-shaped deposition. Our results suggest that fluvial sediment transport on the ~20° gully slopes is rapid. One of our simulation results is shown in the figure below. Based on our simulations, channels 1 m deep by 8 m wide and 0.1 m deep by 3 m wide transport a sediment volume of 6 x105 m3 in 10 h and 40 d, respectively, under constant flow conditions and require a total water volume of 106 m3 and 0.5x106 m3, respectively. These results suggest a sediment:water volume ratio of roughly 35 - 50% by volume. If these volumes of water are discharged as groundwater, the required aquifer thicknesses and aquifer drawdown lengths would be unrealistically large for a single discharge event. Alternatively, the water volume required by the fluvial transport model could be discharged in 15-30 episodes for an aquifer 10 m thick

  4. Hydrologic characteristics of the Agua Fria National Monument, central Arizona, determined from the reconnaissance study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, John B.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrologic conditions in the newly created Agua Fria National Monument were characterized on the basis of existing hydrologic and geologic information, and streamflow data collected in May 2002. The study results are intended to support the Bureau of Land Management's future water-resource management responsibilities, including quantification of a Federal reserved water right within the monument. This report presents the study results, identifies data deficiencies, and describes specific approaches for consideration in future studies. Within the Agua Fria National Monument, the Agua Fria River flows generally from north to south, traversing almost the entire 23-mile length of the monument. Streamflow has been measured continuously at a site near the northern boundary of the monument since 1940. Streamflow statistics for this site, and streamflow measurements from other sites along the Agua Fria River, indicate that the river is perennial in the northern part of the monument but generally is intermittent in downstream reaches. The principal controls on streamflow along the river within the monument appear to be geology, the occurrence and distribution of alluvium, inflow at the northern boundary and from tributary canyons, precipitation, and evapotranspiration. At present, (2004) there is no consistent surface-water quality monitoring program being implemented for the monument. Ground-water recharge within the monument likely results from surface-water losses and direct infiltration of precipitation. Wells are most numerous in the Cordes Junction and Black Canyon City areas. Only eight wells are within the monument. Ground-water quality data for wells in the monument area consist of specific-conductance values and fluoride concentrations. During the study, ground-water quality data were available for only one well within the monument. No ground-water monitoring program is currently in place for the monument or surrounding areas.

  5. Modern Landform Distribution of the Gilbert River Distributive Fluvial System (DFS) and Predictions Regarding Ancient Coastal Plain Progradational Successions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, K. C.; Weissmann, G. S.; Scuderi, L. A.; Owen, A.; Nichols, G. J.; Hartley, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    Distributive fluvial systems (DFSs) are modern fluvial deposits of radial distributive channel patterns and encompass a continuum from small-scale alluvial fans to large-scale fluvial megafans. Given that DFSs have been shown to comprise most continental regimes, we hypothesize that these systems form fluvial deposits in sedimentary basins at the fluvial-marine interface. Few modern examples of DFSs spanning this realm exist, as modern coastlines are presently flooded due to high-amplitude Quaternary sea level changes. The Gilbert River DFS of north Queensland, Australia, represents a modern example of a DFS terminating in the Gulf of Carpentaria. Remote sensing analyses on this system show the same recognizable depositional patterns as purely continental DFS: 1) a radial channel pattern originating from an apex, 2) a down-DFS decrease in both channel and grain size, 3) a lack of lateral channel confinement, 4) a broad fan shape, and 5) a down-DFS increase in floodplain/channel area ratio. The distal portion (influenced by sea level changes) exhibits: a) a sharp contact between DFS and marginal-marine deposits, b) channel incision, confinement and lateral movement, c) channel width increasing due to tidal influence, d) sediment redistribution (spits, small-scale deltas), and e) shoreline progradation (wave-cut platforms and beach ridges). These observations ultimately lead to sedimentologic and stratigraphic predictions regarding coastal DFS deposits in the geologic record. Data from the Gilbert system are compared with facies and facies transitions in Cordilleran foreland basin Cretaceous strata that cross the fluvial-marine interface, such as the John Henry Mbr. of the Straight Cliffs Formation and the Williams Fork Formations of Utah and Colorado, respectively. If these strata are DFS, then the following succession (in ascending order) should exist in a single progradational succession: 1) Distal channel deposits with evidence of tidal influence (herringbone

  6. Rock strength along a fluvial transect of the Colorado Plateau - quantifying a fundamental control on geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursztyn, N.; Pederson, J. L.; Tressler, C.; Mackley, R. D.; Mitchell, K. J.

    2015-11-01

    Bedrock strength is a key parameter that influences slope stability, landscape erosion, and fluvial incision. Yet, it is often ignored or indirectly constrained in studies of landscape evolution, as with the K erodibility parameter in stream-power models. Empirical datasets of rock strength suited to address geomorphic questions are rare, in part because of the difficulty in measuring those rocks at Earth's surface that are heterolithic, weak, or poorly exposed. Here we present a large dataset of measured bedrock strength organized by rock units exposed along the length of the trunk Green-Colorado River through the iconic Colorado Plateau of the western U.S. Measurements include field compressive tests, fracture spacing, and Selby Rock Mass Strength at 168 localities, as well as 672 individual tensile-strength tests in the laboratory. Tensile strength results are compared to geomorphic metrics of unit stream power, river gradient, and channel and valley-bottom width through the arid Colorado Plateau, where the influence of bedrock is intuitive but unquantified. Our dataset reveals logical trends between tensile and compressive strength as well as between strength, rock type and age. In bedrock reaches of the fluvial transect, there is a positive rank-correlation and a strong power-law correlation between reach-averaged rock strength and unit stream power, as well as a linear relation between tensile strength and river gradient. Expected relations between fracture spacing and topography are masked partly by the massive yet weak sandstones in the dataset. To constrain values for weak rock types such as shale, we utilize the inverse power-law scaling between tensile strength and valley-bottom width to estimate their "effective" tensile strength. Results suggest that tensile strength varies to at least an order-of-magnitude smaller values than evident with directly testable rocks in this landscape, and values for erodibility (K) in numerical simulations may be informed

  7. Fluvial Tufa Evidence of Late Pleistocene Wet Intervals from Santa Barbara, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, Y.; Corsetti, F. A.; Feakins, S. J.; Rhodes, E. J.; Kirby, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Past pluvials in the western United States provide valuable context for understanding regional hydroclimate variability. Here we report evidence of conditions substantially wetter than today from fluvial tufa deposits located near Zaca Lake, Santa Barbara County, California that have been dated by radiocarbon (14C) and Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence (IRSL). Two successions of tufa deposition occur within a small catchment that drains Miocene Monterey Formation bedrock: 1) a fluvial deposit (0-0.5 m thick, 200 m in extent) that formed along a narrow valley below a modern spring, and 2) a perched deposit about 10 m higher (2 m thick, 15 m in extent). IRSL and radiocarbon dating of the perched carbonates suggests at least two episodes of carbonate growth: one at 19.4 ± 2.4 (1σ) through 17.8 ± 2.8 (1σ) ka and another at 11.9 ± 1.5 (1σ) ka verified with a charcoal 14C age of 10.95 ± 0.12 (2σ) cal ka BP. The relationship between the perched and fluvial spring deposits is inferred to represent a drop in the water table of more than 10 m associated with a transition from a wet climate in the late glacial to a dry Holocene today. The wet period indicated by tufa growth between 19.4 and 17.8 ka is relatively consistent with other California climate records both north and south of Zaca Lake. However, tufa growth ca. 12 to 11 ka demonstrates wet conditions occurred as far south as Zaca Lake during the Younger Dryas event, in contrast to climate records farther south in Lake Elsinore indicating persistently dry conditions through this interval. A small shift north in the average position of the winter season storm track could explain wet winters at Zaca while at the same time generating dry winters at Lake Elsinore, 275 km southwest of Zaca. If true, these data indicate that rather small latitudinal shifts in the average winter season storm track can produce large changes in regional hydroclimate.

  8. "Who's been feeding in my bed?" Benthivorous fish affect fluvial sediment transport - fact or fairy tale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Stephen; Pledger, Andrew; Smith, James; Toone, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Many species of fish are benthivorous - they forage for food in the river bed - and their foraging disturbs, displaces and sorts bed materials with implications for fluvial sediment transport. Flume experiments have confirmed that benthic foraging by Barbel (Barbus barbus (L.)) and Chub (Squalius cephalus (L.)) modifies the structure and topography of water-worked gravels, thereby increasing particle entrainment probabilities and the quantity of sediment mobilised during experimental high flows. Field experiments and observations have demonstrated the impact of foraging on patch-scale bed disturbance, gravel structure, grain displacements and grain-size sorting. Initial ex-situ experiments support the suggestion that in low gradient rivers, shoals of fish like Bream (Abramis brama (L.)) entrain fine bed sediments, adding a biotic surcharge to the suspended sediment flux and modifying bed topography. These results underpin a novel proposal: that there is an aggregate, cumulative effect of benthic foraging on fluvial sediment transport at larger scales, including at scales where the contribution to sediment movement and river channel behaviour generates management concerns. Evaluating this proposal is a long-term goal, which is based on two intermediate objectives: to develop deeper mechanistic understanding of foraging impacts and to establish the spatial and temporal extent of geomorphologically significant feeding behaviours in river systems. The latter is crucial because field data are currently limited to a single reach on one UK river. It is reasonable to hypothesise that foraging impacts are spatially and temporally widespread because obligate and opportunistic benthic feeding is common and fish feed throughout their life. However, the effectiveness of foraging as a geomorphological process is likely to vary with factors including substrate size, fish community composition, food availability, water temperature, river flows and seasonal changes in fish

  9. Identifying vegetation's influence on multi-scale fluvial processes based on plant trait adaptations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, R.; Merritt, D. M.; Wilcox, A. C.; Scott, M.

    2015-12-01

    Riparian vegetation-geomorphic interactions are critical to the physical and biological function of riparian ecosystems, yet we lack a mechanistic understanding of these interactions and predictive ability at the reach to watershed scale. Plant functional groups, or groupings of species that have similar traits, either in terms of a plant's life history strategy (e.g., drought tolerance) or morphology (e.g., growth form), may provide an expression of vegetation-geomorphic interactions. We are developing an approach that 1) identifies where along a river corridor plant functional groups exist and 2) links the traits that define functional groups and their impact on fluvial processes. The Green and Yampa Rivers in Dinosaur National Monument have wide variations in hydrology, hydraulics, and channel morphology, as well as a large dataset of species presence. For these rivers, we build a predictive model of the probable presence of plant functional groups based on site-specific aspects of the flow regime (e.g., inundation probability and duration), hydraulic characteristics (e.g., velocity), and substrate size. Functional group traits are collected from the literature and measured in the field. We found that life-history traits more strongly predicted functional group presence than did morphological traits. However, some life-history traits, important for determining the likelihood of a plant existing along an environmental gradient, are directly related to the morphological properties of the plant, important for the plant's impact on fluvial processes. For example, stem density (i.e., dry mass divided by volume of stem) is positively correlated to drought tolerance and is also related to the modulus of elasticity. Growth form, which is related to the plant's susceptibility to biomass-removing fluvial disturbances, is also related to frontal area. Using this approach, we can identify how plant community composition and distribution shifts with a change to the flow

  10. How the eastern Qilian Shan Mountain was deformed, revealed by deformed fluvial terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Pan, B.; Gao, H.; Hu, Z.; Geng, H.; Cao, B.

    2012-12-01

    The northwest-southeastern treading Qilian Shan Mountain, margining the northeastern Tibetan Plateau, has been uplifting and deforming related to thrust faults bordering the mountain range in the north. By now, the fault thrust rate and how the mountain was uplifted and deformed is poorly documented along the eastern Qilian Shan. In this study, several flights of late Quaternary fluvial terraces along two rivers (Xiying River and Jinta River), sourced from the mountain crest and flowing transecting these thrust faults and folds, are surveyed by differential GPS with the accuracy of lower than 10 centimeters. Meanwhile, the abandonment times of terrace surfaces were dated by OSL dating on the overlying loess above the fluvial deposits. Analysis results of height data show that fluvial terrace surfaces were obviously deformed related to thrusting and folding. At first, we derive an average uplift rate of 0.05~0.2 mm/yr, which is contributed by folding along the low-mountain range since 120 ka B.P. When the uplift contributed by thrust is added, the total rate of uplift would be 0.45-0.60 mm/yr. The second, by the geometry of terrace surface height, the thrust geometry under the surface is deduced. Along the low-mountain range (with elevation from 2000 m to 3000 m), the dip angle of thrust is bended from ~30° to ~50° at the depth of around 15 km, and at the depth of ~20 km, the thrust dip angle is changed to ~26°. Along the Huangcheng-Taerzhuang Fault, which bordering the high-mountain range (with elevation from 3000 m to 5000 m) and the low-mountain range, the dip angle is bended from ~70° at the surface to ~47° below the depth of ~5 km, and at the depth below 23 km, the dip angel of the thrust is >30°. We conclude that in the late Quaternary, the deforming of mountain range along the eastern Qilian Shan is accomplished both by thrusting and folding; the different uplift rate is mainly caused by different thrust angle in the depth along the eastern Qilian Shan

  11. Late Pleistocene differential uplift inferred from the analysis of fluvial terraces (southern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giano, Salvatore Ivo; Giannandrea, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    The stratigraphic architecture and morphological assemblage of the Pleistocene fluvial terraces contained in two contiguous fluvial valleys are used to understand the spatial distribution and the timing of the differential uplift that affected two different geological and geomorphological settings of an active orogen. The study areas, both placed in the eastern sector of the southern Apennines of Italy, are the Sant'Arcangelo sedimentary basin and the Valsinni Ridge anticline. Pleistocene uplift rate of 0.7-0.9 mm y- 1 and historical earthquakes affecting those areas suggest active tectonics. Based on the synthem units used to classify the fluvial deposits in the field, several strath, fill, and fill-cut terraces have been mapped in the middle valleys of the Agri and Sinni rivers. Four Middle Pleistocene high terraces (Qes) are found in the Sant'Arcangelo Basin and cut its infill, and three Late Pleistocene low terraces (Qt) are found at both the Agri and Sinni valley flanks. The Agri and Sinni rivers cross-cut the NW-SE-oriented fold-and-thrust belt of the southern Apennines from W to E, producing a transverse drainage. As a result, ten- to hundred-metre deep gorges and wide floodplains were created in the middle reach of the river valleys. Computation of the bedrock incision rates from the Qes1, Qes4, and SQt1 terraces, corresponding to 1.2 ± 0.2 mm y- 1 at 400-240 ka and 0.8 ± 0.2 mm y- 1 in the last 240 ka, together with the terrace profile arrangements in the Agri and Sinni valleys, allow for the documentation of i) the differential uplift of the study area and ii) the age of terrace abandonment corresponding to the beginning age of the vertical incision in the valley floor sediments to form the Qt terraces. The differential uplift is subsequently discussed in a space and time-sequence evolution of the Late Pleistocene to assess the complex morphotectonic development that occurred in the eastern threshold of the basin. The differential uplift of both the

  12. Palynostratigraphy and sedimentary facies of Middle Miocene fluvial deposits of the Amazonas Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dino, Rodolfo; Soares, Emílio Alberto Amaral; Antonioli, Luzia; Riccomini, Claudio; Nogueira, Afonso César Rodrigues

    2012-03-01

    Palynostratigraphic and sedimentary facies analyses were made on sedimentary deposits from the left bank of the Solimões River, southwest of Manaus, State of Amazonas, Brazil. These provided the age-dating and subdivision of a post-Cretaceous stratigraphic succession in the Amazonas Basin. The Novo Remanso Formation is subdivided into upper and lower units, and delineated by discontinuous surfaces at its top and bottom. The formation consists primarily of sandstones and minor mudstones and conglomerates, reflecting fluvial channel, point bar and floodplain facies of a fluvial meandering paleosystem. Fairly well-preserved palynoflora was recovered from four palynologically productive samples collected in a local irregular concentration of gray clay deposits, rich in organic material and fossilized wood, at the top of the Novo Remanso Formation upper unit. The palynoflora is dominated by terrestrial spores and pollen grains, and is characterized by abundant angiosperm pollen grains ( Tricolpites, Grimsdalea, Perisyncolporites, Tricolporites and Malvacearumpollis). Trilete spores are almost as abundant as the angiosperm pollen, and are represented mainly by the genera Deltoidospora, Verrutriletes, and Hamulatisporis. Gymnosperm pollen is scarce. The presence of the index species Grimsdalea magnaclavata Germeraad et al. (1968) indicates that these deposits belong to the Middle Miocene homonymous palynozone (Lorente, 1986; Hoorn, 1993; Jaramillo et al., 2011). Sedimentological characteristics (poorly sorted, angular to sub-angular, fine to very-coarse quartz sands facies) are typical of the Novo Remanso Formation upper part. These are associated with a paleoflow to the NE-E and SE-E, and with an entirely lowland-derived palinofloristic content with no Andean ferns and gymnosperms representatives. All together, this suggests a cratonic origin for this Middle Miocene fluvial paleosystem, which was probably born in the Purus Arch eastern flank and areas surrounding the

  13. Case study of climatic changes in Martian fluvial systems at Xanthe Terra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereszturi, Akos

    2014-06-01

    An unnamed valley system was analyzed in Xanthe Terra south of Havel Vallis on Mars where three separate episodes of fluvial activity could be identified with different morphology, water source and erosional processes, inferring formation under different climatic conditions. The oldest scattered valleys (1. group) form interconnecting network and suggest areally distributed water source. Later two valley types formed from confined water source partly supported by possible subsurface water. The smaller upper reaches (2. group) with three separate segments and also a similar aged but areal washed terrain suggest contribution from shallow subsurface inflow. These valleys fed the main channel (3. group), which morphology (wide, theater shaped source, few tributaries, steep walls) is the most compatible with the subsurface sapping origin. While the first valley group formed in the Noachian, the other two, more confined groups are younger. Their crater density based age value is uncertain, and could be only 1200 million years. After these three fluvial episodes etch pitted, heavily eroded terrain formed possibly by ice sublimation driven collapse. More recently (60-200 million years ago) dunes covered the bottom of the valleys, and finally the youngest event took place when mass movements produced debris covered the valleys' slopes with sediments along their wall around 5-15 million years ago, suggesting wind activity finished earlier than the mass movements in the region. This small area represents the sequence of events probably appeared on global scale: the general cooling and drying environment of Mars. Comparing the longitudinal profiles here to other valleys in Xanthe Terra, convex shaped valley profiles are usually connected to steep terrains. The location of erosional base might play an important role in their formation that can be produced convex shapes where the erosional base descended topographically (by deep impact crater or deep outflow channel formation

  14. Late Quaternary fluvial incision rates in a marine terraced landscape, southeastern Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karymbalis, Efthimios; Papanastassiou, Dimitris; Valkanou, Kanella; Gaki-Papanastassiou, Kalliopi

    2014-05-01

    Along the southern coast of the island of Crete, a series of five east-west oriented Late Pleistocene marine terraces exist, demonstrating the significant coastal uplift of this area. These terraces, ranging in elevation from 10 to 160m, are deformed by the vertical movements of the NNE-SSW trending and dipping west normal fault of Ierapetra. This study focuses on defining rates of fluvial incision for the last 410 Ka along valley systems that drain the tectonically uplifting area of Ierapetra, south Crete. The studied streams have a N-S flow direction and discharge into the Libyan Sea. Some of them are developed on the uplifted block of the Ierapetra normal fault whereas others drain the subsiding area west of the fault. The lower reaches of the study streams cut down through these marine terraces, which have been recognized, mapped in detail and correlated with Late Pleistocene Oxygen-Isotope Stages of high sea-level stands following the global sea-level fluctuations. These terraces of known age were used as reference surfaces in order to determine fluvial incision rates as the lower reaches of the streams cut down through these platforms. To evaluate incision rates, thirty five topographic valley cross-sections were drawn through fieldwork measurements as well as using a digital elevation model (DEM) produced by detailed topographic diagrams at the scale of 1:5,000. Cross valley profiles were constructed at specific locations where streams cut down the inner edges of the marine terraces because these points correspond precisely to the age of the palaeo-shoreline during the interglacial stage. For each cross-section the ratio of valley floor width to valley height (Vf) and long-term mean stream incision rates were estimated for the last 410 Ka. The geomorphic evolution of the valleys has been mainly affected by the lithology of the bedrock, sea level fluctuations during the late Quaternary, the head-ward erosion and incision of the channels, as well as both the

  15. A comparison of factors controlling sedimentation rates and wetland loss in fluvial deltaic systems, Texas Gulf coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, William A.; Morton, Robert A.; Holmes, Charles W.

    2002-04-01

    Submergence of coastal marshes in areas where rates of relative sea-level rise exceed rates of marsh sedimentation, or vertical accretion, is a global problem that requires detailed examination of the principal processes that establish, maintain, and degrade these biologically productive environments. Using a simple 210Pb-dating model, we measured sedimentation rates in cores from the Trinity, Lavaca-Navidad, and Nueces bayhead fluvial-deltaic systems in Texas where more than 2000 ha of wetlands have been lost since the 1950s. Long-term average rates of fluvial-deltaic aggradation decrease southwestward from 0.514±0.008 cm year -1 in the Trinity, 0.328±0.022 cm year -1 in the Lavaca-Navidad, to 0.262±0.034 cm year -1 in the Nueces. The relative magnitudes of sedimentation and wetland loss correlate with several parameters that define the differing fluvial-deltaic settings, including size of coastal drainage basin, average annual rainfall, suspended sediment load, thickness of Holocene mud in the valley fill, and rates of relative sea-level rise. There is some evidence that upstream reservoirs have reduced wetland sedimentation rates, which are now about one-half the local rates of relative sea-level rise. The extant conditions indicate that fluvial-deltaic marshes in these valleys will continue to be lost as a result of submergence and erosion.

  16. Paleocurrent and fabric analyses of the imbricated fluvial gravel deposits in Huangshui Valley, the northeastern Tibetan Plateau, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miao, X.; Lu, H.; Li, Z.; Cao, G.

    2008-01-01

    Gravel deposits on fluvial terraces contain a wealth of information about the paleofluvial system. In this study, flow direction and provenance were determined by systematic counts of more than 2000 clasts of imbricated gravel deposits in the Xining Region, northeastern Tibetan Plateau, China. These gravel deposits range in age from the modern Huangshui riverbed to Miocene-aged deposits overlain by eolian sediments. Our major objectives were not only to collect first-hand field data on the fluvial gravel sediments of the Xining Region, but also to the reconstruct the evolution of the fluvial system. These data may offer valuable information about uplift of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau during the late Cenozoic era. Reconstructed flow directions of the higher and lower gravel deposits imply that the river underwent a flow reversal of approximately 130-180??. In addition, the lithological compositions in the higher gravel deposits differ significantly from the lower terraces, suggesting that the source areas changed at the same time. Eolian stratigraphy overlying the gravel deposits and paleomagnetic age determination indicate that this change occurred sometime between 1.55??Ma and 1.2??Ma. We suggest that tectonic activity could explain the dramatic changes in flow direction and lithological composition during this time period. Therefore, this study provides a new scenario of fluvial response to tectonic uplift: a reversal of flow direction. In addition, field observation and statistical analyses reveal a strong relationship between rock type, size and roundness of clasts. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Development a fluvial detachment rate model to predict the erodibility of cohesive soils under the influence of seepage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage influences the erodibility of streambanks, streambeds, dams, and embankments. Usually the erosion rate of cohesive soils due to fluvial forces is computed using an excess shear stress model, dependent on two major soil parameters: the critical shear stress (tc) and the erodibility coefficie...

  18. Formation of a fluvial non-parasitic population of Lethenteron camtschaticum as the first step in petromyzontid speciation.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Y; Yokoyama, R; Nagai, T; Goto, A

    2011-12-01

    To elucidate the petromyzontid speciation process, the genetic independence of the fluvial non-parasitic populations within the anadromous parasitic Lethenteron camtschaticum was estimated by using polymorphic microsatellite loci. Abundant gene flow was revealed in multitemporal scales between potentially sympatric populations, suggesting ongoing gene flow resulting from imperfect size-assortative mating between them and plastic determination of life histories. On the contrary, landlocked fluvial non-parasitic populations in the upper region of dams were genetically divergent from anadromous parasitic populations. The temporal heterogeneity of gene flow, i.e. contemporary little gene flow but significant gene flow over the long-term between the landlocked fluvial non-parasitic and anadromous parasitic populations was elucidated. In addition, the divergence time of isolation of the landlocked populations from the ancestral anadromous parasitic population was estimated to have occurred 17.9-428.2 years ago, which includes the construction times of an initial dam c. 90 years ago. These instances indicate that the landlocked populations should have very recently been established, and subsequent accumulation of divergence and development of reproductive isolation are predicted. The present landlocked fluvial non-parasitic populations should be analogous to the founder populations in terms of petromyzontid speciation. The data also strongly support the hypothesis of multitemporal and multispatial speciation in the petromyzontid stem-satellite species complex. PMID:22141904

  19. Fluvial geomorphology and aquatic-to-terrestrial Hg export are weakly coupled in small urban streams of Columbus, Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, S. Mažeika P.; Boaz, Lindsey E.; Hossler, Katie

    2016-04-01

    Although mercury (Hg) contamination is common in stream ecosystems, mechanisms governing bioavailability and bioaccumulation in fluvial systems remain poorly resolved as compared to lentic systems. In particular, streams in urbanized catchments are subject to fluvial geomorphic alterations that may contribute to Hg distribution, bioaccumulation, and export across the aquatic-to-terrestrial boundary. In 12 streams of urban Columbus, Ohio, we investigated the influence of fluvial geomorphic characteristics related to channel geometry, streamflow, and sediment size and distribution on (1) Hg concentrations in sediment and body burdens in benthic larval and adult emergent aquatic insects and (2) aquatic-to-terrestrial contaminant transfer to common riparian spiders of the families Pisauridae and Tetragnathidae via changes in aquatic insect Hg body burdens as well as in aquatic insect density and community composition. Hydrogeomorphic characteristics were weakly related to Hg body burdens in emergent insects (channel geometry) and tetragnathid spiders (streamflow), but not to Hg concentrations in sediment or benthic insects. Streamflow characteristics were also related to emergent insect density, while wider channels were associated with benthic insect community shifts toward smaller-bodied and more tolerant taxa (e.g., Chironomidae). Thus, our results provide initial evidence that fluvial geomorphology may influence aquatic-to-terrestrial contaminant Hg transfer through the collective effects on emergent insect body burdens as well as on aquatic insect community composition and abundance.

  20. Monitoring Fluvial Erosion of Cohesive Materials Using the Photo-Electronic Erosion Pin Sensor in Clear Creek, IA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, F.; Papanicolaou, T.

    2009-12-01

    Fluvial erosion incites significant bridge scour and large-scale bank erosion causing estimated $1.1 billion damage in the Midwest. Conventional, manual, field monitoring methods, typically erosion pins, cross-section resurveys or terrestrial photogrammetry, used to monitor fluvial erosion rates merely provide a net change in bank surface retreat since the previous measurement. If mass wasting has occurred, the ongoing fluvial erosion would be masked. Erosion event timing, and the precise bank response to individual flow or flow hydrograph changes, is generally uncertain. Thus, a technique that automatically quantifies bank erosion on a continuous basis is needed. This study will monitor the bank response to individual flow (i.e., fluvial erosion) using the Photo-Electronic Erosion Pin (PEEP) sensors in Clear Creek Iowa. It attends to monitor a full episode of bank change, including event timings and magnitude information for specific erosion and deposition events, which can be compared to flow discharges and hydrographs. If exploited, this method can lead to more detailed analysis of bank erosion related to temporal fluctuations in the suspected hydraulic forces.

  1. A comparison of factors controlling sedimentation rates and wetland loss in fluvial-deltaic systems, Texas Gulf coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, W.A.; Morton, R.A.; Holmes, C.W.

    2002-01-01

    Submergence of coastal marshes in areas where rates of relative sea-level rise exceed rates of marsh sedimentation, or vertical accretion, is a global problem that requires detailed examination of the principal processes that establish, maintain, and degrade these biologically productive environments. Using a simple 210Pb-dating model, we measured sedimentation rates in cores from the Trinity, Lavaca-Navidad, and Nueces bayhead fluvial-deltaic systems in Texas where more than 2000 ha of wetlands have been lost since the 1950s. Long-term average rates of fluvial-deltaic aggradation decrease southwestward from 0.514 ?? 0.008 cm year -1 in the Trinity, 0.328 ?? 0.022 cm year -1 in the Lavaca-Navidad, to 0.262 ?? 0.034 cm year -1 in the Nucces. The relative magnitudes of sedimentation and wetland loss correlate with several parameters that define the differing fluvial-deltaic settings, including size of coastal drainage basin, average annual rainfall, suspended sediment load, thickness of Holocene mud in the valley fill, and rates of relative sea-level rise. There is some evidence that upstream reservoirs have reduced wetland sedimentation rates, which are now about one-half the local rates of relative sea-level rise. The extant conditions indicate that fluvial-deltaic marshes in these valleys will continue to be lost as a result of submergence and erosion. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Lacustrine and fluvial-deltaic depositional systems, Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, W.B. Jr.

    1986-11-01

    The Powder River basin is a Laramide foreland basin that was filled by a combination of fluvial, deltaic, paludal, and lacustrine sediments. The depositional history of the Fort Union Formation was unraveled in a regional subsurface study using data from approximately 1400 geophysical well logs. The depositional model developed from the subsurface study was tested by selective fieldwork. The Powder River basin originated as a structural and depositional basin in earliest middle Paleocene. As a result of rapid subsidence, a lake (Lake Lebo) formed along the basin axis. Lake Lebo, documented in the mudstone of the Lebo Shale Member, spread rapidly to cover an area greater than 10,000 mi/sup 2/ (25,900 km/sup 2/). During the middle through late Paleocene, Lake Lebo was filled peripherally by fluvial-deltaic systems that are recorded in the coarser clastics of the Tongue River Member. Primary basin fill was from: (1) the eastern margin by elongate deltas fed by suspended to mixed-load fluvial systems issuing from the ancestral Black Hills, and (2) the southwestern margin by mixed to bed-load streams emanating from the Wind River basin. Secondary fill was from the northwest by an elongate delta system fed by a suspended to mixed-load fluvial system flowing from the Bull Mountain basin. 17 figures.

  3. When do plants modify fluvial processes? Plant-hydraulic interactions under variable flow and sediment supply rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, Rebecca B.; Wilcox, Andrew C.; Kui, Li; Lightbody, Anne F.; Stella, John C.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2015-02-01

    Flow and sediment regimes shape alluvial river channels; yet the influence of these abiotic drivers can be strongly mediated by biotic factors such as the size and density of riparian vegetation. We present results from an experiment designed to identify when plants control fluvial processes and to investigate the sensitivity of fluvial processes to changes in plant characteristics versus changes in flow rate or sediment supply. Live seedlings of two species with distinct morphologies, tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) and cottonwood (Populus fremontii), were placed in different configurations in a mobile sand-bed flume. We measured the hydraulic and sediment flux responses of the channel at different flow rates and sediment supply conditions representing equilibrium (sediment supply = transport rate) and deficit (sediment supply < transport rate). We found that the hydraulic and sediment flux responses during sediment equilibrium represented a balance between abiotic and biotic factors and was sensitive to increasing flow rates and plant species and configuration. Species-specific traits controlled the hydraulic response: compared to cottonwood, which has a more tree-like morphology, the shrubby morphology of tamarisk resulted in less pronation and greater reductions in near-bed velocities, Reynolds stress, and sediment flux rates. Under sediment-deficit conditions, on the other hand, abiotic factors dampened the effect of variations in plant characteristics on the hydraulic response. We identified scenarios for which the highest stem-density patch, independent of abiotic factors, dominated the fluvial response. These results provide insight into how and when plants influence fluvial processes in natural systems.

  4. Turbidity in the fluvial Gironde Estuary (S-W France) based on 10 year continuous monitoring: sensitivity to hydrological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalón-Rojas, I.; Schmidt, S.; Sottolichio, A.

    2015-03-01

    Climate change and human activities impact the volume and timing of freshwater input to estuaries. These modifications in fluvial discharges are expected to influence estuarine suspended sediment dynamics, and in particular the turbidity maximum zone (TMZ). Located in the southwest France, the Gironde fluvial-estuarine systems has an ideal context to address this issue. It is characterized by a very pronounced TMZ, a decrease in mean annual runoff in the last decade, and it is quite unique in having a long-term and high-frequency monitoring of turbidity. The effect of tide and river flow on turbidity in the fluvial estuary is detailed, focusing on dynamics related to changes in hydrological conditions (river floods, periods of low-water, inter-annual changes). Turbidity shows hysteresis loops at different time scales: during river floods and over the transitional period between the installation and expulsion of the TMZ. These hysteresis patterns, that reveal the origin of sediment, locally resuspended or transported from the watershed, may be a tool to evaluate the presence of remained mud. Statistics on turbidity data bound the range of river flow that promotes the TMZ installation in the fluvial stations. Hydrological indicators of the persistence and turbidity level of the TMZ are also defined. The long-term evolution of these indicators confirms the influence of discharge decrease on the intensification of the TMZ in tidal rivers, and provides a tool to evaluate future scenarios.

  5. Effect of metals on Daphnia magna and cladocerans representatives of the Argentinean fluvial littoral.

    PubMed

    Luciana, Regaldo; Reno, Ulises; Gervasio, Susana; Horacio, Troiani; Gagneten, Ana María

    2014-07-01

    Chronic toxicity tests were conducted to assess the effect of Cu, Cr and Pb on Moinodaphnia macleayi and Ceriodaphnia dubia -two cladoceran species from the Argentinian Fluvial Littoral Zone (AFLZ)- and Daphnia magna -an holarctic species-. The specimens were exposed to three concentrations of each metal. As endpoints, the number of living and dead organisms, molts, neonates released, and the age of first reproduction were recorded. Chronic assays showed that Cu significantly affected the analyzed life history traits in the three species. The lowest Pb and Cr concentrations did not affect survival, molting or fecundity in D. magna. Conversely, in M. macleayi and C. dubia, survival, molting and fecundity showed highly significant differences in all the concentrations tested compared to control assay. The present study stresses the importance of using biological parameters as bioindicators, as well as the study species from the Southern Hemisphere to assess metal pollution. PMID:25004754

  6. Stream restoration in dynamic fluvial systems: Scientific approaches, analyses, and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-04-01

    In the United States the average annual investment in river restoration programs is approximately $1 billion. Despite this burgeoning industry, the National Water Quality Inventory, which tracks the health of the nation's rivers, has shown no serious improvement in cumulative river health since the early 1990s. In the AGU monographStream Restoration in Dynamic Fluvial Systems: Scientific Approaches, Analyses, and Tools, editors Andrew Simon, Sean J. Bennett, and Janine M. Castro pull together the latest evidence-based understanding of stream restoration practices, with an aim of guiding the further development of the field and helping to right its apparently unsuccessful course. In this interview, Eos talks to Sean J. Bennett, University of Buffalo, about the culture, practice, and promise of restoring rivers.

  7. The Origin of Warrego Valles: A Case Study for Fluvial Valley Formation on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Dohm, James; Tanaka, Ken; Hare, Trent

    2000-01-01

    Warrego Valles is one of the best examples of a well integrated fluvial valley system that formed early in the geological history of Mars, the lack of similar erosion elsewhere along the edge of Thaumasia plateau is not consistent with a formation by rainfall. Instead the radial pattern of this valley system centered on a region of localized uplift argues for a more localized water source. We conclude that this uplift was most likely the result of a subsurface magmatic intrusion and that the estimated volume of this intrusion is sufficient to cause enough hydrothermal ground-water outflow to form the valley system. A possible alternative to this scenario is hydrothermal ground-water outflow combined with a melting snow pack.

  8. Quality assurance practices for the chemical and biological analyses of water and fluvial sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, Linda C.; Erdmann, David E.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter contains practices used by the U.S. Geological Survey to assure the quality of analytical data for water, fluvial sediment, and aquatic organisms. These practices are directed primarily toward personnel making water quality measurements. Some detail specific quality control techniques, others document quality assurance procedures being used by the Central Laboratories System of the U.S. Geological Survey, and still others describe various statistical techniques and give examples of their use in evaluating and assuring the quality of analytical data. The practices are arranged into eight sections: Analytical Methods Development Procedures, Standard Quantitative Analysis Techniques, Instrumental Techniques, Reference Material, Laboratory Quality Control; Quality Assurance Monitoring; Documentation, Summary, and Evaluation of Data, Materials Evaluation. Each section is preceded by a brief description of the material covered. Similarly within each section, each practice is preceded by a description of its application or scope.

  9. A new model for evaluating the duration of water flow in the Martian fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemanno, G.; Orofino, V.; Di Achille, G.; Mancarella, F.

    To understand the formation mechanisms of Martian fluvial systems and consequently to determine the ancient climate of the planet, we have mapped a sample of Martian valleys longer than 20 km (covering at the moment 65% of the planet) and for a subset extracted among them, containing some of the widest and more developed systems, we have also determined the formation time. To estimate the duration of water flow in these valley networks we have used an original method based on the evaluation of erosion rate of the terrain. Our results, ranging from 105 to 108 years (depending on erosion rate), are in good agreement with those reported in literature and obtained through more detailed models of sediment transport. These results imply that Mars had at least short periods of clement conditions toward the end of the Noachian Era that supported a hydrologic cycle and potentially a biosphere.

  10. Temporal trends in fluvial-sediment discharge in Ohio, 1950-1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hindall, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Long-term fluvial-sediment records of annual suspended-sediment discharge data are available for eight daily suspended-sediment stations operated in Ohio. Graphical and statistical analyses of long-term sediment records indicate that, in general, no long-term (>3- to 5-year) trends are readily apparent in the relation between annual mean suspended-sediment discharge and water discharge in Ohio; however, some short-term, year-to-year changes in that relation occur for Ohio streams. Double-mass curves for five daily suspended-sediment stations and seasonal Kendall analysis of data from eight daily suspended-sediment stations clearly illustrate the lack of any discernible changes in the suspended-sediment-discharge/water-discharge relation or in suspended-sediment concentration for most Ohio streams over the past 36 years. -from Author

  11. Reservoir Characterization, Production Characteristics, and Research Needs for Fluvial/Alluvial Reservoirs in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Jackson, S.R.; Madden, M.P.; Raw-Schatzinger, V.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.; Young, M.A.

    1999-04-28

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program was initiated in 1992 to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from known domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. Cost-shared field demonstration projects are being initiated in geology defined reservoir classes which have been prioritized by their potential for incremental recovery and their risk of abandonment. This document defines the characteristics of the fifth geological reservoir class in the series, fluvial/alluvial reservoirs. The reservoirs of Class 5 include deposits of alluvial fans, braided streams, and meandering streams. Deposit morphologies vary as a complex function of climate and tectonics and are characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity to fluid flow as a result of extreme variations in water energy as the deposits formed.

  12. Geoarchaeology, the four dimensional (4D) fluvial matrix and climatic causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. G.

    2008-10-01

    Geoarchaeology is the application of geological and geomorphological techniques to archaeology and the study of the interactions of hominins with the natural environment at a variety of temporal and spatial scales. Geoarchaeology in the UK over the last twenty years has flourished largely because it has gone beyond technological and scientific applications. Over the same period our ability to reconstruct the 3-dimensional stratigraphy of fluvial deposits and the matrix of fluvial sites has increased dramatically because of a number of technological advances. These have included the use of LiDAR (laser imaging) and radar to produce high-resolution digital surface models, the use of geophysics, particularly ground penetrating radar and electrical resistivity, to produce sediment depth models, and the use of GIS and data visualisation techniques to manipulate and display the data. These techniques along with more systematic and detailed sedimentological recording of exposed sections have allowed the construction of more precise 3-dimensional (volumetric) models of the matrix of artefacts within fluvial deposits. Additionally a revolution in dating techniques, particularly direct sediment dating by luminescence methods, has enabled the creation of 4-dimensional models of the creation and preservation of these sites. These 4-dimensional models have the ability to provide far more information about the processes of site creation, preservation and even destruction, and also allow the integration of these processes with independent data sources concerning cultural evolution and climatic change. All improvements in the precision of dating fluvial deposits have archaeological importance in our need to translate events from a sequential or geological timeframe to human timescales. This allows geoarchaeology to make a more direct contribution to cultural history through the recognition of agency at the individual or group level. This data can then form a component of

  13. An assessment of the fluvial geomorphology of subcatchments in Parana Valles, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, B. G.; Hancock, G. R.; Cohen, S.; Willgoose, G. R.; Rey-Lescure, Olivier

    2013-02-01

    This paper uses a multifaceted remote sensing and morphometric approach to investigate if the surface of subcatchments in the Parana Valles area of Mars (20-30°S, 0-20°W) is reflective of hydrology and sediment transport by water. Using digital elevation model (DEM) data obtained from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), three nested subcatchments were examined using a suite of terrestrial geomorphic and hydrologic statistics to determine if their shape and form lies within the known range of fluvial catchment properties on Earth. Further, an examination of statistical accuracy via an innovative pixel-by-pixel solution of two statistics established that despite mineralogical homogeneity confirmed by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) spectral survey, erosion processes were likely to be variable across the study site. The DEM-based methods outlined here can be employed at other sites to investigate geomorphic properties and attributes of the Martian surface.

  14. Fluvial fan evolution during Late Quaternary climate changes: field and chronological constraints from the Indo-Gangetic basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Gupta, S.; Sinha, R.; Densmore, A.; Thomsen, K. J.; Nayak, N.; Joshi, S. K.; van Dijk, W. M.; Buylaert, J. P.; Mondal, S.; Kumar, D.; Mason, P. J.; Murray, A. S.; Kumar, M.; Shekhar, S.; Rai, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    The stratigraphic evolution of fluvial fans is to a large extent governed by channel avulsion. Spatial variations in alluvial architecture are influenced by avulsion magnitude and frequency. However due to the absence of long-term chronostratigraphic records of fan stratigraphy, it has proved difficult to test patterns of fan evolution against records of climate variability. In order to understand the processes of channel avulsion during fan evolution, it is important to determine the spatio-temporal pattern of fluvial channel aggradation, incision, and migration. In this study, we reconstruct the shallow sub-surface alluvial stratigraphy of fluvial fan systems formed by the major Himalayan rivers, the Sutlej and Yamuna, in the northwestern Indo-Gangetic basin. We map the spatial distribution of channel sand bodies deposited by these rivers and develop a chronostratigraphic model for the fluvial succession in a depositional dip perpendicular transect. Sediment cores up to ~50 m deep along two transects are used to reconstruct the shallow stratigraphy of the fan systems. Discontinuous channel sand bodies are separated by floodplain fines which occasionally show weak pedogenesis that mark the end of episodes of channel aggradation. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is used to bracket the timing of channel-filling episodes, and their spatial distribution. Mapping of sand bodies coupled with chronostratigraphic constraints allows reconstruction of channel migration patterns and their timing across the Sutlej-Yamuna fans. Chronostratigraphy permits temporal correlation with published measures of monsoon variability. We find that fluvial aggradation at the western end of studied transects, near the middle of the Sutlej fan, terminated around ~20 ka. We also show that abandonment of the paleo-Sutlej and major fan-scale avulsion occurred after ~15 ka, and was followed by formation of incised valleys that confined the modern fluvial system in northwestern Indo

  15. Lower Vistula fluvial lakes as possible places of deep groundwaters effluence (Grudziądz Basin, North Central Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordowski, Jaroslaw; Kubiak-Wójcicka, Katarzyna; Solarczyk, Adam; Tyszkowski, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    Regarding the outflow the Vistula River is the largest river in the Baltic catchment. In its lower course, below Bydgoszcz, in the Late Holocene Vistula channel adopted an weakly anastomosing fluvial pattern destroyed by intensive human hydrotechnical activity and by the regulation which have intensified about 200 years ago. Channel regulation have left many artificially separated fluvial lakes. Part of them infilled rapidly but the majority have persisted to present day almost unchanged. It has also arised the question: what drives the resistence for silting? To solve the problem there were conducted simultaneous hydrological and geomorphological investigations, because there were two concepts: one that the mineral material is removed from fluvial lakes while high stands by flood waters and second that the material is removed due to high groundwater "exchange" rate when the fluvial lake has a sufficient hydrological connectivity to the main Vistula channel. The Vistula valley crosses morainic plains of the last glaciation. On the average it has about 10 km width and is incised about 70 - 80 m deep, compared to neighbouring plains, dissecting all the Quaternary aquifers. On the floodplain area the Quaternary sediments lay with a layer of only 10-20 m thickness over Miocene and Oligocene sands. In favourable conditions, particularly while a low stand there exists the possibility of Tertiary water migration toward the surface of fluvial lakes provided they have not continuous flood sediments cover on their floors. As an example of such a lake with an intensive water exchange rate by supposed deep groundwaters was chosen the Old Vistula lake (Stara Wisła) near Grudziądz town. The lake has an area of 40 ha, mean depth 1,73 m, maximum depth 8 m, length about 4 km and medium width about 100 m. In the years 2011-2014, with two weeks frequency, in its surficial water layer were conducted measures which included temperature, pH, Eh, suspended matter amount, total and

  16. Microbiological Comparisons within and across Contiguous Lacustrine, Paleosol, and Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, T. L.; Fredrickson, J. K.; McKinley, J. P.; Bjornstad, B. N.; Rawson, S. A.; Phelps, T. J.; Brockman, F. J.; Pfiffner, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-six subsurface samples were collected from a borehole at depths of 173.3 to 196.8 m in the saturated zone at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The sampling was performed throughout strata that included fine-grained lacustrine (lake) sediments, a paleosol (buried soil) sequence, and coarse-grained fluvial (river) sediments. A subcoring method and tracers were used to minimize and quantify contamination to obtain samples that were representative of subsurface strata. Sediment samples were tested for total organic carbon, inorganic carbon, total microorganisms by direct microscopic counts, culturable aerobic heterotrophs by plate counts, culturable anaerobes by most-probable-number enumeration, basal respiration rates, and mineralization of (sup14)C-labeled glucose and acetate. Total direct microscopic counts of microorganisms were low, ranging from below detection to 1.9 x 10(sup5) cells g (dry weight)(sup-1). Culturable aerobes and anaerobes were below minimum levels of detection in most samples. Direct microscopic counts, basal respiration rates, and (sup14)C-glucose mineralization were all positively correlated with total organic carbon and were highest in the lacustrine sediments. In contrast to previous subsurface studies, these saturated-zone samples did not have higher microbial abundance and activities than unsaturated sediments sampled from the same borehole, the fine-textured lacustrine sediment had higher microbial numbers and activities than the coarse-textured fluvial sands, and the paleosol samples did not have higher biomass and activities relative to the other sediments. The results of this study expand the subsurface microbiology database to include information from an environment very different from those previously studied. PMID:16534940

  17. Interacting effects of climate and agriculture on fluvial DOM in temperate and subtropical catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeber, D.; Goyenola, G.; Meerhoff, M.; Zwirnmann, E.; Ovesen, N. B.; Glendell, M.; Gelbrecht, J.; Teixeira de Mello, F.; Gonzalez-Bergonzoni, I.; Jeppesen, E.; Kronvang, B.

    2015-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important factor in aquatic ecosystems, which is involved in a large variety of biogeochemical and ecological processes, and recent literature suggests that it could be strongly affected by agriculture in different climates. Based on novel monitoring techniques, we investigated the interaction of climate and agriculture effects on DOM quantity and quality. To examine this, we took water samples over 2 years in two paired intensive and extensive farming catchments in each of Denmark (temperate climate) and Uruguay (subtropical climate). We measured dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) concentrations and DOC and DON molecular fractions with size-exclusion chromatography. Moreover, we characterized DOM quality with absorbance and fluorescence measurements, as well as parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). We also calculated the DOC and DON loads based on daily discharge measurements, as well as measured precipitation and air temperature. The fluvial DOM in the catchments in Uruguay was characterized by higher temporal variability of DOC and DON loads which were clearly to a higher temporal variability of precipitation and a DOM composition with rather plant-like character relative to the Danish catchments. Moreover, we found a consistently higher temporal variability of DOC and DON loads in the intensive farming catchments than in the extensive farming catchments, with highest temporal variability in the Uruguayan intensive farming catchment. Furthermore, the composition of DOM exported from the intensive farming catchments was consistently complex and always related to microbial processing in both Denmark and Uruguay. This was indicated by low C : N ratios, several spectroscopic DOM composition indices and PARAFAC fluorescence components. We propose that the consistent effect of intensive farming on DOM composition and the temporal variability of DOC and DON loads is related to similarities in the management of

  18. Fluvial Change Processes During an Exceptional Drought Punctuated by Atmospheric Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. D.; Pasternack, G. B.; Massa, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Lidar-based topographic change detection (TCD) analyses are able to provide meter-scale detail over large spatial extents for understanding watershed sediment budgets, geomorphological processes, and links to ecosystem services. Most TCD analyses use a method of differencing two raster-based digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from interpolated point data. In order to maximum our understanding of topographic change processes, spatial uncertainty in the DEMs must be adequately accounted for before TCD results are tested against some hydraulic or geomorphic hypothesis. A TCD analysis was conducted from 2008 to 2014 for the ~37-km stretch of the lower Yuba River in Northern California. This time period experienced four floodway filling flow events ranging from 5.9 - 8.8 times bankfull discharge (corresponding to ~2.5-5 year recurrence intervals, respectively). The lower Yuba River provides an excellent site to study fluvial change processes as these moderate and frequent overbank flow events rework the gravels and cobbles left from a legacy of hydraulic mining. This study (1) develops a new method for characterizing DEM uncertainty by using a bootstrapping approach to create confidence intervals for each raster cell value based on the point density and surface variability (2) classifies the TCD results into fluvial change processes (e.g. channel downcutting, overbank scour, bar emergence…etc.) and (3) quantifies the sediment budgets at the segment, reach, and morphological unit scale. DEMs were created from a combination of airborne LiDAR with green and near-infrared lasers, single and multibeam sonar, and RTK-GPS surveys. Results show significant topographic change for the floodway area with a net erosional sediment regime and a slightly depositional sediment regime within the 2008 bankfull channel.

  19. Fluvial changes of the Guadalquivir river during the Holocene in Córdoba (Southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribelarrea, David; Benito, Gerardo

    2008-08-01

    Holocene fluvial changes of the Guadalquivir River at Córdoba City were studied with an emphasis on floodplain development, river migration rates, sedimentation rates and environmental history. During the Holocene, the Guadalquivir River has developed a large meander (El Arenal) with a general southwards lateral migration, undercutting Tertiary bedrock, and with a total incision of 9 m, which developed three alluvial surfaces: Fp1, Fp2 and Fp3. The oldest floodplain surface Fp1 (+ 7-9 m) was deposited during the early Holocene and reached its maximum extent around 1000 yr BP. The next floodplain surface Fp2 (+ 5 m) accumulated 500 to 1000 yr ago. Finally, the youngest floodplain surface (Fp3, + 1-2 m) was developed in the last 500 yr. Migration rates and direction changed from 690-480 m 2 yr - 1 in Fp1 (to the southeast), 2280 m 2 yr - 1 in Fp2 and 620 m 2 yr - 1 in Fp3 (to the west). The stratigraphical study of palaeomeanders and chute channel deposits show evidence of river position and dynamics through recent times: (1) "San Eduardo" was filled 4000 yr BP; (2) "Madre Vieja" has been active since 2100 yr BP to the present day; and (3) "El Cortijo" was formed and filled during historical times (the last 1000 yr). The chronology of the alluvial stratigraphy and fluvial dynamics are discussed within the context of historical hydrologic, climatic and anthropogenic changes. In addition, the geomorphological reconstruction of the riverine landscape in historical times provided some clue to the location of Medinat al-Zahira, a lost Muslim settlement built in the 10th century AD and believed to be situated at, or nearby, the Arenal meander. Paleogeographical analysis shows that the most suitable conditions for this medieval settlement were found on the northeast part of the Arenal meander.

  20. Fluvial response to abrupt global warming at the Palaeocene/Eocene boundary.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Brady Z; Heller, Paul L; Clementz, Mark T

    2012-11-01

    Climate strongly affects the production of sediment from mountain catchments as well as its transport and deposition within adjacent sedimentary basins. However, identifying climatic influences on basin stratigraphy is complicated by nonlinearities, feedback loops, lag times, buffering and convergence among processes within the sediment routeing system. The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) arguably represents the most abrupt and dramatic instance of global warming in the Cenozoic era and has been proposed to be a geologic analogue for anthropogenic climate change. Here we evaluate the fluvial response in western Colorado to the PETM. Concomitant with the carbon isotope excursion marking the PETM we document a basin-wide shift to thick, multistoried, sheets of sandstone characterized by variable channel dimensions, dominance of upper flow regime sedimentary structures, and prevalent crevasse splay deposits. This progradation of coarse-grained lithofacies matches model predictions for rapid increases in sediment flux and discharge, instigated by regional vegetation overturn and enhanced monsoon precipitation. Yet the change in fluvial deposition persisted long after the approximately 200,000-year-long PETM with its increased carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, emphasizing the strong role the protracted transmission of catchment responses to distant depositional systems has in constructing large-scale basin stratigraphy. Our results, combined with evidence for increased dissolved loads and terrestrial clay export to world oceans, indicate that the transient hyper-greenhouse climate of the PETM may represent a major geomorphic 'system-clearing event', involving a global mobilization of dissolved and solid sediment loads on Earth's surface. PMID:23128230

  1. Weathering, erosion and fluvial transfers of particulate and dissolved materials from the Taiwan orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovius, Niels; Galy, Albert; Hilton, Robert; West, Joshua; Chen, Hongey; Horng, Ming-Jame; Chen, Meng-Chiang

    2010-05-01

    Systematic monitoring of river loads helps refine and extend the map of internal dynamics and external feedbacks in Earth's surface and near-surface system. Our focus is on Taiwan where hillslope mass wasting and fluvial sediment transport are driven by earthquakes and cyclonic storms. The biggest trigger events cause instantaneous erosion and seed a weakness in the landscape that is removed over time in predictable fashion. This gives rise to patterns of erosion that can not be understood in terms of bulk characteristics of climate, such as average annual precipitation. Instead, these patterns reflect the distribution and history of seismicity and extreme precipitation. For example, the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake has resulted in elevated rates of sediment transport that decayed to normal values over seven years since the earthquake. Very large typhoons, with enhanced precipitation due to a monsoonal feed, have caused a similar, temporary deviation from normal catchment dynamics. Crucially, these events do not only mobilize large quantities of clastic sediment, but they also harvest particulate organic carbon (POC) from rock mass, soils and the biosphere. In Taiwan, most non-fossil POC is carried in hyperpycnal storm floods. This may promote rapid burial and preservation of POC in turbidites, representing a draw down of CO2 from the atmosphere that is potentially larger than that by silicate weathering in the same domain. Oxidation of fossil POC during exhumation and surface transport could offset this effect, but in Taiwan the rate of preservation of fossil POC is extremely high, due to rapid erosion and short fluvial transfer paths. Meanwhile, coarse woody debris flushed from the Taiwan mountains is probably not buried efficiently in geological deposits, representing a concentrated flux of nutrients to coastal and marine environments instead.

  2. Development and Implementation of a Bayesian Model for Sediment Transport in Fluvial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelter, M. L.; Hooten, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies in the field of sediment transport in fluvial systems underscore the difficulty in reliably estimating transport model parameters, collecting accurate observations, and making predictions due to measurement error and uncertainty in conceptual models. While much of the initial research in sediment transport recognized the process as being inherently statistical, developing a sediment transport model in a statistical framework that can manage and account for measurement error, process uncertainty, and provide credible intervals of parameter estimates and transport predictions still presents many opportunities for discovery. In this research, we propose a uni-size bedload sediment transport model in which inference on the critical Shields Number and measurement error along with credible intervals of transport prediction are sought. This model is realized through the application of a Bayesian framework in which posterior distributions of model parameters are evaluated given both simulated data and uni-size sediment transport observations pulled from the literature. Our model provides a sediment rating curve that is delineated in terms of credible intervals for prediction. Credible ranges of the critical Shields Number and process/measurement uncertainty are inferred from simulated and observed data as well. While the application of these methods are currently being tested using simulated and laboratory flume data, the proposed framework can be applied to fluvial systems of arbitrary size. Additionally, our model presents opportunities to evaluate the suitability of different transport relations. The initial findings of applying a sediment transport relation in a Bayesian framework show great promise for managing uncertainty and variability in associated process models and measurements.

  3. Integrating Fluvial and Oceanic Drivers in Operational Flooding Forecasts for San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdman, Liv; Erikson, Li; Barnard, Patrick; Kim, Jungho; Cifelli, Rob; Johnson, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    The nine counties that make up the San Francisco Bay area are home to 7.5 million people and these communties are susceptible to flooding along the bay shoreline and inland creeks that drain to the bay. A forecast model that integrates fluvial and oceanic drivers is necessary for predicting flooding in this complex urban environment. The U.S. Geological Survey ( USGS) and National Weather Service (NWS) are developing a state-of-the-art flooding forecast model for the San Francisco Bay area that will predict watershed and ocean-based flooding up to 72 hours in advance of an approaching storm. The model framework for flood forecasts is based on the USGS-developed Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) that was applied to San Francisco Bay under the Our Coast Our Future project. For this application, we utilize Delft3D-FM, a hydrodynamic model based on a flexible mesh grid, to calculate water levels that account for tidal forcing, seasonal water level anomalies, surge and in-Bay generated wind waves from the wind and pressure fields of a NWS forecast model, and tributary discharges from the Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (RDHM), developed by the NWS Office of Hydrologic Development. The flooding extent is determined by overlaying the resulting water levels onto a recently completed 2-m digital elevation model of the study area which best resolves the extensive levee and tidal marsh systems in the region. Here we present initial pilot results of hindcast winter storms in January 2010 and December 2012, where the flooding is driven by oceanic and fluvial factors respectively. We also demonstrate the feasibility of predicting flooding on an operational time scale that incorporates both atmospheric and hydrologic forcings.

  4. Light History Influences the Response of Fluvial Biofilms to Zn Exposure.

    PubMed

    Corcoll, Natàlia; Bonet, Berta; Leira, Manel; Montuelle, Bernard; Tlili, Ahmed; Guasch, Helena

    2012-12-01

    Fluvial biofilms are subject to multistress situations in natural ecosystems, such as the co-occurrence of light intensity changes and metal toxicity. However, studies simultaneously addressing both factors are rare. This study evaluated in microcosm conditions the relationship between short-term light intensity changes and Zn toxicity on fluvial biofilms with long-term photoacclimation to different light conditions. Biofilms that had long-term photoacclimation to 25 μmol photons · m(-2)  · s(-1) (low light [LL] biofilms), 100 μmol photons · m(-2)  · s(-1) (medium light [ML] biofilms), and 500 μmol photons · m(-2)  · s(-1) (high light [HL] biofilms) were characterized by different structural (Chlorophyll-a [Chl-a], total biomass-AFDW, EPS, algal groups, and diatom taxonomy) and physiological attributes (ETR-I curves and photosynthetic pigments). HL biofilms showed higher light saturation intensity and a higher production of xanthophylls than LL biofilms. In contrast, LL biofilms had many structural differences; a higher proportion of diatoms and lower AFDW and EPS contents than ML and HL biofilms. A clear effect of light intensity changes on Zn toxicity was also demonstrated. Zn toxicity was enhanced when a sudden increase in light intensity also occurred, mainly with LL biofilms, causing higher inhibition of both the Φ'PSII and the ΦPSII . A decoupling of NPQ from de-epoxidation reaction (DR) processes was also observed, indicating substantial damage to photoprotective mechanisms functioning in biofilms (i.e., xanthophyll cycle of diatoms) due to Zn toxicity. This study highlights the need to take into account environmental stress (e.g., light intensity changes) to better assess the environmental risks of chemicals (e.g., metals). PMID:27009992

  5. Contrasting vulnerability of drained tropical and high-latitude peatlands to fluvial loss of stored carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Chris D.; Page, Susan E.; Jones, Tim; Moore, Sam; Gauci, Vincent; Laiho, Raija; Hruška, Jakub; Allott, Tim E. H.; Billett, Michael F.; Tipping, Ed; Freeman, Chris; Garnett, Mark H.

    2014-11-01

    Carbon sequestration and storage in peatlands rely on consistently high water tables. Anthropogenic pressures including drainage, burning, land conversion for agriculture, timber, and biofuel production, cause loss of pressures including drainage, burning, land conversion for agriculture, timber, and biofuel production, cause loss of peat-forming vegetation and exposure of previously anaerobic peat to aerobic decomposition. This can shift peatlands from net CO2 sinks to large CO2 sources, releasing carbon held for millennia. Peatlands also export significant quantities of carbon via fluvial pathways, mainly as dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We analyzed radiocarbon (14C) levels of DOC in drainage water from multiple peatlands in Europe and Southeast Asia, to infer differences in the age of carbon lost from intact and drained systems. In most cases, drainage led to increased release of older carbon from the peat profile but with marked differences related to peat type. Very low DOC-14C levels in runoff from drained tropical peatlands indicate loss of very old (centuries to millennia) stored peat carbon. High-latitude peatlands appear more resilient to drainage; 14C measurements from UK blanket bogs suggest that exported DOC remains young (<50 years) despite drainage. Boreal and temperate fens and raised bogs in Finland and the Czech Republic showed intermediate sensitivity. We attribute observed differences to physical and climatic differences between peatlands, in particular, hydraulic conductivity and temperature, as well as the extent of disturbance associated with drainage, notably land use changes in the tropics. Data from the UK Peak District, an area where air pollution and intensive land management have triggered Sphagnum loss and peat erosion, suggest that additional anthropogenic pressures may trigger fluvial loss of much older (>500 year) carbon in high-latitude systems. Rewetting at least partially offsets drainage effects on DOC age.

  6. An optical age chronology of late Quaternary extreme fluvial events recorded in Ugandan dambo soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, S.A.; Brown, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    There is little geochonological data on sedimentation in dambos (seasonally saturated, channel-less valley floors) found throughout Central and Southern Africa. Radiocarbon dating is problematic for dambos due to (i) oxidation of organic materials during dry seasons; and (ii) the potential for contemporary biological contamination of near-surface sediments. However, for luminescence dating the equatorial site and semi-arid climate facilitate grain bleaching, while the gentle terrain ensures shallow water columns, low turbidity, and relatively long surface exposures for transported grains prior to deposition and burial. For this study, we focused on dating sandy strata (indicative of high-energy fluvial events) at various positions and depths within a second-order dambo in central Uganda. Blue-light quartz optically stimulated luminescences (OSL) ages were compared with infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) ages from finer grains in the same sample. A total of 8 samples were dated, with 6 intervals obtained at ???35, 33, 16, 10.4, 8.4, and 5.9 ka. In general, luminescence ages were stratigraphically, geomorphically and ordinally consistent and most blue-light OSL ages could be correlated with well-dated climatic events registered either in Greenland ice cores or Lake Victoria sediments. Based upon OSL age correlations, we theorize that extreme fluvial dambo events occur primarily during relatively wet periods, often preceding humid-to-arid transitions. The optical ages reported in this study provide the first detailed chronology of dambo sedimentation, and we anticipate that further dambo work could provide a wealth of information on the paleohydrology of Central and Southern Africa. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhancing the natural removal of As in a reactive fluvial confluence receiving acid drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarca, M. I.; Arce, G.; Montecinos, M.; Guerra, P. A.; Pasten, P.

    2014-12-01

    Fluvial confluences are natural reactors that can determine the fate of contaminants in watersheds receiving acid drainage. Hydrological, hydrodynamic and chemical factors determine distinct conditions for the formation of suspended particles of iron and aluminum oxyhydroxides. The chemical and physical properties of these particle assemblages (e.g. particle size, chemical composition) can vary according to inflow mixing ratios, hydrodynamic velocity profiles, and chemical composition of the flows mixing at the confluence. Due to their capacity to sorb metals, it is important to identify the optimal conditions for removing metals from the aqueous phase, particularly arsenic, a contaminant frequently found in acid drainage. We studied a river confluence in the Lluta watershed, located in the arid Chilean Altiplano. We performed field measurements and laboratory studies to find optimal mixing ratio for arsenic sorption onto oxyhydroxide particles at the confluence between the Azufre (pH=2, As=2 mg/L) and the Caracarani river (pH=8, As<0.1 mg/L). As the contribution of the acidic stream increased, the concentration of Fe and Al in the solid phase reached a peak at different pHs. Although the optimal pH for As sorption was ~3, the overall maximum removal of As at the confluence, ocurred for pH~4. This is produced because optimal As sorption does not occur necessarily for the highest concentrations of particles being formed. We propose that fluvial confluences could be engineered to enhance the natural attenuation of contaminants. An analogy between confluences and coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation drinking water plants could be used to engineer such intervention.Acknowledgements: Proyecto Fondecyt 1130936 and Proyecto CONICYT FONDAP 15110020

  8. Fluvial Morphology and Bedform Migration in the Ebb Tidal Dominated Duplin River, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, J. A.; Hill, J. C.; Viso, R. F.; Peterson, R. N.; Carter, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Duplin River is an ebb-domintated, salt marsh drainage system west of Sapelo Island, Georgia. With no riverine input, flow in the Duplin is dependent on local surface run off, groundwater discharge and tidal flushing. Repeat multibeam bathymetry surveys within this system provide insight into sediment transport, current dynamics, and the migration of bottom features. Examination of bathymetric changes and the rate of bedform migration can be used to help estimate net sediment transport in fluvial and tidal systems. The swath bathymetry data presented here were collected during December 2009, March 2013, and June 2013 (high and low tide) aboard a small survey vessel, using a pole-mounted Kongsberg EM3002d multibeam bathymetry system. Along-stream profiles from bathymetry data collected during a single spring tidal cycle show little bedform migration, while the more temporally distant profiles record significant shifts in both small (cm-scale) and large (m-scale) bedform position, as well as changes in the morphology of large erosional scour depressions. Previous work has suggested the larger bedforms, which maintain an ebb-oriented geometry through both ebb and flood tide, are indicative of sediment transport rates that are an order of magnitude greater during the ebb tide (Zarillo, 1985). The new data suggest punctuated events, such as storm surges, may also play an important role in the fluvial transport, although more analysis is needed to determine how sediment storage changes in the Duplin river system over multiple tidal cycles. Integration of topographic LiDAR data, vegetation patterns, sediment composition, groundwater inputs and planform river morphology will also provide insight into sediment storage and transport within the system.

  9. Estuary Turbidity Maxima -- Connections between the Tidal-Fluvial and Estuarine Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jay, D. A.; Talke, S. A.; Hudson, A. S.; Twardowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    An Estuary turbidity maximum or zone (ETM or ETZ) is an area of elevated sediment concentration that often occurs in coastal plain, salt wedge, and river-dominated estuaries. ETMs influence the morphodynamic development, biogeochemical cycling, and contaminant distribution of the many systems in which they occur. In developed estuaries, they are often created or augmented by dredging. Material of either fluvial or marine origin may be trapped, but fluvial supply is dominant in most river-estuary ETMs. An ETM can be described in terms of the type of particle trapping mechanisms that concentrate or trap suspended particulate matter (SPM). Convergent alongchannel SPM fluxes are required to create an ETM, and for a steady-state to pertain, seaward fluxes related to river flow must be balanced by landward mean, tidal or overtide fluxes. Horizontal and vertical salinity and/or sediment gradients often enhance trapping by concentrating SPM near the bed and cause near-bed landward flow and SPM transport. Also, lateral processes can concentrate or disperse SPM, and lags between SPM concentration and velocity are often a dominant factor in systems with fine grained sediment. The settled bed in an ETM may be fine grained, but ETM also occur in sand-bedded systems where no long-term deposition of ETM material occurs. We summarize results of theoretical models that provide a conceptual understanding of how ETM fluxes trap material and how ETM properties vary in response to external forcing. Remote sensing images provide a spatial view of ETM phenomena, and analyses of 15 years of ocean color data for the Columbia River Estuary validate theoretical results. Recent advances in acoustic and optical instrumentation in other environments should facilitate a new generation of ETM measurements, providing better time-space coverage and better flux estimates. Accordingly, we suggest ETM research questions for the coming decade.

  10. The demise of the Oligo-Miocene fluvial system of the Levant and its geodynamic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachtman, Dina; Mart, Yossi

    2015-04-01

    The Levant rift system is a linear assemblage of axial rifts and their mountainous flanks that comprises two structurally distinct sections. The southern segment is built of series of secondary axial grabens, which trend northwards and are separated from each other by poorly rifted threshold zones, which is the northern extension of the Red Sea continental break-up. The northern section comprises the SW-trending Karasu - Hatay rifts, from which the Ghab graben branches southwards, which is tectonically attributed to the westward migration of Anatolia. A system of large rivers transected the southern section of the Levant from central Arabia in the east to the Mediterranean Sea in the west during the Oligo-Miocene, leaving behind 5 km thick series of clastic deposits at sea, and sandstones and conglomerates of variable thickness on land. The demise of that fluvial system was gradual, stretching from the late Miocene to the early Pleistocene, where coastal rivers were truncated from their sources due to the growth of segmented rift. The geodynamic process that constrains the development of the rifts of the southern Levant and their elevated flanks is oblique rifting, where several small rifts start the evolution along a weakness zone concurrently, separated by wide and inactive threshold zones. Gradually the rifts grow along their long axes to interconnect, shrinking the threshold zone to their disappearence. Such geodynamic history best accounts for the observations of relicts of late Miocene fluvial deposits on mountaintops, large river beds dated to the late Miocene-early Pliocene, and large marine fan deposits of early Pliocene age, where rivers continued to flow in the threshold zones, but truncated by the emerging rifts.

  11. Short-term post-wildfire dry-ravel processes in a chaparral fluvial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsheim, Joan L.; Chin, Anne; O'Hirok, Linda S.; Storesund, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Dry ravel, the transport of sediment by gravity, transfers material from steep hillslopes to valley bottoms during dry conditions. Following wildfire, dry ravel greatly increases in the absence of vegetation on hillslopes, thereby contributing to sediment supply at the landscape scale. Dry ravel has been documented as a dominant hillslope erosion mechanism following wildfire in chaparral environments in southern California. However, alteration after initial deposition is not well understood, making prediction of post-fire flood hazards challenging. The majority of Big Sycamore Canyon burned during the May 2013 Springs Fire leaving ash and a charred layer that covered hillslopes and ephemeral channels. Dry-ravel processes following the fire produced numerous deposits in the hillslope-channel transition zone. Field data focus on: 1) deposition from an initial post-wildfire dry-ravel pulse; and 2) subsequent alteration of dry ravel deposits over a seven-month period between September 2013 and April 2014. We quantify geomorphic responses in dry ravel deposits including responses during the one small winter storm that generated runoff following the fire. Field measurements document volumetric changes after initial post-wildfire deposition of sediment derived from dry ravel. Erosion and deposition mechanisms that occurred within dry-ravel deposits situated in the hillslope-channel transition zone included: 1) mobilization and transport of a portion or the entire deposit by fluvial erosion; 2) rilling on the surface of the unconsolidated deposits; 3) deposition on deposits via continued hillslope sediment supply; and 4) mass wasting that transfers sediment within deposits where surface profiles are near the angle of repose. Terrestrial LiDAR scanning point clouds were analyzed to generate profiles quantifying depth of sediment erosion or deposition over remaining dry ravel deposits after the first storm season. This study contributes to the understanding of potential

  12. Dynamic connectivity in a fluvial network for identifying hotspots of geomorphic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2015-03-01

    Dynamical processes occurring on the hierarchical branching structure of a river network tend to heterogeneously distribute fluxes on the network, often concentrating them into "clusters," i.e., places of excess flux accumulation. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that places in the network predisposed (due to process dynamics and network topology) to accumulate excess sediment over a considerable river reach and over a considerable period of time reflect locations where a local imbalance in sediment flux may occur thereby highlighting a susceptibility to potential fluvial geomorphic change. We develop a dynamic connectivity framework which uses the river network structure and a simplified Lagrangian transport model to trace fluxes through the network and integrate emergent "clusters" through a cluster persistence index (CPI). The framework was applied to sand transport in the Greater Blue Earth River Network in the Minnesota River Basin. Three hotspots of fluvial geomorphic change were defined as locations where high rates of channel migration were observed and places of high CPI coincided with two of these hotspots of possibly sediment-driven change. The third hotspot was not identified by high CPI, but instead is believed to be a hotspot of streamflow-driven change based on additional information and the fact that high bed shear stress coincided with this hotspot. The proposed network-based dynamic connectivity framework has the potential to place dynamical processes occurring at small scales into a network context to understand how reach-scale changes cascade into network-scale effects, useful for informing the large-scale consequences of local management actions.

  13. Contrasting depositional styles in Tertiary fluvial deposits of Nenana coal field, central Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, R.G.; Flores, R.M.; Wiley, T.J. )

    1989-03-01

    Oligocene and Miocene fluvial deposits contain about 1.4 billion tons of minable subbituminous coal in the Nenana coal field and are prospective for petroleum in the nearby Middle Tanana basin. These deposits, in ascending stratigraphic order, are in the Healy Creek, Suntrana, and Lignite Creek Formations of the Usibelli Group. To better understand the depositional setting of these units, the authors studied their facies and microarchitecture in outcrops along Suntrana and Healy Creeks, about 120 km southwest of Fairbanks. The lower Healy Creek Formation consists mainly of amalgamated, basally scoured, lenticular conglomerates and sandstones. The conglomerates are normally graded and crudely imbricated, and the sandstones exhibit planar, trough, and ripple cross-stratification. These were likely deposited by migrating longitudinal and transverse bars in braided streams. Minor channel-form lenses of mudstone also occur and probably represent quiet-water deposition in abandoned channels. In contrast, the Suntrana Formation includes several fining-upward sequences in which normally graded pebble conglomerates and cross-stratified sandstones are overlain by mudstones and finally by coals as much as 6 m thick. The conglomerates and sandstones are interpreted as stacked high-energy fluvial channels that were filled by longitudinal gravel bars, sandy midchannel bars, and point bars. The overlying mudstones occupy a series of crosscutting abandoned channels that suggest a complex history of channel abandonment and reoccupation by high-sinuosity streams. Fining-upward sequences also occur in the Lignite Creek Formation, but they differ from those in the underlying Suntrana Formation by having fewer mud-filled abandoned channels, thick intervals of flood-plain mudstone with well-developed crevasse-splay sandstones, and thinner coals (generally < 1 m thick).

  14. Fluvial systems response to rift margin tectonics: Makhtesh Ramon area, southern Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, Ram; Eyal, Yehuda; Zilberman, Ezra; Bowman, Dan

    2002-06-01

    The geomorphic evolution of Makhtesh Ramon, a feather-shaped erosional valley, and the Nahal Neqarot drainage system to the south occurred largely in response to tectonic activity along the Dead Sea Rift and its western shoulder. Remnants of Miocene clastic sediments (Hazeva Formation) deposited on an erosional peneplain that formed over this area during the Oligocene epoch provide a datum plane for reconstructing subsequent fluvial evolution. These clastic remnants are presently located on the shoulders of Makhtesh Ramon at various elevations. The peneplain truncating the Makhtesh Ramon block has been tilted 0.7% northeastward since the Pliocene epoch (post-Hazeva Formation), whereas that of the Neqarot syncline, south of the Ramon, has been tilted 1.2%. The elliptical exposure of friable Lower Cretaceous sandstone, exposed in the core of the truncated Ramon structure, governed the development of a new ENE directed (riftward) drainage system through capture of streams that previously drained toward the Mediterranean Sea to the northwest. Incised fluvial gaps in the southern rim of Makhtesh Ramon and alluvial fan relicts within Makhtesh Ramon attest to original drainage into the Makhtesh from the south. Remnants of the Plio-Pleistocene Arava Conglomerate on the eastern end of the Neqarot syncline contain clasts from rocks exposed within Makhtesh Ramon, also indicating that streams flowed into the Makhtesh from the southern Neqarot block through the western gaps, then turning eastward and exiting the Makhtesh via the next (Sha'ar-Ramon) gap to the east. Further down-faulting of the Neqarot block during Mid-Late Pleistocene time led to westward retreat of the Neqarot valley and capture of the last stream flowing northward into the Ramon, leaving the modern Makhtesh Ramon isolated from the southern drainage system.

  15. Fluvial connectivity and climate: A comparison of channel pattern and process in two climatically contrasting fluvial sedimentary systems in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenfell, S. E.; Grenfell, M. C.; Rowntree, K. M.; Ellery, W. N.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the dynamics of valley formation, sediment delivery and channel pattern in two climatically contrasting fluvial sedimentary systems in South Africa. Each system comprised a network of headwater valley fills and floodplains underlain by sedimentary Karoo Supergroup rocks that are intersected by resistant dolerite dykes and sills. The Seekoei River Floodplain and Gordonville valley fill site in the Great Karoo, however, experience less than half the annual precipitation of the Nsonge River Floodplain and Hlatikhulu valley fill in the KwaZulu-Natal Drakensberg Foothills. Furthermore, rainfall is more variable in the Karoo. Despite climatic differences, headwater valley fills were geomorphically similar. In contrast, floodplains in the two regions were vastly different, even when the same downstream control (a resistant dolerite intrusion crossing the drainage line) was considered. Upstream of a dolerite dyke, the Nsonge River is highly sinuous and located in a wide floodplain that has been carved by lateral planation of the underlying bedrock. In comparison, the Seekoei River, located upstream of a dolerite sill, is discontinuous and characterized by floodouts and avulsing distributaries that undergo periods of bedrock incision, followed by infilling.It is likely that this disparity is caused by the inability of infrequent, unsustained flows to develop meanders and, thus, adjust the channel planform to changes in discharge, sediment load and valley slope. Flow variability, thus, exercises a strong control on channel pattern and causes floodouts in headwater settings and the semi-arid Karoo floodplain. As a result, sediment transport in the Seekoei River is likely to be episodic, and net retention of sediment in the semi-arid floodplain is greater than in the sub-humid Nsonge River Floodplain, where sediment depth is limited.

  16. Climatic implications of correlated upper Pleistocene glacial and fluvial deposits on the Cinca and Gallego rivers, NE Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Claudia J; Mcdonald, Eric; Sancho, Carlos; Pena, Jose- Luis

    2008-01-01

    We correlate Upper Pleistocene glacial and fluvial deposits of the Cinca and Gallego River valleys (south central Pyrenees and Ebro basin, Spain) using geomorphic position, luminescence dates, and time-related trends in soil development. The ages obtained from glacial deposits indicate glacial periods at 85 {+-} 5 ka, 64 {+-} 11 ka, and 36 {+-} 3 ka (from glacial till) and 20 {+-} 3 ka (from loess). The fluvial drainage system, fed by glaciers in the headwaters, developed extensive terrace systems in the Cinca River valley at 178 {+-} 21 ka, 97 {+-} 16 ka, 61 {+-} 4 ka, 47 {+-} 4 ka, and 11 {+-} 1 ka, and in the Gallego River valley at 151 {+-} 11 ka, 68 {+-} 7 ka, and 45 {+-} 3 ka. The times of maximum geomorphic activity related to cold phases coincide with Late Pleistocene marine isotope stages and heinrich events. The maximum extent of glaciers during the last glacial occurred at 64 {+-} 11 ka, and the terraces correlated with this glacial phase are the most extensive in both the Cinca (61 {+-} 4 ka) and Gallego (68 {+-} 7 ka) valleys, indicating a strong increase in fluvial discharge and availability of sediments related to the transition to deglaciation. The global Last Glacial Maximum is scarcely represented in the south central Pyrenees owing to dominantly dry conditions at that time. Precipitation must be controlled by the position of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation system. The glacial systems and the associated fluvial dynamic seem sensitive to (1) global climate changes controlled by insolation, (2) North Atlantic thermohaline circulation influenced by freshwater pulses into the North Atlantic, and (3) anomalies in atmospheric circulation in the North Atlantic controlling precipitation on the Iberian peninsula. The model of glacial and fluvial evolution during the Late Pleistocene in northern Spain could be extrapolated to other glaciated mountainous areas in southern Europe.

  17. Characterizing worldwide patterns of fluvial geomorphology and hydrology with the Global River Widths from Landsat (GRWL) database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. H.; Pavelsky, T.

    2015-12-01

    The width of a river reflects complex interactions between river water hydraulics and other physical factors like bank erosional resistance, sediment supply, and human-made structures. A broad range of fluvial process studies use spatially distributed river width data to understand and quantify flood hazards, river water flux, or fluvial greenhouse gas efflux. Ongoing technological advances in remote sensing, computing power, and model sophistication are moving river system science towards global-scale studies that aim to understand the Earth's fluvial system as a whole. As such, a global spatially distributed database of river location and width is necessary to better constrain these studies. Here we present the Global River Width from Landsat (GRWL) Database, the first global-scale database of river planform at mean discharge. With a resolution of 30 m, GRWL consists of 58 million measurements of river centerline location, width, and braiding index. In total, GRWL measures 2.1 million km of rivers wider than 30 m, corresponding to 602 thousand km2 of river water surface area, a metric used to calculate global greenhouse gas emissions from rivers to the atmosphere. Using data from GRWL, we find that ~20% of the world's rivers are located above 60ºN where little high quality information exists about rivers of any kind. Further, we find that ~10% of the world's large rivers are multichannel, which may impact the development of the new generation of regional and global hydrodynamic models. We also investigate the spatial controls of global fluvial geomorphology and river hydrology by comparing climate, topography, geology, and human population density to GRWL measurements. The GRWL Database will be made publically available upon publication to facilitate improved understanding of Earth's fluvial system. Finally, GRWL will be used as an a priori data for the joint NASA/CNES Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Satellite Mission, planned for launch in 2020.

  18. Insight on watershed development along the actively uplifting Mount Lebanon range (Lebanon) from marine and fluvial terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepley, S.; Gomez, F.; Nader, F.

    2005-12-01

    Active uplift in the Mt. Lebanon range results from regional transpression along a ~200-km-long restraining bend within the Dead Sea fault system. Thus, the resultant landscape is characterized by the combined influences of tectonic, eustatic, and climatic controls. Marine terraces in northern Mt. Lebanon range provide significant constraints on regional uplift and, consequently, base level control on watershed development. Detailed geologic mapping reveals at least six coastal terrace levels between the cities of Tripoli and Batroun in northern Lebanon, ranging in elevation from 5 m to 113 m above sea level. The marine terraces are primarily abrasional platforms with little to no sediment cover. However, at certain locations, the terraces comprise of a thick (up to 20 m towards the coast) sedimentary cover that are the result of episodic periods of cut and fill into older Pliocene deposits. The majority of these sediments are well-rounded, cobble-size clasts of limestone cemented by a calcite matrix with occasional clasts of basalt and marine fossils. Travertine formations, fossil remnants, and limestone clasts are available to constrain ages on terrace formations and, in turn, coastal uplift rates. Correlation of terrace heights with Pleistocene sea level variations suggests an average, regional uplift rate of 0.3 m/ka. Fluvial terraces in the northern Mt. Lebanon allow reconstruction of longitudinal profiles that grade into base levels represented by the corresponding marine terraces. Hence, this correlation constrains the ages of fluvial terraces and consequently permits estimates of fluvial erosion. Temporal variations in fluvial transport capacity are suggested by episodic aggradation of massive boulder-size clasts of basalt and dolomite that originate over 20 km upstream. Furthermore, knickpoints in the present-day drainage also appear to correlate with the former base levels. Hence, the retreat of these knickpoints permits assessing the lag time in the

  19. Fluvial landscapes - human societies interactions during the last 2000 years: the Middle Loire River and its embanking since the Middle Ages (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanet, Cyril; Carcaud, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    This research deals with the study of fluvial landscapes, heavily and precociously transformed by societies (fluvial anthroposystems). It aims to characterize i), fluvial responses to climate, environmental and anthropogenic changes ii), history of hydraulical constructions relative to rivers iii), history of fluvial origin risks and their management - (Program: AGES Ancient Geomorphological EvolutionS of the Loire River hydrosystem). The Middle Loire River valley in the Val d'Orléans was strongly and precociously occupied, particularly during historical periods. Hydrosedimentary flows are there irregular. The river dykes were built during the Middle Ages (dykes named turcies) and the Modern Period, but ages and localizations of the oldest dykes were not precisely known. A systemic and multi-scaled approach aimed to characterize i), palaeo-hydrographical, -hydrological and -hydraulical evolutions of the Loire River, fluvial risks (palaeo-hazards and -vulnerabilities) and their management. It is based on an integrated approach, in and out archaeological sites: morpho-stratigraphy, sedimentology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomatics, geochronology, archaeology. Spatio-temporal variability of fluvial hazards is characterized. A model of the Loire River fluvial activity is developed: multicentennial scale variability, with higher fluvial activity episodes during the Gallo-Roman period, IX-XIth centuries and LIA. Fluvial patterns changes are indentified. Settlement dynamics and hydraulical constructions of the valley are specified. We establish the ages and localizations of the oldest discovered dikes of the Middle Loire River: after the Late Antiquity and before the end of the Early Middle Ages (2 dated dykes), between Bou and Orléans cities. During historical periods, we suggest 2 main thresholds concerning socio-environmental interactions: the first one during the Early Middle Ages (turcies: small scattered dykes), the second during the Modern Period (levees: high

  20. Application of Uav Photogrammetry for Assessment of Fluvial Dynamics of a Montane Stream. Case Study - Roklanský Creek, Šumava Mts., Europe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhammer, J.; Miřijovský, J.; Hartvich, F.; Kaiglová, J.

    2014-12-01

    Current progress in hydrology and fluvial geomorphology is largely driven by the newly emerging survey and detection techniques, employing advanced technologies for remote sensing and monitoring of the runoff processes and fluvial dynamics. The contribution demonstrates the potential of the fusion of experimental survey methods for analysis of fluvial dynamics of a montane stream. The UAV photogrammetry, optical granulometry, ground LiDAR scanning and sensor network monitoring were applied as a base for building hydrodynamic model for simulation of fluvial dynamics. The UAV photogrammetry is employed to acquire high precision DTM and especially for quantitative analysis of volumetric changes related to initial flood events. The hexacopter platform has been used to acquire the data for photogrammetric analysis of complex stretch of stream with historically elevated fluvial dynamics. The SfM algorithm was used to extract accurate DTM of the channel and to consequently analyze the volumetric changes after a flood event. The sensor network with automated high frequency water level monitoring was used to derive information on hydrological properties of initial flood event. The digital granulometry enabled to analyze the structure of sedimentary material in floodplain. The terrestrial LiDAR scanning allows construction of very detailed 3D models of selected fluvial forms, enabling deeper insight into the effects of fluvial dynamics and to verify the spatial information acquired using UAS photogrammetry. The results of above mentioned techniques are applied to build hydrodynamic model explaining threshold conditions for initiation of changes in fluvial morphology of the riverbed in relation to known and theoretical flood magnitude. The results achieved in the study enabled us to discuss the synergic potential of coupling the UAV photogrammetry, sensor networks and other high precision survey techniques to enhance significantly our knowledge on the dynamics of fluvial

  1. Fluvial architecture variations linked to changes in accommodation space: Río Chico Formation (Late Paleocene), Golfo San Jorge basin, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foix, Nicolás; Paredes, José M.; Giacosa, Raúl E.

    2013-08-01

    The Upper Paleocene Río Chico Formation is a 50-180 m thick fluvial succession developed in a passive-margin setting, Golfo San Jorge basin, Central Patagonia, Argentina. A detailed description and interpretation of outcrops was carried out, analyzing exposures from the northern basin margin to the most complete successions at the southern depocenter. The unit is characterized by a regional fluvial system that flowed to the south-east. Five main lithofacies associations were defined: (I) active fluvial channels, with three sub-types: braided, meandering and low-sinuosity, (II) sheet-flood deposits, (III) proximal floodplain (natural levee and crevasse-splay), (IV) distal floodplain, and (V) abandoned channels. Lateral/vertical changes in fluvial architecture of the Río Chico Formation were recognized by variations in preserved thickness, fluvial styles, geometry of fluvial channels, regional paleoflow directions, and channel/floodplain ratios. Close to the northern basin margin, the fluvial succession is 50-60 m thick, composed of braided channels, sheet-flow deposits, and high channel/floodplain ratio. In a basinward direction, the alluvial succession increases to 180 m in thickness, the dominant fluvial styles change to low-sinuosity and meandering channels and channel/floodplain ratio reduces. The fluvial architecture of the Río Chico Formation shows two main depositional trends that resulted from changes in accommodation space across the basin. The interpreted break-point coincides with the underlying Cretaceous basin-boundary, thus the synsedimentary extensional reactivation of the pre-existing tectonic lineament generated differential subsidence, delimiting two different accommodation settings.

  2. Use of Archival Sources to Improve Water-Related Hazard Assessments at Volcán de Agua, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, A. A.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.; Williams, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    This interdisciplinary study focuses on the use of archival sources from the 18th Century Spanish Empire to develop a greater understanding of mudflow trigger mechanisms at Volcán de Agua in Guatemala. Currently, hazard assessments of debris flows at Volcán de Agua are largely based on studies of analogous events, such as the mudflow at Casita Volcano in 1998 caused by excessive rainfall generated by Hurricane Mitch. A preliminary investigation of Spanish archival sources, however, indicates that a damaging mudflow from the volcano in 1717 may have been triggered by activity at the neighbouring Volcán de Fuego. A VEI 4 eruption of Fuego in late August 1717 was followed by 33 days of localized 'retumbos' and then a major local earthquake with accompanying mudflows from several 'bocas' on the southwest flank of Agua. Of particular importance for this study is an archival source from Archivos Generales de Centro América (AGCA) that consists of a series of letters, petitions and witness statements that were written and gathered following the catastrophic events of 1717. Their purpose was to argue for royal permission to relocate the capital city, which at the time was located on the lower flanks of Volcán de Agua. Within these documents there are accounts of steaming 'avenidas' of water with sulphurous smells, and quantitative descriptions that suggest fissure formation related to volcanic activity at Volcán de Fuego. Clear evidence for volcano-tectonic activity at the time, combined with the fact there is no mention of rainfall in the documents, suggest that outbursts of mud from Agua's south flank may have been caused by a volcanic perturbation of a hydrothermal system. This single example suggests that further analysis of archival documents will provide a more accurate and robust assessment of water related hazards at Volcán de Agua than currently exists.

  3. Sediment accumulation rates and high-resolution stratigraphy of recent fluvial suspension deposits in various fluvial settings, Morava River catchment area, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedláček, Jan; Bábek, Ondřej; Kielar, Ondřej

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study concerning sedimentary processes in fluvial sediment traps within the Morava River catchment area (Czech Republic) involving three dammed reservoirs, four meanders and oxbow lakes, and several natural floodplain sites. The objective of the study was to determine sediment accumulation rates (SAR), estimate erosion rates, calculating these using a combination of the 137Cs method and historical data. Another purpose of this study was to provide insight into changing erosion and accumulation rates over the last century. Extensive water course modifications were carried out in the Morava River catchment area during the twentieth century, which likely affected sedimentation rates along the river course. Other multiproxy stratigraphic methods (X-ray densitometry, magnetic susceptibility, and visible-light reflectance spectrometry) were applied to obtain additional information about sediment infill. Sediment stratigraphy revealed distinct distal-to-proximal patterns, especially in reservoirs. Granulometrically, silts and sandy silts prevailed in sediments. Oxbow lakes and meanders contained larger amounts of clay and organic matter, which is the main difference between them and reservoirs. Pronounced 137Cs peaks were recorded in all studied cores (maximum 377 Bq·kg- 1), thus indicating Chernobyl fallout from 1986 or older events. Calculated sediment accumulation rates were lowest in distal parts of reservoirs (0.13-0.58 cm/y) and floodplains (0.45-0.88 cm/y), moderately high rates were found in proximal parts of reservoirs and oxbow lakes (2.27-4.4 cm/y), and the highest rates in some oxbow lakes located near the river (6-8 cm/y). The frequency of the inundation still can be high in some natural areas as in the Litovelské Pomoraví protected area, whereas the decreasing frequency of the inundation in other modified parts can contribute to a lower sedimentation rate. The local effects such as difference between SARs in oxbow lakes and

  4. Spatio-temporal variability and rates of fluvial bedload transport in steep mountain catchments in western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.; Laute, Katja

    2014-05-01

    The timing and rate of fluvial bedload transport are of central importance within sediment budget studies and in many applications in river science and engineering. Bedload transport rates are very difficult to measure and, in many sites, only suspended load and solute data are included in sediment budget studies. During four years (2010 - 2013) detailed field measurements with portable impact sensors as a non-invasive technique for indirectly determining fluvial bedload transport intensity were conducted at several selected channel stretches within two instrumented and supply-limited drainage basin systems (Erdalen and Bødalen) in the steep fjord landscape in western Norway. The selected stream test stretches where impact sensor field measurements were conducted were located (i) downstream of steep channels in headwater areas of the two drainage basin systems Erdalen and Bødalen, (ii) downstream of selected stream channel segments with temporary in-channel storage of bedload material in Erdalen and Bødalen and (iii) at the outlets of the two drainage basin systems Erdalen and Bødalen. The collected impact sensor field data were calibrated with laboratory flume experiments and were combined with field data from continuous discharge monitoring, repeated surveys of channel morphometry and sediment texture, particle tracer measurements, Helley-Smith samplings, underwater videofilming and biofilm analyses. The combination of methods and techniques applied provides detailed insights into the spatio-temporal variability and rates of fluvial bedload transport within Erdalen and Bødalen. Fluvial bedload transport in steep headwater streams is strongly related to sediment delivery from slopes, especially through fluvial transfers in small creeks draining the slope systems and through snow avalanches in spring and debris flows in fall. Channel reaches with temporary in-channel storage of bedload material in the middle parts of the Erdalen and Bødalen drainage basin

  5. A consistent magnetic polarity stratigraphy of Plio-Pleistocene fluvial sediments from the Heidelberg Basin (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidt, Stephanie; Hambach, Ulrich; Rolf, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Deep drillings in the Heidelberg Basins provide access to one of the thickest and most complete successions of Quaternary and Upper Pliocene continental sediments in Central-Europe [1]. In absence of any comprehensive chronostratigraphic model, these sediments are so far classified by lithological and hydrogeological criteria. Therefore the age of this sequence is still controversially discussed ([1], [2]). In spite of the fact that fluvial sediments are a fundamental challenge for the application of magnetic polarity stratigraphy we performed a thorough study on four drilling cores (from Heidelberg, Ludwigshafen and nearby Viernheim). Here, we present the results from the analyses of these cores, which yield to a consistent chronostratigraphic framework. The components of natural remanent magnetisation (NRM) were separated by alternating field and thermal demagnetisation techniques and the characteristic remanent magnetisations (ChRM) were isolated by principle component analysis [3]. Due to the coring technique solely inclination data of the ChRM is used for the determination of the magnetic polarity stratigraphy. Rock magnetic proxies were applied to identify the carriers of the remanent magnetisation. The investigations prove the NRM as a stable, largely primary magnetisation acquired shortly after deposition (PDRM). The Matuyama-Gauss boundary is clearly defined by a polarity change in each core, as suggested in previous work [4]. These findings are in good agreement with the biostratigraphic definition of the base of the Quaternary ([5], [6], [7]). The Brunhes-Matuyama boundary could be identified in core Heidelberg UniNord 1 and 2 only. Consequently, the position of the Jaramillo and Olduvai subchron can be inferred from the lithostratigraphy and the development of fluvial facies architecture in the Rhine system. The continuation of the magnetic polarity stratigraphy into the Gilbert chron (Upper Pliocene) allows alternative correlation schemes for the cores

  6. Geomorphic response to agricultural land use in small fluvial systems - The role of landscape connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poeppl, R.; Keiler, M.; Glade, T.; Engage-Geomorphological Systems; Risk Research

    2010-12-01

    Nearly all river catchments are affected directly or indirectly by human actions, e.g. varying agricultural land use or interventions into to river course and flow lead to significant geomorphic changes. The rates of fluvial change are accelerating in many river catchments and public and institutional awareness of these changes and their consequences has grown. This trend leads to an increasing need for a deeper understanding of how the system elements are interrelated (connected) and how fluvial systems respond to human activities. Most of the studies relating to such topics focus on extrinsic (e.g. climatic) factors, although vegetation cover is one of the primary intrinsic factors on sediment yield to a river and even the most susceptible factor for human alterations. Furthermore, nearly all of the published studies are dealing with large rivers, disregarding the much more abundant smaller ones, which in sum do also influence larger rivers. The presented study contributes to gain a deeper understanding of how river systems geomorphologically respond to human activities. The focus in this study is on the importance of hillslope-channel connectivity relationships, as well as on connectivity relationships between the channel reaches in catchments with agricultural land use. Therefore, aerial photograph and airborne laserscan-interpretations were used to create detailed land use and river maps in order to gather current land use and river planform geometry conditions. The land use data was integrated to a GIS-related spatial soil erosion model so as to determine sources of fine sediment from eroding top soil in agricultural areas. Furthermore, a DEM-based multiple-flow model was applied to examine hillslope-channel connectivity relationships. River bed sediment composition, sediment embeddedness and in-channel accumulation of fine sediments were surveyed as potential indicators for geomorphic system response to agricultural land-use, as well as to determine

  7. Developing an Understanding of Vegetation Change and Fluvial Carbon Fluxes in Semi-Arid Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttock, A. K.; Dungait, J.; Bol, R.; MacLeod, C. J.; Brazier, R.

    2011-12-01

    Dryland environments are estimated to cover around 40% of the global land surface (Okin et al, 2009) and are home to approximately 2.5 billion people (Reynolds et al. 2007). Many of these areas have recently experienced extensive land degradation. One such area and the focus of this project is the semi-arid US Southwest, where degradation over the past 150 years has been characterized by the invasion of woody vegetation into grasslands. Transition from grass to woody vegetation results in a change in ecosystem structure and function (Turnbull et al, 2008). Structural change is typically characterised by an increased heterogeneity of soil and vegetation resources, associated with reduced vegetation coverage and an increased vulnerability to soil erosion and the potential loss of key nutrients to adjacent fluvial systems. Such loss of resources may impact heavily upon the amount of carbon that is sequestered by these environments and the amount of carbon that is lost as the land becomes more degraded. Therefore, understanding these vegetation transitions is significant for sustainable land use and global biogeochemical cycling. This project uses an ecohydrological approach, monitoring natural rainfall-runoff events over six bounded plots with different vegetation coverage. The experiment takes advantage of a natural abundance stable 13C isotope shift from C3 piñon-juniper (Pinus edulis-Juniperus monosperma) mixed stand through a C4 pure-grass (Bouteloua eriopoda) to C3 shrub (Larrea tridentate). Data collected quantify fluvial fluxes of sediment and associated soil organic matter and carbon that is lost from across the grass-to-shrub and grass-to-woodland transition (where change in space is taken to indicate a similar change through time). Results collected during the 2010 and 2011 monsoon seasons will be presented, illustrating that soil and carbon losses are greater as the ecosystem becomes more dominated by woody plants. Additionally this project utilises novel

  8. Climate-sensitive feedbacks between hillslope processes and fluvial erosion in sediment-driven incision models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skov, Daniel S.; Egholm, David L.

    2016-04-01

    Surface erosion and sediment production seem to have accelerated globally as climate cooled in the Late Cenozoic, [Molnar, P. 2004, Herman et al 2013]. Glaciers emerged in many high mountain ranges during the Quaternary, and glaciation therefore represents a likely explanation for faster erosion in such places. Still, observations and measurements point to increases in erosion rates also in landscapes where erosion is driven mainly by fluvial processes [Lease and Ehlers (2013), Reusser (2004)]. Flume experiments and fieldwork have shown that rates of incision are to a large degree controlled by the sediment load of streams [e.g. Sklar and Dietrich (2001), Beer and Turowski (2015)]. This realization led to the formulation of sediment-flux dependent incision models [Sklar and Dietrich (2004)]. The sediment-flux dependence links incision in the channels to hillslope processes that supply sediment to the channels. The rates of weathering and soil transport on the hillslopes are processes that are likely to respond to changing temperatures, e.g. because of vegetation changes or the occurrence of frost. In this study, we perform computational landscape evolution experiments, where the coupling between fluvial incision and hillslope processes is accounted for by coupling a sediment-flux-dependent model for fluvial incision to a climate-dependent model for weathering and hillslope sediment transport. The computational experiments first of all demonstrate a strong positive feedback between channel and hillslope processes. In general, faster weathering leads to higher rates of channel incision, which further increases the weathering rates, mainly because of hillslope steepening. Slower weathering leads to the opposite result. The experiments also demonstrate, however, that the feedbacks vary significantly between different parts of a drainage network. For example, increasing hillslope sediment production may accelerate incision in the upper parts of the catchment, while at

  9. Evidences of Paleoearthquakes in Palaeolithic settlements within fluvial sequences of the Tagus Basin (Madrid, Central Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pablo G.; Rodríguez Pascua, M. A.; Pérez López, R.; Giner Robles, J. L.; Roquero, E.; Tapias, F.; López Recio, M.; Rus, I.; Morin, J.

    2010-05-01

    Multiple evidences of soft-sediment to brittle deformation within the Pleistocene fluvial terraces of the Tagus, Jarama, Tajuña and Manzanares river valleys have been described since the middle 20th Century. Cryoturbation, hydroplastic deformations due to underlying karstic collapses or halokinesis on the substratum of neogene gypsums, and seismic shaking have been proposed to interpret these structures. These deformations are typically concentrated in the +18-20 m terrace levels, and closely linked to well-known Palaeolithic sites, in some cases overlaying and/or affecting true prehistoric settlements (i.e. Arganda, Arriaga and Tafesa sites) within the Jarama and Manzanares valleys. The affected settlements typically display acheulian lithic industry linked to the scavenging of large Pleistocene mammals (i.e. Elephas antiquus). Commonly, deformational structures are concentrated in relatively thin horizons (10-50 cm thick) bracketed by undeformed fluvial sands and gravels. The soft-sediment deformations usually consist on medium to fine sized sands injected and protruded in overlaying flood-plain clayey silts, showing a wide variety of convolutes, injections, sand-dikes, dish and pillar structures, mud volcanoes, faults and folds, some times it is possible to undertake their 3D geometrical analysis due to the exceptional conservation of the structures (Tafesa). Recent geo-archaeological prospecting on the for the Palaeolithic Site of Arriaga (South Madrid City) conducted during the year 2009, let to find out an exceptional horizon of deformation of about 1.20 m thick. It consisted on highly disturbed and pervasively liquefacted sands, which hardly can be attributed to no-seismic processes. The acheulian lithic industry of the Madrid Region have been classically attributed the Late Middle Pleistocene (< 350 kyr BP), but recent OSL dating indicate that the basal horizons of the +18-20 m fluvial terraces hold ages younger than c.a. 120-100 kyr BP in this zone. All

  10. Creating High Quality DEMs of Large Scale Fluvial Environments Using Structure-from-Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javernick, L. A.; Brasington, J.; Caruso, B. S.; Hicks, M.; Davies, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    During the past decade, advances in survey and sensor technology have generated new opportunities to investigate the structure and dynamics of fluvial systems. Key geomatic technologies include the Global Positioning System (GPS), digital photogrammetry, LiDAR, and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). The application of such has resulted in a profound increase in the dimensionality of topographic surveys - from cross-sections to distributed 3d point clouds and digital elevation models (DEMs). Each of these technologies have been used successfully to derive high quality DEMs of fluvial environments; however, they often require specialized and expensive equipment, such as a TLS or large format camera, bespoke platforms such as survey aircraft, and consequently make data acquisition prohibitively expensive or highly labour intensive, thus restricting the extent and frequency of surveys. Recently, advances in computer vision and image analysis have led to development of a novel photogrammetric approach that is fully automated and suitable for use with simple compact (non-metric) cameras. In this paper, we evaluate a new photogrammetric method, Structure-from-Motion (SfM), and demonstrate how this can be used to generate DEMs of comparable quality to airborne LiDAR, using consumer grade cameras at low costs. Using the SfM software PhotoScan (version 0.8.5), high quality DEMs were produced for a 1.6 km reach and a 3.3 km reach of the braided Ahuriri River, New Zealand. Photographs used for DEM creation were acquired from a helicopter flying at 600 m and 800 m above ground level using a consumer grade 10.1mega-pixel, non-metric digital camera, resulting in object space resolution imagery of 0.12 m and 0.16 m respectively. Point clouds for the two study reaches were generated using 147 and 224 photographs respectively, and were extracted automatically in an arbitrary coordinate system; RTK-GPS located ground control points (GCPs) were used to define a 3d non

  11. The Atlas of Natural Hazards and Risks of Austria: first results for fluvial and pluvial floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergili, Martin; Tader, Andreas; Glade, Thomas; Neuhold, Clemens; Stiefelmeyer, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    Incoherent societal adaptation to natural processes results in significant losses every year. A better knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of hazards and risks, and of particular hot spots in a given region or period, is essential for reducing adverse impacts. Commonly, different hazard and risk estimations are performed within individual approaches based on tailor-made concepts. This works well as long as specific cases are considered. The advantage of such a procedure is that each individual hazard and risk is addressed in the best possible manner. The drawback, however, consists in the fact that the results differ significantly in terms of quality and accuracy and therefore cannot be compared. Hence, there is a need to develop a strategy and concept which uses similar data sources of equivalent quality in order to adequately analyze the different natural hazards and risks at broader scales. The present study is aiming to develop such a platform. The project Risk:ATlas focuses on the design of an atlas visualizing the most relevant natural hazards and, in particular, possible consequences for the entire territory of Austria. Available as a web-based tool and as a printed atlas, it is seen as a key tool to improve the basis for risk reduction, risk adaptation and risk transfer. The atlas is founded on those data sets available for the entire territory of Austria at a consistent resolution and quality. A 1 m resolution DEM and the official cadastre and building register represent the core, further data sets are employed according to the requirements for each natural hazard and risk. In this contribution, the methodology and the preliminary results for fluvial and pluvial floods and their consequences to buildings for three selected test areas in different types of landscapes (rural, urban and mountainous) are presented. Flooding depths expected for annualities of 30, 100 and 300 are derived from existing data sets for fluvial floods and are computed

  12. OSL dating of fluvial terraces for incision rate estimation and indication of neotectonic activity in Pamir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, M. C.; Gloaguen, R.; Krbetschek, M.; Szulc, A.

    2012-04-01

    ThePamir owes its special attraction for geo-scientists to being among Earth's largest intra-continental orogens and to display some of the highest uplift rates as well as to host among the most powerful river systems on the planet. The evolution of the drainage network as a proxy for the landscape's response to tectonic signals provides a powerful tool to study neotectonics. The relation between tectonic forcing and surface response is indicated by structural anomalies (e.g. river-capture, river-reversal or -deflection) and spatial differences of process rates (e.g. incision rates). We combine OSL dating with remote sensing tectonic geomorphology in order to determine the zones of active deformation in the Quaternary. The local drainage system of the study region aligns mainly to the east-west-trending belts of shortening, which results from the ongoing northward propagation of the Indian plate. In contrast the major trunk river, the Panj, is unusual in that it deflects northwards and then doubles back to the southwest, cutting the southern and central Pamir doming and several other major Cenozoic deformation zones. We use fluvial terraces along the deflected north-south orientated part including the doubled back prolongation of the more or less normal orientated Panj. These sediment bodies are used as a geomorphic record to reveal changes in the balance between sediment flux and discharge. Dating these fluvial terraces by OSL provides the burial ages of the sediments indicating periods of sedimentation. The remains of those periods are far from equally distributed and mark the time of local conditions for sedimentation as especially the close neighbourhood of most of the terraces from the two youngest periods demonstrate. Precise measurements of the heights of the dated terraces with respect to the present river level based on relative kinematic GPS quantify the total vertical incision of the river subsequent to the sedimentation and abandonment. Incision rates

  13. Fluvial sediments a summary of source, transportation, deposition, and measurement of sediment discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colby, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    This paper presents a broad but undetailed picture of fluvial sediments in streams, reservoirs, and lakes and includes a discussion of the processes involved in the movement of sediment by flowing water. Sediment is fragmental material that originates from the chemical or physical disintegration of rocks. The disintegration products may have many different shapes and may range in size from large boulders to colloidal particles. In general, they retain about the same mineral composition as the parent rocks. Rock fragments become fluvial sediment when they are entrained in a stream of water. The entrainment may occur as sheet erosion from land surfaces, particularly for the fine particles, or as channel erosion after the surface runoff has accumulated in streams. Fluvial sediments move in streams as bedload (particles moving within a few particle diameters of the streambed) or as suspended sediment in the turbulent flow. The discharge of bedload varies with several factors, which may include particle size and a type of effective shear on the surface of the streambed. The discharge of suspended sediment depends partly on concentration of moving sediment near the streambed and hence on discharge of bedload. However, the concentration of fine sediment near the streambed varies widely, even for equal flows, and, therefore, the discharge of fine sediment normally cannot be computed theoretically. The discharge of suspended sediment also depends on velocity, turbulence, depth of flow, and fall velocity of the particles. In general, the coarse sediment transported by a stream moves intermittently and is discharged at a rate that depends on properties of the flow and of the sediment. If an ample supply of coarse sediment is available at the surface of the streambed, the discharge of the coarse sediment, such as sand, can be roughly computed from properties of the available sediment and of the flow. On the other hand, much of the fine sediment in a stream usually moves nearly

  14. Dynamic Processes of Large Wood and Their Effects on Fluvial Export at the Watershed Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, J.; Nakamura, F.; Chun, K.

    2008-12-01

    The presence of large wood (LW) has a pronounced impact on the geomorphic and ecological character of river corridors, yet relatively little is known about the patterns and processes at the watershed scale. To understand these patterns we monitored the volumetric input of LW into 131 reservoirs and a suite of watershed characteristics. Of all geomorphic and hydrologic variables tested, watershed area was most important in explaining LW export. LW export per unit watershed area was relatively high in small watersheds, peaked in intermediate-sized watersheds and decreased in large watersheds. To explain these variations, we surveyed the amount of LW with respect to channel morphology in 78 segments (26 segments in each size class) in the Nukabira River, northern Japan, and examined the differences in LW dynamics, including its recruitment, transport, storage, and fragmentation and decay along the spectrum of watershed sizes. We found in small watersheds a larger proportion of LW produced by forest dynamics and hillslope processes was retained due to narrower valley floors and lower stream power. The retained LW pieces may eventually be exported during debris flows. In intermediate-sized watersheds the volume of LW pieces derived from hillslopes decreased substantially with reductions of proportion of channel length bordered by hillslope margins, which potentially deliver large quantities of LW. Because these channels have lower wood piece length to channel width ratios and higher stream power, LW pieces can be transported downstream. During transport, LW pieces are further fragmented and can be more easily transported; and therefore, the fluvial export of LW is maximized in intermediate-sized watersheds. Rivers in large watersheds, where the recruitment of LW is limited by the decreasing hillslope margins, cannot transport LW pieces because of their low stream power and thus LW pieces accumulate at various storage sites. Although these stored LW pieces can be re

  15. Modeling the implications of fluvial erosion and bank failures on gully development and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istanbulluoglu, E.; Flores, H.; Bras, R.; Tucker, G.

    2003-12-01

    Exploring landscape development due to gully erosion has been an important component in Michael J. Kirkby's scientific career. Gully erosion is most commonly triggered by fluvial erosion due to natural and anthropogenic disturbances, or as a response to changes in climate and tectonic forcing, and base level drop. Field observations suggest that following the development of fluvial incisions, headward growth and widening of many gully systems can be attributed to the instability and collapse of steepened gully walls. Soil saturation, sapping and development of tension cracks contribute to the instability. Recent landscape evolution models treat such mass failures as slope dependent continuous sediment transport processes, sometimes conditioned on a slope threshold or with nonlinear dependence on slope gradient. In this study, first we present a theory for stability analysis of gully head and walls. The theory is based on force balance equation of an assumed planar failure geometry of a steep gully wall, with a potential failure plane dipping to the incised gully bed. We consider development of vertical tension cracks behind the face of the gully head that extend down to the failure plane. In the theory, storm water infiltrates in the tension cracks and generates hydrostatic forces in the vertical crack face, and uplift forces along the failure plane. During storms, water level in the crack is related to steady-state basin hydrology. In our model when tension cracks are either dry or completely filled with runoff water, instability occurs when headcut height exceeds a critical threshold (higher for the dry case). For the case when cracks are partially filled, our theory predicts an inverse relationship between headcut height and drainage area. We used field observations in Colorado and another published data set to test our model. Second, we have implemented this theory in the CHILD landscape evolution model and explored the effects of soil cohesion, erosion

  16. Flood hazards analysis based on changes of hydrodynamic processes in fluvial systems of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simas, Iury; Rodrigues, Cleide

    2016-04-01

    The metropolis of Sao Paulo, with its 7940 Km² and over 20 million inhabitants, is increasingly being consolidated with disregard for the dynamics of its fluvial systems and natural limitations imposed by fluvial terraces, floodplains and slopes. Events such as floods and flash floods became particularly persistent mainly in socially and environmentally vulnerable areas. The Aricanduva River basin was selected as the ideal area for the development of the flood hazard analysis since it presents the main geological and geomorphological features found in the urban site. According to studies carried out by Anthropic Geomorphology approach in São Paulo, to study this phenomenon is necessary to take into account the original hydromorphological systems and its functional conditions, as well as in which dimensions the Anthropic factor changes the balance between the main variables of surface processes. Considering those principles, an alternative model of geographical data was proposed and enabled to identify the role of different driving forces in terms of spatial conditioning of certain flood events. Spatial relationships between different variables, such as anthropogenic and original morphology, were analyzed for that purpose in addition to climate data. The surface hydrodynamic tendency spatial model conceived for this study takes as key variables: 1- The land use present at the observed date combined with the predominant lithological group, represented by a value ranging 0-100, based on indexes of the National Soil Conservation Service (NSCS-USA) and the Hydraulic Technology Center Foundation (FCTH-Brazil) to determine the resulting balance of runoff/infiltration. 2- The original slope, applying thresholds from which it's possible to determine greater tendency for runoff (in percents). 3- The minimal features of relief, combining the curvature of surface in plant and profile. Those three key variables were combined in a Geographic Information System in a series of

  17. Meltwater pathways and grain size transformation in a Pleistocene Mediterranean glacial-fluvial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, Kathryn; Woodward, Jamie; Hughes, Philip

    2013-04-01

    The Pleistocene sedimentary records of Mount Orjen, western Montenegro, have been used to investigate changes in grain size characteristics of fine sediments transported from the glaciated mountains to the fluvial systems downstream. Understanding the particle size characteristics of the fine sediments transported by these cold stage river systems is important for several reasons. The braided rivers draining the glaciated mountains of the western Balkans may have been an important source of loess for example. It is also important to establish the grain size signature of suspended sediment delivered to the marine environment to aid land-marine correlations. The fine-grained component of the tills is dominated by glacially-comminuted limestone particles. Detailed particle size analysis of the fine sediment matrix component (<63 μm) of glacial till and alluvial deposits has been undertaken using multiple samples at 12 sites surrounding the Orjen massif. This limestone karst terrain includes a range of meltwater pathways and depositional contexts, including: river valleys, alluvial fans, poljes, and ice marginal settings. 35 U-series ages and soil development indices have been used to develop a robust geochronology for the Pleistocene records Two dominant surface meltwater and sediment pathways have been identified around Mount Orjen. The particle size distributions reveal that these transportation routes can have distinctive sedimentological signatures. Type 1 pathways deliver meltwater and sediments downstream via bedrock gorges. In these settings, the fine grained alluvial matrix presents a largely bimodal particle size distribution (PSD). Type 2 pathways represent meltwater channels draining directly from the ice margin. Alluvial sediments within these environments more closely resemble the normally distributed PSD of the glacial tills. The transition to bimodal PSDs, downstream of Type 1 meltwater routes, suggests that the glacially-comminuted sediments are

  18. Latitudinal Controls on Topography: The Role of Precipitation and Fluvial Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, C.; Yanites, B.

    2014-12-01

    Observations from the North and South American Cordillera show that mean and maximum elevations decrease with increasing latitude. The trend in elevation follows the latitudinal dependence of snowline altitudes. This correlation between elevation and snowline altitude has been the impetus behind the glacial 'buzzsaw' hypothesis, which states that glaciers limit the elevation of mountain peaks. Underlying this hypothesis is an assumption that elevations prior to glaciation were either uniform, randomly distributed, or followed a pattern that is no longer present. However, there may be other factors that are responsible for these patterns, such as latitudinal trends in precipitation. Here, we address this assumption and the necessity of glacial erosion in explaining the latitudinal trend in elevation. We use the CHILD landscape evolution model parameterized by modern precipitation data along a latitudinal gradient in the Andes to predict the topography in the absence of glaciation. Using NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis precipitation data from 1981-2010, we derive storm duration, intensity, and frequency statistics for a series of locations along the Andean orogen. For each location, we run a model using a sequence of storms generated from these statistics. Erodibility and rock-uplift are held constant between the different locations and the models are run until topographic steady-state is achieved. We also present runs exploring the role of a threshold for bedrock detachment in the modeled results. For each run, we track the maximum and mean elevation as well as the time to steady-state. Preliminary results for all cases show that fluvial processes alone are sufficient to account for the latitudinal dependence of topography. For example, landscapes produced with precipitation statistics similar to the dry central Andes are more than an order of magnitude higher than landscapes from the southern, wetter, part of the orogen. Future analysis will use precipitation data from

  19. A Pleistocene coastal alluvial fan complex produced by Middle Pleistocene glacio-fluvial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, Kathryn; Woodward, Jamie; Hughes, Philip; Giglio, Federico; Del Bianco, Fabrizio

    2014-05-01

    A coarse-grained alluvial fan sequence at Lipci, Kotor Bay, in western Montenegro, provides a sedimentary record of meltwater streams draining from the Orjen Massif (1,894 m a.s.l.) to the coastal zone. At Lipci sedimentary evidence and U-series ages have been used alongside offshore bathymetric imagery and seismic profiles to establish the size of the fan and constrain the nature and timing of its formation. Establishing the depositional history of such coastal fans is important for our understanding of cold stage sediment flux from glaciated uplands to the offshore zone, and for exploring the impact of sea level change on fan reworking. There is evidence of at least four phases of Pleistocene glaciation on the Orjen massif, which have been U-series dated and correlated to MIS 12, MIS 6, MIS 5d-2 and the Younger Dryas. A series of meltwater channels delivered large volumes of coarse- and fine-grained limestone sediment from the glaciated uplands into the Bay of Kotor. At the southern margin of the Orjen massif, a series of large (>700 m long) alluvial fans has developed. Some of these extend offshore for up to 600 m. Lipci fan lies downstream of end moraines in the valley immediately above, which were formed by an extensive outlet glacier of the Orjen ice cap during MIS 12. The terrestrial deposits are part of the fan apex (50 m a.s.l.) that lies at the foot of a steep bedrock channel, but the majority of the fan is now more than 25 m below sea level. The terrestrial fan sediments are strongly cemented by multiple generations of calcite precipitates: the oldest U-series ages are infinite indicating that the fan is >350 ka in age. These ages are in agreement with alluvial sedimentary evidence and U-series ages from other fluvial units on Mount Orjen. The terrestrial portion of the Lipci fan surface contains several channels. These are well preserved due to cementation with calcium carbonate. Submarine imagery indicates that the now submerged portion of the fan also

  20. Inputs and Fluvial Transport of Pharmaceutical Chemicals in An Urban Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G. D.; Shala, L.

    2006-05-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are classes of emerging chemical contaminants thought to enter the aquatic environment primarily through wastewater treatment plant (WTP) discharges. As the use of drugs is expected to rise with the aging demographics of the human population and with more river water being diverted to meet potable water demands, the presence of PPCPs in surface water is becoming an issue of public concern. The intent of our study was to quantify potential WTP inputs of PPCPs to rivers in the Wasington, DC (USA) region, and to investigate the fluvial transport of PPCPs in the Anacostia River (AR), the mainstem of a highly contaminated urban watershed in Washington, DC. The approach was to sample WTP water at various stages of treatment, and to measure seasonal concentrations of PPCPs in fluvial transport in the AR. Surface water from the AR was collected through the use of automated samplers during normal flow and storm flow regimes near the head of tide of the AR, just upstream from the confluence of the Northeast (NE) and Northwest (NW) Branches, the two prominent drainages in the watershed. The water samples were filtered to separate river particles from water, and the filtered water was extracted using solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. The filters were extracted by sonication in methanol. The SPE and filter extracts were analyzed for a group of widely distributed PPCPs as trimethylsilyl derivatives by using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The most frequently detected PPCPs at WTPs included ibuprofen, caffeine, naproxen and triclosan, which ranged from 45 μg/L (caffeine) to 5 μg/L (triclosan) in WTP influent and from 0.08 μg/L (triclosan) to 0.02 μg/L (ibuprofen) in effluent water. Similar PPCPs were detected in both the NE and NW Branches of the AR, but higher concentrations on average were observed in the NE Branch, which receives WTP effluent upstream from the sampling point. The incidence of PPCPs correlated

  1. The River Orontes in Syria and Turkey: Downstream variation of fluvial archives in different crustal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgland, David R.; Westaway, Rob; Romieh, Mohammad Abou; Candy, Ian; Daoud, Mohamad; Demir, Tuncer; Galiatsatos, Nikolaos; Schreve, Danielle C.; Seyrek, Ali; Shaw, Andrew D.; White, Tom S.; Whittaker, John

    2012-09-01

    The geomorphology and Quaternary history of the River Orontes in western Syria and south-central Turkey have been studied using a combination of methods: field survey, differential GPS, satellite imagery, analysis of sediments to determine provenance, flow direction and fluvial environment, incorporation of evidence from fossils for both palaeoenvironments and biostratigraphy, uranium-series dating of calcrete cement, reconciliation of Palaeolithic archaeological contents, and uplift modelling based on terrace height distribution. The results underline the contrasting nature of different reaches of the Orontes, in part reflecting different crustal blocks, with different histories of landscape evolution. Upstream from Homs the Orontes has a system of calcreted terraces that form a staircase extending to ~200 m above the river. New U-series dating provides an age constraint within the lower part of the sequence that suggests underestimation of terrace ages in previous reviews. This upper valley is separated from another terraced reach, in the Middle Orontes, by a gorge cut through the Late Miocene-Early Pliocene Homs Basalt. The Middle Orontes terraces have long been recognized as a source of mammalian fossils and Palaeolithic artefacts, particularly from Latamneh, near the downstream end of the reach. This terraced section of the valley ends at a fault scarp, marking the edge of the subsiding Ghab Basin (a segment of the Dead Sea Fault Zone), which has been filled to a depth of ~ 1 km by dominantly lacustrine sediments of Pliocene-Quaternary age. Review of the fauna from Latamneh suggests that its age is 1.2-0.9 Ma, significantly older than previously supposed, and commensurate with less uplift in this reach than both the Upper and Lower Orontes. Two localities near the downstream end of the Ghab have provided molluscan and ostracod assemblages that record somewhat saline environments, perhaps caused by desiccation within the former lacustrine basin, although they

  2. Human impacts on fluvial systems - A small-catchment case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöppl, Ronald E.; Glade, Thomas; Keiler, Margreth

    2010-05-01

    Regulations of nearly two-thirds of the rivers worldwide have considerable influences on fluvial systems. In Austria, nearly any river (or) catchment is affected by humans, e.g. due to changing land-use conditions and river engineering structures. Recent studies of human impacts on rivers show that morphologic channel changes play a major role regarding channelization and leveeing, land-use conversions, dams, mining, urbanization and alterations of natural habitats (ecomorphology). Thus 'natural (fluvial) systems' are scarce and humans are almost always inseparably interwoven with them playing a major role in altering them coincidentally. The main objective of this study is to identify human effects (i.e. different land use conditions and river engineering structures) on river bed sediment composition and to delineate its possible implications for limnic habitats. The study area watersheds of the 'Fugnitz' River (~ 140km²) and the 'Kaja' River (~ 20km²) are located in the Eastern part of the Bohemian Massif in Austria (Europe) and drain into the 'Thaya' River which is the border river to the Czech Republic in the north of Lower Austria. Furthermore the 'Thaya' River is eponymous for the local National Park 'Nationalpark Thayatal'. In order to survey river bed sediment composition and river engineering structures facies mapping techniques, i.e. river bed surface mapping and ecomorphological mapping have been applied. Additionally aerial photograph and airborne laserscan interpretation has been used to create land use maps. These maps have been integrated to a numerical DEM-based spatial model in order to get an impression of the variability of sediment input rates to the river system. It is hypothesized that this variability is primarily caused by different land use conditions. Finally river bed sites affected by river engineering structures have been probed and grain size distributions have been analyzed. With these data sedimentological and ecological

  3. Late Holocene and present-day fluvial morphodynamics in small catchment areas of Central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englhard, Michael; Damm, Bodo; Frechen, Manfred; Terhorst, Birgit

    2010-05-01

    During the past decades strong runoff events repeatedly occurred in small drainage basins of the European low mountains. In numerous events runoff was connected with erosion and transport of extensive bed load. Runoff events were predominantly triggered by rainstorms, which were limited to the catchment areas. They partly caused severe economic loss. The present study focuses on fluvial morphodynamics in northern Hesse and Lower Saxony. In this area runoff and transport of bed load occurred in small tributary catchment areas of the Fulda, Werra and Oberweser rivers. In general, the small drainage basins are used by agriculture and forestry. Drainage channels are developed as gullies and are incised into solid bedrock, Quaternary hillslope sediments, alluvial fills, and anthropogenic deposits. Vertical incision into the bedrock may amount to 1 meter per event. Furthermore, in single cases sediment discharge amounted to 16.000 m³ in addition to the suspension load. On the base of historical analyses about 50 severe runoff events with a maximum frequency of 10 events during 1965 are recorded during the past 150 years in the study area. Field survey, sedimentological analyses and dating reveal intensive runoff processes since the Neolithic age in a comparable catchment area. In this context potsherds could be dated to the Linear Pottery culture, which were detected in an alluvial cone of the "Rehgraben gully", close to the city of.Kassel. Furthermore, findings of fossil wood were recovered in the same alluvial cone. Radiocarbon dating reveals calibrated ages which are for the most parts younger than AD. In younger sediments we suppose the severe runoff event of 1342. Current studies in the catchment area of the Rehgraben aim to distinguish different processes of the fluvial morphodynamics on a temporal scale and to estimate potential Holocene erosional rates. References Damm, B., 2004. Geschiebe führende und murfähige Wildbäche in Mittelgebirgsr

  4. Fluvial reservoir characterization using topological descriptors based on spectral analysis of graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viseur, Sophie; Chiaberge, Christophe; Rhomer, Jérémy; Audigane, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    Fluvial systems generate highly heterogeneous reservoir. These heterogeneities have major impact on fluid flow behaviors. However, the modelling of such reservoirs is mainly performed in under-constrained contexts as they include complex features, though only sparse and indirect data are available. Stochastic modeling is the common strategy to solve such problems. Multiple 3D models are generated from the available subsurface dataset. The generated models represent a sampling of plausible subsurface structure representations. From this model sampling, statistical analysis on targeted parameters (e.g.: reserve estimations, flow behaviors, etc.) and a posteriori uncertainties are performed to assess risks. However, on one hand, uncertainties may be huge, which requires many models to be generated for scanning the space of possibilities. On the other hand, some computations performed on the generated models are time consuming and cannot, in practice, be applied on all of them. This issue is particularly critical in: 1) geological modeling from outcrop data only, as these data types are generally sparse and mainly distributed in 2D at large scale but they may locally include high-resolution descriptions (e.g.: facies, strata local variability, etc.); 2) CO2 storage studies as many scales of investigations are required, from meter to regional ones, to estimate storage capacities and associated risks. Recent approaches propose to define distances between models to allow sophisticated multivariate statistics to be applied on the space of uncertainties so that only sub-samples, representative of initial set, are investigated for dynamic time-consuming studies. This work focuses on defining distances between models that characterize the topology of the reservoir rock network, i.e. its compactness or connectivity degree. The proposed strategy relies on the study of the reservoir rock skeleton. The skeleton of an object corresponds to its median feature. A skeleton is

  5. A linear dune dam - a unique late Pleistocene aeolian-fluvial archive bordering the northwestern Negev Desert dunefield, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskin, Joel; Bookman, Revital; Friesem, David; Vardi, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between aeolian and fluvial processes, known as aeolian-fluvial (A-F) interactions, play a fundamental role in shaping the surface of the Earth especially in arid zones. The blocking of wadis by dunes (dune-damming) is an A-F interaction that is perceived to be an archive of periods of aeolian 'superiority' on fluvial transport power and has had a strong impact on arid landscapes and prehistoric man since the late Quaternary. The southern fringes of the northwestern Negev dunefield are lined with discontinuous surfaces of light-colored, playa-like, low-energy, fine-grained fluvial deposits (LFFDs). Abundant Epipalaeolithic camp sites mainly border the LFFDs. The LFFDs are understood to be reworked loess-like sediment deposited in short-lived shallow water bodies during the late Pleistocene. These developed adjacently upstream of hypothesized dune dams of wadis that drain the Negev highlands. However, no dune dam structures by the LFFDs have been explicitly identified or analyzed. This paper presents for the first time the morphology, stratigraphy and sedimentology of a hypothesized dune dam. The studied linear-like dune dam structure extends west-east for several hundred meters, has an asymmetric cross-section and is comprised of two segments. In the west, the structure is 3-5 m high, 80 m wide, with a steep southern slope, and is covered by pebbles. Here, its morphology and orientation resembles the prevailing vegetated linear dunes (VLDs) of the adjacent dunefield though its slope angles differ from VLDs. To the south of the structure extends a thick LFFD sequence. In the east the structure flattens and is covered by nebkhas with its southern edge overlapped by LFFD units. The structures' stratigraphy is found to be comprised of a thick LFFD base, overlaid by aeolian and fluvially reworked sand, a thin middle LFFD unit, and a crest comprised of LFFDs, fluvial sand and pebbles. Carbonate contents and particle size distributions of the sediments easily

  6. Geology and Petrophysical Characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D Simulation of a Fluvial-Deltaic Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Ann Mattson; Craig B. Forster; Paul B. Anderson; Steve H. Snelgrove; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    1997-05-20

    The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Four activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and petrophysical characterization of the fluvial-deltaic Ferron Sandstone in the Ivie Creek case-study area: (1) regional stratigraphic interpretation, (2) case-study evaluation, (3) reservoir modeling, and (4) technology transfer.

  7. Use of Ground Imagery to Study Wood Raft and Ice Dynamics in Fluvial Systems: Potential and Challenges.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benacchio, V.; Piegay, H.; Buffin-Belanger, T. K.; Vaudor, L.; Michel, K.

    2014-12-01

    Automatic cameras allow acquisition of large amounts of information at high resolution in both temporal and spatial dimensions, with a roughly close range. Recently, ground cameras have been used to study the morphological evolution of fluvial environments (e.g. bank erosion, bar mobility, braided pattern changes) or to quantify components of fluvial dynamics (e.g. flow velocity, wood transport or river ice development). As the amount of information increases, automation of the data processing becomes essential, but many challenges arise to improve features detection, taking into account light contrasts, shadow and reflection, or to calculate surfaces and volumes from image orthorectification. This study illustrates the high potential of ground cameras to observe and quantify rapid, stochastic or complex events in fluvial systems and the numerous challenges we have to face. In order to automatically monitor such key fluvial processes, two ground cameras were installed. The first one was placed on the Genissiat dam (Rhône River, France) focusing on the reservoir where pieces of wood are trapped, creating a large raft. The objective is to survey wood raft area over time as a surrogate of the basin wood production. The second camera was installed along the St Jean River (Gaspesia, Québec) focusing on a pool section. The objective here is to characterize the evolution of ice cover, in terms of growing rate and ice types. The snowy environment is particularly challenging because of brightness or fairly homogeneous radiometric conditions amongst ice types. In both cases, remote sensing technics, especially feature based classification are used. Radiometric and texture indexes are used to discriminate both wood and water and ice types.

  8. Fluvial diffluence episodes reflected in the Pleistocene tufa deposits of the River Piedra (Iberian Range, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Urbez, M.; Pardo, G.; Arenas, C.; Sancho, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Pleistocene deposits of the valley of the River Piedra (NE Spain) are represented by thick tufas with small amounts of detrital material; the development of these deposits correlates with marine isotopic stages 9, 7, 6, and 5. The sedimentary scenario in which they formed mostly corresponded to stepped fluvial systems with barrage-cascade and associated dammed areas separated by low gradient fluvial stretches. Mapping and determining the sedimentology and chronology of these deposits distinguished two main episodes of fluvial diffluence that originated as a result of the temporary blockage of the river — a consequence of the vertical growth of tufa barrages in the main channel. In both episodes, water spilt out toward a secondary course from areas upstream of barrages where the water level surpassed the height of the divide between the main and secondary course. As a consequence, extensive and distinct tufa deposits with very varied facies formed over a gently inclined area toward and, indeed, within the secondary course. The hydrology of this secondary course was episodic, fed only by surface water. The two diffluence episodes detected occurred during MIS 7 and 7-6 and were interrupted by incision events, reflected by detrital deposits at the base of each tufa sedimentation stage in the main channel. Incision, which caused the breakage of the barrages, allowed water to again flow through the main channel. No evidence of diffluence was seen in any younger (MIS 5 to present-day) tufa deposits. The proposed diffluence model might help explain other carbonate fluvial systems in which (1) tufas appear in areas with no permanent water supply, and (2) tufas are absent over extensive areas despite conditions favourable to their formation.

  9. Fluvial wood function downstream of beaver versus man-made dams in headwater streams in Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, G. C.; DeVito, L. F.; Munz, K. T.; Lisius, G.

    2014-12-01

    Fluvial wood is an essential component of stream ecosystems by providing habitat, increasing accumulation of organic matter, and increasing the processing of nutrients and other materials. However, years of channel alterations in Massachusetts have resulted in low wood loads despite the afforestation that has occurred since the early 1900s. Streams have also been impacted by a large density of dams, built during industrialization, and reduction of the beaver population. Beavers were reintroduced to Massachusetts in the 1940s and they have since migrated throughout the state. Beaver dams impound water, which traps sediment and results in the development of complex channel patterns and more ecologically productive and diverse habitats than those found adjacent to man-made dams. To develop better management practices for dam removal it is essential that we understand the geomorphic and ecologic function of wood in these channels and the interconnections with floodplain dynamics and stream water chemistry. We investigate the connections among fluvial wood, channel morphology, floodplain soil moisture dynamics, and stream water chemistry in six watersheds in Massachusetts that have been impacted by either beaver or man-made dams. We hypothesize that wood load will be significantly higher below beaver dams, subsequently altering channel morphology, water chemistry, and floodplain soil moisture. Reaches are surveyed up- and downstream of each type of dam to better understand the impact dams have on the fluvial system. Surveys include a longitudinal profile, paired with dissolved oxygen and ammonium measurements, cross-section and fluvial wood surveys, hydraulic measurements, and floodplain soil moisture mapping. We found that dissolved oxygen mirrored the channel morphology, but did not vary significantly between reaches. Wood loads were significantly larger downstream of beaver dams, which resulted in significant changes to the ammonium levels. Floodplain soil moisture

  10. Fluvial transport and surface enrichment of arsenic in semi-arid mining regions: examples from the Mojave Desert, California.

    PubMed

    Kim, Christopher S; Stack, David H; Rytuba, James J

    2012-07-01

    As a result of extensive gold and silver mining in the Mojave Desert, southern California, mine wastes and tailings containing highly elevated arsenic (As) concentrations remain exposed at a number of former mining sites. Decades of weathering and erosion have contributed to the mobilization of As-enriched tailings, which now contaminate surrounding communities. Fluvial transport plays an intermittent yet important and relatively undocumented role in the migration and dispersal of As-contaminated mine wastes in semi-arid climates. Assessing the contribution of fluvial systems to tailings mobilization is critical in order to assess the distribution and long-term exposure potential of tailings in a mining-impacted environment. Extensive sampling, chemical analysis, and geospatial mapping of dry streambed (wash) sediments, tailings piles, alluvial fans, and rainwater runoff at multiple mine sites have aided the development of a conceptual model to explain the fluvial migration of mine wastes in semi-arid climates. Intense and episodic precipitation events mobilize mine wastes downstream and downslope as a series of discrete pulses, causing dispersion both down and lateral to washes with exponential decay behavior as distance from the source increases. Accordingly a quantitative model of arsenic concentrations in wash sediments, represented as a series of overlapping exponential power-law decay curves, results in the acceptable reproducibility of observed arsenic concentration patterns. Such a model can be transferable to other abandoned mine lands as a predictive tool for monitoring the fate and transport of arsenic and related contaminants in similar settings. Effective remediation of contaminated mine wastes in a semi-arid environment requires addressing concurrent changes in the amounts of potential tailings released through fluvial processes and the transport capacity of a wash. PMID:22718027

  11. Fluvial incision into bedrock: Insights from morphometric analysis and numerical modeling of gorges incising glacial hanging valleys (Western Alps, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valla, Pierre G.; van der Beek, Peter A.; Lague, Dimitri

    2010-06-01

    Bedrock gorges incising glacial hanging valleys potentially allow measurements of fluvial bedrock incision in mountainous relief. Using digital elevation models, topographic maps, and field reconnaissance, we identified and characterized 30 tributary hanging valleys incised by gorges near their confluence with trunk streams in the Romanche watershed, French Western Alps. Longitudinal profiles of these tributaries are all convex and have abrupt knickpoints at the upper limit of oversteepened gorge reaches. We reconstructed initial glacial profiles from glacially polished bedrock knobs surrounding the gorges in order to quantify the amount of fluvial incision and knickpoint retreat. From morphometric analyses, we find that mean channel gradients and widths, as well as knickpoint retreat rates, display a drainage area dependence modulated by bedrock lithology. However, there appears to be no relation between horizontal retreat and vertical downwearing of knickpoints. Assuming a postglacial origin of these gorges, our results imply high postglacial fluvial incision (0.5-15 mm yr-1) and knickpoint retreat (1-200 mm yr-1) rates that are, however, consistent with previous estimates. Numerical modeling was used to test the capacity of different fluvial incision models to predict the inferred evolution of the gorges. Results from simple end-member models suggest transport-limited behavior of the bedrock gorges. A more sophisticated model including dynamic width adjustment and sediment-dependent incision rates predicts present-day channel geometry only if a significant supply of sediment from the gorge sidewalls (˜10 mm yr-1) is triggered by gorge deepening, combined with pronounced inhibition of bedrock incision by sediment transport and deposition.

  12. Lateglacial/early Holocene fluvial reactions of the Jeetzel river (Elbe valley, northern Germany) to abrupt climatic and environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Falko; Tolksdorf, Johann Friedrich; Viehberg, Finn; Schwalb, Antje; Kaiser, Knut; Bittmann, Felix; von Bramann, Ullrich; Pott, Richard; Staesche, Ulrich; Breest, Klaus; Veil, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of climatic control on river system development are still only partially known. Palaeohydrological investigations from river valleys often lack a precise chronological control of climatic processes and fluvial dynamics, which is why their specific forces remain unclear. In this multidisciplinary case study from the middle Elbe river valley (northern Germany) multiple dating of sites (palynostratigraphy, radiocarbon- and OSL-dating) and high-resolution analyses of environmental and climatological proxies (pollen, plant macro-remains and ostracods) reveal a continuous record of the environmental and fluvial history from the Lateglacial to the early Holocene. Biostratigraphical correlation to northwest European key sites shows that river system development was partially out of phase with the main climatic shifts. The transition from a braided to an incised channel system predated the main phase of Lateglacial warming (˜14.6 ka BP), and the meandering river did not change its drainage pattern during the cooling of the Younger-Dryas period. Environmental reconstructions suggest that river dynamics were largely affected by vegetation cover, as a vegetation cover consisting of herbs, dwarf-shrubs and a few larger shrubs seems to have developed before the onset of the main Lateglacial warming, and pine forests appear to have persisted in the river valley during the Younger Dryas. In addition, two phases of high fluvial activity and new channel incision during the middle part of the Younger Dryas and during the Boreal were correlated with changes from dry towards wet climatic conditions, as indicated by evident lake level rises. Lateglacial human occupation in the river valley, which is shown by numerous Palaeolithic sites, forming one of the largest settlement areas of that period known in the European Plain, is assigned to the specific fluvial and environmental conditions of the early Allerød.

  13. Turbidity in the fluvial Gironde Estuary (southwest France) based on 10-year continuous monitoring: sensitivity to hydrological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalón-Rojas, I.; Schmidt, S.; Sottolichio, A.

    2015-06-01

    Climate change and human activities impact the volume and timing of freshwater input to estuaries. These modifications in fluvial discharges are expected to influence estuarine suspended sediment dynamics, and in particular the turbidity maximum zone (TMZ). Located in southwest France, the Gironde fluvial-estuarine system has an ideal context to address this issue. It is characterized by a very pronounced TMZ, a decrease in mean annual runoff in the last decade, and it is quite unique in having a long-term and high-frequency monitoring of turbidity. The effect of tide and river flow on turbidity in the fluvial estuary is detailed, focusing on dynamics related to changes in hydrological conditions (river floods, periods of low discharge, interannual changes). Turbidity shows hysteresis loops at different timescales: during river floods and over the transitional period between the installation and expulsion of the TMZ. These hysteresis patterns, that reveal the origin of sediment, locally resuspended or transported from the watershed, may be a tool to evaluate the presence of remained mud. Statistics on turbidity data bound the range of river flow that promotes the upstream migration of TMZ in the fluvial stations. Whereas the duration of the low discharge period mainly determines the TMZ persistence, the freshwater volume during high discharge periods explains the TMZ concentration at the following dry period. The evolution of these two hydrological indicators of TMZ persistence and turbidity level since 1960 confirms the effect of discharge decrease on the intensification of the TMZ in tidal rivers; both provide a tool to evaluate future scenarios.

  14. Fluvial processes in Ma'adim Vallis and the potential of Gusev crater as a high priority site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrol, Nathalie; Landheim, Ragnild; Greeley, Ronald; Farmer, Jack

    1994-01-01

    According to exobiology site selection criteria for Mars, the search for potential extinct/extant water dependent life should focus on sites were water flowed and ponded. The Ma'adim Vallis/Gusev crater system is of high priority for exobiology research, because it appears to have involved long term flooding, different periods and rates of sedimentation, and probable episodic ponding. The topics covered include the following: evidence of nonuniform fluvial processes and early overflooding of the plateau and ponding.

  15. Architectural analysis of a Triassic fluvial system: The Sherwood Sandstone of the East Midlands Shelf, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, Oliver J. W.; Hough, Edward; Peatfield, Alex W.

    2015-08-01

    The Sherwood Sandstone Group of the northeast UK (East Midlands Shelf) has hitherto never been studied in detail to ascertain its palaeoenvironment of deposition, largely because it is poorly exposed. As such, this paper aims to provide the first modern sedimentological interpretation of the Sherwood Sandstone in the east of England based on a field outcrop at the disused quarry at Styrrup. This is in stark contrast to the western parts of England where the Sherwood Sandstone is well exposed and offshore in the North Sea Basin where it is represented by a substantial library of core material where it is also relatively well understood. The outcrop at Styrrup Quarry allows contrasts to be made with the style and expression of the Sherwood Sandstone between eastern and western England. Specifically, this highlights differences around the variation in fluvial discharge (between lowstand and highstand) and the absence of aeolian facies types. It is interpreted that these differences relate to discharge variations between ephemeral and perennial systems with a perennial model proposed for Styrrup Quarry. This model draws upon inferences of additional water input from more local areas, likely topographic uplands of the London-Brabant and Pennine Highs which supplement the primary source of the Variscan Mountains in France with additional water and sediment.

  16. Plant biodiversity effects in reducing fluvial erosion are limited to low species richness.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel C; Cardinale, Bradley J; Wynn-Thompson, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that plant biodiversity may increase the erosion resistance of soils, yet direct evidence for any such relationship is lacking. We conducted a mesocosm experiment with eight species of riparian herbaceous plants, and found evidence that plant biodiversity significantly reduced fluvial erosion rates, with the eight-species polyculture decreasing erosion by 23% relative to monocultures. Species richness effects were largest at low levels of species richness, with little increase between four and eight species. Our results suggest that plant biodiversity reduced erosion rates indirectly through positive effects on root length and number of root tips, and that interactions between legumes and non-legumes were particularly important in producing biodiversity effects. Presumably, legumes increased root production of non-legumes by increasing soil nitrogen availability due to their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen. Our data suggest that a restoration project using species from different functional groups might provide the best insurance to maintain long-term erosion resistance. PMID:27008770

  17. Fluvial Responses to Growth Faulting in the West Pearl River, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosser, S. A.; Yeager, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Pearl River Delta (PRD) in southeastern Louisiana is an actively deforming deltaic complex displaying surface and near-surface evidence of growth faulting. Active growth faults in these environments are rarely identified at the surface, in part because the downthrown blocks often experience increased rates of sediment deposition leading to an obscured and low-relief, or entirely absent, surface expression. Faulting can be expressed in fluvial systems as changes in channel gradient, which often result in coincident changes in channel sinuosity, migration rates, planform deflections, and/or ponding features within the deformed zone. The study area is focused on a meander bend of the West Pearl River (WPR). The nature of the meander bend suggests the likely presence of a short growth fault controlling channel morphology. This research tested the hypotheses that active near-surface growth faulting is constraining the tortuous meander bend of the WPR and that growth faults, where present and active, are strongly coupled to channel meander planform changes and marsh vertical accretion rates in the PRD. Tools including shallow lithostratigraphy, use of fallout radionuclides (210Pb, 137Cs, 7Be) to quantify marsh vertical accretion rates, and a ~75 year record of WPR channel migration show that active growth faulting exists along the northern bend of the WPR with resultant lateral channel deflection. Evidence of this growth fault suggests further, eastward extension of the Baton Rouge Fault Zone (BRFZ) into the PRD

  18. Sensitivity of fluvial sediment source apportionment to mixing model assumptions: A Bayesian model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Richard J.; Krueger, Tobias; Hiscock, Kevin M.; Rawlins, Barry G.

    2014-11-01

    Mixing models have become increasingly common tools for apportioning fluvial sediment load to various sediment sources across catchments using a wide variety of Bayesian and frequentist modeling approaches. In this study, we demonstrate how different model setups can impact upon resulting source apportionment estimates in a Bayesian framework via a one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) sensitivity analysis. We formulate 13 versions of a mixing model, each with different error assumptions and model structural choices, and apply them to sediment geochemistry data from the River Blackwater, Norfolk, UK, to apportion suspended particulate matter (SPM) contributions from three sources (arable topsoils, road verges, and subsurface material) under base flow conditions between August 2012 and August 2013. Whilst all 13 models estimate subsurface sources to be the largest contributor of SPM (median ˜76%), comparison of apportionment estimates reveal varying degrees of sensitivity to changing priors, inclusion of covariance terms, incorporation of time-variant distributions, and methods of proportion characterization. We also demonstrate differences in apportionment results between a full and an empirical Bayesian setup, and between a Bayesian and a frequentist optimization approach. This OFAT sensitivity analysis reveals that mixing model structural choices and error assumptions can significantly impact upon sediment source apportionment results, with estimated median contributions in this study varying by up to 21% between model versions. Users of mixing models are therefore strongly advised to carefully consider and justify their choice of model structure prior to conducting sediment source apportionment investigations.

  19. Infiltration in unsaturated layered fluvial deposits at Rio Bravo : photo essay and data summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, James Robert; Glass, Robert John, Jr.

    2007-08-01

    An infiltration and dye transport experiment was conducted to visualize flow and transport processes in a heterogeneous, layered, sandy-gravelly fluvial deposit adjacent to Rio Bravo Boulevard in Albuquerque, NM. Water containing red dye followed by blue-green dye was ponded in a small horizontal zone ({approx}0.5 m x 0.5 m) above a vertical outcrop ({approx}4 m x 2.5 m). The red dye lagged behind the wetting front due to slight adsorption thus allowing both the wetting front and dye fronts to be observed in time at the outcrop face. After infiltration, vertical slices were excavated to the midpoint of the infiltrometer exposing the wetting front and dye distribution in a quasi three-dimensional manner. At small-scale, wetting front advancement was influenced by the multitude of local capillary barriers within the deposit. However at the scale of the experiment, the wetting front appeared smooth with significant lateral spreading {approx} twice that in the vertical, indicating a strong anisotropy due to the pronounced horizontal layering. The dye fronts exhibited appreciably more irregularity than the wetting front, as well as the influence of preferential flow features (a fracture) that moved the dye directly to the front, bypassing the fresh water between.

  20. Fluvial transitions and paleogeography in upper part of Maroon Formation (Pennsylvanian and Permian), northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.Y.

    1986-08-01

    Six detailed lateral profiles (as much as 7 m thick and 50 m long) of fluvial channel sandstone bodies were measured at different locations in the northern part of the Eagle basin, northwestern Colorado. Contrasts in the grain size, internal geometry, and architecture of the sandstone bodies reveal significant facies changes across the basin. Proximal bodies that formed closest to the basin-margin ancestral Uncompahgre and Front Range uplifts consists of massive cross-bedded and flat-bedded coarse-grained to conglomeratic sandstone deposited mainly channel scour and fill and by vertical and lateral accretion on sand-gravel bars in low-sinuosity rivers. Medial sandstone bodies consist mostly of cross-bedded and flat-bedded fine to coarse-grained sandstone that was also deposited in low-sinuosity rivers on sand flats and in sandy bars. Bankfull discharge in proximal and medial channels was probably about 400 to 1000 m/sup 3//sec. The most distal sandstone body is composed of flat- and ripple-laminated, very fine to fine-grained sandstone that probably was deposited in a distributary area, in part by sheet floods. Overall facies changes indicate down-system decreases in competence and depth of flow. Paleocurrent data indicate that Maroon rivers draining the ancestral Uncompahgre uplift flowed northeastward across most of the basin before merging with rivers draining the ancestral Front Range uplift. The depositional axis of the basin was therefore probably strongly skewed to the northeast during late Maroon time.

  1. Dynamics of Mediterranean late Quaternary fluvial activity: An example from the River Ebro (north Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria-Jáuregui, Ángel; González-Amuchástegui, María José; Mauz, Barbara; Lang, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Late Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial evolution of the upper River Ebro (Miranda basin, north Spain) is analysed using geomorphological, sedimentological, and optical dating techniques. Maximum regional crustal uplift of 0.98 m/ka approximately helped preserve a suite of terraces in the Miranda basin: 5 river terraces (T1-5) were identified and their formation attributed to MIS 6 (T1), MIS 5d (T2), MIS 4 (T3), MIS 2 (T4), MIS 1 (T5). Alluvium deposited in terraces T1, T2, T3, and T4 is well-sorted, clast-supported gravels; whereas the T5 deposit is exclusively composed of silt. Gravels were deposited during cold and dry periods when reduced vegetation cover on hillslopes increased sediment supply to the trunk river. Silt was deposited in overbank settings under warmer and wetter climate conditions when vegetation cover stabilised hillslopes and restricted sediment supply. It also resulted in lower peak discharge and reduced flow velocities over vegetated floodplains. The chronological sequence of terraces indicates that incision occurred during climatic transitions. We conclude that the upper River Ebro responded to fluctuations in sediment supply and discharge controlled by late Quaternary climate cycles.

  2. Thermoluminescence and excess 226Ra decay dating of late Quaternary fluvial sands, East Alligator River, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Andrew; Wohl, Ellen; East, Jon

    1992-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating was applied to seven samples of siliceous fluvial sands from the East Alligator River of Northern Australia, giving ages ranging from modern to 6000 yr B.P. Two methods of estimating the equivalent dose (ED), total bleach and regenerative, were applied to the 90- to 125-μm quartz fraction of the samples in order to determine the reliability and internal consistency of the technique. High-resolution γ and α spectroscopy were used to measure radionuclide contents; these measurements revealed an excess 226Ra activity compared with 230Th. This excess decreased with depth, and was used directly to derive mean sedimentation rates, and thus sediment ages. Both this method and one 14C date confirmed the validity of the TL values, which increased systematically with depth and were consistent with site stratigraphy. TL was of limited use in the dating of these late Holocene deposits because of age uncertainties of 500 to 1600 yr, resulting from a significant residual ED. This residual probably resulted from incomplete bleaching during reworking upstream of the sampling site. For Pleistocene deposits, the residual ED will be less significant because of higher total EDs, and TL dates will be correspondingly more accurate.

  3. Fluvial trace fossils in the Middle Siwalik (Sarmatian-Pontian) of Darjeeling Himalayas, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Hasiotis, Stephen T.; Ghosh, Bhaskar; Bhattacharya, Harendra Nath

    2013-08-01

    Trace fossils that record animal and plant activity are described for the first time from the Middle Siwalik, Neogene deposits of Darjeeling Himalaya. Sedimentary facies association attests to a channel-interchannel floodplain fluviatile setting. The intimate association of the burrows with phytoliths, rhizoliths, leaf compressions and coal lenses suggest that the tracemakers dominated a floodplain habitat. Point bar deposits host a low diversity Planolites-Naktodemasis-Macanopsis-Cylindricum equilibrium ichnocoenosis in the heterolithic fine sandstone-siltstone-shale facies that alternates with dense, monospecific colonization of Planolites as opportunistic pioneers relocating under stressed condition. Interlayered floodplain deposits in the fluvial successions preserve enigmatic large diameter, vertical tubes within thin to thick-bedded, dark silty shale facies. These tubes bear mixed characters assignable to both crayfish burrows and large-diameter rhizoliths. Further work on these tubes is necessary to make more accurate interpretations of those structures. Shallow to moderate burrow depths; intermittent, short-lived colonization events and preservation of rhizoliths and rhizohalos under fluctuating moisture content indicate short-term fluctuations of a relatively high water table (close to the paleosurface) in an imperfectly drained proximal floodplain setting. Ichnotaxa distribution and their inferred ethology provide significant faunal data that may put constraints on the reconstruction of Middle Siwalik depositional environment.

  4. High fluvial export of dissolved organic nitrogen from a peatland catchment with elevated inorganic nitrogen deposition.

    PubMed

    Edokpa, D A; Evans, M G; Rothwell, J J

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates seasonal concentrations and fluxes of nitrogen (N) species under stormflow and baseflow conditions in the peat dominated Kinder River catchment, south Pennines, UK. This upland region has experienced decades of high atmospheric inorganic N deposition. Water samples were collected fortnightly over one year, in combination with high resolution stormflow sampling and discharge monitoring. The results reveal that dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) constitutes ~54% of the estimated annual total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) flux (14.3 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)). DON cycling in the catchment is influenced by hydrological and biological controls, with greater concentrations under summer stormflow conditions. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and DON are closely coupled, with positive correlations observed during spring, summer and autumn stormflow conditions. A low annual mean DOC:DON ratio (<25) and elevated dissolved inorganic N concentrations (up to 63μmoll(-1) in summer) suggest that the Kinder catchment is at an advanced stage of N saturation. This study reveals that DON is a significant component of TDN in peatland fluvial systems that receive high atmospheric inputs of inorganic N. PMID:26119385

  5. Monitoring of fluvial transport in small upland catchments - methods and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Grzegorz; Rodzik, Jan; Chabudziński, Łukasz; Franczak, Łukasz; Siłuch, Marcin; Stępniewski, Krzysztof; Dyer, Jamie L.; Kołodziej, Grzegorz; Maciejewska, Ewa

    2014-06-01

    In April 2011 a study was initiated, financed from resources of the Polish National Science Centre, entitled: ‘Rainstorm prediction and mathematic modelling of their environmental and social-economical effects’ (No. NN/306571640). The study, implemented by a Polish-American team, covers meteorological research, including: (1) monitoring of single cell storms developing in various synoptic situations, (2) detection of their movement courses, and (3) estimation of parameters of their rain field. Empirical studies, including hydrological and geomorphological measurements, are conducted in objects researched thoroughly in physiographic terms (experimental catchments) in the Lublin region (SE Poland), distinguished by high frequency of occurrence of the events described. For comparative purposes, studies are also carried out on selected model areas in the lower course of the Mississippi River valley (USA), in a region with high frequency of summer rainstorms. For detailed studies on sediment transport processes during rainstorm events, catchments of low hydrological rank and their sub-catchments in a cascade system were selected. For the basic, relatively uniform geomorpho logical units distinguished this way, erosion and deposition balance of material transported was determined. The aim of work was to determine influence of weather condition on fluvial transport rate in small catchment with low hydrological order

  6. Characterizing fluvial systems at basin scale by fuzzy signatures of hydromorphological drivers in data scarce environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, R.; Bizzi, S.; Castelletti, A.

    2014-06-01

    Despite the relevance of river hydromorphology (HYMO) for integrated water resource management, consistent geomorphic information at the scale of whole river basin is still scarce, especially in emerging economies. In this paper, we propose a new, scalable and globally applicable framework to analyze and classify fluvial systems in data-scarce environments. The framework is based on a data-driven analysis of a multivariate data set of 6 key hydro-morphologic drivers derived using freely available remote-sensing information and several in situ hydrological time series. Core of the framework is a fuzzy classifier that assigns a characteristic signature of HYMO drivers to individual river reaches. We demonstrate the framework on the Red River Basin, a large, trans-boundary river basin in Vietnam and China, where human-induced morphological change, concretely endangering local livelihoods, is contrasted by very limited HYMO information. The derived HYMO information covers spatial scales from the entire basin to individual reaches. It conveys relevant information on subbasin hydro-morphologic characteristic as well as on local geomorphologic forms and processes. The fuzzy classifier successfully distinguishes abrupt from continuous downstream change and spatially dissects the river system in segments with homogeneous hydro-morphologic forcings. Successful numerical modelling of morphologic forms and process rates based on the HYMO signatures indicates that the multivariate, basin-scale classification captures relevant morphological drivers, outperforms an analysis based on local drivers only, and can support river management from diverse, morphology related perspectives over a wide range of scales.

  7. New microbioassays based on biomarkers are more sensitive to fluvial water micropollution than standard testing methods.

    PubMed

    Esteban, S; Fernández Rodríguez, J; Díaz López, G; Nuñez, M; Valcárcel, Y; Catalá, M

    2013-07-01

    Recent investigations suggest that, despite lack of lethality in validated bioassays, micropollutants in surface waters could induce sublethal toxicity in sensitive taxa, jeopardizing their biological performance and eventually leading to populations' extinction. A broader array of testing species, the miniaturization of bioassays and the development of reliable biomarkers of damage are sought in order to improve ecological relevance and cost efficiency of environmental monitoring. Our aim is to assess the different sensitivity of validated bioassays and new approaches using biomarkers as sensitive endpoints of toxicity in spores of Polystichum setiferum and Danio rerio embryos. Six water samples were collected in Tagus basin in summer and winter. Samples tested induce no acute toxicity in validated methods (algae growth inhibition and daphnia mobility inhibition). Summer water samples induced acute membrane damage (lipid peroxidation) in Danio rerio embryos and hormetic increases in fern spore mitochondrial activity. One of the samples dramatically reduced mitochondrial activity indicating severe acute sublethal phytotoxicity. All the winter samples induced significant decreases in fern spore mitochondrial activity and membrane damage increases in Danio rerio embryo. Furthermore, three samples induced lethal phytotoxicity in fern spores. We conclude that the new microbioassays show a better sensitivity to fluvial water micropollution and confirm the necessity to test critical life stages such as development and provide cost-efficient methods for environmental monitoring. PMID:23618774

  8. Holocene beaver damming, fluvial geomorphology, and climate in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Lyman; Meyer, Grant

    2009-05-01

    We use beaver-pond deposits and geomorphic characteristics of small streams to assess long-term effects of beavers and climate change on Holocene fluvial activity in northern Yellowstone National Park. Although beaver damming has been considered a viable mechanism for major aggradation of mountain stream valleys, this has not been previously tested with stratigraphic and geochronologic data. Thirty-nine radiocarbon ages on beaver-pond deposits fall primarily within the last 4000 yr, but gaps in dated beaver occupation from ~ 2200-1800 and 950-750 cal yr BP correspond with severe droughts that likely caused low to ephemeral discharges in smaller streams, as in modern severe drought. Maximum channel gradient for reaches with Holocene beaver-pond deposits decreases with increasing basin area, implying that stream power limits beaver damming and pond sediment preservation. In northern Yellowstone, the patchy distribution and cumulative thickness of mostly < 2 m of beaver-pond deposits indicate that net aggradation forced by beaver damming is small, but beaver-enhanced aggradation in some glacial scour depressions is greater. Although 20th-century beaver loss and dam abandonment caused significant local channel incision, most downcutting along alluvial reaches of the study streams is unrelated to beaver dam abandonment or predates historic beaver extirpation.

  9. Basic principles and ecological consequences of changing water regimes on nitrogen cycling in fluvial systems.

    PubMed

    Pinay, Gilles; Clément, Jean Christophe; Naiman, Robert J

    2002-10-01

    Understanding the environmental consequences of changing water regimes is a daunting challenge for both resource managers and ecologists. Balancing human demands for fresh water with the needs of the environment for water in appropriate amounts and at the appropriate times are shaping the ways by which this natural resource will be used in the future. Based on past decisions that have rendered many freshwater resources unsuitable for use, we argue that river systems have a fundamental need for appropriate amounts and timing of water to maintain their biophysical integrity. Biophysical integrity is fundamental for the formulation of future sustainable management strategies. This article addresses three basic ecological principles driving the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in river systems. These are (1) how the mode of nitrogen delivery affects river ecosystem functioning, (2) how increasing contact between water and soil or sediment increases nitrogen retention and processing, and (3) the role of floods and droughts as important natural events that strongly influence pathways of nitrogen cycling in fluvial systems. New challenges related to the cumulative impact of water regime change, the scale of appraisal of these impacts, and the determination of the impacts due to natural and human changes are discussed. It is suggested that cost of long-term and long-distance cumulative impacts of hydrological changes should be evaluated against short-term economic benefits to determine the real environmental costs. PMID:12481915

  10. The legacy of lead (Pb) in fluvial bed sediments of an urban drainage basin, Oahu, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Hotton, Veronica K; Sutherland, Ross A

    2016-03-01

    The study of fluvial bed sediments is essential for deciphering the impact of anthropogenic activities on water quality and drainage basin integrity. In this study, a systematic sampling design was employed to characterize the spatial variation of lead (Pb) concentrations in bed sediment of urban streams in the Palolo drainage basin, southeastern Oahu, Hawaii. Potentially bioavailable Pb was assessed with a dilute 0.5 N HCl extraction of the <63 μm grain-size fraction from the upper bed sediment layer of 169 samples from Palolo, Pukele, and Waiomao streams. Contamination of bed sediments was associated with the direct transport of legacy Pb from the leaded gasoline era to stream channels via a dense network of storm drains linked to road surfaces throughout the basin. The Palolo Stream had the highest median Pb concentration (134 mg/kg), and the greatest road and storm drain densities, the greatest population, and the most vehicle numbers. Lower median Pb concentrations were associated with the less impacted Pukele Stream (24 mg/kg), and Waiomao Stream (7 mg/kg). The median Pb enrichment ratio values followed the sequence of Palolo (68) > Pukele (19) > Waiomao (8). Comparisons to sediment quality guidelines and potential toxicity estimates using a logistic regression model (LRM) indicated a significant potential risk of Palolo Stream bed sediments to bottom-dwelling organisms. PMID:26573308

  11. Late Quaternary tectonic landforms and fluvial aggradation in the Saryu River valley: Central Kumaun Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothyari, Girish Ch.; Luirei, Khayingshing

    2016-09-01

    The present study has been carried out with special emphasis on the aggradational landforms to explain the spatial and temporal variability in phases of aggradation/incision in response to tectonic activity during the late Quaternary in the Saryu River valley in central Kumaun Himalaya. The valley has preserved cut-and-fill terraces with thick alluvial cover, debris flow terraces, and bedrock strath terraces that provide signatures of tectonic activity and climate. Morphostratigraphy of the terraces reveals that the oldest landforms preserved south of the Main Central Thrust, the fluvial modified debris flow terraces, were developed between 30 and 45 ka. The major phase of valley fill is dated between 14 and 22 ka. The youngest phase of aggradation is dated at early and mid-Holocene (9-3 ka). Following this, several phases of accelerated incision/erosion owing to an increase in uplift rate occurred, as evident from the strath terraces. Seven major phases of bedrock incision/uplift have been estimated during 44 ka (3.34 mm/year), 35 ka (1.84 mm/year), 15 ka (0.91 mm/year), 14 ka (0.83 mm/year), 9 ka (1.75 mm/year), 7 ka (5.38 mm/year), and around 3 ka (4.4 mm/year) from the strath terraces near major thrusts. We postulate that between 9 and 3 ka the terrain witnessed relatively enhanced surface uplift (2-5 mm/year).

  12. Stream classification using hierarchical artificial neural networks: A fluvial hazard management tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besaw, Lance E.; Rizzo, Donna M.; Kline, Michael; Underwood, Kristen L.; Doris, Jeffrey J.; Morrissey, Leslie A.; Pelletier, Keith

    2009-06-01

    SummaryWatershed managers and planners have long sought decision-making tools for forecasting changes in stream-channels over large spatial and temporal scales. In this research, we apply non-parametric, clustering and classification artificial neural networks to assimilate large amounts of disparate data types for use in fluvial hazard management decision-making. Two types of artificial neural networks (a counterpropagation algorithm and a Kohonen self-organizing map) are used in hierarchy to predict reach-scale stream geomorphic condition, inherent vulnerability and sensitivity to adjustments using expert knowledge in combination with a variety of geomorphic assessment field data. Seven hundred and eighty-nine Vermont stream reaches (+7500 km) have been assessed by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources' geomorphic assessment protocols, and are used in the development of this work. More than 85% of the reach-scale stream geomorphic condition and inherent vulnerability predictions match expert evaluations. The method's usefulness as a QA/QC tool is discussed. The Kohonen self-organizing map clusters the 789 reaches into groupings of stream sensitivity (or instability). By adjusting the weight of input variables, experts can fine-tune the classification system to better understand and document similarities/differences among expert opinions. The use of artificial neural networks allows for an adaptive watershed management approach, does not require the development of site-specific, physics-based, stream models (i.e., is data-driven), and provides a standardized approach for classifying river network sensitivity in various contexts.

  13. Fluvial backwater zones as filters on source to sink sediment transport (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, M. P.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Mohrig, D. C.; Shaw, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    Sediment flux from rivers to oceans is the fundamental driver of fluvio-delatic morphodynamics and continental-margin sedimentation, yet sediment transport across the river to marine boundary remains poorly understood. Rivers near their mouths typically are affected by backwater, a zone of spatial decelerating flow and concave water-surface profile that is transitional between normal flow upstream and static water beyond the shoreline. Deceleration in the backwater zone, as well as spreading of the offshore plume should render rivers highly depositional near their mouths. Field observations have shown, however, that the riverbed within the backwater zones of some rivers (e.g., Mississippi River) show flutes and potholes along the riverbed indicating scour into the underlying substrate. We hypothesize that zones of backwater can transition to zones of drawdown and erosion at high flows. Numerical modeling results show that such a scenario is possible where river plumes spread laterally beyond the shoreline. Model results compare favorably with measurements of river water-surface elevation and velocity over a range of discharges for the lower Mississippi River. Our results suggest that that fluvial sediment export to marine environments can be pulse like, where backwater zones retard sediment export at low flows and enhance sediment export at high flows.

  14. Fusion of Remote Sensing Methods, UAV Photogrammetry and LiDAR Scanning products for monitoring fluvial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendzioch, Theodora; Langhammer, Jakub; Hartvich, Filip

    2015-04-01

    Fusion of remote sensing data is a common and rapidly developing discipline, which combines data from multiple sources with different spatial and spectral resolution, from satellite sensors, aircraft and ground platforms. Fusion data contains more detailed information than each of the source and enhances the interpretation performance and accuracy of the source data and produces a high-quality visualisation of the final data. Especially, in fluvial geomorphology it is essential to get valuable images in sub-meter resolution to obtain high quality 2D and 3D information for a detailed identification, extraction and description of channel features of different river regimes and to perform a rapid mapping of changes in river topography. In order to design, test and evaluate a new approach for detection of river morphology, we combine different research techniques from remote sensing products to drone-based photogrammetry and LiDAR products (aerial LiDAR Scanner and TLS). Topographic information (e.g. changes in river channel morphology, surface roughness, evaluation of floodplain inundation, mapping gravel bars and slope characteristics) will be extracted either from one single layer or from combined layers in accordance to detect fluvial topographic changes before and after flood events. Besides statistical approaches for predictive geomorphological mapping and the determination of errors and uncertainties of the data, we will also provide 3D modelling of small fluvial features.

  15. Modeling complex flow dynamics of fluvial floods exacerbated by sea level rise in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeuchi, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Yamazaki, Dai; Kiguchi, Masashi; Koirala, Sujan; Nagano, Takanori; Kotera, Akihiko; Kanae, Shinjiro

    2015-12-01

    Global warming is likely to exacerbate future fluvial floods in the world’s mega-delta regions due to both changing climate and rising sea levels. However, the effects of sea level rise (SLR) on fluvial floods in such regions have not been taken into account in current global assessments of future flood risk, due to the difficulties in modeling channel bifurcation and the backwater effect. We used a state-of-the-art global river routing model to demonstrate how these complexities contribute to future flood hazard associated with changing climate and SLR in the world’s largest mega-delta region, the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Delta. The model demonstrated that flood water in the main channels flows into tributaries through bifurcation channels, which resulted in an increase in inundation depth in deltaic regions. We found that there were large areas that experienced an increase in inundation depth and period not directly from the SLR itself but from the backwater effect of SLR, and the effect propagated upstream to locations far from the river mouth. Projections under future climate scenarios as well as SLR indicated that exposure to fluvial floods will increase in the last part of the 21st century, and both SLR and channel bifurcation make meaningful contributions.

  16. Riparian vegetation patterns in relation to fluvial landforms and channel evolution along selected rivers of Tuscany (Central Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, C.R.; Rinaldi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Riparian vegetation distribution patterns and diversity relative to various fluvial geomorphic channel patterns, landforms, and processes are described and interpreted for selected rivers of Tuscany, Central Italy; with emphasis on channel evolution following human impacts. Field surveys were conducted along thirteen gauged reaches for species presence, fluvial landforms, and the type and amount of channel/riparian zone change. Inundation frequency of different geomorphic surfaces was determined, and vegetation data were analyzed using BDA (binary discriminate analysis) and DCA (detrended correspondence analysis) and related to hydrogeomorphology. Multivariate analyses revealed distinct quantitative vegetation patterns relative to six major fluvial geomorphic surfaces. DCA of the vegetation data also showed distinct associations of plants to processes of adjustment that are related to stage of channel evolution, and clearly separated plants along disturbance/landform/soil moisture gradients. Species richness increases from the channel bed to the terrace and on heterogeneous riparian areas, whereas species richness decreases from moderate to intense incision and from low to intense narrowing. ?? 2007 by Association of American Geographers.

  17. Correlations Between Fluvial Morphologic Changes and Vegetation, and Fluvio-deltaic Behavior on Deltas Using Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felicia, A. L.; Weissmann, G. S.; Scuderi, L. A.; Hartley, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Large deltas (>30 km in length) provide the majority of sediment to the world's oceans and contain important aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs; however, a comprehensive analysis of the geomorphic influence of factors (e.g., tides, groundwater interaction, and upstream discharge and sediment supply) controlling fluvio-deltaic deposition and morphology has not been conducted. To document the geomorphological changes occurring from the apex to the toe of deltas, a database of 84 large modern deltas was compiled. Of these deltas, several were specifically selected to gauge the interplay of tidal, groundwater, and fluvial influence on the modern river channels on these deltas. On these selected deltas, we analyzed the river width and sinuosity with distance downstream from the apex using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and LANDSAT imagery. Additionally, we analyzed a time-series from the year 2000 to 2015 of interpreted vegetation density using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Since vegetation density and type are related to both salinity and groundwater conditions, we are able to observe systematic changes in vegetation across different portions of the delta, depending on the major hydrologic influences in each area (e.g., tidal, fresh groundwater, brackish groundwater, or direct fluvial influence). In this study, we evaluate correlations between fluvial morphologic changes and vegetation density and type, thus helping to improve our understanding of the significance of tides and groundwater on fluvio-deltaic behavior globally.

  18. Fluvial transport potential of shed and root-bearing dinosaur teeth from the late Jurassic Morrison Formation

    PubMed Central

    Coenen, Jason J.; Noto, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Shed dinosaur teeth are commonly collected microvertebrate remains that have been used for interpretations of dinosaur feeding behaviors, paleoecology, and population studies. However, such interpretations may be biased by taphonomic processes such as fluvial sorting influenced by tooth shape: shed teeth, removed from the skull during life, and teeth possessing roots, removed from the skull after death. As such, teeth may behave differently in fluvial systems due to their differences in shape. In order to determine the influence of fluvial processes on the preservation and distribution of shed and root-bearing dinosaur teeth, the hydrodynamic behaviors of high-density urethane resin casts of shed and root-bearing Allosaurus and Camarasaurus teeth were experimentally tested for relative transport distances at increasing flow velocities in an artificial fluviatile environment. Results show that tooth cast specimens exhibited comparable patterns of transport at lower velocities, though the shed Camarasaurus teeth transported considerably farther in medium to higher flow velocities. Two-Way ANOVA tests indicate significant differences in the mean transport distances of tooth casts oriented perpendicular to flow (p < 0.05) with varying tooth morphologies and flow velocities. The differences exhibited in the transportability of shed and root-bearing teeth has important implications for taphonomic reconstructions, as well as future studies on dinosaur population dynamics, paleoecology, and feeding behaviors. PMID:24765581

  19. Deciphering the Late Quaternary fluvial dynamics at the foothill of an active orogen - the example of the Transcaucasian depression in eastern Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Suchodoletz, Hans; Faust, Dominik

    2013-04-01

    Generally, the dynamics of fluvial systems can be triggered by climate, tectonics, anthropogenic activity or internal mechanisms. The lowland of the Transcaucasian depression is located between the Greater Caucasus in the north and the Lesser Caucasus in the south. Both mountainous massifs form a part of the Alpidic orogenic belt and are thus characterized by a high tectonic activity. During the Weichselian glaciation, due to their altitude >3000 m the massifs were strongly glaciated. During the last years, we investigated fluvial sediment sequences of several rivers that originate from the mountain belts and cross the eastern semi-arid part of the Transcauscasian depression towards the Caspian Sea (e.g. Algeti, Khrami, Kura, Alazani), in order to decipher changes of their fluvial dynamics during the past. The investigated sediments of Late Pleistocene and Holocene age show thicknesses up to 50 m and are mostly well outcropped. Our morphologic, sedimentologic and chronostratigraphic investigations of different sediment sequences demonstrate distinctive changes of the fluvial dynamics between the Late Pleistocene and the Holocene, and show that high-frequent Holocene changes of the fluvial pattern of the rivers are probably linked to climatic and/or anthropogenic triggers. Additionally, on a longer time scale the fluvial dynamics of the rivers is obviously controlled by ongoing tectonic processes.

  20. Liquefaction susceptibility assessment in fluvial plains using high-resolution airborne LiDAR data: the case of the 2012 Emilia earthquake sequence area (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civico, R.; Brunori, C. A.; De Martini, P. M.; Pucci, S.; Cinti, F. R.; Pantosti, D.

    2015-07-01

    We report a case study from the Po River plain region (northern Italy), where a significant liquefaction-related land and property damage occurred during the 2012 Emilia seismic sequence. We took advantage of a 1 m pixel LiDAR Digital Terrain Model (DTM) and of the 2012 Emilia coseismic liquefaction dataset to: (a) perform a detailed geomorphological study of the Po River plain area, (b) quantitatively define the liquefaction susceptibility of the geomorphologic features that experienced different frequency of liquefaction. One main finding is that linear topographic highs of fluvial origin, together with crevasse splays and abandoned riverbeds, acted as preferential location for the occurrence of liquefaction phenomena. Moreover, we quantitatively defined a hierarchy in terms of liquefaction susceptibility for fluvial environments. We observed that a very high liquefaction susceptibility is found in coincidence with fluvial landforms, a high-to-moderate liquefaction susceptibility within a buffer distance of 100 and 200 m from mapped fluvial landforms and a low liquefaction susceptibility outside fluvial landforms and relative buffer areas. LiDAR data allowed a significant improvement in mapping with respect to conventional available topographic data and/or aerial imagery. These results have significant implications for accurate hazard and risk assessment as well as for land-use planning. We propose a potentially simpler approach for liquefaction susceptibility assessment with respect to in situ geotechnical investigations. Our findings can be applied to areas beyond Emilia, characterized by similar fluvial-dominated environments and prone to significant seismic hazard.

  1. The Pliocene initiation and Early Pleistocene volcanic disruption of the palaeo-Gediz fluvial system, Western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddy, Darrel; Demir, Tuncer; Bridgland, David R.; Veldkamp, Antonie; Stemerdink, Chris; van der Schriek, Tim; Schreve, Danielle

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we report our latest observations concerning a Pliocene and Early Pleistocene record from Western Turkey. The sedimentary sequence described comprises the fluvial deposits of an Early Pleistocene palaeo-Gediz river system and its tributaries prior to the onset of volcanism around Kula and the subsequent lacustrine, volcaniclastic and fluvial deposits associated with the first phase of volcanism (∼1.2 Ma) in this area. Early development of an east-west drainage system in this area resulted from tectonic adjustments to north-south extension and the formation of east-west-oriented grabens. Headward erosion of drainage entering the main Alaşehir graben led to the progressive capture of pre-existing drainage systems as eastward (headward) erosion upstream tapped drainage networks previously formed in internally draining NNE-SSW-oriented basins. Within one of these, the Selendi Basin, part of this evolutionary sequence is preserved as a buried river terrace sequence. Eleven terraces are preserved beneath alluvial fan sediments that are, in turn, capped by basaltic lava flows. Using the available geochronology these terraces are considered to represent sedimentation-incision cycles which span the period ∼1.67-1.2 Ma. Although progressive valley incision is a fluvial system response to regional uplift, the frequency of terrace formation within this time period suggests that the terrace formation resulted from sediment/water supply changes, a consequence of obliquity-driven climate changes. The production of sub-parallel terraces suggests that during this period the river was able to attain a quasi-equilibrium longitudinal profile adjusted to the regional uplift rate. Thus, the incision rate of 0.16 mm a-1 during this period is believed to closely mirror the regional uplift rate. After the onset of volcanism at ∼1.2 Ma, there is a destruction of the dynamic link between fluvial system behaviour and climate change. The repeated damming of the trunk

  2. Detecting allocyclic signals in volcaniclastic fluvial successions: Facies, architecture and stacking pattern from the Cretaceous of central Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umazano, Aldo M.; Bellosi, Eduardo S.; Visconti, Graciela; Melchor, Ricardo N.

    2012-12-01

    The Castillo Formation and the overlying lower member of the Bajo Barreal Formation (Cretaceous) are the principal hydrocarbon-producing units of the San Jorge Basin, Patagonia, Argentina. They are mainly composed of sandstone lenses interbedded with finer-grained, tuffaceous, sheet-like strata. Both units record fluvial systems influenced by voluminous pyroclastic influx via ash-falls mainly from a western source. These fluvial systems drained from the west toward a non-marine depocenter located in the eastern part of the basin. The units were studied in the Sierra de San Bernardo, a NNW-SSE oriented fold and thrust belt located in the western sector of the basin. The objectives of this study were: (i) to assess the influence of allocyclic factors on fluvial dynamics and sedimentation, and (ii) to determine the possible link between changes in tephra reworking and configuration of channel belts. The methodology included facies and architectural analyses, as well as determination of the stacking pattern of the channel deposits. The Castillo Formation represents permanent single-channel rivers with channel-margin bars. Floodplains were commonly constructed from aqueous reworking of pyroclastic substrates (sheet-floods, debris-flows and shallow lacustrine sedimentation) and, to a lesser extent, by preservation of ash-fall deposits. The lower member of the Bajo Barreal Formation generally records braided fluvial channel belts with a more variable water discharge and, in one locality, single-channeled rivers. Constructive processes of the floodplains were similar to the underlying Castillo Formation, although other types of deposits were detected in lower proportions including hyperconcentrated flows and crevasse-splays. The different pyroclastic sediment supply between both units explains the general evolution of the fluvial systems. The stacking patterns, which are a response to base-level changes, are probably associated with the common tectonic activity recorded in

  3. Rock magnetism on fluvial sediments of Lower Yangtze River, relations to pedogenesis and climate changes of the last 150 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Yang, S.; Deng, C.

    2012-12-01

    Fluvial sediment is one of the most important records for climate change of the river drainage area. While the fluvial sediment experience chemical reaction downward, the profile would show similar layer changes like soil profile, but also presents some different features, such as without parent rock and the weak weathering layer above rock. Therefore, the fluvial sediment profile could not only investigate the climate changes, but also study the features of pedogenesis. Magnetic method has been applied in soil investigation, which is very sensitive to the chemical changes on soil profile for iron ion. In order to understand the magnetic mineral and chemical changes along the profile, detailed magnetic measurements were carried out on a 2 m fluvial sediment profile of Lei Gong Zui (LGZ) Island, which is one of small islands in the middle of lower Yangtze River in Yangzhou City (32°18.4‧N, 119°45.2‧E). This profile spans the last 150 years by Pb210 dating, with average sedimentation rate of 1.3 mm/yr. Rock magnetic measurements, such as thermal magnetic (low temperature and high temperature) and magnetic hysteresis measurements, show that dominant magnetic minerals of the profile are magnetite, hematite and goethite. Variations of relative concentration of each mineral indicate climate changes and also soil chemical reaction. For the top 0.8 m, magnetic concentration presents a downward decline, which is mostly due to soil leaching processes, with dissolution of iron minerals into iron ion. At about 0.8 m, a belt with high concentration of hematite is observed, which is an important signal for illuviation belt. Below 0.8 m, fluctuation of magnetic properties can be well compared to variation of summer Asian Monsoon (AM) during the last 150 years, during which low magnetic concentration corresponds to weak summer AM. This result proves that magnetic analysis on fluvial sediment is a useful way to investigate climate change in the last hundred years. Separation

  4. New aspects of deformed cross-strata in fluvial sandstones: Examples from Neoproterozoic formations in northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Røe, Signe-Line; Hermansen, Marita

    2006-05-01

    Extensive (20-200 m long) exposures of tabular cross-sets in Neoproterozoic fluvial sandstone in Northern Norway demonstrate that deformed cross-strata, in the form of recumbently folded cross-strata with associated massive sand, are localized features passing in both up- and down-current direction into undeformed, concave-upward or sigmoidal cross-strata. The deformation occurs in down-current inclined, tangential wedge-shaped zones beneath reactivation surfaces, and less commonly as flat-topped lenticular zones. The localized nature of the sediment deformation is attributed to local liquefaction below the top of the bed in the case of the flat-topped lenses and at the dune front in the case of the more common tangential wedges. The position of the flat-topped lenses suggests deformation by the shear stress of high-velocity, suspension-laden currents. Although liquefaction of the dune front implies the action of gravity forces, it is argued that the fluvial currents were the main driving force at the instant of bed liquefaction. Post-folding gravitational shearing probably enhanced the deformation within the upper part of the wedges, with their long, flat-lying toeset resulting from redeposition of downslope-moving liquefied sand. The down-current alternation of deformed tangential wedges and undeformed cross-strata suggests that the mechanism that triggered the liquefaction of the dune lee side was related to the fluvial system itself and hence was of autokinetic origin. The tabular cross-sets have previously been interpreted as a product of the dune upper-stage plane-bed flow regime. In this flow context, it can be speculated that the liquefaction and deformation occurred when the flow conditions approached the plane-bed phase, probably inducing a highly differential turbulent pattern and pressure fluctuations sufficient to liquefy the fine/medium sand. The small flat-topped deformation lenses also suggest liquefaction by cyclic loading, whereas the solitary

  5. Aram Dorsum, Candidate ExoMars Rover Landing Site: a Noachian Inverted Fluvial Channel System in Arabia Terra Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balme, Matthew; Grindrod, Peter; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Davis, Joel; Gupta, Sanjeev; Fawdon, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Much of Mars' Noachian-aged southern highlands is dissected by systems of fluvial channels and valleys > 3.7 Ga in age. Arabia Terra, lying between the southern highlands and the northern lowlands, is similarly ancient, yet apparently has few valley networks. This regional lack of valley networks only matches Noachian precipitation predictions from climate models if the Noachian climate was dry and cold [1]. In this scenario, highlands dissection was caused by transient flows of meltwater from large, regionally restricted ice-bodies. However, new results [2,3] show that Arabia Terra is not as poorly dissected as previously thought, and in fact there are extensive networks of inverted channel systems. Here, we describe an example of such a system - Aram Dorsum - which has been studied extensively as an ExoMars Rover candidate landing site. Aram Dorsum is an ~100 km long, 1-2 km wide, branching, flat-topped ridge system, in western Arabia Terra. We have mapped the system using CTX images, DEMs and other data. We interpret the ridge system to be fluvial in origin, preserved in positive relief due to infill and differential erosion; this working hypothesis is used as a conceptual framework for the study. Aram Dorsum is a branching, multi-level, contributory network, set in surrounding floodplains-like material. This demonstrates that it was a relatively long-lived, aggradational fluvial system, rather than an erosional outflow or bedrock-carved fluvial channel. Interestingly, the system shows little evidence for unconfined lateral channel migration, so there must have been significant bank stability. Aram Dorsum was therefore probably once a sizable river and, as just one example of many similar systems, is an exemplar for the middle part of a regional sediment transport system that could have extended from the southern highlands to the northern lowlands. Like Aram Dorsum, many of these other recently-recognized fluvial systems have an origin more consistent with

  6. Fluvial inheritances of the Cher River floodplain (region Centre, France) as elements of characterization of hydrological dynamics and their past evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayssière, Anaëlle; Castanet, Cyril; Gautier, Emmanuèle; Virmoux, Clément

    2015-04-01

    Geomorphological studies of floodplains provide relevant data about evolutions of fluvial landscape over long time-scales and allow a better understanding of palaeo-environnemental evolutions. The Cher River flows from the "Massif Central" to its junction with the Loire River in the South of the "Bassin de Paris". The long-term fluvial evolutions since the LGM of this medium-sized catchment, are not well documented. However, a first prospection revealed a high potential of fluvial archives. The aim of the present work is to provide elements to characterize past fluvial dynamics based on the analysis of inherited landforms (mainly palaeo-channels) and sedimentary bodies located in the floodplain, using hydrogeomorphological methods. Data are acquired through the analysis of DEM LiDAR, geophysical methods (electric tomography) and cores (boreholes) collected in the floodplain. The analysis of DEM LiDAR and morpho-sedimentary observations yields palaeo-hydrographical reconstructions and allows two generations of topographic and sedimentary fluvial inheritances to be identified. Most ancient fluvial landforms correspond to mounds slightly higher than the floodplain level, incised by wide and shallow palaeo-channels. A second fluvial pattern, more recent, is characterized by palaeo-meanders. Measuring the width, the amplitude and the curvature, we show that some of the palaeo-meanders are much larger, wider and more sinuous than the current meanders, showing changes in past flow regime. The analysis of the filling of palaeo-channels allows us to identify firstly the transverse and longitudinal geometry of former channels. These data help us to estimate bank-full discharge of palaeo-channels. Secondly, the morpho-sedimentary analysis highlights their post-abandonment environmental changes. Three main stratigraphic units are identified. (1) At the base, there is medium and coarse sand attributed to fluvial transport. (2) It is overlain by a layer composed of organo

  7. Integrated analysis of environmental drivers, spatiotemporal variability and rates of contemporary chemical and mechanical fluvial denudation in selected glacierized and non-glacierized cold climate catchment systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.

    2016-04-01

    There is, by today, an impressive number of quantitative process geomorphic studies presenting contemporary chemical or mechanical fluvial denudation rates from a wide range of cold climate catchment geo-systems worldwide. However, the number of quantitative studies that actually considers and includes all three main components of fluvial transport, i.e. solute transport, suspended sediment transport and bedload transport, is actually rather small. Most of the existing studies include one or, at best, two of these main components. At the same time, it is generally accepted that a knowledge of the quantitative shares of fluvial solute, suspended sediment and bedload transport of the total fluvial transport, together with detailed information on sediment sources and sediment storage, is needed for the reliable quantitative construction and understanding of present-day sedimentary budgets. In this contribution, results from longer-term process geomorphic work conducted in selected glacierized and non-glacierized high-latitude and high-altitude cold climate catchment systems in Norway, Iceland, Sweden and Finland are compared. The size of the six studied catchment geo-systems ranges from 7.0 km2 to 79.5 km2. Contemporary chemical and mechanical fluvial denudation rates measured in the defined catchment systems with different cold climates, varying degrees of glacier coverage, different lithologies and general sediment availabilities, different catchment morphometries, and varying degrees of vegetation cover are presented. By direct comparisons between the six different catchments environmental controls of the computed annual denudation rates are detected and the spatial variability of the contemporary chemical and mechanical fluvial denudation rates found across the different cold climate catchment systems is explained. Annual fluvial denudation rates generally increase with increasing topographic relief, increasing mean slope angles, increasing annual precipitation

  8. How to find the sedimentary archive of fluvial pollution in a bedrock-confined river reach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elznicova, Jitka; Matys Grygar, Tomas; Kiss, Timea; Lelkova, Tereza; Balogh, Marton; Sikora, Martin

    2016-04-01

    , dated the sediments by dendrology and OSL dating, and performed in situ XRF analysis of sediment cores. The data show that the downstream head of the bar is the oldest and most of fine sediments (mostly sand, minor silt) of the bar material have been historically polluted by Pb mining. The sedimentary sequences, most valuable for reconstruction of recent pollution, were found in the side channel where the fill the representing the last ca 150 years pollution history (Hg and U). The body of the bar has been formed earlier. According to our hypothesis the bar originated as a direct consequence of historical mining in the nearby Jachymov Ore Region. The use of lateral fluvial deposits as a sedimentary archive definitely requires intensive application of fluvial geomorphology. Vice versa, pollution patterns will allow delineating areas, in particular the bar bank and inlet to the side channel, where intensive reworking (erosion/redeposition) occurred as documented by the microtopography and woody debris.

  9. Provenance of the Fluvial-deltaic Sedimentary Deposits Within the Eberswalde Crater Catchment, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, N.; Warner, N. H.; Rice, M. S.; Grindrod, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Eberswalde crater is one of few locations on Mars where a clear source-to-sink sedimentary path can be identified [1]. While the delta in western Eberswalde crater has been extensively studied [e.g., 2-5], few studies have described the catchment geology. [e.g. 6-7]. Here we present a geologic and compositional study of the catchment in order to characterise the source region for the Eberswalde delta. We have used DTMs and images from MRO's Context Camera (CTX) to map the channels that feed the delta at a finer scale than has previously been possible and to identify the headwater regions. We find that all channels begin on local or regional topographic highs, suggesting precipitation or snowmelt as a source of water rather than mobilization of subsurface ice due to hot overlying ejecta from the Holden crater impact [6]. Comparisons of channel depth and estimated Holden crater ejecta thickness throughout the catchment, in addition to our geologic mapping, indicate that the source for the Eberswalde sediments is almost exclusively Holden crater ejecta. One exception is the northern catchment area where channel depths exceed Holden ejecta thicknesses and therefore likely sample underlying Eberswalde ejecta or Holden basin rim material. Previous studies have confirmed the presence of Fe-Mg phyllosilicates in both the Holden crater walls [8] and ejecta [1]. We have also identified Fe-Mg phyllosilicates in a sedimentary deposit in a local basin within the Eberswalde catchment which has been eroded by the main Eberswalde fluvial system [9]. Therefore, there are phyllosilicates within the source sediments for the main deltaic feature within Eberswalde crater. However, some of the channels erode into Noachian-age Eberswalde ejecta and possibly the Holden basin rim. [9-11] have identified a subsurface layer of phyllosilicates that is present throughout the plateau region south of Vallis Marineris, west of Holden and Eberswalde craters, and north of Nirgal Vallis. This layer

  10. Lower Permian stems as fluvial paleocurrent indicators of the Parnaíba Basin, northern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capretz, Robson Louiz; Rohn, Rosemarie

    2013-08-01

    A comprehensive biostratinomic study was carried out with abundant stems from the Lower Permian Motuca Formation of the intracratonic Parnaíba Basin, central-north Brazil. The fossils represent a rare tropical to subtropical paleofloristic record in north Gondwana. Tree ferns dominate the assemblages (mainly Tietea, secondarily Psaronius), followed by gymnosperms, sphenophytes, other ferns and rare lycophytes. They are silica-permineralized, commonly reach 4 m length (exceptionally more than 10 m), lie loosely on the ground or are embedded in the original sandstone or siltstone matrix, and attract particular attention because of their frequent parallel attitudes. Many tree fern stems present the original straight cylindrical to slightly conical forms, other are somewhat flattened, and the gymnosperm stems are usually more irregular. Measurements of stem orientations and dimensions were made in three sites approximately aligned in a W-E direction in a distance of 27.3 km at the conservation unit "Tocantins Fossil Trees Natural Monument". In the eastern site, rose diagrams for 54 stems indicate a relatively narrow azimuthal range to SE. These stems commonly present attached basal bulbous root mantles and thin cylindrical sandstone envelopes, which sometimes hold, almost adjacent to the lateral stem surface, permineralized fern pinnae and other small plant fragments. In the more central site, 82 measured stems are preferentially oriented in the SW-NE direction, the proportion of gymnosperms is higher and cross-stratification sets of sandstones indicate paleocurrents mainly to NE and secondarily to SE. In the western site, most of the 42 measured stems lie in E-W positions. The predominantly sandy succession, where the fossil stems are best represented, evidences a braided fluvial system under semiarid conditions. The low plant diversity, some xeromorphic features and the supposedly almost syndepositional silica impregnation of the plants are coherent with marked dry

  11. Issues with using high-resolution DEMs for fluvial geomorphology modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Andres

    2015-04-01

    It is widely recognized that undertaking detailed fluvial morphology studies can be a difficult and expensive task due to the high amount of resources, such as time and highly trained personnel, that such studies requires in order to obtain accurate results. Yet, for a wide range of projects that in one way or another require the understanding fluvial systems, engineers are frequently challenged with the daunting task of managing expenses within tight budgets and expecting high quality results. It is with this perspective that it is often desired to simplify processes while maintaining a high reliability of results. In an attempt to tackle this issue the current PhD research presents an alternative methodology to undertake river geomorphology studies, by applying an automated procedure to model stream power from DEMs generated from high resolution LiDAR data. The main aim of the research is to estimate the stream power distribution along selected UK catchments and link the estimated stream power values to floodplain development processes. The raw LiDAR data, in the form of ASCII text files, used for the study correspond to 1m, 2m and 10m resolutions. During the process of creating the DEM of one of the selected rivers, the River Teme, the presence of a number of "blank spots" within the mosaic was noted. These areas corresponded to NoData zones generated presumably from the deflection of the laser beam on a water surface. Given that the GIS software didn't consider the missing data areas as part of the DEM, even though most of the "blank spots" were located on the river channel, it was necessary to develop a procedure in order to eliminate the NoData zones and correct the DEM, prior to undertaking the hydrological analysis of the catchment, without compromising the quality of the rest of the data. In search of an improved quality of results it has been commonly assumed that the higher resolution of the data the better and more accurate results are to be obtained

  12. Linking Surface Morphological Change to Subsurface Fluvial Architecture: What Imprints do big Floods Leave?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, P. J.; Best, J. L.; Sambrook-Smith, G. H.; Parker, N.; Lane, S. N.; Lunt, I. A.; Simpson, C. J.; Widdison, P. E.

    2008-12-01

    Ideas concerning the origin of alluvial deposits and their paleoenvironmental interpretation have usually resulted in two schools of thought: that such deposits are either the result of ordinary 'day-to-day' processes that acted uniformly through time, or that they are related to rare events that had a disproportionate effect on erosion and deposition rates. Despite the long running debate of gradualism and catastrophism within the Earth Sciences, there is surprisingly little quantitative data to assess what magnitude of event is represented in many fluvial sequences. This paper reports results of a unique natural 'experiment' where surface (digital elevation models obtained from digital photogrammetry) and subsurface (ground penetrating radar, GPR) data were taken immediately prior to, and after, a large (1 in 40 year) flood event that occurred in 2005 on the sand-bed, braided South Saskatchewan River, Canada. We surveyed several reaches of the river both before and after this major flood event, and collected repeat aerial surveys of the entire channel, as well as GPR surveys along identical survey lines. This allows us to examine the morphological change in the channel form during this flood, quantify the probability distributions of bed heights within the channels, and assess the amount of erosion and/or deposition represented within the subsurface architecture. Results indicate that although this high-magnitude flood had a marked geomorphic impact, the style and scale of both scour and deposition were the same as that measured during lower-magnitude, annual, floods. Hence, rather than being a reflection of either frequent or rare events, alluvial deposits in the South Saskatchewan contain the record of both but these different scale events may be virtually indistinguishable in the subsurface alluvial architecture.

  13. Reservoir characterization of Mesaverde (Campanian) bedload fluvial meanderbelt sandstones, northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.R. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    Reservoir characterization of Mesaverde meanderbelt sandstones is used to determined directional continuity of permeable zones. A 500-m (1600 ft) wide fluvial meanderbelt in the Mesaverde Group is exposed as laterally continuous 3-10-m (10-33-ft) high sandstone cliffs north of Rangely, Colorado. Forty-eight detailed measured sections through 3 point bar complexes oriented at right angles to the long axis of deposition and 1 complex oriented parallel to deposition were prepared. Sections were tied together by detailed sketches delineating and tracing major bounding surfaces such as scours and clay drapes. These complexes contain 3 to 8 multilateral sandstone packages separated by 5-20 cm (2-8 in.) interbedded siltstone and shale beds. Component facies are point bars, crevasse splays, chute bars, and floodplain/overbank deposits. Two types of lateral accretion surfaces are recognized in the point bar facies. Gently dipping lateral accretions containing fining-upward sandstone packages. Large scale trough cross-bedding at the base grades upward into ripples and plane beds. Steeply dipping lateral accretion surfaces enclose beds characterized by climbing ripple cross laminations. Bounding surfaces draped by shale lags can seal vertically stacked point bars from reservoir communication. Scoured boundaries allow communication in some stacked point bars. Crevasse splays showing climbing ripples form tongues of very fine-grained sandstone which flank point bars. Chute channels commonly cut upper point bar surfaces at their downstream end. Chute facies are upward-fining with small scale troughs and common dewatering structures. Siltstones and shales underlie the point bar complexes and completely encase the meanderbelt system. Bounding surfaces at the base of the complexes are erosional and contain large shale rip-up clasts.

  14. Seasonal shoreline behaviours along the arcuate Niger Delta coast: Complex interaction between fluvial and marine processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dada, Olusegun A.; Li, Guangxue; Qiao, Lulu; Ding, Dong; Ma, Yanyan; Xu, Jishang

    2016-07-01

    Deltaic coasts are dynamic geomorphic systems where continuous changes occur on diverse spatial and temporal scales, and these changes constitute an important aspect of their evolution. Based on three-year satellite-derived shoreline data coupled with re-analyzed wave data and hydro-meteorological data, a comprehensive analysis of the dominant processes governing the seasonal shoreline changes along the oil-rich arcuate section of the Niger Delta, in the Nigerian Shelf of the North Atlantic Ocean has been undertaken. Shoreline analysis results show that the delta coast is characterized by predominant summer erosion and maximum winter accretion. Between 2010 and 2012, erosion dominated over accretion and a total of 9.1 km2 deltaic land was lost to coastline erosion at an annual average erosion rate of 4.55±1.21 km2/yr. A greater understanding of the dominant factors responsible for the change is presented. Shoreline change interactions with cross-shore sediment exchange processes are prominent at seasonal timescale (Summer R2=-0.85 and Winter R2=0.7), and interannual timescale (R2=-0.93) with longshore sediment transport processes. Correlation analysis reveals a gradual degeneration of relationship between the suspended sediment flux and coastal hydrodynamics beginning from 2010 to 2012 (cross-shore transport, R=0.68, 0.36 and 0.2 for 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively; longshore transport R=0.63, 0.44 and 0.2 for 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively). The study concludes that the effect of fluvial sediment reduction to the delta coast due to capital dredging of the Lower Niger River channels between 2009 and 2012, and periodic fluctuations in the nearshore hydrodynamics processes caused the observed annual shoreline erosion that eventually forced the deltaic coastline toward a state of landward migration during the study period.

  15. Fluvial islands: First stage of development from nonmigrating (forced) bars and woody-vegetation interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintenberger, Coraline L.; Rodrigues, Stéphane; Bréhéret, Jean-Gabriel; Villar, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Fluvial islands can develop from the channel bed by interactions between pioneer trees and bars. Although vegetation recruitment and survival is possible on all bar types, it is easier for trees to survive on nonmigrating bars developed from a change in channel geometry or to the presence of a steady perturbation. This field study details the first stages of development of a vegetated mid-channel, nonmigrating (or forced) bar and its evolution toward an island form. Over six years, analysis of bed topographical changes, vegetation density and roughness, scour and fill depths, sediment grain size and architecture, and excess bed shear stress highlighted a specific signature of trees on topography and grain size segregation. Two depositional processes combining the formation of obstacle marks and upstream-shifting deposition of sediments led to the vertical accretion of the vegetated bar. During the first stage of the bar accretion, bedload sediment supply coming from surrounding channels during floods was identified as a key process modulated by the presence of woody vegetation and a deflection effect induced by the preexisting topography. Grain size segregation between vegetated and bare areas was also highlighted and interpreted as an important process affecting the development of surrounding channels and the degree of disconnection (and hence the speed of development) of a growing island. The heterogeneity of bedload supply can explain why sediment deposition and density of trees are not strictly related. A general conceptual model detailing the first stages of evolution from a bar to an established island is proposed for relatively large lowland rivers.

  16. Characterization of soil thermal, hydrological, and mechanical properties at Musashino fluvial terrace in Fuchu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Moritani, S.; Kohgo, Y.; Hamamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Ohnishi, J.; Komatsu, T.; Crest Komatsu Team

    2011-12-01

    The ground source heat pump (GSHP) system, based on heat exchange with the deep subsoil environment, generally operates with higher efficiency than the conventional air-source heat pump system. The GSHP system has received great interest in countries in North America and Western Europe because it can potentially reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emission. The GSHP releases heat energy to the subsoil during summer for cooling, while it pumps heat energy from the subsoil during winter for heating. To optimally design and operate GSHP systems, not only heat transport in the subsoil but also the influences of temperature changes on water flow, groundwater quality, and ground deformations need to be accurately simulated. The main objective of this study was to characterize soil thermal, hydrological, and mechanical properties of soils by monitoring subsoil temperature, groundwater level, and ground deformation at one of the potential GSHP installation sites in the Musashino fluvial terrace located in Fuchu-city, Japan. Monitoring instruments including resistance-temperature detectors and displacement transducers were installed inside a 50-m borehole excavated at the study site. Temperature observed at 5 m intervals in the borehole showed (i) that the soil temperature gradually decreased with depth, with the exception of temperature at the 5-m depth, and (ii) average temperatures increased as the average air temperature increased. Readings of the displacement transducers were found to be strongly affected by air temperature changes. Data observed at the borehole will be further evaluated and linked to soil physical properties measured from disturbed and undisturbed soil samples collected at the borehole.

  17. Improved Oil Recovery In Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near Term

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Don W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-01-14

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these types of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

  18. Spatial and temporal variation of dissolved organic matter in the Changjiang: Fluvial transport and flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hongyan; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The Changjiang is the most important source of freshwater and dissolved organic matter (DOM) for the East China Sea. However, knowledge regarding the sources, seasonal fluxes, and fluvial transport of terrigenous DOM (tDOM) in the Changjiang is lacking. To fill this knowledge gap, we measured dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved lignin in water samples collected in the middle and lower Changjiang under different hydrological conditions. Additional samples were collected biweekly in the lower Changjiang. Through comparisons with other rivers, we found that the DOC in the Changjiang is mainly from soil organic matter and has a higher fraction of tDOM during flood. Mass balance model results indicate that approximately 33% of the dissolved lignin discharged into the middle and lower Changjiang is removed during its transport to the lower reach during both low-discharge and flood periods. Based on a comparison of the removal rates under these two contrasting hydrological conditions and considering the lower organic carbon content and fine grain size of the Changjiang's suspended particles, we speculate that the major process for the removal of dissolved lignin is sorption, and potentially flocculation by suspended particles. Changjiang discharges 1.4 ± 0.10 Tg yr-1 and 8.6 ± 0.30 Gg yr-1 DOC and dissolved lignin to the estuary during the period of July 2010 to June 2011, respectively. Seasonal distributions of DOC and dissolved lignin fluxes are controlled by water discharge, which will be affected by future climate change and the Three Gorges Dam.

  19. Effects of fluvial discharges on meiobenthic and macrobenthic variability in the Vistula River prodelta (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Włodarska-Kowalczuk, Maria; Mazurkiewicz, Mikołaj; Jankowska, Emilia; Kotwicki, Lech; Damrat, Mateusz; Zajączkowski, Marek

    2016-05-01

    The role of environmental variability produced by river discharges in shaping the spatial and seasonal patterns of meiobenthic and macrobenthic communities was studied in the Vistula River (Baltic Sea) prodelta. Seven stations located in the delta front, the plume influence area and the distal zone of the prodelta were visited over the four seasons of 2012. Meiofauna, macrofauna, water (temperature, salinity, and suspended matter) and sediments (grain size, POC, TN, δ15N and δ13C and photosynthetic pigments) were analysed. The seasonal variations in the river discharges (with maximum flows in spring) resulted in a strong temporal variability in the studied environmental characteristics. In the benthic biota, the signals of seasonal variability, if present, were much weaker than spatial zonation. The benthic communities inhabiting the delta front where the main bulk of fluvial materials was deposited were taxonomically impoverished. The richest fauna dwelled within the plume influence area where the physical disturbance ceased and primary marine production was enhanced by river transported nutrients. In the distal zone outside the river influence, the fauna was dominated by deeper dwelling species, and the numbers of individuals and taxa decreased. Factors related to the riverine discharges (i.e., salinity, mineral suspension, POC and δ13C in the water and sediments) were identified as having high correlation with variability in the meiofaunal and macrofaunal community descriptors. Evidently, the interplay of food (i.e., the quantity and quality of organic matter) and disturbance (i.e., the deposition of river transported minerals) constraints shaped the patterns of benthic variability in the prodelta of the second largest river entering the Baltic Sea.

  20. Land Use and Climate Impacts on Fluvial Systems (LUCIFS): A PAGES - Focus 4 (PHAROS) research activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearing, John; Hoffmann, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    LUCIFS is a global research program which is concerned with understanding past interactions between climate, human activity and fluvial systems. Its focus is on evaluating the geomorphic impact of humans on landscapes, with a strong emphasis on geomorphological and sedimentological perspectives on mid- to long-term man-landscape interactions. Of particular relevance are aspects of sediment redistribution systems such as non-linear behaviour, the role of system configuration, scale effects, and emergent properties Over the last decade the LUCIFS program has been investigating both contemporary and long-term river response to global change with the principal aims of i)quantifying land use and climate change impacts of river-borne fluxes of water, sediment, C, N and P; ii) identification of key controls on these fluxes at the catchment scale; and iii) identification of the feedback on both human society and biogeochemical cycles of long-term changes in the fluxes of these materials The major scientific tasks of the LUCIFS-program are: • synthesising results of regional case studies • identify regional gaps and encouraging new case studies • addressing research gaps and formulating new research questions • organising workshops and conferences In this paper we present the LUCIFS program within the new PAGES structure. LUCIFS is located in the Focus 4 (PHAROS) dealing with how a knowledge of human-climate-ecosystem interactions in the past can help inform understanding and management today. In conjunction with the other working groups HITE (Human Impacts on Terrestrial Ecosystems), LIMPACS (Human Impacts on Lake Ecosystems) and IHOPE (Integrated History of People on Earth) PHAROS aims to compare regional-scale reconstructions of environmental and climatic processes using natural archives, documentary and instrumental data, with evidence of past human activity obtained from historical, paleoecological and archaeological records.

  1. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated reservoirs of Kansas--near-term. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1996-11-01

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis. Results of these two field projects are discussed.

  2. Sensitivity of fluvial sediment source apportionment to mixing model assumptions: A Bayesian model comparison

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Richard J; Krueger, Tobias; Hiscock, Kevin M; Rawlins, Barry G

    2014-01-01

    Mixing models have become increasingly common tools for apportioning fluvial sediment load to various sediment sources across catchments using a wide variety of Bayesian and frequentist modeling approaches. In this study, we demonstrate how different model setups can impact upon resulting source apportionment estimates in a Bayesian framework via a one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) sensitivity analysis. We formulate 13 versions of a mixing model, each with different error assumptions and model structural choices, and apply them to sediment geochemistry data from the River Blackwater, Norfolk, UK, to apportion suspended particulate matter (SPM) contributions from three sources (arable topsoils, road verges, and subsurface material) under base flow conditions between August 2012 and August 2013. Whilst all 13 models estimate subsurface sources to be the largest contributor of SPM (median ∼76%), comparison of apportionment estimates reveal varying degrees of sensitivity to changing priors, inclusion of covariance terms, incorporation of time-variant distributions, and methods of proportion characterization. We also demonstrate differences in apportionment results between a full and an empirical Bayesian setup, and between a Bayesian and a frequentist optimization approach. This OFAT sensitivity analysis reveals that mixing model structural choices and error assumptions can significantly impact upon sediment source apportionment results, with estimated median contributions in this study varying by up to 21% between model versions. Users of mixing models are therefore strongly advised to carefully consider and justify their choice of model structure prior to conducting sediment source apportionment investigations. Key Points An OFAT sensitivity analysis of sediment fingerprinting mixing models is conducted Bayesian models display high sensitivity to error assumptions and structural choices Source apportionment results differ between Bayesian and frequentist approaches PMID

  3. An objective approach to marginal benefit functions for environmental flows: an example for fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perona, P.; Burlando, P.

    2009-12-01

    Environmental flows can result from the economical competition for water allocation between traditional and non-traditional water uses. This requires the definition of convenient benefit functions (bf) associated with the use of the resource. Since the use of water by the riparian ecosystem is an intangible good, common ways based for instance on the “willingness to pay” have the dramatic weakness of not being objective with regard to the environmental rights. That is, water withdrawal from a given stream environment would depend on the importance and, in turn, on the economical value that people assign to this environment. In this work we discuss a possible objective criterion to establish benefit functions for the environmental uses of the water resource. Our approach is based on studying the optimal water allocation between the users as resulting from marginal economic analysis. That is, we show that the parameters of the marginal demand curve for the riparian ecosystem are intrinsically defined by knowing: (a) the ecological status of the riverine system in pristine conditions, and (b) the marginal benefit function of the potential competitor (e.g., exploitation activity). We solve analytically the water allocation problem for the simple case of water withdrawal from a fluvial system. We show the link between the parameters of the marginal benefit functions and the minimal environmental flow arising from classic engineering analysis, as well as their ecological meaning. This approach allows to restore a more natural variability of the streamflow regime in impounded reaches, to the cost of a profit reduction for the resource exploitation. However, on the long term, the overall idea is that the benefit for having preserved more natural environmental flow conditions since exploitation began would balance the future cost for potential restoration of the riverine corridor and the missing revenues.

  4. The fluvial flux of phosphorus from the UK 1974 - 2012: where has all the phosphorus gone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, Fred; Howden, Nicholas; Burt, Timothy; Jarvie, Helen

    2015-04-01

    As part of the Harmonised Monitoring Scheme, the UK has been monitoring total phosphorus (TP) and total reactive phosphorus (TRP) concentration at the tidal limit of all major UK rivers since 1974. Over the study period there were over 40,000 measurements of TP from 230 catchments and 160,000 measurements of TRP from 270 catchments. Concentrations of TRP and TP in UK rivers have decreased significantly since 1989, with values now less than 50% of their 1974 values. During this time, the ratio of TRP to TP has increased slightly with TRP now representing 73% of TP. The UK riverine flux of TRP peaked at 70.9 ktonnes P/yr (0.29 tonnes P/km2/yr) in 2000 and reached a minimum in 2011 of 9.3 ktonnes P/yr (0.04 tonnes P/km2/yr). Similarly, for TP, the peak flux occurred in 2001 at 95 ktonnes P/yr, with a minimum in 2011 of 15.8 ktonnes P/yr. A comparison of patterns in P fluxes with catchment land-use, soil types and hydroclimatic factors shows that the fluxes of both TP and TRP are dominantly linked to urban land cover, which we consider to be proxy for sewage inputs. The fluvial fluxes of TRP and TP will be discussed in the light of declining P fertiliser inputs; decreased direct sewage outputs of P; increased transfers of P via food and feed imports; and an increasing UK population.

  5. Remote sensing of rivers: an emerging tool to facilitate management and restoration of fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legleiter, C. J.; Overstreet, B. T.

    2013-12-01

    All phases of river restoration, from design to implementation to assessment, require spatially distributed, high-resolution data on channels and floodplains. Conventional field methods are cost prohibitive for large areas, but remote sensing presents an increasingly viable alternative for characterizing fluvial systems. For example, bathymetric maps useful for habitat assessment can be derived from readily available, free or low cost image data, provided depth measurements are available for calibration. In combination with LiDAR, spectrally-based bathymetry can be used to determine bed elevations for estimating scour and fill and/or to obtain topographic input data for morphodynamic modeling. New, water-penetrating green LiDAR systems that measure sub-aerial and submerged elevations could provide a single-sensor solution for mapping riparian environments. Our current research on the Snake River focuses on comparing optical- and LiDAR-based methods for retrieving depths and bed elevations. Multi-sensor surveys from 2012 and 2013 will allow us to evaluate each instrument's capabilities for measuring volumes of erosion and deposition in a dynamic gravel-bed river. Ongoing studies also suggest that additional river attributes, such as substrate composition and flow velocity, could be inferred from hyperspectral image data. In general, remote sensing has considerable potential to facilitate various aspects of river restoration, from site evaluation to post-project assessment. Moreover, by providing more extensive coverage, this approach favors an integrated, watershed perspective for planning, execution, and monitoring of sustainable restoration programs. To stimulate progress toward these objectives, our research group is now working to advance the remote sensing of rivers through tool development and sensor deployment. Bathymetric map of the Snake River, WY, derived from hyperspectral image data via optimal band ratio analysis. Flow direction is from right to left.

  6. Modeling Strike-Slip-Driven Stream Capture in Detachment- and Transport-Limited Fluvial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbert, S.; Duvall, A. R.; Tucker, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers, especially those in mountainous settings, are known to respond to tectonic and climatic drivers through both gradual and abrupt changes in slope, hydraulic geometry, and planform. Modification of drainage network topology by stream capture, in which drainage area, and therefore water and sediment, is diverted suddenly from one catchment into another, represents the rapid end of the fluvial response spectrum. Such sudden drainage rearrangement affects the river's potential for incision and sediment transport, and thus has implications for the development of topography and for depositional histories in sedimentary basins. Despite recognition of the importance of this process in landscape evolution, the factors controlling the occurrence of stream capture are not well understood. Here we investigate the process of stream capture using strike-slip faults as a natural experiment. Lateral fault motion drives stream capture when offset is enough to juxtapose adjacent fault-perpendicular streams. In the simplest scenario, the capture events should occur regularly in space and time whenever two streams are juxtaposed, the frequency of capture depending only on drainage spacing and fault slip rate. However, in real-world settings such as the San Andreas Fault Zone of California and the Marlborough Fault System of New Zealand, such regularity is not always observed. We use the Channel-Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development Model (CHILD) to investigate the mechanisms and frequency of stream capture in a strike-slip setting. Models are designed to address the connection between the size (i.e. drainage area) of juxtaposed rivers and the likelihood that capture will occur between them. We also explore the role of sediment load in the capture process by modeling both detachment-limited and transport-limited systems. Comparison of these model results to case-study field sites will help us to interpret the landscape signature of strike-slip faulting, and to understand

  7. [Influence of three types of riparian vegetation on fluvial erosion control in Pantanos de Centla, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda-Lozada, Alejandra; Geissen, Violette; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana; Jarquín-Sánchez, Aarón; de la Cruz, Simón Hernández; Capetillo, Edward; Zamora-Cornelio, Luis Felipe

    2009-12-01

    Wetlands constitute very important ecological areas. The aim of this study was to quantify the soil losses due to fluvial erosion from 2006 to 2008 in two riverbanks under three types of vegetal coverage dominated by Haematoxylum campechianum, Dalbergia brownei and Brachiaria mutica, in the Pantanos de Centla Biosphere Reserve, SE Mexico. The relationship between the texture, organic matter and pH of soils and soil losses was evaluated. We used erosion sticks to estimate soil losses in 18 plots (three plots per type, three vegetation types, two riverbanks). Soil loss decreased in this order: H. campechianum>B. mutica>D. brownei indicating that D. brownei scrubland has the most potential to retain soil. The higher erosive impact within H. campechianum sites can be related with the low density of these trees in the study areas, as well as the lack of association with other types of vegetation that could reinforce the rooting of the soil profile. Furthermore, soil losses in H. campechianum sites were dependent on soil texture. The soils under this type of vegetal coverage were mainly sandy, which are more vulnerable to the erosive action in comparison with fine textured soils or soils with higher clay content, like the ones found in D. brownei and B. mutica sites. Soil losses of 100 % in the second year (B. mutica plots) can be attributed to the distribution of roots in the upper soil layer and also to livestock management along riverbanks. This study recognizes the importance of D. brownei scrublands in riverbank soil retention. Nevertheless it is necessary to consider the role of an entire vegetal community in future research. PMID:20073341

  8. Fracture density as a controlling factor of postglacial fluvial incision rate, Granite Range, Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagnac, J.-D.; Sternai, P.; Herman, F.; Guralnik, B.; Beaud, F.

    2012-04-01

    The relations between lithosphere and atmosphere to shape the landscape are disputed since the last two decades. The classical "chicken or egg" problem raised the idea that erosion can promote creation of topography thanks to isostatic compensation of eroded material and subsequent positive feedback. Quaternary glaciations and high erosion rates are supposed to be the main agent of such process. More recently, "tectonic activity" has been considered not only as a rock uplift agent, but also as a rock crusher, that in turn promote erosion, thanks to the reduction of size of individual rock elements, more easily transported. The Granite Range in Alaska presents a contrasted morphology: its western part shows preserved glacial landscape, whereas its eastern part presents a strong fluvial / hillslope imprint, and only a few relicts of glacial surfaces. We quantify these differences by 1) qualitative appreciation of the landscape, 2) quantification of post-glacial erosion, and 3) hypsometric quantification of the landscape. On the field, the eastern part appears to be highly fractured, with many, large, penetrative faults, associated with km-thick fault gouges and cataclasites. The westernmost part shows massive bedrock, with minor, localised faults. Remote-sensed fracture mapping confirms this: fracture density is much higher to the east, where hypsometric parameters (HI and HIP) display anomalies, and where high post-glacial incision (up to 600m) is observed. We provide here an impressive case study for tectonic-erosion interactions through rock crushing effect, and document that half of the sediments coming out of the range come from the ~10% of the most fractured area, all other being equal. This challenges the usual view of tectonic "driving" rock uplift, while erosion removes material: In our case, tectonics is the main erosional agent, rivers and glaciers being (efficient) transport agents.

  9. Spatial Variations in Carbon Storage along Headwater Fluvial Networks with Differing Valley Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E. E.; Dwire, K. A.; Polvi, L. E.; Sutfin, N. A.; Bazan, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    We distinguish multiple valley types along headwater fluvial networks in the Colorado Front Range based on valley geometry (downstream gradient and valley-bottom width relative to active channel width) and the presence of biotic drivers (beaver dams or channel-spanning logjams associated with old-growth forest) capable of creating a multi-thread channel pattern. Valley type influences storage of fine sediment, organic matter, and carbon. Deep, narrow valleys have limited storage potential, whereas wide, shallow valleys with multi-thread channels have substantial storage potential. Multi-thread channels only occur in the presence of a biotic driver. Given the importance of headwater streams in the global carbon cycle, it becomes important to understand the spatial distribution and magnitude of carbon storage along these streams, as well as the processes governing patterns of storage. We compare carbon stored in three reservoirs: riparian vegetation (live, dead, and litter), instream and floodplain large wood, and floodplain soils for 100-m-long valley segments in seven different valley types. The valley types are (i) laterally confined valleys in old-growth forest, (ii) partly confined valleys in old-growth forest, (iii) laterally unconfined valleys with multi-thread channels in old-growth forest, (iv) laterally unconfined valleys with single-thread channels in old-growth forest, (v) laterally confined valleys in younger forest, (vi) recently abandoned beaver-meadow complexes with multi-thread channels and willow thickets, and (vii) longer abandoned beaver-meadow complexes with single-thread channels and very limited woody vegetation. Preliminary results suggest that, although multi-thread channel segments driven by beavers or logjams cover less than 25 percent of the total length of headwater river networks in the study area, they account for more than three-quarters of the carbon stored along the river network. Historical loss of beavers and old-growth forest has